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Sample records for program deaf smith

  1. Environmental assessment: Deaf Smith County site, Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-05-01

    In February 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) identified a location in Deaf Smith County, Texas, as one of nine potentially acceptable sites for a mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. To determine their suitability, the Deaf Smith County site and the eight other potentially sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE's General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for the Nuclear Waste Repositories. The Deaf Smith County site is in the Permian Basin, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considered for the first repository. On the basis of the evaluations reported in this EA, the DOE has found that the Deaf Smith County site is not disqualified under the guidelines. On the basis of these findings, the DOE is nominating the Deaf Smith County site as one of the five sites suitable for characterization. 591 refs., 147 figs., 173 tabs.

  2. Environmental assessment, Deaf Smith County site, Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-05-01

    The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (42 USC sections 10101-10226) requires the environmental assessment of a proposed site to include a statement of the basis for nominating a site as suitable for characterization. Volume 2 provides a detailed statement evaluating the site suitability of the Deaf Smith County Site under DOE siting guidelines, as well as a comparison of the Deaf Smith County Site to the other sites under consideration. The evaluation of the Deaf Smith County Site is based on the impacts associated with the reference repository design, but the evaluation will not change if based on the Mission Plan repository concept. The second part of this document compares the Deaf Smith County Site to Davis Canyon, Hanford, Richton Dome and Yucca Mountain. This comparison is required under DOE guidelines and is not intended to directly support subsequent recommendation of three sites for characterization as candidate sites. 259 refs., 29 figs., 66 refs. (MHB)

  3. Environmental assessment: Deaf Smith County site, Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-05-01

    In February 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) identified a location in Deaf Smith County, Texas, as one of the nine potentially acceptable sites for mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. To determine their suitability, the Deaf Smith County site and eight other potentially acceptable sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE's General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for the Nuclear Waste Repositories. The Deaf Smith County site is in the Permian Basin, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considered for the first repository. On the basis of the evaluations reported in this EA, the DOE has found that the Deaf Smith County site is not disqualified under the guidelines.

  4. Programs for the Deaf-Blind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Annals of the Deaf, 1991

    1991-01-01

    This directory lists contact information for programs for the deaf-blind in the United States in 3 categories: (1) programs for deaf-blind children and youth (29 programs listed); (2) Helen Keller National Center for Deaf-Blind Youth and Adults (1 national and 10 regional offices); and (3) programs for training teachers of the deaf-blind (4…

  5. Site study plan for Transportation, Deaf Smith County Site, Texas: Preliminary draft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-06-01

    This site study plan describes transportation field studies to be conducted during the characterization of the Deaf Smith County, Texas, site for the US Department of Energy's Salt Repository Project. The studies are needed to identify and assess potential project impacts to transportation infrastructure and systems in the project vicinity and along potential transportation routes to the site across the State of Texas. The studies are also needed to locate and design project transportation facilities, and to evaluate and design impact mitigation. After identifying the transportation information requirements needed to comply with Federal, State, and local regulations and repository program requirements, the site study plan describes the study design and rationale, the field data collection procedures and equipment, the data analysis methods and application of results, the data management strategy, the schedule of field activities, the management of the study, and the study's quality assurance program. The field data collection activities are organized into programs for the characterization of site vicinity rail corridors and highway corridors, characterization of alternative statewide transportation routes, monitoring of site characterization effects on transportation, characterization of aircraft overflight patterns and hazardous material transportation patterns, and assessment of emergency response preparedness along alternative statewide transportation routes. 34 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. SMITH: How to Produce CAI Courses without Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osin, Louis

    1976-01-01

    A computer-assisted instruction system called SMITH (Self-directed Mixed Initiative Tutorial Helper) has been developed. SMITH relieves the course author of the burden of computer programming, thus greatly reducing course preparation time. (Author)

  7. Programs for Deaf-Blind Children and Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Annals of the Deaf, 2000

    2000-01-01

    This annual directory lists programs for deaf-blind children and adults including programs for deaf-blind children and youth (national and state level), the Helen Keller Centers for deaf-blind youth and adults, and programs for training teachers of deaf-blind students. (DB)

  8. Programs for Deaf-blind Children and Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Annals of the Deaf, 2001

    2001-01-01

    This directory provides information on programs for deaf-blind children and adults including national and state programs, the Helen Keller Centers for Deaf-Blind Youth and Adults, and programs for training teachers of deaf-blind students. Within each broad category, programs are listed alphabetically by state and provide detailed contact…

  9. Programs for Deaf-Blind Children and Youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Annals of the Deaf, 2003

    2003-01-01

    This listing provides directory information on U.S. schools and programs for preschool, elementary, and secondary children who are deaf blind. A list of three national programs is followed by a list of state schools, local programs, and other types of resources. (Author/CR)

  10. A Socialization Program for Developmentally Disabled Deaf Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, Carole

    This paper describes the need for and the structure of a socialization program designed to provide a social environment for five deaf adults with developmental disabilities residing in two different group homes. The program was developed to address the isolation experienced by such adults living in a community with others who do not use sign…

  11. The Garrett Lee Smith Memorial Suicide Prevention Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldston, David B.; Walrath, Christine M.; McKeon, Richard; Puddy, Richard W.; Lubell, Keri M.; Potter, Lloyd B.; Rodi, Michael S.

    2010-01-01

    In response to calls for greater efforts to reduce youth suicide, the Garrett Lee Smith (GLS) Memorial Act has provided funding for 68 state, territory, and tribal community grants, and 74 college campus grants for suicide prevention efforts. Suicide prevention activities supported by GLS grantees have included education, training programs…

  12. A Cooperative Bilingual Language Program for Deaf Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuroth-Gimbrone, Cindy; Logiodice, Colleen M.

    1992-01-01

    Briefly describes a program that sought to improve the written English skills of deaf adolescents' whose first language was American Sign Language, focusing on first-language skills, metalinguistic skills, translating skills, lexical matching across languages, translation of syntactical structures, and recognition of the importance of the…

  13. Petrographic report on clay-rich samples from Permian Unit 4 salt, G. Friemel No. 1 well, Palo Duro Basin, Deaf Smith County, Texas: unanalyzed data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukui, L M

    1983-09-01

    This report presents the results of mineralogic and petrographic analyses performed on five samples of clay-rich rock from salt-bearing Permian strata sampled by drill core from G. Friemel No. 1 Well, Deaf Smith County, Texas. Five samples of clay-rich rock from depths of about 2457, 2458, 2521, 2548, and 2568 feet were analyzed to determine the amounts of soluble phase (halite) and the amounts and mineralogy of the insoluble phases. The amounts of halite found were 59, 79, 47, 40, and 4 weight percent, respectively, for the samples. The insoluble minerals are predominately clay (20 to 60 volume percent) and anhydrite (up to 17 volume percent), with minor (about 1.0%) and trace amounts of quartz, dolomite, muscovite, and gypsum. The clays include illite, chlorite, and interstratified chlorite-smectite. The results presented in this petrographic report are descriptive, uninterpreted data. 2 references, 7 tables.

  14. Classroom management programs for deaf children in state residential and large public schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenkus, M; Rittenhouse, B; Dancer, J

    1999-12-01

    Personnel in 4 randomly selected state residential schools for the deaf and 3 randomly selected large public schools with programs for the deaf were surveyed to assess the types of management or disciplinary programs and strategies currently in use with deaf students and the rated effectiveness of such programs. Several behavioral management programs were identified by respondents, with Assertive Discipline most often listed. Ratings of program effectiveness were generally above average on a number of qualitative criteria.

  15. Enrollment trends in deaf education teacher preparation programs, 1973-2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolman, David

    2010-01-01

    The number of deaf education teacher preparation programs and the number of program graduates were tabulated from reference issues of the American Annals of the Deaf beginning in 1973 and progressing every third year through 2009. Programs and graduates reached their highest levels from the mid-1970s through mid-1980s. In 2006 and 2009, only about one fourth as many students were majoring in deaf education in relation to the general U.S. college population as in 1973, 1976, and 1979. Yet because the population of children identified as deaf and hard of hearing has also declined, the ratio of program graduates to deaf children has stayed relatively balanced for the past 20 years. Current challenges faced by teacher preparation programs include increases in interpreter preparation programs and programs for teaching American Sign Language, as well as the changing nature of the role of teacher of the deaf.

  16. Deaf/Blind. Resource Manuals for Program for Exceptional Children. Volume X.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgia State Dept. of Education, Atlanta. Office of Instructional Services.

    The manual is intended to help local education agencies implement Georgia's laws for providing effective instructional programs for deaf-blind children. A definition and eligibility criteria for deaf-blind children are presented. A section discussing due process considers screening, referral, comprehensive evaluation, individualized education…

  17. Persistence of deaf students in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics undergraduate programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchut, Amber E.

    Diversifying the student population and workforce under science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) is a necessity if innovations and creativity are to expand. There has not been a lot of literature regarding Deaf students in STEM especially regarding understanding how they persist in STEM undergraduate programs to successfully become STEM Bachelor of Science degree recipients. This study addresses the literature gap by investigating six students' experiences as they navigate their STEM undergraduate programs. The investigation uses narrative inquiry methodology and grounded theory method through the lens of Critical Race Theory and Critical Deaf Theory. Using videotaped interviews and observations, their experiences are highlighted using narratives portraying them as individuals surviving in a society that tends to perceive being deaf as a deficit that needs to be treated or cured. The data analysis also resulted in a conceptual model providing a description of how they persist. The crucial aspect of the conceptual model is the participants learned how to manage being deaf in a hearing-dominated society so they can reach their aspirations. The essential blocks for the persistence and managing their identities as deaf undergraduate STEMs include working harder, relying on familial support, and affirming themselves. Through the narratives and conceptual model of the six Deaf STEM undergraduates, the goal is to contribute to literature to promote a better understanding of the persistence of Deaf students, members of a marginalized group, as they pursue their dreams.

  18. Modeling reading vocabulary learning in deaf children in bilingual education programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermans, Daan; Knoors, Harry; Ormel, Ellen; Verhoeven, Ludo

    2008-01-01

    The acquisition of reading vocabulary is one of the major challenges for deaf children in bilingual education programs. Deaf children have to acquire a written lexicon that can effectively be used in reading. In this paper, we present a developmental model that describes reading vocabulary acquisition of deaf children in bilingual education programs. The model is inspired by Jiang's model of vocabulary development in a second language (N. Jiang, 2000, 2004a) and the hierarchical model of lexical representation and processing in bilinguals (J. F. Kroll & E. Stewart, 1988). We argue that lexical development in the written language often fossilizes and that many words deaf readers acquire will not reach the final stage of lexical development. We argue that this feature is consistent with many findings reported in the literature. Finally, we discuss the pedagogical implications of the model.

  19. A Competency Based Instructional Program for Teachers of Deaf-Blind Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, Erin Kent; And Others

    Described is a 9-week, summer, competency-based, instructional program for teachers of deaf blind children. Information provided includes the background and rationale for the program, a list of administrative and instructional staff members, program goals, and a sample scheduling sequence. Goals, session topics, texts and materials, session…

  20. Deaf Education Teacher Preparation: A Phenomenological Case Study of a Graduate Program With a Comprehensive Philosophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engler, Karen S; MacGregor, Cynthia J

    2018-01-01

    At a time when deaf education teacher preparation programs are declining in number, little is known about their actual effectiveness. A phenomenological case study of a graduate-level comprehensive deaf education teacher preparation program at a midwestern university explored empowered and enabled learning of teacher candidates using the Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education educator pillars: (a) commitment to the profession, (b) proficiency in practice, and (c) learning impact, all deemed critical to developing quality teachers. A strong connection was found between the program's comprehensive philosophy and its practice. Embracing diversity of d/Deafness and differentiated instruction were the most prevalent themes expressed by participants. Teacher candidates displayed outstanding commitment to the profession and high proficiency in practice. The findings suggest that additional consideration should be given to classroom and behavior management, teacher candidate workload, teaching beyond academics, and preparation for navigating the public school system.

  1. Program Monitoring Practices for Teachers of the Deaf and Hard of Hearing in Early Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Anne E.; Marvin, Christine A.

    2016-01-01

    Program monitoring is an important and necessary assessment practice within the field of early childhood deaf education. Effective program monitoring requires a focus on both the consistent implementation of intervention strategies (fidelity) and the assessment of children's ongoing progress in response to interventions (progress monitoring).…

  2. Level of Educational Attainment Among Deaf Adults Who Attended Bilingual-Bicultural Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dammeyer, Jesper; Marschark, Marc

    2016-10-01

    In Scandinavia and some other countries, a bilingual-bicultural approach to deaf education was celebrated in national programs from the mid-1980s until the broad popularity of cochlear implantation in middle 2000s created a shift back to an emphasis on spoken language for many deaf children. At the same time, only a few studies evaluated the long-term outcomes of bilingual-bicultural education, and several of their findings have raised questions about benefits of the approach. This study examined the level of educational attainment of 408 deaf individuals who attended primary school either before or during the period of bilingual-bicultural education in Denmark, both relative to a comparable hearing cohort. Beyond group comparisons, three logistic regression models were created to evaluate the prediction of educational attainment by a number of relevant variables. Compared to the hearing population, the deaf population had a significantly lower level of educational attainment both before and after the introduction of bilingual-bicultural education. Signed language and spoken language abilities, the kind of school attended, degree of hearing loss, parental hearing loss, and gender were found significantly to explain levels of educational attainment in the deaf population. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Post Secondary Programs for the Deaf: IV. Empirical Data Analysis. Research Report No. 75.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harlow, Mary Jane P.; And Others

    The fourth of six monographs on postsecondary vocational technical programs for deaf students provides data on students' performances on the Stanford Achievement Test, General Aptitude Test Battery and the Nonreading Measure of General Intelligence, and the Weschler Adult Intelligence Scale. Ss consisted of 28 students from Delgado Junior College,…

  4. Manual for the Deaf-Blind Program and Ability Screening Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyall, J.; And Others

    Presented are a manual and a screening test to assist teachers and professionals to determine the functional ability level and individual program needs of deaf blind and multiply handicapped children. It is noted that the individually administered 10-minute test, based on Gesell's developmental theory, consists of items in seven basic…

  5. Inservice Training Program for Teachers and Aides of Deaf-Blind Children, Summer, 1975. Proceedings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Barbara

    Presented are notes taken from a 6-week inservice training program for 30 teachers and 30 paraprofessionals who work with deaf-blind children. Entries are divided into two sections--lectures and minicourses--and include the following titles: "Piaget" (V. Robinson), "Dichotic Listening--Research and Applications" (B. Franklin), "Curriculum Ideas…

  6. Washington University School of Medicine: A Distinctive Program in Deaf Education Studies at the Program in Audiology and Communication Sciences (PACS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Heather

    2010-01-01

    Developments in universal newborn hearing screening programs and assistive hearing technology have had considerable effects on the speech, language, and educational success of children who are deaf or hard of hearing. Several recent research studies of children who are deaf or hard of hearing and who use spoken language as their primary method of…

  7. An Internship Program for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Students in Polymer-Based Nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cebe,P.; Cherdack, D.; Guertin, R.; Haas, T.; S. Ince, B.; Valluzzi, R.

    2006-01-01

    We report on our summer internship program in Polymer-Based Nanocomposites, for deaf and hard of hearing undergraduates who engage in classroom and laboratory research work in polymer physics. The unique attributes of this program are its emphasis on: 1. Teamwork; 2. Performance of a start-to-finish research project; 3. Physics of materials approach; and 4. Diversity. Students of all disability levels have participated in this program, including students who neither hear nor voice. The classroom and laboratory components address the materials chemistry and physics of polymer-based nanocomposites, crystallization and melting of polymers, the interaction of X-rays and light with polymers, mechanical properties of polymers, and the connection between thermal processing, structure, and ultimate properties of polymers. A set of Best Practices is developed for accommodating deaf and hard of hearing students into the laboratory setting. The goal is to bring deaf and hard of hearing students into the larger scientific community as professionals, by providing positive scientific experiences at a formative time in their educational lives.

  8. Training Program for Defectologists Working with Deaf-blind Children with Sensory-integrative Dysfunction in Primary Health Care

    OpenAIRE

    Idalmis Luisa Martínez Serrano; Alfredo Espinosa Roca; Belquis Rosa Vilaboy Pérez; María Isabel Mantecón Ledo; Clara Mercedes Vitale Alfonso

    2011-01-01

    Background: defectologists´ training for the management of deaf-blind people is a topic being currently investigated by different authors. Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of a training program for defectologists working with deaf-blind children with sensory-integrative dysfunction in primary health care. Methods: before and after intervention research including all defectologists in primary health care in the province of Cienfuegos from June 2006 to July 2008. With this research some...

  9. Susan Smith

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Owner

    Soveel lesers soveel lokmiddele soveel re- sponse kan gelys word om toegang tot die lees van poësie te registreer. 'n Resep om ge- trou of in ontrou na te volg, bestaan nie. Ge- lukkig nie. Susan Smith se (debuut)bundel lok my helaas nie deur die voorblad as vertrek- punt te neem nie. Aan visuele prikkelkrag gaan.

  10. Pre-Placement Program for Severely Multi-Handicapped Deaf-Blind Children, 1980-1981. Final Evaluation Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobias, Robert; And Others

    Evaluation of the sixth and final year of operation for a preplacement program for 13 severely multiply handicapped deaf blind children, located in the Industrial Home for the Blind, is reported. The program is explained to prepare students for entrance into their existing special education programs. Qualitative findings on the physical setting,…

  11. "Multi-County Diagnostic-Instructional Program for Young Deaf Children" (Serving Lee, Collier, Hendry and Charlotte Counties).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee County Board of Public Instruction, Fort Myers, FL.

    Described is a 1 year program designed to provide a sequential diagnostic-instructional program for 16 young deaf and hearing impaired children in four Florida counties. Objectives of the program are said to have included the development of language and communication skills, inservice education for staff members, parent activities to encourage…

  12. Baseline data on distance education offerings in deaf education teacher preparation programs in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stryker, Deborah S

    2011-01-01

    Given that little is empirically known about the use of distance education within deaf education teacher preparation (DETP) programs, the purpose of the present study was to obtain baseline data on distance education activities in these programs. Using a census of the program coordinators of the 68 DETP programs in the United States, the researcher requested and gathered data by means of an 11-item online questionnaire. A 69% response rate was achieved (N = 47). It was found that more than half of the DETP programs offered distance education courses. Respondents indicated that asynchronous technology was used overwhelmingly more often than synchronous technology, with the Internet listed most often, followed by teleconferencing. Additional results provide information about the current status of distance education within the DETP field.

  13. Listening and speaking ability of Thai deaf children in preschool aural rehabilitation program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lertsukprasert, Krisna; Kasemkosin, Nittaya; Cheewareungroj, Wichit; Kasemsuwan, Lalida

    2010-04-01

    An auditory-oral approach can help deaf children achieve success in oral communication. Many studies confirm that deaf children with access to sound through high-powered and appropriate hearing aids at the youngest age possible have the capability to acquire communication skills similar to their hearingpeers. Evaluate the listening and speaking progress made by 27 Thai hearing-impaired children who attended a preschool aural rehabilitation program, which was established at Audiology and Speech clinic. After hearing aids fitting, deaf children were enrolled to the preschool aural rehabilitation program after receiving their parents consent. Hearing impaired children were divided into groups of 4-6 children with approximately the same level of performance. The listening and speaking performance at the initial period were recorded. Each group participated in the 3-hour-program once a week, included auditory training, conversation (maternal reflexive method), and speech stimulation. The improvements and problems of each child were recorded at the end of session. Listening and speaking performance evaluation were recorded at six months intervals. There were 12 boys and 15 girls. The average hearing loss in the better ear was 104 dBHL, range from 83-117 dBHL, SD = 8.33. The mean age of enrollment was 2 years and 10 months. The majority gradually developed listening skills and speaking ability. There was no relationship between age of enrollment and the listening and speaking ability (p > 0.05). However, listening skills had positive relationship with length of speech (r = 0.685), number of spoken vocabulary (r = 0.665), and speech character (r = 0.598); p children to participate in hearing society.

  14. The relationship between the reading and signing skills of deaf children in bilingual education programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermans, Daan; Knoors, Harry; Ormel, Ellen; Verhoeven, Ludo

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports on one experiment in which we investigated the relationship between reading and signing skills. We administered a vocabulary task and a story comprehension task in Sign Language of the Netherlands and in written Dutch to a group of 87 deaf children from bilingual education programs. We found a strong and positive correlation between the scores obtained in the sign vocabulary task and the reading vocabulary task when age, short-term memory scores, and nonverbal intelligence scores were controlled for. In addition, a correlation was observed between the scores in the story comprehension tasks in Sign Language of the Netherlands and written Dutch but only when vocabulary scores for words and signs were not taken into account. The results are briefly discussed with reference to a model we recently proposed to describe lexical development for deaf children in bilingual education programs (Hermans, D., Knoors, H., Ormel, E., & Verhoeven, L., 2008). In addition, the implications of the results of the present study for previous studies on the relationship between reading and signing skills are discussed.

  15. Increasing Cultural And Linguistic Diversity In Deaf Education Teacher Preparation Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Joanna E; Luckner, John L

    2016-01-01

    As the field of education of the d/Deaf and hard of hearing (d/Dhh) continues to diversify, postsecondary institutions must pay close attention not only to the changing needs of d/Dhh students but to the practitioners they are preparing to serve this population. Students who are d/Dhh and come from homes where a language other than English or American Sign Language is used--d/Dhh Multilingual Learners (DMLs)--constitute 19.4%-35.0% of the d/Dhh student population (Gallaudet Research Institute, 2013). In the present article, part of a special American Annals of the Deaf issue on DMLs, the authors review demographic trends, examine the theory behind teacher effectiveness and culturally responsive teaching, provide examples from research on effective components of teacher preparation programs and discuss how they align with the field's certification standards, and recommend practices for programs and teachers to meet these standards within the field's ever-changing landscape.

  16. Academic Achievement of Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Students in an ASL/English Bilingual Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrastinski, Iva; Wilbur, Ronnie B.

    2016-01-01

    There has been a scarcity of studies exploring the influence of students' American Sign Language (ASL) proficiency on their academic achievement in ASL/English bilingual programs. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of ASL proficiency on reading comprehension skills and academic achievement of 85 deaf or hard-of-hearing signing…

  17. Academic Achievement of Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Students in an ASL/English Bilingual Program

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hrastinski, Iva; Wilbur, Ronnie B

    2016-01-01

    ...) proficiency on their academic achievement in ASL/English bilingual programs. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of ASL proficiency on reading comprehension skills and academic achievement of 85 deaf or hard-of-hearing signing students...

  18. Contact: Effects of an Intervention Program To Foster Harmonious Interactions between Deaf-Blind Children and Their Educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Marleen J.; Riksen-Walraven, J. Marianne; Van Dijk, Jan P. M.

    2003-01-01

    This study examined the effects of an intervention program to improve the quality of daily interaction between six congenitally deaf-blind children and their 14 educators (teachers, caregivers, and mothers). With video analysis as the most important tool, the interaction coaches trained the educators to recognize the children's signals and attune…

  19. Apartheid in deaf education: examining workforce diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simms, Laurene; Rusher, Melissa; Andrews, Jean F; Coryell, Judy

    2008-01-01

    A survey of 3,227 professionals in 313 deaf education programs found that 22.0% of teachers and 14.5% of administrators were deaf--a less than 10% increase in deaf professionals since 1993. Additionally, 21.7% of teachers and 6.1% of administrators were professionals of color. Of these minority teachers, only 2.5% were deaf persons of color. Only 3 deaf administrators of color were identified. The study describes how "apartheid" or "intellectual oppression" may result from unchanged hiring practices in K-12 programs for the deaf and in postsecondary institutions. Using a bottle metaphor, the researchers describe how deaf persons of color are often stuck in "a bottleneck on the highway to opportunity." Relevant data underscore that the field of deaf education must diversify its professional force in order to utilize the intellectual, linguistic, and multicultural proficiencies of hearing teachers of color, deaf teachers, and deaf teachers of color.

  20. Teaching manual communication to preservice teachers of the deaf in an accredited comprehensive undergraduate teacher preparation program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Carol A

    2006-01-01

    NOTING THAT there are no standardized manual communication curricula or proficiency assessments available to teacher preparation programs, the author used a case study to describe how preservice teachers of the deaf are taught to incorporate American Sign Language and various forms of signed English as effective communication tools for students who are deaf and hard of hearing. An accredited undergraduate teacher preparation program located in a rural area was selected for the study. Eight curricular components were examined, and data were triangulated from observations, interviews, and document analyses. The author found (a) that manual communication was taught in three required courses making up 6.57% of the overall curriculum, (b) direct application to the classroom was limited, and (c) there was minor misalignment across the eight curricular components examined. The program did not require an exit-level proficiency exam.

  1. Canine deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strain, George M

    2012-11-01

    Conductive deafness, caused by outer or middle ear obstruction, may be corrected, whereas sensorineural deafness cannot. Most deafness in dogs is congenital sensorineural hereditary deafness, associated with the genes for white pigment: piebald or merle. The genetic cause has not yet been identified. Dogs with blue eyes have a greater likelihood of hereditary deafness than brown-eyed dogs. Other common forms of sensorineural deafness include presbycusis, ototoxicity, noise-induced hearing loss, otitis interna, and anesthesia. Definitive diagnosis of deafness requires brainstem auditory evoked response testing. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Children, Deaf, of Deaf Parents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baker, A.E.; van den Bogaerde, B.; Gertz, G.; Boudreault, P.

    2016-01-01

    Deaf children with Deaf parents usually grow up in the Deaf community, that is if their parents offer them a sign language and are active members of the community. These Deaf children are similar to other children of linguistic and cultural minorities in many ways. They are also different in that

  3. Deaf Epistemology: Deafhood and Deafness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser, Peter C.; O'Hearn, Amanda; McKee, Michael; Steider, Anne; Thew, Denise

    2010-01-01

    Deaf epistemology constitutes the nature and extent of the knowledge that deaf individuals acquire growing up in a society that relies primarily on audition to navigate life. Deafness creates beings who are more visually oriented compared to their auditorily oriented peers. How hearing individuals interact with deaf individuals shapes how deaf…

  4. Limited English Literacy Proficiency in Deaf People: A Review of Deafness and Hearing Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodda, Michael; Eleweke, C. Jonah; Chapman, Jonathan

    1998-01-01

    This article examines the deafness and hearing perspectives concerning people with deafness and English literacy. Because literacy is important for people with deafness, it is suggested that carefully developed bilingual-bicultural programs could facilitate the development of English literacy skills in individuals who are deaf. (Contains…

  5. Views from the field: program directors' perceptions of teacher education and the education of students who are deaf or hard of hearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teller, Henry; Harney, Jillian

    Arandom sample of directors of programs for the deaf in North America were surveyed to get their views about the skills that teacher education programs need to be teaching future teachers of students who are deaf or hard of hearing. The directors were queried about literacy practices, classroom management strategies, and communication strategies used in their programs, and were encouraged to comment freely on the questionnaire items presented to them. Program directors predicted a need for more itinerant and resource teachers. The survey also revealed that programs for the deaf are highly behaviorist (i.e., You do this and you'll get that) in the way they induce students to learn and in how they manage student behavior.

  6. Deaf epistemology: Deafhood and Deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser, Peter C; O'Hearn, Amanda; McKee, Michael; Steider, Anne; Thew, Denise

    2010-01-01

    Deaf epistemology constitutes the nature and extent of the knowledge that deaf individuals acquire growing up in a society that relies primarily on audition to navigate life. Deafness creates beings who are more visually oriented compared to their auditorily oriented peers. How hearing individuals interact with deaf individuals shapes how deaf individuals acquire knowledge and how they learn. Aspects of the Deaf episteme, not caused by deafness but by Deafhood, have a positive impact on how deaf individuals learn, resist audism, stay healthy, and navigate the world. Research on psychology, health, and education are reviewed to illustrate how visually oriented beings think and view the world differently from the majority. The article provides support to the theory of multiple epistemologies,and has implications for families, teachers, and researchers.

  7. Academic Achievement of Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Students in an ASL/English Bilingual Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilbur, Ronnie B.

    2016-01-01

    There has been a scarcity of studies exploring the influence of students’ American Sign Language (ASL) proficiency on their academic achievement in ASL/English bilingual programs. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of ASL proficiency on reading comprehension skills and academic achievement of 85 deaf or hard-of-hearing signing students. Two subgroups, differing in ASL proficiency, were compared on the Northwest Evaluation Association Measures of Academic Progress and the reading comprehension subtest of the Stanford Achievement Test, 10th edition. Findings suggested that students highly proficient in ASL outperformed their less proficient peers in nationally standardized measures of reading comprehension, English language use, and mathematics. Moreover, a regression model consisting of 5 predictors including variables regarding education, hearing devices, and secondary disabilities as well as ASL proficiency and home language showed that ASL proficiency was the single variable significantly predicting results on all outcome measures. This study calls for a paradigm shift in thinking about deaf education by focusing on characteristics shared among successful deaf signing readers, specifically ASL fluency. PMID:26864688

  8. ihear[R] Internet Therapy Program: A Program by St. Joseph Institute for the Deaf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broekelmann, Cheryl

    2012-01-01

    The ihear[R] Internet Therapy Program (ihear) provides effective, individualized, and interactive therapy that is tailored to each child's specific needs through a secure, high-quality Internet connection. The program brings listening and spoken language services directly to schools and families. The foundation for ihear is based on the St. Joseph…

  9. Vocational Evaluation of Severely Disabled Deaf Clients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Douglas

    Research and practice in deafness rehabilitation show that evaluation services for severely disabled deaf clients can best be provided within a "total adjustment environment" which incorporates a number of special program considerations associated with the evaluation of deaf clients. Four of these considerations are (1) a rehabilitation…

  10. b-Learning in a Distance Learning Graduate Program for Deaf Students. Practice Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagarto, José Reis; Mineiro, Ana; Pereira, Joana

    2013-01-01

    This article results from a case study with exploratory traits where the implementation of a graduate degree in Portuguese Sign Language at the Portuguese Catholic University is analysed. With this study we intend to determine whether distance learning models using blended learning strategies are adequate for deaf students at the university level.…

  11. Adam Smith, Behavioral Economist

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ashraf, Nava; Camerer, Colin F; Loewenstein, George

    2005-01-01

    Adam Smith's psychological perspective in The Theory of Moral Sentiments is remarkably similar to "dual-process" frameworks advanced by psychologists, neuroscientists, and more recently by behavioral...

  12. Fractional smith chart theory

    KAUST Repository

    Shamim, Atif

    2011-03-01

    For the first time, a generalized Smith chart is introduced here to represent fractional order circuit elements. It is shown that the standard Smith chart is a special case of the generalized fractional order Smith chart. With illustrations drawn for both the conventional integer based lumped elements and the fractional elements, a graphical technique supported by the analytical method is presented to plot impedances on the fractional Smith chart. The concept is then applied towards impedance matching networks, where the fractional approach proves to be much more versatile and results in a single element matching network for a complex load as compared to the two elements in the conventional approach. © 2010 IEEE.

  13. Overview on Deaf-Blindness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Barbara

    2008-01-01

    It may seem that deaf-blindness refers to a total inability to see or hear. However, in reality deaf-blindness is a condition in which the combination of hearing and visual losses in children cause "such severe communication and other develop mental and educational needs that they cannot be accommodated in special education programs solely for…

  14. Smith Tackles Oakland Unified

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellon, Ericka

    2011-01-01

    As a 20-something, Anthony "Tony" Smith had fulfilled one dream: playing professional football for the Green Bay Packers and the San Francisco 49ers. Next up, he thought, was law school, but a former mentor reminded him that he is a teacher. Smith never became a classroom teacher, but his background in sports--where he learned the power…

  15. 07 Smith 02.pmd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Owner

    23 Jun 2009 ... TYDSKRIF VIR LETTERKUNDE • 46 (2) • 2009. 97. Murder your darlings: Breytenbach, die dood en die vrou. Francois Smith. Francois Smith is 'n boekredakteur en. -joernalis van Kaapstad wat vir verskeie uitgewerye manuskripte versorg en ontwikkel. Hy was voorheen die boekeredakteur van Die Burger.

  16. John Tracy Clinic: Programa de Ensenanza por Correspondencia para Los Padres de Ninos Sordo-Ciegos de Edad Preescolar (John Tracy Clinic Correspondence Learning Program for Parents of Preschool Deaf-Blind Children).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thielman, Virginia B.; And Others

    Written in Spanish, the document contains a correspondence learning program for parents of deaf blind preschoolers. An introductory section gives preliminary instructions, an introduction to sign language, and a list of resources for deaf blind children. Twelve lessons follow with information on: the parent's role in teaching the child, visual…

  17. History of the College of the Holy Cross American Sign Language Program and Its Collaborative Partnerships with the Worcester Deaf Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Jami N.

    2014-01-01

    Most postsecondary American Sign Language programs have an inherent connection to their local Deaf communities and rely on the community's events to provide authentic linguistic and cultural experiences for their students. While this type of activity benefits students, there is often little effort toward meaningful engagement or attention to…

  18. The Effect of Vestibular Rehabilitation Therapy Program on Sensory Organization of Deaf Children With Bilateral Vestibular Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Abbas Ebrahimi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of vestibular rehabilitation therapy program on the sensory organization of deaf children with bilateral vestibular dysfunction. This cross-sectional and analytic study was conducted on 24 students between the age of 7 and 12 years (6 girls and 18 boys with the profound sensorineural hearing loss (PTA>90 dB. They were assessed through the balance subtest in Bruininks-Oseretsky test of motor proficiency (BOTMP. For children which the total score of the balance subtest was 3 standard deviation lower than their peers with typical development, vestibular function testing was completed pre-intervention. Posturography Sensory organization testing (SOT was completed pre- and post-intervention with SPS (Synapsys, Marseille, France. Children with bilateral vestibular impairment were randomly assigned to either the exercise or control group. Exercise intervention consisted of compensatory training, emphasizing enhancement of visual and somatosensory function, and balance training. The exercise group entered in vestibular rehabilitation therapy program for 8 weeks. The children initially participating in the control group were provided the exercise intervention following the post-test. Based on the results there was significant difference in condition 5 and 6, areas of limits of stability (LOS, vestibular ratio and global score in posturography at the end of the intervention, but there was no significant difference in the control group in posturography (P<0.05. The results indicated that testing of vestibular, and postural control function, as well as intervention for deficiencies identified, should be included in deaf children rehabilitation program.

  19. The Effect of Vestibular Rehabilitation Therapy Program on Sensory Organization of Deaf Children With Bilateral Vestibular Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, Amir Abbas; Jamshidi, Ali Ashraf; Movallali, Guita; Rahgozar, Mehdi; Haghgoo, Hojjat Allah

    2017-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of vestibular rehabilitation therapy program on the sensory organization of deaf children with bilateral vestibular dysfunction. This cross-sectional and analytic study was conducted on 24 students between the age of 7 and 12 years (6 girls and 18 boys) with the profound sensorineural hearing loss (PTA>90 dB). They were assessed through the balance subtest in Bruininks-Oseretsky test of motor proficiency (BOTMP). For children which the total score of the balance subtest was 3 standard deviation lower than their peers with typical development, vestibular function testing was completed pre-intervention. Posturography Sensory organization testing (SOT) was completed pre- and post-intervention with SPS (Synapsys, Marseille, France). Children with bilateral vestibular impairment were randomly assigned to either the exercise or control group. Exercise intervention consisted of compensatory training, emphasizing enhancement of visual and somatosensory function, and balance training. The exercise group entered in vestibular rehabilitation therapy program for 8 weeks. The children initially participating in the control group were provided the exercise intervention following the post-test. Based on the results there was significant difference in condition 5 and 6, areas of limits of stability (LOS), vestibular ratio and global score in posturography at the end of the intervention, but there was no significant difference in the control group in posturography (P<0.05). The results indicated that testing of vestibular, and postural control function, as well as intervention for deficiencies identified, should be included in deaf children rehabilitation program.

  20. Faculty needs, doctoral preparation, and the future of teacher preparation programs in the education of deaf and hard of hearing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedict, Kendra M; Johnson, Harold; Antia, Shirin D

    2011-01-01

    The purposes of the study were to obtain and analyze data on the need for, and desired characteristics of, faculty in deaf education at American institutions of higher education (IHEs), and to assess the present and projected status of doctoral-level teacher preparation programs in deaf education at American IHEs. Program directors and coordinators provided information on current and projected faculty openings, the number of active doctoral students, faculty research interests, program strengths, and needs in the field. Results indicated a pending shortage due to faculty retirements and a paucity of doctoral-level graduates. Most faculty listed literacy and language as a primary research interest as well as a program strength. The ability to generate new knowledge through research was found to be less desirable for future faculty than teaching ability. Suggestions for improving doctoral preparation and moving the field to evidence-based practices are provided.

  1. Parental Involvement in Deaf Children's Education Programs as a Predictor of Child's Language, Early Reading, and Social-Emotional Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderon, R

    2000-01-01

    This study examined the impact of school-based, teacher-rated parental involvement on four child outcomes: language development, early reading skills, and positive and negative measures of social-emotional development. The 28 children were assessed for outcomes between 9 to 53 months post-graduation from a birth-to-3 early intervention (EI) program for children with hearing loss. Other factors included in the study were child's hearing loss, mother's education level, mother's current communication skills with her child, and maternal use of additional services beyond those offered by the early intervention program or the child's school program. Parental involvement in children's school-based education program is a significant positive predictor to early reading skills but shares considerable variance with maternal communication skill for this outcome. In this study, maternal communication skills and the child's hearing loss were the strongest predictors for language development. Maternal use of additional services was the strongest predictor to poorer social-emotional adjustment. The study's findings indicate that although parental involvement in their deaf child's school-based education program can positively contribute to academic performance, parental communication skill is a more significant predictor for positive language and academic development. Factors associated with parental involvement, maternal communication, and use of additional services are explored and suggestions are offered to enhance parental involvement and communication skills.

  2. Assessment, Intervention, and Program Needs of Lower Achieving and Multiply Disabled Deaf People Requiring Extended Transition Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiman, John; And Others

    This paper begins with an overview of the population of adolescents and young adults with deafness. More detailed information is then provided on the characteristics of lower achieving deaf persons and those with multiple disabling conditions. School-to-community transition experiences of these groups are then discussed, with special focus on the…

  3. Adam Smith and dependency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozler, Sule

    2012-06-01

    The focus of this paper is the works and life of Adam Smith, who is widely recognized as the father and founder of contemporary economics. Latent content analysis is applied to his seminal text in economics, An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations (1776). The results reveal that Smith considers dependence on others a problem and sees the solution to this problem in impersonalized interdependence. In addition, his views on social dependency and personal dependency, reflected in his Lectures on Jurisprudence (1963) and The Theory of Moral Sentiments (1759), are analyzed. This analysis suggests a central tension between dependence and independence in Smith's writings. The personal dependency patterns he exhibited in his life, which also suggest a tension between dependence and independence, are identified through a reading of his biographies. Based on insights from psychoanalytic literature, this paper proposes that developing the ideas in the Wealth of Nations was part of Smith's creative solution to this tension. In particular, his solution to one individual's dependence on another was through a system of impersonalized interdependence. In other words, Smith defended against his personal dependence through his economic theorizing.

  4. Altering Practices to Include Bimodal-bilingual (ASL-Spoken English) Programming at a Small School for the Deaf in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priestley, Karen; Enns, Charlotte; Arbuckle, Shauna

    2018-01-01

    Bimodal-bilingual programs are emerging as one way to meet broader needs and provide expanded language, educational and social-emotional opportunities for students who are deaf and hard of hearing (Marschark, M., Tang, G. & Knoors, H. (Eds). (2014). Bilingualism and bilingual Deaf education. New York, NY: Oxford University Press; Paludneviciene & Harris, R. (2011). Impact of cochlear implants on the deaf community. In Paludneviciene, R. & Leigh, I. (Eds.), Cochlear implants evolving perspectives (pp. 3-19). Washington, DC: Gallaudet University Press). However, there is limited research on students' spoken language development, signed language growth, academic outcomes or the social-emotional factors associated with these programs (Marschark, M., Tang, G. & Knoors, H. (Eds). (2014). Bilingualism and bilingual Deaf education. New York, NY: Oxford University Press; Nussbaum, D & Scott, S. (2011). The cochlear implant education center: Perspectives on effective educational practices. In Paludneviciene, R. & Leigh, I. (Eds.) Cochlear implants evolving perspectives (pp. 175-205). Washington, DC: Gallaudet University Press. The cochlear implant education center: Perspectives on effective educational practices. In Paludnevicience & Leigh (Eds). Cochlear implants evolving perspectives (pp. 175-205). Washington, DC: Gallaudet University Press; Spencer, P. & Marschark, M. (Eds.) (2010). Evidence-based practice in educating deaf and hard-of-hearing students. New York, NY: Oxford University Press). The purpose of this case study was to look at formal and informal student outcomes as well as staff and parent perceptions during the first 3 years of implementing a bimodal-bilingual (ASL and spoken English) program within an ASL milieu at a small school for the deaf. Speech and language assessment results for five students were analyzed over a 3-year period and indicated that the students made significant positive gains in all areas, although results were variable. Staff and parent

  5. Deaf Epistemology: The Deaf Way of Knowing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holcomb, Thomas K.

    2010-01-01

    The standard epistemology requires the use of hard science to gain knowledge and discover the truth. In contrast, Deaf epistemology relies heavily on personal testimonies, personal experiences, and personal accounts to document knowledge. In recent years, a number of deaf schools have adopted deaf-centric policies shaped by Deaf epistemology in an…

  6. John Maynard Smith

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    2004-04-19

    Apr 19, 2004 ... The evolutionary biology community has been saddened and depleted this month by the loss of Prof. John Maynard. Smith who made many important contributions to evolu- tionary theory, including the now ubiquitous concept of an evolutionarily stable strategy (ESS). In a half-century long working career ...

  7. Deaf education in China: history, current issues, and emerging deaf voices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lytle, Richard R; Johnson, Kathryn E; Hui, Yang Jun

    An overview is provided of (a) deaf education in China, (b) views of deaf Chinese, and (c) recent empowering international collaborations. China's national policy focuses on oral/aural education and hearing rehabilitation. However, everyday practice in schools for deaf children includes various forms of Chinese Sign Language. Early childhood education focuses on speech and hearing. Elementary and secondary school curricula reflect low expectations for deaf students and lack the same academic content provided to hearing students. There are limited higher education opportunities. There are no support services such as note takers or interpreters for mainstreamed students. There are no deaf teacher preparation or interpreter training programs. Jobs are few; the vast majority of deaf adults are unemployed. Deaf people interviewed for the article describe their needs, their dreams, and the changes they are witnessing, which result in part from recent empowering international collaborations.

  8. Meet EPA Scientist Betsy Smith, Ph.D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dr. Betsy Smith is Associate National Program Director for Systems Analysis within the Sustainable and Healthy Communities Research Program. Her work has focused on new methods to analyze spatial data on multiple problems.

  9. Zadie Smith: un homenaje

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rivera de la Cruz, Marta

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Considerada por la prestigiosa revista Granta uno de los nombres propios de las letras anglosajonas, Zadie Smith irrumpió en la escena literaria con Dientes blancos cuando contaba con poco más de veinte años. Su extraordinario talento unido a su extrema juventud sorprendieron a la crítica, pero también al público y a los medios de comunicación, que no tardaron en hacer de ella un nuevo icono de la literatura moderna. Zadie Smith ha pasado los últimos años escribiendo y huyendo a la vez de la feria de vanidades de la fama, que amenazaba con oscurecer sus dotes de narradora. Es una escritora total, cuya tercera novela, Sobre la belleza, la ha consagrado de forma definitiva.

  10. Critical Literacy: Deaf Adults Speak Out

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enns, Charlotte

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe a variety of teaching and learning strategies that were used within a classroom of Deaf adults participating in a high school English course as part of an upgrading program. The class was conducted in a bilingual manner; that is, being Deaf and communicating with American Sign Language (ASL) was not…

  11. Literacy for Deaf People Seeking Employment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryall, Gordon

    1993-01-01

    Focuses on the literacy problems of deaf people who are seeking employment. The article argues for the provision of adequate English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) literacy skills training, makes programming recommendations, and suggests employment strategies that deaf people need. (12 references) (Author/CK)

  12. For the Health of Smith Island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsthoffer, Joe

    1997-01-01

    Students in nursing, allied health, social work, and medicine at the University of Maryland are offered clinical experiences on Smith Island in Chesapeake Bay. The program exposes them to the special health care needs and problems of an isolated, economically disadvantaged, rural community. (SK)

  13. Deaf People Can!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wixtrom, Christine

    1987-01-01

    Activities designed to increase deaf students' self-esteem and positive attitudes toward their deafness included a bulletin board displaying the different things deaf children and adults could do; and a trip to see actors from the National Theater of the Deaf. (CB)

  14. Adam Smith's Invisible Hands

    OpenAIRE

    Peter Minowitz

    2004-01-01

    William Grampp’s JPE article on Adam Smith is creative and provocative. It errs, however, by disparaging the invisible hand’s importance as a symbol of various economic processes that help societies prosper in ways that individuals neither intend nor comprehend. Four specific problems stand out. First, Grampp unsoundly tries to limit the relevance of the invisible hand within the Wealth of Nations to situations in which a merchant increases domestic capital and strengthens national defens...

  15. Overview on Deaf-Blindness

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Topics About Deaf-Blindness > What is Deaf-Blindness Definitions of Deaf-Blindness Causes of Deaf-Blindness National Child Count & Demographics Communication > Communication Overview Early Communication Prelinguistic Communication Object Communication ...

  16. Music and Deaf Culture: Images from the Media and Their Interpretation by Deaf and Hearing Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darrow; Loomis

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of the study was threefold: (a) to examine how the visual media have portrayed the subject of music and the deaf, (b) to verify the validity of these portrayals with members of the deaf community, and (c) to compare and contrast deaf and hearing audiences' impressions of these portrayals. An additional purpose of the research was to examine the results in light of possible misconceptions that may be construed by music therapists and music educators based upon the media's representation of the relationship between music and deaf culture. Since music therapists and music educators are the primary persons responsible for the music instruction of students in school programs for deaf and hard-of-hearing students, it is particularly important that they receive accurate messages about the relationship of music to deaf culture. Fifty deaf (n = 25) and hearing (n = 25) undergraduate college students individually viewed motion picture and television excerpts related to music and the deaf. Subjects were instructed to take notes as needed regarding the content of each excerpt and their impressions. Students were then interviewed in their native language, English or American Sign Language, as to their interpretations and perceptions regarding these excerpts and their accuracy. Interviews of the deaf students were translated into English from American Sign Language by trained interpreters. Written transcriptions were then made of the interpreters' English translations of the interviews with deaf students and of the verbal interviews with hearing students. Interview transcripts from both groups were coded and analyzed for recurring themes and patterns using content analysis. Data analysis revealed cultural patterns for the two groups, impressions specific to individual subjects, and trends in communication style and content for the two groups. Implications for music therapists and music educators are given regarding the influence of the media, characteristics of deaf

  17. Sociological Aspects of Deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    World Federation of the Deaf, Rome (Italy).

    Nine conference papers treat the sociological aspects of deafness. Included are "Individuals Being Deaf and Blind and Living with a Well Hearing Society" by A. Marx (German Federal Republic), "A Deaf Man's Experiences in a Hearing World" by A. B. Simon(U.S.A.), "Problem of Text Books and School Appliances for Vocational…

  18. Walrus Movements in Smith Sound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heide-Jørgensen, Mads Peter; Flora, Janne; Andersen, Astrid Oberborbeck

    2017-01-01

    Fifty of 58 walruses (Odobenus rosmarus rosmarus) instrumented with satellite-linked transmitters in four areas in eastern Smith Sound, Northwest Greenland, during May and June of 2010 – 13 and 2015 provided data for this study. These animals departed from the feeding banks along the Greenland...... coast in June – July (average 14th June), simultaneously with the disappearance of sea ice from these areas. Most of them moved to Canadian waters in western Smith Sound. The most frequently used summering grounds were along the coasts of Ellesmere Island: on the eastern coast, the area around Alexandra...... of Jones Sound and Lancaster Sound for short periods during the summer, though this cannot be confirmed with certainty. The return migration from western Smith Sound to the wintering area in eastern Smith Sound takes place in October. The tracked walrus showed high affinity to coastal areas, while walruses...

  19. Does Deafness Affect Resilience?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmadi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background Resilience is a positive psychological characteristic that contributes to mental health and adjustment under challenging conditions, such as deafness. Deafness is a traumatic experience and causes communication disorders; it may also affect resilience. Objectives We compared the resilience of deaf signers to that of a matched group of hearing individuals. Materials and Methods This comparative study was performed to assess self-evaluated resilience in 45 deaf signers and in 76 matched hearing subjects from Hamadan, Iran. Resilience scores were measured using a modified connor-davidson resilience scale. Results The average resilience score was 61.20 in deaf signers and 62.8 in hearing subjects; however, this difference was not statistically significant. The resilience score was different in female and male deaf participants. It was 65.22 for male deaf participants (SD = 10.4 and 55.17 for female deaf participants (SD = 16.1, and this difference was statistically significant (P = 0.014. The gender difference between the resilience scores of hearing participants (male, 66.24 [SD = 16.7] and female, 59.36 [SD = 13.9] was not significant (P = 0.057. Discussion Similar resilience scores in deaf and hearing participants may be due to appropriate interaction of deaf signers with family members and society. Male deaf subjects were more resilient than female ones; studies should be done to examine the effects of cultural characteristics that may provide females with less communication opportunities than males.

  20. THE DEAFNESS, THE DEAF AND HIS DISCURSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neuma Chaveiro

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: The knowledge of LIBRAS – Brazilian Sign Language – is determining to the process of structuring the discursive formations and to the constitution of the deaf one. The present work aims to discuss the LIBRAS as an important tool of structuring the discursive of the deaf individual an as a facilitating factor in the description of his health problems. The data constitute two texts, one of them wrote by a deaf skilled in LIBRAS and the other wrote by a deaf who does not express himself in this kind of language. It was verified that the first text’s author is consistent, has mobility and moves easily through the discursive formations, but otherwise is the text belonging to the other patient. It can be stated that the Brazilian sign language – LIBRAS – is a decisive tool in the working out of the deaf discursive formations and the comprehension of his discourse by the health area professionals provide a larger understanding of the constitution of the deaf identity, a fundamental aspect for an improvement in the services offered in the health area. KEYWORDS: Deafness; Communication; Sign Language.

  1. Smith, Adam (1723-90)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouchet, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    Adam Smith is often said to have been the founder of the science of economics and the father of liberalism in the sphere of economics. In fact he was neither. He lived at a turning point in western economic and political history, one that was littered with disruptive developments. He came up...... with a masterful synthesis of the economic knowledge of his period and emphasized both the relative autonomy of these phenomena and their importance in terms of generating wealth from, and in the interests of, everyone. Nevertheless, Smith never denied the moral foundation of economic behavior....

  2. Metric Education for Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Harry G.

    1979-01-01

    A diagnostic test of metric measurement skills was administered to 283 summer Vestibule Program students in 1978 at the National Technical Institute for the Deaf. Results of the testing showed that most of the deaf students lacked an understanding of the information needed for metric living. (Author)

  3. Innovative and Experimental Happenings in Deaf-Blind Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baud, Hank, Ed.; Garrett, Jeff, Ed.

    Presented are 14 papers delivered at the First Annual Spring Workshop for Professionals Serving Deaf Blind Children in the Mid-Atlantic Region (1974). Covered are the following topics regarding deaf blind children: adapted physical education, a summer day camp program, vocational and prevocational services, audiological and visual evaluations, a…

  4. The Institute for Deaf-Blind Studies: Proceedings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheffler, Joye A.; And Others

    The document contains 16 papers from the Institute for Deaf Blind Studies, a program to bring together many disciplines and to place emphasis on every aspect of the learning and teaching activity involved in the development of deaf-blind children. The following titles and authors are included: "Current Status of the Rubella Problem" (P. Ziring);…

  5. The Position of the Deaf in the Swedish Labor Market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rydberg, Emelie; Gellerstedt, Lotta Coniavitis; Danermark, Berth

    2010-01-01

    The position of deaf people in the Swedish labor market is described and analyzed. A population of 2,144 people born from 1941 to 1980 who attended special education programs for the deaf was compared to 100,000 randomly chosen individuals from the total Swedish population born during the same period. Data on these individuals consisted of…

  6. A National Survey of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Training for the Deaf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Kenneth H.; Tomasetti, James A.

    1983-01-01

    Responses to a national survey by regional directors of the American Heart Association, American National Red Cross, and continuing education programs for the deaf indicated that little is done to train the deaf in cardiopulmonary resuscitation and that communication barriers and inadequate training resources are major reasons. (Author)

  7. Effect of Peer Education on Deaf Secondary School Students' HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study evaluated the effect of an AIDS education program on deaf secondary school students' knowledge, attitude and perceived susceptibility to AIDS using peer education. Two secondary schools matched for ownership (government), composition (mixture of hearing and deaf) and teaching arrangement (separate ...

  8. Libraryservice for the deaf

    OpenAIRE

    Forssell, Beatrice

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this two years master thesis is to explore the relationship between public libraries and deaf adults. I want to know if deaf adults are a prioritized group in Swedish public libraries. Deaf adults use Swedish sign language witch is a visual language and differs from Swedish. I discuss the difference in Swedish Sign Language and Swedish and the importance of Sign Language literature. I also explore what methods can be used for mak-ing the library service towards the deaf group more ...

  9. Educational Programs and Services: Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Annals of the Deaf, 1981

    1981-01-01

    The journal section provided information on the programs offered, the students served, and the educational staff employed by U.S. and Canadian schools and classes for deaf children, deaf educators, and the deaf blind. (SB)

  10. Behavioral problems in deaf populations: a literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guita Movallali

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Studies have found that deaf individuals have higher rates of psychiatric disorders, such as behavioral problems, than those who can hear. The aim of this review was to provide a summary of the literature on behavioral problems, with specific reference to deaf individuals. The objectives of the review were to establish the prevalence of behavioral problems in deaf populations; describe the risk factor for behavioral problems in deaf populations; and describe approaches to intervention and behavioral problems prevention that have been used in deaf populations.Recent Findings: A review of articles published between 1991 and 2013 showed that the prevalence of behavioral problems in deaf people is higher than that of hearing people. Risk factors for behavioral problems in deaf populations include language impairments, communication problems, the role of parents, and the community’s beliefs and attitudes regarding the issue.Conclusion: Given the high prevalence of behavioral problems in deaf people, the effectiveness of prevention strategies should be examined. Consequently, it would be advantageous to increase the availability of specialist mental health services, promote deaf awareness including their abilities, promote awareness and skills development among teachers, staff, and specialists and implement behavior change programs.

  11. Googling "Deaf": Deafness in the World's English-Language Press

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, Des

    2007-01-01

    An Internet search tool, Google Alert, was used to survey the global English-language press July-December 2005 for references to deaf people. The survey found that such references focus on people who are deaf rather than the disability itself, thus demonstrating how well deaf people fit into the mainstream. Derogatory terminology such as "deaf and…

  12. Improving Cancer Literacy for the Deaf Using Deaf-Tailored Educational Interventions: a Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    NaseriBooriAbadi, Tahereh; Sadoughi, Farahnaz; Sheikhtaheri, Abbas

    2017-04-27

    To date, there have been many strategies, including educational interventions, for cancer prevention and control, but most of them are not deaf-tailored ones. This narrative review aimed to examine cancer educational programs to improve the deaf individuals' knowledge and attitude toward cancer. The design of this study is a narrative review. We searched ISI Web of Science, Scopus, Science Direct, and MEDLINE/PubMed using the following search strategy: ("cancer education" AND "deaf") OR ("cancer" AND "deaf" AND literacy). Publication years ranged from 1983 to 2016 for studies on cancer educational interventions for the deaf. Included studies were analyzed regarding research methodologies, types of intervention, and major findings. In total, 12 included studies were classified into three research methodologies. Although short-term and long-term knowledge improvement has been reported, since there is limited evidence on the types of cancer-related educational interventions and there are insufficient studies, longterm effectiveness of educations in improving cancer knowledge of the deaf has to be reported cautiously. Current deaf-tailored education interventions are limited, but included functional features which facilitate communicating cancer health information to the deaf community. In fact, cancer literacy might improve considering deaf community preferences such as using a short open caption, sign language, and plain language in educational interventions, but further research is recommended.

  13. Negotiating Deaf Bodies and Corporeal Experiences: The Cybernetic Deaf Subject

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas P. Horejes

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Deaf people negotiate their embodiment through corporeal experiences to provide a perception of what it means to be human. Some deaf people search for a framework where being deaf is human, not a disability. Other deaf people experience their deafness as a disability and use technology as a means to negotiate their embodiment and experiences. The role of technology or cybernetics, particularly cochlear implants, for the deaf will be examined as a way to understand cultural identities and diverse ideological perspectives concerning what it means to be deaf and normal. Then, this paper focuses on social constructed ‘bodies’ for the deaf using embodied theory and action as a part of a theoretical framework to showcase theoretical ideas and actualities of some deaf people’s lives and experiences. These discussions are ways to open dialogues and collaborative inquiries on larger important issues such as what it means to be deaf and, in essence, human.

  14. Comparing Motor Development of Deaf Children of Deaf Parents and Deaf Children of Hearing Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, Lauren J.; Volding, Lori; Winnick, Joseph P.

    2004-01-01

    Deaf children of Deaf parents perform better academically (Ritter-Brinton & Stewart, 1992), linguistically (Courtin, 2000; M. Harris, 2001; Vaccari & Marschark, 1997), and socially (Hadadian & Rose, 1991; M. Harris, 2001) than Deaf children of hearing parents. Twenty-nine Deaf children in residential schools were assessed to determine if a…

  15. Language and cognitive development in deaf children: deaf children with deaf and deaf children with hearing parents

    OpenAIRE

    Ajda Pfifer

    2011-01-01

    The article reviews the current studies regarding language and cognitive development in children who are deaf. Deaf communicate orally and with sign language. 90 % of deaf children are born into hearing families and hearing parents in most cases do not know the sign language. Besides, hearing parents usually want for their child to become "normally" speaking. Most of the deaf children born into hearing families have very poor early communication. It is now well established that deaf children ...

  16. Adam Smith y el derecho

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Escobar Córdoba

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo destaca el análisis jurídico en la obra de Adam Smith y su enriquecedor método de estudiar el derecho, particularmente en sus Lecciones de jurisprudencia. Esboza el contexto jurídico de las Lecciones e informa sobre su público original. Luego, describe la presencia del derecho romano en esa obra, deteniéndose en dos aspectos que los editores de la Edición Glasgow señalaron como errores o imprecisiones. El artículo analiza estos aspectos, ofrece posibles explicaciones alternativas que, a la vez, resaltan la complejidad del pensamiento jurídico de Smith. Finalmente, identifica tres niveles de análisis, empleados por Smith en las Lecciones, cuya interacción sería una contribución importante a la dogmática jurídica contemporánea.

  17. Right Size, Right Way: Smith College's Successful Voluntary Separation Plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovell, Jonathan B.; Keefe, Janice A.

    1992-01-01

    The program of voluntary separation at Smith College (Massachusetts), implemented as an alternative to forced staff layoffs, is described. The plan included generous separation benefits and counseling services. Related issues are discussed, including tax considerations, eligibility, cost estimation, the plan's timeline, information dissemination,…

  18. A Money Unit for Deaf Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvia, Evelyn

    1983-01-01

    A unit designed to teach deaf children (9 to 11 years old) about money, while covering other mathematical topics, is described. The program can either be covered in one block or infused into regular mathematics curriculum over a long period of time. (Author/SW)

  19. Two-Year Study of Northwest Regional Center's Summer Sessions for Preschool, Rubella, Deaf-Blind Children. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starkovich, Paul

    The report describes the Summer Sessions for Preschool, Rubella, Deaf-Blind Children conducted in 1970 and 1971 by the Northwest Regional Center for Deaf-Blind Children in Vancouver, Washington. The summer programs were primarily designed to evaluate preschool deaf-blind children in a learning and living situation. The report is intended not only…

  20. Hearing Disorders and Deafness

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... enough to enjoy talking with friends or family. Hearing disorders make it hard, but not impossible, to ... often be helped. Deafness can keep you from hearing sound at all. What causes hearing loss? Some ...

  1. Stigma in Mothers of Deaf Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, Hossein; Mohammadi, Eissa; Mohammadi, Mohammad Ali; Pirzadeh, Akbar; Mahmoudi, Hamzeh; Ansari, Ismail

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: A deaf child creates a feeling of stigma in many hearing parents. Stigma in mothers can have a negative impact on a child’s treatment and rehabilitation process. Therefore, this study was conducted to evaluate the extent of stigma in mothers with deaf children. Materials and Methods: This descriptive, cross-sectional study was conducted in 2013 among 90 mothers with deaf children. The data-collection instrument included the stigma scale in the mothers of children with disabilities. The reliability and validity of the instrument were confirmed through content validity and Cronbach’s alpha coefficient (α=86%), respectively. Data were analyzed using SPSS-15 software. Results: Results showed that most mothers suffer from stigma due to having a deaf child. The mean stigma score was 96.48 ±27.72. In total, 24.4% of mothers reported that they had received strange and mocking looks; 72.2% regarded child deafness as a sign of divine retribution; and 33.3% felt ashamed of their child’s deafness. There was an inverse relationship between the mother’s level of education and mean stigma scores (P<0.033). The stigma score was higher in mothers who were living independently of their relatives (P<0.029). The mean stigma score in mothers of children with a cochlear implant was lower than that of mothers of children with earphones (86.70 vs. 99.64), and this difference tended towards significance (P=0.057). Conclusion: This study showed that half of all mothers with deaf children were scorned and felt ashamed of having a deaf child in the family because of the stigma. The majority of mothers with deaf children felt stigmatized, and only their education and residency status affected this issue. The mothers of cochlear-implanted children perceived less stigma. Due to the various social and psychological problems caused by hearing impairment, it is necessary to consider the emotional health and psychological state of the mothers in addition to rehabilitation

  2. An interview with Jim Smith.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maartens, Aidan

    2017-08-01

    Jim Smith is Director of Science at the Wellcome Trust and a group leader at the Francis Crick Institute, where he was formerly Director of Research. A Fellow of both the Royal Society and the Academy of Medical Sciences, he was knighted for his services to medical research and science education in 2016. His lab works on mesoderm induction in the early vertebrate embryo. We met Jim in the Crick to hear about his life in science, his visions for the Crick and the Wellcome Trust, and his advice for early career scientists. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  3. The effectiveness of international development assistance from American organizations to deaf communities in Jamaica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Amy T

    American organizations bringing assistance to deaf people in developing countries unintentionally create relationships of dependency or oppression rather than relationships of support. Using qualitative methods, the author examined the effectiveness of development assistance provided to the Jamaican Deaf community by two American churches, one American nongovernmental organization, and one U.S. federal agency. Documents were reviewed and observations were made. Interviews were conducted with more than 60 deaf and hearing people involved with the American organizations, the Jamaican organizations, and deaf Jamaican beneficiaries. The author concludes that the Jamaican Deaf community was often excluded in planning, designing, or evaluating programs, and was unsatisfied with the American assistance it received. Results also indicate that the American organizations were poorly prepared to work with the Deaf community. Suggestions for American organizations wishing to strengthen and empower deaf people through development assistance in developing countries are proposed.

  4. Inattentional deafness in music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koreimann, Sabrina; Gula, Bartosz; Vitouch, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    While inattentional blindness is a modern classic in attention and perception research, analogous phenomena of inattentional deafness have been widely neglected. We here present the first investigation of inattentional deafness in and with music under controlled experimental conditions. Inattentional deafness in music is defined as the inability to consciously perceive an unexpected musical stimulus when attention is focused on a certain facet of the piece. Participants listened to a modification of the first 1'50″ of Richard Strauss' Thus Spake Zarathustra; while the control group just listened, the experimental group had to count the number of timpani beats. An e-guitar solo served as the unexpected event. In Study 1, experimental data from n = 115 participants were analyzed. Non-musicians were compared with musicians to investigate the impact of expertise. In Study 2 (n = 47), the scope of the inattentional deafness effect was investigated with a more salient unexpected stimulus. Results demonstrate an inattentional deafness effect under dynamic musical conditions. Quite unexpectedly, the effect was structurally equivalent even for musicians. Our findings clearly show that sustained inattentional deafness exists in the musical realm, in close correspondence to inattentional blindness with dynamic visual stimuli.

  5. Calendar systems and communication of deaf-blind children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jablan Branka

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to explain the calendar systems and their role in teaching deaf-blind children. Deaf-blind persons belong to a group of multiple disabled persons. This disability should not be observed as a simple composite of visual and hearing impairments, but as a combination of sensory impairments that require special assistance in the development, communication and training for independent living. In our environment, deaf-blind children are being educated in schools for children with visual impairments or in schools for children with hearing impairments (in accordance with the primary impairment. However, deaf-blind children cannot be trained by means of special programs for children with hearing impairment, visual impairment or other programs for students with developmental disabilities without specific attention required by such a combination of sensory impairments. Deaf-blindness must be observed as a multiple impairment that requires special work methods, especially in the field of communication, whose development is severely compromised. Communication skills in deaf-blind people can be developed by using the calendar systems. They are designed in such a manner that they can be easily attainable to children with various sensory impairments. Calendars can be used to encourage and develop communication between adult persons and a deaf-blind child.

  6. Electronic applications of the Smith chart

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, Phillip

    1995-01-01

    The legendary Smith chart inventor's classic reference book describes how the chart is used for designing lumped element and transmission line circuits. Provides tutorial material on transmission line theory and behavior, circuit representation on the chart, matching networks, network transformations and broadband matching. Includes a new chapter with examples designs and description of the winSMITH software accessory. Many computational instruments have succumbed to the power of the digital computer. This is not the case with the Smith Chart. A testament to Phil's genius is that his Smith Cha

  7. Language and cognitive development in deaf children: deaf children with deaf and deaf children with hearing parents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajda Pfifer

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The article reviews the current studies regarding language and cognitive development in children who are deaf. Deaf communicate orally and with sign language. 90 % of deaf children are born into hearing families and hearing parents in most cases do not know the sign language. Besides, hearing parents usually want for their child to become "normally" speaking. Most of the deaf children born into hearing families have very poor early communication. It is now well established that deaf children of deaf parents generally exhibit normal patterns of development in social, linguistic and cognitive domains relative to their hearing peers. One of the longest-running debates in the field of deaf education was whether introducing young deaf children to sign language impairs their ability and motivation for learning spoken language. Today we have no evidence supporting the hypothesis of a negative effect of sign language on development of spoken langugage.

  8. Cortical deafness in multiple sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Tabira, T; Tsuji, S; Nagashima, T.; Nakajima, T.; Kuroiwa, Y

    1981-01-01

    Cortical deafness in a patient with multiple sclerosis is reported. Complete recovery from total deafness was seen following stages of auditory agnosia and pure word deafness. The otological and neurophysiological studies suggested lesions in subcortical white matter. This report stresses the rarity of the condition, its subcortical origin and good prognosis.

  9. SKI*HI Home-Based Programming for Children Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing: Recent Research Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, Carol J.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Data relating to 2,768 children served by the SKI*HI model of early, home-based programming for children with hearing impairments revealed that SKI*HI children, on average, were identified by 18 months of age, had higher rates of language development during intervention than prior to intervention, and had greater language gains than expected based…

  10. Balancing between deaf and hearing worlds: reflections of mainstreamed college students on relationships and social interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kersting, S

    1997-01-01

    This qualitative study of the social aspects of mainstreaming from the perspective of deaf college students indicates that for some students, social adjustment to college is complicated by experiences of separation and alienation from both deaf and hearing peers. Data were collected through open-ended interviews with deaf students who had little or no previous experience with or exposure to deaf culture or language before their arrival at a mainstream college environment. Feelings of isolation, loneliness, and resentment were most intense during orientation and first year, when alienation from the deaf student community appeared to be caused by lack of sign language skills, unfamiliarity with norms and values of deaf culture, and perceived hostility from deaf peers. Simultaneous experiences of separation from hearing peers appeared to be caused by physical barriers inherent in the classroom, residence hall, and cafeteria environments, as well as by discrimination from hearing peers, who tended to stereotype deaf students. Findings suggest that those involved in the administration and delivery of postsecondary programs for the deaf should investigate the experiences of students who arrive on campus without knowledge of sign language or familiarity with deaf culture and evaluate currently existing programs and services designed to meet these students' needs.

  11. Meeting global deaf peers, visiting ideal deaf places: deaf ways of education leading to empowerment, an exploratory case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Clerck, Goedele A M

    2007-01-01

    In a flemish case study, deaf role models revealed a moment of awakening, indicated by the Flemish sign WAKE-UP Contact with deaf cultural rhetoric made them wake up, and deconstruct and reconstruct their lives, a process represented by a circle of deaf empowerment. Flemish deaf leaders mentioned acquiring this rhetoric during visits to deaf dream worlds (in Flemish Sign Language, WORLD DREAM): places with ideal conditions for deaf people. Such global deaf encounters (Breivik, Haualand, & Solvang, 2002) lead to the "insurrection of subjugated [deaf] knowledges" (Pease, 2002, p. 33). Whereas deaf education had never provided them with deaf cultural rhetoric and was depositing upon them oppressive societal conventions (Jankowski, 1997), a common sign language (Mottez, 1993) and global deaf experience (Breivik et al., 2002; Murray, in press) in barrier-free environments (Jankowski, 1997) provided deaf ways of deaf education (Erting, 1996; Reilly, 1995).

  12. Turgot en Smith; een paar apart

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoyng, A.C.

    2011-01-01

    Anne-Claire Hoyng deed onderzoek naar het boek The Wealth of Nations van Adam Smith (1723-1790). Ze concludeert dat Smith voor het schrijven van zijn boek een werk van de Fransman Anne-Robert Jacques Turgot (1727-1781) als inspiratiebron gebruikte (Réflexions sur la Formation et la distribution des

  13. The Treatment of Smith's Invisible Hand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wight, Jonathan B.

    2007-01-01

    Adam Smith used the metaphor of an invisible hand to represent the instincts of human nature that direct behavior. Moderated by self-control and guided by proper institutional incentives, actions grounded in instincts can be shown to generate a beneficial social order even if not intended. Smith's concept, however, has been diluted and distorted…

  14. 45 CFR 1308.11 - Eligibility criteria: Hearing impairment including deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... CHILDREN, YOUTH AND FAMILIES, HEAD START PROGRAM HEAD START PROGRAM PERFORMANCE STANDARDS ON SERVICES FOR CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES Health Services Performance Standards § 1308.11 Eligibility criteria: Hearing impairment including deafness. (a) A child is classified as deaf if a hearing impairment exists which is so...

  15. Diversity of deaf identities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bat-Chava, Y

    2000-12-01

    Social Identity Theory (Tajfel, 1981) posits that members of minority groups achieve positive social identity by (a) attempting to gain access to the mainstream through individual mobility or (b) working with other group members to bring about social change. Some people may use a combination of both strategies. Through the use of cluster analysis, the existence of three identities associated with these strategies was discerned in a sample of 267 deaf adults: culturally hearing identity, culturally deaf identity, and bicultural identity, each comprising about a third of the sample. A subset of 56 people were interviewed in depth; excerpts are presented to illustrate the identity types. Qualified support was found for the prediction that people with culturally deaf and bicultural identities would have higher self-esteem.

  16. The Incorporation of Deaf American Culture and History in Secondary Education Classrooms

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, James B

    2013-01-01

    Bilingual-Bicultural Education (Bi-Bi) has a positive impact on language development and social-psychological development of Deaf children (Baker, 2011; Scott, 2010; Humphries & Humphries, 2010). This development is predicated on the child’s access to American Sign Language (ASL); however, the role of Deaf culture and history in Bi-Bi is not well-defined (Ladd, 2003). Children at Bi-Bi schools and programs often acquire cultural aspects through social interactions among their Deaf acquaintanc...

  17. Fort Smith, Arkansas Agrees to Upgrade Sewer System to Reduce Discharges of Raw Sewage into Local Waterways / City will also develop a program to help low income communities improve sewer infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    WASHINGTON - The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the U.S. Department of Justice and the state of Arkansas announced that the city of Fort Smith, Ark. will upgrade its sewer collection and treatment system over the next 12 years to reduce

  18. Building Energy Audit Report for Camp Smith, HI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chvala, William D.; De La Rosa, Marcus I.; Brown, Daryl R.; Dixon, Douglas R.

    2010-09-30

    A detailed energy assessment was performed by a team of engineers from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) under contract to the Department of Energy/Federal Energy Management program (FEMP). The effort used the Facility Energy Decision System (FEDS) model to determine how energy is consumed at Camp Smith, identify the most cost-effective energy retrofit measures, and calculate the potential energy and cost savings. This report documents the results of that assessment.

  19. Starry Campus: Reducing Light Pollution at Smith College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenon, Alexandria

    2017-01-01

    This is the start of a program to teach Smith College students about the dangers posed by light pollution and inspire them to help make Smith a better dark sky area. This will focus both on general astronomy education to catch their interest and speciic light pollution information as well. My advisor is creating an initiative for dark skies education and preservation on college campuses, with this as the pilot program. College students can help both on campus and off when they will be able to take what they learn to inform their decisions about lighting when they move out on their own. The ultimate goal is to convince Smith College to make the changes it needs to reduce its light pollution as well as to motivate its students to learn more about astronomy and light pollution. I am developing an education and outreach program using venues such as house teas, lectures, and meetings to teach other students, the staff, and faculty about the issue. I am also working with existing clubs and organizations on campus such as the Green Team, the landscape studies department, and the Center for the Environment, Ecological Design, and Sustainability. This will help to develop campus lighting standards. These lighting standards will be proposed to the college, as there are no current standards in place for lighting around campus.

  20. The horror of being deaf and in prison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCay, Vernon

    2010-01-01

    Being Deaf and in prison is a horror. The main fear of prison inmates, whether Deaf or hearing, is that they will be raped, killed, or subjected to other forms of violence. Such fears are based in reality. The recent overcrowding of jails and prisons has increased these problems significantly. A major reason for this situation is the blatant violation of the Americans With Disabilities Act by most jails and prisons in the United States. This includes the failure to provide interpreting services for necessary activities and facilities such as religious services, educational programs, vocational training, faith-based prisons, and mental health treatment for addiction. The author discusses other problems faced by inmates who are Deaf and offers suggestions for correcting injustices faced by those who are Deaf in American jails and prisons.

  1. Children of Deaf Adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bogaerde, B.; Baker, A.E.; Gertz, G.; Boudreault, P.

    2016-01-01

    The hearing children of Deaf parents grow up in two cultures with two languages. They are similar to other bilingual, bicultural children in many ways but are special also. They can be in conflict between two worlds and often carry an extra burden of responsibility in functioning as a bridge between

  2. Research on Deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Annals of the Deaf, 1997

    1997-01-01

    Lists doctoral dissertations that were completed during 1996 that relate to children and adults with hearing impairments, including the education of children who are deaf or hard of hearing, early intervention, hearing loss, teacher inservice training, cochlear implants, substance abuse, sign language, and socialization. (CR)

  3. Sampling the Deaf Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teller, Henry E.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Two graduate students in deaf education wore ear plugs for two months to simulate hearing loss, and recorded their experiences and feelings. Excerpts from their journals are presented, commenting on such daily activities as shopping at a mall, watching television, driving, babysitting, and attending a football game. (JDD)

  4. Genetics Home Reference: deafness and myopia syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Conditions Deafness and myopia syndrome Deafness and myopia syndrome Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable ... view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Deafness and myopia syndrome is a disorder that causes problems with ...

  5. Conceptual model for quality of life among adults with congenital or early deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushalnagar, Poorna; McKee, Michael; Smith, Scott R; Hopper, Melinda; Kavin, Denise; Atcherson, Samuel R

    2014-07-01

    A conceptual model of health-related quality of life (QoL) is needed to describe key themes that impact perceived QoL in adults with congenital or early deafness. To revise University of Washington Center for Disability Policy and Research's conceptual model of health promotion and QoL, with suggestions for applying the model to improving programs or services that target deaf adults with early deafness. Purposive and theoretical sampling of 35 adults who were born or became deaf early was planned in a 1-year study. In-depth semi-structured interviews probed deaf adult participants' perceptions about quality of life as a deaf individual. Data saturation was reached at the 17th interview with 2 additional interviews for validation, resulting in a total sample of 19 deaf adults. Coding and thematic analysis were conducted to develop the conceptual model. Our conceptual model delineates the relationships between health status (self-acceptance, coping with limitations), intrinsic (functional communication skills, navigating barriers/self-advocacy, resilience) and extrinsic (acceptance by others, access to information, educating others) factors in their influence on deaf adult quality of life outcomes at home, college, work, and in the community. Findings demonstrate the need for the programs and services to consider not only factors intrinsic to the deaf individual but also extrinsic factors in enhancing perceived quality of life outcomes among people with a range of functional hearing and language preferences, including American Sign Language. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Conceptual Model for Quality of Life among Adults With Congenital or Early Deafness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushalnagar, P; McKee, M; Smith, SR; Hopper, M; Kavin, D; Atcherson, SR

    2015-01-01

    Background A conceptual model of health-related quality of life (QoL) is needed to describe key themes that impact perceived QoL in adults with congenital or early deafness. Objective: To revise University of Washington Center for Disability Policy and Research's conceptual model of health promotion and QoL, with suggestions for applying the model to improving programs or services that target deaf adults with early deafness. Methods Purposive and theoretical sampling of 35 adults who were born or became deaf early was planned in a 1-year study. In-depth semi-structured interviews probed deaf adult participants' perceptions about quality of life as a deaf individual. Data saturation was reached at the 17th interview with 2 additional interviews for validation, resulting in a total sample of 19 deaf adults. Coding and thematic analysis were conducted to develop the conceptual model. Results Our conceptual model delineates the relationships between health status (self-acceptance, coping with limitations), intrinsic (functional communication skills, navigating barriers/self-advocacy, resilience) and extrinsic (acceptance by others, access to information, educating others) factors in their influence on deaf adult quality of life outcomes at home, college, work, and in the community. Conclusions Findings demonstrate the need for the programs and services to consider not only factors intrinsic to the deaf individual but also extrinsic factors in enhancing perceived quality of life outcomes among people with a range of functional hearing and language preferences, including American Sign Language. PMID:24947577

  7. Neal Smith monthly activities reports FY 2001

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — These monthly reports detail activities on Neal Smith National Wildlife Refuge in Prairie City, Iowa during the 2001 fiscal year. Included in the document are...

  8. Neal Smith monthly activities reports FY 2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — These monthly reports detail activities on Neal Smith National Wildlife Refuge in Prairie City, Iowa during the 2008 fiscal year. Included in the document are...

  9. Neal Smith monthly activities reports FY 2007

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — These monthly reports detail activities on Neal Smith National Wildlife Refuge in Prairie City, Iowa during the 2007 fiscal year. Included in the document are...

  10. Neal Smith monthly activities reports FY 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — These monthly reports detail activities on Neal Smith National Wildlife Refuge in Prairie City, Iowa during the 2004 fiscal year. Included in the document are...

  11. Neal Smith monthly activities reports FY 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — These monthly reports detail activities on Neal Smith National Wildlife Refuge in Prairie City, Iowa during the 2010 fiscal year. Included in the document are...

  12. Neal Smith monthly activities reports FY 2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — These monthly reports detail activities on Neal Smith National Wildlife Refuge in Prairie City, Iowa during the 2003 fiscal year. Included in the document are...

  13. Neal Smith monthly activities reports FY 2002

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — These monthly reports detail activities on Neal Smith National Wildlife Refuge in Prairie City, Iowa during the 2002 fiscal year. Included in the document are...

  14. Neal Smith monthly activities reports FY 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — These monthly reports detail activities on Neal Smith National Wildlife Refuge in Prairie City, Iowa during the 2005 fiscal year. Included in the document are...

  15. Neal Smith monthly activities reports FY 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — These monthly reports detail activities on Neal Smith National Wildlife Refuge in Prairie City, Iowa during the 2006 fiscal year. Included in the document are...

  16. Neal Smith monthly activities reports FY 2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — These monthly reports detail activities on Neal Smith National Wildlife Refuge in Prairie City, Iowa during the 2009 fiscal year. Included in the document are...

  17. Marshall-Smith syndrome: case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Yong; Lee, Shi Kyung; Cho, In Chul; Han, Chun Hwan [Kangnam General Hosital Public Corporation, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-12-01

    Marshall-Smith syndrome is a rare disease, with about 29 cases reported to date. It is characterized by accelerated bony growth and maturation, phalangeal abnormalities (wide middle and narrow distal phalanges), unusual facial features (prominent eyes, bluish sclerae, coarse eyebrows, an upturned nose, hypoplastic facial bones, and shallow orbits), failure to thrive, respiratory difficulties, and psychomotor retardation. This report of the radiologic findings of Marshall-Smith syndrome is, as for as we know, the first to be published in Korea.

  18. Deafness and Diversity: Early Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Rebecca L; Ammerman, Sarah B; Trautwein, Blane A

    2015-01-01

    earlier identification has increased the number of infants identified with hearing loss. A significant and growing proportion of children who are D/deaf or hard of hearing have a disability (DWD). Literature related to infants and toddlers who are DWD is scarce because of the heterogeneity of the population and because many disabilities may go undiagnosed until a child is older. Service availability, professional preparation, and use of evidence-based practices must improve to best meet the needs of these children and their families. An examination of theory, research, and practice in early intervention for children who are DWD revealed a lack of qualified professionals and a need for targeted instruction in teacher preparation programs and for technological advances paired with treatment (e.g., telepractice). Increased transdisciplinary collaboration and technology utilization in teacher preparation hold promise as ways of improving service provision to young children who are DWD.

  19. Preparing future teachers and doctoral-level leaders in deaf education: meeting the challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Jean F; Covell, John A

    The deaf education profession faces a critical juncture. First, the 2006 leadership crisis that swept deaf education's flagship institution--Gallaudet University--will propel professionals to think deeply about promoting diversity, equity, and access in deaf education teacher and leadership preparation programs. Second, personnel shortages require attention: Teacher and leadership voids in university and K-12 programs loom if training efforts are not increased. Teaching and leadership needs center on three challenges: (a) understanding the changing demographic composition of the student, teacher, and leadership populations; (b) developing an evolving curriculum founded on research-based practices; (c) continuing to enlarge the knowledge base through applied research in the social sciences. Two case studies examine teacher training and leadership programs at universities that address these challenges. The importance of workplace deaf-hearing bicultural teams is examined. Implications for the preparation of teacher and leadership personnel in deaf education are discussed.

  20. Engaging the d/Deaf Audience in Museums: A Case Study at the Calouste Gulbenkian Museum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Patrícia Roque

    2016-01-01

    This article addresses ways that museums can strengthen programming for d/Deaf audiences. Through the development and study of a tour for a d/Deaf audience conducted through signing and oral translation at the Calouste Gulbenkian Museum in Lisbon (Portugal), the author examines issues of language, identity and inclusion. She argues that the use of…

  1. Assessment of Sign Language Development: The Case of Deaf Children in the Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermans, Daan; Knoors, Harry; Verhoeven, Ludo

    2010-01-01

    In this article, we will describe the development of an assessment instrument for Sign Language of the Netherlands (SLN) for deaf children in bilingual education programs. The assessment instrument consists of nine computerized tests in which the receptive and expressive language skills of deaf children at different linguistic levels (phonology,…

  2. Measuring Progress in Deaf-Blind Children: Use of the "Azusa Scale".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stillman, Robert D.

    Evaluated was the use of the Azusa developmental scale with 16 deaf blind children in a completed study and 124 deaf blind children in an ongoing study to determine the scale's usefulness for objective evaluation of behavior change, instructional planning, and program evaluation. The children in the first study were rated on the performance…

  3. Creating and Testing a Deaf-Friendly, Stop-Smoking Web Site Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Elaine G.; Goldsmith, Melissa; Effken, Judith; Button, Kevin; Crago, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Deaf adults' access to smoking cessation programs is limited due to cultural, linguistic, and geographic barriers. Web-based stop-smoking interventions have demonstrated cessation rates comparable to other interventions. The Internet is widely used by Deaf adults, but difficulties with online English text remain. We found no published accounts of…

  4. Substance Abuse: A Hidden Problem within the D/deaf and Hard of Hearing Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guthmann, Debra; Graham, Vicki

    2004-01-01

    Current research indicates that D/deaf and hard of hearing clients seeking treatment for substance abuse often encounter obstacles in receiving the help they need. Many of these obstacles are the result of a lack of knowledge and experience with regard to treating D/deaf and hard of hearing people. Programs designed for hearing people that attempt…

  5. Deaf-Blind Child Counts: Issues and Challenges. inForum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Eve

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe some of the ways deaf-blind projects collect National Technical Assistance Consortium for Children and Youth with Deaf-Blindness (NTAC) census data, compare Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP) Child Count and NTAC census data for the ten states included in this study and identify issues and concerns…

  6. THE STRUCTURE OF MOBILITY AND SKILLS AMONG DEAF CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Husnija HASANBEGOVIĆ

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available A research of mobility and skills among deaf children (from 7 to 17 years old is presented in this work. The sample of examinees (N=98 is consisted of two subsamples. The first subsample is consisted of deaf children (primary-school and secondary-school level, who have been included in the educative and rehabilitative treatment in the special school (N=29 and the second subsample is consisted of hearing children (primary-school and secondary-school level, who have been chosen by random choice (N=69. For the purpose of the research, a measure instrument named “Test for evaluation of the anthropologic features (extremity movement of mobility and skills“, (TAMV, has been constructed. The aim of the research is to establish mobility and skills of deaf children. In order to test the hypothesis that there are statistically significant differencesamong deaf and hearing children (primary-school and secondary-school level in mobility and skills, discriminative analysis has been applied. The results showed that deaf examinees have been much weaker compared to hearing examinees in mobility and skills and that these differences were statistically significant when applied on the system of variables. The results enriched the knowledge about mobility and skills of deaf children, which can encourage more programs of motor mobility and skills improvement to be constructed.

  7. Some Functions and Uses of Literacy in the Deaf Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, Madeline

    1985-01-01

    Analyzes the ways writing is used among the deaf and between deaf and hearing communicators by four groups; deaf adults who sign, families in which parents are hearing and at least one child is deaf, families in which parents are deaf and children are hearing or deaf, and deaf and hearing schoolteachers. (SED)

  8. Transient evoked otoacoustic emissions testing for screening of sensorineural deafness in puppies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBrearty, A; Penderis, J

    2011-01-01

    Transient evoked otoacoustic emissions (TEOAE) are widely used for human neonatal deafness screening, but have not been reported for clinical use in dogs. To investigate the feasibility of TEOAE testing in conscious puppies and the ability of TEOAE testing to correctly identify deaf and hearing ears, as defined by brainstem auditory evoked response (BAER). Forty puppies from 10 litters. Prospective study on puppies presented for hearing assessment as part of a congenital deafness BAER screening program. Hearing status was determined using BAER. TEOAE testing was performed after the BAER assessment and the results of the TEOAE testing were compared with the hearing status for each ear. Parameters were tested for normality using the D'Agostino Pearson test and comparisons between the deaf and hearing ears were made using Mann-Whitney tests. TEOAE testing was readily performed in puppies presented for congenital deafness screening. Using analysis parameters based on those used in human neonatal hearing screening, TEOAE testing correctly identified all deaf ears, as defined by BAER testing, with a sensitivity of 100% (95% CI: 56-100%) for diagnosing deafness and specificity of 78% (95% CI: 66-87%). TEOAE testing is an effective screening modality for identifying congenital sensorineural deafness in dogs. In light of the simpler and less expensive equipment, TEOAE testing has the potential to improve access to hearing screening and through this reduce the prevalence of congenital deafness in the dog. Copyright © 2011 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  9. A Sign Language Screen Reader for Deaf

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Ghoul, Oussama; Jemni, Mohamed

    Screen reader technology has appeared first to allow blind and people with reading difficulties to use computer and to access to the digital information. Until now, this technology is exploited mainly to help blind community. During our work with deaf people, we noticed that a screen reader can facilitate the manipulation of computers and the reading of textual information. In this paper, we propose a novel screen reader dedicated to deaf. The output of the reader is a visual translation of the text to sign language. The screen reader is composed by two essential modules: the first one is designed to capture the activities of users (mouse and keyboard events). For this purpose, we adopted Microsoft MSAA application programming interfaces. The second module, which is in classical screen readers a text to speech engine (TTS), is replaced by a novel text to sign (TTSign) engine. This module converts text into sign language animation based on avatar technology.

  10. 76 FR 26641 - Relay Services for Deaf-Blind Individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-09

    ... possible. 13. Loan Versus Ownership. While the Commission strongly recommends that certified programs lend... from deaf-blind consumers, advocacy groups, and leaders. The Commission encourages certified programs.... Federal Communications Commission. Bulah P. Wheeler, Deputy Manager. For the reasons discussed in the...

  11. Perceived Stress among Deaf Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Elaine G.; Ouellette, Sue E.; Kang, Youngmi

    2006-01-01

    The Present Article describes the effectiveness of stress management classes in decreasing perceived stress among Deaf adults. Deaf adults may experience unique stressors, in addition to circumstances associated with increased stress in the general population. The Perceived Stress Scale (S. Cohen, Kamarck, & Mermelstein, 1983) was used as a…

  12. Identity development in deaf adolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kunnen, E. Saskia

    2014-01-01

    We studied identity development during 5 years in 11 deaf adolescents who attend a school for deaf children in the highest level of regular secondary education (age between 14 and 19 years). Identity development is conceptualized by the processes of exploration and commitment formation, as

  13. Anger communication in deaf children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rieffe, C.J.; Meerum Terwogt, M.

    2006-01-01

    In this study, we investigated how deaf children express their anger towards peers and with what intentions. Eleven-year-old deaf children (n = 21) and a hearing control group (n = 36) were offered four vignettes describing anger-evoking conflict situations with peers. Children were asked how they

  14. Social Connectedness of Deaf Retirees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Sherry; Roberson, Len

    2013-01-01

    The intergenerational connectedness that has traditionally bound members of the Deaf community to each other is changing amidst the current technological and cultural landscape. This study explores perceptions of Deaf retirees concerning their usefulness to younger generations and their need to stay connected to each other despite increasing…

  15. Are Deaf Students Visual Learners?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marschark, Marc; Morrison, Carolyn; Lukomski, Jennifer; Borgna, Georgianna; Convertino, Carol

    2013-01-01

    It is frequently assumed that by virtue of their hearing losses, deaf students are visual learners. Deaf individuals have some visual-spatial advantages relative to hearing individuals, but most have been linked to use of sign language rather than auditory deprivation. How such cognitive differences might affect academic performance has been…

  16. Evaluative expression in deaf children's written narratives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beijsterveldt, E.M. van; Hell, J.G. van

    2009-01-01

    Background: Deaf children vary in the use of and proficiency in signed language. The majority of studies on writing skills of children who are deaf did not assess deaf children's proficiency in signed language and/or grouped together deaf children with varying sign language skills. Aims: Adopting a

  17. Evaluative Expression in Deaf Children's Written Narratives

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Beijsterveldt, Liesbeth Maria; van Hell, Janet G.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Deaf children vary in the use of and proficiency in signed language. The majority of studies on writing skills of children who are deaf did not assess deaf children's proficiency in signed language and/or grouped together deaf children with varying sign language skills. Aims: Adopting a bimodal bilingual perspective, we examined…

  18. Are Deaf Students Visual Learners?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marschark, Marc; Morrison, Carolyn; Lukomski, Jennifer; Borgna, Georgianna; Convertino, Carol

    2013-01-01

    It is frequently assumed that by virtue of their hearing losses, deaf students are visual learners. Deaf individuals have some visual-spatial advantages relative to hearing individuals, but most have been are linked to use of sign language rather than auditory deprivation. How such cognitive differences might affect academic performance has been investigated only rarely. This study examined relations among deaf college students’ language and visual-spatial abilities, mathematics problem solving, and hearing thresholds. Results extended some previous findings and clarified others. Contrary to what might be expected, hearing students exhibited visual-spatial skills equal to or better than deaf students. Scores on a Spatial Relations task were associated with better mathematics problem solving. Relations among the several variables, however, suggested that deaf students are no more likely to be visual learners than hearing students and that their visual-spatial skill may be related more to their hearing than to sign language skills. PMID:23750095

  19. Adam Smith, Market and Social Change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouchet, Dominique

    2017-01-01

    Adam Smith (1723-1790) provided us with a remarkable synthesis of the economic and political ideas of his time and developed a conceptual system to analyse social interactions that mattered for the wealth of nations. He proposed a radically different roadmap for the future development of the soci...... the powerful insights imbued in the original ideas. Putting those back into context, looking into how Smith proceeded then, trying to update his observations, might help us to be more attentive to the market changes and social challenges of our times.......Adam Smith (1723-1790) provided us with a remarkable synthesis of the economic and political ideas of his time and developed a conceptual system to analyse social interactions that mattered for the wealth of nations. He proposed a radically different roadmap for the future development...

  20. Seidel-Smith cohomology for tangles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rezazadegan, Reza

    2009-01-01

    We generalize the “symplectic Khovanov cohomology” of Seidel and Smith (Duke Math J 134(3):453–514, 2006) to tangles using the notion of symplectic valued topological field theory introduced by Wehrheim and Woodward (arXiv:0905.1368).......We generalize the “symplectic Khovanov cohomology” of Seidel and Smith (Duke Math J 134(3):453–514, 2006) to tangles using the notion of symplectic valued topological field theory introduced by Wehrheim and Woodward (arXiv:0905.1368)....

  1. Adam Smith on Capital and Income

    OpenAIRE

    Ormazabal Sánchez, Kepa Mirena

    2002-01-01

    In this paper I critically analyze Smith's thesis in book I, chapter 6 of the "Wealth of Nations" that the replacement of the capital goods consumed in production becomes fully income. I argue that Smith’s argument is defective and does not imply this, and that, once it is properly corrected, it implies that the full value of commodities does not become income; in other words: that GNP is not equal to aggregate income. On this basis, I proceed to analyze Smith's definitions of gross and net i...

  2. Fostering Positive Deaf Identity Development in a K-2 Deaf Classroom /

    OpenAIRE

    Hipskind, Courtney

    2014-01-01

    All Deaf children deserve to have opportunities to openly explore, examine, and affirm their own Deaf identities at school, yet there is a shortage of curricula and resources dedicated to this basic need. The aim of this thesis is to provide Deaf children with such opportunities. The curriculum within- Fostering Deaf Identity Development in a K-2 Deaf Classroom- consists of two units that address positive Deaf identity formation. The first unit focuses on the characterization and affirmation ...

  3. Early Interactions with Children Who Are Deaf-Blind

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Topics About Deaf-Blindness > What is Deaf-Blindness Definitions of Deaf-Blindness Causes of Deaf-Blindness National Child Count & Demographics Communication > Communication Overview Early Communication Prelinguistic Communication Object Communication ...

  4. A Video Technology Program Containing a Complete System of Tactile Communications for Individuals Who Are Deaf-Blind. A Tactile Signing Project: Tactile Interactive Signing and Primitive Signaling (Project TIPS). A Final Narrative Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utah State Univ., Logan. Dept. of Communicative Disorders.

    This report describes the development of two sets of videotapes on early tactile signaling and on interactive signing systems to be used with individuals who are deaf-blind. A tactile signal is defined as a touch cue, tactile gesture, and/or action cue, and these motions help to promote communication for the child who is deaf-blind. The process of…

  5. Deaf and hard of hearing students' perspectives on bullying and school climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Mary T; Day, Stefanie J; Galvan, Dennis

    2013-01-01

    Student perspectives reflect school climate. The study examined perspectives among deaf and hard of hearing students in residential and large day schools regarding bullying, and compared these perspectives with those of a national database of hearing students. The participants were 812 deaf and hard of hearing students in 11 U.S. schools. Data were derived from the Olweus Bullying Questionnaire (Olweus, 2007b), a standardized self-reported survey with multiple-choice questions focusing on different aspects of bullying problems. Significant bullying problems were found in deaf school programs. It appears that deaf and hard of hearing students experience bullying at rates 2-3 times higher than those reported by hearing students. Deaf and hard of hearing students reported that school personnel intervened less often when bullying occurred than was reported in the hearing sample. Results indicate the need for school climate improvement for all students, regardless of hearing status.

  6. Adam Smith, Market and Social Change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouchet, Dominique

    2017-01-01

    Adam Smith (1723-1790) provided us with a remarkable synthesis of the economic and political ideas of his time and developed a conceptual system to analyse social interactions that mattered for the wealth of nations. He proposed a radically different roadmap for the future development of the soci......Adam Smith (1723-1790) provided us with a remarkable synthesis of the economic and political ideas of his time and developed a conceptual system to analyse social interactions that mattered for the wealth of nations. He proposed a radically different roadmap for the future development...... of the society he lived in. The fact that his original analyses were rooted in a given historical context and were founded on a well thought-through conceptual system should not be ignored. The galvanising effect of the dribs and drabs of Adam Smith ideas that have been bandied about are a long way from...... the powerful insights imbued in the original ideas. Putting those back into context, looking into how Smith proceeded then, trying to update his observations, might help us to be more attentive to the market changes and social challenges of our times....

  7. Cyril Stanley Smith's Translations of Metallurgical Classics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The contributions of Cyril Stanley Smith to the science of nonferrous metallurgy and his historic involvement in the de- velopment of the atom bomb are well known. He also was signal in the development of the scholarly field known as the history of technology. Not only did he publish a number of books and papers on the ...

  8. J Maynard Smith: From Engineering to Evolution

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    John Maynard Smith (1920-2004) was a very versatile evolutionary biologist who applied his mind to a number of vexatious conceptual questions in evolution, includ- ing whether the unit of selection is typically the individual or the group, the evolution- ary maintenance of sexual reproduction, the evolution of social ...

  9. Verlossing: van Pelagius tot Joseph Smith

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.F. van Wyk

    2010-07-01

      During this time Joseph Smith started to seek the true church and founded the Mormon Church. Although his theology differs quite strongly from the Methodist Church in which he grew up, the core of the way of salvation is the same: man has free will in choosing his salvation.

  10. CS Smith's Development of a Viewpoint

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 11; Issue 6. C. S. Smith's Development of a Viewpoint - Complex ideas and their Demonstration in the 2D Soap Froth. Denis Weaire. General Article Volume 11 Issue 6 June 2006 pp 31-41 ...

  11. John Smith - eesti kunstnik / Ants Juske

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Juske, Ants, 1956-2016

    2006-01-01

    Marko Mäetamme ja Kaido Ole kollektiivsest loomingust, mida esitatakse John Smithi autorinime all, mõnda ka salapärase J. Smithi nn. biograafiast. Illustratsiooniks J. Smith'i "Jumalate maailm I (fragment). Õli, lõuend, 2002. Erakogu

  12. (JE Smith, 1797) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) larvae

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith, 1797) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) annually cause enormous loss to the producers and their combat has become a worldwide challenge mainly due to several reports of pesticides resistance. Today, one of the best alternatives used in this combat is the application of natural insecticides such ...

  13. John Maynard Smith (1920-2004)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 10; Issue 11. John Maynard Smith (1920-2004). Featured Scientist Volume 10 Issue 11 November 2005 pp 110-110. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/010/11/0110-0110. Resonance – Journal ...

  14. Cyril Stanley Smith's Translations of Metallurgical Classics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 11; Issue 6. Cyril Stanley Smith's Translations of Metallurgical Classics. Martha Goodway. General Article Volume 11 Issue 6 June 2006 pp 63-66. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  15. Nuwe ontwikkelings in pluimveevoeding | Smith | South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Journal of Animal Science. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 17, No 4 (1987) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Nuwe ontwikkelings in pluimveevoeding. GA Smith, Karin de Beer ...

  16. John Maynard Smith (1920-2004)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 10; Issue 11. John Maynard Smith (1920-2004) - “One of the last Grand Evolutionary Theorists of the 20th Century”. Vidyanand Nanjundiah. General Article Volume 10 Issue 11 November 2005 pp 70-78 ...

  17. Rotavirus vaccine AVANT/GlaxoSmithKline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, T

    2001-07-01

    AVANT Immunotherapeutics (formerly Virus Research Institute) and GlaxoSmithKline are developing a live oral rotavirus vaccine with potential to elicit a broadly-protective immune response against the most prevalent strains of rotavirus. Following successful completion of a phase II clinical efficacy trial in June 1999, SmithKline Beecham (now GlaxoSmithKline) assumed responsibility for all subsequent clinical and other development activities [328635], [333677]. Following a licensing agreement, the vaccine was refined and renamed RIX-4414 [371713]. In May 2000, AVANT reported the results of a second-year surveillance extension of the phase II study. The results suggested that AVANT's two-dose oral rotavirus vaccine should be helpful in preventing rotavirus gastroenteritis (RGE) disease in young children for at least two years following administration [365202]. In March 2000, SmithKline Beecham reported that it had initiated phase I/II bridging studies in Europe and the company planned to start phase III safety and efficacy studies in 2001 after review with the health authorities [358963]. In October 2000, Dain Rauscher Wessels stated that an estimated market penetration of 30 to 40% suggested potential sales in excess of US $500 million pa. As a result, the analysts also estimated that incremental revenues to AVANT could be over US $50 million pa [411122].

  18. Attitudes toward the capabilities of deaf and hard of hearing adults: insights from the parents of deaf and hard of hearing children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowe, Kathryn; McLeod, Sharynne; McKinnon, David H; Ching, Teresa Y C

    2015-01-01

    Children who are d/Deaf and hard of hearing (DHH) grow up in environments influenced by their parents' attitudes, which may facilitate or impede these children's development and participation (World Health Organization, 2007). The attitudes of 152 Australian parents of DHH children ages 3 years 7 months to 9 years 5 months (M = 6 years 5 months) were investigated with the Opinions About Deaf People Scale (Berkay, Gardner, & Smith, 1995a). The parents' responses showed very positive attitudes toward the capabilities of DHH adults, particularly on items describing their intellectual and vocational capabilities. Parents' responses to most of the items on the scale were positively skewed, raising questions about its validity as a research tool when used with parents of DHH children. The study findings suggest that for these children, parents' attitudes may facilitate rather than present an environmental barrier to their development.

  19. HSP and deafness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donkervoort, Sandra; Bharucha-Goebel, Diana; Yun, Pomi; Hu, Ying; Mohassel, Payam; Hoke, Ahmet; Zein, Wadih M.; Ezzo, Daniel; Atherton, Andrea M.; Modrcin, Ann C.; Dasouki, Majed; Foley, A. Reghan

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To identify the underlying genetic cause in 2 sisters affected with progressive lower extremity spasticity, neuropathy, and early-onset deafness. Methods: Whole-exome sequencing was performed, and segregation testing of variants was investigated using targeted Sanger sequencing. An inherited paternal mosaic mutation was further evaluated through quantitative analysis of the ratio of mutant vs wild-type allele in genomic DNA from various tissues, including blood, dermal fibroblasts, and saliva. Results: A novel heterozygous nonsense mutation (c.1140C>A; p.Y380X) in SOX10 was identified in the affected sisters. Paternal mosaicism was suspected based on a small chromatogram peak, which was less than the heterozygous peak of the mutated allele. Consistent with mosaicism, the mosaic paternal samples had notable variability in the ratio of mutant vs wild-type allele in various tissues (compared with the fully heterozygous daughter), with the highest paternal mutant levels in saliva (32.7%) and lowest in dermal fibroblasts (13.9%). Targeted clinical re-examination of the father revealed a sensorimotor neuropathy that was previously clinically unrecognized. Conclusions: These findings expand the phenotypic spectrum of SOX10-related neurocristopathy. Mutations in SOX10 should be considered in patients presenting with a complicated form of hereditary spastic paraplegia that includes neuropathy and deafness. Diagnostic workup may be complicated, as SOX10 mutations can present in a mosaic state, with a mild clinical manifestation. PMID:28534044

  20. Deaf not Daft: The Deaf in Mental Subnormality Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Chris

    1982-01-01

    Case studies of deaf or hearing impaired persons in institutions for the mentally retarded illustrate the ways in which the "invisible handicap" can mask cognitive ability, causing unnecessary institutionalization. (CL)

  1. Touch the sky with your hands: a special Planetarium for blind, deaf, and motor disabled

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Beatriz; Maya, Javier; Mancilla, Alexis; Álvarez, Silvina Pérez; Videla, Mariela; Yelós, Diana; Cancio, Angel

    2015-03-01

    The Planetarium for the blind, deaf, and motor disabled is part of the program on Astronomy and Inclusion of the Argentina Pierre Auger Foundation (FOPAA) and the Institute in Technologies and Detection of Astroparticles-Mendoza (ITeDAM).

  2. Alabama Institute for Deaf and Blind Biodiesel Project Green

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edmiston, Jessica L

    2012-09-28

    Through extensive collaboration, Alabama Institute for Deaf and Blind (AIDB) is Alabama's first educational entity to initiate a biodiesel public education, student training and production program, Project Green. With state and national replication potential, Project Green benefits local businesses and city infrastructures within a 120-mile radius; provides alternative education to Alabama school systems and to schools for the deaf and blind in Appalachian States; trains students with sensory and/or multiple disabilities in the acquisition and production of biodiesel; and educates the external public on alternative fuels benefits.

  3. Treatment of Deaf Clients: Ethical Considerations for Professionals in Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boness, Cassandra L.

    2016-01-01

    Providing therapy to deaf clients raises important ethical considerations for psychologists related to competence; multiple relationships and boundary issues; confidentiality; assessment, diagnosis, and evaluation; and communication and using interpreters. In evaluating and addressing these, psychologists must consider the APA’s Ethics Code and other relevant issues (e.g., ADA) necessary to provide ethical treatment. The current article provides background, ethical considerations, principles and standards relevant to the treatment of deaf clients, and recommendations to support psychologists, training programs, and the field. Psychologists have the responsibility to guarantee that the benefits of mental health treatment are fairly and justly provided to this traditionally underserved population. PMID:27917030

  4. Field guide to research at Neal Smith National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document contains a summary of research conducted at Neal Smith National Wildlife Refuge. Research at Neal Smith has resulted in the publication of over 60...

  5. Two Languages, One Goal: Literacy Learning in Deaf Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Charlotte

    1998-01-01

    A study involving three elementary students attending a bilingual-bicultural program for students with deafness found that successful strategies, such as using American Sign Language as the language of instruction, balancing direct and indirect teaching, making translation conceptual rather than literal, and using multimodal information,…

  6. Trained Aides as Baby Sitters of Deaf-Blind Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southwestern Region Deaf-Blind Center, Sacramento, CA.

    The document contains the coordinator's guide, recruitment guide, practicum guide, training model, curriculum guide, bibliography, and evaluation guide for TABS, (Trained Aides as Baby Sitters), a training program that prepares individuals to be competent sitters for deaf-blind children and that provides a curriculum tailored to the needs of the…

  7. Minicourses for Deaf Students in the Intermediate Grades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Peter E.; Shepard, Charlotte H.

    1977-01-01

    A minicourse program with students from grades four through eight at the Oregon State School for the Deaf has been rewarding for teachers and students by serving to develop skills in immediate practical areas of the student's experience as well as in developing recreational skills and interests in such activities as chess, mime, and karate, and…

  8. Acceptability judgments still matter: Deafness and documentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Matthew L; Mayberry, Rachel I; Ferreira, Victor S

    2017-01-01

    The target article's call to end reliance on acceptability judgments is premature. First, it restricts syntactic inquiry to cases were a semantically equivalent alternative is available. Second, priming studies require groups of participants who are linguistically homogenous and whose grammar is known to the researcher. These requirements would eliminate two major research areas: syntactic competence in d/Deaf individuals, and language documentation. (We follow the convention of using deaf to describe hearing levels, Deaf to describe cultural identity, and d/Deaf to include both. Our own work has focused on Deaf signers, but the same concerns could apply to other deaf populations.).

  9. Directory of Services for the Multiply Handicapped Deaf and/or Hearing Impaired. Resources for the Rubella Deaf Child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallaudet Coll., Washington, DC.

    The directory contains information on centers, facilities, and schools which provide some services or programs suitable to the needs of the deaf or hearing impaired who have additonal handicaps (adults as well as children). A brief description of the facility, the clients served, and the services offered accompanies the listing of each facility's…

  10. Dialogue of Differences: The Writing of Henry Holmes Smith.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossen, Howard

    In addition to surveying the writings of Henry Holmes Smith, this paper explains his importance as a theoretician and practitioner of photography. After a discussion of Smith's ideas on "reading photographs" and his concerns with the ethics of photography, particularly of photojournalism, the essays in the book, "Henry Holmes Smith:…

  11. Hearing, Deaf, and Hard-of-Hearing Israeli Adolescents' Evaluations of Deaf Men and Deaf Women's Occupational Competence

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Amatzia Weisel; Rachel Gali Cinamon

    2005-01-01

    This study examined 74 deaf and hard-of-hearing (D/HH) and 91 hearing high school students regarding their own occupational aspirations and their evaluations of occupational competence (EOCs) for deaf adults...

  12. The Development and Validation of an Assessment Instrument for Use with the Deaf Blind: The Severely Handicapped Progress Inventory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlap, William C.

    1984-01-01

    This paper presents an assessment instrument developed for use with both deaf-blind children and adults. Designed to assist in individual program planning and to measure progress, the 199 item inventory is organized in six major categories with 19 subsections. It has been field tested using 271 deaf-blind persons. (Author/BS)

  13. Washington State Services for Children with Deaf-Blindness. Final Project Report, October 1, 1992-September 30, 1995.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fankhauser, Marcia

    This report describes activities and accomplishments of the Washington State Services for Children with Deaf-Blindness 3-year, federally supported program to provide technical assistance and training to families and service providers of approximately 140 children with deaf-blindness. Specific outcomes are listed for each of the project's 11…

  14. What We Should Teach Deaf Children: Deaf Teachers' Folk Models in Britain, the USA and Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton-Spence, Rachel; Ramsey, Claire

    2010-01-01

    Deaf teachers around the world have folk models and beliefs that reflect their understanding of what deaf children need to learn in order to develop healthy identities as deaf people. In this research we report what teachers from England, the USA and Mexico have told us about using creative signing with deaf children. Themes emerging from our data…

  15. Adam Smith et les passions musicales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Parmentier

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Dans sa Théorie des sentiments moraux (1759, Adam Smith classe les passions en trois catégories : passions sociales, asociales, égoïstes. Cette classification résulte directement de leur capacité à susciter ou non la sympathie. Les passions sociales apparaissent ainsi comme les plus propres à susciter un écho sympathique. La question à laquelle tente de répondre l'article est de savoir pourquoi ces mêmes passions sociales sont qualifiées par A. Smith de « naturellement musicales ». L'utilisation du concept de sympathie dans le domaine musical est fréquente aux XVIIème et XVIIIème siècles, mais l'hypothèse avancée ici est que le lien est plus profond chez A. Smith. La sympathie met en effet en évidence une qualité d'ordre à la fois esthétique et morale inhérente à certaines passions, leur « convenance » (propriety par opposition aux passions « discordantes ». Ces passions, produisant une superposition d'échos sympathiques comparables aux harmoniques d'un ton fondamental, sont les plus susceptibles d'être imitées par la musique, si l'on tient compte de la théorie esthétique originale formulée par A. Smith, pour qui la beauté des arts imitatifs ne tient pas à l'illusion mais au contraire à l'écart entre l'imitation et son objet.In his Theory of Moral Sentiments, Adam Smith distinguishes three types of passions: social passions, unsocial passions and selfish passions. This classification relies on their capacity to evoke sympathy. Social passions are the most apt to arouse a sympathetic echo in their observers. This article tries to answer the question why A. Smith describes social passions as « naturally musical ». In 17th and 18th centuries sympathy is often mentioned in connection with musical topics, but the link established by A. Smith is more profound. In fact, sympathy reveals an esthetic and moral quality of « convenient », vs « discordant », passions. These passions, that produce

  16. Graham Smith (1953–99): an appreciation

    OpenAIRE

    Kearns, Gerry (Director)

    1999-01-01

    Graham Smith died on 23 April. He was 46 years old, and had been suffering for some time with undetected carcinomas, only discovered during his brief spell in hospital preceding his death. At this time, his love and regrets were for his wife, Marilyn, his son, Alex, and other members of his family. His pride and content with his academic work were both evident and justified.

  17. Deaf Liberation Theology and Social Justice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah Lewis

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Deaf Liberation Theology is a branch of theology that has been developed over the past twenty years, with the book Deaf Liberation Theology published by Ashgate in 2007 (Lewis 2007 as a focal point of this development. This article briefly looks at the roots of Deaf Liberation Theology in both the concept of Deaf people as an oppressed linguistic minority and the principles of Liberation theology as an engaged contextual theology using the methodology of the hermeneutical circle. It then seeks to examine the impact of Deaf Liberation Theology in practice over the past decade, in particular the impact especially through increasing self-confidence and self-esteem so that deaf people themselves feel empowered to work for social justice. It will use personal reflections by a number of deaf individuals in the UK as source material, and look at how this experience and developments in Deaf studies might develop into the future to further develop social justice.

  18. Films about the deaf: the representations of deaf and sign languages

    OpenAIRE

    Carolina Hessel Silveira

    2009-01-01

    This paper analyzes two films about deafness which have not been investigated in the Brazilian academic context. They are Mandy (directed by Alexander Mackendrick, 1952, England) and After the Silence (by Fred Gerber, 1996, USA). The analysis is supported by Cultural Studies and Deaf Studies, especially on the concepts of cultural pedagogies, deaf culture, deaf identities, sign language, as well as on the analysis of other films about deaf people conducted by Thoma (2004). Both films are clas...

  19. Telehealth and the Deaf: A Comparison Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Jaime A. B.; Wells, M. Gawain

    2009-01-01

    Within the deaf population, an extreme mental health professional shortage exists that may be alleviated with videoconferencing technology--also known as telehealth. Moreover, much needed mental health education within the deaf population remains largely inaccessible. Researchers have warned that the deaf population may remain underserved if…

  20. Understanding Deaf Readers: An Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelstone, Aaron Weir

    2013-01-01

    The development of reading skills, beyond a functional level, is difficult for most deaf readers. Standardized testing demonstrates a median 4th grade reading level that remains consistent even after national norming of the Stanford Achievement test on the population of deaf school children. Deaf education continues to generate various educational…

  1. Deaf child sexual education and family leadership

    OpenAIRE

    García, Mirna Maura

    2010-01-01

    This paper is an approach to the study of the role of the family in sexual education of deaf children and adolescents. The difference between hearing and deaf families is taken into consideration. Likewise, hints that favor communication between deaf children and hearing parents are given.

  2. Deaf Parents and Their Hearing Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singleton, Jenny L.; Tittle, Matthew D.

    2000-01-01

    This literature review begins with a description of the deaf community, their language and culture; then describes communication patterns and parenting issues in deaf-parented families; examines the role of the hearing child in a deaf family and how that affects their functioning in the hearing world; and finally discusses considerations and…

  3. Deaf child sexual education and family leadership

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García, Mirna Maura

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper is an approach to the study of the role of the family in sexual education of deaf children and adolescents. The difference between hearing and deaf families is taken into consideration. Likewise, hints that favor communication between deaf children and hearing parents are given.

  4. Development of Deaf Identity: An Ethnographic Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIlroy, Guy; Storbeck, Claudine

    2011-01-01

    This ethnographic study explores the identity development of 9 deaf participants through the narratives of their educational experiences in either mainstream or special schools for the Deaf. This exploration goes beyond a binary conceptualization of deaf identity that allows for only the medical and social models and proposes a bicultural…

  5. Representations of Sound in American Deaf Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Russell S.

    2007-01-01

    Sound plays a prominent role in narrative description of characters and environs in mainstream American literature. A review of American Deaf literature shows that the representations of sound held for deaf writers are in extensional and oppositional terms. American deaf writers, in their descriptions of entities, characters, functions, and…

  6. No Dummies: Deafness, Baseball, and American Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, R. A. R.

    2012-01-01

    This article begins by examining the historical and social factors that led to 1901 being the "deafest" year in major league baseball history with four deaf players. In particular, the author discusses the career of William Ellsworth "Dummy" Hoy, a deaf man from Ohio who became the most celebrated deaf player in history and…

  7. Teaching deaf learners. Psychological and developmental foundations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knoors, H.E.T.; Marschark, M.

    2014-01-01

    Teaching Deaf Learners: Psychological and Developmental Foundations explores how deaf students (children and adolescents) learn and the conditions that support their reaching their full cognitive potential -- or not. Beginning with an introduction to teaching and learning of both deaf and hearing

  8. Family Therapy with Deaf Member Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloman, Leon; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Examines how family therapists can be more responsive to the unique needs and problems of deaf family members. Compares methods of training in communication for deaf children, addressing the conflicts that may accompany the adoption of a given method. Stresses the pivotal role of communication problems between hearing and deaf family members in…

  9. Pages from the Past: Causes of Deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, W. W.

    1997-01-01

    This reprint of an historical article from 1847 discusses the principal causes of congenital deafness, including constitutional tendency to deafness in the parents, mental impressions of the mother previous to the birth of her child, and intermarriage of near relations. Causes of accidental deafness are also discussed, including injuries from…

  10. Breast cancer knowledge and practices among D/deaf women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Barbara A; Jo, Angela; Cumberland, William G; Booth, Heidi; Britt, Jon; Stern, Carolyn; Zazove, Philip; Kaufman, Gary; Sadler, Georgia Robins; Bastani, Roshan

    2013-10-01

    Limited scientific evidence is available regarding D/deaf women's breast cancer knowledge and early detection practices, as well as about how to increase D/deaf women's breast cancer control practices. To assess baseline breast cancer knowledge and practices among a sample of D/deaf women recruited into a randomized controlled trial of a breast cancer education program developed for this population. A written and signed (American Sign Language) survey was administered to a racially/ethnically diverse sample of 209 D/deaf women, 40+ years old, with lower levels of education, recruited in California between October 2008 and May 2009. There were misconceptions about breast cancer risk factors, screening, and treatment; only 64.2% of respondents correctly identified the purpose of mammography. Mammography in the prior 2 years was reported by 57.3% of the sample, by 69.8% of White women, and by 43.5% of women from other racial/ethnic groups. Rates also varied by education, having seen a physician in the prior year, and type of insurance. This study underscores significant gaps in breast cancer screening knowledge and practices, communication issues in health care settings, and unmet needs for tailored health information and materials in this population. Challenges faced in conducting the research needed to develop and test such programs are noted. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Verlossing: van Pelagius tot Joseph Smith

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.F. van Wyk

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Salvation: from Pelagius to Joseph Smith Every Christian church believes that she is a true church and proclaims that man can be saved and has eternal life. This dogma of salvation is usually based on the Bible as the Word of God. Mormons claim that Joseph Smith, founder and first president of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, received a divine message to restore the church that Jesus had started.  In studying the plan of salvation the Mormons proclaim it is quite clear that that way of salvation was not restored in their church, but that it followed a pattern of false doctrine that was revealed time and again in history.  The core of their preaching of salvation is that man has the free will to choose his own salvation. Mormons are not the first to preach this message. This article will show that Pelagius oisty-kated the free will of man. In the Reformation the Anabaptists preached the same message, being a third movement next to the reformed and Roman Catholic believes. The Anabaptists became part of the churches of the Netherlands and at the Synod of Dordt the theology of the free will was rejected and answered.  The dogma of the free will of man did not end at this Synod: 150 years later John Wesley preached the same message of salvation during his and Whitefield’s campaigns at the dawn of the nineteenth century in the USA.  During this time Joseph Smith started to seek the true church and founded the Mormon Church. Although his theology differs quite strongly from the Methodist Church in which he grew up, the core of the way of salvation is the same: man has free will in choosing his salvation.

  12. ASL, Total Communication and Oralism: Identifying Shared Characteristics of School-Based Writing Intervention Programs for Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Students, K-6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Carolyn Mascia

    2009-01-01

    To be effective in providing a writing literacy program, regardless of communication approaches, educators should establish program-wide conditions that promote English writing literacy over time. The researcher's purpose for this study was to identify shared characteristics of writing intervention programs in three different communication school…

  13. Deafness and motor abilities level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Zwierzchowska

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The audition injury hinders some motor motions and the organised coordination at the higher level and may be a cause of disturbances and disorder in some motor abilities adoption. It was assumed that deafness including its aetiology and injury mechanism may significantly influence the motor development of human being. The study aimed in checking if the deafness, as a result of various unfavourable factors, determines the motor development of children and youngsters. Consequently the dependency between qualitative features i.e.: signed motor level and aetiology, audition injury mechanism and the deafness degree was examined. The mechanism and aetiology of hearing correlated with the motor abilities displayed statistically significant dependencies in few motor trials only. Revealed correlations regarded mostly the coordination trials excluding the flexibility one. Statistically significant dependencies between the audition diminution and the motor abilities level were not found.

  14. La pobreza en Smith y Ricardo

    OpenAIRE

    Pardo Beltrán, Edgar

    2008-01-01

    Este artículo compara los enfoques de Adam Smith y David Ricardo sobre la pobreza en una sociedad capitalista. La comparación se centra alrededor de los diferentes argumentos que ellos utilizan para relacionar la pobreza con la inequidad y las realidades institucionales. La discusión se contextualiza en las experiencias vividas de cada autor, así como en los intereses intelectuales de cada uno; teniendo en cuenta que la pobreza fue uno de los principales problemas que enfrentó Inglaterra entr...

  15. Deaf children learning to sign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jim Kyle

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available It used to be thought that deaf children had a language difficulty. Research we have carried out on deaf children in deaf families from the age of three months, indicates that deaf children learn sign language as effectively as hearing children learn to speak. In contrast, deaf children from hearing homes, even in signing programmes at school lag behind in the acquisition of sign language even up to the age of 11 years. Some initial intervention work has been carried out with families to introduce sign language earlier and several possible means of improving the language environment of deaf children are explored in this paper. Costumava-se pensar que as crianças surdas tinham dificuldade de linguagem. Uma pesquisa que realizamos com crianças surdas, de famílias surdas, a partir de 3 meses de idade, indica que crianças surdas aprendem a língua de sinais tão eficazmente quanto crianças ouvintes aprendem a falar. Em contraste, crianças surdas, de lares ouvintes, mesmo estando em programas para o aprendizado de sinais na escola, ficam atrás na aquisição da língua de sinais até a idade de 11 anos de idade. Alguns trabalhos iniciais de intervenção, que têm sido realizados com as famílias para introduzir a língua de sinais mais cedo, bem como vários meios possíveis de enriquecer o meio lingüístico de crianças surdas são explorados nesse artigo.

  16. Adam Smith and the Invisible Hand: From Metaphor to Myth

    OpenAIRE

    Gavin Kennedy

    2009-01-01

    Adam Smith and the ‘invisible hand’ are nearly synonymous in modern economic thinking. Adam Smith is strongly associated with the invisible hand, understood as a general rule that people in realising their self-interests unintentionally benefit the public good. The attribution to Smith is challengeable. Adam Smith’s use of the metaphor was much more modest; it was re-invented in the 1930s and 1940s onwards to bolster mathematical treatments of capitalism (Samuelson, Friedman) and to sup...

  17. Professional development for teachers of students who are deaf or hard of hearing: facing the assessment challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cawthon, Stephanie

    2009-01-01

    Teachers of students with low-incidence disabilities, such as students who are deaf or hard of hearing, face unique challenges in putting education policy into practice. The present article presents professional development findings from the Third Annual National Survey of Accommodations and Assessment for Students Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing (Cawthon, Hersh, Kim, & Online Research Lab, in press). A total of 391 participants described professional development they had experienced related to assessment of students who are deaf or hard of hearing. Teachers reported greater exposure to topics in school/district sessions and discussion with their colleagues than in their preparation programs. Teaching at a school for the deaf or teaching students in high school were significant predictors of an increased prevalence of professional development opportunities on assessment-related topics for students who are deaf or hard of hearing.

  18. Discrete mathematics in deaf education: a survey of teachers' knowledge and use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagliaro, Claudia M; Kritzer, Karen L

    The study documents what deaf education teachers know about discrete mathematics topics and determines if these topics are present in the mathematics curriculum. Survey data were collected from 290 mathematics teachers at center and public school programs serving a minimum of 120 students with hearing loss, grades K-8 or K-12, in the United States. Findings indicate that deaf education teachers are familiar with many discrete mathematics topics but do not include them in instruction because they consider the concepts too complicated for their students. Also, regardless of familiarity level, deaf education teachers are not familiar with discrete mathematics terminology; nor is their mathematics teaching structured to provide opportunities to apply the real-world-oriented activities used in discrete mathematics instruction. Findings emphasize the need for higher expectations of students with hearing loss, and for reform in mathematics curriculum and instruction within deaf education.

  19. Outcomes of cochlear implantation in deaf children of deaf parents: comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanzadeh, S

    2012-10-01

    This retrospective study compared the cochlear implantation outcomes of first- and second-generation deaf children. The study group consisted of seven deaf, cochlear-implanted children with deaf parents. An equal number of deaf children with normal-hearing parents were selected by matched sampling as a reference group. Participants were matched based on onset and severity of deafness, duration of deafness, age at cochlear implantation, duration of cochlear implantation, gender, and cochlear implant model. We used the Persian Auditory Perception Test for the Hearing Impaired, the Speech Intelligibility Rating scale, and the Sentence Imitation Test, in order to measure participants' speech perception, speech production and language development, respectively. Both groups of children showed auditory and speech development. However, the second-generation deaf children (i.e. deaf children of deaf parents) exceeded the cochlear implantation performance of the deaf children with hearing parents. This study confirms that second-generation deaf children exceed deaf children of hearing parents in terms of cochlear implantation performance. Encouraging deaf children to communicate in sign language from a very early age, before cochlear implantation, appears to improve their ability to learn spoken language after cochlear implantation.

  20. Deaf Community Mobilization in Uruguay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockwood, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    There are more than 50 million (or approximately 15%) persons with disabilities living in Latin America and the Caribbean: 80 percent live in impoverished conditions, lack employment, and encounter social exclusion. Deaf and hard of hearing persons are particularly impacted as they are frequently denied access to most sectors of society. This…

  1. Considerations on Deafness and Homosexuality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phaneuf, Jean

    1987-01-01

    The article reviews the literature and discusses emotions, attitudes, and general reactions toward homosexuality in deaf individuals. The "coming out" process is discussed, with related social, familial, and personal implications, as well as the role of professional counseling and intervention. (Author/DB)

  2. Deafness and Autistic Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernon, McCay; Rhodes, Anthony

    2009-01-01

    An orientation to autistic spectrum disorders (ASD), also known as autism, is provided, and the specific syndrome of autism and deafness is addressed. The two conditions have in common a major problem: communication. Case histories are provided, the development of treatment for autism is discussed, and the separate disorders that make up ASD are…

  3. Writing in Young Deaf Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Cheri; Mayer, Connie

    2015-01-01

    The authors conducted an integrative review of the research literature on the writing development, writing instruction, and writing assessment of young deaf children ages 3 to 8 years (or preschool through third grade) published between 1990 and 2012. A total of 17 studies were identified that met inclusion criteria. The analysis examined research…

  4. Interpreting Hymns for Deaf Worshippers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, Madeline M.; Boster, Shirley

    1982-01-01

    Discusses the special problems of interpreting hymns written in archaic English and then matching words of a translation to music. Addresses the question of whether competence in ASL and knowledge of signs for religious terms are sufficient for hymns to be of value to deaf worshippers. (EKN)

  5. The Consequence Deafness has on the Psychological and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Consequence Deafness has on the Psychological and Academic Development of deaf students. The case of Alpha special school for the deaf in Addis Ababa, Hermata and Mendera Junior School at Jimma Town.

  6. Evaluative expression in deaf children's written narratives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Beijsterveldt, Liesbeth Maria; van Hell, Janet G

    2009-01-01

    Deaf children vary in the use of and proficiency in signed language. The majority of studies on writing skills of children who are deaf did not assess deaf children's proficiency in signed language and/or grouped together deaf children with varying sign language skills. Adopting a bimodal bilingual perspective, we examined evaluative expression, an important narrative tool in both oral/written languages and signed languages, in narratives written in Dutch by deaf children who are proficient in Sign Language of the Netherlands (SLN) and deaf children who are low-proficient in SLN, and hearing monolingual and bilingual children. We hypothesized that deaf children who are proficient in signed language use their knowledge of evaluative expression in signed language to enrich their narratives in written Dutch, and more so than deaf children who are low-proficient in signed language and hearing monolingual and bilingual children. We examined the use of eight different evaluative devices in narratives written by deaf proficiently and low-proficiently signing children, and hearing monolingual and bilingual children. Narratives were also examined for morpho-syntactic errors and use of complex sentences. The results show that proficiently signing deaf children's narratives contain more evaluative devices that enrich the referential structure of the narrative than narratives of low-proficiently signing deaf children, and hearing bilingual and monolingual children. We propose that proficiently signing deaf children use their knowledge of SLN to convey evaluation in their written narratives, and thus have an advantage in enriching their narratives. This study also shows that in order to gain insight into deaf people's writing, it is important to take variations in sign language proficiency into account.

  7. Toward a theory of deaf ethnos: deafnicity -- D/deaf (Homaemon - Homoglosson - Homothreskon).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckert, Richard Clark

    2010-01-01

    Should ethnicity be used to interpret relations between the Deaf community and the hearing people? Recent scholarship questioning the merits of Deaf ethnicity suggests a need to reexamine the use of ethnicity when describing Deaf identity and culture. This article provides an overview of key contributions to race and ethnicity discourse in the 20th century, identifies epistemological and ontological errors to avoid, suggests adherence to the classical Greek concept of ethnos as an alternative to ethnie, and argues for the continuing significance of Deaf ethnicity. Specifically, I propose that Deaf ethnicity is a triadic relational nexus that approximates communities of origin, language, and religion. This is expressed as Deafnicity approximately D/deaf (Hómaemon * Homóglosson * Homóthreskon). Deafnicity offers a promising alternative for examining relations between Deaf and hearing communities, exploring variance between nationalized Deaf communities, and expanding our understanding of audism.

  8. Postural Control in Deaf Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir-Abbas Ebrahimi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This cross-sectional study aimed to determine the reliability of static control evaluation with Synapsys Posturography System (SPS, Marseille, France and to compare the static postural control of deaf children with typically developing children. This study was conducted in 2 phases on 81 children of 7 to 12 years old in Tehran schools. The first phase examined the reliability of static balance evaluation with SPS. In this phase, a total of 12 children with typical development were evaluated and then do a re-test 1 week later. In the second phase, 30 children with profound sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL and high risk in their balance (selected from Baghcheban Schools for the Deaf as the experimental group, and 37 children with typical development (selected randomly from 2 primary schools for girls and boys in District 12 of Tehran Department of Education as control group were enrolled in the study. They were all placed under sensory organization test evaluation. Based on the results of intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC, the unilateral random effects model, test-retest reliability in different sensory conditions, the moderate to excellent results were obtained (ICC between 0.68 and 0.94. Also, the mean displacement of pressure center in all sensory conditions, the limits of stability (LOS area, the overall balance scores, and scores for balance sensory ratio (except the somatosensory ratio of children with typical development were better than the deaf peers (P˂0.05. The SPS has acceptable reliability to evaluate static posture in children between the ages of 7 and 12 years. Furthermore, deaf children as compared to children with typical development had a lower static postural control in all sensory conditions. This finding confirms the need to examine the postural control for identifying the extent of sensory deficit that has caused poor balance function, and also the need for early intervention to address the balance deficit in deaf

  9. Suicide in deaf populations: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Oliver; Windfuhr, Kirsten; Kapur, Navneet

    2007-10-08

    Studies have found that deaf individuals have higher rates of psychiatric disorder than those who are hearing, while at the same time encountering difficulties in accessing mental health services. These factors might increase the risk of suicide. However, the burden of suicidal behaviour in deaf people is currently unknown. The aim of the present review was to provide a summary of literature on suicidal behaviour with specific reference to deaf individuals. The objectives of the review were to establish the incidence and prevalence of suicidal behaviour in deaf populations; describe risk factors for suicidal behaviour in deaf populations; describe approaches to intervention and suicide prevention that have been used in deaf populations. A number of electronic databases (e.g. Medline, PsycINFO, CINAHL, EMBASE, Dissertation Abstracts International, Web of Science, ComDisDome, ASSIA, Education Sage Full Text, Google Scholar, and the grey literature databases FADE and SIGLE) were explored using a combination of key words and medical subject headings as search terms. Reference lists of papers were also searched. The Science and Social Sciences Citation Index electronic databases were used to identify studies that had cited key papers. We also contacted experts and organisations with an interest in the field. Very few studies focussed specifically on suicide in deaf populations. Those studies that were included (n = 13) generally involved small and unrepresentative samples. There were limited data on the rate of suicidal behaviour in deaf people. One study reported evidence of hearing impairment in 0.2% of all suicide deaths. Another found that individuals with tinnitus seen in specialist clinics had an elevated rate of suicide compared to the general population. The rates of attempted suicide in deaf school and college students during the previous year ranged from 1.7% to 18%, with lifetime rates as high as 30%. Little evidence was found to suggest that risk factors for

  10. A Phenomenological Study of Online Learning for Deaf Students in Postsecondary Education: A Deaf Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooten, Patricia Michelle

    2014-01-01

    This qualitative phenomenological study investigated the effects of online learning for deaf college students as opposed to the mainstream classroom setting. This study specifically analyzed the writing and reading skills of deaf students in general and the development of English literacy of prelingually deaf students and those from non-English…

  11. The Church of Deaf Sociality: Deaf Churchgoing Practices and "Sign Bread and Butter" in Bangalore, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedner, Michele

    2014-01-01

    This article ethnographically analyzes the practices of deaf young adults in Bangalore, India. As sign language is not used by families, schools, or other institutions, the church is a crucial educational space. Churchgoing provides deaf young adults with opportunities to orient themselves toward other deaf young adults, to develop new ideas of…

  12. Toward ethical research practice with deaf participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singleton, Jenny L; Jones, Gabrielle; Hanumantha, Shilpa

    2014-07-01

    In recent years, scholars have been critical of what they consider unethical conduct by researchers whose studies focus on members of the Deaf or signing communities. This is the first empirical study that investigates ethical concerns and recommendations from the perspective of three stakeholder groups (Deaf research participants, researchers, and Deaf studies experts). We analyzed focus group discussions using strategies from grounded theory and community-based participatory research. The themes we identified highlight the need for the broader scientific research community to include linguistically and culturally sensitive research procedures that more adequately protect the rights of Deaf research participants, as well as other marginalized groups. We address the need to increase the number of Deaf scientists and reconsider collaboration practices between Deaf and hearing researchers. © The Author(s) 2014.

  13. Author! Author! The Gallant Children's Author: Dick King-Smith

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodie, Carolyn S.

    2005-01-01

    This column presents a brief biography of Dick King-Smith. Born on March 27, 1922 and raised in Gloucestershire, England, he grew up with animals of all kinds. King-Smith was a farmer for twenty years and then became a school teacher. He was also a soldier during wartime, a traveling salesman, shoe factory worker, and television presenter. He…

  14. Father Knows Best: Using Adam Smith to Teach Transactions Costs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupont, Brandon

    2014-01-01

    Adam Smith's moral philosophy can be used to introduce economics students to the important idea of transactions costs. The author provides a brief background in this article to Smith's moral philosophy and connects it to the costs of transacting in a way that fits easily into the standard principles of microeconomics classroom. By doing…

  15. Inattentional deafness under dynamic musical conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Koreimann, Sabrina; Strauß, Sabine; Vitouch, Oliver

    2009-01-01

    While inattentional blindness is a modern classic in attention and perception research, analogous phenomena of inattentional deafness are less well-known. In music, inattentional deafness has never been demonstrated under controlled experimental conditions, despite of indirect evidence for related effects. We tested inattentional deafness with real music in both musicians and non-musicians. Participants listened to the first 1’50” of Richard Strauss’ Thus Spake Zarathustra, with the experimen...

  16. Suicide in deaf populations: a literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Kapur Navneet; Windfuhr Kirsten; Turner Oliver

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Studies have found that deaf individuals have higher rates of psychiatric disorder than those who are hearing, while at the same time encountering difficulties in accessing mental health services. These factors might increase the risk of suicide. However, the burden of suicidal behaviour in deaf people is currently unknown. The aim of the present review was to provide a summary of literature on suicidal behaviour with specific reference to deaf individuals. The objectives ...

  17. MULTIMEDIA BASED LEARNING MATERIALS FOR DEAF STUDENTS

    OpenAIRE

    Luqman Hidayat; Gunarhadi; Furqon Hidayatulloh

    2017-01-01

    Deaf students have different abilities from students who have the ability to hear a lesson at school. Barriers to hear experienced by students with hearing impairment can affect the language, academic, and social skills of deaf students. Deaf students can still obtain information from other senses that are still functioning, such as the senses of sight, touch, taste and smell or of residual hearing that still exist. In the world of education, one way to overcome this obstacle is by making mul...

  18. Stigma in Mothers of Deaf Children

    OpenAIRE

    Hossein Ebrahimi; Eissa Mohammadi; Mohammad Ali Mohammadi; Akbar Pirzadeh; Hamzeh Mahmoudi; Ismail Ansari

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: A deaf child creates a feeling of stigma in many hearing parents. Stigma in mothers can have a negative impact on a child?s treatment and rehabilitation process. Therefore, this study was conducted to evaluate the extent of stigma in mothers with deaf children. Materials and Methods: This descriptive, cross-sectional study was conducted in 2013 among 90 mothers with deaf children. The data-collection instrument included the stigma scale in the mothers of children with disabiliti...

  19. The Effectiveness of Emotional Intelligence Training on the Mental Health of Male Deaf Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourmohamadreza-Tajrishi, Masoume; Ashori, Mohammad; Jalilabkenar, Seyede Somaye

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Deafness is a common neural-sensory impairment which leads to lower life quality, withdrawal, social activities reduction, and rejection feeling. So, it is important to plan suitable training programs for mental health promotion of deaf children. Emotional intelligence training is one of these programs. The present study was aimed to determine the effectiveness of emotional intelligence training on the mental health of deaf students. Methods In this semi-experimental study with pretest and posttest design, General Health Questionnaire (GHQ) was completed in 40 randomly selected boy deaf students with mean age of (12.48) years old before and after the intervention. The aim of the questionnaire was obtaining information of somatic symptoms, anxiety, social dysfunction, and depression as well as general health. The students were assigned in experimental and control group randomly and in equal. Experimental group participated in 12 sessions (each session lasts for 50 minutes; twice a week) and were trained by emotional intelligence program, but control group did not. Multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA) was used for analyzing the data. Results There was a significant difference (P<0.001) between experimental and control group according to somatic symptoms, anxiety, social dysfunction, depression and general health as a whole after participation in intervention sessions. Conclusion There was a significant decrease in somatic symptoms, anxiety, social dysfunction, depression and increase in general health of experimental group. Our findings showed that emotional intelligence training program led to promote of general health of boy deaf students. PMID:26060627

  20. Reduced procedural motor learning in deaf individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justine eLévesque

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Studies in the deaf suggest that cross-modal neuroplastic changes may vary across modalities. Only a handful of studies have examined motor capacities in the profoundly deaf. These studies suggest the presence of deficits in manual dexterity and delays in movement production. As of yet, the ability to learn complex sequential motor patterns has not been explored in deaf populations. The aim of the present study was to investigate the procedural learning skills of deaf adults. A serial reaction-time task (SRTT was performed by 18 deaf subjects and 18 matched controls to investigate possible motor alteration subsequent to auditory deprivation. Deaf participants had various degrees of hearing loss. Half of the experimental group were early-deaf adults mostly using hearing aids, the remaining half were late-deaf adults using a cochlear implant. Participants carried out a repeating 12-item sequence of key presses along with random blocks containing no repeating sequence. Non-specific and sequence-specific learning was analyzed in relation to individual features related to the hearing loss. The results revealed significant differences between groups in sequence-specific learning, with deaf subjects being less efficient than controls in acquiring sequence-specific knowledge. We interpret the results in light of cross-modal plasticity and the auditory scaffolding hypothesis.

  1. Foucault and deaf education in Finland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauri Siisiäinen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The influence of Michel Foucault’s thinking in critical disability studies, and to social studies of deafness, can hardly be doubted. Foucault has offered valuable tools for the critical rethinking of deaf education and pedagogy with respect to normalization and disciplinary power, which are integrally related to the historical construction of deafness as deficiency and pathology by modern, medical, and psychological knowledge. This article explores the applicability and critical potential of the Foucauldian concepts of disciplinary power, surveillance, and normalization within the specific context of the history of deaf education in Finland. The article focuses on the modernization of the education of deaf children that began during the latter half of the nineteenth century in Finland, with the influence of oralism – a pedagogical discourse and deaf-education methods of German origin. Deafness was characterized as a pathology or abnormality of the most severe kind. When taken at the general level, Foucault’s well-known concepts are easily applicable to the analysis of deaf education, also in the Finnish context. However, it is argued that things become much more complex if we first examine more closely the roles played by the eye and the ear, by optic and aural experience, in these Foucauldian notions, and if we then relate this enquiry to our analysis of oralist pedagogy and deaf education.

  2. Deaf Adolescents' Learning of Cardiovascular Health Information: Sources and Access Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Scott R; Kushalnagar, Poorna; Hauser, Peter C

    2015-10-01

    Deaf individuals have more cardiovascular risks than the general population that are believed to be related to their cardiovascular health knowledge disparities. This phenomenological study describes where 20 deaf sign language-using adolescents from Rochester, New York, many who possess many positive characteristics to support their health literacy, learn cardiovascular health information and their lived experiences accessing health information. The goal is to ultimately use this information to improve the delivery of cardiovascular health education to this population and other deaf adolescents at a higher risk for weak health literacy. Deaf bilingual researchers interviewed deaf adolescents, transcribed and coded the data, and described the findings. Five major sources of cardiovascular health information were identified including family, health education teachers, healthcare providers, printed materials, and informal sources. Despite possessing advantageous characteristics contributing to stronger health literacy, study participants described significant challenges with accessing health information from each source. They also demonstrated inconsistencies in their cardiovascular health knowledge, especially regarding heart attack, stroke, and cholesterol. These findings suggest a great need for additional public funding to research deaf adolescents' informal health-related learning, develop accessible and culturally appropriate health surveys and health education programming, improve interpreter education, and disseminate information through social media. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. The history of sign language and deaf education in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemaloğlu, Yusuf Kemal; Kemaloğlu, Pınar Yaprak

    2012-01-01

    Sign language is the natural language of the prelingually deaf people particularly without hearing-speech rehabilitation. Otorhinolaryngologists, regarding health as complete physical, mental and psychosocial well-being, aim hearing by diagnosing deafness as deviance from normality. However, it's obvious that the perception conflicted with the behavior which does not meet the mental and social well-being of the individual also contradicts with the definition mentioned above. This article aims to investigate the effects of hearing-speech target ignoring the sign language in Turkish population and its consistency with the history through statistical data, scientific publications and historical documents and to support critical perspective on this issue. The study results showed that maximum 50% of the deaf benefited from hearing-speech program for last 60 years before hearing screening programs; however, systems including sign language in education were not generated. In the light of these data, it is clear that the approach ignoring sign language particularly before the development of screening programs is not reasonable. In addition, considering sign language being part of the Anatolian history from Hittites to Ottomans, it is a question to be answered that why evaluation, habilitation and education systems excluding sign language are still the only choice for deaf individuals in Turkey. Despite legislative amendments in the last 6-7 years, the primary cause of failure to come into force is probably because of inadequate conception of the issue content and importance, as well as limited effort to offer solutions by academicians and authorized politicians. Within this context, this paper aims to make a positive effect on this issue offering a review for the medical staff, particularly otorhinolaryngologists and audiologists.

  4. Equal Telecommunications Access for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Virginians (TDD/Message Relay Programs). Report to the Governor and the General Assembly of Virginia. House Document No. 9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virginia State Dept. for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing, Richmond.

    The report addresses issues of telecommunications access for hearing and speech impaired persons in Virginia. Six analyses were performed: (1) Accessibility of service organizations--over 89% of sample organizations were not accessible by a telecommunications device for the deaf and existing TDDs were underutilized; (2) Telephone use by persons…

  5. Planes of phenomenological experience: The psychology of deafness as an early example of American Gestalt psychology, 1928-1940.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Marion A

    2017-11-01

    When, in 1928, the Clarke School for the Deaf in Northampton, Massachusetts, opened a psychological research division, it was nothing unusual in a time fascinated with the sciences of education. Yet with its longstanding ties to Northampton's Smith College, the school was able to secure the collaboration of eminent Gestalt psychologist Kurt Koffka, who, in turn, engaged 2 more German-speaking emigrants, Margarete Eberhardt and social psychologist Fritz Heider, and Heider's American wife Grace Moore Heider. This collaboration has seen little attention from historians, who have treated Koffka's and Heider's time in Northampton as a transitory phase. I argue, however, that their research on deafness adds to the history of emigration and knowledge transfer between European and American Schools of psychology, and to historical understanding of the interrelation of Gestalt, child, and social psychology. Professionals in child studies and developmental psychology were keenly interested in the holistic and introspective approach Gestalt psychology offered. Deaf children were considered a particularly fascinating research population for exploring the relationship between thought and language, perception and development, Gestalt, and reality. At the Clarke School, Grace Moore Heider was among the first Americans to apply Gestalt principles to child psychology. In a time in which pejorative eugenic beliefs dominated professional perceptions of disability, the Heiders' groundbreaking work defined the deaf as a social and phenomenological minority. This was in opposition to dominant beliefs in deaf education, yet it points to early roots of a social model of deafness and disability, which historians usually locate in 1960s and '70s activism. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  6. Bringing Hearing to the Deaf

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shipsey, Ian (Purdue)

    2006-06-12

    In his talk, Shipsey will discuss the cochlear implant, the first device to successfully allow the profoundly deaf to regain some sense of hearing. A cochlear implant is a small electronic apparatus. Unlike a normal hearing aid, which amplifies sound, a cochlear implant is surgically implanted behind the ear where it converts sound waves into electrical impulses. These implants have instigated a popular but controversial revolution in the treatment of deafness, and they serve as a model for research in neuroscience and biomedical engineering. Shipsey will discuss the physiology of natural hearing from the perspective of a physicist. He will also touch on the function of cochlear implants in the context of historical treatments, electrical engineering, psychophysics, clinical evaluation of efficacy and personal experience. Finally, Shipsey will address the social implications of cochlear implantation and the future outlook for auditory prostheses.

  7. [Maternally Inherited Diabetes and Deafness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampedro, A; Barbón, J J; Alvarez, J A; Andrés, M A; Baldó, C

    2009-07-01

    We described the follow up of a patient with diabetes mellitus type 2 who had a macular pattern dystrophy and bilateral neurosensory hearing loss. Electrophysiological studies revealed abnormal pattern electroretinography and impaired electro-oculogram responses. Maternally Inherited Diabetes, neurosensory Deafness and generally macular pattern distrophy (MIDD syndrome), is a rare mitochondrial disease, responsible for approximately 0.5 to 2.8% of diabetes mellitus.

  8. Films about the deaf: the representations of deaf and sign languages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Hessel Silveira

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes two films about deafness which have not been investigated in the Brazilian academic context. They are Mandy (directed by Alexander Mackendrick, 1952, England and After the Silence (by Fred Gerber, 1996, USA. The analysis is supported by Cultural Studies and Deaf Studies, especially on the concepts of cultural pedagogies, deaf culture, deaf identities, sign language, as well as on the analysis of other films about deaf people conducted by Thoma (2004. Both films are classified as drama, and particular attention was given to how deaf characters are represented, highlighting scenes showing the difficulties deaf people face in a hearing society. It is worth noting that in the end of both films the deaf characters manage to speak and hear. The pedagogical impact of these films is questioned as they show that the deaf may be able to speak and hear after using Sign Language. Deaf representations, deaf education and sign language are present in both films, although there is a difference in approach between them.

  9. PERSONAL IDENTITY IN DEAF ADOLESCENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna KOSSEWSKA

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the factors influencing the identity deaf adolescents. The study involved 67 deaf adolescents (38 boys and 29 girls aged 16 to 19 students of secondary school. Ninety-three hearing children constituted a comparison group. The structure of identity was explored on the basis of identification references given by the subjects who were to reply in writing, 20 times running, to the question: „Who Am I?” the test, adapted from M. H. Kuhn and T. S. McPartland by Martines and Silvestre (1995 given in written and signed mode.Results showed that the hearing status as well as mode of communication influence the description of personal identity. It was found that deaf adoles­cents used more descriptions especially in the fol­lowing categories: Civil Status, Body and Physical Appearance, Tastes and Activities, Friendship and Relationships, Personal and Social Situation, Negative Personal Traits, and Neutral Personality Traits. Although this study could demonstrate im­pact independent variables on identity, the data raise the need for further, preferably longitudinal, research. This complex phenomenon has to be examined more closely.Combined self-descriptive processes lead to the development of an organized, learned and dynamic identity, and subjective description of an individ­ual has strong emotional consequences for the in­dividual in question.

  10. Educational Methods for Deaf-Blind and Severely Handicapped Students, Volume I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peak, Orel; And Others

    The 17 papers were originally presented at a 1977 series of workshops for personnel serving the deaf-blind and severely handicapped and are organized into the following workshop topics: programing and program development, the senses, cognition, communication, and behavior managment. The papers have the following titles and authors: "Education for…

  11. Two Instructional Films on Pre-School Deaf Children. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegenthaler, Bruce M.; Greenhill, Leslie P.

    A project produced two instructional films on preschool deaf children. Both were black and white sound films about 30 minutes long. Evaluation followed completion of the active phase of film making. Designed to aid in professional education and program development, the two films presented principles of parent-child programs and demonstrated…

  12. ADAM SMITH: THE INVISIBLE HAND OR CONFIDENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Luis, Gache

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In 1776 Adam Smith raised the matter that an invisible hand was the one which moved the markets to obtain its efficiency. Despite in the present paper we are going to raise the hypothesis, that this invisible hand is in fact the confidence that each person feels when he is going to do business. That in addition it is unique, because it is different from the confidence of the others and that is a variable nonlinear that essentially is ligatured to respective personal histories. For that we are going to take as its bases the paper by Leopoldo Abadía (2009, with respect to the financial economy crisis that happened in 2007-2008, to evidence the form in which confidence operates. Therefore the contribution that we hope to do with this paper is to emphasize that, the level of confidence of the different actors, is the one which really moves the markets, (therefore the economy and that the crisis of the subprime mortgages is a confidence crisis at world-wide level.

  13. Morphological sensitivity in deaf readers of Dutch

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogmoed, A.H. van; Verhoeven, L.T.W.; Schreuder, R.; Knoors, H.E.T.

    2011-01-01

    Deaf children experience difficulties with reading comprehension. These difficulties are not completely explained by their difficulties with the reading of single short words. Whether deaf children and adults lag behind in the morphological processing of longer words is therefore examined in two

  14. Communities of Practice: Literacy and Deaf Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristoffersen, Ann-Elise; Simonsen, Eva

    2016-01-01

    This article aims to discuss young deaf children's access to literacy within a sociocultural perspective. We introduce the concept of communities of practice as an aspect in early literacy development for young deaf children. Preschools are learning communities and thus constitute communities of practice. Our discussion on the use of communities…

  15. Deaf Teenagers and Family Alcohol Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Raymond P.

    1987-01-01

    Deaf teenagers have more trouble coping with the effects of parental alcohol abuse than do hearing teenagers. Suggestions are made for helping the deaf teenager and other family members deal with these problems, especially in potentially violent situations. Two short case studies are provided to illustrate intervention methods and outcomes.…

  16. Burnout in Professionals Working with Deaf Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meadow, Kathryn P.

    1981-01-01

    Two hundred forty deaf education professionals completed an inventory on burnout, career motivation, and job satisfaction. Teachers of deaf students were more likely to experience burnout than teachers of nonhandicapped children and teachers aged 27 through 30 expressed the highest degree of emotional exhaustion. (CL)

  17. Metaphor Comprehension by Deaf Young Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Rinat; Segal, Osnat

    2017-01-01

    In the present study, we compared the processing of both conventional and novel metaphors by deaf versus hearing young adults. Eighteen deaf participants with severe-to-profound hearing loss and 18 controls matched for age, sex, and years of education were presented with word pairs of 4 types (literal, conventional metaphors, novel metaphors, and…

  18. Depression and Suicide in Deaf Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messenger, Carolyn J.; Bibby, Mary Ann

    1998-01-01

    This article shares one mother's experiences with the depression of her son and his friend who are both deaf. Findings from interviews with the two adolescents are provided, along with recommendations for educators, peers, and professionals for helping teenagers with deafness coping with depression and thoughts of suicide. (Contains references.)…

  19. Development of Implanted Deaf Children's Conversational Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Maner-Idrissi, Gaid; Dardier, Virginie; Pajon, Cecile; Tan-Bescond, Geraldine; David, Kristell; Deleau, Michel; Godey, Benoit

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies of preverbal development have highlighted the recurrent difficulties experienced by deaf children in acquiring knowledge of the social rules and social skills pertaining to discourse. We expected cochlear implants in children with bilateral profound deafness to improve their use of verbal language, so that their communication…

  20. Feelings and Emotions in Deaf Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambra, Cristina

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this study is to explore the feelings and emotions of deaf adolescents. The study examines the emotional domain of 34 prelingual severely and profoundly deaf adolescents, matched by sex and age with hearing class peers. A sentence completion task (Loeb and Sarigiani, 1986) is employed to assess such feelings as happiness, sadness,…

  1. Genetics: advances in genetic testing for deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearer, A Eliot; Smith, Richard J H

    2012-12-01

    To provide an update on recently discovered human deafness genes and to describe advances in comprehensive genetic testing platforms for deafness, both of which have been enabled by new massively parallel sequencing technologies. Over the review period, three syndromic and six nonsyndromic deafness genes have been discovered, bringing the total number of nonsyndromic deafness genes to 64. Four studies have shown the utility of massively parallel sequencing for comprehensive genetic testing for deafness. Three of these platforms have been released on a clinical or commercial basis. Deafness is the most common sensory deficit in humans. Genetic diagnosis has traditionally been difficult due to extreme genetic heterogeneity and a lack of phenotypic variability. For these reasons, comprehensive genetic screening platforms have been developed with the use of massively parallel sequencing. These technologies are also accelerating the pace of gene discovery for deafness. Because genetic diagnosis is the basis for molecular therapies, these advances lay the foundation for the clinical care of deaf and hard-of-hearing persons in the future.

  2. The Significance of Deaf Identity for Psychological Well-Being

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Madeleine; Dammeyer, Jesper

    2017-01-01

    Research has paid attention to how deaf identity affects life outcomes such as psychological well-being. However, studies are often carried out with small samples and without controlling for other variables. This study examined how different forms of identity--deaf, hearing, bicultural (deaf and hearing), and marginal (neither deaf nor…

  3. Violence against Deaf Women: Effect of Partner Hearing Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Melissa L.; Kobek Pezzarossi, Caroline M.

    2014-01-01

    Using a sample of Deaf female undergraduate students, the current study sought to investigate the prevalence, correlates, and characteristics of intimate partner violence victimization in hearing-Deaf and Deaf-Deaf relationships. Initial results suggest that similarities in hearing status and communication preference are associated with increased…

  4. Without Boundaries: An Inquiry into Deaf Epistemologies through a Metaparadigm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ye

    2010-01-01

    The ongoing debate on Deaf epistemologies reflects two major paradigms in deaf education: positivism and constructivism. The present article investigates Deaf epistemologies through a metaparadigm, which should blur the boundaries among different paradigms and connect the epistemological inquiry to instructional practice for d/Deaf students. The…

  5. Social Maturity and Executive Function among Deaf Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marschark, Marc; Kronenberger, William G.; Rosica, Mark; Borgna, Georgianna; Convertino, Carol; Durkin, Andreana; Machmer, Elizabeth; Schmitz, Kathryn L.

    2017-01-01

    Two experiments examined relations among social maturity, executive function, language, and cochlear implant (CI) use among deaf high school and college students. Experiment 1 revealed no differences between deaf CI users, deaf nonusers, and hearing college students in measures of social maturity. However, deaf students (both CI users and…

  6. Deaf Children and English: More Ways Parents Can Help.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katasse, Constance; Cartwright, Daisy

    1997-01-01

    Ideas to help parents of deaf children foster English language development include communicating regularly in writing, handling public encounters the "deaf" way, interacting with deaf adults, reading books by/about deaf people, learning and maintaining sign language skills, joining local and state associations, and making sure the television has a…

  7. Serving Deaf-Blind Children. Theme of the International Conference on Deaf-Blind Children (4th, 22-27 August 1971, Perkins School for the Blind).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins School for the Blind, Watertown, MA.

    Presented are 30 papers given at a 5-day international conference on serving deaf-blind children. Additionally provided are the conference agenda, a review of the conference, reports of the nominations and resolutions committees, and a list of conference participants. Among the papers are the following titles: "Programs for Non-Verbal Children",…

  8. Body Perception and Action Following Deafness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Houde

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of deafness on sensory abilities has been the topic of extensive investigation over the past decades. These investigations have mostly focused on visual capacities. We are only now starting to investigate how the deaf experience their own bodies and body-related abilities. Indeed, a growing corpus of research suggests that auditory input could play an important role in body-related processing. Deafness could therefore disturb such processes. It has also been suggested that many unexplained daily difficulties experienced by the deaf could be related to deficits in this underexplored field. In the present review, we propose an overview of the current state of knowledge on the effects of deafness on body-related processing.

  9. Numerical Estimation in Deaf and Hearing Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, Rebecca; Marschark, Marc; Sapere, Patty; Davidson, Wendy A; Murphy, Derek; Nordmann, Emily

    2011-08-01

    Deaf students often lag behind hearing peers in numerical and mathematical abilities. Studies of hearing children with mathematical difficulties highlight the importance of estimation skills as the foundation for formal mathematical abilities, but research with adults is limited. Deaf and hearing college students were assessed on the Number-to-Position task as a measure of estimation, and completed standardised assessments of arithmetical and mathematical reasoning. Deaf students performed significantly more poorly on all measures, including making less accurate number-line estimates. For deaf students, there was also a strong relationship showing that those more accurate in making number-line estimates achieved higher scores on the math achievement tests. No such relationship was apparent for hearing students. Further insights into the estimation abilities of deaf individuals should be made, including tasks that require symbolic and non-symbolic estimation and which address the quality of estimation strategies being used.

  10. BILINGUALISM: MULTICULTURALISM HOLOPRAXIOLOGY OF THE VENEZUELAN DEAF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Héctor Florencio Martínez Pérez

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The formation of the child has been made regularly and without many prejudices or tbacks,  until this had some physical characteristic or perceptual, who twisted his attention.  To those who were born with the inability to listen or hear properly, excluded in all respects. At the end of the 20th century, the deaf began to defend their identity and differed between Deafness (lack of hearing of deafness, with "S", which is a socio-anthropological perspective, which includes the use of sign language and the learning of reading and writing of the Spanish (bilingualism in their training. This research had as general objective to unveil bilingualism from an intercultural intersubjectivity of the deaf in Venezuela by applying a qualitative related paradigm with methodology fenomenologica-hermeneutica of Max Van Manen. The information collected observing and interviewing in depth (12 deaf students, parents or representatives (6, (3 researchers and educational specialists deaf and listeners (12. To analyze and triangulate information, obtained the following conclusions about the bilingual deaf: their physical and intellectual abilities are exactly the same to the listeners;  they can achieve the necessary qualification for any job; is required the language of signs so that you can put into practice the language; those who have the organizational capacity to develop oral language, it should not hinder him this opportunity, without detriment to the learning of the language of signs and the systematic training of the deaf teachers and deaf family, educational managers, political and employer of the deaf is essentially required.

  11. A Biologist's Photographic Record of Smith Island and Vicinity

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Details of experience gained during 12 years of work on Smith Island to include brief text and photos. Discussion refers to Black Duck populations and references the...

  12. Multiple self-healing squamous epithelioma of Ferguson-Smith

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broesby-Olsen, Sigurd; Bygum, Anette; Gerdes, Anne-Marie

    2008-01-01

    Multiple self-healing squamous epithelioma of Ferguson-Smith (MSSE) is a rare autosomal dominantly inherited disease, almost exclusively reported in patients of Scottish origin, with recurrent, histologically malignant tumours that undergo spontaneous regression. We report clinical observations...

  13. Genetics Home Reference: Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Many affected children have the characteristic features of autism, a developmental condition that affects communication and social interaction. Malformations of the heart, lungs , kidneys , gastrointestinal tract , and genitalia are also common. Infants with Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome have weak ...

  14. Neal Smith National Wildlife Refuge: Comprehensive Conservation Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) was written to guide management on Neal Smith National Wildlife Refuge for the next 15 years. This plan outlines the...

  15. Neal Smith National Wildlife Refuge, Iowa Contaminants Investigation Final Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document serves as the final report for the Neal Smith National Wildlife Refuge (Refuge) (formerly known as the Walnut Creek National Wildlife Refuge)...

  16. Neal Smith National Wildlife Refuge : Fiscal Year 2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Neal Smith NWR outlines activities and accomplishments during the 2003 fiscal year. The report begins with an introduction to the...

  17. A BRITISH TOUCH ON TANZIMAT: ARCHITECT WILLIAM JAMES SMITH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esma İgüs

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the life and works of British architect William James Smith and outlines his contributions to nineteenth century Ottoman architecture and presents his prominence as an architectural historian of nineteenth century British architectural work.

  18. Authors: A Smith, J Beckmann and S Mampane EXPERIENCES ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    21616744

    PROSECUTORS") IN LEARNER DISCIPLINARY HEARINGS IN PUBLIC. SCHOOLS. A Smith*. J Beckmann**. S Mampane***. 1. Introduction. There is incontrovertible evidence of significant disciplinary problems in South African public schools.1 Before the ...

  19. Llewellyn Smith, Director-General designate of CERN, discusses LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    Sweet, William N

    1992-01-01

    Christopher Llewellyn Smith was nominated by the Committee of Council to be Director General of CERN. He aims to pave the way for the Large Hadron Collider and utilize to the full the Large Electron-Positron machine.

  20. Food resource partitioning of stingless bees; Trigona apicalis Smith, 1857, Trigana collina Smith, 1857 and Trigona fimbriata Smith, 1857 (Apidae, Meliponinae in a mixed deciduous forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jongjitvimol, T.

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Food resource partitioning of three species of stingless bees; Trigona apicalis Smith, 1857, T. collina Smith, 1857 and T. fimbriata Smith, 1857 at Phitsanulok Wildlife Conservation Devolopment and Extension Station were investigated from October 2003 to February 2005. The comparison study among T. apicalis, T. collina and T. fimbriata found different foraging times from food resources. Morphological study to examine the relationship between body size and foraging appendages among these species revealed significant differences in all characteristics (p<0.05. The results of food resource partitioning correlated with the competition theory. The three species appeared to avoid competition by performing a sign of coexistence in the same habitat possessing limited resources.

  1. How do profoundly deaf children learn to read?

    OpenAIRE

    伊藤, 泰子

    2013-01-01

    We know that children who were born profoundly deaf have much difficulty to learn to speak English or Japanese. But is it possible that profoundly deaf children learn to read written English or Japanese? Some researchers mention that early exposure to fingerspelling actually helps deaf children become better readers. Then I tried to find the reason why fingerspelling helps deaf children develop their reading ability and examined how to develop deaf children’s reading ability with fingerspelli...

  2. Computational solution for the auxiliary in the literacy of deaf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Carlos Lopes Fernandes

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The learning of the deaf is a great challenge for educators, especially in Portuguese-speaking course. Brazilian schools are not prepared for suits with deaf, because they lack trained professionals. Current Brazilian educational policies, seeking socialize all deaf and not deaf students. The Brazilian deaf community uses LIBRAS, Brazilian sign language as their main form of communication between them. Integrating LBS and Portuguese is one of the main current challenges and the use of computers has helped a lot.

  3. Predicting the intelligibility of deaf children's speech from acoustic measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchanski, Rosalie M.; Geers, Ann E.; Brenner, Christine M.; Tobey, Emily A.

    2004-05-01

    A weighted combination of speech-acoustic measures may provide an objective assessment of speech intelligibility in deaf children that could be used to evaluate the benefits of sensory aids and rehabilitation programs. This investigation compared the accuracy of two different approaches, multiple linear regression and a simple neural net. These two methods were applied to identical sets of acoustic measures, including both segmental (e.g., voice-onset times of plosives, spectral moments of fricatives, second formant frequencies of vowels) and suprasegmental measures (e.g., sentence duration, number and frequency of intersentence pauses). These independent variables were obtained from digitized recordings of deaf children's imitations of 11 simple sentences. The dependent measure was the percentage of spoken words from the 36 McGarr Sentences understood by groups of naive listeners. The two predictive methods were trained on speech measures obtained from 123 out of 164 8- and 9-year-old deaf children who used cochlear implants. Then, predictions were obtained using speech measures from the remaining 41 children. Preliminary results indicate that multiple linear regression is a better predictor of intelligibility than the neural net, accounting for 79% as opposed to 65% of the variance in the data. [Work supported by NIH.

  4. On the possibilities and limits of "DEAF DEAF SAME": Tourism and empowerment camps in Adamorobe (Ghana, Bangalore and Mumbai (India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Ilana Friedner

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This article qualitatively analyzes the ways that the discourse of "deaf universalism" circulates within two common deaf practices: tourism and engaging in interventions. Arguing that the largely Northern-situated discipline of Deaf Studies does not adequately examine how deaf bodies and discourses travel, ethnographic data compiled in India and Ghana during transnational encounters is employed to examine how claims of "sameness" and "difference" are enacted and negotiated. Similarly, this article examines how deaf individuals and groups deploy the concepts of deaf "heavens" and "hells" to analyze their travel experiences and justify interventions. We argue that deaf travelers and those engaging in interventions, mostly from Northern countries, employ teleological concepts that they attempt to impose on deaf "others." Adopting a critical approach, this article argues for the importance of carving out a space within Deaf Studies for allowing non-Northern concepts to come to the fore. Keywords: Deaf, Development, Universalism, Discourse, India, Ghana

  5. Andrew Smith: peame leidma tee majanduskasvuni, mis põhineb säästmisel, investeeringutel ja ekspordil / Andrew Smith

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Smith, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    KPMG (UK) peaökonomist Andrew Smith vastab küsimustele, mis puudutavad majanduskriisi tekkimist, olukorra paranemist, majandusolukorda Suurbritannias, erinevusi Euroopa ja muude maailma piirkondade vahel, sarnasusi Eesti ja Suurbritannia majandusolukorra vahel ning prognoose edaspidiste arengute osas

  6. Literatura Surda/Deaf Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lodenir Becker Karnopp

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo do presente artigo é proceder a uma análise dos livros de literatura infantil Cinderela Surda e Rapunzel Surda, focalizando os sentidos produzidos sobre identidades e diferenças. As análises desses livros pretendem contribuir para a discussão da produção de uma literatura surda, que está vinculada às discussões sobre cultura e identidade. Na investigação desses materiais, os textos e as imagens produzidas evidenciam que os autores buscam o caminho da auto-representação do grupo de surdos, através da luta pelo estabelecimento do que reconhecem como suas identidades e suas diferenças. Tais evidências estão no uso da língua de sinais, em suas formas de narrar as histórias e/ou de adaptar histórias clássicas, tendo como base suas formas de existência, suas formas de ler, traduzir, conceber e julgar os produtos culturais que consomem e que produzem. This article aims to present an analysis of the fairy tales, Deaf Cinderella and Deaf Rapunzel, focusing on the meanings produced from identities and differences. The analyses of these two books intend to give a contribution to the discussion on the production of deaf literature, which is linked to the discussions on culture and identity. In the investigation of these books, the texts and the images produced show that the authors seek the path to self- representation of the deaf community, through the struggle for the establishment of what they recognize as their identities and differences. Such evidences are in the use of sign language, in their ways of narrating their stories and/or of adapting classic fairy tales, having as a basis their existential ways of being, their ways of reading, translating, conceiving and judging the cultural products which they consume and produce.

  7. Does deafness lead to enhancement of visual spatial cognition in children? Negative evidence from deaf nonsigners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parasnis, I; Samar, V; Bettger, J; Sathe, K

    1996-01-01

    This study investigated whether deafness contributes to enhancement of visual spatial cognition independent of knowledge of a sign language. Congenitally deaf school children in India who were born to hearing parents and were not exposed to any sign language, and matched hearing controls, were given a test of digit span and five tests that measured visual spatial skills. The deaf group showed shorter digit span than the hearing group, consistent with previous studies. Deaf and hearing children did not differ in their performance on the visual spatial skills test, suggesting that deafness per se may not be a sufficient factor for enhancement of visual spatial cognition. Early exposure to a sign language and fluent sign skills may be the critical factors that lead to differential development of visual spatial skills in deaf people.

  8. Adapting health education material for deaf audiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollard, Robert Q; Dean, Robyn K; O'Hearn, Amanda; Haynes, Sharon L

    2009-05-01

    The deaf population is an often-overlooked limited English proficiency (LEP) group at risk for health disparities associated with low health literacy. Lack of access to health information conveyed via radio, television, or ambient auditory sources such as public conversation further aggravates this population's low health literacy. Methods of adapting health education material for hearing LEP populations do not reach deaf audiences with equal effectiveness. We adapt health education material for deaf audiences by first determining the "learning points" contained in vetted source material. A dialog-based film script covering those learning points is created. Supplemental content addressing common deaf population knowledge gaps and sociocultural experiences is added. Deaf actors are filmed following the adapted American Sign Language (ASL) script. Their ASL is back-translated into English to yield vocal track and subtitle scripts. The source material author(s) are consulted throughout the process to assure the film's adherence to the learning point list. Users report that the adapted product is more relevant, engaging, and effective for deaf audiences. This adaptation approach may aid in reducing deaf population health disparities. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2009 APA, all rights reserved).

  9. [Study of generational risk in deafness inflicted couples using deafness gene microarray technique].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ping; Zhao, Jia; Yu, Shu-yuan; Jin, Peng; Zhu, Wei; DU, Bo

    2011-06-01

    To explored the significance of screening the gene mutations of deafness related in deaf-mute (deaf & dumb) family using DNA microarray. Total of 52 couples of deaf-mute were recruited from Changchun deaf-mute community. With an average age of (58.3 ± 6.7) years old (x(-) ± s). Blood samples were obtained with informed consent. Their genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood and PCR was performed. Nine of hot spot mutations in four most common deafness pathologic gene were examined with the DNA microarray, including GJB2, GJB3, PDS and mtDNA 12S rRNA genes. At the same time, the results were verified with the traditional methods of sequencing. Fifty of normal people served as a control group. All patients were diagnosed non-syndromic sensorineural hearing loss by subjective pure tone audiometry. Thirty-two of 104 cases appeared GJB2 gene mutation (30.7%), the mutation sites included 35delG, 176del16, 235delC and 299delAT. Eighteen of 32 cases of GJB2 mutations were 235delC (59.1%). Seven of 104 cases appeared SLC26A4 gene IVS7-2 A > G mutation. Questionnaire survey and gene diagnosis revealed that four of 52 families have deaf offspring (7.6%). When a couple carries the same gene mutation, the risk of their children deafness was 100%. The results were confirmed with the traditional methods of sequencing. There is a high risk of deafness if a deaf-mute family is planning to have a new baby. It is very important and helpful to avoid deaf newborns again in deaf-mute family by DNA microarray.

  10. Peer to peer deaf literacy: working with young deaf people and peer tutors in India

    OpenAIRE

    Gillen, Julia; Panda, Sibaji; Papen, Uta; Zeshan, Ulrike

    2016-01-01

    This report of research in progress introduces the project: Literacy development with deaf communities using sign language, peer tuition, and learner-generated online content: Sustainable educational innovation. The rationale, aims, and participatory approach to learning and teaching English literacy to deaf learners in India are described. Deaf learners are particularly marginalised in the mainstream educational systems of developing countries. This project responds through designing a parti...

  11. Should All Deaf Children Learn Sign Language?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napoli, Donna Jo; Mellon, Nancy K; Niparko, John K; Rathmann, Christian; Mathur, Gaurav; Humphries, Tom; Handley, Theresa; Scambler, Sasha; Lantos, John D

    2015-07-01

    Every year, 10,000 infants are born in the United States with sensorineural deafness. Deaf children of hearing (and nonsigning) parents are unique among all children in the world in that they cannot easily or naturally learn the language that their parents speak. These parents face tough choices. Should they seek a cochlear implant for their child? If so, should they also learn to sign? As pediatricians, we need to help parents understand the risks and benefits of different approaches to parent-child communication when the child is deaf [corrected]. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  12. Stigma in Mothers of Deaf Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Ebrahimi

    2015-03-01

     Results: Results showed that most mothers suffer from stigma due to having a deaf child. The mean stigma score was 96.48 ±27.72. In total, 24.4% of mothers reported that they had received strange and mocking looks; 72.2% regarded child deafness as a sign of divine retribution; and 33.3% felt ashamed of their child’s deafness. There was an inverse relationship between the mother’s level of education and mean stigma scores (P

  13. Stress Deafness in Persian Speakers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehran Ghajargar

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: The current study has been designed based on the framework of the Stress Deafness Model (SDM, and aims at investigating native listeners’ general perceptual sensitivity to theacoustic correlates of stress in Persian, a language with predictable stress. According to SDM, more regularity in a language implies poorer perceptual sensitivity of its native speakers, as regular stress patterns will not require lexical encoding.Methods: The experiment was a modified method of adjustment task where subjects had to simulate stimuli played to them. A total of thirty five Persian speakers took part in the experiment and wereplaced in three groups based on their linguistic background. In addition to overall perceptual sensitivity, the effect of exposure to English and phonetic knowledge were also tested.Results: Persian speakers showed a weak perception of stress correlates. It was found, however, that exposure to English will improve stress deafness among Persian natives (p<0.0001. However, the results failed to show any significant effect by phonetic knowledge. It was also shown that the duration had the most erroneous perception by participants (p=0.0001, while there was no statistically significant difference between understanding fundamental frequency clues and intensity perception by listeners.Conclusion: Since Persian speakers showed an overall weak perception of stress correlates, the results support the predictions made by SDM.

  14. Suicide in deaf populations: a literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kapur Navneet

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies have found that deaf individuals have higher rates of psychiatric disorder than those who are hearing, while at the same time encountering difficulties in accessing mental health services. These factors might increase the risk of suicide. However, the burden of suicidal behaviour in deaf people is currently unknown. The aim of the present review was to provide a summary of literature on suicidal behaviour with specific reference to deaf individuals. The objectives of the review were to establish the incidence and prevalence of suicidal behaviour in deaf populations; describe risk factors for suicidal behaviour in deaf populations; describe approaches to intervention and suicide prevention that have been used in deaf populations. Methods A number of electronic databases (e.g. Medline, PsycINFO, CINAHL, EMBASE, Dissertation Abstracts International, Web of Science, ComDisDome, ASSIA, Education Sage Full Text, Google Scholar, and the grey literature databases FADE and SIGLE were explored using a combination of key words and medical subject headings as search terms. Reference lists of papers were also searched. The Science and Social Sciences Citation Index electronic databases were used to identify studies that had cited key papers. We also contacted experts and organisations with an interest in the field. Results Very few studies focussed specifically on suicide in deaf populations. Those studies that were included (n = 13 generally involved small and unrepresentative samples. There were limited data on the rate of suicidal behaviour in deaf people. One study reported evidence of hearing impairment in 0.2% of all suicide deaths. Another found that individuals with tinnitus seen in specialist clinics had an elevated rate of suicide compared to the general population. The rates of attempted suicide in deaf school and college students during the previous year ranged from 1.7% to 18%, with lifetime rates as high as 30

  15. Silencing Deafness: Displacing Disability in the Nineteenth Century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esme Cleall

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This article traces the way in which the language of displacement and silence were used in nineteenth-century discussions of deafness and connects this tendency to the marginalised place deaf experience occupies historically. Throughout the nineteenth century, a period which saw the consolidation of ‘the deaf and dumb’ as a social category, the word ‘forgetting’ crept into numerous discussions of deafness by both deaf and hearing commentators. Some, such as the educationalist Alexander Graeme Bell, were overt in their desire to forget deafness, demanding disability was ‘bred out’ and deaf culture condemned to the forgotten past. Others used the term ambivalently and sometimes metaphorically discussing the deaf as ‘forgotten’ by society, and ‘children of silence’. Some even pleaded that people who were deaf were not forgotten. But, though varied, the use of the imagery of forgetting and silence to evoke deafness is recurrent, and may, therefore, be seen to reveal something about how deaf experience can be approached as a displacement where deafness was spatially and imaginatively marginalised. I argue that one of the consequences of the conceptual framing of deafness through the language of forgetting was actively to silence deafness and to neutralise the idea that disability should be marginal and could be forgotten.

  16. Science teachers in deaf education: A national survey of K-8 teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Cynthia

    A survey was conducted with 67 science teachers who taught deaf children at the elementary school level. Teacher background variables, information about teacher preparation and certification, preferred teaching methods, communication methodologies, curriculum, and the use of technology were gathered. A purposeful, convenience sampling technique was employed. Utilizing a non-experimental, basic research design and survey methodology, the researcher reviewed both quantitative and qualitative data. The majority of science teachers in this survey at the elementary school level are female and hearing. More than half have deaf education masters degrees. Few have science degrees. The majority of teachers had less than 10 years teaching experience with deaf students. Sixty percent were highly qualified in science; only forty percent were certified in science. They were equally employed at either a state residential school or a public day school. Two-way chi-square analyses were carried out. Hearing teachers preferred to observe other teachers teaching science compared to deaf teachers chi2 (1, N = 67) = 5.39, p English Bilingual Star School program (chi2 (1, N = 67) = 8.49, p strategies in the teaching of science as many of the deaf teachers reported they used these strategies often.

  17. The "SignOn"-Model for Teaching Written Language to Deaf People

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlene Hilzensauer

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper shows a method of teaching written language to deaf people using sign language as the language of instruction. Written texts in the target language are combined with sign language videos which provide the users with various modes of translation (words/phrases/sentences. As examples, two EU projects for English for the Deaf are presented which feature English texts and translations into the national sign languages of all the partner countries plus signed grammar explanations and interactive exercises. Both courses are web-based; the programs may be accessed free of charge via the respective homepages (without any download or log-in.

  18. A Teacher Takes on the Challenges of Deaf Literacy: An Interview with Jennifer Herbold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milone, Michael

    2003-01-01

    Interviews Jennifer Herbold, a deaf teacher of deaf students at the New Mexico School for the Deaf. Discusses important factors in determining Deaf students' success at learning to read. Notes that technology has enormous potential with deaf students because it provides increased exposure to English, it is often fun to use for deaf students, and…

  19. Comunidade surda e Língua Brasileira de Sinais nos relatos de uma professora surda. Deaf Community and the Brazilian Sign Language - Reports of a Deaf teacher

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santos, Saionara Figueiredo

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available O trabalho que apresentamos é parte de um projeto de pesquisa qualitativa mais amplo – uma Dissertação de Mestrado intitulada “Educação Ambiental: recursos imagéticos na produção de significação de um sujeito surdo” –, que foi desenvolvida junto ao Programa de Pós-Graduação em Educação Ambiental da Universidade Federal do Rio Grande (FURG, Brasil. Neste artigo, apresentamos o posicionamento de uma professora surda do Rio Grande do Sul no que se refere à construção da sua identidade surda, considerando o papel fundamental da comunidade surda e da língua materna de um surdo sinalizado – a Língua Brasileira de Sinais (Libras. O presente trabalho fundamenta-se teórica e metodologicamente na abordagem sócio-histórica. Foram realizadas entrevistas semiestruturadas com uma professora surda, além do uso de recursos imagéticos, que possibilitaram o surgimento de narrativas de vida do sujeito pesquisado. Para a análise de dados, foi empregada a técnica da análise de conteúdo, cuja categoria, objeto do presente artigo, refere-se à Comunidade Surda que usa a Libras (Língua Brasileira de Sinais. As narrativas demonstraram a importância que a comunidade surda assume para os surdos, bem como a apreensão de sua língua, a Língua Brasileira de Sinais, ressaltando as conquistas legais e os desafios enfrentados para o reconhecimento e a valorização dessa língua no nosso país, tanto nas escolas regulares e inclusivas quanto no Ensino Superior. Além disso, a comunidade surda configura-se como um espaço e como um lugar de pertencimento, a partir de onde os surdos podem mostrar e valorizar sua identidade surda, suas histórias, exaltando sua diferença cultural. The present study is part of a broader qualitative research - a dissertation entitled "Environmental Education: Imagistic resources in the production of meaning of a Deaf child" - which was developed by the Graduate Program in Environmental Education of the

  20. Identification of Effective Strategies to Promote Language in Deaf Children with Cochlear Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quittner, Alexandra L.; Marker, Craig; DesJardin, Jean L.

    2012-01-01

    Parental involvement and communication are essential for language development in young children. However, hearing parents of deaf children face challenges in providing language input to their children. This study utilized the largest national sample of deaf children receiving cochlear implants, with the aim of identifying effective facilitative language techniques. Ninety-three deaf children (≤ 2 years) were assessed at six implant centers prior to and for three years following implantation. All parent-child interactions were videotaped, transcribed and coded at each assessment. Analyses using bivariate latent difference score modeling indicated that higher versus lower-level strategies predicted growth in expressive language and word types predicted growth in receptive language over time. These effective, higher-level strategies could be used in early intervention programs. PMID:23002910

  1. Discrete Mathematics in Deaf Education: A Survey of Teachers' Knowledge and Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagliaro, C.; Kritzer, K. L.

    2005-01-01

    The study documents what deaf education teachers know about discrete mathematics topics and determines if these topics are present in the mathematics curriculum. Survey data were collected from 290 mathematics teachers at center and public school programs serving a minimum of 120 students with hearing loss, grades K-8 or K-12, in the United…

  2. State of the Art: Perspectives on Serving Deaf-Blind Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowell, Edgar L., Ed.; Rouin, Carole C., Ed.

    Provided is a collection of 23 papers on current services for deaf-blind individuals with four sections on background information, medical and diagnostic perspectives, home visitation and parent counseling, and other topics which include research, program evaluation, and legislative and legal action. Among the entries included are the following…

  3. Directory of Services for Deaf-Blind Children in the Southwestern Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helvig, Diane L., Comp.

    The directory lists services for deaf-blind children in the Southwestern Region, including such services as associations and foundations, child care services, diagnosis and evaluation, educational programs, financial assistance, information and referral, newsletters and periodicals, recreational services, rehabilitation services, and speech and…

  4. Clinical Services: Hearing Impaired, Visually Impaired, Deaf-Blind (Multi-Handicapped).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio State Dept. of Education, Columbus. Div. of Special Education.

    Briefly described are educational and medical clinical services and evaluation procedures for hearing impaired, visually impaired, and deaf-blind children in Ohio. The services are said to assess individual student needs and to facilitate educational placement and programing in special education classes or at state schools for the blind or the…

  5. Universal Design for Learning. Practice Perspectives--Highlighting Information on Deaf-Blindness. Number 8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    It is essential that children who are deaf-blind have learning experiences that improve their quality of life. Unfortunately, even when educational teams work together to create individualized education programs, these students do not always have full and equal opportunities to learn. This issue of "Practice Perspectives" describes the basics of…

  6. Enhancing Social Opportunities and Relationships of Children Who Are Deaf-Blind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mar, H. H.; Sall, N.

    1995-01-01

    This study examined intervention programs to increase the social integration of 3 children with deaf-blindness, aged 7 through 10. Although the number of socially integrated activities increased for each child, the children continued to have few consistent friends and acquaintances. The implications of these results for enhancing long-term social…

  7. National Evaluation of the State Deaf-Blind Projects. NCEE 2018-4006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daley, Tamara C.; Edwards, Jessica; Fiore, Thomas A.; Johnson, Laura

    2018-01-01

    This report describes the work done by the 48 State Deaf-Blind Projects awarded grants by the Department of Education's Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP) in late 2013. The report documents the technical assistance and dissemination activities carried out by the Projects and their collaborative activities, describes the needs for…

  8. On the relation between the signing and reading skills of deaf bilinguals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermans, D.; Ormel, E.A.; Knoors, H.E.T.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we will describe the theoretical underpinning of many bilingual education programs for deaf children: Cummins' Linguistic Interdependence theory. Then, we will review some of the studies that have been conducted on the relation between reading and signing skills, and discuss how

  9. Test Equity for Individuals Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing. PEPNet Test Equity Summit

    Science.gov (United States)

    PEPNet-West, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the highlights of the 2008 Test Equity Summit held in Bloomfield, Colorado last August 6-8, 2008. The 2008 Test Equity Summit convened by the Postsecondary Education Programs Network (PEPNet) identified and examined problems, challenges, and issues that academic and psychoeducational tests pose for individuals who are deaf or…

  10. Deaf Children's Engagement in an Educational Video in American Sign Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golos, Debbie B.

    2010-01-01

    Over time children's educational television has successfully modified programming to incorporate research-based strategies to facilitate learning and engagement during viewing. However, research has been limited on whether these same strategies would work with preschool deaf children viewing videos in American Sign Language. In a descriptive…

  11. Cai-Beneficial Teaching Tool at Texas School for the Deaf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culberton, Lynda B.

    1974-01-01

    Described are efforts of 15 schools for the deaf to continue for their 2000 students (after federal project funding termination) the computer assisted instruction program transmitted through telephone lines between 1971 and 1973 from the Institute for Mathematical Studies in Social Sciences, Stanford University. (Author/MC)

  12. Health Care Access Among Deaf People

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kuenburg, Alexa; Fellinger, Paul; Fellinger, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    .... The present study reviews literature from 2000 to 2015 on access to health care for deaf people and reveals significant challenges in communication with health providers and gaps in global health...

  13. Stigma in Mothers of Deaf Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Ebrahimi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: A deaf child creates a feeling of stigma in many hearing parents. Stigma in mothers can have a negative impact on a child’s treatment and rehabilitation process. Therefore, this study was conducted to evaluate the extent of stigma in mothers with deaf children.  Materials and Methods: This descriptive, cross-sectional study was conducted in 2013 among 90 mothers with deaf children. The data-collection instrument included the stigma scale in the mothers of children with disabilities. The reliability and validity of the instrument were confirmed through content validity and Cronbach’s alpha coefficient (α=86%, respectively. Data were analyzed using SPSS-15 software.   Results: Results showed that most mothers suffer from stigma due to having a deaf child. The mean stigma score was 96.48 ±27.72. In total, 24.4% of mothers reported that they had received strange and mocking looks; 72.2% regarded child deafness as a sign of divine retribution; and 33.3% felt ashamed of their child’s deafness. There was an inverse relationship between the mother’s level of education and mean stigma scores (P

  14. Characteristic Equation of the Modified Smith predictor to MIMO Systems

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    Jorge A. Herrera-Cuartas

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The delay in control systems is a feature frequently in real systems due to the transport of objects or information, a series connection of multiple systems or own processing and sensors delay, among others. Recently there have been several studies to identify the external delay MIMO systems, these works are focused on identification and on-line control of MIMO systems and use a multimodel structure based on modified Smith predictor using different search method. It is clear that for the implementation of the algorithm, and to obtain the convergence and stability analysis, it is necessary to have closed-loop equations of modified Smith predictor. However, in these works is not presented the analytical procedure, not be the main object, displaying only the closed loop equations without the procedure for obtaining it. Therefore, to respond, in this paper, we present an analytical way to derive the closed-loop equations of a modified Smith predictor.  

  15. Hearing research career development for deaf students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brookhouser, P E; Sullivan, P M; Eccarius, M A; Schulte, L; Maliszewski, S; Madrigal, R

    1994-09-01

    One goal of the Americans with Disabilities Act is to enhance access to career opportunities for individuals with hearing loss. Hearing-impaired professionals are woefully underrepresented among the cadre of scientists currently involved in hearing and deafness research. Information was obtained by questionnaire from 190 consecutive attendees (13 through 17 years of age) at a summer program for gifted hearing-impaired adolescents regarding career goals, attitudes toward academic and extracurricular activities, educational placement, primary communication modality, and parental hearing status. A follow-up questionnaire completed by 80 of these youth, presently attending college, provided comparison data regarding type of college attended and academic major. Males were significantly more likely to select majors in mathematics and science-related disciplines. The percentage of college attendees majoring in the sciences was much lower than the percentage of high school students who aspired to a scientific career. Strategies for attracting qualified hearing-impaired students into science majors should include educational efforts directed at students, parents, and academic advisors.

  16. Changing Trends within the Population of Children Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing in Flanders (Belgium): Effects of 12 Years of Universal Newborn Hearing Screening, Early Intervention, and Early Cochlear Implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Raeve, Leo; Lichtert, Guido

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to show the changing trends within the population of children who are deaf and hard of hearing in Belgium over the last 12 years. The combination of Universal Newborn Hearing Screening programs, early intervention, and cochlear implants have tremendously influenced the education and support of children who are deaf or…

  17. Pasos para Aprender: Un Manual para las Personas Que Trabajan con Ninos Sordos-Ciegos en Establecimientos Residenciales (Learning Steps: A Handbook for Persons Working with Deaf-Blind Children in Residential Settings).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southwestern Region Deaf-Blind Center, Sacramento, CA.

    Written in Spanish, the handbook for persons working with deaf blind children in residential settings includes general suggestions, specific teaching activities, and an introduction to sign language. The book is based on the John Tracy Clinic Correspondence Learning Program for Parents of Preschool Deaf Blind Children. General suggestions are…

  18. Access to English Language Acquisition in Ghana Schools for the Deaf: Are the Deaf Students Handicapped?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obosu, Gideon Kwesi; Opoku-Asare, Nana Afia; Deku, Prosper

    2016-01-01

    This paper primarily discusses the challenges deaf students in Ghana are likely to grapple with as they access education provided for them in English language. The arguments discussed in this paper are supported by findings from a multiple site case study of five Schools for the Deaf purposively sampled from four regions of Ghana. Observations…

  19. Objectification Theory and Deaf Cultural Identity Attitudes: Roles in Deaf Women's Eating Disorder Symptomatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi, Bonnie; Rottenstein, Adena

    2007-01-01

    This study examined the generalizability of direct and mediated links posited in objectification theory among internalization of sociocultural standards of beauty, body surveillance, body shame, and eating disorder symptoms with a sample of Deaf women. The study also examined the role of marginal Deaf cultural identity attitudes within this…

  20. "Deaf discourse": the social construction of deafness in a Bedouin community

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kisch, S.

    2008-01-01

    Among the Al-Sayyid Arab-Bedouin, the use of an indigenous sign language is widespread and provides the foundation of a signing community shared by hearing and deaf people. Cases with comparable high incidences of deafness have in recent years stimulated debates in diverse academic disciplines.

  1. Visible violence in Kiki Smith's Life wants to live.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulthard, Lisa

    2004-01-01

    Recent theoretical analyses of domestic violence have posited the complicity of medical communities in erasing and obfuscating the cause of injuries. Although medical cultures have engaged in progressive initiatives to address and treat domestic violence, these medical and clinical models can render domestic violence invisible by framing the battered woman as evidentiary object. By analyzing this invisibility of domestic violence through the concept of public secrecy, in this article I consider Kiki Smith's 1982 installation piece Life Wants to Live. Using medical technologies, Smith's installation offers the viewer a vision of domestic violence that recognizes its inherently problematic invisibility and emphasizes the importance of lived, bodily experience.

  2. CONTROL OF A BIOMASS COMBUSTOR USING THE GENERAL SMITH PREDICTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Ramírez

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a modification to the classic Smith Predictor, known since several decades as aneffective control method for the pure delay noxious effect in the control loop systems. The modificationconsists in the use of a high order model for the system, using an idea of Strejc, instead of the first ordermodel with delay as was proposed by Smith. This allows better approximation to high order systems. It ispresented an algorithm to calculate the Strejc model of the system to be controlled, based on its response to aunit step disturb.

  3. Dr Smith goes to Los Alamos

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    nuclear weapons and terrorism. Nuclear weapons were first developed during World War II in the United States under a top-secret program called the Manhat- tan Project. These weapons were developed because of the fear that Nazi Germany was developing such weapons, but after. Germany's surrender, they were used ...

  4. "Deaf discourse": the social construction of deafness in a Bedouin community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisch, Shifra

    2008-01-01

    Among the Al-Sayyid Arab-Bedouin, the use of an indigenous sign language is widespread and provides the foundation of a signing community shared by hearing and deaf people. Cases with comparable high incidences of deafness have in recent years stimulated debates in diverse academic disciplines. Lacking an accurate term, they are regularly referred to as "Martha's Vineyard situations" and have often been oversimplified and romanticized. This article provides an in-depth analysis of a Bedouin shared-signing community and advocates closer investigation of both facilitating and disabling social practices, which would also allow better examination of comparable cases. This article concentrates on the shared use of sign language, the asymmetry it entails, and the manifold forms of translation and mediation that take place. Whereas most hearing Al-Sayyid persons have access to both spoken and signed modes of communication, deaf people's communication remains largely restricted to the signed mode (hence, the asymmetry). However, in contrast to the common reduction of deafness to the disabling absence of speech or need for translation, deaf people's need for translation is not unusual among the Al-Sayyid; local communication patterns involve many different forms of translation between different spoken languages, written languages, discourses, and social domains. Additionally, ample translators are readily available. Moreover, the common familiarity with deaf people and sign language facilitates the production and sharing of a unique experiential knowledge, grounded in daily experiences and practices. In this context, deafness is not easily subjugated to its medical model. However, encounters with the medical and educational establishment present a series of challenges that may severely exacerbate deaf people's structure of opportunities. Finally, I consider the attempts made so far to classify comparable cases; unfortunately, these mostly attempt to classify deaf

  5. Intergenerational Communication Modes in Deaf-Parented Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallory, Barbara L.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    This study focused on the intergenerational modes used in 15 family triads: hearing child, deaf parent, hearing grandparent. Results raise questions about the effect of mismatched language modes on intergenerational relationships in deaf-parented families. (19 references) (VWL)

  6. The Role of Parents in the Development of Deaf Children

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    IWONA JAGOSZEWSKA

    2017-01-01

    Both the parents and the deaf children live with a disability. The specificity of deafness has a significant impact on the functioning of the families which often requires support of their care and educational functions...

  7. Genetics Home Reference: autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia, deafness, and narcolepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Twitter Home Health Conditions ADCADN Autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia, deafness, and narcolepsy Printable PDF Open All Close ... the expand/collapse boxes. Description Autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia, deafness, and narcolepsy ( ADCADN ) is a nervous system ...

  8. Childhood Deafness: How Big a Problem In Malawi?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the prevalence of childhood deafness in societies similar to Malawi's and extrapolates ... dice chances of admission (personal communication). For those becoming deaf ... people other than his I her immediate family)?. 23. 10, Compared with ...

  9. DeafSpace and the principles of universal design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Claire; Harold, Gill

    2014-01-01

    Recent debates about the epistemological origins of Universal Design (UD) have questioned how far universalist design approaches can address the particularities and diversities of the human form through a series of standardised, technical responses. This article contributes to these debates by discussing an emergent architectural paradigm known as DeafSpace, which articulates a set of design principles originating from the d/Deaf community in the US. Commentary. DeafSpace has emerged as a design paradigm rooted in an expression of d/Deaf cultural identity based around sign language, rather than as a response designed to compensate for, or minimise, impairment. It distinguishes itself from UD by articulating a more user-centred design process, but its principles are arguably rooted in notions of d/Deaf identity based around consensus and homogeneity, with less attention paid to the socio-political contexts which shape diverse experiences of d/Deafness and the exclusion(s) of d/Deaf people from the built environment. While proponents of DeafSpace argue that UD and DeafSpace are not mutually exclusive, nor DeafSpace principles applicable only to d/Deaf people, questions remain about the type of spaces DeafSpace creates, most notably whether they lead to the creation of particularist spaces of and for the d/Deaf community, or reflect a set of design principles which can be embedded across a range of different environments. Implications for Rehabilitation UD as a basis for rehabilitation has been critiqued on the basis that creates "standardised", or universal solutions, thus negating the particularities of the human form. DeafSpace is an architectural paradigm rooted in socio-linguistic understandings of Deafness and the cultural identity of the Deaf community. It challenges UD's technocratic emphasis on minimising impairment and asserts design which is rooted in a more qualitative understanding of individuals' relationship with their environment. DeafSpace seeks to

  10. Inbreeding as a cause for deafness: Dadhkai study

    OpenAIRE

    Sushil Razdan; Sunil Kumar Raina; Pandita, Kamal K.; Shiveta Razdan; Renu Nanda; Rajni Kaul; Sandeep Dogra

    2012-01-01

    Background: We report on the higher prevalence of deaf-mutes from a village in Jammu and Kashmir State of India. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study among 79 deaf mutes using pedigree analysis, audiometry, imaging and molecular analysis. Results: A high rate of hereditary deafness with 79 individuals diagnosed to be suffering from non-syndrome deafness in a total population of 2452 individuals residing in the village. Interpretation: Flourishing of intermarriages led t...

  11. Deaf scholars on reading: a historical review of 40 years of dissertation research (1973-2013): implications for research and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Jean F; Byrne, Andrew; Clark, M Diane

    2015-01-01

    Taking a historical view, the authors reviewed 40 years of dissertation research by deaf scholars (1973-2013) related to reading. Using a qualitative interpretive analysis approach (J. Smith & Osborn, 2003), the authors selected 31 dissertations as primary texts, reviewing them for themes over five time periods. The first finding was a trend of themes on communication methodology in the 1970s (first period), to English reading skills in the 1980s (second period), to American Sign Language/English bilingualism to support acquisition of English literacy during the third, fourth and fifth periods (1990-2013). The second finding was that most of the dissertations used a combination of qualitatively similar and qualitatively different epistemologies in their research. These two findings are related to (a) the role of the deaf reading researcher, (b) historical and current trends in reading research, and (c) the qualitative similarity hypothesis (Paul, Wang, & Williams, 2013).

  12. SKI-HI Home Intervention for Families with Infants, Toddlers, and Preschool Children Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glover, Barbara; And Others

    1994-01-01

    The SKI-HI program, which provides home-based family support services for infants, toddlers, and preschool children who are deaf or hard of hearing, has been implemented by approximately 250 agencies and annually serves about 4,000 families. Information is provided on the program's rationale, development, family-centered home-based services,…

  13. Rediscovery of the Rare Sea Snake Hydrophis parviceps Smith 1935

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Arne R.; Elmberg, Johan; Sanders, Kate L.

    2012-01-01

    Smith's small-headed sea snake, Hydrophis parviceps, was originally described in 1935 from a single type specimen collected in southern Vietnam. Since this time there has been only one further record for the species-a specimen collected near the type locality in 1960 that has since been lost...

  14. Defence transcriptome profiling of Zingiber zerumbet (L.) Smith by ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH KUMAR G

    Soft rot is a serious disease in ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe), imposing a considerable economic loss annually in all ginger-producing countries. In this study, mRNA differential display was employed to identify genes whose expression was altered in a soft rot-resistant accession of Zingiber zerumbet (L.) Smith, a wild ...

  15. Harry Smith — recipient of the 2008 Molecular Ecology Prize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harry Smith is a scholar, mentor, internationally renowned researcher, eloquent speaker and author, pioneering journal editor and highly valued colleague who has contributed greatly in multiple ways to plant science and the community. He richly deserves the honour of the Molecular Ecology Prize....

  16. Nähtamatu revolutsioon / David R. Smith ; interv. Philip Ball

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Smith, David R.

    2007-01-01

    Tehisstruktuuriga metamaterjalid võivad põhjapanevalt muuta telekommunikatsiooni, andmekandjaid ja isegi päikeseenergeetikat, kinnitab Dukeѫi ülikooli töörühma juht David R. Smith. Artikkel üldpealkirja all: 10 tulevikutehnoloogiat 2007

  17. Academic Freedom and Tenure: Philander Smith College (Arkansas).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Academe: Bulletin of the AAUP, 1980

    1980-01-01

    The sequence of events and implications of the disciplinary dismissal of three faculty members of Philander Smith College are discussed with relation to the AAUP's 1940 Statement of Principles. It is concluded that faculty rights were violated by the administration and governing board. (MSE)

  18. Back to the Future with Patty Smith Hill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Patricia A.

    2017-01-01

    Generations after her passing, Patty Smith Hill (1868-1946) remains a towering figure in the world of early childhood education. Her words continue to offer insight, not only for those who work with young children, but also for those who help to prepare the teachers of young children for the important work they do--for those who both engage in and…

  19. Post-exposure prophylaxis | Smith | Southern African Journal of HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Southern African Journal of HIV Medicine. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 2, No 1 (2001) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Post-exposure prophylaxis. C Smith. Abstract.

  20. Biochemical and genetic diagnosis of Smith-Lemli- Opitz syndrome ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. The Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome (SLOS), due to defective function of 7-dehydrocholesterol reductase, is an autosomal recessive disorder that is more common than other defects in cholesterol biosynthesis. The dysmorphology can be suggestive, but biochemical and genetic investigations are required for ...

  1. Triage in mass casualty situations | Smith | Continuing Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Continuing Medical Education. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 30, No 11 (2012) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Triage in mass casualty situations. W Smith. Abstract. No Abstract. Full Text:.

  2. Mastitis en kuddebestuur | Smith | South African Journal of Animal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Journal of Animal Science. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 5, No 2 (1975) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Mastitis en kuddebestuur. A Smith, H.G.J. Coetzee ...

  3. J. L. B. Smith Institute of Ichthyology, Grahamstown

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    fauna of South Africa presently being conducted by the J. L. B. Smith Institute ofIchthyology. The ichthyocide rotenone ... research (particularly in the realm of resource subdivision). Comparisons can then be ... pool fauna is comprised primarily of juveniles with only occasional adults, which probably seldom breed in the area ...

  4. JLB Smith Institute of Ichthyology, Rhodes University, Grahamstown

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1973-11-11

    Nov 11, 1973 ... CABORA BASSA FISH POPULATIONS BEFORE AND DURING. THE FIRST FILLING PHASE. P. B. N. JACKSON. J. L. B. Smith Institute of Ichthyology, Rhodes University, Grahamstown and. K. H. ROGERS. Department of Botany, Natal University, PietermtJl'itzburg. ABSTRACT. Pre-impoundment surveys ...

  5. Smith-Magenis Syndrome: Genetic Basis and Clinical Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finucane, Brenda; Haas-Givler, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) is a neurobehavioral disorder associated with deletions and mutations of the "RAI1" gene on chromosome 17p11.2. Clinical features of the syndrome include intellectual disability, sleep disturbance, craniofacial differences, and a distinctive profile of stereotypic and self-injurious behaviors. Although the functional…

  6. 77 FR 42187 - Relay Services for Deaf-Blind Individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-18

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 64 Relay Services for Deaf-Blind Individuals AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission... Communications and Video Accessibility Act of 2010, Section 105, Relay Services for Deaf-Blind Individuals, Order... Services for Deaf-Blind Individuals, CG Docket No. 10-210. Form Number: N/A. Type of Review: Revision of a...

  7. Sensitivity to Conversational Maxims in Deaf and Hearing Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surian, Luca; Tedoldi, Mariantonia; Siegel, Michael

    2010-01-01

    We investigated whether access to a sign language affects the development of pragmatic competence in three groups of deaf children aged 6 to 11 years: native signers from deaf families receiving bimodal/bilingual instruction, native signers from deaf families receiving oralist instruction and late signers from hearing families receiving oralist…

  8. Reading and Deaf Individuals: Perspectives on the Qualitative Similarity Hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ye; Andrews, Jean

    2014-01-01

    In this, the first article in the "American Annals of the Deaf" special issue on English reading development for individuals who are d/Deaf and hard of hearing, the coeditors aim to promote interdisciplinary dialogue among researchers regarding literacy research with d/Deaf and hard of hearing (d/Dhh) students by setting the tone for an…

  9. Education Reforms and English Teaching for the Deaf in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quay, Suzanne

    2005-01-01

    Deaf education is in a period of great transition in Japan as a result of the "Educational Reform Plan for the 21st Century" proposed by the Japanese education ministry. Unfortunately, the communication needs of deaf students have not been taken into account in the Plan's recommendations. One area where deaf students must attain the same…

  10. Deaf and Hearing Children: A Comparison of Peripheral Vision Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Codina, Charlotte; Buckley, David; Port, Michael; Pascalis, Olivier

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated peripheral vision (at least 30[degrees] eccentric to fixation) development in profoundly deaf children without cochlear implantation, and compared this to age-matched hearing controls as well as to deaf and hearing adult data. Deaf and hearing children between the ages of 5 and 15 years were assessed using a new,…

  11. Deaf Children with Disabilities: Rights under the IDEA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raimondo, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    Parents of children who are deaf and who have disabilities often face barriers in ensuring that their children receive the services they need. Some of these barriers include lack of awareness about deafness-disability constellations, shortages of professionals knowledgeable about how deaf children learn or the impact of the disability on deaf…

  12. Deaf Children's Understanding of Other People's Thought Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmondson, Peter

    2006-01-01

    This study focuses on the ability of deaf children to predict the behaviours of other people, based on an understanding of their beliefs. An unexpected transfer task and a deceptive box task were used with a group of 55 severely/profoundly deaf children. Results reiterate the findings of other studies that many deaf children are grossly delayed in…

  13. The Early Years: Parents and Young Deaf Children Reading Together

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, Lori

    2017-01-01

    Research is just beginning to describe the role of reading in the lives of families with deaf children. While the time that deaf children spend reading or being read to represents only a small part of their lives at home, research highlights its importance for young children--hearing as well as deaf. Children whose parents read to them at home…

  14. Influences on Facial Emotion Recognition in Deaf Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidera, Francesc; Amadó, Anna; Martínez, Laura

    2017-01-01

    This exploratory research is aimed at studying facial emotion recognition abilities in deaf children and how they relate to linguistic skills and the characteristics of deafness. A total of 166 participants (75 deaf) aged 3-8 years were administered the following tasks: facial emotion recognition, naming vocabulary and cognitive ability. The…

  15. Refinement of the locus for non-syndromic sensorineural deafness ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Non-syndromic X-linked deafness is a rare form of genetic deafness in humans accounting for a small proportion of all hereditary hearing loss. Different clinical forms of non-syndromic X-linked deafness have been described, and most of these have been mapped. Here, we report a Chinese family affected by a congenital ...

  16. Reaching the Summit: Deaf Adults as Essential Partners in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourne-Firl, Bridgetta

    2016-01-01

    How do we reach the summit in terms of supporting the best transition possible for each young deaf or hard of hearing individual in the United States? Should professionals who are hearing work alone to succeed with deaf and hard of hearing students? No matter how good the intention, if we want deaf and hard of hearing students to transition from…

  17. Social Factors Influencing Participation in Sport for the Deaf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, David A.

    1987-01-01

    The article looks at social factors influencing participation in sport by the deaf including communication mode and value orientations of community, family, school, and peers of both the hearing and deaf world. A model for integration of the deaf into sports is offered. (DB)

  18. Language policy and literacy among deaf people in Lesotho ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... as yet, failed to change the trend whereby deaf learners remain the most discriminated against. The article further argues that denying deaf learners an opportunity to acquire literacy through the Lesotho Sign Language, which is their primary language, contributes to the unsatisfactory state of deaf education in Lesotho.

  19. Congenital non-syndromal deafness at Adamarobe, an isolated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study to determine the prevalence, incidence and audiometric characteristics of deafness was done at Adamarobe, an isolated deaf village in Ghana. The procedures adopted include collection of family histories, pedigree, otoscopy and audiometric evaluation. As it turned out, a total of 45 deaf persons were identified in ...

  20. The Use of Acquired Speech by Deaf Adults in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mba, Peter O.

    The controversy between the oral and the total communication approach to deaf education is reviewed and a study of the use of acquired speech by 71 deaf adults in Nigeria is presented. Questionnaire results are discussed in terms of demographics, cause and age at onset of deafness, use of amplification, school achievement, type of employment,…

  1. Rubella Deaf-Blind Child: Implications of Psychological Assessment. Proceedings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouin, Carole

    Presented are proceedings of a conference involving authorities in testing and evaluating the blind, deaf, and deaf-blind. In a paper titled "Psychological Implications of Assessing the Deaf", C. Goetzinger discusses references used in audiology, anatomy and physiology of the ear, degrees of hearing impairment, and implications of the various…

  2. Modeling Ocean-Forced Changes in Smith Glacier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilien, D.; Joughin, I. R.; Smith, B. E.

    2014-12-01

    Glaciers along the Amundsen Coast are changing rapidly, which has drawn substantial scientific and public attention. Modeling and observation suggest warm-water intrusion and consequent melting as the cause of observed changes, and that unstoppable retreat may have already been triggered in some drainages. While Pine Island and Thwaites Glaciers are losing the most mass and have been the predominant objects study, other systems, particularly Smith, Pope and Kohler Glaciers and the corresponding Dotson and Crosson Shelves, are changing more rapidly relative to their size. Though smaller, these glaciers still have potentially large implications for overall regional dynamics as their beds connect below sea level to surrounding basins. In particular, the long, deep trough of Smith Glacier nearly links to the large eastern tributary of Thwaites, potentially causing rapid changes of Smith to have significant impact on the continuing retreat of Thwaites.We implemented a numerical model in Elmer/Ice, an open-source, full-Stokes, finite-element software package, to investigate the response of the Smith/Pope/Kohler system to different initial conditions. We use various parameterizations of sub-shelf melting with constant magnitude to examine the sensitivity of overall dynamics to melt distribution. Because melt distribution affects lateral buttressing and upstream grounded areas, it is potentially an important control on ice shelf and outlet glacier dynamics. Through comparison to the most recent velocity data, we evaluate the ability of differing melt parameterizations to reproduce the behavior currently seen in Smith/Pope/Kohler glaciers. In addition, we investigate the effect of using different years of velocity data with constant elevation input when initiating model runs. By comparing results over the satellite record to initiation with synchronous observations, we assess the accuracy of the often necessary practice of using differently timestamped datasets.

  3. Gênero e surdez / Gender and deafness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madalena Klein

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo propõe-se discutir a temática da surdez, articulando-a com discussões referentes a gênero e sexualidade, tomando por referência autores da perspectiva dosEstudos Culturais em Educação e dos Estudos Surdos. A surdez e os surdos, assim como o gênero, são entendidos a partir da diferença cultural. No mercado de trabalho em geral, as surdas são discriminadas, porém são a maioria no professorado, o que é uma conseqüência da feminização do trabalho docente. A crescente presença feminina na liderança dos movimentos surdos pode estar relacionada a essa maioria de professoras, que carregam para os movimentos características da organização escolar. Analisamos dois artigos sobre o tema, além de um encontro sobre mulheres surdas ocorrido em Pelotas – RS, onde as participantes destacaram seu papel na luta política da associação dos surdos, enquanto aos homens cabe o papel de organizar as atividades de lazer e esportes. A luta pelos direitos das mulheres surdas vem crescendo no Brasil e há necessidade de haver mais estudos sobre essa temática.Abstract This paper discusses the topic of deafness, articulating it with discussions referring to gender and sexuality, based on authors from the perspectives of Cultural Studies in Education and Deaf Studies. Deafness and deaf people, as the gender issue, are understood through a cultural difference perspective. Deaf women are discriminated inthe workplace in general, but they are the majority in the teaching profession, a consequence of the feminization of the teaching work. The increasing female presence as leaders of deaf movements may be related to this greater rate of women as teachers, who carry the features of the school organization onto the movements. Two papers onthe topic were examined, as well as a meeting on deaf women occurring in Pelotas – RS, whose participants highlighted their role in the political struggle by the deaf people’s association, while men take

  4. [Evaluation of deaf-mute patients with sensitive deafness gene screening in Shandong province].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Yu-bin; Han, Dong-yi; Wang, Da-yong; Zhou, Yu; Zhao, Cui; Wang, Hui; Lan, Lan; Wang, Qiu-ju

    2009-09-29

    To discuss how to determine the number of samples in epidemiological study about deafness genes and reveal the characteristics of GJB2, SLC26A4 and mitochondrial DNA A1555G mutations in deaf-mute patients in schools for deaf-mutes in Shandong Province. A total of 485 subjects were collected from the different schools for deaf-mutes in Shandong province. Amplified target fragments included GJB2 coding sequence, mtDNA12SrRNA and exon 8, 10, 17, 19 of SLC26A4 gene. The amplicons of mtDNA 12S rRNA were subjected to restriction enzyme Alw26I. The amplicons of patients whose enzyme reaction highly indicating A1555G mutation, amplicons of GJB2 and those exons PCR products of SLC26A4 were directly sequenced. The study revealed that 36.29% patients had two mutated alleles (homozygote & compound heterozygote) of GJB2 (24.12%) and SLC26A4 (6.60%) and mtDNA12SrRNA A1555G (5.57%). The 235delC and IVS7-2A > G were still the mutational hot spot in GJB2 and SLC26A4 respectively. The method of determining the number of sample is very important in the epidemiological study. There were about 24 thousand deaf-mute patients who were caused by three sensitive deafness genes mutations in Shandong province. Screening the sensitive deafness genes in newborn is imminent.

  5. Health promotion of families of deaf children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirna Albuquerque Frota

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the impact of hearing loss in the family dynamics of the deaf child; identify the family’s knowledge about deafness, understand how parents experience the diagnosis and treatment of child with hearing impairment. Methods: The study has aqualitative approach developed at the Center for Integrated Medical Care - NAMI, attached to the University of Fortaleza - UNIFOR located in Fortaleza - CE, Brazil. The participants were six mothers of children with hearing impairment. Data collection was carried outthrough participant observation and semi-structured interview. The Thematic Analysis of Bardin was used for processing the data. Results: After coding, some categories emerged from the discourse: Misinformation of Hearing Loss; impact of the discovery of hearingloss, caregivers and facilitators of the development of the deaf children. Conclusion: The birth of a deaf child alters the previous family balance, causing specific problems, such as the communication barrier, whose solution is related to how to handle the situation. Itis necessary to promote changes, emphasizing the involvement of caregivers and loved as facilitators of deaf child’s development. In Phonoaudiology, this attitude represents discovering new ways to identify the need for the subject, which requires strategies thatvalue their opinion, allowing the expression of expectations, perceptions, representations and feelings.

  6. Consanguinity and deafness in Omani children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khabori, Mazin Al; Patton, Michael A

    2008-01-01

    This study was based on a national retrospective analysis of 1400 questionnaires on the causes of deafness in Omani children, collected from 1986 to 2000. It was found that 70% of the deaf children were from parents of consanguineous marriages, and 30% from non-consanguineous unions. In those with consanguineous families 70.16% were first cousin marriages, 17.54% were second cousins, and 10.86% were from the same tribe. The proportion arising from first cousin marriages was higher than the background rate of first cousin marriages in Oman. In the total cohort, 45% had other family members with hearing loss. There was a greater chance of other relatives being affected in the consanguineous group as opposed to the non-consanguineous group (29.7% versus 15.3%). In most cases the affected relative was a deaf sibling (67.8%). We have demonstrated a higher rate of consanguinity amongst parents of deaf children in Oman and suggest this is associated with a higher frequency of autosomal recessive deafness in this paediatric population.

  7. Deaf Culture and Competing Discourses in a Residential School for the Deaf: "Can Do" versus "Can't Do"

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Catherine A.; Placier, Peggy

    2015-01-01

    From an ethnographic case study of a state-funded residential school for the Deaf, the authors employed Critical Discourse Analysis to identify competing discourses in the talk of educators. These discourses are embedded in the historical oppression and labeling of deaf people as disabled and the development of Deaf culture as a counter-discourse.…

  8. Sign-Language Theatre and Deaf Theatre: New Definitions and Directions. Center on Deafness Publication Series No. 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Dorothy S.; Fant, Louie J., Jr.

    Offered are guidelines to the development of theatre for, by, and about deaf persons. Various terms used for sign-language theatre and deaf theatre are defined and discussed in an introductory section, and the use of sign language as a theatrical medium is explained. The production of theatre is covered by sections on the history of deaf theatre,…

  9. Book Review: Inventing the Market: Smith, Hegel & Political Theory by Liza Herzog

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boscan, Luis

    2014-01-01

    Review of: Inventing the Market: Smith, Hegel & Political Theory. Liza Herzog. Oxford University Press. April 2013.......Review of: Inventing the Market: Smith, Hegel & Political Theory. Liza Herzog. Oxford University Press. April 2013....

  10. Book Review: Inventing the Market: Smith, Hegel & Political Theory by Liza Herzog

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boscan, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Review of: Inventing the Market: Smith, Hegel & Political Theory. Liza Herzog. Oxford University Press. April 2013.......Review of: Inventing the Market: Smith, Hegel & Political Theory. Liza Herzog. Oxford University Press. April 2013....

  11. Automatic Gauge Control in Rolling Process Based on Multiple Smith Predictor Models

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Li, Jiangyun; Wang, Kang; Li, Yang

    2014-01-01

    .... Smith predictor is a method to cope with time-delay system, but the practical feedback control based on traditional Smith predictor cannot get the ideal control result, because the time delay is hard...

  12. Relação entre níveis de compreensão e estratégias de leitura utilizadas por surdos sinalizadores em um programa terapêutico Relationship between comprehension levels and reading strategies used in a therapeutic program by deaf individuals who communicate through sign language

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Sílvia Cárnio

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Determinar as mudanças referentes às estratégias de aprendizagem nos níveis de compreensão de leitura durante um programa de intervenção fonoaudiológica direcionado aos surdos sinalizadores. MÉTODOS: Participaram cinco estudantes surdos, com idades entre dez anos e 15 anos, cuja língua preferencial para comunicação era a Língua Brasileira de Sinais. Todos frequentaram um programa de intervenção fonoaudiológica fundamentada na técnica de scaffolding (andaime. As variáveis consistiram dos desempenhos das avaliações individuais do nível de compreensão de leitura e das estratégias utilizadas para esta compreensão, antes de iniciar o programa e ao término do mesmo. RESULTADOS: Ao término do programa de intervenção, mais estudantes surdos utilizaram estratégias de elaboração (p=0,197 e menos estudantes utilizaram estratégias de monitoramento (p=0,197. Houve mudança significativa quanto à pontuação do nível de decodificação (p=0,109 e tendência à significância no nível de compreensão literal (p=0,197, com aumento da pontuação. Verificou-se significância somente entre a utilização da estratégia de elaboração e os dois momentos da avaliação (inicial e final (p=0,059. CONCLUSÃO: O programa de intervenção baseado na técnica de scaffolding propiciou que estudantes surdos sinalizadores utilizassem mais estratégias de elaboração e menos de monitoramento; consequentemente, uma tendência para a passagem do nível de decodificação para o nível de compreensão literal do texto.PURPOSE: To establish changes in learning strategies at reading comprehension levels during a speech-language intervention program for deaf individuals who use sign language. METHODS: Five deaf students, with ages between ten and 15 years, whose preferential modality of communication was the Brazilian Sign Language, participated in the study. All subjects were participating in a speech-language intervention program

  13. Disaster Relief and Crisis Intervention with Deaf Communities: Lessons Learned from the Japanese Deaf Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayama, Kota

    2017-01-01

    During natural disasters and crises, the deaf and hard of hearing community might not have full accessibility to all of the information shared with the larger hearing community. This could be due to the lack of awareness among social work professionals about these cultural and linguistic needs of this minority population. The purpose of this article is to explore the challenges faced by the deaf community and to discuss culturally and linguistically appropriate crisis intervention and mobilization to natural disaster situations based on the experiences of the Japanese deaf communities affected by the Kobe and Tohoku earthquakes.

  14. orignal paper: Beyond natural selection and divine intervention: The Lamarckian implication of Adam Smith's invisible hand

    OpenAIRE

    Khalil, Elias L.

    2000-01-01

    Adam Smith's invisible hand metaphor (IH) is examined in light of two different accounts of the origin of traits: Charles Darwin's theory of evolutionary optimization and William Paley's theory of divine intervention. Smith's stand supersedes both accounts. For Smith, intermediating drives, such as the sexual one, neither arise accidentally and favored according to their fitness , la Darwin nor planted by the Deity , la Paley. For Smith, such drives are adopted in light of their ultimate end....

  15. Tools Facilitating Communication for the Deaf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luz Magnolia Tilano-Vega

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available There is a great deal of interest worldwide in serving people with diverse abilities and needs, especially in the field of education. This implies a commitment to inclusion, empowerment and creating opportunities in a range of sectors. The deaf pose a considerable challenge to any proposal for inclusion and social integration, because their difficulty affects communication. The purpose of this study is to contribute to theoretical reflection on the development of communication tools that give the deaf access to education. It is based on a review of studies found in databases, on institutional websites and in journals on disciplines such as teaching, psychology and engineering. The various tools that have been created to help members of the deaf community strengthen the social, educational, recreational and work-related aspects of their lives are listed.

  16. Rare cause of bilateral sudden deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vos, F I; Merkus, P; van Nieuwkerk, E B J; Hensen, E F

    2016-10-08

    In this paper, we describe the case of a 62-year-old female with recurring episodes of sudden deafness with vertigo and facial paresis. Within a month's time, this resulted in bilateral deafness and vestibular areflexia. Erroneously, the patient was diagnosed with sudden deafness of unknown origin and subsequently with neuroborreliosis (Lyme disease). The true diagnosis of relapsing polychondritis (RP) was revealed 9 months after initial presentation. The diagnostic delay is in part explained by the fact that, by definition, the disease has to relapse before the diagnosis can be made, but also by its pluriform clinical presentation. Timely identification of RP as the cause of this profound sensorineural hearing loss proved to be important. It was key in instigating adequate follow-up, and allowed for cochlear implantation before total cochlear obliteration, which might have hampered optimal hearing rehabilitation. 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  17. A 3D Human-Machine Integrated Design and Analysis Framework for Squat Exercises with a Smith Machine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Haerin; Jung, Moonki; Lee, Ki-Kwang; Lee, Sang Hun

    2017-02-06

    In this paper, we propose a three-dimensional design and evaluation framework and process based on a probabilistic-based motion synthesis algorithm and biomechanical analysis system for the design of the Smith machine and squat training programs. Moreover, we implemented a prototype system to validate the proposed framework. The framework consists of an integrated human-machine-environment model as well as a squat motion synthesis system and biomechanical analysis system. In the design and evaluation process, we created an integrated model in which interactions between a human body and machine or the ground are modeled as joints with constraints at contact points. Next, we generated Smith squat motion using the motion synthesis program based on a Gaussian process regression algorithm with a set of given values for independent variables. Then, using the biomechanical analysis system, we simulated joint moments and muscle activities from the input of the integrated model and squat motion. We validated the model and algorithm through physical experiments measuring the electromyography (EMG) signals, ground forces, and squat motions as well as through a biomechanical simulation of muscle forces. The proposed approach enables the incorporation of biomechanics in the design process and reduces the need for physical experiments and prototypes in the development of training programs and new Smith machines.

  18. A 3D Human-Machine Integrated Design and Analysis Framework for Squat Exercises with a Smith Machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Haerin; Jung, Moonki; Lee, Ki-Kwang; Lee, Sang Hun

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a three-dimensional design and evaluation framework and process based on a probabilistic-based motion synthesis algorithm and biomechanical analysis system for the design of the Smith machine and squat training programs. Moreover, we implemented a prototype system to validate the proposed framework. The framework consists of an integrated human–machine–environment model as well as a squat motion synthesis system and biomechanical analysis system. In the design and evaluation process, we created an integrated model in which interactions between a human body and machine or the ground are modeled as joints with constraints at contact points. Next, we generated Smith squat motion using the motion synthesis program based on a Gaussian process regression algorithm with a set of given values for independent variables. Then, using the biomechanical analysis system, we simulated joint moments and muscle activities from the input of the integrated model and squat motion. We validated the model and algorithm through physical experiments measuring the electromyography (EMG) signals, ground forces, and squat motions as well as through a biomechanical simulation of muscle forces. The proposed approach enables the incorporation of biomechanics in the design process and reduces the need for physical experiments and prototypes in the development of training programs and new Smith machines. PMID:28178184

  19. 77 FR 12324 - Captain John Smith Chesapeake National Historic Trail Advisory Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-29

    ... National Park Service Captain John Smith Chesapeake National Historic Trail Advisory Council AGENCY... Captain John Smith Chesapeake National Historic Trail will hold a meeting. Designated through an amendment..., Maryland, Delaware, and in the District of Columbia,'' tracing the 1607-1609 voyages of Captain John Smith...

  20. 77 FR 64352 - Notice of Meeting for Captain John Smith Chesapeake National Historic Trail Advisory Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-19

    ... National Park Service Notice of Meeting for Captain John Smith Chesapeake National Historic Trail Advisory... Advisory Committee on the Captain John Smith Chesapeake National Historic Trail will hold a meeting...-1609 voyages of Captain John Smith to chart the land and waterways of the Chesapeake Bay. This meeting...

  1. 77 FR 2317 - Captain John Smith Chesapeake National Historic Trail Advisory Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-17

    ... National Park Service Captain John Smith Chesapeake National Historic Trail Advisory Council AGENCY... Captain John Smith Chesapeake National Historic Trail will hold a meeting via conference call. Designated... voyages of Captain John Smith to chart the land and waterways of the Chesapeake Bay. This meeting is...

  2. 76 FR 26767 - Captain John Smith Chesapeake National Historic Trail Advisory Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-09

    ... National Park Service Captain John Smith Chesapeake National Historic Trail Advisory Council AGENCY... Captain John Smith Chesapeake National Historic Trail will hold a meeting. Designated through an amendment..., Maryland, Delaware, and in the District of Columbia,'' tracing the 1607-1609 voyages of Captain John Smith...

  3. 76 FR 52691 - Captain John Smith Chesapeake National Historic Trail Advisory Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-23

    ... National Park Service Captain John Smith Chesapeake National Historic Trail Advisory Council AGENCY... Captain John Smith Chesapeake National Historic Trail will hold a meeting. Designated through an amendment..., Maryland, Delaware, and in the District of Columbia,'' tracing the 1607-1609 voyages of Captain John Smith...

  4. Green Bank Telescope OH Observations of Smith's Cloud: Evidence Of A Lack Of Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minter, Anthony

    2017-03-01

    Smith's Cloud is a large few × 106 Solar Mass cloud which will impact the Milk Way disk in about 35 Million Years (Lockman et al., 2008). Green Bank Telescope OH observations indicate that there are no molecules present in Smith's Cloud, and thus there is no active ongoing chemistry in Smith's Cloud.

  5. Deafness, a Social Stigma: Physician Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taneja, M K

    2014-12-01

    Hearing is an essential sensory sense of an individual for development of speech which is crucial for verbal communication and personality development. It is the second most common form of disability after loco motor disability in India. Disabling hearing loss is more than 40 dB hearing loss in better ear in a person more than 15 years of age and greater than 30 dB hearing loss in better hearing ear below 14 years of age. WHO estimated 360 million individuals in the world with disabling hearing loss, out of which 91 % are adults and only 9 % are children. Early and accurate identification of birth asphyxia, hyperbilirubinemia, auditory neuropathy Presbyacusis and avoiding noise pollution and discouraging use of mobile phone, tobacco chewing/smoking, in those who are prone to deafness, an intervention is a must to decrease deafness from our society. Deafness prevention can only be possible with mutual cooperation with dedication of different medical and non-medical personnel and also by helping the persons with deafness. We have to focus not only on the children but also on senior citizens as most alarming, up to 40 %, incidence of deafness is in senior citizens above the age of 75 years. Timely cure and preventive measures are essential for better socio-economic state of the country. By helping the persons with deafness, we will not only be doing a great service to the Nation but also to the society at large.

  6. Faster Smith-Waterman database searches with inter-sequence SIMD parallelisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rognes Torbjørn

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Smith-Waterman algorithm for local sequence alignment is more sensitive than heuristic methods for database searching, but also more time-consuming. The fastest approach to parallelisation with SIMD technology has previously been described by Farrar in 2007. The aim of this study was to explore whether further speed could be gained by other approaches to parallelisation. Results A faster approach and implementation is described and benchmarked. In the new tool SWIPE, residues from sixteen different database sequences are compared in parallel to one query residue. Using a 375 residue query sequence a speed of 106 billion cell updates per second (GCUPS was achieved on a dual Intel Xeon X5650 six-core processor system, which is over six times more rapid than software based on Farrar's 'striped' approach. SWIPE was about 2.5 times faster when the programs used only a single thread. For shorter queries, the increase in speed was larger. SWIPE was about twice as fast as BLAST when using the BLOSUM50 score matrix, while BLAST was about twice as fast as SWIPE for the BLOSUM62 matrix. The software is designed for 64 bit Linux on processors with SSSE3. Source code is available from http://dna.uio.no/swipe/ under the GNU Affero General Public License. Conclusions Efficient parallelisation using SIMD on standard hardware makes it possible to run Smith-Waterman database searches more than six times faster than before. The approach described here could significantly widen the potential application of Smith-Waterman searches. Other applications that require optimal local alignment scores could also benefit from improved performance.

  7. Deaf college students' perspectives on literacy portfolios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickerson, Jane Freiburg

    2003-01-01

    The study examined how literacy portfolios were used as tools in a college developmental English class in which deaf students assessed their reading comprehension as well as their writing processes and products. The students' reading and writing assignments involved reflective thinking and were grounded in authentic tasks. Immediate feedback was provided. The study was multidimensional, longitudinal, and ongoing. A variety of field research techniques were used to ascertain the uses and influences of portfolios in regard to students' reading, writing, and reflective thinking. The results support the idea that the use of literacy portfolios can positively influence students who are deaf when they assess their reading and writing abilities.

  8. Effect of rhythmic gymnastics on the rhythm perception of children with deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fotiadou, Eleni G; Tsimaras, Vasilios K; Giagazoglou, Paraskevi F; Sidiropoulou, Maria P; Karamouzi, Anna M; Angelopoulou, Nickoletta A

    2006-05-01

    This study was designed to examine the effect of a rhythmic gymnastics program on the rhythm perception of children with deafness. Two groups--control and experiment--of 12 and 17 children, respectively, coming from the same school for the deaf participated in this study. The duration of the program for the individuals in the experiment group was 16 weeks (at a frequency of 3 lessons per week, for 40 minutes each lesson), while children of both groups adhered to their regular school schedules. Five rhythmic patterns in 3 speeds (tempi) were reproduced both by a metronome and each child's performance and were recorded on a digital disk before and after the application of the program. The rate of time deviation (in seconds) between the 2 beats represented the score for each child. The average rate of the 5 rhythmic patterns in each tempo was calculated separately, giving 3 scores (one for every tempo) for each child. Significance was set at p < or = 0.05. The data revealed significant postexercise differences in favor of the experiment group, an improvement of the experiment group in all pre-post values, as well as an improved medium tempo with relation to the control group. The findings show the effectiveness of the specific program in terms of improving rhythm ability, thus indicating its use in educating children with deafness on rhythm instead of preferring the routine of the adapted school program.

  9. Preventing disability through understanding international megatrends in Deaf bilingual education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz-Baell, I M; Alvarez-Dardet, C; Ruiz, M T; Ortiz, R; Esteban, M L; Ferreiro, E

    2008-02-01

    Education is a basic prerequisite for d/Deaf people's health. Deaf education varies considerably from country to country and we still know very little about the reasons for such variation. To identify international megatrends that influence the current Deaf bilingual education move (Deaf Bilingual-Bicultural education; DBiBi) worldwide. Using the Delphi technique, 41 experts in d/Deaf education (nine Deaf, 32 hearing) from 18 countries identified, ranked, and rated international megatrends in DBiBi education. The process revealed six main essential elements of the international implementation of DBiBi education and nine main barriers against it. The top five promoting forces in that list in order of priority were: (1) societal and political changes towards a growing acceptance of diversity and Deaf issues; (2) growing Deaf activism, self-awareness and empowerment; (3) scientific research in sign linguistics and bilingualism; (4) changes in the d/Deaf educational community; and (5) international cooperation. The top five hindering forces included: (1) the view of deafness as a medical condition with a technological solution; (2) phonocentrism and societal resistance to the unknown; (3) educational and d/Deaf educational policies; (4) DBiBi education weaknesses; and (5) invisibility, heterogeneity and underperformance of the d/Deaf population. The results of this study reveal that social/political changes and a medical/social model of Deaf people's health can promote or limit Deaf people's educational options much more than changes within the education system itself, and that a transnational perspective is needed in deciding how best to support DBiBi education at a national and local level in an increasingly globalised world.

  10. Music in the lives of deaf children with cochlear implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trehub, Sandra E; Vongpaisal, Tara; Nakata, Takayuki

    2009-07-01

    Present-day cochlear implants provide good temporal cues and coarse spectral cues. In general, these cues are adequate for perceiving speech in quiet backgrounds and for young children's acquisition of spoken language. They are inadequate, however, for conveying the rich pitch-patterning of music. As a result, many adults who become implant users after losing their hearing find music disappointing or unacceptable. By contrast, child implant users who were born deaf or became deaf as infants or toddlers typically find music interesting and enjoyable. They recognize popular songs that they hear regularly when the test materials match critical features of the original versions. For example, they can identify familiar songs from the original recordings with words and from versions that omit the words but preserve all other cues. They also recognize theme songs from their favorite television programs when presented in original or somewhat altered form. The motivation of children with implants for listening to music or melodious speech is evident well before they understand language. Within months after receiving their implant, they prefer singing to silence. They also prefer speech in the maternal style to typical adult speech and the sounds of their native language-to-be to those of a foreign language. An important task of future research is to ascertain the relative contributions of perceptual and motivational factors to the apparent differences between child and adult implant users.

  11. Using Language ENvironment Analysis to improve outcomes for children who are deaf or hard of hearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aragon, Miranda; Yoshinaga-Itano, Christine

    2012-11-01

    Very little is known about the language environments of children in the United States in non-English-speaking homes. There is currently no published research that analyzes deaf or hard of hearing children in Spanish-speaking households, although the Colorado Home Intervention Program demographics indicate that these households account for 10 to 15% of the population of children who are deaf or hard of hearing. In other geographic regions in the United States, it is likely that the population of deaf and hard of hearing children from Spanish-speaking homes is considerably larger. The Spanish-speaking population in the United States has grown considerably within the last 5 to 10 years and will continue to expand. For these children to receive adequate treatment, research must be conducted to understand their language environment. The Language ENvironment Analysis (LENA) System uses a small recording device to collect, analyze, and sort a child's language environment into multiple categories and analyzes variables such as child vocalizations, adult words, and conversational turn taking. The normative data for the LENA System are from families who are English-speaking. The article demonstrates the feasibility of using the LENA System to gain understanding of the language environment of a child who is deaf or hard of hearing in a Spanish-speaking household. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  12. Empathy's purity, sympathy's complexities; De Waal, Darwin and Adam Smith.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Weele, Cor

    2011-07-01

    Frans de Waal's view that empathy is at the basis of morality directly seems to build on Darwin, who considered sympathy as the crucial instinct. Yet when we look closer, their understanding of the central social instinct differs considerably. De Waal sees our deeply ingrained tendency to sympathize (or rather: empathize) with others as the good side of our morally dualistic nature. For Darwin, sympathizing was not the whole story of the "workings of sympathy"; the (selfish) need to receive sympathy played just as central a role in the complex roads from sympathy to morality. Darwin's understanding of sympathy stems from Adam Smith, who argued that the presence of morally impure motives should not be a reason for cynicism about morality. I suggest that De Waal's approach could benefit from a more thorough alignment with the analysis of the workings of sympathy in the work of Darwin and Adam Smith.

  13. Defenses and morality: Adam Smith, Sigmund Freud, and contemporary psychoanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrinetti, Paul A; Özler, Sule

    2014-10-01

    In this paper we follow the development and transmission of moral learning from Adam Smith's impartial spectator to Sigmund Freud's superego and then to contemporary psychoanalysis. We argue that defenses are an integral component in the acquisition of any moral system. Elaborating on this argument, we assert that there is a progression from defensive systems that are "closed" to defensive systems that are "open," as defined in a recent work by Novick and Novick. The former system is "static, avoids reality, and is characterized by power dynamics, sadomasochism, and omnipotent defense." The latter, on the other hand, is a system that allows for "joy, creativity, spontaneity, love and it is attuned to reality." Furthermore, while Smith and Freud's systems are more one-person systems of defense, contemporary psychoanalysis has moved to more of a two-person system.

  14. Smith-Purcell Radiation in View of Particle Beam Diagnostics

    CERN Document Server

    Kube, G

    2003-01-01

    The development of the next generation high quality electron beams which are necessary for future high luminosity linear colliders and short wavelengths free electron lasers requires sensitive and non-destructive beam diagnostic techniques. In this context Smith-Purcell radiation which is generated when a charged particle beam passes close to the surface of a periodic structure (diffraction grating) is under discussion as a compact and inexpensive beam profile monitor. In order to study the basic emission process of Smith-Purcell radiation also in view of possible applications for particle beam diagnostics, experimental studies were performed at the Mainz Microtron MAMI in the visible spectral region with a microfocused 855 MeV electron beam. The radiation was separated from background components, as diffracted synchrotron radiation and transition radiation generated by electrons scratching the grating surface, by exploiting their specific emission characteristics. These are the narrow emission cone in the ...

  15. Adam Smith y la teoría social

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge López Lloret

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available El presente artículo estudia las ideas sociales de Adam Smith en su contexto histórico.Como instrumentos de análisis recurre a las nociones de «micro-sociología» y «macro-sociología», así como al enfoque dramatúrgico de la sociología de Goffman. Smith desarrolló un pensamiento social «micro» en La teoría de los sentimientos morales y otro «macro» en La riqueza de las naciones. Identificó además al objeto (como producto de la manufactura y como bien de consumo como el elemento de enlace entre ambas dimensiones, en un doble sentido: 1 como parte de nuestra puesta en escena cotidiana, y 2 como mediador de las relaciones sociales en unos contextos urbanos cada vez más complicados.

  16. Adam Smith and the new era of China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aníbal Carlos Zottele

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available ural area has been the quiet main character of China’s economic development. The history of this thousand-year-old culture seems to be exempted from further comments about its role. Its importance has been strongly expressed during crisis which institutions of that great nation in XX century were shook. Agricultural sector was the key in modernization period initiated in 1980 even in the later phases. Agriculture preponderance as progress support of the nations is presented by Scottish thinker Adam Smith in his work An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations. The status of Chinese development in XVII y XVIII centuries has been characterized in this document as well as the natural order of progress against unnatural or retrograde order followed by the Netherlands, in that time the country that had achieved higher levels growth in Europe. Apparently, at present, China repeats its old experiences by concentrating on the path praised by Smith.

  17. Spectral and spatial shaping of Smith-Purcell radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remez, Roei; Shapira, Niv; Roques-Carmes, Charles; Tirole, Romain; Yang, Yi; Lereah, Yossi; Soljačić, Marin; Kaminer, Ido; Arie, Ady

    2017-12-01

    The Smith-Purcell effect, observed when an electron beam passes in the vicinity of a periodic structure, is a promising platform for the generation of electromagnetic radiation in previously unreachable spectral ranges. However, most of the studies of this radiation were performed on simple periodic gratings, whose radiation spectrum exhibits a single peak and its higher harmonics predicted by a well-established dispersion relation. Here, we propose a method to shape the spatial and spectral far-field distribution of the radiation using complex periodic and aperiodic gratings. We show, theoretically and experimentally, that engineering multiple peak spectra with controlled widths located at desired wavelengths is achievable using Smith-Purcell radiation. Our method opens the way to free-electron-driven sources with tailored angular and spectral responses, and gives rise to focusing functionality for spectral ranges where lenses are unavailable or inefficient.

  18. RoboSmith: Wireless Networked Architecture for Multiagent Robotic System

    OpenAIRE

    Florin Moldoveanu; Doru Ursutiu; Dan Floroian; Laura Floroian

    2010-01-01

    In this paper is presented an architecture for a flexible mini robot for a multiagent robotic system. In a multiagent system the value of an individual agent is negligible since the goal of the system is essential. Thus, the agents (robots) need to be small, low cost and cooperative. RoboSmith are designed based on these conditions. The proposed architecture divide a robot into functional modules such as locomotion, control, sensors, communication, and actuation. Any mobile robot can be const...

  19. Adam Smith om forholdet mellem moralske fornemmelser og naturen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huggler, Lise Oxenbøll

    2008-01-01

    I The Theory of Moral Sentiments giver Adam Smith en fremstilling af, hvordan mennesket i sam­fundslivet udvikler moralske fornemmelser og af den betydning, disse har for menneskers følelses- og handlingsliv. Her er synssansen afgørende, idet den sætter mennesket i stand til rumligt lokaliser......­bart at betragte andre menneskers opførsel såvel som andre menneskers reaktioner på ens egen opførsel. Den sætter derved på en entydig måde mennesket i stand til at forholde sig til sig selv og til andre mennesker. På dette grundlag opstiller Smith en række psykologiske reaktionsmønstre. Ikke desto mindre påkalder...... han jævnligt bl.a. naturen som en metafysisk entitet. Der skal her argumenteres for, at de metafysiske begreber har til opgave at skabe den sammenhæng i menneskelivet, som kausale reaktioner i sig selv ikke giver. I forlængelse af dette peges der på, at Smith synes at hævde, at mennesket i samfundet...

  20. Gain of a Smith-Purcell free-electron laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. L. Andrews

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available A formula is derived for the small-signal gain of a Smith-Purcell free-electron laser. The theory describes the electron beam as a moving plasma dielectric, and assumes that the electron beam interacts with an evanescent mode traveling along the surface of a periodic waveguide with a rectangular profile. The phase velocity of the evanescent wave is synchronous with the electron velocity, but the group velocity is actually negative. The electron beam amplifies the evanescent wave, which does not itself radiate. According to this picture, the radiation observed emanating from the grating is Smith-Purcell radiation enhanced by the bunching of the electrons due to the interaction with the evanescent mode. There will also be radiation from the part of the evanescent mode that is outcoupled from the ends of the grating. This radiation appears at a lower frequency than the Smith-Purcell radiation. The new results explain both the gain and the radiation observed in the experiments of Urata and Walsh, and the cube-root current dependence of the gain inferred by Bakhtyari, Walsh, and Brownell.

  1. The role of music in deaf culture: deaf students' perception of emotion in music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darrow, Alice-Ann

    2006-01-01

    Although emotional interpretation of music is an individual and variable experience, researchers have found that typical listeners are quite consistent in associating basic or primary emotions such as happiness, sadness, fear, and anger to musical compositions. It has been suggested that an individual with a sensorineural hearing loss, or any lesion in auditory perceptors in the brain may have trouble perceiving music emotionally. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether students with a hearing loss who associate with the deaf culture, assign the same emotions to music as students without a hearing loss. Sixty-two elementary and junior high students at a Midwestern state school for the deaf and students at neighboring elementary and junior high schools served as participants. Participants at the state school for the deaf had hearing losses ranging from moderate to severe. Twelve film score excerpts, composed to depict the primary emotions-happiness, sadness, and fear, were used as the musical stimuli. Participants were asked to assign an emotion to each excerpt. Results indicated a significant difference between the Deaf and typical hearing participants' responses, with hearing participants' responses more in agreement with the composers' intent. No significant differences were found for age or gender. Analyses of the Deaf participants' responses indicate that timbre, texture, and rhythm are perhaps the musical elements most influential in transmitting emotion to persons with a hearing loss. Adaptive strategies are suggested for assisting children who are deaf in accessing the elements of music intended to portray emotion.

  2. The Usher's Syndrome Adolescent: Programming Implications for School Administrators, Teachers, and Residential Advisors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Wanda M.; Hicks, Doin E.

    1981-01-01

    The article examines educational programing implications for adolescents with Usher's syndrome, a condition of congenital deafness accompanied by progressive loss of vision through retinitis pigmentosa. (DB)

  3. GPU-Based Cloud Service for Smith-Waterman Algorithm Using Frequency Distance Filtration Scheme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-Ta Lee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available As the conventional means of analyzing the similarity between a query sequence and database sequences, the Smith-Waterman algorithm is feasible for a database search owing to its high sensitivity. However, this algorithm is still quite time consuming. CUDA programming can improve computations efficiently by using the computational power of massive computing hardware as graphics processing units (GPUs. This work presents a novel Smith-Waterman algorithm with a frequency-based filtration method on GPUs rather than merely accelerating the comparisons yet expending computational resources to handle such unnecessary comparisons. A user friendly interface is also designed for potential cloud server applications with GPUs. Additionally, two data sets, H1N1 protein sequences (query sequence set and human protein database (database set, are selected, followed by a comparison of CUDA-SW and CUDA-SW with the filtration method, referred to herein as CUDA-SWf. Experimental results indicate that reducing unnecessary sequence alignments can improve the computational time by up to 41%. Importantly, by using CUDA-SWf as a cloud service, this application can be accessed from any computing environment of a device with an Internet connection without time constraints.

  4. Design and implementation of a hybrid MPI-CUDA model for the Smith-Waterman algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaled, Heba; Faheem, Hossam El Deen Mostafa; El Gohary, Rania

    2015-01-01

    This paper provides a novel hybrid model for solving the multiple pair-wise sequence alignment problem combining message passing interface and CUDA, the parallel computing platform and programming model invented by NVIDIA. The proposed model targets homogeneous cluster nodes equipped with similar Graphical Processing Unit (GPU) cards. The model consists of the Master Node Dispatcher (MND) and the Worker GPU Nodes (WGN). The MND distributes the workload among the cluster working nodes and then aggregates the results. The WGN performs the multiple pair-wise sequence alignments using the Smith-Waterman algorithm. We also propose a modified implementation to the Smith-Waterman algorithm based on computing the alignment matrices row-wise. The experimental results demonstrate a considerable reduction in the running time by increasing the number of the working GPU nodes. The proposed model achieved a performance of about 12 Giga cell updates per second when we tested against the SWISS-PROT protein knowledge base running on four nodes.

  5. Tone deafness: a new disconnection syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loui, Psyche; Alsop, David; Schlaug, Gottfried

    2009-08-19

    Communicating with one's environment requires efficient neural interaction between action and perception. Neural substrates of sound perception and production are connected by the arcuate fasciculus (AF). Although AF is known to be involved in language, its roles in non-linguistic functions are unexplored. Here, we show that tone-deaf people, with impaired sound perception and production, have reduced AF connectivity. Diffusion tensor tractography and psychophysics were assessed in tone-deaf individuals and matched controls. Abnormally reduced AF connectivity was observed in the tone deaf. Furthermore, we observed relationships between AF and auditory-motor behavior: superior and inferior AF branches predict psychophysically assessed pitch discrimination and sound production perception abilities, respectively. This neural abnormality suggests that tone deafness leads to a reduction in connectivity resulting in pitch-related impairments. Results support a dual-stream anatomy of sound production and perception implicated in vocal communications. By identifying white matter differences and their psychophysical correlates, results contribute to our understanding of how neural connectivity subserves behavior.

  6. Educating Deaf Children: Language, Cognition, and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marschark, Marc; Knoors, Harry

    2012-01-01

    Decades of research have demonstrated that deaf children generally lag behind hearing peers in terms of academic achievement, and that lags in some areas may never be overcome fully. Hundreds of research and intervention studies have been aimed at improving the situation, but they have resulted in only limited progress. This paper examines…

  7. Educating Deaf Children: Language, Cognition, and Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marschark, M.; Knoors, H.E.T.

    2012-01-01

    Decades of research have demonstrated that deaf children generally lag behind hearing peers in terms of academic achievement, and that lags in some areas may never be overcome fully. Hundreds of research and intervention studies have been aimed at improving the situation, but they have resulted in

  8. Cerebral Malaria Complicated by Blindness, Deafness and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Malaria is a parasitic disease affecting about 1 billion people globally and causing about 1.24 million deaths ... its attendant sequelae such as cerebral palsy, cortical blindness, sensory-neural deafness and rarely ... under pressure, and its analysis and culture were normal. Blood film for malaria parasite was positive for ...

  9. Deaf College Students' Perspectives on Literacy Portfolios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickerson, Jane Freiburg

    2003-01-01

    This study examined use of literacy portfolios in a college developmental English class in which students who are deaf assessed their reading comprehension, writing processes, and products. Assignments involved reflective thinking and were grounded in authentic tasks. Various field research techniques were used to ascertain the uses and influences…

  10. A DICTIONARY OF IDIOMS FOR THE DEAF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    BOATNER, MAXINE T.; GATES, JOHN E.

    DESIGNED FOR USE IN SECONDARY CLASSES FOR THE DEAF, THIS DICTIONARY LISTS OVER 4,000 IDIOMATIC EXPRESSIONS. FOR EACH IDIOM, THE ENTRY MAY INCLUDE VARIANT FORMS, PART OF SPEECH LABEL, STYLE LABEL, DEFINITION, USAGE NOTE, ILLUSTRATIVE SENTENCES, CROSS REFERENCES, A SYNONYM OR CONTRAST, AND ETYMOLOGY. AN APPENDIX LISTS ESSENTIAL IDIOMS. THIS DOCUMENT…

  11. Language Maintenance and the Deaf Child

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willoughby, Louisa

    2012-01-01

    For all families with deaf children, choosing communication methods is a complex and evolving business. This process is particularly complex for migrant background families, who must not only negotiate the role that speaking or signing will play in their communication practices, but also which spoken language(s) will be used--that of the host…

  12. Deaf Learners' Knowledge of English Universal Quantifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berent, Gerald P.; Kelly, Ronald R.; Porter, Jeffrey E.; Fonzi, Judith

    2008-01-01

    Deaf and hearing students' knowledge of English sentences containing universal quantifiers was compared through their performance on a 50-item, multiple-picture task that required students to decide whether each of five pictures represented a possible meaning of a target sentence. The task assessed fundamental knowledge of quantifier sentences,…

  13. Grapheme-Phoneme Acquisition of Deaf Preschoolers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beal-Alvarez, Jennifer S.; Lederberg, Amy R.; Easterbrooks, Susan R.

    2012-01-01

    We examined acquisition of grapheme-phoneme correspondences by 4 deaf and hard-of-hearing preschoolers using instruction from a curriculum designed specifically for this population supplemented by Visual Phonics. Learning was documented through a multiple baseline across content design as well as descriptive analyses. Preschoolers who used sign…

  14. Deaf Children's Bimodal Bilingualism and Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanwick, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the research into deaf children's bilingualism and bilingual education through a synthesis of studies published over the last 15 years. This review brings together the linguistic and pedagogical work on bimodal bilingualism to inform educational practice. The first section of the review provides a synthesis of…

  15. Waardenburg syndrome in childhood deafness in Cameroon ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two classic characteristics of WS were used as diagnostic criteria: deafness and pigmentation abnormalities (heterochromia iridis, white forelock and depigmented skin patches). In addition, to identify dystopia canthorum, a sign of WS type I, we calculated the W-index. Results. WS comprised 1% of the whole sample, 7% of ...

  16. THE DEAF BODY AND ITS SINGULARITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Rodrigues

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This article refers to a section of a master dissertation held at Univates University Center from July 2013 to July 2015. Among the theories of philosophers of difference, including Deleuze and Barthes, the following research problem was taken: How a deaf body is pierced by different means other than the representation? Such a problem unfolds on the following objectives: understanding the ways in which some deaf bodies are unique and how they empower their lives; carto(photographing the affects produced by the encounter between a deaf body and the photography. These carto(photographs were held at different times, with three deaf people in the cities of Lajeado / RS and Estrela / RS, from paths which were traveled using a camera. The encounter with the work "Walking" by Lygia Clark (1964 served to think the route as a work that takes place in the act. In some cases, an unfinished body in motion of constant refusal to fix; in many others, only one body captured by stratified lines. At the end of the survey, it’s possible to see that the body's release is always difficult, so that it is more fixed in the objectivity and brevity, rather than in what a body is capable of producing as uniqueness.

  17. Deaf-Blind Bibliography. Revised Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuckey, Kenneth A., Comp.

    The bibliography contains approximately 1500 citations (1954-1976) regarding deaf blind children. Entries are arranged alphabetically by author within the following 13 categories: the population; parents, family, and the adult community (including parent education and infant intervention); professionals/paraprofessionals; medical/neurological…

  18. Potentials of Rubella Deaf-Blind Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Benjamin F.

    Potentials of three classifications of rubella deaf blind children are discussed. Potentials for children at the middle trainable level and below are discussed for the areas of communication skills, daily living skills, mobility and orientation, vocational effort, and self-control and social interaction. For children in the upper trainable through…

  19. Hereditary congenital unilateral deafness : A new disorder?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dikkers, FG; Verheij, JBGM; van Mechelen, M

    Congenital unilateral deafness is a rare disorder. The prevalence rates are unknown. The prevalence of children with severe to profound hearing losses that are congenital (or acquired before the development of speech and language) is 0.5 to 3 per 1,000 live births. Evidently, congenital unilateral

  20. Teaching Idioms to Children Who Are Deaf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Kathleen M.; Hornett, Danielle

    1990-01-01

    A method is presented for helping children who are deaf to comprehend idiomatic expressions. The teaching method involves introducing the idiom, providing examples of proper usage, requiring students to give back examples for the idiom, evaluating comprehension of the idiom, and subsequently reinforcing learning through completion of a worksheet.…

  1. Developmental Social Cognitive Neuroscience: Insights from Deafness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corina, David; Singleton, Jenny

    2009-01-01

    The condition of deafness presents a developmental context that provides insight into the biological, cultural, and linguistic factors underlying the development of neural systems that impact social cognition. Studies of visual attention, behavioral regulation, language development, and face and human action perception are discussed. Visually…

  2. ATM: Restructing Learning for Deaf Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keefe, Barbara; Stockford, David

    Governor Baxter School for the Deaf is one of six Maine pilot sites chosen by NYNEX to showcase asynchronous transfer mode (ATM) technology. ATM is a network connection that allows high bandwidth transmission of data, voice, and video. Its high speed capability allows for high quality two-way full-motion video, which is especially beneficial to a…

  3. Health Care Access among Deaf People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuenburg, Alexa; Fellinger, Paul; Fellinger, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Access to health care without barriers is a clearly defined right of people with disabilities as stated by the UN Convention on the Rights of People with Disabilities. The present study reviews literature from 2000 to 2015 on access to health care for deaf people and reveals significant challenges in communication with health providers and gaps in…

  4. Ophthalmologic abnormalities among deaf students in Kaduna ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    [10] Difficult refractions especially in the younger age group were referred to a tertiary health facility for further management. All the children had comprehensive ear examination conducted by an Otorhinolaringologist and drugs were administered to those with treatable eye disease. Results. A total of 620 deaf students were ...

  5. Deaf Children and English: Parents Can Help.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katasse, Constance

    1997-01-01

    Describes strategies parents can use to teach English to children with deafness or those hard of hearing. Strategies include modeling reading and writing, communicating with the child in writing, providing word-rich books and writing supplies, playing word-based games, and learning special techniques for reading to and with the child. (CR)

  6. Alternatives to Teacher Testing for Deaf Candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, David S.

    Standardized written tests required for teacher licensure and certification often prevent or restrict qualified deaf and hard of hearing individuals from entering their chosen profession. These individuals do not have the same access to English as hearing people and the sentence structures, vocabulary, and language style in standardized tests are…

  7. Deafness and Text-Based Literacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Peter V.

    1993-01-01

    This paper argues that English text-based literacy skills (as opposed to nontext forms of communication such as audio-visual and American Sign Language) are necessary for people with deafness to succeed in the current technological, information-intensive society. (DB)

  8. Modifying Dialectical Behavior Therapy for Deaf Individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hearn, Amanda; Pollard, Robert Q., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    Therapies that rely on written materials, information, or procedures involving familiarity with the dominant culture (e.g., colloquialisms, history) often pose barriers to people who use another language, have low English literacy, or are less familiar with the dominant culture. All this applies deaf individuals. One of the most well-validated…

  9. The effect of interventional proprioceptive training on static balance and gait in deaf children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majlesi, Mahdi; Farahpour, Nader; Azadian, Elaheh; Amini, Mahdi

    2014-12-01

    Children with hearing impairment have balance and motor deficits primarily due to concomitant damage to the vestibular structures. Although early intervention focused on the development of communication skills, investigations of intervention for the amelioration of balance deficits in children with hearing loss have been minimal and inconclusive. Therefore, using an experimental design, the present study investigated the effect of a 12-session exercise balance program based on proprioception training on balance and gait in deaf as compared with hearing schoolchildren. The subjects, 10 deaf and 10 typically developing children were assigned to an experimental and a control group respectively. Taking up the initial differences between the groups through a pretest under different conditions, the participants in the experimental group went through a 12-session intervention program including static and dynamic training with emphasis on proprioceptive system. After this, the participants were tested again. The data obtained was analyzed using repeated measure. A comparison between the control and experimental groups revealed that the intervention program had not significantly increased gait velocity while it had significantly decreased the amount of sway. Thus, it was concluded that an exercise program that enhances somatosensory ability can result in improved balance in deaf children. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. CEC-CED Joint Knowledge and Skills statement for all becoming teachers of students who are deaf or hard of hearing. Joint Standards Committee of the National Council on Education of the Deaf and the Council for Exceptional Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-07-01

    In 1992, the National Council on Education of the Deaf (CED) and the Council for Exceptional Children (CEC) began a collaborative process in which new standards were jointly developed and approved by a representation of members from all organizations engaged in the preparation of teachers and in the delivery of services to deaf and hard of hearing learners, including educational, professional/administrative and consumer organizations. A Joint Standards Committee was appointed, and in 1992 enunciated mutually acceptable standards for the preparation of teachers of students who are deaf and hard of hearing. Fundamental to the entire standards development process was respect for the continuum of educational options available for children who are deaf and hard of hearing. The intent of this committee was to provide standards which were credible for all university and college teacher preparation programs and which could serve as a foundation for the development and maintenance of strong and viable programs according to the specific stated philosophy and practice of each. Information regarding the new standards and University/College Program Evaluation can be obtained from: Dr. Harold Johnson, Program Evaluation Chair, Kent State University, Room 405 White Hall, Kent, Ohio 44242.

  11. The management of deafness with cochlear implant – our experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagoda Vatovec

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The hearing impairment has an impact on the person’s capabilities and has an influence on the quality of life. In the early childhood the acoustic information is indispensable for development of speech and language. The cochlear implant is a biomedical device that enables the deaf to hear but it cannot help all the hearing impaired individuals.Patients and methods: In the period from March 1996 to August 2004 there were 110 deaf patients who were operated on for cochlear implantation. We evaluated the ethiologic factors of deafness, the age at onset of deafness and the benefits of cochlear implant use.Results: Most of the implanted patients were congenitally deaf (60.91%. The most frequent cause of deafness was hereditary hearing loss (30.00%. The period of deafness was in majority (52.72% less than five years but a few (10.00% were deaf for more than 15 years. Reimplantation was necessary in four patients. The application and the benefits vary between the individuals but only two gave up the implant all the remainders use it every day. The communication mode in 88 patients is acoustic-oral while in 22 subjects a total method is used.Conclusions: The outcome of management of deafness by cochlear implants is comparable to other centers. Good results in congenitally deaf children support the need for universal neonatal hearing screening.

  12. Some Ethical Dimensions of Cochlear Implantation for Deaf Children and Their Families

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Merv Hyde; Des Power

    A major source of controversy between Deaf people and those who support a "social/cultural" view of Deafness as "a life to be lived" and those who see deafness within a "medical model" as a "condition...

  13. 75 FR 10294 - National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-05

    ... Deafness and Other Communication Disorders; Notice of Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal... ON DEAFNESS AND OTHER COMMUNICATION DISORDERS, including consideration of personnel qualifications..., Division of Intramural Research, National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, 5...

  14. Sexual health behaviors of Deaf American Sign Language (ASL) users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiman, Erica; Haynes, Sharon; McKee, Michael

    2015-10-01

    Little is known about the sexual health behaviors of Deaf American Sign Language (ASL) users. We sought to characterize the self-reported sexual behaviors of Deaf individuals. Responses from 282 Deaf participants aged 18-64 from the greater Rochester, NY area who participated in the 2008 Deaf Health were analyzed. These data were compared with weighted data from a general population comparison group (N = 1890). We looked at four sexual health-related outcomes: abstinence within the past year; number of sexual partners within the last year; condom use at last intercourse; and ever tested for HIV. We performed descriptive analyses, including stratification by gender, age, income, marital status, and educational level. Deaf respondents were more likely than the general population respondents to self-report two or more sexual partners in the past year (30.9% vs 10.1%) but self-reported higher condom use at last intercourse (28.0% vs 19.8%). HIV testing rates were similar between groups (47.5% vs 49.4%) but lower for certain Deaf groups: Deaf women (46.0% vs 58.1%), lower-income Deaf (44.4% vs 69.7%) and among less educated Deaf (31.3% vs 57.7%) than among respondents from corresponding general population groups. Deaf respondents self-reported higher numbers of sexual partners over the past year compared to the general population. Condom use was higher among Deaf participants. HIV was similar between groups, though HIV testing was significantly lower among lower income, less well-educated, and female Deaf respondents. Deaf individuals have a sexual health risk profile that is distinct from that of the general population. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Sexual Health Behaviors of Deaf American Sign Language (ASL) Users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiman, Erica; Haynes, Sharon; McKee, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Background Little is known about the sexual health behaviors of Deaf American Sign Language (ASL) users. Objective We sought to characterize the self-reported sexual behaviors of Deaf individuals. Methods Responses from 282 Deaf participants aged 18–64 from the greater Rochester, NY area who participated in the 2008 Deaf Health were analyzed. These data were compared with weighted data from a general population comparison group (N=1890). We looked at four sexual health-related outcomes: abstinence within the past year; number of sexual partners within the last year; condom use at last intercourse; and ever tested for HIV. We performed descriptive analyses, including stratification by gender, age, income, marital status, and educational level. Results Deaf respondents were more likely than the general population respondents to self-report two or more sexual partners in the past year (30.9% vs 10.1%) but self-reported higher condom use at last intercourse (28.0% vs 19.8%). HIV testing rates were similar between groups (47.5% vs 49.4%) but lower for certain Deaf groups: Deaf women (46.0% vs. 58.1%), lower-income Deaf (44.4% vs. 69.7%) and among less educated Deaf (31.3% vs. 57.7%) than among respondents from corresponding general population groups. Conclusion Deaf respondents self-reported higher numbers of sexual partners over the past year compared to the general population. Condom use was higher among Deaf participants. HIV was similar between groups, though HIV testing was significantly lower among lower-income, less well-educated, and female Deaf respondents. Deaf individuals have a sexual health risk profile that is distinct from that of the general population. PMID:26242551

  16. Adaptive crossmodal plasticity in deaf auditory cortex: areal and laminar contributions to supranormal vision in the deaf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomber, Stephen G; Meredith, M Alex; Kral, Andrej

    2011-01-01

    This chapter is a summary of three interdigitated investigations to identify the neural substrate underlying supranormal vision in the congenitally deaf. In the first study, we tested both congenitally deaf and hearing cats on a battery of visual psychophysical tasks to identify those visual functions that are enhanced in the congenitally deaf. From this investigation, we found that congenitally deaf, compared to hearing, cats have superior visual localization in the peripheral field and lower visual movement detection thresholds. In the second study, we examined the role of "deaf" auditory cortex in mediating the supranormal visual abilities by reversibly deactivating specific cortical loci with cooling. We identified that in deaf cats, reversible deactivation of a region of cortex typically identified as the posterior auditory field (PAF) in hearing cats selectively eliminated superior visual localization abilities. It was also found that deactivation of the dorsal zone (DZ) of "auditory" cortex eliminated the superior visual motion detection abilities of deaf cats. In the third study, graded cooling was applied to deaf PAF and deaf DZ to examine the laminar contributions to the superior visual abilities of the deaf. Graded cooling of deaf PAF revealed that deactivation of the superficial layers alone does not cause significant visual localization deficits. Profound deficits were identified only when cooling extended through all six layers of deaf PAF. In contrast, graded cooling of deaf DZ showed that deactivation of only the superficial layers was required to elicit increased visual motion detection thresholds. Collectively, these three studies show that the superficial layers of deaf DZ mediate the enhanced visual motion detection of the deaf, while the full thickness of deaf PAF must be deactivated in order to eliminate the superior visual localization abilities of the congenitally deaf. Taken together, this combination of experimental approaches has

  17. Service-Learning in Deaf Studies: Impact on the Development of Altruistic Behaviors and Social Justice Concern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Sheryl B.; Cripps, Jody H.; Reisman, Joel I.

    2013-01-01

    A literature review identified various kinds of altruism, including altruism devoted to social change and a charitable form of altruism, along with the concept that it is possible for these types to occur independently or simultaneously. A study was conducted with university students in a Deaf studies program to determine the effect of a…

  18. Marital Status and Birthrate of Deaf People in Two Swedish Counties: The Impact of Social Environment in Terms of Deaf Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsson, P. -I.; Danermark, B.; Borg, E.

    2004-01-01

    Deafness affects many social interactions. The impact of deafness depends on several factors, e.g., the type of social environment in terms of the particular Deaf community a person lives in. The authors recorded the birthrate and the proportions of married and divorced people among deaf people in two Swedish counties: Narke, which had a strong…

  19. After early identification--what follows? A study of some aspects of deaf education from an otolaryngological viewpoint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, I F

    1984-06-01

    Otolaryngologists have accepted their role in the early diagnosis of the deaf and hard of hearing child: however, the social implications and habilitative programs embarked upon may often be regarded as unrelated to the practice of otolaryngology. The otolaryngologist is a key member of the team responsible for early detection and diagnosis, and he must become as involved with the available educational programs as are the other highly qualified competent individuals bringing expertise to the problem. The reason for emphasizing this area is that the otolaryngologist has witnessed a number of a major expansions in knowledge which have occurred in the past 15 years. These include: 1. Early identification of deafness through screening programs. 2. Early diagnosis through peripheral and brain stem evoked response audiometry. 3. Improvement in amplification in hearing aids. 4. Earlier placement in educational programs, many of which have been the center of controversy, particularly in the past 15 years. 5. Emphasis on continued research and development of programs such as the Cochlear Implant. A historical review of deaf education is presented together with an evaluation of the various claims made by the supporters of the auditory-oral vs. total communication techniques. No totally convincing argument for either system can be advanced. There is considerable doubt that the tri-stimulus, or total communication approach to teaching of the deaf, has any superiority over the auditory-oral approach. There are failures with both philosophies and the "deaf voice" is a stigma often associated with either system's graduates. A 13-year follow-up case study is presented in which the child was enrolled in an auditory-oral program. Comments are made as the child was followed through home training to preschool and on to complete integration in the regular school system. The implications of such a study for the Otolaryngologist, particularly with regard to early identification in order

  20. Deaf mothers and breastfeeding: do unique features of deaf culture and language support breastfeeding success?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Nancy P; Cuculick, Jessica; Starr, Matthew; Panko, Tiffany; Widanka, Holly; Dozier, Ann

    2013-11-01

    Deaf mothers who use American Sign Language (ASL) consider themselves a linguistic minority group, with specific cultural practices. Rarely has this group been engaged in infant-feeding research. To understand how Deaf mothers who use ASL learn about infant feeding and to identify their breastfeeding challenges. Using a community-based participatory research approach, we conducted 4 focus groups with Deaf mothers who had at least 1 child 0-5 years old. A script was developed using a social ecological model (SEM) to capture multiple levels of influence. All groups were conducted in ASL, filmed, and transcribed into English. Deaf and hearing researchers analyzed data by coding themes within each SEM level. Fifteen mothers participated. All had initiated breastfeeding with their most recent child. Breastfeeding duration for 8 of the mothers was 3 weeks to 12 months. Seven of the mothers were still breastfeeding, the longest for 19 months. Those mothers who breastfed longer described a supportive social environment and the ability to surmount challenges. Participants described characteristics of Deaf culture such as direct communication, sharing information, use of technology, language access through interpreters and ASL-using providers, and strong self-advocacy skills. Finally, mothers used the sign for "struggle" to describe their breastfeeding experience. The sign implies a sustained effort over time that leads to success. In a setting with a large population of Deaf women and ASL-using providers, we identified several aspects of Deaf culture and language that support breastfeeding mothers across institutional, community, and interpersonal levels of the SEM.

  1. “The Gong Gong Was Beaten” —Adamorobe: A “Deaf Village” in Ghana and Its Marriage Prohibition for Deaf Partners

    OpenAIRE

    Annelies Kusters

    2012-01-01

    Adamorobe is a village in Ghana where the historical presence of a hereditary form of deafness resulted in a high number of deaf inhabitants. Over the centuries, a local sign language emerged, which is used between deaf and hearing people in everyday life, rendering Adamorobe into a unique place of inclusion of deaf people. However, in 1975, a law was introduced to reduce the number of deaf people in Adamorobe: deaf people cannot marry each other in order to avoid deaf offspring. In the long ...

  2. Factors impacting participation of European elite deaf athletes in sport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurková, Petra; Válková, Hana; Scheetz, Nanci

    2011-03-01

    This study examine 53 European elite deaf athletes for their family's hearing status, use of hearing aids, communication preference, education in integrated or segregated settings, family members' encouragement for participation in sports, coach preference (hearing or deaf), and conditions for competitive events with deaf or hearing athletes. These data were gathered through semi-structured interviews administered in the athlete's native language. Deaf athletes reported that when given the opportunity to compete with hearing athletes, it enhanced their opportunity for competition. Participating in sports with hearing athletes played an important role in the integration of deaf athletes into mainstream society. If adaptations to communication can be made in these integrated settings, the ability of deaf athletes to participate in such settings will increase.

  3. Representations of deaf characters in children's picture books.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golos, Debbie B; Moses, Annie M

    2011-01-01

    Picture books can influence how children perceive people of different backgrounds, including people with disabilities whose cultures differ from their own. Researchers have examined the portrayal of multicultural characters with disabilities in children's literature. However, few have specifically considered the portrayal of deaf characters, despite increased inclusion of deaf characters in children's literature over the past two decades. The present study analyzed the portrayal of deaf characters in picture books for children ages 4-8 years. A content analysis of 20 children's picture books was conducted in which the books were analyzed for messages linked to pathological and cultural categories. Results indicated that these books did not portray Deaf characters from a cultural perspective but, rather, highlighted aspects of deafness as a medical condition, one that requires fixing and that perpetuates stereotypes of deafness as a disability.

  4. Deaf/LGBTQ Intersectional Invisibility in Schools: The Lived Experiences of Deaf Lesbian Students of Color at a School for the Deaf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunne, Courtney M.

    2013-01-01

    Historically, American society has had conflicting views on the nature and nurture of Deaf people and Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer (LGBTQ) people. In the context of majority cultures and societies in history, the reality of Deaf and LGBTQ people's lives has often been summarized in general terms such as invisibility and oppression.…

  5. Intelligence assessment of deaf students with TONI 3

    OpenAIRE

    Barbosa,Anna Carolina Cassiano; Lukasova,Katerina; Mecca,Tatiana Pontrelli; Macedo,Elizeu Coutinho

    2013-01-01

    The intelligence assessment of deaf and hard-of-hearing students has been a challenge for Brazilian psychologists, due to the lack of standardized and validated instruments for this population. The objective of this study was to assess the intelligence of deaf and hard-of-hearing students with the Test of Nonverbal Intelligence, Third Edition (TONI-3: Forma A) according to external variables: age, education, gender, type of deafness, use of hearing aid and communication mode. Study participan...

  6. Communication with deaf patients. Knowledge, beliefs, and practices of physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebert, D A; Heckerling, P S

    1995-01-18

    To assess physicians' knowledge and beliefs regarding communication with deaf people and compare their knowledge and beliefs with their methods of communicating with deaf patients in their practices. Survey. University medical center. Attending physicians in an internal medicine department. Physicians were surveyed regarding prior contacts with deaf patients and with deaf people outside the medical setting, and regarding their knowledge and beliefs concerning methods of communicating with deaf people. Physicians were asked to estimate the fraction of encounters in which they communicated with deaf patients by lipreading, writing, translation by a relative or friend, a sign language interpreter, or other methods. Writing was the method used most frequently in communicating with deaf patients. Although 63% of physicians knew that signing should be the initial method of communicating with deaf patients who sign, only 22% used sign language interpreters more frequently than other methods in their practices. Past contact with deaf people (P = .05), belief that communication by signing was the best means of communication (P = .04), and knowledge of the inefficiency of lipreading (P = .04) were predictors of the use of sign language interpreters for deaf patients. Physicians who used sign language interpreters more frequently than other methods believed that much more time and effort were involved in caring for deaf than for hearing patients compared with those who used interpreters less frequently (P = .08). Although most physicians believed that use of sign language interpreters was preferable, only a minority used them in their practices. Greater recognition of the advantages of signing over other methods and greater availability of sign language interpreters should lead to more effective communication between deaf patients and physicians.

  7. The Role of Parents in the Development of Deaf Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IWONA JAGOSZEWSKA

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Both the parents and the deaf children live with a disability. The specificity of deafness has a significant impact on the functioning of the families which often requires support of their care and educational functions. Therefore, it is vital to establish a cooperation between parents and proper institutions and specialists. Hearing dysfunction requires intensification of parents actions in the field of recognizing and developing the strong sides of deaf child

  8. Further Education of Deaf and Hard of Hearing People

    OpenAIRE

    Broncová, Kateřina

    2017-01-01

    This thesis deals with further education of deaf and hard of hearing people. Focus of the thesis is on possibilities of further education for these people in the Czech Republic and identification of their participation in it. Theoretical knowledge of hearing impairment is used in the thesis. Emphasis is put on differences among deaf and hard of hearing people. These differences are caused by diverse severity and type of hearing impairment and different communication systems used by deaf and h...

  9. Six-fold speed-up of Smith-Waterman sequence database searches using parallel processing on common microprocessors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rognes, T; Seeberg, E

    2000-08-01

    Sequence database searching is among the most important and challenging tasks in bioinformatics. The ultimate choice of sequence-search algorithm is that of Smith-Waterman. However, because of the computationally demanding nature of this method, heuristic programs or special-purpose hardware alternatives have been developed. Increased speed has been obtained at the cost of reduced sensitivity or very expensive hardware. A fast implementation of the Smith-Waterman sequence-alignment algorithm using Single-Instruction, Multiple-Data (SIMD) technology is presented. This implementation is based on the MultiMedia eXtensions (MMX) and Streaming SIMD Extensions (SSE) technology that is embedded in Intel's latest microprocessors. Similar technology exists also in other modern microprocessors. Six-fold speed-up relative to the fastest previously known Smith-Waterman implementation on the same hardware was achieved by an optimized 8-way parallel processing approach. A speed of more than 150 million cell updates per second was obtained on a single Intel Pentium III 500 MHz microprocessor. This is probably the fastest implementation of this algorithm on a single general-purpose microprocessor described to date.

  10. The dispersion equation of the induced Smith-Purcell instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klochkov, Dmitry N [Ap.49, Mesentsev St. 44-2, 300026 Tula (Russian Federation); Artemyev, Alexander I [General Physics Institute RAS, Vavilova 38, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Oganesyan, Koryun B [Yerevan Physics Institute, 2 Alikhanian Brothers Street, Yerevan 375036 (Armenia); Rostovtsev, Yuri V; Scully, Marlan O [Department of Physics and Institute for Quantum Studies, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843-4242 (United States); Hu, Chin-Kun, E-mail: bsk@yerphi.a [Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan 1152 (China)

    2010-09-01

    The simplest model of a magnetized infinitely thin electron beam is considered. For the grating, where the depth of grooves is a small parameter, the dispersion equation of the induced Smith-Purcell instability was obtained. It was found that the condition of the Thompson or the Raman regimes of excitation does not depend on beam current but depends on the height of the beam above the grating surface. The growth rate of instability in both cases is proportional to the square root of the electron beam current.

  11. Optimized smith waterman processor design for breast cancer early diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurdin, D. S.; Isa, M. N.; Ismail, R. C.; Ahmad, M. I.

    2017-09-01

    This paper presents an optimized design of Processing Element (PE) of Systolic Array (SA) which implements affine gap penalty Smith Waterman (SW) algorithm on the Xilinx Virtex-6 XC6VLX75T Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) for Deoxyribonucleic Acid (DNA) sequence alignment. The PE optimization aims to reduce PE logic resources to increase number of PEs in FPGA for higher degree of parallelism during alignment matrix computations. This is useful for aligning long DNA-based disease sequence such as Breast Cancer (BC) for early diagnosis. The optimized PE architecture has the smallest PE area with 15 slices in a PE and 776 PEs implemented in the Virtex - 6 FPGA.

  12. Comparing practical knowledge storage of deaf and hearing teachers of students who are deaf or hard of hearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlatt, Edward A

    2004-01-01

    Especially in the education of students who are deaf or hard of hearing, teachers' practical knowledge storage is almost never measured. The Survey of Practical Knowledge was used to compare the practical knowledge storage of deaf and hearing teachers of these students. Surveyed were 48 deaf and 115 hearing individuals at the preservice and in-service experience levels. Practical knowledge storage was defined as images, rules of practice, and practical principles. Results indicate that deaf teachers tend to view students as equals but are more likely to emphasize control over classroom behavior than hearing teachers. Hearing teachers tend to stress efforts to engage students in subject matter by providing variety and relating it to life experiences. Given the trend toward high-stakes testing of teachers, further research is encouraged on role differences between deaf and hearing teachers working with students who are deaf or hard of hearing.

  13. Baby talk - analyse of the deaf child speech

    OpenAIRE

    Hronová, Anna

    2008-01-01

    This work throws light upon the communication in the sign language which is held in a deaf family. Theoretical part of the work is focused on description of the features of language acquisition. General psycholinguistic knowledge i s given parallely with the results of research of sign language acquisition of the the deaf children from deaf families. The largest part of this work i s analyse of a five years old deaf boy speech. The author based her research on the M.A.K. Halliday language acq...

  14. Consanguinity analysis of congenital deafness in Northern Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costeff, H; Dar, H

    1980-01-01

    Consanguinity analysis of heterogeneous populations was performed on a group of 82 Israeli Jewish families with congenitally deaf probands, including 37 multiplex families with normal parents, 10 multiplex families with deaf parents, and 35 simplex families with deafness of unknown cause. Representative gene frequency was estimated as .0198, with two to four major gene loci per ethnic group. In both the simplex families and those with deaf parents, the only significant etiology found was homozygosity for pathologic recessive genes. Comparison of these findings in Israeli isolates with those in panmictic populations seems to imply that the genetic loci are not identical in the various isolates. PMID:7361765

  15. Emergency Department utilization among Deaf American Sign Language users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Michael M; Winters, Paul C; Sen, Ananda; Zazove, Philip; Fiscella, Kevin

    2015-10-01

    Deaf American Sign Language (ASL) users comprise a linguistic minority population with poor health care access due to communication barriers and low health literacy. Potentially, these health care barriers could increase Emergency Department (ED) use. To compare ED use between deaf and non-deaf patients. A retrospective cohort from medical records. The sample was derived from 400 randomly selected charts (200 deaf ASL users and 200 hearing English speakers) from an outpatient primary care health center with a high volume of deaf patients. Abstracted data included patient demographics, insurance, health behavior, and ED use in the past 36 months. Deaf patients were more likely to be never smokers and be insured through Medicaid. In an adjusted analysis, deaf individuals were significantly more likely to use the ED (odds ratio [OR], 1.97; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.11-3.51) over the prior 36 months. Deaf American Sign Language users appear to be at greater odds for elevated ED utilization when compared to the general hearing population. Efforts to further understand the drivers for increased ED utilization among deaf ASL users are much needed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Psycho-physical development of deaf school-age children.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Statiev S.I.

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Examined the psycho-physical development of deaf children and their adaptation to the world, analyzed the studies earlier. Shows the analysis of publications of various experts, we concluded that the problem is poorly understood and requires a solution, as it is currently very topical. Proved that the psycho-physical development of deaf children is low in comparison with hearing and speech development of many deaf people is not coming. It is established that such children find it difficult to adapt to the conditions of modern life and the need to develop different ways to improve the lives of deaf children.

  17. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Philip Smith Mountains NTMS quadrangle, Alaska

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-09-01

    Results of a hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Philip Smith Mountains NTMS quadrangle, Alaska are presented. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form. In this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume. These data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A and B describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data were subsetted by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) sorting programs into groups of stream sediment and lake sediment samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1000000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report.

  18. Behind the tracks of the language: theoretical review of the model RR of Karmiloff-Smith

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Defagó, Cecilia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article we reflect upon a model of cognitive development, so called "Representational Redescription" formulated by Karmiloff-Smith (1994. Her offer contributes new ways of understanding processes and mental representations beyond old dichotomies: conscious / unconscious, innate / acquired, linguistic / non linguistic processes. Her propose appears as going over two model of mental functioning, the constructivism of Piaget and Fodor's innatism, taking elements of each one of them but developing an original offer, contributing explanations to phenomena not included by the above mentioned theories. We assume this analysis will offer a reflection on the cognitive aspects involved in the development of the language, its specificity and its relation with other cognitive processes, so much for the cognitive / linguistic phenomena that explains like for what is not explained for it. About the last point, we consider appropriate the proposal offers by the Minimalist Program of N. Chomsky.

  19. [Multi-center study on the treatment of sudden deafness accompanied with tinnitus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hui; Dong, Hong; Cheng, Yan; Ma, Yuanxu; Lin, Peng; Zhong, Shixun; Kang, Houyong; Qian, Yi; Hu, Guohua

    2015-06-01

    To investigate the clinical characteristics and the effects of different drug therapies in patients of sudden deafness accompanied with tinnitus. The international standardized clinical research methods, the unified design and program were used in the study. The patients of sudden deafness accompanied with tinnitus, aged between 18 to 65 years old, were recruited, whose duration was less than two weeks with no medication. The patients were divided into four types according to the hearing curve: type A was acute sensorineural hearing loss in low tone frequencies, type B was acute sensorineural hearing loss in high tone frequencies, type C was acute sensorineural hearing loss in all frequencies and type D was total deafness. Each type had four different treatment programs, based on the unified designed randomized table. A total of 1024 cases with single side sudden deafness were recruited in the study by 33 hospitals in China from August 2007 to October 2011. Among the 1024 cases, 922 cases were accompanied with tinnitus (90.04%). By classification of audiogram, among the 922 cases, 169 cases were type A (82.44%), 127 cases were type B (90.07%), 370 cases were type C (92.04%), and 256 cases were type D (92.75%). The tinnitus mostly was persistent and low tone tinnitus. The degree of the tinnitus was mostly 2-3 grade. The curative effects of different types were analyzed, type A had the highest rate of 96.18%, type C was 87.75%, type B was 81.51%, and type D had the lowest rate of 75.32%. Significant difference of curative rate between different types was detected (χ² = 125.33, P = 0.000). There had no significant difference between the four different treatment groups (all P > 0.05). In the cases with single side sudden deafness accompanied with tinnitus, the type in low tone frequencies has the best curative effect, followed by the type in all frequencies. The type in high tone frequencies and the total deafness type have poor curative results. The steroid plays a

  20. Adaptive Smith-Waterman residue match seeding for protein structural alignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topham, Christopher M; Rouquier, Mickaël; Tarrat, Nathalie; André, Isabelle

    2013-10-01

    The POLYFIT rigid-body algorithm for automated global pairwise and multiple protein structural alignment is presented. Smith-Waterman local alignment is used to establish a set of seed equivalences that are extended using Needleman-Wunsch dynamic programming techniques. Structural and functional interaction constraints provided by evolution are encoded as one-dimensional residue physical environment strings for alignment of highly structurally overlapped protein pairs. Local structure alignment of more distantly related pairs is carried out using rigid-body conformational matching of 15-residue fragments, with allowance made for less stringent conformational matching of metal-ion and small molecule ligand-contact, disulphide bridge, and cis-peptide correspondences. Protein structural plasticity is accommodated through the stepped adjustment of a single empirical distance parameter value in the calculation of the Smith-Waterman dynamic programming matrix. Structural overlap is used both as a measure of similarity and to assess alignment quality. Pairwise alignment accuracy has been benchmarked against that of 10 widely used aligners on the Sippl and Wiederstein set of difficult pairwise structure alignment problems, and more extensively against that of Matt, SALIGN, and MUSTANG in pairwise and multiple structural alignments of protein domains with low shared sequence identity in the SCOP-ASTRAL 40% compendium. The results demonstrate the advantages of POLYFIT over other aligners in the efficient and robust identification of matching seed residue positions in distantly related protein targets and in the generation of longer structurally overlapped alignment lengths. Superposition-based application areas include comparative modeling and protein and ligand design. POLYFIT is available on the Web server at http://polyfit.insa-toulouse.fr. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. The galvanic treatment of deafness and the trials at the Berlin Royal Deaf-Mute Asylum in 1802.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Söderfeldt, Ylva

    2013-05-01

    In 1802, the director of the Berlin Royal Deaf-Mute Asylum, Ernst Adolph Eschke, performed an experiment to investigate the possibility of curing deafness by means of galvanism. This article explores the hope for a cure for deafness that was connected to the voltaic pile, and concludes that the treatment was based on insufficient knowledge of the aetiology of deafness. Furthermore, it uncovers the competition between the medical and the pedagogic approach to deafness that resulted from the purported cure. Comparing the approaches of different directors of galvanic experiments, divergences in attitudes between the medical and pedagogic realms are revealed. This is explained with reference to the contrasting motives and experiences of educational and medical professionals: the former had reasons to resist a cure to protect their profession, whereas the latter hoped for a medical breakthrough. Since the former had personal and long-lasting relationships to deaf people, while the latter only had brief encounters with deaf patients, the physicians were also more prone to objectify their trial subjects. The report from Eschke's trials is presented as an early document of deaf reactions to attempts to restore their hearing, showing that resistance to medical interventions were prevalent among the deaf already in the early nineteenth century.

  2. Hume, Smith e as etapas da sociedade comercial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogério Arthmar

    Full Text Available Resumo O artigo trata das concepções de David Hume e de Adam Smith sobre o ressurgimento da sociedade comercial na Europa após o feudalismo. Parte-se de breve exposição dos princípios filosóficos de Hume a fim de se apresentar suas teses referentes ao assunto na obra History of England. Mostra-se como ele associa o movimento parlamentar pela liberdade na Inglaterra com o progresso do comércio ocasionado pelo consumo de luxo da nobreza. Posteriormente, revisa-se a posição de Smith sobre os obstáculos à riqueza, bem como sua explicação para a decadência das civilizações grega e romana. Evidencia-se ainda como a interpretação smithiana do advento da sociedade comercial moderna apoia-se na versão antecipada por Hume. Por fim, destacam-se as implicações do conflito central entre predação e produção presente nas teorias do desenvolvimento de longo prazo da humanidade elaboradas por ambos os autores.

  3. TEORI INVISIBLE HAND ADAM SMITH DALAM PERSPEKTIF EKONOMI ISLAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rustam Dahar KAH

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Adam Smith as the founder of modern economics laid the basic foundation for economic development through the capitalist system in which capital factor used as a measuring tool for economic success. One opinion of Adam Smith "the theory of invivisble hand" in economic activity every individual has the full authority of his property and free use of economic resources in ways that he likes, disregarding the interests of the general public. This shows that capitalism has the right to have a peribadi an unlimited of the means of production, which is the driving force personal profit. Islam is essentially bringing the teachings to human life that comes the Koran and Hadith. Economic activity in the view of Islam is the guidance of life, in addition it is also a suggestion that has a dimension of worship. Wealth (material wealth is trustworthy, thus the mandate that God bestowed it must be used together, not to suck other people or enslave other people. Islam allows every person to own property in person, but as it also enjoins on his property was to be used collectively (together, alms or spend a portion of such property in Allah. Economic activity in the view of Islam is not only material but more than that - "material plus" -. Islam has always stressed that every person living in a lawful manner. Islam also does not prohibit untukmelakukan economic activity, but Islam provides guidance and guidance in the form of Islamic values.

  4. The futility of utility: how market dynamics marginalize Adam Smith

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCauley, Joseph L.

    2000-10-01

    Economic theorizing is based on the postulated, nonempiric notion of utility. Economists assume that prices, dynamics, and market equilibria are supposed to be derived from utility. The results are supposed to represent mathematically the stabilizing action of Adam Smith's invisible hand. In deterministic excess demand dynamics I show the following. A utility function generally does not exist mathematically due to nonintegrable dynamics when production/investment are accounted for, resolving Mirowski's thesis. Price as a function of demand does not exist mathematically either. All equilibria are unstable. I then explain how deterministic chaos can be distinguished from random noise at short times. In the generalization to liquid markets and finance theory described by stochastic excess demand dynamics, I also show the following. Market price distributions cannot be rescaled to describe price movements as ‘equilibrium’ fluctuations about a systematic drift in price. Utility maximization does not describe equilibrium. Maximization of the Gibbs entropy of the observed price distribution of an asset would describe equilibrium, if equilibrium could be achieved, but equilibrium does not describe real, liquid markets (stocks, bonds, foreign exchange). There are three inconsistent definitions of equilibrium used in economics and finance, only one of which is correct. Prices in unregulated free markets are unstable against both noise and rising or falling expectations: Adam Smith's stabilizing invisible hand does not exist, either in mathematical models of liquid market data, or in real market data.

  5. Trabalho e troca: Adam Smith e o surgimento do discurso econômico

    OpenAIRE

    Hugo E. A. da Gama Cerqueira

    2000-01-01

    This article explores why Smith's work is a turning point in the history of economic thought. The constitution of an economic discourse and the delimitation of the economy sphere are attributed to: i) the specific nature of Smith's moral philosophy; ii) his way of conceiving economic action as composing an ontological domain structured upon two axis: labor and exchange. The text indicates the connections between Smith's moral philosophy and his economic thought, suggesting that the convention...

  6. THE DEAF PERSON INCLUSION OF HIGHER EDUCATION

    OpenAIRE

    Rose Mery Gómez Tovar

    2013-01-01

    The research that is presented in this study is based on my experience with deaf students from the Psicology and therapist faculty of human communication which is an academic unit from the Juarez University of the Durango state. This article compiles and analyzes the process of inclusive and educational settings that the institution has.  This study is executed from the adoption of the analysis model of the biographic narrative investigation seen from the cualitative paradigm. In this project...

  7. Technology skills assessment for deaf and hard of hearing students in secondary school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luft, Pamela; Bonello, Mary; Zirzow, Nichole K

    2009-01-01

    To BE COMPETITIVE in the workplace, deaf and hard of hearing students must not only possess basic computer literacy but also know how to use and care for personal assistive and listening technology. An instrument was developed and pilot-tested on 45 middle school and high school deaf and hard of hearing students in 5 public school programs, 4 urban and 1 suburban, to assess these students' current technology skills and to prepare them for post-high school expectations. The researchers found that the students' computer skills depended on their access to technology, which was not always present in the schools. Many students also did not know basic care practices or troubleshooting techniques for their own personal hearing aids (if worn), or how to access or use personal assistive technology.

  8. Deaf children's engagement in an educational video in American Sign Language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golos, Debbie B

    2010-01-01

    Over time, children's educational television has successfully modified programming to incorporate research-based strategies to facilitate learning and engagement during viewing. However, research has been limited on whether these same strategies would work with preschool deaf children viewing videos in American Sign Language. In a descriptive study, engagement behaviors of 25 preschool deaf children during multiple viewings of an educational video in ASL were examined. The video incorporated research-based interactive strategies to facilitate engagement while targeting vocabulary through ASL, fingerspelling, and English print. Each of 3 viewing sessions was recorded; videos were transcribed and coded for frequency of children's movements, pointing, fingerspelling, and signing. Behaviors were analyzed for frequency within and across multiple viewings and by level of signing skills. It was found that each of these engagement behaviors occurred frequently throughout viewings and increased across multiple viewings regardless of a child's age or signing skills.

  9. National study of master teachers in deaf education: implications for teacher education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheetz, Nanci A; Martin, David S

    2008-01-01

    After an extensive review of relevant literature, the investigators developed a questionnaire on teacher characteristics and behaviors in relation to master teachers and distributed it electronically to deaf education professionals. The questionnaire recipients represented administrators, experienced teachers (e.g., those with 3 or more years' experience), and college and university faculty responsible for preparing teachers of the deaf. Follow-up interactive interviews were conducted with representatives of each constituency. Considerable similarities were noted in the priorities assigned across the three different constituencies, including a value placed on strong communication skills, having a passion about teaching, being collaborative, remaining current in the field, helping students become independent learners, and employing cognitive strategies. Analyses of responses by constituency are provided, along with recommendations for action, particularly for teacher education programs that are intent on graduating more teachers with master teacher potential.

  10. Congenitally deaf children following cochlear implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donoghue, G M; Nikolopoulos, T; Archbold, S M; Tait, M

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the auditory performance of congenitally deaf children following cochlear implantation. A prospective study is undertaken of 71 such children who have been implanted in a dedicated paediatric cochlear implant centre and who have been followed up to 3 years following implantation. All children are aged less than 8 years at the time of implantation and all receive a multichannel cochlear implant system. No child meeting these criteria has been excluded from the study. The average age at implantation is 56.5 months (range 27 to 93 months, standard deviation 15.9 months). Auditory performance is assessed by using the Categories of Auditory Perception (CAP) scale which is developed primarily as a clinical tool for evaluating profoundly deaf young children following cochlear implantation. The median score prior to implantation on this scale is Category 0 (no awareness of environmental sound), at the 1 year interval is Category 4 (discrimination some speech sounds without lip-reading), and at the 2 and 3 year interval, the median score on the CAP scale is Category 5 (understanding of common phrases without lip-reading). These results indicate the ability of cochlear implants to provide significant auditory receptive skills to young congenitally deaf children.

  11. DEVELOPING WRITING MATERIALS FOR DEAF STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamdan Anwari

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This research is aimed at finding out the suitable writing material for deaf students. This research belongs to research and development. The participants of this research were the eleventh graders of SLB Muhammadiyah Dekso Kalibawang of semester 1 in academic year 2013/2014 which consisted of two students. The instruments used in collecting data were questionnaires. The questionnaires were used in the need analysis, material evaluation and students’ response. The data were analyzed descriptively by using percentage. Based on the need analysis, it was found out that students’ need is suitable with material for writing. In developing  syllabus, existing syllabus must be added with some exercises. In developing material is in the form of hand out. The hand out is writing material for the deaf students. The developed material is for the first semester academic year of 2013/2014. It consists of  three  units, five topics and nineteen activities. In the material evaluation from two experts, the developed materials facilitate the deaf students to write. Based on the student’s response, the developed material is appropriate with their English level competence.

  12. Conversion Deafness Presenting as Sudden Hearing Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Piao Wang

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Conversion deafness is a somatoform disorder characterized by hearing loss without an anatomic or pathophysiologic lesion. Clinically, discrepancies between behavior hearing thresholds and objective electrophysiologic examinations, such as impedance audiometry, otoacoustic emissions (OAE, and auditory brainstem response (ABR, will raise the suspicion of this disorder. It is judged to be due to psychological factors and that patients do not intentionally produce the symptom. Conversion deafness is sometimes reported in children but is extremely rare among adults. Two young adults with this disease are presented. These 2 patients were both under enormous stress from the national entrance examinations for universities. Pure tone audiometry showed bilateral hearing deterioration, but OAE and ABR were normal. The hearing of both patients recovered after treatment. The diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of this disorder are also discussed. It is important to discover the psychological stress in patients with conversion deafness. This report aims to increase awareness of this condition and avoid unnecessary steroid use in its treatment.

  13. Deafness--the neglected and hidden disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackenzie, I; Smith, A

    2009-10-01

    The problem of deafness or hearing loss is increasing world-wide. In countries rich and poor, people are living longer, and presbyacusis, the deafness of old age, is becoming more frequent. Hearing loss is a chronic and often life-long disability that, depending on the severity and the frequencies affected, can cause profound damage to the development of speech, language, and cognitive skills in children, especially if commencing prelingually. That damage, in turn, affects the child's progress in school and, later, his or her ability to obtain, keep, and perform an occupation. For all ages and for both sexes, hearing loss causes difficulties with interpersonal communication and leads to significant individual social problems, especially isolation and stigmatization. All of these difficulties are much magnified in developing countries, where there are generally limited services for the hard of hearing, few people trained to help those with hearing loss, and little awareness about how to deal with the difficulties associated with such loss. Although deafness and hearing impairment are likely to have huge economic effects in such countries, in most areas these effects remain to be quantified.

  14. Obituary: Harding Eugene (Gene) Smith, Jr., 1947-2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonsdale, Carol; Soifer, Tom

    2009-01-01

    Harding Eugene Smith Junior, or Gene, as he was known to family, friends, and colleagues, passed away after an automobile accident in Encinitas, California, on 16 August 2007. He was 60 years old. Gene had recently retired from UCSD after thirty years of service. A memorial service was held at Quail Botanical Gardens in Encinitas, California, on 23 August 2007. A web page is dedicated to his memory at http://harding.smith.muchloved.com, where contributions of memories are invited. Gene was born in San Jose, California in 1947, to Harding Eugene Smith Senior, and Bernice Smith (nee Smith). Harding Smith Senior was an air-force navigator; therefore Gene spent his childhood moving from one air-force base to another. Although an only child, Gene was very close to his cousin Meg, whom he lived nearby to in Gilroy for a time, and the two were like brother and sister. The elder Harding Smith was lost in action over Cambodia in the mid-sixties. Gene was a dedicated student, a boy scout, and a Presidential Scholar. He majored in Physics at Caltech, where he also took a lively interest in the football team and the Glee Club, and was elected a House Officer. To his close friends, he was known at Caltech as Smitty, and the closest of them was Rob Drew, who gave a glimpse into that period of Gene's life at the memorial: "Gene arrived early at campus his first year, in response to an invitation to join the football team. Gene's size and features reminded the head coach of a long-forgotten player named 'Johnson.' After a few days of confusion, Gene simply replaced the name on his helmet. 'Johnson!' coach would yell, 'get in there!' If Johnson was going to get to play, Gene was going to be the best Johnson available!" Gene spent the summer of 1966 working at Kitt Peak, where his lifetime love of observing with ground-based telescopes began, though he learned some things the hard way, such as the fact that trying to squeeze 40,000 numbers onto a computer that stored only 32

  15. Childhood Deafness: How Big a Problem In Malawi?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    among children, severe educational handicap. This is all the more serious in societies where infectious diseases with possible sequelae in deafness are common, yet which lack the resources for screening and special educational services. This short paper reviews what is known about the prevalence of childhood deafness ...

  16. The Horror of Being Deaf and in Prison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernon, McCay

    2010-01-01

    Being deaf and in prison is a horror. The main fear of prison inmates, whether Deaf or hearing, is that they will be raped, killed, or subjected to other forms of violence. Such fears are based in reality. The recent overcrowding of jails and prisons has increased these problems significantly. A major reason for this situation is the blatant…

  17. Deaf College Students' Perceptions of Their Social-Emotional Adjustment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukomski, Jennifer

    2007-01-01

    This study examined differences between deaf and hearing students' perceptions of their social emotional adjustment as they transition to college. The 16PF-Adolescent Personality Questionnaire Life Difficulties Scale was completed by 205 deaf students and 185 hearing students. A multivariate analyses of variance and subsequent univariate tests…

  18. 77 FR 20553 - Relay Services for Deaf-Blind Individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-05

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 64 Relay Services for Deaf-Blind Individuals AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission... individuals in a timely manner. DATES: This document is effective May 7, 2012, except the modified reporting... Relay Services for Deaf-Blind Individuals, Report and Order, document FCC 11-56, published at 76 FR...

  19. 76 FR 31261 - Relay Services for Deaf-Blind Individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-31

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 64 Relay Services for Deaf-Blind Individuals AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission... environments shall be considered when determining whether the individual is deaf-blind under clauses (c)(2)(i...

  20. Interpreted Writing Center Tutorials with College-Level Deaf Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babcock, Rebecca Day

    2011-01-01

    Deaf students are attending mainstream postsecondary institutions in increasing numbers. This study attempts to fill a gap in the literature regarding deaf students' writing tutorials with hearing tutors and interpreters. It consists of observation of tutoring sessions, interviews, and collection and grounded theory analysis of relevant documents…

  1. Informed Choice and Deaf Children: Underpinning Concepts and Enduring Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Alys; Carr, Gwen; Hunt, Ros; McCracken, Wendy; Skipp, Amy; Tattersall, Helen

    2006-01-01

    This article concerns the first stage of a research and development project that aimed to produce both parent and professional guidelines on the promotion and provision of informed choice for families with deaf children. It begins with a theoretical discussion of the problems associated with the concept of informed choice and deaf child services…

  2. Process and Product: Creating Stories with Deaf Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enns, Catherine; Hall, Ricki; Isaac, Becky; MacDonald, Patricia

    2007-01-01

    This article describes the implementation of one element of an adapted language arts curriculum for Deaf students in a bilingual (American Sign Language and English) educational setting. It examines the implementation of writing workshops in three elementary classrooms in a school for Deaf students. The typical steps of preparing/planning,…

  3. Complex word reading in Dutch deaf children and adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogmoed, A.H. van; Knoors, H.E.T.; Schreuder, R.; Verhoeven, L.T.W.

    2013-01-01

    Children who are deaf are often delayed in reading comprehension. This delay could be due to problems in morphological processing during word reading. In this study, we investigated whether 6th grade deaf children and adults are delayed in comparison to their hearing peers in reading complex

  4. Complex Word Reading in Dutch Deaf Children and Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hoogmoed, Anne H.; Knoors, Harry; Schreuder, Robert; Verhoeven, Ludo

    2013-01-01

    Children who are deaf are often delayed in reading comprehension. This delay could be due to problems in morphological processing during word reading. In this study, we investigated whether 6th grade deaf children and adults are delayed in comparison to their hearing peers in reading complex derivational words and compounds compared to…

  5. Reading comprehension of deaf children with cochlear implants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeulen, A.M.; Bon, W.H.J. van; Schreuder, R.; Knoors, H.E.T.; Snik, A.F.M.

    2007-01-01

    The reading comprehension and visual word recognition in 50 deaf children and adolescents with at least 3 years of cochlear implant (0) use were evaluated. Their skills were contrasted with reference data of 500 deaf children without CIs. The reading comprehension level in children with CIs was

  6. Implicit Sequence Learning in Deaf Children with Cochlear Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Christopher M.; Pisoni, David B.; Anaya, Esperanza M.; Karpicke, Jennifer; Henning, Shirley C.

    2011-01-01

    Deaf children with cochlear implants (CIs) represent an intriguing opportunity to study neurocognitive plasticity and reorganization when sound is introduced following a period of auditory deprivation early in development. Although it is common to consider deafness as affecting hearing alone, it may be the case that auditory deprivation leads to…

  7. Acoustics for the Deaf: Can You See Me Now?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vongsawad, Cameron T.; Berardi, Mark L.; Neilsen, Tracianne B.; Gee, Kent L.; Whiting, Jennifer K.; Lawler, M. Jeannette

    2016-01-01

    Although acoustics examples and demonstrations can be an effective tool for engaging students in introductory physics classes and outreach, teaching principles of sound and vibration to the deaf and hard of hearing needs to be approached carefully. The deaf and hard of hearing have less intuition with sound but are no strangers to some of the…

  8. A Comparison of Deaf and Hearing Children's Reading Comprehension Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyle, Fiona E.; Cain, Kate

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Although deaf children typically exhibit severe delays in reading achievement, there is a paucity of research looking at their text-level comprehension skills. We present a comparison of deaf and normally hearing readers' profiles on a commonly used reading comprehension assessment: the Neale Analysis of Reading Ability II. Methods:…

  9. Casefinding Criteria for Use in Identifying Deaf-Blind Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Catherine E.

    The study was undertaken to develop casefinding criteria for identifying deaf-blind children. Referral sources and investigative potentials were obtained from a demographic survey of 164 cases of deaf-blind persons in Louisiana. Inquiry sheets on the possible sources of casefinding twice were sent to and ranked by a panel of 20 persons, including…

  10. A Vision Guide for Teachers of Deaf-Blind Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efron, Marvin; DuBoff, Beth Reilly

    The guide for teachers of deaf blind children deals with visual functioning, evaluation, and instruction. An overview of the fundamentals of visual functioning in deaf blind children includes concepts basic to an understanding of the process. Assessment and evaluation of the child's visual functioning is discussed, and procedures for determining…

  11. EEG Alpha and Beta Activity in Normal and Deaf Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldron, Manjula; And Others

    Electroencephalogram and task performance data were collected from three groups of young adult males: profoundly deaf Ss who signed from an early age, profoundly deaf Ss who only used oral (speech and speedreading) methods of communication, and normal hearing Ss. Alpha and Beta brain wave patterns over the Wernicke's area were compared across…

  12. Phonological Awareness and Reading Proficiency in Adults with Profound Deafness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furlonger, Brett; Holmes, Virginia M.; Rickards, Field W.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated differences in the phonological knowledge and reading skill of deaf adults using three experimental conditions that tested sensitivity to syllables, rhyme, and phonemes. Analysis of response latencies and accuracy in the three awareness tasks demonstrated that skilled deaf readers had superior phonological awareness skill…

  13. KRITERIA DIAGNOSIS DAN DIAGNOSIS BANDING SUDDEN DEAFNESS (SSNHL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arvindan Subramaniam

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Sudden deafness or sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL is defined as sensorineural hearing loss of more than 30 dB at three consecutive frequencies within 3 days of onset, often unilateral and idiopathic. Etiology of sudden deafness is still not known, but there are many theories put forward by the experts as a risk factor for sudden deafness. The prevalence of sudden deafness 5-30 per 100,000 people per year. Distribution of men and women almost equally, with the peak age of 50-60 years. Sudden deafness diagnosis is made based on history, physical examination and audiometry. Sudden deafness has three characteristics; acute, sensorineural hearing loss and unknown etiology. Additional characteristics may include vertigo, tinnitus and the absence of cranial nerve involvement. Management of sudden deafness include conservative therapy with multiple modalities. Case: Patient male, 40 years, Bali, Hindu present with hearing loss since ± 2 weeks ago. Patients previously complained of heat in the ear ± 2 days ago accompanied by a downward hearing and ears. A history of vomiting, coughs and colds denied. History of treatment at the hospital and was hospitalized for ± 2 weeks. Patients had never suffered from the same disease. No history of sinusitis, allergy, anemia, autoimmune and other systemic diseases. Patients also had never experienced trauma and underwent nasal surgery before. Keywords:sudden deafness, sensorineural, audiometry.

  14. Deaf Cultural Production in Twentieth-Century Madrid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Benjamin R.

    2007-01-01

    This article chronicles the recent processes of identity formation among deaf people in Spain, both analyzing Spanish-language poetry published in the journal Faro del Silencio and outlining new directions for research of Deaf culture in Spain in terms of film, theater, visual poetry. It draws attention to the significant connections between the…

  15. Emotion Understanding in Deaf Children with a Cochlear Implant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiefferink, Carin H.; Rieffe, Carolien; Ketelaar, Lizet; De Raeve, Leo; Frijns, Johan H. M.

    2013-01-01

    It is still largely unknown how receiving a cochlear implant affects the emotion understanding in deaf children. We examined indices for emotion understanding and their associations with communication skills in children aged 2.5-5 years, both hearing children (n = 52) and deaf children with a cochlear implant (n = 57). 2 aspects of emotion…

  16. Awareness and Regulation of Emotions in Deaf Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieffe, Carolien

    2012-01-01

    In this study, deaf children's understanding of their own emotions was compared with that of hearing peers. Twenty-six deaf children (mean age 11 years) and 26 hearing children, matched for age and gender, were presented with various tasks that tap into their emotion awareness and regulation (coping) regarding the four basic emotions (happiness,…

  17. Personal Factors that Influence Deaf College Students' Academic Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albertini, John A.; Kelly, Ronald R.; Matchett, Mary Karol

    2012-01-01

    Research tells us that academic preparation is key to deaf students' success at college. Yet, that is not the whole story. Many academically prepared students drop out during their first year. This study identified entering deaf college students' personal factors as assessed by their individual responses to both the "Noel-Levitz College…

  18. Text Revision in Deaf and Hearing Bilingual Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teruggi, Lilia A.; Gutiérrez-Cáceres, Rafaela

    2016-01-01

    In this study we explored the revision process and strategies implemented by deaf and hearing students who attend the same bilingual school context (LIS and Italian). For that we analysed and compared the types and quality of revisions made by deaf and hearing participants to their first draft of a narrative text ("Frog, Where Are You?")…

  19. (Meta)Communication Strategies in Inclusive Classes for Deaf Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelman, Celeste Azulay; Branco, Angela Uchoa

    2009-01-01

    How can an inclusive classroom for deaf students be successful? The use of metacommunication strategies by teachers and hearing peers seems promising. Schools that promote this approach tend to improve deaf students' psychosocial development and academic achievement. However, this is not a general rule. The present study identifies the elements of…

  20. What We Can Learn from Hearing Parents of Deaf Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaherty, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Hearing parents of deaf children face stresses and demands related to parenting a deaf child, including difficult choices about language, technologies, education and identity for their children (Marschark, 1997). To date, few researchers have discussed the unique challenges faced by this group. Through a series of semistructured, in-depth…