WorldWideScience

Sample records for program dairy import

  1. 75 FR 76253 - Dairy Import Licensing Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-08

    ... supply-chain relationships which may be more easily maintained by companies which have historical... not significant under E.O. 12866 and has been reviewed by the Office of Management and Budget..., that provides for the issuance of licenses to import certain dairy articles under tariff-rate quotas...

  2. 76 FR 26930 - Dairy Promotion and Research Program; Importer Nominations to the Dairy Promotion and Research Board

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-10

    .... SUMMARY: This action is pursuant to the Dairy Production Stabilization Act of 1983 (Dairy Act), as amended....gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: This document is being issued pursuant to the Dairy Production...]. The Dairy Board was established under the Dairy Production Stabilization Act of 1983 (Dairy Act) to...

  3. Quantitative aspects of semen imports for South African dairy breeds

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Quantitative aspects of semen imports for South African dairy breeds. Helena E. Theron* and J.H. Hofmeyr. Irene Animal Production Institute, Private Bag )(2, Irene, 1675 Republic of South Africa. S.J. Schoe man. Department of Livestock Science, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, 0002 Republic of South Africa. Dairy cattle ...

  4. Quantitative aspects of semen imports for South African dairy breeds

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dairy cattle semen imported from January 1979 to June 1989 consisted of 72% Holstein-Friesian, 13.6% Jersey,. 11.5% Ayrshire and 2.8% Guernsey semen. There has been a significant increase in the importation of Holstein-. Friesian semen and, to a lesser extent, in that of Jerseys since 1986. An increasing amount of ...

  5. Thermophilic bacilli and their importance in dairy processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Sara A; Lindsay, Denise; Flint, Steve H

    2010-12-15

    The thermophilic bacilli, such as Anoxybacillus flavithermus and Geobacillus spp., are an important group of contaminants in the dairy industry. Although these bacilli are generally not pathogenic, their presence in dairy products is an indicator of poor hygiene and high numbers are unacceptable to customers. In addition, their growth may result in milk product defects caused by the production of acids or enzymes, potentially leading to off-flavours. Dairy thermophiles are usually selected for by the conditions during dairy manufacture. These bacteria are able to grow in sections of dairy manufacturing plants where temperatures reach 40-65°C. Furthermore, because they are spore formers, they are difficult to eliminate. In addition, they exhibit a wide temperature growth range, exhibit a fast growth rate (generation time of approximately 15-20 min) and tend to readily form biofilms. Many strategies have been tested to remove, prevent and/or delay the formation of thermophilic bacilli biofilms in dairy manufacture, but with limited success. This is, in part, because little is known about the structure and composition of thermophilic bacilli biofilms in general and, more specifically, in milk processing environments. Therefore, new cleaning regimes often do not target the problem optimally. A greater understanding of the structure of thermophilic biofilms within the context of the milk processing environment and their link with spore formation is needed to develop better control measures. This review discusses the characteristics and food spoilage potential, enumeration and identification methods for the thermophilic bacilli, as well as their importance to dairy manufacture, with an emphasis on biofilm development and spore formation. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. 76 FR 14777 - National Dairy Promotion and Research Program; Final Rule on Amendments to the Order

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-18

    ... (Act) to mean all States, the District of Columbia, and the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico. Producers in... an independent analysis of the dairy checkoff programs. The independent analysis, conducted by... thereof, on dairy products imported into the United States. This final rule, in accordance with the 2008...

  7. Livestock Gross Margin Insurance for Dairy Cattle: An Analysis of Program Performance and Cost under Alternative Policy Configurations

    OpenAIRE

    Cabrera, Victor E.; Brian W. GOULD; Valvekar, Mayuri

    2009-01-01

    Livestock Gross Margin insurance for dairy cattle (LGM-Dairy) is a risk management tool that can be used to insure a lower bound on a dairy producer’s gross margin. In this paper we (1) review the basic structure of LGM-Dairy (2) examine the sensitivity of Gross Margin Guarantee (GMG) and premium to changes in feeding regimes and (3) quantify impacts of changes in deductible level on important program characteristics.

  8. 76 FR 53844 - National Dairy Promotion and Research Program; Invitation To Submit Comments on Proposed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-30

    ... pursuant to the Dairy Production Stabilization Act (Dairy Act) of 1983 [7 U.S.C. 4501- 4514], as amended... Dairy Production Stabilization Act of 1983 authorizes a national program for dairy product promotion... of milk production in the United States. The Dairy Order is administered by a 38-member Dairy Board...

  9. Developing a Contemporary Dairy Foods Extension Program: A Training and Technical Resource Needs Assessment of Pennsylvania Dairy Foods Processors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syrko, Joseph; Kaylegian, Kerry E.

    2015-01-01

    Growth in the dairy industry and the passage of the Food Safety Modernization Act have renewed interest in dairy foods processing extension positions. A needs assessment survey was sent to Pennsylvania dairy processors and raw milk providers to guide priorities for a dairy foods extension program. The successful development and delivery of…

  10. 75 FR 62692 - Dairy Import Licensing Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-13

    ... an opportunity to participate in #0;the rule making prior to the adoption of the final rules. #0; #0... constitutionally protected property rights. This proposed rule would not interfere with any property rights and...

  11. Veterinary herd health management programs on dairy farms in the Netherlands: Use, execution, and relations on farmers characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derks, M.; Werven, van T.; Hogeveen, H.; Kremer, W.D.J.

    2013-01-01

    Veterinary herd health management (VHHM) programs are of growing importance to the dairy industry; they support farmers in the shift from curative to preventive health management, caused by increased herd sizes and quality standards in dairy farming. Farmers participating in VHHM are visited every 4

  12. Dairy goat production and the importance of gastrointestinal strongyle parasitism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinaldi, Laura; Veneziano, Vincenzo; Cringoli, Giuseppe

    2007-08-01

    In recent years, demand for goat products has increased in both developing and developed countries. Goat production (particularly dairy), however, is negatively affected by several factors, including infectious and parasitic diseases. Among the latter, gastrointestinal strongyle infection remains one of the main constraints to dairy goat production. In this mini-review, we emphasize the negative influence of these parasites, associated with subclinical production losses and depressive impacts upon long-term animal productivity, as well as the scarcity of studies on this topic. Finally, the necessity of reducing the use of anthelminthics and thus minimizing residues in food and the environment is stressed.

  13. Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program Development of a Computer-based Benchmarking and Analytical Tool. Benchmarking and Energy & Water Savings Tool in Dairy Plants (BEST-Dairy)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Tengfang [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Flapper, Joris [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Ke, Jing [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Kramer, Klaas [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Sathaye, Jayant [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2012-02-01

    water usage in individual dairy plants, augment benchmarking activities in the market places, and facilitate implementation of efficiency measures and strategies to save energy and water usage in the dairy industry. Industrial adoption of this emerging tool and technology in the market is expected to benefit dairy plants, which are important customers of California utilities. Further demonstration of this benchmarking tool is recommended, for facilitating its commercialization and expansion in functions of the tool. Wider use of this BEST-Dairy tool and its continuous expansion (in functionality) will help to reduce the actual consumption of energy and water in the dairy industry sector. The outcomes comply very well with the goals set by the AB 1250 for PIER program.

  14. Efficiency of dairy farms participating and not participating in veterinary herd health management programs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derks, Marjolein; Hogeveen, Henk; Kooistra, Sake R; van Werven, Tine; Tauer, Loren W

    2014-01-01

    This paper compares farm efficiencies between dairies who were participating in a veterinary herd health management (VHHM) program with dairies not participating in such a program, to determine whether participation has an association with farm efficiency. In 2011, 572 dairy farmers received a

  15. Food Import Demand: Meat, Dairy Products, Eggs and Live Animals in Oman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.V. Chomo

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available To develop effective food import policies, it is necessary to understand the responsiveness of consumers to factors affecting import demand. These factors include consumer response to changes in import prices and income. In this study the authors develop economic models of import demand for three main product groups in Oman: meats, dairy and eggs, and live animals. These product groups have been identified as major sources of protein for the Omani population. In addition, these products have a history of domestic production and potential for reducing dependence on food imports. The results indicate that the estimated price elasticity of demand for meat products is elastic, which implies that an increase in price Will result in a decrease in revenues for meat import businesses However, the estimated price elasticity for imported dairy and egg products is inelastic. This implies that an increase in import price will result in an increase in revenues for dairy and egg import businesses. The estimated income elasticities for meat products and dairy and egg products were found to be less than one, suggesting that they are normal goods. A one percent increase in per capita incomes Will result in a less than one percent increase in demand for imported meat, dairy, and egg products These results have economic implications for growth and development of businesses in these important food import sectors.

  16. Exploring the Determinants of Consumer Behavior in West Bank, Towards Domestic and Imported Dairy Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansoor Maitah

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to investigate factors influencing the purchasing behavior of Palestinian customers towards domestic and imported dairy products (Israeli and foreign. The secondary data were obtained from the competent authorities. On the other hand, primary data were gathered by utilizing personal interviews and questionnaires. 450 questionnaires were distributed to all governorates of the West Bank. It has been concluded from statistical results that middle-income households concern mainly about quality, image and product validity period. In contrast, low-income households consider mainly product price. The consumer was satisfied with Israeli products that meet his needs. On the other hand, local consumer highly considered price and personal knowledge when purchasing local dairy products. Advertising negatively affected the consumer purchasing behavior of Israeli and foreign dairy products, in contrast it positively affected his behavior when purchasing local dairy products. Period of validity was the most influential factor on the purchasing decision for domestic and imported dairy products. It has been found that consumer expenditures on Israeli dairy products were the highest followed by local and foreign products. Recommendations are as follows: i producers should develop products that could meet the needs and desires of consumers, ii draw effective marketing policies, depending on technologists specialized in dairy industry, iii take into account consumer awareness when developing advertising strategy, and iv quality control should be adjusted in accordance with product specifications and standards.

  17. Dairy processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Kenneth W

    2003-07-01

    The United States dairy processing sector is dynamic and adaptive to new changes in the market place. Changes in consumer preferences and manufacturing technologies are resulting in new challenges to the processing sector. Consumers want a wider array of quality dairy products. Fluid processors are adapting to changing consumer demands for beverage products by introducing new flavors, providing ultrapasteurization, and using creative packaging. In addition, United States food manufacturers are requesting dairy processors to provide new dairy fractions such as MPC for new nutrition products. United States dairy policy is attempting to adapt to these changes. Federal order reform has resulted in new market-oriented signals for dairy farmers to produce what the market wants; namely, quality milk components. US dairy farmers, however, also wants to maintain programs such as the DPSP that have had the unfortunate consequence of spurring demand for protein imports (i.e., MPCs, casein, and caseinates) and also resulted in a disincentive to produce these new innovative protein products here in the United States. Surplus skim milk solids are now moving into US Government warehouses rather than into commercial markets. The future of the United States dairy industry will clearly be toward producing innovative products that the market wants. There is a strong market for dairy products not only here in the United States but also overseas, which will mean learning to compete on a global scale. The challenge is to modernize our United States milk pricing programs to provide dairy farmers and processors proper price signals while providing a minimum level of support to dairy farmers. The benefit of a greater orientation toward the market place will be stronger rates of growth for United States-produced dairy products.

  18. Culture versus PCR for Salmonella Species Identification in Some Dairy Products and Dairy Handlers with Special Concern to Its Zoonotic Importance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwida, Mayada M; Al-Ashmawy, Maha A M

    2014-01-01

    A total of 200 samples of milk and dairy products as well as 120 samples of dairy handlers were randomly collected from different dairy farms and supermarkets in Dakahlia Governorate, Egypt. The conventional cultural and serotyping methods for detection of Salmonella in dairy products were applied and the results were compared with those obtained by molecular screening assay using (ttr sequence). The obtained results revealed that 21% of milk and dairy products (42/200) were positive for Salmonella species using enrichment culture-based PCR method, while 12% of different dairy samples (24/200) were found to be positive for Salmonella species by using the conventional culture methods. Two stool specimens out of 40 apparently healthy dairy handlers were positive by the PCR method. Serotyping of Salmonella isolates revealed that 58.3% (14/24) from different dairy products were contaminated with Salmonella Typhimurium. We conclude that the enrichment culture-based PCR assay has high sensitivity and specificity for detection of Salmonella species in dairy products and handlers. High incidence of Salmonella Typhimurium in the examined dairy samples highlights the important role played by milk and dairy products as a vehicle in disease prevalence. Great effort should be applied for reducing foodborne risk for consumers.

  19. Culture versus PCR for Salmonella Species Identification in Some Dairy Products and Dairy Handlers with Special Concern to Its Zoonotic Importance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayada M. Gwida

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A total of 200 samples of milk and dairy products as well as 120 samples of dairy handlers were randomly collected from different dairy farms and supermarkets in Dakahlia Governorate, Egypt. The conventional cultural and serotyping methods for detection of Salmonella in dairy products were applied and the results were compared with those obtained by molecular screening assay using (ttr sequence. The obtained results revealed that 21% of milk and dairy products (42/200 were positive for Salmonella species using enrichment culture-based PCR method, while 12% of different dairy samples (24/200 were found to be positive for Salmonella species by using the conventional culture methods. Two stool specimens out of 40 apparently healthy dairy handlers were positive by the PCR method. Serotyping of Salmonella isolates revealed that 58.3% (14/24 from different dairy products were contaminated with Salmonella Typhimurium. We conclude that the enrichment culture-based PCR assay has high sensitivity and specificity for detection of Salmonella species in dairy products and handlers. High incidence of Salmonella Typhimurium in the examined dairy samples highlights the important role played by milk and dairy products as a vehicle in disease prevalence. Great effort should be applied for reducing foodborne risk for consumers.

  20. New insights into the importance of prolactin in dairy ruminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacasse, P; Ollier, S; Lollivier, V; Boutinaud, M

    2016-01-01

    In most mammals, prolactin (PRL) is essential for maintaining lactation, and the suppression of PRL inhibits lactation. However, the involvement of PRL in the control of ruminant lactation is less clear, because inconsistent effects on milk yield have been observed with the short-term suppression of PRL by bromocriptine. Therefore, several experiments have been conducted to assess the galactopoietic role of PRL. In an initial experiment, cows in early lactation received daily injections of the dopamine agonist quinagolide for 9 wk. Quinagolide reduced milking-induced PRL release and caused a faster decline in milk production. Quinagolide also reduced mammary epithelial cell activity, survival, and proliferation. In goats, cabergoline, another dopamine agonist, caused a 28% decrease in milk yield the day after injection. In another experiment, cows were injected for 5d with quinagolide, with quinagolide plus bovine PRL injected at milking time, or with vehicles only. Again, quinagolide reduced milk, protein, and lactose yields. Although PRL injections were not sufficient to restore milk yield, they tended to increase milk protein and lactose yields and increased the viability of mammary epithelial cells purified from milk. Recently, our team stimulated PRL secretion with daily injections of the dopamine antagonist domperidone for 5 wk. Milk production increased gradually and was greater in domperidone-treated cows during the last 4 wk of the treatment period. In most experiments where PRL secretion was manipulated, feed intake paralleled the changes of PRL concentration, supporting the idea that PRL increases feed intake to provide the nutrients necessary to support lactation in dairy ruminants. In late-lactation cows, quinagolide and cabergoline decreased milk production within the first day of treatment and induced more rapid changes in several markers of mammary gland involution after drying-off. In addition, quinagolide improved the resistance to intramammary

  1. [Recurrent clinical mastitis in dairy cattle - importance and causes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grieger, A-S; Zoche-Golob, V; Paduch, J-H; Hoedemaker, M; Krömker, V

    2014-01-01

    Clinical mastitis as a frequently recurrent event can cause substantive economic loss on dairy farms. The reason for recurrent mastitis can be either a persistent infection of the bovine mammary gland by a mastitis pathogen or a reinfection of a quarter or udder after bacteriological cure. The virulence properties of a mastitis pathogen and the cure odds of an individual cow determine the development of persistent infections. Clinical episodes may alternate with periods without symptoms in the course of persistent infections. Strategies to reduce cases of recurrent mastitis have to include improved treatment concepts and measures to decrease new infection rates. The present literature review summarises the knowledge of definitions, frequencies, causes and effects of recurrent mastitis.

  2. Importance in dairy technology of bacteriocins produced by dairy starter cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bedia Şimşek

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Bacteriocins produced by Lactic acid bacteria (LAB and propionic acid bacteria (PAB are heterogeneous group of peptide inhibitors which include lantibiotics (class I, e. g. nisin, small heat-stable peptides (class II, e. g. pediocin PA-1 and large heat-labile proteins (class III, e. g. helveticin J. Many bacteriocins belonging to the first two groups can be successfully used to inhibit undesirable microorganisms in foods, but only nisin is produced industrially and is used as a food preservative. LAB and PAB develops easily in milk and milk products. LAB and PAB growth in dairy products can cause microbial interference to spoilage and pathogenic bacteria through several metabolits, specially bacteriocins. The review deals with the description of milk-borne bacteriocins and their application in milk and milk products either to extend the shelf life or to inhibit milk pathogens.

  3. Iodine in dairy milk: Sources, concentrations and importance to human health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Reijden, Olivia L; Zimmermann, Michael B; Galetti, Valeria

    2017-08-01

    Milk and dairy products are major iodine sources in industrialized countries. However, consumption of milk and dairy, as well as their iodine concentrations, vary widely, making them an unpredictable iodine source. Milk iodine concentrations in industrialized countries range from 33 to 534 μg/L and are influenced by the iodine intake of dairy cows, goitrogen intake, milk yield, season, teat dipping with iodine-containing disinfectants, type of farming and processing. We estimate milk and dairy contribute ≈13-64% of the recommended daily iodine intake based on country-specific food intake data. To ensure adequate iodine levels but avoid the risk of iodine excess through milk and dairy, it is crucial to reduce the wide variations in milk iodine. If iodine intakes from iodized salt fall because of public health efforts to reduce salt intake, milk and dairy products may become increasingly important sources of dietary iodine in the future. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Dairy Cattle Breeding Effectiveness Analysis under the Conditions of Import Substitution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokarev, Yuri A.; Merkushova, Nina I.; Bakanach, Olga V.; Proskurina, Natalya V.; Sazhina, Natalia S.

    2016-01-01

    The relevance of the research problem is inspired by the strategic importance of dairy farming to the national economy, which is especially evident in the context of the EU economic sanctions against the Russian Federation and carrying out the import substitution policy. First and foremost, this policy applies to food commodities, including milk.…

  5. 77 FR 51681 - Adjustment of Appendices to the Dairy Tariff-Rate Import Quota Licensing Regulation for the 2012...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-27

    ... of dairy article from a specified country of origin. The Import Policies and Export Reporting... No. and country of origin 1&2 Tokyo R. Uruguay R. schedule NON-CHEESE ARTICLES BUTTER (G-NOTE 6) 4... of licenses to import certain dairy articles under tariff-rate quotas (TRQs) as set forth in the...

  6. Implications of the South Korea-U.S. Free Trade Agreement on South Korean Dairy Product Imports.

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, Keithly G.; Blayney, Donald P.

    2012-01-01

    This study empirically estimates the South Korean short-run and long-run import demand parameters for source-based dairy products and assess the impacts of the KORUS FTA on dairy product trade. These estimates were derived using a Central Bureau of Statistics (CBS) demand system. The impact of the tariff reductions associated with the free trade agreement was calculated. Based on the results, it appears that the free trade agreements open up the South Korean dairy product markets primarily by...

  7. 7 CFR Appendices 1, 2 and 3 to... - Dairy Tariff-Rate Import Quota Licensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Dairy Tariff-Rate Import Quota Licensing 1, Appendices 1, 2 and 3 to Subpart Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture IMPORT QUOTAS AND FEES...) (NOTE 16) 23,018,053 8,451,678 9,661,128 7,496,000 Argentina 7,690 92,310 Australia 535,628 5,542 758...

  8. Dairy Food at the First Occasion of Eating Is Important for Total Dairy Food Intake for Australian Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malcolm D. Riley

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The cross-sectional 2007 Australian National Children’s Nutrition and Physical Activity Survey collected detailed dietary information from a representative sample of more than 4400 children by 24-h dietary recall. Dairy food intake by Australian children is substantially lower than recommendations, and decreases as a percentage of energy intake as children grow older. Children aged 2 to 16 years are, on average, 2.3 times more likely to have a dairy food at the first daily occasion of eating, than at the second occasion. For children who consumed any dairy food at the first occasion of eating, the total daily intake of dairy foods was 129% (95% CI 120%–138% greater than for children who did not consume a dairy food at the first occasion of eating. Their dairy food intake for the rest of the day following the first occasion of eating was also greater by 29% (95% CI 21%–37%. Younger age group, male sex, location of eating being at home or in a residence and starting the first occasion of eating from 6 a.m. to 9 a.m. are all jointly associated with having a dairy food at the first occasion of eating. A simple strategy to increase Australian children’s intake from the dairy and alternatives food group may be to make sure that the first occasion of eating each day includes a dairy food or a nutritional equivalent.

  9. Efficiency of use of imported magnesium, sulfur, copper, and zinc on Idaho dairy farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hristov, A N; Hazen, W; Ellsworth, J W

    2007-06-01

    Six commercial dairies from south central Idaho were surveyed to estimate the whole-farm surpluses of magnesium (Mg), sulfur (S), copper (Cu), and zinc (Zn). Mineral imports and exports were monitored in a 12-mo period and samples from the diets, feeds, feces, urine, and manure were collected at regular farm visits. Soils from manure-amended fields were sampled in the spring and fall. In all cases, the largest import of Mg, S, Cu, and Zn to the dairy was with purchased feeds, from 91 (S) to 97% (Zn) of all imports. The major mineral export item was manure [from 60% (S) to 89% (Cu) of all exports] and forages, in the case of a dairy with a large land base. Export with milk represented on average only 8.6, 25, 2.1, and 11% (Mg, S, Cu, and Zn, respectively) of all exports. Thus, the conversion of the imported feed Mg, S, Cu, and Zn into milk was rather low (on a whole-farm scale): 5.6, 11, 1.4, and 5.2%, respectively. Concentrations of Mg, Cu, and Zn in the lactating cow diets from the participating dairies exceeded National Research Council (2001) recommendations on average by 85, 34, and 73%, respectively, which contributed to the inefficient use of imported minerals. Whole-farm Mg surplus varied from 4 to 54 t/yr (3 to 19 kg/cow per year). The efficiency of use of imported Mg varied from 27 to 88%. Sulfur surpluses were from 9 to 52 t/yr (12 to 40 kg/cow per year). Copper and Zn surpluses were also significant (average of 59 and 585 kg/yr and 0.05 and 0.4 kg/cow per year, respectively). The average efficiency of use of imported S, Cu, and Mg was 44, 62, and 56%, respectively and, as with Mg, varied significantly among the dairies. The results from this study suggest that reduction in the concentration of dietary Mg, Cu, and Zn is potentially the most efficient way of reducing overall excretions and whole-farm surpluses of these minerals.

  10. Somatic Cell Count in Milk of Goats Enrolled in Dairy Herd Improvement Program in 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effects of breed, parity, stage of lactation (month), herd size, and regions/states on somatic cell count (SCC) and production of milk from dairy goats enrolled in the Dairy Herd Improvement (DHI) program in the United States in 2007 were investigated to monitor the current status of SCC and to ...

  11. Dairy Cattle Breeding Simulation Program: a simulation program to teach animal breeding principles and practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medrano, J F; Ahmadi, A; Casellas, J

    2010-06-01

    A dairy cattle breeding simulation program (DCBSP v.4.9) has been developed to teach undergraduate and graduate students animal breeding principles associated with selection for multiple traits in dairy cattle. The current version of the program was written in FORTRAN 90, and a web-based interface was developed for the students to interact with the program in the teaching environment. This software simulates a population of dairy cattle herds and artificial insemination bulls through several generations by integrating students' decisions about mating, culling, and selection of new heifers and bulls based on a multivariate animal mixed model evaluation and marker-assisted selection. All simulation parameters (e.g., number of herds and cows per herd, variance components, effect of genetic markers) can be defined by the administrator of the program in relation to the animal breeding course. During each running period, the program simulates the composition of each herd during a virtual year, generating new calves and new productive records and performing a genetic evaluation for all productive traits. A herd-specific productive summary of all demographic, productive, and genetic data is provided to the students at the end of each simulation period. After several running periods, the genetic trend can be evaluated, providing a realistic experience for the development of animal breeding skills that will be relevant to students with a basic knowledge of animal breeding. Earlier versions of this program have been used at several universities where it has proven to be a very useful teaching tool to illustrate the theoretical basis of animal breeding in livestock. 2010 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Perception of the importance of human-animal interactions on cattle flow and worker safety on Minnesota dairy farms

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sorge, U S; Cherry, C; Bender, J B

    2014-01-01

    .... The objectives of this study were to (1) assess Minnesota dairy herd owners' attitudes toward stockmanship, its perceived importance for cow comfort and worker health, and the establishment of calm cattle movement; and (2...

  13. A 100-Year Review: Identification and genetic selection of economically important traits in dairy cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miglior, Filippo; Fleming, Allison; Malchiodi, Francesca; Brito, Luiz F; Martin, Pauline; Baes, Christine F

    2017-12-01

    Over the past 100 yr, the range of traits considered for genetic selection in dairy cattle populations has progressed to meet the demands of both industry and society. At the turn of the 20th century, dairy farmers were interested in increasing milk production; however, a systematic strategy for selection was not available. Organized milk performance recording took shape, followed quickly by conformation scoring. Methodological advances in both genetic theory and statistics around the middle of the century, together with technological innovations in computing, paved the way for powerful multitrait analyses. As more sophisticated analytical techniques for traits were developed and incorporated into selection programs, production began to increase rapidly, and the wheels of genetic progress began to turn. By the end of the century, the focus of selection had moved away from being purely production oriented toward a more balanced breeding goal. This shift occurred partly due to increasing health and fertility issues and partly due to societal pressure and welfare concerns. Traits encompassing longevity, fertility, calving, health, and workability have now been integrated into selection indices. Current research focuses on fitness, health, welfare, milk quality, and environmental sustainability, underlying the concentrated emphasis on a more comprehensive breeding goal. In the future, on-farm sensors, data loggers, precision measurement techniques, and other technological aids will provide even more data for use in selection, and the difficulty will lie not in measuring phenotypes but rather in choosing which traits to select for. Copyright © 2017 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. From import dependency to export orientation the case of the chilean dairy sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulina Rytkönen

    2011-12-01

    replaced by a highly liberalized process paved the way for breaking import dependency. Strategic decisions by the industry resulted in long term improved competitive power and a final shift towards exports. Contrary to previous research, this article shows that globalization is the main force behind the reorientation of the dairy sector in Chile from import dependency to export orientation.

  15. Dynamics of endemic infectious diseases of animal and human importance on three dairy herds in the northeastern United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, A K; Van Kessel, J S; Karns, J S; Wolfgang, D R; Hovingh, E; Nelen, K A; Smith, J M; Whitlock, R H; Fyock, T; Ladely, S; Fedorka-Cray, P J; Schukken, Y H

    2009-04-01

    Endemic infectious diseases in dairy cattle are of significant concern to the industry as well as for public health because of their potential impact on animal and human health, milk and meat production, food safety, and economics. We sought to provide insight into the dynamics of important endemic infectious diseases in 3 northeastern US dairy herds. Fecal samples from individual cows and various environmental samples from these farms were tested for the presence of major zoonotic pathogens (i.e., Salmonella, Campylobacter, and Listeria) as well as commensal bacteria Escherichia coli and enterococci. Additionally, the presence of Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis was tested in fecal and serum samples from individual cows. Test results and health and reproductive records were maintained in a database, and fecal, plasma, DNA, and tissue samples were kept in a biobank. All bacteria of interest were detected on these farms and their presence was variable both within and between farms. The prevalence of Listeria spp. and L. monocytogenes in individual fecal samples within farm A ranged from 0 to 68.2% and 0 to 25.5%, respectively, over a period of 3 yr. Within farm B, continuous fecal shedding of Salmonella spp. was observed with a prevalence ranging from 8 to 88%; Salmonella Cerro was the predominant serotype. Farm C appeared less contaminated with Salmonella and Listeria, although in the summer of 2005, 50 and 19.2% of fecal samples were positive for Listeria and L. monocytogenes, respectively. The high prevalence of E. coli (89 to 100%), Enterococcus (75 to 100%), and Campylobacter (0 to 81%) in feces suggested they were ubiquitous throughout the farm environment. Fecal culture and ELISA results indicated a low prevalence of Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis infection in these farms (0 to 13.6% and 0 to 4.9% for culture-positive and ELISA-positive, respectively), although the occasional presence of high shedders was observed. Results have major

  16. Eco-efficiency Among Dairy Farmers: The Importance of Socio-economic Characteristics and Farmer Attitudes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perez Urdiales, M.; Oude Lansink, A.G.J.M.; Wall, A.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to assess the eco-efficiency of dairy farms in Spain. To do so, we use data from a survey carried out in 2010 for the specific purpose of analysing the environmental performance of 50 dairy farms in the Spanish region of Asturias. The survey contains information on nutrients

  17. 78 FR 46491 - Adjustment of Appendices to the Dairy Tariff-Rate Import Quota Licensing Regulation for the 2013...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    ... ARTICLES: CHEESE AND SUBSTITUTES FOR CHEESE (EXCEPT: SOFT 21,290,334 10,179,397 31,469,731 9,661,128 7,496... Part 6 Agricultural commodities, Cheese, Dairy products, Imports, Reporting and recordkeeping... & Grand total Chapter 4/ 2 Tokyo R. Uruguay R. 2010 NON-CHEESE ARTICLES: BUTTER (NOTE 6) 4,618,233 2,358...

  18. Modeling small-scale dairy farms in central Mexico using multi-criteria programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Val-Arreola, D; Kebreab, E; France, J

    2006-05-01

    Milk supply from Mexican dairy farms does not meet demand and small-scale farms can contribute toward closing the gap. Two multi-criteria programming techniques, goal programming and compromise programming, were used in a study of small-scale dairy farms in central Mexico. To build the goal and compromise programming models, 4 ordinary linear programming models were also developed, which had objective functions to maximize metabolizable energy for milk production, to maximize margin of income over feed costs, to maximize metabolizable protein for milk production, and to minimize purchased feedstuffs. Neither multi-criteria approach was significantly better than the other; however, by applying both models it was possible to perform a more comprehensive analysis of these small-scale dairy systems. The multi-criteria programming models affirm findings from previous work and suggest that a forage strategy based on alfalfa, ryegrass, and corn silage would meet nutrient requirements of the herd. Both models suggested that there is an economic advantage in rescheduling the calving season to the second and third calendar quarters to better synchronize higher demand for nutrients with the period of high forage availability.

  19. Dairy Herd Mastitis Program in Argentina: Farm Clusters and Effects on Bulk Milk Somatic Cell Counts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Vissio1*, SA Dieser2, CG Raspanti2, JA Giraudo1, CI Bogni2, LM Odierno2 and AJ Larriestra1

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This research has been conducted to characterize dairy farm clusters according to mastitis control program practiced among small and medium dairy producer from Argentina, and also to evaluate the effect of such farm cluster patterns on bulk milk somatic cell count (BMSCC. Two samples of 51 (cross-sectional and 38 (longitudinal herds were selected to identify farm clusters and study the influence of management on monthly BMSCC, respectively. The cross-sectional sample involved the milking routine and facilities assessment of each herd visited. Hierarchical cluster analysis was used to find the most discriminating farm attributes in the cross sectional sample. Afterward, the herd cluster typologies were identified in the longitudinal sample. Herd monthly BMSCC average was evaluated during 12 months fitting a linear mixed model. Two clusters were identified, the farms in the Cluster I applied a comprehensive mastitis program in opposite to Cluster II. Post-dipping, dry cow therapy and milking machine test were routinely applied in Cluster I. In the longitudinal study, 14 out of 38 dairy herds were labeled as Cluster I and the rest were assigned to Cluster II. Significant difference in BMSCC was found between cluster I and II (60,000 cells/mL. The present study showed the relevance and potential impact of promoting mastitis control practices among small and medium sized dairy producers in Argentina.

  20. 76 FR 63538 - Adjustment of Appendices to the Dairy Tariff-Rate Import Quota Licensing Regulation for the 2011...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-13

    ...,781 CHEESE ARTICLES CHEESE AND SUBSTITUTES FOR CHEESE (EXCEPT: SOFT RIPENED 21,557,089 9,912,642 31... Subjects in 7 CFR Part 6 Agricultural commodities, Cheese, Dairy products, Imports, Reporting and.... Uruguay R. schedule NON-CHEESE ARTICLES BUTTER (G-NOTE 6) 5,096,498 1,880,502 6,977,000 6,977,000 EU-25 75...

  1. Identifying cost-minimizing strategies for guaranteeing target dairy income over feed cost via use of the Livestock Gross Margin dairy insurance program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valvekar, M; Cabrera, V E; Gould, B W

    2010-07-01

    Milk and feed price volatility are the major source of dairy farm risk. Since August 2008 a new federally reinsured insurance program has been available to many US dairy farmers to help minimize the negative effects of adverse price movements. This insurance program is referred to as Livestock Gross Margin Insurance for Dairy Cattle. Given the flexibility in contract design, the dairy farmer has to make 3 critical decisions when purchasing this insurance: 1) the percentage of monthly milk production to be covered, 3) declared feed equivalents used to produce this milk, and 3) the level of gross margin not covered by insurance (i.e., deductible). The objective of this analysis was to provide an optimal strategy of how a dairy farmer could incorporate this insurance program to help manage the variability in net farm income. In this analysis we assumed that a risk-neutral dairy farmer wants to design an insurance contract such that a target guaranteed income over feed cost is obtained at least cost. We undertook this analysis for a representative Wisconsin dairy farm (herd size: 120 cows) producing 8,873 kg (19,545 lb) of milk/cow per year. Wisconsin statistical data indicates that dairy farms of similar size must require an income over feed cost of at least $110/Mg ($5/cwt) of milk to be profitable during the coverage period. Therefore, using data for the July 2009 insurance contract to insure $110/Mg of milk, the least cost contract was found to have a premium of $1.22/Mg ($0.055/cwt) of milk produced insuring approximately 52% of the production with variable monthly production covered during the period of September 2009 to June 2010. This premium represented 1.10% of the desired IOFC. We compared the above optimal strategy with an alternative nonoptimal strategy, defined as a contract insuring the same proportion of milk as the optimal (52%) but with a constant amount insured across all contract months. The premium was found to be almost twice the level obtained

  2. Attitudes towards the Canadian quality milk program and use of good production practices among Canadian dairy producers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, I; Rajić, A; Hendrick, S; Parker, S; Sanchez, J; McClure, J T; McEwen, S A

    2010-04-01

    To harmonize good production practices (GPP) for dairy producers in Canada, the Canadian dairy industry has developed and is implementing a program called Canadian Quality Milk (CQM). A postal questionnaire was administered to all Canadian dairy producers enrolled in dairy herd-improvement organizations in 2008 (n=10,474) to investigate their attitudes towards the program and to establish baseline information on their use of GPP. The response percentage was 20.9% (2185/10,474). Two-thirds of producers (67.6%) reported participation in CQM and 61.4% of these indicated that the requirements were easy to implement. Most producers (85.0%) reported the use of cats as a pest-control method in their barns. For dead-livestock disposal, 65.0% and 38.0% indicated use of a collection service and burial, respectively. Nearly 40.0% of respondents indicated that they purchase replacement cattle, and somatic cell-count score was the main health indicator considered before purchase. Over 70% of producers reported that they clean and disinfect maternity, calf and weaned-calf pens, while only 34.1% and 53.1% reported that they provide visitors and employees, respectively, with clean clothes and boots. Through latent-class analysis, five groups (classes) of producers with distinctive patterns of reported use of GPP were identified. These were labelled as "minimal", "sanitation-only", "employee-visitor hygiene", "typical" and "ideal" user groups, with 11.1%, 23.8%, 20.2%, 37.1% and 7.7% of respondents, respectively. Respondents in the "ideal users" group had a higher probability of reporting the use of each GPP and were more likely to have completed an educational course in food safety compared to respondents in each other group. They were also more likely to have a herd size in the uppermost quartile (>65 cows) and report participation in CQM compared to each other group except the "employee-visitor hygiene users". The greatest differences were observed when compared to the "minimal

  3. Constraint analysis to improve integrated dairy production systems in developing countries: the importance of participatory rural appraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devendra, C

    2007-12-01

    The paper describes the rationale and importance of the approaches and methodologies of Participatory Rural Appraisal (PRA) to enable constraint analysis, to understand the complexities of farming systems and to improve integrated dairy productivity. Implicit in this objective is Farming Systems Research (FSR), which focused on cropping systems in the 1970's, with the subsequent addition of animal components. The methodology for FSR involves the following sequential components: site selection, site description and characterization (diagnosis), planning of on-farm research, on-farm testing and validation of alternatives, diffusion of results, and impact assessment. PRA is the development of FSR, which involves the active participation of farmers to identify constraints and plan appropriate solutions. In the Coordinated Research Project (CRP), the approach was adapted to 10 different country situations and led to Economic Opportunity Surveys (EOS) and Diagnostic Surveillance Studies (DSS), allowing the planning and implantation of integrated interventions to improve dairy productivity.

  4. The importance of haplotype lenght and heritability using genomic selection in dairy cattle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villumsen, T M; Janss, L; Lund, M S

    2009-01-01

    Reliabilities for genomic estimated breeding values (GEBV) were investigated by simulation for a typical dairy cattle breeding setting. Scenarios were simulated with different heritabilites (h2) and for different haplotype sizes, and seven generations with only genotypes were generated to investi......Reliabilities for genomic estimated breeding values (GEBV) were investigated by simulation for a typical dairy cattle breeding setting. Scenarios were simulated with different heritabilites (h2) and for different haplotype sizes, and seven generations with only genotypes were generated...... to investigate reliability of GEBV over time. A genome with 5000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) at distances of 0.1 cM and 50 quantitative trait loci (QTL) was simulated, and a Bayesian variable selection model was implemented to predict GEBV. Highest reliabilities were obtained for 10 SNP haplotypes....... At optimal haplotype size, reliabilities in generation 1 without phenotypes ranged from 0.80 for h2 = 0.02 to 0.93 for h2 = 0.30, and in the seventh generation without phenotypes ranged from 0.69 for h2 = 0.02 to 0.86 for h2 = 0.30. Reliabilities of GEBV were found sufficiently high to implement dairy...

  5. Improving Dairy Organizational Communication from the Veterinarian's Perspective: Results of a Continuing Veterinary Medical Education Pilot Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Dale A; Sischo, William M; Kurtz, Suzanne; Siler, Julie D; Pereira, Richard V; Warnick, Lorin D; Davis, Margaret A

    2016-01-01

    The increasing size and complexity of US dairy farms could make it more difficult for a veterinary practitioner to effectively communicate protocol recommendations for prevention or treatment on the farm. A continuing education workshop was set up based on the results of research on dairy organizational communication on dairy farms, which resulted in a tool to assess dairy communication structure and flow. The workshop specifically focused on communication structure and whom to talk to when implementing health care changes in calf rearing. In addition, modern methods of veterinary-client communication knowledge and skills were provided. Primary outcomes of the workshops were to obtain feedback from participants about research findings and the communication model, to improve awareness about the complexity of communication structures on dairy farms, and to change participants' knowledge and skills associated with on-farm communication by providing communication theory and skills and an approach to evaluate and improve dairy organizational communication. Of the 37 participants completing the pre-program assessment, most recognized a need for themselves or their practice to improve communication with clients and farm employees. After the program, most participants were confident in their new communication skills and would consider using them. They highlighted specific new ideas they could apply in practice, such as conducting a "communication audit." The results from the assessment of this communication workshop, focused on dairy veterinarians, highlighted the need for communication training in this sector of the profession and practitioners' desire to engage in this type of training.

  6. [Dairy cattle pregnancy rate in fixed time artificial insemination program with and without ultrasonic gynecologic screening.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Fernandes Grillo

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the pregnancy rate and the importance of ultrasound gynecological screening (US performed prior to fixed time artificial insemination programs (TAI, 120 Girolando cows, over two breeding seasons (2013 and 2014, were divided into two groups: (C / T; n = 58 and without (S / T; n = 62 gynecological screening by ultrasound, using three protocols, and the same for the groups with and without screening. Protocol I - “OvSynch” (OV in which received 0.025 mg of buserelin acetate in D0; 0.15 mg d-cloprostenol on D7; 0.025 mg buserelin acetate D9; It is inseminated at fixed time in D10. Protocol II - “OvSynch” + progesterone (OP4 and III Protocol - “OvSynch” + LH + P4 (OP4LH. Protocols II and III followed the same dosages of “OvSynch” associated with the introduction of intravaginal device containing 1g first use of progesterone in D0 and D7 in withdrawal. In Protocol III, LH replaced buserelin acetate in ovulation induction (D9; 25mg. Gestation diagnosis was made by US 45 days after TAI, and the animals not pregnant were reinseminated as presented heat. Parameters pregnancy rate at TAI (TP, total pregnancy rate (TPT = TAI + Return heat were analyzed by Chi-square or Fisher’s exact with 5% significance level. The use of progesterone favored the pregnancy rate of cyclic and acyclic animals, this has not occurred with LH job as ovulation inductor, providing no increase in pregnancy rates and overall pregnancy rate of dairy cows referred to the rated protocol. The gynecological screening by ultrasonography allowed evaluating the cyclicity of the studied females, indicating that its previous execution to the TAI, can provide good results with the use of better efficiency protocols for TAI programs.

  7. A mixed methods inquiry: How dairy farmers perceive the value(s of their involvement in an intensive dairy herd health management program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristensen Erling

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Research has been scarce when it comes to the motivational and behavioral sides of farmers' expectations related to dairy herd health management programs. The objectives of this study were to explore farmers' expectations related to participation in a health management program by: 1 identifying important ambitions, goals and subjective well-being among farmers, 2 submitting those data to a quantitative analysis thereby characterizing perspective(s of value added by health management programs among farmers; and 3 to characterize perceptions of farmers' goals among veterinarians. Methods The subject was initially explored by means of literature, interviews and discussions with farmers, herd health management consultants and researchers to provide an understanding (a concourse of the research entity. The concourse was then broken down into 46 statements. Sixteen Danish dairy farmers and 18 veterinarians associated with one large nationwide veterinary practice were asked to rank the 46 statements that defined the concourse. Next, a principal component analysis was applied to identify correlated statements and thus families of perspectives between respondents. Q-methodology was utilized to represent each of the statements by one row and each respondent by one column in the matrix. A subset of the farmers participated in a series of semi-structured interviews to face validate the concourse and to discuss subjects like animal welfare, veterinarians' competences as experienced by the farmers and time constraints in the farmers' everyday life. Results Farmers' views could be described by four families of perspectives: Teamwork, Animal welfare, Knowledge dissemination, and Production. Veterinarians believed that farmers' primary focus was on production and profit, however, farmers' valued teamwork and animal welfare more. Conclusion The veterinarians in this study appear to focus too much on financial performance and increased

  8. Computerised claw trimming database programs as the basis for monitoring hoof health in dairy herds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kofler, Johann

    2013-11-01

    Regular documentation and recording of udder health, reproduction and metabolic status are common practices on dairy farms. However, recording of claw health is less commonly undertaken. Computerised claw trimming documentation and analysis programs have been developed in Germany, Denmark, The Netherlands, United Kingdom, Spain, United States, and Austria. Such programs enable automatic analysis of recorded data including the presence/absence of claw lesions, their severity, and exact location (lateral, medial, fore and hind claws, interdigital or in predetermined claw zones) as well as the overall incidence and prevalence of lameness. Analysis of such data, particularly of numerical values, allows comparisons to be made between consecutive visits within one herd as well as between herds. Additionally, computerised programs can include interfaces that link to other herd health management programs or to data available from national breeding associations. Greater use of computerised claw trimming database programs would provide a valuable basis for monitoring and improving claw health and lameness in dairy herds. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Economic evaluation of Johne's disease control programs implemented on six Michigan dairy farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillars, R B; Grooms, D L; Wolf, C A; Kaneene, J B

    2009-08-01

    Johne's disease (JD) is an incurable, chronic infectious disease prevalent in dairy herds throughout the US and the world. The substantial economic losses caused by JD have been well documented. However, information on the costs of controlling the disease is limited, yet necessary, if producers are to make sound decisions regarding JD management. The purpose of this paper is to describe a method for evaluating the cost-effectiveness of management changes to control JD on infected dairy farms. A 5-year longitudinal study of six dairy herds infected with JD was performed. Each herd implemented a JD control program upon study enrollment. Prevalence of JD within each herd was monitored with annual testing of all adult cows using fecal culture and/or serum ELISA. Individual cow production and culling information was collected to estimate the annual economic losses caused by JD. An economic questionnaire was developed and administered to each herd annually to estimate costs directly attributable to the JD control program. Based on the costs of the control program, and using the losses to estimate the potential benefits of the control program, the net present value (NPV) of the control program was calculated for each herd during the study and projected into the future for a total of 20 years. The NPV was calculated for four different scenarios: (1) assuming a linear decline in losses beyond the observed period of the study with JD eradication by year 20 of the control program; (2) assuming losses and JD prevalence remain constant at the rate equal to that of the last observed year while continuing the control program; (3) assuming linear increase in losses at rate equal to that in scenario 1 with no control program; and (4) assuming losses remain constant at same level as the beginning of the study with no control plan implemented. The NPV varied greatly across the herds. For scenario 1, only three herds had a positive NPV; and only two herds had a positive NPV under

  10. 76 FR 80214 - National Dairy Promotion and Research Program; Amendments to the Order

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-23

    ... National Dairy Promotion and Research Board (Dairy Board) members in eight regions, merges Region 8 and Region 10, merges Region 12 and Region 13, and apportions Idaho as a separate region. The total number of... National Dairy Promotion and Research Board (Dairy Board) members in eight regions, merges Region 8 and...

  11. Producer estimates of prevalence and perceived importance of lameness in dairy herds with tiestalls, freestalls, and automated milking systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutler, J H Higginson; Rushen, J; de Passillé, A M; Gibbons, J; Orsel, K; Pajor, E; Barkema, H W; Solano, L; Pellerin, D; Haley, D; Vasseur, E

    2017-10-04

    Lameness is one of the most important welfare and productivity concerns in the dairy industry. Our objectives were to obtain producers' estimates of its prevalence and their perceptions of lameness, and to investigate how producers monitor lameness in tiestall (TS), freestall with milking parlor (FS), and automated milking system (AMS) herds. Forty focal cows per farm in 237 Canadian dairy herds were scored for lameness by trained researchers. On the same day, the producers completed a questionnaire. Mean herd-level prevalence of lameness estimated by producers was 9.0% (±0.9%; ±SE), whereas the researchers observed a mean prevalence of 22.2% (±0.9%). Correlation between producer- and researcher-estimated lameness prevalence was low (r = 0.19) and mean researcher prevalence was 1.6, 1.8, and 4.1 times higher in AMS, FS, and TS farms, respectively. A total of 48% of producers thought lameness was a moderate or major problem in their herds (TS = 34%; AMS =53%; FS = 59%). One third of producers considered lameness the highest ranked health problem they were trying to control, whereas two-thirds of producers (TS = 43%; AMS = 63%; FS = 71%) stated that they had made management changes to deal with lameness in the past 2 yr. Almost all producers (98%) stated they routinely check cows to identify new cases of lameness; however, 40% of producers did not keep records of lameness (AMS = 24%; FS = 23%; TS = 60%). A majority (69%) of producers treated lame cows themselves immediately after detection, whereas 13% relied on hoof-trimmer or veterinarians to plan treatment. Producers are aware of lameness as an issue in dairy herds and almost all monitor lameness as part of their daily routine. However, producers underestimate lameness prevalence, which highlights that lameness detection continues to be difficult in in all housing systems, especially in TS herds. Training to improve detection, record keeping, identification of farm-specific risk factors, and treatment planning

  12. Import Auto Technician; Curriculum Guide for the Development of an Import Automobile Technology Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    East Los Angeles Coll., CA.

    In this curriculum guide, courses in a three-phase community college program for training import automobile technicians are provided. Following an introducation to the guide, the background of the development of the program, the program, the instruction, support for instruction, and the import automobile industry are discussed. Sample options for…

  13. 76 FR 5821 - Earned Import Allowance Program: Evaluation of the Effectiveness of the Program for Certain...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-02

    ... COMMISSION Earned Import Allowance Program: Evaluation of the Effectiveness of the Program for Certain... investigation No. 332-503, Earned Import Allowance Program: Evaluation of the Effectiveness of the Program for... Import Allowance Program (EIAP) and directed the Commission to conduct annual reviews of the program for...

  14. Associations among milk production traits and glycosylated haemoglobin in dairy cattle; importance of lactose synthesis potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahbazkia, Homayon Reza; Aminlari, Mahmoud; Tavasoli, Atoosa; Mohamadnia, Ahmad Reza; Cravador, Alfredo

    2010-01-01

    Glucose is the major precursor of lactose synthesis in the mammary gland. Lactose the major carbohydrate and osmolyte of milk, controls milk volume and its concentration. Glycosylated haemoglobin (HbG) is a retrospective measure of mean blood glucose level and it is largely unaffected by recent physiological conditions and environmental events. The purposes of this study were to determine the correlations between lactose traits and other milk production traits in dairy cattle and to investigate whether HbG level can be correlated with milk and lactose production traits. Here, HbG percentage, milk and lactose production traits including milk yield, lactose, protein, SNF, total solid and fat percentages and yields were measured in 485 second calved Iranian Holstein cattle. Statistically significant negative correlations were established between HbG and milk yield (r = -0.88), lactose yield (r = -0.83), SNF yield (r = -0.81), protein yield (r = -0.79) and total solid yield (r = -0.74). Positive correlations were established between lactose yield and milk (r = 0.96), protein (r = 0.81), SNF (r = 0.92) and total solid (r = 0.79) yields. The negative correlation between HbG and milk and total lactose production is probably related to the higher glucose demands in the lactating mammary gland of more productive cows. The positive correlation between lactose yield and milk, protein, SNF and total solid yield indicates that the level of lactose synthesis influences milk production traits in ways other than merely via its osmolytic action.

  15. Strategies for use of reproductive technologies in genomic dairy cattle breeding programs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomasen, Jørn Rind; Sørensen, Anders Christian

    of genomic breeding values. The breeding schemes were evaluated according to genetic gain and rate of inbreeding. The relative gain by use of reproductive technologies is 11 to 84 percent points depending on the choice of other breeding scheme parameters. A large donor program with high selection intensity......A simulation study was performed for testing the effect of using reproductive technologies in a genomic dairy cattle young bull breeding scheme. The breeding scheme parameters: 1) number of donors, 2) number of progeny per donor, 3) age of the donor, 4) number of sires, and 5) reliability...... of sires provides the highest genetic gain. A relatively higher genetic gain is obtained for higher reliability of GEBV. Extending the donor program and number of selected bulls has a major effect of reducing the rate of inbreeding without compromising genetic gain....

  16. ParaCalc®--a novel tool to evaluate the economic importance of worm infections on the dairy farm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlier, Johannes; Van der Voort, Mariska; Hogeveen, Henk; Vercruysse, Jozef

    2012-03-23

    Subclinical infections with gastrointestinal nematodes and liver fluke are important causes of production losses in grazing cattle. Although there is an extensive compilation of literature describing the effect of these infections on animal performance, only a few attempts have been made to convert these production losses to an economic cost. Here, we propose a novel tool (ParaCalc(®)), available as a web-application, to provide herd-specific estimates of the costs of these infections on dairy farms. ParaCalc(®) is a deterministic spread-sheet model where results from diagnostic methods to monitor the helminth infection status on a herd and anthelmintic usage are used as input parameters. Default values are provided to describe the effects of the infections on production and the cost of these production losses, but the latter can be adapted to improve the herd-specificity of the cost estimate. After development, ParaCalc(®) was applied on input parameters that were available for 93 Belgian dairy herds. In addition, the tool was provided to 6 veterinarians and their user experiences were evaluated. The estimated median [25th-75th percentile] cost per year per cow was € 46 [29-58] and € 6 [0-19] for gastrointestinal nematode and liver fluke infection, respectively. For both infections, the major components in the total costs were those associated with milk production losses in the adult cows. The veterinarians evaluated ParaCalc(®) as a useful tool to raise the farmers' awareness on the costs of worm infections, providing added value for their services. However, the score given for user-friendliness was diverse among users. Although the model behind ParaCalc(®) is a strong simplification of the real herd processes inducing economic losses, the tool may be used in the future to support economic decisions on helminth control. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Risk factors for changing test classification in the Danish surveillance program for Salmonella in dairy herds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lennarth Ravn; Warnick, L. D.; Greiner, M.

    2007-01-01

    A surveillance program in which all cattle herds in Denmark are classified into Salmonella infection categories has been in place since 2002. Dairy herds were considered test negative and thus most likely free of infection if Salmonella antibody measurements were consistently low in bulk tank milk...... samples collected every 3 mo. Herds were considered test positive and thus most likely infected if the 4-quarter moving average bulk tank milk antibody concentration was high or if there was a large increase in the most recent measurement compared with the average value from the previous 3 samples....... The objective of this study was to evaluate risk factors for changing from test negative to positive, which was indicative of herds becoming infected from one quarter of the year to the next, and risk factors for changing from test positive to negative, which was indicative of herds recovering from infection...

  18. IMPORTANCE OF COST OFFSETS FOR DAIRY FARMS MEETING A NUTRIENT APPLICATION STANDARD

    OpenAIRE

    Ribaudo, Marc; Agapoff, Jean

    2004-01-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency requires concentrated animal feeding operations to develop and implement a comprehensive nutrient management plan. Changes in manure management to meet nutrient application standards will generally increase production costs. Some of these costs can be offset by savings from replacing commercial fertilizer with manure nutrients, and through financial assistance programs such as the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Environmental Quality Incentives Progra...

  19. Simulation model estimates of test accuracy and predictive values for the Danish Salmonella surveillance program in dairy herds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warnick, L.D.; Nielsen, L.R.; Nielsen, Jens

    2006-01-01

    is based on a well-established ELISA, but the overall test program accuracy and misclassification was not previously investigated. We developed a model to simulate repeated bulk tank milk antibody measurements for dairy herds conditional on true infection status. The distributions of bulk tank milk...... was made between Dublin and other Salmonella serotypes which cross-react in the ELISA. The simulation model was used to estimate the accuracy of herd classification for true herd-level prevalence values ranging from 0.02 to 0.5. Test program sensitivity was 0.95 across the range of prevalence values......The Danish government and cattle industry instituted a Salmonella surveillance program in October 2002 to help reduce Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serotype Dublin (S. Dublin) infections. All dairy herds are tested by measuring antibodies in bulk tank milk at 3-month intervals. The program...

  20. 77 FR 14568 - Earned Import Allowance Program: Evaluation of the Effectiveness of the Program for Certain...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-12

    ... COMMISSION Earned Import Allowance Program: Evaluation of the Effectiveness of the Program for Certain... review in investigation No. 332-503, Earned Import Allowance Program: Evaluation of the Effectiveness of... Commerce to establish an Earned Import Allowance Program (EIAP) and directed the Commission to conduct...

  1. 78 FR 16297 - Earned Import Allowance Program: Evaluation of the Effectiveness of the Program for Certain...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-14

    ... COMMISSION Earned Import Allowance Program: Evaluation of the Effectiveness of the Program for Certain... fourth annual review in investigation No. 332-503, Earned Import Allowance Program: Evaluation of the... an Earned Import Allowance Program (EIAP) and directed the Commission to conduct annual reviews of...

  2. The comparison of dairy performance and some reproductive parameters of holstein cows imported from Sweden and their Polish age mates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Czerniawska-Piątkowska

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The general aim of the present work was to compare dairy performance and some reproductive parameters of Holstein-Friesian (HF cows imported from Sweden as an in-calf heifers, and their age mates in Poland. The animals were kept freely on the deep litter on the farm owned by Agro-company “Witkowo” and feeding was based on TMR (total mixed ration system during whole year. All ration’s ingredients (bulky feed, concentrate, miscellaneous additives were mixed and fed as all-mash. The feed ration depended from the physiological condition of a cow and it was composed of corn and grass ensilage, mash concentrate, crushed corn meal, brewer’s grains and beet pulp.Cows imported from Sweden as in-calf heifers obtained higher milk, fat and protein yield in both lactations comparing to home cows. Significant statistical differences were observed for kg of milk, kg of protein, for FCM (P<0.01 and for kg of fat (P<0.05 in 2nd lactation. Fat and protein content in milk was in average higher for home cows (P<0.01. Big differences (P<0.01 were observed in SBT (proportion of protein to fat content and RTB (difference between concentration of fat and protein at imported cows in 2nd lactation. As far as reproduction parameters (gestation interval, calving interval, insemination index are concerned was cows from Sweden better too. Heifers from Sweden calved earlier. The usage of high genetic potential of imported cows is possible only with providing them optimum living conditions suitable to their needs.

  3. 7 CFR 1150.112 - Dairy products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Dairy products. 1150.112 Section 1150.112 Agriculture... and Orders; Milk), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DAIRY PROMOTION PROGRAM Dairy Promotion and Research Order Definitions § 1150.112 Dairy products. Dairy products means products manufactured for human...

  4. Meta-analysis of progesterone supplementation during timed artificial insemination programs in dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisinotto, R S; Lean, I J; Thatcher, W W; Santos, J E P

    2015-04-01

    A systematic review of the literature was performed with the objective to evaluate the effects of progesterone supplementation using a single intravaginal insert during timed artificial insemination (AI) programs on fertility in lactating dairy cows. A total of 25 randomized controlled studies including 8,285 supplemented cows and 8,398 untreated controls were included in the meta-analysis. Information regarding the presence of corpus luteum (CL) at the initiation of the synchronization protocol was available for 6,883 supplemented cows and 6,879 untreated controls in 21 experiments. Studies were classified based on service number (first AI vs. resynchronized AI), use of presynchronization (yes vs. no), and insemination of cows in estrus during the synchronization protocol (inseminated in estrus and timed AI vs. timed AI only). Reproductive outcomes of interest were pregnancy per AI (P/AI) measured on d 32 (27 to 42) and 60 (41 to 71) after AI, and pregnancy loss between d 32 and 60 of gestation. Random effects meta-analyses were conducted and treatment effect was summarized into a pooled risk ratio with the Knapp-Hartung modification (RRK+H). The effect of moderator variables was assessed using meta-regression analyses. Progesterone supplementation increased the risk of pregnancy on d 32 [RRK+H = 1.08; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.02-1.14] and 60 after AI (RRK+H = 1.10; 95% CI = 1.03-1.17). The benefit of progesterone supplementation was observed mainly in cows lacking a CL at the initiation of the timed AI program (d 60: RRK+H = 1.18; 95% CI = 1.07-1.30) rather than those with CL (d 60: RRK+H = 1.06; 95% CI = 0.99-1.12). Progesterone supplementation benefited P/AI in studies in which all cows were inseminated at timed AI (d 60: RRK+H = 1.20; 95% CI = 1.10-1.29), but not in studies in which cows could be inseminated in estrus during the timed AI program (d 60: RRK+H = 1.04; 95% CI = 0.92-1.16). Progesterone supplementation tended to reduce the risk of

  5. Linear Programming in the economic estimate of livestock-crop integration: application to a Brazilian dairy farm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Augusto Hauber Gameiro

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT A linear programming mathematical model was applied to a representative dairy farm located in Brazil. The results showed that optimization models are relevant tools to assist in the planning and management of agricultural production, as well as to assist in estimating potential gains from the use of integrated systems. Diversification was a necessary condition for economic viability. A total cost reduction potential of about 30% was revealed when a scenario of lower levels of diversification was contrasted to one of higher levels. Technical complementarities proved to be important sources of economies. The possibility of reusing nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium present in animal waste could be increased to 167%, while water reuse could be increased up to 150%. In addition to economic gains, integrated systems bring benefits to the environment, especially with reference to the reuse of resources. The cost dilution of fixed production factors can help economies of scope to be achieved. However, this does not seem to have been the main source of these benefits. Still, the percentage of land use could increase up to 30.7% when the lowest and the highest diversification scenarios were compared. The labor coefficient could have a 4.3 percent increase. Diversification also leads to drastic transaction cost reductions.

  6. Reproductive technologies combine well with genomic selection in dairy breeding programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomasen, J R; Willam, A; Egger-Danner, C; Sørensen, A C

    2016-02-01

    The objective of the present study was to examine whether genomic selection of females interacts with the use of reproductive technologies (RT) to increase annual monetary genetic gain (AMGG). This was tested using a factorial design with 3 factors: genomic selection of females (0 or 2,000 genotyped heifers per year), RT (0 or 50 donors selected at 14 mo of age for producing 10 offspring), and 2 reliabilities of genomic prediction. In addition, different strategies for use of RT and how strategies interact with the reliability of genomic prediction were investigated using stochastic simulation by varying (1) number of donors (25, 50, 100, 200), (2) number of calves born per donor (10 or 20), (3) age of donor (2 or 14 mo), and (4) number of sires (25, 50, 100, 200). In total, 72 different breeding schemes were investigated. The profitability of the different breeding strategies was evaluated by deterministic simulation by varying the costs of a born calf with reproductive technologies at levels of €500, €1,000, and €1,500. The results confirm our hypothesis that combining genomic selection of females with use of RT increases AMGG more than in a reference scheme without genomic selection in females. When the reliability of genomic prediction is high, the effect on rate of inbreeding (ΔF) is small. The study also demonstrates favorable interaction effects between the components of the breeder's equation (selection intensity, selection accuracy, generation interval) for the bull dam donor path, leading to higher AMGG. Increasing the donor program and number of born calves to achieve higher AMGG is associated with the undesirable effect of increased ΔF. This can be alleviated, however, by increasing the numbers of sires without compromising AMGG remarkably. For the major part of the investigated donor schemes, the investment in RT is profitable in dairy cattle populations, even at high levels of costs for RT. Copyright © 2016 American Dairy Science Association

  7. 77 FR 61012 - Expansion of Importer Self-Assessment Program To Include Qualified Importers of Focused...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-05

    ..., and to discuss the scope and methodology of the self-testing plan developed by the company. Companies... assessment methodology used by the company; the testing methodology; the frequency of self-testing activities... conducted at least annually. ( www.cbp.gov/xp/cgov/trade/trade_programs/importer_self_assessment/ ). Once...

  8. Including nonadditive genetic effects in mating programs to maximize dairy farm profitability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliloo, H; Pryce, J E; González-Recio, O; Cocks, B G; Goddard, M E; Hayes, B J

    2017-02-01

    allocation programs are required to benefit from nonadditive genetic effects in the long term. The Authors. Published by the Federation of Animal Science Societies and Elsevier Inc. on behalf of the American Dairy Science Association®. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/).

  9. Dairy Tool Box Talks: A Comprehensive Worker Training in Dairy Farming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovai, Maristela; Carroll, Heidi; Foos, Rebecca; Erickson, Tracey; Garcia, Alvaro

    2016-01-01

    Today's dairies are growing rapidly, with increasing dependence on Latino immigrant workers. This requires new educational strategies for improving milk quality and introduction to state-of-the-art dairy farming practices. It also creates knowledge gaps pertaining to the health of animals and workers, mainly due to the lack of time and language barriers. Owners, managers, and herdsmen assign training duties to more experienced employees, which may not promote "best practices" and may perpetuate bad habits. A comprehensive and periodic training program administered by qualified personnel is currently needed and will enhance the sustainability of the dairy industry. Strategic management and employee satisfaction will be achieved through proper training in the employee's language, typically Spanish. The training needs to address not only current industry standards but also social and cultural differences. An innovative training course was developed following the same structure used by the engineering and construction industries, giving farm workers basic understanding of animal care and handling, cow comfort, and personal safety. The "Dairy Tool Box Talks" program was conducted over a 10-week period with nine sessions according to farm's various employee work shifts. Bulk milk bacterial counts and somatic cell counts were used to evaluate milk quality on the three dairy farms participating in the program. "Dairy Tool Box Talks" resulted in a general sense of employee satisfaction, significant learning outcomes, and enthusiasm about the topics covered. We conclude this article by highlighting the importance of educational programs aimed at improving overall cross-cultural training.

  10. Factors associated with participation of Alberta dairy farmers in a voluntary, management-based Johne's disease control program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, C; Kwong, G P S; Wolf, R; Pickel, C; Slomp, M; Flaig, J; Mason, S; Adams, C L; Kelton, D F; Jansen, J; De Buck, J; Barkema, H W

    2015-11-01

    The Alberta Johne's Disease Initiative (AJDI) is a voluntary, management-based prevention and control program for Johne's disease (JD), a wasting disease in ruminants that causes substantial economic losses to the cattle industry. Despite extensive communication about the program's benefits and low cost to participating producers, approximately 35% of Alberta dairy farmers have not enrolled in the AJDI. Therefore, the objective was to identify differences between AJDI nonparticipants and participants that may influence enrollment. Standardized questionnaires were conducted in person on 163 farms not participating and 61 farms participating in the AJDI. Data collected included demographic characteristics, internal factors (e.g., attitudes and beliefs of the farmer toward JD and the AJDI), external factors (e.g., farmers' JD knowledge and on-farm goals and constraints), as well as farmers' use and influence of various information sources. Nonparticipants and participants differed in at least some aspects of all studied categories. Based on logistic regression, participating farms had larger herds, higher self-assessed knowledge of JD, better understanding of AJDI details before participation, and used their veterinarian more often to get information about new management practices and technologies when compared with nonparticipants. In contrast, nonparticipants indicated that time was a major on-farm constraint and that participation in the AJDI would take too much time. They also indicated that they preferred to wait and see how the program worked on other farms before they participated. Copyright © 2015 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Diagnostic importance of the concentration of milk amyloid A in quarter milk samples from dairy cows with mastitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Vasiľ

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute phase proteins have been used as biomarkers of inflammation. Their concentrations increase in milk from cows with latent and subclinical mastitis. The aim of our study was to evaluate milk amyloid A (MAA as indicator of udder inflammation. We used 24 dairy cows from a herd with 120 Slovak Pied cattle. In addition to bacteriological examination, the following indicators were determined in all quarter milk samples. On the basis of results of clinical examination, Californian mastitis test (CMT, and number of Somatic cell count (SCC, four groups of quarter milk samples were formed. The levels of MAA in both subgroups of Group 1 (healthy cows, divided by the number of SCC - IA (n = 10, IB (n = 15, determined at repeated samplings, differed significantly from the initial levels (P 2 = 0.272, was detected between SCC, and MAA in Group 2 (n = 27 at individual collections (P P 2 = 0.525 was detected between SCC and MAA in this group. The obtained results allowed us to conclude that MAA in milk can act as a marker of inflammation of the udder only in the initial, asymptomatic stages of dairy cow mastitis. The experiment was one of first studies with MAA in Slovak Pied cattle.

  12. Relative importance of management, meteorological and environmental factors in the spatial distribution of Fasciola hepatica in dairy cattle in a temperate climate zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennema, S C; Ducheyne, E; Vercruysse, J; Claerebout, E; Hendrickx, G; Charlier, J

    2011-02-01

    Fasciola hepatica, a trematode parasite with a worldwide distribution, is the cause of important production losses in the dairy industry. Diagnosis is hampered by the fact that the infection is mostly subclinical. To increase awareness and develop regionally adapted control methods, knowledge on the spatial distribution of economically important infection levels is needed. Previous studies modelling the spatial distribution of F. hepatica are mostly based on single cross-sectional samplings and have focussed on climatic and environmental factors, often ignoring management factors. This study investigated the associations between management, climatic and environmental factors affecting the spatial distribution of infection with F. hepatica in dairy herds in a temperate climate zone (Flanders, Belgium) over three consecutive years. A bulk-tank milk antibody ELISA was used to measure F. hepatica infection levels in a random sample of 1762 dairy herds in the autumns of 2006, 2007 and 2008. The infection levels were included in a Geographic Information System together with meteorological, environmental and management parameters. Logistic regression models were used to determine associations between possible risk factors and infection levels. The prevalence and spatial distribution of F. hepatica was relatively stable, with small interannual differences in prevalence and location of clusters. The logistic regression model based on both management and climatic/environmental factors included the factors: annual rainfall, mowing of pastures, proportion of grazed grass in the diet and length of grazing season as significant predictors and described the spatial distribution of F. hepatica better than the model based on climatic/environmental factors only (annual rainfall, elevation and slope, soil type), with an Area Under the Curve of the Receiver Operating Characteristic of 0.68 compared with 0.62. The results indicate that in temperate climate zones without large climatic

  13. 78 FR 8434 - Dairy Tariff-Rate Import Quota Licensing Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-06

    .... USDA issues three types of licenses: historical, nonhistorical (lottery), and designated. For all three... year. (2) Nonhistorical (lottery) licenses are available each year to any qualified applicant. Lottery... Round Agreement. Applicants for the lottery licenses have no guarantee that they will receive the same...

  14. Dairy Wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pico, Richard F.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of wastes from the dairy industry covering publications of 1976-77. This review covers: (1) government regulations; (2) ion-plant control of dairy effluents; (3) dairy effluent treatment methods; and (4) research on dairy effluents. A list of 26 references is also presented. (HM)

  15. The intention of North-Western Ethiopian dairy farmers to control mastitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mekonnen, Sefinew Alemu; Koop, Gerrit; Lam, Theo J.G.M.; Hogeveen, Henk

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the intentions of dairy farmers towards mastitis control is important to design effective udder health control programs. We used the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) to explore the intentions of North-Western Ethiopian dairy farmers towards implementing non-specified mastitis control

  16. Evaluation of a training programme designed to improve the entrepreneurial competencies of Dutch dairy farmers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergevoet, R.H.M.; Giesen, G.W.J.; Saatkamp, H.W.; Woerkum, van C.M.J.; Huirne, R.B.M.

    2005-01-01

    Due to external and internal changes in dairy farming, entrepreneurial competencies are becoming increasingly important for dairy farmers. Investigating the possibility to improve these competencies by means of a training program is the main topic of the reported research. First the relations

  17. The importance of mineralogical input into geometallurgy programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoal, K. Olson; Woodhead, J.D.; Smith, Kathleen S.

    2013-01-01

    Mineralogy is the link between ore formation and ore extraction. It is the most fundamental component of geomet programs, and the most important aspect of a life-of-project approach to mineral resource projects. Understanding orebodies is achieved by understanding the mineralogy and texture of the materials, throughout the process, because minerals hold the information required to unlock the value they contain. Geomet mineralogy programs absolutely require the appropriate expertise and at least three steps of mineral characterisation prior to using semi-automated or other methods: field examination, thorough core logging, and optical microscopy. Economic geological inputs for orebody characterisation are necessary for orebody understanding, and are exemplified by current research in the Zambian Copperbelt, where revised sequence stratigraphy and understanding of alteration, metasomatism and metamorphism can be used to predict topical issues at mine sites. Environmental inputs for sustainability characterisation are demonstrated by recent work on tailings from the Leadville, Colorado, USA area, including linking mineralogy to water quality issues. Risk assessments need to take into account the technical uncertainties around geological variability and mineral extractability, and mineralogy is the only metric that can be used to make this risk contribution.

  18. Optimization of a genomic breeding program for a moderately sized dairy cattle population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiner-Benaim, A; Ezra, E; Weller, J I

    2017-04-01

    Although it now standard practice to genotype thousands of female calves, genotyping of bull calves is generally limited to progeny of elite cows. In addition to genotyping costs, increasing the pool of candidate sires requires purchase, isolation, and identification of calves until selection decisions are made. We economically optimized via simulation a genomic breeding program for a population of approximately 120,000 milk-recorded cows, corresponding to the Israeli Holstein population. All 30,000 heifers and 60,000 older cows of parities 1 to 3 were potential bull dams. Animals were assumed to have genetic evaluations for a trait with heritability of 0.25 derived by an animal model evaluation of the population. Only bull calves were assumed to be genotyped. A pseudo-phenotype corresponding to each animal's genetic evaluation was generated, consisting of the animal's genetic value plus a residual with variance set to obtain the assumed reliability for each group of animals. Between 4 and 15 bulls and between 200 and 27,000 cows with the highest pseudo-phenotypes were selected as candidate bull parents. For all progeny of the founder animals, genetic values were simulated as the mean of the parental values plus a Mendelian sampling effect with variance of 0.5. A probability of 0.3 for a healthy bull calf per mating, and a genomic reliability of 0.43 were assumed. The 40 bull calves with the highest genomic evaluations were selected for general service for 1 yr. Costs included genotyping of candidate bulls and their dams, purchase of the calves from the farmers, and identification. Costs of raising culled calves were partially recovered by resale for beef. Annual costs were estimated as $10,922 + $305 × candidate bulls. Nominal profit per cow per genetic standard deviation was $106. Economic optimum with a discount rate of 5%, first returns after 4 yr, and a profit horizon of 15 yr were obtained with genotyping 1,620 to 1,750 calves for all numbers of bull sires

  19. Dairy farmers' attitudes and intentions towards improving dairy cow foot health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruijnis, M.R.N.; Hogeveen, H.; Garforth, C.J.; Stassen, E.N.

    2013-01-01

    Dairy cow foot health is a subject of concern because it is considered to be the most important welfare problem in dairy farming and causes economic losses for the farmer. In order to improve dairy cow foot health it is important to take into account the attitude and intention of dairy farmers. In

  20. Pemeliharaan Jamban Keluarga Dan Perilaku Buang Air Besar Pasca Program Sanitasi Total Berbasis Masyarakat (Stbm) Di Desa Pangaribuan Kecamatan Siempat Nempu Hulu Kabupaten Dairi

    OpenAIRE

    Simaibang, Nopa Martogia

    2017-01-01

    The approach used to overcome the sanitation problems, especially the problem of open defecation is a Community-based of Total Sanitation (STBM). Pangaribuan Village, District of Siempat Nempu Hulu, Dairi is one of the villages that stated to be ODF (Open Defecation Program). Through this study the authors discuss the problem titled "The Maintenance of Family Toilet And Behaviorof defecation after-Program Community Based Total Sanitation (STBM) In the Village of Pangaribuan,...

  1. SYNCHRONIZATION PROGRAMS FOR REPRODUCTIVE MANAGEMENT OF DAIRY HERDS PROGRAMAS DE SINCRONIZACIÓN DE CELOS PARA EL MANEJO REPRODUCTIVO DE GANADERÍAS DE LECHE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santos Jose

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available There are many factors that can influence reproduction of the dairy cow such as management, physiologic factors, nutrition, genetics, and diseases Reproductive efficiency. Reproductive performance is therefore a major concern in dairy herds to success, and it has to be subject of continuous and accurate evaluation in reproductive herd health programs, in order to detect problems and implement adequate solutions. Controlled breeding programs have allowed dairy producers to optimize service rate with little impact on conception and pregnancy losses in lactating dairy cows.Existen muchos factores que pueden influenciar la reproduccion en ganaderías de leche, tales como el manejo, factores fisiológicos, la nutrición, genéticos, y la presentación de enfermedades, entre otros. Por esta razon la eficiencia reproductiva es de gran importancia en las ganaderías para ser exitosas y debe ser continua y adecuadamente evaluada en los programas reproductivos de salud de hato, con el fin de detectar los problemas y establecer las soluciones adecuadas. Los programas de reproduccion controlados, han permitido a los productores optimizar las tasas de servicios con un muy pequeño impacto en las tasas de concepción y perdida gestacional en ganaderías de leche.

  2. Invited review: Reproductive and genomic technologies to optimize breeding strategies for genetic progress in dairy cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Fleming

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Dairy cattle breeders have exploited technological advances that have emerged in the past in regards to reproduction and genomics. The implementation of such technologies in routine breeding programs has permitted genetic gains in traditional milk production traits as well as, more recently, in low-heritability traits like health and fertility. As demand for dairy products increases, it is important for dairy breeders to optimize the use of available technologies and to consider the many emerging technologies that are currently being investigated in various fields. Here we review a number of technologies that have helped shape dairy breeding programs in the past and present, along with those potentially forthcoming. These tools have materialized in the areas of reproduction, genotyping and sequencing, genetic modification, and epigenetics. Although many of these technologies bring encouraging opportunities for genetic improvement of dairy cattle populations, their applications and benefits need to be weighed with their impacts on economics, genetic diversity, and society.

  3. Importance of NDF digestibility of whole crop maize silage for dry matter intake and milk production in dairy cows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krämer, Monika; Lund, Peter; Weisbjerg, Martin Riis

    2016-01-01

    source for use in ruminant nutrition. Even though ruminants require forage fibre to maintain rumen function and maximize productivity, excess fibre limits feed intake due to its contribution to physical fill in the rumen. As feed intake is the most important factor for milk production, both a......NDFom concentration and aNDFom digestibility are key determinants of the nutritive value of a diet. Therefore, the importance of maize silage aNDFom digestibility on nutritive value, dry matter (DM) intake (DMI) and milk production was investigated in a literature review across a wide range of studies varying......The importance of maize silage as a feed component in cattle rations and for biogas production has substantially increased. Whole crop maize silage is a forage with a high starch concentration, but also the cell wall fraction, commonly analysed as neutral detergent fibre (aNDFom) is a major energy...

  4. Paracalc® - a novel tool to evaluate the economic importance of worm infections on the dairy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Charlier, C.; Voort, van der J.M.; Hogeveen, H.; Vercruysse, J.

    2012-01-01

    linical infections with gastrointestinal nematodes and liver fluke are important causes of production losses in grazing cattle. Although there is an extensive compilation of literature describing the effect of these infections on animal performance, only a few attempts have been made to convert

  5. Dairy Tool Box Talks: a comprehensive worker training in dairy farming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maristela Rovai

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Today’s dairies are growing rapidly, with increasing dependence on Latino immigrant workers. This requires new educational strategies for improving milk quality and introduction to state-of-the-art dairy farming practices. It also creates knowledge gaps pertaining to the health of animals and workers, mainly due to lack of time and language barriers. Owners, managers and herdsmen assign training duties to more experienced employees, which may not promote ‘best practices’ and may perpetuate bad habits. A comprehensive and periodic training program administered by qualified personnel is currently needed and will enhance the sustainability of the dairy industry. Strategic management and employee satisfaction will be achieved through proper training in the employee’s language, typically Spanish. The training needs to address not only current industry standards but also social and cultural differences. An innovative training course was developed following the same structure used by the engineering and construction industries, giving farm workers basic understanding of animal care and handling, cow comfort and personal safety. The Dairy Tool Box Talks program was conducted over a ten week period with nine 30-minute sessions according to farm’s various employee work shifts. Bulk milk bacterial counts and somatic cell count were used to evaluate milk quality on the three dairy farms participating in the program.Dairy Tool Box Talks resulted in a general sense of employee satisfaction, significant learning outcomes, and enthusiasm about the topics covered. We conclude this article by highlighting the importance of educational programs aimed at improving overall cross-cultural training.

  6. Profitability of a dairy sheep genetic improvement program using artificial insemination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valergakis, G E; Gelasakis, A I; Oikonomou, G; Arsenos, G; Fortomaris, P; Banos, G

    2010-10-01

    This simulation study investigated the farm-level economic benefits of a genetic improvement scheme using artificial insemination (AI) with fresh ram semen in dairy sheep of the Chios breed in Greece. Data were collected from 67 farms associated with the Chios Sheep Breeders' Cooperative 'Macedonia', describing the percentage of ewes that would be artificially inseminated in the flock, pregnancy rate, annual ram costs that could be saved using AI rather than natural mating, expected improvement in milk production, annual costs of semen and feed, milk price and number of years of AI usage. The study considered 77 760 possible scenarios in a 3 × 4 × 4 × 3 × 3 × 3 × 4 × 15 factorial arrangement. Analysis of variance was used to investigate the effect of each factor on farm profitability. All factors considered were statistically significant (P profitability and farmers should become aware that using AI is a long-term investment. Semen price, pregnancy rate and improvement in milk production also had substantial effects. The price of milk and feed had a considerably lower effect on profitability, as did the annual cost of maintaining rams that would be replaced by AI. A positive annual and cumulative return was achieved in the model within the first 6 years. The cost of semen was estimated at 8€ to 10€ per dose for the first 5 years. Where the annual improvement in milk production was 1% of annual phenotypic mean (e.g. 3.0 kg) profitability of the scheme was improved greatly.

  7. The cost of generic clinical mastitis in dairy cows as estimated by using dynamic programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar, D; Tauer, L W; Bennett, G; González, R N; Hertl, J A; Schukken, Y H; Schulte, H F; Welcome, F L; Gröhn, Y T

    2008-06-01

    The objective of this study was to estimate the cost of generic clinical mastitis (CM) in high-yielding dairy cows given optimal decisions concerning handling of CM cases. A specially structured optimization and simulation model that included a detailed representation of repeated episodes of CM was used to study the effects of various factors on the cost of CM. The basic scenario was based on data from 5 large herds in New York State. In the basic scenario, 92% of the CM cases were recommended to be treated. The average cost of CM per cow and year in these herds was $71. The average cost of a CM case was $179. It was composed of $115 because of milk yield losses, $14 because of increased mortality, and $50 because of treatment-associated costs. The estimated cost of CM was highly dependent on cow traits: it was highest ($403) in cows with high expected future net returns (e.g., young, high-milk-yielding cows), and was lowest ($3) in cows that were recommended to be culled for reasons other than mastitis. The cost per case of CM was 18% higher with a 20% increase in milk price and 17% lower with a 20% decrease in milk price. The cost per case of CM was affected little by a 20% change in replacement cost or pregnancy rate. Changes in CM incidence, however, resulted from changes in these factors, thus affecting whole-farm profitability. The detailed results obtained from this insemination and replacement optimization model can assist farmers in making CM treatment decisions.

  8. Kamdhenu Dairy

    OpenAIRE

    Debasis Pradhan; Shabad Kalra; Sangeeta Srinivas

    2007-01-01

    Kamdhenu Dairy was one of the biggest dairy unions in India that came into being in 1969. Kamdhenu dairy, with an annual sales turnover of Rs.5250 million, was procuring its milk from the regular suppliers residing in the villages using its own procurement network. The same network was being used to market other dairy products and essential items like fodder and medicine for the cattle to the milk suppliers. The company had recently chosen to sell tea using the same procurement network. The e...

  9. African fermented dairy products - Overview of predominant technologically important microorganisms focusing on African Streptococcus infantarius variants and potential future applications for enhanced food safety and security.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jans, Christoph; Meile, Leo; Kaindi, Dasel Wambua Mulwa; Kogi-Makau, Wambui; Lamuka, Peter; Renault, Pierre; Kreikemeyer, Bernd; Lacroix, Christophe; Hattendorf, Jan; Zinsstag, Jakob; Schelling, Esther; Fokou, Gilbert; Bonfoh, Bassirou

    2017-06-05

    Milk is a major source of nutrients, but can also be a vehicle for zoonotic foodborne diseases, especially when raw milk is consumed. In Africa, poor processing and storage conditions contribute to contamination, outgrowth and transmission of pathogens, which lead to spoilage, reduced food safety and security. Fermentation helps mitigate the impact of poor handling and storage conditions by enhancing shelf life and food safety. Traditionally-fermented sour milk products are culturally accepted and widely distributed in Africa, and rely on product-specific microbiota responsible for aroma, flavor and texture. Knowledge of microbiota and predominant, technologically important microorganisms is critical in developing products with enhanced quality and safety, as well as sustainable interventions for these products, including Africa-specific starter culture development. This narrative review summarizes current knowledge of technologically-important microorganisms of African fermented dairy products (FDP) and raw milk, taking into consideration novel findings and taxonomy when re-analyzing data of 29 publications covering 25 products from 17 African countries. Technologically-important lactic acid bacteria such as Lactococcus lactis and Streptococcus infantarius subsp. infantarius (Sii), Lactobacillus spp. and yeasts predominated in raw milk and FDP across Africa. Re-analysis of data also suggests a much wider distribution of Sii and thus a potentially longer history of use than previously expected. Therefore, evaluating the role and safety of African Sii lineages is important when developing interventions and starter cultures for FDP in Africa to enhance food safety and food security. In-depth functional genomics, epidemiologic investigations and latest identification approaches coupled with stakeholder involvement will be required to evaluate the possibility of African Sii lineages as novel food-grade Streptococcus lineage. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by

  10. Importance of multidisciplinary trauma prevention program for youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorigatti, Alcir Escocia; Jimenez, Laísa Simakawa; Redondano, Barbara Ribeiro; de Carvalho, Rodrigo Barros; Calderan, Thiago Rodrigues Araujo; Fraga, Gustavo Pereira

    2014-01-01

    present the experience of the P.A.R.T.Y. program in Campinas, thereby changing the habits of young people. The organizers visited the participating schools talking to the students, who are aged between 14-18 years. These students spent an afternoon at the Clinics Hospital of Unicamp, where, for four hours, they attended lectures of the organizers, partners and municipal sectors, and also visited the hospital, talking with trauma victims. Questionnaires were evaluated between 2010-2012, being applied before and after the project. 2,450 high school students attended the program. The mean age is 16 ± 0,99 years and 37.6% were male. 3.6% of males already drive while drunk versus 0.8% of women. Before the project 116 (11.3%) thought that drunk driving wasn't a risk, and only 37 (3.6%) knew the alcohol effects. After the project, 441 (43%) began to consider drunk driving a risk and 193 (18.8%) know the alcohol effects when driving. 956 (93.3%) considered that prevention projects have a huge impact on their formation. It's expected that the attendees will act as multipliers of information, conveying the message of prevention to their entire social circles resulting in reduction in the number of trauma events involving the young, in the long term.

  11. Importance of multidisciplinary trauma prevention program for youth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alcir Escocia Dorigatti

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: present the experience of the P.A.R.T.Y. program in Campinas, thereby changing the habits of young people.METHODS: The organizers visited the participating schools talking to the students, who are aged between 14-18 years. These students spent an afternoon at the Clinics Hospital of Unicamp, where, for four hours, they attended lectures of the organizers, partners and municipal sectors, and also visited the hospital, talking with trauma victims. Questionnaires were evaluated between2010-2012, being applied before and after the project.RESULTS:2,450 high school students attended the program. The mean age is 16 ± 0,99 years and 37.6% were male. 3.6% of males already drive while drunk versus 0.8% of women. Before the project 116 (11.3% thought that drunk driving wasn't a risk, and only 37 (3.6% knew the alcohol effects. After the project, 441 (43% began to consider drunk driving a risk and 193 (18.8% know the alcohol effects when driving. 956 (93.3% considered that prevention projects have a huge impact on their formation.CONCLUSION: It's expected that the attendees will act as multipliers of information, conveying the message of prevention to their entire social circles resulting in reduction in the number of trauma events involving the young, in the long term.

  12. Importance of NDF digestibility of whole crop maize silage for dry matter intake and milk production in dairy cows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krämer, Monika; Lund, Peter; Weisbjerg, Martin Riis

    2016-01-01

    in starch concentration and an increase in crude protein concentration. Nevertheless, the digestibility of DM and organic matter (OM) increased with enhanced aNDFom digestibility. Milk yield and live weight gain also increased with enhanced aNDFom digestibility. A 0.01 increase in the coefficient of maize......NDFom concentration and aNDFom digestibility are key determinants of the nutritive value of a diet. Therefore, the importance of maize silage aNDFom digestibility on nutritive value, dry matter (DM) intake (DMI) and milk production was investigated in a literature review across a wide range of studies varying...... in ration composition and characteristics of maize silage. The dataset compiled for the study comprised 29 experiments with 96 dietary treatments, but for a number of parameters less observations were published and therefore used in the analyses. Enhanced aNDFom digestibility was associated with a decrease...

  13. What Is the Relationship Between Dairy Intake and Blood Pressure in Black and White Children and Adolescents Enrolled in a Weight Management Program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    DellaValle, Diane M; Carter, Janet; Jones, Molly; Henshaw, Melissa Howard

    2017-08-14

    The DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) clinical trials and other studies have demonstrated a relationship between diet and cardiovascular outcomes in adults, yet little is known of this relationship in children. Childhood obesity has reached epidemic proportions in the United States, with similar increases in hypertension among this population. The purpose of our study was to examine the association between dairy intake and blood pressure (BP) in a cohort of children and adolescents (aged 4-17 years) enrolled in a weight management program. Dietary intake was assessed using the Block Kids 2004 food frequency questionnaire in a cross-sectional sample of participants enrolled in the Pediatric Metabolic Syndrome Study at the Children's Hospital (Charleston, SC). BP and other anthropometrics were obtained at baseline. Only children with complete baseline data and food frequency questionnaires were included in this analysis (n=117). Associations between food group/nutrient intake and BP were examined across race and sex using ANOVA and Pearson correlations. Linear regression models were controlled for body mass index and age. In the total sample, a significant inverse relationship was found between the intake of dairy and systolic BP (r=-0.24, P=0.009). The effect of dairy on systolic BP, however, differed by race. We observed a decrease of 11.2 mm Hg for each serving of dairy consumed by white children, and no decrease in systolic BP in black children (P=0.001 for the race-dairy serving interaction). Nutrition professionals must consider nonnutrition factors contributing to childhood hypertension, as current dietary recommendations appear to have differential outcomes across races. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley.

  14. dairy cattle

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Friesian dairy cows from Bunda Dairy Farm. Early lactation (yields in week 1 and 2 and peak milk yields were correlated with total (305-day) lactation yields. Peak yield fac- tors were computed based on total lactation yields and peak yields. I. To predict peak yields from average daily yields of week 1 and week 2, factors ...

  15. Sustaining dairy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Villarreal Herrera, Georgina

    2017-01-01

    Dairy in Europe has undergone many changes in the last few years—the abolition of milk production quotas being a fundamental one. This study explores these changes in relation to the sustained social and environmental viability of the sector and how dairy processors' sustainability

  16. Dairy development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leegwater, P.; Hoorweg, J.C.

    2000-01-01

    The growth of the dairy sector as it has occurred in Kilifi and Malindi Districts is one of the few examples of successful agricultural development in the coastal region in the past decades. Between 1985 and 1997 dairy cattle have more than doubled in number. Three livestock systems are described:

  17. Combi-Cross – The Use of New Technologies for Improving Dairy Crossbreeding Programs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kargo, Morten; Ettema, Jehan Frans; Sørensen, Lydia Henriette

    Combi-cross combines the advantages of pure breeding and crossbreeding within herd through a hierarchical breeding program with use of sexed semen. The highest ranking females in a purebred nucleus are used for pure breeding, while the lower ranking are used for production of Two-cross animals (f 1......). The Two-cross animals produce Three-cross animals also expressing full heterosis. As sexed semen is intensively used in the first two stages of the program all Three-cross animals can be inseminated with beef semen. With a 30% replacement rate it possible to reduce the purebred nucleus to 33...

  18. 7 CFR 58.149 - Alternate quality control programs for dairy products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS AND STANDARDS UNDER THE AGRICULTURAL MARKETING ACT OF 1946 AND THE EGG PRODUCTS... and Grading Service 1 Operations and Operating Procedures § 58.149 Alternate quality control programs...

  19. A BIO-ECONOMIC DYNAMIC PROGRAMMING ANALYSIS OF THE SEASONAL SUPPLY RESPONSE BY FLORIDA DAIRY PRODUCERS

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Xiaoming; Thomas H. Spreen; DeLorenzo, Michael A.

    1992-01-01

    Seasonal price premiums have been proposed as a means of dampening the highly seasonal patterns of milk production in Florida. A Markov decision bio-economic model of the breeding and replacement decisions was solved via stochastic dynamic programming and used to analyze the potential supply response to seasonal price premiums. The results of the analysis suggest that the seasonal milk supply in Florida is highly price inelastic.

  20. Metabolomics to Explore Impact of Dairy Intake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Hong; Clausen, Morten R.; Dalsgaard, Trine K.; Bertram, Hanne C.

    2015-01-01

    Dairy products are an important component in the Western diet and represent a valuable source of nutrients for humans. However, a reliable dairy intake assessment in nutrition research is crucial to correctly elucidate the link between dairy intake and human health. Metabolomics is considered a potential tool for assessment of dietary intake instead of traditional methods, such as food frequency questionnaires, food records, and 24-h recalls. Metabolomics has been successfully applied to discriminate between consumption of different dairy products under different experimental conditions. Moreover, potential metabolites related to dairy intake were identified, although these metabolites need to be further validated in other intervention studies before they can be used as valid biomarkers of dairy consumption. Therefore, this review provides an overview of metabolomics for assessment of dairy intake in order to better clarify the role of dairy products in human nutrition and health. PMID:26091233

  1. Metabolomics to Explore Impact of Dairy Intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Hong; Clausen, Morten R; Dalsgaard, Trine K; Bertram, Hanne C

    2015-06-17

    Dairy products are an important component in the Western diet and represent a valuable source of nutrients for humans. However, a reliable dairy intake assessment in nutrition research is crucial to correctly elucidate the link between dairy intake and human health. Metabolomics is considered a potential tool for assessment of dietary intake instead of traditional methods, such as food frequency questionnaires, food records, and 24-h recalls. Metabolomics has been successfully applied to discriminate between consumption of different dairy products under different experimental conditions. Moreover, potential metabolites related to dairy intake were identified, although these metabolites need to be further validated in other intervention studies before they can be used as valid biomarkers of dairy consumption. Therefore, this review provides an overview of metabolomics for assessment of dairy intake in order to better clarify the role of dairy products in human nutrition and health.

  2. Metabolomics to Explore Impact of Dairy Intake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Zheng

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Dairy products are an important component in the Western diet and represent a valuable source of nutrients for humans. However, a reliable dairy intake assessment in nutrition research is crucial to correctly elucidate the link between dairy intake and human health. Metabolomics is considered a potential tool for assessment of dietary intake instead of traditional methods, such as food frequency questionnaires, food records, and 24-h recalls. Metabolomics has been successfully applied to discriminate between consumption of different dairy products under different experimental conditions. Moreover, potential metabolites related to dairy intake were identified, although these metabolites need to be further validated in other intervention studies before they can be used as valid biomarkers of dairy consumption. Therefore, this review provides an overview of metabolomics for assessment of dairy intake in order to better clarify the role of dairy products in human nutrition and health.

  3. Dairy development and nutrition in Kilifi District, Kenya

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leegwater, P.; Ngolo, J.; Hoorweg, J.C.

    1991-01-01

    The objectives of this study on dairy development in Kilifi District, Kenya, are, first, to assess the importance of - small-scale - intensive dairy farming as promoted by the Ministry of Livestock through the National Dairy Development Programme (DDP) compared with other types of small-scale dairy

  4. Effect of selecting for “Robustness” on temperament in dairy cows

    OpenAIRE

    Gibbons, Jennifer M.

    2009-01-01

    Increased rates of involuntary culling as a consequence of poorer health and fertility had led to the conclusion that dairy cows appear to be less “robust” or adaptable than in the past. A way to address these concerns in breeding programs could be to select for health and welfare by including appropriate traits in a broader breeding index. However, it is important to consider any consequences that such breeding goals may have on dairy cow temperament and welfare. There were tw...

  5. Winter density and habitat preferences of three declining granivorous farmland birds: The importance of the keeping of poultry and dairy farms

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šálek, Martin; Havlíček, J.; Riegert, J.; Nešpor, M.; Fuchs, R.; Kipson, M.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 1 (2015), s. 10-16 ISSN 1617-1381 Institutional support: RVO:68081766 Keywords : Central Europe * Dairy farms * Granivorous birds * Habitat preferences * Poultry keeping * Winter period Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 2.220, year: 2015

  6. Impact of preparing for OSHA local emphasis program inspections of New York dairy farms: Case studies and financial cost analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadomski, Anne M; Vargha, Marybeth; Tallman, Nancy; Scribani, Melissa B; Kelsey, Timothy W

    2016-03-01

    OSHA inspection of dairy farms began in July 1, 2014 in New York State. As of September 2014, a total of eight farms were randomly selected for inspection. This case study addresses how dairy farm managers prepared for these inspections, and identifies farm level costs preparing for inspection and/or being inspected. Four farms that were OSHA inspected and 12 farms that were not inspected were included in this mixed method evaluation using a multimodal (telephone, email, or mail) survey. Descriptive analysis was carried out using frequencies, proportions, means, and medians. Overall, the impact of OSHA inspections was positive, leading to improved safety management and physical changes on the farm and worker trainings, although the farmers' perspectives about OSHA inspection were mixed. The cost of compliance was low relative to estimated overall production costs. Clarifications and engineering solutions for specific dairy farm hazard exposures are needed to facilitate compliance with OSHA regulations. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Emerging Evidence for the Importance of Dietary Protein Source on Glucoregulatory Markers and Type 2 Diabetes: Different Effects of Dairy, Meat, Fish, Egg, and Plant Protein Foods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin B. Comerford

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Observational studies provide evidence that a higher intake of protein from plant-based foods and certain animal-based foods is associated with a lower risk for type 2 diabetes. However, there are few distinguishable differences between the glucoregulatory qualities of the proteins in plant-based foods, and it is likely their numerous non-protein components (e.g., fibers and phytochemicals that drive the relationship with type 2 diabetes risk reduction. Conversely, the glucoregulatory qualities of the proteins in animal-based foods are extremely divergent, with a higher intake of certain animal-based protein foods showing negative effects, and others showing neutral or positive effects on type 2 diabetes risk. Among the various types of animal-based protein foods, a higher intake of dairy products (such as milk, yogurt, cheese and whey protein consistently shows a beneficial relationship with glucose regulation and/or type 2 diabetes risk reduction. Intervention studies provide evidence that dairy proteins have more potent effects on insulin and incretin secretion compared to other commonly consumed animal proteins. In addition to their protein components, such as insulinogenic amino acids and bioactive peptides, dairy products also contain a food matrix rich in calcium, magnesium, potassium, trans-palmitoleic fatty acids, and low-glycemic index sugars—all of which have been shown to have beneficial effects on aspects of glucose control, insulin secretion, insulin sensitivity and/or type 2 diabetes risk. Furthermore, fermentation and fortification of dairy products with probiotics and vitamin D may improve a dairy product’s glucoregulatory effects.

  8. Emerging Evidence for the Importance of Dietary Protein Source on Glucoregulatory Markers and Type 2 Diabetes: Different Effects of Dairy, Meat, Fish, Egg, and Plant Protein Foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comerford, Kevin B; Pasin, Gonca

    2016-07-23

    Observational studies provide evidence that a higher intake of protein from plant-based foods and certain animal-based foods is associated with a lower risk for type 2 diabetes. However, there are few distinguishable differences between the glucoregulatory qualities of the proteins in plant-based foods, and it is likely their numerous non-protein components (e.g., fibers and phytochemicals) that drive the relationship with type 2 diabetes risk reduction. Conversely, the glucoregulatory qualities of the proteins in animal-based foods are extremely divergent, with a higher intake of certain animal-based protein foods showing negative effects, and others showing neutral or positive effects on type 2 diabetes risk. Among the various types of animal-based protein foods, a higher intake of dairy products (such as milk, yogurt, cheese and whey protein) consistently shows a beneficial relationship with glucose regulation and/or type 2 diabetes risk reduction. Intervention studies provide evidence that dairy proteins have more potent effects on insulin and incretin secretion compared to other commonly consumed animal proteins. In addition to their protein components, such as insulinogenic amino acids and bioactive peptides, dairy products also contain a food matrix rich in calcium, magnesium, potassium, trans-palmitoleic fatty acids, and low-glycemic index sugars-all of which have been shown to have beneficial effects on aspects of glucose control, insulin secretion, insulin sensitivity and/or type 2 diabetes risk. Furthermore, fermentation and fortification of dairy products with probiotics and vitamin D may improve a dairy product's glucoregulatory effects.

  9. The importance of agricultural tire habitats for mosquitoes of public health importance in New York State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Phillip E; Harrington, Laura C; Waldron, J Keith; Rutz, Donald A

    2005-06-01

    The presence of mosquito species breeding in agricultural "bunker tires" on dairy farms in New York state was evaluated. Twelve species of mosquitoes (Aedes vexans, Anopheles barberi, An. punctipenriis, An. perplexens, Culex pipiens pipiens, Cx. restuans, Cx. salinarius, Cx. territans, Toxorhynchites rutilus septentrionalis, Ochlerotatus atropalpus, Oc. japonicus japonicus, and Oc. triseriatus) were collected from 8 New York state dairy farms in 2001 and from 17 dairy farms in 2002. All but 2 of these species have been found naturally infected with arboviruses and could be important vectors affecting human and animal health. Because of the potential public and animal health importance of the invasive species Oc. j. japonicus, active surveillance to identify breeding sites and distribution of this mosquito is essential. In 2001, Oc. j. japonicus was recovered from 5 of 8 central New York dairy farms surveyed. In 2002, Oc. j. japonicus was recovered from 4 of the same dairy farms plus an additional dairy out of 5 surveyed. This species appears to be established on dairy farms in the south, central, and eastern regions of New York state, with greatest abundance in the southeastern region. A single Oc. j. japonicus larva was collected from the northern region on the final sampling date in September 2002. Our data demonstrate that agricultural tire habitats can be productive breeding sites for arbovirus vectors. As a consequence, these habitats should not be ignored in vector control and surveillance programs.

  10. Regular-Fat Dairy and Human Health: A Synopsis of Symposia Presented in Europe and North America (2014-2015).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astrup, Arne; Rice Bradley, Beth H; Brenna, J Thomas; Delplanque, Bernadette; Ferry, Monique; Torres-Gonzalez, Moises

    2016-07-29

    In recent history, some dietary recommendations have treated dairy fat as an unnecessary source of calories and saturated fat in the human diet. These assumptions, however, have recently been brought into question by current research on regular fat dairy products and human health. In an effort to disseminate, explore and discuss the state of the science on the relationship between regular fat dairy products and health, symposia were programmed by dairy industry organizations in Europe and North America at The Eurofed Lipids Congress (2014) in France, The Dairy Nutrition Annual Symposium (2014) in Canada, The American Society for Nutrition Annual Meeting held in conjunction with Experimental Biology (2015) in the United States, and The Federation of European Nutrition Societies (2015) in Germany. This synopsis of these symposia describes the complexity of dairy fat and the effects regular-fat dairy foods have on human health. The emerging scientific evidence indicates that the consumption of regular fat dairy foods is not associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and inversely associated with weight gain and the risk of obesity. Dairy foods, including regular-fat milk, cheese and yogurt, can be important components of an overall healthy dietary pattern. Systematic examination of the effects of dietary patterns that include regular-fat milk, cheese and yogurt on human health is warranted.

  11. Regular-Fat Dairy and Human Health: A Synopsis of Symposia Presented in Europe and North America (2014–2015)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astrup, Arne; Rice Bradley, Beth H.; Brenna, J. Thomas; Delplanque, Bernadette; Ferry, Monique; Torres-Gonzalez, Moises

    2016-01-01

    In recent history, some dietary recommendations have treated dairy fat as an unnecessary source of calories and saturated fat in the human diet. These assumptions, however, have recently been brought into question by current research on regular fat dairy products and human health. In an effort to disseminate, explore and discuss the state of the science on the relationship between regular fat dairy products and health, symposia were programmed by dairy industry organizations in Europe and North America at The Eurofed Lipids Congress (2014) in France, The Dairy Nutrition Annual Symposium (2014) in Canada, The American Society for Nutrition Annual Meeting held in conjunction with Experimental Biology (2015) in the United States, and The Federation of European Nutrition Societies (2015) in Germany. This synopsis of these symposia describes the complexity of dairy fat and the effects regular-fat dairy foods have on human health. The emerging scientific evidence indicates that the consumption of regular fat dairy foods is not associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and inversely associated with weight gain and the risk of obesity. Dairy foods, including regular-fat milk, cheese and yogurt, can be important components of an overall healthy dietary pattern. Systematic examination of the effects of dietary patterns that include regular-fat milk, cheese and yogurt on human health is warranted. PMID:27483308

  12. A Modified Importance-Performance Framework for Evaluating Recreation-Based Experiential Learning Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitas, Nicholas; Murray, Alison; Olsen, Max; Graefe, Alan

    2017-01-01

    This article describes a modified importance-performance framework for use in evaluation of recreation-based experiential learning programs. Importance-performance analysis (IPA) provides an effective and readily applicable means of evaluating many programs, but the near universal satisfaction associated with recreation inhibits the use of IPA in…

  13. 76 FR 34004 - Dairy Product Mandatory Reporting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-10

    ... manufacturers of dairy products to report sales information for a mandatory dairy product reporting program. The... announces the intention of AMS to request approval by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) of... functions for the program. NASS publishes sales information for cheddar cheese, butter, dry whey, and nonfat...

  14. Invited review : Changes in the dairy industry affecting dairy cattle health and welfare

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barkema, H W; von Keyserlingk, M A G; Kastelic, J P; Lam, T J G M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/14686820X; Luby, C; Roy, J-P; LeBlanc, S J; Keefe, G P; Kelton, D F

    2015-01-01

    The dairy industry in the developed world has undergone profound changes over recent decades. In this paper, we present an overview of some of the most important recent changes in the dairy industry that affect health and welfare of dairy cows, as well as the science associated with these changes.

  15. 78 FR 70530 - Notice of Determination; New and Revised Treatments for the Imported Fire Ant Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-26

    ... No. APHIS-2012-0064] Notice of Determination; New and Revised Treatments for the Imported Fire Ant... the public that we are adding or revising certain treatment schedules for the Imported Fire Ant... revised treatments in the imported fire ant program. Based on the treatment evaluation document, the...

  16. [The economic margins of activities of a bovine practitioner on dairy farms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Genugten, A J M; van Haaften, J A; Hogeveen, H

    2011-11-01

    Because of lower margins and market liberalisation veterinarians and farmers are increasingly negotiating rates. Therefore, the margins of veterinarians are under pressure. In addition, the sales if drugs, performance of operations or giving of advice are more and more separated. These developments give veterinarians uncertainty about the profitability of their activities for dairy farmers. Not much is known about margins on veterinary activities on dairy farms. Moreover, it is interesting to see how much margins of the bovine practitioner differ between veterinary practises and dairy farms. In this study, invoices for bovine activities of 14 veterinary practises were combined with milk production registration data of the dairy farms of these practices. This way, the gross margin per bovine practitioner could be studied for the different veterinary practise. Moreover the relation between gross margin and specification of the veterinary practise could be studied. Finally, the gross margin per dairy farm and the factors that influenced this gross margin were studied. The most important result was the observation that the gross margin per bovine practitioner was dependent on the number of dairy farms per practitioner, the margin on drugs and the region of the veterinary practise. The size of the veterinary practise, the share of the dairy farming within the practise and the source of the gross margin (drugs, time or operations) did not influence the gross margin. Variables that explained the gross margin per dairy farm were, amongst others, the number of dairy cows, the milk production level of the farms and participation in PIR-DAP (a system to support the veterinarians herd health and management program). There is no relation of gross margin per dairy farm and the veterinary practise or region.

  17. The Perceived Importance of Youth Educator's Confidence in Delivering Leadership Development Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brumbaugh, Laura; Cater, Melissa

    2016-01-01

    A successful component of programs designed to deliver youth leadership develop programs are youth educators who understand the importance of utilizing research-based information and seeking professional development opportunities. The purpose of this study was to determine youth educator's perceived confidence in leading youth leadership…

  18. The Cost of Inequality: The Importance of Investing in High Quality Early Childhood Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith, Rebecca S.

    2017-01-01

    The focus of this dissertation was to explore the importance of high quality early education in later secondary education development, quantifying quality in early childhood education programs, and examining how teacher education contributes to quality of early childhood education programs. For phase I, early childhood education positively…

  19. Reproductive performance of dairy cows managed with a program aimed at increasing insemination of cows in estrus based on increased physical activity and fertility of timed artificial inseminations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordano, J O; Stangaferro, M L; Wijma, R; Chandler, W C; Watters, R D

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the reproductive performance of lactating dairy cows using a treatment (TRT) program for second and subsequent artificial insemination (AI) services aimed at (1) increasing AI upon estrus detection based on increased physical activity (AIAct) and (2) increasing fertility of timed AI (TAI) services for cows not AIAct through presynchronization of the estrous cycle and improved physiological milieu before TAI. Cows in the control (CON) group were managed with a program that combined AIAct and TAI after the Ovsynch protocol. After nonpregnancy diagnosis (NPD) by transrectal ultrasonography at 31 ± 3 d after AI, cows received the following treatments: (1) CON (n=634), AIAct any time after a previous AI and resynchronization with the Ovsynch-56 protocol (GnRH-7d-PGF2α-56 h-GnRH-16 h-TAI) 1d after NPD, or (2) TRT (n = 616): cows with a corpus luteum (CL) ≥ 20 mm (TRT-CL) received a PGF2α injection 1d after NPD, whereas cows with no CL or a CL fertility to AIAct, and TAI failed to improve overall reproductive performance. A low proportion of cows with a CL at NPD (65.2%) and a poor response to PGF2α may explain the poor estrus detection efficiency in the TRT group. We concluded that, when compared with a typical estrus detection and TAI program for cows failing to conceive to previous AI services, a program aimed at increasing the proportion of cows AIAct after NPD and fertility of TAI services increased the proportion of cows AIAct but failed to reduce days to pregnancy during lactation because of greater days to AI after NPD. Copyright © 2015 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Um programa para o planejamento da recria de fêmeas oriundas de rebanhos leiteiros A computer program for planning dairy heifer raising

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moisés de Andrade Resende Filho

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Alimentação e manejo inadequados das novilhas em recria constituem alguns dos entraves ao incremento da produtividade do rebanho leiteiro no Brasil. Nessa fase, o pecuarista deve decidir entre recriar os animais de reposição, adquiri-los ou terceirizar sua criação. Além disso, em se decidindo por recriar suas próprias novilhas, seria importante encontrar a melhor alternativa em termos econômicos. Visando auxiliar o pecuarista a resolver tal questão, apresenta-se um modelo matemático que permite estimar os custos decorrentes da recria de fêmeas de rebanhos leiteiros até atingir o peso recomendado à cobertura. Tal modelo foi inserido em um programa de computador de maneira a permitir a construção de diferentes cenários, considerando-se peso, raça e ganho de peso diário do lote de novilhas. Assim, após contrastar os cenários gerados com as opções de compra das novilhas ou terceirização da recria, o pecuarista aumenta as chances de tomar uma decisão mais lucrativa. Exemplos de utilização do modelo inserido em um programa de computador são apresentados e avaliados.Inadequate feeding and management when raising heifers are two factors that constrain dairy cattle productivity in Brazil. In order to build their heads, Brazilian dairy farmers must choose between three options: to raise their own heifers to breeding age, to purchase mature heifers from outside sources, or to employ a custom heifer raiser. If the dairy farmer chooses to raise his own heifers, he needs to determine the most economically rational production strategy. To aid the farmer in this determination, a mathematical model was developed to create a budget for raising a group of heifers to their recommended breeding weight. This model was embedded in a computer program making it possible to build different growth scenarios, which can be adjusted by breed, desired daily weight gain, and average weight for a given group of heifers. After contrasting the results

  1. Trends in dairy and non-dairy probiotic products - a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijaya Kumar, Bathal; Vijayendra, Sistla Venkata Naga; Reddy, Obulam Vijaya Sarathi

    2015-10-01

    Health awareness has grown to a greater extent among consumers and they are looking for healthy probiotic counterparts. Keeping in this view, the present review focuses recent developments in dairy and non-dairy probiotic products. All over the world, dairy probiotics are being commercialized in many different forms. However, the allergy and lactose intolerance are the major set-backs to dairy probiotics. Whereas, flavor and refreshing nature are the major advantages of non-dairy drinks, especially fruit juices. Phenotypic and genotypic similarities between dairy and non-dairy probiotics along with the matrix dependency of cell viability and cell functionality are reviewed. The heterogeneous food matrices of non-dairy food carriers are the major constraints for the survival of the probiotics, while the probiotic strains from non-dairy sources are satisfactory. Technological and functional properties, besides the viability of the probiotics used in fermented products of non-dairy origin are extremely important to get a competitive advantage in the world market. The functional attributes of dairy and non-dairy probiotic products are further enhanced by adding prebiotics such as galacto-oligosaccharide, fructo-oligosaccharide and inulin.

  2. Regular-fat dairy and human health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astrup, Arne; Bradley, Beth H Rice; Brenna, J Thomas

    2016-01-01

    to disseminate, explore and discuss the state of the science on the relationship between regular fat dairy products and health, symposia were programmed by dairy industry organizations in Europe and North America at The Eurofed Lipids Congress (2014) in France, The Dairy Nutrition Annual Symposium (2014......) in Canada, The American Society for Nutrition Annual Meeting held in conjunction with Experimental Biology (2015) in the United States, and The Federation of European Nutrition Societies (2015) in Germany. This synopsis of these symposia describes the complexity of dairy fat and the effects regular...

  3. Educational factors outweigh the importance of lifestyle factors for residency program applicants: an international comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Yuichi; Hosoya, Yoshinori; Sata, Naohiro; Yasuda, Yoshikazu; Lefor, Alan T

    2012-01-01

    Although studies have been conducted to identify factors that attract students to a career in surgery, the relative importance of factors that attract students to a particular training program remains unknown. Comparative data between countries may provide insights and ultimately provide guidance to program directors as they seek to attract the best applicants to their program. Blinded written survey, scored 1-5 on a list of 26 factors divided into 3 categories, including educational factors, lifestyle factors, and other. Jichi Medical University, Japan and the David Geffen School of Medicine at University of California-Los Angeles. Japan residents (N = 125), Japan Medical Students (N = 68), United States Residents (N = 99), and United States Students (N = 55). All 4 groups surveyed judged faculty quality among the most important factors, with educational program quality, clinical experience and perceptions of resident happiness also rated among the most important. A comparison of factors consistent with lifestyle and factors consistent with the educational program found significantly (p applicants are most interested in training program factors related to the quality of the educational program and the faculty. Issues such as salary, vacation, night call, location, or benefits are considered less important. The results in Japan and the United States were remarkably similar despite major differences in the educational system and debt load at the time of graduation. Program directors should communicate the value of those factors considered important by applicants as part of the recruitment process. Copyright © 2012 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Factors associated with fertility of nulliparous dairy heifers following a 10-day fixed-time artificial insemination program with sex-sorted and conventional semen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noonan, E J; Kelly, J C; Beggs, D S

    2016-05-01

    To examine factors associated with fertility on dairy farms that used a common fixed-time artificial insemination (FTAI) program in yearling heifers. Records were analysed from 954 yearling heifers on 10 south-west Victorian dairy farms that used a common FTAI program, involving the insertion of a 1.9-g progesterone-releasing device for 10 days; 2 mg oestradiol benzoate at insertion; 500 µg cloprostenol on day 7; and FTAI 48 h after device removal. Weight, age, expression of oestrus, sire, semen type (frozen sex-sorted or frozen conventional) and timing of insemination were examined for their relationship with first-service conception rates. Heifers over 300 kg body weight were 1.18-fold more likely to express oestrus during the FTAI program. For every extra 1 kg, there was a 1.5% increase in the likelihood of expressing oestrus. First-service conception rates were 40.3% and 56.0% for sex-sorted and conventional semen, respectively, and were significantly higher when oestrus was expressed. The difference was greater for sex-sorted semen (3.4-fold) compared with conventional semen (1.5-fold). The interval from device removal to insemination varied between 47 and 51.4 h and had no significant effect on conception rates. However, there was a trend towards a higher conception rate for sex-sorted semen when inseminations were performed >50 h after device removal. Increased fertility was associated with larger heifers and heifers that expressed oestrus, particularly when sexed-sorted semen was used. Variation in the timing of AI with respect to device removal between 47 and 51.4 h did not adversely affect conception rates. © 2016 Australian Veterinary Association.

  5. Priority setting for bird conservation in Mexico: the role of the Important Bird Areas program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma. del Coro Arizmendi; Laura Marquez Valdelamar; Humberto Berlanga

    2005-01-01

    Many species in Mexico are threatened and in need of protection. At least seventy species are considered to be globally threatened, yet conservation actions have been scarce and not coordinated. In 1996 BirdLife International’s Important Bird Areas Program was initiated in Mexico to identify a network of the most important places in Mexico for birds, with the...

  6. Crossbreeding in Dairy Cattle: A Danish Perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, M K; Norberg, E; Pedersen, J

    2008-01-01

    breeds. This review focuses on the practical and theoretical background of crossbreeding and describes the gain to be expected using systematic crossbreeding in dairy production. In Denmark, 24% of dairy farmers would consider starting crossbreeding programs within their herd. Evidence for the value...

  7. Antibodies and longevity of dairy cattle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klerk, de B.

    2016-01-01

    The dairy sector has a big impact on food production for the growing world population and contributes substantially to the world economy. In order to produce food in a sustainable way, dairy cows need to be able to produce milk without problems and as long as possible. Therefore, breeding programs

  8. Dairy cow disability weights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnel, Craig S; McNeil, Ashleigh A; Hadrich, Joleen C; Lombard, Jason E; Garry, Franklyn B; Heller, Jane

    2017-08-01

    Over the past 175 years, data related to human disease and death have progressed to a summary measure of population health, the Disability-Adjusted Life Year (DALY). As dairies have intensified there has been no equivalent measure of the impact of disease on the productive life and well-being of animals. The development of a disease-adjusted metric requires a consistent set of disability weights that reflect the relative severity of important diseases. The objective of this study was to use an international survey of dairy authorities to derive disability weights for primary disease categories recorded on dairies. National and international dairy health and management authorities were contacted through professional organizations, dairy industry publications and conferences, and industry contacts. Estimates of minimum, most likely, and maximum disability weights were derived for 12 common dairy cow diseases. Survey participants were asked to estimate the impact of each disease on overall health and milk production. Diseases were classified from 1 (minimal adverse effects) to 10 (death). The data was modelled using BetaPERT distributions to demonstrate the variation in these dynamic disease processes, and to identify the most likely aggregated disability weights for each disease classification. A single disability weight was assigned to each disease using the average of the combined medians for the minimum, most likely, and maximum severity scores. A total of 96 respondents provided estimates of disability weights. The final disability weight values resulted in the following order from least to most severe: retained placenta, diarrhea, ketosis, metritis, mastitis, milk fever, lame (hoof only), calving trauma, left displaced abomasum, pneumonia, musculoskeletal injury (leg, hip, back), and right displaced abomasum. The peaks of the probability density functions indicated that for certain disease states such as retained placenta there was a relatively narrow range of

  9. Dairy foods are an important source of calcium and vitamin D among Canadian-born and Asian-born Chinese in Edmonton, Alberta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yan Han; Farmer, Anna; Mager, Diana R; Willows, Noreen D

    2012-03-01

    Low intakes of calcium and vitamin D increase the risk for osteoporosis, bone fracture, and other health problems. This study aimed to examine the calcium and vitamin D intakes of Canadian-born Chinese (CBC) and Asian-born Chinese (ABC) in Edmonton, Canada, and to identify usual food sources of these nutrients. We hypothesized that CBC would have higher intakes of calcium and vitamin D than ABC and that the food sources of these nutrients would differ by region of birth (Canada vs Asia). Two in-person multipass 24-hour dietary recalls were administered for 1 weekday and weekend day for 81 healthy ethnically Chinese aged 18 to 58 years. The risks for calcium and vitamin D inadequacy were calculated as were the contributions of specific foods to calcium and vitamin D intakes. Calcium intake was 781 ± 337 mg/d for CBC and 809 ± 369 mg/d for ABC (P = .737). Vitamin D intake was 3.8 ± 3.4 μg/d for CBC and 5.0 ± 3.9 μg/d for ABC (P = .158). Respective risks for calcium and vitamin D inadequacy were 36% and 98% for men and 78% and 100% for women. Dairy contributed most to the calcium (43%) and vitamin D (52%) intake of participants. For ABC, soybean products contributed to 8.1% of calcium, whereas fatty fish contributed to 16.7% of vitamin D. For CBC, red meats contributed to 11.1% of vitamin D. Dietary intakes of calcium and vitamin D need to be increased in Chinese Canadians through the promotion of dairy and culturally relevant sources of these nutrients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Solving linear programs under uncertainty, using decomposition, importance sampling and parallel processors. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dantzig, G.B.; Glynn, P.; Infanger, G.

    1994-03-01

    Planning under uncertainty is a fundamental problem of decision science where solution could advance man`s ability to plan, schedule, design, and control complex situations. Goal is to develop efficient methods for solving an important class of planning problems, namely linear programs whose parameters (coefficients, right hand sides) are not known with certainty. The research concentrated on theoretical tasks of decomposition and importance sampling techniques, implementation, and software development issues and on applications. Research is continuing on use of parallel processors for solving stochastic programs.

  11. Probiotic Delivery through Fermentation: Dairy vs. Non-Dairy Beverages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaminda Senaka Ranadheera

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Probiotics are live microorganisms that, when administered in adequate amounts, confer a health benefit on the host, mainly through the process of replacing or including beneficial bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract. Fermented dairy foods such as yogurt, fermented milk and cheese are the major vehicle in delivering probiotics, and probiotic delivery have been traditionally associated with these fermented dairy foods. Additionally, many other non-dairy probiotic products and non-food form such as capsules, pills and tablets are also available and some of these non-food forms are highly popular among the consumers. Certain non-dairy probiotic foods, especially beverages that are non-fermented products, can also play an important role in probiotic delivery. There is an increasing demand for non-dairy probiotic foods (both fermented and non-fermented including fruit and vegetable juices, soy and certain cereal products due to vegetarianism, lactose intolerance and dairy allergies, as well as interest in low cholesterol foods. In this context, this review mainly focus on the different types of probiotic food products including beverages with special reference to their viability followed by a brief account on the applicability of using fermented and non-fermented beverage products in probiotic delivery.

  12. Factors influencing dairy calf and replacement heifer mortality in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raboisson, D; Maigne, E; Sans, P; Allaire, G; Cahuzac, E

    2014-01-01

    Herd-level risk factors for dairy calf and heifer mortality in France were identified by calculating herd-level variables (including mortality risk or rate) using the National Bovine Identification Database (2005 and 2006). Eleven dairy production areas representing different livestock systems were also included. Statistical analyses were based on a probit model (mortality risk or rate=0 or >0) and a linear model (mortality risk or rate >0) corrected by the sample bias Heckman method. The same associations were reported for 2005 and 2006. The mortality risks or rates for calves and heifers were positively associated with the proportion of purchased cows or being a Milk Control Program member and negatively associated with adhering to the Good Breeding Practices charter and having an autumn calving peak. The associations between mortality and the breeds or the production areas were positive or negative, depending on the classes of animal. Mortality and having a beef herd in addition to the dairy herd were negatively associated for noncrossed birth to 2-d-old calves, noncrossed 3-d- to 1-mo-old calves, and 3-d- to 1-mo-old heifers. Having a beef herd probably provides specific know-how related to newborn and young calf management that makes it easier to attain low mortality in pure-breed dairy calves. The proportion of males born was positively associated with mortality for the birth to 2-d-old calves (all classes) and for the 3-d- to 1-mo-old beef-crossed calves, but negatively for all classes of heifers. This indicates that heifer management was improved when the availability of newborn heifers decreased, resulting in low mortality. This lower mortality is apparent for all classes of heifers present on the farm during the year when the proportion of males was low, and demonstrates an anticipatory effect. In conclusion, this study shows that the presence of a beef herd in addition to the dairy herd within a farm is associated with decreased dairy calf mortality. It

  13. Delivering on seafood traceability under the new U.S. import monitoring program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willette, Demian A; Cheng, Samantha H

    2018-02-01

    The United States is the world's largest fish importer. Recent reports, however, indicate that 25-30% of wild-caught seafood imported into the US is illegally caught, heightening concerns over the country's significant role in driving Illegal, Unreported, and Unregulated (IUU) fishing. In January 2017, NOAA enacted the Seafood Import Monitoring Program in an effort to combat IUU fishing through mandating improved seafood traceability requirements. This program requires reporting of fisheries data from harvest to arrival at the US border. Given the role of the US as a major global importer of seafood, this regulation could be a transformative action on fisheries worldwide if implementation includes two key components-(1) applying best available and most appropriate technologies and (2) building monitoring and enforcement capacity among trading nations. This paper provides insightful commentary on the potential for this US policy to lead by example and improve an essential natural resource that over a billion people worldwide depend on for nutrition and livelihoods.

  14. Dairy producers' attitudes toward reproductive management and performance on Canadian dairy farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denis-Robichaud, J; Cerri, R L A; Jones-Bitton, A; LeBlanc, S J

    2018-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to explore Canadian dairy producers' attitudes toward reproductive performance and challenges they perceive to be related to reproduction and reproductive management practices. A survey in both English and French was developed, validated, and administered to Canadian dairy farmers between March and May 2014 to collect general farm, reproduction management, and reproductive performance data, as well as opinions and perceptions about different facets of reproduction. Associations between management practices and the perceived importance of reproduction were tested using a logistic regression model. Thematic network analysis was used to identify themes from the open-ended survey questions about challenges concerning reproduction. Finally, questions that were answered on a Likert scale were graphically represented using diverging stacked bar charts. A total of 832 questionnaires were completed online and by mail, which represents approximately 7% of all dairy farms in Canada. Respondents that ranked reproduction in lactating dairy cows as 1 of the 3 most important challenges faced on their farm (66%) were more likely to house their lactating cows in a tiestall and to have a lower herd annual 21-d pregnancy rate. Estrus detection and conception risk were 2 major themes raised and discussed by the respondents. Other concepts, including housing and milk production, were also perceived to affect estrus detection and conception risk. Whereas analysis of open-ended survey questions does not allow for quantification of the importance of different themes in the sample as a whole, it does show that respondents are aware of the multifactorial complexity of reproductive challenges on dairy farms. Improving performance was the main factor influencing decisions concerning reproduction for 80% of the respondents, and they adopted tools and technologies such as synchronization programs and automated activity monitoring systems to improve herd

  15. Effects of Translation Methods in Imported Instructional Video Programs on Taiwan Fourth Graders' Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyan, Nay-ching Nancy; Hu, Yi-chain

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of various translation methods used in imported instructional video programs on Taiwan elementary school students' visual and verbal memory. Following pretesting, 128 fourth grade students from an urban public elementary school in northern Taiwan participated. The students in 4 experimental…

  16. Student Perceptions of the Importance of Employability Skill Provision in Business Undergraduate Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Denise

    2013-01-01

    Studies examining student perceptions of employability skill development in business undergraduate programs are limited. Assurance of student buy-in is important to ensure learners engage with skill provision; to enable them to articulate their capabilities to potential employers; and to facilitate the transfer of acquired skills. The author…

  17. 78 FR 69602 - Foreign Supplier Verification Programs for Importers of Food for Humans and Animals; Extension of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-20

    ... Programs for Importers of Food for Humans and Animals'' proposed rule to allow interested persons an... Programs for Importers of Food for Humans and Animals; Extension of Comment Periods AGENCY: Food and Drug... entitled ``Foreign Supplier Verification Programs for Importers of Food for Humans and Animals'' that...

  18. Dairy in a sustainable diet: a question of balance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hooijdonk, van A.C.M.; Hettinga, K.A.

    2015-01-01

    The demand for dairy products is growing rapidly, especially in emerging markets. Dairy products are nutrient rich and, therefore, an important food group for ensuring nutrient security in the future. In many countries, dairy contributes significantly to nutrient intake. Meta-analyses have shown

  19. Intelligent milking systems : computerized dairy cows management and control systems

    OpenAIRE

    Munyoro, John

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis is to define an Intelligent Milking System as a modern technology and innovation in the dairy farming that allows farmers to use computerized machines to do diversified activities regarding their dairy cattle management and productions systems. This thesis will explain why Kenya should adopt the use of this milking system in its dairy sector. In addition, it will explore how this system works in a typical dairy farm and highlight important considerations that wi...

  20. The influence of restricting nitrogen losses of dairy farms on dairy cattle breeding goals.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steverink, M.H.A.; Groen, A.F.; Berentsen, P.B.M.

    1994-01-01

    The objective of this paper was to investigate the influence of environmental legislation to restrict nitrogen losses on dairy cattle breeding goals. Linear programming was used to model a dairy farm, including multiple restrictions on product output and production factor input. Management was

  1. Assessing the impact of natural service bulls and genotype by environment interactions on genetic gain and inbreeding in organic dairy cattle genomic breeding programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, T; Wensch-Dorendorf, M; Simianer, H; Swalve, H H; König, S

    2014-06-01

    The objective of the present study was to compare genetic gain and inbreeding coefficients of dairy cattle in organic breeding program designs by applying stochastic simulations. Evaluated breeding strategies were: (i) selecting bulls from conventional breeding programs, and taking into account genotype by environment (G×E) interactions, (ii) selecting genotyped bulls within the organic environment for artificial insemination (AI) programs and (iii) selecting genotyped natural service bulls within organic herds. The simulated conventional population comprised 148 800 cows from 2976 herds with an average herd size of 50 cows per herd, and 1200 cows were assigned to 60 organic herds. In a young bull program, selection criteria of young bulls in both production systems (conventional and organic) were either 'conventional' estimated breeding values (EBV) or genomic estimated breeding values (GEBV) for two traits with low (h 2=0.05) and moderate heritability (h 2=0.30). GEBV were calculated for different accuracies (r mg), and G×E interactions were considered by modifying originally simulated true breeding values in the range from r g=0.5 to 1.0. For both traits (h 2=0.05 and 0.30) and r mg⩾0.8, genomic selection of bulls directly in the organic population and using selected bulls via AI revealed higher genetic gain than selecting young bulls in the larger conventional population based on EBV; also without the existence of G×E interactions. Only for pronounced G×E interactions (r g=0.5), and for highly accurate GEBV for natural service bulls (r mg>0.9), results suggests the use of genotyped organic natural service bulls instead of implementing an AI program. Inbreeding coefficients of selected bulls and their offspring were generally lower when basing selection decisions for young bulls on GEBV compared with selection strategies based on pedigree indices.

  2. Economic evaluation of progeny-testing and genomic selection schemes for small-sized nucleus dairy cattle breeding programs in developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kariuki, C M; Brascamp, E W; Komen, H; Kahi, A K; van Arendonk, J A M

    2017-03-01

    In developing countries minimal and erratic performance and pedigree recording impede implementation of large-sized breeding programs. Small-sized nucleus programs offer an alternative but rely on their economic performance for their viability. We investigated the economic performance of 2 alternative small-sized dairy nucleus programs [i.e., progeny testing (PT) and genomic selection (GS)] over a 20-yr investment period. The nucleus was made up of 453 male and 360 female animals distributed in 8 non-overlapping age classes. Each year 10 active sires and 100 elite dams were selected. Populations of commercial recorded cows (CRC) of sizes 12,592 and 25,184 were used to produce test daughters in PT or to create a reference population in GS, respectively. Economic performance was defined as gross margins, calculated as discounted revenues minus discounted costs following a single generation of selection. Revenues were calculated as cumulative discounted expressions (CDE, kg) × 0.32 (€/kg of milk) × 100,000 (size commercial population). Genetic superiorities, deterministically simulated using pseudo-BLUP index and CDE, were determined using gene flow. Costs were for one generation of selection. Results show that GS schemes had higher cumulated genetic gain in the commercial cow population and higher gross margins compared with PT schemes. Gross margins were between 3.2- and 5.2-fold higher for GS, depending on size of the CRC population. The increase in gross margin was mostly due to a decreased generation interval and lower running costs in GS schemes. In PT schemes many bulls are culled before selection. We therefore also compared 2 schemes in which semen was stored instead of keeping live bulls. As expected, semen storage resulted in an increase in gross margins in PT schemes, but gross margins remained lower than those of GS schemes. We conclude that implementation of small-sized GS breeding schemes can be economically viable for developing countries. The

  3. Vadose Zone Monitoring of Dairy Green Water Lagoons using Soil Solution Samplers.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brainard, James R.; Coplen, Amy K

    2005-11-01

    Over the last decade, dairy farms in New Mexico have become an important component to the economy of many rural ranching and farming communities. Dairy operations are water intensive and use groundwater that otherwise would be used for irrigation purposes. Most dairies reuse their process/green water three times and utilize lined lagoons for temporary storage of green water. Leakage of water from lagoons can pose a risk to groundwater quality. Groundwater resource protection infrastructures at dairies are regulated by the New Mexico Environment Department which currently relies on monitoring wells installed in the saturated zone for detecting leakage of waste water lagoon liners. Here we present a proposal to monitor the unsaturated zone beneath the lagoons with soil water solution samplers to provide early detection of leaking liners. Early detection of leaking liners along with rapid repair can minimize contamination of aquifers and reduce dairy liability for aquifer remediation. Additionally, acceptance of vadose zone monitoring as a NMED requirement over saturated zone monitoring would very likely significantly reduce dairy startup and expansion costs. Acknowledgment Funding for this project was provided by the Sandia National Laboratories Small Business Assistance Program

  4. Nutrition and Health Disparities: The Role of Dairy in Improving Minority Health Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constance Brown-Riggs

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Consuming a balanced diet, such as the food groups represented on MyPlate, is key to improving health disparities. Despite the best of intentions, however, the dietary guidelines can be culturally challenging, particularly when it comes to dairy consumption. Many African and Hispanic Americans avoid milk and dairy products—key contributors of three shortfall nutrients (calcium, potassium and vitamin D—because many people in these populations believe they are lactose intolerant. However, avoiding dairy can have significant health effects. An emerging body of evidence suggests that yogurt and other dairy products may help support reduced risk of heart disease, hypertension, obesity, and type 2 diabetes—conditions that disproportionately impact people of color. For this reason, the National Medical Association and the National Hispanic Medical Association issued a joint consensus statement recommending African Americans consume three to four servings of low-fat dairy every day. Cultured dairy products could play an important role in addressing these recommendations. Because of the presence of lactase-producing cultures, yogurt is often a more easily digestible alternative to milk, and thus more palatable to people who experience symptoms of lactose intolerance. This was a key factor cited in the final rule to include yogurt in the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children.

  5. Increased genetic gains in sheep, beef and dairy breeding programs from using female reproductive technologies combined with optimal contribution selection and genomic breeding values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granleese, Tom; Clark, Samuel A; Swan, Andrew A; van der Werf, Julius H J

    2015-09-14

    Female reproductive technologies such as multiple ovulation and embryo transfer (MOET) and juvenile in vitro embryo production and embryo transfer (JIVET) can boost rates of genetic gain but they can also increase rates of inbreeding. Inbreeding can be managed using the principles of optimal contribution selection (OCS), which maximizes genetic gain while placing a penalty on the rate of inbreeding. We evaluated the potential benefits and synergies that exist between genomic selection (GS) and reproductive technologies under OCS for sheep and cattle breeding programs. Various breeding program scenarios were simulated stochastically including: (1) a sheep breeding program for the selection of a single trait that could be measured either early or late in life; (2) a beef breeding program with an early or late trait; and (3) a dairy breeding program with a sex limited trait. OCS was applied using a range of penalties (severe to no penalty) on co-ancestry of selection candidates, with the possibility of using multiple ovulation and embryo transfer (MOET) and/or juvenile in vitro embryo production and embryo transfer (JIVET) for females. Each breeding program was simulated with and without genomic selection. All breeding programs could be penalized to result in an inbreeding rate of 1 % increase per generation. The addition of MOET to artificial insemination or natural breeding (AI/N), without the use of GS yielded an extra 25 to 60 % genetic gain. The further addition of JIVET did not yield an extra genetic gain. When GS was used, MOET and MOET + JIVET programs increased rates of genetic gain by 38 to 76 % and 51 to 81 % compared to AI/N, respectively. Large increases in genetic gain were found across species when female reproductive technologies combined with genomic selection were applied and inbreeding was managed, especially for breeding programs that focus on the selection of traits measured late in life or that are sex-limited. Optimal contribution selection was

  6. Dairy beverages and energy balance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astrup, Arne; Chaput, Jean-Philippe; Gilbert, Jo-Anne

    2010-01-01

    to exist. We have found that high versus low calcium intakes from dairy products had no effect on 24-h energy expenditure or substrate oxidation rates, but fecal fat excretion increased approximately 2.5-fold on the high-calcium diets. In a meta-analysis of intervention studies we found that increasing...... dairy calcium intake by 1200mg/day resulted in increased fecal fat excretion by 5.2 (1.6-8.8) g/day. Newer research shows that humans possess taste receptors for calcium in the gastrointestinal tract and that signaling may be linked to appetite regulation. A new line of evidence suggests...... that an inadequate calcium intake during an energy restricted weight loss program may trigger hunger and impair compliance to the diet. These mechanisms may be part of the explanation for the protective effects of dairy products with regard to obesity and metabolic syndrome....

  7. Mastitis therapy and antimicrobial susceptibility: a multispecies review with a focus on antibiotic treatment of mastitis in dairy cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlow, John

    2011-12-01

    Mastitis occurs in numerous species. Antimicrobial agents are used for treatment of infectious mastitis in dairy cattle, other livestock, companion animals, and humans. Mastitis is an economically important disease of dairy cattle and most mastitis research has focused on epidemiology and control of bovine mastitis. Antibiotic treatment of clinical and subclinical mastitis in dairy cattle is an established component of mastitis control programs. Research on the treatment of clinical and subclinical mastitis in other dairy species such as sheep and goats has been less frequent, although the general principles of mastitis therapy in small ruminants are similar to those of dairy cattle. Research on treatment of clinical mastitis in humans is limited and as for other species empirical treatment of mastitis appears to be common. While antimicrobial susceptibility testing is recommended to direct treatment decisions in many clinical settings, the use of susceptibility testing for antibiotic selection for mastitis treatments of dairy cattle has been challenged in a number of publications. The principle objective of this review is to summarize the literature evaluating the question, "Does antimicrobial susceptibility predict treatment outcome for intramammary infections caused by common bacterial pathogens?" This review also addresses current issues related to antimicrobial use and treatment decisions for mastitis in dairy cattle. Information on treatment of mastitis in other species, including humans, is included although research appears to be limited. Issues related to study design, gaps in current knowledge and opportunities for future research are identified for bovine mastitis therapy.

  8. The Importance of Reflection within the Academic Assignments of Study Abroad Programs

    OpenAIRE

    Plaza, Raymond Vidal

    2016-01-01

    Today, almost 305,000 U.S. college students are taking advantage of study abroad opportunities throughout the world. While study abroad experiences have has been increasing in number and scope, there continue to be questions about the importance and value of study abroad on the students�[BULLET] growth and development. This study highlights a summer study abroad program at Virginia Tech from 2008 �" 2012. Reflection and transformative learning serve as the primary theoretical frameworks...

  9. Acculturation and Important People and Programming for Chinese International Students at Liberal Arts Colleges

    OpenAIRE

    Arenstein, Laura Tokuza

    2015-01-01

    This dissertation examined the acculturation experiences of Chinese international students attending liberal arts colleges. Through the dissemination of questionnaires and by facilitating focus groups and interviews with students, faculty, and staff, I was able to understand what Chinese students struggled with and where they succeeded at different intervals of their college experiences. Interactions with students highlighted the importance of certain academic and social programs. Interviews ...

  10. Loyalty programs (FPs in tourism: Importance of long term relationship with customers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukić Tamara

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper emphasizes the significance of developing long-term relationships with customers through the introduction of loyalty programs in everyday business. The paper further presents a link between the creation of a solid consumer base and their value in providing stable profits to companies for a longer period of time. Thus, in order to better understand the importance of customer lifetime value, authors gave a simple example how companies could calculate potential profit of a single consumer. Also, the paper explains the principle of CRM and presents the rules in creating incentives for customers to engage in frequent purchases of tourism products. Especially, authors of this paper highlight the need of developing frequency programs (FPs as a guideline in creation of customized relationships with customers, using examples from companies operating in the tourism sector.

  11. A multidisciplinary weight-loss program: the importance of psychological group therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Duarte Ferrari

    Full Text Available Abstract In addition to dietary factors and sedentary habits, there is a relationship between obesity and psychological variables, even without a clear distinction between cause, effect, and correlation. Despite this relationship, weight-loss programs are limited to a combination of nutrition and physical education, leaving psychological intervention out of the treatment plan. Self-esteem issues, depression, and anxiety are just some of the emotional conditions related to obesity. However, there is no information in the literature about the importance of psychological counseling in a multidisciplinary program for weight-loss in adults. In this context, the main objective of this study was to analyze the effect of cognitive-behavioral therapy in groups (CBTG combined with nutrition and physical education within a multidisciplinary approach to treat obesity. 46 individuals (7 men and 39 women were divided into two groups: control (GC and psychology (GP. Baseline and intervention measures were obtained prior to intervention and before the final meeting, including physical capacity tests and the administering the International Physical Activities Questionnaire (IPAQ. Both groups attended weekly lectures given by a nutritionist and two physical education professionals for 12 weeks. In addition, the GP participated in weekly sessions of CBTG for the same period. After the program, there were significant changes in body mass index, waist circumference, body fat percentage, and strength of the lower limbs in both groups. In addition to these changes, the GP also showed improvements in diastolic blood pressure and IPAQ scores, being the only one that increased its time of weekly physical activity. Thus, it was concluded that the psychological treatment might play an important role in a multidisciplinary weight-loss program.

  12. Clinical trial on the effects of a free-access acidified milk replacer feeding program on the health and growth of dairy replacement heifers and veal calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, C G; Leslie, K E; Millman, S T; Bielmann, V; Anderson, N G; Sargeant, J M; DeVries, T J

    2017-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effects of free-access acidified milk replacer feeding on the pre- and postweaning health of dairy and veal calves. Individually housed calves were systematically assigned at birth to 1 of 2 feeding programs: free-access feeding (ad libitum) of acidified milk replacer (ACD, n=249) or traditional restricted feeding (3L fed twice daily) of milk replacer (RES, n=249). Calves were fed milk replacer containing 24% crude protein and 18% fat. Acidified milk replacer was prepared to a target pH between 4.0 and 4.5 using formic acid. Calves were weaned off milk replacer at approximately 6wk of age. Weaning occurred over 5d, and during this weaning period, ACD calves had access to milk replacer for 12h/d and RES calves were offered only one feeding of milk replacer (3 L) daily. Calves were monitored daily for signs of disease. Fecal consistency scores were assigned each week from birth until weaning. A subset of calves was systematically selected for fecal sampling at 3 time points between 7 and 27d of age. Fecal samples were analyzed for enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli F5, Cryptosporidium parvum, rotavirus, and coronavirus. Hip width, hip height, body length, heart girth, and body weight were measured at birth and weaning. Postweaning body weight measurements were collected from the heifers at approximately 8mo of age. Postweaning body weight and carcass grading information was collected from the veal calves at slaughter once a live weight between 300 and 350kg had been achieved. The odds of ACD calves being treated for a preweaning disease event tended to be lower than that of the RES calves (1.2 vs. 5.2%, respectively). Preweaning mortality, postweaning disease treatment, and postweaning mortality did not differ between feeding treatments. The ACD feeding treatment supported greater preweaning average daily gain (0.59 vs. 0.43kg/d) and structural growth than RES feeding. Postweaning average daily gain and carcass

  13. THE SOCIO-ECONOMIC IMPORTANCE OF PROGRAMS FOR THE FINANCING OF CROSS-BORDER COOPERATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mioara BORZA

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The topic of European funding shows a great interest for present and, especially, for the future. The common problems of areas implied in the cross-border programs are correlated to socio-economic development of communities. By this paper we propose an analysis, by inventory type, descriptive and qualitative, of implemented projects and of the perspectives for projects in 2014-2020 period. The results of paper consist in identification of solid arguments about the importance and necessity of these programmes and projects.

  14. FIRE: an SPSS program for variable selection in multiple linear regression analysis via the relative importance of predictors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lorenzo-Seva, Urbano; Ferrando, Pere J

    2011-01-01

    We provide an SPSS program that implements currently recommended techniques and recent developments for selecting variables in multiple linear regression analysis via the relative importance of predictors...

  15. Decomposition and (importance) sampling techniques for multi-stage stochastic linear programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Infanger, G.

    1993-11-01

    The difficulty of solving large-scale multi-stage stochastic linear programs arises from the sheer number of scenarios associated with numerous stochastic parameters. The number of scenarios grows exponentially with the number of stages and problems get easily out of hand even for very moderate numbers of stochastic parameters per stage. Our method combines dual (Benders) decomposition with Monte Carlo sampling techniques. We employ importance sampling to efficiently obtain accurate estimates of both expected future costs and gradients and right-hand sides of cuts. The method enables us to solve practical large-scale problems with many stages and numerous stochastic parameters per stage. We discuss the theory of sharing and adjusting cuts between different scenarios in a stage. We derive probabilistic lower and upper bounds, where we use importance path sampling for the upper bound estimation. Initial numerical results turned out to be promising.

  16. Current situation and the development of the dairy industry in Jordan, Saudi Arabia, and Syria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alqaisi, Othman; Ndambi, O Assah; Uddin, Mohammad Mohi; Hemme, Torsten

    2010-08-01

    The development of the dairy industry plays an important role in the economy of Middle Eastern countries. Judged by its growth rate, the dairy industry is viewed as one of the most progressive food industries in the Middle East. During the early 1970s, countries established executive programs to promote dairy farming; the major objective was to attain self-sufficiency in milk production. A massive investment was set up for importing top class cattle, complying with top industry operating standards, and a simultaneous introduction of the latest technology in processing, packaging, and distributing. Milk production has grown tremendously at rates of 6.6% and 4.9% in Syria and Saudi Arabia, respectively, between 2002 and 2007, which resulted in these nations being almost self-sufficient. Regarding Jordan, milk production has not yet met this target. An excessive growth in the dairy industry is quite noticeable in this region with an expanding capacity for exports. The aim of this study is to show the most recent trends and future prospects of the dairy industries in Syria, Saudi Arabia, and Jordan. It also attempts to investigate the drivers for the development of milk production, consumption, and trade in the region.

  17. Dairy farming and dairy industry in Iran

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beldman, A.; Berkum, van S.; Kortstee, H.; Zijlstra, J.

    2017-01-01

    Iran is a country with a long dairy tradition. Dairy production has increased to a level of about 9bn kg of milk per year. The ambition in the sector is to further increase production and to improve the quality of the milk to be able to export. Based on the analysis of available data and on a field

  18. The importance of leadership in Soldiers' nutritional behaviors: results from the Soldier Fueling Initiative program evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Theresa K; Cable, Sonya J; Jin, Wana K; Robinson, Ayanna; Dennis, Sabriya D; Vo, Linda T; Prosser, Trish J; Rawlings, Jess A

    2013-01-01

    Improving Soldiers' nutritional habits continues to be a concern of the US Army, especially amidst increasing obesity and high injury rates. This study examines leadership influence on nutritional behaviors within the context of the Soldier Fueling Initiative, a program providing nutrition education and improved dining facility menus to Soldiers in Basic Combat Training (BCT) and Advanced Individual Training (AIT). A mixed methods design using surveys (N=486) and focus groups (N=112) was used to collect data at Fort Jackson, SC, and Fort Eustis, VA, in 2011. Survey results showed 75% of Soldiers in BCT believed their drill sergeant was helpful in making performance-enhancing food choices, and 86% agreed their drill sergeant believed it is important to eat for performance. Soldiers in AIT perceived their cadre as less helpful than their BCT drill sergeants and agreed less frequently that the AIT cadre believed it was important to eat for performance (Pnutritional attitudes and behaviors in both BCT and AIT. Focus groups revealed 5 key themes related to cadre influence and nutrition behavior (listed in order of most to least frequent): (1) cadre influence food choices through consequences related to selection, (2) cadre teach Soldiers how to eat, (3) cadre rush Soldiers to eat quickly to return to training, (4) cadre influence choice through example but often do not make healthy choices, and (5) cadre have no influence on food choices. Leaders influence most Soldiers' nutrition practices within the training environment, particularly within BCT. Given that leader influence can impact Soldiers' attitudes and behaviors, it is critical that military leaders become knowledgeable about optimal nutrition practices to disseminate appropriate information to their Soldiers, avoid reprimand associated with trainees' food choices, reinforce key messages associated with nutrition programming, and lead by example in their own food choices.

  19. Assessing the research and education needs of the organic dairy industry in the northeastern United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, A B D; Brito, A F; Townson, L L; Townson, D H

    2013-01-01

    Demographic and management data about organic dairies have been reported previously, but the current study is the first needs assessment of research and educational priorities of organic dairy farmers in the northeastern United States based directly upon their input. Our objectives were to (1) develop an initial understanding of the emerging research and educational needs of organic dairy farmers in the northeastern United States via focus group interviews, and (2) prioritize the needs identified by the focus groups with a broader population of organic dairy farmers via survey methods. Focus group interviews determined the questions used for the survey questionnaire distributed to 1,200 members of the Northeast Organic Dairy Producers Alliance. The members were asked about demographic information, but more importantly, challenges concerning business management and marketing, organic certification, and animal nutrition, health, and reproduction. The results (183 respondents, 15% response rate) were parsed by region (New England farms compared with New York and Pennsylvania farms), herd size (i.e., 12 to 37, 38 to 59, and >60 cows), and years of organic certification (farm consisted of 309 acres and 57 milking cows, on which most of the forage was homegrown but grains were purchased (73% of farms). Among the greatest challenges identified by the farmers were obtaining a steady, fair price for milk (85% respondents); determining dry matter intake for animals on pasture (76%); and controlling nuisance flies (89%). Needs for additional research included organic treatments for mastitis (92% respondents), growing forages for organic production (84%), and developing value-added products (84%). Farms with learning about direct marketing possibilities (76% respondents) and providing training to regional veterinarians interested in organic remedies (91%). In conclusion, the information obtained from the current needs assessment provides a foundation for future research

  20. Udder health in dairy goats

    OpenAIRE

    Koop, G.

    2012-01-01

    In this thesis, monitoring and control of udder health in dairy goats was studied. The diagnostic properties of somatic cell count as a monitoring tool for udder health of a goat herd and of individual goats was evaluated. Furthermore, the diagnostic value of bacteriological culture of bulk milk and of individual milk samples was assessed. The importance of various udder health pathogens was studied. Staphylococcus aureus seems to be the most important udder health pathogen in goats. Somatic ...

  1. National Breeding System of Dairy Cattle Husbandry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Diwyanto

    1999-05-01

    Full Text Available The husbandry of domestic dairy cattle as one of the components of  livestock sub-sector development is hopefully to increase numerously the capacity and the quality on its milk production, to gradually meet national milk demand and face the competitiveness at the global. The achievement of this purpose should be supported by the production of dairy breeding stock in good quality and sufficient number to increase efficiency of both quantity and quality of domestic milk production. One of important aspect that should be prepared is in determining national breeding system of dairy cattle that can function effectively as guidance and regulation for producing, distributing, and using dairy cattle as “domestic breeding stock”. As in other livestock, breeding system of dairy cattle basically constituted of three main subsystems, i.e. production , distribution and marketing, and quality establishment subsystem. The paper discusses some aspects of these three subsystems to give considerable input in preparing the national concept of dairy cattle breeding system. enterprise (Animal Production 1(2: 43-55 (1999   KeyWords: dairy cattle, breeding stock, milk production.

  2. Dairy products, yogurts, and bone health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzoli, René

    2014-05-01

    Fracture risk is determined by bone mass, geometry, and microstructure, which result from peak bone mass (the amount attained at the end of pubertal growth) and from the amount of bone lost subsequently. Nutritional intakes are an important environmental factor that influence both bone mass accumulation during childhood and adolescence and bone loss that occurs in later life. Bone growth is influenced by dietary intake, particularly of calcium and protein. Adequate dietary calcium and protein are essential to achieve optimal peak bone mass during skeletal growth and to prevent bone loss in the elderly. Dairy products are rich in nutrients that are essential for good bone health, including calcium, protein, vitamin D, potassium, phosphorus, and other micronutrients and macronutrients. Studies supporting the beneficial effects of milk or dairy products on bone health show a significant inverse association between dairy food intake and bone turnover markers and a positive association with bone mineral content. Fortified dairy products induce more favorable changes in biochemical indexes of bone metabolism than does calcium supplementation alone. The associations between the consumption of dairy products and the risk of hip fracture are less well established, although yogurt intake shows a weakly positive protective trend for hip fracture. By consuming 3 servings of dairy products per day, the recommended daily intakes of nutrients essential for good bone health may be readily achieved. Dairy products could therefore improve bone health and reduce the risk of fractures in later life.

  3. Clostridium botulinum in cattle and dairy products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindström, Miia; Myllykoski, Jan; Sivelä, Seppo; Korkeala, Hannu

    2010-04-01

    The use of plastic-wrapped and nonacidified silage as cattle feed has led to an increasing number of botulism outbreaks due to Clostridium botulinum Groups I-III in dairy cattle. The involvement of Groups I and II organisms in cattle botulism has raised concern of human botulism risk associated with the consumption of dairy products. Multiplication of C. botulinum in silage and in the gastrointestinal tract of cattle with botulism has been reported, thus contamination of the farm environment and raw milk, and further transmission through the dairy chain, are possible. The standard milk pasteurization treatment does not eliminate spores, and the intrinsic factors of many dairy products allow botulinal growth and toxin production. Although rare, several large botulism outbreaks due to both commercial and home-prepared dairy products have been reported. Factors explaining these outbreaks include most importantly temperature abuse, but also unsafe formulation, inadequate fermentation, insufficient thermal processing, post-process contamination, and lack of adequate quality control for adjunct ingredients were involved. The small number of outbreaks is probably explained by a low incidence of spores in milk, the presence of competitive bacteria in pasteurized milk and other dairy products, and growth-inhibitory combinations of intrinsic and extrinsic factors in cultured and processed dairy products.

  4. Short communication: Change in dose delivery of prostaglandin F2α in a 5-day timed artificial insemination program in lactating dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, J S; Pulley, S L; Hill, S L

    2013-09-01

    We hypothesized that 50mg of prostaglandin F2α (PG) on d 6 would induce luteolysis in a traditional 5-d Ovsynch-72 program [GnRH 5 d before (d 0) and 72 h after (d 8) 25-mg PG doses (d 5 and 6 after GnRH); timed artificial insemination (AI) on d 8]. Experiment 1 monitored luteal regression of original and GnRH-induced luteal tissue (corpus luteum, CL) by transrectal ultrasonography and blood serum concentrations of progesterone after both 25-mg doses of PG (d 5 and 6; control; n=31) or a single 50-mg dose of PG on d 6 (n=30). Estrous cycles were presynchronized (GnRH 7d before 25 mg of PG); 11 d later, cows were enrolled in a 5-d Ovsynch-72 program (62 to 71 d in milk) and treatments were administered. Blood was sampled for progesterone analysis and luteal structures were measured on d 0 (original CL) and d 5 through 9 to monitor original and new GnRH-induced CL. Control PG reduced luteal tissue area of original CL on d 6 and 7 compared with PG administered only on d 6, but no difference between treatments was detected by d 9. In contrast, no differences were detected in luteal tissue area of the induced CL on d 5 through 9. Serum progesterone on d 5 through 9 differed only on d 6 for control and the 50-mg dose. Luteolysis occurred in all 31 controls, but luteolytic failure occurred in 2 of 30 cows receiving 50mg, in which no CL were present on d 0 but 1 or 3 new CL were present on d 5 in these 2 cows. Pregnancy outcome 32 d after AI was 14 of 30 (40%) compared with 15 of 30 (50%) for control versus 50-mg dose, respectively. Experiment 2 monitored luteolysis in nonpregnant repeat-service cows subsequently treated with the same 2 treatments as in experiment 1. Serum progesterone in 63 cows (serum progesterone ≥1 ng/mL on d 5) on d 5, 6, and 8 differed only on d 6 for control and the 50-mg dose. Luteolysis occurred in 32 of 34 controls and in 29 of 29 cows treated with 50mg. Pregnancy outcome 32 d after AI was 17 of 33 (52%) compared with 13 of 29 (45%) for

  5. OPR-PPR, a Computer Program for Assessing Data Importance to Model Predictions Using Linear Statistics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthew J. Tonkin; Claire R. Tiedeman; D. Matthew Ely; and Mary C. Hill

    2007-08-16

    The OPR-PPR program calculates the Observation-Prediction (OPR) and Parameter-Prediction (PPR) statistics that can be used to evaluate the relative importance of various kinds of data to simulated predictions. The data considered fall into three categories: (1) existing observations, (2) potential observations, and (3) potential information about parameters. The first two are addressed by the OPR statistic; the third is addressed by the PPR statistic. The statistics are based on linear theory and measure the leverage of the data, which depends on the location, the type, and possibly the time of the data being considered. For example, in a ground-water system the type of data might be a head measurement at a particular location and time. As a measure of leverage, the statistics do not take into account the value of the measurement. As linear measures, the OPR and PPR statistics require minimal computational effort once sensitivities have been calculated. Sensitivities need to be calculated for only one set of parameter values; commonly these are the values estimated through model calibration. OPR-PPR can calculate the OPR and PPR statistics for any mathematical model that produces the necessary OPR-PPR input files. In this report, OPR-PPR capabilities are presented in the context of using the ground-water model MODFLOW-2000 and the universal inverse program UCODE_2005. The method used to calculate the OPR and PPR statistics is based on the linear equation for prediction standard deviation. Using sensitivities and other information, OPR-PPR calculates (a) the percent increase in the prediction standard deviation that results when one or more existing observations are omitted from the calibration data set; (b) the percent decrease in the prediction standard deviation that results when one or more potential observations are added to the calibration data set; or (c) the percent decrease in the prediction standard deviation that results when potential information on one

  6. OPR-PPR, a Computer Program for Assessing Data Importance to Model Predictions Using Linear Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonkin, Matthew J.; Tiedeman, Claire R.; Ely, D. Matthew; Hill, Mary C.

    2007-01-01

    The OPR-PPR program calculates the Observation-Prediction (OPR) and Parameter-Prediction (PPR) statistics that can be used to evaluate the relative importance of various kinds of data to simulated predictions. The data considered fall into three categories: (1) existing observations, (2) potential observations, and (3) potential information about parameters. The first two are addressed by the OPR statistic; the third is addressed by the PPR statistic. The statistics are based on linear theory and measure the leverage of the data, which depends on the location, the type, and possibly the time of the data being considered. For example, in a ground-water system the type of data might be a head measurement at a particular location and time. As a measure of leverage, the statistics do not take into account the value of the measurement. As linear measures, the OPR and PPR statistics require minimal computational effort once sensitivities have been calculated. Sensitivities need to be calculated for only one set of parameter values; commonly these are the values estimated through model calibration. OPR-PPR can calculate the OPR and PPR statistics for any mathematical model that produces the necessary OPR-PPR input files. In this report, OPR-PPR capabilities are presented in the context of using the ground-water model MODFLOW-2000 and the universal inverse program UCODE_2005. The method used to calculate the OPR and PPR statistics is based on the linear equation for prediction standard deviation. Using sensitivities and other information, OPR-PPR calculates (a) the percent increase in the prediction standard deviation that results when one or more existing observations are omitted from the calibration data set; (b) the percent decrease in the prediction standard deviation that results when one or more potential observations are added to the calibration data set; or (c) the percent decrease in the prediction standard deviation that results when potential information on one

  7. Cost implications of improving food safety in the Dutch dairy chain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valeeva, N.I.; Meuwissen, M.P.M.; Oude Lansink, A.G.J.M.; Huirne, R.B.M.

    2006-01-01

    This paper examines control measures for improving food safety in the dairy chain, using an integer linear programming model. The chain includes feed (compound feed production and delivery), farm (dairy farm) and dairy processing (transport and processing of raw milk, delivery of pasteurised milk)

  8. Coagulase-negative staphylococci mastitis in Dutch dairy herds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sampimon, O.C.

    2009-01-01

    Mastitis is one of the most important diseases in dairy cattle. Recently, the so-called minor pathogens, of which coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) are the most important group of bacteria, has received more attention. This thesis focuses on the role of CNS in udder health of dairy cows. The

  9. Evaluation of mass drug administration in the program to control imported lymphatic filariasis in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toothong, Tanaporn; Tipayamongkholgul, Mathuros; Suwannapong, Nawarat; Suvannadabba, Saravudh

    2015-09-28

    Migration plays a major role in the emergence and resurgence of lymphatic filariasis (LF) in many countries. Because of the high prevalence of Imported Bancroftian Filariasis (IBF) caused by nocturnally periodic Wuchereria bancrofti and the intensive movement of immigrant workers from endemic areas, Thailand has implemented two doses of 6 mg/kg diethylcarbamazine (DEC) with interval of 6 months to prevent IBF. In areas where immigrants are very mobile, the administration of DEC may be compromised. This study aimed to evaluate DEC administration and its barriers in such areas. A cross-sectional study with two-stage stratified cluster sampling was conducted. We selected Myanmar immigrants aged >18 years from factory and fishery areas of Samut Sakhon Province for interview with a structured questionnaire. We also interviewed health personnel regarding the functions of the LF program and practice of DEC delivery among immigrants. Associations were measured by multiple logistic regression, at P Incorrect perceptions about the side-effects of DEC also obstructed DEC access for Myanmar immigrants. All positive LF antigenic immigrants reported visiting and emigrating from LF-endemic areas. Hospital-based DEC administration was an inappropriate approach to DEC delivery in areas with highly mobile Myanmar immigrants. Incorporating health-center personnel in DEC delivery twice yearly and improving the perceptions of DEC side effects would likely increase DEC coverage among Myanmar immigrants.

  10. HIV-Infected Adolescent, Young Adult and Pregnant Smokers: Important Targets for Effective Tobacco Control Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerome Escota

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Tobacco use is inextricably linked to a number of health risks both in the general and HIV-infected populations. There is, however, a dearth of research on effective tobacco control programs among people living with HIV, and especially among adolescents, young adults and pregnant women, groups with heightened or increased vulnerability secondary to tobacco use. Adolescents and young adults constitute a growing population of persons living with HIV infection. Early and continued tobacco use in this population living with a disease characterized by premature onset multimorbidity and chronic inflammation is of concern. Additionally, there is an increased acuity for tobacco control among HIV-infected pregnant women to reduce pregnancy morbidity and improve fetal outcome. This review will provide an important summary of current knowledge of tobacco use among HIV-infected adolescents, young adults and pregnant women. The effects of tobacco use in these specific populations will be presented and the current state of tobacco control within these populations, assessed.

  11. THE IMPORTANCE OF MYCOTOXINS IN DAIRY PRODUCTS

    OpenAIRE

    TAHMAS KAHYAOĞLU, Deren

    2017-01-01

    In suitablemoisture and temperature conditions some fungus such as Aspergillus,Penicillium, Fusarium, Alternaria, Claviceps synthesis the mycotoxins whichhave toxic and carcinogenic properties are fungal metabolites that have lowmolecular weights. Aflatoxin, ochratoxin, trichothecene, zearalenone, patulinand fumonisin are the most common mycotoxins. Aflatoxins, one ofthe mostimportant mycotoxins, are heat- resistant, toxic, immunosuppressive, mutagenic,teratogenic secondary metabolic products...

  12. Institutional factors influencing innovation adoption by dairy farmers in Ireland

    OpenAIRE

    Rieple, A.; Snijders, S.

    2014-01-01

    Location-based resources are important factors in the entrepreneurial creation of wealth. This is as true in agriculture as it is in other industrial contexts. In this study, we are interested in how formal and informal institutions such as knowledge networks and localized ‘webs’ of influence act to facilitate or block innovation in the dairy farming industry. Our study of dairy farmers in Munster, Republic of Ireland (an intensive location for dairy farming), is located in a context in which...

  13. The importance of using evidence-based e-health smoking cessation programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hein De Vries

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available eHealth programs have become very popular to help people to quit smoking. Yet, the efficacy of eHealth programs is dependent on the health communication theories used and applied in these programs. Computer tailored technology has shown to be an effective tool to help people to quit smoking. Programs with even one session can increase the success rates significantly. During this presentation I will discuss several computer tailored eHealth programs for smoking cessation that have been developed and tested at Maastricht University. I will discuss the theoretical grounding of these programs, their effects and the cost-effectiveness. Additionally I will also outline some potential innovations for eHealth programs, and will also share the results of a test comparing eHealth and mHealth.

  14. Competitive Dairy Value Chains in Southeast Asia – Part II : Dairy Expert Roundtable Meeting, December 8 & 9, 2010, Muak Lek, Thailand

    OpenAIRE

    Haartsen, L.; Lee, van der, J.; Wouters, A.P.

    2011-01-01

    The regional Dairy Expert Roundtable Meeting on “Competitive Dairy Value Chains in Southeast Asia” provided a forum for participants from six Southeast Asian countries to discuss how dairy value chains in this region can become more competitive and sustainable. The demand for dairy products in these countries is increasing steadily. Countries rely more and more on imports. Inefficiencies in the chain, low productivity, quality issues, as well as institutional obstacles make locally produced d...

  15. An application of mixed-integer linear programming models on the redesign of the supply network of Nutricia Dairy & Drinks Group in Hungary

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouda, H.E.; Beek, van P.; Vorst, van der J.G.A.J.; Tacke, H.

    2002-01-01

    Between 1995 and 1998 Nutricia acquired a number of dairy companies in Hungary. Each of these companies produced a wide variety of products for its regional market. Although alterations had been made to the production system in the last few years, production and transportation costs were still

  16. Scale of production and implementation of food safety programs influence the performance of current food safety management systems: Case of dairy processors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Njage, Patrick Murigu Kamau; Opiyo, Beatrice; Wangoh, John

    2017-01-01

    An FSMS-Diagnostic Instrument was used to evaluate fifteen Kenyan dairy processors based on indicators and descriptive grids for context riskiness, FSMS activities, and microbial food safety (FS) output with respect to scale of production. Contextual riskiness was diagnosed as low, moderate or high...

  17. Optimization of dairy sludge for growth of Rhizobium cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ashok Kumar; Singh, Gauri; Gautam, Digvijay; Bedi, Manjinder Kaur

    2013-01-01

    In this study dairy sludge was evaluated as an alternative cultivation medium for Rhizobium. Growth of bacterial strains at different concentrations of Dairy sludge was monitored. Maximum growth of all strains was observed at 60% Dairy sludge concentration. At 60% optical density (OD) values are 0.804 for Rhizobium trifolii (MTCC905), 0.825 for Rhizobium trifolii (MTCC906), and 0.793 for Rhizobium meliloti (MTCC100). Growth pattern of strains was observed at 60% Dairy sludge along with different synthetic media (tryptone yeast, Rhizobium minimal medium and yeast extract mannitol). Growth in 60% Dairy sludge was found to be superior to standard media used for Rhizobium. Media were optimized using 60% dairy sludge along with different concentrations of yeast extract (1-7 g/L) and mannitol (7-13 g/L) in terms of optical density at different time intervals, that is, 24, 48 and 72 hours. Maximum growth was observed in 6 g/L of yeast extract and 12 g/L of mannitol at 48-hour incubation period in all strains. The important environmental parameters such as pH were optimized using 60% dairy sludge, 60% dairy sludge +6 g/L yeast extract, and 60% dairy sludge +12 g/L mannitol. The maximum growth of all strains was found at pH 7.0. The present study recommends the use of 60% dairy sludge as a suitable growth medum for inoculant production.

  18. Effect of gonadotropin-releasing hormone or prostaglandin F(2α)-based estrus synchronization programs for first or subsequent artificial insemination in lactating dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, R G S; Farias, A M; Hernández-Rivera, J A; Navarrette, A E; Hawkins, D E; Bilby, T R

    2013-03-01

    The objective was to evaluate the effects of GnRH or PGF(2α)-based synchronization and resynchronization programs on fertility in lactating dairy cows. For experiment 1, cows (n=1,521) were presynchronized with 2 injections of PGF given at 36 and 50 DIM and assigned to 1 of 3 protocols: Ovsynch [OVS; n=552; GnRH injection, PGF(2α) injection 7 d later, GnRH injection 56 h later, and timed artificial insemination (TAI) 16 h later] beginning at 14 d after presynchronization (PS), GnRH-GnRH-PGF(2α)-GnRH (GGPG; n=402) treatment with a GnRH injection given 7 d after PS and OVS 7 d later, or PGF(2α)-GnRH-PGF(2α)-GnRH (P7GPG; n=567) treatment with a PGF(2α) injection given 7 d after PS and OVS beginning 7 d later. Experiment 2 cows (n=2,327) were assigned to 1 of 3 resynchronization protocols 7 d before nonpregnancy diagnosis (NPD): GGPG cows (n=458) received a GnRH injection at enrollment and OVS at NPD; P7GPG cows (n=940) received a PGF(2α) injection at NPD and OVS 7 d later; and P11GPG cows (n=929) received a PGF(2α) injection 3 d after NPD and OVS 11 d later. In both experiments, cows were artificially inseminated upon estrus detection (ED). In experiment 1, 52.3% of cows were artificially inseminated upon ED, with GGPG having reduced ED (GGPG=46.8 vs. OVS=50.7 and P7GPG=57.7%). Treatments did not affect overall pregnancy per artificial insemination (P/AI) at 36 and 66 d after AI (OVS=34.1 and 32.3, P7GPG=34.6 and 31.9, and GGPG=31.3 and 28.1%, respectively) or pregnancy loss but cows artificially inseminated upon ED had higher P/AI than cows undergoing TAI (ED cows=37.9 vs. TAI cows=28.8%). Treatment did not affect P/AI for cows artificially inseminated upon ED or TAI at 36 and 66 d after AI (OVS=34.1 and 32.3, P7GPG=34.6 and 31.9, and GGPG=31.3 and 28.1%). Median days in milk at first AI was affected by treatment (P7GPG=59 vs. OVS=68 and GGPG=68 d). In experiment 2, GGPG reduced ED (GGPG=23.3 vs. P7GPG=74.9 and P11GPG=79.6%). Treatment did not affect overall

  19. The importance of basic science and clinical research as a selection criterion for general surgery residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melendez, Mark M; Xu, Xiaoti; Sexton, Thomas R; Shapiro, Marc J; Mohan, Eugene P

    2008-01-01

    The selection criteria for surgical residents applying for residency differ among programs nationwide. Factors influencing this selection process have not been well defined, and research in particular has not been evaluated fully. This study aimed to evaluate the relative importance of basic science and clinical research in the selection criteria used by program directors (PDs). A web-based survey consisting of 11 questions was sent to PDs using the list server of the Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Respondents were asked to rank selection factors using a 1-to-5 scoring system, with 5 as most important. Their responses were recorded and tabulated. University-based teaching hospital. The survey went to 251 accredited general surgery residency programs in the United States. Overall, 134 (53.3%) of the surveys were returned, representing 61 university-based programs, 57 community-based programs with university affiliation, and 16 community-based programs without university affiliation. In total, 120 PDs (89.5%) considered basic or clinical research almost always or all the time when evaluating applicants to their general surgery program. Another 73 PDs (54.5%) gave basic science and clinical research equal importance. Another 40 PDs (29.9%) rarely or never credited research unless it had been published as an abstract or paper. In ranking research, 11 (8.2%) respondents gave it the 5 score. Most respondents (n = 93; 69.4%) gave it the 3 score. An applicant's interview and interest in surgery were the factors considered most important by 93 (69.4%) and 78 (58.2%), respectively, of the PDs. Basic science and clinical research constituted an important but secondary criterion for resident selection by PDs into general surgery residency programs. PDs perceived the primary factors for residency selection to be the interview, demonstrated interest in surgery, AOA membership, letters of recommendation, and USMLE Step I scores.

  20. Family Connections: The Importance of Prison Reading Programs for Incarcerated Parents and Their Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumberg, Daniel M.; Griffin, Dawn A.

    2013-01-01

    This article introduces a successful reading program, Family Connections, for incarcerated parents and their children. A comprehensive review of the literature supports the need to implement prison programs from an ecological perspective, in which the needs of inmates and their families are considered. More specifically, the benefits of directing…

  1. Federal Child Nutrition Programs Are Important to Rural Households. Issue Brief No. 11

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wauchope, Barbara; Shattuck, Anne

    2010-01-01

    This brief, based on data from the U.S. Census Bureau, examines how rural families use four of the major federal child nutrition programs. It finds that 29 percent of rural families with children participate but that there are barriers to these nutrition programs, such as the lack of public transportation and high operating costs for rural schools…

  2. Social support and dairy products intake among adolescents: a study from Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shokrvash, Behjat; Salehi, Leili; Hariri Akbari, Maral; Ebrahimi Mamagani, Mehrangiz; Nedjat, Saharnaz; Asghari, Mohammad; Majlessi, Freshteh; Montazeri, Ali

    2015-10-22

    Adequate daily milk and dairy products intake seems to an important for adolescents' health. This study aimed to identify the high-risk group adolescents who did not meet the recommended daily serving milk and dairy products and indeed to find out associated factors relating to their nutrition behaviors. This cross sectional study was carried out on 7th grade students, in Tabriz, East Azerbaijan province, Iran. An anonymous self-administrated questionnaire including items on perceived social support, physical activity, and sedentary behaviors was administered. In addition a valid food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) measuring daily milk products serving intake as a main outcome measure was completed for each respondent. Logistic regression analysis was applied to examine the association between milk and dairy products consumption and independents variables. In all 402 students (51.5 % female) participated in the study. The mean age of students was 12.9 (SD = 0.49) years. The average daily intake of milk and dairy products was 1.64 (SD = 0.78) servings per day. Overall 14.2 % of adolescents (18.8 % of girls, and 9.2 % of boys, p = 0.006) reported consumption of the recommended daily milk and dairy products serving per day. The results indicated that gender boys (OR for boys = 2.41, 95 % CI = 1.25-4.67), mother age (OR for age group 40-55 years = 2.52, 95 % CI = 1.18-5.38), poor perceived emotional family support, (OR = 1.10, 95 % CI = 1.05-3.61), and poor perceived practical family support (OR = 2.04, 95 % CI = 1.18-4.17) were the most significant contributing factors to low level milk and dairy products intake in adolescents. The findings indicated that adolescents did not take the recommended daily amount of milk and dairy products and this appeared to be strongly related to low perceived family support. To achieve the recommended daily milk and dairy products serving consumption, family involvements in any programs that

  3. Improving smallholder livelihoods: Dairy production in Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Ulicky

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Tanzania is primarily an agro-based economy, characterized by subsistence agricultural production that employs more than 80% of the population and contributes up to 45% of the GDP (2005. This country is endowed with a cattle population of 21.3 M, composed mainly of indigenous Zebu breeds and about 680 000 improved dairy animals. About 70% of the milk produced comes from the traditional sector (indigenous cattle kept in rural areas, while the remaining 30% comes from improved cattle, mainly kept by smallholder producers. In Northern Tanzania and particularly in Hai district of Kilimanjaro Region, some dairy farmers organize themselves into small producer groups for the purpose of milk collecting, marketing and general promotion of the dairy sector in their community. Nronga Women Dairy Cooperative Society (NWDCS Limited is one of such organizations dedicated to improve the well-being of the Nronga village community through promoting small-scale dairy farming and its flow-on benefits. Milk flows out of the village, and services for investment and dairy production flow into the village, ensuring a sustainable financial circulation necessary for poverty reduction, rural development and better life for the rural community. In 2001 NWDCS introduced a school milk feeding program that has attracted Australian donors since 2005. Guided by Global Development Group, a multi-faceted project, integrating micro-enterprises, business, education and child health/nutrition, was proposed and initiated by building a dairy plant in Hai District headquarters, the Boma plant. In March 2013, the Australian High Commission to East Africa approved Direct Aid Program funding of AUD 30 000 towards the NWDCS - Biogas Pilot Project in Tanzania, which included the renovation of zero-grazing cow shade units, the construction of 6-m3 biodigester plants on each farm, and encouragement of the use of bioslurry for pasture production and home gardens.

  4. Nurses' caring attitude: fall prevention program implementation as an example of its importance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzeng, Huey-Ming

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND OF THE PROBLEM: Fall prevention programs are universally multidisciplinary, but nursing care plays the central role. Since October 2008, Medicare has no longer reimbursed acute care hospitals for the costs of additional care required due to hospital-acquired injuries (e.g., injurious falls). However, fall prevention programs for hospitalized patients have had limited success, and multifaceted strategies for implementing fall prevention programs cannot guarantee success. It is possible that cultivating and sustaining a caring attitude among clinicians is often overlooked as an intervention strategy. This article discusses the barriers to implementing fall prevention programs in acute care hospitals. The attributional theory of success and failure is used to analyze these barriers. In addition, the author discusses whether a lack of knowledge and/or a lack of caring attitude play a role as the underlying barriers to implementing a successful fall prevention program. A patient's story illustrates patients' expectations for the care environment to center on their needs. Possible educational strategies as interventions for fall prevention programs are discussed. It is suggested that education goals for nurses need to not only promote their professional knowledge and skills in implementing a fall prevention program but also cultivate their caring attitudes. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Food preference for milk and dairy products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuzana Derflerová Brázdová

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Milk and dairy products constitute an important source of energy and nutrients for humans. Food preferences may significantly influence the actual consumption (and thus nutrition of people at the population level. The objective of the present large-scale survey was to specify current preferences for milk and dairy products with regard to age and sex. The study was conducted across the Moravia region, Czech Republic, on a sample of 451 individuals divided into 4 age groups: children, adolescents, young adults, and elderly people. A graphic scale questionnaire was administered, with respondents rating their degree of preference for each food item by drawing a mark on a 35 mm line. Out of the 115 items in the questionnaire, 11 items represented dairy products. Data was analysed by means of a general linear model using IBM SPSS Statistics software. Preference for milk was lower in the elderly group than the other groups (P P < 0.01. The overall preference for dairy products (21.6 was lower than the average preference for all foods on the list (22.5. The cross-sectional study revealed intergenerational differences in preferences for specific dairy products, which were most marked in case of cream, processed cheese, blue cheese, and buttermilk. The knowledge of these differences might help promote more focused action at the community level directed at increasing the overall consumption of dairy products in the population.

  6. Developments in the Dairy Industries of Mexico, Central America, Argentina, and Brazil -- Implications for the U.S. Dairy Sector

    OpenAIRE

    Dobson, William D.

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this Discussion Paper is to evaluate how economic problems and developments in the dairy industries of Mexico, Central America, Argentina, and Brazil will affect the U.S. dairy sector. Mexico, a signatory to the North American Free Trade Agreement, now applies zero tariffs to imports of most U.S. dairy products. Nonfat dry milk (NFDM) is a notable exception; Mexican tariffs on U.S. exports of NFDM will not go to zero until 2008. However, Mexico’s dairy market no longer represen...

  7. A Summary of the United States Food and Drug Administrations' Food Safety Program for Imported Seafood; One Country's Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koonse, Brett

    2016-04-29

    It is well known that the vast majority of seafood is captured or farmed in emerging countries and exported to developed countries. This has resulted in seafood being the number one traded food commodity in the world. Food safety is essential to this trade. Exporting countries should understand the regulatory food safety programs of the countries they ship to in order to comply with their applicable laws and regulations to avoid violations and disruptions in trade. The United States (U.S.) imports more seafood than any individual country in the world but the European Union (E.U.) countries, as a block, import significantly more. Each importing country has its own programs and systems in place to ensure the safety of imported seafood. However, most countries that export seafood have regulatory programs in place that comply with the import requirements of the E.U. The purpose of this paper is to describe the United States Food and Drug Administration's (USFDA) imported seafood safety program. The primary audience for the information is foreign government regulators, seafood exporters, and U.S. importers. It can also give consumers confidence that f U.S. seafood is safe no matter which country it originates from.

  8. Dairy farmers' perceptions toward the implementation of on-farm Johne's disease prevention and control strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, C; Jansen, J; Roth, K; Kastelic, J P; Adams, C L; Barkema, H W

    2016-11-01

    Implementation of specific management strategies on dairy farms is currently the most effective way to reduce the prevalence of Johne's disease (JD), an infectious chronic enteritis of ruminants caused by Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP). However, dairy farmers often fail to implement recommended strategies. The objective of this study was to assess perceptions of farmers participating in a JD prevention and control program toward recommended practices, and explore factors that influence whether or not a farmer adopts risk-reducing measures for MAP transmission. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 25 dairy farmers enrolled in a voluntary JD control program in Alberta, Canada. Principles of classical grounded theory were used for participant selection, interviewing, and data analysis. Additionally, demographic data and MAP infection status were collected and analyzed using quantitative questionnaires and the JD control program database. Farmers' perceptions were distinguished according to 2 main categories: first, their belief in the importance of JD, and second, their belief in recommended JD prevention and control strategies. Based on these categories, farmers were classified into 4 groups: proactivists, disillusionists, deniers, and unconcerned. The first 2 groups believed in the importance of JD, and proactivists and unconcerned believed in proposed JD prevention and control measures. Groups that regarded JD as important had better knowledge about best strategies to reduce MAP transmission and had more JD risk assessments conducted on their farm. Although not quantified, it also appeared that these groups had more JD prevention and control practices in place. However, often JD was not perceived as a problem in the herd and generally farmers did not regard JD control as a "hot topic" in communications with their herd veterinarian and other farmers. Recommendations regarding how to communicate with farmers and motivate various

  9. Biomarkers and mechanisms of natural disease resistance in dairy cows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Altena, van S.E.C.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to define and test biomarkers for disease resistance in dairy cows and to determine the underlying mechanism in natural disease resistance. The health status of the cows is an important issue in dairy farming. Due to the mandatory reduction in the use of antibiotics,

  10. Greenhouse gas emissions in milk and dairy product chains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flysjö, Anna Maria

    Reducing greenhouse gas emissions from dairy products is one important step towards a more sustainable dairy sector. To ensure effective mitigation, reliable assessment methods are required. The present PhD thesis focuses on some of the most critical methodological aspects influencing the carbon...

  11. Determinants Of Dairy Intensification In Uganda - An Integrated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    participation of adults in off farm work (p≤0.05), negatively affected the chances of dairy intensification. It can therefore be concluded that farm domestic human capital, demand for dairy products, diminishing feed resources and the need for cattle confinement and availability of family labour are important factors determining ...

  12. Environmental sensitivity in dairy cattle with focus on fertility traits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ismael, Ahmed; Løvendahl, Peter; Strandberg, Erling

    2012-01-01

    Dairy cattle differ in production, fertility, health, and other important traits in the different environment as both the phenopypic and genetic level (Winding et la., 2005 and Calus et al., 2005). Fertility of Nordic dairy cattle breeds (Holstein, Red, Jersey) is a complex trait...

  13. Contribution of Dairy to Nutrient Intake in the Western Diet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hettinga, Kasper; Valenberg, van Hein

    2017-01-01

    Milk and dairy products play an important role in providing nutrients in both Western and developing countries. Most research in this area focuses on the intake of individual nutrients from food products, like dairy products. However, nutrients are not consumed, and do not function, in isolation.

  14. Mastitis pathogens prevalent in dairy cattle at Magadu farm ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Kanamycin and Norfloxacin showed to be the best drugs of choice for treatment. The economic losses due to reduction in milk yield, changes in milk composition and discarded milk are serious burden to the dairy industry. Mastitis can be subclinical, therefore, it is important to screen dairy animal frequently to determine the ...

  15. Dairy intake-related intentions, attitudes, subjective norms and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Intake of dairy-related nutrients of South Africans is low. Nutrition professionals may influence dietary behaviour. Their own disposition related to dairy is unknown, yet important in promoting the “have milk, maas or yoghurt every day” guideline. Aim: Guided by the Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB), this study ...

  16. Impact of ASEAN-India Free Trade Agreement on Indian Dairy Trade: A Quantitative Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Bitan Mondal, Bitan Mondal; Smita Sirohi, Smita Sirohi; Vishal Thorat, Vishal Thorat

    2012-01-01

    The study attempts a quantitative assessment of the impact of recently signed ASEAN-India FTA (AIFTA) for dairy commodities in India. ASEAN is strategically a potential market in dairy for India and our country already stands as net exporter of dairy products in this region. Partial equilibrium model (SMART model) has been used to simulate the likely impact of dairy exports to and imports from ASEAN countries under the proposed tariff reduction schedule of the AIFTA. The SMART model simulatio...

  17. Selection for longevity in dairy cattle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vollema, A.R.

    1998-01-01

    This thesis deals with several aspects of longevity of dairy cattle. When breeding organizations want to implement longevity in their breeding programs they have to make several decisions. This thesis aims to give tools to make those decisions.

    Chapter 2 gives an overview

  18. Dairy product consumption and the metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Meijl, Leonie E C; Vrolix, Ruth; Mensink, Ronald P

    2008-12-01

    The metabolic syndrome is an important risk factor for type 2 diabetes mellitus and CVD. Epidemiological studies have now suggested protective effects of dairy product consumption on the development of this syndrome. Here we review the physiological effects and possible mechanisms involved of three main dairy constituents (Ca, protein, fat) on important components of the metabolic syndrome. Ca supplements improve the serum lipoprotein profile, particularly by decreasing serum total and LDL-cholesterol concentrations. They also lower systolic and diastolic blood pressure. Insufficient evidence exists for a significant role of Ca supplements or dairy in body-weight management. Effects of Ca may be related to intestinal binding to fatty acids or bile acids, or to changes in intracellular Ca metabolism by suppressing calciotropic hormones. Dietary proteins may increase satiety in both the short and longer term, which may result in a reduced energy intake. They have also been reported to improve the serum lipoprotein profile as compared with carbohydrates. Dairy proteins are precursors of angiotensin-I-converting enzyme-inhibitory peptides, which may lower blood pressure. Such effects, however, have inconsistently been reported in human studies. Finally, conjugated linoleic acid, which effectively lowers body weight in animals, has no such effect in humans in the quantities provided by dairy products. To reduce the intake of SFA, the consumption of low-fat instead of high-fat dairy products is recommended. In conclusion, more research is warranted to better understand the physiological effects and the mechanisms involved of dairy products in the prevention and treatment of the metabolic syndrome.

  19. 78 FR 45729 - Foreign Supplier Verification Programs for Importers of Food for Humans and Animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-29

    ... (HACCP) and preventive controls programs), we believe that it provides the most effective way to... fishery products (which are already subject to verification under FDA's HACCP regulations), food for... industry. FDA's regulations on the processing of juice and seafood products under HACCP systems, as well as...

  20. How Important Are Classroom Peer Effects? Evidence from Boston's METCO Program. Working Paper Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angrist, Joshua, D.; Lang, Kevin

    This paper studies the impact of the Metropolitan Council for Educational Opportunities (METCO), a desegregation program that sends mostly black students out of the Boston public school district to attend schools in more affluent suburban districts. It examines METCO's impact on the test scores of third, fifth, and seventh graders in a large…

  1. Lessons Learned through the Piedmont Futures Program: Why Career Education Is Important to Student Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughey-Commers, Erin

    2011-01-01

    Hands-on learning with business professionals is at the heart of the educators' approach with the Piedmont Futures program at Piedmont Virginia Community College. Too often educators provide the answers before students have asked the questions; they create career pathways without providing students with sufficient opportunities to explore which…

  2. THE IMPORTANCE OF A SUCCESSFUL QUALITY ASSURANCE (QA) PROGRAM FROM A RESEARCH MANAGER'S PERSPECTIVE

    Science.gov (United States)

    The paper discusses the Air Pollution Prevention and Control Division's Quality Assurance (QA) program and the approaches used to meet QA requirements in the Division. The presentation is a technical manager's perspective of the Division's requirements for and approach to QA in i...

  3. Making the Grade: The Importance of Academic Enablers in the Elementary School Counseling Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barna, Jennifer S.; Brott, Pamelia E.

    2014-01-01

    Elementary school counselors can support academic achievement by connecting their comprehensive programs to increasing academic competence. One valuable framework focuses on academic enablers, which are identified as interpersonal skills, motivation, engagement, and study skills (DiPerna, 2004). In this article, the authors (a) discuss the…

  4. Participation in the National School Lunch Program: Importance of School-Level and Neighborhood Contextual Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirtcheva, Donka M.; Powell, Lisa M.

    2009-01-01

    Background: This study examined the effect of stigma (proxied by school-level peer participation), neighborhood food environment, and demographic characteristics on participation in the U.S. Department of Agriculture National School Lunch Program (NSLP). Methods: The 1997 and 2003 waves of the Child Development Supplement to the Panel Study of…

  5. Mineral elements in milk and dairy products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šimun Zamberlin

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Mineral elements occur in milk and dairy products as inorganic ions and salts, as well as part of organic molecules, such as proteins, fats, carbohydrates and nucleic acids. The chemical form of mineral elements is important because it determines their absorption in the intestine and their biological utilization. The mineral composition of milk is not constant because it depends on lactation phase, nutritional status of the animal, and environmental and genetic factors. The objective of this research is to point out the research results of chemical form, content and nutritional importance of individual mineral elements that are present in various milks and dairy products.

  6. Staphylococcus aureus entrance into the dairy chain: Tracking S. aureus from dairy cow to cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Kümmel

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most important contagious mastitis pathogens in dairy cattle. Due to its zoonotic potential, control of S. aureus is not only of great economic importance in the dairy industry but also a significant public health concern. The aim of this study was to decipher the potential of bovine udder associated S. aureus as reservoir for S. aureus contamination in dairy production and processing. From 18 farms, delivering their milk to an alpine dairy plant for the production of smeared semi-hard and hard cheese. 1176 quarter milk (QM samples of all cows in lactation (n = 294 and representative samples form bulk tank milk (BTM of all farms were surveyed for coagulase positive (CPS and coagulase negative Staphylococci (CNS. Furthermore, samples from different steps of the cheese manufacturing process were tested for CPS and CNS. As revealed by chemometric-assisted FTIR spectroscopy and molecular subtyping (spa typing and multi locus sequence typing, dairy cattle represent indeed an important, yet underreported, entrance point of S. aureus into the dairy chain. Our data clearly show that certain S. aureus subtypes are present in primary production as well as in the cheese processing at the dairy plant. However, although a considerable diversity of S. aureus subtypes was observed in QM and BTM at the farms, only certain S. aureus subtypes were able to enter and persist in the cheese manufacturing at the dairy plant and could be isolated from cheese until day fourteen of ripening. Farm strains belonging to the FTIR cluster B1 and B3, which show genetic characteristics (t2953, ST8, enterotoxin profile: sea/sed/sej of the recently described S. aureus genotype B, most successfully contaminated the cheese production at the dairy plant. Thus our study fosters the hypothesis that genotype B S. aureus represent a specific challenge in control of S. aureus in the dairy chain that requires effective clearance strategies and hygienic

  7. Staphylococcus aureus Entrance into the Dairy Chain: Tracking S. aureus from Dairy Cow to Cheese

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kümmel, Judith; Stessl, Beatrix; Gonano, Monika; Walcher, Georg; Bereuter, Othmar; Fricker, Martina; Grunert, Tom; Wagner, Martin; Ehling-Schulz, Monika

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most important contagious mastitis pathogens in dairy cattle. Due to its zoonotic potential, control of S. aureus is not only of great economic importance in the dairy industry but also a significant public health concern. The aim of this study was to decipher the potential of bovine udder associated S. aureus as reservoir for S. aureus contamination in dairy production and processing. From 18 farms, delivering their milk to an alpine dairy plant for the production of smeared semi-hard and hard cheese. one thousand hundred seventy six one thousand hundred seventy six quarter milk (QM) samples of all cows in lactation (n = 294) and representative samples form bulk tank milk (BTM) of all farms were surveyed for coagulase positive (CPS) and coagulase negative Staphylococci (CNS). Furthermore, samples from different steps of the cheese manufacturing process were tested for CPS and CNS. As revealed by chemometric-assisted FTIR spectroscopy and molecular subtyping (spa typing and multi locus sequence typing), dairy cattle represent indeed an important, yet underreported, entrance point of S. aureus into the dairy chain. Our data clearly show that certain S. aureus subtypes are present in primary production as well as in the cheese processing at the dairy plant. However, although a considerable diversity of S. aureus subtypes was observed in QM and BTM at the farms, only certain S. aureus subtypes were able to enter and persist in the cheese manufacturing at the dairy plant and could be isolated from cheese until day 14 of ripening. Farm strains belonging to the FTIR cluster B1 and B3, which show genetic characteristics (t2953, ST8, enterotoxin profile: sea/sed/sej) of the recently described S. aureus genotype B, most successfully contaminated the cheese production at the dairy plant. Thus, our study fosters the hypothesis that genotype B S. aureus represent a specific challenge in control of S. aureus in the dairy chain that requires

  8. Invited review: Changes in the dairy industry affecting dairy cattle health and welfare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkema, H W; von Keyserlingk, M A G; Kastelic, J P; Lam, T J G M; Luby, C; Roy, J-P; LeBlanc, S J; Keefe, G P; Kelton, D F

    2015-11-01

    The dairy industry in the developed world has undergone profound changes over recent decades. In this paper, we present an overview of some of the most important recent changes in the dairy industry that affect health and welfare of dairy cows, as well as the science associated with these changes. Additionally, knowledge gaps are identified where research is needed to guide the dairy industry through changes that are occurring now or that we expect will occur in the future. The number of farms has decreased considerably, whereas herd size has increased. As a result, an increasing number of dairy farms depend on hired (nonfamily) labor. Regular professional communication and establishment of farm-specific protocols are essential to minimize human errors and ensure consistency of practices. Average milk production per cow has increased, partly because of improvements in nutrition and management but also because of genetic selection for milk production. Adoption of new technologies (e.g., automated calf feeders, cow activity monitors, and automated milking systems) is accelerating. However, utilization of the data and action lists that these systems generate for health and welfare of livestock is still largely unrealized, and more training of dairy farmers, their employees, and their advisors is necessary. Concurrently, to remain competitive and to preserve their social license to operate, farmers are increasingly required to adopt increased standards for food safety and biosecurity, become less reliant on the use of antimicrobials and hormones, and provide assurances regarding animal welfare. Partly because of increasing herd size but also in response to animal welfare regulations in some countries, the proportion of dairy herds housed in tiestalls has decreased considerably. Although in some countries access to pasture is regulated, in countries that traditionally practiced seasonal grazing, fewer farmers let their dairy cows graze in the summer. The proportion of

  9. The Importance of Training Needs’ Questionnaire in order to Arrange Science Teacher Training Program

    OpenAIRE

    M. C. Tapilouw; H. Firman; S. Redjeki; D. T. Chandra

    2017-01-01

    An ideal teacher training program is by participant’s need. The major aim of this study is getting information about science teacher’s perception and needs in their professional’s life as a science teacher in Junior High School. The main idea of teacher training is to strengthen the integrated science of Natural Science concepts and problem-based learning. Data is gathered by spreading training needs questionnaire to 20 science teachers under an education foundation in Bandung. The questionna...

  10. THE RESCUE PROGRAM FOR TUROPOLJER PIG AND ITS IMPORTANCE FOR THE NATURE PARK LONJSKO POLJE (CROATIA)

    OpenAIRE

    Gugić, Goran

    1994-01-01

    Since 1991 the population of the Turopolje pig has decreased dramatically on direct and indirect account of the war. The breed is acutly endangered to become extinct. SAVE and EURONATUR have started an emergency program which provides in-situ and ex-situ preservation. Nondirected crossbreeding has strongly distorted the original appearance of the breed. The author tries to define characteristics of the breed evaluating scientific literature, information of old heradsmen and observations by hi...

  11. The wider importance of cadavers: educational and research diversity from a body bequest program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornwall, Jon; Stringer, Mark D

    2009-10-01

    The debate surrounding the use of cadavers in teaching anatomy has focused almost exclusively on the pedagogic role of cadaver dissection in medical education. The aim of this study was to explore the wider aspects of a body bequest program for teaching and research into gross anatomy in a University setting. A retrospective audit was undertaken on body donation and the use of cadaver specimens for teaching and research at our institution between 1876 and 2009. The body bequest program, first established in 1943, now receives more than 40 donations per year. In addition to the medical course, nine other University degrees and courses currently use cadaver specimens for gross anatomy; four of these are research degrees and the remainder undergraduate degrees and courses. The use of cadaver specimens by non-University groups has also increased, particularly during the past decade, such that there are now 16 different groups using cadaver specimens for instructional courses; most of these are professional medical courses. The use of cadavers for both research and teaching may encourage a more evidence-based approach to clinical anatomy. This unique audit, spanning more than a century of anatomy education within a single University Medical School, highlights the utility of a robust body bequest program and the wide range of students and health professionals who interact with this precious resource.

  12. The role and importance of internship programs as part of formal education: Students' perceptions: The case of college of tourism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šimičević Dario

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available As one of the fastest growing industries tourism is in increasing need for well educated and skillful employees on both operational and managerial level. Institutions of higher education are requested by tourism industry to produce quality human resources able to respond immediately to their needs and to be involved in working processes as fast as possible with low or without any additional costs for future employees' initial job training. With inclusion of training and internship programs into, primarily vocational, but also, into bachelor studies students will be trained for their future jobs through real business situations and environment. This paper focuses on students' perceptions of internship and training programs as part of their formal education. Through analysis of the survey distributed among students of the College of Tourism it will be shown how students perceive the internship programs and importance of these programs for their future employment. Also, it will be shown the level of their satisfaction with tourism companies where they are performing internship programs and the level of their satisfaction with activities of the College of Tourism in communications during the internship, program management and implementation of the internship programs.

  13. Dairy production medicine

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Risco, Carlos A; Melendez Retamal, Pedro

    2011-01-01

    ... Insemination José Eduardo P . Santos Applications of Ultrasonography in Dairy Cattle Reproductive Management Jill D. Colloton 3 7 19 27 33 73 81 99 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 Diseases that Affect the Reprod...

  14. Genomic dairy cattle breeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mark, Thomas; Sandøe, Peter

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to discuss the potential consequences of modern dairy cattle breeding for the welfare of dairy cows. The paper focuses on so-called genomic selection, which deploys thousands of genetic markers to estimate breeding values. The discussion should help to structure...... the thoughts of breeders and other stakeholders on how to best make use of genomic breeding in the future. Intensive breeding has played a major role in securing dramatic increases in milk yield since the Second World War. Until recently, the main focus in dairy cattle breeding was on production traits......, unfavourable genetic trends for metabolic, reproductive, claw and leg diseases indicate that these attempts have been insufficient. Today, novel genome-wide sequencing techniques are revolutionising dairy cattle breeding; these enable genetic changes to occur at least twice as rapidly as previously. While...

  15. The Importance, Content and Teaching of the Political Geography Course in Social Studies Undergraduate Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocal, Tulay

    2016-01-01

    Today, big countries and other countries inside their axes have entered power wars in regions where underground and aboveground sources are important. One of the characteristics of countries where these power wars take place is them not being able to understand the current world politics and elements of political geography. These countries cannot…

  16. The importance of educational and social backgrounds of diverse students to nursing program success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Bronwynne C

    2008-07-01

    This article compares the educational and social backgrounds of Anglo students with those of Hispanic/Latino and American Indian students receiving stipends and other services from a Nursing Workforce Diversity Grant to determine the possible effects of such backgrounds on success in a baccalaureate nursing program. Stipend recipients provided baseline background data by interview on admission, and the results were compared with corresponding data from a volunteer sample of Anglo students to enhance understanding of the educational and social circumstances of the stipend recipients and to identify a need for individualized, tailored grant approaches. The Hispanic/Latino and American Indian students demonstrated less adequate educational backgrounds and lower social class as gauged by parental occupation, than did the Anglo students. Although overall comprehensive grant strategies maximized the potential for success of stipend recipients, strategies need to be tailored to fit each individual's unique educational and social background.

  17. ENTREPRENEURSHIP AND IMPORTANCE OF PERSONALITY ON ENTREPRENEURSHIP: A RESEARCH ON TRAINEES OF ENTREPRENEURSHIP EDUCATION PROGRAM

    OpenAIRE

    DEVELI, E. Ildem; ERDIL ŞAHIN, Begüm; SEVIMLI, Yeliz

    2011-01-01

    Enterprising personality has distinctive characteristics separating the entrepreneur from others. Therefore, the level of impact of personality and environmental factors on entrepreneurship has increasingly been discussed over the last years. Entrepreneur people are the ones which have ability to see the opportunities and seize, to take risks, to create innovation and implement. In this research, the notions of entrepreneur and entrepreneurship are defined, the important personal charac...

  18. Gross revenue risk in Swiss dairy farming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Benni, N; Finger, R

    2013-02-01

    This study investigated how agricultural policy reforms, including market liberalization and market deregulation, have influenced gross revenue risk of Swiss dairy producers using farm-level panel data between 1990 and 2009. Based on detrended data, variance decomposition was applied to assess how output prices and yields contributed to revenue risk over 3 different periods: the whole period (1990-2009), the first decade (1990-1999), and the second decade (1999-2009). In addition, the effect of expected changes in animal-based support for roughage-consuming cattle and price volatility on revenue risk was evaluated using a simulation model. Prices were the main contributor to revenue risk, even if the importance of yield risk increased over time. Swiss dairy producers can profit from natural hedge but market deregulation and market liberalization have reduced the natural hedge at the farm level. An increase in price volatility would substantially increase revenue risk and would, together with the abandonment of direct payments, reduce the comparative advantage of dairy production for risk-averse decision makers. Depending on other available risk management strategies, price risk management instruments might be a valuable solution for Swiss dairy producers in the future. Copyright © 2013 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Dairy cow handling facilities and the perception of Beef Quality Assurance on Colorado dairies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, A E; Olea-Popelka, F J; Grandin, T; Woerner, D R; Roman-Muniz, I N

    2014-02-01

    A survey was conducted on Colorado dairies to assess attitudes and practices regarding Dairy Beef Quality Assurance (DBQA). The objectives were to (1) assess the need for a new handling facility that would allow all injections to be administered via DBQA standards; (2) establish if Colorado dairy producers are concerned with DBQA; and (3) assess differences in responses between dairy owners and herdsmen. Of the 95 dairies contacted, 20 (21%) agreed to participate, with a median herd size of 1,178. When asked to rank the following 7 traits--efficiency, animal safety, human safety, ease of animal handling, ease of operation, inject per Beef Quality Assurance (BQA) procedures, and cost--in order of priority when designing a new handling facility, human and animal safety were ranked highest in priority (first or second) by the majority of participants, with ease of animal handling and efficiency ranked next. Interestingly, the administration of injections per BQA standards was ranked sixth or seventh by most participants. Respondents estimated the average annual income from the sale of cull cows to be 4.6% of all dairy income, with 50% receiving at least one carcass discount or condemnation in the past 12 mo. Although almost all of the participating dairy farmers stated that the preferred injection site for medications was the neck region, a significant number admitted to using alternate injection sites. In contrast, no difference was found between responses regarding the preferred and actual location for intravenous injections. Although most participating producers are aware of BQA injection guidelines, they perceive efficiency as more important, which could result in injections being administered in locations not promoted by BQA. Dairy owners and herdsmen disagreed in whether or not workers had been injured in the animal handling area in the last 12 mo. Handling facilities that allow for an efficient and safe way to administer drugs according to BQA guidelines and

  20. Methods Of Body Condition Scoring System: An Important ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods Of Body Condition Scoring System: An Important Management Decision Support Tool For Resource-Poor Smallholder Dairy Farmers In Tanzania. ... Therefore, body condition scoring procedures may be recommended to dairy extension agents, dairy producers, and indigenous cattle keepers, country wide for a ...

  1. Treatment Options for Lameness Disorders in Organic Dairies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinedo, Pablo; Velez, Juan; Manriquez, Diego; Bothe, Hans

    2017-07-01

    Animal welfare is an essential aspect of organic dairying. Consequently, adequate lameness control should be a central component of on-farm health monitoring programs. The combination of organic management practices, including grazing requirements that are combined with different types of housing, results in unique features determining the cows' feet and legs health condition. Because the use of therapeutic resources is limited, preventive management and early detection of lameness is critical in organic dairies. This article discusses the relevant aspects of prevention and treatment options of lameness disorders in organic dairy farms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Review of important rock mechanics studies required for underground high level nuclear waste repository program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, S.; Cho, W. J

    2007-01-15

    Disposal concept adapting room and pillar method, which is a confirmed technique in mining and tunnel construction for long time, has advantages at cost, safety, technical feasibility, flexibility, and international cooperation point of views. Then the important rock mechanics principals and in situ and laboratory tests for understanding the behavior of rock, buffer, and backfill as well as their interactions will be reviewed. The accurate understanding of them is important for developing a safe disposal concept and successful operation of underground repository for permanent disposal of radioactive wastes. First of all, In this study, current status of rock mechanics studies for HLW disposal in foreign countries such as Sweden, USA, Canada, Finland, Japan, and France were reviewed. After then the in situ and laboratory tests for site characterization were summarized. Furthermore, rock mechanics studies required during the whole procedure for the disposal project from repository design to the final closure will be reviewed systematically. This study will help for developing a disposal system including site selection, repository design, operation, maintenance, and closure of a repository in deep underground rock. By introducing the required rock mechanics tests at different stages, it would be helpful from the planning stage to the operation stage of a radioactive waste disposal project.

  3. Use of a mock deposition program to improve resident understanding of the importance of documentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerges, Mina; Slama, Eliza; Zayadin, Yacoub; Kieninger, Alicia

    2017-05-01

    It has been estimated that the probability of a physician being involved in a medical litigation by 65 years of age ranges from 76 to 98% depending on specialty. We hypothesized that a mock deposition held by a medico-legal expert attorney could effectively increase awareness of the importance of accurate and complete medical documentation. Pre and post-lecture and mock deposition surveys were analyzed and the contents evaluated. Residents and attendings from the surgical, medical and OB-GYN departments participated. Results were analyzed through frequency distribution. A total of 62 participants attended, 42 completed the pre-survey, while 24 completed the post-survey. Majority had no prior experience in malpractice lawsuits. After the post-survey, 95.8% believed that incorporating the mock deposition may reduce documentation error. Based on the results of the surveys we concluded that a mock deposition exercise provides a means for education residents regarding the importance of medical documentation. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Carbon footprint of dairy production systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and their potential impact on global warming has become an important national and international concern. Dairy production systems along with all other types of animal agriculture are recognized as a source of GHG. Although little information exists on the net GHG emiss...

  5. Selective dry cow treatment in dairy cows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scherpenzeel, C.G.M.

    2017-01-01

    In the dairy industry, udder health is associated with mastitis management, of which blanket dry cow treatment has been an important part for decades. To prevent the udder from new intramammary infections during the dry period, the use of blanket dry cow treatment has been advocated for more than 50

  6. Modeling Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Dairy Farms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evaluation and mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions from dairy farms requires a comprehensive approach that integrates the impacts and interactions of all important sources and sinks. This approach requires some form of modeling. Types of models commonly used include empirical emission factors, pr...

  7. Approved Practices in Dairy Reproduction. Slide Script.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roediger, Roger D.; Barr, Harry L.

    This slide script, part of a series of slide scripts designed for use in vocational agriculture classes, deals with approved practices in dairy reproduction. Included in the guide are narrations for use with 200 slides dealing with the following topics: the importance of good reproduction, the male and female roles in reproduction, selection of…

  8. The Dairy Group. The Food Guide Pyramid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Helen

    This booklet for young children is part of a series that supports national science standards related to physical health and nutrition, describing and illustrating the importance of using the Food Guide Pyramid and eating from the dairy group. Colorful photographs support early readers in understanding the text. The repetition of words and phrases…

  9. Water footprinting of dairy farming in Ireland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Murphy, E.; Boer, de I.J.M.; Middelaar, van C.E.; Holden, N.M.; Shalloo, L.; Curran, T.P.; Upton, J.

    2017-01-01

    In the context of global water scarcity, water footprints have become an important sustainability indicator for food production systems. To improve the water footprint of the dairy sector, insight into freshwater consumption of individual farms is required. The objective of this study was to

  10. FIRM HOUSEHOLD INTERRELATIONSHIPS ON DUTCH DAIRY FARMS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ELHORST, JP

    1994-01-01

    In this article an agricultural household model is developed in which production and consumption decisions are non-separable. On the basis of this model the importance of coupling production and consumption decisions is investigated for the Dutch dairy sector both before and after the introduction

  11. Radiological accidents potentially important to human health risk in the U.S. Department of Energy waste management program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, C.; Roglans-Ribas, J.; Folga, S.; Nabelssi, B. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Jackson, R. [Science Applications International Corp., Golden, CO (United States)

    1995-03-01

    Human health risks as a consequence of potential radiological releases resulting from plausible accident scenarios constitute an important consideration in the US Department of Energy (DOE) national program to manage the treatment, storage, and disposal of wastes. As part of this program, the Office of Environmental Management (EM) is currently preparing a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) that evaluates the risks that could result from managing five different waste types. This paper (1) briefly reviews the overall approach used to assess process and facility accidents for the EM PEIS; (2) summarizes the key inventory, storage, and treatment characteristics of the various DOE waste types important to the selection of accidents; (3) discusses in detail the key assumptions in modeling risk-dominant accidents; and (4) relates comparative source term results and sensitivities.

  12. A 100-Year Review: Metabolic modifiers in dairy cattle nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuffey, R K

    2017-12-01

    The first issue of the Journal of Dairy Science in 1917 opened with the text of the speech by Raymond A. Pearson, president of the Iowa State College of Agriculture, at the dedication of the new dairy building at the University of Nebraska (J. Dairy Sci. 1:4-18, 1917). Fittingly, this was the birth of a new research facility and more importantly, the beginning of a new journal devoted to the sciences of milk production and manufacture of products from milk. Metabolic modifiers of dairy cow metabolism enhance, change, or interfere with normal metabolic processes in the ruminant digestive tract or alter postabsorption partitioning of nutrients among body tissues. Papers on metabolic modifiers became more frequent in the journal around 1950. Dairy farming changed radically between 1955 and 1965. Changes in housing and feeding moved more cows outside, and cows and heifers in all stages of lactation, including the dry period, were fed as a single group. Rations became wetter with the shift to corn silage as the major forage in many rations. Liberal grain feeding met the requirements of high-producing cows and increased production per cow but introduced new challenges; for example, managing and feeding cows as a group. These changes led to the introduction of new strategies that identified and expanded the use of metabolic modifiers. Research was directed at characterizing the new problems for the dairy cow created by group feeding. Metabolic modifiers went beyond feeding the cow and included environmental and housing factors and additives to reduce the incidence and severity of many new conditions and pathologies. New collaborations began among dairy cattle specialties that broadened our understanding of the workings of the cow. The Journal of Dairy Science then and now plays an enormously important role in dissemination of the findings of dairy scientists worldwide that address existing and new technologies. Copyright © 2017 American Dairy Science Association

  13. Receptive vocabulary knowledge tests: Their potential importance for planning a well-balanced vocabulary component of a language program

    OpenAIRE

    Wakeling, Elliott

    2015-01-01

    iii Abstract Nation and Webb (2011) state ‘Testing is one of the major jobs of the vocabulary teacher, because without good information about our learners’ vocabulary knowledge, we cannot do the most important job of planning a well-balanced program’ (p. 219). This paper evaluated different receptive vocabulary knowledge tests and assessed their potential to help a teacher plan a well-balanced vocabulary program. The Vocabulary Levels Test (VLT) was selected to assess the vocabulary kno...

  14. Synchronisation of ovulation for management of reproduction in dairy cows

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bisinotto, R S; Ribeiro, E S; Santos, J E P

    2014-01-01

    Important developments have occurred in the last two decades, since the advent of the Ovsynch protocol, on the understanding and use of synchronisation programmes for management of reproduction in dairy herds...

  15. Reducing environmental impact of dairy cattle: a Czech case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havlikova, Martina; Kroeze, Carolien

    2010-07-01

    We analyze options to reduce the future environmental impact of dairy cattle production, using an optimization model (DAIRY) applied to the Czech Republic. The DAIRY model can be used to calculate the overall environmental impact (OEI). We show that aquatic eutrophication and global warming are the 2 most important problems caused by dairy cattle. These problems are largely caused by nitrate leaching and emissions from animal housing. The DAIRY model indicates that the costs of reducing the OEI in 2020 by 20% are 12 MEuro. It is most cost effective to achieve this reduction by improving the efficiency of animal manure used as fertilizer. We tested the sensitivity of the model to assumptions about the following: 1) the relative importance of environmental problems as expressed in weighting factors, and 2) future cattle numbers and milk yield per milking cow. The first case indicates that disagreement on which problem is most urgent need not lead to disagreement about policies to be undertaken. Regardless of the weighting factors used, aquatic eutrophication and global warming are the most important problems. However, the overall costs of reducing the OEI differ with alternative sets of weighting factors, because the costs of emission reduction differ among pollutants. The second case shows that the DAIRY model results are more sensitive to changes in cattle numbers than to changes in milk yield. This study is the first integrated assessment of dairy cattle production for a Central European country and illustrates how systematic analyses may help to find optimal solutions. (c) 2010 SETAC.

  16. A survey of bacteria found in Belgian dairy farm products

    OpenAIRE

    N'Guessan, Elise; Godrie, Thérèse; De Laubier, Juliette; Ringuet, Mélanie; Sindic, Marianne

    2015-01-01

    Description of the subject. Due to the potential hazards caused by pathogenic bacteria, farm dairy production remains a challenge from the point of view of food safety. As part of a public program to support farm diversification and short food supply chains, farm dairy product samples including yogurt, ice cream, raw-milk butter and cheese samples were collected from 318 Walloon farm producers between 2006 and 2014. Objectives. Investigation of the microbiological quality of the Belgian da...

  17. Fate of Nitrogen on California Dairies as Measured by Regulatory Reporting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, T.; Lee, E.; Harter, T.

    2016-12-01

    California is the largest dairy producer in the Unites States, generating over 20% of U.S. milk and cheese. Many California dairy herds live in concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) in the Central Valley. Surrounding these CAFOs, dairies also manage a significant amount of forage land where animal waste is recycled. Through expansion and more efficient production, the milk and manure output of the Central Valley dairies increased nearly exponentially for five decades, until animal numbers levelled off in the 2000s. Due to this expansion, specifically in the Central Valley, the dairy industry poses significant concerns in regard to nitrate contamination and salinization of groundwater. In 2007, new regulations were placed upon the California dairy industry, pertaining to nonpoint source emissions to groundwater. We have digitized and are currently analyzing these annual dairy reports submitted by individual operators to the regulatory agency (Regional Water Boards) to assess the fate of nutrients on dairies in the Central Valley. We are able to assess data completeness and consistency, annual trends over the first eight years of the program, and evaluate the reporting program. Our analysis can be used to determine potential groundwater nitrate impacts based on field nitrogen mass balance. Preliminary results indicate that increased regulation and efforts made by dairy operations have decreased the presence of excess nutrients on dairy lands, although improvements need to be made to the reporting process in order to further this progress.

  18. The intention of North-Western Ethiopian dairy farmers to control mastitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekonnen, Sefinew Alemu; Koop, Gerrit; Lam, Theo J G M; Hogeveen, Henk

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the intentions of dairy farmers towards mastitis control is important to design effective udder health control programs. We used the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) to explore the intentions of North-Western Ethiopian dairy farmers towards implementing non-specified mastitis control measures (nsMCMs) and towards implementing 4 specific MCMs. Face to face interviews were held with 134 dairy farmers to study associations between their intentions and any of three factors (attitude, subjective norm and perceived behavioral control) that, according to the TPB, determine intentions. The majority of the farmers (93%) had a positive intention to implement nsMCMs, whereas a smaller majority of farmers had the intention to implement the specific MCMs to improve udder cleaning (87%), to improve stall hygiene (78%), to improve feeding of cows (76%), and to perform foremilk stripping (74%). Farmers had a more positive attitude, but lower subjective norm and lower perceived behavioural control towards implementing nsMCMs compared with implementing most specific MCMs, although the subjective norms for stall hygiene and perceived behavioural control for improving feeding of cows were also low. Attitude was positively associated with intentions to implement nsMCMs, to improve cleaning of the udders, to improve stall hygiene and to implement foremilk stripping. Both the intention to improve udder cleaning and to implement foremilk stripping, were positively associated to subjective norms towards these MCMs. Our data can help tailor intervention programs aiming to increase the intention of Ethiopian dairy farmers to implement MCMs and thus to improve udder health in this country. We show that such programs should primarily focus on changing attitude and secondarily on improving the farmers' subjective norms.

  19. The intention of North-Western Ethiopian dairy farmers to control mastitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koop, Gerrit; Lam, Theo J. G. M.; Hogeveen, Henk

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the intentions of dairy farmers towards mastitis control is important to design effective udder health control programs. We used the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) to explore the intentions of North-Western Ethiopian dairy farmers towards implementing non-specified mastitis control measures (nsMCMs) and towards implementing 4 specific MCMs. Face to face interviews were held with 134 dairy farmers to study associations between their intentions and any of three factors (attitude, subjective norm and perceived behavioral control) that, according to the TPB, determine intentions. The majority of the farmers (93%) had a positive intention to implement nsMCMs, whereas a smaller majority of farmers had the intention to implement the specific MCMs to improve udder cleaning (87%), to improve stall hygiene (78%), to improve feeding of cows (76%), and to perform foremilk stripping (74%). Farmers had a more positive attitude, but lower subjective norm and lower perceived behavioural control towards implementing nsMCMs compared with implementing most specific MCMs, although the subjective norms for stall hygiene and perceived behavioural control for improving feeding of cows were also low. Attitude was positively associated with intentions to implement nsMCMs, to improve cleaning of the udders, to improve stall hygiene and to implement foremilk stripping. Both the intention to improve udder cleaning and to implement foremilk stripping, were positively associated to subjective norms towards these MCMs. Our data can help tailor intervention programs aiming to increase the intention of Ethiopian dairy farmers to implement MCMs and thus to improve udder health in this country. We show that such programs should primarily focus on changing attitude and secondarily on improving the farmers’ subjective norms. PMID:28787018

  20. Conceptual Evolution and Importance of Andragogy towards the Scope Optimization of University Academic Rural Development Programs and Projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Bernal Azofeifa-Bolaños

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out with the objective of describing the evolution and importance of andragogical processes in the search of rural profiles committed to the university work in the development and implementation of programs and projects. Among its main contributions, the importance of knowing and teaching processes applied strictly for adults by university coordinators of programs and projects stands out. The relevance of applying this kind of knowledge will allow efficient use of institutional financial resources, particularly for the real commitment of the rural adult community towards the implementation of field activities and accomplishing, in a shorter term, the expected academic achievement. A successful project experience is described in which some andragogical strategies were applied through extension, and which produced a better participation and engagement from rural people with the projects developed by the University. Consequently, applicability of these concepts in the programs and projects of rural development promoted through universities must lay the foundation for regional rural development strategies with the ultimate goal of finding ways to improve the quality of life of people in particular scenarios.

  1. An empirical survey on factors influencing on packaging dairy products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naser Azad

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Packaging plays an essential role on supplying different materials such as dairy products. The first thing people may look into when they purchase dairy products such as milk, cheese, etc. is associated with the packaging characteristics. This paper attempts to find important factors influencing on packaging dairy products. The study uses factor analysis to detect important factors based on a questionnaire consists of 28 questions in Likert scale, which is distributed among 200 regular employees of Pegah dairy producer. Cronbach alpha, Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin Measure of Sampling adequacy and Bartlett's test of Sphericity approximation Chi-Square are 0.81, 0.679 and 844.475, respectively and they are within acceptable limit. The study has determined five factors including infrastructure, awareness, design and communication as important factors influencing consumers.

  2. Implementation of new clinical programs in the VHA healthcare system: the importance of early collaboration between clinical leadership and research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, R Ryanne; Kinsinger, Linda S; Provenzale, Dawn; King, Heather A; Akerly, Patricia; Barnes, Lottie K; Datta, Santanu K; Grubber, Janet M; Katich, Nicholas; McNeil, Rebecca B; Monte, Robert; Sperber, Nina R; Atkins, David; Jackson, George L

    2014-12-01

    Collaboration between policy, research, and clinical partners is crucial to achieving proven quality care. The Veterans Health Administration has expended great efforts towards fostering such collaborations. Through this, we have learned that an ideal collaboration involves partnership from the very beginning of a new clinical program, so that the program is designed in a way that ensures quality, validity, and puts into place the infrastructure necessary for a reliable evaluation. This paper will give an example of one such project, the Lung Cancer Screening Demonstration Project (LCSDP). We will outline the ways that clinical, policy, and research partners collaborated in design, planning, and implementation in order to create a sustainable model that could be rigorously evaluated for efficacy and fidelity. We will describe the use of the Donabedian quality matrix to determine the necessary characteristics of a quality program and the importance of the linkage with engineering, information technology, and clinical paradigms to connect the development of an on-the-ground clinical program with the evaluation goal of a learning healthcare organization. While the LCSDP is the example given here, these partnerships and suggestions are salient to any healthcare organization seeking to implement new scientifically proven care in a useful and reliable way.

  3. Invited review: A systematic literature review and meta-analysis of mortality and culling in dairy cattle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Compton, C. W. R.; Heuer, C.; Thomsen, Peter T.

    2017-01-01

    Dairy industries and individual farmers are concerned about mortality and culling of dairy animals. This is because the timing and fates of animals that exit dairy farms have important animal welfare and economic consequences that reflect the conditions under which they are farmed and the efficie...

  4. Grazing dairy cows in North-West Europe : Economic farm performance and future developments with emphasis on the Dutch situation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reijs, J.W.; Daatselaar, C.H.G.; Helming, J.F.M.; Jager, J.H.; Beldman, A.C.G.

    2013-01-01

    The dairy sector is an important contributor to food production, economic activity and land use in the European Union. Grazing has long been a traditional element of dairy farming in the EU. Current developments in the dairy sector appear to result in a decline in grazing. The World Society for the

  5. The impact of 3 strategies for incorporating polled genetics into a dairy cattle breeding program on the overall herd genetic merit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spurlock, D M; Stock, M L; Coetzee, J F

    2014-01-01

    Dehorning in cattle has been associated with behavioral, physiological, and neuroendocrine responses indicative of pain. Unaddressed, the pain associated with a routine production procedure could contribute to a negative public perception of livestock production practices. Alternative considerations of dehorning include the selection of polled cattle within herds, thereby avoiding pain and production loss. As polledness results from an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance, genetic selection for polled cattle could reduce the prevalence of the horned trait. Herein we discuss 3 strategies to incorporate polled genetics into a cow herd and the estimated impact on the overall genetic merit of the herd. Furthermore, the availability and genetic merit of polled artificial insemination bulls in the United States is summarized. Both Holstein and Jersey dairy bulls registered with the National Association of Animal Breeders from December 2010 through April 2013 were queried. Polled bulls were identified as either being homozygous (PP) or heterozygous (Pp) and the average net merit (NM) predicted transmitting ability (PTA) of each sire group was calculated. The percentage of polled calves born each year over a 10-yr period was calculated for the following 3 scenarios: (A) various percentages of horned cows were randomly mated to Pp bulls, (B) various percentages of horned cows were preferentially mated to Pp bulls, and (C) horned cows were selectively mated to PP bulls, heterozygous cows to Pp bulls, and homozygous polled cows to horned bulls. Additionally, the change in NM PTA of the cow herd was calculated over the same period. The highest percentage of polled animals (87%) was achieved in scenario C. An evaluation of the herd NM PTA highlights the trade-offs associated with increasing polled genetics. Given the current genetic merit of horned and polled bulls, increasing the percentage of polled calves will decrease the NM PTA in Holstein, but may have minimal impact

  6. Antimicrobial use on Canadian dairy farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, V; McClure, J T; Léger, D; Dufour, S; Sheldon, A G; Scholl, D T; Barkema, H W

    2012-03-01

    systemically administered ceftiofur, cephapirin administered for dry cow therapy, and pirlimycin administered for clinical mastitis treatment. Herd size and ADUR of systemically administered ceftiofur were also positively associated. In conclusion, β-lactams were most commonly used on Canadian dairy farms. Among antimicrobials of very high importance in human medicine, the use of fluoroquinolones was rare, whereas third-generation cephalosporins and penicillin combinations containing colistin were used very frequently on Canadian dairy farms. Copyright © 2012 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. FIRE: an SPSS program for variable selection in multiple linear regression analysis via the relative importance of predictors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzo-Seva, Urbano; Ferrando, Pere J

    2011-03-01

    We provide an SPSS program that implements currently recommended techniques and recent developments for selecting variables in multiple linear regression analysis via the relative importance of predictors. The approach consists of: (1) optimally splitting the data for cross-validation, (2) selecting the final set of predictors to be retained in the equation regression, and (3) assessing the behavior of the chosen model using standard indices and procedures. The SPSS syntax, a short manual, and data files related to this article are available as supplemental materials from brm.psychonomic-journals.org/content/supplemental.

  8. Product Quality in the Canadian Dairy Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Nogueira, Lia; Baylis, Katherine R.

    2004-01-01

    Supply management has been shown to increase the price of milk. Technological change has induced (and allowed) processors to substitute alternative inputs, many of which can be imported tariff-free, for the traditional ingredients to lower costs and maximize profit. Meanwhile, there has been a great deal of consolidation in the dairy processing industry. We analyse the effect of these trends on cheese quality by measuring the increase in casein imports. Results suggest that supply management ...

  9. Precision Dairy Farming 2016

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamphuis, C.; Steeneveld, W.

    2016-01-01

    The supply of new innovative precision dairy farming technologies is steadily increasing. It aims to help farmers to be more labour efficient and to support them in their daily management decisions. At the same time, since many technologies are developed from an engineering perspective, adoption of

  10. The reverse logistics importance in the management of residues of plastic packaging of lubricants and the program jogue limpo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Everaldo Francisco da Silva

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to demonstrate the importance of the Reverse Logistics in the management of solid residues through the Jogue Limpo program, an initiative dedicated to the destination and recycling of lubricant packaging. In the current context, where natural resources are scarce, the environmental issue is a factor of differentiation in business, so the destination of the waste we produce along the production chain and the possibility of reuse and mitigation of possible environmental impacts are extremely important for the society. The article seeks to show how the Reverse Logistics is the means to interconnect stakeholders for the correct destination and reuse of resources, as well as the benefits of this initiative for the society.

  11. 7 CFR 1170.4 - Dairy products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Dairy products. 1170.4 Section 1170.4 Agriculture... and Orders; Milk), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DAIRY PRODUCT MANDATORY REPORTING § 1170.4 Dairy products. Dairy Products means: (a) Manufactured dairy products that are used by the Secretary to establish...

  12. Importance of well-designed monitoring programs for the conservation of endangered species: case study of the Snail Kite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, J.; Kitchens, W.M.; Hines, J.E.

    2007-01-01

    Monitoring natural populations is often a necessary step to establish the conservation status of species and to help improve management decisions. Nevertheless, many monitoring programs do not effectively address primary sources of variability in monitoring data, which ultimately may limit the utility of monitoring in identifying declines and improving management. To illustrate the importance of taking into account detectability and spatial variation, we used a recently proposed estimator of abundance (superpopulation estimator) to estimate population size of and number of young produced by the Snail Kite (Rostrhamus sociabilis plumbeus) in Florida. During the last decade, primary recovery targets set by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for the Snail Kite that were based on deficient monitoring programs (i.e., uncorrected counts) were close to being met (by simply increasing search effort during count surveys). During that same period, the Snail Kite population declined dramatically (by 55% from 1997 to 2005) and the number of young decreased by 70% between 1992?1998 and 1999?2005. Our results provide a strong practical case in favor of the argument that investing a sufficient amount of time and resources into designing and implementing monitoring programs that carefully address detectability and spatial variation is critical for the conservation of endangered species.

  13. Prior authorization policies in Medicaid programs: The importance of study design and analysis on findings and outcomes from research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keast, Shellie L; Farmer, Kevin; Smith, Michael; Nesser, Nancy; Harrison, Donald

    2016-01-01

    U.S. State Medicaid programs for the medically indigent strive to deliver quality health care services with limited budgets. An often used cost management strategy is prior authorization of services or prescription medications. The goal of this strategy is to shape the pharmaceutical market share in the most efficient manner for the particular state Medicaid program, much like commercial managed care organizations. These policies are often scrutinized due to the population Medicaid serves, which in the past was largely composed of individuals with vulnerable health status. Unintended consequences can occur if these policies are not carried out in an appropriate manner or if they greatly restrict services. The data used for policy implementation research is prone to certain problems such as skewness and multimodality. Previous guidelines have been published regarding the best practices when analyzing these data. These guidelines were used to review the current body of literature regarding prior authorization in Medicaid. Further discussed are additional characteristics such as therapeutic areas researched and the outcomes identified. Finally, the importance of considering state-specific characteristics when reviewing individual policies and the usefulness of these results for other programs are also considered. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Evaluation of fecal culture and fecal RT-PCR to detect Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis fecal shedding in dairy goats and dairy sheep using latent class Bayesian modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauman, Cathy A; Jones-Bitton, Andria; Jansen, Jocelyn; Kelton, David; Menzies, Paula

    2016-09-20

    The study's objective was to evaluate the ability of fecal culture (FCUL) and fecal PCR (FPCR) to identify dairy goat and dairy sheep shedding Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis. A cross-sectional study of the small ruminant populations was performed in Ontario, Canada between October 2010 and August 2011. Twenty-nine dairy goat herds and 21 dairy sheep flocks were visited, and 20 lactating females > two years of age were randomly selected from each farm resulting in 580 goats and 397 sheep participating in the study. Feces were collected per rectum and cultured using the BD BACTEC™ MGIT™ 960 system using a standard (49 days) and an extended (240 days) incubation time, and underwent RT-PCR based on the hsp-X gene (Tetracore®). Statistical analysis was performed using a 2-test latent class Bayesian hierarchical model for each species fitted in WinBUGS. Extending the fecal culture incubation time statistically improved FCUL sensitivity from 23.1 % (95 % PI: 15.9-34.1) to 42.7 % (95 % PI: 33.0-54.5) in dairy goats and from 5.8 % (95 % PI: 2.3-12.4) to 19.0 % (95 % PI: 11.9-28.9) in dairy sheep. FPCR demonstrated statistically higher sensitivity than FCUL (49 day incubation) with a sensitivity of 31.9 % (95 % PI: 22.4-43.1) in goats and 42.6 % (95 % PI: 28.8-63.3) in sheep. Fecal culture demonstrates such low sensitivity at the standard incubation time it cannot be recommended as a screening test to detect shedding of MAP in either goats or sheep. Extending the incubation time resulted in improved sensitivity; however, it is still disappointingly low for screening purposes. Fecal PCR should be the screening test of choice in both species; however, it is important to recognize that control programs should not be based on testing alone when they demonstrate such low sensitivity.

  15. Repetition priming of motor activity mediated by a central pattern generator: the importance of extrinsic vs. intrinsic program initiators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siniscalchi, Michael J.; Jing, Jian; Weiss, Klaudiusz R.

    2016-01-01

    Repetition priming is characterized by increased performance as a behavior is repeated. Although this phenomenon is ubiquitous, mediating mechanisms are poorly understood. We address this issue in a model system, the feeding network of Aplysia. This network generates both ingestive and egestive motor programs. Previous data suggest a chemical coding model: ingestive and egestive inputs to the feeding central pattern generator (CPG) release different modulators, which act via different second messengers to prime motor activity in different ways. The ingestive input to the CPG (neuron CBI-2) releases the peptides feeding circuit activating peptide and cerebral peptide 2, which produce an ingestive pattern of activity. The egestive input to the CPG (the esophageal nerve) releases the peptide small cardioactive peptide. This model is based on research that focused on a single aspect of motor control (radula opening). Here we ask whether repetition priming is observed if activity is triggered with a neuron within the core CPG itself and demonstrate that it is not. Moreover, previous studies demonstrated that effects of modulatory neurotransmitters that induce repetition priming persist. This suggests that it should be possible to “prime” motor programs triggered from within the CPG by first stimulating extrinsic modulatory inputs. We demonstrate that programs triggered after ingestive input activation are ingestive and programs triggered after egestive input activation are egestive. We ask where this priming occurs and demonstrate modifications within the CPG itself. This arrangement is likely to have important consequences for “task” switching, i.e., the cessation of one type of motor activity and the initiation of another. PMID:27466134

  16. Long-term adherence to CPAP treatment in patients with obstructive sleep apnea: importance of educational program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    La Piana GE

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Giuseppe Emanuele La Piana1, Alessandro Scartabellati1, Lodovico Chiesa1, Luca Ronchi1, Paola Raimondi1, Miriam A Carro1, Silvia Zibetti1, Stefano Aiolfi2 1Pulmonary Rehabilitation Unit, S. Marta Hospital, Rivolta D'Adda; 2Unit of Pneumology, AO Ospedale Maggiore di Crema, Crema, Italy Background: Lack of adherence with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP therapy is the major cause of treatment failure in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. We evaluated the effectiveness of our intensive educational program on adherence in the short term and the long term. Methods: The educational program consisted of: intensive training, whereby each patient performed individual and collective sessions of three hours receiving information about obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, familiarizing themselves with CPAP tools, on six consecutive days; long-term training; and support meetings, with reassessment at three months and one year. Results: In 202 patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, the mean (standard deviation apnea/hypopnea index was 45 ± 22, the Epworth Sleepiness Scale score was 14 ± 5, and the average titration pressure was 10 ± 2 cm H2O. At three months, 166 patients (82% used CPAP for an average of 7.3 hours per night. At one year, 162 (80% used CPAP for about seven hours per night. At two years, 92 patients (43% used CPAP for about five hours per night. The level of satisfaction remained higher in patients in ventilation. Conclusion: Our data show strong adherence to CPAP at three months and one year, with a decrease at two years. The initial educational program seems to play an important role in adherence. This effect is lost in the long term, suggesting that periodic reinforcement of educational support would be helpful. Keywords: adherence, continuous positive airway pressure, obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, educational program

  17. Optimization of dairy based farming agricultural in critical land area of Yogyakarta Special Territory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elan Masbula

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available A study has been done to provide a conceptual basis for the development of agricultural system in critical land area in Yogyakarta Special Teritory as the smallest production unit to (1 determine optimum dairy farming based agriculture for the area and income maximization on either farmer own inputs or with CAFlTAL aid provided by a funding party, (2 to develop a model for developing farming system based on dairy farming in critical land area in Yogyakarta Special Teritory.Methods being used multistage problem solving approach to the problem encountered in farming system as practiced in Glagaharjo Village, Sub District of Cangkringan, Sleman with Rapid Rural Appraisal (RRA and Agro-ecosystem Analysis as diagnostic activities. Farm record keeping and survey to fourty respondents purposively selected were then conducted. Using Linear Programming (LPM, a normative solution, under the imposed constraints for each activity, was obtained to see development effectivity of dairy based farming agricultural system. The result indicated that land resources had not managed optimally. Out of an average possession of 1,5 ha dry land, only 0,6 ha was cultivated, leading to relativelly low yield and income. Optimum dairy farming agriculture migh be an option to develop the area. Dairy farm Cooperative Agency (Model of Scenario I can play important role to improve farmer income. With an average of 1,5 ha dry land and an average of 3 Animal Unit raised would optimized the resources allocation and income of Rp.20,385,340 for a period of eight years. The income rnigh be further increased to Rp.36,176,070 for similar production period with soft loan provided by ventura fund (Model of Scenario ll to optimize land resources and family labor force use and a farmer was able to raised an average of 4 Animal Unit. If as being planned - such as scheme is adopted by 1,400 farmer, 230 worker will be employed in the first years. Employement need is increasing with time and

  18. The heat stress for workers employed in a dairy farm

    OpenAIRE

    Marucci, A; D. Marucci; D. Monarca; Cecchini, M.; Colantoni, A; Di Giacinto, S.; A. Cappuccini

    2013-01-01

    The italian dairy production is characterized by high heterogeneity. The typology quantitatively more important (80% of national production) is represented by cow’s milk cheeses (Grana Padano cheese, string cheese, Parmesan cheese, etc.),while the cheese from buffalo’s milk (especially string cheese such as mozzarella ) and cheese from sheep and goats represents respectively 4% and 8% of the national dairy production, and are linked to specific regional contexts. Some phases of the cycle of m...

  19. Potential health benefits of sphingolipids in milk and dairy products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slavica Potočki

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Sphingolipids are found in all eukaryotic and some prokaryotic cells. Milk and dairy products are one of the most important sources of sphingolipids. This compounds participate in a variety of indispensable metabolic, neurological, and intracellular signaling processes. Sphingolipids and their derivatives are highly bioactive compounds with anti-cancer, bacteriostatic and cholesterol-lowering properties. Therefore, this review focuses on the potential health benefits of the milk and dairy sphingolipids.

  20. Systems Genetics and Transcriptomics of Feed Efficiency in Dairy Cattle

    OpenAIRE

    Salleh, Suraya Binti Mohamad; Hoglund, J.; Løvendahl, P.; Kadarmideen, Haja

    2015-01-01

    Feed is the largest variable cost in milk production industries, thus improving feed efficiency will give better use of resources. This project works closely on definitions of feed efficiency in dairy cattle and uses advanced integrated genomics, bioinformatics and systems biology methods linking transcriptomics differences to important attributes or traits related to dairy cattle feed efficiency. Twenty cows (10 Jersey; 10 Holstein Friesian) will be used in the experiment. These two groups o...

  1. Structural changes in dairy business in Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teo Vujčić

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Croatia today is in the economy transition process that also includes agriculture aiming to increase production and achieving competitive standard with international and European markets. Currently, domestic cow milk production ensures 80% of annual milk and dairy products requirements with the 20% import. In the period from 1990-1992, during the patriot war, 103000 cows and heifers were destroyed. Since then, Croatia started the gradual process of reorganization of the agricultural private sector including dairy business in order to increase production insensitivity.The agricultural structure of dairy segment is unsatisfactory with only 23.39% of farms holding four or more heifers. Households with 3 cows per farm dominate with average real estate of 0.10-3.0 acres.Changes in milk production (1990-2003 are reflected in the decrease of the number of breeding cattle – index 56.13%, and decrease of milk market producers from 65 000 to 65 151. Never the less, positive trends towards stabilization in milk production (2003 – 642 mil litres and annual milk intake increased from 342 mil litres in 1990 to 472 mil litres in 2003 (index 138.08% can be noticed. Changes in the structure of milk producers show certain positive movements as 23.39% of producers have 53.40% cows and respectively participation in milk production and buy off. Until 2008, with determined development conditions, cow milk production can increase for 42% and from 2703 litres to average of 4000 litres per dairy cow.

  2. Short communication: Passive shedding of Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis in commercial dairy goats in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, D G G; Lima, M C; Barros, M; Valente, F L; Scatamburlo, T M; Rosado, N; Oliveira, C T S A M; Oliveira, L L; Moreira, M A S

    2017-10-01

    Goat farming is a low-cost alternative to dairy production in developing countries. In Brazil, goat production has increased in recent years due in part to the implementation of programs encouraging this activity. Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis (MAP) is the causative agent of paratuberculosis, a disease that causes chronic granulomatous enteritis in ruminants, but MAP transmission dynamics are still poorly understood in goats. In a previously published study of our research group, 10 dairy goat farms (467 animals) from Minas Gerais state were analyzed for MAP detection; 2 fecal cultures and 11 milk samples tested positive for MAP by conventional PCR and were confirmed by sequencing. Because no clinical signs were observed over 1 yr of monitoring, we hypothesized that these MAP-positive goats could be passive shedders. Thus, in the present study, 4 positive goats (4/13) from the previous study were purchased and feces and milk samples were collected for evaluation (twice, with an interval of 3 mo between tests) by culture of MAP, IS900 PCR, or both. All analyses were negative for MAP. At the last time point, blood samples were collected for ELISA, the animals were killed, and tissues collected for tissue culture and histopathology. At necropsy, no macroscopic lesions related to paratuberculosis were observed. Similarly, no histological changes were observed and MAP in samples stained by Ziehl-Neelsen was not detected. These animals were characterized as potential passive shedders with upward contamination of the teat canal by MAP. This is the first report of the passive shedding phenomenon in goats in Brazil and it highlights the importance of identifying these animals for control programs and to ensure the quality of dairy products. Copyright © 2017 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Pregnancy outcomes after change in dose delivery of prostaglandin F₂α and time of gonadotropin-releasing hormone injection in a 5-day timed artificial insemination program in lactating dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, J S; Pulley, S L; Hill, S L

    2014-12-01

    We demonstrated that 50mg of PGF₂α on d 6 successfully induced luteolysis in lactating dairy cows enrolled in a traditional 5-d Ovsynch-72 program [GnRH injection 5 d before (d 0; GnRH-1) and 56 (p.m. on d 7; GnRH-2) or 72 h (d 8; GnRH-2) after a 25-mg injection of PGF₂α (d 5 and 6 after GnRH injection); timed artificial insemination (AI) on d 8]. Our current objective was to determine pregnancy outcomes in lactating dairy cows after a 50-mg injection of PGF₂α on d 6 or a 25-mg injection of PGF₂α on d 5 and 6 in a 5-d Ovsynch program. Cows in herd 1 diagnosed not pregnant between 30 and 36 d since last AI were enrolled to receive either a 50-mg injection of PGF₂α on d 6 (1 × 50; n=134) or a 25-mg injection of PGF₂α on d 5 and 6 (2 × 25; n=139) after GnRH-1 (d 0), with GnRH-2 at 72 h after PGF₂α injection (d 5), concurrent with timed AI (d 8). Cows in herd 2 diagnosed not pregnant between 34 and 40 d were treated similarly: even-tagged cows received the 2 × 25 (n=422) treatment, and odd-tagged cows received the 1 × 50 (n=450) treatment, except that GnRH-2 was administered at 56 h. Blood collected from cows in herd 1 at d 0, 5, 6, and 8 was assayed for progesterone. Luteolysis was defined to occur when progesterone concentration was ≥1 ng/mL on d 5, and 72 h later (d 8) was either <0.5 ng/mL or <1 ng/mL. Progesterone concentrations did not differ between treatments on pretreatment d 0 and 5, but were greater in 1 × 50 than 2 × 25 cows on d 6 (4.7 ± 0.2 vs. 1.1 ± 0.2 ng/mL) and d 8 (0.43 ± 0.04 vs. 0.19 ± 0.04 ng/mL), respectively. Luteolysis was greater in the 2 × 25 versus 1 × 50 treatment when the cut point was 0.5 ng/mL, whereas no difference was detected when the cut point was <1 ng/mL on d 8. Lack of complete luteolysis was greater in cows classified as early cycle on d 0 or having a new corpus luteum after d 0 because progesterone concentration was greater on d 5 and 6 than for cows classified as late cycle on d 0 or cows

  4. Economic-environmental modelling of Dutch dairy farms incorporating technical and institutional change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berentsen, P.B.M.

    1999-01-01

    Circumstances in Dutch dairy farming are changing continuously. The general objective in this thesis was to develop and apply a method to enlighten the consequences of these changing circumstances for dairy farms. The research was started with the development of a linear programming model

  5. Economic and environmental consequences of technical and institutional change in Dutch dairy farming.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berentsen, P.B.M.; Giesen, G.W.J.; Renkema, J.A.

    1997-01-01

    A linear programming model of a dairy farm was used to explore the future for different types of Dutch dairy farms under different scenarios. The scenarios are consistent sets of changing factors that are considered external at farm level. The factors included are technical, such as efficiency of

  6. Optimization of dairy heifer management decisions based on production conditions of Pennsylvania

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mourits, M.C.M.; Galligan, D.T.; Dijkhuizen, A.A.; Huirne, R.B.M.

    2000-01-01

    We used a dynamic programming model to determine optimum rearing decisions of dairy replacements. Heifers were described in the model by age, season, body weight, pregnancy state, and prepubertal growth rate. Prices and parameters were chosen to represent the dairy population of Pennsylvania. We

  7. Feeding practices and potential risk factors for laminitis in dairy cows in Thailand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pilachai, R.

    2013-01-01

    Laminitis is considered an important health problem facing the Thai dairy industry. Although the etiology of laminitis is multifactorial, nutrition is considered an important risk factor. Rumen acidosis, lipopolysaccharides (LPS) and histamine may play a role in the development of laminitis in dairy

  8. Radioactivity monitoring of Irish dairy produce

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelleher, K. (Radiological Protection Institute of Ireland. Radiation Monitoring, Dublin (Ireland))

    2010-03-15

    Full text: The RPII has been carrying out monitoring of milk and dairy produce since 1986. Milk samples are routinely analysed for radiocaesium and strontium-90 as part of the RPII's environmental monitoring programme to determine the doses received to the Irish population from milk consumption. The method the RPII utilises for determining the Sr-90 activity in milk is by measuring the Cerenkov radiation produced by its daughter 90Y isolated from interfering nuclides such as uranium, thorium, radium and their decay products as well as isotopes of caesium, potassium and strontium by extraction with 10% di-(2-ethylhexyl)phosphate (HDEHP) in toluene. The chemical yield of 90Y is determined by the acidmetric titration of yttrium nitrate carrier with titriplex III. The levels of Sr-90 and dose to the Irish population from milk consumption have been negligible when compared to other radioactive sources in the Irish environment. Other dairy products are analysed for radiocaesium on a routine basis for commercial customers to ensure the levels of radioactivity in the dairy products fall within EC regulations governing the export/import of dairy produce. The export of milk and milk produce from Ireland is a very important industry, 80% of dairy products produced in Ireland are exported and these exports are worth Euro 2.2 billion annually to the Irish economy. The dairy products are analysed by gamma spectroscopy and include full and skim milk powders, butter, casein, cheese, cream, whey and lactose. The levels of radiocaesium in these products are typically below 5 Bk/kg and fall well within the limit of 370 Bq/kg laid down by the European Community in Council Regulation 737/90. Although the levels of these radionuclides are relatively low the RPII recognises the importance of analysing these samples for radioactivity to inform the public, ensure consumer confidence and, more importantly, to maintain a level of expertise in the RPII in these analytical techniques so

  9. IMPORTANCE, STRUCTURE AND OUTCOMES OF THE MUSIC PROGRAM IN THE PRIMARY SCHOOL: THE EXPERIENCE OF CROATIA, MONTENEGRO, AND SERBIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabina Vidulin

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In an effort to look into the importance and structure of the program through a simultaneous analysis of the achievement outcomes for the Music course in three countries – Croatia, Montenegro, and Serbia, the authors have performed a detailed analysis of a number of documents covering the topic in these countries. A comparative analysis of the contents of these documents has provided us with the opportunity to assess the speed at which the educational systems in the three countries are being reformed, the differences in the approach to individual areas, but also the need to provide joint theoretical efforts whose goal would be to foster what is the common denominator for us all – a promoted process of teaching music which would provide a simultaneous development of students’ artistic identity.

  10. The dairy chains in North Africa (Algeria, Morocco and Tunisia): from self sufficiency options to food dependency?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sraïri, Mohamed Taher; Benyoucef, Mohammed Tahar; Kraiem, Khemais

    2013-12-01

    The Maghreb countries (Algeria, Morocco and Tunisia) have experienced since the early 1950s a rapid demographic growth coupled to a significant rhythm of urbanization. This has led to a marked increase in the demand of dairy products. In order to secure the supply, specific policies have been implemented. They mainly consisted in the establishment of a dairy industry, based on the processing of either raw milk produced locally (in Morocco and Tunisia) or imported milk powder (in Algeria). These divergent options have had significant consequences on the whole organization of the dairy chains in these countries, from cattle rearing practices, to milk collection and processing. They have also implied differences in milk and its derivatives' prices and levels of consumption. The paper draws a comparative analysis of milk chains within the three countries: a supply mainly based on imports in Algeria, whereas in Morocco and Tunisia, the demand is satisfied by a chain relying on locally produced cattle milk. The paper also emphasizes on the future challenges that will have to be addressed: a rising volatility of milk and other strategic inputs' prices (feed, machinery, cattle, etc.) in global markets, an improvement in consumers' awareness about milk quality, a further pressure on natural resources (mainly soils and water) to get more raw milk, in countries already suffering an acute water stress. The article also establishes recommendations about specific issues related to the development of the dairy chains in the context of North Africa. These are mainly linked to the fragmented offer induced by numerous smallholder farms, which implies obvious difficulties to assess the hygienic and the chemical quality of milk batches delivered daily. Moreover, this fragmented offer also means that specific support programs will have to be designed, as the vast majority of farms are not dairy specialized, expecting both milk and calf crop from their herds.

  11. Dairy sheep production research at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, USA - a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, David L; Berger, Yves M; McKusick, Brett C; Mikolayunas, Claire M

    2014-01-01

    Commercial milking of sheep is a new agricultural industry in the United States starting approximately 30 yr ago. The industry is still small, but it is growing. The majority of the sheep milk is used in the production of specialty cheeses. The United States is the major importer of sheep milk cheeses with 50 to 60% of annual world exports coming to the United States during the past 20 yr. Therefore, there is considerable growth potential for the industry in the United States. The only dairy sheep research flock in North America is located at the Spooner Agricultural Research Station of the University of Wisconsin-Madison. The research program started in 1993 and has been multifaceted; dealing with several areas important to commercial dairy sheep farmers. The East Friesian and Lacaune dairy breeds were compared and introduced to the industry through the research program. Both dairy breeds produced significantly more milk than traditional meat-wool breeds found in the U.S., but the two breeds differed in their production traits. East Friesian-cross ewes produced more lambs and slightly more milk than Lacaune-cross ewes whereas Lacaune-cross ewes produced milk with a higher percentage of fat and protein than East Friesian-cross ewes. Lactation physiology studies have shown that ewes with active corpora lutea have increased milk yields, oxytocin release during milking is required to obtain normal fat percentages in the milk, large udder cisterns of dairy ewes can allow for increased milking intervals, and short daylengths during late pregnancy results in increased milk yield. In the nutrition area, legume-grass pastures and forages with a higher percentage of legume will result in increased milk production. Grazing ewes respond to additional supplementation with increased milk yield, but it is important to match the supplement to the quality of the grazing. Ewes on high quality legume-grass pastures that are high in rumen degradable protein respond with increased

  12. Dairy sheep production research at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, USA – a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Commercial milking of sheep is a new agricultural industry in the United States starting approximately 30 yr ago. The industry is still small, but it is growing. The majority of the sheep milk is used in the production of specialty cheeses. The United States is the major importer of sheep milk cheeses with 50 to 60% of annual world exports coming to the United States during the past 20 yr. Therefore, there is considerable growth potential for the industry in the United States. The only dairy sheep research flock in North America is located at the Spooner Agricultural Research Station of the University of Wisconsin-Madison. The research program started in 1993 and has been multifaceted; dealing with several areas important to commercial dairy sheep farmers. The East Friesian and Lacaune dairy breeds were compared and introduced to the industry through the research program. Both dairy breeds produced significantly more milk than traditional meat-wool breeds found in the U.S., but the two breeds differed in their production traits. East Friesian-cross ewes produced more lambs and slightly more milk than Lacaune-cross ewes whereas Lacaune-cross ewes produced milk with a higher percentage of fat and protein than East Friesian-cross ewes. Lactation physiology studies have shown that ewes with active corpora lutea have increased milk yields, oxytocin release during milking is required to obtain normal fat percentages in the milk, large udder cisterns of dairy ewes can allow for increased milking intervals, and short daylengths during late pregnancy results in increased milk yield. In the nutrition area, legume-grass pastures and forages with a higher percentage of legume will result in increased milk production. Grazing ewes respond to additional supplementation with increased milk yield, but it is important to match the supplement to the quality of the grazing. Ewes on high quality legume-grass pastures that are high in rumen degradable protein respond with increased

  13. Dairy farmers’ values and how their values affect their decision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bjørn Gunnar Hansen

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Values affect humans’ perception of situations and problems and guide our actions. The objective of this study was to explore the values of dairy farmers, and whether their values influenced their decisions to maintain dairy farming or to buy consultancy services. During late fall 2007 we visited and interviewed 90 farmers. First we did a qualitative analysis of the data and then we merged the interview data with the existing database of financial data from the year 2007 to do statistical analyses. We also checked whether the farmers still produced milk in 2013, six years after the interviews.  Most farmers had terminal values like keeping up the tradition and to have an interesting work. Value combinations with instrumental values such as to earn money and to produce milk were common. Realizing that many farmers prioritize terminal values over instrumental values has important consequences for dairy companies, dairy consultants and politicians.

  14. U.S. DAIRY FORAGE RESEARCH CENTER

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Vision: Leading the world in integrated dairy forage systems research. Mission: Providing dairy industry solutions for food security, environmental sustainability,...

  15. U.S. Dairy Forage Research Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Vision: Leading the world in integrated dairy forage systems research. Mission: Providing dairy industry solutions for food security, environmental sustainability,...

  16. Molecular screening of pathogenic Escherichia coli strains isolated from dairy neonatal calves in Cordoba province, Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picco, Natalia Y; Alustiza, Fabrisio E; Bellingeri, Romina V; Grosso, María C; Motta, Carlos E; Larriestra, Alejandro J; Vissio, Claudina; Tiranti, Karina I; Terzolo, Horacio R; Moreira, Ana R; Vivas, Adriana B

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to perform a current molecular characterization of bovine pathogenic Escherichia coli strains isolated from random samplings in Argentinean dairy farms. Rectal swabs were obtained from 395 (63.7%) healthy and 225 (36.3%) diarrheic calves, belonging to 45 dairy farms in Cordoba Province, Argentina. E. coli isolates were examined for virulence genes (f5, f41, f17, sta, stb, lt, eae, vt) using PCR and the prevalence of E. coli virulence profiles was spatially described in terms of spatial distribution. A total of 30.1% isolates were found to be positive for at least one of the virulence genes. Depending on the different gene combinations present, 11 virulence profiles were found. Most of the isolates analyzed had a single gene, and no combination of fimbrial and enterotoxin gene was predominant. There was no association between the frequency and distribution of E. coli virulence genes and calf health status. Most of the virulence profiles were compatible with ETEC strains and showed a homogeneous distribution over the sampled area. A clustering pattern for E. coli virulence profiles could not be recognized. This work provides updated information on the molecular characterization of pathogenic E. coli strains from dairy herds in Cordoba, Argentina. These findings would be important to formulate prevention programs and effective therapies for diarrhea in calves caused by E. coli. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Argentina de Microbiología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Caring Dairy: A Sustainable Dairy Farming Initiative in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calker, van K.J.; Hooch Antink, R.H.J.; Beldman, A.C.G.; Mauser, A.

    2005-01-01

    Interest in the concept of sustainability in dairy farming has grown as a result of the continuous pressure on farm incomes, occurrence of animal diseases with a major impact on the image of dairy farming, concerns about animal welfare, and environmental problems caused by agriculture. There are,

  18. Modeling salmonella Dublin into the dairy herd simulation model Simherd

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kudahl, Anne Braad

    2010-01-01

    Infection with Salmonella Dublin in the dairy herd and effects of the infection and relevant control measures are currently being modeled into the dairy herd simulation model called Simherd. The aim is to compare the effects of different control strategies against Salmonella Dublin on both within...... of the simulations will therefore be used for decision support in the national surveillance and eradication program against Salmonella Dublin. Basic structures of the model are programmed and will be presented at the workshop. The model is in a phase of face-validation by a group of Salmonella......-herd- prevalence and economy by simulations. The project Dublin on both within-herd- prevalence and economy by simulations. The project is a part of a larger national project "Salmonella 2007 - 2011" with the main objective to reduce the prevalence of Salmonella Dublin in Danish Dairy herds. Results...

  19. Cost of Milk and Marketing Margins in Dairy Farms of Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzunoz, Meral; Altintas, Gulcin; Akcay, Yasar

    The study is based on the cost of milk and marketing margins in dairy farms in Tokat-Turkey with the help of primary data collected randomly from 62 farmers. In the study it was determined that milk production in dairy farms was relatively profitable in domestic (1.34), cross-bred (1.29) and culture (1.58) dairy cattle. It was found that marketing margins of milk were 183.33% for domestic, cross-breed and culture dairy cattle. As a result, although there were some structural problems for dairy farms such as high input prices, lack of cooperation among producers and long marketing chains between producers and retailers, it can be still perceived that the dairy farming can be one of the most important income sources for the farmers of rural provinces of Tokat-Turkey. Furthermore it should be stated that current livestock policy need to be regulated.

  20. Colours used in Dairy Products.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. This study was carried out to investigate the effects of pH and heat treatment processing on stability and natural food colours used in dairy products. A repeated laboratory experiment was conducted in which loss of colour intensity or change in shade of natural food colours used in acid and nearly neutral dairy ...

  1. Entrepreneurship of Dutch dairy farmers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergevoet, R.H.M.

    2005-01-01

    Several developments in the Netherlands as well as in the other countries within the EU are forcing dairy farmers to reconsider their involvement in dairy production. Farmers are being called to account more for the entrepreneurial element of their farming behaviour. Up till now it was unclear how

  2. Dairy cluster design for Myanmar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijlstra, J.; Lee, van der J.

    2015-01-01

    At the request of the Dutch and Myanmar governments, a project team consisting of researchers from Wageningen University & Research centre and experts from dairy processor Royal FrieslandCampina, feed company Royal De Heus and AgriWorks consultancy have developed a design for a dairy cluster in

  3. Place of dairy products in the Chinese-American family food system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Nan; Brown, J Lynne

    2010-08-01

    Chinese Americans have a high risk of osteoporosis and their calcium intake is substantially below the daily recommendation. However, little has been done to reduce the risk of this hard-to-reach population. This theory-based qualitative study explored how first-generation Chinese American couples with children view dairy products, how they use them in their family food system, and how these uses influence their dietary behavior or intake. Twenty couples, recruited from weekend Chinese schools at three locations in Pennsylvania, were interviewed. Taste, texture, and use of additives and growth hormones appeared to be more important influences on dairy choice than lactose intolerance. In these families, parental use of food rules and power to influence food patterns affected family flexibility about dairy use. Father's power, his views of dairy products, and his preference for Chinese-based dinners had a greater influence than those of his wife or children on the use of dairy-based dinner dishes. In contrast, choices at breakfast or lunch and for snacks were more flexible and could include dairy products. Nutrition educators can encourage introduction of dairy products into the traditional dietary pattern of Chinese Americans by offering opportunities to taste unfamiliar dairy products, demonstrating use of dairy products to prepare familiar foods, including both parents in any intervention or at least in tasting recipes, and providing information on importance of calcium to bone health and amount of calcium needed from reputable sources. 2010 American Dietetic Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Direct uses of hot water (geothermal) in dairying

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barmettler, E.R.; Rose, W.R. Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Digital computer simulation was used to investigate the peak, steady energy utilization of a geothermal energy-supported dairy. A digital computer program was also written to assess the lifetime economics of the dairy operation. A dynamic simulation program was written to design water storage tanks under diurnal transient loading. The geothermal site specified is the artesian spring named Hobo Wells near Susanville, California. The dairy configuration studies are unique, but consist of conventional processing equipment. In the dairy, cattle waste would be used to generate methane and carbon dioxide by anaerobic digestion. Some carbon dioxide would be removed from the gas stream with a pressurized water scrubber to raise the heating value. The product gas would be combusted in a spark ignition engine connected to an electric generator. The electrical power produced would be used for operation of fans, pumps, lights and other equipment in the dairy. An absorption chiller using a geothermal water driven generator would provide milk chilling. Space heating would be done with forced air hot water unit heaters.

  5. Management of the calving pen is a crucial factor for paratuberculosis control in large dairy herds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donat, Karsten; Schmidt, Mandy; Köhler, Heike; Sauter-Louis, Carola

    2016-05-01

    Improvement of hygiene and herd management to reduce the contact of calves with adult cow feces to prevent new infections is one of the basic strategies to manage paratuberculosis-affected dairy herds. Control programs should recommend an evidence-based selection of factors that demonstrably reduce the transmission of the infectious agent and decrease the prevalence of infected cattle to improve acceptance and implementation of the recommended measures among farmers. This study aimed to assess the influence of several management measures on control success in a longitudinal study in 28 large dairy herds with a median size of 415 cows in Thuringia, Germany. The cumulative incidence of cows shedding Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis (MAP) per year was determined by individual fecal culture of all cows during 5 consecutive years. Relevant management practices as well as herd size, milk yield, and purchase of cattle were recorded by on-farm risk assessment. Mean holding time of MAP shedders within the herd was calculated from individual data of each shedding cow. Using multiple regression models, separate calving pens for shedders and disinfection of the pen after use were identified as significant risk factors that reduced the cumulative incidence of MAP shedders per year on the herd level. The results provide evidence that, in addition to other factors, calving hygiene and management of the calving pens are crucial for paratuberculosis control, particularly in large dairy herds. Considered together with the outcome from other studies, these results might be important to weight various risk factors and to avoid overburdening and overwhelming farmers and keeping them committed. Copyright © 2016 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Microworlds, Games, Animations, Mobile Apps, Puzzle Editors and More: What Is Important for an Introductory Programming Environment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xinogalos, Stelios; Satratzemi, Maya; Malliarakis, Christos

    2017-01-01

    Teaching and learning programming constitutes a challenge. Although several teaching approaches and programming tools have been proposed, it seems that they have limited impact on classroom practice. This article investigates students' perceptions on five educational programming environments that are widely used and the features that any…

  7. Genomic Selection Improves Heat Tolerance in Dairy Cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, J B; Douglas, M L; Williams, S R O; Wales, W J; Marett, L C; Nguyen, T T T; Reich, C M; Hayes, B J

    2016-09-29

    Dairy products are a key source of valuable proteins and fats for many millions of people worldwide. Dairy cattle are highly susceptible to heat-stress induced decline in milk production, and as the frequency and duration of heat-stress events increases, the long term security of nutrition from dairy products is threatened. Identification of dairy cattle more tolerant of heat stress conditions would be an important progression towards breeding better adapted dairy herds to future climates. Breeding for heat tolerance could be accelerated with genomic selection, using genome wide DNA markers that predict tolerance to heat stress. Here we demonstrate the value of genomic predictions for heat tolerance in cohorts of Holstein cows predicted to be heat tolerant and heat susceptible using controlled-climate chambers simulating a moderate heatwave event. Not only was the heat challenge stimulated decline in milk production less in cows genomically predicted to be heat-tolerant, physiological indicators such as rectal and intra-vaginal temperatures had reduced increases over the 4 day heat challenge. This demonstrates that genomic selection for heat tolerance in dairy cattle is a step towards securing a valuable source of nutrition and improving animal welfare facing a future with predicted increases in heat stress events.

  8. Effects of Fermented Dairy Products on Skin: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughn, Alexandra R; Sivamani, Raja K

    2015-07-01

    Fermented dairy products, such as yogurt, have been proposed as a natural source of probiotics to promote intestinal health. Growing evidence shows that modulation of the gastrointestinal tract microbiota can modulate skin disease as well. This systematic review was conducted to examine the evidence for the use of ingested fermented dairy products to modulate skin health and function. We also sought to review the effects of the topical application of dairy products. The PubMed and Embase databases were systematically searched for clinical studies involving humans only that examined the relationship between fermented dairy products and skin health. A total of 312 articles were found and a total of 4 studies met inclusion criteria. Three studies evaluated the effects of ingestion, while one evaluated the effects of topical application. All studies noted improvement with the use of fermented dairy. Overall, there is early and limited evidence that fermented dairy products, used both topically and orally, may provide benefits for skin health. However, existing studies are limited and further studies will be important to better assess efficacy and the mechanisms involved.

  9. Dairy Proteins and Energy Balance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtsen, Line Quist

    High protein diets affect energy balance beneficially through decreased hunger, enhanced satiety and increased energy expenditure. Dairy products are a major source of protein. Dairy proteins are comprised of two classes, casein (80%) and whey proteins (20%), which are both of high quality......, but casein is absorbed slowly and whey is absorbed rapidly. The present PhD study investigated the effects of total dairy proteins, whey, and casein, on energy balance and the mechanisms behind any differences in the effects of the specific proteins. The results do not support the hypothesis that dairy...... proteins, whey or casein are more beneficial than other protein sources in the regulation of energy balance, and suggest that dairy proteins, whey or casein seem to play only a minor role, if any, in the prevention and treatment of obesity....

  10. The Dairy - Business Plan

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, Natalie

    2013-01-01

    The Bachelor thesis in question has been composed to help the founders of a small start-up company, in the holiday rental industry, succeed in running a sustainable business. The purpose was to create a practical plan for setting up and running the Dairy, a two-bedroom holiday rental in the rural Devon countryside. The business plan discussed the location and facilities of the holiday rental along with a comprehensive account of its competitors. The Dairy’s marketing activity and risk asses...

  11. Patterns of dairy manure management in China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Chen Yan; Qiao, Wei; Melse, Roland W.; Li, Lu Jun; Buisonjé, De Fridtjof E.; Wang, Ya Jing; Dong, Renjie

    2017-01-01

    The dairy industry in China is rapidly developing, particularly in terms of the upscaling of dairy farms. However, nutrient-rich manure brings challenges to the sustainability of the dairy industry. This study investigated and reviewed the patterns of dairy manure management in China, and the

  12. Pathogens in Dairy Farming: Source Characterization and Groundwater Impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwill, E. R.; Watanabe, N.; Li, X.; Hou, L.; Harter, T.; Bergamaschi, B.

    2007-12-01

    Intense animal husbandry is of growing concern as a potential contamination source of enteric pathogens as well as antibiotics. To assess the public health risk from pathogens and their hydrologic pathways, we hypothesize that the animal farm is not a homogeneous diffuse source, but that pathogen loading to the soil and, therefore, to groundwater varies significantly between the various management units of a farm. A dairy farm, for example, may include an area with calf hutches, corrals for heifers of various ages, freestalls and exercise yards for milking cows, separate freestalls for dry cows, a hospital barn, a yard for collection of solid manure, a liquid manure storage lagoon, and fields receiving various amounts of liquid and solid manure. Pathogen shedding and, hence, therapeutic and preventive pharmaceutical treatments vary between these management units. We are implementing a field reconnaissance program to determine the occurrence of three different pathogens ( E. coli, Salmonella, Campylobacter) and one indicator organism ( Enterococcus) at the ground-surface and in shallow groundwater of seven different management units on each of two farms, and in each of four seasons (spring/dry season, summer/irrigation season, fall/dry season, winter/rainy season). Initial results indicate that significant differences exist in the occurrence of these pathogens between management units and between organisms. These differences are weakly reflected in their occurrence in groundwater, despite the similarity of the shallow geologic environment across these sites. Our results indicate the importance of differentiating sources within a dairy farm and the importance of understanding subsurface transport processes for these pathogens.

  13. Is experience on a farm an effective approach to understanding animal products and the management of dairy farming?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochizuki, Mariko; Osada, Masahiro; Ishioka, Katsumi; Matsubara, Takako; Momota, Yutaka; Yumoto, Norio; Sako, Toshinori; Kamiya, Shinji; Yoshimura, Itaru

    2014-03-01

    The understanding of animal products and dairy farming is important for the promotion of dairy farming. Thus, to examine the effects of farm experience on the understanding of animal products and the management of dairy farming, the interaction between students and dairy cows was investigated in groups of first-year veterinary nursing students in 2011 and 2012 (n = 201). These students included 181 women and 20 men. Nine items about dairy cows were presented in a questionnaire. The survey was performed before and after praxis on the educational farm attached to the authors' university. After praxis on the farm, increases occurred in the number of positive responses to the items involving the price of milk, dairy farming and the taste of milk. For these items, a significant difference (P animal products and dairy farming. © 2013 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  14. Knowledge of Bovine Tuberculosis, Cattle Husbandry and Dairy Practices amongst Pastoralists and Small-Scale Dairy Farmers in Cameroon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Robert F; Hamman, Saidou M; Morgan, Kenton L; Nkongho, Egbe F; Ngwa, Victor Ngu; Tanya, Vincent; Andu, Walters N; Sander, Melissa; Ndip, Lucy; Handel, Ian G; Mazeri, Stella; Muwonge, Adrian; Bronsvoort, Barend M de C

    2016-01-01

    Control of bovine tuberculosis (bTB) and zoonotic tuberculosis (zTB) has relied upon surveillance and slaughter of infected cattle, milk pasteurisation and public health education. In Cameroon, like many other sub-Saharan African countries, there is limited understanding of current cattle husbandry or milk processing practices or livestock keepers awareness of bTB. This paper describes husbandry and milk processing practices within different Cameroonian cattle keeping communities and bTB awareness in comparison to other infectious diseases. A population based cross-sectional sample of herdsmen and a questionnaire were used to gather data from pastoralists and dairy farmers in the North West Region and Vina Division of Cameroon. Pastoralists were predominately male Fulanis who had kept cattle for over a decade. Dairy farmers were non-Fulani and nearly half were female. Pastoralists went on transhumance with their cattle and came into contact with other herds and potential wildlife reservoirs of bTB. Dairy farmers housed their cattle and had little contact with other herds or wildlife. Pastoralists were aware of bTB and other infectious diseases such as foot-and-mouth disease and fasciolosis. These pastoralists were also able to identify clinical signs of these diseases. A similar proportion of dairy farmers were aware of bTB but fewer were aware of foot-and-mouth and fasciolosis. In general, dairy farmers were unable to identify any clinical signs for any of these diseases. Importantly most pastoralists and dairy farmers were unaware that bTB could be transmitted to people by consuming milk. Current cattle husbandry practices make the control of bTB in cattle challenging especially in mobile pastoralist herds. Routine test and slaughter control in dairy herds would be tractable but would have profound impact on dairy farmer livelihoods. Prevention of transmission in milk offers the best approach for human risk mitigation in Cameroon but requires strategies that

  15. Measures to improve dairy cow foot health: consequences for farmer income and dairy cow welfare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruijnis, M R N; Hogeveen, H; Stassen, E N

    2013-01-01

    Dairy farming in western countries with cubicle housing is an efficient way of dairy farming. Though, a disadvantage is the high prevalence and incidence of foot disorders (clinical and subclinical), which cause high economic losses and also seriously impair the welfare of dairy cattle. To point out the importance of reducing the amount and severity of foot disorders, advice to farmers should include information about the scale of the problem and the consequences in terms of economics and animal welfare. To provide support in making decisions on implementing intervention measures, insight into costs and benefits of different measures should be available. The objective of this study, therefore, is to provide more insight into the costs and benefits, for farmer and cow, of different intervention measures to improve dairy cow foot health. Intervention measures were modeled when they were applicable on a dairy farm with cubicle housing and when sufficient information was available in literature. Net costs were calculated as the difference between the costs of the measure and the economic benefits resulting from the measure. Welfare benefits were calculated as well. Cost-effective measures are: improving lying surface (mattress and bedding, €7 and €1/cow per year, respectively), reducing stocking density (break even) and performing additional foot trimming (€1/cow per year). Simultaneously, these measures have a relative high welfare benefit. Labor costs play an important role in the cost-effectiveness of labor-intensive measures. More insight into cost-effectiveness and welfare benefits of intervention measures can help to prioritize when choosing between intervention measures.

  16. Dairy Intake, Blood Pressure, and Incident Hypertension in a General Dutch Population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engberink, M.F.; Geleijnse, J.M.; Jong, N.; Smit, H.A.; Kok, F.J.; Verschuren, W.M.M.

    2009-01-01

    Diet and lifestyle are important for maintaining a healthy blood pressure (BP). The role of dairy in the prevention of hypertension, however, is not yet clear. We studied the relation of dairy intake with BP in 21,553 Dutch participants aged 20¿65 y who did not use antihypertensive medication. In

  17. Software for evaluating greenhouse gas emissions and the carbon footprint of dairy production systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abstract: Dairy production, along with all other types of animal agriculture, is a recognized source of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, but little information exists on the net emissions from our farms. Component models for representing all important sources and sinks of CH4, N2O, and CO2 in dairy p...

  18. European dairy policy in the years to come; Quota abolition and competitiveness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongeneel, R.A.; Berkum, van S.; Bont, de C.J.A.M.; Bruchem, van C.; Helming, J.F.M.; Jager, J.H.

    2010-01-01

    This study examines and discusses recent and future developments in the EU dairy sector. Expected future market projections are discussed. Market impacts are downscaled to farm level, illustrated by quantitative effects on the Dutch dairy sector. Structural change appears to be an important factor

  19. Effect of neosporosis on productive and reproductive performance of dairy cattle in Costa Rica

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Romero, J.J.; Breda, van S.; Vargas, B.; Dolz, G.; Frankena, K.

    2005-01-01

    A cross-sectional study was conducted to assess the effect of neosporosis on productive and reproductive parameters in dairy cows. Cows (n = 2743) from 94 farms located in the most important dairy areas in Costa Rica were used in the study. The size of the herds ranged from 32 to 379 females (mean =

  20. Milk progesterone on day 5 following insemination in the dairy cow ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Despite the importance of progesterone on the fertility of lactating dairy cows, the factors that affect post ovulatory progesterone concentration are still unclear. Thus, the aim of the present study was to identify factors associated with the post ovulatory progesterone rise following 1st insemination in lactating dairy cows.

  1. Economic cost of increased somatic cell count in South African dairy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cuthbert

    2014-06-24

    Jun 24, 2014 ... Somatic cell count (SCC) is of economic importance in dairy production as it directly influences the revenue from the ... dairy products of inferior quality, which translates to economic losses. .... allow benefits related to reduced mastitis incidence to be quantified using the approach of Winkelman et al. 0.00.

  2. Economic optimization of decisions with respect to dairy cow health management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houben, E.H.P.

    1995-01-01


    The research described in this thesis was directed towards decision support in dairy cow health management. Attention was focused on clinical mastitis, in many countries considered to be the most important dairy health problem. First a statistical analysis was carried out to obtain

  3. Genome Sequences of Four Italian Streptococcus thermophilus Strains of Dairy Origin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Treu, Laura; Vendramin, Veronica; Bovo, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    This report describes the genome sequences of four Streptococcus thermophilus strains, namely, TH982, TH985, TH1477, and 1F8CT, isolated from different dairy environments from the Campania and the Veneto regions in Italy. These data are aimed at increasing the genomic information available on thi...... on this species, which is of paramount importance for the dairy industry....

  4. Improving food safety within the dairy chain: an application of conjoint analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valeeva, N.I.; Meuwissen, M.P.M.; Oude Lansink, A.G.J.M.; Huirne, R.B.M.

    2005-01-01

    This study determined the relative importance of attributes of food safety improvement in the production chain of fluid pasteurized milk. The chain was divided into 4 blocks: "feed" (compound feed production and its transport), "farm" (dairy farm), "dairy processing" (transport and processing of raw

  5. Old friends - New trends : emerging business opportunities in the dairy sector of Sri Lanka

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vernooij, A.G.; Houwers, H.W.J.; Zijlstra, J.

    2015-01-01

    The government of Sri Lanka has given high priority to the development of the dairy sector in the coming years. The aim is to raise the present self-sufficiency rate of 35 % to 100 % in 2020. Milk production systems will be modernized through the importation of dairy heifers, establishment of large

  6. Genetic analysis of longevity in Dutch dairy cattle using random regression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pelt, van M.L.; Meuwissen, T.H.E.; Jong, de G.; Veerkamp, R.F.

    2015-01-01

    Longevity, productive life, or lifespan of dairy cattle is an important trait for dairy farmers, and it is defined as the time from first calving to the last test date for milk production. Methods for genetic evaluations need to account for censored data; that is, records from cows that are still

  7. FACTORS INFLUENCING THE LABOUR PRODUCTIVITY IN DAIRY SECTOR IN EU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radek ZDENĚK

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The most important for the stability of Europe and Czech milk market is to remain competitive in world markets, as the main way for balance on the internal market is based on successful export of dairy products to third countries. Price volatility and environmental sustainability are seen as the most serious current problems in the dairy industry and dairy farming. The aim of this paper is to assess the development of the production and milk prices in the EU and assess the main factors that affect labour productivity. The number of cows per worker is one of the most important factors affecting labour productivity. Effect of prices on labour productivity in monetary expression is not as significant as is usually assumed. The technical equipment of labour should be an important factor influencing the number of cows per worker. The hypothesis that higher technical equipment of labour should create better conditions for higher productivity could be assumed.

  8. Hydrogeologic controls on water quality at a university dairy farm

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, L. D.; Hunter, R. W.; Lee, J.

    2010-12-01

    Dairy farms typically produce large quantities of manure and other waste products which are often stored or treated in lagoons and then applied to local fields as fertilizer. Contamination of nearby streams by dairy farm wastes through surface runnoff, drainage tile discharge, direct release of wastes or inundation of waste storage facilities during seasonal flooding have long been recognized as major environmental concerns. However, much less attention has been paid to fate and transport of dairy wastes in the subsurface and their potential impact on water quality in aquifers or in groundwater discharge to streams. One of the challenges in evaluating the environmental impact of dairy operations is that there are relatively few field research sites where all of the potential pathways for waterborne transport of dairy wastes are monitored and quantititatively evaluated. There are even fewer sites where extensive baseline water quality monitoring programs were established prior to operation of the dairy. This is essential to distinguish between environmental impacts from dairy operations and other nearby sources, such as beef production and human sewage from septic fields. This talk describes the development of a an integrated hydrogeologic/hydrologic site assessment and groundwater/surface water quality monitoring program at the University of Tennessee - Little River Dairy Farm, located near Townsend, TN. The dairy is currently under construction and the first cows are expected to arrive in late 2010. Hydrologic/hydrogeologic investigations of streams and groundwater at the site have been underway for more than 3 years, and these are expected to provide background data for assessing impacts of dairy wastes and for testing the effectiveness of different management practises. The lower half of the ~180 ha site consists of low-relief fields used for row crops, which are underlain by 4 - 8 m of alluvial deposits (mainly interbedded silt and fine-grained sands) on top of

  9. Performance of crossbred dairy cows suitable for smallholder ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present study was undertaken to investigate productive and reproductive performances of F1 crossbred cows to produce and develop improved dairy cattle breed at on station and back up the on farm crossbreeding program at Holetta Research Center (HRC). One hundred fifty three F1 crossbred heifers were used to ...

  10. Evaluation of food safety management systems in Serbian dairy industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Tomašević

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports incentives, costs, difficulties and benefits of food safety management systems implementation in the Serbian dairy industry. The survey involved 27 food business operators with the national milk and dairy market share of 65 %. Almost two thirds of the assessed dairy producers (70.4 % claimed that they had a fully operational and certified HACCP system in place, while 29.6 % implemented HACCP, but had no third party certification. ISO 22000 was implemented and certified in 29.6 % of the companies, while only 11.1 % had implemented and certified IFS standard. The most important incentive for implementing food safety management systems for Serbian dairy producers was to increase and improve safety and quality of dairy products. The cost of product investigation/analysis and hiring external consultants were related to the initial set-up of food safety management system with the greatest importance. Serbian dairy industry was not greatly concerned by the financial side of implementing food safety management systems due to the fact that majority of prerequisite programmes were in place and regularly used by almost 100 % of the producers surveyed. The presence of competency gap between the generic knowledge for manufacturing food products and the knowledge necessary to develop and implement food safety management systems was confirmed, despite the fact that 58.8 % of Serbian dairy managers had university level of education. Our study brings about the innovation emphasizing the attitudes and the motivation of the food production staff as the most important barrier for the development and implementation of HACCP. The most important identified benefit was increased safety of dairy products with the mean rank scores of 6.85. The increased customer confidence and working discipline of staff employed in food processing were also found as important benefits of implementing/operating HACCP. The study shows that the level of HACCP

  11. Barriers and Facilitators to Intake of Dairy Products in Adolescent Males and Females With Different Levels of Habitual Intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racey, Megan; Bransfield, Jeanette; Capello, Kathryn; Field, David; Kulak, Verena; Machmueller, David; Preyde, Michèle; Newton, Genevieve

    2017-01-01

    Background: Dairy products and alternatives can contribute to overall good health including positive body composition and decreased adiposity; however, these foods are grossly underconsumed by youth, and worldwide, almost 25% of children are overweight or obese. Objective: The study investigated the barriers and facilitators toward dairy consumption by Grade 7 youth. Methods: Thirty 50-minute, audio-recorded focus groups were conducted with 134 students in eight Grade 7 classes across 5 elementary schools. Focus groups were led by trained facilitators in the elementary schools and participants were separated based on dairy consumption and gender. Recorded data were transcribed and thematically analyzed using qualitative analysis software to identify themes related to barriers and facilitators to dairy product intake by each gender. Results: Factors considered important by males and females across different levels of habitual intake include personal knowledge about dairy products and misconceptions regarding dairy foods and their associated health benefits; food characteristics, including taste; personal behaviors such as habits or routines including dairy products; social environments including parental and peer influence; physical environments factors such as availability and skipping meals; and the convenience of dairy products. Interestingly, only males noted sports as a positive influence for dairy product intake. Also, there were differences in the way males and females perceived dining out as affecting their dairy intake. Conclusion: Results suggest several potential factors that nutrition education interventions aiming to increase dairy consumption could target.

  12. Barriers and Facilitators to Intake of Dairy Products in Adolescent Males and Females With Different Levels of Habitual Intake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan Racey MSc

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dairy products and alternatives can contribute to overall good health including positive body composition and decreased adiposity; however, these foods are grossly underconsumed by youth, and worldwide, almost 25% of children are overweight or obese. Objective: The study investigated the barriers and facilitators toward dairy consumption by Grade 7 youth. Methods: Thirty 50-minute, audio-recorded focus groups were conducted with 134 students in eight Grade 7 classes across 5 elementary schools. Focus groups were led by trained facilitators in the elementary schools and participants were separated based on dairy consumption and gender. Recorded data were transcribed and thematically analyzed using qualitative analysis software to identify themes related to barriers and facilitators to dairy product intake by each gender. Results: Factors considered important by males and females across different levels of habitual intake include personal knowledge about dairy products and misconceptions regarding dairy foods and their associated health benefits; food characteristics, including taste; personal behaviors such as habits or routines including dairy products; social environments including parental and peer influence; physical environments factors such as availability and skipping meals; and the convenience of dairy products. Interestingly, only males noted sports as a positive influence for dairy product intake. Also, there were differences in the way males and females perceived dining out as affecting their dairy intake. Conclusion: Results suggest several potential factors that nutrition education interventions aiming to increase dairy consumption could target.

  13. 9 CFR 327.6 - Products for importation; program inspection, time and place; application for approval of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...; MANDATORY MEAT AND POULTRY PRODUCTS INSPECTION AND VOLUNTARY INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION IMPORTED PRODUCTS... inspection, time and place; application for approval of facilities as official import inspection... facilities as official import inspection establishment; refusal or withdrawal of approval; official numbers...

  14. Constraints in adapting animal husbandry practices by the dairy farmers in the Marathwada region of Maharashtra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. T. Gangasagare

    Full Text Available The study was conducted to review the situation of dairying in Marathwada with the objectives to identify major constraints of the dairy farmers in adapting the recommended animal husbandry practices. The survey work was carried out for the milk pocket areas in eight districts of the Marathwada region. Out of 144 dairy farmers, 109 farmers cared crossbred animals; 65 out of 85 dairy farmers adapted cooling arrangement to cross-bred cows during summer; 35 of 45 adapted washing their animals during summer; 98 of 230 dairy farmers followed vaccination to their animals; 45 of 230 dairy farmers followed de-worming their animals; 37 of 230 adapted to control the ecto-parasite; 65 of 230 reacted for removal old debris; 105 of 230 dairy farmers adapted A.I. policy and only 88 of 230 dairy farmers were positive for the animals insurance. Higher proportion of the farmers has accepted the importance of crossbred cows. Higher numbers of farmers have positive response to cool their animals. Significantly more numbers of farmers did not care to vaccinate and accept other health measures for their animals. Non-significant differences between dairy farmers adapting and non-adapting A.I. practices were recorded while significant (P>0.01 difference was observed between the farmers adapting and not adapting the insurance policy. [Vet World 2009; 2(9.000: 347-349

  15. Export competitiveness of dairy products on global markets: the case of the European Union countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bojnec, Š; Fertő, I

    2014-10-01

    This paper analyzed the export competitiveness of dairy products of the European Union (EU) countries (EU-27) on intra-EU, extra-EU, and global markets, using the revealed comparative advantage index over the 2000-2011 period. The results indicated that about half of the EU-27 countries have had competitive exports in a certain segment of dairy products. The results differed by level of milk processing and for intra-EU and extra-EU markets, and did so over the analyzed years. Belgium, Denmark, France, Ireland, and the Netherlands are old EU-15 countries with competitive dairy exports (from the lowest to the highest according to the level of milk processing). The majority of the new EU-12 countries have faced difficulties in maintaining their level of export competitiveness, at least for some dairy products and market segments. The more competitive EU-12 countries in dairy exports were the Baltic States (Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania) and Poland. The duration of export competitiveness differed across the dairy groups of products according to the level of milk processing, indicating the importance of dairy chain product differentiation for export competitiveness and specialization. The export competitiveness of the higher level of processed milk products for final consumption can be significant for export dairy chain competitiveness on global markets. Copyright © 2014 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Reducing non-allocative costs on Danish dairy farms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Mogens; Jacobsen, Brian H.; Hansen, Lars C.E.

    1993-01-01

    inefficiencies are far more important for dairy farms than inefficiencies due to sub-optimal farm size. Non-proportional reductions are shown to be as important as reductions due to scale economies. The paper closes with a discussion of the implications for farm policy and management practice....

  17. Research and teaching of dairy cattle well being: finding synergy between ethology and epidemiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffield, Todd F; Leslie, Ken E; Lissemore, Kerry D; Millman, Suzanne T

    2009-01-01

    Epidemiology is a tool used to identify and quantify risk factors that contribute to the state of health or disease. In addition, the maintenance of health and recognition of nonhuman animal welfare are both key principles of health management. Animal welfare and ethology provide important contributions to our ability to understand and improve health. As such, there can be a strong connection between the disciplines of ethology and epidemiology. This connection becomes a synergy through collaborative research. At the University of Guelph, and at other institutions, dairy health management research efforts involving collaborations between faculty trained in ethology and epidemiology have led to refined and improved research programs, improved access to funding, and a broader extension audience. Furthermore, these collaborations have enhanced teaching programs and facilitated the integration of ethology and welfare topics throughout the veterinary medical curriculum. The paper provides the basis and context for the synergy between ethology and epidemiology and describes examples of teaching and research programs built upon this synergy for the enhancement of dairy cattle well being.

  18. Invited review: Effects of heat stress on dairy cattle welfare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polsky, Liam; von Keyserlingk, Marina A G

    2017-11-01

    The effects of high ambient temperatures on production animals, once thought to be limited to tropical areas, has extended into northern latitudes in response to the increasing global temperature. The number of days where the temperature-humidity index (THI) exceeds the comfort threshold (>72) is increasing in the northern United States, Canada, and Europe. Compounded by the increasing number of dairy animals and the intensification of production, heat stress has become one of the most important challenges facing the dairy industry today. The objectives of this review were to present an overview of the effects of heat stress on dairy cattle welfare and highlight important research gaps in the literature. We will also briefly discuss current heat abatement strategies, as well as the sustainability of future heat stress management. Heat stress has negative effects on the health and biological functioning of dairy cows through depressed milk production and reduced reproductive performance. Heat stress can also compromise the affective state of dairy cows by inducing feelings of hunger and thirst, and we have highlighted the need for research efforts to examine the potential relationship between heat stress, frustration, aggression, and pain. Little work has examined how heat stress affects an animal's natural coping behaviors, as well as how the animal's evolutionary adaptations for thermoregulation are managed in modern dairy systems. More research is needed to identify improved comprehensive cow-side measurements that can indicate real-time responses to elevated ambient temperatures and that could be incorporated into heat abatement management decisions. The Authors. Published by the Federation of Animal Science Societies and Elsevier Inc. on behalf of the American Dairy Science Association®. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/).

  19. Optimal dairy farm adjustments to increased utilization of corn distillers dried grains with solubles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmit, T M; Boisvert, R N; Enahoro, D; Chase, L E

    2009-12-01

    The purpose of this paper was to identify effective dairy farm management adjustments related to recent structural changes in agricultural commodity markets because of expanded biofuels production and other market factors. We developed a mathematical programming model of a representative dairy farm in New York State to estimate the effects of changes in the relative prices of important feed components on farm profitability, identify optimal adjustments for on-farm feed production, crop sales, and dairy rations that account for expanded utilization of corn distillers dried grains with solubles (DDGS), and point out potential implications of these adjustments on whole-farm nutrient planning. We mapped out an effective farm-level demand curve for DDGS by varying DDGS prices relative to other primary feed ingredients, which allowed us to compare DDGS utilization at alternative market conditions. Had the relative prices of major feed ingredients remained at their historical averages, our results suggest that there is only modest potential for feeding DDGS through supplementation in rations for dry cows and heifers as a substitute for soybean meal. However, the relatively lower DDGS prices experienced in 2008 imply an expanded optimal use of DDGS to include rations for lactating cows at 10% of the total mixed ration. Despite these expanded opportunities for DDGS at lower prices, the effects on farm net returns were modest. The most important considerations are perhaps those related to changes in the phosphorus (P) levels in the dairy waste. We showed that including moderate levels of DDGS (10%) in rations for lactating cows did not significantly increase P excretion. However, if the rations for dry cows and heifers were supplemented with DDGS, P excretion did increase, resulting in sizable increases of plant-available phosphorus applied to cropland well beyond crop nutrient requirements. Although our results show that it is economically optimal for the dairy producer to

  20. GEOSPATIAL TECHNOLOGY: A MODERN APPROACH TO SUSTAINABLE DAIRY PRODUCTION SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. DUNEA

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper briefly presents several applications of the geospatial technology as a method to maximize the efficiency of the dairy farm management. The experiment was carried out at Negraşi dairy farm in Târgovişte Plain. A functional farm production and mapping program for detailed farm management information system with several modules: mapping, forage stock, feed forecaster, individual cattle database, fuel consume for field operations and farm inputs database was developed for handheld computers with GPS navigation. Such portable information tools might help the decision making process, the development of ideo-types or in the exploration of land use options to support the policy makers at eco-regional level, the management staff at farm level and various other applications in dairy farms.

  1. Dairy in a sustainable diet: a question of balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hooijdonk, Toon; Hettinga, Kasper

    2015-08-01

    The demand for dairy products is growing rapidly, especially in emerging markets. Dairy products are nutrient rich and, therefore, an important food group for ensuring nutrient security in the future. In many countries, dairy contributes significantly to nutrient intake. Meta-analyses have shown that consumption of dairy may reduce the risk of chronic diseases and thereby lower healthcare costs. Milk production and processing contribute to greenhouse gas emissions, estimated at 2.7% (cradle-to-retail) of the world's total. Evaluating the position of dairy in the diet should take into account the impact of both nutritional and environmental factors. Local conditions are also important; in many parts of the world, the cow is an efficient converter of human-inedible resources into nutrient-dense food. Increased productivity of cows is a decisive factor in realizing sufficient milk production with optimal resource efficiency and minimal greenhouse gas emission. Models that optimize total diets, rather than individual food products, for their nutritional and environmental impact are the preferred approach for developing realistic alternative consumption strategies. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Life Sciences Institute. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Preharvest Food Safety Challenges in Beef and Dairy Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David R

    2016-08-01

    Foods of animal origin, including beef and dairy products, are nutritious and important to global food security. However, there are important risks to human health from hazards that are introduced to beef and dairy products on the farm. Food safety hazards may be chemical, biological, or physical in nature. Considerations about protecting the safety of beef and dairy products must begin prior to harvest because some potential food safety hazards introduced at the farm (e.g., chemical residues) cannot be mitigated by subsequent postharvest food processing steps. Also, some people have preferences for consuming food that has not been through postharvest processing even though those foods may be unsafe because of microbiological hazards originating from the farm. Because of human fallibility and complex microbial ecologies, many of the preharvest hazards associated with beef and dairy products cannot entirely be eliminated, but the risk for most can be reduced through systematic interventions taken on the farm. Beef and dairy farms differ widely in production practices because of differences in natural, human, and capital resources. Therefore, the actions necessary to minimize on-farm food safety hazards must be farm-specific and they must address scientific, political, economic, and practical aspects. Notable successes in controlling and preventing on-farm hazards to food safety have occurred through a combination of voluntary and regulatory efforts.

  3. The importance of socio-economic context for social marketing models for improving reproductive health: evidence from 555 years of program experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meekers, Dominique; Rahaim, Stephen

    2005-01-27

    Over the past two decades, social marketing programs have become an important element of the national family planning and HIV prevention strategy in several developing countries. As yet, there has not been any comprehensive empirical assessment to determine which of several social marketing models is most effective for a given socio-economic context. Such an assessment is urgently needed to inform the design of future social marketing programs, and to avoid that programs are designed using an ineffective model. This study addresses this issue using a database of annual statistics about reproductive health oriented social marketing programs in over 70 countries. In total, the database covers 555 years of program experience with social marketing programs that distribute and promote the use of oral contraceptives and condoms. Specifically, our analysis assesses to what extent the model used by different reproductive health social marketing programs has varied across different socio-economic contexts. We then use random effects regression to test in which socio-economic context each of the models is most successful at increasing use of socially marketed oral contraceptives and condoms. The results show that there has been a tendency to design reproductive health social marketing program with a management structure that matches the local context. However, the evidence also shows that this has not always been the case. While socio-economic context clearly influences the effectiveness of some of the social marketing models, program maturity and the size of the target population appear equally important. To maximize the effectiveness of future social marketing programs, it is essential that more effort is devoted to ensuring that such programs are designed using the model or approach that is most suitable for the local context.

  4. Lameness detection in dairy cattle

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hertem, Van, T; Bahr, C; Schlageter Tello, A; Viazzi, S; Steensels, M; Romanini, C.E.B; Lokhorst, C; Maltz, E; Halachmi, I; Berckmans, D

    2016-01-01

    ...) was a better classifier for lameness than the single-sensor-based detection models. Between September 2013 and August 2014, 3629 cow observations were collected on a commercial dairy farm in Belgium...

  5. Dairy goats feeding and nutrition

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pulina, Giuseppe; Cannas, Antonello; Francesconi, Ana Helena Dias

    2008-01-01

    ... on Mediterranean Shrublands M. Decandia, M.D. Yiakoulaki, G. Pinna, A. Cabiddu and G. Molle 161 vvi Contents 9 Grazing Management of Dairy Goats on Mediterranean Herbaceous Pastures A. Bonanno, V. F...

  6. Seroprevalence of chlamydial infection in dairy goats in Shaanxi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Seroprevalence of chlamydial infection in dairy goats in Shaanxi Province, Northwestern China. ... samples from 729 dairy goats (263 Saanen dairy goats and 466 Guanzhong dairy goats). ... EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT

  7. Monitoring feeding behaviour of dairy cows using accelerometers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele Mattachini

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring cow behaviour has become increasingly important in understanding the nutrition, production, management of the well being, and overall health of dairy cows. Methods of assessing behavioural activity have changed in recent years, favouring automatic recording techniques. Traditional methods to measure behaviour, such as direct observation or time-lapse video, are labour-intensive and time-consuming. Automated recording devices have become increasingly common to measure behaviour accurately. Thus, the development of automated monitoring systems that can continuously and accurately quantify feeding behaviour are required for efficient monitoring and control of modern and automated dairy farms. The aim of this study was to evaluate the possible use of a 3D accelerometer to record feeding behaviour of dairy cows. Feeding behaviour (feeding time and number of visits to the manger of 12 lactating dairy cows was recorded for approximately 3 h with 3D-accelerometer data loggers (HOBO Pendant G logger. The sensors were positioned in the high part of the neck to monitor head movements. Behaviour was simultaneously recorded using visual observation as a reference. Linear regression analysis between the measurement methods showed that the recorded feeding time (R2=0.90, n=12, P<0.001 was closely related to visual observations. In contrast, the number of visits was inadequately recorded by the 3D-accelerometer, showing a poor relationship with visual observations (R2=0.31, n=12, P<0.06. Results suggest that the use of accelerometer sensors can be a reliable and suitable technology for monitoring feeding behaviour of individual dairy cows in free stall housing. However, further research is necessary to develop an appropriate device able to detect and recognise the movements connected with the head movement during feeding. Such a device could be part of an automatic livestock management tool for the efficient monitoring and control of comfort and

  8. Emergy evaluation of contrasting dairy systems at multiple levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigne, Mathieu; Peyraud, Jean-Louis; Lecomte, Philippe; Corson, Michael S; Wilfart, Aurélie

    2013-11-15

    Emergy accounting (EmA) was applied to a range of dairy systems, from low-input smallholder systems in South Mali (SM), to intermediate-input systems in two regions of France, Poitou-Charentes (PC) and Bretagne (BR), to high-input systems on Reunion Island (RI). These systems were studied at three different levels: whole-farm (dairy system and cropping system), dairy-system (dairy herd and forage land), and herd (animals only). Dairy farms in SM used the lowest total emergy at all levels and was the highest user of renewable resources. Despite the low quality of resources consumed (crop residues and natural pasture), efficiency of their use was similar to that of industrialised inputs by intensive systems in RI, PC and BR. In addition, among the systems studied, SM dairy farms lay closest to environmental sustainability, contradicting the usual image of high environmental impact of cattle production in developing countries. EmA also revealed characteristics of the three intensive systems. Systems from RI and PC had lower resource transformation efficiency and higher environmental impacts than those from BR, due mainly to feeding strategies that differed due to differing socio-climatic constraints. Application of EmA at multiple levels revealed the importance of a multi-level analysis. While the whole-farm level assesses the overall contribution of the system to its environment, the dairy-system level is suitable for comparison of multi-product systems. In contrast, the herd level focuses on herd management and bypasses debates about definition of system boundaries by excluding land management. Combining all levels highlights the contribution of livestock to the global agricultural system and identifies inefficiencies and influences of system components on the environment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Swedish nursing students' experience of aspects important for their learning process and their ability to handle the complexity of the nursing degree program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Petra Lilja; Edberg, Anna-Karin

    2012-05-01

    The aim of the study was to explore nursing students' experiences of aspects important for their learning process and their ability to handle the complexity of the nursing degree program. The study was longitudinal and qualitative based on interviews with nursing students, six women and two men aged 20-36, during their three years of education. In all, seven patterns were found embracing aspects of importance for the students' learning: Having a clear goal, being able to re-evaluate one's ideas, being acknowledged, when the abstract becomes tangible, using one's own experiences as a tool for learning, hovering between closeness and distance regarding one's future profession and handling theory and practice in relation to one another. The results show the importance of providing clinical courses, strongly connected to the theoretical parts of the program and to use reflection and experience-based learning in the nursing program. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Greenhouse gas emissions in milk and dairy product chains: Improving the carbon footprint of dairy products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flysjoe, A.M.

    2012-11-01

    The present PhD project has focused on some of the most critical methodological aspects influencing GHG emission estimates of milk and dairy products and how the methodology can be improved. In addition, the Carbon Footprint (CF) for different types of dairy products has been analysed. Based on these results, mitigation options have been identified along the entire dairy value chain. The key methodological challenges analysed in the present study are: estimation of CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O emissions, assessment of CO{sub 2} emissions from land use change (LUC), co-product handling, and definition of the functional unit. Estimates of the biogenic emissions CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O are associated with large uncertainties due to the complexity and natural variation in biological processes. Accounting for these variations resulted in a {+-}30-50% variation in the CF for milk in Sweden and New Zealand (excluding emissions from LUC). The inclusion of emissions from LUC can drastically affect the CF of dairy products, and different models can even provide contradictory results. Thus, it is suggested that emissions associated with LUC are reported separately and that underlying assumptions are clearly explained. Accounting for the by-product beef is decisive for the CF of milk, and when designing future strategies for the dairy sector, milk and meat production needs to be addressed in an integrated approach. It is shown that an increase in milk yield per cow does not necessarily result in a lower CF of milk, when taking into account the alternative production of the by-product beef. This demonstrates that it is important to investigate interactions between different product chains, i.e. to apply system thinking. The CF of dairy products from Arla Foods analysed in the present study range from: 1.2-5.5 kg CO{sub 2}e per kg fresh dairy products, 7.3-10.9 kg CO{sub 2}e per kg butter and butter blends, 4.5-9.9 kg CO{sub 2}e per kg cheese, and 1.0-17.4 kg CO{sub 2}e per kg milk

  11. Association between dairy food consumption and risk of myocardial infarction in women differs by type of dairy food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Emma; Larsson, Susanna C; Wolk, Alicja; Åkesson, Agneta

    2013-01-01

    The relation between dairy foods, particularly specific foods, and risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains unclear. We examined the association between total, as well as specific, dairy food intakes and incidence of myocardial infarction (MI) in a prospective population-based cohort. We followed 33,636 women (aged 48-83 y), free from CVD, cancer, and diabetes at baseline (1997), in the Swedish Mammography Cohort. Consumption of milk, cultured milk/yogurt, cheese, cream, crème fraiche, and butter was obtained from a validated self-administered FFQ at baseline. We used Cox proportional hazards regression models to estimate HRs and 95% CIs, adjusted for relevant CVD risk factors. MI incidence was ascertained from national registries. Over 11.6 y of follow-up, we ascertained 1392 cases of MI. When the highest quintile was compared with the lowest quintile, total dairy food intake was inversely associated with MI risk [multivariable adjusted HR: 0.77 (95% CI: 0.63, 0.95)]. Among specific dairy food products, total cheese was inversely associated [HR: 0.74 (95% CI: 0.60, 0.91)] and butter used on bread but not on cooking was positively associated [HR: 1.34 (95% CI: 1.02, 1.75)] with MI risk. Other specific dairy food products were not significantly associated with MI risk. No differences were observed between consumption of specific low-fat and high-fat dairy foods, expressed as either absolute intakes or intakes relative to the total, and MI risk. Failure to consider dairy foods as a heterogeneous group in future studies could hamper important insights of relevance for the development of dietary guidelines.

  12. Estimation of risk management effects on revenue and purchased feed costs on US dairy farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadrich, Joleen C; Johnson, Kamina K

    2015-09-01

    Variations in milk and feed prices directly affect dairy farm risk management decisions. This research used data from the 2010 US Department of Agriculture-Agricultural Resource Management Surveys phase III dairy survey to examine how risk management tools affected revenues and expenses across US dairy farms. The survey was sent to 26 states and collected information on costs and returns to individual dairy farms. This research used the information from milk sales, crops sales, feed expenses, and farm and operator characteristics, as well as the use of risk management tools. Matching methodology was used to evaluate the effect of 5 independent risk management tools on revenues and expenses: selling milk to a cooperative, using a commodity contract to sell grain, feeding homegrown forage at a basic and intensive level, and use of a nutritionist. Results showed that dairy farms located in the Midwest and East benefit from selling milk to a cooperative and using commodity contracts to sell grain. Across the United States, using a nutritionist increased total feed costs, whereas a feeding program that included more than 65% homegrown forages decreased total feed costs. Results point to benefits from educational programming on risk management tools that are region specific rather than a broad generalization to all US dairy farmers. Copyright © 2015 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. An Assessment of Ammonia Emissions from Dairy Facilities in Pennsylvania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James D. Ferguson

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available A survey of 715 Holstein dairy farms in Pennsylvania was used to construct demographics for the average Holstein dairy farm. The average Holstein dairy farm was composed of 69 lactating cows; 11 nonlactating, pregnant cows; 44 heifers; and 18 calves. Milk production averaged 27.3 kg (60.0 lb. Crop area averaged 73.6 ha. Milk production, crop area and type, average county yields, and herd animal groups were used to construct a typical feeding program for these farms. Typical rations were constructed for six feeding groups (three milk production groups, one nonlactating group, two heifer groups to meet milk production, pregnancy, and growth requirements. Rations were constructed based on three forage qualities (excellent, average, and poor typically observed on Pennsylvania dairy farms. Data for animal description (milk production, body weight, growth, and pregnancy status and ration components and amounts consumed for each animal group were input into the excretion model of the Dairy Nutrient Planner computer program (DNP. Excretion of fecal N and dry matter (DM, urinary N, and total P and K were produced for each animal group and used to assess potential volatile losses of N. Work at the Marshak Dairy, New Bolton Center, indicates the majority of urinary N is rapidly lost as ammonia from dairy facilities. Based on this observation, the losses of N as ammonia were estimated to be 4.63, 4.62, and 4.28�tonne/year for the farm with excellent, average, and poor quality forages, respectively. Volatile losses of N may be reduced most by controlling levels of urea in urine. Urinary N may be reduced through dietary manipulation of protein and carbohydrate sources. Conversion of urea to ammonia may be reduced by altering the pH of barn floors and gutters. Entrapment of ammonia may be accomplished by acidification of manure slurry. Atmospheric ammonia contributes to acid rain, eutrophication of estuaries and lakes, and particulate air pollution

  14. Somatotropin and prolactin profile characteristics in proven AI dairy sires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazmer, G W; Canfield, R W; Bean, B

    1991-04-01

    Blood samples were collected at 20-min intervals for 8 h from 16 Holstein sires, each of which had U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and Northeast AI Sire Comparison (NEAISC) progeny test evaluation data available. Plasma somatotropin (ST) and prolactin (PRL) concentrations were measured, and resulting endocrine profiles were analyzed by PULSAR, a microcomputer-based hormone peak-detection program. The number of ST peaks during the sampling period was negatively related to USDA Predicted Transmitting Ability (PTA) for fat yield, milk, and fat product value (PTA+), and for milk, fat, and protein product value (PRO+), and ST peak length was negatively related to PTA for protein percentage (PTA %P). Interpeak interval for ST was positively related to NEAISC percentage of Protein Deviation (%P). Prolactin peak length was correlated positively with both USDA PTA %P and NEAISC %P, and peak frequency was correlated positively with NEAISC %P. Interpeak interval for PRL was related positively to NEAISC Milk and Fat Deviations. Area under PRL profile was negatively related (P less than .05) to USDA PTA+ and PRO+, and NEAISC Fat Deviation and Dollars. The results indicated that endocrine traits in mature dairy sires are correlated with genetic merit for economically important production traits and suggested that such profile characteristics may be useful in selecting young sires for progeny testing programs.

  15. Investigating brand loyalty using Dirichlet benchmarks: The case of light dairy products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krystallis, Athanasios; Chrysochou, Polymeros

    constitutes an indication of this success. The present work aims to investigate consumer loyalty to light dairy (milk and yoghurt) brands. First, basic Brand Performance Measures (BPMs) are empirically estimated to describe market structure of the dairy categories under investigation. Then, the Dirichlet...... model (Ehrenberg et al., 2004) was fitted to the empirical data, pointing out to theoretical category loyalty measures. Grouping of the dairy categories under investigation according to their purchase frequency and brand penetration then follows. The work concludes with the overall estimation...... of consumer loyalty to the light dairy sub-category compared to other sub-categories that exist within the wider dairy categories under investigation. The total market share of light brands is found to be directly comparable with that of full fat brands. The importance of the light sub-category is indicated...

  16. The effect of housing on dairy cattle behavior during the transition period

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campler, Magnus Robert Bertil

    2014-01-01

    Lying- and feeding behavior in dairy cows are important factors for assessing welfare, and there is considerable knowledge about how the housing of dairy cows can affect these behaviors. To date, most studies on dairy cow behavior has focused on the lactation period, but there is less knowledge...... about the behavior of dairy cows‘ during the transition period around calving (defined as 3 weeks before calving to 3 weeks after calving). During the transition period, dairy cows undergo both physical- and behavioral changes during a short time span. Since most cows are housed in facilities...... with freestalls until the day before calving or signs of imminent calving in Denmark (and northern Europe), the aim of this PhD was to investigate the effect of a straw yard housing system during the last 4 weeks of the dry period compared to freestalls on; 1) lying-, feeding- and agonistic behavior before...

  17. Does Green Feed Result in Healthier Dairy Products?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werner, Louise Bruun

    by the degradation of the chlorophyll molecule, is a fatty acid uniquely found in ruminant fat. PA has been suggested to have beneficial properties with regard to metabolic disorders. The content of milk fat PA has been shown to increase with the content of green feed fed to dairy cows. Hence, increasing green feed...... has the potential to modify the content of this FA in commercially sold dairy products. The objective of the first part of this PhD thesis was to examine if dairy products derived from cows fed green plant material have protective effect against risk markers of the metabolic syndrome compared to milk...... greenhouse gas emissions (GHGE) on a per kg basis compared to vegetable products. Therefore, a change toward a less animal-dependent diet is also one of the solutions often suggested to reduce GHGE. However, products of animal origin also have an important place in a healthy diet because of their high...

  18. Methodologies for the Characterization of the Quality of Dairy Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karoui, Romdhane

    The growing interest of consumers in food quality and safety issues has contributed to the increasing demand for sensitive and rapid analytical technologies. Physicochemical, textural, sensory, etc., methods have been used to evaluate the quality and authenticity of milk and dairy products. Despite the importance of these standard methods, they are expensive and time consuming. Recently, spectroscopic methods have shown great potential due to speed of analysis, minimal sample preparation, high repeatability, low cost, and, most of all, the fact that these techniques are noninvasive and nondestructive and, therefore, could be applied to any on-line monitoring system. This chapter gave examples of the application of the most commonly traditional methods for the determination of the quality of milk and dairy products. A special focus is devoted to the use of infrared and fluorescence spectroscopies for the evaluation of the quality of dairy products. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Does Green Feed Result in Healthier Dairy Products?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werner, Louise Bruun

    has the potential to modify the content of this FA in commercially sold dairy products. The objective of the first part of this PhD thesis was to examine if dairy products derived from cows fed green plant material have protective effect against risk markers of the metabolic syndrome compared to milk...... greenhouse gas emissions (GHGE) on a per kg basis compared to vegetable products. Therefore, a change toward a less animal-dependent diet is also one of the solutions often suggested to reduce GHGE. However, products of animal origin also have an important place in a healthy diet because of their high...... by the degradation of the chlorophyll molecule, is a fatty acid uniquely found in ruminant fat. PA has been suggested to have beneficial properties with regard to metabolic disorders. The content of milk fat PA has been shown to increase with the content of green feed fed to dairy cows. Hence, increasing green feed...

  20. Composition of lactic acid bacteria in dairy products and their effect on tourism development of inner Mongolia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Liu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the development of dairy industry in Inner Mongolia has accelerated its economic growth, and its grassland culture has become appealing to the public. As an important support industry for the economic development in tourism area of Inner Mongolia, dairy industry can create economic value for the development of tourism. In view of the importance of dairy products-the habitat of lactic acid bacteria, this study aims to reveal the composition of lactic acid bacteria in dairy products and isolate lactic acid bacteria resources. Firstly, we selected 60 traditional dairy product samples (from the pasture in scenic area of Inner Mongolia as the research objects. Based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, lactic acid bacteria in the samples were isolated and identified; Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (q-PCR technology was applied to the comparative analysis on the population of dominant bacteria in samples. It was found that there were significant differences in the numbers of dominant bacteria in different dairy products. With the advantages of improving nutritional value and extending storage time of dairy products, lactic acid bacteria is contributive to the development of dairy industry, which further promotes the prosperity of economy and tourism. Therefore, it is of great importance to study the composition of lactic acid bacteria in dairy products.

  1. Value-Added Dairy Products from Grass-Based Dairy Farms: A Case Study in Vermont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qingbin; Parsons, Robert; Colby, Jennifer; Castle, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    On-farm processing of value-added dairy products can be a way for small dairy farms to diversify production and increase revenue. This article examines characteristics of three groups of Vermont farmers who have grass-based dairy farms--those producing value-added dairy products, those interested in such products, and those not interested in such…

  2. Dairy Foods and Dairy Proteins in the Management of Type 2 Diabetes: A Systematic Review of the Clinical Evidence12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasin, Gonca; Comerford, Kevin B

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a growing public health concern affecting hundreds of millions of people worldwide and costing the global economy hundreds of billions of dollars annually. This chronic disease damages the blood vessels and increases the risk of other cardiometabolic ailments such as cardiovascular disease and stroke. If left unmanaged it can also lead to nerve damage, kidney damage, blindness, and amputation. For the most part, many of these symptoms can be prevented or reduced through simple dietary modifications and proper nutrition. Therefore, identifying relatively inexpensive and easily implementable dietary modifications for the prevention and management of T2DM is of considerable value to human health and healthcare modalities around the globe. Protein-rich dairy products have consistently been shown in epidemiologic studies to be beneficial for reducing the risk of developing T2DM. The clinical evidence regarding both dairy foods and dairy proteins (i.e., casein and whey protein) have shown promise for improving insulin secretion in individuals with T2DM. However, the clinical research on dairy protein supplementation in subjects with T2DM has been limited to acute studies. These studies have been mostly descriptive and have not been focused on important T2DM endpoints such as prevention, management, or treatment. Long-term studies are clearly needed to help researchers and medical professionals better understand the effects of consistent dairy protein intake on the metabolic health of humans with T2DM. PMID:25979490

  3. THE FEATURES AND THE PROBLEMS OF STRATEGIC DEVELOPMENT OF A DAIRY SUBCOMPLEX ORGANIZATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Анна Николаевна Рида

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the research is finding out the specific features and problems of strategic development of an agricultural and overworking enterprises of a dairy subcomplex. The characteristic of functional structure of a dairy subcomplex is given in the article. The importance of a dairy subcomplex in ensuring food security of the country is designated. Specific features of a dairy subcomplex which should be considered in the course of strategic management of the enterprises of this type of economic activity are presented. The main problems of development of the organizations of a dairy animal husbandry and the dairy industry are revealed: high capital intensity of investment projects, use of outdated technologies, low efficiency of dairy animal husbandry, Russia's accession to the World Trade Organization etc. On the basis of the conducted research there was drawn a conclusion that one of the directions of strategic development of a dairy subcomplex is supposed to be a creation of the cooperated and integrated structures.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.12731/2218-7405-2013-6-40

  4. A systems approach to the South African dairy industry

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Elsabe Gagiano

    national dairy herd can only increase by 1 - 3% per life cycle through normal population growth. Short- ... and milk products between 2005 and 2007 resulted in net imports during the last three years (Anonymous, ... Using these figures the productive herd life of cows not participating in milk recording can be deducted by.

  5. Alterations in reproductive hormones during heat stress in dairy cattle

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In dairy cows inseminated during the hot months of the year, there is a decrease in fertility. Different factors contribute to this situation; the most important are a consequence of increased temperature and humidity that result in a decreased expression of overt estrus and a reduction in appetite and dry matter intake.

  6. Genomic selection for feed efficiency in dairy cattle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pryce, J.E.; Wales, W.J.; Haas, de Y.; Veerkamp, R.F.; Hayes, B.J.

    2014-01-01

    Feed is a major component of variable costs associated with dairy systems and is therefore an important consideration for breeding objectives. As a result, measures of feed efficiency are becoming popular traits for genetic analyses. Already, several countries account for feed efficiency in their

  7. Fertility of Zero-Grazed Dairy Cattle following Hormone Treatment ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Reproduction is important to dairy herds and achievement of economically optimal performance still remains a substantial multifactorial challenge in many herds. Poor estrus expression and detection, repeat breeding, prolonged postpartum anestrus and delayed onset of puberty are some of the limiting factors to attainment ...

  8. Nitrogen and amino acid metabolism in dairy cows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tamminga, S.

    1981-01-01

    For the process of milk production, the dairy cow requires nutrients of which energy supplying nutrients and protein or amino acid supplying nutrients are the most important. Amino acid supplying nutrients have to be absorbed from the small intestine and the research reported in this thesis mainly

  9. The growing importance of costs and ways to maintain cost control on a large program in today's competitive environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, J. J.; Grimes, D. W.; Gaetano, F. W.

    1973-01-01

    Discussion of management techniques that make it possible to overcome inflationary and developmental cost rises while holding schedule and performance fixed in scientific space programs. The techniques reviewed pertain to high personnel motivation, continual review of contract rigidity for de facto modification by senior judgment, standardization vs design innovation, cooperative customer/contractor goal orientation vs task orientation, and deep real-time management visibility.

  10. Going Domestic: Importing the Study Abroad Experience. The Development of a Multicultural New York City Study Away Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Susan Hayes; Huffman, Carolyn; Brackney, Dana E; Cuddy, Alyssa

    2017-07-01

    Significant off-campus domestic study away experiences have been shown to be a transformative active learning environment for students and achieve similar learning outcomes as study abroad programs. This manuscript describes the conception, development, and pedagogical approach of a faculty-led domestic study away experience in New York City for pre-licensure and post-licensure nursing students as an active learning strategy for developing cultural competence. Students participated in service-learning activities that illuminated the realities and challenges persons from other cultures face as they interact with health care in a culture that is not their own. In partnership with New York Cares©, students were immersed in well-established ongoing sustainable community-based projects. These experiences fostered reflective conversations between community members, student participants, and faculty regarding social factors, cultural issues and needs, and global issues and trends. Through the New York study away program, students were able to broaden their perspectives about social factors and culture beyond geographic or ethnic boundaries and apply these service experiences to their nursing practice. Study away programs are an excellent strategy for nursing educators to prepare students for care of multicultural populations and for proficiency in cultural competency within the globalization of the United States. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Expression profiles of genes regulating dairy cow fertility: recent findings, ongoing activities and future possibilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beerda, B.; Wyszynska-Koko, J.; Pas, te M.F.W.; Wit, de A.A.C.; Veerkamp, R.F.

    2008-01-01

    Subfertility has negative effects for dairy farm profitability, animal welfare and sustainability of animal production. Increasing herd sizes and economic pressures restrict the amount of time that farmers can spend on counteractive management Genetic improvement will become increasingly important

  12. Applications and cost benefits of sexed semen in pasture-based dairy production systems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Butler, S T; Hutchinson, I A; Cromie, A R; Shalloo, L

    2014-01-01

    .... The negative implications of the reduced fertility of sexed semen are amplified in seasonal systems of dairy production, as the importance of fertility is greater in these systems compared with year...

  13. DairyGHG: a tool for evaluating the greenhouse gas emissions and carbon footprint of dairy production systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and their potential impact on the environment have become important national and international concerns. Dairy production, along with all other animal agriculture, is a recognized source of GHG emissions, but little information exists on the net emissions from our farm...

  14. A tale of two dairies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estabrook, Barry

    2010-01-01

    Milk has always been susceptible to price fluctuations. Farmers are used to putting away money during good times to see themselves through lean times. Recently, however, the cycles have become more violent, with lows falling lower and highs rising not quite so high and the intervals between peaks and valleys shrinking. In 1970, when milk was bringing farmers the same amount that it is today, there were nearly 650,000 dairy farms in the United States. Now there are fewer than one tenth as many, only about 54,000. The largest 1 percent of dairy farms (a figure than includes only enormous factory farms with over 2,000 cows) produced nearly one quarter of the milk we consume. Recently, dairy farmers banded together to propose a radical solution to the dairy crisis. In order to survive, they concluded, American dairy farmers would have to join together to control the supply of milk, an approach along lines similar to the one taken in Canada.

  15. Dairy cow monitoring by RFID

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stevan Stankovski

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Dairy cows identification and monitoring on small cattle farms are usually based on the utilization of barcode technology. This kind of identification technology is unsuitable for dairy cows milking and feeding process automation. Radio Frequency Identification (RFID technology is a better solution in this case. This paper describes the research and implementation of the milking cycle´s automated monitoring with the use of RFID tags conducted on a small cattle farm in the Republic of Serbia. This solution is based on RFID system which consists of two parts. First part includes control box, two Ultra High Frequency (UHF RFID readers operating at frequency of 915 MHz and RFID tags glued onto the dairy cow ear labels. Second part includes software modules for acquisition and collecting data from RFID tags to build up an archive due to supervision and analysis of the milking cycle. Reading accuracy of RFID system in the observed period was 99.8 % in average. A group of dairy cows having a settled milking cycle within an interval of 12h ± 5 % had a 1.5 % better yield and a 0.08 better quality in comparison with a group of dairy cows having a milking cycle variance higher than 20 %. RFID system implemented in described way can be easily integrated into a new or existing farm management system in order to have better production results which depend on several factors including settled milking cycles.

  16. 7 CFR 58.519 - Dairy products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Dairy products. 58.519 Section 58.519 Agriculture..., GENERAL SPECIFICATIONS FOR APPROVED PLANTS AND STANDARDS FOR GRADES OF DAIRY PRODUCTS 1 General... Material § 58.519 Dairy products. (a) Raw skim milk. All raw skim milk obtained from a secondary source...

  17. Examining the occurrence of residues of flunixin meglumine in cull dairy cows by use of the flunixin cull cow survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deyrup, Cynthia L; Southern, Kristal J; Cornett, Julie A; Shultz, Craig E; Cera, Deborah A

    2012-07-15

    To determine whether cull dairy cows with signs of certain clinical conditions, termed suspect, are more likely than healthy-appearing cull dairy cows to have violative concentrations of flunixin meglumine in their tissues at slaughter. Cross-sectional study. 961 cull dairy cows. Suspect cull dairy cows were selected from 21 beef slaughter establishments with a high production volume of dairy cows, and kidney and liver tissues were collected for screening. Kidney tissues were screened for antibiotics and sulfonamides with the fast antimicrobial screening test (FAST). Liver tissues were screened for flunixin meglumine with an ELISA, and quantitative analysis of ELISA-positive samples was performed with high-performance liquid chromatography. During the same time period, liver tissues from 251 healthy-appearing cull dairy cows were collected for the Food Safety and Inspection Service National Residue Program Scheduled Sampling Plan, but were screened only for flunixin meglumine. Of 710 suspect cull dairy cows, 50 (7.04%) had liver tissue flunixin concentrations higher than the flunixin tolerance concentration (0.125 ppm). Thirty-one of 168 (18.45%) FAST-positive and 19 of 542 (3.51%) FAST-negative suspect cull dairy cows had violative tissue flunixin concentrations. Two of the 251 (0.80%) healthy-appearing cull dairy cows had violative tissue flunixin concentrations. Suspect cull dairy cows, especially those that were also FAST positive, had a significantly higher incidence of violative tissue flunixin concentrations than healthy-appearing cull dairy cows at slaughter. Targeted sampling plans for flunixin meglumine in suspect dairy cows can help to support more efficient use of resources and further safeguard the nation's food supply.

  18. SIMS(DAIRY): a modelling framework to identify sustainable dairy farms in the UK. Framework description and test for organic systems and N fertiliser optimisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Prado, A; Misselbrook, T; Chadwick, D; Hopkins, A; Dewhurst, R J; Davison, P; Butler, A; Schröder, J; Scholefield, D

    2011-09-01

    Multiple demands are placed on farming systems today. Society, national legislation and market forces seek what could be seen as conflicting outcomes from our agricultural systems, e.g. food quality, affordable prices, a healthy environmental, consideration of animal welfare, biodiversity etc., Many of these demands, or desirable outcomes, are interrelated, so reaching one goal may often compromise another and, importantly, pose a risk to the economic viability of the farm. SIMS(DAIRY), a farm-scale model, was used to explore this complexity for dairy farm systems. SIMS(DAIRY) integrates existing approaches to simulate the effect of interactions between farm management, climate and soil characteristics on losses of nitrogen, phosphorus and carbon. The effects on farm profitability and attributes of biodiversity, milk quality, soil quality and animal welfare are also included. SIMS(DAIRY) can also be used to optimise fertiliser N. In this paper we discuss some limitations and strengths of using SIMS(DAIRY) compared to other modelling approaches and propose some potential improvements. Using the model we evaluated the sustainability of organic dairy systems compared with conventional dairy farms under non-optimised and optimised fertiliser N use. Model outputs showed for example, that organic dairy systems based on grass-clover swards and maize silage resulted in much smaller total GHG emissions per l of milk and slightly smaller losses of NO(3) leaching and NO(x) emissions per l of milk compared with the grassland/maize-based conventional systems. These differences were essentially because the conventional systems rely on indirect energy use for 'fixing' N compared with biological N fixation for the organic systems. SIMS(DAIRY) runs also showed some other potential benefits from the organic systems compared with conventional systems in terms of financial performance and soil quality and biodiversity scores. Optimisation of fertiliser N timings and rates showed a

  19. Impact of methodology on the results of economic evaluations of varicella vaccination programs: is it important for decision-making?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Coelho de Soárez

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to review the literature on economic evaluation of childhood varicella vaccination programs and to discuss how heterogeneity in methodological aspects and estimation of parameters can affect the studies' results. After applying the inclusion criteria, 27 studies published from 1980 to 2008 were analyzed in relation to methodological differences. There was great heterogeneity in the perspective adopted, evaluation of indirect costs, type of model used, modeling of the effect on herpes zoster, and estimation of vaccine price and efficacy parameters. The factor with the greatest impact on results was the inclusion of indirect costs, followed by the perspective adopted and vaccine price. The choice of a particular methodological aspect or parameter affected the studies' results and conclusions. It is essential that authors present these choices transparently so that users of economic evaluations understand the implications of such choices and the direction in which the results of the analysis were conducted.

  20. EU`s research programs - an important source for Norwegian innovation; EUs forskningsprogrammer - en viktig kilde til norsk innovasjon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-05-01

    This document presents some examples of the Norwegian participation in the research programs of the European Union (EU). By the end of 1997, Norwegian researchers had taken part in the formulation of more than 2400 applications. Over 660 applications with Norwegian participation have been granted support from the EU for common European projects. The examples most directly relating to energy technology and environment are from the following fields: (1) Well technology (CENET project). Utilization of abandoned oil- and gas installations to the benefit of the fisheries, (2) Climate research based on forest observations (FOREST project), (3) Improved methods of analysing and characterising the sea floor (ISACS project), (4) Water-based hydraulic systems, (5) Surface treatment of aluminium, (6) The Arctic environment, (7) Solar cells

  1. Smallholder dairy production in Northern Malawi: production practices and constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tebug, Stanly Fon; Kasulo, Victor; Chikagwa-Malunga, Susan; Wiedemann, Steffi; Roberts, David J; Chagunda, Mizeck G G

    2012-01-01

    Milk production in Malawi is still unsatisfactory despite efforts by different stakeholders to boost the dairy sector. To investigate the roots of the problem, a survey on the current production practices and constraints on smallholder dairy farming was conducted in the Northern Region of the country. A total of 210 farmers were interviewed. The results revealed that farmers had small herd sizes in the region with an average of 2.2 ± 0.6 cattle per farmer. Average herd size was larger in male-managed farms than in female-managed farms (2.6 ± 2.8 vs. 1.8 ± 1.3), farmers with more than 5 years of dairy farming experience had larger herds than those with less experience (2.6 ± 2.8 vs. 1.9 ± 1. 2) and farmers who grazed their animals tended to have larger herds than those that stall-fed their animals (4.4 ± 5.1 vs. 1.9 ± 1.3). Average milk production was 8.2 ± 6.5 l per cow per day. Higher average daily milk production was observed in farmers with above primary school education (10.3 ± 8.3 vs. 7.7 ± 5.6), those with dairy farming as main activity (9.3 ± 6.6 vs. 6. 5 ± 6.1) and farmers with more than 2 years of experience in dairy farming (9.3 ± 6.3 vs. 6.1 ± 6.4). Unreliable supply of improved animal genetics, poor animal health, feed shortage and poor prices for milk were considered to be the most important constraints to smallholder dairy farming in descending order.

  2. Dairy foods and health in Asians: Taiwanese considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Meei-Shyuan; Wahlqvist, Mark L; Peng, Cheau-Jane

    2015-01-01

    The health relevance of dairy products has mostly been judged by their abundant nutrients (protein, calcium and riboflavin) and recommendations for these derived in lactase-persistent Caucasian populations. Extrapolation to Asians who are generally lactase non-persisters may not be biologically, culturally or environmentally sound. A number of studies, especially among north-east Asians as in Taiwan, provide guidance for their optimal dairy intakes. In Taiwan, the NAHSIT (Nutrition and Health Surveys in Taiwan) linked to the National Health Insurance and Death Registry data bases provide most of the evidence. Cultural and socio-economic barriers create population resistance to increase dairy consumption beyond one serving per day as reflected in food balance sheet and repeat survey trend analyses. For the morbidity and mortality patterns principally seen in Asia, some, but not too much, dairy is to be preferred. This applies to all-cause and cardiovascular, especially stroke, mortality, to the risk of overfatness (by BMI and abdominal circumference) and diabetes and very likely to fracture and its sequelae. In Taiwan, there is no apparent association with total cancer mortality, but among Europeans, there may be protection. Historically, while fermented mammalian milks have been consumed in south Asia and various Asian subgroups and regions, most of the uptake of dairy in Asia after World War 2 has been from imported powdered milk or fresh liquid milk, encouraged further by the use of yogurts and popularization of milk teas and coffee. Asian dietary guidelines and clinical nutrition protocols need to encourage a modest, asymptomatic dairy intake.

  3. Dairy donkey: an alternative building layout

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Bibbiani

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In Italy, donkey dairies are growing in popularity to produce an alternative milk source for human infants. The use of donkey milk is not limited to the paediatric field, being used in geriatric nutrition and in the cosmetic industry. In 2010, the Department of Veterinary Science, University of Pisa, was involved in a project supported by the Tuscany Region Rural Development Fund 2007- 2013 dealing with the creation of a donkey milk productive chain. The project has as its main partner the Bandite di Scarlino, an agro-forestry complex of considerable size. It covers approximately 9000 hectares, which fall in Scarlino, Castiglione della Pescaia, Follonica and Gavorrano municipalities, under Tuscany regional control. The so-called FILAMI project (Filiera Latte Asino Amiatino, acronym of the goal of the project in Italian had among its goals helping preserve an indigenous breed of donkeys called Amiatina. Salimei (2011 assessed that the presence of the foal during milking does not affect milk ejection in jennies (the female donkey adapted to the milking procedure, but when foals are not present the milking routine is more manageable for the animals and for optimal milk harvest; in accordance, in the present farming system the jenny has been kept separately from the foal during the milking session. To this purpose, the stable, the milking parlour and the paddocks must be well organised with a proper milking routine. Milking facilities must be designed for the milk treatment and storage at low temperature or for freezing. Currently, the milk undergoes a pasteurisation cycle for human consumption, or directed to the cosmetic industry. Moreover, the milking facilities should fulfil the creation of a milk collection centre in order to play an important role between the dairy donkey farms and the dairy industry. In this paper, the technical and technological aspects of the donkey stable, paddocks, milking parlour, mobile milking unit, and processing

  4. Food Safety Knowledge, Attitudes and Behavior among Dairy Plant Workers in Beijing, Northern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yan; Ji, Hua; Chen, Li-Jun; Jiang, Rong; Wu, Yong-Ning

    2018-01-03

    The safety of milk and dairy products has always been one of the focuses of consumers, the food industry and regulatory agencies. The purpose of this study was to gain insight into the food safety knowledge, attitudes and behavior of dairy plant workers. A cross-sectional survey was performed between May and August 2015 in three dairy plants in Beijing, northern China. A total of 194 dairy plant workers were interviewed to collect information on food safety knowledge, attitudes and self-reported behavior. The 194 dairy plant workers interviewed showed a sufficient level of knowledge (mean score 34 on a scale from 0-58), perfect attitudes (mean score 17 on a scale from 0-18), and perfect behavior (mean score 38 on a scale from 8-40). Only 39% of workers correctly determined specific pathogens or diseases that could be conveyed through milk and dairy products. 24% of workers knew the correct method of washing hands. A significant positive association was observed between attitudes and knowledge ( p food safety knowledge, attitudes, and behavior ( p food hazards and hand hygiene remains an issue that needs to be emphasized in future training programs. Education level is a determinant of attitudes and behavior with regard to the proper handling of milk and dairy products.

  5. Lactic acid bacteria in dairy food: surface characterization and interactions with food matrix components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgain, J; Scher, J; Francius, G; Borges, F; Corgneau, M; Revol-Junelles, A M; Cailliez-Grimal, C; Gaiani, C

    2014-11-01

    This review gives an overview of the importance of interactions occurring in dairy matrices between Lactic Acid Bacteria and milk components. Dairy products are important sources of biological active compounds of particular relevance to human health. These compounds include immunoglobulins, whey proteins and peptides, polar lipids, and lactic acid bacteria including probiotics. A better understanding of interactions between bioactive components and their delivery matrix may successfully improve their transport to their target site of action. Pioneering research on probiotic lactic acid bacteria has mainly focused on their host effects. However, very little is known about their interaction with dairy ingredients. Such knowledge could contribute to designing new and more efficient dairy food, and to better understand relationships between milk constituents. The purpose of this review is first to provide an overview of the current knowledge about the biomolecules produced on bacterial surface and the composition of the dairy matter. In order to understand how bacteria interact with dairy molecules, adhesion mechanisms are subsequently reviewed with a special focus on the environmental conditions affecting bacterial adhesion. Methods dedicated to investigate the bacterial surface and to decipher interactions between bacteria and abiotic dairy components are also detailed. Finally, relevant industrial implications of these interactions are presented and discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Delivering Improved Nutrition: Dairy Ingredients in Food Aid Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlossman, Nina

    2016-03-01

    The United States has a long history of food assistance for humanitarian need. The Food for Peace Act of 1954 established the United States' permanent food assistance program which has fed over 3 billion people in 150 countries worldwide through thousands of partner organizations. In 60 years, the program has evolved and will continue to do so. Recently, the program has gone from a focus on quantity of food shipped to quality food assistance from improved products, programs, and processes to effectively meet the needs of different vulnerable groups. The current debate focuses on the appropriateness of using fortified blended foods to prevent and treat malnutrition during the first 1000 days of life. Dairy ingredients have been at the center of this debate; they were included initially in fortified blended, removed in the 1980s, and now reincorporated into fortified therapeutic and supplemental foods. Improved quality food baskets and effective nutrition programming to prevent and treat malnutrition were developed through multisectoral collaboration between government and nongovernment organizations. The US Agency for International Development has focused on improving nutrition through development programs often tied to health, education, and agriculture. The years since 2008 have been a particularly intense period for improvement. The Food Aid Quality Review was established to update current food aid programming products, program implementation, cost-effectiveness, and interagency processes. Trials are underway to harmonize the areas of multisectoral nutrition programming and gather more evidence on the effects of dairy ingredients in food aid products. © The Author(s) 2016.

  7. Impact of production strategies and animal performance on economic values of dairy sheep traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupová, Z; Wolfová, M; Krupa, E; Oravcová, M; Daňo, J; Huba, J; Polák, P

    2012-03-01

    The objective of this study was to carry out a sensitivity analysis on the impact of various production strategies and performance levels on the relative economic values (REVs) of traits in dairy sheep. A bio-economic model implemented in the program package ECOWEIGHT was used to simulate the profit function for a semi-extensive production system with the Slovak multi-purpose breed Improved Valachian and to calculate the REV of 14 production and functional traits. The following production strategies were analysed: differing proportions of milk processed to cheese, customary weaning and early weaning of lambs with immediate sale or sale after artificial rearing, seasonal lambing in winter and aseasonal lambing in autumn. Results of the sensitivity analysis are presented in detail for the four economically most important traits: 150 days milk yield, conception rate of ewes, litter size and ewe productive lifetime. Impacts of the differences in the mean value of each of these four traits on REVs of all other traits were also examined. Simulated changes in the production circumstances had a higher impact on the REV for milk yield than on REVs of the other traits investigated. The proportion of milk processed to cheese, weaning management strategy for lambs and level of milk yield were the main factors influencing the REV of milk yield. The REVs for conception rate of ewes were highly sensitive to the current mean level of the trait. The REV of ewe productive lifetime was most sensitive to variation in ewe conception rate, and the REV of litter size was most affected by weaning strategy for lambs. On the basis of the results of sensitivity analyses, it is recommended that economic values of traits for the overall breeding objective for dairy sheep be calculated as the weighted average of the economic values obtained for the most common production strategies of Slovak dairy sheep farms and that economic values be adjusted after substantial changes in performance levels

  8. Management and use of dairy cattle feed resources on smallholder certified organic pineapple farms in Central Uganda

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiggundu, Muhammad; Kabi, Fred; Vaarst, Mette

    2014-01-01

    as major dairy cattle feed resources while only 19% reported using elephant grass. Banana peels (25.1%) and sweet potato vines (24.7%) were the most important crop residues fed to cattle. Farmers reported high cost of concentrates and scarcity of feeds as their biggest challenges in dairy cattle production...

  9. 7 CFR 1494.1200 - Program operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... operation of the Dairy Export Incentive Program (DEIP) of the Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC). Under the... Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) COMMODITY CREDIT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LOANS, PURCHASES, AND OTHER OPERATIONS EXPORT BONUS PROGRAMS Dairy Export Incentive...

  10. Light-load maximal lifting velocity full squat training program improves important physical and skill characteristics in futsal players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Torrelo, Julio; Rodríguez-Rosell, David; González-Badillo, Juan José

    2017-05-01

    This study aimed to compare the effect of 6 weeks of resistance training or combined resistance training and change of direction exercises on physical performance and motor skills in futsal players. Thirty-four futsal players were divided into full squat group (SG, n = 12), combined full squat and change of direction exercises group (S+CDG, n = 12) and control group (CG, n = 10). The resistance training for SG consisted of full squat with low load (~45-58% 1RM) and low volume (4-6 repetitions), whereas the S+CDG performed the same resistance training program combined with loaded change of direction. Sprint time in 10 and 20 m, change of direction test, countermovement vertical jump (CMJ) height, maximal strength and force-velocity relationship in full squat exercise, kicking speed ball (BS mean ) and repeated sprint ability (RSA mean ) were selected as testing variables. Both experimental groups showed significant improvements for CMJ, BS mean and all strength parameters. Only SG resulted in significant sprint gains, whereas S+CDG also achieved significant improvements in RSA mean . The CG remained unchanged after training period. No significant differences were found between both experimental groups. These findings suggest that only 12 sessions of either lightweight resistance training alone, lifting the load at maximal intended velocity or combined with change of direction exercises is enough to improve several physical and skills capacities critical to futsal performance in adult players.

  11. Assessing the Importance of Domestic Vaccine Manufacturing Centers: An Overview of Immunization Programs, Vaccine Manufacture, and Distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Rey-Jurado

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Vaccines have significantly reduced the detrimental effects of numerous human infectious diseases worldwide, helped to reduce drastically child mortality rates and even achieved eradication of major pathogens, such as smallpox. These achievements have been possible due to a dedicated effort for vaccine research and development, as well as an effective transfer of these vaccines to public health care systems globally. Either public or private institutions have committed to developing and manufacturing vaccines for local or international population supply. However, current vaccine manufacturers worldwide might not be able to guarantee sufficient vaccine supplies for all nations when epidemics or pandemics events could take place. Currently, different countries produce their own vaccine supplies under Good Manufacturing Practices, which include the USA, Canada, China, India, some nations in Europe and South America, such as Germany, the Netherlands, Italy, France, Argentina, and Brazil, respectively. Here, we discuss some of the vaccine programs and manufacturing capacities, comparing the current models of vaccine management between industrialized and developing countries. Because local vaccine production undoubtedly provides significant benefits for the respective population, the manufacture capacity of these prophylactic products should be included in every country as a matter of national safety.

  12. Assessing the Importance of Domestic Vaccine Manufacturing Centers: An Overview of Immunization Programs, Vaccine Manufacture, and Distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey-Jurado, Emma; Tapia, Felipe; Muñoz-Durango, Natalia; Lay, Margarita K; Carreño, Leandro J; Riedel, Claudia A; Bueno, Susan M; Genzel, Yvonne; Kalergis, Alexis M

    2018-01-01

    Vaccines have significantly reduced the detrimental effects of numerous human infectious diseases worldwide, helped to reduce drastically child mortality rates and even achieved eradication of major pathogens, such as smallpox. These achievements have been possible due to a dedicated effort for vaccine research and development, as well as an effective transfer of these vaccines to public health care systems globally. Either public or private institutions have committed to developing and manufacturing vaccines for local or international population supply. However, current vaccine manufacturers worldwide might not be able to guarantee sufficient vaccine supplies for all nations when epidemics or pandemics events could take place. Currently, different countries produce their own vaccine supplies under Good Manufacturing Practices, which include the USA, Canada, China, India, some nations in Europe and South America, such as Germany, the Netherlands, Italy, France, Argentina, and Brazil, respectively. Here, we discuss some of the vaccine programs and manufacturing capacities, comparing the current models of vaccine management between industrialized and developing countries. Because local vaccine production undoubtedly provides significant benefits for the respective population, the manufacture capacity of these prophylactic products should be included in every country as a matter of national safety.

  13. C-Speak Aphasia Alternative Communication Program for People with Severe Aphasia: Importance of Executive Functioning and Semantic Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholas, Marjorie; Sinotte, Michele P.; Helm-Estabrooks, Nancy

    2011-01-01

    Learning how to use a computer-based communication system can be challenging for people with severe aphasia even if the system is not word-based. This study explored cognitive and linguistic factors relative to how they affected individual patients’ ability to communicate expressively using C-Speak Aphasia, (CSA), an alternative communication computer program that is primarily picture-based. Ten individuals with severe non-fluent aphasia received at least six months of training with CSA. To assess carryover of training, untrained functional communication tasks (i.e., answering autobiographical questions, describing pictures, making telephone calls, describing a short video, and two writing tasks) were repeatedly probed in two conditions: 1) using CSA in addition to natural forms of communication, and 2) using only natural forms of communication, e.g., speaking, writing, gesturing, drawing. Four of the ten participants communicated more information on selected probe tasks using CSA than they did without the computer. Response to treatment also was examined in relation to baseline measures of non-linguistic executive function skills, pictorial semantic abilities, and auditory comprehension. Only nonlinguistic executive function skills were significantly correlated with treatment response. PMID:21506045

  14. A military suicide prevention program in the Israeli Defense Force: a review of an important military medical procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelef, Leah; Laur, Lucian; Raviv, Gil; Fruchter, Eyal

    2015-01-01

    The phenomenon of suicide during military service is not unique to the Israeli military and other armies. Soldiers' age--adolescence--is a known factor contributing to suicide, in light of psychological processes of identity formation and self-definition, the stresses of military service, and above all, the availability of weapons. The stigma of seeking help deters some soldiers from getting the assistance they need when they need it most, thus contributing to the higher suicide rate. In the previous decade the IDF initiated intensive and structured preventive procedures aimed at reducing suicide rate among soldiers. The IDF's Suicide Prevention Program (SPP) was grounded in professional knowledge and backed by military policy changes, both critical to the implementation and change processes. The SPP includes thorough psycho-education and guidance, supervision, greater accessibility of mental health officers, and lower accessibility of nonessential weapons. The SPP has succeeded in reducing the suicide rate by almost 50 %. The aim of this article is to review the background of the design of the IDF's SPP and its major components, leading to the current success.

  15. Factors Affecting SSR in Holstein Dairy Cows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Heravi Mosavi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Secondary sex ratio (SSR is the proportion of males to females at birth. It has been shown in many different mammalian species, many factors are associated with SSR. Changes in secondary sex ratio in dairy cows is considered economically important and the ability to change it could affect the revenues and profitability of a dairy farm. Thus, sperm or embryo sexing techniques in recent years has attracted more attention. Most breed of dairy cattle are more likely to have female calf is born to use them as replacement heifers and in order to maintain their productive herd number. On the contrary, when the goal is the production of meat, bull calves due to higher growth rates and production efficiency, are more convenient and more economically efficient. The aim of present study was to investigate some key factors affecting SSR in Iranian Holstein cows. According to Fisher, the sex ratio in the population under the control of natural selection is not always the same. There is overwhelming evidence to support the theory that shows Fisher Primary and secondary sex ratio sex ratio can deviate from this balance and natural selection caused a change in this ratio can be in certain circumstances. For example, the secondary sex ratio of 52:48 has been reported in dairy cows. Studies on mammalian species suggest that several factors, including latitude of the location, the dominant regional climate model, time and frequency of mating to ovulation, diet, age of parents, physical score, breed and produced eggs from ovarian left or right can have a significant effect on the secondary sex ratio. Weather conditions may modify the internal environment and the effect on physiological mechanisms or through the impact on the frequency and type of foods available to parents, the secondary sex ratio is impressive. The impact on the quantity and quality of parent's access to food sources in many species of mammals, the sex ratio has been fixed. Previous

  16. Sward and milk production response to early turnout of dairy cows to pasture in Finland

    OpenAIRE

    Virkajärvi, Perttu; Sairanen, Auvo; Nousiainen, Jouni I.; Khalili, Hannele

    2003-01-01

    The timing of turnout is an important factor affecting the grazing management of dairy cows. However, its consequences are not well known in the short grazing season of northern Europe. Thus, the effect of the turnout date of dairy cows to pasture on sward regrowth, herbage mass production and milk production was studied in two experiments, 1) a grazing trial with 16 Holstein-Friesian dairy cows and 2) a plot trial where the treatments simulated the grazing trial. The treatments were early tu...

  17. Synchronization and Artificial Insemination Strategies in Dairy Herds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Jeffrey S

    2016-07-01

    Timed artificial insemination (AI) programs are commonly used in the dairy industry for lactating cows, but less so in replacement heifers. Excellent programs using combinations of prostaglandin F2α and gonadotropin-releasing hormone in protocols relying on timed AI without detection of estrus or in protocols that combine timed AI with inseminations performed after detected estrus are able to achieve acceptable pregnancy percentages. In herds with excellent estrus detection, timed AI programs serve as a failsafe system to address cows or heifers not yet inseminated after a defined period of estrus detection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Daily intake of dairy products in Brazil and contributions to nutrient intakes: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Mary M; Barraj, Leila M; Toth, Lindsey D; Harkness, Laura S; Bolster, Douglas R

    2016-02-01

    Dairy products are sources of protein and micronutrients important in a healthy diet. The purpose of the present analysis was to estimate consumption of dairy products by Brazilians and identify contributions of dairy products to nutrient intakes. Dairy consumption data were obtained from 24 h dietary records. Dairy products were defined as milk (including flavoured), cheese and yoghurt. Estimates of dairy product intakes were generated for all individuals, individuals in urban and rural households and for age groups 10-18 years, 19-59 years and ≥60 years. Contributions to nutrient intakes were estimated for the total sample and sub-populations. Nationwide cross-sectional survey, 2008-2009. Nationally representative sample of individuals aged ≥10 years in the Individual Food Intake survey, a component of the Brazilian Household Budget Survey (n 34 003). Among individuals aged ≥10 years, per capita intake of dairy products was 142 (se 2.1) g/d. Dairy product intake was higher among individuals in urban compared with rural areas and among groups 10-18 years and ≥60 years compared with adults aged 19-59 years. Dairy products accounted for 6.1% of daily energy intake, 7.3% of protein, 16.9% of saturated fat, 11.1% and 4.3% of total and added sugars, respectively, and 10.2-37.9% of daily Ca, vitamin D, P, vitamin A and K. Dairy products were substantial contributors to daily intakes of selected nutrients of concern in Brazil, although mean daily dairy product consumption was less than a typical portion. Education efforts in Brazil to raise awareness about the nutritional role of dairy foods may serve to improve overall diet quality.

  19. Dairy meals of hospitalized children as a source of energy, calcium and phosphorus in satisfying their daily needs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Vukman

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available A dairy meal is defined as a specific food serving composed from milk and dairy products. Because of its nutritional value and complex chemical composition, milk and dairy products play an important role in the diet of children and represent a rich source of calcium, phosphorus, as well as valuable proteins, B vitamins and minerals. Healthy children should consume at least three servings of dairy products daily, which contributes to the total energy and nutrients that children need. The needs of an unhealthy child are often higher than those who are healthy and depend on the state of the body. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of consumption of dairy meals in hospitalized children and to find out if their energy needs, as well as their need for calcium and phosphorus through the consumption of the same were met. Significant differences were found between recommended energy intake from dairy products and actual energy intake from consumed milk and dairy products in three Croatian regions (P=0.021 tested. The highest values were recorded in central Croatia (253 Kcal or 34.4 % and the lowest in the northern Croatian coastal region (17.05 Kcal or 20.1 %, which indicates a greater representation of milk and dairy meals in children’s daily menu. Furthermore, hospitalized children meet almost half of their recommended daily intake of calcium and phosphorus from dairy meals for all three regions. The highest rate was found in central Croatia, 48.7 % or 400 mg of calcium, respectively 42.9 % or 322.69 mg phosphorus, while the remaining portion of calcium and phosphorus originates from different rich non-dairy food sources. In all regions the most common forms of dairy foods consumed were milk and dairy desserts.

  20. Impact of extension interventions in improving livelihood of dairy farmers of Nadia district of West Bengal, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garai, Suman; Garai, Sanchita; Maiti, Sanjit; Meena, B S; Ghosh, M K; Bhakat, Champak; Dutta, T K

    2017-03-01

    Livestock is a one of the major sources of livelihood for most of the small and marginal farmers in India, particularly for rural households who live in below poverty line. Extension interventions have long been seen as a key element for enabling farmers to obtain information and technologies that can improve their livelihoods. It is also recognized that extension is an important factor in promoting dairy development. Ex-post-facto cause to effect research design was applied in this study to trace out the impact of extension interventions in improving knowledge, attitude, adoption towards scientific dairy farming practices and improvement in milk production of dairy animal and income from dairying which will be resulted into improved livelihood of rural poor in Nadia district of West Bengal, India. Therefore, 60 dairy farmers of experimental villages who were considered as beneficiaries and 60 dairy farmers of control villages who were considered as non-beneficiaries were selected as sample for the study. It was found that beneficiaries had significantly higher score in all the five components of livelihood improvement with its all sub components, i.e., knowledge, attitude, adoption of scientific dairy farming practices, milk production per household per day and monthly income from dairying except disease control, and marketing component of adoption. Hence, it may be concluded that extension interventions had a significant impact on improving livelihood of rural dairy farmers in Nadia district of West Bengal, India.

  1. Lameness detection in dairy cattle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hertem, Van T.; Bahr, C.; Schlageter Tello, A.; Viazzi, S.; Steensels, M.; Romanini, C.E.B.; Lokhorst, C.; Maltz, E.; Halachmi, I.; Berckmans, D.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate if a multi-sensor system (milk, activity, body posture) was a better classifier for lameness than the single-sensor-based detection models. Between September 2013 and August 2014, 3629 cow observations were collected on a commercial dairy farm in

  2. Udder health in dairy goats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koop, G.

    2012-01-01

    In this thesis, monitoring and control of udder health in dairy goats was studied. The diagnostic properties of somatic cell count as a monitoring tool for udder health of a goat herd and of individual goats was evaluated. Furthermore, the diagnostic value of bacteriological culture of bulk milk and

  3. Metagenomic Analysis of Dairy Bacteriophages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muhammed, Musemma K.; Kot, Witold; Neve, Horst

    2017-01-01

    Despite their huge potential for characterizing the biodiversity of phages, metagenomic studies are currently not available for dairy bacteriophages, partly due to the lack of a standard procedure for phage extraction. We optimized an extraction method that allows to remove the bulk protein from...

  4. Coping strategies in dairy cows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hopster, H.

    1998-01-01

    The central aim of this thesis is to investigate whether individual dairy cows display different and coherent patterns of physiological and behavioural stress responses. Such responses enable them to successful adapt in a changing environment.

    In Chapter 1, current

  5. Teat condition in dairy cows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neijenhuis, Francesca

    2004-01-01

    The dairy cow's teat is the first line of defence against mastitis pathogens. The milking process may affect the teat's condition, increasing the risk of mastitis. It is well-proven that teat-ends with severe erosions or broken skin will have an increased risk of mastitis. However, more common

  6. Authenticity assessment of dairy products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Fuente, Miguel Angel; Juárez, Manuela

    2005-01-01

    The authenticity of dairy products has become a focal point, attracting the attention of scientists, producers, consumers, and policymakers. Among many others, some of the practices not allowed in milk and milk products are the substitution of part of the fat or proteins, admixtures of milk of different species, additions of low-cost dairy products (mainly whey derivatives), or mislabeling of products protected by denomination of origin. A range of analytical methods to detect frauds have been developed, modified, and continually reassessed to be one step ahead of manufacturers who pursue these illegal activities. Traditional procedures to assess the authenticity of dairy products include chromatographic, electrophoretic, and immunoenzymatic methods. New approaches such as capillary electrophoresis, polymerase chain reaction, and isotope ratio mass spectrometry have also emerged alongside the latest developments in the former procedures. This work intends to provide an updated and extensive overview since 1991 on the principal applications of all these techniques together with their advantages and disadvantages for detecting the authenticity of dairy products. The scope and limits of different tools are also discussed.

  7. The Tanga Dairy Platform: Fostering Innovations for more Efficient Dairy Chain Coordination in Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Joseph Cadilhon

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The Tanga Dairy Platform, created in 2008, is an informal forum of different stakeholders involved in the dairy industry of Tanzania’s Northeastern Tanga region. The platform’s objective is to exchange knowledge and develop joint actions to common problems. Six years on, it is a sustainable example of a commodity association addressing the joint problems of the region’s dairy industry. The platform has achieved a common understanding among chain actors on dairy price structure; it has successfully lobbied policy makers to reduce value-added tax on dairy inputs and products, and to remove limitations on urban dairy farming in Tanga city.

  8. The Importance of MS PHD'S and SEEDS Mentoring and Professional Development Programs in the Retenion of Underrepresented Minorities in STEM Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickland, J.; Johnson, A.; Williamson Whitney, V.; Ricciardi, L.

    2012-12-01

    participants affirms that these programs provided an excellent environment for advancing interest in, and knowledge of STEM, and for influencing academic career goals for participants. These programs are models and reflect the importance of providing diversity, mentoring and professional development programs to broaden the participation and retention of URM students in STEM fields.

  9. Knowledge of Bovine Tuberculosis, Cattle Husbandry and Dairy Practices amongst Pastoralists and Small-Scale Dairy Farmers in Cameroon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert F Kelly

    Full Text Available Control of bovine tuberculosis (bTB and zoonotic tuberculosis (zTB has relied upon surveillance and slaughter of infected cattle, milk pasteurisation and public health education. In Cameroon, like many other sub-Saharan African countries, there is limited understanding of current cattle husbandry or milk processing practices or livestock keepers awareness of bTB. This paper describes husbandry and milk processing practices within different Cameroonian cattle keeping communities and bTB awareness in comparison to other infectious diseases.A population based cross-sectional sample of herdsmen and a questionnaire were used to gather data from pastoralists and dairy farmers in the North West Region and Vina Division of Cameroon.Pastoralists were predominately male Fulanis who had kept cattle for over a decade. Dairy farmers were non-Fulani and nearly half were female. Pastoralists went on transhumance with their cattle and came into contact with other herds and potential wildlife reservoirs of bTB. Dairy farmers housed their cattle and had little contact with other herds or wildlife. Pastoralists were aware of bTB and other infectious diseases such as foot-and-mouth disease and fasciolosis. These pastoralists were also able to identify clinical signs of these diseases. A similar proportion of dairy farmers were aware of bTB but fewer were aware of foot-and-mouth and fasciolosis. In general, dairy farmers were unable to identify any clinical signs for any of these diseases. Importantly most pastoralists and dairy farmers were unaware that bTB could be transmitted to people by consuming milk.Current cattle husbandry practices make the control of bTB in cattle challenging especially in mobile pastoralist herds. Routine test and slaughter control in dairy herds would be tractable but would have profound impact on dairy farmer livelihoods. Prevention of transmission in milk offers the best approach for human risk mitigation in Cameroon but requires

  10. Issues and perspectives in dairy sheep breeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierlorenzo Secchiari

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The present review consists of two parts. In the first part, the authors briefly describe the state of the art of breedingprogrammes for Italian dairy sheep; then they report new models for genetic evaluation and consider the problem ofgenotype x environment interaction and the impact of farming systems on the genetic merit of animals. In the secondpart new breeding goals regarding the evolution of milk quality concept and the increasing importance of functional traitsare reported. Regarding milk quality, the authors especially focus on the traits related to cheese-making ability and onthe nutraceutical aspects of milk. Among functional traits, resistance to diseases (mastitis and Scrapie has been highlightedfor its great importance in livestock species. Finally, the perspectives of marker-assisted selection have also beenreported.

  11. An epidemiologic study of late-term abortions in dairy cattle in Denmark, July 2000 August 2003

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carpenter, Tim E.; Chriél, Mariann; Andersen, Mette M.

    2006-01-01

    to 3 years of data on the highest aborting dairies and showed that July had nearly double the expected number of maximum monthly abortions (P provide further insight into the reported abortion pattern in Danish dairies and may facilitate planning future control programs.......Abortion in dairy cows in well-managed dairies is not common but differences have been reported probably due to variation in animal health, nutrition and management, as well as difficulties in observing the aborted material. A 38-month study of 507 large Danish dairy herds revealed 3354 late......-term abortions and 224,419 calvings were recorded. During the study period, a total of 3717 submissions were made to the Danish Institute for Food and Veterinary Research (DFVF). A broad spectrum of abortive agents was isolated but none were found to be statistically associated with abortions. The number...

  12. The distribution of fat in dried dairy particles determines flavor release and flavor stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, C W; Drake, M A

    2014-04-01

    Dried dairy ingredients are utilized in various food and beverage applications for their nutritional, functional, and sensory properties. Dried dairy ingredients include milk powders of varying fat content and heat treatment and buttermilk powder, along with both milk and whey proteins of varying protein contents. The flavor of these ingredients is the most important characteristic that determines consumer acceptance of the ingredient applications. Lipid oxidation is the main mechanism for off-flavor development in dried dairy ingredients. The effects of various unit operations on the flavor of dried dairy ingredients have been investigated. Recent research documented that increased surface free fat in spray dried WPC80 was associated with increased lipid oxidation and off-flavors. Surface free fat in spray-dried products is fat on the surface of the powder that is not emulsified. The most common emulsifiers present in dried dairy ingredients are proteins and phospholipids. Currently, only an association between surface free fat and lipid oxidation has been presented. The link between surface free fat in dried dairy ingredients and flavor and flavor stability has not been investigated. In this review, some hypotheses for the role of surface free fat on the flavor of dried dairy ingredients are presented along with proposed mechanisms. © 2014 Institute of Food Technologists®

  13. A survey of bacteria found in Belgian dairy farm products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N'Guessan, E.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Description of the subject. Due to the potential hazards caused by pathogenic bacteria, farm dairy production remains a challenge from the point of view of food safety. As part of a public program to support farm diversification and short food supply chains, farm dairy product samples including yogurt, ice cream, raw-milk butter and cheese samples were collected from 318 Walloon farm producers between 2006 and 2014. Objectives. Investigation of the microbiological quality of the Belgian dairy products using the guidelines provided by the European food safety standards. Method. The samples were collected within the framework of the self-checking regulation. In accordance with the European Regulation EC 2073/2005, microbiological analyses were performed to detect and count Enterobacteriaceae, Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella spp., Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. Results. Even when results met the microbiological safety standards, hygienic indicator microorganisms like E. coli and S. aureus exceeded the defined limits in 35% and 4% of butter and cheese samples, respectively. Unsatisfactory levels observed for soft cheeses remained higher (10% and 2% for S. aureus and L. monocytogenes respectively than those observed for pressed cheeses (3% and 1% and fresh cheeses (3% and 0% (P ≥ 0.05. Furthermore, the percentages of samples outside legal limits were not significantly higher in the summer months than in winter months for all mentioned bacteria. Conclusions. This survey showed that most farm dairy products investigated were microbiologically safe. However, high levels of hygiene indicators (e.g., E. coli in some products, like butter, remind us of applying good hygienic practices at every stage of the dairy production process to ensure consumer safety.

  14. Constraints affecting dairy goats milk production in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbindyo, C M; Gitao, C G; Peter, S G

    2018-01-01

    In Kenya, the population of dairy goats is about 200,000 and 80% of these are reared in Mount Kenya region. They provide a quick source of milk for consumption or sale, which has an immense value especially to poor households. The small land sizes required for their rearing are especially useful in these highly populated areas. Although much research has been done on problems faced by dairy cattle farmers, limited information is available on problems faced by dairy goat farmers. Therefore, the objective of this study was to determine the constraints affecting dairy goat production in Mount Kenya region. In a cross-sectional survey, 157 farmers were interviewed on major constraints using a semi-structured questionnaire. The results from the questionnaires showed that the main problems experienced by these farmers were as follows: lack of market of milk and goats 45% (71/157), diseases 33% (52/157), high cost of concentrates 25% (38/157), lack of feed 19% (30/157), problems of unreliable buck rotation program 16.5% (26/157), and insecurity 1.8% (3/157). The study revealed that dairy goat farmers in the region faced by a number of challenges and therefore, our recommendation is there is a need for farmers to be trained on innovative ways of value chain addition and other strategies to market their milk. Additionally, the government should put resources to salvage the milk plant and association members should put firm measures to improve management. Creation of farmer awareness, treatment, and disease control measures should be instituted to improve productivity.

  15. Importance of Active Participation in Obesity Management Through Mobile Health Care Programs: Substudy of a Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Bumjo; Yi, Ga-Hye; Han, Min Kyu; Kim, Jong Seung; Lee, Chang Hee; Cho, Belong; Kang, Hee Cheol

    2018-01-03

    passive group and 209 in the control group (without SmartCare service). There was a statistically significant difference in improvements to body weight, BMI, body fat percentage, and waist circumference among active participants compared with less active participants and the control group (P<.05). However, the lipid profile changes did not differ significantly between groups. The level of participation may be related to improved weight-related outcomes, which may improve health outcomes. To maximize the effectiveness of the SmartCare service, encouraging active participation is important. Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01344811; https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01344811 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6alT2MmIB).

  16. Lactose in dairy ingredients: Effect on processing and storage stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huppertz, Thom; Gazi, Inge

    2016-08-01

    Lactose is the main carbohydrate in the milk of most species. It is present in virtually all dry dairy ingredients, with levels ranging from powders. The presence of lactose has a strong effect on ingredient processing and stability. Lactose can negatively influence powder properties and lead to undesirable effects, such as the stickiness of powder resulting in fouling during drying, or caking and related phenomena during storage. In addition, being a reducing carbohydrate, lactose can also participate in the Maillard reaction with free amino groups of proteins, peptides, and free AA. In this review, the influence of the presence (or absence) of lactose on physiochemical properties of dairy ingredients is reviewed, with particular emphasis on behavior during processing and storage. Particularly important features in this respect are whether lactose is in the (glassy) amorphous phase or in the crystalline phase, which is strongly affected by precrystallization conditions (e.g., in lactose, permeate, and whey powders) and by drying conditions. Furthermore, the moisture content and water activity of the ingredients are important parameters to consider, as they determine both mobility and reactivity, influencing Maillard reactions and concomitant browning, the crystallization of amorphous lactose during storage of dairy ingredients, glass transitions temperatures, and associated stickiness and caking phenomena. For the stickiness and caking, a crucial aspect to take into account is powder particle surface composition in relation to the bulk powder. Lactose is typically underrepresented at the powder surface, as a result of which deviations between observed lactose-induced caking and stickiness temperatures, and determined glass transition temperatures arise. By considering lactose as an integral part of ingredient composition along with all other compositional and environmental properties, lactose behavior in dairy ingredients can be understood, controlled, and

  17. Happy Dutch organic calves: suckling systems in organic dairying in the Netherlands

    OpenAIRE

    Wagenaar, J. P.

    2009-01-01

    Organic dairy farmers in The Netherlands, supported by the Louis Bolk Institute, developed a calf rearing system in which newborn heifer calves suckle their mother or a nurse cow up to three months of age. Consumers played an important role. Their critical questions made farmers take the initiative to investigate and develop an alternative way (more animal friendly) to raise organic dairy calves. Increased animal welfare and health were the focus of system development, but the practical an...

  18. Analyses of Dynamics in Dairy Products and Identification of Lactic Acid Bacteria Population by Molecular Methods

    OpenAIRE

    Aytül Sofu

    2017-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) with different ecological niches are widely seen in fermented meat, vegetables, dairy products and cereals as well as in fermented beverages. Lactic acid bacteria are the most important group of bacteria in dairy industry due to their probiotic characteristics and fermentation agents as starter culture. In the taxonomy of the lactic acid bacteria; by means of rep-PCR, which is the analysis of repetitive sequences that are based on 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene seque...

  19. Milk and dairy products: a unique micronutrient combination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaucheron, Frédéric

    2011-10-01

    Milk and dairy products contain micronutrients such as minerals and vitamins, which contribute to multiple and different vital functions in the organism. The mineral fraction is composed of macroelements (Ca, Mg, Na, K, P, and Cl) and oligoelements (Fe, Cu, Zn, and Se). From a physicochemical point of view, the chemical forms, the associations with other ions or organic molecules, and the location of macroelements such as Ca, Mg, Na, K, P, and Cl in milk are relatively well described and understood. Thus, it is admitted that these macroelements are differently distributed into aqueous and micellar phases of milk, depending on their nature. K, Na, and Cl ions are essentially in the aqueous phase, whereas Ca, P, and Mg are partly bound to the casein micelles. About one third of the Ca, half of the P, and two thirds of the Mg are located in the aqueous phase of milk. Dairy products are more or less rich in these different minerals. In cheeses, mineral content depends mainly on their processing. The Ca content is strongly related to the acidification step. Moreover, if acidification is associated with the draining step, the Ca content in the cheese will be reduced. Thus, the Ca content varies in the following increasing order: milks/fermented milks/fresh cheeses milk. Concerning Ca, the formation of insoluble calcium phosphate, carbonate, and lactate is reported in some ripened cheeses. The NaCl content in cheeses depends on the salting of the curd. From a nutritional point of view, it is largely admitted that milk and dairy products are important sources of Ca, Mg, Zn, and Se. The vitamin fraction of milk and dairy products is composed of lipophilic (A, D, E, and K) and hydrophilic (B(1), B(2), B(3), B(5), B(6), B(8), B(9), B(12), and C) vitamins. Because of their hydrophobic properties, the lipophilic vitamins are mainly in the milk fat fraction (cream, butter). The hydrophilic vitamins are in the aqueous phase of milk. For one part of these vitamins, the

  20. [Measuring body temperature in dairy cows--applications and influencing factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burfeind, O; Suthar, V; Heuwieser, W

    2013-01-01

    Measuring body temperature plays an integral role in early puerperal cow monitoring programs. Furthermore, body temperature is part of the definition of puerperal metritis. Antibiotic treatment decisions are based on body temperature in several international publications on intervention strategies widely adopted in the modern dairy industry. The objective of this article is to provide a brief overview of the most recent publications on this important criterion. Several factors can influence the measurement of the body temperature (type of thermometer, insertion depth, skills of the investigator) as well as the cow's body temperature (days in milk, parity, time of the day, climate at calving). Furthermore, the occurrence of increased body temperature in healthy cows was demonstrated independently by several investigations. In ambiguous cases (e.g. raised body temperature as the only symptom) results should be interpreted with caution.

  1. Lifetime effects of infection with bovine leukemia virus on longevity and milk production of dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nekouei, Omid; VanLeeuwen, John; Stryhn, Henrik; Kelton, David; Keefe, Greg

    2016-10-01

    Enzootic bovine leukosis (EBL) is an economically important disease of dairy cattle caused by bovine leukemia virus (BLV). The economic impacts of the infection have been debated in the literature. The present study was conducted to determine the lifetime effects of BLV infection on longevity and milk production of dairy cows in Canada. The data were aggregated from a combination of two data sets: 1) BLV serum-ELISA test results from Canada-wide surveys of production limiting diseases, which took place between 1998 and 2003 in 8 provinces, and 2) longitudinal production data for all cows in the former study, extracted from the Canadian dairy herd improvement database. All participant cows had been culled or died by the onset of this study. A historical cohort study was designed, including cows which tested positive to BLV-antibodies in their first lactation (positive cohort, n=1858) and cows which tested negative in their second or later lactations (negative cohort, n=2194). To assess the impacts of infection with BLV on longevity (the number of lifetime lactations), a discrete-time survival analysis was carried out. The effect of BLV on the lifetime milk production (the sum of all life 305-day milk production) was evaluated using a multilevel linear regression model. Overall, 4052 cows from 348 herds met the eligibility criteria and were enrolled in the study. In the longevity model, the interaction term between time (lactation number) and BLV-status was highly significant. Cows which were positive to BLV had consistently greater probabilities of being culled (or dying) than the test-negative cows. In the milk production model, the interaction term between BLV-status and longevity of the cows was highly significant; indicating that lifetime BLV effects on the total milk production was dependent on the lactation in which the study cows were culled/died. Infected cows with 2 and 3 lactations showed significantly lower life milk productions [-2554kg (-3609 to -1500

  2. Perceptions of Dairy Farmers of Gadag district in northwestern part of Karnataka state, India regarding Clean Milk Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivakumar K. Radder and S.K. Bhanj

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Clean milk production is one important aspect in enhancing the quality of milk. It is important to know farmers' perception about it. With this view, present study was undertaken with the objective of understanding perception of dairy farmers about clean milk production. The study was conducted in six villages of Gadag district of Karnataka state. A total of 180 respondents were interviewed. Perceptions of the farmers regarding family manpower involved in dairy farming, personnel involved in milking, dairy income, intention to produce clean milk, price dependence for following clean milk production, reasons for following cleanliness measures in milk production, sale price received for milk and satisfaction for the price they received for milk were studied. Most of the dairy farmers expressed their willingness to follow clean milk production measures. Further, most of them were ready to follow such measures even if they were not paid more price for milk. Farmers practiced clean milk production measures mainly to follow regulations at the dairy co-operative society followed by to avoid spoilage of milk. Dairy farmers largely neglected impact of cleanliness on animals' udder and health, about milk contamination causing health hazards. Milking was mainly a domain of women. For over 80 % farmers, dairy farming provided a moderate income as portion of their total family income. Majority of the producers were not satisfied with price they were getting for milk. Hence, the study recommends, requisite facilities and guidelines from the agencies concerned are needed to be provided to the dairy farmers to adopt clean milk production practices. Proper education to the farmers regarding importance of clean milk production from health, marketing and animal health point of views needs to be given. There is need to give more importance to women in dairy farmers' trainings. The study also suggests offering satisfactory price for milk to hasten the process of

  3. Digesters and demographics: identifying support for anaerobic digesters on dairy farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, D J; Roberts, M C; Ernst, S C; Thraen, C S

    2010-11-01

    The dairy industry in the United States is amidst a long-running trend toward fewer, larger dairy farms. This development has created a backlash in some communities over concerns such as odor, waste management, and environmental degradation. Separately, anaerobic digestion has advanced as a waste management technology that potentially offers solutions to some of these issues, providing odor control and a combustible biogas among other things. These digesters require significant capital investments. Voluntary consumer premiums for the renewable energy produced have been used in some instances as a means to move adoption of such systems toward financial feasibility. This project employed a survey to measure Ohio consumers' willingness to pay a premium for renewable energy produced by anaerobic digesters on dairy farms. Cluster analysis was used to segment consumers by willingness to pay, age, education, income, self-identified political inclination, and a composite variable that served as a proxy for respondents' environmental stewardship. Four distinctive groups emerged from the data. Older, less educated respondents were found to have the least amount of support for digesters on dairy farms, whereas politically liberal, environmentally proactive respondents demonstrated the strongest support. Well-educated, affluent respondents and young respondents fell between these 2 groups. Most large dairy farms are generally met with fairly negative responses from their local communities; in contrast, this research finds some popular support for anaerobic digestion technology. Going forward, establishing a positive link between support for anaerobic digesters and for their use on large dairies could open up a new route for less-contested large dairy farm developments. Evaluation of community demographics could become an important part of finding an optimal location for a large dairy farm. Copyright © 2010 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All

  4. Survey of management practices related to bovine respiratory disease in preweaned calves on California dairies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, W J; Lehenbauer, T W; Karle, B M; Hulbert, Lindsey E; Anderson, Randall J; Van Eenennaam, A L; Farver, T B; Aly, S S

    2016-02-01

    In the spring of 2013, a survey of California (CA) dairies was performed to characterize management practices related to bovine respiratory disease in preweaned calves, compare these practices across geographic regions of the state, and determine the principal components that explain the variability in management between herds. The questionnaire consisted of 53 questions divided into 6 sections to assess management practices affecting dairy calves from precalving to weaning. The questionnaire was mailed to 1,523 grade A licensed dairies in CA and 224 responses (14.7%) were collected. Survey response rates were similar over the 3 defined regions of CA: northern CA, northern San Joaquin Valley, and the greater southern CA region. The mean size of respondent herds was 1,423 milking cows. Most dairies reported raising preweaned calves on-site (59.7%). In 93.3% of dairies, preweaned calves were raised in some form of individual housing. Nonsaleable milk was the most frequent liquid diet fed to preweaned heifers (75.2%). Several important differences were identified between calf-raising practices in CA and practices reported in recent nationwide studies, including herd sizes, housing practices, and sources of milk fed to heifers. The differences between the CA and nationwide studies may be explained by differences in herd size. Regional differences within CA were also identified. Compared with the 2 other regions, northern CA dairies were found to have smaller herds, less Holstein cattle, calves remained with dams for longer periods of time after calving, were more likely to be certified organic dairies, and raised their own calves more often. Principal component analysis was performed and identified 11 components composed of 28 variables (questions) that explained 66.5% of the variability in the data. The identified components and questions will contribute to developing a risk assessment tool for bovine respiratory disease in preweaned dairy calves. Copyright © 2016

  5. Strengthening Dairy Cooperative through National Development of Livestock Region

    OpenAIRE

    Priyono; A.Priyanti

    2016-01-01

    Establishment of dairy cattle development region needs to be conducted in accordance with the national dairy industry development plan. Dairy cattle regions have been designed and equipped with infrastructure supplies, supporting facilities, technologies, finance, processing, marketing, institutional and human resources. Dairy cooperative is one of the marketing channels of milk and milk products which have strategic roles to support the national dairy industry. Collaborations between dairy c...

  6. Measures to improve dairy cow foot health: consequences for farmer income and dairy cow welfare

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruijnis, M.R.N.; Hogeveen, H.; Stassen, E.N.

    2013-01-01

    Dairy farming in western countries with cubicle housing is an efficient way of dairy farming. Though, a disadvantage is the high prevalence and incidence of foot disorders (clinical and subclinical), which cause high economic losses and also seriously impair the welfare of dairy cattle. To point out

  7. PRODUCTION OF BIOGAS FROM DAIRY WASTE WATER

    OpenAIRE

    S. Karthiyayini; A. Sivabharathy; Sreehari, C; M. Sreepoorani; V. Vinjth

    2017-01-01

    Pollution caused by dairy effluents is a serious problem throughout the world. The major source of waste water is from dairy industry. The effluent from dairy processing unit affects the environment. As a solution our aim is to produce bio-gas from diary wastewater. There are various treatment technologies, among them anaerobic treatment technology is simple and encouraged due to the following advantages such as low cost of construction, pH stability, low maintenance and repair. The biogas is...

  8. Multi-criteria and econometric evaluation of dairy products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karmen Pažek

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the multi-criteria assessment of four dairy products: “Pomursko mlejko” (Pomurje milk, “Lejko mleko” (light milk, “Fyto mleko” (Fyto milk and “Posneto mleko v prahu” (dried milk. The research was executed by using a multi-criteria methodology, DEX, which was complemented by an econometric analysis for light milk to estimate the trends in production and consumption before analyzed dairy products were implemented on the market. DEXi computer program results indicated that all analyzed milk products were ‘above average’. The econometric model was applied to examine changes in the demand for low-fat milk (light milk. Empirical results showed significant consumer re¬sponse to the increase in the prices of low-fat milk demonstrating income elasticity (1,15 unit.

  9. Molecular Epidemiology of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis on Dairy Farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lingling; Katani, Robab; Schilling, Megan; Kapur, Vivek

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) is the etiological agent of severe chronic intestinal inflammatory disease in ruminants, termed Johne's disease, and can infect many other animal species, including humans. MAP has a long incubation period prior to manifestation of clinical signs including diarrhea, weight loss, and loss of production. MAP has a high prevalence in dairy herds and results in considerable adverse impacts on animal health and productivity throughout the world. Recent investigations have leveraged the characterization of the MAP genome for the development of powerful new molecular techniques for MAP strain differentiation. These approaches are providing key insights into the epidemiology and transmission of MAP on and between dairy herds. We summarize the state of the art for MAP diagnostics and strain differentiation and our current knowledge of mechanisms of within- and between-herd transmission of MAP, along with future needs for the development of rational MAP infection control programs.

  10. Freeze concentration of dairy products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amarnath, K.R. [Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (United States). Systems and Materials Dept.; Swinkels, W. [Holland Energy Technology BV (Netherlands)

    1992-12-31

    Freeze concentration as a separation process was discussed. It separates mixed liquids by converting one or more of them to a solid. The process is more energy efficient in many applications than either evaporation or distillation, the most common industrial separation methods today. An EPRI report has shown that annual heat energy consumption would decrease an estimated 1.4 quads if industry replaced evaporation and distillation in every feasible case where freezing can be used. The freeze concentration process was employed to replace thermal evaporation in the dairy industry. The goals of the project were to save energy by converting concentration processes to an efficient electrically powered refrigeration system, and to create higher quality dairy products. Tests showed equal or superior quality from freeze concentrates. 2 tabs.

  11. Microbiological Spoilage of Dairy Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledenbach, Loralyn H.; Marshall, Robert T.

    The wide array of available dairy foods challenges the microbiologist, engineer, and technologist to find the best ways to prevent the entry of microorganisms, destroy those that do get in along with their enzymes, and prevent the growth and activities of those that escape processing treatments. Troublesome spoilage microorganisms include aerobic psychrotrophic Gram-negative bacteria, yeasts, molds, heterofermentative lactobacilli, and spore-forming bacteria. Psychrotrophic bacteria can produce large amounts of extracellular hydrolytic enzymes, and the extent of recontamination of pasteurized fluid milk products with these bacteria is a major determinant of their shelf life. Fungal spoilage of dairy foods is manifested by the presence of a wide variety of metabolic by-products, causing off-odors and flavors, in addition to visible changes in color or texture.

  12. Prevalence of bacteremia in dairy cattle with acute puerperal metritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Credille, B C; Woolums, A R; Giguère, S; Robertson, T; Overton, M W; Hurley, D J

    2014-01-01

    Acute puerperal metritis (APM) affects 30% of postpartum dairy cattle. Bacteremia negatively impacts survival in cattle with coliform mastitis. However, the prevalence of bacteremia in dairy cattle with APM is unknown. Bacteremia is detectable in a large proportion of cattle with APM. Seventeen dairy cows with APM and 17 healthy dairy cattle. Prospective case-control study. Cases were identified by daily monitoring of cattle in the first 10 days after calving. Controls were matched to cases by parity and days in milk. Cows were examined at the time of identification of APM. A complete blood count, serum biochemical analysis, and bacteriologic culture of blood and lochial fluid were performed on each animal at the time of diagnosis. The same samples were collected from healthy herdmates of a similar parity and days in milk. Blood culture results and clinicopathologic variables were compared between groups. Conditional logistic regression was used to evaluate factors associated with APM, whereas multivariate logistic regression was used to evaluate factors associated with bacteremia. Bacteremia occurred in 53% (9/17) of cattle with APM and 53% (8/15) controls. Bacillus spp. was the organism most commonly isolated from the bloodstream in cattle of both groups. Bacteremic cattle in both groups were significantly less likely to have basophils in the peripheral circulation (P = .02) and more likely to have higher serum globulin concentrations (P = .02). Bacteremia is a common occurrence in postpartum dairy cattle. Further study is warranted to investigate the modes by which bacteria colonize the bloodstream in this population of animals and the importance of bacteremia on health and productivity of affected animals. Copyright © 2014 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  13. A participatory approach to design monitoring indicators of production diseases in organic dairy farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duval, J E; Fourichon, C; Madouasse, A; Sjöström, K; Emanuelson, U; Bareille, N

    2016-06-01

    Production diseases have an important negative effect on the health and welfare of dairy cows. Although organic animal production systems aim for high animal health levels, compliance with European organic farming regulations does not guarantee that this is achieved. Herd health and production management (HHPM) programs aim at optimizing herd health by preventing disease and production problems, but as yet they have not been consistently implemented by farmers. We hypothesize that one reason is the mismatch between what scientists propose as indicators for herd health monitoring and what farmers would like to use. Herd health monitoring is a key element in HHPM programs as it permits a regular assessment of the functioning of the different components of the production process. Planned observations or measurements of these components are indispensable for this monitoring. In this study, a participatory approach was used to create an environment in which farmers could adapt the indicators proposed by scientists for monitoring the five main production diseases on dairy cattle farms. The adaptations of the indicators were characterized and the farmers' explanations for the changes made were described. The study was conducted in France and Sweden, which differ in terms of their national organic regulations and existing advisory services. In both countries, twenty certified organic dairy farmers and their animal health management advisors participated in the study. All of the farmers adapted the initial monitoring plan proposed by scientists to specific production and animal health situation on their farm. This resulted in forty unique and farm-specific combinations of indicators for herd health monitoring. All but three farmers intended to monitor five health topics simultaneously using the constructed indicators. The qualitative analysis of the explanations given by farmers for their choices enabled an understanding of farmers' reasons for selecting and adapting

  14. Vitamin and water requirements of dairy sheep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fulvia Bovera

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors review the physiological role and the daily requirement of fat-soluble vitamins (A, D, E and K, vitamin C  and water in dairy sheep. Regarding the vitamins, classical clinical symptoms and/or non-specific parameters, such as  lowered production and reproduction rates are associated with their deficiencies or excesses. Until the last decade,  these compounds were considered important only for the prevention of such alterations; currently, there is more  emphasis on their function as the vitamins can play a key role in optimising animal health. In this respect, of particu-  lar interest is the action of the antioxidant vitamins (especially vitamin C, vitamin E and beta-carotene in improving  the efficiency of the immune system. 

  15. Effect of feeding fractionated RBD palm stearin on milk yield and quality of dairy cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norliza, S.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Energy intake of dairy cows is important during the peak of milk production to maintain consistency of milk yield. To overcome energy deficiency, diet with high energy density is required for lactating dairy cows which can be enhanced by incorporating fats. Therefore a feeding trial was conducted to determine the effects of supplementing fat with fractionated RBD Palm Stearin on feed consumption, milk yield, composition and fatty acid profile of dairy cows. A total of 35 lactating dairy cows in early and mid-lactating periods were used in this trial. The trial was conducted for 12 wk and individual milk yield was recorded twice daily. Daily milk yield was increased (p<0.05 from 8.18 l for diet without fat to 8.42 and 8.32 l of milk yield per day, for inclusion of 5% and 2.5% fractionated RBD Palm Stearin, respectively.

  16. Determination of economic selection index coefficients for dairy cows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanović Sanjin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available There is no research regarding economic effects of genetic improvement for dairy cattle in Serbia. Therefore, the goal of this paper is to determine economic values for various production traits (milk yield, milk fat content and proteins content in dairy production, as well as to determine total economic selection index. The research is based on data which include 9,516 lactations of 4,893 milking cows from 7 farms. Data were collected during the period 2004 - 2012. Authors used sensitivity analysis and partial budgeting approach to determine changes in revenues caused by variations of particular production traits. It was determined that within economic selection index the most important trait is milk yield, while values for other traits are almost negligible. On the other hand, it is expected that importance of certain traits will be changed after Serbian accession to the European Union.

  17. Probiotic bacteria: selective enumeration and survival in dairy foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, N P

    2000-04-01

    A number of health benefits have been claimed for probiotic bacteria such as Lactobacillus acidophilus, Bifidobacterium spp., and Lactobacillus casei. Because of the potential health benefits, these organisms are increasingly incorporated into dairy foods. However, studies have shown low viability of probiotics in market preparations. In order to assess viability of probiotic bacteria, it is important to have a working method for selective enumeration of these probiotic bacteria. Viability of probiotic bacteria is important in order to provide health benefits. Viability of probiotic bacteria can be improved by appropriate selection of acid and bile resistant strains, use of oxygen impermeable containers, two-step fermentation, micro-encapsulation, stress adaptation, incorporation of micronutrients such as peptides and amino acids and by sonication of yogurt bacteria. This review will cover selective enumeration and survival of probiotic bacteria in dairy foods.

  18. diets for lactating dairy cows

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    I. & MERTENS, D.R.. l984. The use ofneutral detergent fibre versus acid detergent fibre in balancing dairy rations. Monsanto Technical Symposium, Fresno. Cal. March 14. 1984. VAN SOEST, P..I. & WlNE, R.H._ I967. Use ofdetergents in the analysis of fibrous feeds. lV. Determination of plant cell wall constituents. J. Assoc.

  19. New perspectives on dairy and cardiovascular health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovegrove, Julie A; Hobbs, Ditte A

    2016-08-01

    CVD are the leading cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide. One of the key dietary recommendations for CVD prevention is reduction of saturated fat intake. Yet, despite milk and dairy foods contributing on average 27 % of saturated fat intake in the UK diet, evidence from prospective cohort studies does not support a detrimental effect of milk and dairy foods on risk of CVD. The present paper provides a brief overview of the role of milk and dairy products in the diets of UK adults, and will summarise the evidence in relation to the effects of milk and dairy consumption on CVD risk factors and mortality. The majority of prospective studies and meta-analyses examining the relationship between milk and dairy product consumption and risk of CVD show that milk and dairy products, excluding butter, are not associated with detrimental effects on CVD mortality or risk biomarkers that include serum LDL-cholesterol. In addition, there is increasing evidence that milk and dairy products are associated with lower blood pressure and arterial stiffness. These apparent benefits of milk and dairy foods have been attributed to their unique nutritional composition, and suggest that the elimination of milk and dairy may not be the optimum strategy for CVD risk reduction.

  20. Dairy foods and body weight management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milna Tudor

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The existing data about the role of dairy foods in body weight management, as a physiological explanation are shown in this paper. There is accumulating evidence about inverse association between body weight and dairy intake. Research showed that obese individuals consume fewer dairies than normal weight people. Also three servings of dairy foods per day in a reduced calorie diet may help accelerate body fat loss when compared to a calorie-restricted diet low in dairy foods. Calcium plays the main role and is present in great amounts in dairy foods. Its anti-obesity effect is attributed to its impact on lypogenesis and lipolysis in adipocytes. Calcium supplements do not have such effect as dairy calcium, possibly due to the effects of other bioactive components in dairy foods such as conjugated linoleic acid, whey peptides, branched aminoacids and lactose which amplify anti-obesity effect. Cross-sectional epidemiological studies confirmed the hypothesis that high dairy food intake can act in a weight management, but prospective studies and randomized controlled intervention trials have yielded inconsistent results. Therefore there is a need of conducting more large population-based clinical trials and meta-analysis.

  1. An economic comparison of typical dairy farming systems in South Africa, Morocco, Uganda and Cameroon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndambi, Oghaiki Asaah; Hemme, Torsten

    2009-08-01

    Population growth, urbanisation and increased per capita milk consumption are main reasons for recent increasing milk demand in Africa. Due to globalisation, it is important to know how competitive various production systems are, especially as most governments promote local production and disfavour dairy imports. The TIPI-CAL (Technology Impact, Policy Impact Calculations model) was used to analyse and compare costs and returns of predominant dairy farming systems in South Africa, Morocco, Uganda and Cameroon. Results show that, as farms grew larger in size, family resources (especially land and labour) became insufficient and there was need for their acquisition from external sources. Though extensive dairy farming systems had the lowest cost of milk production (<20 US-$ per 100 kg milk), their input productivities and milk yields were lower, leading to very low net cash returns from dairying. Large intensive farms in South Africa had relatively low costs (<30 US-$ per 100 kg milk) and a high Return on Investment (ROI) due to a higher efficiency of input utilisation. It was concluded that, intensification of dairy farming and simultaneously increasing the scale of production will greatly increase productivity of farm inputs, thus recommended for development of the dairy sector in African countries.

  2. Consumers’ behaviour and motives for selection of dairy beverages in Kvarner region: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greta Krešić

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Since food choice is always a unique and personal experience, consumer behaviour is important for food manufacturers and marketers in term of product success. Due to the beneficial healthprotective effects of dairy beverages, this market segment is very innovative and fast-growing. The aim of this pilot-study was to examine the consumption patterns, purchasing behaviour and motivesfor selection of dairy beverages. The sample of this study included 114 participants (44 males and 70 females which were interviewed face-to-face at the entrance of 5 shopping centres. The surveyinstrument consisted of closed questions regarding habits of consumption, purchasing habits and motives for selection of dairy beverages. Gender specific differences were tested. The results obtained have shown that females consumed more milk and milk drinks (p<0.001 and fermented milk drinks (p=0.002 than males. The consumption of whey-based beverages was sporadical in both genders. Females in higher percentage purchase low-fat dairy beverages (p=0.043, while males exhibited a higher level of loyalty to a certain product (p=0.034. Sensory appeals were the most important motivational factor for both genders. Brand was ranked second for males (p<0.001 and health aspect for females. The products’ origin was ranked third, while price was ranked fifth for both genders. The results obtained could be useful to researchers and dairy market sector in developing and promotinga group of dairy beverage products based on innovations and health.

  3. Food Safety Knowledge, Attitudes and Behavior among Dairy Plant Workers in Beijing, Northern China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Chen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The safety of milk and dairy products has always been one of the focuses of consumers, the food industry and regulatory agencies. The purpose of this study was to gain insight into the food safety knowledge, attitudes and behavior of dairy plant workers. A cross-sectional survey was performed between May and August 2015 in three dairy plants in Beijing, northern China. A total of 194 dairy plant workers were interviewed to collect information on food safety knowledge, attitudes and self-reported behavior. The 194 dairy plant workers interviewed showed a sufficient level of knowledge (mean score 34 on a scale from 0–58, perfect attitudes (mean score 17 on a scale from 0–18, and perfect behavior (mean score 38 on a scale from 8–40. Only 39% of workers correctly determined specific pathogens or diseases that could be conveyed through milk and dairy products. 24% of workers knew the correct method of washing hands. A significant positive association was observed between attitudes and knowledge (p < 0.001 as well as behavior (p < 0.01. Education level was positively and significantly associated with food safety knowledge, attitudes, and behavior (p < 0.05. Workers in dairy enterprises in northern China have relatively low levels of knowledge, yet satisfactory attitudes and behavior. The knowledge of microbial food hazards and hand hygiene remains an issue that needs to be emphasized in future training programs. Education level is a determinant of attitudes and behavior with regard to the proper handling of milk and dairy products.

  4. Delivery of iron-fortified yoghurt, through a dairy value chain program, increases hemoglobin concentration among children 24 to 59 months old in Northern Senegal: A cluster-randomized control trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnes Le Port

    Full Text Available Innovative strategies are needed to enhance the nutritional impact of agriculture. Value chain approaches, which use supply chains to add value (usually economic to products as they move from producers to consumers, can be used to increase access to nutritious foods and improve nutritional status. This study tested whether a dairy value chain could be used to distribute a micronutrient-fortified yoghurt (MNFY (conditional upon the producer supplying a minimum amount of cow milk/day to improve hemoglobin and reduce anemia among preschool children in a remote area in Northern Senegal.A cluster randomized control trial was used to compare 204 children (24 to 59 months of age at baseline from households who received the MNFY coupled to a behavior change communication (BCC campaign focusing on anemia prevention to 245 children from a control group (receiving BCC only after one year. Randomization was done at the level of the family concession (households from the same family (n = 321. Eligible households had a child of the target age and were willing to deliver milk to the dairy factory. Changes in anemia and hemoglobin between groups were assessed using mixed regression models.Anemia prevalence was very high at baseline (80% and dropped to close to 60% at endline, with no differences between intervention groups. Hemoglobin increased by 0.55 g/dL, 95%CI (0.27; 0.84 more in the intervention compared to the control group after one year, in models that controlled for potentially confounding factors. The impact was greater (0.72 g/dL, 95%CI (0.34; 1.12 for boys, compared to girls (0.38 g/dL, 95%CI (-0.03; 0.80.The dairy value chain was a successful strategy to distribute MNFY among pastoralists in Northern Senegal, and increase Hb concentrations among their children. This study is one of the first proofs of concept showing that a nutrition-sensitive agriculture value chain approach can contribute to improved child nutrition in a remote pastoralist

  5. The awareness of patients with non - muscle invasive bladder cancer regarding the importance of smoking cessation and their access to smoking cessation programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuruk, Emrah; Tuken, Murat; Colakerol, Aykut; Serefoglu, Ege Can

    2017-01-01

    Smoking is the most important risk factor for bladder cancer and smoking cessation is associated with reduced risk of tumor recurrence and progression. The aim of this study is to assess the awareness of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) patients regarding the importance of smoking cessation, determine their access to smoking cessation programs and the effects of smoking cessation on recurrence rates of NMIBC. NMIBC patients who were followed with cystoscopy were included in the study. Their demographic properties were recorded, along with their smoking habits, awareness regarding the effects of smoking on bladder cancer and previous attempts for smoking cessation. Moreover, the patients were asked whether they applied for a smoking cessation program. Recurrence of bladder cancer during the follow-up period was also noted. A total of 187 patients were included in the study. The mean age was 64.68±12.05 (range: 15-90) and the male to female ratio was 167/20. At the time of diagnosis, 114 patients (61.0%) were active smokers, 35 patients (18.7%) were ex-smokers and 38 patients (20.3%) had never smoked before. After the diagnosis, 83.3% of the actively smoking patients were advised to quit smoking and 57.9% of them quit smoking. At the time of the study, 46.52% of the NMIBC patients were aware of the link between smoking and bladder cancer, whereas only 4.1% of the smoking patients were referred to smoking cessation programs. After a mean follow-up of 32.28±11.42 months, 84 patients (44.91%) had recurrence; however, current smoking status or awareness of the causative role of smoking on NMIBC did not affect the recurrence. In our study group, the majority of the NMIBC patients were not aware of the association between smoking and bladder cancer. Although most of the physicians advised patients to quit smoking, a significant amount of the patients were still active smokers during follow-up. Only a small proportion of patients were referred to smoking

  6. Dairy farm cost efficiency in leading milk-producing regions in Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobczyński, T; Klepacka, A M; Revoredo-Giha, C; Florkowski, W J

    2015-12-01

    This paper examines the cost efficiency of dairy farms in 2 important regions of commercial milk production in Poland (i.e., Wielkopolskie and Podlaskie). Both regions gained importance following the market-driven resource allocation mechanism adopted after Poland's transition to the market economy in 1989 and accession to the European Union (EU) in 2004. The elimination of the dairy quota system in the EU in 2015 offers new expansion opportunities. The analysis of trends in cow numbers, milk production, and yield per cow shows different patterns of expansion of the dairy sector in the 2 regions. We selected dairy farm data from the Farm Accounts Data Network database for both regions and applied the cost frontier estimation model to calculate the relative cost-efficiency index for the period 2004 to 2009. The indexes compare each farm in the sample to the most efficient dairy farm in each region separately. Additionally, the top 5% of dairy farms with the highest relative cost efficiency index from each region were compared in terms of production costs with published results from a study using the representative farm approach. The comparison of results from 2 different studies permits a conclusion that Wielkopolskie and Podlaskie dairy farms are able to compete with farms from the 4 largest milk-producing countries in the EU. Although both regions can improve yields per cow, especially Podlaskie, both regions are likely to take advantage of the expansion opportunities offered by the 2015 termination of the milk quota system. Copyright © 2015 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. A cross sectional observational study to estimate herd level risk factors for Leptospira spp. serovars in small holder dairy cattle farms in southern Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgado, Miguel; Otto, Barbara; Sandoval, Errol; Reinhardt, German; Boqvist, Sofia

    2014-06-06

    The south of Chile constitutes the main cattle milk producing area of the country. Regarding leptospirosis control in Chile, there is neither an official program nor an epidemiological characterization of smallholder dairy farms. This study was carried out to determine Leptospira seroprevalence and to evaluate risk factors associated with seropositivity at herd level in smallholder bovine dairy herds in southern Chile.A cross-sectional study was conducted, and a convenient sample of 1,537 apparently healthy dairy cows was included in the study. Individual blood samples were taken and examined for six selected reference Leptospira serovars by the Microscopic Agglutination Test (MAT). Of the included herds 75% (52/69) showed serological titers against one or more Leptospira serovar. Leptospira borgpetersenii serovar Hardjo was the serovar most frequently (81%) reported from animals with positive results. The variables considered risk factors for Leptospira seropositivity were calve natural breeding system, using a specific calving area and vaccination against Leptospira. Adult cows in contact with calves weaned, proved to be a protective factor against infection. Herds neglecting the management practices mentioned in this study could represent an important source of Leptospira infection for other herds in the same geographic area, as well as for other animal species.

  8. A genome scan for milk production traits in dairy goats reveals two new mutations in Dgat1 reducing milk fat content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Pauline; Palhière, Isabelle; Maroteau, Cyrielle; Bardou, Philippe; Canale-Tabet, Kamila; Sarry, Julien; Woloszyn, Florent; Bertrand-Michel, Justine; Racke, Ines; Besir, Hüseyin; Rupp, Rachel; Tosser-Klopp, Gwenola

    2017-05-12

    The quantity of milk and milk fat and proteins are particularly important traits in dairy livestock. However, little is known about the regions of the genome that influence these traits in goats. We conducted a genome wide association study in French goats and identified 109 regions associated with dairy traits. For a major region on chromosome 14 closely associated with fat content, the Diacylglycerol O-Acyltransferase 1 (DGAT1) gene turned out to be a functional and positional candidate gene. The caprine reference sequence of this gene was completed and 29 polymorphisms were found in the gene sequence, including two novel exonic mutations: R251L and R396W, leading to substitutions in the protein sequence. The R251L mutation was found in the Saanen breed at a frequency of 3.5% and the R396W mutation both in the Saanen and Alpine breeds at a frequencies of 13% and 7% respectively. The R396W mutation explained 46% of the genetic variance of the trait, and the R251L mutation 6%. Both mutations were associated with a notable decrease in milk fat content. Their causality was then demonstrated by a functional test. These results provide new knowledge on the genetic basis of milk synthesis and will help improve the management of the French dairy goat breeding program.

  9. The Role of Dairy Cattle Husbandry in Supporting The Development of National Dairy Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anneke Anggraeni

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available An intensive development in Indonesian dairy industry has expanded over two decades. During this period, the structure of the national dairy industry has progressed completely. The capacity of the national fresh milk production, however, has been able to supply only 35% of domestic milk demand. The milk domestic demand is predicted to be continous due to the increases in the national population and their welfare. Raising temperate dairy breed (Holstein-Friesian under tropical climate has resulted many deteriorates in productivity. More inferiority has been found under a semi-intensive management at small dairy farms. The existence of various changes in the global trade regulation for agriculture commodities has been a considerable factor directly affecting the future development of the national dairy industry. Increasing efficiency of various determinant components of the national dairy industry is required to produce domestic fresh milk in a good quality at a competitive price. This paper is dealing with the status of various determined factors especially for dairy livestock components to improve the future national dairy industry prospectively, involving for the national dairy cattle population, domestic milk yield, productivity of dairy cattle, breeding system and supporting reproduction technology. More over, other essential factors providing for dairy institution as well as distribution and marketing domestic milk production are also described.

  10. 75 FR 41365 - Dairy Product Price Support Program and Dairy Indemnity Payment Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-16

    ... appropriated funds are insufficient to pay all claims. That method is changing from a pro rata method to a... such milk or milk products contained certain harmful pesticide residues, chemicals, or toxic substances... supply of funds, requiring pro-rated partial payments. If the funds are not sufficient to pay all claims...

  11. Cow-specific risk factors for clinical mastitis in Brazilian dairy cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, C S F; Hogeveen, H; Botelho, A M; Maia, P V; Coelho, S G; Haddad, J P A

    2015-10-01

    Information related to mastitis risk factors is useful for the design and implementation of clinical mastitis (CM) control programs. The first objective of our study was to model the risk of CM under Brazilian conditions, using cow-specific risk factors. Our second objective was to explore which risk factors were associated with the occurrence of the most common pathogens involved in Brazilian CM infections. The analyses were based on 65 months of data from 9,789 dairy cows and 12,464 CM cases. Cow-specific risk factors that could easily be measured in standard Brazilian dairy farms were used in the statistical analyses, which included logistic regression and multinomial logistic regression. The first month of lactation, high somatic cell count, rainy season and history of clinical mastitis cases were factors associated with CM for both primiparous and multiparous cows. In addition, parity and breed were also associated risk factors for multiparous cows. Of all CM cases, 54% showed positive bacteriological culturing results from which 57% were classified as environmental pathogens, with a large percentage of coliforms (35%). Coagulase-negative Staphylococcus (16%), Streptococcus uberis (9%), Streptococcus agalactiae (7%) and other Streptococci (9%) were also common pathogens. Among the pathogens analyzed, the association of cow-specific risk factors, such as Zebu breed (OR=5.84, 95%CI 3.77-10.77) and accumulated history of SCC (1.76, 95%CI 1.37-2.27), was different for CM caused by Coagulase-negative Staphylococcus and S. agalactiae in comparison to CM caused by coliforms. Our results suggest that CM control programs in Brazil should specially consider the recent history of clinical mastitis cases and the beginning of the lactations, mainly during the rainy season as important risk factor for mastitis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Planning of dairy farm and dairy plant based ecotourism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarnyoto, A. S.; Tama, I. P.; Tantrika, C. F. M.

    2017-06-01

    One of a dairy production company producing pasteurized milk and yoghurt drink, whose brand has widely known in East Java, has a factory plant in Batu City, one of tourism destinations in Indonesia. Behind the factory plant, there is a vacant land with an estimated total area of 2.3 ha and a vacant cowshed which had not been used for cattle ranching. Because of that, the company planned to develop the vacant land as a dairy farm and plant based ecotourism. In addition, dairy farm and dairy plant based tourism attractions are still rarely found in Batu. Thus, the first aim of this study was to analyse the potencies of the company that related to future plans of ecotourism built. The second aim was to set up the strategies that can be done in order to actualize the ecotourism project. The next aim was to plan the ecotourism, especially the facilities planning and the facilities arrangement on the vacant land. Strategic management approach was used to analyse the potencies and to determine the strategies. To select the proper facilities, tourists were asked to give appraisal by using questionnaire. Appraisal result was mapped onto four quadrants spatial map to see advantages and shortcomings of each facility along with choosing the right facilities to be built. Those facilities and tourist activities were compared with ecotourism criteria to make sure that the facilities were appropriate to provide not only entertainment but also ecotourism function. To arrange the chosen facilities, the step in Systematic Layout Planning were conducted to generate a propose layout of facilities arrangement. Based on potencies analysis, in Internal-External matrix, the company current position was on quadrant 2 (grow and build), with the most appropriate strategy was intensive or integrative. The proposed strategies were to build the new infrastructure, to renovate cowshed, and to add new tourism facilities on the land. There were 11 selected facilities based on MDS. Moreover, based

  13. Family Dairy Tech, India : advisory report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eweg, R.; Rankenberg, E.H.M.; Agrawal, P.; Verschuur, C.M.

    2017-01-01

    This advisory report describes the results and recommendations for Indian dairy farmers and Dutch and Indian companies, from the RAAK Family Dairy Tech India project. Researchers and students of two Dutch and one Indian University of Applied Sciences, together with ten Dutch companies, Indian

  14. Brief of requirements of the dairy cow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cornelissen, J.M.R.; Ursinus, W.W.; Schepers, F.; Groot Koerkamp, P.W.G.; Dixhoorn, van I.D.E.

    2009-01-01

    This report lists the brief of requirements of the dairy cow, based on her needs (also listed). The BoR indicates the actor’s needs with regards to the animal husbandry system. BoR of the main actors are incorporated in the redesign of a dairy husbandry system in the project Cow Power

  15. Dairy Dilemma: Are You Getting Enough Calcium?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... body also needs vitamin D to absorb calcium. Nutrition surveys have shown that most people in the U.S. aren’t getting the calcium they need. If you’re avoiding milk and dairy ... taking nutritional supplements and choosing reduced-lactose or non-dairy ...

  16. Determinants of dairy consumption expenditure in urban ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The main purpose of the study was to examine the level of household expenditure on dairy products and to identify the principal factors that influence the level of consumption expenditure on dairy products across households in Accra and Kumasi. Structured questionnaire was used to elicit primary information from a total of ...

  17. Efficiency of European dairy processing firms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soboh, R.A.M.E.; Oude Lansink, A.; Dijk, van G.

    2014-01-01

    This paper compares the technical efficiency and production frontier of dairy processing cooperatives and investor owned firms in six major dairy producing European countries. Two parametric production frontiers are estimated, i.e. for cooperatives and investor owned firms separately, which are used

  18. Efficiency of European Dairy Processing Firms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soboh, R.A.M.E.; Oude Lansink, A.G.J.M.; Dijk, van G.

    2014-01-01

    This paper compares the technical efficiency and production frontier of dairy processing cooperativesand investor owned firms in six major dairy producing European countries. Two parametric produc-tion frontiers are estimated, i.e. for cooperatives and investor owned firms separately, which are

  19. Perceptions of Dairy Farmers of Gadag district in northwestern part of Karnataka state, India regarding Clean Milk Production

    OpenAIRE

    Shivakumar K. Radder and S.K. Bhanj

    2011-01-01

    Clean milk production is one important aspect in enhancing the quality of milk. It is important to know farmers' perception about it. With this view, present study was undertaken with the objective of understanding perception of dairy farmers about clean milk production. The study was conducted in six villages of Gadag district of Karnataka state. A total of 180 respondents were interviewed. Perceptions of the farmers regarding family manpower involved in dairy farming, personnel involved in ...

  20. Programmed cell death 4 (PDCD4) is an important functional target of the microRNA miR-21 in breast cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frankel, Lisa; Christoffersen, Nanna R; Jacobsen, Anders

    2008-01-01

    MicroRNAs are emerging as important regulators of cancer-related processes. The miR-21 microRNA is overexpressed in a wide variety of cancers and has been causally linked to cellular proliferation, apoptosis, and migration. Inhibition of mir-21 in MCF-7 breast cancer cells causes reduced cell gro...... and demonstrated that PDCD4 is a functionally important target for miR-21 in breast cancer cells.......MicroRNAs are emerging as important regulators of cancer-related processes. The miR-21 microRNA is overexpressed in a wide variety of cancers and has been causally linked to cellular proliferation, apoptosis, and migration. Inhibition of mir-21 in MCF-7 breast cancer cells causes reduced cell...... growth. Using array expression analysis of MCF-7 cells depleted of miR-21, we have identified mRNA targets of mir-21 and have shown a link between miR-21 and the p53 tumor suppressor protein. We furthermore found that the tumor suppressor protein Programmed Cell Death 4 (PDCD4) is regulated by miR-21...

  1. Influence of raw milk quality on processed dairy products: How do raw milk quality test results relate to product quality and yield?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Steven C; Martin, Nicole H; Barbano, David M; Wiedmann, Martin

    2016-12-01

    This article provides an overview of the influence of raw milk quality on the quality of processed dairy products and offers a perspective on the merits of investing in quality. Dairy farmers are frequently offered monetary premium incentives to provide high-quality milk to processors. These incentives are most often based on raw milk somatic cell and bacteria count levels well below the regulatory public health-based limits. Justification for these incentive payments can be based on improved processed product quality and manufacturing efficiencies that provide the processor with a return on their investment for high-quality raw milk. In some cases, this return on investment is difficult to measure. Raw milks with high levels of somatic cells and bacteria are associated with increased enzyme activity that can result in product defects. Use of raw milk with somatic cell counts >100,000cells/mL has been shown to reduce cheese yields, and higher levels, generally >400,000 cells/mL, have been associated with textural and flavor defects in cheese and other products. Although most research indicates that fairly high total bacteria counts (>1,000,000 cfu/mL) in raw milk are needed to cause defects in most processed dairy products, receiving high-quality milk from the farm allows some flexibility for handling raw milk, which can increase efficiencies and reduce the risk of raw milk reaching bacterial levels of concern. Monitoring total bacterial numbers in regard to raw milk quality is imperative, but determining levels of specific types of bacteria present has gained increasing importance. For example, spores of certain spore-forming bacteria present in raw milk at very low levels (e.g., quality incentive programs in the United States but is used in other countries (e.g., the Netherlands). Copyright © 2016 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Multiple criteria decision-making process to derive consensus desired genetic gains for a dairy cattle breeding objective for diverse production systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kariuki, C M; van Arendonk, J A M; Kahi, A K; Komen, H

    2017-06-01

    Dairy cattle industries contribute to food and nutrition security and are a source of income for numerous households in many developing countries. Selective breeding can enhance efficiency in these industries. Developing dairy industries are characterized by diverse production and marketing systems. In this paper, we use weighted goal aggregating procedure to derive consensus trait preferences for different producer categories and processors. We based the study on the dairy industry in Kenya. The analytic hierarchy process was used to derive individual preferences for milk yield (MY), calving interval (CIN), production lifetime (PLT), mature body weight (MBW), and fat yield (FY). Results show that classical classification of production systems into large-scale and smallholder systems does not capture all differences in trait preferences. These differences became apparent when classification was based on productivity at the individual animal level, with high and low intensity producers and processors as the most important groups. High intensity producers had highest preferences for PLT and MY, whereas low intensity producers had highest preference for CIN and PLT; processors preferred MY and FY the most. The highest disagreements between the groups were observed for FY, PLT, and MY. Individual and group preferences were aggregated into consensus preferences using weighted goal programming. Desired gains were obtained as a product of consensus preferences and percentage genetic gains (G%). These were 2.42, 0.22, 2.51, 0.15, and 0.87 for MY, CIN, PLT, MBW, and FY, respectively. Consensus preferences can be used to derive a single compromise breeding objective for situations where the same genetic resources are used in diverse production and marketing circumstances. The Authors. Published by the Federation of Animal Science Societies and Elsevier Inc. on behalf of the American Dairy Science Association®. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license

  3. Management practices on organic and conventional dairy herds in Minnesota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorge, U S; Moon, R; Wolff, L J; Michels, L; Schroth, S; Kelton, D F; Heins, B

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study was to describe and compare husbandry practices on organic and conventional dairy farms of similar sizes in Minnesota. Organic (ORG, n=35), same-sized conventional (SC, n=15, conventional (MC, n=13, ≥200 cows) dairy herds were visited in 2012, and farmers were interviewed once about their farm, herd demographics, and herd management practices concerning nutrition, housing, and reproductive programs. Organic farms had been established as long as conventional farms, and ORG producers had most commonly selected ORG farming because of a negative perception of pesticides for human health. The distribution of cattle breeds and ages differed across farm types. Organic farms had more crossbred cows and a greater number of older cows than conventional farms, who had mainly Holstein cattle. Organic farms did not dock tails, were more likely to use breeding bulls, and were less likely to conduct pregnancy diagnoses in cattle. All conventional farmers fed corn, corn silage, and hay, but no forage or feed supplement was fed by all ORG farms with the exception of pasture. Kelp was supplemented on most ORG farms but on none of the conventional farms. In summary, although there were differences across farm types regarding the use of pasture, feeds, and feed additives, breed and age distribution, reproductive management, and the use of tail docking, observations in other management areas showed large overlap across herd types. Copyright © 2016 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The use of bulk tank milk samples to monitor trends in antimicrobial resistance on dairy farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berge, Anna Catharina B; Champagne, Staci C; Finger, Regina M; Sischo, William M

    2007-01-01

    The routine monitoring of bacteria obtained from bulk tank milk (BTM) may be an important tool for detecting farm-level trends in antimicrobial resistance on dairy farms. This study describes and compares antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica (Salmonella) and Escherichia coli recovered from dairy BTM. BTM from more than 400 dairies in a dairy-intense region of California were sampled eight times at 2- to 3-month intervals over a 29-month period. From Salmonella positive and Salmonella negative herds any one Salmonella and three E. coli isolates per sample were tested for susceptibility to 12 antimicrobials. The prevalence of multiple drug resistant (MDR) E. coli was assessed in relation to Salmonella on the farm, farm size, season, MDR Salmonella, and serovar. At each sampling period, 10-21% and 54-77% of the dairy farms were positive for Salmonella and E. coli, respectively. The most commonly recovered Salmonella serovars were Montevideo (33%), Typhimurium (14%), Dublin (13%), and Give (11%). Two-thirds, respectively, of 478 Salmonella and 1577 E. coli isolates were pan-susceptible. The antimicrobial resistance patterns of MDR Salmonella tended to be serovar dependent and were different from the antimicrobial resistance patterns of MDR E. coli. MDR E. coli were more likely to be recovered from dairies with MDR Salmonella. There were no associations between MDR E. coli and season, Salmonella serovar detected in the BTM, or dairy herd size. Bulk milk E. coli and Salmonella could be valuable to monitor the dynamics of antimicrobial resistance in dairy milk production.

  5. Quality and microbiological safety of fermented bovine dairy produced in Federal District, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Lima dos Reis

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Considering the growing importance of fermented dairy products in the domestic market and the scarcity of data in the Federal District (DF, it was evaluated the quality and microbiological safety of these products in the DF and its adaptation to current standards. The study was conducted in five dairy being collected 105 samples of fermented dairy products corresponding to 21 lots (n = 5 per lot, with 65 samples of yogurt, 20 of curd and 20 of fermented dairy drink. All samples were submitted to a count of aerobic mesophilic, psychrotrophic, coliforms at 35 ° C, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus coagulase positive, Salmonella spp., molds, yeasts and viable lactic acid bacteria (BAL. The total lots analyzed, 62% were considered acceptable under the Regulatory Instructions n ° 46/2007 and n ° 16/2005. In order of quality, fermented dairy drink was the one with lots more apt to consumption (75% followed by yoghurt (61.5% and, lastly, curd (50%. For samples units, the results showed that: 17% of yoghurt samples, 15% of curd and 20% of fermented dairy drink showed scores above the allowed CT; 11% of yoghurt samples and 30% of fermented dairy drink showed BAL counts below specific minimum limits; and 61% samples of yogurt and curd were 30% of curd was with yeasts and molds counts above permitted. No samples showed the development of E. coli or Salmonella spp. Despite the absence of microbiological hazards in the samples analyzed, the study indicates problems in the production of these products in the DF that may be related to deficiencies in hygienic of the processes, most rigor in the quality controls of dairy and oversight of industries is needed.

  6. Fourier transform infrared and fluorescence spectral features of organic matter in conventional and organic dairy manure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhongqi; Ohno, Tsutomu

    2012-01-01

    Organic dairy production has exhibited potential for growth in the United States dairy sector. However, little information is available on whether there is any difference in manure composition and quality between organic (OD) and conventional (CD) dairy manure even though the composition and quality are important parameters with respect to availability, utilization, and cycling of manure nutrients and environmental impact evaluation. We comparatively characterized whole and water-extracted materials of 15 OD and seven CD dairy manure samples by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and fluorescence spectroscopies. Fourier transform infrared features of manure organic matter varied mainly in the 1650 to 1550 cm range, reflecting the presence of different N compounds in these manure samples. Fluorescence data revealed five fluorophore components present in the water-extracted organic matter from the manures. We found no clearly distinct value ranges in whole and water-extractable organic matter between the two types of dairy manure with respect to C and N contents and FT-IR and fluorescence spectral features. However, based on the average values, we observed general pattern differences on the effect of organic farming on the manure composition: OD contained less soluble C and N compounds on dry weight basis but more hydrophobic aliphatic groups in whole manure. The soluble organic matter in OD samples contained more stable humic- and lignin-related components and less amino/protein N-related components based on their spectroscopic features. These differences might be attributed to more forage feedstuffs in organic dairy farming management and more protein additives in conventional dairy feedstuffs. Information from this work may be useful in aiding organic dairy farmers in making manure management decisions. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  7. Internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequencing reveals considerable fungal diversity in dairy products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buehler, A J; Evanowski, R L; Martin, N H; Boor, K J; Wiedmann, M

    2017-11-01

    Fungi are important spoilage organisms in dairy products. However, little is known about the diversity of naturally occurring spoilage fungi in raw milk and processed dairy products, due at least in part to the fact that classical fungal identification methods require considerable expertise. To gain further insight into the fungal diversity in the dairy system, we isolated fungi from raw milk, raw and pasteurized milk cheese, and yogurt using the selective dichloran rose bengal chloramphenicol agar. In total, 361 fungal isolates were obtained and further characterized by DNA sequencing of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region and the nuclear ribosomal large subunit (LSU) rRNA gene if needed. We conducted BLAST (https://blast.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/Blast.cgi) searches of the ITS region sequences against the UNITE Database (https://unite.ut.ee/analysis.php), and selected other databases if needed, which allowed identification to the species level of 183 isolates and to the genus level of 107 of the 346 isolates that were successfully ITS sequenced. The isolates characterized represented 3 phyla and 19 genera; the most common genera isolated were Penicillium (25% of isolates), Debaryomyces (18%), and Candida (9%). This study not only provides, by using modern molecular tools, a baseline understanding of the types of fungi in dairy products, but also confirms that ITS sequencing is a useful approach for identification of fungal organisms found in the dairy food chain. Copyright © 2017 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. CONSIDERATIONS UPON MILK AND DAIRY PRODUCT PRODUCTION IN THE U.S.A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AGATHA POPESCU

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper aimed to present the evolution of milk production and dairy products in the USA during the period 2004-2006, based on USDA Statistics. The USA is a top produce of milk and dairy products in the world. Milk production accounted for 181,798 Millions Pounds in the year 2006. Its continuously increase during the last years has been positively influenced by the increasing number of dairy cows and average milk yield . The top states are California, Wisconsin, New York, Idaho and Pennsylvania, which all together achieve about 54 % of the country milk production. Over 99.37 % of Milk Production is marketed. Considering all milk marketings, Million USD 23,422 cash receiptscould be obtained from a dairy farm in the year 2006. The average return per Cwt was about USD 13 in 2006 . Milk is processed by about 1,000 manufacturing plants in a large variety of dairy products. Cheese production was about 9.5 Billion Pounds in the last analyzed years. The US also produces important amounts of butter , yogurt, ice cream etc. About 8.3 % of the US dairy products are exported, the most markets being Japan, Mexico and Canada.

  9. Preparation and evaluation of a novel therapeutic dairy-based drink for phenylketonuria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Salam, Ahmed M.; Effat, Laila K.

    2010-01-01

    Background: People with phenylketonuria need to eat a special diet which contains a low level of phenylalanine. Most of these special diets have high protein levels which contain phenylalanine. Control of phenylalanine levels in the early years of life is crucial and remains important throughout childhood, especially for cognitive function and behavior. Aims: The current study evaluated the biological and sensory properties of a novel dairy-based drink for patients with phenylketonuria (PKU). Methods and Materials: The novel dairy-based drink was prepared by emulsifying corn germ oil with casein glycomacropeptide (GMP) solution in milk permeates. The chemical composition and sensory properties of the dairy-based drink were determined. In addition, the dairy-based drink was nutritionally evaluated using patient volunteers. These patients followed a strict diet limiting phenylalanine in their food. Phenylalanine levels were measured before and after three days of consuming the dairy-based drink. Results: The results of the sensory evaluation showed that the product was ranked that there were decreases in “good” and was acceptable by all test panels and volunteers. Serum phenylalanine levels in all volunteers decreased between 30% - 80%. Conclusions: The data obtained from the sensory evaluation and the decreases in serum phenylalanine levels encourage us to utilize this formulated dairy-based drink for therapeutic feeding of PKU patients. PMID:22624117

  10. From rags to riches: the story of carbon, nutrients and pasture with dairy compost application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Jess; Cavagnaro, Tim; Patti, Tony; Wilkinson, Kevin; McDonald, Declan; Johnston, Priscilla; Wilson, Katrina; Rose, Mick; Jackson, Roy

    2014-05-01

    Around the world, dairy farmers are transforming dairy waste to compost for land application. In southeastern Australia, farmers are using composted dairy waste to increase production and reduce costs. In addition, the farmers are considering the benefits of compost for increasing sequestration of soil carbon, and on-farm nutrient retention. The "Carbon Farming Initative" in Australia is exploring the option to allow farmers to trade Carbon Credits for carbon stored in the soil. Compost also retains vital nutrients, such as N, on farm rather than importing N in the form of mineral fertilisers. Composting also reduces greenhouse gas emissions, such as CH4, compared to when stored in effluent ponds. This project will investigate if dairy compost applied to pasture improves carbon sequestration, nutrient retention and pasture production. In this project dairy compost, made from dairy effluent, feedpad waste, spoilt sillage and wood mulch, was applied onto a 1Ha field and companion plots at a rate of 0, 3, 6 and 12 t/ha. The field plot is open to grazing and normal farm management practices. The companion plots are being subjected to simulated grazing (mowing). The trials, currently underway will run for 18 months. Along with preliminary soil carbon results, this work will also include preliminary data for total and plant available nutrients, and farm biomass production. The outcomes of this research, and benefits it finds for "Carbon Farming" and nutrient retention has practical, policy and economic applications for world wide markets.

  11. Vulnerability and Tradeoffs of Dairy Farmers to the Impacts of Climate Variability and Change in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhakrishnan, A.; Gupta, J.; R, D.

    2016-12-01

    In recent years climate variability has threatened the sustainability of dairy animals and dairy farming in India. The study aims at assessing the vulnerability and tradeoffs of Dairy Based Livelihoods to Climate Variability and Change in the Western Ghat ecosystem and for this purpose; data were aggregated to an overall Livelihood Vulnerability Index (LVI) to Climate Change underlying the principles of IPCC, using 28 indicators and trade-off between vulnerability and milk production was calculated. Data were collected through Participatory Rural Appraisal and personal interviews from 360 randomly selected dairy farmers of three states of Western Ghat region, complemented by thirty years of gridded weather data and livestock data. The index score of dairy based livelihoods of many regions were negative. Lanja taluka of Maharashtra has highest level of vulnerability with overall LVI value -4.17 with 48% farmers falling in highly vulnerable category. There is also significant tradeoff between milk production and components of LVI. Thus our research will provide an important basis for policy makers to develop appropriate adaptation strategies for alarming situation and decision making for farmers to minimize the risk of dairy sector to climate variability.

  12. Role of antioxidant vitamins and trace elements in mastitis in dairy cows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Li Yang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Mastitis is associated with release of free radicals, increased total oxidant capacity and decreased total antioxidants capacity in milk. Antioxidant vitamins and minerals protect the body from free radicals either by directly scavenging free radicals or by inhibiting the activity of oxidizing enzymes. The supplementation of mastitic dairy cows with antioxidant vitamins as vitamin A (VA and β-carotene (BC, vitamin C (VC, vitamin E (VE, and antioxidant minerals as selenium (Se, Zinc (Zn and copper (Cu is very important to help the animal recover early. The aim of this review was to discuss the oxidative stress in dairy cows’ mastitis, and the roles of VA and BC, VC, VE, Se, Zn, and Cu in mastitis of dairy cows. Before deciding to supplement dairy cow rations with the levels of vitamins and minerals, dairy farmers should have their animal feeds tested and their rations evaluated by a competent dairy cow nutritionist and a trustworthy laboratory to be sure what levels of supplementation may be warranted. While inadequate intake and absorption of certain nutrients may result in a weakened immune system and perhaps more mastitis during the lactation period, unjustified supplementation can be expensive and lead to other animal health problems.

  13. Selection for profit in cattle: II. Economic weights for dairy and beef sires in crossbreeding systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfová, M; Wolf, J; Kvapilík, J; Kica, J

    2007-05-01

    The relative economic importance (economic weights) of 18 traits was determined for Holstein and Charolais sires used in a dairy production system applying cross-breeding with beef sires and in a cow-calf pasture cross-breeding system with integrated fattening of surplus animals. A bioeconomic model containing a profit function was used for the calculations in both systems. Discounted expressions for direct and maternal components of the traits during an investment period of 25 yr were calculated using the gene-flow technique. The relative economic weights for some traits or trait components of the dairy sires differed substantially between the purebred and crossbred dairy systems. There were also meaningful differences among the relative economic weights of traits for beef sires, depending on whether these bulls were used for terminal crossing with F1 females in the cow-calf pasture system (back-crossing), for crossing in dairy herds producing slaughter animals, or for crossing in dairy herds producing F1 females for the cow-calf pasture system. We therefore recommend construction of specific sets of subindices for dairy and beef sires to allow users to rank the bulls according to expected merit of their progeny in specific production systems.

  14. Engineering to support wellbeing of dairy animals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caja, Gerardo; Castro-Costa, Andreia; Knight, Christopher Harold

    2016-01-01

    Current trends in the global milk market and the recent abolition of milk quotas have accelerated the trend of the European dairy industry towards larger farm sizes and higher-yielding animals. Dairy cows remain in focus, but there is a growing interest in other dairy species, whose milk is often...... directed to traditional and protected designation of origin and gourmet dairy products. The challenge for dairy farms in general is to achieve the best possible standards of animal health and welfare, together with high lactational performance and minimal environmental impact. For larger farms, this may...... need to be done with a much lower ratio of husbandry staff to animals. Recent engineering advances and the decreasing cost of electronic technologies has allowed the development of 'sensing solutions' that automatically collect data, such as physiological parameters, production measures and behavioural...

  15. The role of whey in functional dairy food production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ljubica Tratnik

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Modern life style also enhances a need for creation of better dairyproducts, in comparison with traditional ones, possessing functionalcharacteristics. Whey is consisted primarily of lactose, proteins of high nutritive value, important minerals and imunoactive compounds, as well as vitamins of B group. It can be used for fermented probiotic drinks and albumin cheese production. Using new methods of pressure membrane filtration and demineralisation the economic manufacture of whey, as a valuable source of nutrients, is enabled. The aim of this paper is to give an overview on the possibilities of sweet whey, especially whey protein concentrates, use in functional dairy products manufacture from cow’s and goat’s milk. The paper is based on the published scientific research performed in the Laboratory for Technology of Milk and Dairy Products of the Faculty of Food Technology and Biotechnology University of Zagreb.

  16. Inhibition of Brevibacterium linens by Probiotics from Dairy Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison M. Knox

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Brevibacterium linens is an important species in dairy products rendering a specific taste and aroma to numerous smear ripened and blue veined cheeses due to proteolysis. However, the presence of the species in South African blue veined cheeses is undesirable and consumers demand the product void of the species. Accordingly, numerous methods including microbial inhibition using fungi and bacterial probiotic cultures with possible inhibitory effects were applied in an attempt to inhibit the species. None of the fungi, however, proved to be successful, whereas Lactobacillus rhamnosus and Bifidobacterium lactis, two typical probiotic species applied in dairy products, showed inhibitory effects against B. linens when tested using the spot-on-lawn assay.

  17. VIABILITY OF THE PROBIOTIC BACTERIA L. ACIDOPHILUS IN DAIRY PRODUCTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janka Koreňová

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available A number of health benefits have been claimed for probiotic bacteria such as Lactobacillus acidophilus. Because of the potential health benefits, these organisms are increasingly incorporated into dairy foods. Viability of probiotic bacteria is important in order to provide health benefits. However, many studies have shown low viability of probiotics in market preparations. This study cover selective enumeration and survival of probiotic bacteria L. acidophilus in some dairy drinks. L. acidophilus was found in the range from 106 to 107 CFU.g-1 in five types of fermented milk products containing probiotic cultures. Two investigated products were up to standard according to Regulation of Ministry of Agriculture and Ministry of Health of Slovak Republic.doi: 10.5219/147

  18. Production of selenium-enriched milk and dairy products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Csapó J.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Until the middle of the last century, selenium was considered to be toxic, but recently it turned out to be a micronutrient with important physiological effects, whose lack impedes the functioning of several enzymes, while in the case of a prolonged deficiency, disease processes can also occur in the body. Hungary belongs to the selenium-deficient regions in Europe; therefore, our aim was to contribute to the improvement of selenium supply of the population through increasing the selenium content of milk and dairy products. A daily supplementation of 1-6 mg organic selenium to the feed of dairy cows increases the selenium content of milk from the value of 18 μg/kg to 94 μg/kg in 8 weeks, decreasing again to the initial value in 6 weeks after stopping the supplementation.

  19. The RESET Mindset Model applied on decreasing antibiotic usage in dairy cattle in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, T J G M; Jansen, J; Wessels, R J

    2017-01-01

    Prudent use of antibiotics is important to prevent antibiotic resistance in humans and in animals. For this reason politicians demanded a decrease of total antibiotic use and of use of critically important antibiotics in animal husbandry in the Netherlands. In the dairy sector the use of antibiotics almost halved in the years 2009-2015, with a decrease of the use of critically important antibiotics to very low levels. To realize a sustainable decrease in antibiotic usage, the mindset towards the subject was considered crucial. Based on several models from social psychology, the RESET Mindset Model was used. This model contains the most important cues to change human behaviour, being Rules and regulations, Education and information, Social pressure, Economics, and Tools. To change behaviour of groups in order to reach a tipping point, it is of utmost importance to not choose among the different cues, but to use them all. In order to decrease antibiotic usage in dairy cattle in the Netherlands several actions, obliged as well as voluntary, were undertaken. An independent veterinary medicine authority was founded that became active for all animal sectors. In the dairy sector a national database on antibiotic usage called MediRund was developed, which made transparency and benchmarking on antibiotic usage at the national and the herd level possible. Several other activities are described, such as herd health and treatment plans, selective dry cow therapy, and the strong limitation on the use of critically important antibiotics. Antibiotic usage at the herd level, referred to as the 'antibiotic number', became an important and socially accepted herd level parameter. The actions undertaken worked through different cues, all part of the RESET Mindset Model. As such, different types of dairy farmers sensitive to different types of cues were motivated to change their behaviour. Antibiotic usage in dairy cattle in the Netherlands decreased significantly by intense

  20. Dairy goat production systems: status quo, perspectives and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escareño, Luis; Salinas-Gonzalez, Homero; Wurzinger, Maria; Iñiguez, Luiz; Sölkner, Johann; Meza-Herrera, Cesar

    2013-01-01

    Goat production concentrated in developing countries (tropics, dry areas), contributes largely to the livelihoods of low and medium income farmers. Farming systems in these areas have evolved to cope with the formidable constraints imposed by harsh natural and economic conditions by adapting integrated crop/livestock production strategies. In Asia, Africa and Latin America, due to its almost exclusive extensive nature, goat production relies mainly on grazing on communal lands that hardly provide the minimum nutrient requirements due to overstocking and degradation. While some of these production systems are becoming semi-intensive, appropriate breeding strategies should be designed to promote conservation and improvement of their unique attributes, such as adaptability, water use efficiency and suitability under harsh climatic conditions. In Europe, dairy goat production is more common around the Mediterranean basin, where it is important from an economic, environmental and sociological perspective to the Mediterranean countries: Spain, France, Italy and Greece. Europe owns only 5.1 % of the world's dairy goat herds, but produces 15.6 % of the world's goat milk; this is the only continent where goat milk has such an economic importance and organization. In developing countries the dairy goat sector requires a systemic approach, whereby nutrition, animal health, breeding, know-how, inputs and technologies must be assembled. This would allow the optimization of natural and local resources and would promote the transition from a risk reduction strategy towards an increased productivity strategy. Such an increase would privilege production efficiency based on clean, green and ethical practices for responsible innovation.

  1. The current status of autologous blood transfusion in Japan--the importance of pre-deposit autologous blood donation program and the needs to achieve patient blood management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuno, Nelson Hirokazu; Nagura, Yutaka; Kawabata, Michiru; Matsuhashi, Mika; Sone, Shinji; Ikeda, Toshiyuki; Okochi, Naoko; Takahashi, Koki

    2013-12-01

    Autologous blood transfusion (ABT) is currently considered the safest transfusion, since the risks of allogeneic immunological reaction and viral transmission are theoretically null. Although its use has declined in Western countries in the recent decade, it has been progressively expanded in Japan. With the widening of the concept of patient blood management (PBM), which aims to prevent the harmful adverse effects of the exposure to allogeneic blood, the importance of the ABT has once again gained interest. Here, we retrospectively analyzed the cases pre-depositing autologous blood for an elective surgery in the period of January 2000 to December 2010 in our hospital, where a pre-deposit autologous blood donation (PAD) program has been established in 2006, in an attempt to analyze the improvements achieved, and the problems remaining to achieve patient blood management. The PAD program contributed for the further improvement of ABT, and the number of participating patients increased, especially in the period 2002-2003, when the idea of PAD program implementation came out. By simple extrapolation of the ABT data to allogeneic blood, ABT was found to be superior in terms of cost-effectiveness. However, problems such as the high wastage rate, and the inappropriate transfusion triggers remain to be solved. ABT plays the central role in PBM, but to achieve the real PBM, there is need to indicate ABT appropriately, according to the individual needs, and use it adequately, without discarding. Our present data reflect the present status of the ABT performance in Japan, and will serve as the basis for the development of strategies to achieve safe and appropriate performance of ABT, and consequently, achieve PBM. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Epidemiologic aspects of neural tube defects in the United States: changing concepts and their importance for screening and prenatal diagnostic programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sever, L.E.; Strassburg, M.A.

    1983-09-01

    This report considers several major epidemiologic aspects of neural tube defects (NTDs). After examining briefly the approaches and goals of epidemiology the traditional epidemiologic concepts of NTDs are reviewed and new interpretations of the epidemiology of these defects is suggested. Three major topics are addressed: (1) that much of our knowledge of the epidemiology of the NTDs comes from areas or periods of high rates of occurrence and that generalizations based on these data may not be applicable to low incidence situations; (2) that the etiology of these defects is multifactorial, involving interaction between genetic and nongenetic factors which may differ in their relative importance between populations; and (3) that anencephalus and spina bifida may be more epidemiologically and etiologically distinct than is usually appreciated. A final consideration deals with some recent contributions of epidemiology to screening and prenatal diagnosis programs.

  3. Dairy constituents and neurocognitive health in ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camfield, David A; Owen, Lauren; Scholey, Andrew B; Pipingas, Andrew; Stough, Con

    2011-07-01

    Age-related cognitive decline (ARCD) and dementia are of increasing concern to an ageing population. In recent years, there has been considerable research focused on effective dietary interventions that may prevent or ameliorate ARCD and dementia. While a number of studies have considered the impact that dairy products may have on physiological health, particularly with regard to the metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular health, further research is currently needed in order to establish the impact that dairy products have in the promotion of healthy brain function during ageing. The present review considers the available evidence for the positive effects of dairy products on the metabolic syndrome and glucose regulation, with consideration of the implications for neurocognitive health. A literature search of current (September 2010) meta-analyses/reviews and original research regarding dairy products and cognition was conducted through SCOPUS using the following search terms for dairy consituents: dairy, milk, cheese, yoghurt, probiotics, whey protein, alpha lactalbumin, calcium, B-12, bioactive peptides and colostrinin (CLN). These search terms for dairy products were combined with the following search terms related to cognition and health: cognition, cognitive decline, dementia, Alzheimer's disease, metabolic syndrome, diabetes, insulin resistance and glucose regulation. Concerns regarding SFA and other fatty acids found in dairy products are also reviewed in relation to different forms of dairy products. The review also considers recent evidence for positive neurocognitive effects associated with bioactive peptides, CLN and proline-rich polypeptides, α-lactalbumin, vitamin B12, calcium and probiotics. Future directions for the extraction and purification of beneficial constituents are also discussed. It is concluded that low-fat dairy products, when consumed regularly as part of a balanced diet, may have a number of beneficial outcomes for neurocognitive health

  4. DAIRY BUSINESS: THE CASE OF BULGARIAN DAIRY CATTLE FARMERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsvetana HARIZANOVA-METODIEVA

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to explore differences between dairy cattle farmers in Bulgaria, according to certain factors. Information about the social characteristics of the farmers (educational level, gender, and age, and about the farm characteristics (number of cows in the main herd, average milk yield, and the rate of return on investment was collected. Sixty percent of the farmers were up to 50 years of age. Fifty percent of the farmers had had a secondary education and the rest had gained a university degree. The study found that only one of the 20 farmers was a woman. It was found that the group of farmers with a university degree had lower average age than the group of farmers with secondary school. There was no significant difference in the rate of return between the two groups of farms in terms of the effectiveness of the farm. The difference in the number of cows in the main herd was not significant too. The research identified a need for additional training for farmers in order to reduce their dependence on hired workers. It was found that farmers attend basic courses in the field of agriculture and livestock breeding in order to fill the gap between the existing levels of knowledge of farmers and the necessary skills for the effective management of dairy farms.

  5. Electrocoagulation of synthetic dairy wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smoczynski, Lech; Munska, Kamilla; Pierozynski, Boguslaw

    2013-01-01

    This study compares the effectiveness of pollutant removal from synthetic dairy wastewater electrocoagulated by means of aluminum and iron anodic dissolution. A method based on the cubic function (third degree polynomial) was proposed for electrocoagulant dosing. Mathematical methods for calculating the optimal electrocoagulant doses proved to be quite precise and useful for practical applications. The results of gravimetric measurements of electrocoagulant (electrode) consumption demonstrated that theoretical doses of Al determined based on Faraday's law were substantially lower than those produced by electrode weighing. The above phenomenon was also discussed in the light of the results of polarization resistance measurements for Al and Fe electrodes used in the study.

  6. Costs of Producing Biogas at Dairy Farms in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gebrezgabher, S.A.; Meuwissen, M.P.M.; Oude Lansink, A.G.J.M.

    2010-01-01

    By 2020, Dutch dairy chains envisage to be self-sufficient with regard to energy used by dairy farms and dairy processors. This would require dairy farms to produce 25 PJ per year, possibly by a combination of wind, solar and biogas. This paper focuses on biogas. To evaluate the project’s viability

  7. 21 CFR 163.145 - Mixed dairy product chocolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Mixed dairy product chocolates. 163.145 Section... § 163.145 Mixed dairy product chocolates. (a) Description. Mixed dairy product chocolates are the foods...; or (iv) Malted milk; and (2) The finished mixed dairy product chocolates shall contain not less than...

  8. 7 CFR 58.222 - Dry dairy product cooling equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Dry dairy product cooling equipment. 58.222 Section 58... DAIRY PRODUCTS 1 General Specifications for Dairy Plants Approved for USDA Inspection and Grading Service 1 Equipment and Utensils § 58.222 Dry dairy product cooling equipment. Cooling equipment shall be...

  9. The Myanmar dairy sector : a quickscan of opportunities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee, van der J.; Jong, M.J.; Thant, A.M.; Oo, T.; Lynn, P.K.; Ren, X.

    2014-01-01

    This report describes the Myanmar dairy sector and opportunities for development, for private as well as public actors. It describes the dairy market, dairy farming systems, and the enabling environment for dairy. A number of business opportunities are listed. It concludes with recommendations on

  10. Introduction to Dairy Production. Instructor Guide [and] Student Reference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Kevin

    This packet contains an instructor guide and student reference for a course in introduction to dairy production. The curriculum contains the following six lessons: (1) introduction to the dairy industry; (2) breeds of dairy cattle; (3) principles of dairy cattle selection; (4) herd management; (5) herd health; and (6) industry issues. The…

  11. Daily eating activity of dairy cows from 3D accelerometer data and RFID signals: prediction by random forests and detection of sick cows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foldager, Leslie; Gildbjerg, Lars Bilde; Voss, Heidi

    2017-01-01

    Feed intake is very important for dairy cows and deviation from normal eating behaviour may predict a cow that needs treatment. We used video recordings of dairy cows at the Danish Cattle Research Centre (DKC) combined with data from a neck-collar mounted 3D accelerometer and RFID device from...

  12. Culling reasons in organic and conventional dairy herds and genotype by environment interaction for longevity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlman, T; Berglund, B; Rydhmer, L; Strandberg, E

    2011-03-01

    criteria differ between organic and conventional production. Different preferences may influence the need for alternative selection indexes for organic production, with different weightings of traits, or a separate breeding program. However, no genotype by environment interaction of importance was found between the production systems. Copyright © 2011 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Use of metabolic profiles in dairy cattle in tropical and subtropical countries on smallholder dairy farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitaker, D A; Goodger, W J; Garcia, M; Perera, B M; Wittwer, F

    1999-01-27

    Metabolic profile testing has generally been used as part of a multidisciplinary approach for dairy herds in temperate climates. Our goal was to evaluate the effectiveness of the technique for identifying constraints on productivity in small herds in environments less favorable for milk production. Metabolites tested were chosen for stability in the sample after collection of blood, ease of analysis and practical knowledge of the meaning of the results. Blood levels of five different metabolites in low-producing dairy cows belonging to smallholders in tropical and subtropical environments were measured. The study involved 13 projects with 80 cows in each, carried out in six Latin American, six Asian, and one southern European countries. Data were also collected on feeding, body condition score (BCS) and weight change, parasitism, and reproduction. In Chile, Mexico, Paraguay, Philippines, Uruguay, and Venezuela, globulin levels were high in > 17% of cows sampled on each occasion. Globulin levels were also high in Turkey and Vietnam on one or more occasions. In Paraguay, 49% of cows had high globulin levels at two to three months after calving. These results suggest that inflammatory disease was present to a potentially important degree, although this was not always investigated and not always taken into account. In all countries except Mexico and Venezuela, high beta-hydroxybutyrate (BHB) levels before calving in many cows highlighted the presence of condition loss in late pregnancy, an important potential constraint on productivity and fertility. Fewer cows showed high BHB levels in lactation, whereas change in BCS and weight was more sensitive for measuring negative energy balance. Urea concentrations were low in only small numbers of cows suggesting that dietary protein shortages were not common. Albumin values were low mainly in cows where globulin values were high and, hence, did not generally provide additional information. The exception was in China where

  14. Herd-level and contextual factors influencing dairy cow mortality in France in 2005 and 2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raboisson, D; Cahuzac, E; Sans, P; Allaire, G

    2011-04-01

    Dairy cow mortality causes financial loss and is increasing over time; it indicates suboptimal herd health or welfare. To describe the herd-level and contextual factors affecting cow mortality, the French National Bovine Dataset Identification was used to create dairy, beef, or fattening units within farms, for 2005 and 2006. Mortality rate (MO-RA, outcome variable) and most variables were calculated at the unit level, whereas contextual variables were defined at the municipality level [cattle density, inhabitant density, agricultural land always with grass on overall agricultural land (ALWG/OAL)]. The localization (11 dairy production areas, representative of the farming systems) was also included. The statistical analysis was performed with a probit regression model (MO-RA=0 or>0) and with a linear model corrected by the Heckman method for bias sample selection. For 2005 and 2006, 3.8 and 3.7 million dairy cow-years, 101,445 and 96,954 dairy units, and 141,677 and 143,424 deaths were recorded, respectively. Over one-third of the units had no dairy cow mortality in 2005 or 2006. Overall MO-RA was 3.7 and 3.8% for 2005 and 2006, respectively. Restricted MO-RA (farms without death excluded) was 5.8% for 2005 and 2006. The correlation of MO-RA among units between the 2 yr was 0.25. The same effects and close estimate values were reported for 2005 and 2006 with both models. Mortality rate was positively associated with the number of cow-years, having a beef unit in addition to a dairy unit, the proportion of purchased cows, the proportion of first-calving cows, the average calving interval, being a Milk Control Program member, inhabitant density, not being in dairy production area Grand-Ouest, and ALWG/OAL. Negative associations were reported for breed other than Holstein, being a Good Breeding Practices member, having a calving peak in autumn, culling rate, and municipal cattle density. This study reports an average mortality rate for the French dairy cows. It

  15. A diagnostic and prognostic tool for epidemiologic and economic analyses of dairy herd health management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enevoldsen, Carsten; Sørensen, J.T.; Thysen, Iver

    1995-01-01

    A computer program framework was established to enable a dairy herd production consultant to perform whole-herd analysis. The diagnostic process was an extensive data analysis 1) to derive key parameters related to production, reproduction, and health and 2) to produce input to a prognostic proce...

  16. Economic and epidemiological evalution of possible salmonella control strategies in dairy cattle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergevoet, R.H.M.; Schaik, van G.; Veling, J.; Backus, G.B.C.; Franken, P.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of a Salmonella control program for Dutch dairy herds. Salmonella control strategies were evaluated using a computer-based model consisting of an epidemiological module and an economics module. The epidemiological module is a state transition model of the infectivity

  17. Multi-bucket optimization for integrated planning and scheduling in the perishable dairy supply chain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sel, C.; Bilgen, B.; Bloemhof, J.M.; Vorst, van der J.G.A.J.

    2015-01-01

    This paper considers a dairy industry problem on integrated planning and scheduling of set yoghurt production. A mixed integer linear programming formulation is introduced to integrate tactical and operational decisions and a heuristic approach is proposed to decompose time buckets of the decisions.

  18. Strategic test-day recording regimes to estimate lactation yield in tropical dairy animals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McGill, D.M.; Thomson, P.C.; Mulder, H.A.; Lievaart, J.J.

    2014-01-01

    Background In developing dairy sectors, genetic improvement programs have limited resources and recording of herds is minimal. This study evaluated different methods to estimate lactation yield and sampling schedules with fewer test-day records per lactation to determine recording regimes that (1)

  19. MEXICO'S DAIRY SECTOR IN THE 1990S: A DESCRIPTIVE ANALYSIS

    OpenAIRE

    Nicholson, Charles F.

    1995-01-01

    Mexico's dairy sector is diverse. Regional differences in production systems and seasonality, processing technology and infrastructure, and consumer preferences and purchasing power imply a strong need for spatial disaggregation in analysis of the country's dairy industry. This bulletin summarizes the characteristics of milk production, dairy processing, consumer demand, and trade in dairy products in Mexico as of 1994. Expenditure elasticities for eight dairy products estimated from househol...

  20. Role of Women Workers at Dairy Farms in Banyumas District

    OpenAIRE

    Mastuti, S; Hidayat, NN

    2009-01-01

    Dairy farm is one of promising to increase the household income. Dairy farm generally involve all the household members. The research was aimed to: 1) know contribution of work duration of women woker to the total duration of work in dairy farm; 2) identify contribution of women income to the total income of dairy farm; 3) determine factors that influence contribution of income of women to the total income of dairy farm. Three sub districts were taken as area sample using purposive sampling...

  1. 7 CFR 1145.2 - Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Program. 1145.2 Section 1145.2 Agriculture Regulations... Orders; Milk), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DAIRY FORWARD PRICING PROGRAM Program Rules § 1145.2 Program. (a... be entered into under the program after September 30, 2012, and no forward contract entered into...

  2. Closantel plasma and milk disposition in dairy goats: assessment of drug residues in cheese and ricotta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iezzi, S; Lifschitz, A; Sallovitz, J; Nejamkin, P; Lloberas, M; Manazza, J; Lanusse, C; Imperiale, F

    2014-12-01

    Closantel (CLS) is currently used in programs for the strategic control of gastrointestinal nematodes. CLS is extralabel used in different dairy goat production systems. From available data in dairy cows, it can be concluded that residues of CLS persist in milk. The current work evaluated the concentration profiles of CLS in plasma and milk from lactating orally treated dairy goats to assess the residues pattern in dairy products such as cheese and ricotta. Six (6) female Saanen dairy goats were treated orally with CLS administered at 10 mg/kg. Blood and milk samples were collected between 0 and 36 days post-treatment. The whole milk production was collected at 1, 4, 7, and 10 days post-treatment to produce soft cheese and ricotta. CLS concentrations in plasma, milk, cheese, whey, and ricotta were determined by HPLC. The concentrations of CLS measured in plasma were higher than those measured in milk at all sampling times. However, the calculated withdrawal time for CLS in milk was between 39 and 43 days postadministration to dairy goats. CLS residual concentrations in cheese (between 0.93 and 1.8 μg/g) were higher than those measured in the milk used for its production. CLS concentrations in ricotta were sixfold higher than those in the milk and 20-fold higher than those in the whey used for its production. The persistent and high residual concentrations of CLS in the milk and in the cheese and ricotta should be seriously considered before issuing any recommendation on the extralabel use of CLS in dairy goat farms. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Prevalence and risk factors of bovine tuberculosis in dairy cattle in Eritrea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghebremariam, Michael K; Rutten, V P M G; Vernooij, J C M; Uqbazghi, K; Tesfaalem, T; Butsuamlak, T; Idris, A M; Nielen, M; Michel, A L

    2016-05-25

    The prevalence of bovine tuberculosis (BTB) in dairy cattle in the three major milk producing regions of Eritrea was assessed by subjecting 15,354 dairy cattle, 50 % of Eritrea's dairy cattle population, to the single intradermal comparative tuberculin test (SICTT). Skin test results were interpreted according to guidelines of the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE) with >4 mm as cutoff in skin thickness increase. In addition, we studied the relation between 'physiological' variables related to pregnancy and lactation, and the variable 'region' on the probability to be skin test positive. The BTB prevalences at animal and herd levels were: 21.5% and 40.9% in Maekel, 7.3% and 10% in Debub, and 0.2% and 1.6% in the Anseba region, respectively. Overall, in the regions included, prevalence was 11.3% (confidence interval (CI) 95% CI, 11.29 - 11.31%) and 17.3% (95% CI, 17.27-17.33%), at animal and herd level, respectively. Considering positive herds only, the animal BTB prevalence was 36.8%, 30.1%, and 1.8%, in Maekel, Debub and Anseba, respectively, and the overall animal prevalence within these herds was 32%. In adult dairy cattle the probability of positive reactivity in the SICTT test was highest in pregnant animals as compared to the other categories. This study reports persistent prevalence of BTB as defined by positive SICTT in the dairy sector of Eritrea, especially in the regions of Maekel and Debub that are located in the central highlands of the country. To our understanding this is the first report that has encompassed all the major dairy farms in Eritrea and it will be instrumental in advocating future BTB control programs in the dairy sector.

  4. Assessing economic consequences of foot disorders in dairy cattle using a dynamic stochastic simulation model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruijnis, M.R.N.; Hogeveen, H.; Stassen, E.N.

    2010-01-01

    Foot disorders are an important health problem in dairy cattle, in terms of economics and animal welfare. The incidence, severity, and duration of foot disorders account for their importance. Prevalence of both subclinical and clinical foot disorders is high. More insight into the economic

  5. The RESET Mindset Model applied on decreasing antibiotic usage in dairy cattle in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lam, T. J. G. M.; Wessels, R. J.; Jansen, Jolanda

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Prudent use of antibiotics is important to prevent antibiotic resistance in humans and in animals. For this reason politicians demanded a decrease of total antibiotic use and of use of critically important antibiotics in animal husbandry in the Netherlands. In the dairy sector the use of

  6. Prevalence of paratuberculosis in the dairy goat and dairy sheep industries in Ontario, Canada

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bauman, Cathy A.; Jones-Bitton, Andria; Menzies, Paula

    2016-01-01

    A cross-sectional study was undertaken (October 2010 to August 2011) to estimate the prevalence of paratuberculosis in the small ruminant dairy industries in Ontario, Canada. Blood and feces were sampled from 580 goats and 397 sheep (lactating and 2 y of age or older) that were randomly selected...... from 29 randomly selected dairy goat herds and 21 convenience -selected dairy sheep flocks. Fecal samples were analyzed using bacterial culture (BD BACTEC MGIT 960) and polymerase chain reaction (Tetracore); serum samples were tested with the Prionics Parachek enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA......). Using 3-test latent class Bayesian models, true farm-level prevalence was estimated to be 83.0% [95% probability interval (PI): 62.6% to 98.1%] for dairy goats and 66.8% (95% PI: 41.6% to 91.4%) for dairy sheep. The within-farm true prevalence for dairy goats was 35.2% (95% PI: 23.0% to 49...

  7. Susceptibility to and diagnosis of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis infection in dairy calves: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortier, Rienske A R; Barkema, Herman W; De Buck, Jeroen

    2015-10-01

    The primary objectives of paratuberculosis control programs are reducing exposure of calves to Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP), reducing herd infection pressure and regular testing of cattle >36 months of age. Although control programs based on these principles have reduced prevalence of MAP infection in dairy herds, they have generally not eliminated the infection. Recent infection trial(s) have yielded new knowledge regarding diagnostic testing and age- and dose-dependent susceptibility to MAP infection. Calves up to 1 year of age are still susceptible to MAP infection; therefore, control programs should refrain from referring to specific ages with respect to susceptibility and prevention of new infections. Notwithstanding, lesions were more severe when calves were inoculated at 2 weeks versus 1 year of age. Furthermore, a high inoculation dose resulted in more pronounced lesions than a low inoculation dose, especially in young calves. Consequently, keeping infection pressure low should decrease the incidence of new MAP infections and severity of JD in cattle that do acquire the infection. It was also evident that early diagnosis of MAP infection was possible and could improve efficacy of control programs. Although its use will still need to be validated in the field, a combination of antibody ELISA and fecal culture in young stock, in addition to testing cattle >36 months of age when screening a herd for paratuberculosis, was expected to improve detection of dairy cattle infected with MAP. Although calves were inoculated using a standardized method in a controlled environment, there were substantial differences among calves with regards to immune response, shedding and pathology. Therefore, we inferred there were genetic differences in susceptibility. Important insights were derived from experimental infection trials. Therefore, it was expected that these could improve paratuberculosis control programs by reducing severity and incidence of

  8. Safety assessment of dairy microorganisms: Propionibacterium and Bifidobacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meile, Leo; Le Blay, Gwenaelle; Thierry, Anne

    2008-09-01

    The genera Propionibacterium and Bifidobacterium are clustered in the class Actinobacteria and form the anaerobic branch of coryneform bacteria. The dairy propionibacteria comprising four species P. freudenreichii, P. acidipropionici, P. jensenii and P. thoenii are industrially important as starter cultures in hard-cheese ripening and recently also as protective bio-preservatives and probiotics. These four species are considered as safe whereas cutaneous Propionibacterium species (also named "acnes group") are pathogens. In contrast, bifidobacteria in fermented dairy products and milk powder are exclusively used as probiotics; selected strains of several species (out of more than thirty) contribute to this task. It has been only rarely found that commensal bifidobacteria have been connected with certain dental and other infections. Consequently, only one single species, Bifidobacterium dentium, is recognized as pathogenic. Genome sequence analysis of Bifidobacterium longum and molecular biological analysis of other probiotic strains confirmed so far the absence of virulence and pathogenecity factors. However, tetracycline resistance genes tet(W), although probably not easy transferable, were found in Bifidobacterium strains, also in Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis, the worldwide most used industrial strain. Conclusively, strains from the Propionibacterium and Bifidobacterium species in dairy food generally represent so far no health hazards.

  9. PHYSICOCHEMICAL AND RHEOLOGICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF COMMERCIAL DAIRY FERMENTED BEVERAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KAMILLA SOARES MENDONÇA

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The Technical Regulation on Identity and Quality of Whey-based Drinks establish few parameters to dairy beverages, which may impair standardized product providing to the consumer. The ingathering of the physicochemical characteristics provides information that allow the standardization of the product and provide safety to the consumer, whereas the rheological characterization in important for the processing. Samples of five commercial brands of strawberry flavored dairy beverages, with ten to fourteen days of manufacture, from three different batches were analyzed in triplicate in order to study the percentage of protein, fat, pH, titratable acidity, total dry extract, fixed mineral residue and lactose. It was performed a colorimetric determination and verification of the presence of starch .The rheological tests were carried out in a rotational rheometer and the data was adjusted by Herschel-Bulkley’s model. The statistical analysis was executed by an analysis of variance and the Tukey’s test with 5% significance. The analysis showed that the percentages of lipids of three brands were below the required by legislation. Furthermore, the presence of starch in the composition was detected for all analyzed beverages. Both for the physicochemical and rheological parameters the brands of dairy beverage examined differed between themselves in several parameters. These results indicated the need to establish well-defined identity and quality standards aiming at product quality control and consumer safety improvement.

  10. Determination of aspartase activity in dairy Propionibacterium strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasco, Lucia; Kahala, Minna; Tupasela, Tuomo; Joutsjoki, Vesa

    2011-08-01

    Propionic acid bacteria (PAB) are important as starter cultures for the dairy industry in the manufacture of Swiss-type cheeses, in which they are involved in the formation of eyes and are responsible for the typical flavour and aroma. These characteristics are mainly due to the classical propionic acid fermentation, but also the conversion of aspartate to fumarate and ammonia by the enzyme aspartase and the subsequent reduction of fumarate to succinate, which occur in dairy Propionibacterium freudenreichii ssp. shermanii and ssp. freudenreichii starter strains. Additionally, the metabolism of free amino acids may be partly responsible for secondary fermentation and the subsequent split defects in cheese matrix. Here a method for aspartase activity was established and a number of dairy propionibacteria belonging to P. freudenreichii ssp. shermanii and freudenreichii were screened for this enzyme activity. A wide range of aspartase activity could be found in PAB isolates originating from cheese. The majority, i.e. 70% of the 100 isolates tested, showed very low levels of aspartate activity. © 2011 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Galactomyces geotrichum - moulds from dairy products with high biotechnological potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grygier, Anna; Myszka, Kamila; Rudzińska, Magdalena

    2017-01-01

    The article reviews the properties of the Galactomyces geotrichum species, the mould that is most important for the dairy industry. G. geotrichum mould has been isolated from milk, cheeses and alcoholic beverage. Its presence in food products makes it possible to obtain a characteristic aroma and taste, which corresponds to the needs and preferences of consumers. G. geotrichum plays an important role in ecology, where the mould is employed for the degradation of various hazardous substances and wastewater treatment. It has also been found to have potential for biofuel production. In addition to this, G. geotrichum can be applicable in two further major areas: agriculture and health protection.

  12. Main causes of poor welfare in intensively reared dairy cows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Abeni

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this review is to summarise the main causes of poor welfare in intensively reared dairy cows. Intensive farming systems are considered, both from a structural and a managerial point of view, for their constraints that may limit animal welfare: possible physical activity; acceptable interactions with humans and other animals; feeding and watering, protection from climate, parasites, and diseases. The dairy farms managed according to the organic rules do not always guarantee, per se, better welfare conditions; organic or low input dairy farming needs to consider the right interaction among cattle breed and herd management, focusing on the actual quality of feedstuffs meet face cow requirements. The considered structural aspects evidence how special care must be given to the rest area (straw yard or cubicle; to the floors that should be not too hard or abrasive and not slippery; to the cubicle bedding material to ensure hygiene, softness, and dryness; to the feeding (and watering area to reduce conflicts; to a microclimate control system, to avoid heat stress during summer time. The importance of proper management for animal welfare is evidenced for buildings and equipment, to have clean and comfortable stables and well functioning milking machines; nutritive and storage quality of feeds; diet suitability (energy, protein, physically efficient fibre, buffers etc., in the different phases of a dairy cow’s life (dry period, close-up, transition, and lactation; feed distribution (frequency and time, and 24h availability. Special attention has to be paid to the social aspects, regarding both animal competition (stocking density, group size, and human/animal interactions (methods of management and manipulation. The interaction between welfare and health requires special attention. Poor welfare can cause immune depression, thus increasing the risk of disease. In turn, any disease that causes an inflammatory response may determine depression

  13. Implementing biosecurity measures on dairy farms in Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayers, R G; Sayers, G P; Mee, J F; Good, M; Bermingham, M L; Grant, J; Dillon, P G

    2013-08-01

    Dairy farms in Ireland are expanding in preparation for a new era of unrestricted milk production with the elimination of the European Union (EU) production quotas in 2015. Countries experiencing a changing agricultural demographic, including farm expansion, can benefit from documenting the implementation of on-farm biosecurity. The objectives of this study were to document and describe influences on biosecurity practices and related opinions on dairy farms. A representative response rate of 64% was achieved to a nationwide telesurvey of farmers. A 20% discrepancy was found between self-declared and truly 'closed' herds indicating a lack of understanding of the closed herd concept. Although >72% of farmers surveyed considered biosecurity to be important, 53% stated that a lack of information might prevent them from improving their biosecurity. Logistic regression highlighted regional, age, and farm-size related differences in biosecurity practices and opinions towards its implementation. Farmers in the most dairy cattle dense region were three times more likely to quarantine purchased stock than were their equivalents in regions where dairy production was less intense (P=0.012). Younger farmers in general were over twice as likely as middle-aged farmers to implement biosecurity guidelines (P=0.026). The owners of large enterprises were almost five times more likely to join a voluntary animal health scheme (P=0.003), and were over three times more likely to pay a premium price for health accredited animals (P=0.02) than were those farming small holdings. The baseline data recorded in this survey will form the basis for more detailed sociological and demographic research which will facilitate the targeting of future training of the farming community in biosecurity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Biofilm formation of Staphylococcus aureus dairy isolates representing different genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiran, E; Di Ciccio, P A; Graber, H U; Zanardi, E; Ianieri, A; Hummerjohann, J

    2017-11-15

    The objective of this study was to compare the biofilm-forming capabilities of different genotypes of Staphylococcus aureus dairy isolates from Switzerland and northern Italy, including Staph. aureus genotype B (GTB) and methicillin-resistant Staph. aureus (MRSA). We hypothesized that biofilm formation might be more pronounced in the contagious GTB isolates compared with other genotypes affecting individual animals. Twenty-four dairy isolates, including 9 MRSA, were further characterized by genotyping by using ribosomal spacer PCR, spa typing, biofilm formation under static and dynamic conditions, and scanning electron microscopy. The GTB isolates (n = 6) were more able to form biofilms than other genotypes at 37°C and at 20°C after 48 and 72 h of incubation in the static assay using polystyrene microtiter plates. This result was supported by scanning electron micrographs showing a GTB isolate producing strong biofilm with extracellular matrix in contrast to a genotype C isolate. Furthermore, none of the MRSA isolates formed strong biofilms in the static assay. However, some MRSA produced low or moderate amounts of biofilm depending on the applied conditions. Under dynamic conditions, a much more diverse situation was observed. The ability of GTB isolates to be strong biofilm formers was not observed in all cases, emphasizing the importance of growth conditions for the expression of biofilm-related genes. No specific genotype, spa type, or MRSA isolate could be categorized significantly into one level of biofilm formation. Nineteen percent of isolates behaved similarly under static and dynamic conditions. The results of this study expand our knowledge of different dairy-related Staph. aureus subtypes and indicate the benefit of genotyping when biofilms are studied. The Authors. Published by the Federation of Animal Science Societies and Elsevier Inc. on behalf of the American Dairy Science Association®. This is an open access article under the CC BY

  15. The heat stress for workers employed in a dairy farm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Marucci

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The italian dairy production is characterized by high heterogeneity. The typology quantitatively more important (80% of national production is represented by cow’s milk cheeses (Grana Padano cheese, string cheese, Parmesan cheese, etc.,while the cheese from buffalo’s milk (especially string cheese such as mozzarella and cheese from sheep and goats represents respectively 4% and 8% of the national dairy production, and are linked to specific regional contexts. Some phases of the cycle of milk processing occur at certain temperatures that not are comfortable for the operator also in relation to possible problems due to thermal shock. The aim of this study was to evaluate the risk of heat stress on workers operating in a dairy for processing of buffalo milk. The research was conducted at a dairy farm located in the province of Viterbo, Italy, during the spring-summer period. To carry out the research were detected major climatic parameters (air temperature, relative humidity, mean radiant temperature, air velocity and the main parameters of the individual operators (thermal insulation provided by clothing and the energy expenditure required from the work done by employees in the work areas investigated. Subsequently were calculated main indices of heat stress assessment provided by the main technical standards. In particular have been calculated Predicted Mean Vote (PMV and Predicted Percentage of Dissatisfied (PPD in moderate environments, provided by the UNI EN ISO 7730 and the wet bulb globe temperature (WBGT in severe hot environments required by UNI EN 27243. The results show some phases of risk from heat stress and possible solutions to improve the safety of the operators.

  16. The heat stress for workers employed in a dairy farm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvaro Marucci

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The Italian dairy production is characterized by high heterogeneity. The typology quantitatively more important (80% of national production is represented by cow’s milk cheeses (Grana Padano cheese, string cheese, Parmesan cheese, etc., while the cheese from buffalo’s milk (especially string cheese such as mozzarella and cheese from sheep and goats represents respectively 4% and 8% of the national dairy production, and are linked to specific regional contexts. Some phases of the cycle of milk processing occur at certain temperatures that are not comfortable for the workers also in relation to possible problems due to thermal shock. The aim of this study was to evaluate the risk of heat stress on workers operating in a dairy for processing of buffalo milk. The research was conducted at a dairy farm located in the province of Viterbo, Italy, during the spring-summer period. To carry out the research were detected major climatic parameters (air temperature, relative humidity, mean radiant temperature, air velocity and the main parameters of the individual operators (clothing thermal insulation and the energy expenditure required from the work done by employees. Subsequently, main indices of heat stress assessment provided by the main technical standards were calculated. In particular have been calculated predicted mean vote and predicted percentage of dissatisfied in moderate thermal environments (environments in which the objective, in the design and management phases, is to achieve the thermal comfort, provided by the UNI EN ISO 7730 and the wet bulb globe temperature in severe hot environments (environments in which you must protect the health of workers required by UNI EN ISO 27243. The results show some phases of risk from heat stress especially during times of test in which the internal air temperature exceeds the threshold of 30°C and possible solutions to improve the safety of the operators.

  17. Comprehensive Review of the Impact of Dairy Foods and Dairy Fat on Cardiometabolic Risk123

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drouin-Chartier, Jean-Philippe; Côté, Julie Anne; Labonté, Marie-Ève; Brassard, Didier; Tessier-Grenier, Maude; Desroches, Sophie; Couture, Patrick; Lamarche, Benoît

    2016-01-01

    Because regular-fat dairy products are a major source of cholesterol-raising saturated fatty acids (SFAs), current US and Canadian dietary guidelines for cardiovascular health recommend the consumption of low-fat dairy products. Yet, numerous randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have reported rather mixed effects of reduced- and regular-fat dairy consumption on blood lipid concentrations and on many other cardiometabolic disease risk factors, such as blood pressure and inflammation markers. Thus, the focus on low-fat dairy in current dietary guidelines is being challenged, creating confusion within health professional circles and the public. This narrative review provides perspective on the research pertaining to the impact of dairy consumption and dairy fat on traditional and emerging cardiometabolic disease risk factors. This comprehensive assessment of evidence from RCTs suggests that there is no apparent risk of potential harmful effects of dairy consumption, irrespective of the content of dairy fat, on a large array of cardiometabolic variables, including lipid-related risk factors, blood pressure, inflammation, insulin resistance, and vascular function. This suggests that the purported detrimental effects of SFAs on cardiometabolic health may in fact be nullified when they are consumed as part of complex food matrices such as those in cheese and other dairy foods. Thus, the focus on low-fat dairy products in current guidelines apparently is not entirely supported by the existing literature and may need to be revisited on the basis of this evidence. Future studies addressing key research gaps in this area will be extremely informative to better appreciate the impact of dairy food matrices, as well as dairy fat specifically, on cardiometabolic health. PMID:28140322

  18. ECONOMICS OF DAIRY FARMING IN TURKEY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özgür Bor

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In this study dairy farming activities in Turkey are employed to prove that small-scale agricultural production is disappearing rapidly due to costly investment and mechanization needs. For that purpose the cost structure and the investment needs in starting a dairy farm are analyzed. The results show that the capital requirements of building a dairy farm with optimal capacity are hard to reach for small farmers unless a system of marketing and production agricultural cooperatives and/or institutions are organized.

  19. Detection of Subclinical Ketosis in Dairy Cows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhigang Zhang, Guowen Liu1, Hongbin Wang, Xiaobing Li1 and Zhe Wang1*

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Ketosis is a common metabolic disorder frequently observed in dairy cows during the early lactation period. It is characterized by increased levels of ketone bodies in the blood, urine, and milk. Subclinical ketosis (SCK in dairy cattle is an excess level of circulating ketone bodies in the absence of clinical signs of ketosis. Usually, detection of SCK is carried out by testing the ketone concentrations in blood, urine, and milk. Here, This review overview the detection methods for SCK in dairy cows, including cowside and laboratory tests.

  20. Reduction of volatile fatty acids and odor offensiveness by anaerobic digestion and solid separation of dairy manure during manure storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Laura H; Ni, Ji-Qin; Zhang, Hao; Heber, Albert J; Mosier, Nathan S; Liu, Xingya; Joo, Hung-Soo; Ndegwa, Pius M; Harrison, Joseph H

    2015-04-01

    Volatile fatty acids (VFA) play an important role in the biodegradation of organic wastes and production of bioenergy under anaerobic digestion, and are related to malodors. However, little is known about the dynamics of VFA during dairy manure storage. This study evaluated the characteristics of VFA in dairy manure before and after anaerobic co-digestion in a laboratory experiment using eight lab-scale reactors. The reactors were loaded with four different types of dairy manure: (1) liquid dairy manure from a freestall barn, (2) mixture of dairy manure and co-digestion food processing wastes at the inlet of an anaerobic digester, (3) effluent from the digester outlet, and (4) the liquid fraction of effluent from a solid separator. Four VFA (acetic, propionic, butyric, and 2-methylbutyric acids) were identified and quantified in weekly manure samples from all reactors. Results showed that the dominant VFA was acetic acid in all four manure sources. The off-farm co-digestion wastes significantly increased the total VFA concentrations and the proportions of individual VFA in the influent. The dairy manure under storage demonstrated high temporal and spatial variations in pH and VFA concentrations. Anaerobic digestion reduced the total VFA by 86%-96%; but solid-liquid separation did not demonstrate a significant reduction in total VFA in this study. Using VFA as an indicator, anaerobic digestion exhibited an effective reduction of dairy manure odor offensiveness. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.