WorldWideScience

Sample records for program curriculum frameworks

  1. DEVELOPING CURRICULUM OF BACHELOR IN ELT PROGRAM BASED ON THE INDONESIAN NATIONAL QUALIFICATION FRAMEWORK (KKNI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amirudin Latif

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The study is intended to develop curriculum of bachelor in ELT Program based on the Indonesian National Qualification Framework (KKNI. The procedure of the curriculum development is adapted from a guidance book of the curriculum development for higher education published by RISTEKDIKTI. The subjects of the study are the lecturers and students of English Department Muhammadiyah University of Metro, English teachers, headmaster, English course owners, heads of private and state institution, and heads of regency and city education office. The result of the study is the curriculum documents such as graduate profiles, learning outcomes, study materials, the structure of curriculum, the semesterly course distribution, course description, syllabus, and lesson plan. The curriculum has been being implemented for two semesters. The students give positive response on the implementation of the curriculum.

  2. Mississippi Curriculum Framework for Welding and Cutting Programs (Program CIP: 48.0508--Welder/Welding Technologist). Postsecondary Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mississippi Research and Curriculum Unit for Vocational and Technical Education, State College.

    This document, which is intended for use by community and junior colleges throughout Mississippi, contains curriculum frameworks for the course sequences in the welding and cutting programs cluster. Presented in the introductory section are a description of the program and suggested course sequence. Section I lists baseline competencies, and…

  3. Mississippi Curriculum Framework for Physical Therapist Assistant (CIP: 51.0806--Physical Therapy Assistant). Postsecondary Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mississippi Research and Curriculum Unit for Vocational and Technical Education, State College.

    This document, which is intended for use by community and junior colleges throughout Mississippi, contains curriculum frameworks for the course sequences in the physical therapy assistant program. Presented in the introductory section are a description of the program and suggested course sequence. Section I lists baseline competencies, and section…

  4. Mississippi Curriculum Framework for Fashion Marketing Technology (Program CIP: 08.0101--Apparel and Accessories Mkt. Op., Gen.). Postsecondary Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mississippi Research and Curriculum Unit for Vocational and Technical Education, State College.

    This document, which is intended for use by community and junior colleges throughout Mississippi, contains curriculum frameworks for the course sequences in the fashion marketing technology programs cluster. Presented in the introductory section are a description of the program and suggested course sequence. Section I lists baseline competencies,…

  5. Mississippi Curriculum Framework for Horticulture Technology Cluster (Program CIP: 01.0601--Horticulture Serv. Op. & Mgmt., Gen.) (Program CIP: 01.0605--Landscaping Op. & Mgmt.). Postsecondary Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mississippi Research and Curriculum Unit for Vocational and Technical Education, State College.

    This document, which is intended for use by community and junior colleges throughout Mississippi, contains curriculum frameworks for the course sequences in the horticulture technology programs cluster. Presented in the introductory section are a framework of programs and courses, description of the programs, and suggested course sequences for…

  6. Mississippi Curriculum Framework for Medical Radiologic Technology (Radiography) (CIP: 51.0907--Medical Radiologic Technology). Postsecondary Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mississippi Research and Curriculum Unit for Vocational and Technical Education, State College.

    This document, which is intended for use by community and junior colleges throughout Mississippi, contains curriculum frameworks for the course sequences in the radiologic technology program. Presented in the introductory section are a description of the program and suggested course sequence. Section I lists baseline competencies for the program,…

  7. Mississippi Curriculum Framework for Diesel Equipment Technology (CIP: 47.0605--Diesel Engine Mechanic & Repairer). Postsecondary Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mississippi Research and Curriculum Unit for Vocational and Technical Education, State College.

    This document, which is intended for use by community and junior colleges throughout Mississippi, contains curriculum frameworks for the course sequences in the diesel equipment technology programs cluster. Presented in the introductory section are a description of the program and suggested course sequence. Section I lists baseline competencies,…

  8. Mississippi Curriculum Framework for Welding (Program CIP: 48.0508--Welder/Welding Technologist). Secondary Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mississippi Research and Curriculum Unit for Vocational and Technical Education, State College.

    This document, which reflects Mississippi's statutory requirement that instructional programs be based on core curricula and performance-based assessment, contains outlines of the instructional units required in local instructional management plans and daily lesson plans for welding I and II. Presented first are a program description and course…

  9. Towards a mobile learning curriculum framework

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Botha, Adèle

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available of the definitive Mobile Learning Curriculum Framework as a first attempt to systematically and comprehensively explore, where and how mobiles could appear within educational provision. The curriculum framework is underpinned by three broad learning objectives...

  10. 2005 Mississippi Curriculum Framework: Secondary Cosmetology. (Program CIP: 12.0401 - Cosmetology/Cosmetologist, General)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanon, Rouser; Farmer, Helen

    2005-01-01

    Secondary vocational-technical education programs in Mississippi are faced with many challenges resulting from sweeping educational reforms at the national and state levels. Schools and teachers are increasingly being held accountable for providing true learning activities to every student in the classroom. This accountability is measured through…

  11. 2007 Mississippi Curriculum Framework: Secondary Computer Graphics. (Program CIP: 50.0402 - Commercial and Advertising Art)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creel, Jo Anne; Denson, Cornelius; New, Ray

    2007-01-01

    Secondary vocational-technical education programs in Mississippi are faced with many challenges resulting from sweeping educational reforms at the national and state levels. Schools and teachers are increasingly being held accountable for providing true learning activities to every student in the classroom. This accountability is measured through…

  12. Mississippi Curriculum Framework for Diesel Equipment Repair & Service (Program CIP: 47.0605--Diesel Engine Mechanic & Repairer). Secondary Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mississippi Research and Curriculum Unit for Vocational and Technical Education, State College.

    This document, which reflects Mississippi's statutory requirement that instructional programs be based on core curricula and performance-based assessment, contains outlines of the instructional units required in local instructional management plans and daily lesson plans for diesel engine mechanics I and II. Presented first are a program…

  13. Mississippi Curriculum Framework for Agriculture Production (Program CIP: 01.0301--Agricultural Prod. Workers & Mgrs.). Secondary Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mississippi Research and Curriculum Unit for Vocational and Technical Education, State College.

    This document, which reflects Mississippi's statutory requirement that instructional programs be based on core curricula and performance-based assessment, contains outlines of the instructional units required in local instructional management plans and daily lesson plans for agriculture production I and II. Presented first are a program…

  14. A CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK FOR GEOGRAPHICAL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HDuplessis

    professional body in terms of Act 40 of 1984 (South Africa, 1984), is the statutory body responsible for regulating the ... profession (through certification) as well as in educational institutions (through accreditation) ... (GI S&T) Body of Knowledge (BoK) which is used by many international universities for GISc curriculum ...

  15. Web-Based Engine for Program Curriculum Designers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamam, H.; Loucif, S.

    2009-01-01

    Educational institutions pay careful attention to the design of program curricula, which represent a framework to meet institutional goals and missions. Of course, the success of any institution depends highly on the quality of its program curriculum. The development of such a curriculum and, more importantly, the evaluation of its quality are…

  16. Programming Entity Framework

    CERN Document Server

    Lerman, Julia

    2010-01-01

    Get a thorough introduction to ADO.NET Entity Framework 4 -- Microsoft's core framework for modeling and interacting with data in .NET applications. The second edition of this acclaimed guide provides a hands-on tour of the framework latest version in Visual Studio 2010 and .NET Framework 4. Not only will you learn how to use EF4 in a variety of applications, you'll also gain a deep understanding of its architecture and APIs. Written by Julia Lerman, the leading independent authority on the framework, Programming Entity Framework covers it all -- from the Entity Data Model and Object Service

  17. Physical Education Curriculum Framework K-12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennessee State Dept. of Education, Nashville.

    This monograph presents a framework for physical education programs in Tennessee for grades K-12. The framework covers four areas: (1) games/sports; (2) gymnastics; (3) physical fitness; and (4) rhythmic movement. The goals and objectives for each of these areas are outlined and described for all grade levels. (JD)

  18. Programming Entity Framework

    CERN Document Server

    Lerman, Julia

    2009-01-01

    Programming Entity Framework is a thorough introduction to Microsoft's new core framework for modeling and interacting with data in .NET applications. This highly-acclaimed book not only gives experienced developers a hands-on tour of the Entity Framework and explains its use in a variety of applications, it also provides a deep understanding of its architecture and APIs -- knowledge that will be extremely valuable as you shift to the Entity Framework version in .NET Framework 4.0 and Visual Studio 2010. From the Entity Data Model (EDM) and Object Services to EntityClient and the Metadata Work

  19. 2005 Mississippi Curriculum Framework: Secondary Hotel, Restaurant, and Tourism Management. (Program CIP: 52.0901--Hospitality Administration/Management)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Lady Anne; Chandler, Mark; Nichols, Raynette; Nevill, Becky

    2005-01-01

    Secondary vocational-technical education programs in Mississippi are faced with many challenges resulting from sweeping educational reforms at the national and state levels. Schools and teachers are increasingly being held accountable for providing true learning activities to every student in the classroom. This accountability is measured through…

  20. 2007 Mississippi Curriculum Framework: Secondary Design Technology for Fashion and Interiors. (Program CIP: 19.0901 - Apparel and Textiles, General)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, Carol; Lawrence, Angie; Pou, Margaret

    2007-01-01

    Secondary vocational-technical education programs in Mississippi are faced with many challenges resulting from sweeping educational reforms at the national and state levels. Schools and teachers are increasingly being held accountable for providing true learning activities to every student in the classroom. This accountability is measured through…

  1. 2006 Mississippi Curriculum Framework: Secondary Culinary and Related Foods Technology. (Program CIP: 20.0401 - Institutional Food Workers & Admin)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, Linda; Early, Lanell; Wood, Becky Jolly

    2006-01-01

    Secondary vocational-technical education programs in Mississippi are faced with many challenges resulting from sweeping educational reforms at the national and state levels. Schools and teachers are increasingly being held accountable for providing true learning activities to every student in the classroom. This accountability is measured through…

  2. 2005 Mississippi Curriculum Framework: Secondary Horticulture. (Program CIP: 01.0601 - Applied Horticulture/Horticultural Operations, General)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research and Curriculum Unit, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Secondary vocational-technical education programs in Mississippi are faced with many challenges resulting from sweeping educational reforms at the national and state levels. Schools and teachers are increasingly being held accountable for providing true learning activities to every student in the classroom. This accountability is measured through…

  3. A Need for a Framework for Curriculum Evaluation in Oman

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Jardani, Khalid Salim; Siraj, Saedah; Abedalaziz, Nabeel

    2012-01-01

    The field of curriculum evaluation is a key part of the educational process. This means that this area needs to be developed continuously and requires ongoing research. This paper highlights curriculum evaluation in Oman, different evaluation procedures and methods and instruments used. The need for a framework for curriculum evaluation is a vital…

  4. Extending the theoretical framework for curriculum integration in pre-clinical medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergel, John; Stentoft, Diana; Montoya, Juny

    2017-08-01

    Curriculum integration is widely discussed in medical education but remains ill defined. Although there is plenty of information on logistical aspects of curriculum integration, little attention has been paid to the contextual issues that emerge from its practice and may complicate students' knowledge integration. Therefore, we aimed to uncover how curriculum integration is manifested through context. We collected data from the official curriculum and interviewed ten participants (including curriculum designers, facilitators, and students) in the bachelor's medical program at Aalborg University. We observed various learning activities focused on pre-clinical education. Inspired by grounded theory, we analyzed the information we gathered. The following theoretical constructs emerged after the inductive analysis: 1) curriculum integration complexity is embedded in the institutional learning perspectives; 2) curriculum integration is used to harmonize conflicting learning perspectives in curriculum practice; 3) curriculum integration creates tensions that self-organize its structure; and 4) curriculum integration becomes visible in collaborative learning spaces. These constructs provide a framework for analyzing curriculum integration in the context in which it is meant to appear, which may assist educationalists to gain a more specific understanding of the term. This may enable effective curriculum integration since contextual issues are addressed in addition to the goals specified in the official curriculum.

  5. Framework on Curriculum Needs for Enhancing Basic Education in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The challenging needs (baseline data) were used to develop the objectives, proposed intervention, and activities in the framework. The major findings showed that curriculum content did not contain more practical and functional subjects, daily balance school meal, medical services, curriculum support materials. There were ...

  6. Paralegal Studies Program. Curriculum Utilization. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphrey, Doris D.

    A program developed a paralegal studies program for Delaware County Community College in the Philadelphia (Pennsylvania) metropolitan area. Activities included gathering of information on paralegal studies as it related to curriculum content; advisory group establishment; curriculum development; training/educational material development; and…

  7. Developing a curriculum framework for global health in family medicine: emerging principles, competencies, and educational approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Recognizing the growing demand from medical students and residents for more comprehensive global health training, and the paucity of explicit curricula on such issues, global health and curriculum experts from the six Ontario Family Medicine Residency Programs worked together to design a framework for global health curricula in family medicine training programs. Methods A working group comprised of global health educators from Ontario's six medical schools conducted a scoping review of global health curricula, competencies, and pedagogical approaches. The working group then hosted a full day meeting, inviting experts in education, clinical care, family medicine and public health, and developed a consensus process and draft framework to design global health curricula. Through a series of weekly teleconferences over the next six months, the framework was revised and used to guide the identification of enabling global health competencies (behaviours, skills and attitudes) for Canadian Family Medicine training. Results The main outcome was an evidence-informed interactive framework http://globalhealth.ennovativesolution.com/ to provide a shared foundation to guide the design, delivery and evaluation of global health education programs for Ontario's family medicine residency programs. The curriculum framework blended a definition and mission for global health training, core values and principles, global health competencies aligning with the Canadian Medical Education Directives for Specialists (CanMEDS) competencies, and key learning approaches. The framework guided the development of subsequent enabling competencies. Conclusions The shared curriculum framework can support the design, delivery and evaluation of global health curriculum in Canada and around the world, lay the foundation for research and development, provide consistency across programmes, and support the creation of learning and evaluation tools to align with the framework. The process used to

  8. Striving for excellence: developing a framework for the Triple C curriculum in family medicine education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Colla J; McKeen, Martha; Wooltorton, Eric; Boucher, Francois; Lemelin, Jacques; Leith-Gudbranson, Donna; Viner, Gary; Pullen, Judi

    2012-10-01

    Postgraduate medical education programs will need to be restructured in order to respond to curriculum initiatives promoted by the College of Family Physicians of Canada. To develop a framework for the Triple C Competency-based Curriculum that will help provide residents with quality family medicine (FM) education programs. The Family Medicine Curriculum Framework (FMCF) incorporates the 4 principles of FM, the CanMEDs-FM roles, the Triple C curriculum principles, the curriculum content domains, and the pedagogic strategies, all of which support the development of attitudes, knowledge, and skills in postgraduate FM training programs. The FMCF was an effective approach to the development of an FM curriculum because it incorporated not only core competencies of FM health education but also contextual educational values, principles, and dynamic learning approaches. In addition, the FMCF provided a foundation and quality standard to designing, delivering, and evaluating the FM curriculum to ensure it met the needs of FM education stakeholders, including preceptors, residents, and patients and their families.

  9. Priority-queue framework: Programs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katajainen, Jyrki

    2009-01-01

    This is an electronic appendix to the article "Generic-programming framework for benchmarking weak queues and its relatives". The report contains the programs related to our priority-queue framework. Look at the CPH STL reports 2009-3 and 2009-4 to see examples of other component frameworks....

  10. A Multicultural Framework: Transforming Curriculum, Transforming Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moremen, Robin D.

    1997-01-01

    Discusses efforts to bring a multicultural perspective to a 200-level course on the sociology of health and aging as a means of addressing broader multicultural curriculum transformation issues. The course is constructed around students' examination of four basic questions concerning their own experiences with exclusion and entitlement. (MJP)

  11. THE NEW CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK IN ARAGON. OBJECTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urbano Martínez Elena

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This academic year 2014-2015 begins the implementation of a new curriculum in Primary Education. This new curricular model is closer than the previous one. Some regulated aspects seem to be difficult to comply with due to the time and effort they require. The Inspection of Education should accompany the educational centers in this process of adaptation to the new situation.

  12. 14 CFR 142.39 - Training program curriculum requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Training program curriculum requirements... TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SCHOOLS AND OTHER CERTIFICATED AGENCIES TRAINING CENTERS Aircrew Curriculum and Syllabus Requirements § 142.39 Training program curriculum requirements. Each training program curriculum...

  13. Relativism, Values and Morals in the New Zealand Curriculum Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgensen, Lone Morris; Ryan, Sueann

    The New Zealand Curriculum Framework, 1993, is the official document for teaching, learning and assessment in New Zealand schools. It consists of a set of curriculum statements, which define the learning principles, achievement aims and essential skills for seven learning areas. It also indicates the place of attitudes and values in the school curriculum. This paper investigates the requirements for teaching attitudes, values and ethics in the curriculum statements for Science, Biology and Technology. The question is raised whether the teaching of skills for resolving moral and ethical dilemmas are required by the official education standards in New Zealand, and internationally. The paper reports on a survey done on pre-service teacher trainees of their understanding of these requirements. Implications for courses that might need to be provided in future pre-service teacher education programmes are briefly discussed.

  14. Integrative Report on a culture-sensitive quality & curriculum framework

    OpenAIRE

    Sylva, Kathy; Ereky-Stevens, Katharina; Pastori, Giulia; Slot, P.L.; Lerkkanen, Marja-Kristiina

    2016-01-01

    This report draws together research findings that support a comprehensive culture-sensitive European curriculum and quality assessment framework that can inform practice, teacher education and policy. The aim of this integrative report is to inform the development of a comprehensive, culture-sensitive European framework for evaluating and monitoring ECEC quality and child wellbeing. WP 2 specifically focuses on micro- and meso-level characteristics of ECEC that constitute quality in practice ...

  15. Integrative Report on a culture-sensitive quality & curriculum framework

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sylva, Kathy; Ereky-Stevens, Katharina; Pastori, Giulia; Slot, P.L.; Lerkkanen, Marja-Kristiina

    This report draws together research findings that support a comprehensive culture-sensitive European curriculum and quality assessment framework that can inform practice, teacher education and policy. The aim of this integrative report is to inform the development of a comprehensive,

  16. Dialogism in India's New National Curriculum Framework for Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setty, Rohit

    2014-01-01

    This article presents evidence from a linguistic analysis conducted on the National Curriculum Framework for Teacher Education (NCFTE) 2009, and explores the dialogic characteristics of the document driving the current reform of teacher education. I address one orienting research question: in what ways and to what extent are the aims and…

  17. 14 CFR 91.1079 - Training program: Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Training program: Curriculum. 91.1079... Operations Program Management § 91.1079 Training program: Curriculum. (a) Each program manager must prepare and keep current a written training program curriculum for each type of aircraft for each crewmember...

  18. 14 CFR 121.403 - Training program: Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Training program: Curriculum. 121.403...: Curriculum. (a) Each certificate holder must prepare and keep current a written training program curriculum... airplane. The curriculum must include ground and flight training required by this subpart. (b) Each...

  19. The Self-Care Deficit Nursing Theory as a curriculum conceptual framework in baccalaureate education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berbiglia, Violeta A

    2011-04-01

    Although Dorothea Orem's Self-Care Deficit Nursing Theory has been used for curricula framework for years, it was not until 2001 that Orem identified the nursing practice sciences and the foundational nursing sciences and specified the appropriate content for the two sciences. The broad purpose of this paper is to reinforce the importance of utilizing nursing theories as curricular conceptual frameworks. The specific purpose is to delineate the appropriate content for baccalaureate programs that adopt a Self-Care Deficit Nursing Theory conceptual framework for their curriculum.

  20. 14 CFR 135.327 - Training program: Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Training program: Curriculum. 135.327... § 135.327 Training program: Curriculum. (a) Each certificate holder must prepare and keep current a written training program curriculum for each type of aircraft for each crewmember required for that type...

  1. Linear Programming across the Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoder, S. Elizabeth; Kurz, M. Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Linear programming (LP) is taught in different departments across college campuses with engineering and management curricula. Modeling an LP problem is taught in every linear programming class. As faculty teaching in Engineering and Management departments, the depth to which teachers should expect students to master this particular type of…

  2. Improving Quality of Elementary Music Programs through Common Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edele, Cameron

    2011-01-01

    Developing a music program based on quality curriculum is the key to success. The purpose of my research was to explore whether teachers used curriculum for quality control in an Elementary music program. Using student questionnaires, teacher interviews, and teacher observations I found that the music curriculum in each school was different. There…

  3. 2007 Mississippi Curriculum Framework: Secondary Automotive Collision Repair Technology. (Program CIP: 47.0603 - Autobody/Collision and Repair Technology/Technician)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowds, Eris; Anderson, Daniel; Sizemore, Rick; Johnson, John

    2007-01-01

    Secondary vocational-technical education programs in Mississippi are faced with many challenges resulting from sweeping educational reforms at the national and state levels. Schools and teachers are increasingly being held accountable for providing true learning activities to every student in the classroom. This accountability is measured through…

  4. Using Curriculum Mapping to Engage Faculty Members in the Analysis of a Pharmacy Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vercaigne, Lavern; Davies, Neal M.; Davis, Christine; Renaud, Robert; Kristjanson, Cheryl

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To develop a curriculum mapping process that supports continuous analysis and evidence-based decisions in a pharmacy program. Design. A curriculum map based on the national educational outcomes for pharmacy programs was created using conceptual frameworks grounded in cognitive learning and skill acquisition. Assessment. The curriculum map was used to align the intended curriculum with the national educational outcomes and licensing examination blueprint. The leveling and sequencing of content showed longitudinal progression of student learning and performance. There was good concordance between the intended and learned curricula as validated by survey responses from employers and graduating students. Conclusion. The curriculum mapping process was efficient and effective in providing an evidence-based approach to the continuous quality improvement of a pharmacy program. PMID:25258444

  5. BIM and Sustainability Education: Incorporating Instructional Needs into Curriculum Planning in CEM Programs Accredited by ACCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingxiao Zhang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Higher education ought to support the identification of training needs for industrial building information modelling (BIM curriculum development and sustainability education in the fields of civil engineering and management (CEM. This paper proposes a framework based on a four-phase step-by-step quality function deployment (QFD application for CEM curriculum planning and quality management. The framework attempts to respond to requests collected from 17 professionals and professors in order to integrate BIM into the higher education curriculum in China with a specific focus on construction management programs accredited by the American Council for Construction Education (ACCE. The entropy method and a K1–K6 scale adapted from Bloom’s revised cognitive process were employed to evaluate the CEM curriculum in QFD. The proposed framework was successfully applied to CEM curriculum planning, which included two curriculums of the four main knowledge areas provided by the Chinese CEM guidelines: construction cost and flow construction. Two curriculum areas showed that content should focus on knowledge such as (a Program evaluation and review technique(PERT planning; (b construction optimization in flow construction; (c principles of bill of quantities and (d construction consumption in construction costs. As for teaching quality management in China, the higher education curriculum should focus on three aspects to promote curriculum integration: (a pedagogical design; (b teaching resource and material and (c curriculum assessment. This research sheds light on the pedagogical shift to a similar context that has established guidelines accredited by the ACCE, with respect to reviewing curriculum planning from a knowledge system perspective in order to meet industrial demands at the operational level.

  6. A Curriculum Innovation Framework for Science, Technology and Mathematics Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tytler, Russell; Symington, David; Smith, Craig

    2011-01-01

    There is growing concern about falling levels of student engagement with school science, as evidenced by studies of student attitudes, and decreasing participation at the post compulsory level. One major response to this, the Australian School Innovation in Science, Technology and Mathematics (ASISTM) initiative, involves partnerships between schools and community and industry organisations in developing curriculum projects at the local level. This project fulfils many of the conditions advocated to engage students in learning in the sciences. ASISTM is underpinned by the notion of innovation. This paper describes the findings of case study research in which 16 ASISTM projects were selected as innovation exemplars. A definition of innovation and an innovation framework were developed, through which the case studies were analysed to make sense of the significance of the ideas and practices, participating actors, and outcomes of the projects. Through this analysis we argue that innovation is a powerful idea for framing curriculum development in the sciences at the local level that is generative for students and teachers, and that these ASISTM projects provide valuable models for engaging students, and for teacher professional learning.

  7. Program and Project Management Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Cassandra D.

    2002-01-01

    The primary objective of this project was to develop a framework and system architecture for integrating program and project management tools that may be applied consistently throughout Kennedy Space Center (KSC) to optimize planning, cost estimating, risk management, and project control. Project management methodology used in building interactive systems to accommodate the needs of the project managers is applied as a key component in assessing the usefulness and applicability of the framework and tools developed. Research for the project included investigation and analysis of industrial practices, KSC standards, policies, and techniques, Systems Management Office (SMO) personnel, and other documented experiences of project management experts. In addition, this project documents best practices derived from the literature as well as new or developing project management models, practices, and techniques.

  8. Development of a Core Curriculum Framework in Cariology for U.S. Dental Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontana, Margherita; Guzmán-Armstrong, Sandra; Schenkel, Andrew B; Allen, Kennneth L; Featherstone, John; Goolsby, Susie; Kanjirath, Preetha; Kolker, Justine; Martignon, Stefania; Pitts, Nigel; Schulte, Andreas; Slayton, Rebecca L; Young, Douglas; Wolff, Mark

    2016-06-01

    Maintenance of health and preservation of tooth structure through risk-based prevention and patient-centered, evidence-based disease management, reassessed at regular intervals over time, are the cornerstones of present-day caries management. Yet management of caries based on risk assessment that goes beyond restorative care has not had a strong place in curriculum development and competency assessment in U.S. dental schools. The aim of this study was to develop a competency-based core cariology curriculum framework for use in U.S. dental schools. The Section on Cariology of the American Dental Education Association (ADEA) organized a one-day consensus workshop, followed by a meeting program, to adapt the European Core Cariology Curriculum to the needs of U.S. dental education. Participants in the workshop were 73 faculty members from 35 U.S., three Canadian, and four international dental schools. Representatives from all 65 U.S. dental schools were then invited to review and provide feedback on a draft document. A recommended competency statement on caries management was also developed: "Upon graduation, a dentist must be competent in evidence-based detection, diagnosis, risk assessment, prevention, and nonsurgical and surgical management of dental caries, both at the individual and community levels, and be able to reassess the outcomes of interventions over time." This competency statement supports a curriculum framework built around five domains: 1) knowledge base; 2) risk assessment, diagnosis, and synthesis; 3) treatment decision making: preventive strategies and nonsurgical management; 4) treatment decision making: surgical therapy; and 5) evidence-based cariology in clinical and public health practice. Each domain includes objectives and learning outcomes.

  9. A Review of Curriculum History and the Conceptual Framework of Curriculum History in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aktan, Sümer

    2015-01-01

    Curriculum is generally defined based on the philosophical perspectives of the individuals. One of the definitions of curriculum states that curriculum is a field of academic study and research, having an intrinsic research systematic, theory, and tradition. From this perspective, this study is designed as three main chapters. The first chapter…

  10. A Differentiated Program: Significant Curriculum Adaptations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Juan A.

    1999-01-01

    This article describes a model for curricular adaptations for gifted students. A distinction is made between non-significant curriculum adaptations that can be easily made by the regular teacher and significant curriculum adaptations that involve deep changes in aims, content, and evaluation criteria. (Contains references.) (DB)

  11. The Skills Framework for the Information Age: Engaging Stakeholders in Curriculum Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Konsky, Brian R.; Miller, Charlynn; Jones, Asheley

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on a research project, examining the role of the Skills Framework for the Information Age (SFIA) in Information and Communications Technology (ICT) curriculum design and management. A goal was to investigate how SFIA informs a top-down approach to curriculum design, beginning with a set of skills that define a particular career…

  12. The Curriculum Innovation Canvas: A Design Thinking Framework for the Engaged Educational Entrepreneur

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willness, Chelsea; Bruni-Bossio, Vince

    2017-01-01

    Integrating literature on entrepreneurial business models and community-based experiential learning, we propose a new framework to advance the practice of curriculum innovation. Grounded in principles of design thinking, the curriculum innovation canvas provides a human-centered, collaborative, and holistic platform for instructors, curriculum…

  13. Bilingual Vocational Training Program for Chinese Chefs. Curriculum Package.

    Science.gov (United States)

    China Inst. in America, New York, NY.

    This manual was prepared by the staff of the China Institute's Bilingual Vocational Training Program, which has been in operation since 1975. The document includes a description of the training program for Chinese chefs and the curriculum guide used in the program. Following the introductory section, which describes the program objectives,…

  14. The curriculum success of business administration education programs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijker, Monique; Van der Klink, Marcel; Boshuizen, Els

    2012-01-01

    Bijker, M. M., Van der Klink, M. R., & Boshuizen, H. P. A. (2011, 8 September). The curriculum success of business administration education programs. Presentation for the visit of KU Leuven, Open Universiteit, Heerlen, The Netherlands.

  15. A BASIC Programming Curriculum for Enhancing Problem-Solving Ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overbaugh, Richard C.

    This curriculum is proposed to enhance problem-solving ability through learning to program in BASIC. Current research shows development of problem-solving skills from learning to program in BASIC. Successful treatments have been based on contemporary problem-solving theory, top-down, modular programing, and rigorous length and intensity. The…

  16. THE TRAVELLING SALESMAN PROBLEM IN THE ENGINEERING EDUCATION PROGRAMMING CURRICULUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yevgeny Gayev

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To make students familiar with the famous Traveling Salesman Problem (TSP and suggest the latter to become a common exercise in engineering programming curriculum provided the students master computer science in the easy programming environment MATLAB. Methods: easy programming in MATLAB makes true such modern educational approach as “discovery based” methodology. Results: a MATLAB TSP-program oriented to Ukrainian map is suggested that allows to pictorially demonstrate the process of optimal route search with an option to decelerate or accelerate the demonstration. The program is guessed to be useful both for learning the TSP as one of fundamental logistics problems and as an intriguing programming curriculum excersize. Several sub-programs according to key stone Computer Science Curriculum have also been suggested. This lies in line with recent “discovery based” learning methodology. Discussion: we explain how to create this program for visual discrete optimization, suggest required subprograms belonging to key stone programming algorithms including rather modern graphical user interface (GUI, how to use this MATLAB TSP-program for demonstration the drastical grows of solution time required. Conclusions: easy programming being realized in MATLAB makes dificult curriculum problems attractive to students; it focuses them to main problem’ features, laws and algorithms implementing the “discovery based” methodology in such a way.

  17. Systemic Changes in the Undergraduate Chemistry Curriculum Program Awards

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-07-01

    develop new curricula, materials and methods that will enhance the appreciation and learning of science, especially chemistry, for every undergraduate student such that all college graduates will command the knowledge and skills necessary to permit continued learning, lead productive lives, and make informed decisions. To accomplish this mission, a modular approach to teaching chemistry in the first two years of the undergraduate curriculum is being developed and evaluated. Modules of 1-4 weeks present fundamental chemistry to students in the context of a real-world problem or application and emphasize the links between chemistry and other disciplines. In collaboration with the ChemLinks Coalition, modules are being developed, tested and refined at the two- and four-year colleges and research universities comprising the two consortia. Curriculum materials, including text, lab, and multimedia components suitable for students from diverse cultural and ethnic backgrounds and usable at a wide variety of undergraduate institutions are being produced and distributed by an established publisher. Teaching methods that utilize current understanding of learning processes and emphasize active learning and the full spectrum of modern technologies are being supported, tested, and promulgated. A model support infrastructure for development and assessment of new materials and methods is being provided. A framework for continuous improvement of curricula should result from the work and be institutionalized within the consortium. Faculty workshops and sessions at national and regional meetings will be conducted to guarantee dissemination. Our consortium institutions now participate significantly in pre-service teacher training and education of advanced science or engineering technicians and are developing new programs in these areas. Thus, our program will strongly impact the Advanced Technological Education and Teacher Preparation Programs by developing modular materials appropriate to

  18. Asia vs. Europe: Conceptual Framework of the High School World History Curriculum in South Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Sunjoo

    2003-01-01

    In this article, the author explores the conceptual framework of South Korea's high school world history curriculum, and the problems it has faced related to Eurocentrism and Sinocentrism. Through a description of the development of current and past curriculua, the author intends to make clear that in the traditional conceptual framework of Asia…

  19. Restructuring High School Science Curriculum: A Program Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Cathy Jean

    One rural Midwestern high school discovered a discrepancy among school, state, and national science skill attainment, verified by ACT scores. If students do not acquire vital science skills, they may not perform proficiently on science tests, thus impacting future college options. Inquiry based instruction and constructivism provided the basis for the theoretical framework. This study questioned associations between ACT scores, inquiry science technique usage, and ACT standard usage (Phase 1), and teachers' views on science instruction (Phase 2). This sequential explanatory mixed methods program evaluation included 469 ACT scores, surveys sent to 9 science teachers, and 8 interviews. Phase 1 used the inquiry science implementation scale survey and an ACT college readiness standards workbook to determine proportional associations between datasets. Descriptive statistics, one-sample t tests, and binomial tests were used to analyze Phase 1 data. Phase 2 interviews augmented Phase 1 data and were disassembled, reassembled, and interpreted for parallel viewpoints. Phase 1 data indicated that teachers use a slightly above average amount of inquiry and science ACT standards in the classroom; however, most science students did not test above the curriculum and there were inconsistencies in standards covered. Phase 2 data revealed teachers need time to collaborate and become skilled in inquiry methods to rectify the inconsistencies. The project was an evaluation report. This study will foster positive social change by giving the district a plan: adapt the science curriculum by integrating more ACT and inquiry standards and participate in more professional development that applies inquiry as a tool to increase science skill proficiency, thus generating locally competitive students for college and the workforce.

  20. Curriculum Program for the Apache Language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteriver Public Schools, AZ.

    These curriculum materials from the Whiteriver (Arizona) Elementary School consist of--(1) an English-Apache word list of some of the most commonly used words in Apache, 29p.; (2) a list of enclitics with approximate or suggested meanings and illustrations of usage, 5 p.; (3) an illustrated chart of Apache vowels and consonants, various written…

  1. Machine Operator Training Program and Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St. Cyr, David; And Others

    This curriculum contains materials for use in duplicating the 11-week course for machine operators that was implemented at New Hampshire Vocational-Technical College in Nashua, New Hampshire. Addressed in the course, which is designed to prepare entry-level employees, are the following topics: basic math, blueprint reading, layout tools and…

  2. Assistant Chef Program. Curriculum Outline, Orientation, Safety and Sanitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saint Augustine Coll., Chicago, IL.

    Instructor materials are provided for an assistant chef program intended for English as a second language (ESL) or bilingual (Spanish speaking) students. A curriculum outline includes a listing of the tasks to be mastered in the program. Other contents include key terms from the production and service area of food service in the areas of…

  3. Cybersecurity Curriculum Development: Introducing Specialties in a Graduate Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bicak, Ali; Liu, Michelle; Murphy, Diane

    2015-01-01

    The cybersecurity curriculum has grown dramatically over the past decade: once it was just a couple of courses in a computer science graduate program. Today cybersecurity is introduced at the high school level, incorporated into undergraduate computer science and information systems programs, and has resulted in a variety of cybersecurity-specific…

  4. The effect of using different competence frameworks to audit the content of a masters program in public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Roger A; Gemmell, Isla; Reed, Katie

    2015-01-01

    (1) To quantify the effect of using different public health competence frameworks to audit the curriculum of an online distance learning MPH program, and (2) to measure variation in the outcomes of the audit depending on which competence framework is used. Retrospective audit. We compared the teaching content of an online distance learning MPH program against each competence listed in different public health competence frameworks relevant to an MPH. We then compared the number of competences covered in each module in the program's teaching curriculum and in the program overall, for each of the competence frameworks used in this audit. A comprehensive search of the literature identified two competence frameworks specific to MPH programs and two for public health professional/specialty training. The number of individual competences in each framework were 32 for the taught aspects of the UK Faculty of Public Health Specialist Training Program, 117 for the American Association of Public Health, 282 for the exam curriculum of the UK Faculty of Public Health Part A exam, and 393 for the European Core Competencies for MPH Education. This gave a total of 824 competences included in the audit. Overall, the online MPH program covered 88-96% of the competences depending on the specific framework used. This fell when the audit focused on just the three mandatory modules in the program, and the variation between the different competence frameworks was much larger. Using different competence frameworks to audit the curriculum of an MPH program can give different indications of its quality, especially as it fails to capture teaching considered to be relevant, yet not included in an existing competence framework. The strengths and weaknesses of using competence frameworks to audit the content of an MPH program have largely been ignored. These debates are vital given that external organizations responsible for accreditation specify a particular competence framework to be used. Our

  5. Addressing Sexual Minority Issues in Social Work Education: A Curriculum Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsay Gezinski

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper will explore a curriculum framework that explicitly addresses the reduction of heterosexism as a means to produce students that are culturally competent of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ community. Van Den Bergh and Crisp (2004 place great importance on addressing beliefs/attitudes, knowledge, and skills when broaching culturally competent practice with the LGBTQ population. Beliefs/attitudes, knowledge, and skills in an educational approach will be advocated in this paper. Specifically, the creation of a constructivist environment will be endorsed as a means for students to critically assess their own beliefs/attitudes, knowledge, and skills. A curriculum framework that utilizes classroom activities related to heterosexual privilege, policy, and practice role plays will be discussed. This curriculum framework is intended to prepare social work students to work with LGBTQ clients.

  6. Programming Entity Framework Code First

    CERN Document Server

    Lerman, Julia

    2011-01-01

    Take advantage of the Code First data modeling approach in ADO.NET Entity Framework, and learn how to build and configure a model based on existing classes in your business domain. With this concise book, you'll work hands-on with examples to learn how Code First can create an in-memory model and database by default, and how you can exert more control over the model through further configuration. Code First provides an alternative to the database first and model first approaches to the Entity Data Model. Learn the benefits of defining your model with code, whether you're working with an exis

  7. How Programming Fits with Technology Education Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Geoffrey A.; Rich, Peter; Leatham, Keith R.

    2012-01-01

    Programming is a fundamental component of modern society. Programming and its applications influence much of how people work and interact. Because of people's reliance on programming in one or many of its applications, there is a need to teach students to be programming literate. Because the purpose of the International Technology and Engineering…

  8. The impact of New Hampshire K-6 science frameworks in curriculum and staff-development: A CIPPS approach to curriculum renewal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellaci, Frank L.

    The purpose of this study was to determine if there was any quantitative or qualitative evidence indicating a need for science curriculum review in aligning district outcomes with the New Hampshire State Science Frameworks. Also examined were such exogenous factors as teachers' perception, attitudes and background preparation pertaining to science instruction. Another component of the study was the evaluation of a Cross-Level Mentoring Program used to address weaknesses in the K-8 science curriculum of four schools that comprise District SAU #35 in New Hampshire. The subjects of the study were 41 K-8 science teachers employed by the district's four K-12 schools. It was determined that there was a statistical difference between teacher attitudes, behavior and perception in regard to science instruction. A quantitative/qualitative survey designed on a Likert-type scale was administered to the four schools in this study to determine any positive impact a mentorship program may have effected. Components of the CIPP Model of Evaluation were used to evaluate the mentoring program. This evaluation is mostly formative in nature and will not lead to summative conclusions until 2002. Analysis of the first part of the evaluation were positive, in that teachers participating in the mentoring program showed more confidence in their ability to instruct in the science content areas.

  9. A Strategic Approach to Curriculum Design for Information Literacy in Teacher Education--Implementing an Information Literacy Conceptual Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klebansky, Anna; Fraser, Sharon P.

    2013-01-01

    This paper details a conceptual framework that situates curriculum design for information literacy and lifelong learning, through a cohesive developmental information literacy based model for learning, at the core of teacher education courses at UTAS. The implementation of the framework facilitates curriculum design that systematically,…

  10. Perceptual Skills Curriculum: Auditory-motor Skills, Program II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosner, Jerome

    This curriculum is designed primarily for use in individualized classrooms where the teacher is working with an assistant, but it has also been proven effective in traditional classrooms and in remedial situations. Program II focuses on the basic abilities used in analyzing and organizing acoustical patterns, with special emphasis on verbal…

  11. Perceptual Skills Curriculum: General-motor Skills, Program III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosner, Jerome

    This curriculum is designed primarily for use in individualized classrooms where the teacher is working with an assistant, but it has also been proven effective in traditional classrooms and in remedial situations. Program 3 focuses on a variety of gross-and fine-motor functions--basic abilities that affect the way the child physically interacts…

  12. Perceptual Skills Curriculum: Visual-motor Skills, Program 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosner, Jerome

    This curriculum is designed primarily for use in individualized classrooms where the teacher is working with an assistant, but it has also been proven effective in traditional classrooms and in remedial situations. Program 1 focuses on the basic abilities children use to analyze and organize graphic and other spatial patterns--skills directly…

  13. The Checkerboard Cardiovascular Curriculum: A Culturally Oriented Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Mary B.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Pilot-testing of a cardiovascular health education curriculum with 218 American Indian and Hispanic fifth graders in rural New Mexico noted significant increases in knowledge about the cardiovascular system, exercise, nutrition, obesity, tobacco use, and habit change, suggesting that the culturally oriented program may help promote a healthy…

  14. Incorporating a Diabetes Certificate Program in a Pharmacy Curriculum

    OpenAIRE

    Sterrett, James; Croom, Meg; Phillips, Cynthia M.; Shrader, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To determine student competency and confidence in the provision of diabetes care and satisfaction with incorporation of the American Pharmacist Association/American Association of Diabetes Educators (APhA/AADE) diabetes certificate program into the required doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) curriculum.

  15. Curriculum and Practice of an Innovative Teacher Professional Development Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, Akesha; Shack, Kyle; Mehta, Rohit

    2017-01-01

    The MSUrbanSTEM fellowship program provides exemplary urban STEM teachers the opportunity to engage in transformative instructional and leadership experiences that support the advancement of their teaching practice. In this chapter, we provide a foundational examination of the development and implementation of a curriculum for this innovative…

  16. Mathematics Program for Grade 1, De Soto Parish Curriculum Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elam, Helen; And Others

    A program of mathematics instruction for grade one is provided in this curriculum guide. The teaching goal of each lesson is stated in the Purpose section. Visual aids and manipulative materials useful in developing each lesson are suggested and additional teaching aids are listed. Suggestions for teaching the lessons are separated into three…

  17. The Plato Program: An Innovative Information Skills Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton, John

    2010-01-01

    The Plato Program is an innovative and dynamic subject that was introduced to explore "learning how to learn" in Year 7. In response to observations by staff that students lacked critical thinking and research skills, it has metamorphosed into a vehicle for the delivery of information literacy within the curriculum, with a particular…

  18. Applying the Kirkpatrick Model: Evaluating an "Interaction for Learning Framework" Curriculum Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paull, Megan; Whitsed, Craig; Girardi, Antonia

    2016-01-01

    Global perspectives and interpersonal and intercultural communication competencies are viewed as a priority within higher education. For management educators, globalisation, student mobility and widening pathways present numerous challenges, but afford opportunities for curriculum innovation. The "Interaction for Learning Framework"…

  19. The Quality of Early Childhood Education Curriculum Framework in the Republic of Serbia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krnjaja, Živka

    2015-01-01

    The paper addresses Serbian preschool education Curriculum Framework as one of dimensions of the preschool education quality. The first part of paper deals with the importance of preschool education worldwide as a social responsibility and its accountability in education policy. The second part provides the evaluation of the preschool education…

  20. Leading a New Pedagogical Approach to Australian Curriculum Mathematics: Using the Dual Mathematical Modelling Cycle Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, Janeen; Kawakami, Takashi; Saeki, Akihiko; Matsuzaki, Akio

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the use of the "dual mathematical modelling cycle framework" as one way to meet the espoused goals of the Australian Curriculum Mathematics. This study involved 23 Year 6 students from one Australian primary school who engaged in an "Oil Tank Task" that required them to develop two…

  1. Integrating medical simulation programs into the Turkish undergraduate medical curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kitapçıoğlu D

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dilek Kitapçıoğlu, Mehmet Emin Aksoy Medical Education Department, Faculty of Medicine, Acibadem University, CASE - Center of Advanced Simulation and Education, Istanbul, TurkeyThe letter by Ah-kee and Khan1 arguing that a mandatory year for studying leadership management within an already overcrowded undergraduate curriculum is not realistic and feasible drew our attention. We strongly support this idea because of the difficulties we met during integration of simulation programs into the undergraduate curriculum in Turkey.View the original paper by Ah-kee and Khan.

  2. Analyzing the curriculum of the faculty of medicine, University of Gezira using Harden’s 10 questions framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YASAR ALBUSHRA AHMED

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Despite the importance of curriculum analysis for internal refinement of a programme, the approach for such a step in under-described in the literature. This article describes the analysis of the medical curriculum at the Faculty of Medicine, University of Gezira (FMUG. This analysis is crucial in the era of innovative medical education since introducing new curricula and curricular changes has become a common occurrence in medical education worldwide. Methods: The curriculum analysis was qualitatively approached using descriptive analysis and adopting Harden’s 10 Questions of curriculum development framework approach. Answering Harden’s questions reflects the fundamental curricular components and how the different aspects of a curriculum framework fit together. The key features highlighted in the curriculum-related material and literature have been presented. Results: The analysis of the curriculum of FMUG reveals a curriculum with interactive components. Clear structured objectives and goals reflect the faculty’s vision. The approach for needs assessment is based on a scientific ground, and the curriculum integrated contents have been set to meet national and international requirements. Adopting SPICES strategies helps FMUG and students achieve the objectives of the curriculum. Multiple motivated instructional methods are adopted, fostering coping with the programme objectives and outcomes. A wide range of assessment methods has been adopted to assess the learning outcomes of the curriculum correctly, reliably, and in alignment with the intended outcomes. The prevailing conducive educational environment of FMUG is favourable for its operation and profoundly influences the outcome of the programme. And there is a well-defined policy for curriculum management, monitoring and evaluation. Conclusion: Harden’s 10 questions are satisfactorily addressed by the multi-disciplinary and well-developed FMUG curriculum. The current

  3. Using Intentional Development of Research Skills as a Framework for Curriculum Reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, V. L.; Lord, M. L.

    2008-12-01

    We advocate that geoscience departmental or community discussions related to curriculur revision or accreditation should be considered within a framework that clearly and intentionally develops research and professional skills throughout the curricular structure. Among the primary qualities sought by geoscience employers and graduate schools are graduates with strong research, critical thinking, field, communication, and people/team skills. While these should be the hallmark of a liberally educated graduate, we think it is imperative to explicitly develop and assess these skills as part of the same curricular framework used for organizing essential content. Though many organizations and authors have argued about the importance and effectiveness of undergraduate research as a means to develop higher level skill sets, discussions of geoscience accreditation or curricular revision commonly emphasize the choice of a core set of courses or content. Drummond and Markin (2008) highlight the commonalities among core geoscience courses. However, their summary, and our own experiences and program comparisons also point out diversity among successful geoscience program cores that may relate to expansion of the boundaries of our discipline, geographic factors, and/or size and character of department faculty. At Western Carolina University (WCU) and more recently at Grand Valley State University, attempts at curricular revision were initially stymied by difficulties in defining core courses. At WCU, focus on a critical skills framework helped to work through these challenges to establish a revised geology curriculum in 2000 with explicit goals to build critical thinking, reasoning, synthesis, and communication skills. To achieve these goals, investigative experiences were included in all geology courses, a senior research capstone was required, and more opportunities were created for all students to engage in out-of-class research. Numerous measures indicate programmatic and

  4. Transmedia Teaching Framework: From Group Projects to Curriculum Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, James; Gilardi, Filippo

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes an innovative project-based learning framework theoretically based on the ideas of Transmedia Storytelling, Participatory Cultures and Multiple intelligences that can be integrated into the f?lipped classroom method, and practically addressed using Content- Based Instruction (CBI) and Project-Based Learning (PBL) approaches.…

  5. A Framework for Curriculum Development in Marketing Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everett, Donna R.

    This book is designed to show marketing education teachers how Missouri's Show-Me Knowledge and Performance Standards can be reflected in the Marketing Education Framework. It is organized to present each of the nine competency strands (instructional units) by learner outcome and competencies. The instructional units are as follows: communications…

  6. Designing anatomy program in modern medical curriculum: matter of balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grković, Ivica; Marinović Guić, Maja; Kosta, Vana; Poljicanin, Ana; Carić, Ana; Vilović, Katarina

    2009-02-01

    To evaluate the structure of the anatomy program in the first year medical curriculum of University of Split School of Medicine by comparing it with the recommendations by the Educational Affairs Committee of the American Association of Clinical Anatomists (AACA) and the Terminologia Anatomica (TA); we also quantitatively evaluated the organization of teaching material in contemporary topographical anatomy textbooks and matched them with the AACA recommendations, TA, and the curriculum of the anatomy course taught at Medical School in Split, Croatia. TA, official recommendations of the AACA, 6 contemporary anatomy textbooks, and the structure of the anatomy course were analyzed for the proportion of the terms or text devoted to standard topographical regions of the body. The findings were correlated using Spearman rho test. The curriculum outline correlated both with the AACA recommendations (Spearman rho=0.83, P=0.015) and TA (Spearman rho=0.73, P=0.046). Textbooks contained 8 distinct sections, 7 allocated to topographic anatomy regions and 1 to general anatomy concepts and principles. The structure of all textbooks correlated significantly with the course curriculum. However, 4 out of 6 textbooks did not correlate with TA and only a single textbook showed significant correlation with the AACA recommendations. Anatomy textbooks vary in the amount of text dedicated to different parts of topographical anatomy and are not quite concordant with curriculum recommendations and standard anatomical terminology. Planning the structure of an anatomy course should not be based on a single book or recommendation but on evidence.

  7. A Typology Framework of Loyalty Reward Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yuheng; Nsakanda, Aaron Luntala; Mann, Inder Jit Singh

    Loyalty reward programs (LRPs), initially developed as marketing programs to enhance customer retention, have now become an important part of customer-focused business strategy. With the proliferation and increasing economy impact of the programs, the management complexity in the programs has also increased. However, despite widespread adoption of LRPs in business, academic research in the field seems to lag behind its practical application. Even the fundamental questions such as what LRPs are and how to classify them have not yet been fully addressed. In this paper, a comprehensive framework for LRP classification is proposed, which provides a foundation for further study of LRP design and planning issues.

  8. A blended learning framework for curriculum design and professional development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Negin Mirriahi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The need for flexibility in learning and the affordances of technology provided the impetus for the rise of blended learning (BL globally across higher education institutions. However, the adoption of BL practices continues at a low pace due to academics’ low digital fluency, various views and BL definitions, and limited standards-based tools to guide academic practice. To address these issues, this paper introduces a BL framework, based on one definition and with criteria and standards of practice to support the evaluation and advancement of BL in higher education. The framework is theoretically underpinned by the extant literature and supported by focus group discussions. The evidence supporting the criteria and standards are discussed with suggestions for how they can be used to guide course design, academic practice, and professional development.

  9. A quality framework for addiction treatment programs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nabitz, Udo; van den Brink, Wim; Walburg, Jan

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To identify and specify the structure and the elements of a quality framework for addiction treatment programs. METHOD: Concept mapping strategy was applied. In brainstorm sessions, 70 statements were generated and rated by 90 representatives of three stakeholder groups. Using multivariate

  10. Barber/Cosmetologist Curriculum. Program Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraine Park Technical Coll., Fond du Lac, WI.

    This guide provides the instructor with materials for a barber/cosmetologist program. Seventeen study guides are provided: anatomy and physiology; applied chemistry; chemical straightening/relaxing; chemical waving; electricity and light therapy; facial services; hair coloring and lightening (bleach); hair cutting; hair, skin, and nail disorders;…

  11. A Competence-Based Curriculum Design for Entrepreneurship Study Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priska J.R. Siagian

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Indonesia is affected by global crisis. Increasing the number of entrepreneurs is one of many solutions to increase the economic growth in Indonesia. The number of entrepreneurs in Indonesia to leverage the economic growth is still limited. Entrepreneurs can be prepared through an Entrepreneurship Study Program. Entrepreneurship Study Program attempts to create qualified entrepreneurs who have relevant competences. In order to create a qualified entrepreneurs, the Entrepreneurial Studies Program requires a competency-based curriculum that will support the educational process and provide all the necessary to become future entrepreneurs who can survive through a global challenge. This research aims to design a competence-based curriculum for entrepreneurial study and uses Quality Function Deployment (QFD as the major tool to design the competence-based curriculum. From the QFD process, this research finds core and elective courses for the Entrepreneurship Study Program. The result shows the competences covered by the courses and sequence, credits, and teaching methods for each course. The competences prepared the potential entrepreneurs can be achieved through specific courses which can be acquired within 8 semesters.

  12. Curriculum Mapping: A Method to Assess and Refine Undergraduate Degree Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyner-Melito, Helen S.

    2016-01-01

    Over the past several decades, there has been increasing interest in program- and university-level assessment and aligning learning outcomes to program content. Curriculum mapping is a tool that creates a visual map of all courses in the curriculum and how they relate to curriculum learning outcomes. Assessment tools/activities are often included…

  13. The ethics curriculum for doctor of nursing practice programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peirce, Anne Griswold; Smith, Jennifer A

    2008-01-01

    Ethical questions dealt with by nurses who have Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) degrees include traditional bioethical questions, but also business and legal ethics. Doctorally prepared nurses are increasingly in positions to make ethical decisions rather than to respond to decisions made by others. The traditional master's-degree advanced practice nursing curriculum does not address the extended expertise and decision-making skills needed by DNP practitioners as they face these new types of ethical dilemmas. We propose that a curricular framework that addresses clinical, research, business, and legal ethics is needed by all DNP students.

  14. Towards a discursive and non-affirmative framework for curriculum studies, Didaktik and educational leadership

    OpenAIRE

    Uljens, Michael; Ylimaki, Rose

    2015-01-01

    This article presents a general theoretical framework for curriculum studies, Didaktik and educational leadership that builds upon strengths and limitations of these traditions, respectively, in Europe and the United States. Methodologically, a meta-theoretical level is used with two guiding core questions: (1) the relation between education and society and (2) the nature of educational influence on the interactive level. On the first question, a nonhierarchical position is defended as it off...

  15. Designing Anatomy Program in Modern Medical Curriculum: Matter of Balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grković, Ivica; Marinović Guić, Maja; Košta, Vana; Poljičanin, Ana; Čarić, Ana; Vilović, Katarina

    2009-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the structure of the anatomy program in the first year medical curriculum of University of Split School of Medicine by comparing it with the recommendations by the Educational Affairs Committee of the American Association of Clinical Anatomists (AACA) and the Terminologia Anatomica (TA); we also quantitatively evaluated the organization of teaching material in contemporary topographical anatomy textbooks and matched them with the AACA recommendations, TA, and the curriculum of the anatomy course taught at Medical School in Split, Croatia. Methods TA, official recommendations of the AACA, 6 contemporary anatomy textbooks, and the structure of the anatomy course were analyzed for the proportion of the terms or text devoted to standard topographical regions of the body. The findings were correlated using Spearman ρ test. Results The curriculum outline correlated both with the AACA recommendations (Spearman ρ = 0.83, P = 0.015) and TA (Spearman ρ = 0.73, P = 0.046). Textbooks contained 8 distinct sections, 7 allocated to topographic anatomy regions and 1 to general anatomy concepts and principles. The structure of all textbooks correlated significantly with the course curriculum. However, 4 out of 6 textbooks did not correlate with TA and only a single textbook showed significant correlation with the AACA recommendations. Conclusion Anatomy textbooks vary in the amount of text dedicated to different parts of topographical anatomy and are not quite concordant with curriculum recommendations and standard anatomical terminology. Planning the structure of an anatomy course should not be based on a single book or recommendation but on evidence. PMID:19260144

  16. Variability in Integrated Cardiothoracic Training Program Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Elizabeth H; Walters, Dustin M; Eilers, Amanda L; Tchantchaleishvili, Vakhtang; Goldstone, Andrew B; Gillaspie, Erin A; Fiedler, Amy; LaPar, Damien J

    2017-06-01

    Development of curricula that appropriately progress a resident from medical school graduate to fully trained cardiothoracic surgeon is a key challenge for integrated cardiothoracic training programs. This study examined variability and perceived challenges in integrated curricula. Responses to the 2016 TSDA/TSRA survey that accompanies the annual in-training exam taken by current cardiothoracic surgery residents were analyzed. Standard statistical methods were utilized to examine trends in participant responses. General surgery experience decreased with post-graduate year, whereas cardiac operative experience increased. Rotations in a wide variety of adjunct fields were common. The majority (87%) of respondents reported had dedicated cardiothoracic intensive care unit (ICU) rotations, and surgical ICU and cardiac care unit rotations were less common (68% and 42%, respectively). The most common surgical subspecialty rotations were vascular (94%) and acute care surgery (88%), with a wide range of clinical exposure (ie, 3-44 weeks for vascular). Importantly, 52% felt competition with general surgery residents for experience and 22.5% of general surgery rotations were at hospitals without general surgery residents. Perceived challenges included optimization of rotations (78%), faculty allowing residents to perform case components (60%), faculty teaching in the operating room (29%), and improving surgical experience on general surgery rotations (19%). Significant variation exists in integrated cardiothoracic surgery curricula. Optimization of rotations, access to surgical experience, and integration with general surgery appear to be the most significant perceived challenges. These data suggest that optimization of early clinical and surgical experience within institutions could improve trainee preparedness for senior cardiothoracic surgery training. Copyright © 2017 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Environmental Education Organizations and Programs in Texas: Identifying Patterns through a Database and Survey Approach for Establishing Frameworks for Assessment and Progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd-Strovas, Jenny D.; Arsuffi, Thomas L.

    2016-01-01

    We examined the diversity of environmental education (EE) in Texas, USA, by developing a framework to assess EE organizations and programs at a large scale: the Environmental Education Database of Organizations and Programs (EEDOP). This framework consisted of the following characteristics: organization/visitor demographics, pedagogy/curriculum,…

  18. 77 FR 41191 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request: Effectiveness of the NIH Curriculum Supplements Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-12

    ... NIH Curriculum Supplements Programs SUMMARY: In compliance with the requirements of section 3506(c)(2... review and approval. Proposed Collection: Title: The Effectiveness of the NIH Curriculum Supplements... will attempt to assess customer demographics and their satisfaction with the NIH curriculum supplements...

  19. Marketing and Retailing. A Curriculum Guide for a Two-Year Postsecondary Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overton, R. Jean; Proffitt, Sally

    This manual was developed to provide a comprehensive curriculum guideline for postsecondary marketing and retailing programs. It contains competence-based materials and integrates the Interstate Distributive Education Curriculum Consortium (IDECC) Learning Activity Packages into the curriculum. The first of seven chapters in this manual presents…

  20. The five resources of critical digital literacy: a framework for curriculum integration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliet Hinrichsen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This article sets out a framework for a critical digital literacy curriculum derived from the four resources, or reader roles, model of critical literacy developed by Luke and Freebody (1990. We suggest that specific problematics in academic engagement with and curriculum development for digital literacy have occurred through an overly technocratic and acritical framing and that this situation calls for a critical perspective, drawing on theories and pedagogies from critical literacy and media education. The article explores the consonance and dissonance between the forms, scope and requirements of traditional print/media and the current digital environment, emphasising the knowledge and operational dimensions that inform literacy in digital contexts. It offers a re-interpretation of the four resources framed as critical digital literacy (Decoding, Meaning Making, Using and Analysing and elaborates the model further with a fifth resource (Persona. The article concludes by identifying implications for institutional practice.

  1. COMP Superscalar, an interoperable programming framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa M. Badia

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available COMPSs is a programming framework that aims to facilitate the parallelization of existing applications written in Java, C/C++ and Python scripts. For that purpose, it offers a simple programming model based on sequential development in which the user is mainly responsible for (i identifying the functions to be executed as asynchronous parallel tasks and (ii annotating them with annotations or standard Python decorators. A runtime system is in charge of exploiting the inherent concurrency of the code, automatically detecting and enforcing the data dependencies between tasks and spawning these tasks to the available resources, which can be nodes in a cluster, clouds or grids. In cloud environments, COMPSs provides scalability and elasticity features allowing the dynamic provision of resources.

  2. Curriculum in Psychiatry and Neurology for Pharmacy Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dopheide, Julie A; Bostwick, Jolene R; Goldstone, Lisa W; Thomas, Kelan; Nemire, Ruth; Gable, Kelly N; Cates, Marshall; Caballero, Joshua; Smith, Tawny; Bainbridge, Jacquelyn

    2017-09-01

    Objective. To describe pharmacy curricula in psychiatry and neurology and to report on neuropsychiatric pharmacy specialists' views on optimal curriculum. Methods. Design and administer one electronic survey to accredited pharmacy programs asking them to report information on curricula in psychiatry and neurology for the 2014-2015 academic year. Design and administer a separate electronic survey to board certified pharmacists with an academic affiliation who are members of the College of Psychiatric and Neurologic Pharmacists (CPNP) asking about their teaching activities and their opinion on optimal curricula. Results. Fifty-six percent of pharmacy programs and 65% of CPNP members responded to the surveys. The program survey revealed greater than 80% of topics were taught by full-time faculty. Didactic lecturing, team-based learning, and case studies were the most common teaching methods. Programs dedicated the most didactics (3 to 5+ hours) to epilepsy, depression, schizophrenia, substance use disorders, and pain. Autism, traumatic brain injury, personality, and eating disorders were either not taught or given ≤ 1 hour of didactics in most programs. Inpatient psychiatry had the most APPE placements with a mean of 19.6, range 0-83. APPE electives in psychiatry outnumbered those in neurology 5 to 1. CPNP member survey results showed 2 out of 3 members agreed that curriculum could be improved with additional APPEs in psychiatry and neurology. Conclusion. Didactic hour distribution in psychiatry and neurology could be improved to better align with board certification in psychiatric pharmacy (BCPP) recommendations and disorder prevalence and complexity. Specialists recommend an experiential component in neurology and psychiatry to combat stigma and improve pharmacist knowledge and skills.

  3. Is there a Core Curriculum across Higher Education Doctoral Programs?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sydney Freeman Jr.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Currently the study of higher education has been referred to as a multidisciplinary field. Consensus is continuing to evolve regarding both what is considered the appropriate coursework and the foundational knowledgebase of this field. The study of higher education is maturing and has the potential to transition from being seen as a field to being respected as an academic discipline. The purpose of the present study is to investigate the status of the core curriculum in higher education doctoral programs from the perspective of program directors with programs that required the completion of standardized coursework prior to beginning a dissertation. We used online survey analytic techniques to query program directors about their EdD and PhD programs in higher education, credit hours, and curricular content. Our study confirms previous work finding that there is common agreement in the subject matter areas of organization, leadership, administration, and history. What our work adds is that there is a growing consensus among higher education doctoral programs about the position of higher education law and finance in the curricular core. In addition, we find there is a growing interest in public policy and community colleges over time, with a majority of EdD programs including instruction in these areas. Nevertheless, majoritarian agreement does not meet at a level wherein consensus can be inferred, especially within PhD programs where requirements are more varied across programs. In addition, while there is an increasing trend in the inclusion of multiculturalism in higher education doctoral programming, multiculturalism is not currently part of higher education’s core. We conclude with research and practice implications for doctoral programs in higher education as a field of study.

  4. Using apps for learning across the curriculum a literacy-based framework and guide

    CERN Document Server

    Beach, Richard

    2014-01-01

    How can apps be used to foster learning with literacy across the curriculum? This book offers both a theoretical framework for considering app affordances and practical ways to use apps to build students' disciplinary literacies and to foster a wide range of literacy practices.Using Apps for Learning Across the Curriculumpresents a wide range of different apps and also assesses their value features methods for and apps related to planning instruction and assessing student learning identifies favorite apps whose affordances are most likely to foster certain disciplinary literacies includes reso

  5. The Impact of New Hampshire K-6 Science Frameworks in Curriculum and Staff-Development: A CIPPS Approach to Curriculum Renewal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellaci, Frank L.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if there was any quantitative or qualitative evidence indicating a need for science curriculum review in aligning district outcomes with the New Hampshire State Science Frameworks. Also examined were such exogenous factors as teachers' perception, attitudes and background preparation pertaining to science…

  6. Systematic Changes in the Undergraduate Chemistry Curriculum Progam Award and Course and Curriculum Development Program Awards

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-06-01

    Eight awards in chemistry curriculum development for FY1996 have been announced. One award, to a consortium centered at the University of California-Los Angeles, represents the fifth award in the Systemic Changes in the Undergraduate Chemistry Curriculum program. Although no proposals will be accepted in this program for either planning or full grants for FY1997, it is anticipated that proposals will be accepted in June of 1997 for projects that would adapt and adopt materials developed by the five funded consortia: Molecular Science centered at the University of California-Los Angeles; ChemLinks centered at Beloit College; MolecularChem Consortium centered at the University of California-Berkeley; Workshop Chemistry centered at CUNY City College; and New Traditions centered at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Seven awards have been made in the Course and Curriculum Development program. This ongoing program continues to accept proposals in chemistry as usual. Systemic Changes in the Undergraduate Chemistry Curriculum Program Award. Molecular Science. Orville L. Chapman University of California-Los Angeles DUE 9555605 FY96 725,000 FY97 575,000, FY98 575,000 FY99 275,000, FY00 275,000 The UCLA-CSUF-Community College Alliance (24 area community colleges that have worked together for more than 15 years) proposes a sweeping restructuring of the lower division chemistry curriculum and the auxiliary learning and assessment processes. In forming our new curriculum, we reject the positivist approach to science education in favor of a constructivist approach that emphasizes problem solving and exploratory learning. We make this change in order to focus on the developing key skills, traits, and abilities of our students. Our new curriculum, the Molecular Science Curriculum, cuts across departments and disciplines to embrace all activities that involve the study of atoms and molecules. In particular, environmental science, materials science, and molecular life science have

  7. An aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander oral health curriculum framework: development experiences in Western Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazen, J; Paul, D; Tennant, M

    2007-06-01

    Indigenous oral health is widely acknowledged as paralleling the significant issues faced in general health. It is recognized that as part of the process of addressing these issues, practitioners need to be aware of the complex nature of working in an Indigenous social and cultural context, including issues beyond direct health care services. It is against this backdrop that collaborators from The University of Western Australia's (UWA) Centre for Rural and Remote Oral Health (CRROH) and Centre for Aboriginal Medical and Dental Health (CAMDH) developed a comprehensive, integrated Indigenous Oral Health Curriculum Framework for the Bachelor of Dental Science (BDSc) course. This development was based on the existing framework developed by the Committee of Deans of Australian Medical Schools (CDAMS) for medical education but was tailored to the specific issues and needs of oral health. Additional consultation with the Oral Health Centre of Western Australia (OHCWA), the School of Indigenous Studies (SIS) as well as Indigenous Australian groups occurred to ensure the development process was inclusive. The inclusion of an Indigenous Oral Health Curriculum Framework in the BDSc will enable UWA dental graduates to practise dentistry in a culturally appropriate manner. The framework provides the structure for students to develop and demonstrate an understanding of Indigenous histories, cultures and social experiences and how these impact on Indigenous peoples' health. It is anticipated that this will foster more positive and culturally secure patient-practitioner interactions between UWA dental graduates and Indigenous Australians, thereby making it more likely for Indigenous Australians to present for treatment. The increased awareness of Indigenous oral health issues will hopefully encourage more graduates to become involved in the treatment of Indigenous peoples. The combination of these factors could lead to an improvement in oral health outcomes for Australia

  8. A Curriculum Development Simulation in a Graduate Program

    OpenAIRE

    Newton, Gail D.; Hagemeier, Nicholas E.

    2011-01-01

    Objective. To implement and evaluate a curriculum development seminar in which graduate students experienced circumstances that occur when faculty members develop and attempt to secure colleague approval for a curriculum.

  9. Conceptions of curriculum in co-operative education: a framework for analysis of the co-op preparatory curriculum

    OpenAIRE

    Davidge-Johnston, Nancy Lee

    2007-01-01

    The model of co-operative education has been part of higher education for one hundred years with relatively little attention paid to its curriculum. Given the significant changes in the co-op “landscape” over this same time, a thorough review of the co-op curriculum is in order to ensure its relevance to a contemporary model of post-secondary education. This analysis explores the literature regarding learning and curriculum to better assess and develop the co-op curriculum. Several theoretica...

  10. Effecting Change in an Evidence-Based Medicine Curriculum: Librarians' Role in a Pediatric Residency Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeblisky, Kathy; Birr, Rebecca A; Sjursen Guerrero, Anne Marie

    2015-01-01

    Librarians for the joint Phoenix Children's Hospital/Maricopa Medical Center Pediatric Residency Program were asked to assist on the Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM) Subcommittee for the program. Faculty was open to recommendations for revising and improving the curriculum and desired librarian assistance in completing the task. The annual program review and conference evaluations revealed a gap between the objectives of the EBM curriculum and the residents' perceived abilities to integrate knowledge into meaningful literature searches. This column demonstrates how librarians can collaborate with their residency programs to revise and improve processes to effect change in their program's EBM curriculum.

  11. Teaching and learning curriculum programs: recommendations for postgraduate pharmacy experiences in education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Eric A; Brown, Bonnie; Gettig, Jacob; Martello, Jay L; McClendon, Katie S; Smith, Kelly M; Teeters, Janet; Ulbrich, Timothy R; Wegrzyn, Nicole; Bradley-Baker, Lynette R

    2014-08-01

    Recommendations for the development and support of teaching and learning curriculum (TLC) experiences within postgraduate pharmacy training programs are discussed. Recent attention has turned toward meeting teaching- and learning-related educational outcomes through a programmatic process during the first or second year of postgraduate education. These programs are usually coordinated by schools and colleges of pharmacy and often referred to as "teaching certificate programs," though no national standards or regulation of these programs currently exists. In an effort to describe the landscape of these programs and to develop a framework for their basic design and content, the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy Pharmacy Practice Section's Task Force on Student Engagement and Involvement, with input from the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, reviewed evidence from the literature and conference proceedings and considered author experience and expertise over a two-year period. The members of the task force created and reached consensus on a policy statement and 12 recommendations to guide the development of best practices of TLC programs. The recommendations address topics such as the value of TLC programs, program content, teaching and learning experiences, feedback for participants, the development of a teaching portfolio, the provision of adequate resources for TLC programs, programmatic assessment and improvement, program transparency, and accreditation. TLC programs provide postgraduate participants with valuable knowledge and skills in teaching applicable to the practitioner and academician. Postgraduate programs should be transparent to candidates and seek to ensure the best experiences for participants through systematic program implementation and assessments. Copyright © 2014 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Enhancing Usefulness of Declarative Programming Frameworks through Complete Integration

    OpenAIRE

    Falkman, Goran; Torgersson, Olof

    2002-01-01

    The Gisela framework for declarative programming was developed with the specific aim of providing a tool that would be useful for knowledge representation and reasoning within real-world applications. To achieve this, a complete integration into an object-oriented application development environment was used. The framework and methodology developed provide two alternative application programming interfaces (APIs): Programming using objects or programming using a traditional equational declara...

  13. Integrating Clinical Experiences in a TESOL Teacher Education Program: Curriculum Mapping as Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baecher, Laura

    2012-01-01

    Across all certification areas, teacher education is being challenged to better integrate clinical experiences with coursework. This article describes the process of curriculum mapping and its impact on the organization of clinical experiences in a master's TESOL program over a 1-year redesign process. Although curriculum mapping has been employed…

  14. Agricultural Resources Materials for Agricultural Education Programs. Core Agricultural Education Curriculum, Central Cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illinois Univ., Urbana. Office of Agricultural Communications and Education.

    This curriculum guide contains four units with relevant problem areas and is intended as a source unit for agricultural education. These problem areas have been selected as suggested areas of study to be included in a core curriculum for secondary students enrolled in an agricultural education program. Each problem area includes some or all of the…

  15. The Making of a History Standards Wiki: "Covering", "Uncovering", and "Discovering" Curriculum Frameworks Using a Highly Interactive Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloy, Robert W.; Poirier, Michelle; Smith, Hilary K.; Edwards, Sharon A.

    2010-01-01

    This article explores using a wiki, one of the newest forms of interactive computer-based technology, as a resource for teaching the Massachusetts K-12 History and Social Science Curriculum Framework, a set of state-mandated learning standards. Wikis are web pages that can be easily edited by multiple authors. They invite active involvement by…

  16. Developing Local Curriculum Framework on Water Resource and Disaster Course for Enhancing Students' Learning Achievements in the Basic Educational System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chunrasaksakun, Chunwadee; Sanrattana, Unchalee; Tungkasamit, Angkana; Srisawat, Niwat

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the paper was to administer and prepare teachers for management to their students' learning achievements within the curriculum framework of water resource and disaster management. This course was compared to manage learning into different school sizes with the sample size in the lower secondary education schools with two groups of 28…

  17. Model Wind Turbine Design in a Project-Based Middle School Engineering Curriculum Built on State Frameworks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogger, Steven D.; Miley, Daniel H.

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposes that project-based active learning is a key part of engineering education at the middle school level. One project from a comprehensive middle school engineering curriculum developed by the authors is described to show how active learning and state frameworks can coexist. The theoretical basis for learning and assessment in a…

  18. An evaluation framework and comparative analysis of the widely used first programming languages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooq, Muhammad Shoaib; Khan, Sher Afzal; Ahmad, Farooq; Islam, Saeed; Abid, Adnan

    2014-01-01

    Computer programming is the core of computer science curriculum. Several programming languages have been used to teach the first course in computer programming, and such languages are referred to as first programming language (FPL). The pool of programming languages has been evolving with the development of new languages, and from this pool different languages have been used as FPL at different times. Though the selection of an appropriate FPL is very important, yet it has been a controversial issue in the presence of many choices. Many efforts have been made for designing a good FPL, however, there is no ample way to evaluate and compare the existing languages so as to find the most suitable FPL. In this article, we have proposed a framework to evaluate the existing imperative, and object oriented languages for their suitability as an appropriate FPL. Furthermore, based on the proposed framework we have devised a customizable scoring function to compute a quantitative suitability score for a language, which reflects its conformance to the proposed framework. Lastly, we have also evaluated the conformance of the widely used FPLs to the proposed framework, and have also computed their suitability scores.

  19. An Evaluation Framework and Comparative Analysis of the Widely Used First Programming Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooq, Muhammad Shoaib; Khan, Sher Afzal; Ahmad, Farooq; Islam, Saeed; Abid, Adnan

    2014-01-01

    Computer programming is the core of computer science curriculum. Several programming languages have been used to teach the first course in computer programming, and such languages are referred to as first programming language (FPL). The pool of programming languages has been evolving with the development of new languages, and from this pool different languages have been used as FPL at different times. Though the selection of an appropriate FPL is very important, yet it has been a controversial issue in the presence of many choices. Many efforts have been made for designing a good FPL, however, there is no ample way to evaluate and compare the existing languages so as to find the most suitable FPL. In this article, we have proposed a framework to evaluate the existing imperative, and object oriented languages for their suitability as an appropriate FPL. Furthermore, based on the proposed framework we have devised a customizable scoring function to compute a quantitative suitability score for a language, which reflects its conformance to the proposed framework. Lastly, we have also evaluated the conformance of the widely used FPLs to the proposed framework, and have also computed their suitability scores. PMID:24586449

  20. An evaluation framework and comparative analysis of the widely used first programming languages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Shoaib Farooq

    Full Text Available Computer programming is the core of computer science curriculum. Several programming languages have been used to teach the first course in computer programming, and such languages are referred to as first programming language (FPL. The pool of programming languages has been evolving with the development of new languages, and from this pool different languages have been used as FPL at different times. Though the selection of an appropriate FPL is very important, yet it has been a controversial issue in the presence of many choices. Many efforts have been made for designing a good FPL, however, there is no ample way to evaluate and compare the existing languages so as to find the most suitable FPL. In this article, we have proposed a framework to evaluate the existing imperative, and object oriented languages for their suitability as an appropriate FPL. Furthermore, based on the proposed framework we have devised a customizable scoring function to compute a quantitative suitability score for a language, which reflects its conformance to the proposed framework. Lastly, we have also evaluated the conformance of the widely used FPLs to the proposed framework, and have also computed their suitability scores.

  1. Position Paper: General Practice Residency and Advanced Education in General Dentistry Programs: Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brody, Harvey A.

    1983-01-01

    A comparison of curricula for the two kinds of postdoctoral dental education programs examines clinical curriculum, program design, hospital-based and non-hospital-based programs, patient population, needs for such specialization, program length, and suggested changes and additions. (MSE)

  2. Great expectations: using an analysis of current practices to propose a framework for the undergraduate inorganic curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisner, Barbara A; Smith, Sheila R; Stewart, Joanne L; Raker, Jeffrey R; Crane, Johanna L; Sobel, Sabrina G; Pesterfield, Lester L

    2015-09-21

    The undergraduate inorganic chemistry curriculum in the United States mirrors the broad diversity of the inorganic research community and poses a challenge for the development of a coherent curriculum that is thorough, rigorous, and engaging. A recent large survey of the inorganic community has provided information about the current organization and content of the inorganic curriculum from an institutional level. The data reveal shared "core" concepts that are broadly taught, with tremendous variation in content coverage beyond these central ideas. The data provide an opportunity for a community-driven discussion about how the American Chemical Society's Committee on Professional Training's vision of a foundation and in-depth course for each of the five subdisciplines maps onto an inorganic chemistry curriculum that is consistent in its coverage of the core inorganic concepts, yet reflects the diversity and creativity of the inorganic community. The goal of this Viewpoint is to present the current state of the diverse undergraduate curriculum and lay a framework for an effective and engaging curriculum that illustrates the essential role inorganic chemistry plays within the chemistry community.

  3. Perspectives of Residents of Mashhad School of Dentistry about the Curriculum of Residency Program

    OpenAIRE

    Javad Sarabadani; Maryam Amirchaghmaghi; Yadolah Zarezadeh; Eshagh Yara; Hosein Souratgar

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: This study was carried out to analyze the viewpoint of the residents of school of dentistry about the curriculum presented in the residency program to students of Mashhad School of Dentistry. Methods: To evaluate the perspectives of residents of dental school about the curriculum and regulations of residency program, a questionnaire was designed whose validity and reliability were confirmed by the authorities of School of Dentistry and test-retest reliability, respectively. ...

  4. Public health program capacity for sustainability: a new framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schell, Sarah F; Luke, Douglas A; Schooley, Michael W; Elliott, Michael B; Herbers, Stephanie H; Mueller, Nancy B; Bunger, Alicia C

    2013-02-01

    Public health programs can only deliver benefits if they are able to sustain activities over time. There is a broad literature on program sustainability in public health, but it is fragmented and there is a lack of consensus on core constructs. The purpose of this paper is to present a new conceptual framework for program sustainability in public health. This developmental study uses a comprehensive literature review, input from an expert panel, and the results of concept-mapping to identify the core domains of a conceptual framework for public health program capacity for sustainability. The concept-mapping process included three types of participants (scientists, funders, and practitioners) from several public health areas (e.g., tobacco control, heart disease and stroke, physical activity and nutrition, and injury prevention). The literature review identified 85 relevant studies focusing on program sustainability in public health. Most of the papers described empirical studies of prevention-oriented programs aimed at the community level. The concept-mapping process identified nine core domains that affect a program's capacity for sustainability: Political Support, Funding Stability, Partnerships, Organizational Capacity, Program Evaluation, Program Adaptation, Communications, Public Health Impacts, and Strategic Planning. Concept-mapping participants further identified 93 items across these domains that have strong face validity-89% of the individual items composing the framework had specific support in the sustainability literature. The sustainability framework presented here suggests that a number of selected factors may be related to a program's ability to sustain its activities and benefits over time. These factors have been discussed in the literature, but this framework synthesizes and combines the factors and suggests how they may be interrelated with one another. The framework presents domains for public health decision makers to consider when developing

  5. Curriculum design and German student exchange for Sino-German Bachelor program majored in optoelectronics engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jihong; Fuhrmann, Thomas; Xu, Boqing; Schreiner, Rupert; Jia, Hongzhi; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Ning; Seebauer, Gudrun; Zhu, Jiyan

    2017-08-01

    Different higher education backgrounds in China and Germany led to challenges in the curriculum design at the beginning of our cooperative bachelor program in Optoelectronics Engineering. We see challenges in different subject requirements from both sides and in the German language requirements for Chinese students. The curriculum was optimized according to the ASIIN criteria, which makes it acceptable and understandable by both countries. German students are integrated into the Chinese class and get the same lectures like their Chinese colleagues. Intercultural and curriculum challenges are successfully solved. The results are summarized to provide an example for other similar international programs.

  6. Application of the Intervention Mapping Framework to Develop an Integrated Twenty-first Century Core Curriculum-Part Three: Curriculum Implementation and Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corvin, Jaime A; DeBate, Rita; Wolfe-Quintero, Kate; Petersen, Donna J

    2017-01-01

    Public health professionals have been challenged to radically reform public health training to meet evolving demands of twenty-first century public health. Such a transformation requires a systems thinking approach with an interdisciplinary focus on problem solving, leadership, management and teamwork, technology and information, budgeting and finance, and communication. This article presents processes for implementing and evaluating a revised public health curriculum and outlines lessons learned from this initiative. To date, more than 200 students have participated in the initial pilot testing of this program. A rigorous process and outcome evaluation plan was developed and employed. Results from the evaluation were used to enhance the resulting curriculum. Specifically, all instructional materials were evaluated by both the students who received the materials and the faculty who presented the materials. As each successive pilot is delivered, both enrollment and faculty involvement has increased. Through this process, the value of committed faculty, the importance of engaging learners in the evaluation of an education program, and the need to implement curriculum that has been carefully evaluated and evidence-informed in nature has emerged. We credit our successful transformation of the Masters in Public Health core to the challenge provided by the Framing the Future task force, the commitment of our College of Public Health leadership, the engagement of our faculty, and the time we allowed for the process to unfold. Ultimately, we believe this transformed curriculum will result in better trained public health professionals, interdisciplinary practitioners who can see public health challenges in new and different ways.

  7. Information to Include in Curriculum Vitae | Cancer Prevention Fellowship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Applicants are encouraged to use their current curriculum vitae and to add any necessary information. Please include your name and a page number on each page of the curriculum vitae. Some of the information requested below will not be applicable to all individuals. Please do not print or type your information on this page. Personal Information Name (First middle last) Gender (optional) Race (optional) Date of birth Place of birth (city,

  8. Evaluation Framework for NASA's Educational Outreach Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Rick; Booker, Angela; Linde, Charlotte; Preston, Connie

    1999-01-01

    The objective of the proposed work is to develop an evaluation framework for NASA's educational outreach efforts. We focus on public (rather than technical or scientific) dissemination efforts, specifically on Internet-based outreach sites for children.The outcome of this work is to propose both methods and criteria for evaluation, which would enable NASA to do a more analytic evaluation of its outreach efforts. The proposed framework is based on IRL's ethnographic and video-based observational methods, which allow us to analyze how these sites are actually used.

  9. Statewide collaborative curriculum project: a shared vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Susan C; Aldrich, Suzanne L; Dahlvang, Victoria K; Fenlason, Kristen L; Jennissen, Sarah A; Madigan, Kristin N; Thoma, Dione M

    2014-12-01

    In 2011, national accreditation was mandated for all nursing programs within the state of Minnesota. Only three of the 23 practical nursing (PN) programs were nationally accredited at the time. The majority of the PN programs needed major curricular revisions to meet national accreditation standards. Many of the PN programs were rural, with limited resources, faculty, or expertise. A collaborative process between industry and nursing programs was established to develop a curriculum framework that met national accreditation standards and could be used as a foundation by the PN programs for curriculum development and revision. The results of the collaborative process included a curriculum framework that was guided by eight student learning outcomes and included an online resource of course outlines, assignments, rubrics, and clinical evaluation tools. The process described in this article can be replicated to guide other programs in development of a curriculum framework to ease the burden of individual nursing programs. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  10. Designing a tool for curriculum leadership development in postgraduate programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Avizhgan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Leadership in the area of curriculum development is increasingly important as we look for ways to improve our programmes and practices. In curriculum studies, leadership has received little attention. Considering the lack of an evaluation tool with objective criteria in postgraduate curriculum leadership process, this study aimed to design a specific tool and determine the validity and reliability of the tool. Method: This study is a methodological research.  At first, domains and items of the tool were determined through expert interviews and literature review. Then, using Delphi technique, 54 important criteria were developed. A panel of experts was used to confirm content and face validity. Reliability was determined by a descriptive study in which 30 faculties from two of Isfahan universities and was estimated by internal consistency. The data were analyzed by SPSS software, using Pearson Correlation Coefficient and reliability analysis. Results: At first, considering the definition of curriculum leadership determined the domains and items of the tool and they were developed primary tool. Expert’s faculties’ views were used in deferent stages of development and psychometry. The tool internal consistency with Cronbach's alpha coefficient times was 96.5. This was determined for each domain separately. Conclution: Applying this instrument can improve the effectiveness of curriculum leadership. Identifying the characteristics of successful and effective leaders, and utilizing this knowledge in developing and implementing curriculum might help us to have better respond to the changing needs of our students, teachers and schools of tomorrow.

  11. Summary of Curriculum Units: Health and Biomedical Science Program of Study Integrated Curriculum Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    ConnectEd: The California Center for College and Career, 2008

    2008-01-01

    Successful Linked Learning pathways depend on curricula and instruction that challenge students to reach high academic standards through relevant and engaging content. These pathways offer an "integrated curriculum" that connects challenging, college-preparatory material to career-based technical concepts and applications. Teachers in…

  12. Design and Curriculum Considerations for a Computer Graphics Program in the Arts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leeman, Ruedy W.

    This history and state-of-the-art review of computer graphics describes computer graphics programs and proposed programs at Sheridan College (Canada), the Rhode Island School of Design, the University of Oregon, Northern Illinois University, and Ohio State University. These programs are discussed in terms of their philosophy, curriculum, student…

  13. Integrated Pest Management: A Curriculum for Early Care and Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    California Childcare Health Program, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This "Integrated Pest Management Toolkit for Early Care and Education Programs" presents practical information about using integrated pest management (IPM) to prevent and manage pest problems in early care and education programs. This curriculum will help people in early care and education programs learn how to keep pests out of early…

  14. Career Preparation Program Curriculum Guide for: Hospitality/Tourism Industry (Food Services).

    Science.gov (United States)

    British Columbia Dept. of Education, Victoria. Curriculum Development Branch.

    This curriculum outline provides secondary and postsecondary instructors with detailed information on student learning outcomes for completion of the food services program requirements in the hospitality/tourism industry. A program overview discusses the aims of education; secondary school philosophy; and career preparation programs and their…

  15. Import Auto Technician; Curriculum Guide for the Development of an Import Automobile Technology Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    East Los Angeles Coll., CA.

    In this curriculum guide, courses in a three-phase community college program for training import automobile technicians are provided. Following an introducation to the guide, the background of the development of the program, the program, the instruction, support for instruction, and the import automobile industry are discussed. Sample options for…

  16. Reinforcing Alcohol Prevention (RAP) Program: A Secondary School Curriculum to Combat Underage Drinking and Impaired Driving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Will, Kelli England; Sabo, Cynthia Shier

    2010-01-01

    The Reinforcing Alcohol Prevention (RAP) Program is an alcohol prevention curriculum developed in partnership with secondary schools to serve their need for a brief, evidence-based, and straightforward program that aligned with state learning objectives. Program components included an educational lesson, video, and interactive activities delivered…

  17. Action Research for Curriculum Development: An Alternative Approach in the Algerian Centralised Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ikhlas GHERZOULI

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Literature in the field of curriculum is debating the extent to which teachers should or could participate in the developmental process of the curriculum they enact. Being the practitioners, teachers are the ones who transmit theory into practice. However, they are not only consumers of curriculum knowledge, but also significant producers of it. Thus, teachers’ active participation as primary stakeholders in the curriculum development process is a necessity. The paper outlines one approach for teacher participation in curriculum development, which is action research. The main aim of this paper is twofold; first: it explores literature about ‘curriculum’, ‘curriculum development’ and ‘action research’; and second, it emphasizes the prominence of teachers’ involvement and research in curriculum development, paying specific attention to the Algerian secondary school educational reform, which is highly controlled and centralised.

  18. Conceptual framework for a Danish human biomonitoring program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Marianne; Knudsen, Lisbeth E.; Vorkamp, Katrin

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present the conceptual framework for a Danish human biomonitoring (HBM) program. The EU and national science-policy interface, that is fundamental for a realization of the national and European environment and human health strategies, is discussed, including the need...... for a structured and integrated environmental and human health surveillance program at national level. In Denmark, the initiative to implement such activities has been taken. The proposed framework of the Danish monitoring program constitutes four scientific expert groups, i.e. i. Prioritization of the strategy...... for the monitoring program, ii. Collection of human samples, iii. Analysis and data management and iv. Dissemination of results produced within the program. This paper presents the overall framework for data requirements and information flow in the integrated environment and health surveillance program. The added...

  19. The Event Coordination Notation: Execution Engine and Programming Framework

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kindler, Ekkart

    2012-01-01

    that was written manually. In this paper, we rephrase the main concepts of ECNO. The focus of this paper, however, is on the architecture of the ECNO execution engine and its programming framework. We will show how this framework allows us to integrate ECNO with object-oriented models, how it works without any...

  20. 76 FR 38602 - Bovine Tuberculosis and Brucellosis; Program Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    ... Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service Bovine Tuberculosis and Brucellosis; Program Framework AGENCY... extending the comment period on a new framework being developed for the bovine tuberculosis and brucellosis... bovine brucellosis in the United States. The notice stated that USDA would hold four public meetings...

  1. Obstetric and gynecologic ultrasound curriculum and competency assessment in residency training programs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abuhamad, Alfred; Minton, Katherine K; Benson, Carol B

    2018-01-01

    in Medicine assembled a multisociety task force to develop a consensus-based, standardized curriculum and competency assessment tools for obstetric and gynecologic ultrasound training in residency programs. The curriculum and competency assessment tools were developed based on existing national...... and international guidelines for the performance of obstetric and gynecologic ultrasound examinations and thus are intended to represent the minimum requirement for such training. By expert consensus, the curriculum was developed for each year of training, criteria for each competency assessment image were...... that the criteria set forth in this document will evolve with time. The task force also encourages use of ultrasound simulation in residency training and expects that simulation will play a significant part in the curriculum and the competency assessment process. Incorporating this training curriculum...

  2. Strategic Framework for GIS: Region 6 Refuge Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The objective of this framework is to develop a Region 6 GIS program to meet the needs at both the field and landscape level. It's application is threefold; be...

  3. XACC - eXtreme-scale Accelerator Programming Framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-11-18

    Hybrid programming models for beyond-CMOS technologies will prove critical for integrating new computing technologies alongside our existing infrastructure. Unfortunately the software infrastructure required to enable this is lacking or not available. XACC is a programming framework for extreme-scale, post-exascale accelerator architectures that integrates alongside existing conventional applications. It is a pluggable framework for programming languages developed for next-gen computing hardware architectures like quantum and neuromorphic computing. It lets computational scientists efficiently off-load classically intractable work to attached accelerators through user-friendly Kernel definitions. XACC makes post-exascale hybrid programming approachable for domain computational scientists.

  4. Adoption of oral health curriculum by physician assistant education programs in 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langelier, Margaret H; Glicken, Anita Duhl; Surdu, Simona

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to describe inclusion of didactic and clinical instruction in oral health in physician assistant (PA) education programs in 2014. A previous study in 2008 found that PA education program directors generally understood the importance of teaching about the linkage of oral health with systemic health; yet, few programs had actually integrated oral health instruction into the PA curriculum. This study was undertaken to ascertain the number of PA programs teaching oral health topics and to evaluate the content of instruction and implementation strategies. The study used a Web-based survey using a skip logic design that branched respondents based on inclusion or the absence of an oral health curriculum in the PA education program. The questions included predefined response options with the opportunity for narrative responses and comments. Analysis of survey data was completed using SPSS (IBM) and SAS (SAS Institute, Inc) and consisted mainly of frequencies and cross tabulations. There was greater inclusion of oral health curriculum in 2014 than in 2008 with most PA programs now providing didactic and clinical training in oral health. Stakeholders' efforts to engage PA program faculty with integration of oral health subject matter into core curriculum have resulted in wider availability of training for PA students in oral health promotion and prevention services. Efforts to equip PA faculty to teach oral health topics and clinical skills should continue as past efforts have resulted in wider integration of oral health subject matter into core PA curriculum.

  5. Implementing a robotics curriculum at an academic general surgery training program: our initial experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winder, Joshua S; Juza, Ryan M; Sasaki, Jennifer; Rogers, Ann M; Pauli, Eric M; Haluck, Randy S; Estes, Stephanie J; Lyn-Sue, Jerome R

    2016-09-01

    The robotic surgical platform is being utilized by a growing number of hospitals across the country, including academic medical centers. Training programs are tasked with teaching their residents how to utilize this technology. To this end, we have developed and implemented a robotic surgical curriculum, and share our initial experience here. Our curriculum was implemented for all General Surgical residents for the academic year 2014-2015. The curriculum consisted of online training, readings, bedside training, console simulation, participating in ten cases as bedside first assistant, and operating at the console. 20 surgical residents were included. Residents were provided the curriculum and notified the department upon completion. Bedside assistance and operative console training were completed in the operating room through a mix of biliary, foregut, and colorectal cases. During the fiscal years of 2014 and 2015, there were 164 and 263 robot-assisted surgeries performed within the General Surgery Department, respectively. All 20 residents completed the online and bedside instruction portions of the curriculum. Of the 20 residents trained, 13/20 (65 %) sat at the Surgeon console during at least one case. Utilizing this curriculum, we have trained and incorporated residents into robot-assisted cases in an efficient manner. A successful curriculum must be based on didactic learning, reading, bedside training, simulation, and training in the operating room. Each program must examine their caseload and resident class to ensure proper exposure to this platform.

  6. Extending the theoretical framework for curriculum integration in pre-clinical medical education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vergel, John; Stentoft, Diana; Montoya, Juny

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Curriculum integration is widely discussed in medical education but remains ill defined. Although there is plenty of information on logistical aspects of curriculum integration, little attention has been paid to the contextual issues that emerge from its practice and may complicate...... at Aalborg University. We observed various learning activities focused on pre-clinical education. Inspired by grounded theory, we analyzed the information we gathered. RESULTS: The following theoretical constructs emerged after the inductive analysis: 1) curriculum integration complexity is embedded...

  7. Conceptual framework for a Danish human biomonitoring program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fauser Patrik

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The aim of this paper is to present the conceptual framework for a Danish human biomonitoring (HBM program. The EU and national science-policy interface, that is fundamental for a realization of the national and European environment and human health strategies, is discussed, including the need for a structured and integrated environmental and human health surveillance program at national level. In Denmark, the initiative to implement such activities has been taken. The proposed framework of the Danish monitoring program constitutes four scientific expert groups, i.e. i. Prioritization of the strategy for the monitoring program, ii. Collection of human samples, iii. Analysis and data management and iv. Dissemination of results produced within the program. This paper presents the overall framework for data requirements and information flow in the integrated environment and health surveillance program. The added value of an HBM program, and in this respect the objectives of national and European HBM programs supporting environmental health integrated policy-decisions and human health targeted policies, are discussed. In Denmark environmental monitoring has been prioritized by extensive surveillance systems of pollution in oceans, lakes and soil as well as ground and drinking water. Human biomonitoring has only taken place in research programs and few incidences of e.g. lead contamination. However an arctic program for HBM has been in force for decades and from the preparations of the EU-pilot project on HBM increasing political interest in a Danish program has developed.

  8. Life imitating art: depictions of the hidden curriculum in medical television programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanek, Agatha; Clarkin, Chantalle; Bould, M Dylan; Writer, Hilary; Doja, Asif

    2015-09-26

    The hidden curriculum represents influences occurring within the culture of medicine that indirectly alter medical professionals' interactions, beliefs and clinical practices throughout their training. One approach to increase medical student awareness of the hidden curriculum is to provide them with readily available examples of how it is enacted in medicine; as such the purpose of this study was to examine depictions of the hidden curriculum in popular medical television programs. One full season of ER, Grey's Anatomy and Scrubs were selected for review. A summative content analysis was performed to ascertain the presence of depictions of the hidden curriculum, as well as to record the type, frequency and quality of examples. A second reviewer also viewed a random selection of episodes from each series to establish coding reliability. The most prevalent themes across all television programs were: the hierarchical nature of medicine; challenges during transitional stages in medicine; the importance of role modeling; patient dehumanization; faking or overstating one's capabilities; unprofessionalism; the loss of idealism; and difficulties with work-life balance. The hidden curriculum is frequently depicted in popular medical television shows. These examples of the hidden curriculum could serve as a valuable teaching resource in undergraduate medical programs.

  9. Implementation of a Professional Society Core Curriculum and Integrated Maintenance of Certification Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlos, W Graham; Poston, Jason T; Michaud, Gaetane C; Dela Cruz, Charles S; Luks, Andrew M; Boyer, Debra; Moore, Paul E; McSparron, Jakob I; Hayes, Margaret M; Balachandran, Jay S; Wang, Tisha S; Larsson, Eileen; Siegel-Gasiewski, Jennifer; Kantz, Alan; Beck, James M; Thomson, Carey C

    2017-04-01

    Medical professional societies exist to foster collaboration, guide career development, and provide continuing medical education opportunities. Maintenance of certification is a process by which physicians complete formal educational activities approved by certifying organizations. The American Thoracic Society (ATS) established an innovative maintenance of certification program in 2012 as a means to formalize and expand continuing medical education offerings. This program is unique as it includes explicit opportunities for collaboration and career development in addition to providing continuing medical education and maintenance of certification credit to society members. In describing the development of this program referred to as the "Core Curriculum," the authors highlight the ATS process for content design, stages of curriculum development, and outcomes data with an eye toward assisting other societies that seek to program similar content. The curriculum development process described is generalizable and positively influences individual practitioners and professional societies in general, and as a result, provides a useful model for other professional societies to follow.

  10. A Program Management Framework for Facilities Managers

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Dan

    2012-01-01

    The challenge faced by senior facility leaders is not how to execute a single project, but rather, how to successfully execute a large program consisting of hundreds of projects. Senior facilities officers at universities, school districts, hospitals, airports, and other organizations with extensive facility inventories, typically manage project…

  11. 3.0 Foundation programs for the Delaware CEMRI framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter S. Murdoch

    2008-01-01

    A complete review of all the national monitoring programs that could possibly contribute to the Delaware River Basin (DRB) CEMRI Framework is beyond the scope of this report. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Mid-Atlantic Integrated Assessment developed a Web-based annotated inventory of such monitoring programs for the mid-Atlantic region. Olsen et al. (...

  12. Moral Frameworks for Leaders of Gifted Programs and Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Elissa F.; Rinko-Gay, Catherine

    2017-01-01

    Given the complexities of being an educational leader and, specifically, an educational leader of a gifted program or school, should there be a moral guide or framework that can inform the daily practices of leaders within an ever-changing educational context of competing demands? Should leaders of gifted programs employ the same ethos as any…

  13. Development of a Program to Enhance Curriculum and Learning Management Competency of Private Primary School Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panichpongsapak, Ratthasart; Tesaputa, Kowat; Sri-ampai, Anan

    2016-01-01

    The aims of this research were: (1) to study the factors and indicators to enhance curriculum and learning management competency of private primary school teachers; (2) to study current situations and desirable situations and techniques; (3) to develop a program; and (4) to study the effects of a program. The study comprised 4 phases: Phase…

  14. Improving International Marketing Programs to Reflect Global Complexity and Risk: Curriculum Drivers and Constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vos, Lynn

    2013-01-01

    This article looks at the curriculum redesign of a master's-level program in international marketing from a UK perspective. In order to ensure that the program would be more fit-for-purpose for future managers working under conditions of complexity, uncertainty, and within regimes often very different from the home market, the team began the…

  15. The Rise of International Relations Programs in the Brazilian Federal Universities: Curriculum Specificities and Current Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Marcos Alan S. V.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this reflection is to study the new international relations (IR) programs introduced by Brazilian federal universities, looking comparatively at their curriculum specificities and current challenges. In recent years, Brazil has seen an increase of IR programs launched in several regions. Since 2003, the Ministry of Education is in the…

  16. Communicative automata based programming. Society Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei Micu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available One of the aims of this paper is to present a new programming paradigm based on the new paradigms intensively used in IT industry. Implementation of these techniques can improve the quality of code through modularization, not only in terms of entities used by a program, but also in terms of states in which they pass. Another aspect followed in this paper takes into account that in the development of software applications, the transition from the design to the source code is a very expensive step in terms of effort and time spent. Diagrams can hide very important details for simplicity of understanding, which can lead to incorrect or incomplete implementations. To improve this process communicative automaton based programming comes with an intermediate step. We will see how it goes after creating modeling diagrams to communicative automata and then to writing code for each of them. We show how the transition from one step to another is much easier and intuitive.

  17. Extending the theoretical framework for curriculum integration in pre-clinical medical education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vergel, John; Stentoft, Diana; Montoya, Juny

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Curriculum integration is widely discussed in medical education but remains ill defined. Although there is plenty of information on logistical aspects of curriculum integration, little attention has been paid to the contextual issues that emerge from its practice and may complicate ...

  18. Health systems engineering fellowship: curriculum and program development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Bradley V; Shiner, Brian; Cully, Jeffrey A; Gilman, Stuart C; Benneyan, James C; Eisenhauer, William

    2015-01-01

    Industrial engineering and related disciplines have been used widely in improvement efforts in many industries. These approaches have been less commonly attempted in health care. One factor limiting application is the limited workforce resulting from a lack of specific education and professional development in health systems engineering (HSE). The authors describe the development of an HSE fellowship within the United States Department of Veterans Affairs, Veterans Health Administration (VA). This fellowship includes a novel curriculum based on specifically established competencies for HSE. A 1-year HSE curriculum was developed and delivered to fellows at several VA engineering resource centers over several years. On graduation, a majority of the fellows accepted positions in the health care field. Challenges faced in developing the fellowship are discussed. Advanced educational opportunities in applied HSE have the potential to develop the workforce capacity needed to improve the quality of health care. © 2014 by the American College of Medical Quality.

  19. Perspectives of Residents of Mashhad School of Dentistry about the Curriculum of Residency Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javad Sarabadani

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This study was carried out to analyze the viewpoint of the residents of school of dentistry about the curriculum presented in the residency program to students of Mashhad School of Dentistry. Methods: To evaluate the perspectives of residents of dental school about the curriculum and regulations of residency program, a questionnaire was designed whose validity and reliability were confirmed by the authorities of School of Dentistry and test-retest reliability, respectively. The questionnaire was distributed among 100 residents and 80 of them completed the questionnaires. The data were analyzed by SPSS software (version 11.5. Results: A total of 43% of residents were informed of the curriculum (e.g. academic leave, transfer, removal of semester, etc.. As for the ability to write research proposal, 42.7% of residents were reported to have a favorable status, i.e. they were able to write more than 80% of their proposal. From among the residents, 30.4% had specialized English language certificate. Most of them (77% were satisfied with the professional staff, faculty members, of the faculty. Many students liked to participate in the teaching method courses of the residency program. Conclusion: Residents maintained that the curriculum in such domains as educational and research issues and special capabilities had some weak points. Thus, appropriate strategies are recommended to be applied to revise the curriculum using the residents’ views on these programs.

  20. Curriculum and Design Analysis of a Mathematics-Based Educational Television Program: A Case Study of Cyberchase Animated Television Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusop, Farrah Dina

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a curriculum and design analyses of an Emmy-award winning children educational television series, Cyberchase. Using Posner's (2004) four process of curriculum analysis framework, this paper addresses each of the components and relates it to the design principles undertaken by the Cyberchase production team. Media and document…

  1. A framework for evaluation of technology transfer programs. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-07-01

    The objective of this volume is to describe a framework with which DOE can develop a program specific methodology to evaluate it`s technology transfer efforts. This approach could also be applied to an integrated private sector technology transfer organization. Several benefits will be realized from the application of this work. While the immediate effect will be to assist program managers in evaluating and improving program performance, the ultimate benefits will accrue to the producing industry, the states, and the nation in the form of sustained or increased domestic oil production. This benefit depends also, of course, on the effectiveness of the technology being transferred. The managers of the Technology Transfer program, and the larger federal oil and gas R&D programs, will be provided with a means to design and assess the effectiveness of program efforts as they are developed, tested and performed. The framework allows deficiencies in critical aspects of the program to be quickly identified, allowing for timely corrections and improvements. The actual process of developing the evaluation also gives the staff of the Oil R&D Program or Technology Transfer subprogram the opportunity to become oriented to the overall program goals. The structure and focus imposed by the evaluation paradigm will guide program staff in selecting activities which are consistent with achieving the goals of the overall R&D program.

  2. Evaluating Prior Learning Assessment Programs: A Suggested Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan L. Travers and Marnie T. Evans

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the past two decades, American institutions have been expected to include systematic program reviews to meet accrediting standards, either by independent or governmental review agencies. Program evaluation is critical for several reasons: it provides systematic ways to assess what needs improvement or what needs changing and it provides ways to validate practices, whether to internal or external audiences (Mishra, 2007. Most program evaluative models are focused on academic programs, which don’t fit the uniqueness of prior learning assessment programs. This paper proposes an evaluative framework for prior learning assessment programs, which takes into account the type of work within prior learning assessment programs and uses program portfolios, similar to how students are asked to document their work.

  3. Stakeholders and Tourism Education. Curriculum Planning Using a Quality Management Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Chris; Westlake, John

    1998-01-01

    Stakeholder analysis provides insights useful in the educational process for tourism and hospitality education. Stakeholders can influence (1) strategic direction through curriculum planning and (2) measurement of performance through quality management. (SK)

  4. Psychological Counseling and Guidance Programs Perception of Hidden Curriculum (Inonu University Example: A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kemal DURUHAN

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In this study, Inonu University Faculty of Educations Psychological Counseling and Guidance Programs Hidden Curriculum, third grade students’ views and conducted observations are intended to be studied. The method of qualitative research ‘Case Study’ is designed. The studies work group consists of 18 third grade Inonu University Psychological Counseling and Guidance Program students. The research data was obtained using observation and half structured interaction technique and the data was analyzed using a descriptive and content method. Due to some findings in the research, in accordance to the physical areas Hidden Curriculum show that leaning towards more interaction is not supported by educational effort; about interaction between the teacher and the student; the teachers implication of class rules, the way of teaching, participation, homework leading to the evaluation method and the Hidden Curriculums expectations to be reached according to the results and from these results a variety changing recommendations were reached.

  5. Implementation of curriculum guidelines for pharmacology and pharmacotherapeutics in FNP graduate programs: a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, N S; Possidente, C J; Muskus, C

    2001-01-01

    Model Pharmacology and Pharmacotherapeutics Curriculum Guidelines were developed by the National Council of State Boards of Nursing and the National Organization of Nurse Practitioner Faculties and published in 1998. To date, no publication of evaluation of adoption or adherence to these guidelines is available. The purpose of this survey was to determine how family nurse practitioner programs incorporate the guidelines into their curriculum. A mailed self-report questionnaire to 193 schools yielded a 41% response rate. Eighty-five percent (n = 68) of the programs have not yet fully integrated the guidelines into their curriculum. Difficulties addressing the extensive content within a 3-credit course and the challenges of teaching students with varied clinical backgrounds and knowledge levels were frequently cited. Although further study of achievement of the guidelines is necessary, an increase in credit allocation, consideration of a conceptual approach to the topic, and use of varied teaching strategies may make achievement of the guidelines more realistic.

  6. CURRICULUM IN EDUCATION AND CHARACTER BUILDING PROGRAM IN NEW ZEALAND PRIMARY SCHOOLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ella Masita

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available As one of the most leading country at the quality education, New Zealand’s students consistently achieve high rank at the Programme for International Students Assessment (PISA for years. The paper will explore what curriculum in education used at primary school level in New Zealand is about. The focus is on the children’s character building program of the curriculum as a fundamental basis in teaching. The discussion will be followed by examples of how those programs are implemented in primary high schools both inside and outside the classrooms. It is hoped that we can learn from this curriculum system for the better quality of Indonesian educational system. Reconstructions in every single part of education will give great contribution to achieve the aims of creating qualified Indonesian people; to able to compete in this global world and have responsibility of their morals and behaviors. Introduction

  7. A Resilient Program technical baseline framework for future space systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Tien M.; Guillen, Andy T.; Matsunaga, Sumner S.

    2015-05-01

    Recent Better Buying Power (BBP) initiative for improving DoD's effectiveness in developing complex systems includes "Owning the Technical Baseline" (OTB). This paper presents an innovative approach for the development of a "Resilient Program" Technical Baseline Framework (PTBF). The framework provides a recipe for generating the "Resilient Program2" Technical Baseline (PTB) components using the Integrated Program Management (IPM) approach to integrate Key Program Elements (KPEs)3 with System Engineering (SE) process/tools, acquisition policy/process/tools, Cost and Schedule estimating tools, DOD Architecture Framework (DODAF) process/tools, Open System Architecture (OSA) process/tools, Risk Management process/tools, Critical Chain Program Management (CCPM) process, and Earned Value Management System (EVMS) process/tools. The proposed resilient framework includes a matrix that maps the required tools/processes to technical features of a comprehensive reference U.S. DOD "owned" technical baseline. Resilient PTBF employs a new Open System Approach (OSAP) combining existing OSA4 and NOA (Naval Open Architecture) frameworks, supplemented by additional proposed OA (Open Architecture) principles. The new OSAP being recommended to SMC (Space and Missiles Systems Center) presented in this paper is referred to as SMC-OSAP5. Resilient PTBF and SMC-OSAP conform to U.S. DOD Acquisition System (DAS), Joint Capabilities Integration and Development System (JCIDS), and DODAF processes. The paper also extends Ref. 21 on "Program Resiliency" concept by describing how the new OSAP can be used to align SMC acquisition management with DOD BBP 3.0 and SMC's vison for resilient acquisition and sustainment efforts.

  8. A Framework for Implementing TQM in Higher Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatraman, Sitalakshmi

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to provide a TQM framework that stresses continuous improvements in teaching as a plausible means of TQM implementation in higher education programs. Design/methodology/approach: The literature survey of the TQM philosophies and the comparative analysis of TQM adoption in industry versus higher education provide the…

  9. Application of an interactive computer program to manage a problem-based dental curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, Colman; Comfort, Margaret B; Luo, Yan; Samaranayake, Lakshman P; Clark, Christopher D

    2006-04-01

    Managing the change from traditional to problem-based learning (PBL) curricula is complex because PBL employs problem cases as the vehicle for learning. Each problem case covers a wide range of different learning issues across many disciplines and is coordinated by different facilitators drawn from the school's multidisciplinary pool. The objective of this project was to adapt an interactive computer program to manage a problem-based dental curriculum. Through application of a commercial database software--CATs (Curriculum Analysis Tools)--an electronic database for all modules of a five-year problem-based program was developed. This involved inputting basic information on each problem case relating to competencies covered, key words (learning objectives), participating faculty, independent study, and homework assignments, as well as inputting information on contact hours. General reports were generated to provide an overview of the curriculum. In addition, competency, key word, manpower, and clock-hour reports at three levels (individual PBL course component, yearly, and the entire curriculum) were produced. Implications and uses of such reports are discussed. The adaptation of electronic technology for managing dental curricula for use in a PBL curriculum has implications for all those involved in managing new-style PBL dental curricula and those who have concerns about managing the PBL process.

  10. Program evaluation of an integrated basic science medical curriculum in Shiraz Medical School, using CIPP evaluation model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    AZADEH ROOHOLAMINI; MITRA AMINI; LEILA BAZRAFKAN; MOHAMMAD REZA DEHGHANI; ZOHREH ESMAEILZADEH; PARISA NABEIEI; RITA REZAEE; JAVAD KOJURI

    2017-01-01

    ...) for undergraduate medical education. The purpose of this study was to provide the required data for the program evaluation of this curriculum for undergraduate medical students, using CIPP program evaluation model. Methods...

  11. A Review of a Dental Record Audit Program within a Predoctoral Dental Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Henrietta; Gardner, Thomas

    1988-01-01

    Record maintenance with periodic record audits, conducted by student peer auditors, became part of the curriculum of the University of Iowa College of Dentistry. A review to determine whether the quality of record keeping in the dental clinics had improved as a result of the audit program is reported. (MLW)

  12. Competency Based Curriculum. Revised Delivery Systems for Culinary Arts Program. Project Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spokane Community Coll., WA.

    Developed through a grant that enabled faculty members to work together to define goals and set objectives, this curriculum guide contains course objectives for the culinary arts program at Spokane Community College in Washington. Objectives are provided for the following courses: culinary techniques and skill development (two levels),…

  13. Competency Based Education Curriculum for the Orientation and Safety Program of the Oil and Gas Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    United Career Center, Clarksburg, WV.

    This competency-based education curriculum for teaching the orientation and safety program for the oil and gas industry in West Virginia is organized into seven units. These units cover the following topics: introduction to oil and gas, first aid, site preparation, drilling operations, equipment familiarity, well completion, and preparation for…

  14. Searching for the Core of Journalism Education: Program Directors Disagree on Curriculum Priorities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blom, Robin; Davenport, Lucinda D.

    2012-01-01

    To carry out their mission of preparing students to be successful journalism professionals, educators make important decisions on the core curriculum: the common courses that all journalism students must take to graduate, no matter their area of emphasis or academic constraints. This national study of U.S. journalism program directors shows they…

  15. Research-Informed Curriculum Design for a Master's-Level Program in Project Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, Yongmei; Richardson, Diane; Duan, Yanqing; Philpott, Elly; Ong, Vincent; Owen, David

    2013-01-01

    This article reports on the application of Research-Informed Curriculum Design (RICD) for the development and implementation of an MSc Program in Project Management. The research focused on contemporary issues in project management and provided an analysis of project management approaches, tools, and techniques currently used in organizations.…

  16. The Professional Values of Program Directors and Head Athletic Trainers: The Impact of the Hidden Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peer, Kimberly S.; Schlabach, Gretchen A.

    2011-01-01

    Context: Athletic training education programs (ATEPs) promote the development of foundational behaviors of professional practice. Situated in the context of professional values, ATEPs are challenged to identify outcome measures for these behaviors. These values are tacitly reflected as part of the hidden curriculum. Objective: To ascertain the…

  17. The Hidden Curriculum of a Teacher Induction Program: Ontario Teacher Educators' Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Sarah Elizabeth; Solomon, R. Patrick; Singer, Jordan; Portelli, John P.; Mujuwamariya, Donatille

    2009-01-01

    This article investigates the hidden curriculum of Ontario's New Teacher Induction Program (NTIP). The study involved interviews with 47 teacher educators from eight faculties of education. Responses revealed concerns about (a) who chooses the mentors, (b) the probationary status of new teachers, and (c) the evaluation of new teachers' competence.…

  18. Program Accreditation and the Graduate Reference Curriculum in Systems Engineering (GRCSE (trademark))

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-01

    variables , and discrete mathematics. The curriculum for programs containing the modifier ―computer‖ in the title must include discrete mathematics...Engineer consultant to Lockheed Martin, IBM, and EDO Ceramics, for ASSETT. Dr. Squires holds INCOSE CSEP, CSEP-Acquisition certifications

  19. Program Evaluation of the "PREPaRE" School Crisis Prevention and Intervention Training Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickerson, Amanda B.; Serwacki, Michelle L.; Brock, Stephen E.; Savage, Todd A.; Woitaszewski, Scott A.; Louvar Reeves, Melissa A.

    2014-01-01

    This study details a program evaluation of the "PREPaRE School Crisis Prevention and Intervention Training Curriculum" ("PREPaRE"), conducted in the United States and Canada between 2009 and 2011. Significant improvements in crisis prevention and intervention attitudes and knowledge were shown among 875 "Crisis Prevention…

  20. Curriculum Planning for Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Assistant Program. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Mary Ann

    This project was conducted to develop a curriculum for dental auxiliary training in the dental specialty field of oral and maxillofacial surgery. Research was conducted to identify the major functions performed by an oral surgery assistant and then to organize these functions into an educational program that would provide adequate didactic and…

  1. Curriculum-Integrated Information Literacy (CIIL) in a Community College Nursing Program: A Practical Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argüelles, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    This article describes a strategy to integrate information literacy into the curriculum of a nursing program in a community college. The model is articulated in four explained phases: preparatory, planning, implementation, and evaluation. It describes a collaborative process encouraging librarians to work with nursing faculty, driving students to…

  2. Developing a Comprehensive Learning Community Program: Implementing a Learning Community Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workman, Jamie L.; Redington, Lyn

    2016-01-01

    This is the second of a three-part series which will share information about how a mid-size, comprehensive university developed a learning community program, including a residential curriculum. Through intentional collaboration and partnerships, the team, comprised of faculty and staff throughout the university, developed a "multi-year plan…

  3. A Model for Infusing Energy Concepts into Vocational Education Programs. Solar Energy Curriculum Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delta Vocational Technical School, Marked Tree, AR.

    This solar energy curriculum guide is designed to assist teachers in infusing energy concepts into vocational education programs. It consists of 31 competency-based instructional units organized into 10 sections. Covered in the sections are the following topics: related instructions (history and development; human relations; general safety;…

  4. Acute pain management curriculum for emergency medicine residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motov, Sergey M; Marshall, John P

    2011-10-01

    Pain is the most common reason people visit emergency departments (EDs); this implies that emergency physicians (EPs) should be experts in managing acute painful conditions. The current trend in the literature, however, demonstrates that EPs possess inadequate knowledge and lack formal training in acute pain management. The purpose of this article is to create a formal educational curriculum that would assist emergency medicine (EM) residents in proper assessment and treatment of acute pain, as well as in providing a solid theoretical and practical knowledge base for managing acute pain in the ED. The authors propose a series of lectures, case-oriented study groups, practical small group sessions, and class-specific didactics with the goal of enhancing the theoretical and practical knowledge of acute pain management in the ED. © 2011 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  5. The Maps in Medicine program: An evaluation of the development and implementation of life sciences curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Malley, Jennifer

    There has been a downward trend in both science proficiency and interest in science in the United States, especially among minority students and students of a disadvantaged background. This has led to a downturn in the number of individuals within these groups considering a career in the sciences or a related field. Studies have identified many potential causes for this problem including the current structure of science curriculum, lack of teacher preparedness, and the lack of quality education and support for those students currently underrepresented in the sciences. Among the solutions to this problem include redesigning the science curriculum, offering high-quality professional development opportunities to teachers, and creating programs to give support to individuals currently underrepresented in the sciences, so that they may have a better chance of pursuing and obtaining a science career. The Maps in Medicine program (MiM) has been designed to incorporate all of the aforementioned solutions and apply them to the current science education problem. The Maps in Medicine (MiM) program was established at the University of Missouri -- Columbia, and is funded by the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. Newly developed MiM curricula and student activities are intended to promote positive attitude changes in those students who are currently underrepresented in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) fields, with the program also providing professional development to high school science teachers. It was important to determine if the MiM program's solution to the science education problem has been successful, and so the program evaluation piece was integral. A mixed-methods approach was used to evaluate the MiM program. Formative evaluation results indicated a positive response from teachers and students regarding curriculum and professional development, and student activities. These results have also lead to the identification of appropriate improvements

  6. The Hidden Ethics Curriculum in Two Canadian Psychiatry Residency Programs: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Mona; Forlini, Cynthia; Lenton, Keith; Duchen, Raquel; Lohfeld, Lynne

    2016-08-01

    The authors describe the hidden ethics curriculum in two postgraduate psychiatry programs. Researchers investigated the formal, informal, and hidden ethics curricula at two demographically different postgraduate psychiatry programs in Canada. Using a case study design, they compared three sources: individual interviews with residents and with faculty and a semi-structured review of program documents. They identified the formal, informal, and hidden curricula at each program for six ethics topics and grouped the topics under two thematic areas. They tested the applicability of the themes against the specific examples under each topic. Results pertaining to one of the themes and its three topics are reported here. Divergences occurred between the curricula for each topic. The nature of these divergences differed according to local program characteristics. Yet, in both programs, choices for action in ethically challenging situations were mediated by a minimum standard of ethics that led individuals to avoid trouble even if this meant their behavior fell short of the accepted ideal. Effective ethics education in postgraduate psychiatry training will require addressing the hidden curriculum. In addition to profession-wide efforts to articulate high-level values, program-specific action on locally relevant issues constitutes a necessary mechanism for handling the impact of the hidden curriculum.

  7. Integrative Medicine in Preventive Medicine Education: Competency and Curriculum Development for Preventive Medicine and Other Specialty Residency Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jani, Asim A; Trask, Jennifer; Ali, Ather

    2015-11-01

    During 2012, the USDHHS's Health Resources and Services Administration funded 12 accredited preventive medicine residencies to incorporate an evidence-based integrative medicine curriculum into their training programs. It also funded a national coordinating center at the American College of Preventive Medicine, known as the Integrative Medicine in Preventive Medicine Education (IMPriME) Center, to provide technical assistance to the 12 grantees. To help with this task, the IMPriME Center established a multidisciplinary steering committee, versed in integrative medicine, whose primary aim was to develop integrative medicine core competencies for incorporation into preventive medicine graduate medical education training. The competency development process was informed by central integrative medicine definitions and principles, preventive medicine's dual role in clinical and population-based prevention, and the burgeoning evidence base of integrative medicine. The steering committee considered an interdisciplinary integrative medicine contextual framework guided by several themes related to workforce development and population health. A list of nine competencies, mapped to the six general domains of competence approved by the Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education, was operationalized through an iterative exercise with the 12 grantees in a process that included mapping each site's competency and curriculum products to the core competencies. The competencies, along with central curricular components informed by grantees' work presented elsewhere in this supplement, are outlined as a roadmap for residency programs aiming to incorporate integrative medicine content into their curricula. This set of competencies adds to the larger efforts of the IMPriME initiative to facilitate and enhance further curriculum development and implementation by not only the current grantees but other stakeholders in graduate medical education around integrative medicine training

  8. Rapid Health Care Improvement Science Curriculum Integration Across Programs in a School of Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Brant J; Potter, Mertie; Pomerleau, Mimi; Phillips, Andrew; O'Donnell, Mimi; Cowley, Connie; Sipe, Margie

    This article describes the systematic efforts undertaken by a school of nursing in the Northeastern United States to foster innovation in health professions education. We present an application of modified team coaching and plan-do-study-act improvement methods in an educational context to rapidly integrate a quality and safety curriculum across programs. We discuss applications in generalist, advanced practice, doctoral, residency, and advanced fellowship programs and provide examples of each.

  9. Teaching Adaptability of Object-Oriented Programming Language Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiao-dong

    2012-01-01

    The evolution of object-oriented programming languages includes update of their own versions, update of development environments, and reform of new languages upon old languages. In this paper, the evolution analysis of object-oriented programming languages is presented in term of the characters and development. The notion of adaptive teaching upon…

  10. Aligning the Hidden Curriculum of Management Education with PRME: An Inquiry-Based Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasco, Maribel

    2012-01-01

    This article argues that mainstreaming responsible management education in line with the Principles of Responsible Management Education (PRME) requires close attention to the hidden curriculum (HC), that is, the implicit dimensions of educational experiences. Altering formal curricular goals and content alone is not enough to improve students'…

  11. Using Green Chemistry Principles as a Framework to Incorporate Research into the Organic Laboratory Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Nancy E.; Gurney, Rich; Soltzberg, Leonard

    2014-01-01

    Despite the accepted pedagogical value of integrating research into the laboratory curriculum, this approach has not been widely adopted. The activation barrier to this change is high, especially in organic chemistry, where a large number of students are required to take this course, special glassware or setups may be needed, and dangerous…

  12. A Conceptual Framework for Developing the Curriculum and Delivery of Technology Education in Early Childhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turja, Leena; Endepohls-Ulpe, Martina; Chatoney, Marjolaine

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of the analysis of the Early Childhood Education (ECE) curriculum in six countries involved in the UPDATE-project, and on that basis, propose a conceptual foundation for technology education in ECE that aims to enhance gender sensitive technology education in the continuum from early years to…

  13. In search for a public health leadership competency framework to support leadership curriculum-a consensus study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czabanowska, Katarzyna; Smith, Tony; Könings, Karen D; Sumskas, Linas; Otok, Robert; Bjegovic-Mikanovic, Vesna; Brand, Helmut

    2014-10-01

    Competency-based education is increasingly popular, especially in the area of continuing professional development. Many competency frameworks have been developed; however, few address leadership competencies for European public health professionals. The aim of this study was to develop a public health leadership competency framework to inform a leadership curriculum for public health professionals. The framework was developed as part of the Leaders for European Public Health project-supported by the EU Lifelong Learning Programme. The study was carried out in three phases: a literature review, consensus development panel and Delphi survey. The public health leadership competency framework was initially developed from a literature review. A preliminary list of competencies was submitted to a panel of experts. Two consensus development panels were held to evaluate and make changes to the initial draft competency framework. Then two rounds of a Delphi survey were carried out in an effort to reach consensus. Both surveys were presented through Survey Monkey to members of the Association of the Schools of Public Health in the European Region Working Group on Innovation in Public Health Teaching and Education. The framework was developed consisting of 52 competencies organized into eight domains: Systems Thinking; Political Leadership; Collaborative Leadership: Building and Leading Interdisciplinary Teams; Leadership and Communication; Leading Change; Emotional Intelligence and Leadership in Team-based Organizations; Leadership, Organizational Learning and Development and Ethics and Professionalism. The framework can serve as a useful tool in identifying gaps in knowledge and skills, and shaping competency-based continuing professional development leadership curricula for public health professionals in Europe. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Public Health Association. All rights reserved.

  14. Curriculum development for a national cardiotocography education program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thellesen, Line; Hedegaard, Morten; Bergholt, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To define learning objectives for a national cardiotocography (CTG) education program based on expert consensus. DESIGN: A three-round Delphi survey. POPULATION AND SETTING: One midwife and one obstetrician from each maternity unit in Denmark were appointed based on CTG teaching experi...... on CTG learning objectives was achieved using the Delphi methodology. This was an initial step in developing a valid CTG education program. A prioritized list of objectives will clarify which topics to emphasize in a CTG education program.......OBJECTIVE: To define learning objectives for a national cardiotocography (CTG) education program based on expert consensus. DESIGN: A three-round Delphi survey. POPULATION AND SETTING: One midwife and one obstetrician from each maternity unit in Denmark were appointed based on CTG teaching...

  15. Integrating a Supplemental Vocabulary Instruction Program into an EFL Curriculum

    OpenAIRE

    ヒューバート, ラッセル ポール; ゴーベル, ピーター

    2012-01-01

    This article describes a supplemental vocabulary instruction program piloted in the KSU Faculty of Cultural Studies during the 2011 academic year. The program was created to enhance the depth of vocabulary knowledge and active usage of English vocabulary of first-year students (N=230). Initial student vocabulary knowledge levels were evaluated by a Vocabulary Levels Test (VLT) examination at the beginning of the academic year. A vocabulary textbook series was selected for the required reading...

  16. Application of the Intervention Mapping Framework to Develop an Integrated Twenty-first Century Core Curriculum-Part Two: Translation of MPH Core Competencies into an Integrated Theory-Based Core Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corvin, Jaime A; DeBate, Rita; Wolfe-Quintero, Kate; Petersen, Donna J

    2017-01-01

    In the twenty-first century, the dynamics of health and health care are changing, necessitating a commitment to revising traditional public health curricula to better meet present day challenges. This article describes how the College of Public Health at the University of South Florida utilized the Intervention Mapping framework to translate revised core competencies into an integrated, theory-driven core curriculum to meet the training needs of the twenty-first century public health scholar and practitioner. This process resulted in the development of four sequenced courses: History and Systems of Public Health and Population Assessment I delivered in the first semester and Population Assessment II and Translation to Practice delivered in the second semester. While the transformation process, moving from traditional public health core content to an integrated and innovative curriculum, is a challenging and daunting task, Intervention Mapping provides the ideal framework for guiding this process. Intervention mapping walks the curriculum developers from the broad goals and objectives to the finite details of a lesson plan. Throughout this process, critical lessons were learned, including the importance of being open to new ideologies and frameworks and the critical need to involve key-stakeholders in every step of the decision-making process to ensure the sustainability of the resulting integrated and theory-based curriculum. Ultimately, as a stronger curriculum emerged, the developers and instructors themselves were changed, fostering a stronger public health workforce from within.

  17. A flexible framework for secure and efficient program obfuscation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solis, John Hector

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, we present a modular framework for constructing a secure and efficient program obfuscation scheme. Our approach, inspired by the obfuscation with respect to oracle machines model of [4], retains an interactive online protocol with an oracle, but relaxes the original computational and storage restrictions. We argue this is reasonable given the computational resources of modern personal devices. Furthermore, we relax the information-theoretic security requirement for computational security to utilize established cryptographic primitives. With this additional flexibility we are free to explore different cryptographic buildingblocks. Our approach combines authenticated encryption with private information retrieval to construct a secure program obfuscation framework. We give a formal specification of our framework, based on desired functionality and security properties, and provide an example instantiation. In particular, we implement AES in Galois/Counter Mode for authenticated encryption and the Gentry-Ramzan [13]constant communication-rate private information retrieval scheme. We present our implementation results and show that non-trivial sized programs can be realized, but scalability is quickly limited by computational overhead. Finally, we include a discussion on security considerations when instantiating specific modules.

  18. An Evaluation of the "Computer Technology and Programming" Curriculum in the Vocational Higher Education System in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adiguzel, Oktay C.; Cardak, Cigdem S.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the "Computer Technology and Programming" curriculum offered at vocational colleges with a focus on the goals of the curriculum and student thoughts. Document analysis and semi-structured interviews were conducted to gather the data. Results revealed that there were mainly four problematic issues…

  19. "It's Not Always What It Seems": Exploring the Hidden Curriculum within a Doctoral Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foot, Rachel Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative, naturalistic study was to explore the ways in which hidden curriculum might influence doctoral student success. Two questions guided the study: (a) How do doctoral students experience the hidden curriculum? (b) What forms of hidden curricula can be identified in a PhD program? Data were collected from twelve…

  20. Development of Curriculum Content for a Unique Career Ladder Multi-Entry/Multi-Exit Nursing Program. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosbach, Ellen M.

    A project was undertaken to develop the curriculum content for a unique career ladder multi-entry/multi-exit nursing program that would provide training for nurse aides, practical nurses, and registered nurses. The major objectives of the project were to conduct a review of the literature on curriculum materials presently in use, to develop 11…

  1. Challenges of Globalization: Morocco and Tunisia. Curriculum Projects. Fulbright-Hays Summer Seminars Abroad Program, 2001 (Morocco and Tunisia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002

    This publication contains a collection of curriculum projects developed by educators who were participants in the 2001 Fulbright-Hays Summer Seminars Abroad Program in Morocco and Tunisia. The 13 curriculum projects in the publication are entitled: "Women in Morocco, Artists and Artisans" (Virginia da Costa); "Cultures of…

  2. An Undergraduate Information Security Program: More than a Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, Belle; Imboden, Thomas; Martin, Nancy L.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the implementation of an information security program at a large Midwestern university. The initial work is briefly summarized and improvements that have occurred over time are described. Current activities and future plans are discussed. This paper offers insight and lessons learned for organizations that have or are…

  3. Advancing Teacher Education and Curriculum Development through Study Abroad Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Joan A., Ed.; Milby, Tammy M., Ed.

    2016-01-01

    The number of English language students in American schools has dramatically increased in recent years, creating a greater awareness of cross-cultural issues and considerations in education. Globalization as well as an increase in international exchange student programs has proven that pre-service teachers can benefit from traveling abroad and…

  4. A Retrospective Program Evaluation of a Domestic Violence Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakaryan, Hasmik

    2013-01-01

    Domestic Violence (DV) continues to be a worldwide public health problem. Research in the area indicates that domestic violence has damaging, long-term serious mental, emotional, as well as physiological consequences both for the partners of the perpetrators and for their children. Even though various programs focused on treatments of the damaging…

  5. An enhancement strategy for integration of population health into medical school education: employing the framework developed by the Healthy People Curriculum Task Force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerkering, Kathryn Waldrop; Novick, Lloyd F

    2008-04-01

    The authors describe an enhancement strategy for integration of population health content into the medical school curriculum at The Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University conducted in 2005-2006. The Clinical Prevention and Population Health Curriculum Framework developed by the Healthy People Curriculum Task Force served as the planning template for curriculum analysis. Key to success was the incorporation of population health as a "curriculum enhancement," as opposed to curricular expansion or substitution. Strategies included introduction of a Case-Based Series in Population-Oriented Prevention (C-POP) in the preclinical years; community assessments, home visits, and public health assignments in the family medicine and pediatrics clinical clerkships; and prevention history-taking. The Brody integrated curriculum included a wide range of topics and clinical experiences specific to prevention and population health; however, the coverage was uneven. Hybrid teaching cases were developed from four C-POP cases which were adapted to existing instructional materials. Students learned to define the determinants of health, disease burden in their community settings, and community strengths and obstacles specific to dealing with chronic conditions. Factors contributing to the successful integration of population health included a receptive primary care medical school, use of the Framework, analysis of gaps between the Framework and the existing curriculum, providing enhancements to the existing curriculum, employment of patient cases, and integrating population health into a variety of classroom and community medical learning experiences. This approach, as opposed to a separate and distinct course, seeks to reinforce the interconnectedness of communities, families, and individuals.

  6. A Comparative Analysis of International Frameworks for 21st Century Competences: Implications for National Curriculum Policies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voogt, Joke; Roblin, Natalie Pareja

    2012-01-01

    National curricula need to change drastically to comply with the competences needed for the 21st century. In this paper eight frameworks describing 21st century competences were analysed. A comprehensive search for information about 21st century competences was conducted across the official websites of the selected frameworks, resulting in 32…

  7. Implementation a Medical Simulation Curriculum in Emergency Medicine Residency Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amirhossein Jahanshir

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Applying simulation in medical education is becoming more and more popular. The use of simulation in medical training has led to effective learning and safer care for patients. Nowadays educators have confronted with the challenge of respecting patient safety or bedside teaching. There is widespread evidence, supported by robust research, systematic reviews and meta-analysis, on how much effective simulation is. Simulation supports the acquisition of procedural, technical and non-technical skills through repetitive practice with feedbacks. Our plan was to induct simulation in emergency medicine residency program in order to ameliorate our defects in clinical bedside training. Our residents believed that simulation could be effective in their real medical practice. They mentioned that facilitators’ expertise and good medical knowledge, was the strongest point of the program and lack of proper facilities was the weakest.

  8. Aura: A Multi-Featured Programming Framework in Python

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper puts forward the design, programming and application of innovative educational software, ‘Aura’ made using Python and PyQt Python bindings. The research paper presents a new concept of using a single tool to relate between syntaxes of various programming languages and algorithms. It radically increases their understanding and retaining capacity, since they can correlate between many programming languages. The software is a totally unorthodox attempt towards helping students who have their first tryst with programming languages. The application is designed to help students understand how algorithms work and thus, help them in learning multiple programming languages on a single platform using an interactive graphical user interface. This paper elucidates how using Python and PyQt bindings, a comprehensive feature rich application, that implements an interactive algorithm building technique, a web browser, multiple programming language framework, a code generator and a real time code sharing hub be embedded into a single interface. And also explains, that using Python as building tool, it requires much less coding than conventional feature rich applications coded in other programming languages, and at the same time does not compromise on stability, inter-operability and robustness of the application.

  9. Obstetric and gynecologic ultrasound curriculum and competency assessment in residency training programs: consensus report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuhamad, Alfred; Minton, Katherine K; Benson, Carol B; Chudleigh, Trish; Crites, Lori; Doubilet, Peter M; Driggers, Rita; Lee, Wesley; Mann, Karen V; Perez, James J; Rose, Nancy C; Simpson, Lynn L; Tabor, Ann; Benacerraf, Beryl R

    2018-01-01

    Ultrasound imaging has become integral to the practice of obstetrics and gynecology. With increasing educational demands and limited hours in residency programs, dedicated time for training and achieving competency in ultrasound has diminished substantially. The American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine assembled a multisociety task force to develop a consensus-based, standardized curriculum and competency assessment tools for obstetric and gynecologic ultrasound training in residency programs. The curriculum and competency assessment tools were developed based on existing national and international guidelines for the performance of obstetric and gynecologic ultrasound examinations and thus are intended to represent the minimum requirement for such training. By expert consensus, the curriculum was developed for each year of training, criteria for each competency assessment image were generated, the pass score was established at, or close to, 75% for each, and obtaining a set of 5 ultrasound images with pass score in each was deemed necessary for attaining each competency. Given the current lack of substantial data on competency assessment in ultrasound training, the task force expects that the criteria set forth in this document will evolve with time. The task force also encourages use of ultrasound simulation in residency training and expects that simulation will play a significant part in the curriculum and the competency assessment process. Incorporating this training curriculum and the competency assessment tools may promote consistency in training and competency assessment, thus enhancing the performance and diagnostic accuracy of ultrasound examination in obstetrics and gynecology. Copyright © 2017 International Society of Ultrasound in Obstetrics and Gynecology, American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine, Elsevier Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. THE 2013 CURRICULUM BASED SYLLABUS FOR SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL’S ENGLISH EXTRACURRICULAR PROGRAM

    OpenAIRE

    Masrur Mustolih; Hermayawati Hermayawati

    2015-01-01

    The study aimed at designing syllabus for English extracurricular in SMAN 1 Seyegan based on the 2013 Curriculum. This was Research and Development (R&D) study using ADDIE model. There were five stages in conducting the research; (1) Analysis; (2) Design; (3) Development; (4) Implementation; (5) Evaluation. This study involved 15 students of ten graders who registered to English extracurricular program. To gain the Needs Analysis (NA), the researcher used observation, questionn...

  11. Curriculum Evaluation and Employers Opinions: the case study of Educational Technology Program in Bachelor Degree (Continuing Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakhon Lalognam

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The purposes of this research were: 1 to evaluate the Educational Technology Program (Continuing Program in Bachelor Degree curriculum which is revised in 2007 by applying CIPP model for evaluation. 2 to study the opinions of the employers about the ideal characteristics and actual characteristics of graduates. 3 to study the opinions for the requirements of the Educational Technology Program in Bachelor Degree (Continuing Program and knowledge implementation in work of graduates. 4 to make the suggestions and guidelines to improve the Educational Technology Program in Bachelor Degree (Continuing Program to achieve potentiality and responsive for the requirements of learners and employers. The sample of this research were 310 persons ; consisted of graduates in the Educational Technology Program in Bachelor Degree (Continuing Program in academic year 2006 - 2010, the committee of the Educational Technology Program in Bachelor Degree (Continuing Program , instructors and employers by using Multi-stage Random Sampling and Simple Random Sampling. The instruments of this research were the 5 levels rating scale questionnaire and the structured interview type. They consisted of 3 sets: 1 for graduates, 2 for the committee of the Educational Technology Program in Bachelor Degree (Continuing Program and 3 for instructors and employers. The research found that: 1. The results of evaluation on the Educational Technology Program in Bachelor Degree (Continuing Program which is revised in 2007 were: 1.1 The opinions of graduates to curriculum in all of aspects were average at the uncertain level which the context aspect was at the high level, input aspect was at the uncertain level, process aspect was at the uncertain level and product aspect was at the high level. 1.2 The opinions of the curriculum committee and instructors to curriculum in all of aspects were average at the high level which the context aspect was at the high level, input aspect was at the

  12. Exploring a Framework for Professional Development in Curriculum Innovation: Empowering Teachers for Designing Context-Based Chemistry Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolk, Machiel J.; de Jong, Onno; Bulte, Astrid M. W.; Pilot, Albert

    2011-05-01

    Involving teachers in early stages of context-based curriculum innovations requires a professional development programme that actively engages teachers in the design of new context-based units. This study considers the implementation of a teacher professional development framework aiming to investigate processes of professional development. The framework is based on Galperin's theory of the internalisation of actions and it is operationalised into a professional development programme to empower chemistry teachers for designing new context-based units. The programme consists of the teaching of an educative context-based unit, followed by the designing of an outline of a new context-based unit. Six experienced chemistry teachers participated in the instructional meetings and practical teaching in their respective classrooms. Data were obtained from meetings, classroom discussions, and observations. The findings indicated that teachers became only partially empowered for designing a new context-based chemistry unit. Moreover, the process of professional development leading to teachers' empowerment was not carried out as intended. It is concluded that the elaboration of the framework needs improvement. The implications for a new programme are discussed.

  13. Interreligious education: Conceptualising a needs assessment framework for curriculum design in plural societies (with special reference to Mauritius)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maudarbux, Mohammad Belall

    2016-08-01

    The growing debate on intercultural and interreligious dialogue has one major drawback: how to translate academic and theoretical contributions into practical tools for educators and policy makers. This paper aims to fill this gap by presenting a transferable "needs assessment model" based on five criteria and twenty measurable indicators of interreligious relations within a country. Using the example of Mauritius, a densely multilingual and multireligious country, the paper gives an inside view of the preparations which led to the launch of an innovative "Peace and Interfaith Studies" course at the University of Mauritius in 2010. The author was himself involved first as a curriculum consultant and then as a project manager of this course at the Council of Religions in Mauritius. After clarifying the differences between related concepts like multicultural education, intercultural education and religious education, the author defines "interreligious education" as being distinct from all of the above. The paper then proceeds to explain the rationale of interreligious education, followed by the identification of the critical factors which affect curriculum design and policy making. It uses these factors to highlight how each of them operates in Mauritius to create a web of complexity which makes interreligious education extremely volatile. This is followed by an overview of religious education in the Mauritian schooling system, an overview of the needs assessment framework and a description of the innovative "Peace and Interfaith Studies" course. The paper ends with a brief discussion of the main challenges of this model.

  14. [Curriculum analysis and comparison between strategies or programs for early child development in Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas-López, Guillermo; Guadarrama-Orozco, Jessica Haydee; Rizzoli-Córdoba, Antonio; Narcizo-Cenobio, Francisco Javier; Medrano-Loera, Gerónimo; Villagrán, Daniel Aceves; O'Shea Cuevas, Gabriel; Muñoz Hernández, Onofre

    Most of the strategies or programs that support early child development in Mexico are independent efforts that vary in scale, services offered and means of providing them. For the evaluation of the quality of these programs, an important aspect is the curriculum content. The aim of this study was to analyze and compare the curriculum content of the different strategies or programs focused on the promotion and intervention of early child development, which are offered by the Federal Government in Health and Education sectors in Mexico. We conducted a review of the curriculum content of the strategies and programs. The qualitative phase consisted of a comparative analysis where 75 indicators proposed by the Inter-American Development Bank were identified. The quantitative phase consisted of a descriptive analysis of the indicators. Finally, the analyses were compared to establish the performance of each one. Six strategies or programs were identified. In the analysis of the presence of indicators, the Oportunidades de Aprendizaje (Learning Opportunities, LO) strategy showed a larger number of indicators. In the amplitude analysis, both PEI-CONAFE and LO were the best balanced. Finally, in-depth analysis of the indicators LO and Skills for life were the best balanced while PEI-CONAFE was the best balanced in the social-emotional area, CeNSIA program for language and LO for cognitive development area. LO strategy showed the closest level of contents established by the Inter-American Development Bank. Copyright © 2016 Hospital Infantil de México Federico Gómez. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  15. Statistical Framework for Planning a Component Shelf Life Program.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crowder, Stephen V. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-02-01

    This document outlines a statistical framework for establishing a shelf-life program for components whose performance is measured by the value of a continuous variable such as voltage or function time. The approach applies to both single measurement devices and repeated measurement devices, although additional process control charts may be useful in the case of repeated measurements. The approach is to choose a sample size that protects the margin associated with a particular variable over the life of the component. Deviations from expected performance of the measured variable are detected prior to the complete loss of margin. This ensures the reliability of the component over its lifetime.

  16. Integrating the Jewish Dietary Laws into a dietetics program. Kashruth in a dietetics curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natow, A B; Heslin, J A; Raven, B C

    1975-07-01

    A clinical and community dietetics program integrates Kashruth, the Jewish Dietary Laws, into its curriculum. Simply defined, kosher means fit for consumption. Emblems used throughout the United States and Canada to indicate a program of rabbinic endoresment and supervision of canned, boxed, and bottled products are included. An existing kosher unit is described, and guidelines for establishing a kosher food science laboratory unit are offered. Suggestions for instituting kosher foodservice in health care facilities are given. Therapeutic applications of Kashruth are suggested, and approved therapeutic food products are listed.

  17. Ressources de mathematiques, maternelle-12e annee: Bibliographie annotee. Cadre commun des programmes d'etudes (Pre-Kindergarten-Grade 12 Mathematics Resources: Annotated Bibliography. Common Curriculum Framework).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Western Canadian Protocol for Collaboration in Basic Education, Edmonton (Alberta).

    This annotated bibliography identifies French language resources endorsed for the K-12 grade levels by all Western Canadian Protocol (WCP) jurisdictions implementing the Common Curriculum Framework for K- 12 Mathematics. Resources were selected through a collaborative review process based on their high level of fidelity with the rationale,…

  18. Revisioning Curriculum in the Age of Transnational Mobility: Towards a Transnational and Transcultural Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Shibao; Maitra, Srabani

    2017-01-01

    Under the new mobilities paradigm, migration is conceptualized as circulatory and transnational, moving us beyond the framework of methodological nationalism. Transnational mobility has called into question dominant notions of migrant acculturation or assimilation. Migrants no longer feel obligated to remain tied to or locatable in a…

  19. Curriculum, curriculum development, curriculum studies ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... see curriculum studies as a dumping ground and others make no theoretical contribution to the discipline. The article concludes by suggesting ways which would encourage the intellectual advancement of curriculum studies through rigorous disciplinarity. Keywords: curriculum; curriculum development; curriculum studies ...

  20. A Framework for Integrating Biosimilars Into the Didactic Core Requirements of a Doctor of Pharmacy Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Edward; Liu, Jennifer; Ramchandani, Monica

    2017-04-01

    Biologic drugs approved via the abbreviated United States biosimilar approval pathway are anticipated to improve access to medications by addressing increasing health care expenditures. Surveys of health care practitioners indicate that there is inadequate knowledge and understanding about biosimilars; this must be addressed to ensure safe and effective use of this new category of products. Concepts of biosimilar development, manufacturing, regulation, naming, formulary, and inventory considerations, as well as patient and provider education should be included within the doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) curriculum as preparation for clinical practice. Based on these considerations, we propose that PharmD graduates be required to have knowledge in the following domains regarding biologics and biosimilars: legal definition, development and regulation, state pharmacy practice laws, and pharmacy practice management. We link these general biosimilar concepts to the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE) Standards 2016 and Center for the Advancement of Pharmacy Education (CAPE) Outcomes 2013, and provide example classroom learning objectives, in-class activities, and assessments to guide implementation.

  1. Increasing diversity in international education: Programming for non-traditional students through an alternative curriculum model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca A. Clothey

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper looks at an alternative curriculum model for study abroad designed specifically to address some of the needs of non-traditional students enrolled in an online education program. In order to meet the needs of non-traditional students and provide quality international programming for them, it is necessary first to understand their restraints to studying abroad, and then to design alternative educational models that can address these challenges. The paper describes the challenges of balancing the need to create quality international learning opportunities for education students, with the limitations faced by non-traditional online adult learners who have families and full-time jobs. It is based on an action research case study of two study abroad programs implemented for online students at a northeastern four-year research-one institution of higher education.

  2. A Traumatic Death Support Group Program: Applying an Integrated Conceptual Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walijarvi, Corrine M.; Weiss, Ann H.; Weinman, Maxine L.

    2012-01-01

    This article describes an 8-week, curriculum-based traumatic death support group program that is offered at Bo's Place, a grief and bereavement center in Houston, Texas. The program was implemented in 2006 in an effort to help family members who had experienced a death in the family by suicide, murder, accident, or sudden medical problem. The…

  3. Application of the Intervention Mapping Framework to Develop an Integrated Twenty-First Century Core Curriculum-Part 1: Mobilizing the Community to Revise the Masters of Public Health Core Competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBate, Rita; Corvin, Jaime A; Wolfe-Quintero, Kate; Petersen, Donna J

    2017-01-01

    Twenty-first century health challenges have significantly altered the expanding role and functions of public health professionals. Guided by a call from the Association of Schools and Programs of Public Health's (ASPPH) and the Framing the Future: The Second 100 Years of Education for Public Health report to adopt new and innovative approaches to prepare public health leaders, the University of South Florida College of Public Health aimed to self-assess the current Masters of Public Health (MPH) core curriculum with regard to preparing students to meet twenty-first century public health challenges. This paper describes how Intervention Mapping was employed as a framework to increase readiness and mobilize the COPH community for curricular change. Intervention Mapping provides an ideal framework, allowing organizations to access capacity, specify goals, and guide the change process from curriculum development to implementation and evaluation of competency-driven programs. The steps outlined in this paper resulted in a final set of revised MPH core competencies that are interdisciplinary in nature and fulfill the emergent needs to address changing trends in both public health education and challenges in population health approaches. Ultimately, the competencies developed through this process were agreed upon by the entire College of Public Health faculty, signaling one college's readiness for change, while providing the impetus to revolutionize the delivery of public health education at the University of South Florida.

  4. The Challenge of an Interdisciplinary Curriculum: A Cultural Analysis of a Doctoral-Degree Program in Neuroscience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holley, Karri

    2009-01-01

    Drawing on data collected through 45 interviews with faculty, doctoral students, and administrators affiliated with an interdisciplinary neuroscience program, I examine the structure of the interdisciplinary graduate curriculum. The data presented here highlight the challenge of such programs. I review the purpose, organization, and content of the…

  5. Peer mentoring program in an interprofessional and interdisciplinary curriculum in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Camila Aparecida Machado; de França Carvalho, Carolina Prado; Céspedes, Isabel Cristina; de Oliveira, Flávia; Le Sueur-Maluf, Luciana

    2015-01-01

    The Federal University of São Paulo, Baixada Santista Campus was founded in 2006 with five degree-granting programs in physical education, physiotherapy, nutrition, psychology, and occupational therapy. The guiding principle behind the programs' educational mission was centered on the development of health care professionals capable of working in interdisciplinary teams with an emphasis on holistic patient care. This pedagogical structure required peer-mentoring programs in order to integrate different areas of knowledge and to improve learning strategies among new generations of students. The authors' objective in the present report is to discuss the strategies and activities of the peer-mentoring program in histophysiology and gross anatomy in an interdisciplinary and interprofessional curriculum. Evaluations by students, mentors and professors are presented, along with a statistical analysis of variance comparing student performance in the module assessments according to their participation in the peer-mentoring activities. The results demonstrated that students who participated in peer-mentoring activities enjoyed a higher rate of academic success than those who did not participate. In addition, student and mentor evaluations of the peer mentoring program were highly positive. The program enabled mentors to gain a deeper knowledge of the subjects addressed in the learning modules, as well as to develop intrinsic teaching skills during their time as mentors. In short, the authors believe that the peer-mentoring program has been validated for its effectiveness in raising student academic performance. © 2015 American Association of Anatomists.

  6. Development and Evaluation of the Curriculum for BOLD (Bronx Oncology Living Daily) Healthy Living: a Diabetes Prevention and Control Program for Underserved Cancer Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conlon, Beth A; Kahan, Michelle; Martinez, Melissa; Isaac, Kathleen; Rossi, Amerigo; Skyhart, Rebecca; Wylie-Rosett, Judith; Moadel-Robblee, Alyson

    2015-09-01

    Underserved minority communities have few resources for addressing comorbidity risk reduction among long-term cancer survivors. To address this community need, we developed and piloted the Bronx Oncology Living Daily (BOLD) Healthy Living program, the first known diabetes prevention and control program to target cancer survivors and co-survivors in Bronx County, NY. The program aimed to facilitate lifestyle change and improve health-related quality of life (HRQoL) through weekly group nutrition education (60-90 min) and exercise (60 min) classes. We examined baseline characteristics of participants using simple descriptive statistics and evaluated program implementation and impact using the Reach, Efficacy, Adoption, Implementation and Maintenance (RE-AIM) framework. The curriculum, which drew from the social-ecological framework and motivational and cognitive behavioral strategies, consisted of 12 culturally and medically tailored modules with options for implementation as a 12- or 4-week program. Seven programs (four 12 weeks and three 4 weeks in length, respectively) were implemented at five community site locations. Sixty-six cancer survivors and 17 cancer co-survivors (mean age 60.5 ± 10.2 years) enrolled in one of the programs. Most participants were female (95.2 %) minority (55.4 % black, 26.5 % Hispanic/Latino) breast cancer survivors (75.7 %). Median program attendance was 62.5 % and did not significantly differ by program length; however, 67.3 % of participants achieved ≥60 % attendance among the 12-week programs, compared to 41.9 % among the 4-week programs, and this difference was statistically significant (p = 0.02). Overall, participants reported significant pre/post improvements in perceived health as good/excellent (66.0 to 75.5 %; p = 0.001) and borderline significant decreases in perceived pain as moderate/severe (45.5 to 38.2 %; p = 0.05). More than 90 % of participants reported that the program helped them to achieve their

  7. Electronic laboratory quality assurance program: A method of enhancing the prosthodontic curriculum and addressing accreditation standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghadam, Marjan; Jahangiri, Leila

    2015-08-01

    An electronic quality assurance (eQA) program was developed to replace a paper-based system and to address standards introduced by the Commission on Dental Accreditation (CODA) and to improve educational outcomes. This eQA program provides feedback to predoctoral dental students on prosthodontic laboratory steps at New York University College of Dentistry. The purpose of this study was to compare the eQA program of performing laboratory quality assurance with the former paper-based format. Fourth-year predoctoral dental students (n=334) who experienced both the paper-based and the electronic version of the quality assurance program were surveyed about their experiences. Additionally, data extracted from the eQA program were analyzed to identify areas of weakness in the curriculum. The study findings revealed that 73.8% of the students preferred the eQA program to the paper-based version. The average number of treatments that did not pass quality assurance standards was 119.5 per month. This indicated a 6.34% laboratory failure rate. Further analysis of these data revealed that 62.1% of the errors were related to fixed prosthodontic treatment, 27.9% to partial removable dental prostheses, and 10% to complete removable dental prostheses in the first 18 months of program implementation. The eQA program was favored by dental students who have experienced both electronic and paper-based versions of the system. Error type analysis can yield the ability to create customized faculty standardization sessions and refine the didactic and clinical teaching of the predoctoral students. This program was also able to link patient care activity with the student's laboratory activities, thus addressing the latest requirements of the CODA regarding the competence of graduates in evaluating laboratory work related to their patient care. Copyright © 2015 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Data Science Programs in U.S. Higher Education: An Exploratory Content Analysis of Program Description, Curriculum Structure, and Course Focus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Rong; Sae-Lim, Watinee

    2016-01-01

    In this study, an exploratory content analysis of 30 randomly selected Data Science (DS) programs from eight disciplines revealed significant gaps in current DS education in the United States. The analysis centers on linguistic patterns of program descriptions, curriculum requirements, and DS course focus as pertaining to key skills and domain…

  9. [Model core curriculum in neurology--current status and problems after its application to the medical education program].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Hidenao

    2007-11-01

    Taking the needs of society and progress of medicine into account, The Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan, reformed the education program and established a "model core curriculum" on Mar 2001, which is introduced to the medial universities since then. Principles of this curriculum consist of selected categories such as lists mandatory for current medicine, set up of optional courses, and voluntary attitude for lifelong studying. To search for The Education Program of Medical University, the subcommittee of the Japanese Society of Neurology sent a Questionnaire on this curriculum to all the Medical Universities of Japan. Answers were obtained from 56 out of 87 Universities. According to them, some agree to the concept and content of the curriculum, while others insist that it is still insufficient to educate update Neurology. The clinical clerkship is important for the students to experience the basic process of neurology. However, the study disclosed that program of clinical clerkship to neurology is different among the institutes. The list of curriculum needs additional neurological disorders and symptoms commonly seen, and that clinical clerkship to neurology must be taken into account as one of compulsory rather than optional course.

  10. An international, multidisciplinary, service-learning program: an option in the dental school curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Mier, Esperanza A; Soto-Rojas, Armando E; Stelzner, Sarah M; Lorant, Diane E; Riner, Mary E; Yoder, Karen M

    2011-04-01

    Many health professions students who treat Spanish-speaking patients in the United States have little concept of their culture and health related traditions. The lack of understanding of these concepts may constitute major barriers to healthcare for these patients. International service-learning experiences allow students to work directly in communities from which patients immigrate and, as a result, students gain a better understanding of these barriers. This article describes the implementation of an international, multidisciplinary, service-learning program in a dental school in the United States. The Indiana University International Service-Learning program in Hidalgo, Mexico began in 1999 as an alternative spring break travel and clinical experience for medical students, focusing on the treatment of acute health problems. Travel-related preparatory sessions were offered, and no learning or service objectives had been developed. The program has evolved to include a multidisciplinary team of dental, medical, nursing, public health and social work students and faculty. The experience is now integrated into a curriculum based on the service-learning model that allows students to use their clinical skills in real-life situations and provides structured time for reflection. The program aims to enhance teaching and foster civic responsibility in explicit partnership with the community. Preparatory sessions have evolved into a multidisciplinary graduate level course with defined learning and service objectives. PROGRAM EVALUATION METHODS: In order to assess the program's operation as perceived by students and faculty and to evaluate student's perceptions of learning outcomes, evaluation tools were developed. These tools included student and faculty evaluation questionnaires, experiential learning journals, and a strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats analysis. Evaluation data show that after program participation, students perceived an increase in their

  11. A Model for Technovocational School-Based Curriculum Planning and Evaluation under the Framework of Total Quality Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yen-Zen

    In the current climate of rapid technological advance and social value change, many have suggested that schools should use a school-based approach to curriculum planning. How to design such a curriculum in order to train graduates suited for employment has become an important issue. Many domestic and international enterprises have successfully…

  12. The SBIRT program matrix: a conceptual framework for program implementation and evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Boca, Frances K; McRee, Bonnie; Vendetti, Janice; Damon, Donna

    2017-02-01

    Screening, Brief Intervention and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT) is a comprehensive, integrated, public health approach to the delivery of services to those at risk for the adverse consequences of alcohol and other drug use, and for those with probable substance use disorders. Research on successful SBIRT implementation has lagged behind studies of efficacy and effectiveness. This paper (1) outlines a conceptual framework, the SBIRT Program Matrix, to guide implementation research and program evaluation and (2) specifies potential implementation outcomes. Overview and narrative description of the SBIRT Program Matrix. The SBIRT Program Matrix has five components, each of which includes multiple elements: SBIRT services; performance sites; provider attributes; patient/client populations; and management structure and activities. Implementation outcomes include program adoption, acceptability, appropriateness, feasibility, fidelity, costs, penetration, sustainability, service provision and grant compliance. The Screening, Brief Intervention and Referral to Treatment Program Matrix provides a template for identifying, classifying and organizing the naturally occurring commonalities and variations within and across SBIRT programs, and for investigating which variables are associated with implementation success and, ultimately, with treatment outcomes and other impacts. © 2017 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  13. Midwifery participatory curriculum development: Transformation through active partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidebotham, Mary; Walters, Caroline; Chipperfield, Janine; Gamble, Jenny

    2017-07-01

    Evolving knowledge and professional practice combined with advances in pedagogy and learning technology create challenges for accredited professional programs. Internationally a sparsity of literature exists around curriculum development for professional programs responsive to regulatory and societal drivers. This paper evaluates a participatory curriculum development framework, adapted from the community development sector, to determine its applicability to promote engagement and ownership during the development of a Bachelor of Midwifery curriculum at an Australian University. The structures, processes and resulting curriculum development framework are described. A representative sample of key curriculum development team members were interviewed in relation to their participation. Qualitative analysis of transcribed interviews occurred through inductive, essentialist thematic analysis. Two main themes emerged: (1) 'it is a transformative journey' and (2) focused 'partnership in action'. Results confirmed the participatory curriculum development process provides symbiotic benefits to participants leading to individual and organisational growth and the perception of a shared curriculum. A final operational model using a participatory curriculum development process to guide the development of accredited health programs emerged. The model provides an appropriate structure to create meaningful collaboration with multiple stakeholders to produce a curriculum that is contemporary, underpinned by evidence and reflective of 'real world' practice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The American College of Surgeons/Association of Program Directors in Surgery National Skills Curriculum: adoption rate, challenges and strategies for effective implementation into surgical residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korndorffer, James R; Arora, Sonal; Sevdalis, Nick; Paige, John; McClusky, David A; Stefanidis, Dimitris

    2013-07-01

    The American College of Surgeons/Association of Program Directors in Surgery (ACS/APDS) National Skills Curriculum is a 3-phase program targeting technical and nontechnical skills development. Few data exist regarding the adoption of this curriculum by surgical residencies. This study attempted to determine the rate of uptake and identify implementation enablers/barriers. A web-based survey was developed by an international expert panel of surgical educators (5 surgeons and 1 psychologist). After piloting, the survey was sent to all general surgery program directors via email link. Descriptive statistics were used to determine the residency program characteristics and perceptions of the curriculum. Implementation rates for each phase and module were calculated. Adoption barriers were identified quantitatively and qualitatively using free text responses. Standardized qualitative methodology of emergent theme analysis was used to identify strategies for success and details of support required for implementation. Of the 238 program directors approached, 117 (49%) responded to the survey. Twenty-one percent (25/117) were unaware of the ACS/APDS curriculum. Implementation rates for were 36% for phase I, 19% for phase II, and 16% for phase III. The most common modules adopted were the suturing, knot-tying, and chest tube modules of phase I. Over 50% of respondents identified lack of faculty protected time, limited personnel, significant costs, and resident work-hour restrictions as major obstacles to implementation. Strategies for effective uptake included faculty incentives, adequate funding, administrative support, and dedicated time and resources. Despite the availability of a comprehensive curriculum, its diffusion into general surgery residency programs remains low. Obstacles related to successful implementation include personnel, learner, and administrative issues. Addressing these issues may improve the adoption rate of the curriculum. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc

  15. Improving Programs and Outcomes: Implementation Frameworks and Organization Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertram, Rosalyn M.; Blase, Karen A.; Fixsen, Dean L.

    2015-01-01

    This article presents recent refinements to implementation constructs and frameworks. It updates and clarifies the frequently cited study conducted by the National Implementation Research Network that introduced these frameworks for application in diverse endeavors. As such, it may serve as a historical marker in the rapidly developing science and…

  16. Perceptual Skills Curriculum; Introductory Letters and Numerals, Program IV. Part 1 Capital Letters and Part 2 Lower-case Letters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosner, Jerome

    This curriculum is designed primarily for use in individualized classrooms where the teacher is working with an assistant, but it has also been proven effective in traditional classrooms and in remedial situations. Program four focuses on four abilities as they relate to the basic symbol system of the classroom. These are the abilities to:…

  17. Measuring outcome in an early intervention program for toddlers with autism spectrum disorder: use of a curriculum-based assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacon, Elizabeth C; Dufek, Sarah; Schreibman, Laura; Stahmer, Aubyn C; Pierce, Karen; Courchesne, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Measuring progress of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) during intervention programs is a challenge faced by researchers and clinicians. Typically, standardized assessments of child development are used within research settings to measure the effects of early intervention programs. However, the use of standardized assessments is not without limitations, including lack of sensitivity of some assessments to measure small or slow progress, testing constraints that may affect the child's performance, and the lack of information provided by the assessments that can be used to guide treatment planning. The utility of a curriculum-based assessment is discussed in comparison to the use of standardized assessments to measure child functioning and progress throughout an early intervention program for toddlers with risk for ASD. Scores derived from the curriculum-based assessment were positively correlated with standardized assessments, captured progress masked by standardized assessments, and early scores were predictive of later outcomes. These results support the use of a curriculum-based assessment as an additional and appropriate method for measuring child progress in an early intervention program. Further benefits of the use of curriculum-based measures for use within community settings are discussed.

  18. Long-Term Impacts of a Faculty Development Program for the Internationalization of Curriculum in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, Emily; Navarro, Maria; Borron, Abigail

    2017-01-01

    Faculty development programs for internationalization of the curriculum in higher education are often evaluated for short- and medium-term outcomes, but more long-term assessments are needed to determine impact. This study examined the long-term (6 years) impacts on faculty from colleges of agriculture after participating in a one-year…

  19. Teacher Adaptations to a Core Reading Program: Increasing Access to Curriculum for Elementary Students in Urban Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maniates, Helen

    2017-01-01

    This article examines how three urban elementary school teachers adapted pedagogical strategies from a school district--adopted core reading program to increase their students' access to the curriculum. Using teacher interviews and classroom observations to construct a descriptive case study of teacher adaptation, analysis reveals that the…

  20. A Needs Assessment Study and Curriculum Development for a Public and Private Security Program at Alvin Community College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bethscheider, John

    A needs assessment for a community college curriculum in public and private security was conducted by surveying 50 high schools, four-year colleges, and private security agencies in the Alvin Community College area; 36 institutions responded. Findings revealed: most have a designated director of their security program; most would rather hire the…

  1. Measuring Outcome in an Early Intervention Program for Toddlers with Autism Spectrum Disorder: Use of a Curriculum-Based Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth C. Bacon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Measuring progress of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD during intervention programs is a challenge faced by researchers and clinicians. Typically, standardized assessments of child development are used within research settings to measure the effects of early intervention programs. However, the use of standardized assessments is not without limitations, including lack of sensitivity of some assessments to measure small or slow progress, testing constraints that may affect the child’s performance, and the lack of information provided by the assessments that can be used to guide treatment planning. The utility of a curriculum-based assessment is discussed in comparison to the use of standardized assessments to measure child functioning and progress throughout an early intervention program for toddlers with risk for ASD. Scores derived from the curriculum-based assessment were positively correlated with standardized assessments, captured progress masked by standardized assessments, and early scores were predictive of later outcomes. These results support the use of a curriculum-based assessment as an additional and appropriate method for measuring child progress in an early intervention program. Further benefits of the use of curriculum-based measures for use within community settings are discussed.

  2. Designing Undergraduate Curriculum for Management Information Systems (MIS Education: A Comparison of the MIS Programs of Turkish Universities with those of Global Universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eyüp AKÇETİN

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Competition in the global environment takes place among multinational corporations, which is directly linked to human resources and the quality of training and education they have. The competitive advantage of the businesses is associated with the excellence of human resources, which is measured by the education quality of the employees. Information systems have become an essential requirement for the businesses of today’s digital age. Therefore, with this study, curricula of 90 universities’ Management Information Systems (MIS Undergraduate Programs, 57 of which are foreign and 33 are Turkish, were compared. The study methods include data mining approaches namely random clustering and making a text mining analysis. As the number and importance of the MIS programs are rapidly increasing, it is aimed with these approaches to contribute developing a world-class curriculum model to improve the quality of education of them. On that ground, the main purpose of this study is creating a framework that defines a world-class MIS curriculum model by presenting the current situation in Turkey.

  3. Frameworks in CS1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Henrik Bærbak; Caspersen, Michael Edelgaard

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we argue that introducing object-oriented frameworks as subject already in the CS1 curriculum is important if we are to train the programmers of tomorrow to become just as much software reusers as software producers. We present a simple, graphical, framework that we have successfully...... used to introduce the principles of object-oriented frameworks to students at the introductory programming level. Our framework, while simple, introduces central abstractions such as inversion of control, event-driven programming, and variability points/hot-spots. This has provided a good starting...... point for introducing graphical user interface frameworks such as Java Swing and AWT as the students are not overwhelmed by all the details of such frameworks right away but given a conceptual road-map and practical experience that allow them to cope with the complexity....

  4. Nationwide program of education for undergraduates in the field of disaster medicine: development of a core curriculum centered on blended learning and simulation tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingrassia, Pier Luigi; Ragazzoni, Luca; Tengattini, Marco; Carenzo, Luca; Della Corte, Francesco

    2014-10-01

    In recent years, effective models of disaster medicine curricula for medical schools have been established. However, only a small percentage of medical schools worldwide have considered at least basic disaster medicine teaching in their study program. In Italy, disaster medicine has not yet been included in the medical school curriculum. Perceiving the lack of a specific course on disaster medicine, the Segretariato Italiano Studenti in Medicina (SISM) contacted the Centro di Ricerca Interdipartimentale in Medicina di Emergenza e dei Disastri ed Informatica applicata alla didattica e alla pratica Medica (CRIMEDIM) with a proposal for a nationwide program in this field. Seven modules (introduction to disaster medicine, prehospital disaster management, definition of triage, characteristics of hospital disaster plans, treatment of the health consequences of different disasters, psychosocial care, and presentation of past disasters) were developed using an e-learning platform and a 12-hour classroom session which involved problem-based learning (PBL) activities, table-top exercises, and a computerized simulation (Table 1). The modules were designed as a framework for a disaster medicine curriculum for undergraduates and covered the three main disciplines (clinical and psychosocial, public health, and emergency and risk management) of the core of "Disaster Health" according to the World Association for Disaster and Emergency Medicine (WADEM) international guidelines for disaster medicine education. From January 2011 through May 2013, 21 editions of the course were delivered to 21 different medical schools, and 524 students attended the course. The blended approach and the use of simulation tools were appreciated by all participants and successfully increased participants' knowledge of disaster medicine and basic competencies in performing mass-casualty triage. This manuscript reports on the designing process and the initial outcomes with respect to learners

  5. Integrative Curriculum Development in Nuclear Education and Research Vertical Enhancement Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egarievwe, Stephen U.; Jow, Julius O.; Edwards, Matthew E.; Montgomery, V. Trent [Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Science Center, Alabama A and M University, Huntsville, AL (United States); James, Ralph B.; Blackburn, Noel D. [Nonproliferation and National Security Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States); Glenn, Chance M. [College of Engineering, Technology and Physical Sciences, Alabama A and M University, Huntsville, AL (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Using a vertical education enhancement model, a Nuclear Education and Research Vertical Enhancement (NERVE) program was developed. The NERVE program is aimed at developing nuclear engineering education and research to 1) enhance skilled workforce development in disciplines relevant to nuclear power, national security and medical physics, and 2) increase the number of students and faculty from underrepresented groups (women and minorities) in fields related to the nuclear industry. The program uses multi-track training activities that vertically cut across the several education domains: undergraduate degree programs, graduate schools, and post-doctoral training. In this paper, we present the results of an integrative curriculum development in the NERVE program. The curriculum development began with nuclear content infusion into existing science, engineering and technology courses. The second step involved the development of nuclear engineering courses: 1) Introduction to Nuclear Engineering, 2) Nuclear Engineering I, and 2) Nuclear Engineering II. The third step is the establishment of nuclear engineering concentrations in two engineering degree programs: 1) electrical engineering, and 2) mechanical engineering. A major outcome of the NERVE program is a collaborative infrastructure that uses laboratory work, internships at nuclear facilities, on-campus research, and mentoring in collaboration with industry and government partners to provide hands-on training for students. The major activities of the research and education collaborations include: - One-week spring training workshop at Brookhaven National Laboratory: The one-week training and workshop is used to enhance research collaborations and train faculty and students on user facilities/equipment at Brookhaven National Laboratory, and for summer research internships. Participants included students, faculty members at Alabama A and M University and research collaborators at BNL. The activities include 1) tour and

  6. Nutrition Education Curriculum. Kindergarten Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkansas State Dept. of Education, Little Rock.

    Six major concepts form the framework for this kindergarten nutrition education curriculum: (1) Food is essential for all living things (learning to identify foods and food sources); (2) Nutrition is the food you eat and how the body uses it (recognizing the relationship between body growth and the ingestion of food); (3) Food is made up of…

  7. Strategy of Philosophy Education to Develop Thinking Children : An Analysis of Curriculum for Early Elementally School in the Program “Philosophy for Children”

    OpenAIRE

    Fukui, Suguru

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the author explores the strategy of the philosophy education to develop thinking children by analyzing of structures of the curriculum for early elementally school in the program “Philosophy for Children”. The curriculum consists of a storybook and instructional manual. The curriculum is structured so that children are made aware of problematical concepts in their own life, and then required to practice judge relations of concepts on their own experience. Children discover good...

  8. Lifestyle medicine curriculum for a preventive medicine residency program: implementation and outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haq Nawaz

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: The vast majority of the healthcare problems burdening our society today are caused by disease-promoting lifestyles (e.g., physical inactivity and unhealthy eating. Physicians report poor training and lack of confidence in counseling patients on lifestyle changes. Objective: To evaluate a new curriculum and rotation in lifestyle medicine for preventive medicine residents. Methods: Training included didactics (six sessions/year, distance learning, educational conferences, and newly developed lifestyle medicine rotations at the Institute of Lifestyle Medicine, the Yale-Griffin Prevention Research Center, and the Integrative Medicine Center. We used a number of tools to assess residents’ progress including Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCEs, self-assessments, and logs of personal health habits. Results: A total of 20 residents participated in the lifestyle medicine training between 2010 and 2013. There was a 15% increase in residents’ discussions of lifestyle issues with their patients based on their baseline and follow-up surveys. The performance of preventive medicine residents on OSCEs increased each year they were in the program (average OSCE score: PGY1 73%, PGY2 83%, PGY3 87%, and PGY4 91%, p=0.01. Our internal medicine and preliminary residents served as a control, since they did participate in didactics but not in lifestyle medicine rotations. Internal medicine and preliminary residents who completed the same OSCEs had a slightly lower average score (76% compared with plural for resident, preventive medicine residents (80%. However, this difference did not reach statistical significance (p=0.11. Conclusion: Incorporating the lifestyle medicine curriculum is feasible for preventive medicine training allowing residents to improve their health behavior change discussions with patients as well as their own personal health habits.

  9. Lifestyle medicine curriculum for a preventive medicine residency program: implementation and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawaz, Haq; Petraro, Paul V; Via, Christina; Ullah, Saif; Lim, Lionel; Wild, Dorothea; Kennedy, Mary; Phillips, Edward M

    2016-01-01

    The vast majority of the healthcare problems burdening our society today are caused by disease-promoting lifestyles (e.g., physical inactivity and unhealthy eating). Physicians report poor training and lack of confidence in counseling patients on lifestyle changes. To evaluate a new curriculum and rotation in lifestyle medicine for preventive medicine residents. Training included didactics (six sessions/year), distance learning, educational conferences, and newly developed lifestyle medicine rotations at the Institute of Lifestyle Medicine, the Yale-Griffin Prevention Research Center, and the Integrative Medicine Center. We used a number of tools to assess residents' progress including Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCEs), self-assessments, and logs of personal health habits. A total of 20 residents participated in the lifestyle medicine training between 2010 and 2013. There was a 15% increase in residents' discussions of lifestyle issues with their patients based on their baseline and follow-up surveys. The performance of preventive medicine residents on OSCEs increased each year they were in the program (average OSCE score: PGY1 73%, PGY2 83%, PGY3 87%, and PGY4 91%, p=0.01). Our internal medicine and preliminary residents served as a control, since they did participate in didactics but not in lifestyle medicine rotations. Internal medicine and preliminary residents who completed the same OSCEs had a slightly lower average score (76%) compared with plural for resident, preventive medicine residents (80%). However, this difference did not reach statistical significance (p=0.11). Incorporating the lifestyle medicine curriculum is feasible for preventive medicine training allowing residents to improve their health behavior change discussions with patients as well as their own personal health habits.

  10. Commentary: The Course, Curriculum, and Laboratory Improvement (CCLI) Program: What's New about the Current Solicitation and Suggestions for the Geosciences' Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Jill

    2009-01-01

    The Course, Curriculum, and Laboratory Improvement (CCLI) program recently released the program guidelines (NSF 09-529) for the next round of the program. There are several changes to the CCLI program and a new program opportunity that invites proposals for projects that would provide leadership and contribute to transforming undergraduate STEM…

  11. Developing an evaluation framework for clinical redesign programs: lessons learnt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samaranayake, Premaratne; Dadich, Ann; Fitzgerald, Anneke; Zeitz, Kathryn

    2016-09-19

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to present lessons learnt through the development of an evaluation framework for a clinical redesign programme - the aim of which was to improve the patient journey through improved discharge practices within an Australian public hospital. Design/methodology/approach The development of the evaluation framework involved three stages - namely, the analysis of secondary data relating to the discharge planning pathway; the analysis of primary data including field-notes and interview transcripts on hospital processes; and the triangulation of these data sets to devise the framework. The evaluation framework ensured that resource use, process management, patient satisfaction, and staff well-being and productivity were each connected with measures, targets, and the aim of clinical redesign programme. Findings The application of business process management and a balanced scorecard enabled a different way of framing the evaluation, ensuring measurable outcomes were connected to inputs and outputs. Lessons learnt include: first, the importance of mixed-methods research to devise the framework and evaluate the redesigned processes; second, the need for appropriate tools and resources to adequately capture change across the different domains of the redesign programme; and third, the value of developing and applying an evaluative framework progressively. Research limitations/implications The evaluation framework is limited by its retrospective application to a clinical process redesign programme. Originality/value This research supports benchmarking with national and international practices in relation to best practice healthcare redesign processes. Additionally, it provides a theoretical contribution on evaluating health services improvement and redesign initiatives.

  12. Welding Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaska State Dept. of Education, Juneau. Div. of Adult and Vocational Education.

    This competency-based curriculum guide is a handbook for the development of welding trade programs. Based on a survey of Alaskan welding employers, it includes all competencies a student should acquire in such a welding program. The handbook stresses the importance of understanding the principles associated with the various elements of welding.…

  13. Stimulated Hyposalivary Flow Rates in Healthcare Students in an Interprofessional Awareness Educational Program Curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Constance Wiener

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Hyposalivation influences quality of life and medication compliance. However, oral health knowledge (in general and knowledge about hyposalivation (in particular are often lacking in nondental healthcare professional’s curricula. Additionally, hyposalivation has not been adequately studied in young adults. The purpose for this study is twofold: to use an interprofessional educational curriculum to increase nondental healthcare students’ knowledge about oral health and salivary testing and determine whether hyposalivation is different between sexes in young adults. Method. First-year medical and pharmacy students (N=178 learned the process of saliva collection and provided samples in an interprofessional program. Results. There were 14.4% of participants with hyposalivation; 72.0% were female. Males had higher flow rates (P=0.005. There failed to be a significant difference between the sexes with frank hyposalivation. There failed to be a significant difference in hyposalivation and medication use/nonuse. Conclusions. Hyposalivation is a biomedical, public health concern. However, in this young population, there was no significant difference between sexes or in medication use/nonuse. Through participation in the program, the students learned about salivary flow rates and the need for collaboration among professionals to prevent negative impacts of hyposalivation and oral health.

  14. Evaluation framework for nursing education programs: application of the CIPP model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Mina D

    2004-01-01

    It is advised that all nursing education programs conduct program evaluations to address accountability requirements and information for planning and guiding the delivery of the programs. Stufflebeam's CIPP Model, supported by triangulation of multiple modes of data collection provides such a theoretical framework for evaluations. This article proposes a total CIPP evaluation framework for nursing education programs. While this evaluation framework is applicable to any nursing evaluation program, it is practically useful for collaborative nursing programs as it allows a full assessment of each partner in its context. Under the direction of this author, the York-Seneca-Georgian-Durham collaborative BScN Program Evaluation Committee in Ontario developed and utilized a CIPP process evaluation.

  15. A Learning Curriculum: Toward Student-Driven Pedagogy in the Context of Adult English for Academic Purposes, English for Specific Purposes, and Workplace English Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ananyeva, Maria

    2014-01-01

    This article introduces the concept of a learning curriculum that places adult English as a second language (ESL) students' needs in the center and encourages the engagement of ESL learners in curriculum design. The study is based on contemporary research in the field of adult ESL program planning. It summarizes key components of a learning…

  16. Overview of Related Research To Inform the Development of the Western Canadian Protocol Social Studies (K-12) Common Curriculum Framework for Francophone Education = Apercu de recherches en vue de l'elaboration du Cadre commun de resultats d'apprentissage en sciences humaines (M-12) du Protocole de l'Ouest canadien pour l'education francophone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stocco, Denise; Belanger, Jocelyne, Ed.

    This curriculum framework informs the development of the Western Canadian Protocol Social Studies (K-12) Common Curriculum Framework for Francophone students in a minority setting. Most of the information presented in the framework is drawn from three unpublished documents (in French) that can be consulted at the Alberta Learning Library…

  17. Development of a diabetes care management curriculum in a family practice residency program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuovo, Jim; Balsbaugh, Thomas; Barton, Sue; Davidson, Ellen; Fox-Garcia, Jane; Gandolfo, Angela; Levich, Bridget; Seibles, Joann

    2004-01-01

    Improving the quality of care for patients with chronic illness has become a high priority. Implementing training programs in disease management (DM) so the next generation of physicians can manage chronic illness more effectively is challenging. Residency training programs have no specific mandate to implement DM training. Additional barriers at the training facility include: 1) lack of a population-based perspective for service delivery; 2) weak support for self-management of illness; 3) incomplete implementation due to physician resistance or inertia; and 4) few incentives to change practices and behaviors. In order to overcome these barriers, training programs must take the initiative to implement DM training that addresses each of these issues. We report the implementation of a chronic illness management curriculum based on the Improving Chronic Illness Care (ICIC) Model. Features of this process included both patient care and learner objectives. These were: development of a multidisciplinary diabetes DM team; development of a patient registry; development of diabetes teaching clinics in the family practice center (nutrition, general management classes, and one-on-one teaching); development of a group visit model; and training the residents in the elements of the ICIC Model, ie, the community, the health system, self-management support, delivery system design, decision support, and clinical information systems. Barriers to implementing these curricular changes were: the development of a patient registry; buy-in from faculty, residents, clinic leadership, staff, and patients for the chronic care model; the ability to bill for services and maintain clinical productivity; and support from the health system key stakeholders for sustainability. Unique features of each training site will dictate differences in emphasis and structure; however, the core principles of the ICIC Model in enhancing self-management may be generalized to all sites.

  18. The Biomedical Humanities program: merging humanities and science in a premedical curriculum at Hiram College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fried, Colleen; Madar, Sandra; Donley, Carol

    2003-10-01

    The Biomedical Humanities program at Hiram College, established in 1999, engages premedical and other qualified students in ethical and informed decision making, improves their ability to interact with persons of different backgrounds and cultures, provides them an active introduction to basic medical research and clinical practice, and coaches them in communicating across barriers, appreciating that scientists and humanists typically learn and work differently. The program offers both a major and a minor in biomedical humanities topics. The major requires the core biology and chemistry curriculum necessary for further studies in medicine as well as courses in genetics and statistics. The remainder of the major is devoted to four core areas: Communications, Relationships and Cultural Sensitivity, Ethics and Medical Humanities, and a nonacademic core area, Experiential Learning. Many of the ethics and medical humanities options are team-taught interdisciplinary courses. The Experiential Learning area requires students to take two special topics seminars, two service seminars, and two internships-one shadowing a professional in his or her area of interest and one engaging in basic biomedical research. The shadowing internship and service seminars focus not only on career exploration, but also on human interactions. Students reflect on the personal interactions they observe during their various experiences, and on their own strengths and weaknesses. Essays, designed to help students learn more about their roles in these settings, push them to deal with the sociopolitical issues involved in their service. The major, a robust and vital component of Hiram's undergraduate program, has attracted academically gifted students with a diverse array of career goals.

  19. Using the RE-AIM framework to evaluate the statewide dissemination of a school-based physical activity and nutrition curriculum: "Exercise Your Options".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunton, Genevieve F; Lagloire, Renee; Robertson, Trina

    2009-01-01

    Examine the reach, efficacy, adoption, implementation, and maintenance of a physical activity and nutrition curriculum for middle-school students. Nonexperimental pilot evaluation of a statewide dissemination trial. California middle schools during the 2006 to 2007 school year. Sixteen classes (N = 668 students and 16 teachers) sampled from the statewide pool who used the program. An eight-lesson nutrition and physical activity curriculum, "Exercise Your Options" (EYO), including a teacher guide, video clips, a student activity booklet, and ancillary materials was made available to teachers. Program records, classroom observations, teacher surveys, and student presurveys and postsurveys (assessing physical activity, sedentary behaviors, and dietary intake). Descriptive statistics and multilevel random-coefficient modeling. The EYO program reached 234,442 middle-school students in California. During the program, total physical activity increased (p lessons. Over the past 5 years, 51% of all middle-school students in California were exposed to the program. The EYO program showed its potential for moderate to high public health impact among California middle-school students.

  20. Examining the Sustainability of an Evidence-Based Preschool Curriculum: The REDI Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanford DeRousie, Rebecca M.; Bierman, Karen L.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the extent to which an evidence-based preschool curriculum (Head Start REDI) was sustained by 20 teachers during the year following a randomized controlled efficacy trial, when teachers were no longer required by the research project to implement the curriculum. Two quantitative measures of sustainability (teacher ratings, REDI…

  1. Programming in the IS Curriculum: Are Requirements Changing for the Right Reason?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, John H.; Adams, D. Robert; Ferguson, Roger C.; Leidig, Paul M.

    2017-01-01

    All curricula for any given academic discipline evolves over time. This is also true for the Information Systems (IS) model curriculum. Curriculum evolution is driven by several factors, such as changes in technologies, industry shifts to meet customer needs, and perceived student deficiencies. One outcome of such factors has been a change in the…

  2. Marketing Agricultural Products. Curriculum Guide Developed for Secondary and Post Secondary Agriculture Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, W. Wade; And Others

    This curriculum guide can be used by secondary and postsecondary agriculture instructors for a semester course in marketing agricultural products or individual units can be incorporated in other courses. The curriculum guide consists of six units of study made up of two to eight lessons each. The units cover the following topics: (1) marketing…

  3. Embedding International Experiences in Business Curriculum Design: Cultivating a Study Abroad Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babb, Jeffry; Womble, Lynsee A.; De'Armond, De'Arno

    2013-01-01

    In business education, the impacts of the globalization of markets, financial institutions, and economies exert increasing influence on the curriculum in business schools. Schools of business recognize the need to embed international experiences into their curriculum in order to prepare students for global context of the marketplace. Often,…

  4. Translating policies into practice: a framework to prevent childhood obesity in afterschool programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beets, Michael W; Webster, Collin; Saunders, Ruth; Huberty, Jennifer L

    2013-03-01

    Afterschool programs (3-6 p.m.) are positioned to play a critical role in combating childhood obesity. To this end, state and national organizations have developed policies related to promoting physical activity and guiding the nutritional quality of snacks served in afterschool programs. No conceptual frameworks, however, are available that describe the process of how afterschool programs will translate such policies into daily practice to reach eventual outcomes. Drawing from complex systems theory, this article describes the development of a framework that identifies critical modifiable levers within afterschool programs that can be altered and/or strengthened to reach policy goals. These include the policy environment at the national, state, and local levels; individual site, afterschool program leader, staff, and child characteristics; and existing outside organizational partnerships. Use of this framework and recognition of its constituent elements have the potential to lead to the successful and sustainable adoption and implementation of physical activity and nutrition policies in afterschool programs nationwide.

  5. On the C++ Object Programming for Time Series, in the Linux framework

    OpenAIRE

    Mateescu, George Daniel

    2013-01-01

    We study the implementation of time series trough C++ classes, using the fundamentals of C++ programming language, in the Linux framework. Such an implementation may be useful in time series modelling.

  6. Building Campus Communities Inclusive of International Students: A Framework for Program Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jameson, Helen Park; Goshit, Sunday

    2017-01-01

    This chapter provides readers with a practical, how-to approach and framework for developing inclusive, intercultural training programs for student affairs professionals on college campuses in the United States.

  7. Attitude modification in health education through an interventive, antismoking program incorporated within traditional science curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoller, Uri; Maymon, Tsipora

    The effectiveness of a smoking-prevention program - incorporated within a traditional science curriculum - was assessed in terms of attitude modification in such categories as health, peer pressure, and social image as related to smoking. The study indicates that most relevant attitudes, the emotionally intense in particular, are modifiable in the desired direction, although the changes are small. Some gender differences in the recorded changes suggest a difference in the dynamics of the response to smoking intervention between male and female high school students. A desired change of attitude frequency distributions (e.g., from less extreme to more extreme responses) has also been found. In addition, the tendency of the experimental students to actively act against smoking within family circles increased, although not significantly. All the above was accompanied by a decrease in the number of smokers in the experimental group and a significant increase in the number of smokers in the control group. These results suggest that it is educationally possible to modify attitudes in health education in the desired direction by means of a properly designed interdisciplinary science curricular unit implemented within ongoing traditional science teaching.

  8. Livingston College's Minor in Organizational Leadership: A Theoretical Framework for Leadership Education in the Context of an Undergraduate Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyndman, Arnold G.; Ashbaugh, Anne

    Livingston College, Rutgers University, Piscataway, New Jersey, offers a minor in organizational leadership. The university has a body of courses that are fundamental to leadership instruction. The minor gathers those courses into a curriculum that provides the expertise students need to assume a leading role in an organization. Most of the course…

  9. Design of the Curriculum for a Second-Cycle Course in Civil Engineering in the Context of the Bologna Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavin, K. G.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the design of the curriculum for a Master of Engineering programme in civil engineering at University College Dublin. The revised programme was established to meet the requirements of the Bologna process and this paper specifically considers the design of a new, second-cycle master's component of the programme. In addition to…

  10. Integrating Spanish language training across a Doctor of Physical Therapy curriculum: a case report of one program's evolving model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pechak, Celia; Diaz, Deborah; Dillon, Loretta

    2014-12-01

    As the Hispanic population continues to expand in the United States, health professionals increasingly may encounter people who speak Spanish and have limited English proficiency. Responding to these changes, various health profession educators have incorporated Spanish language training into their curricula. Of 12 doctor of physical therapy (DPT) programs identified as including elective or required Spanish courses, the program at The University of Texas at El Paso is the only one integrating required Spanish language training across the curriculum. The purpose of this case report is to describe the development, implementation, and preliminary outcomes of the evolving educational model at The University of Texas at El Paso. The University of Texas at El Paso is situated immediately across the border from Mexico. Responding to the large population with limited English proficiency in the community, faculty began to integrate required Spanish language training during a transition from a master-level to a DPT curriculum. The Spanish language curriculum pillar includes a Spanish medical terminology course, language learning opportunities threaded throughout the clinical courses, clinical education courses, and service-learning. Forty-five DPT students have completed the curriculum. Assessment methods were limited for early cohorts. Clinically relevant Spanish verbal proficiency was assessed with a practical examination in the Spanish course, a clinical instructor-rated instrument, and student feedback. Preliminary data suggested that the model is improving Spanish language proficiency. The model still is evolving. Spanish language learning opportunities in the curriculum are being expanded. Also, problems with the clinical outcome measure have been recognized. Better definition of intended outcomes and validation of a revised tool are needed. This report should promote opportunities for collaboration with others who are interested in linguistic competence. © 2014

  11. The Development and Testing of a Statewide Multilevel Curriculum Management System for Georgia Vocational Education Programs. A Model State Level Curriculum Management System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Paul; And Others

    A project to propose a system for managing curriculum improvement at the state level (1) identified the basic functions necessary for a statewide curriculum management effort, (2) explained the supporting activities required to initiate and maintain its operation, and (3) developed a model system for curriculum management. The five functions…

  12. Student Perception of the Integrated PBL MBCHB-III Program Curriculum in a Medical University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirta Garcia-Jardon

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Integrated PBL is now an accepted method of teaching the medical curriculum. The objective of this study was to determine MBChB-III students’ perceptions about some key aspects related to our integrated PBL curriculum. Methods: This was an anonymous, questionnaire based, descriptive study, involving the Walter Sisulu University MBChB year 3 students as participants. The short questionnaire focused on key student perception areas related to integrated PBL curriculum Results: More than half of the students felt that the curriculum enhanced analytical skills, and was reasoning and learning centered. 29.5% of the students felt that the desired goals and objectives were not clear enough. About 90% felt that they felt they could recognize discipline interrelations. While 61.7% of students felt that the curriculum facilitated active learning opportunities, more than 70% felt that it increased the workload and stress levels. About half of the students expressed overall satisfaction with the level of content integration. Conclusion: Students generally presented favorable perceptions of the integrated MBChB-III PBL curriculum.  There were concerns about the associated heavy workload and stress. Student counseling with respect to time and stress management coupled with improvements in curriculum design would be helpful in addressing the issue.

  13. Summer Curriculum Guide for Agriscience/Agrimarketing Programs in Louisiana. Vocational Education Curriculum Development. Bulletin No. 1898.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge.

    Produced by agriscience and agrimarketing teachers, teacher educators in agriculture, and state supervisory staff in agricultural education in Louisiana, this guide was developed to aid experienced and beginning agriscience and agrimarketing teachers to plan and conduct effective summer programs. The guide is organized in the following seven major…

  14. Application of the Intervention Mapping Framework to Develop an Integrated Twenty-first Century Core Curriculum—Part Three: Curriculum Implementation and Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime A. Corvin

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Public health professionals have been challenged to radically reform public health training to meet evolving demands of twenty-first century public health. Such a transformation requires a systems thinking approach with an interdisciplinary focus on problem solving, leadership, management and teamwork, technology and information, budgeting and finance, and communication. This article presents processes for implementing and evaluating a revised public health curriculum and outlines lessons learned from this initiative. To date, more than 200 students have participated in the initial pilot testing of this program. A rigorous process and outcome evaluation plan was developed and employed. Results from the evaluation were used to enhance the resulting curriculum. Specifically, all instructional materials were evaluated by both the students who received the materials and the faculty who presented the materials. As each successive pilot is delivered, both enrollment and faculty involvement has increased. Through this process, the value of committed faculty, the importance of engaging learners in the evaluation of an education program, and the need to implement curriculum that has been carefully evaluated and evidence-informed in nature has emerged. We credit our successful transformation of the Masters in Public Health core to the challenge provided by the Framing the Future task force, the commitment of our College of Public Health leadership, the engagement of our faculty, and the time we allowed for the process to unfold. Ultimately, we believe this transformed curriculum will result in better trained public health professionals, interdisciplinary practitioners who can see public health challenges in new and different ways.

  15. Application of the Intervention Mapping Framework to Develop an Integrated Twenty-first Century Core Curriculum—Part Three: Curriculum Implementation and Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corvin, Jaime A.; DeBate, Rita; Wolfe-Quintero, Kate; Petersen, Donna J.

    2017-01-01

    Public health professionals have been challenged to radically reform public health training to meet evolving demands of twenty-first century public health. Such a transformation requires a systems thinking approach with an interdisciplinary focus on problem solving, leadership, management and teamwork, technology and information, budgeting and finance, and communication. This article presents processes for implementing and evaluating a revised public health curriculum and outlines lessons learned from this initiative. To date, more than 200 students have participated in the initial pilot testing of this program. A rigorous process and outcome evaluation plan was developed and employed. Results from the evaluation were used to enhance the resulting curriculum. Specifically, all instructional materials were evaluated by both the students who received the materials and the faculty who presented the materials. As each successive pilot is delivered, both enrollment and faculty involvement has increased. Through this process, the value of committed faculty, the importance of engaging learners in the evaluation of an education program, and the need to implement curriculum that has been carefully evaluated and evidence-informed in nature has emerged. We credit our successful transformation of the Masters in Public Health core to the challenge provided by the Framing the Future task force, the commitment of our College of Public Health leadership, the engagement of our faculty, and the time we allowed for the process to unfold. Ultimately, we believe this transformed curriculum will result in better trained public health professionals, interdisciplinary practitioners who can see public health challenges in new and different ways. PMID:29164093

  16. Applying the Community of Inquiry Framework to an Online Professional Practice Doctoral Program

    OpenAIRE

    Swapna Kumar; Kara Dawson; Black, Erik W.; Catherine Cavanaugh; Christopher D. Sessums

    2011-01-01

    The community of inquiry (CoI) framework has commonly been used to study teaching and learning in online courses (Garrison, Anderson, & Archer 2000). This paper describes the implementation of the CoI framework in a cohort-based online EdD program, where teaching presence and cognitive presence were easier to foster than social presence. Based on the results of an initial evaluation, suggestions are made to expand the components of the CoI framework when using it at a program level. Lessons l...

  17. Student Focused Geospatial Curriculum Initiatives: Internships and Certificate Programs at NCCU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlahovic, G.; Malhotra, R.

    2009-12-01

    This paper reports recent efforts by the Department of Environmental, Earth and Geospatial Sciences faculty at North Carolina Central University (NCCU) to develop a leading geospatial sciences program that will be considered a model for other Historically Black College/University (HBCU) peers nationally. NCCU was established in 1909 and is the nation’s first state supported public liberal arts college funded for African Americans. In the most recent annual ranking of America’s best black colleges by the US News and World Report (Best Colleges 2010), NCCU was ranked 10th in the nation. As one of only two HBCUs in the southeast offering an undergraduate degree in Geography (McKee, J.O. and C. V. Dixon. Geography in Historically Black Colleges/ Universities in the Southeast, in The Role of the South in Making of American Geography: Centennial of the AAG, 2004), NCCU is uniquely positioned to positively affect talent and diversity of the geospatial discipline in the future. Therefore, successful creation of research and internship pathways for NCCU students has national implications because it will increase the number of minority students joining the workforce and applying to PhD programs. Several related efforts will be described, including research and internship projects with Fugro EarthData Inc., Center for Remote Sensing and Mapping Science at the University of Georgia, Center for Earthquake Research and Information at the University of Memphis and the City of Durham. The authors will also outline requirements and recent successes of ASPRS Provisional Certification Program, developed and pioneered as collaborative effort between ASPRS and NCCU. This certificate program allows graduating students majoring in geospatial technologies and allied fields to become provisionally certified by passing peer-review and taking the certification exam. At NCCU, projects and certification are conducted under the aegis of the Geospatial Research, Innovative Teaching and

  18. Integrating Numerical Computation into the Modeling Instruction Curriculum

    CERN Document Server

    Caballero, Marcos D; Aiken, John M; Douglas, Scott S; Scanlon, Erin M; Thoms, Brian; Schatz, Michael F

    2012-01-01

    We describe a way to introduce physics high school students with no background in programming to computational problem-solving experiences. Our approach builds on the great strides made by the Modeling Instruction reform curriculum. This approach emphasizes the practices of "Developing and using models" and "Computational thinking" highlighted by the NRC K-12 science standards framework. We taught 9th-grade students in a Modeling-Instruction-based physics course to construct computational models using the VPython programming environment. Numerical computation within the Modeling Instruction curriculum provides coherence among the curriculum's different force and motion models, links the various representations which the curriculum employs, and extends the curriculum to include real-world problems that are inaccessible to a purely analytic approach.

  19. A Framework for Constraint-Programming based Configuration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Queva, Matthieu Stéphane Benoit

    algorithm DnSTR is developed in order to solve the dynamic addition and retraction of table constraints at runtime. Finally, we present and evaluate a prototype implementation of ProCoLa and the configuration framework, including the integration in a development environment, tool support and interaction...... the configuration task. Several challenges arise when dealing with product configuration. One of those issues concerns how to model a configurable product family, i.e. how to represent the dierent types of conguration knowledge and their interactions. Another challenge is to provide adequate formalisms...

  20. An integrative theory-driven framework for evaluating travel training programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chul Hyun; Welch, Eric W; Sriraj, P S

    2016-12-01

    Since the 1970s, travel training programs, which provide a short-term training to people with disabilities and older people to teach them independent travel skills required to use fixed-route transportation, have spread across the United States. But the authors note that currently, there is no integrative framework for evaluating the training programs, although it is crucial for improving program implementation and developing knowledge and theories related to travel training. Therefore, this research aims to build an integrative theory-driven evaluation framework of the programs on the basis of prior studies on travel training and the literature on program evaluation and learning and training theories. The framework considers (1) a wide range of key elements related to the delivery systems and outcomes of travel training; (2) diverse stakeholders that engage in designing, operating, and assessing travel training; and (3) the short-term, intermediate, and long-term outcomes of the programs. Based on the framework, the authors develop a flexible logic model for travel training programs to help scholars and practitioners design and conduct actual evaluation studies. Thus, this research is expected to make theoretical and practical contributions to theory-driven program evaluation and travel training programs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. 2008 Mississippi Curriculum Framework: Postsecondary Pharmacy Technology. (Program CIP: 51.0805 - Pharmacy Technician/Assistant)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juergens, John; Sanders, Marsha

    2008-01-01

    As the world economy continues to evolve, businesses and industries must adopt new practices and processes in order to survive. Quality and cost control, work teams and participatory management, and an infusion of technology are transforming the way people work and do business. Employees are now expected to read, write, and communicate…

  2. 2011 Mississippi Curriculum Framework: Postsecondary Forestry Technology. (Program CIP: 03.0511 - Forest Technology/Technician)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Luke; Keeton, Jeff

    2011-01-01

    As the world economy continues to evolve, businesses and industries must adopt new practices and processes in order to survive. Quality and cost control, work teams and participatory management, and an infusion of technology are transforming the way people work and do business. Employees are now expected to read, write, and communicate…

  3. 2009 Mississippi Curriculum Framework: Postsecondary Ophthalmic Technology. (Program CIP-51.1801 - Opticianry/Dispensing Optician)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciple, Eddie

    2009-01-01

    As the world economy continues to evolve, businesses and industries must adopt new practices and processes in order to survive. Quality and cost control, work teams and participatory management, and an infusion of technology are transforming the way people work and do business. Employees are now expected to read, write, and communicate…

  4. 2009 Mississippi Curriculum Framework: Postsecondary Occupational Safety and Health Technology. Program CIP: 15.0701

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flowers, Walter M.

    2009-01-01

    As the world economy continues to evolve, businesses and industries must adopt new practices and processes in order to survive. Quality and cost control, work teams and participatory management, and an infusion of technology are transforming the way people work and do business. Employees are now expected to read, write, and communicate…

  5. 2010 Mississippi Curriculum Framework: Postsecondary Clothing and Textile Services. (Program CIP-19.0905)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redfield, Verlene

    2010-01-01

    As the world economy continues to evolve, businesses and industries must adopt new practices and processes in order to survive. Quality and cost control, work teams and participatory management, and an infusion of technology are transforming the way people work and do business. Employees are now expected to read, write, and communicate…

  6. 2009 Mississippi Curriculum Framework: Postsecondary Cardiovascular Technology. (Program CIP: 51.0901 - Cardiovascular Technology)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanford-Means, Cynthia; Stevens, Richard

    2009-01-01

    As the world economy continues to evolve, businesses and industries must adopt new practices and processes in order to survive. Quality and cost control, work teams and participatory management, and an infusion of technology are transforming the way people work and do business. Employees are now expected to read, write, and communicate…

  7. 2011 Mississippi Curriculum Framework: Postsecondary Occupational Therapy Assistant. (Program CIP: 51.0803 - Occupational Therapist Assistant)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hager, Sherry; Pulver, Tim; Chittom, Suzanne

    2011-01-01

    As the world economy continues to evolve, businesses and industries must adopt new practices and processes in order to survive. Quality and cost control, work teams and participatory management, and an infusion of technology are transforming the way people work and do business. Employees are now expected to read, write, and communicate…

  8. Examining the Sustainability of an Evidence-Based Preschool Curriculum: The REDI Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanford DeRousie, Rebecca M.; Bierman, Karen L.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the extent to which an evidence-based preschool curriculum (Head Start REDI) was sustained by 20 teachers during the year following a randomized controlled efficacy trial, when teachers were no longer required by the research project to implement the curriculum. Two quantitative measures of sustainability (teacher ratings, REDI coach ratings) and a qualitative measure (teacher interview) were collected and compared. Sustainability varied by the specific curriculum component, with higher rates of sustainability for the social-emotional component (Preschool PATHS) than for the language and literacy components. Estimates of sustainability were affected by the method of measurement, with REDI coach ratings and qualitative teacher interviews more closely aligned than teacher ratings. Responses from qualitative interviews identified the main factors that teachers thought affected sustainability. Teacher responses suggest that efforts to promote sustainability are best targeted at reducing barriers, such as competing demands, rather than simply highlighting the benefits of the new curriculum. PMID:22408287

  9. Reorienting an Information Literacy Program toward Social Justice: Mapping the Core Values of Librarianship to the ACRL Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Lua; Higgins, Shana

    2017-01-01

    Since the publication of the Association of College and Research Libraries' (ACRL) "Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education," librarians have grappled with the purposes, impact, and meaning of this teaching document for their daily instructional practice, for curriculum development, and for institutional and programmatic…

  10. A framework for evaluating and designing citizen science programs for natural resources monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chase, Sarah K; Levine, Arielle

    2016-06-01

    We present a framework of resource characteristics critical to the design and assessment of citizen science programs that monitor natural resources. To develop the framework we reviewed 52 citizen science programs that monitored a wide range of resources and provided insights into what resource characteristics are most conducive to developing citizen science programs and how resource characteristics may constrain the use or growth of these programs. We focused on 4 types of resource characteristics: biophysical and geographical, management and monitoring, public awareness and knowledge, and social and cultural characteristics. We applied the framework to 2 programs, the Tucson (U.S.A.) Bird Count and the Maui (U.S.A.) Great Whale Count. We found that resource characteristics such as accessibility, diverse institutional involvement in resource management, and social or cultural importance of the resource affected program endurance and success. However, the relative influence of each characteristic was in turn affected by goals of the citizen science programs. Although the goals of public engagement and education sometimes complimented the goal of collecting reliable data, in many cases trade-offs must be made between these 2 goals. Program goals and priorities ultimately dictate the design of citizen science programs, but for a program to endure and successfully meet its goals, program managers must consider the diverse ways that the nature of the resource being monitored influences public participation in monitoring. © 2016 Society for Conservation Biology.

  11. Merging Problem-Based Learning with Simulation-Based Learning in the Medical Undergraduate Curriculum: The PAIRED Framework for Enhancing Lifelong Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Jansen; Dubrowski, Adam

    2016-06-19

    Lifelong learning is an essential trait that is expected of every physician. The CanMeds 2005 Physician Competency Framework emphasizes lifelong learning as a key competency that physicians must achieve in becoming better physicians. However, many physicians are not competent at engaging in lifelong learning. The current medical education system is deficient in preparing medical students to develop and carry out their own lifelong learning curriculum upon graduation. Despite understanding how physicians learn at work, medical students are not trained to learn while working. Similarly, although barriers to lifelong learning are known, medical students are not adequately skilled in overcoming these barriers. Learning to learn is just as important, if not more, as acquiring the skills and knowledge required of a physician. The medical undergraduate curriculum lacks a specific learning strategy to prepare medical students in becoming an adept lifelong learner. In this article, we propose a learning strategy for lifelong learning at the undergraduate level. In developing this novel strategy, we paid particular attention to two parameters. First, this strategy should be grounded on literature describing a physician's lifelong learning process. Second, the framework for implementing this strategy must be based on existing undergraduate learning strategies to obviate the need for additional resources, learner burden, and faculty time. In this paper, we propose a Problem, Analysis, Independent Research Reporting, Experimentation Debriefing (PAIRED) framework that follows the learning process of a physician and serves to synergize the components of problem-based learning and simulation-based learning in specifically targeting the barriers to lifelong learning.

  12. Hospitality Management. Florida Vocational Program Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florida State Univ., Tallahassee. Center for Instructional Development and Services.

    This program guide is intended for the implementation of a hospitality management program in Florida secondary and postsecondary schools. The program guide describes the program content and structure, provides a program description, describes jobs under the program, and includes a curriculum framework and student performance standards for…

  13. Designing Educational Games for Computer Programming: A Holistic Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malliarakis, Christos; Satratzemi, Maya; Xinogalos, Stelios

    2014-01-01

    Computer science is continuously evolving during the past decades. This has also brought forth new knowledge that should be incorporated and new learning strategies must be adopted for the successful teaching of all sub-domains. For example, computer programming is a vital knowledge area within computer science with constantly changing curriculum…

  14. Programming-Languages as a Conceptual Framework for Teaching Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feurzeig, Wallace; Papert, Seymour A.

    2011-01-01

    Formal mathematical methods remain, for most high school students, mysterious, artificial and not a part of their regular intuitive thinking. The authors develop some themes that could lead to a radically new approach. According to this thesis, the teaching of programming languages as a regular part of academic progress can contribute effectively…

  15. Model Point-of-Care Ultrasound Curriculum in an Intensive Care Unit Fellowship Program and Its Impact on Patient Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith Killu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. This study was designed to assess the clinical applicability of a Point-of-Care (POC ultrasound curriculum into an intensive care unit (ICU fellowship program and its impact on patient care. Methods. A POC ultrasound curriculum for the surgical ICU (SICU fellowship was designed and implemented in an urban, academic tertiary care center. It included 30 hours of didactics and hands-on training on models. Minimum requirement for each ICU fellow was to perform 25–50 exams on respective systems or organs for a total not less than 125 studies on ICU. The ICU fellows implemented the POC ultrasound curriculum into their daily practice in managing ICU patients, under supervision from ICU staff physicians, who were instructors in POC ultrasound. Impact on patient care including finding a new diagnosis or change in patient management was reviewed over a period of one academic year. Results. 873 POC ultrasound studies in 203 patients admitted to the surgical ICU were reviewed for analysis. All studies included were done through the POC ultrasound curriculum training. The most common exams performed were 379 lung/pleural exams, 239 focused echocardiography and hemodynamic exams, and 237 abdominal exams. New diagnosis was found in 65.52% of cases (95% CI 0.590, 0.720. Changes in patient management were found in 36.95% of cases (95% CI 0.303, 0.435. Conclusions. Implementation of POC ultrasound in the ICU with a structured fellowship curriculum was associated with an increase in new diagnosis in about 2/3 and change in management in over 1/3 of ICU patients studied.

  16. Model Point-of-Care Ultrasound Curriculum in an Intensive Care Unit Fellowship Program and Its Impact on Patient Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killu, Keith; Coba, Victor; Mendez, Michael; Reddy, Subhash; Adrzejewski, Tanja; Huang, Yung; Ede, Jessica; Horst, Mathilda

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. This study was designed to assess the clinical applicability of a Point-of-Care (POC) ultrasound curriculum into an intensive care unit (ICU) fellowship program and its impact on patient care. Methods. A POC ultrasound curriculum for the surgical ICU (SICU) fellowship was designed and implemented in an urban, academic tertiary care center. It included 30 hours of didactics and hands-on training on models. Minimum requirement for each ICU fellow was to perform 25–50 exams on respective systems or organs for a total not less than 125 studies on ICU. The ICU fellows implemented the POC ultrasound curriculum into their daily practice in managing ICU patients, under supervision from ICU staff physicians, who were instructors in POC ultrasound. Impact on patient care including finding a new diagnosis or change in patient management was reviewed over a period of one academic year. Results. 873 POC ultrasound studies in 203 patients admitted to the surgical ICU were reviewed for analysis. All studies included were done through the POC ultrasound curriculum training. The most common exams performed were 379 lung/pleural exams, 239 focused echocardiography and hemodynamic exams, and 237 abdominal exams. New diagnosis was found in 65.52% of cases (95% CI 0.590, 0.720). Changes in patient management were found in 36.95% of cases (95% CI 0.303, 0.435). Conclusions. Implementation of POC ultrasound in the ICU with a structured fellowship curriculum was associated with an increase in new diagnosis in about 2/3 and change in management in over 1/3 of ICU patients studied. PMID:25478217

  17. Translating the PLAYgrounds program into practice: A process evaluation using the RE-AIM framework

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, M.; Toussaint, H.M.; van Mechelen, W.; Verhagen, E.A.L.M.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To present the results of the process evaluation of the PLAYgrounds program, using the RE-AIM framework. Design: This study provides information regarding Reach, Adoption, Implementation and Maintenance. Methods: The PLAYgrounds program promotes increasing levels of physical activity in

  18. Utilizing the Theoretical Framework of Collective Identity to Understand Processes in Youth Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Futch, Valerie A.

    2016-01-01

    This article explores collective identity as a useful theoretical framework for understanding social and developmental processes that occur in youth programs. Through narrative analysis of past participant interviews (n = 21) from an after-school theater program, known as "The SOURCE", it was found that participants very clearly describe…

  19. A Modified Importance-Performance Framework for Evaluating Recreation-Based Experiential Learning Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitas, Nicholas; Murray, Alison; Olsen, Max; Graefe, Alan

    2017-01-01

    This article describes a modified importance-performance framework for use in evaluation of recreation-based experiential learning programs. Importance-performance analysis (IPA) provides an effective and readily applicable means of evaluating many programs, but the near universal satisfaction associated with recreation inhibits the use of IPA in…

  20. A Framework for Physical Activity Programs within School-Community Partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Acker, Ragnar; De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse; De Martelaer, Kristine; Seghers, Jan; Kirk, David; Haerens, Leen; De Cocker, Katrien; Cardon, Greet

    2011-01-01

    School-community partnerships have shown their potential as incubators for innovations and for contributing to comprehensive physical activity (PA) programs. However, implementation frameworks for school-community partnerships that allow local tailoring of PA programs remain scarce. The present paper aims at documenting the composition of a…

  1. Design, delivery, and validation of a trainer curriculum for the national laparoscopic colorectal training program in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackenzie, Hugh; Cuming, Tamzin; Miskovic, Danilo; Wyles, Susannah M; Langsford, Laura; Anderson, John; Thomas-Gibson, Siwan; Valori, Roland; Hanna, George B; Coleman, Mark G; Francis, Nader

    2015-01-01

    To validate the delivery and efficacy of the national laparoscopic colorectal surgery "training the trainer" (Lapco TT) curriculum. The National Training Programme in Laparoscopic Colorectal Surgery designed the Lapco TT curriculum to improve, standardize, and benchmark the quality of training. Evidence for such courses rarely extends beyond subjective feedback. The Lapco TT curriculum tailors key teaching skills for laparoscopic colorectal surgery: training structure, skills deconstruction, trainer intervention, and performance enhancing feedback. Ten Lapco TT courses were delivered to 65 national Lapco trainers since 2010. The course was validated at Kirkpatrick's 4 levels of evaluation: (i) pre- and post-course interviews reflecting initial reaction; (ii) training quality assessment on simulated scenarios using the Structured Training Trainer Assessment Report (STTAR) tool; (iii) follow-up interviews at 4 to 6 months; and (iv) delegate performance ratings, by their trainees, using the mini-STTAR and the delegates' trainees learning curves before and after the course. There were significant improvements in training in the post-course simulated scenario, especially in the "set" (P situations. Findings mirrored in performance ratings by their trainees: overall (4.37 vs 4.46, P = 0.040), agreed learning points (3.65 vs 4.00, P = 0.042), encouraged self-reflection (3.67 vs 3.94, P = 0.046), and encouraged team awareness (3.53 vs 4.05, P = 0.045). The learning curve of delegates' trainees improved after the course. The Lapco TT curriculum improved training performance in the short- and long-term, provided a structured training framework, and enhanced the learning curve of delegates' trainees.

  2. Cognitive, Behavioral and Emotional Empathy in Pharmacy Students: Targeting Programs for Curriculum Modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamayo, Cassandra A.; Rizkalla, Mireille N.; Henderson, Kyle K.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Empathy is an essential trait for pharmacists and is recognized as a core competency that can be developed in the classroom. There is a growing body of data regarding levels of empathy in pharmacy students; however, these studies have not measured differences in behavioral, cognitive, and emotional empathy. The goal of this study was to parse the underlying components of empathy and correlate them to psychosocial attributes, with the overall goal of identifying curriculum modifications to enhance levels of empathy in pharmacy students. Methods: IRB approval was obtained to measure empathy levels in pharmacy students attending Midwestern University. An online, anonymous survey administered through a secure website (REDCap) was used. This survey utilized the Jefferson Scale of Empathy (Medical Student version) and included questions regarding demographics and personality traits. Empathy questions were sub-divided into behavioral, cognitive, and emotional categories. Data are presented as mean ± SEM with significance set at P ≤ 0.05. Results: Three hundred and four pharmacy students at Midwestern University participated in a fall survey with an overall response rate of 37%. The average empathy score was 110.4 ± 0.8 on a scale of 20–140; which is comparable to empathy scores found by Fjortoft et al. (2011) and Van Winkle et al. (2012b). Validating prior research, females scored significantly higher than males in empathy as well as behavioral, cognitive, and emotional subcomponents. For the entire population, emotional empathy was significantly higher than cognitive and behavioral empathy (P empathy were observed for self-serving behavior (R D 0.490, P empathy levels in pharmacy students are similar to prior studies with females scoring higher than males. Emotional empathy may play a greater role than cognitive and behavioral empathy in this group of students. Targeted programs that promote volunteerism and activities that foster responsiveness to

  3. Is the "Health and Physical Education" Curriculum in South Australia Enough? A Critical Review of the SACSA Framework and the New SACE Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talukdar, Joy; Aspland, Tania

    2012-01-01

    Sexually transmitted diseases as well as the major hepatides, hepatitis A, B and C are on the rise in South Australia, specifically among the adolescents and young adults' age group. Adolescents rely much on school programs for their health-related information. Accordingly, the present review provides critical insights into the existing…

  4. Framework for assessing causality in disease management programs: principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Thomas; MacDowell, Martin

    2003-01-01

    To credibly state that a disease management (DM) program "caused" a specific outcome it is required that metrics observed in the DM population be compared with metrics that would have been expected in the absence of a DM intervention. That requirement can be very difficult to achieve, and epidemiologists and others have developed guiding principles of causality by which credible estimates of DM impact can be made. This paper introduces those key principles. First, DM program metrics must be compared with metrics from a "reference population." This population should be "equivalent" to the DM intervention population on all factors that could independently impact the outcome. In addition, the metrics used in both groups should use the same defining criteria (ie, they must be "comparable" to each other). The degree to which these populations fulfill the "equivalent" assumption and metrics fulfill the "comparability" assumption should be stated. Second, when "equivalence" or "comparability" is not achieved, the DM managers should acknowledge this fact and, where possible, "control" for those factors that may impact the outcome(s). Finally, it is highly unlikely that one study will provide definitive proof of any specific DM program value for all time; thus, we strongly recommend that studies be ongoing, at multiple points in time, and at multiple sites, and, when observational study designs are employed, that more than one type of study design be utilized. Methodologically sophisticated studies that follow these "principles of causality" will greatly enhance the reputation of the important and growing efforts in DM.

  5. OpenARC: Extensible OpenACC Compiler Framework for Directive-Based Accelerator Programming Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seyong [ORNL; Vetter, Jeffrey S [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Directive-based, accelerator programming models such as OpenACC have arisen as an alternative solution to program emerging Scalable Heterogeneous Computing (SHC) platforms. However, the increased complexity in the SHC systems incurs several challenges in terms of portability and productivity. This paper presents an open-sourced OpenACC compiler, called OpenARC, which serves as an extensible research framework to address those issues in the directive-based accelerator programming. This paper explains important design strategies and key compiler transformation techniques needed to implement the reference OpenACC compiler. Moreover, this paper demonstrates the efficacy of OpenARC as a research framework for directive-based programming study, by proposing and implementing OpenACC extensions in the OpenARC framework to 1) support hybrid programming of the unified memory and separate memory and 2) exploit architecture-specific features in an abstract manner. Porting thirteen standard OpenACC programs and three extended OpenACC programs to CUDA GPUs shows that OpenARC performs similarly to a commercial OpenACC compiler, while it serves as a high-level research framework.

  6. A programming framework for data streaming on the Xeon Phi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapeland, S.; ALICE Collaboration

    2017-10-01

    ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is the dedicated heavy-ion detector studying the physics of strongly interacting matter and the quark-gluon plasma at the CERN LHC (Large Hadron Collider). After the second long shut-down of the LHC, the ALICE detector will be upgraded to cope with an interaction rate of 50 kHz in Pb-Pb collisions, producing in the online computing system (O2) a sustained throughput of 3.4 TB/s. This data will be processed on the fly so that the stream to permanent storage does not exceed 90 GB/s peak, the raw data being discarded. In the context of assessing different computing platforms for the O2 system, we have developed a framework for the Intel Xeon Phi processors (MIC). It provides the components to build a processing pipeline streaming the data from the PC memory to a pool of permanent threads running on the MIC, and back to the host after processing. It is based on explicit offloading mechanisms (data transfer, asynchronous tasks) and basic building blocks (FIFOs, memory pools, C++11 threads). The user only needs to implement the processing method to be run on the MIC. We present in this paper the architecture, implementation, and performance of this system.

  7. The image of psychology programs: the value of the instrumental-symbolic framework

    OpenAIRE

    Van Hoye, Greet; Lievens, Filip; Soete, Britt De; Libbrecht, Nele; Schollaert, Eveline; Baligant, Dimphna

    2014-01-01

    As competition for funding and students intensifies, it becomes increasingly important for psychology programs to have an image that is attractive and makes them stand out from other programs. We use the instrumental-symbolic framework from the marketing domain to determine the image of different master’s programs in psychology and examine how these image dimensions relate to student attraction and competitor differentiation. The samples consist of both potential students (N = 114) and curren...

  8. Engineering the curriculum: Towards an adaptive curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johns-Boast, Lynette Frances

    The curriculum is one of the most important artefacts produced by higher education institutions, yet it is one of the least studied. Additionally, little is known about the decision-making of academics when designing and developing their curricula, nor how they make use of them. This research investigates how 22 Australian higher education engineering, software engineering, computer science, and information systems academics conceive of curriculum, what approaches they take when designing, and developing course and program curricula, and what use they make of the curriculum. It also considers the implications of these conceptions and behaviour upon their curricula. Data were collected through a series of one-to-one, in-depth, qualitative interviews as well as small focus group sessions and were analysed following Charmaz’ (2006) approach to grounded theory. In this thesis, I argue that the development of curricula for new higher degree programs and courses and / or the updating and innovating of an existing curriculum is a design problem. I also argue that curriculum is a complex adaptive system. Surrounding the design and development of a curriculum is a process of design that leads to the creation of a designed object – the official-curriculum. The official-curriculum provides the guiding principles for its implementation, which involves the design and development of the curriculum-in-use, its delivery, and evaluation. Data show that while the participants conceive of curriculum as a problem of design involving a design process leading to the development of the official-curriculum, surprisingly, their behaviour does not match their conceptions. Over a very short period, their behaviour leads to a process I have called curriculum drift where the official-curriculum and the curriculum-in-use drift away from each other causing the curriculum to lose its integrity. Curricular integrity is characterised through the attributes of alignment, coherence, and

  9. Storing Clocked Programs Inside DNA A Simplifying Framework for Nanocomputing

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, Jessica

    2011-01-01

    In the history of modern computation, large mechanical calculators preceded computers. A person would sit there punching keys according to a procedure and a number would eventually appear. Once calculators became fast enough, it became obvious that the critical path was the punching rather than the calculation itself. That is what made the stored program concept vital to further progress. Once the instructions were stored in the machine, the entire computation could run at the speed of the machine. This book shows how to do the same thing for DNA computing. Rather than asking a robot or a pers

  10. Effects of Curriculum and Nonacademic Factors on Undergraduate Electronic Engineering Program Retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulaiman, Munir

    Science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) programs in higher education institutions, particularly engineering programs, face challenges related to recruitment, retention, and graduation rates. The purpose of this study was to determine whether there are significant relationships among students' major preference, academic skills, nonacademic characteristics and perceptions, and retention to year 2 among students in electronic engineering, other STEM, and non STEM majors. The academic skills considered were study habits, intellectual interest, verbal and writing confidence, and academic assistance. The non-academic factors included academic support, family support, financial support, and student social integration into the campus environment. Tinto's theory of retention served as the theoretical framework. The research design was quantitative with a general linear method of analysis using responses to the College Student Inventory (CSI) survey as secondary data to determine the relationships among the independent variables (major and academic and non-academic factors) and dependent variable (retention). Participants were 3,575 first year undergraduate full-time students from three entering classes, 2012 to 2014. Findings suggested that student major and non-academic factors had no effect on student retention, but student study habits and seeking academic assistance were predictors of retention in each of the three groups of majors: engineering, other STEM majors, and nonSTEM majors. Strategies to help increase undergraduate students' study skills and help seeking behaviors may contribute to positive social change at HBCU institutions.

  11. A Practical Framework for Evaluating Health Services Management Educational Program: The Application of The Mixed-Method Sequential Explanatory Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bazrafshan Azam

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction:Health services managers are responsible for improving the efficiency and quality in delivering healthcare services. In this regard, Health Services Management (HSM programs have been widely established to provide health providers with skilled, professional managers to address those needs. It is therefore important to ascertain the quality of these programs. The purpose of this study was to synthesize and develop a framework to evaluate the quality of the Health Services Management (HSM program at Kerman University of Medical Sciences. Methods: This study followed a mixed-method sequential explanatory approach in which data were collected through a CIPP survey and semi-structured interviews. In phase 1, participants included 10 faculty members, 64 students and 90 alumni. In phase 2, in-depth semi-structured interviews and purposeful sampling were conducted with 27 participants to better understand their perceptions of the HSM program. All interviews were audio-taped and transcribed verbatim. NVivo N8 was used to analyze the qualitative data and extract the themes. Results: The data analysis revealed both positive and negative attitudes toward the HSM program. According to the CIPP survey, program objectives (74%, curriculum content (59.5% and graduate skills (79% were the major sources of dissatisfaction. However, most respondents (n=48 reported that the classes are well equipped and learning resources are well prepared (n=41. Most respondents (n=41 reported that the students are actively involved in classroom activities. The majority of respondents (n=43 pointed out that the instructors implemented appropriate teaching strategies. Qualitative analysis of interviews revealed that a regular community needs assessment, content revision and directing attention to graduate skills and expertise are the key solutions to improve the program’s quality.Conclusion: This study revealed to what extent the HSM program objectives is being

  12. Application of the Intervention Mapping Framework to Develop an Integrated Twenty-first Century Core Curriculum—Part Two: Translation of MPH Core Competencies into an Integrated Theory-Based Core Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corvin, Jaime A.; DeBate, Rita; Wolfe-Quintero, Kate; Petersen, Donna J.

    2017-01-01

    In the twenty-first century, the dynamics of health and health care are changing, necessitating a commitment to revising traditional public health curricula to better meet present day challenges. This article describes how the College of Public Health at the University of South Florida utilized the Intervention Mapping framework to translate revised core competencies into an integrated, theory-driven core curriculum to meet the training needs of the twenty-first century public health scholar and practitioner. This process resulted in the development of four sequenced courses: History and Systems of Public Health and Population Assessment I delivered in the first semester and Population Assessment II and Translation to Practice delivered in the second semester. While the transformation process, moving from traditional public health core content to an integrated and innovative curriculum, is a challenging and daunting task, Intervention Mapping provides the ideal framework for guiding this process. Intervention mapping walks the curriculum developers from the broad goals and objectives to the finite details of a lesson plan. Throughout this process, critical lessons were learned, including the importance of being open to new ideologies and frameworks and the critical need to involve key-stakeholders in every step of the decision-making process to ensure the sustainability of the resulting integrated and theory-based curriculum. Ultimately, as a stronger curriculum emerged, the developers and instructors themselves were changed, fostering a stronger public health workforce from within. PMID:29164094

  13. Application of the Intervention Mapping Framework to Develop an Integrated Twenty-first Century Core Curriculum—Part Two: Translation of MPH Core Competencies into an Integrated Theory-Based Core Curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime A. Corvin

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In the twenty-first century, the dynamics of health and health care are changing, necessitating a commitment to revising traditional public health curricula to better meet present day challenges. This article describes how the College of Public Health at the University of South Florida utilized the Intervention Mapping framework to translate revised core competencies into an integrated, theory-driven core curriculum to meet the training needs of the twenty-first century public health scholar and practitioner. This process resulted in the development of four sequenced courses: History and Systems of Public Health and Population Assessment I delivered in the first semester and Population Assessment II and Translation to Practice delivered in the second semester. While the transformation process, moving from traditional public health core content to an integrated and innovative curriculum, is a challenging and daunting task, Intervention Mapping provides the ideal framework for guiding this process. Intervention mapping walks the curriculum developers from the broad goals and objectives to the finite details of a lesson plan. Throughout this process, critical lessons were learned, including the importance of being open to new ideologies and frameworks and the critical need to involve key-stakeholders in every step of the decision-making process to ensure the sustainability of the resulting integrated and theory-based curriculum. Ultimately, as a stronger curriculum emerged, the developers and instructors themselves were changed, fostering a stronger public health workforce from within.

  14. Printing. Florida Vocational Program Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    University of South Florida, Tampa. Dept. of Adult and Vocational Education.

    This document contains a vocational program guide and Career Merit Achievement Plan (Career MAP) for secondary and postsecondary printing programs. The guide contains the following sections: occupational description; program content (curriculum framework and student performance standards); program implementation (student admission criteria,…

  15. Cognitive, Behavioral and Emotional Empathy in Pharmacy Students: Targeting Programs for Curriculum Modification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cassandra A. Tamayo

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Empathy is an essential trait for pharmacists and is recognized as a core competency that can be developed in the classroom. There is a growing body of data regarding levels of empathy in pharmacy students; however, these studies have not measured differences in behavioral, cognitive, and emotional empathy. The goal of this study was to parse the underlying components of empathy and correlate them to psychosocial attributes, with the overall goal of identifying curriculum modifications to enhance levels of empathy in pharmacy students.Methods: IRB approval was obtained to measure empathy levels in pharmacy students attending Midwestern University. An online, anonymous survey administered through a secure website (REDCap was used. This survey utilized the Jefferson Scale of Empathy (Medical Student version and included questions regarding demographics and personality traits. Empathy questions were sub-divided into behavioral, cognitive, and emotional categories. Data are presented as mean ± SEM with significance set at P < 0.05.Results: Three hundred and four pharmacy students at Midwestern University participated in a fall survey with an overall response rate of 37%. The average empathy score was 110.4 ± 0.8 on a scale of 20-140; which is comparable to empathy scores found by Fjortoft et al. and Van Winkle et al. Validating prior research, females scored significantly higher than males in empathy as well as behavioral, cognitive, and emotional subcomponents. For the entire population, emotional empathy was significantly higher than cognitive and behavioral empathy (P < 0.05. Furthermore, negative correlations to empathy were observed for self-serving behavior (R = 0.490, P < 0.001, medical authoritarianism (R = 0.428, P < 0.001, and experience of coercion (R = 0.344, P < 0.001. Conclusion: Overall, empathy levels in pharmacy students are similar to prior studies with females scoring higher than males. Emotional empathy may play a

  16. [DIFFERENCES IN PHYSICAL ACTIVITY AND IN PHYSICAL CONDITION BETWEEN SCHOOL AGE STUDENTS OF TWO PUBLIC CURRICULUM PROGRAMS IN BOGOTA, COLOMBIA].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo Cubides, Raúl; Aldana Alarcón, Luis Gonzalo; Gutiérrez Galvis, Adriana Rocío

    2015-11-01

    During the past five decades there has been an increased in the prevalence of obesity and over weight, also in physical inactivity and /or low cardiorespiratory fitness within the population in school age from diverse regions of the planet, including Bogota-Colombia. The general objective of this study was to compare the physical condition and the levels of physical activity from students who belonged to two curriculum programs of the Public Schools Network from Bogota, one of which includes two sessions per week, each session of 90 minutes of physical activity. We developed a research of unlike cross-sectional groups. There were 178 children evaluated from the regular curriculum and 170 kids belonging to the program 40 x 40. The physical condition was evaluated applying the protocol of high priority from the ALPHA -Fitness test Battery. The weight, height, body mass index, the waist circumference, the standing long jump, the handgrip in both hands and the motor fitness 20 meter shuttle run test were developed under standardized conditions. The Global School Health Survey (GSHS) was used to evaluate the levels of AF. No significant statistical differences were founded between P-40x40 and the regular curriculum regarding: weight, height, the body mass index, the waist circumference, the handgrip in both hands and the explosive strength in lower limbs. Nevertheless the cardiorespiratory fitness was significantly lower within de P-40x40. In conclusion the participation in the curricular program 40 x 40 was not associated with better levels of physical condition. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  17. Curriculum Development: Teacher Involvement in Curriculum Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsubaie, Merfat Ayesh

    2016-01-01

    In order for curriculum development to be effective and schools to be successful, teachers must be involved in the development process. An effective curriculum should reflect the philosophy, goals, objectives, learning experiences, instructional resources, and assessments that comprise a specific educational program ("Guide to curriculum…

  18. Implementing radical curriculum change in a family medicine residency: the majors and masteries program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzone, Michael; Krasovich, Susanne; Fay, David; Ginn, Patrick; Lopresti, Leigh; Nelson, Karen; Ambuel, Bruce

    2011-01-01

    There have been dramatic changes in the specialty of family medicine and the American health care system in the more than 40 years since the formation of the specialty. As a result, there is urgent need for experimentation and innovation in residency training to better prepare family physicians. Waukesha Family Medicine Residency used a strategic planning process to identify four guiding concepts for a new model of residency education: intentional diversification; options for advanced training in a fourth year of residency; longitudinal, competency-based training; and strong fundamental background in family medicine skills. These concepts guided radical restructuring of the curriculum. The new Majors and Masteries curriculum begins with 19 months of training in core family medicine skills. Residents then elect to pursue a Major or Mastery in an area of interest. Majors are completed within 3 years, while Masteries are completed in 4 years and include advanced training (MPH, MBA, advanced obstetrics). Since implementation, residents have selected a broad range of Majors, three residents have elected advanced training in three different mastery areas, and resident recruitment has not been disrupted. The Majors and Masteries curriculum and the process used to implement it may benefit other residencies considering radical curriculum change.

  19. Maintaining Curriculum Consistency of Technical and Vocational Educational Programs through Teacher Design Teams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albashiry, Nabeel; Voogt, Joke; Pieters, Julius Marie

    2016-01-01

    Maintaining the quality and relevance of Technical Vocational Education and Training (TVET) curricula is a great challenge for TVET institutions in developing countries. One major challenge lies in the lack of curriculum design expertise of TVET academics. The purpose of this multiplecase study is

  20. Implementing Visual Culture Curriculum for Underserved Populations in an Afterschool Ceramics Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanderson, Christen Noel

    2017-01-01

    Economically disadvantaged students face an array of adversities during their childhood. With the media having an outstanding influence on the self-esteem of children, it is important that they have the tools necessary to question images they encounter. A Visual Culture curriculum in combination with a ceramics course can provide students with the…

  1. Certification of School Social Workers and Curriculum Content of Programs Offering Training in School Social Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumm, Ann Marie; Bye, Lynn

    2011-01-01

    This article examines the status of certification requirements for school social workers across the United States and the policy context in which certification is embedded. The article also details findings of a study on the curriculum available at various schools of social work offering training in school social work. The article makes a case for…

  2. Mexico, Past and Present. Curriculum Projects. Fulbright-Hays Summer Seminars Abroad Program, 2002 (Mexico).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamken, Mary

    This curriculum unit focuses on the Aztec settlement in Mesoamerica comparing it with present-day Mexico. The unit is oriented to teach basic communicative skills to beginning English language learners in small groups of approximately five students. It helps Mexican Spanish-speaking students embrace their own culture and build on their prior…

  3. An Analysis of the e-Business Program in the School of Business Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Shyamalendu; Reddy, Surender

    2007-01-01

    The article analyzes various present and future aspects of e-business as it is or should be incorporated in the school of business curriculum. The study uses both primary and secondary data. The results indicate that e-business courses are currently taught across the traditional disciplines of business schools. The courses are primarily taught as…

  4. Juno Lighting Inc. Curriculum, Basic Skills for Maintenance Workers. Worker Education Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Sabrina Budasi

    The curriculum guide is designed for a basic skills course for machine maintenance workers. The 12-week course is divided into three segments: English as a Second Language and vocabulary development; technical vocabulary and mathematics; and technical symbols, trouble-shooting, and word problems. For each of the three segments, a list of…

  5. China: Tradition and Transformation Curriculum Projects. Fulbright-Hays Summer Seminars Abroad Program, 2000.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000

    This collection of curriculum projects considers the change and modernization of China. The following 15 projects are in the collection: "Globalization in China" (Allan Cooper); "Religion and Identity in Contemporary China" (Wade H. Dazey); "China and the West: A Global Context for Chinese Immigration to the United…

  6. The Relationship between Curriculum Change and Student Outcomes in a Registered Nursing Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Jim

    2013-01-01

    Nursing schools face the challenge of improving student academic performance and completion rates. The current supply of newly graduated nurses fails to meet the increasing demands of society. In 2009, Cochise College responded by implementing a major change in their curriculum to improve student retention and academic performance. The problem…

  7. Equasions for Curriculum Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckenrod, James S.

    1986-01-01

    Describes the Technology in Curriculum (TIC) program resource guides which will be distributed to California schools in the fall of 1986. These guides match available instructional television programs and computer software to existing California curriculum guides in order to facilitate teachers' classroom use. (JDH)

  8. Effects of donor proliferation in development aid for health on health program performance: A conceptual framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallas, Sarah Wood; Ruger, Jennifer Prah

    2017-02-01

    Development aid for health increased dramatically during the past two decades, raising concerns about inefficiency and lack of coherence among the growing number of global health donors. However, we lack a framework for how donor proliferation affects health program performance to inform theory-based evaluation of aid effectiveness policies. A review of academic and gray literature was conducted. Data were extracted from the literature sample on study design and evidence for hypothesized effects of donor proliferation on health program performance, which were iteratively grouped into categories and mapped into a new conceptual framework. In the framework, increases in the number of donors are hypothesized to increase inter-donor competition, transaction costs, donor poaching of recipient staff, recipient control over aid, and donor fragmentation, and to decrease donors' sense of accountability for overall development outcomes. There is mixed evidence on whether donor proliferation increases or decreases aid volume. These primary effects in turn affect donor innovation, information hoarding, and aid disbursement volatility, as well as recipient country health budget levels, human resource capacity, and corruption, and the determinants of health program performance. The net effect of donor proliferation on health will vary depending on the magnitude of the framework's competing effects in specific country settings. The conceptual framework provides a foundation for improving design of aid effectiveness practices to mitigate negative effects from donor proliferation while preserving its potential benefits. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Bridging the Gap between Engineering Design and PK-12 Curriculum Development through the Use of the STEM Education Quality Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinnell, Margaret; Rowly, James; Preiss, Sandi; Franco, Suzanne; Blust, Rebecca; Beach, Renee

    2013-01-01

    This paper will describe a unique partnership among the Department of Teacher Education and School of Engineering at the University of Dayton (UD) and the Dayton Regional STEM Center (DRSC). This partnership resulted in the development of the STEM Education Quality Framework (SQF), a tool to guide educators in teaching, learning and refining STEM…

  10. Designing the framework for competency-based master of public health programs in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Kavya; Zodpey, Sanjay; Morgan, Alison; Gaidhane, Abhay; Syed, Zahiruddin Quazi; Kumar, Rajeev

    2013-01-01

    Competency in the practice of public health is the implicit goal of education institutions that offer master of public health (MPH) programs. With the expanding number of institutions offering courses in public health in India, it is timely to develop a common framework to ensure that graduates are proficient in critical public health. Steps such as situation assessment, survey of public health care professionals in India, and national consultation were undertaken to develop a proposed competency-based framework for MPH programs in India. The existing curricula of all 23 Indian MPH courses vary significantly in content with regard to core, concentration, and crosscutting discipline areas and course durations. The competency or learning outcome is not well defined. The findings of the survey suggest that MPH graduates in India should have competencies ranging from monitoring of health problems and epidemics in the community, applying biostatistics in public health, conducting action research, understanding social and community influence on public health developing indicators and instruments to monitor and evaluate community health programs, developing proposals, and involving community in planning, delivery, and monitoring of health programs. Competency statements were framed and mapped with domains including epidemiology, biostatistics, social and behavioral sciences, health care system, policy, planning, and financing, and environmental health sciences and a crosscutting domain that include health communication and informatics, health management and leadership, professionalism, systems thinking, and public health biology. The proposed competency-based framework for Indian MPH programs can be adapted to meet the needs of diverse, unique programs. The framework ensures the uniqueness and diversity of individual MPH programs in India while contributing to measures of overall program success.

  11. Sustainability of ARV provision in developing countries: challenging a framework based on program history

    OpenAIRE

    Azeredo, Thiago Botelho; Oliveira,Maria Auxiliadora; Santos-Pinto,Cláudia Du Bocage; Miranda,Elaine Silva; Osorio-de-Castro,Claudia Garcia Serpa

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The provision of ARVs is central to HIV/AIDS programs, because of its impact on the course of the disease and on quality of life. Although first-line treatments costs have declined, treatment-associated expenses are steeper each year. Sustainability is therefore an important variable for the success of treatment programs. A conceptual framework on sustainability of ARV provision was developed, followed by data collection instruments. The pilot study was undertaken in Brazil. Bolivia,...

  12. Suggested Curriculum Guidelines for an Effective Bilingual Program. 1972-1973. Destrezas Comunicativas del Idioma Espanol. Spanish Language Skills. Second Grade, Level 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artesia Public Schools, NM.

    This volume contains suggested curriculum guidelines for an effective bilingual program, with specific focus on Spanish language skills for the second grade level. The philosophy of the program views bilingual education as a vehicle and pedagogical tool to be used to better prepare all children to function in society. The point of departure for…

  13. Suggested Curriculum Guidelines for an Effective Bilingual Program, 1972-1973. Destrezas Comunicativas del Idioma Espanol. Spanish Language Skills. Third Grade, Level 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artesia Public Schools, NM.

    This volume contains suggested curriculum guidelines for an effective bilingual program, with specific focus on Spanish language skills for the third grade level. The philosophy of the program views bilingual education as a vehicle and pedagogical tool to be used to better prepare all children to function in society. The point of departure for…

  14. Curriculum design of emergency medical services program at the College of Applied Medical Sciences, King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alanazi AF

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abdullah Foraih AlanaziCollege of Applied Medical Sciences, King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi ArabiaBackground: The emergency medical services program at the College of Applied Medical Sciences, King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, was adapted from the integrated problem-based learning curriculum of Flinders University, Adelaide, South Australia.Purpose: The purpose of this article is to discuss the major adaptations required for adoption of the full-fledged PBL curriculum, use of sequential blocks, and multilayer alignment of the curriculum.Methods: A logical model and step-by-step approach were used to design the curriculum. Several studies using Delphi methods, focus group interviews, and expert opinions were performed to identify the priority health problems; related competencies, learning objectives, and learning strategies; the web-based curriculum for delivery; student assessment; and program evaluation.Results: Sixty priority health problems were identified for inclusion in different blocks of the curriculum. Identified competencies matched the satisfaction of different stakeholders, and ascertained learning objectives and strategies were aligned with the competencies. A full-fledged web-based curriculum was designed and an assessment was created that aligned with a blueprint of the objectives and the mode of delivery.Conclusion: Step-by-step design ensures the multilayer alignment of the curriculum, including priority health problems, competencies, objectives, student assessment, and program evaluation.Keywords: emergency medical services, problem-based learning, logical model, step-by-step approach, multilayer alignment

  15. Program evaluation of an Integrated Basic Science Medical Curriculum in Shiraz Medical School, Using CIPP Evaluation Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rooholamini, Azadeh; Amini, Mitra; Bazrafkan, Leila; Dehghani, Mohammad Reza; Esmaeilzadeh, Zohreh; Nabeiei, Parisa; Rezaee, Rita; Kojuri, Javad

    2017-07-01

    In recent years curriculum reform and integration was done in many medical schools. The integrated curriculum is a popular concept all over the world. In Shiraz medical school, the reform was initiated by stablishing the horizontal basic science integration model and Early Clinical Exposure (ECE) for undergraduate medical education. The purpose of this study was to provide the required data for the program evaluation of this curriculum for undergraduate medical students, using CIPP program evaluation model. This study is an analytic descriptive and triangulation mixed method study which was carried out in Shiraz Medical School in 2012, based on the views of professors of basic sciences courses and first and second year medical students. The study evaluated the quality of the relationship between basic sciences and clinical courses and the method of presenting such courses based on the Context, Input, Process and Product (CIPP) model. The tools for collecting data, both quantitatively and qualitatively, were some questionnaires, content analysis of portfolios, semi- structured interview and brain storming sessions. For quantitative data analysis, SPSS software, version 14, was used. In the context evaluation by modified DREEM questionnaire, 77.75%of the students believed that this educational system encourages them to actively participate in classes. Course schedule and atmosphere of class were reported suitable by 87.81% and 83.86% of students. In input domain that was measured by a researcher made questionnaire, the facilities for education were acceptable except for shortage of cadavers. In process evaluation, the quality of integrated modules presentation and Early Clinical Exposure (ECE) was good from the students' viewpoint. In product evaluation, students' brain storming, students' portfolio and semi-structured interview with faculties were done, showing some positive aspects of integration and some areas that need improvement. The main advantage of assessing

  16. Program evaluation of an integrated basic science medical curriculum in Shiraz Medical School, using CIPP evaluation model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AZADEH ROOHOLAMINI

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In recent years curriculum reform and integration was done in many medical schools. The integrated curriculum is a popular concept all over the world. In Shiraz medical school, the reform was initiated by stablishing the horizontal basic science integration model and Early Clinical Exposure (ECE for undergraduate medical education. The purpose of this study was to provide the required data for the program evaluation of this curriculum for undergraduate medical students, using CIPP program evaluation model. Methods: This study is an analytic descriptive and triangulation mixed method study which was carried out in Shiraz Medical School in 2012, based on the views of professors of basic sciences courses and first and second year medical students. The study evaluated the quality of the relationship between basic sciences and clinical courses and the method of presenting such courses based on the Context, Input, Process and Product (CIPP model. The tools for collecting data, both quantitatively and qualitatively, were some questionnaires, content analysis of portfolios, semistructured interview and brain storming sessions. For quantitative data analysis, SPSS software, version 14, was used. Results: In the context evaluation by modified DREEM questionnaire, 77.75%of the students believed that this educational system encourages them to actively participate in classes. Course schedule and atmosphere of class were reported suitable by 87.81% and 83.86% of students. In input domain that was measured by a researcher made questionnaire, the facilities for education were acceptable except for shortage of cadavers. In process evaluation, the quality of integrated modules presentation and Early Clinical Exposure (ECE was good from the students’ viewpoint. In product evaluation, students’ brain storming, students’ portfolio and semi-structured interview with faculties were done, showing some positive aspects of integration and some areas

  17. Content knowledge development in a chemistry teacher preparation program: A current potentials and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widhiyanti, Tuszie; Treagust, David F.; Mocerino, Mauro; Vishnumolakala, Venkat

    2017-08-01

    One of the essential facets in teacher education program is the development of the teachers' content knowledge and it has been suggested by many scholars that the study to analyse the process of content knowledge development in teacher education program is necessary. Regarding this, the aim of this research is to evaluate the existing program of developing pre-service chemistry teachers' content knowledge, especially in the topic about the particulate nature of matter. The curriculum of content knowledge development was analysed using the forms of the curriculum evaluation (Akker, 1998; Goodlad, Klein, and Tye (1979); Treagust, 1987). Within this framework, the curriculum was evaluated in several aspects including the vision and intention of the curriculum as mentioned in the curriculum documents (intended curriculum), the users' interpretation and perception about the curriculum (perceived curriculum), the actual process of curriculum implementation (implemented curriculum), and the outcomes of the curriculum (achieved curriculum). According to the framework used for this study, the research combined qualitative and quantitative methods of data collection and the interpretation including document analysis, classroom observation, interviews, and two-tier diagnostic test. Through this research we examined the coherence among those aspects. The results reveal that although the content knowledge development is explicitly intended in a curriculum, its implementation and lecturers' perceptions give influence in the results as appear in pre-service teachers' achievements. In general, this research provides basic information about the effectiveness of the program including the challenges and the potentials for a reconsideration of the program in the future.

  18. Introduction of blended learning in a master program: Developing an integrative mixed method evaluation framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmiel, Aviva S; Shaha, Maya; Schneider, Daniel K

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this research is to develop a comprehensive evaluation framework involving all actors in a higher education blended learning (BL) program. BL evaluation usually either focuses on students, faculty, technological or institutional aspects. Currently, no validated comprehensive monitoring tool exists that can support introduction and further implementation of BL in a higher education context. Starting from established evaluation principles and standards, concepts that were to be evaluated were firstly identified and grouped. In a second step, related BL evaluation tools referring to students, faculty and institutional level were selected. This allowed setting up and implementing an evaluation framework to monitor the introduction of BL during two succeeding recurrences of the program. The results of the evaluation allowed documenting strengths and weaknesses of the BL format in a comprehensive way, involving all actors. It has led to improvements at program, faculty and course level. The evaluation process and the reporting of the results proved to be demanding in time and personal resources. The evaluation framework allows measuring the most significant dimensions influencing the success of a BL implementation at program level. However, this comprehensive evaluation is resource intensive. Further steps will be to refine the framework towards a sustainable and transferable BL monitoring tool that finds a balance between comprehensiveness and efficiency. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. 75 FR 24824 - Energy Efficiency Program for Consumer Products: Public Meeting and Availability of the Framework...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-06

    ... of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of public meeting and... of Energy, Forrestal Building, Room 8E-089, 1000 Independence Avenue, SW., Washington, DC 20585-0121.... Department of Energy, Building Technologies Program, Mailstop EE-2J, Framework Document for Commercial...

  20. 75 FR 70852 - Energy Efficiency Program for Consumer Products: Public Meeting and Availability of the Framework...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-19

    .... Charles Llenza, U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Building... Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Building Technologies Program, EE-2J, 1000 Independence Avenue, SW... Renewable Energy, Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of public meeting and availability of the framework...

  1. A general framework for implementing NLO calculations in shower Monte Carlo programs. The POWHEG BOX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alioli, Simone [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany); Nason, Paolo [INFN, Milano-Bicocca (Italy); Oleari, Carlo [INFN, Milano-Bicocca (Italy); Milano-Bicocca Univ. (Italy); Re, Emanuele [Durham Univ. (United Kingdom). Inst. for Particle Physics Phenomenology

    2010-02-15

    In this work we illustrate the POWHEG BOX, a general computer code framework for implementing NLO calculations in shower Monte Carlo programs according to the POWHEG method. Aim of this work is to provide an illustration of the needed theoretical ingredients, a view of how the code is organized and a description of what a user should provide in order to use it. (orig.)

  2. Energy star product specification development framework: Using data and analysis to make program decisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McWhinney, Marla; Fanara, Andrew; Clark, Robin; Hershberg, Craig; Schmeltz, Rachel; Roberson, Judy

    2003-09-12

    The Product Development Team (PD) in the US Environmental Protection Agency's ENERGY STAR Labeling Program fuels the long-term market transformation process by delivering new specifications. PD's goal is to expand the reach and visibility of ENERGY STAR as well as the market for new energy-efficient products. Since 2000, PD has launched nine new ENERGY STAR specifications and continues to evaluate new program opportunities. To evaluate the ENERGY STAR carbon savings potential for a diverse group of products, PD prepared a framework for developing new and updating existing specifications that rationalizes new product opportunities and draws upon the expertise and resources of other stakeholders, including manufacturers, utilities, environmental groups and other government agencies. By systematically reviewing the potential of proposed product areas, PD makes informed decisions as to whether or not to proceed with developing a specification. In support of this strategy, PD ensures that new product specifications are consistent with the ENERGY STAR guidelines and that these guidelines are effectively communicated to stakeholders during the product development process. To date, the framework has been successful in providing consistent guidance on collecting the necessary information on which to base sound program decisions. Through the application of this framework, PD increasingly recognizes that each industry has unique market and product characteristics that can require reconciliation with the ENERGY STAR guidelines. The new framework allows PD to identify where reconciliation is needed to justify program decisions.

  3. Development and Assessment of an HIV-focused E-learning Flipped Classroom Curriculum in an Infectious Diseases Fellowship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bares, Sara; Sandkovsky, Uriel

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background Most of the care of HIV-infected patients is now provided in the clinic where there is less time for bedside teaching than in the inpatient setting. We sought to augment the clinical experience by developing an HIV-focused e-learning flipped classroom curriculum in our ID fellowship program. Methods Six e-learning modules were developed using Articulate Storyline. Topics included: HIV Diagnosis, Evaluation of the HIV-infected Patient, When to Start Antiretroviral Therapy, What to Start, HIV Resistance, and HIV Drug-Drug Interactions. Modules were made available 1 week in advance, lasted 20 minutes, and included interactive questions. Class time was spent discussing clinical cases related to the module. The IDSA “HIV Medicine in Clinical Practice” exam and pre and post-course surveys were administered to measure changes in both objective and self-perceived knowledge before and after completion of the curriculum. Wilcoxon-signed rank test was used to compare test results between the 2 periods. Results Seven fellows participated in the curriculum and 10 fellows completed the pre and post-tests (3 fellows tested only with pretest as they were finishing fellowship, 4 fellows took both pre and post- test, and 3 fellows only took the post-test). Overall scores between pre-and post-test were not significantly different between pooled pre- and post-test results (7 fellows took each test) (P = 0.8). Among the 4 fellows who completed both tests, there was a trend to improved scores (P = 0.06). 7 of 7 fellows completed the pre- and post-curriculum surveys. All agreed or strongly agreed that the flipped classroom model enhanced their learning of the material and self-perceived knowledge improved in all assessed areas following participation in the curriculum (see Figure). Conclusion The introduction of the e-learning modules in a flipped classroom format was well received by fellows and allowed for better preparation and discussion of HIV-related topics

  4. Humanities for medical students? A qualitative study of a medical humanities curriculum in a medical school program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Troein Margareta

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Today, there is a trend towards establishing the medical humanities as a component of medical education. However, medical humanities programs that exist within the context of a medical school can be problematic. The aim of this study was to explore problems that can arise with the establishment of a medical humanities curriculum in a medical school program. Methods Our theoretical approach in this study is informed by derridean deconstruction and by post-structuralist analysis. We examined the ideology of the Humanities and Medicine program at Lund University, Sweden, the practical implementation of the program, and how ideology and practice corresponded. Examination of the ideology driving the humanities and medicine program was based on a critical reading of all available written material concerning the Humanities and Medicine project. The practice of the program was examined by means of a participatory observation study of one course, and by in-depth interviews with five students who participated in the course. Data was analysed using a hermeneutic editing approach. Results The ideological language used to describe the program calls it an interdisciplinary learning environment but at the same time shows that the conditions of the program are established by the medical faculty's agenda. In practice, the "humanities" are constructed, defined and used within a medical frame of reference. Medical students have interesting discussions, acquire concepts and enjoy the program. But they come away lacking theoretical structure to understand what they have learned. There is no place for humanities students in the program. Conclusion A challenge facing cross-disciplinary programs is creating an environment where the disciplines have equal standing and contribution.

  5. Developing Culturally Sensitive Parent Education Programs for Immigrant Families: The Helping Youth Succeed Curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zha Blong Xiong

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the process by which the Helping Youth Succeed (HYS curriculum was developed for Cambodian, Hmong, Lao, and Vietnamese immigrants in the United States to help address and minimize conflicts between immigrant parents and their adolescent children. A detailed explanation of this model is provided to encourage the development of additional culturally specific parent education curricula for other immigrant/refugee groups and/or diversepopulations.

  6. Stimulated Hyposalivary Flow Rates in Healthcare Students in an Interprofessional Awareness Educational Program Curriculum

    OpenAIRE

    Wiener, R. Constance; Morgan, Susan; Swager, Lauren; DeBiase, Christina; Lilly, Christa L.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. Hyposalivation influences quality of life and medication compliance. However, oral health knowledge (in general) and knowledge about hyposalivation (in particular) are often lacking in nondental healthcare professional’s curricula. Additionally, hyposalivation has not been adequately studied in young adults. The purpose for this study is twofold: to use an interprofessional educational curriculum to increase nondental healthcare students’ knowledge about oral health and salivary test...

  7. The image of psychology programs: the value of the instrumental-symbolic framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hoye, Greet; Lievens, Filip; De Soete, Britt; Libbrecht, Nele; Schollaert, Eveline; Baligant, Dimphna

    2014-01-01

    As competition for funding and students intensifies, it becomes increasingly important for psychology programs to have an image that is attractive and makes them stand out from other programs. The current study uses the instrumental-symbolic framework from the marketing domain to determine the image of different master's programs in psychology and examines how these image dimensions relate to student attraction and competitor differentiation. The samples consist of both potential students (N = 114) and current students (N = 68) of three psychology programs at a Belgian university: industrial and organizational psychology, clinical psychology, and experimental psychology. The results demonstrate that both instrumental attributes (e.g., interpersonal activities) and symbolic trait inferences (e.g., sincerity) are key components of the image of psychology programs and predict attractiveness as well as differentiation. In addition, symbolic image dimensions seem more important for current students of psychology programs than for potential students.

  8. The hidden curriculum in radiology residency programs: A path to isolation or integration?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Deven, T. [Department of Medical Imaging, Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry (Canada); Hibbert, K., E-mail: khibbert@uwo.ca [Faculty of Education, Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry (Canada); Faden, L. [Faculty of Education, The University of Western Ontario (Canada); Chhem, R.K. [Institute of History, Philosophy and Ethics of Medicine, Ulm University, Ulm (Germany)

    2013-05-15

    Purpose: In this qualitative case study involving five academic Radiology centres across Canada, the authors seek to identify the hidden curriculum. Methods: A qualitative case study methodology was used for its potential to explore and provide rich descriptions and allow for the in-depth analysis of multiple data sources that include official institutional documents, surveys, observations and interviews (including undergraduate students, postgraduate, radiologists, imaging scientists, residents, faculty and administrators). This study relied on 48 interviews and involved primary data analysis by the core research team, and a secondary analysis by external examiners. Results: The results revealed that in four of the five major centres studied, a hidden curriculum of isolation prevailed, reinforcing an image of the radiologist as an independent operator within an organization dependent upon collaboration for optimal performance. The fifth site exhibited a hidden curriculum of collaboration and support, although the messages received were conflicting when addressing issues around teaching. Conclusions: The authors conclude by noting two possibilities for medical imaging departments to consider that of isolation or that of integration. They examine the implications of each and propose a way forward that situates Radiology as the crossroads of medicine. As such, the need for a new, generative metaphor reasserts the importance of recognizing the role and function of scholarship in teaching and learning contexts across Canada.

  9. The hidden curriculum in radiology residency programs: a path to isolation or integration?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Deven, T; Hibbert, K; Faden, L; Chhem, R K

    2013-05-01

    In this qualitative case study involving five academic Radiology centres across Canada, the authors seek to identify the hidden curriculum. A qualitative case study methodology was used for its potential to explore and provide rich descriptions and allow for the in-depth analysis of multiple data sources that include official institutional documents, surveys, observations and interviews (including undergraduate students, postgraduate, radiologists, imaging scientists, residents, faculty and administrators). This study relied on 48 interviews and involved primary data analysis by the core research team, and a secondary analysis by external examiners. The results revealed that in four of the five major centres studied, a hidden curriculum of isolation prevailed, reinforcing an image of the radiologist as an independent operator within an organization dependent upon collaboration for optimal performance. The fifth site exhibited a hidden curriculum of collaboration and support, although the messages received were conflicting when addressing issues around teaching. The authors conclude by noting two possibilities for medical imaging departments to consider that of isolation or that of integration. They examine the implications of each and propose a way forward that situates Radiology as the crossroads of medicine. As such, the need for a new, generative metaphor reasserts the importance of recognizing the role and function of scholarship in teaching and learning contexts across Canada. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Survey of Current Clinical and Curriculum Practices of Postgraduate Pediatric Dentistry Programs in Nonintravenous Conscious Sedation in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, Aline; Ocanto, Romer; Drukteinis, Lesbia; Hardigan, Patrick C

    2016-10-15

    The purposes of this study were to: (1) describe the sedation protocols of postgraduate pediatric dentistry programs (PPDPs) in the U.S.; (2) evaluate how consistent they were with current American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry sedation guidelines and Commission on Dental Accreditation (CODA) sedation curriculum requirements; (3) identify barriers to and tools for implementing these guidelines; and (4) determine the independent association between PPDPs' adherence to guidelines and the program setting. In February 2015, a 40-item questionnaire was e-mailed to all postgraduate pediatric dentistry program directors (PPDPDs) of CODA-accredited programs in the U.S. (n equals 74). Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and Kruskal-Wallis and pairwise Nemenyi tests. Fifty-two PPDPDs responded (70 percent). Since the 2013 change in CODA sedation requirements, only a limited number of PPDPs (36 percent) were found to be noncompliant with CODA standards. PPDPDs trained at hospital-based programs were found to direct programs that were more compliant with CODA sedation standards (PPediatric Dentistry and Commission on Dental Accreditation sedation standards.

  11. The Dialectical Psychoeducational Workshop (DPEW): the conceptual framework and curriculum for a preventative intervention for males at risk for IPV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanaugh, Mary M; Solomon, Phyllis; Gelles, Richard J

    2011-08-01

    Current programs aimed at reducing intimate partner violence (IPV) have demonstrated little effect on at-risk males, who may potentially engage in acts of IPV. Dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) provides the conceptual and empirical foundation for the dialectical psychoeducational workshop (DPEW). The DPEW offers a targeted preventative intervention for individuals potentially at risk for IPV. This article offers the rationale and theoretical basis for a specialized preventative approach to IPV and delineates a brief psychoeducational program that may stimulate further research and provide an alternate preventative intervention strategy in an area in need of innovative programs.

  12. Curriculum as natural history: A life-history case study of an alternative science learning program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windward, Rolfe

    The aim of this study is to further our understanding of the nexus between individual development and conceptions of science curriculum with particular emphasis upon root metaphors. The initial conceptual springboard is based upon the rather consistent conflation of selectionist (Darwinian) and developmental cosmologies in most scientific thinking about complex systems. A partial goal of this study then being the development of a visual metaphor that offers a more coherent heuristic of what it means to be a knowing individual within a changing ecosocial reality. This is a paradigmatic examination and it is conjectured that the root assumptions underlying the bulk of curriculum theory are unrealistic, that the appearance of stability in curriculum and practice is largely a byproduct of misclassification or even category error, and that reconceptualizing curriculum as a description of an adaptive system rather than a system-by-design will assist in unpacking a number of problems including the so-called theory-practice gap. The basic procedure is a life-history case study of seven participants--three female high school students, three male high school students, and their teacher--tracked between three learning contexts: the classroom, an extracurricular science "institute," and a virtual astronomy class. The biography of the researcher is incorporated both as a matter of methodology and as a matter of interventionist stance. It is concluded that the 'science institute' embodied a number of innovative features, including more equality among all participants, that also allowed masking-off of countervailing forces perceived as antithetical to its own development. Its organization was not stable but constituted a strongly expansive instrument in the individuation of all participants, allowing the students to more clearly visualize the multiple natures of science and themselves as individuals and scientists. It also allowed the teacher involved to leverage change in his

  13. Developing a Communication Curriculum and Workshop for an Internal Medicine Residency Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salib, Sherine; Glowacki, Elizabeth M; Chilek, Lindsay A; Mackert, Michael

    2015-06-01

    Learning effective communication is essential for physicians. Effective communication has been shown to affect healthcare outcomes, including patient safety, adherence rates, patient satisfaction, and enhanced teamwork. The importance of these skills has become even more apparent in recent years, with value-based purchasing programs and federal measures of patient satisfaction in the form of Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems scores becoming an important part of measuring the performance of a healthcare facility. We conducted a communication workshop for internal medicine residents at the University of Texas. Topics covered included the Acknowledge, Introduce, Duration, Explanation, Thank You framework; managing up; resolving conflicts; error disclosure; new medication and discharge counseling; intercultural communication; understanding Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems scores; and avoiding burnout. Because it would have been logistically difficult to block whole days for the workshop, the various topics were offered to residents during their regular noon conference hour for several consecutive days. After the workshop, the residents completed an anonymous questionnaire regarding their perception of the importance of various aspects of communication in patient care. The majority of the participating residents perceived the various communication skills explored during the workshop to be highly important in patient care. Concurrently, however, most residents believed that they had initially overestimated their knowledge about these various communication issues. Some demographic differences in the responses also were noted. Our findings demonstrate a needs gap and an area of potential improvement in medical education. We anticipate that with the growing understanding of the importance of communication skills in the healthcare setting, there will be an enhanced role for teaching these skills at all levels of

  14. Framework for Creating Intuitive Motion Content for Humanoid Robots Based on Programming by Demonstration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gi il Kwon

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we propose an easy to use framework for creating motion content for humanoid robots based on user demonstrations. A wearable interface is proposed and a prototype of the wearable interface is implemented to provide an intuitive content creation method for users who lack expertise in robot programming. An algorithm for transferring human motion to a robot and creating editable motions is presented to improve the reusability of the demonstrated motions. For generating various motions from a limited number of demonstrations, two motion models are presented and diverse motions are generated from the motion models. A humanoid robot, AMIO, is used to validate the proposed motion generation framework.

  15. Development of a curriculum and training program in Woman Veterans Health for Internal Medical Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceylony, Manju; Porhomayon, Jahan; Pourafkari, Leili; Nader, Nader D

    2017-09-26

    Internal Medicine residents must develop competency as Primary Care Providers, but a gap exists in their curriculum and training with regard to women's reproductive health. With increasing need in VA due to new influx of women veterans it poses problems in recruitment of competent physicians trained in Women's health. An intensive, one-month women's reproductive health curriculum with hands on experience for Internal Medicine residents was provided. Curriculum was taught to the residents who rotated at the Women's Health Clinic for one month. Pre-test and post-test exams were administered. Increase in knowledge of residents in providing gender specific evaluations and management was objectively assessed by changes in post-test scores. Data were analyzed for statistically significant improvement in written tests scores. Total of 47 Internal Medicine residents rotated through Women's Health Center during the evaluation period. All residents completed both pre-test and post-test exams. The average time to complete the pre-test was 20.5 ± 5.4 min and 19.5 ± 4.8 min for post-test. There was no correlation between the time to complete the pre-test exam and the post-test exam. The total score was significantly improved from 8.5 ± 1.6 to 13.2 ± 1.8 (p training with information on women's health that enables them to provide safe and gender appropriate care in primary care settings. This practice will reduce the need for frequent referrals for specialized care and thus provide cost saving for patient and health care on the whole.

  16. A Simulation Modeling Framework to Optimize Programs Using Financial Incentives to Motivate Health Behavior Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Sanjay; Kiernan, Michaela

    2016-01-01

    While increasingly popular among mid- to large-size employers, using financial incentives to induce health behavior change among employees has been controversial, in part due to poor quality and generalizability of studies to date. Thus, fundamental questions have been left unanswered: To generate positive economic returns on investment, what level of incentive should be offered for any given type of incentive program and among which employees? We constructed a novel modeling framework that systematically identifies how to optimize marginal return on investment from programs incentivizing behavior change by integrating commonly collected data on health behaviors and associated costs. We integrated "demand curves" capturing individual differences in response to any given incentive with employee demographic and risk factor data. We also estimated the degree of self-selection that could be tolerated: that is, the maximum percentage of already-healthy employees who could enroll in a wellness program while still maintaining positive absolute return on investment. In a demonstration analysis, the modeling framework was applied to data from 3000 worksite physical activity programs across the nation. For physical activity programs, the incentive levels that would optimize marginal return on investment ($367/employee/year) were higher than average incentive levels currently offered ($143/employee/year). Yet a high degree of self-selection could undermine the economic benefits of the program; if more than 17% of participants came from the top 10% of the physical activity distribution, the cost of the program would be expected to always be greater than its benefits. Our generalizable framework integrates individual differences in behavior and risk to systematically estimate the incentive level that optimizes marginal return on investment. © The Author(s) 2015.

  17. Business Education for Plastic Surgeons: A Systematic Review, Development, and Implementation of a Business Principles Curriculum in a Residency Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarrabi, Bahar; Burce, Karen K; Seal, Stella M; Lifchez, Scott D; Redett, Richard J; Frick, Kevin D; Dorafshar, Amir H; Cooney, Carisa M

    2017-05-01

    Rising health care costs, decreasing reimbursement rates, and changes in American health care are forcing physicians to become increasingly business-minded. Both academic and private plastic surgeons can benefit from being educated in business principles. The authors conducted a systematic review to identify existing business curricula and integrated a business principles curriculum into residency training. The authors anonymously surveyed their department regarding perceived importance of business principles and performed a systematic literature review from 1993 to 2013 using PubMed and Embase to identify residency training programs that had designed/implemented business curricula. Subsequently, the authors implemented a formal, quarterly business curriculum. Thirty-two of 36 physicians (88.9 percent; 76.6 percent response rate) stated business principles are either "pretty important" or "very important" to being a doctor. Only 36 percent of faculty and 41 percent of trainees had previous business instruction. The authors identified 434 articles in the systematic review: 29 documented formal business curricula. Twelve topics were addressed, with practice management/administration (n = 22) and systems-based practice (n = 6) being the most common. Four articles were from surgical specialties: otolaryngology (n = 1), general surgery (n = 2), and combined general surgery/plastic surgery (n = 1). Teaching formats included lectures and self-directed learning modules; outcomes and participant satisfaction were reported inconsistently. From August of 2013 to June of 2015, the authors held eight business principles sessions. Postsession surveys demonstrated moderately to extremely satisfied responses in 75 percent or more of resident/fellow respondents (n = 13; response rate, 48.1 percent) and faculty (n = 9; response rate, 45.0 percent). Business principles can be integrated into residency training programs. Having speakers familiar with the physician audience and a

  18. Can programming frameworks bring smartphones into the mainstream of psychological science?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukasz Piwek

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Smartphones continue to provide huge potential for psychological science and the advent of novel research frameworks brings new opportunities for researchers who have previously struggled to develop smartphone applications. However, despite this renewed promise, smartphones have failed to become a standard item within psychological research. Here we consider the key barriers that continue to limit smartphone adoption within psychological science and how these barriers might be diminishing in light of ResearchKit and other recent methodological developments. We conclude that while these programming frameworks are certainly a step in the right direction it remains challenging to create usable research-orientated applications with current frameworks. Smartphones may only become an asset for psychology and social science as a whole when development software that is both easy to use, secure, and becomes freely available.

  19. Faculty Perceptions of Effective Practices for Utilizing a Framework to Develop a Concept-Based Curriculum in Nursing Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magorian, Kathryn G.

    2013-01-01

    All programs of healthcare education face increasing change and daunting challenges to prepare new graduates for the real world of practice as care providers in complex systems. The necessity for change in nursing education is at a critical level, called on from a variety of sources. New nurses must be able to enter practice as competent, safe,…

  20. The "Comparing Approaches" Workshop as an Introduction to Inquiry-Based Learning, Curriculum Design, and the Professional Development Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, E. L.

    2010-12-01

    The Comparing Approaches to Hands-On Science workshop was developed by the Institute for Inquiry at the Exploratorium and incorporated as a half-day activity into the Center for Adaptive Optics Professional Development Program (PDP) and other teaching venues supported by PDP participants and staff. The Comparing Approaches activity builds upon the common assumption that "hands-on" learning experiences develop deeper and longer-lasting understanding of material. It challenges teacher-participants to reflect on why that is and to consider how hands-on learning is most effectively incorporated into a science curriculum to meet the defined content, scientific process, and attitudinal objectives. I have participated in the Comparing Approaches workshop at several venues and with a variety of roles, and in this paper I describe how the workshop is effective as preparation for exploring the concept of inquiry and inquiry-based learning and as an introduction to "backward" curriculum design and to the PDP as a whole. I discuss challenges I faced as a participant, as a facilitator (instructor) for the activity, and as a discussion leader and provide advice for future implementations of the workshop.

  1. Development of a New Curriculum in a Positive Youth Development Program: The Project P.A.T.H.S. in Hong Kong

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel T. L. Shek

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The design of a new curriculum in a positive youth development program (Project P.A.T.H.S. in Hong Kong is outlined. The Tier 1 Program of the original phase of the Project P.A.T.H.S. is a universal positive youth development program for students in Secondary 1 to Secondary 3 with the curricula developed by a research team comprising scholars in different disciplines (e.g., social work, psychology, and education. The 120 teaching units are designed with reference to 15 positive youth development constructs identified in the successful positive youth development programs. In the extension phase of the project, a new curriculum with 60 teaching units is developed in accordance with these 15 constructs with specific reference to five major adolescent developmental issues. These issues include substance abuse, sexuality issue, Internet addiction, bullying, and money and success issues. The principles underlying the program development and implementation strategies are outlined.

  2. Outcomes-based curriculum development and student evaluation in nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hesook Suzie

    2012-12-01

    A curriculum development model is presented to examine the processes necessary to develop new programs or evaluate existing programs within the philosophy of outcomes-based education in nursing, especially in the context of accreditation. The philosophy of outcomes-based education is to produce individuals who can demonstrate the evidence of competencies in designated areas of education. For nursing education, this means competencies in performing the role of professional nursing as defined by the profession and social needs at the beginning level upon completing a nursing program. A curriculum development model has been developed analytically based on the literature and experiences. A 10-step process framework incorporating the tenets of outcomes-based nursing education is illustrated. This curriculum development framework can be applied in developing new educational programs in nursing or to evaluate and revise existing programs in anticipation of the accreditation process that is moving with a full force in such countries as Korea.

  3. Curriculum Policies for Students with Special Needs in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aspland, Tania; Datta, Poulomee; Talukdar, Joy

    2012-01-01

    The curriculum policies for students with special needs across Australia have been reviewed. The Curriculum Framework in the Australian Capital Territory is used to inform their school based curriculum. The Northern Territory Curriculum Framework describes what learners are expected to achieve and what learners have achieved. The New South Wales…

  4. A mathematical programming framework for early stage design of wastewater treatment plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bozkurt, Hande; Quaglia, Alberto; Gernaey, Krist

    2015-01-01

    The increasing number of alternative wastewater treatment technologies and stricter effluent requirements make the optimal treatment process selection for wastewater treatment plant design a complicated problem. This task, defined as wastewater treatment process synthesis, is currently based on e...... the design problem is formulated as a Mixed Integer (Non)linear Programming problem e MI(N)LP e and solved. A case study is formulated and solved to highlight the application of the framework. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  5. Negotiating Resistance to Multiculturalism in a Teacher Education Curriculum: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Shelley; Vanderhaar, Judi

    2008-01-01

    This study examined a teacher education program rooted in a social justice framework and intended to infuse multicultural education throughout the curriculum. Two teacher educators designed the three-year, undergraduate program to prepare mostly White candidates from a suburban area to teach in urban elementary schools. By describing the…

  6. Cosmetology. Secondary Curriculum Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moye, Michael D.; And Others

    This curriculum guide is designed to offer guidelines along with supporting resources and teaching ideas from which the local secondary instructor can extract a cosmetology curriculum that meets local needs. Following an outline of the philosophy and goals underlying state and local vocational education programs in Georgia, the purpose and…

  7. Marketing Education Curriculum Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michigan State Univ., East Lansing. Coll. of Agriculture and Natural Resources Education Inst.

    This curriculum guide is intended to provide a common core of competencies from which to design an effective secondary marketing education program. Introductory materials include a definition of marketing education, objectives, outline of instructional content, and questions and answers regarding the curriculum guide. These practical materials are…

  8. Curriculum Development Based on the Big Picture Assessment of the Mechanical Engineering Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabri, Mohd Anas Mohd; Khamis, Nor Kamaliana; Tahir, Mohd Faizal Mat; Wahid, Zaliha; Kamal, Ahmad; Ihsan, Ariffin Mohd; Sulong, Abu Bakar; Abdullah, Shahrum

    2013-01-01

    One of the major concerns of the Engineering Accreditation Council (EAC) is the need for an effective monitoring and evaluation of program outcome domains that can be associated with courses taught under the Mechanical Engineering program. However, an effective monitoring method that can determine the results of each program outcome using Bloom's…

  9. Curriculum Mapping with Academic Analytics in Medical and Healthcare Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komenda, Martin; Víta, Martin; Vaitsis, Christos; Schwarz, Daniel; Pokorná, Andrea; Zary, Nabil; Dušek, Ladislav

    2015-01-01

    No universal solution, based on an approved pedagogical approach, exists to parametrically describe, effectively manage, and clearly visualize a higher education institution's curriculum, including tools for unveiling relationships inside curricular datasets. We aim to solve the issue of medical curriculum mapping to improve understanding of the complex structure and content of medical education programs. Our effort is based on the long-term development and implementation of an original web-based platform, which supports an outcomes-based approach to medical and healthcare education and is suitable for repeated updates and adoption to curriculum innovations. We adopted data exploration and visualization approaches in the context of medical curriculum innovations in higher education institutions domain. We have developed a robust platform, covering detailed formal metadata specifications down to the level of learning units, interconnections, and learning outcomes, in accordance with Bloom's taxonomy and direct links to a particular biomedical nomenclature. Furthermore, we used selected modeling techniques and data mining methods to generate academic analytics reports from medical curriculum mapping datasets. We present a solution that allows users to effectively optimize a curriculum structure that is described with appropriate metadata, such as course attributes, learning units and outcomes, a standardized vocabulary nomenclature, and a tree structure of essential terms. We present a case study implementation that includes effective support for curriculum reengineering efforts of academics through a comprehensive overview of the General Medicine study program. Moreover, we introduce deep content analysis of a dataset that was captured with the use of the curriculum mapping platform; this may assist in detecting any potentially problematic areas, and hence it may help to construct a comprehensive overview for the subsequent global in-depth medical curriculum

  10. Compendium of Curriculum Projects for 1991 Fulbright-Hays Seminars Abroad Program: Ancient and Modern Egypt and Israel, June 20-22, 1991.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Institute of International Education, New York, NY.

    These curriculum projects were produced by teachers who traveled to Egypt and Israel as part of the Fulbright-Hays Seminars Abroad Program. The materials developed by the educators were: Activities and Bibliography of Resources to Promote Student Involvement in a Class Study of Egypt and Egyptian Culture (Edith Baxter); Egypt at the Crossroads of…

  11. Sustainability Infused Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibarra, D. L.

    2015-12-01

    The Independent Schools Foundation Academy (ISF) in Hong Kong established a sustainability policy in 2015, which explicitly states, "an experimentally integrated, environmentally and ethically sustainable system of science education and conservation practices based on the 2012 Jeju Declaration of the World Conservation Congress will be implemented through the school". ISF Academy is a private Chinese bilingual school in Hong Kong serving over 1500 students K-12, following the framework and curriculum of the International Baccalaureate Organization (IBO). The strategy behind the implementation of this policy includes: development of a scientific sustainable curriculum that is age appropriate; establish a culture of sustainability within the ISF community and beyond to the wider HK community; install sustainable infrastructure that allows students to learn; and learn first hand sustainable living practices. It is well understood that solutions to the environmental challenges facing Hong Kong and our planet will require multiple disciplines. The current sustainability programs at ISF include: a) a whole school aerobic food waste composting system and organic farming, b) energy consumption monitoring of existing buildings, c) upcoming installation of an air pollution monitoring equipment that will correlate with the AQHI data collected by the Hong Kong government, d) a Renewable Energy Education Center (REEC) that will teach students about RE and also produce solar energy for classroom consumption, and e) student lead environmental group that manages the paper and used cooking oil recycling on campus. The Shuyuan Science and Sustainability faculty work closely with classroom teachers to ensure that the above mentioned projects are incorporated into the curriculum throughout the school. Interdisciplinary units (IDU) of study are being developed that encourage faculty and students to work across subject areas. Projects include Personal Projects, Extended Essays

  12. Developing Leaders Through Future-Aimed Curriculum: An Instructional Future-Aimed Curriculum Model, USOE Programs for Education of the Gifted and Talented.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakima School District Number 7, WA.

    The document is designed to provide the teacher of the gifted and talented child with an overview and operational procedure to facilitate the use of future-aimed learning activities for developing leadership capabilities in students. Initial sections cover elements of the future-aimed curriculum mode, definitions of terms, and descriptions of…

  13. Curriculum development for an advanced regional anesthesia education program: one institution's experience from apprenticeship to comprehensive teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouanes, Jean-Pierre P; Schwengel, Deborah; Mathur, Vineesh; Ahmed, Omar I; Hanna, Marie N

    2014-02-01

    Results of recent attitude survey studies suggest that most practicing physicians are inadequately treating postoperative pain. Residents in anesthesia are confident in performing lumbar epidural and spinal anesthesia, but many are not confident in performing the blocks with which they have the least exposure. Changes need to be made in the training processes to a comprehensive model that prepares residents to perform a wider array of blocks in postgraduate practice. Here, we describe one institution's approach to creating a standardized, advanced regional anesthesia curriculum for residents that follows the six core competencies of the ACGME. Residents received training in anatomy dissection, ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia, traditional nerve stimulation techniques, problem-based learning and simulation sessions, oral board presentation sessions, and journal club sessions. Residents kept a detailed log for their use of peripheral nerve block procedures. We have now redesigned and implemented an advanced regional anesthesia program within our institution to provide residents with experience in regional anesthesia at a competent level. Resident's knowledge in regional anesthesia did improve after the first year of implementation as reflected in improvements between the pre- and post-tests. As the advanced regional anesthesia education program continues to improve, we hope to demonstrate levels of validity, reliability, and usability by other programs.

  14. Engineering Design Skills Coverage in K-12 Engineering Program Curriculum Materials in the USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabalengula, Vivien M.; Mumba, Frackson

    2017-01-01

    The current "K-12 Science Education framework" and "Next Generation Science Standards" (NGSS) in the United States emphasise the integration of engineering design in science instruction to promote scientific literacy and engineering design skills among students. As such, many engineering education programmes have developed…

  15. Encouraging scholarship: medical school programs to promote student inquiry beyond the traditional medical curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Emily P; Borkan, Jeffrey M; Pross, Susan H; Adler, Shelley R; Nothnagle, Melissa; Parsonnet, Julie; Gruppuso, Philip A

    2010-03-01

    Many medical curricula now include programs that provide students with opportunities for scholarship beyond that provided by their traditional, core curricula. These scholarly concentration (SC) programs vary greatly in focus and structure, but they share the goal of producing physicians with improved analytic, creative, and critical-thinking skills. In this article, the authors explore models of both required and elective SC programs. They gathered information through a review of medical school Web sites and direct contact with representatives of individual programs. Additionally, they discuss in-depth the SC programs of the Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University; the University of South Florida College of Medicine; the University of California, San Francisco; and Stanford University School of Medicine. The authors describe each program's focus, participation, duration, centralization, capstone requirement, faculty involvement, and areas of concentration. Established to address a variety of challenges in the U.S. medical education system, these four programs provide an array of possible models for schools that are considering the establishment of an SC program. Although data on the impact of SC programs are lacking, the authors believe that this type of program has the potential to significantly impact the education of medical students through scholarly, in-depth inquiry and longitudinal faculty mentorship.

  16. A framework-based approach to designing simulation-augmented surgical education and training programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristancho, Sayra M; Moussa, Fuad; Dubrowski, Adam

    2011-09-01

    The goal of simulation-based medical education and training is to help trainees acquire and refine the technical and cognitive skills necessary to perform clinical procedures. When designers incorporate simulation into programs, their efforts should be in line with training needs, rather than technology. Designers of simulation-augmented surgical training programs, however, face particular problems related to identifying a framework that guides the curricular design activity to fulfill the particular requirements of such training programs. These problems include the lack of (1) an objective identification of training needs, (2) a systematic design methodology to match training objectives with simulation resources, (3) structured assessments of performance, and (4) a research-centered view to evaluate and validate systematically the educational effectiveness of the program. In this report, we present a process called "Aim - FineTune - FollowThrough" to enable the connection of the identified problems to solutions, using frameworks from psychology, motor learning, education and experimental design. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. A benchmarking program to reduce red blood cell outdating: implementation, evaluation, and a conceptual framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barty, Rebecca L; Gagliardi, Kathleen; Owens, Wendy; Lauzon, Deborah; Scheuermann, Sheena; Liu, Yang; Wang, Grace; Pai, Menaka; Heddle, Nancy M

    2015-07-01

    Benchmarking is a quality improvement tool that compares an organization's performance to that of its peers for selected indicators, to improve practice. Processes to develop evidence-based benchmarks for red blood cell (RBC) outdating in Ontario hospitals, based on RBC hospital disposition data from Canadian Blood Services, have been previously reported. These benchmarks were implemented in 160 hospitals provincewide with a multifaceted approach, which included hospital education, inventory management tools and resources, summaries of best practice recommendations, recognition of high-performing sites, and audit tools on the Transfusion Ontario website (http://transfusionontario.org). In this study we describe the implementation process and the impact of the benchmarking program on RBC outdating. A conceptual framework for continuous quality improvement of a benchmarking program was also developed. The RBC outdating rate for all hospitals trended downward continuously from April 2006 to February 2012, irrespective of hospitals' transfusion rates or their distance from the blood supplier. The highest annual outdating rate was 2.82%, at the beginning of the observation period. Each year brought further reductions, with a nadir outdating rate of 1.02% achieved in 2011. The key elements of the successful benchmarking strategy included dynamic targets, a comprehensive and evidence-based implementation strategy, ongoing information sharing, and a robust data system to track information. The Ontario benchmarking program for RBC outdating resulted in continuous and sustained quality improvement. Our conceptual iterative framework for benchmarking provides a guide for institutions implementing a benchmarking program. © 2015 AABB.

  18. MetaJC++: A flexible and automatic program transformation technique using meta framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beevi, Nadera; Reghu, M.; Chitraprasad, D.; Vinodchandra, S.

    2014-09-01

    Compiler is a tool to translate abstract code containing natural language terms to machine code. Meta compilers are available to compile more than one languages. We have developed a meta framework intends to combine two dissimilar programming languages, namely C++ and Java to provide a flexible object oriented programming platform for the user. Suitable constructs from both the languages have been combined, thereby forming a new and stronger Meta-Language. The framework is developed using the compiler writing tools, Flex and Yacc to design the front end of the compiler. The lexer and parser have been developed to accommodate the complete keyword set and syntax set of both the languages. Two intermediate representations have been used in between the translation of the source program to machine code. Abstract Syntax Tree has been used as a high level intermediate representation that preserves the hierarchical properties of the source program. A new machine-independent stack-based byte-code has also been devised to act as a low level intermediate representation. The byte-code is essentially organised into an output class file that can be used to produce an interpreted output. The results especially in the spheres of providing C++ concepts in Java have given an insight regarding the potential strong features of the resultant meta-language.

  19. What Is the Purpose of the Theses Addressing the Issue of Program Evaluation in Turkey? (The Case of Curriculum and Instruction: 1997-2015)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkin-Sahin, Senar; Tunca, Nihal

    2016-01-01

    In the current study, the aim is to investigate the theses addressing the issue of program evaluation in the field of Curriculum and Instruction (C&I) in 1997-2015. The study employed the survey model. The universe of the study consists of totally 87 theses addressing the issue of program evaluation in the field of C&I in 1997-2015. As the…

  20. Agent oriented programming: An overview of the framework and summary of recent research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoham, Yoav

    1993-01-01

    This is a short overview of the agent-oriented programming (AOP) framework. AOP can be viewed as an specialization of object-oriented programming. The state of an agent consists of components called beliefs, choices, capabilities, commitments, and possibly others; for this reason the state of an agent is called its mental state. The mental state of agents is captured formally in an extension of standard epistemic logics: beside temporalizing the knowledge and belief operators, AOP introduces operators for commitment, choice and capability. Agents are controlled by agent programs, which include primitives for communicating with other agents. In the spirit of speech-act theory, each communication primitive is of a certain type: informing, requesting, offering, etc. This document describes these features in more detail and summarizes recent results and ongoing AOP-related work.

  1. Interim Evaluation of the Tier 1 Program (Secondary 1 Curriculum of the Project P.A.T.H.S.: First Year of the Full Implementation Phase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel T. L. Shek

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available To understand the implementation quality of the Tier 1 Program (Secondary 1 Curriculum of the Project P.A.T.H.S. (Positive Adolescent Training through Holistic Social Programmes in the full implementation phase, 100 schools were randomly selected to participate in personal and/or telephone interviews regarding the quality of the implementation process of the Tier 1 Program. In the interviews, the participants described the responses of the students to the program, the perceived benefits of the program, the perceived good aspects of the program, and the areas requiring improvement, difficulties encountered in the implementation process, and perceived attributes of the worker-support scheme (“Co-Walker Scheme”. Results showed that most workers perceived that the students had positive responses to the program and the program was beneficial to the students. They also identified several good aspects in the program, although negative comments on the program design and difficulties in the implementation process were also recorded. Roughly half of the respondents had positive comments on the “Co-Walker Scheme”. In sum, the respondents generally regarded the program as beneficial to the students and they were satisfied with the Tier 1 Program (Secondary 1 Curriculum in the full implementation phase, although some implementation difficulties were also expressed.

  2. Exploring the "Black Box" of Programming: Applying Systematic Implementation Evaluation to a Structured Camp Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainieri, Tracy L.; Anderson, Denise M.

    2015-01-01

    Camp scholars have designed structured curricula to engender specific outcomes and to break down the "black box" of programming. Implementation evaluation explores how well a program operates when delivered, further breaking down the black box. The purpose of this study was to explore the implementation of a new structured camp…

  3. Peer Mentoring Program in an Interprofessional and Interdisciplinary Curriculum in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Camila Aparecida Machado; de França Carvalho, Carolina Prado; Céspedes, Isabel Cristina; de Oliveira, Flávia; Le Sueur-Maluf, Luciana

    2015-01-01

    The Federal University of São Paulo, Baixada Santista Campus was founded in 2006 with five degree-granting programs in physical education, physiotherapy, nutrition, psychology, and occupational therapy. The guiding principle behind the programs' educational mission was centered on the development of health care professionals capable of working in…

  4. Teaching Astronomy and Computation with Gaia: A New Curriculum for an Extra-curricular High School Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwab, Ellianna; Faherty, Jacqueline K.; Barua, Prachurjya; Cooper, Ellie; Das, Debjani; Simone-Gonzalez, Luna; Sowah, Maxine; Valdez, Laura; BridgeUP: STEM

    2018-01-01

    BridgeUP: STEM (BridgeUP) is a program at the American Museum of Natural History (AMNH) that seeks to empower women by providing early-career scientists with research fellowships and high-school aged women with instruction in computer science and algorithmic methods. BridgeUP achieves this goal by employing post-baccalaureate women as Helen Fellows, who, in addition to conducting their own scientific research, mentor and teach high school students from the New York City area. The courses, targeted at early high-school students, are designed to teach algorithmic thinking and scientific methodology through the lens of computational science. In this poster we present the new BridgeUP astronomy curriculum created for 9th and 10th grade girls.The astronomy course we present is designed to introduce basic concepts as well as big data manipulation through a guided exploration of Gaia (DR1). Students learn about measuring astronomical distances through hands-on lab experiments illustrating the brightness/distance relationship, angular size calculations of the height of AMNH buildings, and in-depth Hertzsprung-Russell Diagram activities. Throughout these labs, students increase their proficiency in collecting and analyzing data, while learning to build and share code in teams. The students use their new skills to create color-color diagrams of known co-moving clusters (Oh et al. 2017) in the DR1 dataset using Python, Pandas and Matplotlib. We discuss the successes and lessons learned in the first implementation of this curriculum and show the preliminary work of six of the students, who are continuing with computational astronomy research over the current school year.

  5. Pedagogical approach in the implementation of curriculum programs in nurse training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Débora Maria Vargas Makuch

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To evaluate the trends of changes in the Pedagogical Approach axis in the training of nurse practitioners. Methods: Convergent research with a mixed approach, with 63 participants from 9 nursing schools from Curitiba and metropolitan area. Data collection followed the Focus Group technique. Results: In the Pedagogical Approach axis, 66.7% of the schools reached the Advanced typology (A and 33.3% reached the Innovative typology with an Advanced Trend (ItA. From the analysis of the thematic content, seven units of context emerged. Conclusions: The continuous process experience of commitment to human beings and their context gives autonomy to students. The problematization method is an effective teaching-learning strategy for the construction of comprehensiveness. Implications for practice: The knowledge of pedagogical trends favors changes in nurse's education in line with the profile of the graduates, established by the specific Brazilian Curriculum Guidelines for nursing practice, was confirmed as the intention of professors in this study.

  6. A program for the Bayesian Neural Network in the ROOT framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Jiahang; Huang, Run-Sheng; Lee, Shih-Chang

    2011-12-01

    We present a Bayesian Neural Network algorithm implemented in the TMVA package (Hoecker et al., 2007 [1]), within the ROOT framework (Brun and Rademakers, 1997 [2]). Comparing to the conventional utilization of Neural Network as discriminator, this new implementation has more advantages as a non-parametric regression tool, particularly for fitting probabilities. It provides functionalities including cost function selection, complexity control and uncertainty estimation. An example of such application in High Energy Physics is shown. The algorithm is available with ROOT release later than 5.29. Program summaryProgram title: TMVA-BNN Catalogue identifier: AEJX_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEJX_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: BSD license No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 5094 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1,320,987 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++ Computer: Any computer system or cluster with C++ compiler and UNIX-like operating system Operating system: Most UNIX/Linux systems. The application programs were thoroughly tested under Fedora and Scientific Linux CERN. Classification: 11.9 External routines: ROOT package version 5.29 or higher ( http://root.cern.ch) Nature of problem: Non-parametric fitting of multivariate distributions Solution method: An implementation of Neural Network following the Bayesian statistical interpretation. Uses Laplace approximation for the Bayesian marginalizations. Provides the functionalities of automatic complexity control and uncertainty estimation. Running time: Time consumption for the training depends substantially on the size of input sample, the NN topology, the number of training iterations, etc. For the example in this manuscript, about 7 min was used on a PC/Linux with 2.0 GHz processors.

  7. Education for a Green and Resilient Economy: An Educator Framework for Teaching Climate and Energy Literacy for K-12 Teachers Across the Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niepold, F., III; Ledley, T. S.; Lockwood, J.; Youngman, E.; Manning, C. L. B.; Sullivan, S. M.

    2015-12-01

    The U.S. is embarking on a major transition to a green and resilient economy, a monumental change requiring all sectors and segments of the population to pull together. Transforming our nation's economic, energy, and environmental systems to in this way will require a sustained level of expertise, innovation, and cooperative effort unseen since the 1940s to meet the challenges involved. Education can - and must - help people understand the true connections, the linkages and interdependencies, between the environment, our energy sources and the economy which underpin and form the very foundation of the concept of a green and resilient economy. To produce such a literate future workforce and citizenry, the United States will need to make major new investments in our educational systems. Teachers across the nation are helping to increase science-based understanding and awareness of current and future climate change, enhancing climate and energy literacy in K-12 classrooms, on college and university campuses. There has been tremendous progress to date, but there is still more work to be done. The new academic standards in mathematics and science (the Common Core State Standards in Mathematics and the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS)) represent a sea change from the nation's previous sets of standards. Addressing these standards in the currently over 40 percent of the nation's classrooms that have adopted or adapted the NGSS will demand that we prepare new and current teachers, who can effectively address the interdisciplinary nature of climate change and societal responses. To address this opportunity and need a collaboration between NOAA, TERC and CIRES has been established to develop an Educator Framework for Teaching Climate and Energy Literacy for K-12 teachers across the curriculum based on the NRC Framework for K-12 Science Education: Practices, Crosscutting Concepts, and Core Ideas. This collaboration is developing an effective way to frame the use of

  8. An overview of ethical frameworks in public health: Can they be supportive in the evaluation of programs to prevent overweight?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. ten Have (Marieke); I.D. de Beaufort (Inez); J.P. Mackenbach (Johan); A. van der Heide (Agnes)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractBackground. The prevention of overweight sometimes raises complex ethical questions. Ethical public health frameworks may be helpful in evaluating programs or policy for overweight prevention. We give an overview of the purpose, form and contents of such public health frameworks and

  9. Sustainability of ARV provision in developing countries: challenging a framework based on program history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azeredo, Thiago Botelho; Oliveira, Maria Auxiliadora; Santos-Pinto, Cláudia Du Bocage; Miranda, Elaine Silva; Osorio-de-Castro, Claudia Garcia Serpa

    2017-08-01

    The provision of ARVs is central to HIV/AIDS programs, because of its impact on the course of the disease and on quality of life. Although first-line treatments costs have declined, treatment-associated expenses are steeper each year. Sustainability is therefore an important variable for the success of treatment programs. A conceptual framework on sustainability of ARV provision was developed, followed by data collection instruments. The pilot study was undertaken in Brazil. Bolivia, Peru and Mozambique, were visited. Key informants were identified and interviewed. Investigation of sustainability related to ARV provision involved implementation and routinization events of provision schemes. Evidence of greater sustainability potential was observed in Peru, where provision is implemented and routinized by the National HIV/AIDS program and expenditures met by the government. In Mozambique, provision is dependent on donations and external aid, but the country displays a great effort to incorporate ARV provision and care in routine healthcare activities. Bolivia, in addition to external dependence on financing and management of drug supply, presents problems regarding implementation and routinization. The conceptual framework was useful in recognizing events that influence sustainable ARV provision in these countries.

  10. A Model for a Doctor of Psychology Program in Forensic Psychology: Curriculum and Rationale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenster, C. Abraham; And Others

    1976-01-01

    An overview of the objectives and courses of a doctoral program in forensic psychology is provided. Forensic psychology is the application of psychological methods, principles, and skills to the relevant needs of the legal system. (DE)

  11. Curriculum Design Issues in Developing a Doctor of Philosophy Program in Aeronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    A Ph.D. degree program in the non-engineering aeronautical/aerospace sciences (aeronology) will likely be required in the near future to meet the increasing demands for qualified faculty, administrators, and industry representatives within the aviati...

  12. iOS Game Development using SpriteKit Framework with Swift Programming Language

    OpenAIRE

    Gurung, Lal

    2016-01-01

    iOS is a mobile operating system for Apple manufactured phones and tablets. Mobile Gaming Industries are growing very fast, and compatibility with iOS is becoming very popular among game developers. The aim of this Bachelor’s thesis was to find the best available game development tools for iOS platform. The 2D game named Lapland was developed using Apple’s own native framework, SpriteKit. The game was written with the SpriteKit programming language. The combination of SpriteKit and Swift...

  13. Communication skills curriculum for foreign medical graduates in an internal medicine residency program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaswamy, Ravishankar; Williams, Alicia; Clark, Elizabeth M; Kelley, Amy S

    2014-11-01

    Effective communication is an important aspect of caring for the elderly, who are more likely to have multimorbidity, limited health literacy, and psychosocial barriers to care. About half of Internal Medicine (IM) trainees in the United States are foreign medical graduates, and may not have been exposed to prior communication skills education. This novel communication skills curriculum for IM interns aimed to increase trainees' confidence and use of specific communication tools with older adults, particularly in delivering bad news and conducting family meetings. The workshop consisted of two interactive sessions in a small group with two learners and one or two facilitators, during the 4-week geriatrics block in IM internship training year. Twenty-three IM interns at an urban Veterans Affairs Medical Center were surveyed at the beginning and at the end of the 4-week block and 3 months after completion of the workshop about their knowledge, confidence, and skill in communication and asked about challenges to effective communication with older adults. The primary outcome measure was change in self-reported confidence and behavior in communication at 4 weeks. On a 4-point Likert scale, there was average improvement of 0.70 in self-reported confidence in communication, which was sustained 3 months after completion of the workshop. Participants reported several patient, physician, and system barriers to effective communication. Communication skills education in a small-group setting and the opportunity for repeated practice and self-reflection resulted in a sustained increase in overall confidence in IM interns in communication with older adults and may help overcome certain patient- and physician-specific communication barriers. © 2014, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2014, The American Geriatrics Society.

  14. Communication Skills Curriculum for Foreign Medical Graduates in an Internal Medicine Residency Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaswamy, Ravishankar; Williams, Alicia; Clark, Elizabeth M.; Kelley, Amy S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Effective communication is an important aspect of caring for the elderly, who are more likely to have multimorbidity, limited health literacy and psychosocial barriers to care. About half of Internal Medicine (IM) trainees in the United States are foreign medical graduates, and may not have been exposed to prior communication skills education. This novel communication skills curriculum for IM interns aimed to increase trainees' confidence and use of specific communication tools with older adults, particularly in delivering bad news and conducting family meetings. Methods The workshop consisted of 2 interactive sessions, in a small group with 2 learners and 1-2 facilitators, during the Geriatrics block of the internship year. Twenty-three IM interns were surveyed at the beginning and at the end of the 4-week block and at 3 months after completion of the workshop about their knowledge, confidence and skill in communication, and asked about any challenges to effective communication with older patients. The primary outcome measure was change in self-reported confidence and behavior in communication at 4 weeks. Results On a 4-point Likert scale, there was an average improvement of 0.70 in self-reported confidence in communication, which sustained at 3 months after completion of the workshop. Participants reported several patient, physician and system barriers to effective communication. Conclusion Communication skills education in a small-group setting and the opportunity for repeated practice and self-reflection resulted in sustained increase in overall confidence among IM interns in communication with older adults, and may help overcome certain patient and physician-specific communication barriers. PMID:25354834

  15. Gasoline Engine Mechanics. Florida Vocational Program Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    University of South Florida, Tampa. Dept. of Adult and Vocational Education.

    This vocational program guide is intended to assist in the organization, operation, and evaluation of a program in gasoline engine mechanics in school districts, area vocational centers, and community colleges. The following topics are covered: job duties of small-engine mechanics; program content (curriculum framework and student performance…

  16. Commercial Art. Florida Vocational Program Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    University of South Florida, Tampa. Dept. of Adult and Vocational Education.

    This document contains a vocational program guide and Career Merit Achievement Plan (Career MAP) for secondary and postsecondary commercial art. The guide contains the following sections: occupational description; program content (curriculum framework and student performance standards); program implementation (student admission criteria,…

  17. Marketing Education. Vocational Education Program Courses Standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee. Div. of Vocational, Adult, and Community Education.

    This document contains vocational education program courses standards (curriculum frameworks and student performance standards) for exploratory courses, practical arts courses, and job preparatory programs in marketing offered at the secondary or postsecondary level as a part of Florida's comprehensive vocational education program. Each standard…

  18. Evaluation of Capacity-Building Program of District Health Managers in India: A Contextualized Theoretical Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prashanth, N. S.; Marchal, Bruno; Kegels, Guy; Criel, Bart

    2014-01-01

    Performance of local health services managers at district level is crucial to ensure that health services are of good quality and cater to the health needs of the population in the area. In many low- and middle-income countries, health services managers are poorly equipped with public health management capacities needed for planning and managing their local health system. In the south Indian Tumkur district, a consortium of five non-governmental organizations partnered with the state government to organize a capacity-building program for health managers. The program consisted of a mix of periodic contact classes, mentoring and assignments and was spread over 30 months. In this paper, we develop a theoretical framework in the form of a refined program theory to understand how such a capacity-building program could bring about organizational change. A well-formulated program theory enables an understanding of how interventions could bring about improvements and an evaluation of the intervention. In the refined program theory of the intervention, we identified various factors at individual, institutional, and environmental levels that could interact with the hypothesized mechanisms of organizational change, such as staff’s perceived self-efficacy and commitment to their organizations. Based on this program theory, we formulated context–mechanism–outcome configurations that can be used to evaluate the intervention and, more specifically, to understand what worked, for whom and under what conditions. We discuss the application of program theory development in conducting a realist evaluation. Realist evaluation embraces principles of systems thinking by providing a method for understanding how elements of the system interact with one another in producing a given outcome. PMID:25121081

  19. Evaluation of capacity-building program of district health managers in India: a contextualized theoretical framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prashanth, N S; Marchal, Bruno; Kegels, Guy; Criel, Bart

    2014-01-01

    Performance of local health services managers at district level is crucial to ensure that health services are of good quality and cater to the health needs of the population in the area. In many low- and middle-income countries, health services managers are poorly equipped with public health management capacities needed for planning and managing their local health system. In the south Indian Tumkur district, a consortium of five non-governmental organizations partnered with the state government to organize a capacity-building program for health managers. The program consisted of a mix of periodic contact classes, mentoring and assignments and was spread over 30 months. In this paper, we develop a theoretical framework in the form of a refined program theory to understand how such a capacity-building program could bring about organizational change. A well-formulated program theory enables an understanding of how interventions could bring about improvements and an evaluation of the intervention. In the refined program theory of the intervention, we identified various factors at individual, institutional, and environmental levels that could interact with the hypothesized mechanisms of organizational change, such as staff's perceived self-efficacy and commitment to their organizations. Based on this program theory, we formulated context-mechanism-outcome configurations that can be used to evaluate the intervention and, more specifically, to understand what worked, for whom and under what conditions. We discuss the application of program theory development in conducting a realist evaluation. Realist evaluation embraces principles of systems thinking by providing a method for understanding how elements of the system interact with one another in producing a given outcome.

  20. Framework for a ground-water quality monitoring and assessment program for California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belitz, Kenneth; Dubrovsky, Neil M.; Burow, Karen; Jurgens, Bryant C.; John, Tyler

    2003-01-01

    developed a framework for a comprehensive ground-water-quality monitoring and assessment program for California. The proposed framework relies extensively on previous work conducted by the USGS through its National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) program. In particular, the NAWQA program defines three types of ground-water assessment: (1) status, the assessment of the current quality of the ground-water resource; (2) trends, the detection of changes in water quality, and (3) understanding, assessing the human and natural factors that affect ground-water quality. A Statewide, comprehensive ground-water quality-monitoring and assessment program is most efficiently accomplished by applying uniform and consistent study-design and data-collection protocols to the entire State. At the same time, a comprehensive program should be relevant at a variety of scales, and therefore needs to retain flexibility to address regional and local issues. Consequently, many of the program components include a predominant element that will be consistently applied in all basins, and a secondary element that may be applied in specific basins where local conditions warrant attention.

  1. Development and applications of an outcomes assessment framework for care management programs in learning health systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lin; Kuntz-Melcavage, Kara; Forrest, Christopher B; Lu, Yanyan; Piet, Leslie; Evans, Kathy; Uriyo, Maria; Sherry, Melissa; Richardson, Regina; Hawkins, Michelle; Neale, Donna

    2015-01-01

    To develop and apply an outcomes assessment framework (OAF) for care management programs in health care delivery settings. Care management (CM) refers to a regimen of organized activities that are designed to promote health in a population with particular chronic conditions or risk profiles, with focus on the triple aim for populations: improving the quality of care, advancing health outcomes, and lowering health care costs. CM has become an integral part of a care continuum for population-based health care management. To sustain a CM program, it is essential to assure and improve CM effectiveness through rigorous outcomes assessment. To this end, we constructed the OAF as the foundation of a systematic approach to CM outcomes assessment. To construct the OAF, we first systematically analyzed the operation process of a CM program; then, based on the operation analysis, we identified causal relationships between interventions and outcomes at various implementation stages of the program. This set of causal relationships established a roadmap for the rest of the outcomes assessment. Built upon knowledge from multiple disciplines, we (1) formalized a systematic approach to CM outcomes assessment, and (2) integrated proven analytics methodologies and industrial best practices into operation-oriented CM outcomes assessment. This systematic approach to OAF for assessing the outcomes of CM programs offers an opportunity to advance evidence-based care management. In addition, formalized CM outcomes assessment methodologies will enable us to compare CM effectiveness across health delivery settings.

  2. Programas de Educacion Inicial en America Latina y los Curriculos Nacionales en el siglo XXI. [Latin American Early Childhood Educational Programs and National Curriculum in the 21st Century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peralta, Maria Victoria

    2003-01-01

    Describes the history of early childhood education in Chile and recent educational reforms. Offers an overview of the Chilean Early Childhood Education program and discusses the new national curriculum and issues arising from its implementation. Describes methods taken to help implement the new curriculum nationwide and to assist teachers in…

  3. Suicide Risk Assessment Training for Psychology Doctoral Programs: Core Competencies and a Framework for Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, Robert J; Johnson, Shara M; McLaughlin, Jennifer; Rausch, Emilie M; Conroy, Mary Alice

    2013-02-01

    Clinical and counseling psychology programs currently lack adequate evidence-based competency goals and training in suicide risk assessment. To begin to address this problem, this article proposes core competencies and an integrated training framework that can form the basis for training and research in this area. First, we evaluate the extent to which current training is effective in preparing trainees for suicide risk assessment. Within this discussion, sample and methodological issues are reviewed. Second, as an extension of these methodological training issues, we integrate empirically- and expert-derived suicide risk assessment competencies from several sources with the goal of streamlining core competencies for training purposes. Finally, a framework for suicide risk assessment training is outlined. The approach employs Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) methodology, an approach commonly utilized in medical competency training. The training modality also proposes the Suicide Competency Assessment Form (SCAF), a training tool evaluating self- and observer-ratings of trainee core competencies. The training framework and SCAF are ripe for empirical evaluation and potential training implementation.

  4. The Triple P Implementation Framework: the Role of Purveyors in the Implementation and Sustainability of Evidence-Based Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWilliam, Jenna; Brown, Jacquie; Sanders, Matthew R; Jones, Liz

    2016-07-01

    Evidence-based programs are considered critical in the human services field if major social and health problems are to be addressed. Despite the large number of programs that have been developed and implemented, there is much to learn about how to effectively implement these programs in community settings. One perspective that is rarely represented in the literature is that of the purveyor organization (an organization that actively works to disseminate and support the implementation of a program or practice). This paper introduces the Triple P Implementation Framework, developed by the program's purveyor organization, and discusses principles underlying the design and implementation of the Framework. The Framework incorporates two key underlying principles of the Triple P system: minimal sufficiency and self-regulation. Lessons learned from the application of these principles and the implementation process are discussed, along with directions for future research.

  5. Carpentry, Culinary Arts Instructor Guide and Curriculums. Bilingual Vocational Education Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Densmore, Roxanne T.

    This guide is intended to assist vocational English as a second language (VESL) instructors in teaching courses in carpentry and the culinary arts to residents of Navajo reservations. The first section outlines the rationale and content of the two training programs as well as the basic VESL objectives that they seek to address. The next section, a…

  6. Rapid Growth of Psychology Programs in Turkey: Undergraduate Curriculum and Structural Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sümer, Nebi

    2016-01-01

    Similar to the other developing countries, undergraduate psychology programs in Turkish universities have rapidly grown in the last two decades. Although this sharp increment signifies the need for psychologists, it has also caused a number of challenges for effective teaching of psychology. The department chairs (N = 42) were interviewed with an…

  7. Communicating across the Curriculum in an Undergraduate Business Program: Management 100--Leadership and Communication in Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuleja, Elizabeth A.; Greenhalgh, Anne M.

    2008-01-01

    Educating undergraduate business students in the 21st century requires more than addressing the quantitative side of business; rather, it calls for including the more qualitative "soft skills," such as speaking and writing. This article examines the design, delivery, and effectiveness of an undergraduate program dedicated to leadership,…

  8. Linking Curriculum and Learning to Facilities: Arizona State University's GK-12 Sustainable Schools Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elser, Monica M.; Pollari, Lynette; Frisk, Erin; Wood, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Arizona State University's "Sustainability Science for Sustainable Schools program" brings together graduate students, sustainability researchers, high school teachers and students, and school or district administrators in a project designed to address the challenge of becoming a "sustainable school." Funded by the National…

  9. Situating Information Literacy within the Curriculum: Using a Rubric to Shape a Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jastram, Iris; Leebaw, Danya; Tompkins, Heather

    2014-01-01

    Rubrics are a rapidly growing subfield of information literacy assessment, providing a powerful tool for understanding student learning. This paper explores the role that the creation and application of an information literacy rubric can play in program development. Because of the Information Literacy in Student Writing assessment project at…

  10. Evaluation of the 2006 and 2015 Turkish Education Program in Secondary School Curriculum in Turkey in Terms of Critical Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aytan, Talat

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the primary school second stage Turkish Education Curriculum effectuated in 2006 and the secondary school Turkish Education Curriculum effectuated in 2015 comparatively in terms of critical thinking. Of qualitative research designs, document analysis approach and content analysis were adopted for the…

  11. Reconceptualizing Curriculum Politics: A Case Study of an ESP Program for Vocational High School Students in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Yi-Hsuan Gloria

    2017-01-01

    A curriculum is a form of politics (Apple, 1993). The politics of a curriculum defines what is legitimate and valued and what is not. In Taiwan, the objectives of vocational high school (VHS) education are to prepare students to acquire relevant professional knowledge and practical skills and to integrate them into their future career development.…

  12. A framework for conducting a national study of substance abuse treatment programs serving American Indian and Alaska native communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novins, Douglas K; Moore, Laurie A; Beals, Janette; Aarons, Gregory A; Rieckmann, Traci; Kaufman, Carol E

    2012-09-01

    Because of their broad geographic distribution, diverse ownership and operation, and funding instability, it is a challenge to develop a framework for studying substance abuse treatment programs serving American Indian and Alaska Native communities at a national level. This is further complicated by the historic reluctance of American Indian and Alaska Native communities to participate in research. We developed a framework for studying these substance abuse treatment programs (n ≈ 293) at a national level as part of a study of attitudes toward, and use of, evidence-based treatments among substance abuse treatment programs serving AI/AN communities with the goal of assuring participation of a broad array of programs and the communities that they serve. Because of the complexities of identifying specific substance abuse treatment programs, the sampling framework divides these programs into strata based on the American Indian and Alaska Native communities that they serve: (1) the 20 largest tribes (by population); (2) urban AI/AN clinics; (3) Alaska Native Health Corporations; (4) other Tribes; and (5) other regional programs unaffiliated with a specific AI/AN community. In addition, the recruitment framework was designed to be sensitive to likely concerns about participating in research. This systematic approach for studying substance abuse and other clinical programs serving AI/AN communities assures the participation of diverse AI/AN programs and communities and may be useful in designing similar national studies.

  13. An overview of ethical frameworks in public health: can they be supportive in the evaluation of programs to prevent overweight?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mackenbach Johan P

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prevention of overweight sometimes raises complex ethical questions. Ethical public health frameworks may be helpful in evaluating programs or policy for overweight prevention. We give an overview of the purpose, form and contents of such public health frameworks and investigate to which extent they are useful for evaluating programs to prevent overweight and/or obesity. Methods Our search for frameworks consisted of three steps. Firstly, we asked experts in the field of ethics and public health for the frameworks they were aware of. Secondly, we performed a search in Pubmed. Thirdly, we checked literature references in the articles on frameworks we found. In total, we thus found six ethical frameworks. We assessed the area on which the available ethical frameworks focus, the users they target at, the type of policy or intervention they propose to address, and their aim. Further, we looked at their structure and content, that is, tools for guiding the analytic process, the main ethical principles or values, possible criteria for dealing with ethical conflicts, and the concrete policy issues they are applied to. Results All frameworks aim to support public health professionals or policymakers. Most of them provide a set of values or principles that serve as a standard for evaluating policy. Most frameworks articulate both the positive ethical foundations for public health and ethical constraints or concerns. Some frameworks offer analytic tools for guiding the evaluative process. Procedural guidelines and concrete criteria for solving important ethical conflicts in the particular area of the prevention of overweight or obesity are mostly lacking. Conclusions Public health ethical frameworks may be supportive in the evaluation of overweight prevention programs or policy, but seem to lack practical guidance to address ethical conflicts in this particular area.

  14. An overview of ethical frameworks in public health: can they be supportive in the evaluation of programs to prevent overweight?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ten Have, Marieke; de Beaufort, Inez D; Mackenbach, Johan P; van der Heide, Agnes

    2010-10-22

    The prevention of overweight sometimes raises complex ethical questions. Ethical public health frameworks may be helpful in evaluating programs or policy for overweight prevention. We give an overview of the purpose, form and contents of such public health frameworks and investigate to which extent they are useful for evaluating programs to prevent overweight and/or obesity. Our search for frameworks consisted of three steps. Firstly, we asked experts in the field of ethics and public health for the frameworks they were aware of. Secondly, we performed a search in Pubmed. Thirdly, we checked literature references in the articles on frameworks we found. In total, we thus found six ethical frameworks. We assessed the area on which the available ethical frameworks focus, the users they target at, the type of policy or intervention they propose to address, and their aim. Further, we looked at their structure and content, that is, tools for guiding the analytic process, the main ethical principles or values, possible criteria for dealing with ethical conflicts, and the concrete policy issues they are applied to. All frameworks aim to support public health professionals or policymakers. Most of them provide a set of values or principles that serve as a standard for evaluating policy. Most frameworks articulate both the positive ethical foundations for public health and ethical constraints or concerns. Some frameworks offer analytic tools for guiding the evaluative process. Procedural guidelines and concrete criteria for solving important ethical conflicts in the particular area of the prevention of overweight or obesity are mostly lacking. Public health ethical frameworks may be supportive in the evaluation of overweight prevention programs or policy, but seem to lack practical guidance to address ethical conflicts in this particular area.

  15. An overview of ethical frameworks in public health: can they be supportive in the evaluation of programs to prevent overweight?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background The prevention of overweight sometimes raises complex ethical questions. Ethical public health frameworks may be helpful in evaluating programs or policy for overweight prevention. We give an overview of the purpose, form and contents of such public health frameworks and investigate to which extent they are useful for evaluating programs to prevent overweight and/or obesity. Methods Our search for frameworks consisted of three steps. Firstly, we asked experts in the field of ethics and public health for the frameworks they were aware of. Secondly, we performed a search in Pubmed. Thirdly, we checked literature references in the articles on frameworks we found. In total, we thus found six ethical frameworks. We assessed the area on which the available ethical frameworks focus, the users they target at, the type of policy or intervention they propose to address, and their aim. Further, we looked at their structure and content, that is, tools for guiding the analytic process, the main ethical principles or values, possible criteria for dealing with ethical conflicts, and the concrete policy issues they are applied to. Results All frameworks aim to support public health professionals or policymakers. Most of them provide a set of values or principles that serve as a standard for evaluating policy. Most frameworks articulate both the positive ethical foundations for public health and ethical constraints or concerns. Some frameworks offer analytic tools for guiding the evaluative process. Procedural guidelines and concrete criteria for solving important ethical conflicts in the particular area of the prevention of overweight or obesity are mostly lacking. Conclusions Public health ethical frameworks may be supportive in the evaluation of overweight prevention programs or policy, but seem to lack practical guidance to address ethical conflicts in this particular area. PMID:20969761

  16. The Role of Counseling in an Associate Degree in Labor Studies Program: Counseling in a Work Oriented Setting (The Importance of Including Counseling Courses within the Curriculum of the Associate Degree in Labor Studies Program at the Community College Level).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingery, Bruce

    This research had a two-fold purpose: (1) to assess the need for a labor studies program at the community college level; and (2) to consider the advisability of including within such a curriculum a cross-section of adult/family/worker-oriented counseling and guidance courses. The study employed a questionnaire completed by union delegates, which…

  17. Framework and criteria for program evaluation in the Office of Conservation and Renewable Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-04-30

    This study addresses the development of a framework and generic criteria for conducting program evaluation in the Office of Conservation and Renewable Energy. The evaluation process is intended to provide the Assistant Secretary with comprehensive and consistent evaluation data for management decisions regarding policy and strategy, crosscutting energy impacts and resource allocation and justification. The study defines evaluation objectives, identifies basic information requirements (criteria), and identifies a process for collecting evaluation results at the basic program level, integrating the results, and summarizing information upward through the CE organization to the Assistant Secretary. Methods are described by which initial criteria were tested, analyzed, and refined for CE program applicability. General guidelines pertaining to evaluation and the Sunset Review requirements are examined and various types, designs, and models for evaluation are identified. Existing CE evaluation reports are reviewed and comments on their adequacy for meeting current needs are provided. An inventory and status survey of CE program evaluation activities is presented, as are issues, findings, and recommendations pertaining to CE evaluation and Sunset Review requirements. Also, sources of data for use in evaluation and the Sunset Review response are identified. An inventory of CE evaluation-related documents and reports is provided.

  18. Thematic curriculum approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šefer Jasmina P.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Thematic curriculum combines disciplines and media. The process is problem-oriented and the scenario most often follows the logic of exploring or storytelling. Those two approaches to teaching are appropriate because they fit into interdisciplinary and creative open-ended problem solving through play, as insisted upon by thematic curriculum. The matrix, where seven types of abilities intersect with five types of problems according to their degree of openness, defines well the outcomes of teaching. However, it did not prove to be suitable for planning the majority of activities in thematic curriculum, for it follows with difficulty the process of exploring or storytelling i.e. it disrupts the subject matter coherence of thematic curriculum. Therefore, it is suggested that matrix should be used for disciplinary curriculum planning but for that of thematic curriculum only in exclusive cases. The matrix should be used primarily as a framework for evaluating the distribution of various types of abilities and problem situations in teaching. The logic of diverse approaches to teaching reflects itself in the manner of planning and organizing the teaching process. Conceptual, visual-graphic, structural and other aids employed during educational process planning should suit the nature of the approach chosen. On the basis of qualitative investigations of educational process, in the present paper considerations are given to various approaches to teaching development of various drafts for the planning of teaching, and recognition of the logic of storytelling and exploring in thematic curriculum.

  19. An analysis of undergraduate exercise science programs: an exercise science curriculum survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elder, Craig L; Pujol, Thomas J; Barnes, Jeremy T

    2003-08-01

    Undergraduate exercise science programs develop curricula by referring to standards set by professional organizations. A web-based survey was administered to 235 institutions with exercise science undergraduate programs to evaluate their adherence to stated curricular guidelines. Results indicate that 29% of institutions considered American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) Knowledge, skills, and abilities (KSAs); 33% both ACSM and National Association for Sport and Physical Education (NASPE) guidelines; 6% ACSM, NASPE, and National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA); 8% ACSM, NASPE, NSCA, and American Society of Exercise Physiologists, and 5% NASPE. The two largest subgroups had good compliance with the areas of exercise physiology, biomechanics, and human anatomy and physiology. However, neither subgroup adhered to the areas of exercise prescription, testing, and implementation; exercise and aging; or exercise with special populations. Regardless of the implemented guideline(s), most institutions placed minimal emphasis on areas related to health promotion and many curricula did not require any field experience.

  20. Implementation of the court visitor program in a clinical nursing curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stowell, Jane M; Pihlak, Mary Rose; Matzke, Amanda; O'Keefe, Mary

    2013-12-01

    The State of Texas has more than 19,000 individuals who lack the physical or mental ability to provide for their need for shelter, financial management, or physical care. These individuals have been designated as wards of the court and placed under guardianship. Texas probate courts appoint individuals known as court visitors to make annual visits to wards of the court to assess their well-being under guardianship. Although the 10 statutory probate courts have court visitor programs, many county courts do not. This article describes the details of a service-learning experience using an online distance educational program to train undergraduate nursing students in a mental health course to become court visitors. This information may be useful to others looking for nontraditional clinical experiences and service-learning opportunities for undergraduate nursing students.

  1. Incorporating Cutting Edge Scientific Results from the Margins-Geoprisms Program into the Undergraduate Curriculum: The Subduction Factory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penniston-Dorland, S.; Stern, R. J.; Edwards, B. R.; Kincaid, C. R.

    2014-12-01

    The NSF-MARGINS Program funded a decade of research on continental margin processes. The NSF-GeoPRISMS Mini-lesson Project, funded by NSF-TUES, is designed to integrate fundamental results from the MARGINS program into open-source college-level curriculum. Three Subduction Factory (SubFac) mini-lessons were developed as part of this project. These include hands-on examinations of data sets representing 3 key components of the subduction zone system: 1) Heat transfer in the subducted slab; 2) Metamorphic processes happening at the plate interface; and 3) Typical magmatic products of arc systems above subduction zones. Module 1: "Slab Temperatures Control Melting in Subduction Zones, What Controls Slab Temperature?" allows students to work in groups using beads rolling down slopes as an analog for the mathematics of heat flow. Using this hands-on, exploration-based approach, students develop an intuition for the mathematics of heatflow and learn about heat conduction and advection in the subduction zone environment. Module 2: "Subduction zone metamorphism" introduces students to the metamorphic rocks that form as the subducted slab descends and the mineral reactions that characterize subduction-related metamorphism. This module includes a suite of metamorphic rocks available for instructors to use in a lab, and exercises in which students compare pressure-temperature estimates obtained from metamorphic rocks to predictions from thermal models. Module 3: "Central American Arc Volcanoes, Petrology and Geochemistry" introduces students to basic concepts in igneous petrology using the Central American volcanic arc, a MARGINS Subduction Factory focus site, as an example. The module relates data from two different volcanoes - basaltic Cerro Negro (Nicaragua) and andesitic Ilopango (El Salvador) including hand sample observations and major element geochemistry - to explore processes of mantle and crustal melting and differentiation in arc volcanism.

  2. Water-saving interventions assessment framework: an application for the Urmia Lake Restoration Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadkam, Somayeh; Oel, Pieter; Kabat, Pavel; Ludwig, Fulco

    2017-04-01

    Increasing water demand often results in unsustainable water use leaving insufficient amounts of water for sustaining natural environments. Therefore, to save natural resources water-saving interventions have been introduced to the environmental policy agenda in many (semi)-arid regions. Many policies, however, have failed reaching their objectives to increase water availability for the environment. This calls for a comprehensive tool to assess water-saving policies. Therefore, this study introduces a constructive framework to assess the policies by estimating five components: 1) Total water demand under socio-economic scenarios, 2) Water supply under climate change scenarios, 3) Water withdrawal for different sectors, 4) Water depletion and 5) Environmental flow. The framework, was applied to assess Urmia Lake Restoration Program (ULRP), which aims to restore the drying Urmia Lake in north-western Iran by increasing the lake inflow by 3.1×106m3yr-1. Results suggest that although the ULRP helps to increase inflow by up to 57% it is unlikely to fully reach its target. The analysis shows that there are three main reasons for the potential poor performance. The first reason is decreasing return flows due to increasing irrigation efficiency. This means that the expected increase in lake inflow volume is smaller than the volume saved by increasing irrigation efficiency. The second reason is increased depletion which is due to neglecting the fact that agricultural water demand is currently higher than available water for agriculture. As a result, increasing water use efficiency may result in increased water depletion. The third reason is ignoring the potential impact of climate change, which might decrease future water availability by 3% to 15%. Our analysis suggests that to reach the intervention target, measures need to focus on reducing Water demand and Water depletion rather than on reducing Water withdrawals. The assessment framework can be used to comprehensively

  3. Implementation and Evaluation of Technology Mentoring Program Developed for Teacher Educators: A 6M-Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selim Gunuc

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this basic research is to determine the problems experienced in the Technology Mentoring Program (TMP, and the study discusses how these problems affect the process in general. The implementation was carried out with teacher educators in the education faculty. 8 doctorate students (mentors provided technology mentoring implementation for one academic term to 9 teacher educators (mentees employed in the Education Faculty. The data were collected via the mentee and the mentor interview form, mentor reflections and organization meeting reflections. As a result, the problems based on the mentor, on the mentee and on the organization/institution were determined. In order to carry out TMP more effectively and successfully, a 6M-framework (Modifying, Meeting, Matching, Managing, Mentoring - Monitoring was suggested within the scope of this study. It could be stated that fewer problems will be encountered and that the process will be carried out more effectively and successfully when the structure in this framework is taken into consideration.

  4. Understanding China's Curriculum Reform for the 21st Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Wing-Wah

    2014-01-01

    This article uses curriculum-making frameworks to analyse and reconstruct the Chinese curriculum-making model and unpack the dynamics, complexity and constraints of China's curriculum reform since the early 1990s. It argues that curriculum reform is China's main human capital development strategy for coping with the challenges of the 21st century,…

  5. Tatool: a Java-based open-source programming framework for psychological studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Bastian, Claudia C; Locher, André; Ruflin, Michael

    2013-03-01

    Tatool (Training and Testing Tool) was developed to assist researchers with programming training software, experiments, and questionnaires. Tatool is Java-based, and thus is a platform-independent and object-oriented framework. The architecture was designed to meet the requirements of experimental designs and provides a large number of predefined functions that are useful in psychological studies. Tatool comprises features crucial for training studies (e.g., configurable training schedules, adaptive training algorithms, and individual training statistics) and allows for running studies online via Java Web Start. The accompanying "Tatool Online" platform provides the possibility to manage studies and participants' data easily with a Web-based interface. Tatool is published open source under the GNU Lesser General Public License, and is available at www.tatool.ch.

  6. A blueprint of pain curriculum across prelicensure health sciences programs: one NIH Pain Consortium Center of Excellence in Pain Education (CoEPE) experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doorenbos, Ardith Z; Gordon, Deborah B; Tauben, David; Palisoc, Jenny; Drangsholt, Mark; Lindhorst, Taryn; Danielson, Jennifer; Spector, June; Ballweg, Ruth; Vorvick, Linda; Loeser, John D

    2013-12-01

    To improve U.S. pain education and promote interinstitutional and interprofessional collaborations, the National Institutes of Health Pain Consortium has funded 12 sites to develop Centers of Excellence in Pain Education (CoEPEs). Each site was given the tasks of development, evaluation, integration, and promotion of pain management curriculum resources, including case studies that will be shared nationally. Collaborations among schools of medicine, dentistry, nursing, pharmacy, and others were encouraged. The John D. Loeser CoEPE is unique in that it represents extensive regionalization of health science education, in this case in the region covering the states of Washington, Wyoming, Alaska, Montana, and Idaho. This paper describes a blueprint of pain content and teaching methods across the University of Washington's 6 health sciences schools and provides recommendations for improvement in pain education at the prelicensure level. The Schools of Dentistry and Physician Assistant provide the highest percentage of total required curriculum hours devoted to pain compared with the Schools of Medicine, Nursing, Pharmacy, and Social Work. The findings confirm the paucity of pain content in health sciences curricula, missing International Association for the Study of Pain curriculum topics, and limited use of innovative teaching methods such as problem-based and team-based learning. Findings confirm the paucity of pain education across the health sciences curriculum in a CoEPE that serves a large region in the United States. The data provide a pain curriculum blueprint that can be used to recommend added pain content in health sciences programs across the country. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Successful implementation of the american college of surgeons/association of program directors in surgery surgical skills curriculum via a 4-week consecutive simulation rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Mayank Kumar; Dumon, Kristoffel R; Edelson, Paula Kaitlyn; Acero, Natalia Martinez; Hashimoto, Daniel; Danzer, Enrico; Selvan, Ben; Resnick, Andrew S; Morris, Jon B; Williams, Noel N

    2012-06-01

    Increased patient awareness, duty hour restrictions, escalating costs, and time constraints in the operating room have revolutionized surgery education. Although simulation and skills laboratories are emerging as promising alternatives for skills training, their integration into graduate surgical education is inconsistent, erratic, and often on a voluntary basis. We hypothesize that, by implementing the American College of Surgeons/Association of Program Directors in Surgery Surgical Skills Curriculum in a structured, inanimate setting, we can address some of these concerns. Sixty junior surgery residents were assigned to the Penn Surgical Simulation and Skills Rotation. The National Surgical Skills Curriculum was implemented using multiple educational tools under faculty supervision. Pretraining and posttraining assessments of technical skills were conducted using validated instruments. Trainee and faculty feedbacks were collected using a structured feedback form. Significant global performance improvement was demonstrated using Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skills score for basic surgical skills (knot tying, wound closure, enterotomy closure, and vascular anastomosis) and Fundamentals of Laparoscopic Surgery skills, P < 0.001. Six trainees were retested on an average of 13.5 months later (range, 8-16 months) and retained more than 75% of their basic surgical skills. The American College of Surgeons/Association of Program Directors in Surgery National Surgical Skills Curriculum can be implemented in its totality as a 4-week consecutive surgical simulation rotation in an inanimate setting, leading to global enhancement of junior surgical residents' technical skills and contributing to attainment of Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education core competency.

  8. Foundational Elements of Applied Simulation Theory: Development and Implementation of a Longitudinal Simulation Educator Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Michelle; Posner, Glenn; Humphrey-Murto, Susan

    2017-01-27

    Simulation-based education has gained popularity, yet many faculty members feel inadequately prepared to teach using this technique. Fellowship training in medical education exists, but there is little information regarding simulation or formal educational programs therein. In our institution, simulation fellowships were offered by individual clinical departments. We recognized the need for a formal curriculum in educational theory. Kern's approach to curriculum development was used to develop, implement, and evaluate the Foundational Elements of Applied Simulation Theory (FEAST) curriculum. Needs assessments resulted in a 26-topic curriculum; each biweekly session built upon the previous. Components essential to success included setting goals and objectives for each interactive session and having dedicated faculty, collaborative leadership and administrative support for the curriculum. Evaluation data was collated and analyzed annually via anonymous feedback surveys, focus groups, and retrospective pre-post self-assessment questionnaires. Data collected from 32 fellows over five years of implementation showed that the curriculum improved knowledge, challenged thinking, and was excellent preparation for a career in simulation-based medical education. Themes arising from focus groups demonstrated that participants valued faculty expertise and the structure, practicality, and content of the curriculum. We present a longitudinal simulation educator curriculum that adheres to a well-described framework of curriculum development. Program evaluation shows that FEAST has increased participant knowledge in key areas relevant to simulation-based education and that the curriculum has been successful in meeting the needs of novice simulation educators. Insights and practice points are offered for educators wishing to implement a similar curriculum in their institution.

  9. Foundational Elements of Applied Simulation Theory: Development and Implementation of a Longitudinal Simulation Educator Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posner, Glenn; Humphrey-Murto, Susan

    2017-01-01

    Simulation-based education has gained popularity, yet many faculty members feel inadequately prepared to teach using this technique. Fellowship training in medical education exists, but there is little information regarding simulation or formal educational programs therein. In our institution, simulation fellowships were offered by individual clinical departments. We recognized the need for a formal curriculum in educational theory. Kern’s approach to curriculum development was used to develop, implement, and evaluate the Foundational Elements of Applied Simulation Theory (FEAST) curriculum. Needs assessments resulted in a 26-topic curriculum; each biweekly session built upon the previous. Components essential to success included setting goals and objectives for each interactive session and having dedicated faculty, collaborative leadership and administrative support for the curriculum. Evaluation data was collated and analyzed annually via anonymous feedback surveys, focus groups, and retrospective pre-post self-assessment questionnaires. Data collected from 32 fellows over five years of implementation showed that the curriculum improved knowledge, challenged thinking, and was excellent preparation for a career in simulation-based medical education. Themes arising from focus groups demonstrated that participants valued faculty expertise and the structure, practicality, and content of the curriculum. We present a longitudinal simulation educator curriculum that adheres to a well-described framework of curriculum development. Program evaluation shows that FEAST has increased participant knowledge in key areas relevant to simulation-based education and that the curriculum has been successful in meeting the needs of novice simulation educators. Insights and practice points are offered for educators wishing to implement a similar curriculum in their institution. PMID:28280655

  10. The Inherent Vulnerability of the Australian Curriculum's Cross-Curriculum Priorities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salter, Peta; Maxwell, Jacinta

    2016-01-01

    National curriculum development is a complex and contested process. By its very function, a national curriculum serves to organise diverse interests into a common framework, a task fraught with cultural and political tensions and compromises. In the emergent Australian Curriculum these tensions are manifest in and around the cross-curriculum…

  11. A framework program for the teaching of alternative methods (replacement, reduction, refinement) to animal experimentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daneshian, Mardas; Akbarsha, Mohammad A; Blaauboer, Bas; Caloni, Francesca; Cosson, Pierre; Curren, Rodger; Goldberg, Alan; Gruber, Franz; Ohl, Frauke; Pfaller, Walter; van der Valk, Jan; Vinardell, Pilar; Zurlo, Joanne; Hartung, Thomas; Leist, Marcel

    2011-01-01

    Development of improved communication and education strategies is important to make alternatives to the use of animals, and the broad range of applications of the 3Rs concept better known and understood by different audiences. For this purpose, the Center for Alternatives to Animal Testing in Europe (CAAT-Europe) together with the Transatlantic Think Tank for Toxicology (t(4)) hosted a three-day workshop on "Teaching Alternative Methods to Animal Experimentation". A compilation of the recommendations by a group of international specialists in the field is summarized in this report. Initially, the workshop participants identified the different audience groups to be addressed and also the communication media that may be used. The main outcome of the workshop was a framework for a comprehensive educational program. The modular structure of the teaching program presented here allows adaptation to different audiences with their specific needs; different time schedules can be easily accommodated on this basis. The topics cover the 3Rs principle, basic research, toxicological applications, method development and validation, regulatory aspects, case studies and ethical aspects of 3Rs approaches. This expert consortium agreed to generating teaching materials covering all modules and providing them in an open access online repository.

  12. Interaction of Vietnamese teachers with a social constructivism-based primary science curriculum in a framework appropriate for a Confucian heritage culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vu Thu Hang, N.; Bulte, A.M.W.; Pilot, A.

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes the perception of a social constructivist approach to teaching and learning among Vietnamese teachers in a Confucian heritage culture and the changes these teachers undergo through their interaction with a new science curriculum that was designed culturally appropriate. A

  13. Empowering chemistry teachers for context-based education. Towards a framework for design and evaluation of a teacher professional development programme in curriculum innovations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stolk, M.J.

    2013-01-01

    Many countries experience a wave of context-based curriculum innovation aimed at meaningful student learning. During such innovations, teachers are encouraged to participate in the design of innovative context-based teaching materials. This thesis describes studies on the empowerment of Dutch

  14. Marketing Education. Vocational Education Program Courses Standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee. Div. of Applied Tech., Adult, and Community Education.

    This document contains vocational education program course standards (curriculum frameworks and student performance standards) for exploratory courses, practical arts courses, and job preparatory programs offered at the secondary and postsecondary level as part of the marketing education component of Florida's comprehensive vocational education…

  15. A framework for understanding international medical graduate challenges during transition into fellowship programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sockalingam, Sanjeev; Khan, Attia; Tan, Adrienne; Hawa, Raed; Abbey, Susan; Jackson, Timothy; Zaretsky, Ari; Okrainec, Allan

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have highlighted unique needs of international medical graduates (IMG) during their transition into medical training programs; however, limited data exist on IMG needs specific to fellowship training. We conducted the following mixed-method study to determine IMG fellow training needs during the transition into fellowship training programs in psychiatry and surgery. The authors conducted a mixed-methods study consisting of an online survey of IMG fellows and their supervisors in psychiatry or surgery fellowship training programs and individual interviews of IMG fellows. The survey assessed (a) fellows' and supervisors' perceptions on IMG challenges in clinical communication, health systems, and education domains and (b) past orientation initiatives. In the second phase of the study, IMG fellows were interviewed during the latter half of their fellowship training, and perceptions regarding orientation and adaptation to fellowship in Canada were assessed. Survey data were analyzed using descriptive and Mann-Whitney U statistics. Qualitative interviews were analyzed using grounded theory methodology. The survey response rate was 76% (35/46) and 69% (35/51) for IMG fellows and supervisors, respectively. Fellows reported the greatest difficulty with adapting to the hospital system, medical documentation, and balancing one's professional and personal life. Supervisors believed that fellows had the greatest difficulty with managing language and slang in Canada, the healthcare system, and an interprofessional team. In Phase 2, fellows generated themes of disorientation, disconnection, interprofessional team challenges, a need for IMG fellow resources, and a benefit from training in a multicultural setting. Our study results highlight the need for IMG specific orientation resources for fellows and supervisors. Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs may be a useful framework for understanding IMG training needs.

  16. Development of a technical assistance framework for building organizational capacity of health programs in resource-limited settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, E Michael; Sharma, Anjali; Thomas, Kate K; Kuehn, Chuck; Morales, José Rafael

    2014-09-17

    Little information exists on the technical assistance needs of local indigenous organizations charged with managing HIV care and treatment programs funded by the US President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR). This paper describes the methods used to adapt the Primary Care Assessment Tool (PCAT) framework, which has successfully strengthened HIV primary care services in the US, into one that could strengthen the capacity of local partners to deliver priority health programs in resource-constrained settings by identifying their specific technical assistance needs. Qualitative methods and inductive reasoning approaches were used to conceptualize and adapt the new Clinical Assessment for Systems Strengthening (ClASS) framework. Stakeholder interviews, comparisons of existing assessment tools, and a pilot test helped determine the overall ClASS framework for use in low-resource settings. The framework was further refined one year post-ClASS implementation. Stakeholder interviews, assessment of existing tools, a pilot process and the one-year post- implementation assessment informed the adaptation of the ClASS framework for assessing and strengthening technical and managerial capacities of health programs at three levels: international partner, local indigenous partner, and local partner treatment facility. The PCAT focus on organizational strengths and systems strengthening was retained and implemented in the ClASS framework and approach. A modular format was chosen to allow the use of administrative, fiscal and clinical modules in any combination and to insert new modules as needed by programs. The pilot led to refined pre-visit planning, informed review team composition, increased visit duration, and restructured modules. A web-based toolkit was developed to capture three years of experiential learning; this kit can also be used for independent implementation of the ClASS framework. A systematic adaptation process has produced a qualitative framework that can

  17. Natural Resources and Forest Ecology. Florida Vocational Program Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florida State Univ., Tallahassee. Center for Instructional Development and Services.

    This program guide identifies primary considerations in the organization, operation, and evaluation of a natural resources and forest ecology program. Program content is presented first. A curriculum framework specifies the exact course title, course number, levels of instruction, major course content, laboratory activities, special notes, major…

  18. 2011 Mississippi Curriculum Framework: Postsecondary Conservation Law Enforcement Technology. (Program CIP: 03.0208 - Natural Resources Management and Policy, Other)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Luke; Myrick, Dwight

    2011-01-01

    As the world economy continues to evolve, businesses and industries must adopt new practices and processes in order to survive. Quality and cost control, work teams and participatory management, and an infusion of technology are transforming the way people work and do business. Employees are now expected to read, write, and communicate…

  19. 2008 Mississippi Curriculum Framework: Postsecondary Massage Therapy. (Program CIP: 51.3501 - Massage Therapy/Therapeutic Massage)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Teresa; Russell, Cydnee

    2008-01-01

    As the world economy continues to evolve, businesses and industries must adopt new practices and processes in order to survive. Quality and cost control, work teams and participatory management, and an infusion of technology are transforming the way people work and do business. Employees are now expected to read, write, and communicate…

  20. 2007 Mississippi Curriculum Framework: Postsecondary Small Engine and Turf Equipment Repair Technology. (Program CIP: 01.0299 Agricultural Mechanization, Other )

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence, Allen; Campus, Raymond

    2007-01-01

    As the world economy continues to evolve, businesses and industries must adopt new practices and processes in order to survive. Quality and cost control, work teams and participatory management, and an infusion of technology are transforming the way people work and do business. Employees are now expected to read, write, and communicate…

  1. 2008 Mississippi Curriculum Framework: Postsecondary Food Production and Management Technology. (Program CIP: 12.0508 - Institutional Food Workers)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carver, Matthew; Hoff, Jody; Little, Lisa; Samuel, Carolyn

    2008-01-01

    As the world economy continues to evolve, businesses and industries must adopt new practices and processes in order to survive. Quality and cost control, work teams and participatory management, and an infusion of technology are transforming the way people work and do business. Employees are now expected to read, write, and communicate…

  2. 2009 Mississippi Curriculum Framework: Postsecondary Nuclear Medicine Technology. (Program CIP: 51.0905 - Nuclear Medical Technology/Technologist)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boney, Linda; Lee, Joanne; Pyles, Alice; Whitfield, Stacy

    2009-01-01

    As the world economy continues to evolve, businesses and industries must adopt new practices and processes in order to survive. Quality and cost control, work teams and participatory management, and an infusion of technology are transforming the way people work and do business. Employees are now expected to read, write, and communicate…

  3. 2009 Mississippi Curriculum Framework: Postsecondary Health Information Technology. (Program CIP-51.0707-Medical Records Technology/Technician)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Casey; Jones, Robin; McGuffee, Michelle; Scott, Nena

    2009-01-01

    As the world economy continues to evolve, businesses and industries must adopt new practices and processes in order to survive. Quality and cost control, work teams and participatory management, and an infusion of technology are transforming the way people work and do business. Employees are now expected to read, write, and communicate…

  4. 2010 Mississippi Curriculum Framework: Postsecondary Meat Merchandising Technology. (Program CIP: 12.0506 - Meat Cutting/Meat Cutter)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Roger; Currie, Lamar; Clayton, Sheila

    2010-01-01

    As the world economy continues to evolve, businesses and industries must adopt new practices and processes in order to survive. Quality and cost control, work teams and participatory management, and an infusion of technology are transforming the way people work and do business. Employees are now expected to read, write, and communicate…

  5. 2009 Mississippi Curriculum Framework: Postsecondary Early Childhood Education Technology. (Program CIP: 19.0709 - Child Care Provider/Assistant)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shumate, Win; Greene, Mary A.; Ford, Sandra; Jones, Pamela; Anders, Sheri

    2009-01-01

    As the world economy continues to evolve, businesses and industries must adopt new practices and processes in order to survive. Quality and cost control, work teams and participatory management, and an infusion of technology are transforming the way people work and do business. Employees are now expected to read, write, and communicate…

  6. 2010 Mississippi Curriculum Framework: Postsecondary Banking and Finance Technology. (Program CIP: 52.0803 - Banking and Financial Support Services)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gullett, Janet; Dinkins, Shivochie

    2010-01-01

    As the world economy continues to evolve, businesses and industries must adopt new practices and processes in order to survive. Quality and cost control, work teams and participatory management, and an infusion of technology are transforming the way people work and do business. Employees are now expected to read, write, and communicate…

  7. Curriculum Online Review System: Proposing Curriculum with Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhinehart, Marilyn; Barlow, Rhonda; Shafer, Stu; Hassur, Debby

    2009-01-01

    The Curriculum Online Review System (CORS) at Johnson County Community College (JCCC) uses SharePoint as a Web platform for the JCCC Curriculum Proposals Process. The CORS application manages proposals throughout the approval process using collaboration tools and workflows to notify all stakeholders. This innovative new program has changed the way…

  8. Fitting form to function: reorganization of faculty roles for a new dental curriculum and its governance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Charlotte L; Patston, Philip A; Knight, G William; Alexander, Lea; Norman, Nancy

    2013-01-01

    The College of Dentistry at the University of Illinois at Chicago has reorganized its predoctoral curriculum to better integrate biomedical, clinical, and behavioral sciences using a systems-based framework. The resulting D.M.D. curriculum features small-group discussions of patient scenarios that include orofacial, systemic, and professionalism learning objectives. Small-group learning is closely coordinated with laboratory, pre-patient care, and patient care experiences. Accordingly, the college has also reorganized its faculty roles to eliminate discipline-based silos and to better ensure program coherence. The new organizational structure is designed to improve coordination among faculty course teams that develop and administer individual courses, several units that provide curriculum resources and support services, and the curriculum committee, which is charged with governance of the curriculum as a whole. In addition, the new structure employs a system of reporting and planning relationships to ensure continuous monitoring and improvement of the curriculum. This article describes six principles that guide the new faculty roles structure, defines the various faculty roles and their coordinating relationships, presents diagrams depicting the organizational structures for curriculum governance, administration, and support, and discusses mechanisms for faculty support and continuous curriculum improvement.

  9. Using Campinha-Bacote's Framework to Examine Cultural Competence from an Interdisciplinary International Service Learning Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall-Bassett, Elizabeth DeVane; Hegde, Archana Vasudeva; Craft, Katelyn; Oberlin, Amber Louise

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate an interdisciplinary international service learning program and its impact on student sense of cultural awareness and competence using the Campinha-Bacote's (2002) framework of cultural competency model. Seven undergraduate and one graduate student from Human Development and Nutrition Science…

  10. Application of the Intervention Mapping Framework to Develop an Integrated Twenty-first Century Core Curriculum—Part Three: Curriculum Implementation and Evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Corvin, Jaime A.; Rita DeBate; Kate Wolfe-Quintero; Petersen, Donna J.

    2017-01-01

    Public health professionals have been challenged to radically reform public health training to meet evolving demands of twenty-first century public health. Such a transformation requires a systems thinking approach with an interdisciplinary focus on problem solving, leadership, management and teamwork, technology and information, budgeting and finance, and communication. This article presents processes for implementing and evaluating a revised public health curriculum and outlines lessons lea...

  11. Cosmetology. Post Secondary Curriculum Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moye, Michael D.; And Others

    This curriculum guide is designed to offer guidelines along with supporting resources and teaching ideas from which the local postsecondary instructor can extract a cosmetology curriculum that meets local needs. Following an outline of the philosophy and goals underlying state and local vocational education programs in Georgia, the purpose and…

  12. Precision Machining Technology. Curriculum Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idaho State Dept. of Education, Boise. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This curriculum guide was developed from a Technical Committee Report prepared with the assistance of industry personnel and containing a Task List which is the basis of the guide. It presents competency-based program standards for courses in precision machining technology and is part of the Idaho Vocational Curriculum Guide Project, a cooperative…

  13. Drainage network extraction from a high-resolution DEM using parallel programming in the .NET Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Chao; Ye, Aizhong; Gan, Yanjun; You, Jinjun; Duan, Qinyun; Ma, Feng; Hou, Jingwen

    2017-12-01

    High-resolution Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) can be used to extract high-accuracy prerequisite drainage networks. A higher resolution represents a larger number of grids. With an increase in the number of grids, the flow direction determination will require substantial computer resources and computing time. Parallel computing is a feasible method with which to resolve this problem. In this paper, we proposed a parallel programming method within the .NET Framework with a C# Compiler in a Windows environment. The basin is divided into sub-basins, and subsequently the different sub-basins operate on multiple threads concurrently to calculate flow directions. The method was applied to calculate the flow direction of the Yellow River basin from 3 arc-second resolution SRTM DEM. Drainage networks were extracted and compared with HydroSHEDS river network to assess their accuracy. The results demonstrate that this method can calculate the flow direction from high-resolution DEMs efficiently and extract high-precision continuous drainage networks.

  14. A new stochastic mixed integer programming to design integrated cellular manufacturing system: A supply chain framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid Reza Ghezavati

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This research defines a new application of mathematical modeling to design a cellular manufacturing system integrated with group scheduling and layout aspects in an uncertain decision space under a supply chain characteristics. The aim is to present a mixed integer programming (MIP which optimizes cell formation, scheduling and layout decisions, concurrently where the suppliers are required to operate exceptional products. For this purpose, the time in which parts need to be operated on machines and also products' demand are uncertain and explained by set of scenarios. This model tries to optimize expected holding cost and the costs regarded to the suppliers network in a supply chain in order to outsource exceptional operations. Scheduling decisions in a cellular manufacturing framework is treated as group scheduling problem, which assumes that all parts in a part group are operated in the same cell and no inter-cellular transfer is required. An efficient hybrid method made of genetic algorithm (GA and simulated annealing (SA will be proposed to solve such a complex problem under an optimization rule as a sub-ordinate section. This integrative combination algorithm is compared with global solutions and also, a benchmark heuristic algorithm introduced in the literature. Finally, performance of the algorithm will be verified through some test problems.

  15. Transnational Policy Transfer over Three Curriculum Reforms in Finland: The Constructions of Conditional and Purposive Programs (1994-2016)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivesind, Kirsten; Afsar, Azita; Bachmann, Kari E.

    2016-01-01

    This article examines how three national curricula for basic education in Finland reflect transnational policy perspectives from 1994 to the present. By developing a conceptual apparatus for curriculum analysis, we examine how national curricula in Finland can be interpreted as modifications of transnational policy transfers shaped by…

  16. The Robust Learning Model with a Spiral Curriculum: Implications for the Educational Effectiveness of Online Master Degree Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Yoram; Neumann, Edith; Lewis, Shelia

    2017-01-01

    This study integrated the Spiral Curriculum approach into the Robust Learning Model as part of a continuous improvement process that was designed to improve educational effectiveness and then assessed the differences between the initial and integrated models as well as the predictability of the first course in the integrated learning model on a…

  17. Monterrey, La Ciudad Dorada/Monterrey, The Golden City. Curriculum Projects. Fulbright-Hays Summer Seminars Abroad Program, 2002 (Mexico).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintyne, Susan

    This curriculum project is designed for high school classes in Spanish, social studies, or global studies. The project's lesson plan lists materials needed; poses seven key questions about Mexico and Monterrey; outlines background notes on Mexico; and provides a detailed, step-by-step procedure for classroom implementation during three days. Also…

  18. Fostering High-Quality Teaching with an Enriched Curriculum and Professional Development Support: The Head Start REDI Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domitrovich, Celene E.; Gest, Scott D.; Gill, Sukhdeep; Bierman, Karen L.; Welsh, Janet A.; Jones, Damon

    2009-01-01

    This randomized controlled trial tested whether teaching quality in Head Start classrooms could be improved with the addition of evidence-based curriculum components targeting emergent language or literacy and social-emotional development and the provision of associated professional development support. Participants were lead and assistant…

  19. Curriculum Planning: Trends in Communication Studies, Workplace Competencies, and Current Programs at 4-Year Colleges and Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertelsen, Dale A.; Goodboy, Alan K.

    2009-01-01

    Many communication scholars recognize the need to regularly explore current communication curriculum and to evaluate its contribution to meeting the needs of students and the demands of the workplace. However, within the communication discipline, current curricular decisions are based on studies conducted nearly a decade ago. This study (a)…

  20. Mexican Muralists: Rivera, Siqueiros, and Orozco. Curriculum Projects. Fulbright-Hays Summer Seminars Abroad Program, 2002 (Mexico).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Kim

    Murals created by Diego Rivera, Jose Clemente Orozco, and David Alfaro Siqueiros embody a time of change in Mexico. The murals they created were intended to educate an illiterate population. Today these murals embody national pride. The goal of this curriculum project is rooted in learning about the history, culture, and art of Mexico. The project…

  1. The Curriculum Improvement Project in Business Careers Programs: Business Manager, Officer Administrator, Real Estate Agent, Real Estate Broker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    College of the Mainland, Texas City, TX.

    In 1987, the College of the Mainland undertook a project to update curricula in real estate, business management, and office technology. The project entailed a survey of the labor market to clarify personnel needs in selected fields; the use of the DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) process, which involved expert workers in the creation of task…

  2. Change in Mexico: Problems and Promise. Curriculum Project. Fulbright-Hays Summer Seminars Abroad Program, 1993 (Mexico).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrum, Andrea

    This curriculum unit presents an overview of change in Mexico. The unit is not meant to be an in-depth study, but rather a survey of four areas traditionally important in Mexican life: the economy, politics, religion, and literature, with particular emphasis on the first two. The unit is designed as a module on contemporary Mexico in a Latin…

  3. Writing across and against the Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Art

    2003-01-01

    Reviews the author's career as a teacher of composition and literature and as a writing program administrator of writing across the curriculum. Discusses the potential of poetry across the curriculum as an important tool for writing "against" the curriculum of academic discourse. Concludes that when they write poetry, students often express…

  4. The 7 th framework program of the EU; 7 Programa Marco de I+D de la Union Europea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, E. M.; Serrano, J. A.

    2007-07-01

    The framework Program is the principal community initiative for fostering and supporting R and D in the European Union. its main goal is to improve competitiveness by fundamentally financing research, technological development, demonstration and innovation activities through transnational collaboration between research institutes and firms belong to both the European Union countries and States affiliated as third countries. In addition, it provides financial support to enhancement and coordination of European research infrastructures, promotion and training of research personnel, basic research and, particularly as of the current 7th Framework Program, coordination of national R and D programs and impllementation of European technology platforms (PTEs), which have been conveived to promote strategic research agendas in key sectors with the cooperation of all the involved players. In the wake of the PTEs, different national platforms have been implemented at the national level which are very active in different sectors. (Authors)

  5. The Australian Health Informatics Competencies Framework and Its Role in the Certified Health Informatician Australasia (CHIA) Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Sanchez, Fernando; Rowlands, David; Schaper, Louise; Hansen, David

    2017-01-01

    The Certified Health Informatician Australasia (CHIA) program consists of an online exam, which aims to test whether a candidate has the knowledge and skills that are identified in the competencies framework to perform as a health informatics professional. The CHIA Health Informatics Competencies Framework provides the context in which the questions for the exam have been developed. The core competencies for health informatics that are tested in the exam have been developed with reference to similar programs by the American Medical Informatics Association, the International Medical Informatics Association and COACH, Canada's Health Informatics Association, and builds on the previous work done by the Australian Health Informatics Education Council. This paper shows how the development of this competency framework is helping to raise the profile of health informaticians in Australasia, contributing to a wider recognition of the profession, and defining more clearly the body of knowledge underpinning this discipline. This framework can also be used as a set of guidelines for recruiting purposes, definitions of career pathways, or the design of educational and training activities. We discuss here the current status of the program, its resultsandprospectsfor the future.

  6. The Mini-Grid Framework: Application Programming Support for Ad hoc Volunteer Grids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Venkataraman, Neela Narayanan

    2013-01-01

    such infrastructure, called the Mini-Grid Framework for resource management in ad hoc grids using market-based scheduling and context-based resource and application modeling. The framework proposes peer-to-peer architecture that supports several futures: ease of deployment, decentralized task distribution, small......, iv) the definition of an extensible API for ad hoc grid formation and v) enabling symmetric resource participation. The Mini-Grid framework has been designed and developed as proof-of-concept. The Mini-Grid framework has been evaluated using LAB deployment at ITU, and has been deployed at i...

  7. The Vector Idea and its spheres: a training proposal for curriculum greening processes from the complexity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genina CALAFELL

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The study is in the framework of Education for Sustainability and, specifically, in the curriculum greening processes. In the first place, a conceptualization about curriculum greening is briefly presented following the ACES model. In the second instance, the research is exposed. It is concretized in the analysis of the degree of curriculum greening in a training program aimed at education professionals. This training programme has been elaborated from the perspective of complexity and based on the proposal of Vector Idea and its spheres (conceptual, methodological, creative, and investigative. The research carried out has an interpretative approach and the participants were teachers who followed the training programme. The results allow obtain guidelines for the development of a training process in curriculum greening, coherent with the ACES model, and with real impact on the participants. These orientations are based on the following ideas: credibility, cosmovision, conceptualization and action. 

  8. Commentary on a framework for multicultural education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammerich, Karin F

    2014-09-01

    Today's changing demographics require that multicultural factors be considered in the delivery of quality patient-centred health care in chiropractic. Yet minimal training in cultural competency in chiropractic education leaves graduates ill-equipped to treat a diverse population. This commentary examines cultural competency training in current literature, demonstrates frameworks for curriculum integration, and suggests how cultural competency might be included in a chiropractic college curriculum. A database search yielded little evidence that cultural competency is integrated into curricula of chiropractic schools. Some journal articles note that promoting multicultural education and cultural sensitivity is an important goal. However, they provide no mechanisms as to how this can be achieved within training programs. Thus, although an undeniable need exists for all healthcare practitioners to develop cultural competency in the face of an increasingly diverse population, cultural competency education has not kept pace. Chiropractic schools must review their curricula to develop the cultural competencies of their graduates and a basic framework is suggested.

  9. Increasing ocean sciences in K and 1st grade classrooms through ocean sciences curriculum aligned to A Framework for K-12 Science Education, and implementation support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedemonte, S.; Weiss, E. L.

    2016-02-01

    Ocean and climate sciences are rarely introduced at the early elementary levels. Reasons for this vary, but include little direct attention at the national and state levels; lack of quality instructional materials; and, lack of teacher content knowledge. Recent recommendations by the National Research Council, "revise the Earth and Space sciences core ideas and grade band endpoints to include more attention to the ocean whenever possible" (NRC, 2012, p. 336) adopted in the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS), may increase the call for ocean and climate sciences to be addressed. In response to these recommendations' and the recognition that an understanding of some of the Disciplinary Core Ideas (DCIs) would be incomplete without an understanding of processes or phenomena unique to the ocean and ocean organisms; the ocean Literacy community have created documents that show the alignment of NGSS with the Ocean Literacy Principles and Fundamental Concepts (Ocean Literacy, 2013) as well as the Ocean Literacy Scope and Sequence for Grades K-12 (Ocean Literacy, 2010), providing a solid argument for how and to what degree ocean sciences should be part of the curriculum. However, the percentage of science education curricula focused on the ocean remains very low. This session will describe a new project, that draws on the expertise of curriculum developers, ocean literacy advocates, and researchers to meet the challenges of aligning ocean sciences curriculum to NGSS, and supporting its implementation. The desired outcomes of the proposed project are to provide a rigorous standards aligned curricula that addresses all of the Life Sciences, and some Earth and Space Sciences and Engineering Design Core Ideas for Grades K and 1; and provides teachers with the support they need to understand the content and begin implementation. The process and lessons learned will be shared.

  10. Developing an Aging Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Allen J.; Roubinek, Darrell L.

    The program upon which this paper is based, Developing an Aging Curriculum, was initiated as a pilot project to assess the appropriateness of introducing aging information and concepts to elementary-age students. Seventeen teachers in grades K-6 in one school district have been involved in the project as part of a graduate course. The project was…

  11. K-6 Science Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blueford, J. R.; And Others

    A unified science approach is incorporated in this K-6 curriculum mode. The program is organized into six major cycles. These include: (1) science, math, and technology cycle; (2) universe cycle; (3) life cycle; (4) water cycle; (5) plate tectonics cycle; and (6) rock cycle. An overview is provided of each cycle's major concepts. The topic…

  12. Plumbing and Heating Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    EASTCONN Regional Educational Services Center, North Windham, CT.

    Theory and experience in the following areas are included in this plumbing curriculum: (1) plumbing fixtures and heating; (2) city water service; (3) fixture roughing; (4) venting; and (5) solar heating systems. The plumbing program manual includes the following sections: (1) general objectives for grades 10, 11, and 12; (2) a list of 33 major…

  13. A semidefinite programming based branch-and-bound framework for the quadratic assignment problem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Truetsch, U.

    2014-01-01

    The practical approach to calculate an exact solution for a quadratic assignment problem (QAP) via a branch-and-bound framework depends strongly on a "smart" choice of different strategies within the framework, for example the branching strategy, heuristics for the upper bound or relaxations for the

  14. Public-health instruction necessary to supplement the veterinary professional curriculum: the DVM/MPH coordinated-degree program at Auburn University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenzel, James G W; Nusbaum, Kenneth E; Wright, James C; Hall, Dugald C A

    2008-01-01

    To meet long-term needs, many veterinary colleges and schools are participating in dual-degree DVM/MPH programs. Auburn University's College of Veterinary Medicine and the School of Public Health at the University of Alabama at Birmingham have developed a coordinated-degree curriculum in which the DVM and the MPH are not necessarily awarded simultaneously. Other opportunities at Auburn include Public Health Careers Day, trips to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, several elective courses related to veterinary epidemiology, and online access to the Emerging and Exotic Diseases of Animals course available from the Veterinary Information Network. We have been able to increase our students' exposure to the role of the veterinarian in public health and to develop a program to augment their training in public practice.

  15. Assessing the Practices of Population-Based Birth Defects Surveillance Programs Using the CDC Strategic Framework, 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai, Cara T; Correa, Adolfo; Kirby, Russell S; Rosenberg, Deborah; Petros, Michael; Fagen, Michael C

    2015-01-01

    We assessed the practices of U.S. population-based birth defects surveillance programs in addressing current and emergent public health needs. Using the CDC Strategic Framework considerations for public health surveillance (i.e., lexicon and standards, legal authority, technological advances, workforce, and analytic capacity), during 2012 and 2013, we conducted a survey of all U.S. operational birth defects programs (n=43) soliciting information on legal authorities, case definition and clinical information collected, types of data sources, and workforce staffing. In addition, we conducted semi-structured interviews with nine program directors to further understand how programs are addressing current and emergent needs. Three-quarters of birth defects surveillance programs used national guidelines for case definition. Most birth defects surveillance programs (86%) had a legislative mandate to conduct surveillance, and many relied on a range of prenatal, postnatal, public health, and pediatric data sources for case ascertainment. Programs reported that the transition from paper to electronic formats was altering the information collected, offering an opportunity for remote access to improve timeliness for case review and verification. Programs also reported the growth of pooled, multistate data collaborations as a positive development. Needs identified included ongoing workforce development to improve information technology and analytic skills, more emphasis on data utility and birth defects-specific standards for health information exchange, and support to develop channels for sharing ideas on data interpretation and dissemination. The CDC Strategic Framework provided a useful tool to determine the birth defects surveillance areas with positive developments, such as multi-state collaborative epidemiologic studies, and areas for improvement, such as preparation for health information exchanges and workforce database and analytic skills. Our findings may inform

  16. Replicating MISTERS: an epidemiological criminology framework analysis of a program for criminal justice-involved minority males in the community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Roberto Hugh; Akers, Timothy A; Bowman, Daniel Richard

    2013-01-01

    The Men in STD Training and Empowerment Research Study (MISTERS) program and epidemiological criminology began their development in Atlanta at about the same time. MISTERS focuses on men recently released from jail to reduce both HIV/STD and crime-related risk factors through a brief educational intervention. This article examines ways in which MISTERS and epidemiological criminology have been used to inform one another in the replication of the MISTERS program in Orange County, Florida. Data from 110 MISTERS participants during the first 10 months of operation are analyzed to examine the overlapping occurrence of health and criminal risk behaviors in the men's lives. This provides a test of core hypotheses from the epidemiological criminology framework. This article also examines application of the epidemiological criminology framework to develop interventions to address health and crime risk factors simultaneously in Criminal Justice-Involved populations in the community.

  17. Toward a Collaborative Approach to Curriculum Development: A Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunan, David

    1989-01-01

    Describes the National Curriculum Project, an effort in curriculum renewal set up within the Australian Adult Migrant Education Program. The rationale for and the effectiveness of a collaborative approach between teachers and curriculum specialists in school-based English-as-a-Second-Language curriculum development are discussed. Project…

  18. Engaging young children in collective curriculum design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulart, Maria Inês Mafra; Roth, Wolff-Michael

    2010-09-01

    In this study we investigate how 5-year-old children in Brazil and their teachers collectively design science curriculum. More specifically, we develop an agency|structure dialectic as a framework to describe this collective praxis in which science curriculum may emerge as the result of children-teacher transactions rather than as a result of being predetermined and controlled by the latter. We draw on a cultural-historical approach and on the theory of structure and agency to analyze the events showing the complexity of the activity inside a classroom of very young children by science education standards. Data were collected in the context of a science unit in an early-childhood education program in Belo Horizonte. Our study suggests that (a) throughout the movement of agency|passivity || schema|resources one can observe participative thinking, a form of collective consciousness that arises in and from lived experience; (b) learning is a process in which a group is invested in searching for solutions while they create schemas and rearrange resources to evolve a new structure; and (c) the emergent curriculum is a powerful form of praxis that develops children's participation from early childhood on.

  19. iOS game development : Mobile game development with Swift programming language and SceneKit framework

    OpenAIRE

    Koskenseppä, Juuso

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the thesis was to create an iOS game that could be deemed complete enough, so it could be published in Apple’s App Store. This meant fulfilling different guide-lines specified by Apple. The project was carried out by using Apple’s new Swift programming language and SceneKit framework, with an intention to see how they work for iOS game development. The immaturity of Swift programming language led to several code rewrites, every time a newer Swift version was released. T...

  20. The Innovative Immersion of Mobile Learning into a Science Curriculum in Singapore: an Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Daner; Looi, Chee-Kit; Wu, Longkai; Xie, Wenting

    2016-08-01

    With advancements made in mobile technology, increasing emphasis has been paid to how to leverage the affordances of mobile technology to improve science learning and instruction. This paper reports on a science curriculum supported by an inquiry-based framework and mobile technologies. It was developed by teachers and researchers in a multiyear program of school-based research. The foci of this paper is on the design principles of the curriculum and its enactment, and the establishment of a teacher learning community. Through elucidating the design features of the innovative curriculum and evaluating teacher and student involvement in science instruction and learning, we introduce the science curriculum, called Mobilized 5E Science Curriculum (M5ESC), and present a representative case study of how one experienced teacher and her class adopted the curriculum. The findings indicate the intervention promoted this teacher's questioning competency, enabled her to interact with students frequently and flexibly in class, and supported her technology use for promoting different levels of cognition. Student learning was also improved in terms of test achievement and activity performance in and out of the classroom. We propose that the study can be used to guide the learning design of mobile technology-supported curricula, as well as teacher professional development for curriculum enactment.

  1. Healthy Eating and Harambee: curriculum development for a culturally-centered bio-medically oriented nutrition education program to reach African American women of childbearing age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannan, Srimathi; Sparks, Arlene V; Webster, J DeWitt; Krishnakumar, Ambika; Lumeng, Julie

    2010-07-01

    The purpose was to develop, implement and evaluate a peer-led nutrition curriculum Healthy Eating and Harambee that addresses established objectives of maternal and infant health and to shift the stage for African American women of childbearing age in Genesee County toward healthier dietary patterns using a socio-cultural and biomedical orientation. The PEN-3 model, which frames culture in the context of health promotion interventions, was integrated with the Transtheoretical Model to guide this 13-week pre-test/post-test curriculum. Materials developed included soul food plate visuals, a micronutrient availability worksheet, a fruit stand, and gardening kits. Learning activities included affirmations, stories, case-scenarios, point-of-purchase product recognition, church health teams, and community health fairs. We investigated health-promoting dietary behaviors (consumption of more fruits and vegetables (F&V), serving more F&V to their families, and moderating dietary sodium and fat intakes), and biomedical behaviors (self-monitoring blood pressure and exercising) across five stages of change. Session attendance and program satisfaction were assessed. N = 102 women participated (mean age = 27.5 years). A majority (77%) reported adopting at least one healthy eating behavior (moderating sodium, serving more F&V to their families), 23% adopted at least two such behaviors (reading food labels for sodium; using culinary herbs/spices; serving more F&V to their families), and 45% adopted both dietary (moderating sodium; eating more fruits) and biomedical behaviors. Participants and facilitators favorably evaluated the curriculum and suggested improvements. A multi-conceptual approach coupled with cultural and biomedical tailoring has potential to promote young African American women's movement to more advanced stages of change and improve self-efficacy for fruit and vegetable intake, dietary sodium moderation, and self-monitoring blood pressure and physical activity.

  2. Ostomy Home Skills Program

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of Master Surgeon Educators ACS Fundamentals of Surgery Curriculum Transition to Practice Program ACS/APDS Surgery Resident Skills Curriculum ACS/APDS/ASE Resident Prep Curriculum ACS/ASE ...

  3. Curriculum Integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, J. A.

    1979-01-01

    This essay addresses the problem of the nature of curriculum integration, and an attempt is made to lay the basis for a theory of integration. An aspect of the relationship between mathematics and physics is discussed. (Author/MLF)

  4. Mathematical Story: A Metaphor for Mathematics Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietiker, Leslie

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a theoretical framework for interpreting the content found in mathematics curriculum in order to offer teachers and other mathematics educators comprehensive conceptual tools with which to make curricular decisions. More specifically, it describes a metaphor of "mathematics curriculum as story" and defines and…

  5. Disease Management, Case Management, Care Management, and Care Coordination: A Framework and a Brief Manual for Care Programs and Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Osman I

    2016-01-01

    With the changing landscape of health care delivery in the United States since the passage of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act in 2010, health care organizations have struggled to keep pace with the evolving paradigm, particularly as it pertains to population health management. New nomenclature emerged to describe components of the new environment, and familiar words were put to use in an entirely different context. This article proposes a working framework for activities performed in case management, disease management, care management, and care coordination. The author offers standard working definitions for some of the most frequently used words in the health care industry with the goal of increasing consistency for their use, especially in the backdrop of the Centers for Medicaid & Medicare Services offering a "chronic case management fee" to primary care providers for managing the sickest, high-cost Medicare patients. Health care organizations performing case management, care management, disease management, and care coordination. Road map for consistency among users, in reporting, comparison, and for success of care management/coordination programs. This article offers a working framework for disease managers, case and care managers, and care coordinators. It suggests standard definitions to use for disease management, case management, care management, and care coordination. Moreover, the use of clear terminology will facilitate comparing, contrasting, and evaluating all care programs and increase consistency. The article can improve understanding of care program components and success factors, estimate program value and effectiveness, heighten awareness of consumer engagement tools, recognize current state and challenges for care programs, understand the role of health information technology solutions in care programs, and use information and knowledge gained to assess and improve care programs to design the "next generation" of programs.

  6. Using the Five Senses of Success framework to understand the experiences of midwifery students enroled in an undergraduate degree program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidebotham, M; Fenwick, J; Carter, A; Gamble, J

    2015-01-01

    developing a student's sense of capability, purpose, resourcefulness, identity and connectedness (five-senses of success) are key factors that may be important in predicting student satisfaction and progression within their university program. the study aimed to examine the expectations and experiences of second and third year midwifery students enroled in a Bachelor of Midwifery program and identify barriers and enablers to success. a descriptive exploratory qualitative design was used. Fifty-six students enroled in either year 2 or 3 of the Bachelor of Midwifery program in SE Queensland participated in an anonymous survey using open-ended questions. In addition, 16 students participated in two year-level focus groups. Template analysis, using the Five Senses Framework, was used to analyse the data set. early exposure to 'hands on' clinical midwifery practice as well as continuity of care experiences provided students with an opportunity to link theory to practice and increased their perception of capability as they transitioned through the program. Students' sense of identity, purpose, resourcefulness, and capability was strongly influenced by the programs embedded meta-values, including a 'woman centred' approach. In addition, a student's ability to form strong positive relationships with women, peers, lecturers and supportive clinicians was central to developing connections and ultimately a sense of success. A sense of connection not only fostered an ongoing belief that challenges could be overcome but that students themselves could initiate or influence change. the five senses framework provided a useful lens through which to analyse the student experience. Key factors to student satisfaction and retention within a Bachelor of Midwifery program include: a clearly articulated midwifery philosophy, strategies to promote student connectedness including the use of social media, and further development of clinicians' skills in preceptorship, clinical teaching and

  7. Eco-Literacy Development through a Framework for Indigenous and Environmental Educational Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulnieks, Andrejs; Longboat, Dan Roronhiakewan; Young, Kelly

    2013-01-01

    In response to the call of curriculum reforms at the international, national, and local levels, we conceptualize an eco-mentorship program and envision a learning garden alternative practica. We aim to advance a framework enabling the innovation of Indigenous environmental studies, eco-justice education, and Western scientific environmental…

  8. Leadership training in a family medicine residency program: Cross-sectional quantitative survey to inform curriculum development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Erin; Moore, Ainsley; Schabort, Inge

    2017-03-01

    To assess the current status of leadership training as perceived by family medicine residents to inform the development of a formal leadership curriculum. Cross-sectional quantitative survey. Department of Family Medicine at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ont, in December 2013. A total of 152 first- and second-year family medicine residents. Family medicine residents' attitudes toward leadership, perceived level of training in various leadership domains, and identified opportunities for leadership training. Overall, 80% (152 of 190) of residents completed the survey. On a Likert scale (1 = strongly disagree, 4 = neutral, 7 = strongly agree), residents rated the importance of physician leadership in the clinical setting as high (6.23 of 7), whereas agreement with the statement "I am a leader" received the lowest rating (5.28 of 7). At least 50% of residents desired more training in the leadership domains of personal mastery, mentorship and coaching, conflict resolution, teaching, effective teamwork, administration, ideals of a healthy workplace, coalitions, and system transformation. At least 50% of residents identified behavioural sciences seminars, a lecture and workshop series, and a retreat as opportunities to expand leadership training. The concept of family physicians as leaders resonated highly with residents. Residents desired more personal and system-level leadership training. They also identified ways that leadership training could be expanded in the current curriculum and developed in other areas. The information gained from this survey might facilitate leadership development among residents through application of its results in a formal leadership curriculum. Copyright© the College of Family Physicians of Canada.

  9. Is Europe Open to a Student-Oriented Framework for Literature? A Comparative Analysis of the Formal Literature Curriculum in Six European Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witte, Theo; Sâmihaian, Florentina

    2013-01-01

    This study is a comparative analysis of literary curricula in six European countries and is part of the project LiFT-2, funded by Comenius' Life Long Learning Programme of the European Commission. The result of this project, that involved almost 4,500 teachers, is a European literary framework for secondary education which can be described as a…

  10. A framework to build readers and writers in the second language classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilma Zúñiga Camacho

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This article proposes a framework to create readers and writers in the second language classroom. The components of the framework are curriculum, instruction and assessment. The curriculum states the goals and philosophy of the program that intends to create lifelong readers that find reading as a source of entertainment and information. It will also include the kind of literacy that the curriculum wants to support, the effect of reading in the first language, and the use of appropriate materials to achieve the goals. Instruction is framed under principles like reading is thinking and learning, reading and writing are taught together, and technology influences reading and writing development. Assessing reading in the second language classroom is the next component of the framework discussed in the article and it proposes the use of authentic tools like portfolios and observations. Traditional tools like tests are also mentioned.

  11. International Federation for Emergency Medicine model curriculum for emergency medicine specialists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cherri Hobgood

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available To meet a critical and growing need for emergency physicians and emergency medicine resources worldwide, physicians must be trained to deliver time-sensitive interventions and lifesaving emergency care. Currently, there is no globally recognized, standard curriculum that defines the basic minimum standards for specialist trainees in emergency medicine. To address this deficit, the International Federation for Emergency Medicine (IFEM convened a committee of international physicians, health professionals, and other experts in emergency medicine and international emergency medicine development to outline a curriculum for training of specialists in emergency medicine. This curriculum document represents the consensus of recommendations by this committee. The curriculum is designed to provide a framework for educational programs in emergency medicine. The focus is on the basic minimum emergency medicine educational content that any emergency medicine physician specialist should be prepared to deliver on completion of a training program. It is designed not to be prescriptive but to assist educators and emergency medicine leadership to advance physician education in basic emergency medicine no matter the training venue. The content of this curriculum is relevant not just for communities with mature emergency medicine systems but in particular for developing nations or for nations seeking to expand emergency medicine within the current educational structure. We anticipate that there will be wide variability in how this curriculum is implemented and taught. This variability will reflect the existing educational milieu, the resources available, and the goals of the institutions’ educational leadership with regard to the training of emergency medicine specialists.

  12. A Producer's Propensity to Conserve Framework: Application to a US and Australian Conservation Program

    OpenAIRE

    Eigenraam, Mark; Doering, Otto C.; Spinelli, Felix

    2006-01-01

    Increasing recognition of the environmental impact of agriculture has led to increasing public activity around the world encouraging public conservation programs. Different countries have taken different program approaches to accomplish this. The comparison and contrast here is between Australia and the United States, examining the CREP program in the U.S. and the Eco Tender program in Australia. A different historical experience in the U.S. sets certain parameters that are expected in their ...

  13. Along the way to developing a theory of the program: a re-examination of the conceptual framework as an organizing strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helitzer, Deborah L; Sussman, Andrew L; Hoffman, Richard M; Getrich, Christina M; Warner, Teddy D; Rhyne, Robert L

    2014-08-01

    Conceptual frameworks (CF) have historically been used to develop program theory. We re-examine the literature about the role of CF in this context, specifically how they can be used to create descriptive and prescriptive theories, as building blocks for a program theory. Using a case example of colorectal cancer screening intervention development, we describe the process of developing our initial CF, the methods used to explore the constructs in the framework and revise the framework for intervention development. We present seven steps that guided the development of our CF: (1) assemble the "right" research team, (2) incorporate existing literature into the emerging CF, (3) construct the conceptual framework, (4) diagram the framework, (5) operationalize the framework: develop the research design and measures, (6) conduct the research, and (7) revise the framework. A revised conceptual framework depicted more complicated inter-relationships of the different predisposing, enabling, reinforcing, and system-based factors. The updated framework led us to generate program theory and serves as the basis for designing future intervention studies and outcome evaluations. A CF can build a foundation for program theory. We provide a set of concrete steps and lessons learned to assist practitioners in developing a CF. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Presenting an Alternative Source Code Plagiarism Detection Framework for Improving the Teaching and Learning of Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattingh, Frederik; Buitendag, Albertus A. K.; van der Walt, Jacobus S.

    2013-01-01

    The transfer and teaching of programming and programming related skills has become, increasingly difficult on an undergraduate level over the past years. This is partially due to the number of programming languages available as well as access to readily available source code over the Web. Source code plagiarism is common practice amongst many…

  15. A human-centered framework for innovation in conservation incentive programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorice, Michael G; Donlan, C Josh

    2015-12-01

    The promise of environmental conservation incentive programs that provide direct payments in exchange for conservation outcomes is that they enhance the value of engaging in stewardship behaviors. An insidious but important concern is that a narrow focus on optimizing payment levels can ultimately suppress program participation and subvert participants' internal motivation to engage in long-term conservation behaviors. Increasing participation and engendering stewardship can be achieved by recognizing that participation is not simply a function of the payment; it is a function of the overall structure and administration of the program. Key to creating innovative and more sustainable programs is fitting them within the existing needs and values of target participants. By focusing on empathy for participants, co-designing program approaches, and learning from the rapid prototyping of program concepts, a human-centered approach to conservation incentive program design enhances the propensity for discovery of novel and innovative solutions to pressing conservation issues.

  16. Applications of the MapReduce programming framework to clinical big data analysis: current landscape and future trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of massive datasets in a clinical setting presents both challenges and opportunities in data storage and analysis. This so called “big data” challenges traditional analytic tools and will increasingly require novel solutions adapted from other fields. Advances in information and communication technology present the most viable solutions to big data analysis in terms of efficiency and scalability. It is vital those big data solutions are multithreaded and that data access approaches be precisely tailored to large volumes of semi-structured/unstructured data. The MapReduce programming framework uses two tasks common in functional programming: Map and Reduce. MapReduce is a new parallel processing framework and Hadoop is its open-source implementation on a single computing node or on clusters. Compared with existing parallel processing paradigms (e.g. grid computing and graphical processing unit (GPU)), MapReduce and Hadoop have two advantages: 1) fault-tolerant storage resulting in reliable data processing by replicating the computing tasks, and cloning the data chunks on different computing nodes across the computing cluster; 2) high-throughput data processing via a batch processing framework and the Hadoop distributed file system (HDFS). Data are stored in the HDFS and made available to the slave nodes for computation. In this paper, we review the existing applications of the MapReduce programming framework and its implementation platform Hadoop in clinical big data and related medical health informatics fields. The usage of MapReduce and Hadoop on a distributed system represents a significant advance in clinical big data processing and utilization, and opens up new opportunities in the emerging era of big data analytics. The objective of this paper is to summarize the state-of-the-art efforts in clinical big data analytics and highlight what might be needed to enhance the outcomes of clinical big data analytics tools. This paper is concluded by

  17. Applications of the MapReduce programming framework to clinical big data analysis: current landscape and future trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Emad A; Far, Behrouz H; Naugler, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of massive datasets in a clinical setting presents both challenges and opportunities in data storage and analysis. This so called "big data" challenges traditional analytic tools and will increasingly require novel solutions adapted from other fields. Advances in information and communication technology present the most viable solutions to big data analysis in terms of efficiency and scalability. It is vital those big data solutions are multithreaded and that data access approaches be precisely tailored to large volumes of semi-structured/unstructured data. THE MAPREDUCE PROGRAMMING FRAMEWORK USES TWO TASKS COMMON IN FUNCTIONAL PROGRAMMING: Map and Reduce. MapReduce is a new parallel processing framework and Hadoop is its open-source implementation on a single computing node or on clusters. Compared with existing parallel processing paradigms (e.g. grid computing and graphical processing unit (GPU)), MapReduce and Hadoop have two advantages: 1) fault-tolerant storage resulting in reliable data processing by replicating the computing tasks, and cloning the data chunks on different computing nodes across the computing cluster; 2) high-throughput data processing via a batch processing framework and the Hadoop distributed file system (HDFS). Data are stored in the HDFS and made available to the slave nodes for computation. In this paper, we review the existing applications of the MapReduce programming framework and its implementation platform Hadoop in clinical big data and related medical health informatics fields. The usage of MapReduce and Hadoop on a distributed system represents a significant advance in clinical big data processing and utilization, and opens up new opportunities in the emerging era of big data analytics. The objective of this paper is to summarize the state-of-the-art efforts in clinical big data analytics and highlight what might be needed to enhance the outcomes of clinical big data analytics tools. This paper is concluded by

  18. Computer Service Technician "COMPS." Curriculum Grant 1985.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoolcraft Coll., Livonia, MI.

    This document is a curriculum guide for a program in computer service technology developed at Schoolcraft College, Livonia, Michigan. The program is designed to give students a strong background in the fundamentals of electricity, electronic devices, and basic circuits (digital and linear). The curriculum includes laboratory demonstrations of the…

  19. Active Labor Market Programs for Youth : A Framework to Guide Youth Employment Interventions

    OpenAIRE

    Cunningham, Wendy; Sanchez-Puerta, Maria Laura; Wuermli, Alice

    2010-01-01

    Youth are three times more likely to be unemployed than adults, even in economies with strong economic growth. This note is a tool to provide policymakers and youth-serving organizations with a framework to better diagnose short- to medium-run constraints facing the stock of unemployed youth and to design evidence based youth employment interventions. The note only addresses youth employme...

  20. Digital Citizenship in the Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krutka, Daniel G.; Carpenter, Jeffrey P.

    2017-01-01

    "If education is to be a safeguard of democracy, then recent events suggest tweets and other social media must be part of curriculum," write Daniel G. Krutka and Jeffrey P. Carpenter. In this article, the authors argue that teaching citizenship also requires teaching with and about social media. They provide a framework for educators to…