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  1. Schistosomiasis Sustained Control Program in Ethnic Groups Around Ninefescha (Eastern Senegal).

    Science.gov (United States)

    N'Diaye, Monique; Dioukhane, Elhadji M; Ndao, Babacar; Diedhiou, Kemo; Diawara, Lamine; Talla, Idrissa; Vernet, Charlotte; Bessin, François; Barbier, Dominique; Dewavrin, Patrick; Klotz, Francis; Georges, Pierre

    2016-09-07

    Schistosomiasis is the second most significant parasitic disease in children in several African countries. For this purpose, the "Programme National de Lutte contre les Bilharzioses" (PNLB) was developed in partnership with the World Health Organization (WHO) to control this disease in Senegal. However, geographic isolation of Bedik ethnic groups challenged implementation of the key elements of the schistosomiasis program in eastern Senegal, and therefore, a hospital was established in Ninefescha to improve access to health care as well as laboratory support for this population. The program we have implemented from 2008 in partnership with the PNLB/WHO involved campaigns to 1) evaluate schistosomiasis prevalence in children of 53 villages around Ninefescha hospital, 2) perform a mass drug administration following the protocol established by the PNLB in school-aged children, 3) monitor annual prevalence, 4) implement health education campaigns, and 5) oversee the building of latrines. This campaign led to a drop in schistosomiasis prevalence but highlighted that sustainable schistosomiasis control by praziquantel treatment, awareness of the use of latrines, and inhabitants' voluntary commitment to the program are crucial to improve Schistosoma elimination. Moreover, this study revealed that preschool-aged children, for whom praziquantel was not recommended until 2014 in Senegal, constituted a significant reservoir for the parasite. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  2. Elevator Group Supervisory Control System Using Genetic Network Programming with Macro Nodes and Reinforcement Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jin; Yu, Lu; Mabu, Shingo; Hirasawa, Kotaro; Hu, Jinglu; Markon, Sandor

    Elevator Group Supervisory Control System (EGSCS) is a very large scale stochastic dynamic optimization problem. Due to its vast state space, significant uncertainty and numerous resource constraints such as finite car capacities and registered hall/car calls, it is hard to manage EGSCS using conventional control methods. Recently, many solutions for EGSCS using Artificial Intelligence (AI) technologies have been reported. Genetic Network Programming (GNP), which is proposed as a new evolutionary computation method several years ago, is also proved to be efficient when applied to EGSCS problem. In this paper, we propose an extended algorithm for EGSCS by introducing Reinforcement Learning (RL) into GNP framework, and an improvement of the EGSCS' performances is expected since the efficiency of GNP with RL has been clarified in some other studies like tile-world problem. Simulation tests using traffic flows in a typical office building have been made, and the results show an actual improvement of the EGSCS' performances comparing to the algorithms using original GNP and conventional control methods. Furthermore, as a further study, an importance weight optimization algorithm is employed based on GNP with RL and its efficiency is also verified with the better performances.

  3. A group randomized controlled trial integrating obesity prevention and control for postpartum adolescents in a home visiting program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haire-Joshu, Debra L; Schwarz, Cynthia D; Peskoe, Sarah B; Budd, Elizabeth L; Brownson, Ross C; Joshu, Corinne E

    2015-06-26

    Adolescence represents a critical period for the development of overweight that tracks into adulthood. This risk is significantly heightened for adolescents that become pregnant, many of whom experience postpartum weight retention. The aim of this study was to evaluate Balance Adolescent Lifestyle Activities and Nutrition Choices for Energy (BALANCE), a multicomponent obesity prevention intervention targeting postpartum adolescents participating in a national home visiting child development-parent education program. A group randomized, nested cohort design was used with 1325 adolescents, 694 intervention and 490 control, (mean age = 17.8 years, 52 % underrepresented minorities) located across 30 states. Participatory methods were used to integrate lifestyle behavior change strategies within standard parent education practice. Content targeted replacement of high-risk obesogenic patterns (e.g. sweetened drink and high fat snack consumption, sedentary activity) with positive behaviors (e.g. water intake, fruit and vegetables, increased walking). Parent educators delivered BALANCE through home visits, school based classroom-group meetings, and website activities. Control adolescents received standard child development information. Phase I included baseline to posttest (12 months); Phase II included baseline to follow-up (24 months). When compared to the control group, BALANCE adolescents who were ≥12 weeks postpartum were 89 % more likely (p = 0.02) to maintain a normal BMI or improve an overweight/obese BMI by 12 months; this change was not sustained at 24 months. When compared to the control group, BALANCE adolescents significantly improved fruit and vegetable intake (p = .03). In stratified analyses, water intake improved among younger BALANCE teens (p = .001) and overweight/obese BALANCE teens (p = .05) when compared to control counterparts. There were no significant differences between groups in sweetened drink and snack consumption

  4. Diet design for a multicenter controlled feeding trial: the DELTA program. Delta Research Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, B H; Stewart, P; Wang, C H; Champagne, C; Windhauser, M; Ershow, A; Karmally, W; Phillips, K; Stewart, K; Van Heel, N; Farhat-Wood, A; Kris-Etherton, P M

    1998-07-01

    To describe the process and results of diet standardization, diet validation, and monitoring of diet composition, which were key components of protocol 1 of Dietary Effects on Lipoproteins and Thrombogenic Activity (DELTA-1), the initial protocol in a program of multicenter human feeding studies designed to evaluate the effects of amount and type of fat on lipoproteins and hemostasis parameters in various demographic groups. DELTA-1 was based on a randomized, blinded, crossover experimental design. Three diets were fed for 8 weeks to 103 healthy men and women aged 22 to 67 years at 4 field centers. Diet A, an average American diet, was designed to provide 37% of energy from fat, 16% of energy from saturated fatty acids (SFAs); diet B (step 1 diet) was designed to provide 30% of energy from fat, 9% of energy from SFA; and diet C (low SFA diet) was designed to provide 26% of energy from fat, 5% of energy from SFA. Key features of diet standardization included central procurement of fat-containing foods, inclusion of standard ingredients, precision weighing of foods--especially sources of fat and cholesterol--and use of standardized written procedures. For menu validation, a set of 12 menus for each diet was prepared in duplicate and chemically assayed. For monitoring of diet composition during the study, an 8-day diet cycle (6 weekday and 2 weekend menus) was sampled by every field center twice during each of 3 feeding periods. Means (+/- standard error) were calculated and compared with target nutrient specifications. DELTA-1 was able to provide a standardized diet that met nutrient specifications across 4 field centers over 24 weeks of participant feeding spanning a total of 8 months. Prestudy chemical validation of menus and continuous sampling and assay of diets throughout the study are essential to standardize experimental diets and to ensure that nutrient target goals are met and maintained throughout a controlled multicenter feeding study.

  5. Evaluating a community-based early childhood education and development program in Indonesia: study protocol for a pragmatic cluster randomized controlled trial with supplementary matched control group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pradhan, M.; Brinkman, S.A.; Beatty, A.; Maika, A.; Satriawan, E.; de Ree, J.; Hasan, A.

    2013-01-01

    Background This paper presents the study protocol for a pragmatic cluster randomized controlled trial (RCT) with a supplementary matched control group. The aim of the trial is to evaluate a community-based early education and development program launched by the Government of Indonesia. The program

  6. Effectiveness of a group-based self-management program for people with chronic fatigue syndrome: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinxsterhuis, Irma; Sandvik, Leiv; Strand, Elin Bolle; Bautz-Holter, Erik; Sveen, Unni

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of a group-based self-management program for people with chronic fatigue syndrome. A randomized controlled trial. Four mid-sized towns in southern Norway and two suburbs of Oslo. A total of 137 adults with chronic fatigue syndrome. A self-management program including eight biweekly meetings of 2.5 hours duration. The control group received usual care. Primary outcome measure: Medical Outcomes Study-Short Form-36 physical functioning subscale. Fatigue severity scale, self-efficacy scale, physical and mental component summary of the Short Form-36, and the illness cognition questionnaire (acceptance subscale). Assessments were performed at baseline, and at six-month and one-year follow-ups. At the six-month follow-up, a significant difference between the two groups was found concerning fatigue severity ( p = 0.039) in favor of the control group, and concerning self-efficacy in favor of the intervention group ( p = 0.039). These significant differences were not sustained at the one-year follow-up. No significant differences were found between the groups concerning physical functioning, acceptance, and health status at any of the measure points. The drop-out rate was 13.9% and the median number of sessions attended was seven (out of eight). The evaluated self-management program did not have any sustained effect, as compared with receiving usual care.

  7. The Family Startup Program: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial of a universal group-based parenting support program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trillingsgaard, Tea; Maimburg, Rikke Damkjær; Simonsen, Marianne

    2015-04-21

    Inadequate parenting is an important public health problem with possible severe and long-term consequences related to child development. We have solid theoretical and political arguments in favor of efforts enhancing the quality of the early family environment in the population at large. However, little is known about effect of universal approaches to parenting support during the transition to parenthood. This protocol describes an experimental evaluation of group based parenting support, the Family Startup Program (FSP), currently implemented large scale in Denmark. Participants will be approximately 2500 pregnant women and partners. Inclusion criteria are parental age above 18 and the mother expecting first child. Families are recruited when attending routine pregnancy scans provided as a part of the publicly available prenatal care program at Aarhus University Hospital, Skejby. Families are randomized within four geographically defined strata to one of two conditions a) participation in FSP or b) Treatment As Usual (TAU). FSP aims to prepare new families for their roles as parents and enhance parental access to informal sources of support, i.e. social network and community resources. The program consists of twelve group sessions, with nine families in each group, continuing from pregnancy until the child is 15 months old. TAU is the publicly available pre- and postnatal care available to families in both conditions. Analyses will employ survey data, administrative data from health visitors, and administrative register based data from Statistics Denmark. All data sources will be linked via the unique Danish Civil Registration Register (CPR) identifier. Data will be obtained at four time points, during pregnancy, when the child is nine months, 18 months and seven years. The primary study outcome is measured by the Parenting Sense of Competence scale (PSOC) J Clin Child Psychol 18:167-75, 1989. Other outcomes include parenting and couple relationship quality

  8. A randomized controlled trial of a brief versus standard group parenting program for toddler aggression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tully, Lucy A; Hunt, Caroline

    2017-05-01

    Physical aggression (PA) in the toddler years is common and developmentally normal, however, longitudinal research shows that frequent PA is highly stable and associated with long-term negative outcomes. Significant research has demonstrated the efficacy of parenting interventions for reducing externalizing behavior in children yet their typical length may overburden families, leading to low participation rates and high attrition rates. To increase the reach of parenting interventions and impact on the prevalence of externalizing behavior problems, brief interventions are needed. This RCT compared a standard (8 session) group Triple P to a brief (3 session) discussion group and a waitlist control for reducing toddler PA, dysfunctional parenting and related aspects of parent functioning. Sixty-nine self-referred families of toddlers with PA were randomized to the respective conditions. At post-assessment, families in the standard intervention had significantly lower levels of observed child aversive behavior, mother reports of PA and dysfunctional parenting, and higher levels of mother- and partner-rated behavioral self-efficacy than the waitlist control. Families in the standard intervention also had significantly lower levels mother-rated dysfunctional parenting than the brief intervention, and the brief intervention had significantly lower levels of mother-rated dysfunctional parenting than waitlist. There were no significant group differences at post-assessment for measures of parental negative affect or satisfaction with the partner relationship. By 6 month follow-up, families in the brief and standard intervention did not differ significantly on any measure. The implications of the findings to delivery of brief parenting interventions are discussed. Aggr. Behav. 43:291-303, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Nurse-Led Programs to Facilitate Enrollment to Children's Oncology Group Cancer Control Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haugen, Maureen; Kelly, Katherine Patterson; Leonard, Marcia; Mills, Denise; Sung, Lillian; Mowbray, Catriona; Landier, Wendy

    2016-09-01

    The progress made over the past 50 years in disease-directed clinical trials has significantly increased cure rates for children and adolescents with cancer. The Children's Oncology Group (COG) is now conducting more studies that emphasize improving quality of life for young people with cancer. These types of clinical trials are classified as cancer control (CCL) studies by the National Cancer Institute and require different resources and approaches to facilitate adequate accrual and implementation at COG institutions. Several COG institutions that had previously experienced problems with low accruals to CCL trials have successfully implemented local nursing leadership for these types of studies. Successful models of nurses as institutional leaders and "champions" of CCL trials are described. © 2015 by Association of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology Nurses.

  10. A group-delivered self-management program reduces spasticity in people with multiple sclerosis: A randomized, controlled pilot trial

    OpenAIRE

    Hugos, Cinda L; Bourdette, Dennis; Chen, Yiyi; Chen, Zunqiu; Cameron, Michelle

    2017-01-01

    Background Spasticity affects more than 80% of people with multiple sclerosis (MS), affecting activity, participation, and quality of life. Based on an international guideline, an MS spasticity group education and stretching program, MS Spasticity: Take Control (STC), has been developed. Objective The objective of this paper is to determine whether STC with home stretching is associated with greater changes in spasticity than usual care (UC), consisting of an illustrated stretching booklet an...

  11. A controlled trial of the SibworkS group program for siblings of children with special needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Rachel M; Ejova, Anastasia; Giallo, Rebecca; Strohm, Kate; Lillie, Meredith; Fuss, Belinda

    2015-01-01

    Siblings of children with a disability are an at risk group for emotional and behavioral problems. This study evaluated an intervention to promote the emotional and behavioral functioning of siblings of children with disabilities and chronic health conditions. SibworkS is a six-week manual-based, cognitive-behavioral group support program focussed on strengthening siblings' perceived social support, self-esteem, problem-solving skills, adaptive coping behaviors and positive sibling relationships. Fifty-six children aged 7-12 were allocated to either the SibworkS program (n=30) or waitlist control (n=26) in alternating sequence. The primary outcome was siblings' emotional and behavioral functioning. Additional outcomes were self-esteem, perceived social support, the sibling relationship and coping behaviors. Siblings were followed-up immediately after the intervention and at 3-months. Siblings participating in the SibworkS intervention were reported to have fewer emotional and behavioral difficulties than siblings in the control group immediately following the intervention and at the 3-month follow-up. Participation in SibworkS was associated with fewer emotional and behavioral difficulties for siblings. Implications for practice and future research include recommendations for improving program participation. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Effectiveness of a psycho-educational group program for major depression in primary care: a randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Studies show the effectiveness of group psychoeducation in reducing symptoms in people with depression. However, few controlled studies that have included aspects of personal care and healthy lifestyle (diet, physical exercise, sleep) together with cognitive-behavioral techniques in psychoeducation are proven to be effective. The objective of this study is to assess the effectiveness of a psychoeducational program, which includes aspects of personal care and healthy lifestyle, in patients with mild/moderate depression symptoms in Primary Care (PC). Methods In a randomized, controlled trial, 246 participants over 20 years old with ICD-10 major depression were recruited through nurses/general practitioners at 12 urban Primary Care Centers (PCCs) in Barcelona. The intervention group (IG) (n=119) received a group psychoeducational program (12 weekly, 1.5 h sessions led by two nurses) and the control group (CG) (n=112) received usual care. Patients were assessed at baseline and at, 3, 6 and 9 months. The main outcome measures were the BDI, EQ-5D and remission based upon the BDI. Results 231 randomized patients were included, of whom 85 had mild depression and 146 moderate depression. The analyses showed significant differences between groups in relation to remission of symptoms, especially in the mild depression group with a high rate of 57% (p=0.009) at post-treatment and 65% (p=0.006) at 9 month follow up, and only showed significant differences on the BDI at post-treatment (p=0.016; effect size Cohen’s d’=.51) and at 6 and 9 month follow-up (p= 0.048; d’=.44). In the overall and moderate sample, the analyses only showed significant differences between groups on the BDI at post-treatment, p=0.02 (d’=.29) and p=0.010 (d’=.47), respectively. The psychoeducation group improved significantly on the EQ-5D at short and long-term. Conclusions This psychoeducational intervention is a short and long-term effective treatment for patients with mild

  13. Improving Nutrition and Physical Activity Policies in Afterschool Programs: Results from a Group-Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenney, Erica L.; Giles, Catherine M.; deBlois, Madeleine E.; Gortmaker, Steven L.; Chinfatt, Sherene; Cradock, Angie L.

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Afterschool programs can be health-promoting environments for children. Written policies positively influence nutrition and physical activity (PA) environments, but effective strategies for building staff capacity to write such policies have not been evaluated. This study measures the comprehensiveness of written nutrition, PA, and screen time policies in afterschool programs and assesses impact of the Out of School Nutrition and Physical Activity (OSNAP) intervention on key policies. METHODS Twenty afterschool programs in Boston, MA participated in a group-randomized, controlled trial from September 2010 to June 2011. Intervention program staff attended learning collaboratives focused on practice and policy change. The Out-of-School Time (OST) Policy Assessment Index evaluated written policies. Inter-rater reliability and construct validity of the measure and impact of the intervention on written policies were assessed. RESULTS The measure demonstrated moderate to excellent inter-rater reliability (Spearman’s r=0.53 to 0.97) and construct validity. OSNAP was associated with significant increases in standards-based policy statements surrounding snacks (+2.6, p=0.003), beverages (+2.3, p=0.008), screen time (+0.8, p=0.046), family communication (+2.2, p=0.002), and a summary index of OSNAP goals (+3.3, p=0.02). CONCLUSIONS OSNAP demonstrated success in building staff capacity to write health-promoting policy statements. Future research should focus on determining policy change impact on practices. PMID:24941286

  14. A group-delivered self-management program reduces spasticity in people with multiple sclerosis: A randomized, controlled pilot trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hugos, Cinda L; Bourdette, Dennis; Chen, Yiyi; Chen, Zunqiu; Cameron, Michelle

    2017-01-01

    Spasticity affects more than 80% of people with multiple sclerosis (MS), affecting activity, participation, and quality of life. Based on an international guideline, an MS spasticity group education and stretching program, MS Spasticity: Take Control (STC), has been developed. The objective of this paper is to determine whether STC with home stretching is associated with greater changes in spasticity than usual care (UC), consisting of an illustrated stretching booklet and home stretching but without group instruction or support, in people with MS. Ambulatory MS patients with self-reported spasticity interfering with daily activities were randomized to STC or UC. Individuals completed questionnaires regarding MS, spasticity, walking, fatigue and mood, and physical measures of spasticity and walking. Thirty-eight of 40 participants completed both assessments. Mean total score and scores on two subscales of the MS Spasticity Scale-88 improved more with STC than with UC (p spasticity more than UC and provided encouraging improvements in other measures.

  15. The ACTIVATE study: results from a group-randomized controlled trial comparing a traditional worksite health promotion program with an activated consumer program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, Paul E; Fowles, Jinnet Briggs; Xi, Min; Harvey, Lisa

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE. This study compares a traditional worksite-based health promotion program with an activated consumer program and a control program DESIGN. Group randomized controlled trial with 18-month intervention. SETTING. Two large Midwestern companies. SUBJECTS. Three hundred and twenty employees (51% response). INTERVENTION. The traditional health promotion intervention offered population-level campaigns on physical activity, nutrition, and stress management. The activated consumer intervention included population-level campaigns for evaluating health information, choosing a health benefits plan, and understanding the risks of not taking medications as prescribed. The personal development intervention (control group) offered information on hobbies. The interventions also offered individual-level coaching for high risk individuals in both active intervention groups. MEASURES. Health risk status, general health status, consumer activation, productivity, and the ability to evaluate health information. ANALYSIS. Multivariate analyses controlled for baseline differences among the study groups. RESULTS. At the population level, compared with baseline performance, the traditional health promotion intervention improved health risk status, consumer activation, and the ability to recognize reliable health websites. Compared with baseline performance, the activated consumer intervention improved consumer activation, productivity, and the ability to recognize reliable health websites. At the population level, however, only the activated consumer intervention improved any outcome more than the control group did; that outcome was consumer activation. At the individual level for high risk individuals, both traditional health coaching and activated consumer coaching positively affected health risk status and consumer activation. In addition, both coaching interventions improved participant ability to recognize a reliable health website. Consumer activation coaching also

  16. A Comprehensive Lifestyle Peer Group-Based Intervention on Cardiovascular Risk Factors: The Randomized Controlled Fifty-Fifty Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Pardo, Emilia; Fernández-Alvira, Juan Miguel; Vilanova, Marta; Haro, Domingo; Martínez, Ramona; Carvajal, Isabel; Carral, Vanesa; Rodríguez, Carla; de Miguel, Mercedes; Bodega, Patricia; Santos-Beneit, Gloria; Peñalvo, Jose Luis; Marina, Iñaki; Pérez-Farinós, Napoleón; Dal Re, Marian; Villar, Carmen; Robledo, Teresa; Vedanthan, Rajesh; Bansilal, Sameer; Fuster, Valentin

    2016-02-09

    Cardiovascular diseases stem from modifiable risk factors. Peer support is a proven strategy for many chronic illnesses. Randomized trials assessing the efficacy of this strategy for global cardiovascular risk factor modification are lacking. This study assessed the hypothesis that a peer group strategy would help improve healthy behaviors in individuals with cardiovascular risk factors. A total of 543 adults 25 to 50 years of age with at least 1 risk factor were recruited; risk factors included hypertension (20%), overweight (82%), smoking (31%), and physical inactivity (81%). Subjects were randomized 1:1 to a peer group-based intervention group (IG) or a self-management control group (CG) for 12 months. Peer-elected leaders moderated monthly meetings involving role-play, brainstorming, and activities to address emotions, diet, and exercise. The primary outcome was mean change in a composite score related to blood pressure, exercise, weight, alimentation, and tobacco (Fuster-BEWAT score, 0 to 15). Multilevel models with municipality as a cluster variable were applied to assess differences between groups. Participants' mean age was 42 ± 6 years, 71% were female, and they had a mean baseline Fuster-BEWAT score of 8.42 ± 2.35. After 1 year, the mean scores were significantly higher in the IG (n = 277) than in the CG (n = 266) (IG mean score: 8.84; 95% confidence interval (CI): 8.37 to 9.32; CG mean score: 8.17; 95% CI: 7.55 to 8.79; p = 0.02). The increase in the overall score was significantly larger in the IG compared with the CG (difference: 0.75; 95% CI: 0.32 to 1.18; p = 0.02). The mean improvement in the individual components was uniformly greater in the IG, with a significant difference for the tobacco component. The peer group intervention had beneficial effects on cardiovascular risk factors, with significant improvements in the overall score and specifically on tobacco cessation. A follow-up assessment will be performed 1 year after the final assessment

  17. A group-delivered self-management program reduces spasticity in people with multiple sclerosis: A randomized, controlled pilot trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourdette, Dennis; Chen, Yiyi; Chen, Zunqiu; Cameron, Michelle

    2017-01-01

    Background Spasticity affects more than 80% of people with multiple sclerosis (MS), affecting activity, participation, and quality of life. Based on an international guideline, an MS spasticity group education and stretching program, MS Spasticity: Take Control (STC), has been developed. Objective The objective of this paper is to determine whether STC with home stretching is associated with greater changes in spasticity than usual care (UC), consisting of an illustrated stretching booklet and home stretching but without group instruction or support, in people with MS. Methods Ambulatory MS patients with self-reported spasticity interfering with daily activities were randomized to STC or UC. Individuals completed questionnaires regarding MS, spasticity, walking, fatigue and mood, and physical measures of spasticity and walking. Results Thirty-eight of 40 participants completed both assessments. Mean total score and scores on two subscales of the MS Spasticity Scale-88 improved more with STC than with UC (p spasticity more than UC and provided encouraging improvements in other measures. PMID:28607753

  18. A Double-Deck Elevator Group Supervisory Control System with Destination Floor Guidance System Using Genetic Network Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lu; Zhou, Jin; Mabu, Shingo; Hirasawa, Kotaro; Hu, Jinglu; Markon, Sandor

    The Elevator Group Supervisory Control Systems (EGSCS) are the control systems that systematically manage three or more elevators in order to efficiently transport the passengers in buildings. Double-deck elevators, where two elevators are connected with each other, serve passengers at two consecutive floors simultaneously. Double-deck Elevator systems (DDES) become more complex in their behavior than conventional single-deck elevator systems (SDES). Recently, Artificial Intelligence (AI) technology has been used in such complex systems. Genetic Network Programming (GNP), a graph-based evolutionary method, has been applied to EGSCS and its advantages are shown in some papers. GNP can obtain the strategy of a new hall call assignment to the optimal elevator when it performs crossover and mutation operations to judgment nodes and processing nodes. Meanwhile, Destination Floor Guidance System (DFGS) is installed in DDES, so that passengers can also input their destinations at elevator halls. In this paper, we have applied GNP to DDES and compared DFGS with normal systems. The waiting time and traveling time of DFGS are all improved because of getting more information from DFGS. The simulations showed the effectiveness of the double-deck elevators with DFGS in different building traffics.

  19. The Effect of Group Psychoeducation Program on Medication Adherence in Patients with Bipolar Mood Disorders: a Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmani, Farnaz; Ebrahimi, Hossein; Ranjbar, Fatemeh; Razavi, Seyed Sajjad; Asghari, Elnaz

    2016-12-01

    Introduction: Medication nonadherence is highly prevalent in patients with bipolar disorders and often results in worsening disease prognosis. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of group psychoeducation on medication adherence in female patients with bipolar mood disorder type I. Methods: This randomized controlled trial was conducted on 76 patients with bipolar mood disorder admitted in female psychiatric wards of Razi teaching hospital, Tabriz, Iran. The participants were selected by convenience sampling method and were randomly assigned to experimental and control groups. Patients in experimental group received 10 continuous 90 minutes sessions of psychoeducation, two times a week. Medication adherence was measured using the medicine check list and medication adherence rating scale (MARS) before and after intervention. Data analysis was performed with SPSS ver.13. Results: There was no significant difference between two groups regarding medication adherence before the intervention. After the study intervention, the mean scores of medication adherence check list and medication adherence rating scale in the experimental group were significantly higher than the control group. Conclusion: Since group psychoeducation was effective in improving patients' medication adherence, it could be recommended for psychiatric nurses to apply this intervention in the clinical setting.

  20. The Effect of Group Psychoeducation Program on Medication Adherence in Patients with Bipolar Mood Disorders: a Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farnaz Rahmani

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Medication nonadherence is highly prevalent in patients with bipolar disorders and often results in worsening disease prognosis. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of group psychoeducation on medication adherence in female patients with bipolar mood disorder type I. Methods: This randomized controlled trial was conducted on 76 patients with bipolar mood disorder admitted in female psychiatric wards of Razi teaching hospital, Tabriz, Iran. The participants were selected by convenience sampling method and were randomly assigned to experimental and control groups. Patients in experimental group received 10 continuous 90 minutes sessions of psychoeducation, two times a week. Medication adherence was measured using the medicine check list and medication adherence rating scale (MARS before and after intervention. Data analysis was performed with SPSS ver.13. Results: There was no significant difference between two groups regarding medication adherence before the intervention. After the study intervention, the mean scores of medication adherence check list and medication adherence rating scale in the experimental group were significantly higher than the control group. Conclusion: Since group psychoeducation was effective in improving patients' medication adherence, it could be recommended for psychiatric nurses to apply this intervention in the clinical setting.

  1. Effectiveness Trial of an Indicated Cognitive-Behavioral Group Adolescent Depression Prevention Program versus Bibliotherapy and Brochure Control at 1- and 2-Year Follow-Up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohde, Paul; Stice, Eric; Shaw, Heather; Gau, Jeff M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Evaluate the longterm effects of a brief group cognitive-behavioral (CB) adolescent depression indicated prevention program through 2-year follow-up, relative to CB bibliotherapy and brochure control, when high school personnel recruited students and delivered the program. Method 378 adolescents (M age = 15.5, SD = 1.2; 68% female, 72% White) with elevated self-assessed depressive symptoms who were randomized to CB group, CB bibliotherapy, or educational brochure control were assessed at pre, post, 6-, 12-, 18-, and 24-month follow-up. Results By 2 years post-intervention, CB group participants showed significantly lower major depressive disorder (MDD) onset versus CB bibliotherapy (10% vs. 25%, respectively; HR = 2.48, p = .006), but the incidence difference relative to brochure controls (17%) was nonsignificant; MDD incidence for bibliotherapy and brochure controls did not differ. Although CB group participants showed lower depressive symptoms at post versus brochure controls, there were no effects for this outcome or for social adjustment or substance use over 2-year follow-up. Moderator analyses suggested that participants with higher baseline depressive symptoms showed greater longterm symptom reductions in the CB group intervention versus bibliotherapy. Conclusions The evidence that a brief CB group intervention delivered by real-world providers significantly reduced MDD onset versus CB bibliotherapy is potentially encouraging. However, the lack of MDD prevention effects relative to brochure control and lack of longterm symptom effects (though consistent with results from other depression prevention trials), suggest that the delivery of CB group should be refined to strengthen its effectiveness. PMID:25894666

  2. Effectiveness trial of an indicated cognitive-behavioral group adolescent depression prevention program versus bibliotherapy and brochure control at 1- and 2-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohde, Paul; Stice, Eric; Shaw, Heather; Gau, Jeff M

    2015-08-01

    The main goal of this study was to evaluate the long-term effects of a brief group cognitive-behavioral (CB) adolescent depression indicated prevention program through 2-year follow-up, relative to CB bibliotherapy and brochure control, when high school personnel recruited students and delivered the program. Three hundred seventy-eight adolescents (M age = 15.5, SD = 1.2; 68% female, 72% White) with elevated self-assessed depressive symptoms who were randomized to CB group, CB bibliotherapy, or educational brochure control were assessed at pretest, posttest, and 6-, 12-, 18-, and 24-month follow-up. By 2 years postintervention, CB group participants showed significantly lower major depressive disorder (MDD) onset versus CB bibliotherapy (10% vs. 25%, respectively; hazard ratio = 2.48, p = .006), but the incidence difference relative to brochure controls (17%) was nonsignificant; MDD incidence for bibliotherapy and brochure controls did not differ. Although CB group participants showed lower depressive symptoms at posttest versus brochure controls, there were no effects for this outcome or for social adjustment or substance use over 2-year follow-up. Moderator analyses suggested that participants with higher baseline depressive symptoms showed greater long-term symptom reductions in the CB group intervention versus bibliotherapy. The evidence that a brief CB group intervention delivered by real-world providers significantly reduced MDD onset versus CB bibliotherapy is potentially encouraging. However, the lack of MDD prevention effects relative to brochure control and lack of long-term symptom effects (though consistent with results from other depression prevention trials), suggest that the delivery of the CB group should be refined to strengthen its effectiveness. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  3. Costs of Control in Groups

    OpenAIRE

    Riener, Gerhard; Wiederhold, Simon

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores the role of social groups in explaining the reaction to control.We propose a simple model with a principal using control devices and a controlledagent, which incorporates the existence of social groups. Testing experimentally theconjectures derived from the model and related literature, we find that agents in socialgroups (i) perform more than other (no-group) agents; (ii) expect less control thanno-group agents; (iii) decrease their performance substantially when actual c...

  4. The Effects of Forest Therapy on Coping with Chronic Widespread Pain: Physiological and Psychological Differences between Participants in a Forest Therapy Program and a Control Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jin-Woo; Choi, Han; Jeon, Yo-Han; Yoon, Chong-Hyeon; Woo, Jong-Min; Kim, Won

    2016-02-24

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of a two-day forest therapy program on individuals with chronic widespread pain. Sixty one employees of a public organization providing building and facilities management services within the Seoul Metropolitan area participated in the study. Participants were assigned to an experimental group (n = 33) who participated in a forest therapy program or a control group (n = 28) on a non-random basis. Pre- and post-measures of heart rate variability (HRV), Natural Killer cell (NK cell) activity, self-reported pain using the visual analog scale (VAS), depression level using the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), and health-related quality of life measures using the EuroQol Visual Analog Scale (EQ-VAS) were collected in both groups. The results showed that participants in the forest therapy group, as compared to the control group, showed physiological improvement as indicated by a significant increase in some measures of HRV and an increase in immune competence as indicated by NK cell activity. Participants in the forest therapy group also reported significant decreases in pain and depression, and a significant improvement in health-related quality of life. These results support the hypothesis that forest therapy is an effective intervention to relieve pain and associated psychological and physiological symptoms in individuals with chronic widespread pain.

  5. The Effects of Forest Therapy on Coping with Chronic Widespread Pain: Physiological and Psychological Differences between Participants in a Forest Therapy Program and a Control Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Woo Han

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the effects of a two-day forest therapy program on individuals with chronic widespread pain. Sixty one employees of a public organization providing building and facilities management services within the Seoul Metropolitan area participated in the study. Participants were assigned to an experimental group (n = 33 who participated in a forest therapy program or a control group (n = 28 on a non-random basis. Pre- and post-measures of heart rate variability (HRV, Natural Killer cell (NK cell activity, self-reported pain using the visual analog scale (VAS, depression level using the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI, and health-related quality of life measures using the EuroQol Visual Analog Scale (EQ-VAS were collected in both groups. The results showed that participants in the forest therapy group, as compared to the control group, showed physiological improvement as indicated by a significant increase in some measures of HRV and an increase in immune competence as indicated by NK cell activity. Participants in the forest therapy group also reported significant decreases in pain and depression, and a significant improvement in health-related quality of life. These results support the hypothesis that forest therapy is an effective intervention to relieve pain and associated psychological and physiological symptoms in individuals with chronic widespread pain.

  6. Effectiveness of a psycho-educational group program for major depression in primary care: a randomized controlled trial

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Casañas, Rocío; Catalán, Rosa; del Val, Jose Luis; Real, Jordi; Valero, Sergi; Casas, Miquel

    2012-01-01

    ... to be effective.The objective of this study is to assess the effectiveness of a psychoeducational program, which includes aspects of personal care and healthy lifestyle, in patients with mild/moderate depression...

  7. Survey of care for the underserved: a control group study of practicing physicians who were graduates of The Ohio State University College of Medicine premedical postbaccalaureate training program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDougle, Leon; Way, David P; Rucker, Yosman L

    2010-01-01

    Multiple publications describe short- term and intermediate outcomes of premedical postbaccalaureate programs (PBPs). However, the authors could find no control group studies reporting the service provided by graduates of PBPs to patients who are medically indigent (e.g., on Medicaid or uninsured) and/or poor. The authors explored the relationship between successful completion of a midwestern PBP and providing care for the underserved. In 2008, the authors surveyed 1996-2002 graduates of The Ohio State University College of Medicine who had been in practice for at least one year about their current practice population. The authors compared two groups: (1) physicians who completed the PBP and (2) a stratified random control group of physicians who graduated from the same medical school, in the same graduating classes, but did not participate in the PBP. The survey return rate was 70.9% (73/103). Findings suggest that PBP graduates were more likely to be practicing medicine in a federally designated underserved area (29.4% versus 5.1%, P < .009) or providing service where 40% or more of the patients were medically indigent or poor (67.6% versus 33.3%, P < .003). PBP graduates were also more likely to be volunteering their services to patients who were indigent (47.1% versus 10.3%, P < .001). This is likely the first control group study demonstrating the increased likelihood of graduates of a PBP providing health care to patients who are medically indigent and/or poor.

  8. The Use of Self-Directed Relapse Prevention Booklets to Assist in Maintaining Abstinence After a 6-Week Group Smoking Cessation Treatment Program: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veldheer, Susan; Hrabovsky, Shari; Yingst, Jessica; Sciamanna, Chris; Berg, Arthur; Foulds, Jonathan

    2017-06-01

    Identifying effective relapse prevention interventions is a vital step to help smokers maintain abstinence for the long term. The purpose of this study is to determine if providing recently quit smokers with self-directed relapse prevention booklets is effective at maintaining abstinence after intensive group smoking cessation treatment. Two hundred and twenty-five participants were randomized to receive Forever Free (FF) relapse prevention booklets or a control booklet (Surgeon General's report, SG) at the end of a 6-week group treatment program. Participants were then contacted by phone to assess whether they had read the materials. Smoking status was assessed 6 months after their target quit date. Primary analyses focused on the 115 participants who quit at the end of treatment. There was no difference in the 6-month quit rate between groups (40.7% quit FF vs. 44.6% quit SG, p = .67). The FF group read a significantly smaller proportion of the materials versus the control booklet (20.0% read most or all of FF vs. 72.0% of SG, p self-directed relapse prevention booklets did not reduce relapse or enhance cessation over general tobacco and health information when added to intensive group smoking cessation treatment. However, this study lacked power to detect a small but clinically meaningful positive effect.

  9. Control systems on Lie groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurdjevic, V.; Sussmann, H. J.

    1972-01-01

    The controllability properties of systems which are described by an evolution equation in a Lie group are studied. The revelant Lie algebras induced by a right invariant system are singled out, and the basic properties of attainable sets are derived. The homogeneous case and the general case are studied, and results are interpreted in terms of controllability. Five examples are given.

  10. Attitude Control Working Group report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Daniel F.; Studer, Phillip A.

    1986-01-01

    The goals were to establish the Attitude Control System (ACS) requirements, constraints, technology assessment, technology shortfalls, expected in the year 2000. These were based upon all missions, military and civil, for LEO and GEO. The critical ACS technology issues were identified and ACS programs developed to address these critical issues.

  11. Effects of a group-based exercise and educational program on physical performance and disease self-management in rheumatoid arthritis : a randomized controlled study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breedland, I.; van Scheppingen, C.; Leijsma, M.; Verheij-Jansen, N.P.; van Weert, E.

    Background. Evidence supports the use of educational and physical training programs for people with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Objective. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of a group-based exercise and educational program on the physical performance and disease self-management of

  12. Thermal Control Working Group report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haslett, Robert; Mahefkey, E. Thomas

    1986-01-01

    The Thermal Control Working Group limited its evaluation to issues associated with Earth orbiting and planetary spacecraft with power levels up to 50 kW. It was concluded that the space station technology is a necessary precursor but does not meet S/C 2000 needs (life, high heat flux, long term cryogenics, and survivability). Additional basic and applied research are required (fluid/materials compatibility and two phase system modeling). Scaling, the key issue, must define accelerated life test criteria. The two phase systems require 0g to 1 g correlation. Additional ground test beds are required and combined space environment tests of materials.

  13. Group Therapy Training in a Doctoral Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caffaro, John

    This document describes a program at the California School of Professional Psychology-Los Angeles that provides a three-semester sequence of group therapy courses to counseling students. In the students' final year, they are required to take an advanced clinical course titled Advanced Group Process. The course synthesizes didactic methods for…

  14. The effects of a group based stress treatment program (the Kalmia concept) targeting stress reduction and return to work. A randomized, wait-list controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Netterstrøm, Bo; Friebel, Lene; Ladegaard, Yun Katrine

    2012-01-01

    of an integrative approach of group psychotherapy for 2.5 hours per week and Basic Body Awareness Therapy (BBAT) with mindfulness meditation for 1.5 hours per week, which runs in a parallel process supplemented with workplace dialogue; the treatment-as-usual control group (TAUCG, 71 participants), who received 12...

  15. A failure to confirm the effectiveness of a brief group psychoeducational program for mothers of children with high-functioning pervasive developmental disorders: a randomized controlled pilot trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Masako; Yamada, Atsurou; Watanabe, Norio; Akechi, Tatsuo; Katsuki, Fujika; Nishiyama, Takeshi; Imaeda, Masayuki; Miyachi, Taishi; Otaki, Kazuo; Mitsuda, Yumiko; Ota, Akino; Furukawa, Toshi A

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of group psychoeducation to relieve the psychological distress of mothers of children with high-functioning pervasive developmental disorders (HFPDD) and to improve the behaviors of the children. Methods Seventy-two mothers of preschool outpatients with HFPDD were randomly assigned to a four-session brief group psychoeducational program (GP). The sessions were held every second week in addition to the usual treatment (GP + treatment as usual [TAU] group), or to a TAU-alone group. The primary outcome was self-reported symptoms of maternal mental health as assessed using the 28-item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28) at 21 weeks post-randomization (week 21). The GHQ-28 at the end of the intervention (week 7), Aberrant Behavior Checklist (ABC) for the behavior of the children, the Zarit Burden Interview (ZBI), and the Medical Outcomes Study 36-item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) were carried out at weeks 7 and 21. We tested the group effects with the interaction between the intervention and the evaluation points. Results The GHQ-28 score at week 21 was significantly higher in the GP + TAU group as compared to that in the TAU-alone group, indicating a greater improvement in the TAU-alone group. There was no evidence that GP + TAU led to a greater improvement of maternal mental health than TAU-alone at week 7. Similarly, no evidence was obtained to indicate that GP + TAU led to a reduction in the ABC or ZBI scores by week 7 or 21. The adjusted scores for the RF (role emotional) and MH (mental health) subscales of the SF-36 at week 21 were also significantly lower in the GP + TAU group, indicating a similar tendency to that of the change of the GHQ-28 score at week 21. Conclusion The psychoeducational program did not alleviate maternal distress, aberrant behaviors of the children, or caregiver burden. PMID:25061301

  16. Crisis Group Fellowship Program | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    In much of the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) and West Africa, there is a dearth of research, training and employment opportunities in the social sciences, particularly in the area of research and policy analysis on local conflicts. The Crisis Group has long considered establishing a fellowship program in order to train a ...

  17. A randomized controlled trial of an enhanced interdisciplinary community based group program for people with Parkinson's disease: study rationale and protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Catherine; Currin, Michelle; Tyson, Sara; Rogers, Anthea; Healy, Susan; McPhail, Steven; Brauer, Sandra G.; Heathcote, Katharine; Comans, Tracy

    2012-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive, chronic neurodegenerative disorder for which there is no known cure. Physical exercise programs may be used to assist with the physical management of PD. Several studies have demonstrated that community based physical therapy programs are effective in reducing physical aspects of disability among people with PD. While multidisciplinary therapy interventions may have the potential to reduce disability and improve the quality of life of people with PD, there is very limited clinical trial evidence to support or refute the use of a community based multidisciplinary or interdisciplinary programs for people with PD. A two group randomized trial is being undertaken within a community rehabilitation service in Brisbane, Australia. Community dwelling adults with a diagnosis of Idiopathic Parkinson's disease are being recruited. Eligible participants are randomly allocated to a standard exercise rehabilitation group program or an intervention group which incorporates physical, cognitive and speech activities in a multi-tasking framework. Outcomes will be measured at 6-week intervals for a period of six months. Primary outcome measures are the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) and the Timed Up and Go (TUG) cognitive test. Secondary outcomes include changes in health related quality of life, communication, social participation, mobility, strength and balance, and carer burden measures. This study will determine the immediate and long-term effectiveness of a unique multifocal, interdisciplinary, dual-tasking approach to the management of PD as compared to an exercise only program. We anticipate that the results of this study will have implications for the development of cost effective evidence based best practice for the treatment of people with PD living in the community. PMID:22593807

  18. A randomised controlled trial of an enhanced interdisciplinary community based group program for people with Parkinson’s disease: study rationale and protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Peters

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson’s disease (PD is a progressive, chronic neurodegenerative disorder for which there is no known cure. Physical exercise programs may be used to assist with the physical management of PD. Several studies have demonstrated that community based physical therapy programs are effective in reducing physical aspects of disability among people with PD. While multidisciplinary therapy interventions may have the potential to reduce disability and improve the quality of life of people with PD, there is very limited clinical trial evidence to support or refute the use of a community based multidisciplinary or interdisciplinary programs for people with PD. A two group randomized trial is being undertaken within a community rehabilitation service in Brisbane, Australia. Community dwelling adults with a diagnosis of Idiopathic Parkinson’s disease are being recruited. Eligible participants are randomly allocated to a standard exercise rehabilitation group program or an intervention group which incorporates physical, cognitive and speech activities in a multi-tasking framework. Outcomes will be measured at 6-week intervals for a period of six months. Primary outcome measures are the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA and the Timed Up and Go (TUG cognitive test. Secondary outcomes include changes in health related quality of life, communication, social participation, mobility, strength and balance, and carer burden measures. This study will determine the immediate and long-term effectiveness of a unique multifocal, interdisciplinary, dual-tasking approach to the management of PD as compared to an exercise only program. We anticipate that the results of this study will have implications for the development of cost effective evidence based best practice for the treatment of people with PD living in the community.

  19. Matching with Multiple Control Groups with Adjustment for Group Differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Elizabeth A.; Rubin, Donald B.

    2008-01-01

    When estimating causal effects from observational data, it is desirable to approximate a randomized experiment as closely as possible. This goal can often be achieved by choosing a subsample from the original control group that matches the treatment group on the distribution of the observed covariates. However, sometimes the original control group…

  20. Hidden Costs of Control in Social Groups

    OpenAIRE

    Wiederhold, Simon; Riener, Gerhard

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigates the role of social identity in reactions to control. We propose a simple principal-agent model with control that incorporates the existence of social groups. Our laboratory experiment shows that, in contrast to no-group agents, agents in social groups (i) perform better; (ii) expect less control; (iii) do not reciprocate when facing less control than expected; (iv) decrease their performance substantially when actual control exceeds their expectation. Hidden costs of c...

  1. A failure to confirm the effectiveness of a brief group psychoeducational program for mothers of children with high-functioning pervasive developmental disorders: a randomized controlled pilot trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzuki M

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Masako Suzuki,1 Atsurou Yamada,1 Norio Watanabe,1 Tatsuo Akechi,1 Fujika Katsuki,2 Takeshi Nishiyama,3 Masayuki Imaeda,4 Taishi Miyachi,4 Kazuo Otaki,5 Yumiko Mitsuda,6 Akino Ota,6 Toshi A Furukawa7 1Department of Psychiatry and Cognitive-Behavioral Medicine, Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya, Japan; 2Department of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing, Nagoya City University School of Nursing, Nagoya, Japan; 3Clinical Trial Management Center, Nagoya City University Hospital, Nagoya, Japan; 4Department of Neonatology and Pediatrics, Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya, Japan; 5Kazuo Mental Clinic, Toyohashi, Japan; 6Toyokawa Sakura Hospital, Toyokawa Japan; 7Department of Health Promotion and Human Behavior, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine/School of Public Health, Kyoto, Japan Objective: The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of group psychoeducation to relieve the psychological distress of mothers of children with high-functioning pervasive developmental disorders (HFPDD and to improve the behaviors of the children. Methods: Seventy-two mothers of preschool outpatients with HFPDD were randomly assigned to a four-session brief group psychoeducational program (GP. The sessions were held every second week in addition to the usual treatment (GP + treatment as usual [TAU] group, or to a TAU-alone group. The primary outcome was self-reported symptoms of maternal mental health as assessed using the 28-item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28 at 21 weeks post-randomization (week 21. The GHQ-28 at the end of the intervention (week 7, Aberrant Behavior Checklist (ABC for the behavior of the children, the Zarit Burden Interview (ZBI, and the Medical Outcomes Study 36-item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36 were carried out at weeks 7 and 21. We tested the group effects with the interaction between the intervention and the evaluation points. Results: The GHQ-28

  2. A group-randomized controlled trial for health promotion in Girl Scouts: Healthier Troops in a SNAP (Scouting Nutrition & Activity Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behrens Timothy K

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Girl Scouting may offer a viable channel for health promotion and obesity prevention programs. This study evaluated the effectiveness of an intervention program delivered through Girl Scout Junior troops that was designed to foster healthful troop meeting environments and increase obesity prevention behaviors at home. Methods Seven Girl Scout troops were randomized to intervention (n = 3, with 34 girls or standard-care control (n = 4, with 42 girls conditions. Girls ranged in age from 9 to 13 years (mean 10.5 years. Intervention troop leaders were trained to implement policies promoting physical activity (PA and healthful eating opportunities at troop meetings, and to implement a curriculum promoting obesity-prevention behaviors at home. The primary outcome variable was child body mass index (BMI z-score. Secondary outcomes included accelerometer-assessed PA levels in troop meetings, direct observations of snack offerings, time spent in physically active meeting content, and leader encouragement of PA and healthful eating. Results The intervention was delivered with good fidelity, and intervention troops provided greater opportunities for healthful eating and PA (x2 = 210.8, p 2 = 23.46, p 2 = 18.14, p 2 = 9.63, p = .002 compared to control troop leaders. Most effects of the intervention on individual-level variables of girls and parents were not significantly different from the control condition, including the primary outcome of child BMI z-score (F1, 5 = 0.42, p = .544, parent BMI (F1, 5 = 1.58, p = .264, and related behavioral variables. The notable exception was for objectively assessed troop PA, wherein girls in intervention troops accumulated significantly less sedentary (x2 = 6.3, p = .011, significantly more moderate (x2 = 8.2, p = .004, and more moderate-to-vigorous physical activity, (x2 = 18.4, p Conclusions Implementing a health promotion curriculum and supporting policies to provide more healthful environments in

  3. A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial of the ACCESS Program: A Group Intervention to Improve Social, Adaptive Functioning, Stress Coping, and Self-Determination Outcomes in Young Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oswald, Tasha M; Winder-Patel, Breanna; Ruder, Steven; Xing, Guibo; Stahmer, Aubyn; Solomon, Marjorie

    2017-12-12

    The purpose of this pilot randomized controlled trial was to investigate the acceptability and efficacy of the Acquiring Career, Coping, Executive control, Social Skills (ACCESS) Program, a group intervention tailored for young adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) to enhance critical skills and beliefs that promote adult functioning, including social and adaptive skills, self-determination skills, and coping self-efficacy. Forty-four adults with ASD (ages 18-38; 13 females) and their caregivers were randomly assigned to treatment or waitlist control. Compared to controls, adults in treatment significantly improved in adaptive and self-determination skills, per caregiver report, and self-reported greater belief in their ability to access social support to cope with stressors. Results provide evidence for the acceptability and efficacy of the ACCESS Program.

  4. Control groups in recent septic shock trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pettilä, Ville; Hjortrup, Peter B; Jakob, Stephan M

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: The interpretation of septic shock trial data is profoundly affected by patients, control intervention, co-interventions and selected outcome measures. We evaluated the reporting of control groups in recent septic shock trials. METHODS: We searched for original articles presenting...... randomized clinical trials (RCTs) in adult septic shock patients from 2006 to 2016. We included RCTs focusing on septic shock patients with at least two parallel groups and at least 50 patients in the control group. We selected and evaluated data items regarding patients, control group characteristics...... % the proportion of patients with elevated lactate values. Five studies (21 %) provided data to estimate the proportion of septic shock patients fulfilling the Sepsis-3 definition. The mean data completeness score was 19 out of 36 (range 8-32). Of 18 predefined control group characteristics, a mean of 8 (range 2...

  5. Targeting core groups for gonorrhoea control: feasibility and impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giguère, Katia; Alary, Michel

    2015-06-01

    We aimed to outline why core groups should be targeted in Neisseria gonorrhoeae control and suggest several important and timely interventions to target core groups while highly resistant strains are spreading. Core group definition, feasibility and impact of gonorrhoea core group interventions as well as gonorrhoea resistance development have been reviewed in the paper. Core group interventions have proven effective in gonorrhoea control in the past but are compromised by the spread of highly resistant strains. Worldwide functional Gonorrhoea Antimicrobial Surveillance Program, better screening and better treatment programmes are needed. Prevention through condom promotion aimed at core groups remains essential. More specific treatment guidance for low-income and middle-income countries without resistance data is required in the meantime to achieve a better use of antibiotics. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  6. Grouping machines for effective workload control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henrich, P.; Land, M.J.; Gaalman, G.J.C.

    2006-01-01

    Workload control (WLC) allows the release of new orders to the shop floor as long as workload norms for capacity groups, generally a number of functionally similar machines, are not exceeded. Effective WLC requires a profound decision on the grouping of machines as well as on the norm levels for the

  7. The Challenge of Recruiting Control Groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Connor, Maja

    2011-01-01

      Recruitment of a large and reliable control group is a challenge in psychological survey based research. The effect of recruitment styles and age on response-rate, data quality, and individual differences were investigated in a control group for a postal survey of elderly bereaved people....... This study was a direct reaction to the first recruitment attempt that had a 10% response rate. This study consisted of four groups of randomly selected elderly married people (65-81 years) receiving a postal questionnaire measuring depression, social support, coping style, adult attachment, life...... incentive had the highest response-rate (51%), good data quality, and no sampling bias in individual differences. This method can be highly recommended in future control group recruitment....

  8. Intrinsic Optimal Control for Mechanical Systems on Lie Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The intrinsic infinite horizon optimal control problem of mechanical systems on Lie group is investigated. The geometric optimal control problem is built on the intrinsic coordinate-free model, which is provided with Levi-Civita connection. In order to obtain an analytical solution of the optimal problem in the geometric viewpoint, a simplified nominal system on Lie group with an extra feedback loop is presented. With geodesic distance and Riemann metric on Lie group integrated into the cost function, a dynamic programming approach is employed and an analytical solution of the optimal problem on Lie group is obtained via the Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman equation. For a special case on SO(3, the intrinsic optimal control method is used for a quadrotor rotation control problem and simulation results are provided to show the control performance.

  9. Control of complex physically simulated robot groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brogan, David C.

    2001-10-01

    Actuated systems such as robots take many forms and sizes but each requires solving the difficult task of utilizing available control inputs to accomplish desired system performance. Coordinated groups of robots provide the opportunity to accomplish more complex tasks, to adapt to changing environmental conditions, and to survive individual failures. Similarly, groups of simulated robots, represented as graphical characters, can test the design of experimental scenarios and provide autonomous interactive counterparts for video games. The complexity of writing control algorithms for these groups currently hinders their use. A combination of biologically inspired heuristics, search strategies, and optimization techniques serve to reduce the complexity of controlling these real and simulated characters and to provide computationally feasible solutions.

  10. First steps: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial of the effectiveness of the Group Family Nurse Partnership (gFNP) program compared to routine care in improving outcomes for high-risk mothers and their children and preventing abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Jacqueline; Aistrop, Dipti; Allen, Elizabeth; Barlow, Jane; Elbourne, Diana; Macdonald, Geraldine; Melhuish, Edward; Petrou, Stavros; Pink, Joshua; Snowdon, Claire; Spiby, Helen; Stuart, Jane; Sturgess, Joanna

    2013-09-08

    Evidence from the USA suggests that the home-based Family Nurse Partnership program (FNP), extending from early pregnancy until infants are 24 months, can reduce the risk of child abuse and neglect throughout childhood. FNP is now widely available in the UK. A new variant, Group Family Nurse Partnership (gFNP) offers similar content but in a group context and for a shorter time, until infants are 12 months old. Each group comprises 8 to 12 women with similar expected delivery dates and their partners. Its implementation has been established but there is no evidence of its effectiveness. The study comprises a multi-site randomized controlled trial designed to identify the benefits of gFNP compared to standard care. Participants (not eligible for FNP) must be either aged FNP and, in either age group, severe psychotic mental illness or not able to communicate in English. Consenting women are randomly allocated (minimized by site and maternal age group) when between 10 and 16 weeks pregnant to either to the 44 session gFNP program or to standard care after the collection of baseline information. Researchers are blind to group assignment.The primary outcomes at 12 months are child abuse potential based on the revised Adult-Adolescent Parenting Inventory and parent/infant interaction coded using the CARE Index based on a video-taped interaction. Secondary outcomes are maternal depression, parenting stress, health related quality of life, social support, and use of services. This is the first study of the effectiveness of gFNP in the UK. Results should inform decision-making about its delivery alongside universal services, potentially enabling a wider range of families to benefit from the FNP curriculum and approach to supporting parenting. ISRCTN78814904.

  11. Potential explanations for control group benefit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Linda O; Martindale-Adams, Jennifer L; Burns, Robert; Graney, Marshall J; Zuber, Jeffrey K; Kennedy, Sarah E

    2012-10-01

    Estimating effectiveness of clinical interventions depends on detecting differences between the responses of intervention and control groups. The outcome, intervention, and moderating factors all may influence the between group change. The absence of a clinically or statistically meaningful difference may also result from control group improvement due to nonspecific factors such as participants' perception of attention, positive regard, expectations, desire to please, and therapeutic alliance with the care provider. We examined perceived benefit and sources of benefit for control caregivers who participated in the CONNECT randomized controlled trial of a dementia caregiving intervention. After the final scheduled data collection in CONNECT, control group participants were asked whether they believed they benefited from study participation. Those who reported benefit were asked to describe the benefit received. Data were analyzed qualitatively. Of 60 available control caregivers, 82% reported a perceived benefit from study participation in five areas: getting information about dementia and caregiving; having someone to talk to and feeling supported; receiving understanding and validation of feelings; knowledge that others were in similar situations; and perceived appreciation of own abilities. Control caregivers who reported benefit were less burdened and depressed and spent less time on duty at baseline than those who did not report benefit. From caregivers' responses, we have identified the assessment battery, both content and time spent in data collection, as a possible mechanism of action for benefit. Study limitations include the better baseline characteristics of the control caregivers who reported benefit, the sample size of benefit control caregivers, the possibility of perceptions of benefit being a function of social desirability, and the lack of a similar question about benefit being asked of intervention caregivers. These findings suggest that the

  12. Effectiveness of small-group interactive education vs. lecture-based information-only programs on motivation to change and lifestyle behaviours. A prospective controlled trial of rehabilitation inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reusch, Andrea; Ströbl, Veronika; Ellgring, Heiner; Faller, Hermann

    2011-02-01

    Although patient education may promote motivation to change health behaviours, the most effective method has not yet been determined. This prospective, controlled trial compared an interactive, patient-oriented group program with lectures providing only information. We evaluated motivational stages of change and self-reported behaviours in three domains (sports, diet, relaxation) at four times up to one year (60% complete data) among 753 German rehabilitation inpatients (mean age 50 years, 52% male) with orthopaedic (59%) or cardiologic disorders (10%) or diabetes mellitus (31%). We found improvements between baseline and follow up regarding each outcome (psports (p=.006). Interactive group patients reported healthier diets both after 3 months (p=0.013) and 12 months (p=0.047), more relaxation behaviours (p=.029) after 3 months and higher motivation for sports after 12 months (p=.08). The superior effectiveness of the interactive group was only partly confirmed. This short, 5-session interactive program may not be superior to lectures to induce major sustainable changes in motivation. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Support Groups: Diverse Programs for Diverse Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockwood, Anne Turnbaugh

    1987-01-01

    This resource bulletin focuses on problems in the lives of adolescents that affect students' engagement in schoolwork (drug abuse, teenage pregnancy, the increasing adolescent suicide rate) and considers the school's role with and responsibility for troubled students. It looks specifically at the high school's use of support groups to help such…

  14. Salmonella Control Programs in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wegener, Henrik Caspar; Hald, Tine; Wong, Danilo Lo Fo

    2003-01-01

    We describe Salmonella control programs of broiler chickens, layer hens, and pigs in Denmark. Major reductions in the incidence of foodborne human salmonellosis have occurred by integrated control of farms and food processing plants. Disease control has been achieved by monitoring the herds...... and flocks, eliminating infected animals, and diversifying animals (animals and products are processed differently depending on Salmonella status) and animal food products according to the determined risk. In 2001, the Danish society saved U.S.$25.5 million by controlling Salmonella. The total annual...... Salmonella control costs in year 2001 were U.S.$14.1 million (U.S.$0.075/kg of pork and U.S.$0.02/kg of broiler or egg). These costs are paid almost exclusively by the industry. The control principles described are applicable to most industrialized countries with modern intensive farming systems....

  15. The Group as Support in a Native Teacher Education Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, H. R.; Scarfe, D. R.

    This study examines a specific Indian/Metis teacher education program which uses the group as a support system--the Saskatchewan Urban Native Teacher Education Program (SUNTEP) at Regina. SUNTEP is a part of the Elementary Teacher Education Program of the Univesity of Regina. This paper: (1) discusses the support services and systems provided as a…

  16. The Performance Enhancement Group Program: Integrating Sport Psychology and Rehabilitation

    OpenAIRE

    Granito, Vincent J.; Hogan, Jeffery B.; Varnum, Lisa K.

    1995-01-01

    In an effort to improve the psychological health of the athlete who has sustained an injury, the Performance Enhancement Group program for injured athletes was created. This paper will offer a model for the Performance Enhancement Group program as a way to: 1) support the athlete, both mentally and physically; 2) deal with the demands of rehabilitation; and 3) facilitate the adjustments the athlete has to make while being out of the competitive arena. The program consists of responsibilities ...

  17. "Everybody brush!": protocol for a parallel-group randomized controlled trial of a family-focused primary prevention program with distribution of oral hygiene products and education to increase frequency of toothbrushing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha-Cruz, Joana; Milgrom, Peter; Shirtcliff, R Michael; Huebner, Colleen E; Ludwig, Sharity; Allen, Gary; Scott, JoAnna

    2015-05-22

    Twice daily toothbrushing with fluoridated toothpaste is the most widely advocated preventive strategy for dental caries (tooth decay) and is recommended by professional dental associations. Not all parents, children, or adolescents follow this recommendation. This protocol describes the methods for the implementation and evaluation of a quality improvement health promotion program. The objective of the study is to show a theory-informed, evidence-based program to improve twice daily toothbrushing and oral health-related quality of life that may reduce dental caries, dental treatment need, and costs. The design is a parallel-group, pragmatic randomized controlled trial. Families of Medicaid-insured children and adolescents within a large dental care organization in central Oregon will participate in the trial (n=21,743). Families will be assigned to one of three groups: a test intervention, an active control, or a passive control condition. The intervention aims to address barriers and support for twice-daily toothbrushing. Families in the test condition will receive toothpaste and toothbrushes by mail for all family members every three months. In addition, they will receive education and social support to encourage toothbrushing via postcards, recorded telephone messages, and an optional participant-initiated telephone helpline. Families in the active control condition will receive the kit of supplies by mail, but no additional instructional information or telephone support. Families assigned to the passive control will be on a waiting list. The primary outcomes are restorative dental care received and, only for children younger than 36 months old at baseline, the frequency of twice-daily toothbrushing. Data will be collected through dental claims records and, for children younger than 36 months old at baseline, parent interviews and clinical exams. Enrollment of participants and baseline interviews have been completed. Final results are expected in early summer

  18. “Everybody Brush!”: Protocol for a Parallel-Group Randomized Controlled Trial of a Family-Focused Primary Prevention Program With Distribution of Oral Hygiene Products and Education to Increase Frequency of Toothbrushing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Background Twice daily toothbrushing with fluoridated toothpaste is the most widely advocated preventive strategy for dental caries (tooth decay) and is recommended by professional dental associations. Not all parents, children, or adolescents follow this recommendation. This protocol describes the methods for the implementation and evaluation of a quality improvement health promotion program. Objective The objective of the study is to show a theory-informed, evidence-based program to improve twice daily toothbrushing and oral health-related quality of life that may reduce dental caries, dental treatment need, and costs. Methods The design is a parallel-group, pragmatic randomized controlled trial. Families of Medicaid-insured children and adolescents within a large dental care organization in central Oregon will participate in the trial (n=21,743). Families will be assigned to one of three groups: a test intervention, an active control, or a passive control condition. The intervention aims to address barriers and support for twice-daily toothbrushing. Families in the test condition will receive toothpaste and toothbrushes by mail for all family members every three months. In addition, they will receive education and social support to encourage toothbrushing via postcards, recorded telephone messages, and an optional participant-initiated telephone helpline. Families in the active control condition will receive the kit of supplies by mail, but no additional instructional information or telephone support. Families assigned to the passive control will be on a waiting list. The primary outcomes are restorative dental care received and, only for children younger than 36 months old at baseline, the frequency of twice-daily toothbrushing. Data will be collected through dental claims records and, for children younger than 36 months old at baseline, parent interviews and clinical exams. Results Enrollment of participants and baseline interviews have been completed. Final

  19. Using Focus Groups to Validate a Pharmacy Vaccination Training Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushell, Mary; Morrissey, Hana; Ball, Patrick

    2015-06-12

    Introduction: Focus group methodology is commonly used to quickly collate, integrated views from a variety of different stakeholders. This paper provides an example of how focus groups can be employed to collate expert opinion informing amendments on a newly developed training program for integration into undergraduate pharmacy curricula. Materials and methods: Four focus groups were conducted, across three continents, to determine the appropriateness and reliability of a developed vaccination training program with nested injection skills training. All focus groups were comprised of legitimate experts in the field of vaccination, medicine and/or pharmacy. Results: Themes that emerged across focus groups informed amendments giving rise to a validated version of a training program. Discussion: The rigorous validation of the vaccination training program offers generalizable lessons to inform the design and validation of future training programs intended for the health sector and or pharmacy curricula. Using the knowledge and experience of focus group participants fostered collaborative problem solving and validation of material and concept development. The group dynamics of a focus group allowed synthesis of feedback in an inter-professional manner. Conclusions: This paper provides a demonstration of how focus groups can be structured and used by health researchers to validate a newly developed training program.

  20. Using Focus Groups to Validate a Pharmacy Vaccination Training Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Bushell

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Focus group methodology is commonly used to quickly collate, integrated views from a variety of different stakeholders. This paper provides an example of how focus groups can be employed to collate expert opinion informing amendments on a newly developed training program for integration into undergraduate pharmacy curricula. Materials and methods: Four focus groups were conducted, across three continents, to determine the appropriateness and reliability of a developed vaccination training program with nested injection skills training. All focus groups were comprised of legitimate experts in the field of vaccination, medicine and/or pharmacy. Results: Themes that emerged across focus groups informed amendments giving rise to a validated version of a training program. Discussion: The rigorous validation of the vaccination training program offers generalizable lessons to inform the design and validation of future training programs intended for the health sector and or pharmacy curricula. Using the knowledge and experience of focus group participants fostered collaborative problem solving and validation of material and concept development. The group dynamics of a focus group allowed synthesis of feedback in an inter-professional manner. Conclusions: This paper provides a demonstration of how focus groups can be structured and used by health researchers to validate a newly developed training program.

  1. Advanced Emissions Control Development Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A.P.Evans; K.E. Redinger; M.J. Holmes

    1998-04-01

    The objective of the Advanced Emissions Control Development Program (AECDP) is to develop practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of air toxics from coal-fired boilers. Ideally, the project aim is to effectively control air toxic emissions through the use of conventional flue gas cleanup equipment such as electrostatic precipitators (ESPS), fabric filters (baghouse), and wet flue gas desulfurization. Development work to date has concentrated on the capture of mercury, other trace metals, fine particulate and hydrogen chloride. Following the construction and evaluation of a representative air toxics test facility in Phase I, Phase II focused on the evaluation of mercury and several other air toxics emissions. The AECDP is jointly funded by the United States Department of Energy's Federal Energy Technology Center (DOE), the Ohio Coal Development Office within the Ohio Department of Development (oCDO), and Babcock& Wilcox-a McDermott company (B&W).

  2. 76 FR 70510 - Federal Employees' Group Life Insurance Program: New Federal Employees' Group Life Insurance...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-14

    ... MANAGEMENT Federal Employees' Group Life Insurance Program: New Federal Employees' Group Life Insurance... Management (OPM) is announcing changes in premiums for certain Federal ] Employees' Group Life Insurance... bands), and Post-Retirement Basic Insurance. These rates will be effective the first pay period...

  3. Undergraduate Rural Medical Education Program Development: Focus Group Consultation with the NRHA Rural Medical Educators Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downey, Laura H.; Wheat, John R.; Leeper, James D.; Florence, Joseph A.; Boulger, James G.; Hunsaker, Matt L.

    2011-01-01

    Context: Over a decade ago, leaders in rural medical education established the Rural Medical Educators (RME) Group, an interest group within the National Rural Health Association, to support faculty in rural medical education programs. This group has convened an annual RME conclave since 2006. In 2008, this conclave convened 15 national leaders in…

  4. Bereavement Support Group Program for Children: Participant Workbook. Second Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haasl, Beth; Marnocha, Jean

    This participant workbook contains goals and activities for children in the Bereavement Support Group Program for Children. The six session program is designed for children between the ages of 6 and 15 who have experienced the death of a loved one or other significant losses. Sections are devoted to death and grief, feelings and self-esteem,…

  5. The Development of a Program Engagement Theory for Group Offending Behavior Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holdsworth, Emma; Bowen, Erica; Brown, Sarah; Howat, Douglas

    2017-10-01

    Offender engagement in group offending behavior programs is poorly understood and under-theorized. In addition, there is no research on facilitators' engagement. This article presents the first ever theory to address this gap. A Program Engagement Theory (PET) was derived from a constructivist grounded theory analysis that accounts for both facilitators' and offenders' engagement in group offending behavior programs (GOBPs). Interviews and session observations were used to collect data from 23 program facilitators and 28 offenders (group members). The analysis revealed that group members' engagement involved shared identities and moving on as a group. In turn, this was dependent on facilitators personalising treatment frameworks and establishing a hook to help group members move on. The PET emphasizes the importance of considering change during treatment as a process rather than simply a program outcome. Solution-focused (SF) programs were more conducive to engagement and the change process than offence-focused programs.

  6. Open Groups: Adaptations in Implementing a Parent Training Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donna-Jean P. Brock

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Programs that focus on positive parenting have been shown to improve parental attitudes, knowledge, and behaviors, and increase parent and child bonding. These programs are typically conducted in a closed group format. However, when individual or community needs are more immediate, programmers sometimes opt for an open group format. To determine the effectiveness of this adaptation to an open group format, the present study compared both groups on parental outcomes. Methods: Both closed and open group formats were offered and implemented between January 2009 and December 2012. Participants for both formats were recruited through similar means and the format placement for each family was determined by the immediacy of the need for an intervention, the time lapse until a new cycle would begin, and scheduling flexibility. Chi-Square analyses were conducted to determine demographic differences between the two groups and gain scores were calculated from the pre- and post-test AAPI-2 scales within a mixed MANOVA to determine group for-mat effectiveness. Results: Though open groups contained higher risk families; parental out-come improvements were significant for both groups. All participants, regardless of group membership, demonstrated the same statistically significant improvements following completion of the program. Conclusion: Findings provide support for adapting group formats when necessary to fit community and individual needs.

  7. Neurolinguistic Programming in the Context of Group Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childers, John H. Jr.; Saltmarsh, Robert E.

    1986-01-01

    Describes neurolinguistic programming (NLP) in the context of group counseling. NLP is a model of communication that focuses on verbal and nonverbal patterns of behaviors as well as on the structures and processes of human subjectivity. Five stages of group development are described, and specific NLP techniques appropriate to the various stages…

  8. Problem-Solving Strategies and Group Processes in Small Groups Learning Computer Programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Noreen M.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Planning and debugging strategies and group processes predicting learning of computer programming were studied in 30 students aged 11 to 14. Students showed little advance planning. Factors associated with learning included high-level planning of program chunks, debugging of single statements, explaining, and verbalizing aloud while typing.…

  9. External and Turbomachinery Flow Control Working Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, G.; Alstrom, B.; Colonius, T.; Dannenhoffer, J.; Glauser, M.; Helenbrook, B.; Higuchi, H.; Hodson, H.; Jha, R.; Kabiri, P.; hide

    2010-01-01

    Broad Flow Control Issues: a) Understanding flow physics. b) Specific control objective(s). c) Actuation. d) Sensors. e) Integrated active flow control system. f) Development of design tools (CFD, reduced order models, controller design, understanding and utilizing instabilities and other mechanisms, e.g., streamwise vorticity).

  10. Teaching Group Processes through Multiple Group Leadership Opportunities in a Masters Level Counselor Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgeois, Marc B.; Winters, Ryan C.; Esters, Irvin E.

    2016-01-01

    Utilizing an experiential component in group work training is a prominent feature in Counselor Education programs. Although numerous models have been proposed, the vast majority offer limited explanations of incorporating the number of hours of group participation and observation recommended by the Professional Standards for the Training of Group…

  11. Impact of a nurse-directed, coordinated school health program to enhance physical activity behaviors and reduce body mass index among minority children: a parallel-group, randomized control trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Kynna; Giger, Joyce Newman; Norris, Keth; Suro, Zulma

    2013-06-01

    Underserved children, particularly girls and those in urban communities, do not meet the recommended physical activity guidelines (>60min of daily physical activity), and this behavior can lead to obesity. The school years are known to be a critical period in the life course for shaping attitudes and behaviors. Children look to schools for much of their access to physical activity. Thus, through the provision of appropriate physical activity programs, schools have the power to influence apt physical activity choices, especially for underserved children where disparities in obesity-related outcomes exist. To evaluate the impact of a nurse directed, coordinated, culturally sensitive, school-based, family-centered lifestyle program on activity behaviors and body mass index. This was a parallel group, randomized controlled trial utilizing a community-based participatory research approach, through a partnership with a University and 5 community schools. Participants included 251 children ages 8-12 from elementary schools in urban, low-income neighborhoods in Los Angeles, USA. The intervention included Kids N Fitness(©), a 6-week program which met weekly to provide 45min of structured physical activity and a 45min nutrition education class for parents and children. Intervention sites also participated in school-wide wellness activities, including health and counseling services, staff professional development in health promotion, parental education newsletters, and wellness policies for the provision of healthy foods at the school. The Child and Adolescent Trial for Cardiovascular Health School Physical Activity and Nutrition Student Questionnaire measured physical activity behavior, including: daily physical activity, participation in team sports, attending physical education class, and TV viewing/computer game playing. Anthropometric measures included height, weight, body mass index, resting blood pressure, and waist circumference. Measures were collected at baseline

  12. [Life style and metabolic control in DiabetIMSS program].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa-Suárez, María Eugenia; Cruz-Toledo, Jairo Enoc; Ortiz-Aguirre, Alma Rosa; Lagunes-Espinosa, Alma Luisa; Jiménez-Luna, Jorge; Rodríguez-Moctezuma, José Raymundo

    2014-01-01

    To compare the lifestyle and metabolic control of diabetes patients included and not included in the DiabetIMSS program. Subjects with diabetes in the DiabetIMSS program and the general clinic were divided into three groups: group 1 first attended the program, group 2 were enrolled during the study, and group 3 had not been included the program. Demographic and clinical aspects were measured and the IMEVID instrument was applied. We included 539 type-2 diabetes patients, predominantly females (73.3%), mainly of primary school level, and more frequently on double-drug therapy. There were clinical differences between the three groups for program leavers in terms of weight, waist, blood pressure, fasting glucose, HbA1c, triglycerides, and IMEVID qualification, all p DiabetIMSS program.

  13. 76 FR 9585 - Poison Control Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-18

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Poison Control Program AGENCY: Health... professionals. The centers also offer programs to help clinicians better manage poisoning and overdose cases.... FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Poison Control Program, Director, Elisa Gladstone via e-mail at...

  14. Seniors' Program for Injury Control and Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornbrook, M C; Stevens, V J; Wingfield, D J

    1993-03-01

    The Seniors' Program for Injury Control and Education (SPICE) examines the effects of exercise and physical fitness on falls and related injuries among older persons. The design is a two-group, randomized trial with 2 years of follow-up. The study is at Northwest Region of Kaiser Permanente (NWKP), a large hospital-based prepaid group practice HMO in Portland, OR. The participants are 1,323 community-living persons 65 years or older who are enrolled in NWKP and are at moderate risk of falling. A multifaceted intervention strategy uses a group approach to falls and injury prevention which includes moderate intensity endurance-building exercise (walking), strength and balance training, home safety improvements, and mental practice. Sessions of 20-25 participants are led by two nurses. Participants set their own realistic goals for exercising to accommodate to differing functional abilities and baseline conditioning. The control group receives usual care from the HMO. Participants report all falls for 2 years after randomization. Outcome measures include health status, physical functioning, falls, and fall-related medical care use and cost. If SPICE is effective, cost-effectiveness analysis will examine the relative efficiency of SPICE versus other successful FICSIT interventions. Thus far, recruitment and intervention compliance goals have been met from a population of frail elderly HMO members.

  15. Effects of a meditation program on verbal creative levels in a group of studens in late secondary education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franco Justo, Clemente

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzes the effects of a meditation program on level of verbal creativity (fluency, flexibility and originality in a group of students in Spain’s two-year educational program for university preparation (Bachillerato. Participants formed two groups: a experimental group that participated in a meditation program, and a control group that did not take part in this intervention. Creativitylevels for the two groups were assessed using the verbal battery of the Torrance Tests of Creative Thinking, with significant improvement found in the experimental group as compared to the control group for the variables studied.

  16. International Piping Integrity Research Group (IPIRG) Program. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkowski, G.; Schmidt, R.; Scott, P. [and others

    1997-06-01

    This is the final report of the International Piping Integrity Research Group (IPIRG) Program. The IPIRG Program was an international group program managed by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and funded by a consortium of organizations from nine nations: Canada, France, Italy, Japan, Sweden, Switzerland, Taiwan, the United Kingdom, and the United States. The program objective was to develop data needed to verify engineering methods for assessing the integrity of circumferentially-cracked nuclear power plant piping. The primary focus was an experimental task that investigated the behavior of circumferentially flawed piping systems subjected to high-rate loadings typical of seismic events. To accomplish these objectives a pipe system fabricated as an expansion loop with over 30 meters of 16-inch diameter pipe and five long radius elbows was constructed. Five dynamic, cyclic, flawed piping experiments were conducted using this facility. This report: (1) provides background information on leak-before-break and flaw evaluation procedures for piping, (2) summarizes technical results of the program, (3) gives a relatively detailed assessment of the results from the pipe fracture experiments and complementary analyses, and (4) summarizes advances in the state-of-the-art of pipe fracture technology resulting from the IPIRG program.

  17. The Effect of Group Counseling Program on 8th Grade Students’ Assertiveness Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İsmail SEÇER

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This study is conducted to determine the effects of group counseling program on elementary school 8th grade students’ assertiveness skills. Study group was formed of 100 students getting educated in Erzurum Kültür Elementary School in 2011-2012 education years. RAE-Rathus Assertiveness Schedule was applied on this group to gather data. 30 students getting lower scores from the inventory have been randomly divided into experimental and control groups. Each group is formed of 15 students. Group counseling program has been carried out for 8 weeks on the experimental group to improve the students’ assertiveness skills. Single-way and two-way analysis of covariance (ANCOVA has been used in the analysis of the data. The data is analyzed with SPSS 19.00. The results of the study show that assertiveness skills of the students who participate in the group counseling program has increased significantly compared to the control group and to the preexperimental circumstances. Besides, it is determined that the change observed in the experimental group has been occurred separately from the age and socio-economic level variables, and it is determined with the monitoring test applied after four months that this affect is continued. According to this result, it can be said that the applied group counseling program is an effective means to improve the assertiveness skills of elementary school students

  18. Crisis Group Fellowship Program | CRDI - Centre de recherches ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    In much of the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) and West Africa, there is a dearth of research, training and employment opportunities in the social sciences, particularly in the area of research and policy analysis on local conflicts. The Crisis Group has long considered establishing a fellowship program in order to train a ...

  19. Striving for Group Agency: Threat to Personal Control Increases the Attractiveness of Agentic Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janine eStollberg

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available When their sense of personal control is threatened people try to restore perceived control through the social self. We propose that it is the perceived agency of ingroups that provides the self with a sense of control. In three experiments, we for the first time tested the hypothesis that threat to personal control increases the attractiveness of being part or joining those groups that are perceived as coherent entities engaging in coordinated group goal pursuit (agentic groups but not of those groups whose agency is perceived to be low. Consistent with this hypothesis we found in Study 1 (N = 93 that threat to personal control increased ingroup identification only with task groups, but not with less agentic types of ingroups that were made salient simultaneously. Furthermore, personal control threat increased a sense of collective control and support within the task group, mediated through task-group identification (indirect effects. Turning to groups people are not (yet part of, Study 2 (N = 47 showed that personal control threat increased relative attractiveness ratings of small groups as possible future ingroups only when the relative agency of small groups was perceived to be high. Perceived group homogeneity or social power did not moderate the effect. Study 3 (N = 78 replicated the moderating role of perceived group agency for attractiveness ratings of entitative groups, whereas perceived group status did not moderate the effect. These findings extend previous research on group-based control, showing that perceived agency accounts for group-based responses to threatened control.

  20. Single-Subject Designs for Client Groups: Implications for Program Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reagles, Kenneth W.; O'Neill, John

    1977-01-01

    The ethical dilemma of (a) desiring a control group for validity purposes in program evaluation strategies and (b) withholding needed services from eligible clients to achieve such control has limited the credibility of many evaluation efforts. A potential solution is suggested by the use of time-series, single-subject designs. (Author)

  1. AN INTEGRATIVE GROUP PSYCHOTHERAPY PROGRAM FOR CHILDREN. THE WIZARDING SCHOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oana Maria Popescu

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important tendencies in child psychotherapy is the integration of various psychotherapeutic approaches and technical interventions belonging to different orientations. Based on the Harry Potter stories, the „Wizarding School” structured group therapy program is a 12-step integratively oriented program applicable in personal development, individual and group therapy for children aged 6 to 13 (at present being adapted for adult psychotherapy. The program takes place within a fairy tale, being therefore a type of informal hypnotic trance. The interventions are drawn from the lessons described in Harry Potter’s story at Hogwarts, based on the fundamental principles of child psychotherapy and including elements of play therapy, art therapy, hypnotherapy, cognitive- behavioural therapy, transactional analysis, supportive therapy, family therapy and person centred therapy. From a theoretical point of view the program is based on elements from a number of psychotherapeutic approaches, the main concept being that we need to create a therapeutic myth that is acceptable to a child. The program is not suitable for children with structural deficits, who have difficulties in making the difference between fantasy and reality.

  2. Systematic review of control groups in nutrition education intervention research

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Carol Byrd-Bredbenner; FanFan Wu; Kim Spaccarotella; Virginia Quick; Jennifer Martin-Biggers; Yingting Zhang

    2017-01-01

    ... from the experimental group can be compared. Despite the impact different types of control groups can have on study outcomes, the treatment provided to participants in the control condition has received limited attention in the literature...

  3. Chronic Disease Control Research Fellowship Program (Guatemala ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The Program will recruit and mentor research fellows to study policy-relevant issues and translate the resulting knowledge into action. The program will focus initially on tobacco control research (smoking prevention, cessation), in recognition that tobacco use is the leading cause of chronic disease. However, as the program ...

  4. Telemetry, Tracking, and Control Working Group report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Richard; Rogers, L. Joseph

    1986-01-01

    After assessing the design implications and the criteria to be used in technology selection, the technical problems that face the telemetry, tracking, and control (TTC) area were defined. For each of the problems identified, recommendations were made for needed technology developments. These recommendations are listed and ranked according to priority.

  5. 27 CFR 46.237 - Controlled group member.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Controlled group member... Tubes Held for Sale on April 1, 2009 Filing Requirements § 46.237 Controlled group member. If the dealer is a member of a controlled group, but has its own employer identification number, the dealer must...

  6. Developing the Adversity Quotient of Mathayomsuksa 3 Students using the Integrated Group Counseling Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pantheetra Samart

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The purposes of this study were (1 to study the definitions, and components of the adversity quotient ; (2 to develop the integrated group counseling program ; and, (3 to compare the results of using the integrated group counseling program to develop the adversity quotient of students. The samples of study consisted of 16 students who enrolled in Mathayomsuksa 3 in an academic year 2015 at Mahasarakham University Demonstration School (secondary. They were randomly selected and divided into two groups: an experimental group and a control group, each of which contained 8 students. The instruments were the 5 rating scale adversity quotient test, integrated group counseling program, behavioral observation and recording form. The data were analyzed by using the Friedman Test, the Wilcoxon Match Pair Signed – Ranks Test and the Mann - Whitney U – Test, respectively. The results of this study indicated that the adversity quotient was defined as the expression of the students on understanding, embracing and responsibility to the adversity, planning and controlling to deal the adversity with patience, perseverance and overcoming the adversity There were four components of the adversity quotient, that is, controlling, responsibility, adversity accessing and analyzing, and motivation and patience. These components were put in the integrated group counseling program to develop the adversity quotient of students. This program was validated by the experts with known appropriate values of 4.00 to 4.80 and standard deviation values of 0.00 to 0.89. After this program was implemented, it was found that the mean scores of the adversity quotient in the experimental group after participating in the program were higher than those before participating in the program at the statistically significance level of .05. When considering the retention behaviors, it was found that the mean scores of the adversity quotient in the experimental group during the follow-up 1

  7. Planning for cancer control programs: Leadership considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, John; Sutcliffe, Simon B

    2018-01-01

    Cancer is a significant challenge globally. Reducing the impact of cancer requires a program and plans that address the main aspects of cancer from prevention through to end-of-life care. This article summarizes the requirements of a robust cancer control program and outlines the contextual and leadership considerations that are required to ensure that the planning and implementation of a control program can achieve improved cancer outcomes.

  8. A Mentoring Program in Environmental Science for Underrepresented Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, L.; Rizzo, D. M.

    2009-12-01

    We developed a four-year program, combining educational and career support and research activities, to recruit and retain students from underrepresented groups in environmental sciences. Specifically, the program: ○ Assigns each student a faculty or graduate student mentor with whom the student conducts research activities. ○ Includes a weekly group meeting for team building and to review professional development and academic topics, such as time management and research ethics. ○ Requires students to make multiple formal presentations of their research proposals and results. ○ Provides scholarships and stipends for both the academic year and to engage students in summer research. The program seeks to achieve several goals including: ● Enhance academic performance. ● Encourage continued study in environmental science. ● Facilitate students completing their studies at UVM. ● Increase students’ interest in pursuing science careers. ● Create a more welcoming academic environment. To assess progress toward achievement of these goals, we conducted individual structured interviews with participating undergraduate students, graduate students, and faculty members at two points in time. First, interviews were conducted in the fall of 2007 after two years, and again in spring 2009, after four years. An independent research consultant, Dr. Livingston, conducted the interviews. In 2009, over the course of three days, the interviews included three graduate student and two faculty mentors, and six of the seven undergraduate students. Of the six students, three were juniors and three were graduating seniors. Results of the 2009 interviews echoed those of 2007. Both students and their mentors are quite satisfied with the program. The student presentations, weekly meetings, mentoring relationships, and summer research experiences all get high ratings from program participants. Students give high praise to their mentors and the program directors for providing

  9. 07051 Working Group Outcomes -- Programming Paradigms for the Web: Web Programming and Web Services

    OpenAIRE

    Hull, Richard; Thiemann, Peter; Wadler, Philip

    2007-01-01

    Participants in the seminar broke into groups on ``Patterns and Paradigms'' for web programming, ``Web Services,'' ``Data on the Web,'' ``Software Engineering'' and ``Security.'' Here we give the raw notes recorded during these sessions.

  10. Leader Behaviors, Group Cohesion, and Participation in a Walking Group Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumi, Betty T; Schulz, Amy J; Mentz, Graciela; Israel, Barbara A; Sand, Sharon L; Reyes, Angela G; Hoston, Bernadine; Richardson, Dawn; Gamboa, Cindy; Rowe, Zachary; Diaz, Goya

    2015-07-01

    Less than half of all U.S. adults meet the 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines. Leader behaviors and group cohesion have been associated with increased participation or adherence in sports team and exercise class settings. Physical activity interventions in community settings that encompass these factors may enhance intervention adherence. The purpose of this study is to examine the impact of Community Health Promoter leader behaviors and group cohesion on participation in a walking group intervention among racially/ethnically diverse adults in low to moderate-income communities in Detroit, Michigan. Data for the current study were drawn from the Walk Your Heart to Health (WYHH) data set. WYHH was a multisite cluster RCT with a lagged intervention and outcome measurements at baseline and 4, 8, and 32 weeks. Pooled survey data from both intervention arms were used for the current study. Data were analyzed between August 2013 and October 2014. A total of 603 non-Hispanic black, non-Hispanic white, and Hispanic adults across five cohorts that began the 32-week WYHH intervention between March 2009 and October 2011. The intervention was a 32-week walking group program hosted by community- and faith-based organizations and facilitated by Community Health Promoters. Walking groups met three times per week for 90 minutes per session. To promote participation in or adherence to WYHH, Community Health Promoters used evidence-based strategies to facilitate group cohesion. Group members assumed increasing leadership responsibility for facilitating sessions over time. Participation in WYHH as measured by consistency of attendance. Community Health Promoter leader behaviors were positively associated with participation in WYHH. Social but not task cohesion was significantly associated with consistent participation. Social cohesion may mediate the relationship between leader behaviors and walking group participation. Providing leaders with training to build socially cohesive groups

  11. Evaluation of the Navy Plaque Control Program, at Great Lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-02-01

    I 0 Individual clinicians who practice plaque control with their patients receive great reward and sense of accomplishment when dental caries is...Navy Dental Corps (43). The program requirements included plaque control instruction given through individual or small group sessions. The sessions... plaque removal techniques; demonstration of sulcular methods of tooth cleansing with the toothbrush ; and instruction in the use of plaque disclosing

  12. The efficacy of a compact psychoeducational group training program for married couples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, A; Hahlweg, K; Fehm-Wolfsdorf, G; Groth, T

    1998-10-01

    There is a lack of psychoeducational programs for married couples who, although subjectively concerned about their marriages, do not seek marital therapy. In this study, the efficacy of a cognitive-behavioral program delivered on a weekend by 2 trainers for groups of 4 couples was investigated. Couples (n = 67) were recruited by newspaper announcements, then randomly assigned to the intervention program or a waiting-list control group. The program consisted of communication and problem-solving training, couples' discussions to clarify their relationship expectations, and exercises to enhance their sensual or sexual relationship. At postassessment, intervention couples emitted more positive verbal and nonverbal communication behaviors during a conflict discussion task than did control couples, who reported significantly more relationship problem areas and displayed more negative communication behaviors. At the 1-year follow-up, intervention couples reported fewer problem areas in comparison with preassessment.

  13. Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program focus groups: A manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carnes, S.A.; Garkovich, C.A.; Shriver, T.E. Jr.

    1991-04-01

    While completing a congressionally mandated destruction of the US stockpile of unitary chemical weapons, the US Army decided that enhanced emergency planning was needed to reduce the consequences of an accidental release of agent. This decision is being implemented cooperatively by the US Department of the Army and the Federal Emergency Management Agency in the form of the Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program (CSEPP), with additional cooperation from other federal agencies and affected state and local governments. This manual supports that effort by providing information about a commonly used qualitative data and information gathering technique, focus group interviewing, that may be used to design public education materials and other wide enhance communication among CSEPP providers and users. The focus group technique is characterized by structured discussions on a specific topic among a carefully selected group of participants. This manual provides background information on the CSEPP and the current management plan for the CSEPP. It describes the focus group technique and how it may be applied, either by itself or in conjunction with other appropriate research techniques, by state and local government officials to investigate many of the behavioral and organizational impacts of the CSEPP. Sample questions and probes that may be useful in designing and conducting specific CSEPP focus groups are also provided. The manual also includes a list of suggested readings and other reference material that may be useful in designing focus groups. 26 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. The NASA Goddard Group's Source Monitoring Database and Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gipson, John; Le Bail, Karine; Ma, Chopo

    2014-12-01

    Beginning in 2003, the Goddard VLBI group developed a program to purposefully monitor when sources were observed and to increase the observations of ``under-observed'' sources. The heart of the program consists of a MySQL database that keeps track of, on a session-by-session basis: the number of observations that are scheduled for a source, the number of observations that are successfully correlated, and the number of observations that are used in a session. In addition, there is a table that contains the target number of successful sessions over the last twelve months. Initially this table just contained two categories. Sources in the geodetic catalog had a target of 12 sessions/year; the remaining ICRF-1 defining sources had a target of two sessions/year. All other sources did not have a specific target. As the program evolved, different kinds of sources with different observing targets were added. During the scheduling process, the scheduler has the option of automatically selecting N sources which have not met their target. We discuss the history and present some results of this successful program.

  15. Environmental Restoration Program Document Control Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montgomery, L.M.

    1993-09-01

    This Environmental Restoration (ER) Program Document Control Plan has been developed to comply with the document control system requirements of the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL), the Hanford Federal Facility and the ER Program. One of the five components, or summary subprojects, of the Environmental Restoration (ER) Program is program management and support, which includes both management systems development and information and data management. Efforts within the management systems development area include the creation of a document control plan. Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) has developed and established an overall document control system that governs the methods by which all WHC documents are generated, maintained, and disposed of. The ER Program performing organizations within WHC utilize the established WHC document control systems to the maximum extent possible. These systems are discussed in Chapters 3.0 and 4.0 of this plan. In addition, this plan describes the documents that require control within the ER Program and how they will be controlled.

  16. The use of control groups in artificial grammar learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reber, Rolf; Perruchet, Pierre

    2003-01-01

    Experimenters assume that participants of an experimental group have learned an artificial grammar if they classify test items with significantly higher accuracy than does a control group without training. The validity of such a comparison, however, depends on an additivity assumption: Learning is superimposed on the action of non-specific variables-for example, repetitions of letters, which modulate the performance of the experimental group and the control group to the same extent. In two experiments we were able to show that this additivity assumption does not hold. Grammaticality classifications in control groups without training (Experiments 1 and 2) depended on non-specific features. There were no such biases in the experimental groups. Control groups with training on randomized strings (Experiment 2) showed fewer biases than did control groups without training. Furthermore, we reanalysed published research and demonstrated that earlier experiments using control groups without training had produced similar biases in control group performances, bolstering the finding that using control groups without training is methodologically unsound.

  17. Transitioning Together: A Multi-Family Group Psychoeducation Program for Adolescents with ASD and Their Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    DaWalt, Leann Smith; Greenberg, Jan S.; Mailick, Marsha R.

    2018-01-01

    Currently there are few evidence-based programs available for families of individuals with ASD during the transition to adulthood. The present study provided a preliminary evaluation of a multi-family group psychoeducation intervention using a randomized waitlist control design (n = 41). Families in the intervention condition participated in…

  18. Groundwater Contamination. Instructor Guide. Working for Clean Water: An Information Program for Advisory Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Charles A.

    Described is a presentation and learning session on groundwater, which is intended to educate advisory groups interested in improving water quality decision making. Among the areas addressed are the importance of groundwater, sources of contamination, and groundwater pollution control programs. These materials are part of the Working for Clean…

  19. Research for International Tobacco Control (RITC) : Program ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    . The Department for International Development (DFID), United Kingdom, is making a grant of up to £1 100 000 to IDRC to cover three years of Research for International Tobacco Control (RITC) programming between April 2005 and March ...

  20. Traffic control device evaluation program : FY 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    This report presents findings on three different activities conducted in the Traffic Control Device Evaluation Program during the 2016 fiscal year. The first two activities are evaluations of full-matrix color light-emitting diode changeable message ...

  1. Command and Control of Guerrilla Groups in the Philippines, 1941-1945

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-25

    Command and Control of Guerrilla Groups in the Philippines, 1941-1945 A Monograph by MAJ Thomas R. Nypaver Texas Army National Guard...Groups in the Philippines, 1941-1945 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) MAJ Thomas R...of Candidate: MAJ Thomas R. Nypaver Monograph Title: Command and Control of Guerrilla Groups in the Philippines, 1941-1945 Approved by

  2. Struggling with cancer and treatment: young athletes recapture body control and identity through exercise: qualitative findings from a supervised group exercise program in cancer patients of mixed gender undergoing chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamsen, L; Andersen, C; Midtgaard, J; Møller, T; Quist, M; Rørth, M

    2009-02-01

    Cancer and treatment can negatively affect the body's performance and appearance. Exercise has been tested in a few studies for altered body image among middle-aged women with breast cancer. The aim of the study was to explore how young pre-cancer athletes of both genders experience disease- and treatment-related physical fitness and appearance changes while undergoing chemotherapy and participating in a 6-week group exercise intervention. A prospective, explorative study using semi-structured interviews was conducted before and at termination of the intervention. The study included 22 cancer patients (median age 28 years). The young athletes experienced a change from a high level of physical activity, body satisfaction and a positive self-identity to a low level of physical activity, body denial and a negative self-identity. In the program, the patients experienced increased physical strength and recapture of certain aspects of their former positive body perception. Deterioation of muscle functions caused by chemotherapy was particularly painful to these patients, independent of gender and age. Young physically active patients are heavily dependent on their physical capacity, body satisfaction and self-identity. This should be taken into account when designing programs to rehabilitate and encourage these patients through the often-strenuous antineoplastic treatments.

  3. A home program of rehabilitation for moderately severe traumatic brain injury patients. The DVHIP Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warden, D L; Salazar, A M; Martin, E M; Schwab, K A; Coyle, M; Walter, J

    2000-10-01

    We have recently reported the results of a prospective controlled randomized trial comparing home versus inpatient cognitive rehabilitation for patients with moderate to severe head injury. That study showed no overall difference in outcomes between the two groups.(1) In this article, we provide further details of the home program arm of the study. All patients in the home program received medical treatment as needed, a multidisciplinary in-hospital evaluation, and TBI counseling before entering the eight-week home program, which then included guidance on home activities, as well as weekly telephone calls from a psychiatric nurse.

  4. Children of mentally ill parents—a pilot study of a group intervention program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, Hanna; Anding, Jana; Schrott, Bastian; Röhrle, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The transgenerational transmission of mental disorders is one of the most prominent risk factors for the development of psychological disorders. Children of mentally ill parents are a vulnerable high risk group with overall impaired development and high rates of psychological disorders. To date there are only a few evidence based intervention programs for this group overall and hardly any in Germany. We translated the evidence based Family Talk Intervention by Beardslee (2009) and adapted it for groups. First results of this pilot study are presented. Method: This investigation evaluates a preventive group intervention for children of mentally ill parents. In a quasi-experimental design three groups are compared: an intervention group (Family Talk Intervention group: n = 28), a Wait Control group (n = 9), and a control group of healthy children (n = 40). Mean age of children was 10.41 years and parental disorders were mostly depressive/affective disorders (n = 30), but a small number also presented with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (n = 7). Results: Children of mentally ill parents showed higher rates of internalizing/externalizing disorders before and after the intervention compared to children of parents with no disorders. Post intervention children's knowledge on mental disorders was significantly enhanced in the Family Talk Intervention group compared to the Wait Control group and the healthy control group. Parental ratings of externalizing symptoms in the children were reduced to normal levels after the intervention in the Family Talk Intervention group, but not in the Wait Control group. Discussion: This pilot study of a group intervention for children of mentally ill parents highlights the importance of psycho-education on parental mental disorders for children. Long-term effects of children's enhanced knowledge about parental psychopathology need to be explored in future studies. PMID:26539129

  5. 29 CFR 4001.3 - Trades or businesses under common control; controlled groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... CORPORATION GENERAL TERMINOLOGY § 4001.3 Trades or businesses under common control; controlled groups. For... control with such person. (2) Persons are under common control if they are members of a “controlled group... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Trades or businesses under common control; controlled...

  6. Material control system simulator program reference manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollstien, R.B.

    1978-01-24

    A description is presented of a Material Control System Simulator (MCSS) program for determination of material accounting uncertainty and system response to particular adversary action sequences that constitute plausible material diversion attempts. The program is intended for use in situations where randomness, uncertainty, or interaction of adversary actions and material control system components make it difficult to assess safeguards effectiveness against particular material diversion attempts. Although MCSS may be used independently in the design or analysis of material handling and processing systems, it has been tailored toward the determination of material accountability and the response of material control systems to adversary action sequences.

  7. 26 CFR 1.382-8 - Controlled groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Controlled groups. 1.382-8 Section 1.382-8 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Insolvency Reorganizations § 1.382-8 Controlled groups. (a) Introduction. This section...

  8. Child Cancer Control. Report on a Working Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    World Health Organization, Copenhagen (Denmark). Regional Office for Europe.

    This World Health Organization (WHO) report on the proceedings of a Working Group on Child Cancer Control was prepared by the WHO Regional Office for Europe. The working group met in Prague in April 1977 and was comprised of representatives from 14 European countries. Its task was to review existing methods of child cancer control, the efficacy of…

  9. Challenges of Tobacco Control Program in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poorolajal, Jalal; Mohammadi, Younes; Mahmoodi, Azam

    2017-04-01

    This study assessed the status of cigarette marketing in Iran as well as the attitude of smokers toward smoking and the policies and tobacco control programs in the country. This cross-sectional study was conducted on 3480 volunteer smokers in six provinces, using a stratified cluster random sampling method. The study population consisted of smokers who used at least one cigarette per day. The data collection tool was an anonymous self-administered questionnaire including basic information and 20 five-choice questions related to participants' attitude toward smoking habits (Cronbach's alpha; 79.73%.). The majority (66.9%) of participants started smoking at the age of 10 to 19 years and 61.1% used foreign cigarettes. Of 160 marketed brands, 38 (23.8%) were domestic and 122 (76.2%) were foreign, including 63 (39.3%) imported and 59 (36.9%) smuggled brands. Being tempted (25.0%), getting nervous (24.1%), and seeking euphoria (24.1%) were the most common reasons for restarting cigarette smoking after cessation. The majority of participants believed that smoking in public places was a violation of the rights of others and smoking should be avoided in such places. Smoking prevention programs should focus on adolescents as the most vulnerable age group. Raising the retail price of tobacco products through increasing taxes can reduce consumption, particularly among first starters and youth. However, increasing taxes and prices of tobacco products may be effective when simultaneous effective measures are implemented to eliminate all kinds of illicit trade in all forms of tobacco products.

  10. Experimental determination of group flux control coefficients in metabolic networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, T.W.; Shimizu, Hiroshi; Stephanopoulos, G. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1998-04-20

    Grouping of reactions around key metabolite branch points can facilitate the study of metabolic control of complex metabolic networks. This top-down Metabolic Control Analysis is exemplified through the introduction of group control coefficients whose magnitudes provide a measure of the relative impact of each reaction group on the overall network flux, as well as on the overall network stability, following enzymatic amplification. In this article, the authors demonstrate the application of previously developed theory to the determination of group flux control coefficients. Experimental data for the changes in metabolic fluxes obtained in response to the introduction of six different environmental perturbations are used to determine the group flux control coefficients for three reaction groups formed around the phosphoenolpyruvate/pyruvate branch point. The consistency of the obtained group flux control coefficient estimates is systematically analyzed to ensure that all necessary conditions are satisfied. The magnitudes of the determined control coefficients suggest that the control of lysine production flux in Corynebacterium glutamicum cells at a growth base state resides within the lysine biosynthetic pathway that begins with the PEP/PYR carboxylation anaplorotic pathway.

  11. Stochastic control theory dynamic programming principle

    CERN Document Server

    Nisio, Makiko

    2015-01-01

    This book offers a systematic introduction to the optimal stochastic control theory via the dynamic programming principle, which is a powerful tool to analyze control problems. First we consider completely observable control problems with finite horizons. Using a time discretization we construct a nonlinear semigroup related to the dynamic programming principle (DPP), whose generator provides the Hamilton–Jacobi–Bellman (HJB) equation, and we characterize the value function via the nonlinear semigroup, besides the viscosity solution theory. When we control not only the dynamics of a system but also the terminal time of its evolution, control-stopping problems arise. This problem is treated in the same frameworks, via the nonlinear semigroup. Its results are applicable to the American option price problem. Zero-sum two-player time-homogeneous stochastic differential games and viscosity solutions of the Isaacs equations arising from such games are studied via a nonlinear semigroup related to DPP (the min-ma...

  12. Empowerment Program for People With Prediabetes: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mei-Fang; Hung, Shu-Ling; Chen, Shu-Lin

    2017-04-01

    Practicing a health-promoting lifestyle is believed to be effective for delaying or preventing the onset of diabetes. However, although empowerment interventions have proven effective for encouraging the adoption of a health-promoting lifestyle in people with diabetes, these interventions are rarely promoted to people with prediabetes. The aims of this study were to develop an empowerment program for people with prediabetes and to examine its efficacy in terms of the adoption of a health-promoting lifestyle and improvements in blood sugar, body mass index, and self-efficacy. A randomized controlled trial was conducted between May and December 2013. A convenience sample of people with a fasting blood sugar level of 100-125 mg/dl during the previous 3 months was recruited from the health examination center of a hospital in Kaohsiung, Taiwan. Participants were assigned to either the experimental group or the control group using block randomization with a block size of 8. The experimental group (n = 38) participated in a 4-month empowerment program (the ABC empowerment program), which encouraged participants to practice a health-promoting lifestyle in three phases: awareness raising, behavior building, and results checking. The control group (n = 40) received routine clinical care. Statistical analyses included descriptive statistics, independent t test, paired t test, and generalized estimated equations. After controlling for the differences at baseline and considering the interaction between group and time from baseline to 1 week and 3 months after completing the intervention, the generalized estimating equation showed significantly larger improvements in a health-promoting lifestyle, blood sugar, and self-efficacy in the experimental group than in the control group (p empowerment program was shown to have short-term, positive effects on behavioral, physical, and psychosocial outcomes in a Taiwan population with prediabetes. The results of this study provide a useful

  13. Systematic review of control groups in nutrition education intervention research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrd-Bredbenner, Carol; Wu, FanFan; Spaccarotella, Kim; Quick, Virginia; Martin-Biggers, Jennifer; Zhang, Yingting

    2017-07-11

    Well-designed research trials are critical for determining the efficacy and effectiveness of nutrition education interventions. To determine whether behavioral and/or cognition changes can be attributed to an intervention, the experimental design must include a control or comparison condition against which outcomes from the experimental group can be compared. Despite the impact different types of control groups can have on study outcomes, the treatment provided to participants in the control condition has received limited attention in the literature. A systematic review of control groups in nutrition education interventions was conducted to better understand how control conditions are described in peer-reviewed journal articles compared with experimental conditions. To be included in the systematic review, articles had to be indexed in CINAHL, PubMed, PsycINFO, WoS, and/or ERIC and report primary research findings of controlled nutrition education intervention trials conducted in the United States with free-living consumer populations and published in English between January 2005 and December 2015. Key elements extracted during data collection included treatment provided to the experimental and control groups (e.g., overall intervention content, tailoring methods, delivery mode, format, duration, setting, and session descriptions, and procedures for standardizing, fidelity of implementation, and blinding); rationale for control group type selected; sample size and attrition; and theoretical foundation. The search yielded 43 publications; about one-third of these had an inactive control condition, which is considered a weak study design. Nearly two-thirds of reviewed studies had an active control condition considered a stronger research design; however, many failed to report one or more key elements of the intervention, especially for the control condition. None of the experimental and control group treatments were sufficiently detailed to permit replication of the

  14. Synthesis of Control Algorithm for a Leaderheaded UAVs Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. O. Samodov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, a defense sphere uses unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs. UAVs have several advantages over manned aircrafts such as small size, reduced combat losses of personnel, etc. In addition, in threat environment, it is necessary to arrange both bringing together distant from each other UAVs in a group and their undetected in radar fields compact flying in terms of the joint flight security.However, the task to control a UAVs group is much more difficult than to control a single UAV, since it is necessary not only to control the aircraft, but also take into account the relative position of objects in the group.To solve this problem two ways are possible: using a network exchange between members of the group on the "everyone with everyone" principle and organizing the leader-headed flight.The aim of the article is to develop and study a possible option of the UAVs group control with arranging a leader-headed flight to provide the undetected in radar fields compact flying in terms of the joint flight security.The article develops a universal algorithm to control leader-headed group, based on a new modification of the statistical theory of optimal control. It studies effectiveness of the algorithm. While solving this task, a flight of seven UAVs was simulated in the horizontal plane in a rectangular coordinate system. Control time, linear errors of desired alignment of UAV, and control errors with respect to angular coordinates are used as measures of merit.The study results of the algorithm to control a leader-headed group of UAVs confirmed that it is possible to fulfill tasks of flying free-of-collision group of UAVs with essentially reduced computational costs.

  15. Behavioral and cognitive group treatment for fear of flying: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Gerwen, Lucas J; Spinhoven, Philip; Van Dyck, Richard

    2006-12-01

    In a long-standing fear-of-flying program, persons with fear of flying (N=150) were after a diagnostic assessment and individual preparation phase randomly assigned to either a 1-day behavioral group treatment (BGT) program, a 2-day cognitive-behavioral group treatment (CBGT) program or a waiting list (WL) control group. A post-treatment flight on a commercial airline measured participants' ability to fly. Different self-report flight anxiety questionnaires were completed before, during and after treatment at 3-, 6- and 12-month follow-up. Results indicated that both treatments were superior to the WL, and equally effective on the flying test and later independent flying, but also that the 2-day CBGT program was significantly more effective than the 1-day BGT program on subjective measures of fear and self-efficacy.

  16. A randomized controlled trial of a commercial internet weight loss program

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Womble, Leslie G; Wadden, Thomas A; McGuckin, Brian G; Sargent, Stephanie L; Rothman, Rebecca A; Krauthamer-Ewing, E Stephanie

    2004-01-01

    ...) a weight loss manual (i.e., LEARN Program for Weight Control 2000). At baseline, participants in both groups met briefly with a psychologist who instructed them to follow the components of their program as closely as possible...

  17. Children of mentally ill parents – a pilot study of a group intervention program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna eChristiansen

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The transgenerational transmission of mental disorders is one of the most prominent risk factors for the development of psychological disorders. To date there are only a few evidence based intervention programs for this group overall and hardly any in Germany. We translated the evidence based Family Talk Intervention by Beardslee (2009 and adapted it for groups. In a quasi-experimental design three groups are compared: an intervention group (Family Talk Intervention group: n = 28, a Wait Control group (n = 9, and a control group of healthy children (n = 40. Children of mentally ill parents showed higher rates of internalizing/externalizing disorders before and after the intervention compared to children of parents with no disorders. Post intervention children’s knowledge on mental disorders was significantly enhanced in the Family Talk Intervention group and externalizing symptoms were reduced for this group as well. This pilot study of a group intervention for children of mentally ill parents highlights the importance of psycho-education on parental mental disorders for children. Long-term effects of children’s enhanced knowledge about parental psychopathology need to be explored in future studies.

  18. Quasi-Experiments in Schools: The Case for Historical Cohort Control Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara M. Walser

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available There is increased emphasis on using experimental and quasi-experimental methods to evaluate educational programs; however, educational evaluators and school leaders are often faced with challenges when implementing such designs in educational settings. Use of a historical cohort control group design provides a viable option for conducting quasi-experiments in school-based outcome evaluation. A cohort is a successive group that goes through some experience together, such as a grade level or a training program. A historical cohort comparison group is a cohort group selected from pre-treatment archival data and matched to a subsequent cohort currently receiving a treatment. Although prone to the same threats to study validity as any quasi-experiment, issues related to selection, history, and maturation can be particularly challenging. However, use of a historical cohort control group can reduce noncomparability of treatment and control conditions through local, focal matching. In addition, a historical cohort control group design can alleviate concerns about denying program access to students in order to form a control group, minimize resource requirements and disruption to school routines, and make use of archival data schools and school districts collect and find meaningful.

  19. Neurolinguistic programming training, trait anxiety, and locus of control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konefal, J; Duncan, R C; Reese, M A

    1992-06-01

    Training in the neurolinguistic programming techniques of shifting perceptual position, visual-kinesthetic dissociation, timelines, and change-history, all based on experiential cognitive processing of remembered events, leads to an increased awareness of behavioral contingencies and a more sensitive recognition of environmental cues which could serve to lower trait anxiety and increase the sense of internal control. This study reports on within-person and between-group changes in trait anxiety and locus of control as measured on the Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory and Wallston, Wallston, and DeVallis' Multiple Health Locus of Control immediately following a 21-day residential training in neurolinguistic programming. Significant with-in-person decreases in trait-anxiety scores and increases in internal locus of control scores were observed as predicted. Chance and powerful other locus of control scores were unchanged. Significant differences were noted on trait anxiety and locus of control scores between European and U.S. participants, although change scores were similar for the two groups. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that this training may lower trait-anxiety scores and increase internal locus of control scores. A matched control group was not available, and follow-up was unfortunately not possible.

  20. A learner-control instructional multimedia program is as effective as a program-control version in undergraduate orthodontic teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bearn, David

    2007-01-01

    A randomised controlled trial (RCT) was conducted in a dental school in Belgium. Undergraduate dental students were randomly assigned to a learner-control, multimedia learning-environment, courseware package (module) or the same module but structured in a program-control form. The learning objectives of learner- and program-control versions of the appliances module were identical. Both groups received the same materials covering the principles of orthodontic appliances that are normally provided at this stage of the undergraduate orthodontic curriculum. Both modules have didactic, interactive and simple animation components. Students were evaluated by means of a 15-item multiple-choice test covering knowledge, understanding and application. They were carried out at baseline and 15 min after finishing studying the modules. The tests were assessed by calculating the total score of the correct answers. Of 39 undergraduate dental students invited to take part, 30 students participated, 15 in each group. There was no significant difference in prior knowledge in the groups at baseline. Although both groups significantly improved their scores after studying the course, no significant difference was found between both groups in relation to answers to questions about knowledge, understanding and application. In this study, the learner-control instructional multimedia program was found to be as effective as the program-control version when teaching principles of the orthodontic appliances to undergraduate students. Future work should focus on how to improve the value of computer-assisted learning (CAL), and comparative evaluations are still needed of how different CAL approaches compare with or complement one another.

  1. Divison of Environmental Control Technology program, 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mott, William E.

    1979-06-01

    This report covers Division of Environmental Control Technology projects in progress during FY 1978, within the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Department of Energy. It is the second in a planned series of annual reports. The Division of Environmental Control Technology (ECT) continues to support the Assistant Secretary for Environment (EV) in discharging two primary responsibilities: (1) under the Environmental Engineering (EE) Program, the independent overview and assessment of environmental control aspects of both the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) research, development, and demonstration (RD and D) programs and the Nation's energy policies, and (2) under the Decontamination and Decommissioning Program, the reduction of potential environmental hazards at the radioactively contaminated sites that are presently owned or were formerly used by the Government. This report presents a short summary of objectives, approach, progress and results, future plans, and a reference bibliography for each research, development, or assessment project within the program areas described above.

  2. The Comparison of the Effects of a Didactic Stress Management Program and Group Counselling on the Coping Strategies of School Counsellors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coban, Aysel Esen; Hamamci, Zeynep

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of a didactic stress management program, group counselling, and a control group on school counsellors' stress coping strategies. Thirty-four school counsellors were randomly assigned to either a didactic stress management group, group counselling, or a control group. The didactic stress management…

  3. Refinement from a control problem to program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schenke, Michael; Ravn, Anders P.

    1996-01-01

    The distinguishing feature of the presented refinement approach is that it links formalisms from a top level requirements notation down to programs together in a mathematically coherent development trajectory. The approach uses Duration Calculus, a real-time interval logic, to specifyrequirements...... for a control task, exemplified by a steam boiler.The same formalism is used to refine requirements to a functional design.Through a suitable transformation this is taken to an event andaction based formalism. Finally components in this design for a distributedarchitecture are transformed to occam-like programs....

  4. [The new Tuberculosis Control Program of Japan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Toru

    2006-07-01

    The 1951 Tuberculosis Control Law of Japan was amended extensively and has been in effect since April, 2005. The revision of the National Tuberculosis Program (NTP) is to respond to the tremendous changes that have occurred during the last 50 years in tuberculosis epidemiology and in the environment in tuberculosis control implementation. In this review, the main points and framework of the revisions were summarized and the perspective of the development of new technical innovations relevant to each area of the revised TB control legislation is discussed. Also, challenges of Japan's NTP in the recent future are discussed, including the controversies over the proposed abolishment of the Tuberculosis Control Law. 1. IMMUNIZATION: In the revision of NTP, the BCG vaccination of elementary school and junior-high school entrants was discontinued. In order to strengthen the early primary vaccination for infants, the new Law has adopted the direct vaccination scheme omitting tuberculin testing prior to immunization. This program is implemented to young babies, i.e., less than six months old, as defined by the decree. It is a heavy responsibility for the municipalities to ensure the high coverage of immunization when the period of legal vaccination is rather strictly limited practically to the fourth to sixth months after birth. The safe direct vaccination is another new challenge where appropriate management of the Koch's phenomenon or similar reactions should be warranted. 2. CHEMOPROPHYLAXIS: Though unfortunately suspended for some legal reason currently, the expansion and improvement of chemoprophylaxis, or treatment of latent tuberculosis infection, to cover anyone with higher risk of clinical development of TB would have a tremendous effect in Japan, especially since 90% of patients who developed TB were infected tens of years ago. The technical innovations in diagnosis of TB infection such as QuantiFERON will be very helpful. Development of new drugs or drug regimens

  5. Control groups in recent septic shock trials: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettilä, Ville; Hjortrup, Peter Buhl; Jakob, Stephan M; Wilkman, Erika; Perner, Anders; Takala, Jukka

    2016-12-01

    The interpretation of septic shock trial data is profoundly affected by patients, control intervention, co-interventions and selected outcome measures. We evaluated the reporting of control groups in recent septic shock trials. We searched for original articles presenting randomized clinical trials (RCTs) in adult septic shock patients from 2006 to 2016. We included RCTs focusing on septic shock patients with at least two parallel groups and at least 50 patients in the control group. We selected and evaluated data items regarding patients, control group characteristics, and mortality outcomes, and calculated a data completeness score to provide an overall view of quality of reporting. A total of 24 RCTs were included (mean n = 287 patients and 71 % of eligible patients were randomized). Of the 24 studies, 14 (58 %) presented baseline data on vasopressors and 58 % the proportion of patients with elevated lactate values. Five studies (21 %) provided data to estimate the proportion of septic shock patients fulfilling the Sepsis-3 definition. The mean data completeness score was 19 out of 36 (range 8-32). Of 18 predefined control group characteristics, a mean of 8 (range 2-17) were reported. Only 2 (8 %) trials provided adequate data to confirm that their control group treatment represented usual care. Recent trials in septic shock provide inadequate data on the control group treatment and hemodynamic values. We propose a standardized trial dataset to be created and validated, comprising characteristics of patient population, interventions administered, hemodynamic values achieved, surrogate organ dysfunction, and mortality outcomes, to allow better analysis and interpretation of future trial results.

  6. Brief group psychotherapy for the spousally bereaved: a controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, M A; Yalom, I

    1992-01-01

    A consecutive sample of mid- and late-life bereaved spouses were randomly assigned to treatment and no-treatment groups. Two hypotheses were tested: (1) that brief group psychotherapy during the early stages of loss would facilitate adjustment assessed by measures of mental health, positive psychological states, social role, and mourning; and (2) that positive effects would be maximized for subjects who were more distressed psychologically. Although group participants, compared with untreated controls, did over 1 year show modest improvement on role functioning and positive psychological states, overall the study failed to find substantial support for the two major hypotheses. Both experimental and control groups showed improvement over the year, particularly on measures of mental health and mourning. Differential benefit was not observed for the high-risk group.

  7. Pilot study of the Korean Parent Training Program using a partial group randomized experimental study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eunjung; Cain, Kevin; Boutain, Doris; Chun, Jin-Joo; Kim, Sangho; Im, Hyesang

    2017-01-01

    Problems Korean American (KA) children experience mental health problems due to difficulties in parenting dysfunction complicated by living in two cultures. Methods Korean Parent Training Program (KPTP) was pilot tested with 48 KA mothers of children (ages 3–8) using partial group randomized controlled experimental study design. Self-report survey and observation data were gathered. Findings Analyses using generalized estimating equation indicated the intervention group mothers increased effective parenting and their children decreased behavior problems and reported less acculturation conflict with mothers. Conclusions The KPTP is a promising way to promote effective parenting and increase positive child mental health in KA families. PMID:24645901

  8. Robust Control Design via Linear Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keel, L. H.; Bhattacharyya, S. P.

    1998-01-01

    This paper deals with the problem of synthesizing or designing a feedback controller of fixed dynamic order. The closed loop specifications considered here are given in terms of a target performance vector representing a desired set of closed loop transfer functions connecting various signals. In general these point targets are unattainable with a fixed order controller. By enlarging the target from a fixed point set to an interval set the solvability conditions with a fixed order controller are relaxed and a solution is more easily enabled. Results from the parametric robust control literature can be used to design the interval target family so that the performance deterioration is acceptable, even when plant uncertainty is present. It is shown that it is possible to devise a computationally simple linear programming approach that attempts to meet the desired closed loop specifications.

  9. Validation of a proposal for evaluating hospital infection control programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Cristiane Pavanello Rodrigues; Lacerda, Rúbia Aparecida

    2011-02-01

    To validate the construct and discriminant properties of a hospital infection prevention and control program. The program consisted of four indicators: technical-operational structure; operational prevention and control guidelines; epidemiological surveillance system; and prevention and control activities. These indicators, with previously validated content, were applied to 50 healthcare institutions in the city of São Paulo, Southeastern Brazil, in 2009. Descriptive statistics were used to characterize the hospitals and indicator scores, and Cronbach's α coefficient was used to evaluate the internal consistency. The discriminant validity was analyzed by comparing indicator scores between groups of hospitals: with versus without quality certification. The construct validity analysis was based on exploratory factor analysis with a tetrachoric correlation matrix. The indicators for the technical-operational structure and epidemiological surveillance presented almost 100% conformity in the whole sample. The indicators for the operational prevention and control guidelines and the prevention and control activities presented internal consistency ranging from 0.67 to 0.80. The discriminant validity of these indicators indicated higher and statistically significant mean conformity scores among the group of institutions with healthcare certification or accreditation processes. In the construct validation, two dimensions were identified for the operational prevention and control guidelines: recommendations for preventing hospital infection and recommendations for standardizing prophylaxis procedures, with good correlation between the analysis units that formed the guidelines. The same was found for the prevention and control activities: interfaces with treatment units and support units were identified. Validation of the measurement properties of the hospital infection prevention and control program indicators made it possible to develop a tool for evaluating these programs

  10. Utilizing the Zero-One Linear Programming Constraints to Draw Multiple Sets of Matched Samples from a Non-Treatment Population as Control Groups for the Quasi-Experimental Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuan H.; Yang, Yu N.; Tompkins, Leroy J.; Modarresi, Shahpar

    2005-01-01

    The statistical technique, "Zero-One Linear Programming," that has successfully been used to create multiple tests with similar characteristics (e.g., item difficulties, test information and test specifications) in the area of educational measurement, was deemed to be a suitable method for creating multiple sets of matched samples to be…

  11. Educational Groups for Single Parents: The Parenting after Divorce Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Nancy J.; Amara, Ingrid A.

    1984-01-01

    Describes a group that teaches parenting skills to divorced parents. Presents various elements of the group experience, including a focus on the child's needs and developmental stages, role-playing, and co-parenting issues. Response to the group suggests that parents with greater postdivorce stress benefit the most. (BH)

  12. Quasi-Experiments in Schools: The Case for Historical Cohort Control Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walser, Tamara M.

    2014-01-01

    There is increased emphasis on using experimental and quasi-experimental methods to evaluate educational programs; however, educational evaluators and school leaders are often faced with challenges when implementing such designs in educational settings. Use of a historical cohort control group design provides a viable option for conducting…

  13. Coordination of baseload power plant group control with static reactive power compensator control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zbigniew Szczerba

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Reactive power sources in power system nodes: generators and static reactive power compensators, are controlled by control systems. Generators – by generator node group controllers, compensators – by voltage controllers. The paper presents issues of these control systems’ coordination and proposals for its implementation.

  14. Controller design approach based on linear programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Ryo; Shibasaki, Hiroki; Ogawa, Hiromitsu; Murakami, Takahiro; Ishida, Yoshihisa

    2013-11-01

    This study explains and demonstrates the design method for a control system with a load disturbance observer. Observer gains are determined by linear programming (LP) in terms of the Routh-Hurwitz stability criterion and the final-value theorem. In addition, the control model has a feedback structure, and feedback gains are determined to be the linear quadratic regulator. The simulation results confirmed that compared with the conventional method, the output estimated by our proposed method converges to a reference input faster when a load disturbance is added to a control system. In addition, we also confirmed the effectiveness of the proposed method by performing an experiment with a DC motor. © 2013 ISA. Published by ISA. All rights reserved.

  15. 78 FR 67132 - GPS Satellite Simulator Control Working Group Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-08

    ... Department of the Air Force GPS Satellite Simulator Control Working Group Meeting AGENCY: Space and Missile Systems Center, Global Positioning Systems (GPS) Directorate, Air Force, DoD. ACTION: Meeting notice..., 2013 Vol. 78 No. 206. This new meeting notice is to inform GPS simulator manufacturers, who supply...

  16. 78 FR 63459 - GPS Satellite Simulator Control Working Group Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-24

    ... Force GPS Satellite Simulator Control Working Group Meeting AGENCY: Department of the Air Force. ACTION: Meeting Notice. SUMMARY: This meeting notice is to inform GPS simulator manufacturers, who supply products to the Department of Defense (DoD), and GPS simulator users, both government and DoD contractors...

  17. 77 FR 70421 - GPS Satellite Simulator Control Working Group Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-26

    ... Department of the Air Force GPS Satellite Simulator Control Working Group Meeting AGENCY: Space and Missile Systems Center, Global Positioning Systems (GPS) Directorate, Department of the Air Force, DoD. ACTION: Meeting Notice. SUMMARY: This meeting notice is to inform GPS simulator manufacturers, who supply products...

  18. Approximate Dynamic Programming in Tracking Control of a Robotic Manipulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcin Szuster

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This article focuses on the implementation of an approximate dynamic programming algorithm in the discrete tracking control system of the three-degrees of freedom Scorbot-ER 4pc robotic manipulator. The controlled system is included in an articulated robots group which uses rotary joints to access their work space. The main part of the control system is a dual heuristic dynamic programming algorithm that consists of two structures designed in the form of neural networks: an actor and a critic. The actor generates the suboptimal control law while the critic approximates the difference of the value function from Bellman's equation with respect to the state. The residual elements of the control system are the PD controller, the supervisory term and an additional control signal. The structure of the supervisory term derives from the stability analysis performed using the Lyapunov stability theorem. The control system works online, the neural networks' weights-adaptation procedure is performed in every iteration step, and the neural networks' preliminary learning process is not required. The performance of the control system was verified by a series of computer simulations and experiments performed using the Scorbot-ER 4pc robotic manipulator.

  19. Weight Control in Adolescents: Focus Groups With Korean Adolescents and Their Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Sun-Mi; Yeo, Ji-Young; Hwang, Ji-Hye; Lee, Ji-Hye; Lim, Jiyoung; Kwon, Insook

    This qualitative descriptive study sought to identify perceptions about and status of weight control in adolescents from the perspective of adolescents and their teachers. Focus groups were used with six separate groups, 20 adolescents divided into four groups and 14 teachers divided into two groups. The qualitative data were analyzed using a thematic analysis in NVivo 11.0. Consolidated criteria for reporting qualitative studies (COREQ) were followed. We extracted three themes and 12 sub-themes with 52 meaningful codes. Both adolescents and teachers stated that perceptions about weight control in adolescents were overly weighted toward management of one's appearance. The adolescents reported an increase in weight gained during adolescence, especially after entering high school, and they noted a lack of participation in physical activities and the presence of unhealthy dietary behaviors. However, adolescents perceived excessive weight gain during adolescence as natural, as long as they studied hard. Their teachers and parents were also permissive about weight gain resulted from study. The participants suggested that a weight control program for adolescents should be conducted in schools and should include every student in order to avoid discrimination. In addition, teacher involvement was emphasized to promote participation of adolescents in a school program. Our findings indicate that adolescents, especially those in a society emphasizing academics, need to practice healthy weight control behaviors. A school-based weight control program involving teachers and peers would be suitable and should be provided to all students regardless of weight classification. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Supervision and Group Performance; Instructor's Guide: Interagency Training Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Civil Service Commission, Washington, DC. Bureau of Training.

    The instructor's guide to the course designed to acquaint supervisors, with such behavioral science theories as motivation, leadership, group dynamics, and change, stresses student participation through group discussion, role-playing, incident-process case discussion, and management simulation or games. The course is organized around four themes…

  1. Focus Group Outcomes of the Happy Kids Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Karen; Ferguson, Neil; Partington, Gary; Byrne, Matt

    2015-01-01

    In this article, the outcomes of The Happy Kids project, a strategy to improve the social and emotional well-being of primary school students, were examined. Results indicated that the Happy Kids program had demonstrated positive social and emotional outcomes for students in all schools, in particular, a positive impact upon students' confidence,…

  2. Psychotropic Medication Management in a Residential Group Care Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spellman, Douglas F.; Griffith, Annette K.; Huefner, Jonathan C.; Wise, Neil, III; McElderry, Ellen; Leslie, Laurel K.

    2010-01-01

    This article presents a psychotropic medication management approach that is used within a residential care program. The approach is used to assess medications at youths' times of entry and to facilitate decision making during care. Data from a typical case study have indicated that by making medication management decisions slowly, systematically,…

  3. 77 FR 70619 - Incentives for Nondiscriminatory Wellness Programs in Group Health Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-26

    ... insurance issuers in the group and individual markets. The term ``group health plan'' includes both insured...-baby visits,\\6\\ a program that reimburses employees for the costs of smoking cessation programs... the nondiscrimination protections to the individual market.\\8\\ The wellness program exception to the...

  4. Group Cognitive Behavior Therapy Program with Troubled Adolescents: A Learning Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelman, Sarah; Remond, Louise

    2005-01-01

    Group CBT programs are widely used for assisting teenagers with anxiety, depression and other psychological problems. The majority of reported programs have targeted school or clinical populations however few have specifically targeted adolescents from highly troubled and disadvantaged backgrounds. This paper describes a group CBT program that was…

  5. Psychosocial and psychoeducational group program for main caregiver of mentally sick in early phase of schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estíbaliz Amaro Martín

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Deinstitutionalization processes in recent times have led to a new age in relations between family and mental health professionals. Care professionals were replaced, after the psychiatric reform, for care carried out by the family without the knowledge, information and skills to assume these functions. This is the situation of many families of patients with schizophrenia.Disabling features of schizophrenia usually cause depends on their families, who take care with the consequent impact on their lives. Psychosocial interventions assessing their work and want to build an alliance with them by giving them skills and coping mechanisms to reduce adverse family atmosphere, anticipate and solve problems and reduce the expressions of anger and guilt keeping appropiate expectations. However, these actions must be enforced by providing main caregivers with the skills that enable them to gain control, this is the main target of psychoeducational programs.Today there are many people in favour of such interventions in the early stages of schizophrenia. However, it is no clear how far development of these programs is supported by evidence of effectiveness. So it has proposed a psychosocial and psychoeducational program aimed at main caregivers of patients with schizophrenia in early stages. This program will be led by a psychiatric nurse in collaboration with other professionals in the interdisciplinary team; psychiatrist, clinical psychologist and social worker. It has developed clinical trial with a control group who will receive the gide for families, caregivers and people affected, "Cómo afrontar la esquizofrenia," and an experimental group will receive, in addition to the guide, the group intervention sessions.

  6. Struggling with cancer and treatment: young athletes recapture body control and identity through exercise: qualitative findings from a supervised group exercise program in cancer patients of mixed gender undergoing chemotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adamsen, L.; Andersen, C.; Midtgaard, J.

    2009-01-01

    Cancer and treatment can negatively affect the body's performance and appearance. Exercise has been tested in a few studies for altered body image among middle-aged women with breast cancer. The aim of the study was to explore how young pre-cancer athletes of both genders experience disease...... patients (median age 28 years). The young athletes experienced a change from a high level of physical activity, body satisfaction and a positive self-identity to a low level of physical activity, body denial and a negative self-identity. In the program, the patients experienced increased physical strength...... and recapture of certain aspects of their former positive body perception. Deterioation of muscle functions caused by chemotherapy was particularly painful to these patients, independent of gender and age. Young physically active patients are heavily dependent on their physical capacity, body satisfaction...

  7. A comparison of donor and control group quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumin, Makmor; Abdul Talib Abdul Mutalib, Muzalwana; Mohd Satar, Nurulhuda; Abdullah, Nawi; Chong, Chin-Sieng; Ng, Kok-Peng; Lim, Soo-Kun

    2014-03-03

    Informed consent of prospective donors should include information about the quality of life (QoL) of existing donors, especially those within the relevant country. This study aimed to provide information on Malaysian organ donors' QoL relative to a control group. Using a shorter version of the SF-36, QoL of 80 donors from the University of Malaya Medical Center (UMMC), Malaysia was surveyed and compared to QoL of 80 selected healthy individuals. ANOVA and General Linear Model (GLM) procedure were each applied for the QoL comparison, which was based on gender and age. Donors recorded a better QoL relative to the control group. Comparison across gender revealed that differences are more obvious for males than females. Donor/control comparison across age groups reveals that donors aged 56 and above reported significantly better QoL in most domains relative to other age groups. Information on donor QoL should be made available to the public to present a comprehensive picture of the consequences of organ donation. Nonetheless, we also argue that, despite the merits of organ donation, caution is required before concluding that donors have better QoL because the present research outcomes may reflect a self-selection bias in which respondents only included donors engaging in regular follow-ups.

  8. Usual and unusual care: existing practice control groups in randomized controlled trials of behavioral interventions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Freedland, Kenneth E; Mohr, David C; Davidson, Karina W; Schwartz, Joseph E

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the use of existing practice control groups in randomized controlled trials of behavioral interventions and the role of extrinsic health care services in the design and conduct of behavioral trials...

  9. Strategies to control morphology in hybrid group III-V/group IV heterostructure nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillerich, Karla; Dick, Kimberly A; Wen, Cheng-Yen; Reuter, Mark C; Kodambaka, Suneel; Ross, Frances M

    2013-03-13

    By combining in situ and ex situ transmission electron microscopy measurements, we examine the factors that control the morphology of "hybrid" nanowires that include group III-V and group IV materials. We focus on one materials pair, GaP/Si, for which we use a wide range of growth parameters. We show through video imaging that nanowire morphology depends on growth conditions, but that a general pattern emerges where either single kinks or inclined defects form some distance after the heterointerface. We show that pure Si nanowires can be made to exhibit the same kinks and defects by changing their droplet volume. From this we derive a model where droplet geometry drives growth morphology and discuss optimization strategies. We finally discuss morphology control for material pairs where the second material kinks immediately at the heterointerface and show that an interlayer between segments can enable the growth of unkinked hybrid nanowires.

  10. Strengthening Young Mothers: A Qualitative Evaluation of a Pilot Support Group Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, Pauline; Joe, Tara

    2010-01-01

    The Young Mothers Support Group program was designed to engage pregnant teens and young mothers in a youth-driven program tailored to meet their identified needs. Central to the success of the program were the premises that young women would engage in healthy relationships with adults and peers within the program, and were able to actively…

  11. A multidisciplinary weight-loss program: the importance of psychological group therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Duarte Ferrari

    Full Text Available Abstract In addition to dietary factors and sedentary habits, there is a relationship between obesity and psychological variables, even without a clear distinction between cause, effect, and correlation. Despite this relationship, weight-loss programs are limited to a combination of nutrition and physical education, leaving psychological intervention out of the treatment plan. Self-esteem issues, depression, and anxiety are just some of the emotional conditions related to obesity. However, there is no information in the literature about the importance of psychological counseling in a multidisciplinary program for weight-loss in adults. In this context, the main objective of this study was to analyze the effect of cognitive-behavioral therapy in groups (CBTG combined with nutrition and physical education within a multidisciplinary approach to treat obesity. 46 individuals (7 men and 39 women were divided into two groups: control (GC and psychology (GP. Baseline and intervention measures were obtained prior to intervention and before the final meeting, including physical capacity tests and the administering the International Physical Activities Questionnaire (IPAQ. Both groups attended weekly lectures given by a nutritionist and two physical education professionals for 12 weeks. In addition, the GP participated in weekly sessions of CBTG for the same period. After the program, there were significant changes in body mass index, waist circumference, body fat percentage, and strength of the lower limbs in both groups. In addition to these changes, the GP also showed improvements in diastolic blood pressure and IPAQ scores, being the only one that increased its time of weekly physical activity. Thus, it was concluded that the psychological treatment might play an important role in a multidisciplinary weight-loss program.

  12. PTS performance by flight- and control-group macaques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washburn, D. A.; Rumbaugh, D. M.; Richardson, W. K.; Gulledge, J. P.; Shlyk, G. G.; Vasilieva, O. N.

    2000-01-01

    A total of 25 young monkeys (Macaca mulatta) were trained with the Psychomotor Test System, a package of software tasks and computer hardware developed for spaceflight research with nonhuman primates. Two flight monkeys and two control monkeys were selected from this pool and performed a psychomotor task before and after the Bion 11 flight or a ground-control period. Monkeys from both groups showed significant disruption in performance after the 14-day flight or simulation (plus one anesthetized day of biopsies and other tests), and this disruption appeared to be magnified for the flight animal.

  13. Heterogenic control groups in randomized, controlled, analgesic trials of total hip- and knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsen, Anders P; Mathiesen, Ole; Dahl, Jørgen B

    2017-11-17

    Postoperative analgesic interventions are often tested adjunct to basic non- opioid analgesics in randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Consequently, treatment in control groups, and assay sensitivity, differs between trials. We hypothesized that postoperative opioid requirements and pain intensities varies between different control groups in analgesic trials. Control groups from RCTs investigating analgesic interventions after total hip and knee arthroplasty were categorized based on standardized basic analgesic treatment. Morphine consumption 0-24h postoperatively, and resting pain scores at 6 and 24 hours for subgroups of basic treatments, were compared with ANOVA. In an additional analysis, we compared pain and opioid requirements in trials where NSAID was administered as an intervention with trial where NSAID was administered in a control group. We included 171 RCTs employing 28 different control groups with large variability in pain scores and opioid requirements. Four types of control groups (comprising 78 trials) were eligi- ble for subgroup comparisons. These subgroups received: 'opioid', 'NSAID+opioid', 'acetamino- phen+opioid', or 'NSAID+acetaminophen+opioid'. Morphine consumption and pain scores varied substantially between these groups, with no consistent superior efficacy in any subgroup. Addi- tionally, trials administering NSAID as an intervention demonstrated lower pain scores and opioid requirements than trials where NSAID was administered in a control group. Analgesic treatment in RCT control groups varies considerably. Control groups receiving various combinations of opioid, NSAID and acetaminophen did not differ consistently in pain and opioid requirements. Pain and opioid requirements were lower in trials administering NSAID as an intervention compared with trials administering NSAID in a control group.

  14. Non-connected gauge groups and the plethystic program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourget, Antoine; Pini, Alessandro

    2017-10-01

    We present in the context of supersymmetric gauge theories an extension of the Weyl integration formula, first discovered by Robert Wendt [1], which applies to a class of non-connected Lie groups. This allows to count in a systematic way gauge-invariant chiral operators for these non-connected gauge groups. Applying this technique to O( n), we obtain, via the ADHM construction, the Hilbert series for certain instanton moduli spaces. We validate our general method and check our results via a Coulomb branch computation, using three-dimensional mirror symmetry.

  15. Self-Esteem and Vocational Self-Esteem Enhancement: A Group Counseling Program for University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aricak, O. Tolga

    2002-01-01

    This study is a group counseling program developed to enhance self-esteem and vocational self-esteem of university students. In this paper, a brief theoretical background, all sessions of the program and applications were presented. (Contains 14 footnotes.)

  16. Evolution of equine infection control programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Bradford P

    2004-12-01

    The science of control of infectious diseases in hospitals was born in 1847 when Semmelweis, a physician, ordered his medical students to scrub their hands in chlorinated lime water between patients and demonstrated that this simple procedure resulted ina dramatic decline in patient morbidity and mortality. In the late nineteenth century came huge breakthroughs in the understanding that microorganisms cause many disorders, and methods to eliminate and control these microorganisms were attempted. By 1910, sterile instruments, gowns, masks, and gloves had become standard for surgical procedures in large university human hospitals, and isolation of human and veterinary patients with contagious diseases became standard. With the advent of vaccines, many epidemic viral diseases could be controlled, and antimicrobial drugs allowed many previously devastating bacterial diseases to be treated effectively. Before long, however, bacterial resistance became an important issue and remains so today, particularly for Salmonella and Staphylococcus aureus in horses. Vaccination has decreased the number of animals susceptible to equine influenza and equine herpesvirus 1, yet these contagious diseases still pose a serious issue in large equine veterinary hospitals. The development of equine isolation facilities and improved methods of barn cleaning; mandatory application of procedures, such as handwashing or use of disinfectant hand wipes, to prevent the spread of infectious diseases; and monitoring of antimicrobial resistance and use of restricted antimicrobial drugs were driven by recognition and necessity and have given rise to current equine infection control programs.

  17. 26 CFR 1.267(f)-1 - Controlled groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... controlled group, P forms M with a $100 contribution on January 1 of Year 1 and S sells the land to M for $100. On December 1 of Year 1, when the value of the land has decreased to $90, M sells the land to B for $90. On July 1 of Year 3, while B still owns the land, P sells all of M's stock to X and M becomes...

  18. Integrating CERN e-groups into TWiki access control.

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, PL; Hoymr, N; CERN. Geneva. IT Department

    2010-01-01

    Wikis allow for easy collaborative editing of documents on the web for users located in different buildings, cities or even countries. TWiki culture lends to open free form editing and most pages are world readable and editable by CERN authenticated users, however access control is possible and is used to protect sensitive documents. This note discusses the integration of E-groups for authorisation purposes at CERN.

  19. The Weight Management Dietetics Practice Group collecting outcomes mentoring program

    Science.gov (United States)

    The is a newsletter article for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (AND), Weight Management Dietetics Practice Group (WM DPG). The article presents the ‘Collecting Outcomes Mentoring Program’ for 2017 that is managed by the Research Section of the WM DPG. Dietitians in the WM DGP are provided wi...

  20. Pile group program for full material modeling and progressive failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    Strain wedge (SW) model formulation has been used, in previous work, to evaluate the response of a single pile or a group of piles (including its : pile cap) in layered soils to lateral loading. The SW model approach provides appropriate prediction f...

  1. Simplified programming and control of automated radiosynthesizers through unit operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claggett, Shane B; Quinn, Kevin M; Lazari, Mark; Moore, Melissa D; van Dam, R Michael

    2013-07-15

    Many automated radiosynthesizers for producing positron emission tomography (PET) probes provide a means for the operator to create custom synthesis programs. The programming interfaces are typically designed with the engineer rather than the radiochemist in mind, requiring lengthy programs to be created from sequences of low-level, non-intuitive hardware operations. In some cases, the user is even responsible for adding steps to update the graphical representation of the system. In light of these unnecessarily complex approaches, we have created software to perform radiochemistry on the ELIXYS radiosynthesizer with the goal of being intuitive and easy to use. Radiochemists were consulted, and a wide range of radiosyntheses were analyzed to determine a comprehensive set of basic chemistry unit operations. Based around these operations, we created a software control system with a client-server architecture. In an attempt to maximize flexibility, the client software was designed to run on a variety of portable multi-touch devices. The software was used to create programs for the synthesis of several 18F-labeled probes on the ELIXYS radiosynthesizer, with [18F]FDG detailed here. To gauge the user-friendliness of the software, program lengths were compared to those from other systems. A small sample group with no prior radiosynthesizer experience was tasked with creating and running a simple protocol. The software was successfully used to synthesize several 18F-labeled PET probes, including [18F]FDG, with synthesis times and yields comparable to literature reports. The resulting programs were significantly shorter and easier to debug than programs from other systems. The sample group of naive users created and ran a simple protocol within a couple of hours, revealing a very short learning curve. The client-server architecture provided reliability, enabling continuity of the synthesis run even if the computer running the client software failed. The architecture enabled

  2. Control group selection in critical care randomized controlled trials evaluating interventional strategies: An ethical assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Henry J; Miller, Franklin G

    2004-03-01

    Ethical concern has been raised with critical care randomized controlled trials in which the standard of care reflects a broad range of clinical practices. Commentators have argued that trials without an unrestricted control group, in which standard practices are implemented at the discretion of the attending physician, lack the ability to redefine the standard of care and might expose subjects to excessive harms due to an inability to stop early. To develop a framework for analyzing control group selection for critical care trials. Ethical analysis. A key ethical variable in trial design is the extent with which the control group adequately reflects standard care practices. Such a control group might incorporate either the "unrestricted" practices of physicians or a protocol that specifies and restricts the parameters of standard practices. Control group selection should be determined with respect to the following ethical objectives of trial design: 1) clinical value, 2) scientific validity, 3) efficiency and feasibility, and 4) protection of human subjects. Because these objectives may conflict, control group selection will involve trade-offs and compromises. Trials using a protocolized rather than an unrestricted standard care control group will likely have enhanced validity. However, if the protocolized control group lacks representativeness to standard care practices, then trials that use such groups will offer less clinical value and could provide less assurance of protecting subjects compared with trials that use unrestricted control groups. For trials evaluating contrasting strategies that do not adequately represent standard practices, use of a third group that is more representative of standard practices will enhance clinical value and increase the ability to stop early if needed to protect subjects. These advantages might come at the expense of efficiency and feasibility. Weighing and balancing the competing ethical objectives of trial design should be

  3. Maintenance accountability, jobs, and inventory control (MAJIC) program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adkisson, B P

    1990-01-01

    This document describes the operating procedures for the maintenance accountability, jobs, and inventory control (MAJIC) program for the Maintenance Management Department of the ORNL Instrumentation and Controls Division.

  4. From deception trials to control reagents - The introduction of the control group about a century ago

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dehue, T

    This is the story of the remarkable psychologist John E. Coover, who, in the early 1900s, was the first to advocate the comparison of experimental and control ol groups as a methodological necessity. Moreover, the author raises the issue of why control groups were launched about a century ago, and

  5. Treating Juveniles in a Sex Offender Program Using Adventure-Based Programming: A Matched Group Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillis, H. L.; Gass, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    Ninety-five male juvenile sex offenders in an adventure-based behavior management program (LEGACY) were matched with male juveniles in state treatment-as-usual and other specialized programs in the same state to determine program effectiveness (as measured by rearrest rates). The LEGACY program demonstrated significant treatment effectiveness on…

  6. 15 CFR 752.11 - Internal Control Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Internal Control Programs. 752.11... COMPREHENSIVE LICENSE § 752.11 Internal Control Programs. (a) Scope—(1) Introduction. It is through Internal Control Programs (ICPs) that the SCL holder and the consignee assure that exports and reexports are not...

  7. Usual and unusual care: existing practice control groups in randomized controlled trials of behavioral interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedland, Kenneth E; Mohr, David C; Davidson, Karina W; Schwartz, Joseph E

    2011-05-01

    To evaluate the use of existing practice control groups in randomized controlled trials of behavioral interventions and the role of extrinsic health care services in the design and conduct of behavioral trials. Selective qualitative review. Extrinsic health care services, also known as nonstudy care, have important but under-recognized effects on the design and conduct of behavioral trials. Usual care, treatment-as-usual, standard of care, and other existing practice control groups pose a variety of methodological and ethical challenges, but they play a vital role in behavioral intervention research. This review highlights the need for a scientific consensus statement on control groups in behavioral trials.

  8. Effects of a Psychoeducational Group on Mood and Glycemic Control in Adults with Diabetes and Visual Impairments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trozzolino, Linda; Thompson, Pamela S.; Tansman, Mara S.; Azen, Stanley P.

    2003-01-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of a 12-week psychoeducational group therapy program in improving mood and glycemic control in 48 adults with diabetes and visual impairments. Participants made statistically significant gains in glycemic control. There was a significant positive relationship between control and improvement in depression, but…

  9. How Fucose of Blood Group Glycotopes Programs Human Gut Microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kononova, S V

    2017-09-01

    Formation of appropriate gut microbiota is essential for human health. The first two years of life is the critical period for this process. Selection of mutualistic microorganisms of the intestinal microbiota is controlled by the FUT2 and FUT3 genes that encode fucosyltransferases, enzymes responsible for the synthesis of fucosylated glycan structures of mucins and milk oligosaccharides. In this review, the mechanisms of the selection and maintenance of intestinal microorganisms that involve fucosylated oligosaccharides of breast milk and mucins of the newborn's intestine are described. Possible reasons for the use of fucose, and not sialic acid, as the major biological signal for the selection are also discussed.

  10. Group excitation control of generators in state regional electric power plant transformer station automatic control systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gumin, M.I.; Rosman, L.V.; Tarnavskii, V.M.

    1983-01-01

    Group excitation control of electric generators according to standard methods is essential for the management of power plant conditions according to voltage and reactive power. A system is described that provides coordinated changes in the automatic excitation controller set point for generators that operate on common buses. The advantages of the excitation control system are discussed.

  11. Improving insomnia in primary care patients: A randomized controlled trial of nurse-led group treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandlund, Christina; Hetta, Jerker; Nilsson, Gunnar H; Ekstedt, Mirjam; Westman, Jeanette

    2017-07-01

    Insomnia is a common health problem, and most people who seek help for insomnia consult primary care. In primary care, insomnia treatment typically consists of hypnotic drugs, although cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia is the recommended treatment. However, such treatment is currently available to few primary care patients. To evaluate the effects of a group treatment program for insomnia led by nurses in primary care. were the Insomnia Severity Index, a 2-week sleep diary, and a questionnaire on frequency of hypnotic drug use. A randomized controlled trial with pre- and post-treatment assessment and a 1-year post-treatment follow-up of the intervention group. Routine primary health care; 7 primary care centers in Stockholm, Sweden. Patients consulting primary care for insomnia were assessed for eligibility. To be included, patients had to have insomnia disorder and be 18 years or older. Patients were excluded if they if they worked night shifts or had severe untreated somatic and/or mental illness, bipolar disorder, or untreated sleep disorder other than insomnia. One-hundred and sixty-five patients 20 to 90 years were included. Most were women, and many had co-existing somatic and/or mental health problems. The post-treatment dropout rate was 20%. The intervention was a nurse-led group treatment for insomnia based on the techniques of cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia. The nurses had 2days of training in how to deliver the program. Ninety patients were randomized to the intervention and 75 to the control group (treatment as usual). Data from 82 in the intervention and 71 in the control group were analyzed in accordance with intention-to-treat principles. Fifty-four of the 72 in the intervention group who participated in the group treatment program were followed up after 1year. Mean Insomnia Severity Index score decreased significantly from 18.4 to 10.7 after group treatment but remained unchanged after treatment as usual (17.0 to 16.6). The effect

  12. Randomized controlled study of a retiree health promotion program. The Bank of American Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leigh, J P; Richardson, N; Beck, R; Kerr, C; Harrington, H; Parcell, C L; Fries, J F

    1992-06-01

    The initial results of a 12-month controlled trial of a health promotion program in 5686 Bank of America retirees, randomized into full program, questionnaire only, and insurance claims only groups, were analyzed to determine whether the health promotion program was effective. Comparisons were between program and questionnaire only groups for self-reported health habit changes, health risk scores, medical care utilization, and days confined to home, and between all groups for insurance claims data. The intervention, or full program, included health habit questionnaires administered every 6 months, individualized time-oriented health risk appraisals, personal recommendation letters, self-management materials, and a health promotion book. Twelve-month changes in health habits, health status, and economic variables favored the full program group in 31 of 32 comparisons and were statistically significant at the .05 level in two-tailed tests in 19 comparisons and at the .01 level in two-tailed tests in 13 comparisons. Over 12 months, overall computed health risk scores decreased by 4.3% in the full program experimental group and increased by 7.2% in the questionnaire only control group. Total direct and indirect costs decreased by 11% in the experimental group and increased by 6.3% in the questionnaire only control group. Analysis of claims data confirmed these trends. A low-cost health promotion program for retirees was effective in changing health behaviors and has potential to decrease health care utilization.

  13. Synthetic RNA Controllers for Programming Mammalian Cell Fate and Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-04

    Final report for “Synthetic RNA controllers for programming mammalian cell fate and function” Principal Investigator: Christina D. Smolke...SUBTITLE Synthetic RNA controllers for programming mammalian cell fate and function 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER...Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18   2 Synthetic RNA controllers for programming mammalian cell fate and function Task 1

  14. Advanced Emissions Control Development Program: Phase III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G.T. Amrhein; R.T. Bailey; W. Downs; M.J. Holmes; G.A. Kudlac; D.A. Madden

    1999-07-01

    The primary objective of the Advanced Emissions Control Development Program (AECDP) is to develop practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of air toxics from coal-fired boilers. The project goal is to effectively control air toxic emissions through the use of conventional flue gas clean-up equipment such as electrostatic precipitators (ESPs), fabric filters (baghouses - BH), and wet flue gas desulfurization systems (WFGD). Development work concentrated on the capture of trace metals, fine particulate, hydrogen chloride and hydrogen fluoride, with an emphasis on the control of mercury. The AECDP project is jointly funded by the US Department of Energy's Federal Energy Technology Center (DOE), the Ohio Coal Development Office within the Ohio Department of Development (OCDO), and Babcock and Wilcox, a McDermott company (B and W). This report discusses results of all three phases of the AECDP project with an emphasis on Phase III activities. Following the construction and evaluation of a representative air toxics test facility in Phase I, Phase II focused on characterization of the emissions of mercury and other air toxics and the control of these emissions for typical operating conditions of conventional flue gas clean-up equipment. Some general comments that can be made about the control of air toxics while burning a high-sulfur bituminous coal are as follows: (1) particulate control devices such as ESP's and baghouses do a good job of removing non-volatile trace metals, (2) particulate control devices (ESPs and baghouses) effectively remove the particulate-phase mercury, but the particulate-phase mercury was only a small fraction of the total for the coals tested, (3) wet scrubbing can effectively remove hydrogen chloride and hydrogen fluoride, and (4) wet scrubbers show good potential for the removal of mercury when operated under certain conditions, however, for certain applications, system enhancements can be required to achieve

  15. A distributed implementation of a mode switching control program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holdgaard, Michael; Eriksen, Thomas Juul; Ravn, Anders P.

    1995-01-01

    A distributed implementation of a mode switched control program for a robot is described. The design of the control program is given by a set of real-time automatons. One of them plans a schedule for switching between a fixed set of control functions, another dispatches the control functions...

  16. Evaluation of the effect of a life review group program on self-esteem and life satisfaction in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Kai-Jo; Lu, Ru-Band; Chu, Hsin; Chang, Yue-Cune; Chou, Kuei-Ru

    2008-01-01

    This study was aimed at evaluating whether a Life Review Group Program (LRGP) improved the self-esteem and life satisfaction in the elderly. This randomized, controlled trial consisted of 75 elderly males from a Veterans' Home in Northern Taiwan, 36 of whom were in the experimental group and 39 of whom were in the control group. The subjects in the experimental group participated in an 8-week LRGP. Data were collected before and after the LRGP and again 1 month after the end of the program. The study subjects had a mean age of 78.13 years. The generalized estimating equation was used to compare alterations in the self-esteem and life satisfaction of the elderly before and after the intervention. The alterations in self-esteem and life satisfaction in the experimental group after the LRGP were significantly improved compared to the control group. One month after the LRGP was completed, the self-esteem and life satisfaction of the experimental group continued to improve when compared with pre-intervention levels. Based on these results, the LRGP can potentially improve the self-affirmation, confidence, and self-esteem of the elderly and promote short-term life satisfaction. The results of this study provide a model for clinical evidence-based therapy, serving as a reference for related studies and evaluation of health-promoting programs, as well as improving the health and quality of care of the elderly.

  17. Effects of a group-focused cognitive behavioral health education program on cigarette smoking in a sample of Nigerian prisoners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onyechi, Kay C N; Eseadi, Chiedu; Umoke, Prince C I; Ikechukwu-Ilomuanya, Amaka B; Otu, Mkpoikanke S; Obidoa, Jaachimma C; Agu, Fedinand U; Nwaubani, Okechukwu O; Utoh-Ofong, Anthonia N; Ncheke, Chijioke D; Ugwuozor, Felix O

    2017-01-01

    Smoking is a learned habit that has an impact on the psychological and biochemical health of individuals. It is the leading preventable cause of chronic illness worldwide. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a group-focused cognitive behavioral health education program (GCBHEP) on cigarette smoking in a sample of Nigerian prisoners. The study used a pretest-posttest randomized control group design. Twenty inmates were identified through self-reporting, 1-to-1 counseling, and observation. The treatment group took part in a GCBHEP for 10 weeks, while the control group received 10 weeks' conventional counseling. After the intervention program, both the treatment and control groups were evaluated. The repeated measures analysis of variance was used for data analysis and partial η was also used as a measure of effect size. The findings showed that the GCBHEP had a strong effect on cigarette-smoking habits among the inmates in the treatment group compared with those in the control group. The effect of the GCBHEP by age was moderate, and modest by educational qualification. Group-focused cognitive behavioral health education is effective in breaking the habit of cigarette smoking among Nigerian prisoners. Therefore, future researchers are encouraged to adopt this approach in helping individuals with a smoking problem and other drug-abuse behaviors in Nigerian prisons.

  18. 76 FR 584 - Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Program Work Group (AMWG)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-05

    ... Bureau of Reclamation Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Program Work Group (AMWG) AGENCY: Bureau of... Management Work Group (AMWG), a technical work group (TWG), a Grand Canyon Monitoring and Research Center.... Glen Knowles, Chief, Adaptive Management Work Group, Environmental Resources Division, Upper Colorado...

  19. Evaluation of a Group-Based Trauma Recovery Program in Gaza: Students' Subjective Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron, Ian; Abdullah, Ghassan

    2012-01-01

    Internationally, evaluation of group-based trauma recovery programs has relied upon normative outcome measures, with no studies systematically analyzing children's subjective experience for program development. In contrast, the current study explored children's experience of a Gazan recovery program "in their own words." Twenty-four…

  20. Efficacy of a post-secondary environmental science education program on the attitude toward science of a group of Mississippi National Guard Youth ChalleNGe Program students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, William Bradford, Jr.

    The National Guard Youth ChalleNGe Program (ChalleNGe) is a 17 month quasi-military training program authorized by Congress in the 1993 Defense Authorization Bill designed to improve life skills, education levels, and employment potential of 16--18 year old youth who drop out of high school. ChalleNGe is currently operational in 27 states/territories with the focus of this study on the Mississippi National Guard Program operated at Camp Shelby, Mississippi. During the five month residential portion of the program students are guided through an eight step process designed to meet the goals of improving life skills, education levels, and employment potential while ultimately leading to completion of high school equivalency credentials followed by a 12 month mentoring phase to encourage and track progress toward goals. The purpose of this study was to investigate the attitude toward science of a group of students enrolled in the ChalleNGe Program at Camp Shelby (ChalleNGe). The GED test is administered approximately two months into the residential phase of the program. While the program boasts an overall GED pass rate of nearly 80%, approximately 30--35% of students successfully complete the initial offering of the GED. As high school graduates, these students are offered college courses through William Carey College in Hattiesburg, Mississippi. Twenty four students elected to take the Introduction to Environmental Science course and formed the experimental group while 24 other students who passed the GED comprised the control group. Each group was administered the Scientific Attitude Inventory II, a 40 statement instrument with Likert Scale responses, as a pretest. Paired samples t-tests indicated no significant difference in attitude toward science between the experimental and control groups on the pretest. Following the two week Introduction to Environmental Science course for the experimental group, both groups were post tested. As predicted, the attitude toward

  1. Attitudes of older adults in a group-based exercise program towards a blended intervention; a focus-group study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumit Mehra

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Ageing is associated with a decline in daily functioning and mobility. A physically active life and physical exercise can minimize the decline of daily functioning and improve the physical-, psychological- and social functioning of older adults. Despite several advantages of group-based exercise programs, older adults participating in such interventions often do not meet the frequency, intensity or duration of exercises needed to gain health benefits. An exercise program that combines the advantages of group-based exercises led by an instructor with tailored home-based exercises can increase the effectiveness. Technology can assist in delivering a personalized program. The aim of the study was to determine the susceptibility of older adults currently participating in a nationwide group-based exercise program to such a blended exercise program. Eight focus-groups were held with adults of 55 years of age or older. Two researchers coded independently the remarks of the 30 participants that were included in the analysis according to the three key concepts of the Self Determination Theory: autonomy, competence and relatedness. The results show that maintaining self-reliance and keeping in touch with others were the main motives to participate in the weekly group-based exercises. Participants recognized benefits of doing additional home-based exercises, but had concerns regarding guidance, safety and motivation. Furthermore, some participants strongly rejected the idea to use technology to support them in doing exercises at home, but the majority was open to it. Insights are discussed how these findings can help design novel interventions that can increase the wellbeing of older adults and preserve an independent living.

  2. 34 CFR 664.1 - What is the Fulbright-Hays Group Projects Abroad Program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Group Projects Abroad Program is designed to contribute to the development and improvement of the study... teachers, students, and faculty to study in foreign countries. (b) Under the program, the Secretary awards... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What is the Fulbright-Hays Group Projects Abroad...

  3. Linear programming control of a group of heat pumps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fink, J.; van Leeuwen, Richard Pieter; Hurink, Johann L.; Smit, Gerardus Johannes Maria

    2015-01-01

    For a new district in the Dutch city Meppel, a hybrid energy concept is developed based on bio-gas co-generation. The generated electricity is used to power domestic heat pumps which supply thermal energy for domestic hot water and space heating demand of households. In this paper, we investigate

  4. EVALUASI PROGRAM HOMESCHOOLING GROUP UNTUK ANAK USIA 5-6 TAHUN

    OpenAIRE

    CHOIRIYAH, CHOIRIYAH

    2017-01-01

    Abstract: The research objective was to evaluate the Homeschooling Program Group 5-6 Year Olds in Khairu Ummah Bekasi Jatisampurna 2014. Research program evaluation apply Cippo models that include context, input, process and output products. The research was conducted for two months ie from May to June 2014. The results showed: (1) aspects of the context, the implementation of the program of homeschooling services group operating license is not obtained in the form of an operating license hom...

  5. Evaluation of a structured group format memory rehabilitation program for adults following brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thickpenny-Davis, Kirsten L; Barker-Collo, Suzanne L

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of an 8-session structured group format memory rehabilitation program on impaired memory functioning. Adults with traumatic brain injury (N = 10) or cerebral vascular accidents (N = 2). A waitlist control study with pregroup, postgroup, and 1-month follow-up assessments. WECHSLER MEMORY SCALE-REVISED: Neuropsychological assessments of memory (California Verbal Learning Test, Wechsler Memory Scale-Revised logical memory, visual-paired associates, and Rey Complex Figure) and both self-report and significant other report of behaviors indicative of memory difficulties and the use of memory strategies. Participation in the memory group increased participants' knowledge of memory and memory strategies as well as use of memory aids and strategies; reduced behaviors indicative of memory impairment; and had a positive effect on neuropsychological assessments of memory (eg, delayed recall for words and figures). All significant improvements exceeded change experienced by waiting-list controls and were maintained at 1-month follow-up assessment. While extension of the findings is needed, the memory group has a positive impact on both neuropsychological measures of memory and everyday memory functioning.

  6. The effectiveness of a group psycho-educational program on family caregiver burden of patients with mental disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navidian Ali

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Brief family intervention may have a positive impact on family caregivers for patients with mental disorders. We assessed the effectiveness of a group psycho-educational program on family caregivers for patients with schizophrenia and mood disorders. Methods This randomized controlled trial was performed on 100 caregivers for patients with mental disorders attending the Isfahan Behavioral Sciences Research Center (IBSRC, in Isfahan, Iran. One hundred family caregivers of patients with schizophrenia (n = 50 and mood disorders (n = 50 were selected and assigned randomly to either a psycho-educational group intervention or routine care in each diagnosis category. The caregivers were followed for 3 months. Caregiver burden was assessed using the Zarit Burden Interview Results The mean scores of the Zarit caregiver burden decreased significantly for the group that participated in the psycho-educational program, while scores in the control group did not change significantly. Conclusions This group intervention program was effective to reduce the caregiver burden for both categories of mental disorders in the Iranian population. This group intervention program may improve the quality of life of patients and caregivers by improving the standards of care giving. Trial registration RCT registration number: IRCT138804272200N

  7. Pilot early intervention antenatal group program for pregnant women with anxiety and depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Naomi; Komiti, Angela; Judd, Fiona

    2014-12-01

    This study aims to examine the acceptability and effectiveness of an antenatal group intervention designed to reduce the severity of depression and anxiety symptoms and improve maternal attachment in pregnant women with current or emerging depression and anxiety. Women who participated in the program completed pre- and posttreatment measures of depression (Centre of Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale) and Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale), anxiety (State-Trait Anxiety Inventory) and maternal attachment (Condon Maternal Antenatal Attachment Scale). Participants also completed a satisfaction questionnaire and provided general feedback about the group intervention and experience. A total of 48 women (M = 26 weeks of gestation) commenced and 37 (77 %) completed at least 80 % of the six session group intervention. Significant improvements with moderate to large effect sizes were observed for depression as measured on the Centre of Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) (p Scale (EPDS) (p anxiety (p Future directions could involve more comprehensive randomised controlled trials (RCT) to examine the effectiveness of the group intervention.

  8. Parent and adolescent effects of a universal group program for the parenting of adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Joanna Ting Wai; Bullen, Pat; Farruggia, Susan P; Dittman, Cassandra K; Sanders, Matthew R

    2015-05-01

    There is growing support for the large-scale implementation of parenting programs for the prevention of child behavior disorders and child maltreatment in younger children. However, there is only limited evidence on the efficacy of parenting programs in modifying risk and protective factors relating to adolescent behavior problems. This study examined the efficacy of Group Teen Triple P (GTTP), an eight-session parenting program specifically designed for parents of young adolescents. Seventy-two families with adolescents aged between 12 and 15 years were randomly assigned to either GTTP (n = 35) or a care as usual (CAU) control condition (n = 37). Compared to CAU parents, parents who received GTTP reported significant improvements in parenting practices, parenting confidence, the quality of family relationships, and fewer adolescent problem behaviors at post-intervention. Several of the parent-reported effects were corroborated by reports from adolescents, including decreases in parent-adolescent conflict and increases in parental monitoring. Adolescents whose parents participated in GTTP also reported significantly fewer behavioral problems than adolescents in the CAU condition. Many of these improvements were maintained at 6-month follow-up.

  9. Differentiating progress in a clinical group of fibromyalgia patients during and following a multicomponent treatment program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Den Houte, Maaike; Luyckx, Koen; Van Oudenhove, Lukas; Bogaerts, Katleen; Van Diest, Ilse; De Bie, Jozef; Van den Bergh, Omer

    2017-07-01

    Treatments including multiple nonpharmacological components have beneficial effects on the key symptoms of fibromyalgia, although effects are limited and often do not persist. In this study, we examined different patterns of clinical progress and the dynamic interplay between predictors and outcomes over time. Fibromyalgia patients (N=153; 135 women) followed a multidisciplinary group program spanning 12weeks, aimed at "regaining control over daily functioning". Anxiety, depression, pain coping and kinesiophobia were used as predictor variables. Outcome variables were pain severity, pain-related disability, physical functioning and functional interference. All variables were assessed at 3 moments: on the first and last day of treatment, and 12weeks after the last day of treatment. Overall treatment effects were analyzed using mixed model analyses. Latent class growth analysis identifying different treatment trajectory classes was used to investigate individual differences in treatment effects. Finally, cross-lagged structural equation models were used to investigate the dynamic interplay between predictors and outcomes over time. Only a fourth to a third of the total group showed improvement on the outcome variables. These patients had lower baseline anxiety, depression and kinesiophobia, and improved more on anxiety, depression and kinesiophobia. Physical well-being had a stronger effect on anxiety and depression than vice versa. Physical functioning predicted relative changes in kinesiophobia, while kinesiophobia predicted relative changes in pain-related disability. The results emphasize the importance of tailoring treatments to individual needs in order to improve overall effectiveness of treatment programs. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Reported eating behavior and attitudes improvement after a nutrition intervention program in a group of young female dancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yannakoulia, Mary; Sitara, Marietta; Matalas, Antonia-Leda

    2002-03-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness of an intervention program that combined nutrition education and prevention of disordered eating in a group of female professional dance students. Thirty-two dancers, aged 19-25 years, took part in the program. Evaluation was done by a series of questionnaires that participants were asked to complete on 3 occasions. Assessments of body composition and dietary intake were also performed. Significant improvements in nutrition knowledge as well as a decrease in abnormal eating behavior and dietary restraint were observed at post intervention. At 6-month follow-up, the positive effects were maintained and further benefits were recorded; only nutrition knowledge showed a minor decline. Participants who were at higher risk for adopting abnormal eating behavior benefited the most from the program. These findings encourage the implementation of intervention programs in groups of young women that experience particular pressures for controlling body weight.

  11. [A new program-controlled telemetry technology for pacemakers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Huang, Xin-ming; Fang, Zu-xinag

    2002-09-01

    This thesis is about a new technology of program-controlled telemetry for pacemakers. The system utilizes digital logic circuit design, and the program-controlled part uses single chip to control for display and debug. PWM and reflectance telemetry may improve the preciseness and correctness of signal transmission, and reduce the power consumption of pacemakers and prolong the lifetime.

  12. Outcomes of group-based treatment program with parental involvement for the management of childhood and adolescent obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiprabhob, Jeerunda; Leewanun, Chanin; Limprayoon, Kawewan; Kiattisakthavee, Pornpimol; Wongarn, Renu; Aanpreung, Prapun; Likitmaskul, Supawadee

    2014-10-01

    An uncontrolled study was conducted to evaluate the effects of a group-based program on weight control, metabolic profiles, and obesity-related complications in obese youth. The program consisted of an initial in-patient session and five group sessions, one, two, three, six, and nine months into the study, providing participants and their parents with information about the consequences of obesity and lifestyle modifications. The severity of obesity and obesity-related complications were evaluated at baseline and 12 months after the intervention. The participants' and their parents' perceptions of the program were assessed. Of the obese youth recruited (n=126), 115 completed the study. Their percentage weight for height and percentage body fat decreased significantly (both pparents perceived the program as valuable. A group-based program is effective in managing childhood obesity, improving metabolic profiles, and alleviating certain obesity-related complications. A group-based program that provides education and raises the awareness of obese children and their parents about the consequences of obesity is an effective model for treating childhood obesity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Food Group Preferences of Elementary School Children Participating in the National School Lunch Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cashman, Linda; Tripurana, Madhuri; Englund, Tim; Bergman, Ethan A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The purpose of the study was to assess the food group preferences of second through fifth grade children based on ethnic background, gender, and grade. Food group preferences were determined by the amount of various food groups consumed in meals served as part of the National School Lunch Program at selected schools. Research…

  14. The influence of control group reproduction on the statistical ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Because of various Congressional mandates to protect the environment from endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs), the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) initiated the Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program. In the context of this framework, the Office of Research and Development within the USEPA developed the Medaka Extended One Generation Reproduction Test (MEOGRT) to characterize the endocrine action of a suspected EDC. One important endpoint of the MEOGRT is fecundity of breeding pairs of medaka. Power analyses were conducted to determine the number of replicates needed in proposed test designs and to determine the effects that varying reproductive parameters (e.g. mean fecundity, variance, and days with no egg production) will have on the statistical power of the test. A software tool, the MEOGRT Reproduction Power Analysis Tool, was developed to expedite these power analyses by both calculating estimates of the needed reproductive parameters (e.g. population mean and variance) and performing the power analysis under user specified scenarios. The manuscript illustrates how the reproductive performance of the control medaka that are used in a MEOGRT influence statistical power, and therefore the successful implementation of the protocol. Example scenarios, based upon medaka reproduction data collected at MED, are discussed that bolster the recommendation that facilities planning to implement the MEOGRT should have a culture of medaka with hi

  15. Reducing Aggressive Behavior in Boys With a Social Cognitive Group Treatment: Results of a Randomized, Controlled Trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Manen, T.G.; Prins, P.J.M.; Emmelkamp, P.M.G.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of a social cognitive intervention program for Dutch aggressive boys and to compare it with a social skills training and a waitlist control group. Method: A randomized, controlled treatment outcome study with 97 aggressive boys (aged 9-13 years) was

  16. A case-control investigation of adenomyosis: impact of control group selection on risk factor strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trabert, Britton; Weiss, Noel S; Rudra, Carole B; Scholes, Delia; Holt, Victoria L

    2011-01-01

    Using a medical record abstraction-based case-control study with two control groups, we evaluated adenomyosis risk factors and investigated differences related to comparison group selection. Medical records of all female 18- to 49-year-old Group Health (GH) enrollees with ICD-9 code 617.0 were abstracted using a standard data collection form. Cases were enrollees diagnosed with adenomyosis (n = 174) between April 1996 and September 2001. For comparison, medical records of two control groups were selected from the GH population: An age-matched sample of female enrollees (population-based controls; n = 149) and all female 18- to 49-year-old enrollees undergoing a hysterectomy (hysterectomy controls; n = 106) during the same time without adenomyosis. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated using logistic regression, adjusted for identified covariates. Compared with normal and underweight women, overweight and obese women had increased adenomyosis risk using hysterectomy controls (OR, 2.2, 95% CI, 1.0-4.5; obese: OR, 2.2; 95% CI, 1.1-4.3) and population controls (overweight: OR, 2.1; 95% CI, 1.2-4.0; obese: OR, 3.8; 95% CI, 2.0-7.0). Using population controls, women with at least one live birth were more likely to have adenomyosis than nulliparous women (OR, 3.4; 95% CI, 1.9-6.2). Although some risk factors persisted in analyses using either control group, divergent results in relation to other risk factors for adenomyosis suggest that results of investigations of this disease may be affected by the choice of the comparison population. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Effects of a Group Psychoeducation Program on Self-Stigma, Empowerment and Perceived Discrimination of Persons with Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivezić, Slađana Štrkalj; Sesar, Marijan Alfonso; Mužinić, Lana

    2017-03-01

    Self-stigma adversely affects recovery from schizophrenia. Analyses of self stigma reduction programs discovered that few studies have investigated the impact of education about the illness on self-stigma reduction. The objective of this study was to determine whether psychoeducation based on the principles of recovery and empowerment using therapeutic group factors assists in reduction of self-stigma, increased empowerment and reduced perception of discrimination in patients with schizophrenia. 40 patients participated in psychoeducation group program and were compared with a control group of 40 patients placed on the waiting list for the same program. A Solomon four group design was used to control the influence of the pretest. Rating scales were used to measure internalized stigma, empowerment and perception of discrimination. Two-way analysis of variance was used to determine the main effects and interaction between the treatment and pretest. Simple analysis of variance with repeated measures was used to additionally test effect of treatment onself-stigma, empowerment and perceived discrimination. The participants in the psychoeducation group had lower scores on internalized stigma (F(1,76)=8.18; pdiscrimination. Group psychoeducation decreased the level of self stigma. This intervention can assist in recovery from schizophrenia.

  18. A core stability group program for children with developmental coordination disorder: 3 clinical case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Kyra; Bell, Ali

    2009-01-01

    This series of case reports documents the response of 3 children with developmental coordination disorder to a group intervention program. The 3 children, 9-11 years old, who participated in the 6-week group exercise program, illustrate the heterogeneity of this population. Two group sessions per week and a home program included a core stability program, fitness activities, and task-specific intervention based on child-chosen goals. The effect of the program on motor skills, self-perceived adequacy for physical activity and balance, strength, and core stability activities was examined. Each child improved in 1 or more areas of motor skill, self-efficacy for physical activity, and core stability outcome measures. Possible reasons for the range of outcomes are discussed. Physical activity promotion in this population has the potential to improve the quality of life and reduce health risks associated with sedentary lifestyles.

  19. Preliminary Effectiveness and Sustainability of Group Aerobic Exercise Program in Patients with Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Sol; Ryu, Je-Kwang; Kim, Chan-Hyung; Chang, Jhin-Goo; Lee, Hwa-Bock; Kim, Do-Hoon; Roh, Daeyoung

    2016-09-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the feasibility and sustained effect of a group aerobic exercise program in patients with schizophrenia. Twenty-four schizophrenic patients participated in a group-based individually tailored 90-minute outdoor cycling session per week for 3 months with intervention to enhance motivation. Physical health was evaluated by anthropometric measures, cardiorespiratory (CR) fitness, and blood tests. Mental health was assessed on self-esteem, interpersonal relationship, quality of life, and global function. Attrition rate for the exercise program was 8.3%. Exercise program significantly increased participant's self-esteem, positive relationship, global function, and quality of life. CR fitness significantly improved after 3 months. At the 9-month follow-up, 6 months after program completion, only in interpersonal relationship change the improved effects were maintained. These findings support the feasibility of group aerobic exercise program with high level of adherence and its long-term benefits in positive relationship change.

  20. A Fully Automated Diabetes Prevention Program, Alive-PD: Program Design and Randomized Controlled Trial Protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, Gladys; Azar, Kristen Mj; Block, Torin J; Romanelli, Robert J; Carpenter, Heather; Hopkins, Donald; Palaniappan, Latha; Block, Clifford H

    2015-01-21

    In the United States, 86 million adults have pre-diabetes. Evidence-based interventions that are both cost effective and widely scalable are needed to prevent diabetes. Our goal was to develop a fully automated diabetes prevention program and determine its effectiveness in a randomized controlled trial. Subjects with verified pre-diabetes were recruited to participate in a trial of the effectiveness of Alive-PD, a newly developed, 1-year, fully automated behavior change program delivered by email and Web. The program involves weekly tailored goal-setting, team-based and individual challenges, gamification, and other opportunities for interaction. An accompanying mobile phone app supports goal-setting and activity planning. For the trial, participants were randomized by computer algorithm to start the program immediately or after a 6-month delay. The primary outcome measures are change in HbA1c and fasting glucose from baseline to 6 months. The secondary outcome measures are change in HbA1c, glucose, lipids, body mass index (BMI), weight, waist circumference, and blood pressure at 3, 6, 9, and 12 months. Randomization and delivery of the intervention are independent of clinic staff, who are blinded to treatment assignment. Outcomes will be evaluated for the intention-to-treat and per-protocol populations. A total of 340 subjects with pre-diabetes were randomized to the intervention (n=164) or delayed-entry control group (n=176). Baseline characteristics were as follows: mean age 55 (SD 8.9); mean BMI 31.1 (SD 4.3); male 68.5%; mean fasting glucose 109.9 (SD 8.4) mg/dL; and mean HbA1c 5.6 (SD 0.3)%. Data collection and analysis are in progress. We hypothesize that participants in the intervention group will achieve statistically significant reductions in fasting glucose and HbA1c as compared to the control group at 6 months post baseline. The randomized trial will provide rigorous evidence regarding the efficacy of this Web- and Internet-based program in reducing or

  1. Weight change among people randomized to minimal intervention control groups in weight loss trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johns, David J; Hartmann-Boyce, Jamie; Jebb, Susan A; Aveyard, Paul

    2016-04-01

    Evidence on the effectiveness of behavioral weight management programs often comes from uncontrolled program evaluations. These frequently make the assumption that, without intervention, people will gain weight. The aim of this study was to use data from minimal intervention control groups in randomized controlled trials to examine the evidence for this assumption and the effect of frequency of weighing on weight change. Data were extracted from minimal intervention control arms in a systematic review of multicomponent behavioral weight management programs. Two reviewers classified control arms into three categories based on intensity of minimal intervention and calculated 12-month mean weight change using baseline observation carried forward. Meta-regression was conducted in STATA v12. Thirty studies met the inclusion criteria, twenty-nine of which had usable data, representing 5,963 participants allocated to control arms. Control arms were categorized according to intensity, as offering leaflets only, a single session of advice, or more than one session of advice from someone without specialist skills in supporting weight loss. Mean weight change at 12 months across all categories was -0.8 kg (95% CI -1.1 to -0.4). In an unadjusted model, increasing intensity by moving up a category was associated with an additional weight loss of -0.53 kg (95% CI -0.96 to -0.09). Also in an unadjusted model, each additional weigh-in was associated with a weight change of -0.42 kg (95% CI -0.81 to -0.03). However, when both variables were placed in the same model, neither intervention category nor number of weigh-ins was associated with weight change. Uncontrolled evaluations of weight loss programs should assume that, in the absence of intervention, their population would weigh up to a kilogram on average less than baseline at the end of the first year of follow-up. © 2016 The Authors Obesity published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Obesity Society (TOS).

  2. Psychoeducative groups help control type 2 diabetes in a primary care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervantes Cuesta, Miguel Ángel; García-Talavera Espín, Noelia Victoria; Brotons Román, Josefa; Núñez Sánchez, M Ángeles; Brocal Ibáñez, Pedro; Villalba Martín, Pilar; Saura García, Carmen; Sánchez Esteban, Tomasa; Romero López-Reinoso, Helena; Delgado Aroca, Ma José; Sánchez Gil, Dolores; Meoro Avilés, Amparo; Soriano Palao, José

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to measure the impact of a psychoeducational group intervention in diabetes using glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c), the body mass index (BMI) and cardiovascular risk factors (CVRF) compared with conventional educational measures provided individually. A quasi-experimental study (pre/post-intervention) with a non-equivalent control group was conducted, including 72 type 2 individuals with diabetes (mean data: age 63.08 years, HbA1C 6.98%, BMI 30.48 kg/m2).The beneficial effect of psychoeducational group therapy in the study group (PGT) was compared with conventional diabetes education in the control group (CG). The PGT had a higher mean HbA1c reduction (-0.51 ± 1.7 vs. -0.06 ± 0.53%, p 0.003), met the objectives of optimal control of HbA1c to a higher degree (80% vs. 48%, p 0.005) and greater mean weight reduction (-1.93 ± 3.57 vs. 0.52 ± 1.73 kg, p 0002) than the CG.A significant improvement in total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, triglycerides, systolic and diastolic blood pressure was achieved in PGT (all p programs should be considered to introduce these more efficient therapies for diabetes education in primary care. Copyright © AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2013. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  3. Group Theoretical Approach for Controlled Quantum Mechanical Systems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tarn, Tzyh-Jong

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this research is the study of controllability of quantum mechanical systems and feedback control of de-coherence in order to gain an insight on the structure of control of quantum systems...

  4. The geography and human cultural resources working group of the EROS program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlach, A. C.

    1972-01-01

    The functions, activities, and objectives of the Geography and Human-Cultural Resources Working Group of the EROS program are outlined. The Group's primary function is to coordinate remote sensing experiments of physical scientists and the needs of socioeconomic and culturally orientated planners, policy makers, administrators, and other user groups. Other functions of the Group include land use analysis, resource mapping, and development of an operational automatic information system receptive to land use and environmental data.

  5. CDC Best Practices for Comprehensive Tobacco Control Programs - 2007

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Best Practices for Comprehensive Tobacco Control Programs. Funding. CDC's Best Practices for Comprehensive Tobacco...

  6. CDC Best Practices for Comprehensive Tobacco Control Programs - 2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Best Practices for Comprehensive Tobacco Control Programs. Funding. CDC's Best Practices for Comprehensive Tobacco...

  7. [Impulsivity-focused Group Intervention to reduce Binge Eating Episodes in Patients with Binge Eating Disorder - A Group Training Program].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schag, Kathrin; Leehr, Elisabeth J; Skoda, Eva-Maria; Becker, Sandra; Zipfel, Stephan; Giel, Katrin E

    2016-11-01

    Binge Eating Disorder (BED) is an eating disorder where cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) could already show reliable efficacy. Relying on basic research, CBT interventions which especially focus on impulsivity could be effective, because binge eating episodes represent highly impulsive eating behaviour. For this reason, we developed a treatment concept about an impulsivity-focused behavioural group intervention for patients with BED, called IMPULS. The efficacy of IMPULS is currently investigated in a randomised controlled trial 1. IMPULS is drafted as a weekly group training programme with 5-6 participants per group. The essential interventions are food-related cue exposure with response prevention and the development of self-control strategies. These interventions are adapted onto the impulsivity concept from conventional treatment of addictive disorders and BED. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. Hanford Site guide for preparing and maintaining generator group pollution prevention program documentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Place, B. G.

    1997-11-25

    This document provides guidance to contractor generator groups for developing and maintaining documentation of Pollution Prevention/Waste. Minimization (P2/WMin) Program activities. The program documentation is intended to demonstrate generator compliance with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requirements as well as state and Federal regulations.

  9. Does Like Seek Like?: The Formation of Working Groups in a Programming Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanou Gozalo, Eduard; Hernández-Fernández, Antoni; Arias, Marta; Ferrer-i-Cancho, Ramon

    2017-01-01

    In a course of the degree of computer science, the programming project has changed from individual to teamed work, tentatively in couples (pair programming). Students have full freedom to team up with minimum intervention from teachers. The analysis of the working groups made indicates that students do not tend to associate with students with a…

  10. A Traumatic Death Support Group Program: Applying an Integrated Conceptual Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walijarvi, Corrine M.; Weiss, Ann H.; Weinman, Maxine L.

    2012-01-01

    This article describes an 8-week, curriculum-based traumatic death support group program that is offered at Bo's Place, a grief and bereavement center in Houston, Texas. The program was implemented in 2006 in an effort to help family members who had experienced a death in the family by suicide, murder, accident, or sudden medical problem. The…

  11. The Relationships among Group Size, Participation, and Performance of Programming Language Learning Supported with Online Forums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Ruey-Shiang

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the relationships among group size, participation, and learning performance factors when learning a programming language in a computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL) context. An online forum was used as the CSCL environment for learning the Microsoft ASP.NET programming language. The collaborative-learning experiment…

  12. A pilot study of a combined group and individual functional remediation program for patients with bipolar I disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zyto, Susan; Jabben, Nienke; Schulte, Peter F J; Regeer, Barbara J; Kupka, Ralph W

    2016-04-01

    Bipolar disorder has been associated with a decrease in cognitive functioning affecting the functional outcome of patients independent of mood states. However, there have only been few attempts to investigate the effects of functional remediation for patients with bipolar disorder. The current study investigates the feasibility and effectiveness of a combined group and individual functional remediation program for bipolar disorder, including both patients and their caregivers. Twelve participants diagnosed with bipolar I disorder, and their caregivers, were treated with a combined group and individual functional remediation program. The feasibility of the program was evaluated by dropout rates and participants' evaluations of the program. The effectiveness of the program was explored through the assessment of functional outcome at baseline, immediately post-treatment, and follow-up three months later. The results indicate a high degree of satisfaction and a low dropout rate with the current program. Assessment of outcomes suggests improved functioning in the areas of autonomy and occupational functioning, evolving from baseline to follow-up. Due to a small sample size and the lack of a control group the results are preliminary. This relatively brief intervention offers a more tailor-made approach to functional remediation and shows good feasibility, acceptability and improvement of functioning in patients with bipolar I disorder. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Fatality Assessment and Control Evaluation (FACE) Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Each day, between 12 to 13 U.S. workers die as a result of a traumatic injury on the job. Investigations conducted through the FACE program allow the identification...

  14. Division of Environmental Control Technology program, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-06-01

    Environmental engineering programs are reviewed for the following technologies; coal; petroleum and gas; oil shale; solar; geothermal and energy conservation; nuclear energy; and decontamination and decommissioning. Separate abstracts were prepared for each technology. (MHR)

  15. Social Skills Training as a Classroom Program among a Group of Female Students of a Primary School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fariba Arabgol

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available "n Objective: "n "nThe main objective of this study is to compare the efficacy of social skill training as a classroom program in schoolgirl students of a primary school with a control group. "nMethod: The 4th grade school girls of two classes in a primary school and at least one of their parents or caregivers participated in this study and they were allocated in the case and control groups. The student's age range was 9-11 years. The social skill education program was designed for primary school children by child and adolescent psychiatry department of Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences .Demographic characteristics were recorded in a designed questionnaire , and included name, age, prior history of psychiatric and medical condition, and prior history of participation in a social skill education program . Achenbach Child Behavior Check List parent's report form (CBCL was used before and after the study in the case group to evaluate the efficacy of the program interventions and, it was also used for the controls at the same times . The change of mean scores, inter and intra groups, and the categorical shifts were compared using repeated measure ANOVA and Chi square statistical methods of analysis by the SPSS-15 statistical software. "nResults: "nThe total number of 66 students with the mean age of 9.80±0.49 years participated in the study: 39 students were assigned to the experimental group and 27 students to the control group. The comparison of the mean age revealed no statistically significant differences between the two groups. The results showed an increment in internalizing problems and total competence and also in affective, anxiety, oppositionality and conduct problem scores which are statistically significant. The percentage of change in behavioral problems was compared between the cases and controls after the interventions. Based on the results, 25.6% of the intervention group got worse in internalizing problems

  16. LDA-Based Unified Topic Modeling for Similar TV User Grouping and TV Program Recommendation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyo, Shinjee; Kim, Eunhui; Kim, Munchurl

    2015-08-01

    Social TV is a social media service via TV and social networks through which TV users exchange their experiences about TV programs that they are viewing. For social TV service, two technical aspects are envisioned: grouping of similar TV users to create social TV communities and recommending TV programs based on group and personal interests for personalizing TV. In this paper, we propose a unified topic model based on grouping of similar TV users and recommending TV programs as a social TV service. The proposed unified topic model employs two latent Dirichlet allocation (LDA) models. One is a topic model of TV users, and the other is a topic model of the description words for viewed TV programs. The two LDA models are then integrated via a topic proportion parameter for TV programs, which enforces the grouping of similar TV users and associated description words for watched TV programs at the same time in a unified topic modeling framework. The unified model identifies the semantic relation between TV user groups and TV program description word groups so that more meaningful TV program recommendations can be made. The unified topic model also overcomes an item ramp-up problem such that new TV programs can be reliably recommended to TV users. Furthermore, from the topic model of TV users, TV users with similar tastes can be grouped as topics, which can then be recommended as social TV communities. To verify our proposed method of unified topic-modeling-based TV user grouping and TV program recommendation for social TV services, in our experiments, we used real TV viewing history data and electronic program guide data from a seven-month period collected by a TV poll agency. The experimental results show that the proposed unified topic model yields an average 81.4% precision for 50 topics in TV program recommendation and its performance is an average of 6.5% higher than that of the topic model of TV users only. For TV user prediction with new TV programs, the average

  17. [Effects of a cultural competence promotion program for multicultural maternity nursing care: case-based small group learning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Myung-Sook; Kweon, Young-Ran

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a cultural competence improvement program for maternity nurses. A quasi-experimental study using a non-equivalent control group pre and posttest design was used. Participants were 67 maternity nurses caring for multicultural pregnant women in G city. The cultural competence improvement program was developed based on the 3-D Puzzle Model and was provided using case-based small group learning methods for the experimental group (n=31). The control group (n=36) did not receive any intervention. Data were collected using self-report structured questionnaires at two time points: prior to the intervention and after the intervention and were analyzed with descriptive statistics, χ²-test, and t-test. Compared to the control group, the experimental group reported significant positive changes for cultural knowledge (t=6.39, pawareness (t=3.50, pmulticultural maternity care. Further, strategies to improve cultural nursing behavior should be developed to promote culturally congruent nursing care.

  18. Transmission Control Protocol, DARPA Internet Program Protocol Specification

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-09-01

    particular a source or destination of messages from the point of view of the communicatio network. identification An Internet Protocol field. This...15-( RFC- 793 "* •TRANSMISSION CONTROL PROTOCOL ’-v DARPA INTERNET PROGRAM PROTOCOL SPECIFICATION September 1981 S... INTERNET PROGRAM PROTOCOL SPECIFICATION 1. INTRODUCTION The Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) is intended for use as a highly reliable host-to-host

  19. The Advanced Controls Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knee, H.E.; White, J.D.

    1990-01-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), under sponsorship of the US Department of Energy (DOE), is conducting research that will lead to advanced, automated control of new liquid-metal-reactor (LMR) nuclear power plants. Although this program of research (entitled the Advanced Controls Program'') is focused on LMR technology, it will be capable of providing control design, test, and qualification capability for other advanced reactor designs (e.g., the advanced light water reactor (ALWR) and high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) designs), while also benefiting existing nuclear plants. The Program will also have applicability to complex, non-nuclear process control environments (e.g., petrochemical, aerospace, etc.). The Advanced Controls Program will support capabilities throughout the entire plant design life cycle, i.e., from the initial interactive first-principle dynamic model development for the process, systems, components, and instruments through advanced control room qualification. The current program involves five principal areas of research activities: (1) demonstrations of advanced control system designs, (2) development of an advanced controls design environment, (3) development of advanced control strategies, (4) research and development (R D) in human-system integration for advanced control system designs, and (5) testing and validation of advanced control system designs. Discussion of the research in these five areas forms the basis of this paper. Also included is a description of the research directions of the program. 8 refs.

  20. Intelligent system for controlling of generator groups; Sistema inteligente para controle de grupos geradores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Figueiredo, Ricardo [RF Eletro-Eletronica (Brazil); Suppa, Mauricio R. [GESTAL - Gestao de Energia e Utilidades Ltda, SP (Brazil)

    1998-10-01

    The use of generation-motor groups as an alternative to the supplying the concessionaires is presented, aiming the cost reduction and electric power energy conservation. The technical and economical advantages of an intelligent system implantation for generators control and supervision are highlighted, such as open and flexible architecture, maintenance easiness and long distance management.

  1. EFFECTIVENESS OF GROUP-MEDIATED LIFESTYLE PHYSICAL ACTIVITY PROGRAM FOR HEALTH BENEFIT IN PHYSICAL ACTIVITY AMONG ELDERLY PEOPLE AT RURAL THAILAND.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ethisan, Plernta; Chapman, Robert; Kumar, Ramesh; Somrogthong, Ratana

    2015-01-01

    Elderly population is considered as a vulnerable group and prone to develop multiple medical problems. This aging population is rapidly increasing in developing countries especially in Thailand. This study was a quasi-experimental study to evaluate the effectiveness of Group-Mediated Lifestyle Physical Activity (GLPA) program on change health benefit in physical activity among elderly people by using validated and reliable Global Physical Activity Questionnaire-GPAQv2. The study was conducted in Phranakhonsiayutthaya district, Ayutthaya province due to its population being the second highest elderly in the Central Region of Thailand. A total of 102 persons of age 60 and over who could read and write Thai language were selected purposively. However, 52 elderly were enrolled in the intervention group and 50 were enrolled for the control group. General Linear Model repeated-measures ANOVA was used to evaluate the effects of program on change health benefit in physical activity among elderly. Overall health benefit at baseline were similar between intervention and control group and found statistically non-significant with p-value 0.638 (>0.05). However, the mean score of health benefit was 23.21 +/- 29.23 in intervention group and 20.74 +/- 23.18 in control group. One third of participants of intervention group had not found health benefit due to physical activity while in control group this number was more than half. After elderly received Group-Mediated Lifestyle Physical Activity program intervention for 6 month found significant statistical differences as compared with mean score at baseline (health benefit 6 month, intervention group =40.7?34.28 and control group = 4.56 +/- 8.79). The effect of Group-Mediated Lifestyle Physical Activity program change intervention was statistically significant in health benefit after intervention program between intervention and control group. Our study suggested that there was need of promoting and encourages physical activity to

  2. Teaching Emotional Intelligence: A Control Group Study of a Brief Educational Intervention for Emergency Medicine Residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diane L. Gorgas

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Emotional Intelligence (EI is defined as an ability to perceive another’s emotional state combined with an ability to modify one’s own. Physicians with this ability are at a distinct advantage, both in fostering teams and in making sound decisions. Studies have shown that higher physician EI’s are associated with lower incidence of burn-out, longer careers, more positive patient-physician interactions, increased empathy, and improved communication skills. We explored the potential for EI to be learned as a skill (as opposed to being an innate ability through a brief educational intervention with emergency medicine (EM residents. Methods: This study was conducted at a large urban EM residency program. Residents were randomized to either EI intervention or control groups. The intervention was a two-hour session focused on improving the skill of social perspective taking (SPT, a skill related to social awareness. Due to time limitations, we used a 10-item sample of the Hay 360 Emotional Competence Inventory to measure EI at three time points for the training group: before (pre and after (post training, and at six-months post training (follow up; and at two time points for the control group: pre- and follow up. The preliminary analysis was a four-way analysis of variance with one repeated measure: Group x Gender x Program Year over Time. We also completed post-hoc tests. Results: Thirty-three EM residents participated in the study (33 of 36, 92%, 19 in the EI intervention group and 14 in the control group. We found a significant interaction effect between Group and Time (p<0.05. Post-hoc tests revealed a significant increase in EI scores from Time 1 to 3 for the EI intervention group (62.6% to 74.2%, but no statistical change was observed for the controls (66.8% to 66.1%, p=0.77. We observed no main effects involving gender or level of training. Conclusion: Our brief EI training showed a delayed but statistically significant

  3. Measurement control program for NDA instruments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsue, S.T.; Marks, T.

    1983-01-01

    Measurement control checks for nondestructive assay instruments have been a constant and continuing concern at Los Alamos National Laboratory. This paper summarizes the evolution of the measurement control checks in the various high-resolution gamma systems we have developed. In-plant experiences with these systems and checks will be discussed. Based on these experiences, a set of measurement control checks is recommended for high-resolution gamma-ray systems.

  4. Does programmed CTL proliferation optimize virus control?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wodarz, Dominik; Thomsen, Allan Randrup

    2005-01-01

    CD8 T-cell or cytotoxic T-lymphocyte responses develop through an antigen-independent proliferation and differentiation program. This is in contrast to the previous thinking, which was that continuous antigenic stimulation was required. This Opinion discusses why nature has chosen the proliferati...

  5. Healthy weight control and dissonance-based eating disorder prevention programs: results from a controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stice, Eric; Trost, Ariel; Chase, Allison

    2003-01-01

    Because universal psychoeducational eating disorder prevention programs have had little success, we developed and evaluated two interventions for high-risk populations: a healthy weight control intervention and a dissonance-based intervention. Adolescent girls (N = 148) with body image concerns were randomized to one of these interventions or to a waitlist control group. Participants completed baseline, termination, and 1, 3, and 6-month follow-up surveys. Participants in both interventions reported decreased thin-ideal internalization, negative affect, and bulimic symptoms at termination and follow-up relative to controls. However, no effects were observed for body dissatisfaction or dieting and effects diminished over time. Results provide evidence that both interventions effectively reduce bulimic pathology and risk factors for eating disturbances. Copyright 2002 by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. 75 FR 26945 - International Education Programs Service-Fulbright-Hays Group Projects Abroad Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-13

    ... colleges or departments of arts and sciences within institutions of higher education, and (2) projects that... promote the internationalization of teacher education and would expand the capabilities of participating... represented in those groups in substantial numbers. We believe that internationalization of K-12 education can...

  7. From Victim to Taking Control: Support Group for Bullied Schoolchildren

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvarme, Lisbeth Gravdal; Aabø, Liv Sandnes; Saeteren, Berit

    2016-01-01

    School bullying is a serious problem affecting the victims in their daily lives at school. The aim of this study was to investigate whether support groups were able to help the victims of bullying to overcome their victim status and to explore what it means to be a member of a support group. An exploratory qualitative design, with individual and…

  8. Enhancing a cancer prevention and control curriculum through interactive group discussions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsythe, L P; Gadalla, S M; Hamilton, J G; Heckman-Stoddard, B M; Kent, E E; Lai, G Y; Lin, S W; Luhn, P; Faupel-Badger, J M

    2012-06-01

    The Principles and Practice of Cancer Prevention and Control course (Principles course) is offered annually by the National Cancer Institute Cancer Prevention Fellowship Program. This 4-week postgraduate course covers the spectrum of cancer prevention and control research (e.g., epidemiology, laboratory, clinical, social, and behavioral sciences) and is open to attendees from medical, academic, government, and related institutions across the world. In this report, we describe a new addition to the Principles course syllabus, which was exclusively a lecture-based format for over 20 years. In 2011, cancer prevention fellows and staff designed and implemented small group discussion sessions as part of the curriculum. The goals of these sessions were to foster an interactive environment, discuss concepts presented during the Principles course, exchange ideas, and enhance networking among the course participants and provide a teaching and leadership opportunity to current cancer prevention fellows. Overall, both the participants and facilitators who returned the evaluation forms (n=61/87 and 8/10, respectively) reported a high satisfaction with the experience for providing both an opportunity to explore course concepts in a greater detail and to network with colleagues. Participants (93%) and facilitators (100%) stated that they would like to see this component remain a part of the Principles course curriculum, and both groups provided recommendations for the 2012 program. The design, implementation, and evaluation of this initial discussion group component of the Principles course are described herein. The findings in this report will not only inform future discussion group sessions in the Principles course but may also be useful to others planning to incorporate group learning into large primarily lecture-based courses.

  9. Enhancing a Cancer Prevention and Control Curriculum through Interactive Group Discussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsythe, L.P.; Gadalla, S.M.; Hamilton, J.G.; Heckman-Stoddard, B.M.; Kent, E.E.; Lai, G.Y.; Lin, S.W.; Luhn, P.; Faupel-Badger, J.M.

    2012-01-01

    The Principles and Practice of Cancer Prevention and Control course (Principles course) is offered annually by the National Cancer Institute Cancer Prevention Fellowship Program. This four-week post-graduate course covers the spectrum of cancer prevention and control research (e.g. epidemiology, laboratory, clinical, social, and behavioral sciences) and is open to attendees from medical, academic, government, and related institutions across the world. In this report, we describe a new addition to the Principles course syllabus, which was exclusively a lecture-based format for over 20 years. In 2011, Cancer Prevention Fellows and staff designed and implemented small group discussion sessions as part of the curriculum. The goals of these sessions were to foster an interactive environment, discuss concepts presented during the Principles course, exchange ideas, and enhance networking amongst the course participants, and provide a teaching and leadership opportunity to current Cancer Prevention Fellows. Overall, both the participants and facilitators who returned the evaluation forms (n=61/87, and 8/10, respectively), reported high satisfaction with the experience for providing both an opportunity to explore course concepts in greater detail and to network with colleagues. Participants (93%) and facilitators (100%) stated they would like to see this component remain a part of the Principles course curriculum, and both groups provided recommendations for the 2012 program. The design, implementation, and evaluation of this initial discussion group component of the Principles course are described herein. The findings in this report will not only inform future discussion group sessions in the Principles course but may also be useful to others planning to incorporate group learning into large primarily lecture-based courses. PMID:22661264

  10. A comparison group analysis of DOE`s Energy-Related Inventions Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, M.A.; Curlee, T.R.; Elliott, S.R.; Franchuk, C.A.

    1993-06-01

    Over the past decade, Oak Ridge National Laboratory has conducted four evaluations of the economic impacts of the US DOE`s Energy-Related Inventions Program (ERIP). None of these evaluations has involved the use of a comparison group. Instead, statistics on the innovation process have been compiled from a review of the literature. Unfortunately, the types of technologies and inventors documents by previous studies do not match those supported by the Energy-Related Inventions Program. ERIP-supported technologies are diverse in both application and technical complexity. ERIP-supported inventors are a particular subset of inventors: the Program targets inventors who are either independently employed or are employees of a small business. The purpose of this task is to identify and characterize a matched comparison group of inventors whose progress can be compared with the progress of ERIP inventors. With this comparison group, we will be able to assess more accurately the impact of the ERIP support and thereby strengthen the program`s impact evaluations. This report is divided into six sections. As background to understanding the comparison group design and the results provided in this report, section 1.3 provides an overview of the Energy-Related Inventions Program. Section 2 describes the research design used to define and characterize a suitable comparison group. Section 3 presents comparative statistics describing both the comparison group and the ERIP technologies. Section 4 is more qualitative in nature; it describes four technologies in the comparison group that were commercially successful, focusing on how they succeeded in the absence of DOE/ERIP support. The report ends with a summary of its findings (section 5) and a list of references (section 6).

  11. Culture-specific programs for children and adults from minority groups who have asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCallum, Gabrielle B; Morris, Peter S; Brown, Ngiare; Chang, Anne B

    2017-08-22

    studies ranged from very low to low. For our primary outcome (asthma exacerbations during follow-up), the quality of evidence was low for all outcomes. In adults, use of a culture-specific programme, compared to generic programmes or usual care did not significantly reduce the number of participants from two studies with 294 participants for: exacerbations with one or more exacerbations during follow-up (odds ratio (OR) 0.80, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.50 to 1.26), hospitalisations over 12 months (OR 0.83, 95% CI 0.31 to 2.22) and exacerbations requiring oral corticosteroids (OR 0.97, 95% CI 0.55 to 1.73). However, use of a culture-specific programme, improved asthma quality of life scores in 280 adults from two studies (mean difference (MD) 0.26, 95% CI 0.17 to 0.36) (although the MD was less then the minimal important difference for the score). In children, use of a culture-specific programme was superior to generic programmes or usual care in reducing severe asthma exacerbations requiring hospitalisation in two studies with 305 children (rate ratio 0.48, 95% CI 0.24 to 0.95), asthma control in one study with 62 children and QoL in three studies with 213 children, but not for the number of exacerbations during follow-up (OR 1.55, 95% CI 0.66 to 3.66) or the number of exacerbations (MD 0.18, 95% CI -0.25 to 0.62) among 100 children from two studies. The available evidence showed that culture-specific education programmes for adults and children from minority groups are likely effective in improving asthma-related outcomes. This review was limited by few studies and evidence of very low to low quality. Not all asthma-related outcomes improved with culture-specific programs for both adults and children. Nevertheless, while modified culture-specific education programs are usually more time intensive, the findings of this review suggest using culture-specific asthma education programmes for children and adults from minority groups. However, more robust RCTs are needed to

  12. Cognitive-behavioral group therapy versus group psychotherapy for social anxiety disorder among college students: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjornsson, Andri S; Bidwell, L Cinnamon; Brosse, Alisha L; Carey, Gregory; Hauser, Monika; Mackiewicz Seghete, Kristen L; Schulz-Heik, R Jay; Weatherley, Donald; Erwin, Brigette A; Craighead, W Edward

    2011-11-01

    In this randomized controlled trial, cognitive-behavioral group therapy (CBGT) for social anxiety disorder (SAD) was compared to group psychotherapy (GPT), a credible, structurally equivalent control condition that included only nonspecific factors of group treatment (such as group dynamics). Participants were 45 college students at the University of Colorado with a primary diagnosis of SAD. Each treatment condition comprised eight group sessions lasting 2 hr each. Independent assessors (blind to treatment assignment) assessed participants at baseline and posttreatment with the Clinical Global Impression Scale (CGI) and the Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale (LSAS). Both treatments were found to be equally credible. There were five noncompleters in the CBGT condition (21.7%) and only one in the GPT condition (4.3%). There were no statistically significant differences posttreatment (controlling for pretreatment scores) between the two treatment conditions, and both treatments were found to be efficacious. Effect sizes for CBGT were similar to earlier studies, and adherence ratings revealed excellent adherence. Treatment of SAD appears to be moving toward individual CBT, partly because of high attrition rates and underutilization of group dynamics in group CBT. However, group therapy has unique therapeutic ingredients, and it may be too early to give up on group treatment altogether. Discussion of these findings included future directions with this treatment modality, especially whether these two types of group treatment could be combined and whether such combination might serve to decrease attrition, enhance efficacy, and facilitate dissemination. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Controlling Cocaine. Supply Versus Demand Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    Santa Monica, CA: RAND. Haaga, John G., and Elizabeth A. McGlynn (1993), The DrugAbuse Treatment System: Prospects for Reform, MR-226-DRPC, Santa...Prevalence, Los Angeles, CA: UCLA DrugAbuse Research Group. Homer, Jack B. (1993a), "A System Dynamics Model for Cocaine Prevalence Estimation and Trend

  14. Learner-control vs. program-control instructional multimedia: a comparison of two interactions when teaching principles of orthodontic appliances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aly, M; Elen, J; Willems, G

    2005-11-01

    Many studies have compared computer assisted learning (CAL) to more traditional learning formats and have shown CAL to be as effective as or superior to the alternative resources. However, there are only scarce attempts to show which style of CAL leads to the best learning outcomes in orthodontics. To compare the effectiveness of a learner-control (group A) vs. program-control (group B) multimedia learning environment courseware packages regarding knowledge, understanding and transfer of content when applied to teaching principles of orthodontic appliances to undergraduate students. Pre- and post-test assessments of undergraduate dental students (n = 30) who either studied a learner-control multimedia learning environment courseware package (n = 15) or a program-control version (n = 15) on equivalent material of the orthodontic appliances curriculum. Both groups were evaluated by means of multiple-choice questions covering knowledge, understanding and application. A one-way ANOVA was carried out in order to check for statistical difference between the two groups. The P-value was set at 0.05. There was no difference in prior knowledge between both groups at baseline. Although, both groups significantly improved their scores after having studied the course, no significant difference was found between both groups in relation to answers to questions about knowledge, understanding and application. In this study, the learner-control instructional multimedia program was found to be as effective as the program-control version when teaching principles of the orthodontic appliances to undergraduate students. The focus needs to be on improving the value of CAL. Comparative evaluations of how different CAL approaches compare with or complement one another are certainly needed.

  15. Pilot Mentorship Program for Tobacco Control Researchers | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    It will do so by offering expanded capacity-building opportunities for tobacco control researchers through a parallel mentorship program. Research for International Tobacco Control (RITC) has identified an initial cadre of awardees who possess excellent tobacco control leadership potential. The idea is to enhance the ...

  16. Formative Evaluation of a University Birth Control Education Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huettman, Julie K. Doidge; Sarvela, Paul D.

    1992-01-01

    A university birth control education program was created to improve student knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors. Students attended a birth control class before visiting the health clinic for prescriptions. Pre- and posttest questionnaires and clinician assessments indicated knowledge of birth control improved significantly, and students became…

  17. [Effects of Group Counseling Program Based on Goal Attainment Theory for Middle School Students with Emotional and Behavioral Problems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, In Ju; Kim, Soo Jin

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a group counseling program based on goal attainment theory on self-esteem, interpersonal relationships, and school adjustment of middle school students with emotional and behavioral problems. Forty-four middle school students with emotional and behavioral problems (22 in the experimental group and 22 in the control group) from G city participated in this study. Data were collected from July 30 to September 24, 2015. The experimental group received the 8-session program, scheduled once a week, with each session lasting 45 minutes. Outcome variables included self-esteem, interpersonal relationship, and school adjustment. There were significant increases for self-esteem (t=3.69, p=.001), interpersonal relationship (t=8.88, ptheory is very effective in increasing self-esteem, interpersonal relationship, and school adjustment for middle school students with emotional and behavioral problems. Therefore, it is recommended that the group counseling program based on goal attainment theory be used as an effective psychiatric nursing intervention for mental health promotion and the prevention of mental illness in adolescents.

  18. Impact of a Healthy Nails Program on Nail-Biting in Turkish Schoolchildren: A Controlled Pretest-Posttest Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ergun, Ayse; Toprak, Rumeysa; Sisman, Fatma Nevin

    2013-01-01

    This study was conducted to examine the effect of a healthy nails program on nail-biting in Turkish schoolchildren. This quasi-experimental study was of pretest-posttest control group design. A total of 50 students of a primary school formed the intervention group, while 53 students from the same school formed the control group. Data were…

  19. Resocialisation program “Miriam” as a Christian subculture group in female prison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Losane R.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper aims to study the similarities and differences between small or informal groups in prison subculture and re-socialization program “Miriam”, which is created as a different cultural space in female prison. The dominating norms in the small groups in prison subculture the values, artefact, leader, table culture, and a sense of space and time strengthens the convicted person's criminal identity. Under the program “Miriam”, which also has elements of prisoner small group subculture, women are offered to learn about different cultural and artistic values together with fundamental Christianity values by program leaders – well-known people from Art and Culture area. With this kind of approach different cultural space is created in prison opposite to the prisoner subculture. And this creates favourable conditions for transformation of the convicted person's point of view.

  20. Ongoing quality control in digital radiography: Report of AAPM Imaging Physics Committee Task Group 151

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, A. Kyle, E-mail: kyle.jones@mdanderson.org; Geiser, William [Department of Imaging Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Heintz, Philip [Department of Radiology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87104 (United States); Goldman, Lee [Hartford Hospital, Hartford, Connecticut 06102 (United States); Jerjian, Khachig [Hoag Memorial Hospital, Newport Beach, California 92658 (United States); Martin, Melissa [Therapy Physics, Inc., Gardena, California 90248 (United States); Peck, Donald [Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan 48202 (United States); Pfeiffer, Douglas [Boulder Community Foothills Hospital, Boulder, Colorado 80303 (United States); Ranger, Nicole [Landauer, Inc., Glenwood, Illinois 60425 (United States); Yorkston, John [Carestream Health, Inc., Rochester, New York 14615 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Quality control (QC) in medical imaging is an ongoing process and not just a series of infrequent evaluations of medical imaging equipment. The QC process involves designing and implementing a QC program, collecting and analyzing data, investigating results that are outside the acceptance levels for the QC program, and taking corrective action to bring these results back to an acceptable level. The QC process involves key personnel in the imaging department, including the radiologist, radiologic technologist, and the qualified medical physicist (QMP). The QMP performs detailed equipment evaluations and helps with oversight of the QC program, the radiologic technologist is responsible for the day-to-day operation of the QC program. The continued need for ongoing QC in digital radiography has been highlighted in the scientific literature. The charge of this task group was to recommend consistency tests designed to be performed by a medical physicist or a radiologic technologist under the direction of a medical physicist to identify problems with an imaging system that need further evaluation by a medical physicist, including a fault tree to define actions that need to be taken when certain fault conditions are identified. The focus of this final report is the ongoing QC process, including rejected image analysis, exposure analysis, and artifact identification. These QC tasks are vital for the optimal operation of a department performing digital radiography.

  1. Impact of a self-control promotion program on nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grima-Ruiz de Angulo, Lidia

    2017-06-01

    To describe the characteristics of positive mental health in nursing students, and to determine the impact of a self-control promotion program. A quasi-experimental controlled trial including 72 second-year of Vitoria-Gasteiz University Nursing School. The lowest scores in every measurement were for the self-control factor (F3). There were no statistically significant differences in self-control (F3) between the groups. This program shows higher scores in inter-personal relationship skills. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Internet based self-help therapy versus waitlist control group for persons with anxiety disorders: A randomised feasibility study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenger, Morten Munthe; Lindschou, Jane; Gluud, Christian

    ) FearFighter or B) waitlist control group. Participants are persons with a diagnosis of social phobia, agora phobia, phobia or panic disorder. The intervention with FearFighter is a nine step cognitive behavioural self-help therapy program delivered over the internet over nine weeks. Participants...

  3. Hanford Site Guide for Preparing and Maintaining Fenerator Group Pollution Prevention Program Documentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PLACE, B.G.

    1999-11-01

    This document provides guidance to generator groups for preparing and maintaining documentation of Pollution Prevention/Waste Minimization (P2/WMin) Program activities. The guidance is one of a hierarchical series that includes the Hanford Site Waste Minimization and Pollution Prevention Awareness Program Plan (DOE-RL, 1998a) and Prime Contractor implementation plans describing programs required by Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) 3002(b) and (300501) (RCRA and EPA, 1994). Documentation guidance for the following five P2/WMin elements are discussed: Fiscal Year (FY) Goals; Budget and Staffing; Waste Minimization (WMinn ) Assessments (WMAs); Pollution Prevention (P2) Reporting; WMin Certification.

  4. Tank waste remediation system heat stress control program report, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carls, D.R.

    1995-09-28

    Protecting employees from heat stress within tank farms during the summer months is challenging. Work constraints typically experienced in tank farms complicate the measures taken to protect employees from heat stress. TWRS-Industrial Hygiene (IH) has endeavored to control heat stress injuries by anticipating, recognizing, evaluating and controlling the factors which lead or contribute to heat stress in Tank Farms. The TWRS Heat Stress Control Program covers such areas as: employee and PIC training, communication of daily heat stress alerts to tank farm personnel, setting work/rest regimens, and the use of engineering and personal protective controls when applicable. The program has increased worker awareness of heat stress and prevention, established provisions for worker rest periods, increased drinking water availability to help ensure worker hydration, and allowed for the increased use of other protective controls to combat heat stress. The TWRS Heat Stress Control Program is the cornerstone for controlling heat stress among tank farm employees. The program has made great strides since it`s inception during the summer of 1994. Some improvements can still be made to enhance the program for the summer of 1996, such as: (1) procurement and use of personal heat stress monitoring equipment to ensure appropriate application of administrative controls, (2) decrease the need for use of containment tents and anti-contamination clothing, and (3) providing a wider variety of engineering and personal protective controls for heat stress prevention

  5. Efektifitas Penerapan Program Penanganan Turnover Karyawan Staf Manajemen PT. BEHAESTEX Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratna Juita

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research are to recognize turnover management program implementation effectiveness of management staffs of PT. BEHAESTEX Group and know the causes aspect the employee who leave out then program that given is the target precise. This research used qualitative method with qualitative descriptive research type. Information digging by in depth interview, observation, and documentation taken from HRD data. Research subjects as 18 respondents obtained from staff employee who already terminated from PT. BEHAESTEX Group since 2010 until 2012 and represented each department. The result of the research indicates that effective turnover management program only one program that is employee training. While three other programs that are induction and orientation, coaching and counseling, building and brainstorming ineffective. The causes are the aim does not appropriate, human resources development qualification as program implementer is lack of competence and inconsistency program implementation. Beside found that the causes aspect which result employee terminated could be classified with work term under two years namely unable to adjustment with corporate culture, high idealism and accepted as civil servant. While work term over two years the causes are injustice pay, superior mind pattern still departmental and career stage is unobvious.

  6. Evaluation of Nosocomial Infection Control Programs in health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menegueti, Mayra Gonçalves; Canini, Silvia Rita Marin da Silva; Bellissimo-Rodrigues, Fernando; Laus, Ana Maria

    2015-01-01

    to evaluate the Nosocomial Infection Control Programs in hospital institutions regarding structure and process indicators. this is a descriptive, exploratory and quantitative study conducted in 2013. The study population comprised 13 Nosocomial Infection Control Programs of health services in a Brazilian city of the state of São Paulo. Public domain instruments available in the Manual of Evaluation Indicators of Nosocomial Infection Control Practices were used. The indicators with the highest average compliance were "Evaluation of the Structure of the Nosocomial Infection Control Programs" (75%) and "Evaluation of the Epidemiological Surveillance System of Nosocomial Infection" (82%) and those with the lowest mean compliance scores were "Evaluation of Operational Guidelines" (58.97%) and "Evaluation of Activities of Control and Prevention of Nosocomial Infection" (60.29%). The use of indicators identified that, despite having produced knowledge about prevention and control of nosocomial infections, there is still a large gap between the practice and the recommendations.

  7. A comparison group analysis of DOE's Energy-Related Inventions Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, M.A.; Curlee, T.R.; Elliott, S.R.; Franchuk, C.A.

    1993-06-01

    Over the past decade, Oak Ridge National Laboratory has conducted four evaluations of the economic impacts of the US DOE's Energy-Related Inventions Program (ERIP). None of these evaluations has involved the use of a comparison group. Instead, statistics on the innovation process have been compiled from a review of the literature. Unfortunately, the types of technologies and inventors documents by previous studies do not match those supported by the Energy-Related Inventions Program. ERIP-supported technologies are diverse in both application and technical complexity. ERIP-supported inventors are a particular subset of inventors: the Program targets inventors who are either independently employed or are employees of a small business. The purpose of this task is to identify and characterize a matched comparison group of inventors whose progress can be compared with the progress of ERIP inventors. With this comparison group, we will be able to assess more accurately the impact of the ERIP support and thereby strengthen the program's impact evaluations. This report is divided into six sections. As background to understanding the comparison group design and the results provided in this report, section 1.3 provides an overview of the Energy-Related Inventions Program. Section 2 describes the research design used to define and characterize a suitable comparison group. Section 3 presents comparative statistics describing both the comparison group and the ERIP technologies. Section 4 is more qualitative in nature; it describes four technologies in the comparison group that were commercially successful, focusing on how they succeeded in the absence of DOE/ERIP support. The report ends with a summary of its findings (section 5) and a list of references (section 6).

  8. The first decade of the Massachusetts Tobacco Control Program.

    OpenAIRE

    Koh, Howard K.; Judge, Christine M.; Robbins, Harriet; Celebucki, Carolyn Cobb; Walker, Deborah K.; Connolly, Gregory N

    2005-01-01

    This article provides a comprehensive overview of the first decade of the Massachusetts Tobacco Control Program (MTCP). Born after Massachusetts passed a 1992 ballot initiative raising cigarette excise taxes to fund the program, MTCP greatly reduced statewide cigarette consumption before being reduced to a skeletal state by funding cuts. The article describes the program's components and goals, details outcomes, presents a summary of policy accomplishments, and reviews the present status of M...

  9. Programs for control of congenital toxoplasmosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes-Mori, Fabiana Maria Ruiz; Mitsuka-Breganó, Regina; Capobiango, Jaqueline Dario; Inoue, Inácio Teruo; Reiche, Edna Maria Vissoci; Morimoto, Helena Kaminami; Casella, Antônio Marcelo Barbante; Bittencourt, Laura Helena França de Barros; Freire, Roberta Lemos; Navarro, Italmar Teodorico

    2011-01-01

    Congenital toxoplasmosis can cause miscarriage and neurological and/or eye damage to the fetus. Since Austria and France established the prenatal screening, the prevalence of toxoplasmosis has declined from 50% to 35% and 84% to 44%, respectively. Other countries, such as the United Kingdom, have educational practices to reduce the risk of infection in seronegative pregnant women. In Brazil, prenatal screening is carried out in the states of Mato Grosso do Sul and Minas Gerais and the cities of Curitiba and Porto Alegre. In Londrina, state of Parana, the "Health Surveillance Program for Toxoplasmosis Acquired during Pregnancy and Congenital Toxoplasmosis" was established, which is based on serological screening, advising on prevention measures and quarterly serological monitoring in pregnant women that are initially seronegative, in addition to the monitoring of pregnant women and children with acute infection and case notification. In the first four years of implementation, the program evaluation showed a 63% reduction in the number of pregnant women and 42% in the number of children referred to reference services, resulting in the opening of vacancies for the care of patients with other diseases. As for medications, there was a 62% reduction in consumption of folic acid and 67% of sulfadiazine. Moreover, the definition of the protocols resulted in the standardization of care and safety for the decision-making by physicians. Therefore, as there are several protocols individualized in various departments and regions, the establishment of an ideal, consensual conduct with technical support, will result in implementing measures that will certainly save public resources, with the decrease in congenital toxoplasmosis.

  10. A Formal Verification Methodology for DDD Mode Pacemaker Control Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sana Shuja

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pacemakers are safety-critical devices whose faulty behaviors can cause harm or even death. Often these faulty behaviors are caused due to bugs in programs used for digital control of pacemakers. We present a formal verification methodology that can be used to check the correctness of object code programs that implement the safety-critical control functions of DDD mode pacemakers. Our methodology is based on the theory of Well-Founded Equivalence Bisimulation (WEB refinement, where both formal specifications and implementation are treated as transition systems. We develop a simple and general formal specification for DDD mode pacemakers. We also develop correctness proof obligations that can be applied to validate object code programs used for pacemaker control. Using our methodology, we were able to verify a control program with millions of transitions against the simple specification with only 10 transitions. Our method also found several bugs during the verification process.

  11. Aquatic Plant Control Research Program. Volume A-00-1

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kirk, James

    2000-01-01

    ... at the Waterways Experiment Station. It is principally intended to be a forum whereby information pertaining to and resulting from the Corps of Engineers' nationwide Aquatic Plant Control Research Program (APCRP...

  12. Adipocyte lipid synthesis coupled to neuronal control of thermogenic programming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adilson Guilherme

    2017-08-01

    Conclusions: These results demonstrate that downregulation of fatty acid synthesis via FASN depletion in white adipocytes of mature mice can stimulate neuronal signaling to control thermogenic programming in iWAT.

  13. Derivation of sequential, real-time, process-control programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzullo, Keith; Schneider, Fred B.; Budhiraja, Navin

    1991-01-01

    The use of weakest-precondition predicate transformers in the derivation of sequential, process-control software is discussed. Only one extension to Dijkstra's calculus for deriving ordinary sequential programs was found to be necessary: function-valued auxiliary variables. These auxiliary variables are needed for reasoning about states of a physical process that exists during program transitions.

  14. Food and Nutrition Services Quality Control Management Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wimsatt-Fraim, Teresa S.

    A program was conducted to improve the quality of food service through the training of 44 food and nutrition service employees in a 200-bed hospital. A 12-week quality control program was implemented to address four key areas: food temperatures, food accuracy, food quality, and dietary personnel. Learning strategies, emphasizing critical thinking…

  15. Using telepsychology to provide a group parenting program: A preliminary evaluation of effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, Robert J; Slone, Norah C; Soares, Neelkamal; Sprang, Rob

    2015-08-01

    Telepsychology offers the potential to reach rural and underserved children and families with mental health concerns. The current study evaluated the effects of using videoconferencing technology to deliver an evidence-based parenting program, the Group Triple P Positive Parenting Program (Group Triple P; Turner, Markie-Dadds, & Sanders, 2002), with families who had a child experiencing behavioral problems. Using a pre/post design, families (N = 13) from low socioeconomic backgrounds in Kentucky completed the Group Triple P via a videoconferencing delivery format. A benchmarking strategy (Weersing & Hamilton, 2005) indicated that treatment effect sizes for the videoconferencing format were generally comparable to treatment effect sizes for Group Triple P studies conducted in-person. Specifically, child behavior and parenting outcomes were similar across delivery formats. Implications of the study's findings and future directions for telepsychology research and practice with underserved families and children are discussed. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  16. Treatment of posttraumatic stress disorder in postwar Kosovar adolescents using mind-body skills groups: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, James S; Staples, Julie K; Blyta, Afrim; Bytyqi, Murat; Wilson, Amy T

    2008-09-01

    To determine whether participation in a mind-body skills group program based on psychological self-care, mind-body techniques, and self-expression decreases symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Eighty-two adolescents meeting criteria for PTSD according to the Harvard Trauma Questionnaire (which corresponds with 16 of the 17 diagnostic criteria for PTSD in DSM-IV) were randomly assigned to a 12-session mind-body group program or a wait-list control group. The program was conducted by high school teachers in consultation with psychiatrists and psychologists and included meditation, guided imagery, and breathing techniques; self-expression through words, drawings, and movement; autogenic training and biofeedback; and genograms. Changes in PTSD symptoms were measured using the Harvard Trauma Questionnaire. The study was conducted from September 2004 to May 2005 by The Center for Mind-Body Medicine at a high school in the Suhareka region of Kosovo. Students in the immediate intervention group had significantly lower PTSD symptom scores following the intervention than those in the wait-list control group (F = 29.8, df = 1,76; p < .001). Preintervention and postintervention scores (mean [SD]) for the intervention group were 2.5 (0.3) and 2.0 (0.3), respectively, and for the control group, 2.5 (0.3) and 2.4 (0.4), respectively. The decreased PTSD symptom scores were maintained in the initial intervention group at 3-month follow-up. After the wait-list control group received the intervention, there was a significant decrease (p < .001) in PTSD symptom scores compared to the preintervention scores. Mind-body skills groups can reduce PTSD symptoms in war-traumatized high school students and can be effectively led by trained and supervised schoolteachers. Copyright 2008 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  17. The aircraft energy efficiency active controls technology program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, R. V., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Broad outlines of the NASA Aircraft Energy Efficiency Program for expediting the application of active controls technology to civil transport aircraft are presented. Advances in propulsion and airframe technology to cut down on fuel consumption and fuel costs, a program for an energy-efficient transport, and integrated analysis and design technology in aerodynamics, structures, and active controls are envisaged. Fault-tolerant computer systems and fault-tolerant flight control system architectures are under study. Contracts with leading manufacturers for research and development work on wing-tip extensions and winglets for the B-747, a wing load alleviation system, elastic mode suppression, maneuver-load control, and gust alleviation are mentioned.

  18. Evaluation of a women group led health communication program in Haryana, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Manmeet; Jaswal, Nidhi; Saddi, Anil Kumar

    2017-12-01

    Sakshar Mahila Smooh (SMS) program was launched in rural areas of Haryana in India during 2008. A total of 6788 SMSs, each having 5-10 literate women, were equipped to enhance health communication. We carried out process evaluation of this program as an external agency. After a review of program documents, a random sample survey of Auxiliary Nurse Midwives (ANMs), SMS members, and village women was conducted. Out of four divisions of the state, one was randomly chosen, which had five districts. From 330 randomly chosen villages, 283 ANMs, 1164 SMS members, and 1123 village women were interviewed using a semi- structured interview schedule. Program inputs, processes, and outputs were compared in the five districts. Chi square was used for significance test. In the sampled division, out of 2009 villages, 1732 (86%) had functional SMS. In three years, SMS conducted 15036 group meetings, 2795 rallies, 2048 wall writings, and 803 competitions, and 44.5% of allocated budget was utilized. Most ANMs opined that SMSs are better health communicators. SMS members were aware about their roles and responsibilities. Majority of village women reported that SMS carry out useful health education activities. The characteristics of SMS members were similar but program performance was better in districts where health managers were proactive in program planning and monitoring. SMS Program has communicated health messages to majority of rural population, however, better planning & monitoring can improve program performance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Effects of a group circuit progressive resistance training program compared with a treadmill training program for adolescents with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aviram, Ronit; Harries, Netta; Namourah, Ibtisam; Amro, Akram; Bar-Haim, Simona

    2017-08-01

    To determine whether goal-directed group circuit progressive resistance exercise training (GT) can improve motor function in adolescents with cerebral palsy (CP) and to compare outcomes with a treadmill training (TT) intervention. In a multi-centered matched pairs study, 95 adolescents with spastic CP (GMFCS II-III) were allocated to GT or TT interventions for 30 bi-weekly one hour training. Outcome measures of GMFM-66, GMFM-D%, GMFM-E%, TUG, 10 meter walk test (10 MWT), and 6 minute walk test (6 MWT) were made at baseline (T1), after interventions (T2) and 6 months post training (T3). Both training programs induced significant improvement in all outcome measures (T2-T1) that were mostly retained at T3. At the end of the intervention, the GT group showed an advantage in all measured changes compared to the TT group and in percentage changes. Differences were significant (p programs were effective in improving motor function in adolescents with cerebral palsy. The GT program had generally greater benefits based on the functional measures.

  20. Quality control program: the radiology technician approach

    OpenAIRE

    Helga Alexandra Soares Macedo; Vitor Manuel Costa Pereira Rodrigues

    2009-01-01

    OBJETIVO: Pretendeu-se averiguar que importância os técnicos de radiologia atribuem à implementação de um programa de controle de qualidade em radiologia, e conhecer a importância da existência de critérios de proteção. MATERIAIS E MÉTODOS: Estudo descritivo e transversal. Os dados foram recolhidos por meio de um questionário (quatro partes), tendo sido garantido o anonimato e a confidencialidade dos dados. Participaram neste estudo 48 técnicos de radiologia que exercem funções em instituiçõe...

  1. Distribution automation and control support; Analysis and interpretation of DAC working group results for use in project planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klock, P.; Evans, D.

    1979-01-01

    The Executive Summary and Proceedings of the Working Group Meeting was analyzed to identify specific projects appropriate for Distribution Automation and Control DAC RD&D. Specific projects that should be undertaken in the DAC RD&D program were recommended. The projects are presented under broad categories of work selected based on ESC's interpretation of the results of the Working Group Meeting. Some of the projects are noted as utility industry projects. The ESC recommendations regarding program management are presented. Utility versus Government management responsibilities are noted.

  2. Tuberculosis control program in the municipal context: performance evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakawa, Tiemi; Magnabosco, Gabriela Tavares; Andrade, Rubia Laine de Paula; Brunello, Maria Eugenia Firmino; Monroe, Aline Aparecida; Ruffino-Netto, Antonio; Scatena, Lucia Marina; Villa, Tereza Cristina Scatena

    2017-03-30

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the performance of the Tuberculosis Control Program in municipalities of the State of São Paulo. This is a program evaluation research, with ecological design, which uses three non-hierarchical groups of the municipalities of the State of São Paulo according to their performance in relation to operational indicators. We have selected 195 municipalities with at least five new cases of tuberculosis notified in the Notification System of the State of São Paulo and with 20,000 inhabitants or more in 2010. The multiple correspondence analysis was used to identify the association between the groups of different performances, the epidemiological and demographic characteristics, and the characteristics of the health systems of the municipalities. The group with the worst performance showed the highest rates of abandonment (average [avg] = 10.4, standard deviation [sd] = 9.4) and the lowest rates of supervision of Directly Observed Treatment (avg = 6.1, sd = 12.9), and it was associated with low incidence of tuberculosis, high tuberculosis and HIV, small population, high coverage of the Family Health Strategy/Program of Community Health Agents, and being located on the countryside. The group with the best performance presented the highest cure rate (avg = 83.7, sd = 10.5) and the highest rate of cases in Directly Observed Treatment (avg = 83.0, sd = 12.7); the group of regular performance showed regular results for outcome (avg cure = 79.8, sd = 13.2; abandonment avg = 9.5, sd = 8.3) and supervision of the Directly Observed Treatment (avg = 42.8, sd = 18.8). Large population, low coverage of the Family Health Strategy/Program of Community Health Agents, high incidence of tuberculosis and AIDS, and being located on the coast and in metropolitan areas were associated with these groups. The findings highlight the importance of the Directly Observed Treatment in relation to the outcome for treatment and raise reflections on the

  3. The first decade of the Massachusetts Tobacco Control Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Howard K; Judge, Christine M; Robbins, Harriet; Celebucki, Carolyn Cobb; Walker, Deborah K; Connolly, Gregory N

    2005-01-01

    This article provides a comprehensive overview of the first decade of the Massachusetts Tobacco Control Program (MTCP). Born after Massachusetts passed a 1992 ballot initiative raising cigarette excise taxes to fund the program, MTCP greatly reduced statewide cigarette consumption before being reduced to a skeletal state by funding cuts. The article describes the program's components and goals, details outcomes, presents a summary of policy accomplishments, and reviews the present status of MTCP in the current climate of national and state fiscal crises. The first decade of the MTCP offers many lessons learned for the future of tobacco control.

  4. Effectiveness of a Group-Based Program for Parents of Children with Dyslexia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Multhauf, Bettina; Buschmann, Anke; Soellner, Renate

    2016-01-01

    Parents of children with dyslexia experience more parenting stress and depressive symptoms than other parents. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of a cognitive-behavioral group-based program for parents of dyslexic children on parenting stress levels, parent-child homework interactions and parental competencies. 39 children…

  5. Secret Message Decryption: Group Consulting Projects Using Matrices and Linear Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurski, Katharine F.

    2009-01-01

    We describe two short group projects for finite mathematics students that incorporate matrices and linear programming into fictional consulting requests presented as a letter to the students. The students are required to use mathematics to decrypt secret messages in one project involving matrix multiplication and inversion. The second project…

  6. Urban Stormwater Runoff. Instructor Guide. Working for Clean Water: An Information Program for Advisory Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simko, Robert A.

    Urban stormwater runoff collects pollutants from many parts of a city and is an important consideration in water quality planning. Presented is an instructor's guide for a learning session covering various aspects of urban runoff including pollutant sources, management practices, and regulatory programs. Intended for citizen advisory groups, this…

  7. Effectiveness of a Universal, Interdependent Group Contingency Program on Children's Academic Achievement: A Countywide Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weis, Robert; Osborne, Karen J.; Dean, Emily L.

    2015-01-01

    The Good Behavior Game (GBG) is a universal prevention program designed to increase academic engagement and to decrease disruptive behavior in elementary school-age children. Teachers and other school personnel use interdependent group contingencies to improve students' behavior in the classroom. Previous research indicates the GBG is efficacious…

  8. An Education-Support-Group Program for Visually Impaired People with Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caditz, J.

    1992-01-01

    This article describes the Diabetes Education/Support Group Program for people with diabetes and visual impairment. It analyzes some of the common problems that participants have reported (such as fear of insulin reactions and of long-term complications) and discusses methods of reducing anxiety and depression related to the two conditions.…

  9. 76 FR 75458 - Servicemembers' Group Life Insurance Traumatic Injury Protection Program-Genitourinary Losses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-02

    ... governing the Servicemembers' Group Life Insurance Traumatic Injury Protection (TSGLI) program by adding certain genitourinary (GU) system losses to the TSGLI Schedule of Losses and defining terms relevant to... Servicemembers TSGLI benefits. The intended effect is to expand the list of losses for which TSGLI payments can...

  10. 77 FR 32397 - Servicemembers' Group Life Insurance Traumatic Injury Protection Program-Genitourinary Losses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    ... Servicemembers' Group Life Insurance Traumatic Injury Protection (TSGLI) program by adding certain genitourinary (GU) system losses to the TSGLI Schedule of Losses and defining terms relevant to these new losses. This amendment is necessary to make qualifying GU losses a basis for paying TSGLI benefits to...

  11. The Implementation of Maternity Group Home Programs: Serving Pregnant and Parenting Teens in a Residential Setting.

    OpenAIRE

    Lara K. Hulsey; Robert G. Wood; Anu Rangarajan

    2005-01-01

    Maternity group homes offer an innovative and intensive approach to addressing the needs of an extremely vulnerable population—teenage mothers and their children who have no other suitable place to live. This report documents the implementation of such programs in seven states. Issues discussed include management, funding, target populations, services, staffing, and costs.

  12. Interpersonal Process Group Counseling for Educationally Marginalized Youth: The MAGNIFY Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slaten, Christopher D.; Elison, Zachary M.

    2015-01-01

    Youth mental health is an area of profound disparity between the demand and supply of services, particularly in schools that serve students at risk of school dropout. This article describes the conceptual foundations and implementation of "MAGNIFY", a program that provides free group counseling to small alternative schools with students…

  13. Qualitative Assessment of Challenges in Tuberculosis Control in West Gojjam Zone, Northwest Ethiopia: Health Workers' and Tuberculosis Control Program Coordinators' Perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Gebreegziabher, Senedu B.; Yimer, Solomon A; Bjune, Gunnar A.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Weak health systems pose many barriers to effective tuberculosis (TB) control. This study aimed at exploring health worker’s and TB control program coordinator’s perspectives on health systems challenges facing TB control in West Gojjam Zone, Amhara Region, Ethiopia. Methods. This was a qualitative descriptive study. Eight in-depth interviews with TB control program coordinators and two focus group discussions among 16 health workers were conducted. Purposive sampling was used to ...

  14. Teaching family carers about home-based palliative care: final results from a group education program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Peter; Thomas, Tina; Quinn, Karen; Cockayne, Mark; Braithwaite, Maxine

    2009-08-01

    Without the considerable support provided by family carers, many patients receiving palliative care would be unable to remain at home. However, family carers typically lack the required information and skills to prepare them for such a role. Pilot work has demonstrated that group education programs for family carers can be readily developed; they are feasible, accessible, and useful. This project sought to build on our pilot research to further examine the effectiveness of a group education program by evaluating the outcomes with a larger number of participants. The program aimed to prepare primary family carers for the role of supporting a relative with advanced, noncurative cancer at home. The psycho-educational program consisted of three consecutive weekly sessions presented in a group format, conducted at six home-based palliative care services across metropolitan and regional Victoria, Australia. The following dependent variables were measured at three time points: carer competence, preparedness, rewards, and information needs. The three time points were: commencement of the program (Time 1), upon completion (Time 2), and two weeks later (Time 3). A total of 156 participants (including the pilot phase) completed Time 1 questionnaires and 96 completed all three time periods (62%). Between Time 1 and Time 2, the intervention had a statistically significant positive effect on preparedness, competence, rewards, and having informational needs met. Outcomes were maintained at Time 3. There was no difference in the effectiveness of the intervention for participants in regional areas compared to participants in metropolitan areas. This study demonstrated that a group education program to prepare family carers for the role of supporting a dying relative at home was effective. Implications for further research and practice are outlined.

  15. A Review of Economic Evaluations of Tobacco Control Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer W. Kahende

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Each year, an estimated 443,000 people die of smoking-related diseases in the United States. Cigarette smoking results in more than $193 billion in medical costs and productivity losses annually.In an effort to reduce this burden, many states, the federal government, and several national organizations fund tobacco control programs and policies. For this report we reviewed existing literature on economic evaluations of tobacco control interventions. We found that smoking cessation therapies, including nicotine replacement therapy (NRT and self-help are most commonly studied. There are far fewer studies on other important interventions, such as price and tax increases, media campaigns, smoke free air laws and workplace smoking interventions, quitlines, youth access enforcement, school-based programs, and community-based programs. Although there are obvious gaps in the literature, the existing studies show in almost every case that tobacco control programs and policies are either cost-saving or highly cost-effective.

  16. Family leader empowerment program using participatory learning process for dengue vector control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pengvanich, Veerapong

    2011-02-01

    Assess the performance of the empowerment program using participatory learning process for the control of Dengue vector The program focuses on using the leaders of families as the main executer of the vector control protocol. This quasi-experimental research utilized the two-group pretest-posttest design. The sample group consisted of 120 family leaders from two communities in Mueang Municipality, Chachoengsao Province. The research was conducted during an 8-week period between April and June 2010. The data were collected and analyzed based on frequency, percentage, mean, paired t-test, and independent t-test. The result was evaluated by comparing the difference between the mean prevalence index of mosquito larvae before and after the process implementation in terms of the container index (CI) and the house index (HI). After spending eight weeks in the empowerment program, the family leader's behavior in the aspect of Dengue vector control has improved. The Container Index and the House Index were found to decrease with p = 0.05 statistical significance. The reduction of CI and HI suggested that the program worked well in the selected communities. The success of the Dengue vector control program depended on cooperation and participation of many groups, especially the families in the community When the family leaders have good attitude and are capable of carrying out the vector control protocol, the risk factor leading to the incidence of Dengue rims infection can be reduced.

  17. Consensus definitions and application guidelines for control groups in cerebrospinal fluid biomarker studies in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teunissen, Charlotte; Menge, Til; Altintas, Ayse; Álvarez-Cermeño, José C; Bertolotto, Antonio; Berven, Frode S; Brundin, Lou; Comabella, Manuel; Degn, Matilde; Deisenhammer, Florian; Fazekas, Franz; Franciotta, Diego; Frederiksen, Jette L; Galimberti, Daniela; Gnanapavan, Sharmilee; Hegen, Harald; Hemmer, Bernhard; Hintzen, Rogier; Hughes, Steve; Iacobaeus, Ellen; Kroksveen, Ann C; Kuhle, Jens; Richert, John; Tumani, Hayrettin; Villar, Luisa M; Drulovic, Jelena; Dujmovic, Irena; Khalil, Michael; Bartos, Ales

    2013-11-01

    The choice of appropriate control group(s) is critical in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarker research in multiple sclerosis (MS). There is a lack of definitions and nomenclature of different control groups and a rationalized application of different control groups. We here propose consensus definitions and nomenclature for the following groups: healthy controls (HCs), spinal anesthesia subjects (SASs), inflammatory neurological disease controls (INDCs), peripheral inflammatory neurological disease controls (PINDCs), non-inflammatory neurological controls (NINDCs), symptomatic controls (SCs). Furthermore, we discuss the application of these control groups in specific study designs, such as for diagnostic biomarker studies, prognostic biomarker studies and therapeutic response studies. Application of these uniform definitions will lead to better comparability of biomarker studies and optimal use of available resources. This will lead to improved quality of CSF biomarker research in MS and related disorders.

  18. Consensus definitions and application guidelines for control groups in cerebrospinal fluid biomarker studies in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teunissen, Charlotte; Menge, Til; Altintas, Ayse

    2013-01-01

    The choice of appropriate control group(s) is critical in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarker research in multiple sclerosis (MS). There is a lack of definitions and nomenclature of different control groups and a rationalized application of different control groups. We here propose consensus...... definitions and nomenclature for the following groups: healthy controls (HCs), spinal anesthesia subjects (SASs), inflammatory neurological disease controls (INDCs), peripheral inflammatory neurological disease controls (PINDCs), non-inflammatory neurological controls (NINDCs), symptomatic controls (SCs......). Furthermore, we discuss the application of these control groups in specific study designs, such as for diagnostic biomarker studies, prognostic biomarker studies and therapeutic response studies. Application of these uniform definitions will lead to better comparability of biomarker studies and optimal use...

  19. Establishment of seed quality control programs Implantação de programas de controle de qualidade de sementes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Cicero

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available An efficient quality control program should lead to the production of high quality seeds. Consequently, a series of technical and administrative procedures must be adopted in a way that does not compromise this objective. Considering that, in applied terms, external control becomes less important as internal control programs advance technologically, this work emphasizes the principle factors that should be considered in the implantation of a seed quality control program, such as: work groups, physical structure and procedures to initiate the program.Um programa de controle de qualidade deve proporcionar a produção de sementes de alta qualidade. Para que tal objetivo seja alcançado com sucesso, e necessário a adoção de uma serie de procedimentos técnicos e administrativos, sem os quais haverá comprometimento das metas a serem atingidas. Levando-se em conta que, em termos aplicados, o controle externo perde importância na medida que avançam tecnologicamente os programas de controle interno, o presente trabalho aborda os principais fatores que devem ser considerados na implantação de um programa de controle de qualidade de sementes, tais como: equipe de trabalho, estrutura física e procedimentos para iniciar o programa.

  20. Participant perceptions of a mindful movement program for older women with breast cancer: focus group results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane-Okada, Rebecca; Kiger, Holly; Anderson, Nancy L R; Carroll-Johnson, Rose Mary; Sugerman, Fred; Shapiro, Shauna L; Wyman-McGinty, Wendy

    2012-01-01

    Little attention has been directed to the longer-term survivorship phase for older breast cancer survivors (BCSs) who often continue to struggle with late and long-term adverse effects of treatment including lower physical functioning, fear of recurrence, stress and anxiety, neuropathies, and pain. Creative and accessible strategies are needed that offer support to this population of cancer survivors. The purpose of this study was to examine participant perceptions of the effects of a Mindful Movement Program intervention on quality of life and mindfulness through focus groups. This was part of a pilot feasibility study testing the intervention with older women at more than 1 year after treatment for breast cancer. Eight to 9 weeks after completion of 12 weekly, 2-hour mindful movement sessions, focus groups were held with 3 experimental group cohorts of participants who had attended on average 10.4 classes. Focus group interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed using qualitative techniques for recurrent themes. Four themes emerged from the direct quotes of the participants: freedom, rediscovering, body sense in moving, and in the moment. Participants also contributed opinions about program delivery. Participants described how the Mindful Movement Program experience affected their lives. Their feedback indicated that the intervention yielded positive results and was feasible for a variety of older BCSs. Research with a wider group of participants is needed. Preliminary indications are that mindful movement may offer an acceptable strategy for increasing activity and decreasing stress among older BCSs.

  1. Group psychosocial program for enhancing psychological well-being of people with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Petrus; Chan, Winky

    2007-01-01

    Emotional ups and downs are common among people with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) as they live with fears about treatment, pain from the illness and unexpected "flare-ups." The side effects of medications have a severe impact on their self-esteem and lead to psychological distress. This paper reports a study on the impact of a psychosocial group program on the self-esteem and psychosocial functioning of people with SLE. A total of 56 people with SLE were recruited to participate in a 6-week, 2.5-hour weekly session psychosocial group. The group served to equip members with knowledge and skills to cope with SLE and stress arising from the illness, to enhance their self-confidence and develop a positive attitude toward the illness, and to enhance their social support network. The members were assessed before the commencement and during the last session of the groups with Rosenberg's Self-esteem Inventory and General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-30). Results showed that members obtained better scores in self-esteem (p self-esteem and psychosocial functioning of people with SLE after the psychosocial group program. The implications for psychosocial programs for people with SLE are discussed.

  2. Sporting programs for inactive population groups: factors influencing implementation in the organized sports setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooms, Linda; Veenhof, Cindy; Schipper-van Veldhoven, Nicolette; de Bakker, Dinny H

    2015-01-01

    The organized sports sector has received increased attention as a setting to promote health-enhancing physical activity (HEPA) to the general population. For significant public health impact, it is important that successful HEPA programs are widely adopted, implemented and continued as ongoing practice. The importance of evaluating the context in which programs are implemented has been identified as critical. However, little research has focused on understanding the organized sports implementation context, including factors facilitating and impeding implementation. In this study, the main factors influencing implementation of HEPA programs in the organized sports setting were studied. Fourteen sporting programs in the Netherlands aimed at increasing participation in sports by inactive population groups and funded within the National Action Plan for Sport and Exercise (NAPSE) were investigated. The programs were developed by ten Dutch National Sports Federations (NSFs) and implemented by different sports clubs in the Netherlands over a 3-year implementation period (June 2008-June 2011). The qualitative research component involved yearly face-to-face interviews (i.e. fourteen interviews each year, n = 12 program coordinators) and a group meeting with the program coordinators of the NSFs (n = 8). Cross-case comparisons and thematic analyses were performed to identify and categorize important facilitating and impeding factors respectively. The quantitative research component, used to identify the most important facilitating and impeding factors across all sporting programs, consisted of ranking of factors according to importance by the program coordinators (n = 12). Different factors act during six identified (implementation) phases. When comparing factors across phases, several key learnings were evident. Successful implementation relied, for example, on program design and enthusiastic individuals within sporting organizations. On the other hand, inactive

  3. Environmental control program creates nature habitat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharitz, K.N.

    1996-09-01

    Environmental control efforts at a chemical company`s Santa Rosa plant in Milton, Fla., have turned the grounds surrounding the plant into a refuge for wildlife, a home for nature lovers and a laboratory for the University of Florida. The Santa Rosa facility, situated on 2,200 acres of forest lands, produces acrylic fiber. The plant opened in 1958 and its initial wastewater treatment system consisted of a primary treatment lagoon and direct discharge into Escambia Bay, which borders the property. Additional lagoons were added in 1966 and 1977. In 1958, both primary treated domestic and industrial wastewater were discharged into the Bay. As the area`s population grew, the Pensacola Bay system became overloaded, and undesirable levels of carbonaceous, nitrogenous, oxygen-demanding compounds were detected in the Bay. To reduce these materials from the plant`s discharge, wastewaters were characterized and treatment and disposal systems designed and piloted. Strong and weak wastewater streams, each with its own treatment and disposal method, were isolated in 1975. With the new systems in place, discharge quality for five-day biochemical demand, total suspended solids, total nitrogen, cyanide and orthophosphate achieved the average monthly permitted limitations in pounds per day.

  4. Neural Excitability and Joint Laxity in Chronic Ankle Instability, Coper, and Control Groups

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bowker, Samantha; Terada, Masafumi; Thomas, Abbey C; Pietrosimone, Brian G; Hiller, Claire E; Gribble, Phillip A

    2016-01-01

    ... ankle sprain, and a healthy control group. To determine if differences exist in spinal reflex excitability and ankle laxity among participants with CAI, copers, and healthy controls. Case-control study...

  5. Purwarupa Sistem Kontrol Elevator Berbasis Programable Logic Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fathahillah Fathahillah

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Various methods / types of controls developed in accordance with industry needs one of them in the field of building automation system. One of the controls in the field of building automation system is the elevator control system (elevator. Early elevator control systems that transport humans or goods as vertical transportation vehicles are still conventional using human power, then evolved using steam engines, until now the elevators use AC motors equipped with control systems. The purpose of this research is to design the prototype of elevator control system using programmable logic control (PLC. The type of PLC controller used in the study using Omron PLC. The results show the design of prototype of elevator control system using PLC successfully and can control eleveator in accordance with its function, besides its programming form can be more simple.

  6. Programming Real-Time Motion Control Robot Prototype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Medina-Santiago

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This item presents the real-time programming of a prototype robot to control its movement from one moment to another without showing response delays. Contributing to this is the communication protocol developed in our laboratories and feasibility of being implemented in the future with wireless control via radio frequency, and to present the progress to date have been obtained.

  7. Effects of a case management program on patients with oral precancerous lesions: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hsiu-Ying; Chen, Shu-Ching; Peng, Hsi-Ling; Chen, Mu-Kuan

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to identify the effects of a case management program on knowledge about oral cancer, preventive behavior for oral cancer, and level of uncertainty for patients with oral precancerous lesions. A randomized controlled trial was conducted with two groups, using a pre- and posttest design. The experimental group received a case management program and telephone follow-up sessions; the control group received routine care. Patients were assessed at three time points: first visit to the otolaryngology clinic for biopsy examination (T0), and then at 2 weeks (T1) and 4 weeks (T2) after the biopsy examination. Patients in both groups had significantly higher levels of knowledge about oral cancer, preventive behavior for oral cancer, and lower level of uncertainty at T2 compared to T0. At T2, participants in the experimental group had significantly greater knowledge about oral cancer, more preventive behavior for oral cancer, and less uncertainty compared to those in the control group. The case management program with telephone counseling effectively improved knowledge about oral cancer, preventive behavior for oral cancer, and uncertainty levels in patients with oral precancerous lesions in the four weeks after receiving a biopsy examination. The case management program can be applied with positive results to patients receiving different types of cancer screening, including colorectal, breast, and cervical screening.

  8. Maryland Controlled Fusion Research Program. Progress report, November 1, 1992--October 31, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antonsen, T.M. Jr.; Drake, J.F.; Guzdar, P.; Hassam, A.; Liu, C.S.; Ott, E.

    1995-05-01

    In the past three years, members of the Maryland Plasma Theory Group have made significant contributions to the national fusion theory program, and, in many cases, these theoretical developments helped to interpret experimental results and to design new experimental programs. In this report, they summarize the technical progress in four major areas of tokamak research: (a) L/H transition and edge turbulence and transport; (b) active control of micro-turbulence and transport; (c) major disruptions; and (d) the sawtooth crash.

  9. Should body image programs be inclusive? A focus group study of college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciao, Anna C; Ohls, Olivia C; Pringle, Kevin D

    2018-01-01

    Most evidence-based body image programs for college students (e.g., the Body Project) are designed for female-only audiences, although body dissatisfaction is not limited to female-identified individuals. Furthermore, programs do not explicitly discuss diversity, although individuals with marginalized gender, racial, and sexual identities may be particularly vulnerable to body image disturbances. Making programs more inclusive may increase their disseminability. This qualitative study examined the feasibility of adapting the Body Project for universal and inclusive use with college students. Participants (N = 36; M age = 21.66 years; 73% female-identified; 20% sexual minority; 23% racial minority) attended one of five semi-structured focus groups to explore the inclusivity of appearance-based cultural norms using adapted Body Project activities and discuss the feasibility of universal and inclusive interventions. Inductive qualitative content analysis with three-rater consensus identified focus group themes. There was consensus that inclusive interventions could have a positive impact (broadening perspectives, normalizing body image concerns, increasing awareness) despite potential barriers (poor diversity representation, vulnerability). There was strong consensus regarding advice for facilitating inclusive interventions (e.g., skilled facilitation, education, increasing diversity). Results suggest that inclusive body image programs are desirable and provide a framework for creating the EVERYbody Project, a program for more universal audiences. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Adaptive Dynamic Programming for Control Algorithms and Stability

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Huaguang; Luo, Yanhong; Wang, Ding

    2013-01-01

    There are many methods of stable controller design for nonlinear systems. In seeking to go beyond the minimum requirement of stability, Adaptive Dynamic Programming for Control approaches the challenging topic of optimal control for nonlinear systems using the tools of  adaptive dynamic programming (ADP). The range of systems treated is extensive; affine, switched, singularly perturbed and time-delay nonlinear systems are discussed as are the uses of neural networks and techniques of value and policy iteration. The text features three main aspects of ADP in which the methods proposed for stabilization and for tracking and games benefit from the incorporation of optimal control methods: • infinite-horizon control for which the difficulty of solving partial differential Hamilton–Jacobi–Bellman equations directly is overcome, and  proof provided that the iterative value function updating sequence converges to the infimum of all the value functions obtained by admissible control law sequences; • finite-...

  11. Effects of proprioceptive training program on core stability and center of gravity control in sprinters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Franco, Natalia; Martínez-López, Emilio; Lomas-Vega, Rafael; Hita-Contreras, Fidel; Martínez-Amat, Antonio

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determinate the effect of a 6-week specific-sprinter proprioceptive training program on core stability and gravity center control in sprinters. Thirty-three athletes (age = 21.82 ± 4.84 years, height = 1.76 ± 0.07 m, weight = 67.82 ± 08.04 kg, body mass index = 21.89 ± 2.37 kg · m(-2)) from sprint disciplines were divided into a control (n = 17) and experimental (n = 16) groups. A 30-minute proprioceptive training program was included in the experimental group training sessions, and it was performed for 6 weeks, 3 times each week. This program included 5 exercises with the BOSU and Swiss ball as unstable training tools that were designed to reproduce different moments of the technique of a sprint race. Stability with eyes open (EO) and eyes closed, postural stability, and gravity center control were assessed before and after the training program. Analyses of covariance (α = 0.05) revealed significant differences in stability in the medial-lateral plane with EO, gravity center control in the right direction and gravity center control in the back direction after the exercise intervention in the experimental athletes. Nevertheless, no other significant differences were demonstrated. A sprinter-specific proprioceptive training program provided postural stability with EO and gravity center control measures improvements, although it is not clear if the effect of training would transfer to the general population.

  12. [Costa Rica: control program of sexually transmitted diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaramillo, O; Blum, E; Freer, E

    1979-02-01

    Programming activities for the control of venereal diseases implies certain difficulties in Latin American countries owing to the lack of basic information and resources. It is perhaps for this reason that such programs have so far failed to achieve an adequate epidemiological impact. In late 1975, a new program was set up in Costa Rica with the following objectives: 1) reducing the incidence of venereal diseases; 2) detecting cases at an early stage in order to begin treatment; 3) developing a far-reaching hygiene education program; 4) establishing appropriate epidemiological surveillance machinery, including border-area programs; 5) integrating control activities with the general health services; 6) training personnel; and 7) carrying out research. Among the activities planned for the attainment of the aforementioned objectives was the detection of cases by means of voluntary presentation; surveillance of contacts; serological testing of pregnant women, blood donors, and applicants for health care identity cards, and other types of examination. Outpatient treatment was planned for all cases detected. Where epidemiological surveillance was concerned, it was proposed that improvements be made in morbidity report procedures, data analysis, and border-area programs. Plans were also made for integrating control activities into the basic health services and for reviewing the existing legislation with a view to expediting the implementation of the program. Steps taken to that end included the establishment of a more effective coordination of such activities with the Costa Rican Social Security Institute, an entity which attends the health needs of 80% of the population; a follow-up program for cases detected in the hospitals included in the program, and preparation of a flow diagram to be used for that purpose by such institutions. Other aspects considered were the distribution of treatment manuals, and information on epidemiological interview methods and laboratory

  13. Experience with multiple control groups in a large population-based case control study on genetic and environmental risk factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pomp, E.R.; van Stralen, K.J.; le Cessie, S.; Vandenbroucke, J.P.; Rosendaal, F.R.; Doggen, Catharina Jacoba Maria

    2010-01-01

    We discuss the analytic and practical considerations in a large case–control study that had two control groups; the first control group consisting of partners of patients and the second obtained by random digit dialling (RDD). As an example of the evaluation of a general lifestyle factor, we present

  14. Effects of a training program after surgically treated ankle fracture: a prospective randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekdahl Charlotte S

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite conflicting results after surgically treated ankle fractures few studies have evaluated the effects of different types of training programs performed after plaster removal. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of a 12-week standardised but individually suited training program (training group versus usual care (control group after plaster removal in adults with surgically treated ankle fractures. Methods In total, 110 men and women, 18-64 years of age, with surgically treated ankle fracture were included and randomised to either a 12-week training program or to a control group. Six and twelve months after the injury the subjects were examined by the same physiotherapist who was blinded to the treatment group. The main outcome measure was the Olerud-Molander Ankle Score (OMAS which rates symptoms and subjectively scored function. Secondary outcome measures were: quality of life (SF-36, timed walking tests, ankle mobility tests, muscle strength tests and radiological status. Results 52 patients were randomised to the training group and 58 to the control group. Five patients dropped out before the six-month follow-up resulting in 50 patients in the training group and 55 in the control group. Nine patients dropped out between the six- and twelve-month follow-up resulting in 48 patients in both groups. When analysing the results in a mixed model analysis on repeated measures including interaction between age-group and treatment effect the training group demonstrated significantly improved results compared to the control group in subjects younger than 40 years of age regarding OMAS (p = 0.028, muscle strength in the plantar flexors (p = 0.029 and dorsiflexors (p = 0.030. Conclusion The results of this study suggest that when adjusting for interaction between age-group and treatment effect the training model employed in this study was superior to usual care in patients under the age of 40. However, as only three

  15. Resident-Assisted Montessori Programming (RAMP): training persons with dementia to serve as group activity leaders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camp, Cameron J; Skrajner, Michael J

    2004-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of an activity implemented by means of Resident-Assisted Montessori Programming (RAMP). Four persons with early-stage dementia were trained to serve as leaders for a small-group activity played by nine persons with more advanced dementia. Assessments of leaders' ability to learn the procedures of leading a group, as well as their satisfaction with this role, were taken, as were measures of players' engagement and affect during standard activities programming and RAMP activities. Leaders demonstrated the potential to fill the role of group activity leader effectively, and they expressed a high level of satisfaction with this role. Players' levels of positive engagement and pleasure during the RAMP activity were higher than during standard group activities. This study suggests that to the extent that procedural learning is available to persons with early-stage dementia, especially when they are assisted with external cueing, these individuals can successfully fill the role of volunteers when working with persons with more advanced dementia. This can provide a meaningful social role for leaders and increase access to high quality activities programming for large numbers of persons with dementia. Copyright 2004 The Gerontological Society of America

  16. A Telerehabilitation Program Improves Postural Control in Multiple Sclerosis Patients: A Spanish Preliminary Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Ortiz-Gutiérrez

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Postural control disorders are among the most frequent motor disorder symptoms associated with multiple sclerosis. This study aims to demonstrate the potential improvements in postural control among patients with multiple sclerosis who complete a telerehabilitation program that represents a feasible alternative to physical therapy for situations in which conventional treatment is not available. Fifty patients were recruited. Control group (n = 25 received physiotherapy treatment twice a week (40 min per session. Experimental group (n = 25 received monitored telerehabilitation treatment via videoconference using the Xbox 360® and Kinect console. Experimental group attended 40 sessions, four sessions per week (20 min per session.The treatment schedule lasted 10 weeks for both groups. A computerized dynamic posturography (Sensory Organization Test was used to evaluate all patients at baseline and at the end of the treatment protocol. Results showed an improvement over general balance in both groups. Visual preference and the contribution of vestibular information yielded significant differences in the experimental group. Our results demonstrated that a telerehabilitation program based on a virtual reality system allows one to optimize the sensory information processing and integration systems necessary to maintain the balance and postural control of people with multiple sclerosis. We suggest that our virtual reality program enables anticipatory PC and response mechanisms and might serve as a successful therapeutic alternative in situations in which conventional therapy is not readily available.

  17. Applied Research of Enterprise Cost Control Based on Linear Programming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Shuo

    2015-01-01

    This paper researches the enterprise cost control through the linear programming model, and analyzes the restriction factors of the labor of enterprise production, raw materials, processing equipment, sales price, and other factors affecting the enterprise income, so as to obtain an enterprise cost control model based on the linear programming. This model can calculate rational production mode in the case of limited resources, and acquire optimal enterprise income. The production guiding program and scheduling arrangement of the enterprise can be obtained through calculation results, so as to provide scientific and effective guidance for the enterprise production. This paper adds the sensitivity analysis in the linear programming model, so as to learn about the stability of the enterprise cost control model based on linear programming through the sensitivity analysis, and verify the rationality of the model, and indicate the direction for the enterprise cost control. The calculation results of the model can provide a certain reference for the enterprise planning in the market economy environment, which have strong reference and practical significance in terms of the enterprise cost control.

  18. Evaluation of support group interventions for children in troubled families: study protocol for a quasi-experimental control group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skerfving, Annemi; Johansson, Fredrik; Elgán, Tobias H

    2014-01-24

    Support groups for children in troubled families are available in a majority of Swedish municipalities. They are used as a preventive effort for children in families with different parental problems such as addiction to alcohol/other drugs, mental illness, domestic violence, divorce situations, or even imprisonment. Children from families with these problems are a well-known at-risk group for various mental health and social problems. Support groups aim at strengthening children's coping behaviour, to improve their mental health and to prevent a negative psycho-social development. To date, evaluations using a control-group study design are scarce. The aim of the current study is to evaluate the effects of support groups. This paper describes the design of an effectiveness study, initially intended as a randomized controlled trial, but instead is pursued as a quasi-experimental study using a non-randomized control group. The aim is to include 116 children, aged 7-13 years and one parent/another closely related adult, in the study. Participants are recruited via existing support groups in the Stockholm county district and are allocated either into an intervention group or a waiting list control group, representing care as usual. The assessment consists of questionnaires that are to be filled in at baseline and at four months following the baseline. Additionally, the intervention group completes a 12-month follow-up. The outcomes include the Strength and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ S11-16), the Kids Coping Scale, the "Ladder of life" which measures overall life satisfaction, and "Jag tycker jag är" (I think I am) which measures self-perception and self-esteem. The parents complete the SDQ P4-16 (parent-report version) and the Swedish scale "Familjeklimat" (Family Climate), which measures the emotional climate in the family. There is a need for evaluating the effects of support groups targeted to children from troubled families. This quasi-experimental study

  19. Group Cognitive Behavioural Therapy and Group Recreational Activity for Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Preliminary Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesselmark, Eva; Plenty, Stephanie; Bejerot, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    Although adults with autism spectrum disorder are an increasingly identified patient population, few treatment options are available. This "preliminary" randomized controlled open trial with a parallel design developed two group interventions for adults with autism spectrum disorders and intelligence within the normal range: cognitive…

  20. Theory-based Osteoporosis Prevention Education and Counseling Program for Women: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Aslı Kalkım, RN, PhD; Şafak Dağhan, RN, PhD

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this research was to investigate the effect of an osteoporosis prevention program based on the Health Belief Model for women between the ages of 30 years and 45 years at risk of osteoporosis. Methods: This study was conducted with randomized control group pretest, post-test and follow-up trial. Intervention group (n = 37) and control group (n = 36) participated in the research. Data were collected using a sociodemographic data questionnaire, the Osteoporosis Knowled...

  1. Predicting participation in group parenting education in an Australian sample: the role of attitudes, norms, and control factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Katherine M; Wellington, Larne

    2009-03-01

    We examined the theory of planned behavior (TPB) in predicting intentions to participate in group parenting education. One hundred and seventy-six parents (138 mothers and 38 fathers) with a child under 12 years completed TPB items assessing attitude, subjective norms, perceived behavioral control (PBC), and two additional social influence variables (self-identity and group norm). Regression analyses supported the TPB predictors of participation intentions with self-identity and group norm also significantly predicting intentions. Editors' Strategic Implications: these findings provide preliminary support for the TPB, in conjunction with additional sources of social influence, as a predictive model for participation in parent education and other prevention programs.

  2. Efficacy of a Universal Parent Training Program (HOPE-20): Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Cynthia; Tsang, Sandra; Kwan, H. W.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: This study examined the efficacy of Hands-On Parent Empowerment-20 (HOPE-20) program. Methods: Eligible participants were parents residing in Hong Kong with target children aged 2 years attending nursery schools. Cluster randomized control trial was adopted, with 10 schools (110 participants) assigned to intervention group and 8 schools…

  3. Making policy practice in afterschool programs: a randomized controlled trial on physical activity changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beets, Michael W; Weaver, R Glenn; Turner-McGrievy, Gabrielle; Huberty, Jennifer; Ward, Dianne S; Pate, Russell R; Freedman, Darcy; Hutto, Brent; Moore, Justin B; Beighle, Aaron

    2015-06-01

    In the U.S., afterschool programs are asked to promote moderate to vigorous physical activity. One policy that has considerable public health importance is California's afterschool physical activity guidelines that indicate all children attending an afterschool program accumulate 30 minutes each day the program is operating. Few effective strategies exist for afterschool programs to meet this policy goal. The purpose of this study was to evaluate a multistep adaptive intervention designed to assist afterschool programs in meeting the 30-minute/day moderate to vigorous physical activity policy goal. A 1-year group randomized controlled trial with baseline (spring 2013) and post-assessment (spring 2014). Data were analyzed 2014. Twenty afterschool programs, serving >1,700 children (aged 6-12 years), randomized to either an intervention (n=10) or control (n=10) group. The employed framework, Strategies To Enhance Practice, focused on intentional programming of physical activity opportunities in each afterschool program's daily schedule and included professional development training to establish core physical activity competencies of staff and afterschool program leaders with ongoing technical assistance. The primary outcome was accelerometry-derived proportion of children meeting the 30-minute/day moderate to vigorous physical activity policy. Children attending intervention afterschool programs had an OR of 2.37 (95% CI=1.58, 3.54) to achieve the physical activity policy at post-assessment compared to control afterschool programs. Sex-specific models indicated that the percentage of intervention girls and boys achieving the physical activity policy increased from 16.7% to 21.4% (OR=2.85, 95% CI=1.43, 5.68) and 34.2% to 41.6% (OR=2.26, 95% CI=1.35, 3.80), respectively. At post-assessment, six intervention afterschool programs increased the proportion of boys achieving the physical activity policy to ≥45% compared to one control afterschool program, whereas three

  4. [Group psychotherapy. Aspects of mental health in a program of community psychiatry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrade Espinosa, M

    1977-01-01

    At the ISSSTE, a community psychiatry program was created and is being developed in two areas: the population of beneficiaries who attend two clinics and groups of employees of those same clinics at their respective places of work. The main purpose is to carry out prevention in mental health. In this report only the work in the first session of eight employee operative groups is reported. The method, the difficulties and the characteristics of the groupings are explained. Some theoretical aspects are shown. Results showed: 1. Little correspondence between the internal reality of the beneficiaries. 2. Difficulties in communication which produce differences of criteria with the clinic. 3. Difficulties in the internal distribution of power. 4. Unnecessary expenditure of energy. 5. Suggestions to solve the problems handled in the group. 6. Resistance against responsibilities.

  5. Hanford Site Guide for Preparing and Maintaining Generator Group Pollution Prevention Program Documentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PLACE, B.G.

    2000-11-01

    This document provides guidance to generator groups for preparing and maintaining documentation of Pollution Prevention/Waste Minimization (P2/WMin) Program activities. The guidance is one of a hierarchical series that includes the Hanford Site Waste Minimization and Pollution Prevention Awareness Program Plan (DOE-RL, 2000) and Prime Contractor implementation plans describing programs required by Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) 3002(b) and 3005(h) (RCRA and EPA, 1994) and Department of Energy Acquisition Regulations (DEAR) (48 CFR 970.5204-2 and 48 CFR 970.5204-78). Documentation guidance for the following five P2/WMin elements is discussed: Fiscal Year (FY) Goals; Budget and Staffing; Pollution Prevention (P2) Reporting; WMin Certification; and Waste Minimization (WMin) Assessments (WMAs).

  6. 75 FR 30046 - Medicaid and CHIP Programs; Meeting of the CHIP Working Group-June 14, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-28

    ... Administration Medicaid and CHIP Programs; Meeting of the CHIP Working Group-- June 14, 2010 AGENCY: Centers for... the second meeting of the Medicaid, Children's Health Insurance Program (``CHIP''), and Employer-Sponsored Coverage Coordination Working Group ] (referred to as the ``CHIP Working Group''). The CHIP...

  7. 75 FR 16149 - Medicaid and CHIP Programs; Meeting of the CHIP Working Group-April 26, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-31

    ... Administration Medicaid and CHIP Programs; Meeting of the CHIP Working Group-- April 26, 2010 AGENCIES: Centers... announces the first meeting of the Medicaid, Children's Health Insurance Program (``CHIP''), and Employer-Sponsored Coverage Coordination Working Group (referred to as the ``CHIP Working Group''). The CHIP Working...

  8. Implementation contexts of a Tuberculosis Control Program in Brazilian prisons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Gonçalves Dutra de Oliveira

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE To analyze the influence from context characteristics in the control of tuberculosis in prisons, and the influence from the program implementation degrees in observed effects.METHODS A multiple case study, with a qualitative approach, conducted in the prison systems of two Brazilian states in 2011 and 2012. Two prisons were analyzed in each state, and a prison hospital was analyzed in one of them. The data were submitted to a content analysis, which was based on external, political-organizational, implementation, and effect dimensions. Contextual factors and the ones in the program organization were correlated. The independent variable was the program implementation degree and the dependent one, the effects from the Tuberculosis Control Program in prisons.RESULTS The context with the highest sociodemographic vulnerability, the highest incidence rate of tuberculosis, and the smallest amount of available resources were associated with the low implementation degree of the program. The results from tuberculosis treatment in the prison system were better where the program had already been partially implemented than in the case with low implementation degree in both cases.CONCLUSIONS The implementation degree and its contexts – external and political-organizational dimensions – simultaneously contribute to the effects that are observed in the control of tuberculosis in analyzed prisons.

  9. Implementation contexts of a Tuberculosis Control Program in Brazilian prisons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Luisa Gonçalves Dutra; Natal, Sonia; Camacho, Luiz Antonio Bastos

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze the influence from context characteristics in the control of tuberculosis in prisons, and the influence from the program implementation degrees in observed effects.METHODS A multiple case study, with a qualitative approach, conducted in the prison systems of two Brazilian states in 2011 and 2012. Two prisons were analyzed in each state, and a prison hospital was analyzed in one of them. The data were submitted to a content analysis, which was based on external, political-organizational, implementation, and effect dimensions. Contextual factors and the ones in the program organization were correlated. The independent variable was the program implementation degree and the dependent one, the effects from the Tuberculosis Control Program in prisons.RESULTS The context with the highest sociodemographic vulnerability, the highest incidence rate of tuberculosis, and the smallest amount of available resources were associated with the low implementation degree of the program. The results from tuberculosis treatment in the prison system were better where the program had already been partially implemented than in the case with low implementation degree in both cases.CONCLUSIONS The implementation degree and its contexts - external and political-organizational dimensions - simultaneously contribute to the effects that are observed in the control of tuberculosis in analyzed prisons.

  10. Feasibility and Outcomes of an Internet-Based Mindfulness Training Program: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvillemo, Pia; Brandberg, Yvonne; Bränström, Richard

    2016-07-22

    Interventions based on meditation and mindfulness techniques have been shown to reduce stress and increase psychological well-being in a wide variety of populations. Self-administrated Internet-based mindfulness training programs have the potential to be a convenient, cost-effective, easily disseminated, and accessible alternative to group-based programs. This randomized controlled pilot trial with 90 university students in Stockholm, Sweden, explored the feasibility, usability, acceptability, and outcomes of an 8-week Internet-based mindfulness training program. Participants were randomly assigned to either an intervention (n=46) or an active control condition (n=44). Intervention participants were invited to an Internet-based 8-week mindfulness program, and control participants were invited to an Internet-based 4-week expressive writing program. The programs were automated apart from weekly reminders via email. Main outcomes in pre- and postassessments were psychological well-being and depression symptoms. To assess the participant's experiences, those completing the full programs were asked to fill out an assessment questionnaire and 8 of the participants were interviewed using a semistructured interview guide. Descriptive and inferential statistics, as well as content analysis, were performed. In the mindfulness program, 28 out of 46 students (60%) completed the first week and 18 out of 46 (39%) completed the full program. In the expressive writing program, 35 out of 44 students (80%) completed the first week and 31 out of 44 (70%) completed the full program. There was no statistically significantly stronger intervention effect for the mindfulness intervention compared to the active control intervention. Those completing the mindfulness group reported high satisfaction with the program. Most of those interviewed were satisfied with the layout and technique and with the support provided by the study coordinators. More frequent contact with study coordinators was

  11. Effect of Topical and Intravenously Applied Tranexamic Acid Compared to Control Group on Bleeding in Primary Unilateral Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uğurlu, Mahmut; Aksekili, Mehmet Atıf Erol; Çağlar, Ceyhun; Yüksel, Kağan; Şahin, Ercan; Akyol, Mesut

    2017-02-01

    We aimed to answer the following three questions in this study: (1) Does tranexamic acid (TA) reduce the amount of bleeding in total knee arthroplasty (TKA)? (2) Does TA reduce requirement for blood transfusion? (3) Is there any difference on reliability and efficacy between topical and intravenous (IV) applications of TA? Patients were allocated into three groups randomly by a software program as topical, IV, and control group. TA was applied as 20 mg/kg to the IV group and as 3 g/100 mL saline to the topical group. The hemoglobin values were recorded preoperatively and postoperatively on the same day and on day 1 and day 2. Removal of the drain postoperatively and length of hospital stay, as well as any complications such as pulmonary embolism or deep venous thrombosis, were also noted. The study comprised 40 patients in the IV group, 42 in the topical group, and 41 in the control group. The drain output values were similar in the IV and topical groups (p = 0.161), while those of the control group were significantly higher than both the IV and topical groups (p control group, 4.8% in the topical group, and 5.1% of the IV group (χ2 = 6.522; p = 0.038). The results of the study showed that 20 mg/kg single-dose IV bolus or 3 g topical TA application reduced blood loss and transfusion requirement without increasing the rate of thromboembolic complications in unilateral primary TKA. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  12. Theory-based Osteoporosis Prevention Education and Counseling Program for Women: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalkım, Aslı; Dağhan, Şafak

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this research was to investigate the effect of an osteoporosis prevention program based on the Health Belief Model for women between the ages of 30 years and 45 years at risk of osteoporosis. This study was conducted with randomized control group pretest, post-test and follow-up trial. Intervention group (n = 37) and control group (n = 36) participated in the research. Data were collected using a sociodemographic data questionnaire, the Osteoporosis Knowledge Test, the Osteoporosis Health Belief Scale, the Osteoporosis Self-efficacy Scale, a monitoring form for estimated dairy calcium intake, and a monitoring form for estimated weekly exercise. Intervention program was composed of a 4-week education program and a 24-week counseling program. Data were collected pretest, post-test 15 days after the end of the education program, follow-up 1 after 3 months, and follow-up 2 after 6 months. Mann Whitney U test, chi-square test, Friedman test, Bonferroni test, two means test and Wilcoxon signed-rank test were used for statistical analysis. After the education and counseling program, a significant increase was seen in comparison with the control group in the mean scores of the intervention group on the Osteoporosis Knowledge Test and its subscales (p Belief Scale and its subscales (p Belief Model-based osteoporosis prevention education and counseling program conducted by nurses. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. The Second International Piping Integrity Research Group (IPIRG-2) program. Final report, October 1991--April 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopper, A.; Wilowski, G.; Scott, P.; Olson, R. [and others

    1997-03-01

    The IPIRG-2 program was an international group program managed by the US NRC and funded by organizations from 15 nations. The emphasis of the IPIRG-2 program was the development of data to verify fracture analyses for cracked pipes and fittings subjected to dynamic/cyclic load histories typical of seismic events. The scope included: (1) the study of more complex dynamic/cyclic load histories, i.e., multi-frequency, variable amplitude, simulated seismic excitations, than those considered in the IPIRG-1 program, (2) crack sizes more typical of those considered in Leak-Before-Break (LBB) and in-service flaw evaluations, (3) through-wall-cracked pipe experiments which can be used to validate LBB-type fracture analyses, (4) cracks in and around pipe fittings, such as elbows, and (5) laboratory specimen and separate effect pipe experiments to provide better insight into the effects of dynamic and cyclic load histories. Also undertaken were an uncertainty analysis to identify the issues most important for LBB or in-service flaw evaluations, updating computer codes and databases, the development and conduct of a series of round-robin analyses, and analyst`s group meetings to provide a forum for nuclear piping experts from around the world to exchange information on the subject of pipe fracture technology. 17 refs., 104 figs., 41 tabs.

  14. Mars exploration program analysis group goal one: determine if life ever arose on Mars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoehler, Tori M; Westall, Frances

    2010-11-01

    The Mars Exploration Program Analysis Group (MEPAG) maintains a standing document that articulates scientific community goals, objectives, and priorities for mission-enabled Mars science. Each of the goals articulated within the document is periodically revisited and updated. The astrobiology-related Goal One, "Determine if life ever arose on Mars," has recently undergone such revision. The finalized revision, which appears in the version of the MEPAG Goals Document posted on September 24, 2010, is presented here.

  15. The Impact of Technology on the Command, Control, and Organizational Structure of Insurgent Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-06-17

    THE IMPACT OF TECHNOLOGY ON THE COMMAND, CONTROL, AND ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE OF INSURGENT GROUPS A thesis presented to the...CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE THE IMPACT OF TECHNOLOGY ON THE COMMAND, CONTROL, AND ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE OF...Kevin C. Leahy Thesis Title: The Impact of Technology on the Command, Control, and Organizational Structure of Insurgent Groups Approved by

  16. Sensitivity Analysis of Linear Programming and Quadratic Programming Algorithms for Control Allocation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Susan A.; Bodson, Marc; Acosta, Diana M.

    2009-01-01

    The Next Generation (NextGen) transport aircraft configurations being investigated as part of the NASA Aeronautics Subsonic Fixed Wing Project have more control surfaces, or control effectors, than existing transport aircraft configurations. Conventional flight control is achieved through two symmetric elevators, two antisymmetric ailerons, and a rudder. The five effectors, reduced to three command variables, produce moments along the three main axes of the aircraft and enable the pilot to control the attitude and flight path of the aircraft. The NextGen aircraft will have additional redundant control effectors to control the three moments, creating a situation where the aircraft is over-actuated and where a simple relationship does not exist anymore between the required effector deflections and the desired moments. NextGen flight controllers will incorporate control allocation algorithms to determine the optimal effector commands and attain the desired moments, taking into account the effector limits. Approaches to solving the problem using linear programming and quadratic programming algorithms have been proposed and tested. It is of great interest to understand their relative advantages and disadvantages and how design parameters may affect their properties. In this paper, we investigate the sensitivity of the effector commands with respect to the desired moments and show on some examples that the solutions provided using the l2 norm of quadratic programming are less sensitive than those using the l1 norm of linear programming.

  17. The regional student group program of the ISCB student council: stories from the road.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macintyre, Geoff; Michaut, Magali; Abeel, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    The International Society for Computational Biology (ISCB) Student Council was launched in 2004 to facilitate interaction between young scientists in the fields of bioinformatics and computational biology. Since then, the Student Council has successfully run events and programs to promote the development of the next generation of computational biologists. However, in its early years, the Student Council faced a major challenge, in that students from different geographical regions had different needs; no single activity or event could address the needs of all students. To overcome this challenge, the Student Council created the Regional Student Group (RSG) program. The program consists of locally organised and run student groups that address the specific needs of students in their region. These groups usually encompass a given country, and, via affiliation with the international Student Council, are provided with financial support, organisational support, and the ability to share information with other RSGs. In the last five years, RSGs have been created all over the world and organised activities that have helped develop dynamic bioinformatics student communities. In this article series, we present common themes emerging from RSG initiatives, explain their goals, and highlight the challenges and rewards through specific examples. This article, the first in the series, introduces the Student Council and provides a high-level overview of RSG activities. Our hope is that the article series will be a valuable source of information and inspiration for initiating similar activities in other regions and scientific communities.

  18. The regional student group program of the ISCB student council: stories from the road.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoff Macintyre

    Full Text Available The International Society for Computational Biology (ISCB Student Council was launched in 2004 to facilitate interaction between young scientists in the fields of bioinformatics and computational biology. Since then, the Student Council has successfully run events and programs to promote the development of the next generation of computational biologists. However, in its early years, the Student Council faced a major challenge, in that students from different geographical regions had different needs; no single activity or event could address the needs of all students. To overcome this challenge, the Student Council created the Regional Student Group (RSG program. The program consists of locally organised and run student groups that address the specific needs of students in their region. These groups usually encompass a given country, and, via affiliation with the international Student Council, are provided with financial support, organisational support, and the ability to share information with other RSGs. In the last five years, RSGs have been created all over the world and organised activities that have helped develop dynamic bioinformatics student communities. In this article series, we present common themes emerging from RSG initiatives, explain their goals, and highlight the challenges and rewards through specific examples. This article, the first in the series, introduces the Student Council and provides a high-level overview of RSG activities. Our hope is that the article series will be a valuable source of information and inspiration for initiating similar activities in other regions and scientific communities.

  19. Internet Based Obesity Prevention Program for Thai School Children- A Randomized Control Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rerksuppaphol, Lakkana; Rerksuppaphol, Sanguansak

    2017-03-01

    Internet based obesity prevention program is one approach in learning strategies to improve healthy behaviour. It has been advocated as one strategy to address the rising prevalence of childhood obesity; however, their efficacy is not seen consistently. The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy of internet based obesity prevention program in Thai school children. Healthy children studying in public schools in one township of central Thailand were randomly assigned to either the intervention (internet based) program or the control group. Anthropometric characteristics were recorded at baseline and for the next four following months at monthly intervals. Changes in the percentage of overweight/obese children and changes in BMI at the end of study were considered as the primary and secondary outcome, respectively. A total of 217 children, mean age of 10.7 years, were included into the final analysis. Baseline anthropometric parameters and percentages of overweight/obesity were not significantly different between groups. At the end of the study, the control group had a higher percentage of overweight/obesity than the intervention group (56.6% vs. 39.6%, respectively; p-value=0.009). Children in the control group had a significantly higher increase in net BMI gains than those in the intervention group (1.24kg/m(2) vs. 0.40kg/m(2), p-value=0.027). The intervention group had no changes in BMI z-score (-0.001, 95%CI -0.19 to 0.18, p-value=0.988), contrary to those in the control group, which had significant gain of BMI z-score at the end of study (0.45, 95%CI 0.27 to 0.63, p-value<0.001). Internet the based obesity prevention program was effective in modifying anthropometric outcome and helped to address the rising prevalence of overweight and obese status in Thai children.

  20. Sexual risk attitudes and intentions of youth aged 12-14 years: survey comparisons of parent-teen prevention and control groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lederman, Regina P; Chan, Wenyaw; Roberts-Gray, Cynthia

    2004-01-01

    In this study, the authors compared differences in sexual risk attitudes and intentions for three groups of youth (experimental program, n = 90; attention control, n = 80; and nonparticipant control, n = 634) aged 12-14 years. Two student groups participated with their parents in programs focused on strengthening family interaction and prevention of sexual risks, HIV, and adolescent pregnancy. Surveys assessed students' attitudes and intentions regarding early sexual and other health-risk behaviors, family interactions, and perceived parental disapproval of risk behaviors. The authors used general linear modeling to compare results. The experimental prevention program differentiated the total scores of the 3 groups (p group scored higher than the nonparticipant group on total scores (p < .01) and on students' intention to avoid sex (p < .01). The results suggest this novel educational program involving both parents and students offers a promising approach to HIV and teen pregnancy prevention.

  1. Roentgenographic findings in hyaline membrane disease treated with exogenous surfactant: comparison with control group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sun Kyoung; Lim, Chae Ha; Lim, Woo Young; Kim, Young Sook; Byen, Ju Nam; Oh, Jae Hee; Kim, Young Chul [Chosun Univ. College of Medicine, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-01-01

    To compare, with the use of chest radiographic findings, improvement and complications in newborns treated with exogenous surfactant for hyaline membrane disease (HMD), and an untreated control group. Thirty-six patients with HMD were randomly assigned to a control group (n=18) or surfactant treated group (n=18). As part of an initial evaluation of their pulmonary status, we then performed a retrospective statistical analysis of chest radiographic findings obtained in exogenous surfactant treated and untreated infants within the first 90 minutes of life. Subsequent examinations were performed at less than 24 hours of age. Chest radiograph before treatment showed no significant differences between the two groups, but significant improvement was noted in the surfactant treated group, in contrast to the control group. The most common chest radiographic finding after surfactant administration was uniform (n=15) or disproportionate (n=2) improvement of pulmonary aeration. Patent ductus arteriosus developed in three treated neonates and in four cases in the control group. Air leak occurred in three cases in the treated group and in five cases in the control group. In one treated patient pulmonary hemorrhage developed and intracranial hemorrhage occurred in three treated neonates and in four cases in the control group. Bronchopulmonary dysplasia was developed in 6 cases of treated group and 3 cases of control group. A chest radiograph is considered to be helpful in the evaluation of improvement and complications of HMD in infants treated with surfactant.

  2. The Juscelino Kubitschek government and the Brazilian Malaria Control and Eradication Working Group: collaboration and conflicts in Brazilian and international health agenda, 1958-1961

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato da Silva

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Malaria, a disease which was under control in the beginning of Juscelino Kubitschek government, became the most important endemic disease in 1958, when Brazil made a commitment with the World Health Organization to convert its control programs into eradication programs. For this purpose a Malaria Control and Eradication Group was set up under the leadership of the malaria specialist Mário Pinotti. Malaria would become an important bargaining chip in the context of the development policies of Kubitschek. This article focuses on path of the Malaria Control and Eradication Working Group in Brazil, in its varying relationships with the arguments and guidelines established at international level

  3. [Modification of the risk profile of obese essential hypertensive patients by the group "hypertension discussion" program].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basler, H D; Baumann, H; Beckers, H H; Bergdolt, H; Deschner, W; Ebschner, K J; Hasper, M; Kies, H K; Nüssel, E; Wenzel, G

    1988-01-01

    The programme "Discussions on Hypertension" is a programme for group treatment of obese essential hypertensives in medical practices on the basis of behavioural therapy. A co-operation model was developed between the Department for General Medicine of the "Medizinische Hochschule Hannover", the Institute for Medical Psychology of the "Philipps-Universität Marburg" and the company Galenus Mannheim and was offered to doctors in general practice. The effects of the programme on the modifying of the risk profile for coronary heart disease was investigated in a controlled study in 137 patients by nine general practitioners. 81 patients were enrolled in the experimental group and 56 patients were assigned to a control group that was not using the programme. The experimental and control groups were comparable with respect to sociodemographic, psychological and medical parameters. Three months after completing the programme, the results of the study was shown in specific effect both on the psychological criteria of success (well-being, health knowledge, healthy behaviour, salt use and compliance) and in a reduction of the diastolic blood pressure in spite of a reduction of the antihypertensive drug treatment. The blood lipid levels (cholesterol and triglycerides) and the blood glucose level were also favourably affected. Patients in the experimental group had reduced their weight by an average of 5.6 kg. The patients in the control group only by 0.8 kg. Overall, there was a marked reduction in the proportion of patients with several risk factors in the experimental group, so that the programme can be attributed a preventive effect.

  4. Feasibility of a group-based self-management program for ethnically diverse people with HIV/AIDS in Hawaii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen M. Sullivan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available HIV/AIDS has transformed from a terminal to a chronic health condition affecting individuals for decades rather than years. Yet the development of care models that enhance client-focused HIV disease management skills is still in progress, especially in HIV resource-poor locales. This pilot study tested the feasibility of implementing the group-based Positive Self-Management Program (PSMP to participants recruited from Oahu, Hawaii. The PSMP is a self-management program developed at Stanford University. A paucity of data exists on the efficacy of implementing the specialized PSMP that addresses unique needs of persons living with HIV. With a focus on enhancing self-efficacy beliefs, examples of topics addressed during seven weekly 2-hr group sessions include managing the physiological and psychological aspects of HIV, adherence to treatment regimes, symptom management, and fostering healthy lifestyle behaviors. Using a randomized waitlist control design, participants were recruited via convenience sampling and active outreach. The manualized PSMP was delivered by trained seropositive lay leaders. The completion rate for those who attended any sessions was 93.5%. The average attendance rate was 85%. The majority of participants reported being comfortable in the PSMP group setting and very satisfied with program activities. Almost all participants reported that the PSMP was a useful and easy method to learn new ways of managing their illness. The majority (93.8% were most satisfied with skill development in goal setting and action planning. Implementation of the program for persons living with HIV in Hawaii was feasible. Lessons learned for future research and application to practice are discussed.

  5. Multicomponent interdisciplinary group intervention for self-management of fibromyalgia: a mixed-methods randomized controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Bourgault

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the efficacy of the PASSAGE Program, a structured multicomponent interdisciplinary group intervention for the self-management of FMS.A mixed-methods randomized controlled trial (intervention (INT vs. waitlist (WL was conducted with patients suffering from FMS. Data were collected at baseline (T0, at the end of the intervention (T1, and 3 months later (T2. The primary outcome was change in pain intensity (0-10. Secondary outcomes were fibromyalgia severity, pain interference, sleep quality, pain coping strategies, depression, health-related quality of life, patient global impression of change (PGIC, and perceived pain relief. Qualitative group interviews with a subset of patients were also conducted. Complete data from T0 to T2 were available for 43 patients.The intervention had a statistically significant impact on the three PGIC measures. At the end of the PASSAGE Program, the percentages of patients who perceived overall improvement in their pain levels, functioning and quality of life were significantly higher in the INT Group (73%, 55%, 77% respectively than in the WL Group (8%, 12%, 20%. The same differences were observed 3 months post-intervention (Intervention group: 62%, 43%, 38% vs Waitlist Group: 13%, 13%, 9%. The proportion of patients who reported ≥ 50% pain relief was also significantly higher in the INT Group at the end of the intervention (36% vs 12% and 3 months post-intervention (33% vs 4%. Results of the qualitative analysis were in line with the quantitative findings regarding the efficacy of the intervention. The improvement, however, was not reflected in the primary outcome and other secondary outcome measures.The PASSAGE Program was effective in helping FMS patients gain a sense of control over their symptoms. We suggest including PGIC in future clinical trials on FMS as they appear to capture important aspects of the patients' experience.International Standard Randomized Controlled Trial Number

  6. Carcinogenicity evaluation: comparison of tumor data from dual control groups in the CD-1 mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldrick, Paul; Reeve, Lesley

    2007-06-01

    Current regulatory thinking allows for the use of single control groups for rodent carcinogenicity testing although there has been a trend until recently to use dual control groups. To date, virtually nothing has been published on whether a shift from dual to single control groups will affect the identification of tumorigenic risk potential in these studies. A recent evaluation of dual control carcinogenicity data in the rat (Baldrick, Toxicol Pathol 2005, 33: 283-291) showed that although no major differences in tumor incidences between the control groups were found, some interstudy variation occurred and in cases were a notable difference was seen, the use of 2 control groups, as well as robust, contemporary background data, allowed an easier interpretation of findings in drug-treated groups. In this paper, the results of 10 mouse carcinogenicity studies, performed between 1991 and 2004, with 2 control groups, are presented. As in the rat, interstudy variation was seen and in some cases, the use of dual control groups assisted in the tumor risk assessment. Thus, the continued use of 2 control groups can have a vital role in mouse carcinogenicity studies. The paper also presents an update on survival, on the range and extent of background spontaneous neoplasms and comments on genetic drift in this commonly used mouse strain.

  7. Predicting healthcare employees' participation in an office redesign program: Attitudes, norms and behavioral control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukas Carol

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The study examined the extent to which components based on a modified version of the theory of planned behavior explained employee participation in a new clinical office program designed to reduce patient waiting times in primary care clinics. Methods We regressed extent of employee participation on attitudes about the program, group norms, and perceived behavioral control along with individual and clinic characteristics using a hierarchical linear mixed model. Results Perceived group norms were one of the best predictors of employee participation. Attitudes about the program were also significant, but to a lesser degree. Behavioral control, however, was not a significant predictor. Respondents with at least one year of clinic tenure, or who were team leaders, first line supervisor, or managers had greater participation rates. Analysis at the clinic level indicated clinics with scores in the highest quartile clinic scores on group norms, attitudes, and behavioral control scores were significantly higher on levels of overall participation than clinics in the lowest quartile. Conclusion Findings suggest that establishing strong norms and values may influence employee participation in a change program in a group setting. Supervisory level was also significant with greater responsibility being associated with greater participation.

  8. WAIS Performance in Unincarcerated Groups of MMPI-Defined Sociopaths and Normal Controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allain, Albert N.

    1974-01-01

    This investigation examines WAIS performance in groups of 32 sociopaths and 33 normal controls defined by Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory criteria. Sociopaths and normal controls show no differences in overall level of intellectual functioning. (Author)

  9. Involvement of Consumer Groups in Tobacco Control: Russia and Belarus Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitry Yanin

    2017-05-01

    5. Cooperation of consumer organizations from Russia (KONFOP and Belarus (Belarus Consumer Society, launched to promote best Tobacco Control practices, according to FCTC provisions, is a success story of involvement of consumer groups in Tobacco Control.

  10. The Effectiveness of School-Based Nutritional Education Program among Obese Adolescents: A Randomized Controlled Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supinya In-Iw

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to determine the change in body weight and body mass index (BMI, as well as diet behaviors at 4 months after intervention between obese adolescent girls who participated in the school-based nutritional education program, addressed by pediatrician, compared to those who attended regular nutritional class. Methods. 49 obese girls were recruited from a secondary school. Those, were randomized into 2 groups of intervention and control. The intensive interactive nutritional program was provided to the intervention group. Weight and height, dietary record and % fat consumption, as well as self-administered questionnaires on healthy diet attitudes were collected at baseline and 4-month follow-up, and then compared between two groups. Results. There was a statistically significant change of BMI in the intervention group by  kg/m2 ( compared to the control group ( kg/m2, but no significant change in calorie and % fat consumption between groups. The attitudes on healthy eating behaviors in the intervention group were shown improving significantly (. Conclusions. Interactive and intensive nutritional education program as shown in the study was one of the most successful school-based interventions for obese adolescents.

  11. Indicators of asthma control among students in a rural, school-based asthma management program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasberry, Catherine N; Cheung, Karen; Buckley, Rebekah; Dunville, Richard; Daniels, Brandy; Cook, Deborah; Robin, Leah; Dean, Blair

    2014-10-01

    The evaluation sought to determine if a comprehensive, school-based asthma management program in a small, rural school district helped students improve asthma control. To determine if students in the asthma program demonstrated better asthma control than students in a comparison school district, the evaluation team used a quasi-experimental, cross-sectional design and administered questionnaires assessing asthma control (which included FEV1 measurement) to 456 students with asthma in the intervention and comparison districts. Data were analyzed for differences in asthma control between students in the two districts. To determine if students in the intervention experienced increased asthma control between baseline and follow-up, the evaluation team used a one-group retrospective design. Program records for 323 students were analyzed for differences in percent of predicted forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) between baseline and follow-up. Students with asthma in the intervention district exhibited significantly better asthma control than students with asthma in the comparison district. Percent of predicted FEV1 did not change significantly between baseline and follow-up for the intervention participants; however, post hoc analyses revealed students with poorly controlled asthma at baseline had significantly higher FEV1 scores at follow-up, and students with well-controlled asthma at baseline had significantly lower FEV1 scores at follow-up. Findings suggest that the comprehensive school-based program led to improvements in asthma control for students with poorly controlled asthma at baseline, and school-based programs need mechanisms for tracking students with initially well-controlled asthma to ensure they maintain control.

  12. Testing the Efficacy of OurSpace, a Brief, Group Dynamics-Based Physical Activity Intervention: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, Brandon; Kurz, Daniel; Chalin, Patrice; Thompson, Nicholas

    2016-05-06

    Emerging technologies (ie, mobile phones, Internet) may be effective tools for promoting physical activity (PA). However, few interventions have provided effective means to enhance social support through these platforms. Face-to-face programs that use group dynamics-based principles of behavior change have been shown to be highly effective in enhancing social support through promoting group cohesion and PA, but to date, no studies have examined their effects in Web-based programs. The aim was to explore proof of concept and test the efficacy of a brief, online group dynamics-based intervention on PA in a controlled experiment. We expected that the impact of the intervention on PA would be moderated by perceptions of cohesion and the partner's degree of presence in the online media. Participants (n=135) were randomized into same-sex dyads and randomly assigned to one of four experimental conditions: standard social support (standard), group dynamics-based-high presence, group dynamics-based-low presence, or individual control. Participants performed two sets of planking exercises (pre-post). Between sets, participants in partnered conditions interacted with a virtual partner using either a standard social support app or a group dynamics-based app (group dynamics-based-low presence and group dynamics-based-high presence), the latter of which they participated in a series of online team-building exercises. Individual participants were given an equivalent rest period between sets. To increase presence during the second set, participants in the group dynamics-based-high presence group saw a live video stream of their partner exercising. Perceptions of cohesion were measured using a modified PA Group Environment Questionnaire. Physical activity was calculated as the time persisted during set 2 after controlling for persistence in set 1. Perceptions of cohesion were higher in the group dynamics-based-low presence (overall mean 5.81, SD 1.04) condition compared to the

  13. Exercise intervention in childhood obesity: a randomized controlled trial comparing hospital-versus home-based groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisón, Juan Francisco; Real-Montes, José María; Torró, Isabel; Arguisuelas, María Dolores; Alvarez-Pitti, Julio; Martínez-Gramage, J; Aguilar, Francisco; Lurbe, Empar

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effect of a hospital clinic group- versus home-based combined exercise-diet program for the treatment of childhood obesity. One hundred ten overweight/obese Spanish children and adolescents (6-16 years) in 2 intervention groups (hospital clinic group-based [n = 45] and home-based [n = 41]) and a sex-age-matched control group (n = 24) were randomly assigned to participate in a 6-month combined exercise (aerobic and resistance training) and Mediterranean diet program. Anthropometric values (including body weight, height, body mass index, BMI-Z score, and waist circumference) were measured pre- and postintervention for all the participants. Percentage body fat was also determined with a body fat analyzer (TANITA TBF-410 M). Our study showed a significant reduction in percentage body fat and body mass index Z-score among both intervention-group participants (4%, 0.16, hospital clinic group-based; 4.4%, 0.23, home-based; P exercise and Mediterranean diet program may be effective among overweight and obese children and adolescents, because it improves body composition, is feasible and can be adopted on a large scale without substantial expenses. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Completion report : Effect of Comprehensive Yogic Breathing program on type 2 diabetes: A randomized control trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V P Jyotsna

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Yoga has been shown to be benefi cial in diabetes in many studies, though randomized control trials are few. The aim of this randomized control trial was to see the effect of Sudarshan Kriya and related practices (comprehensive yogic breathing program on quality of life, glycemic control, and cardiac autonomic functions in diabetes. Diabetes mellitus is a risk factor for sudden cardiac death. Cardiac autonomic neuropathy has been implicated in the causation of sudden cardiac death. Therefore, a maneuver to prevent progression of cardiac autonomic neuropathy holds signifi cance. Materials and Methods: A total of 120 patients of diabetes on oral medication and diet and exercise advice were randomized into two groups: (1 Continued to receive standard treatment for diabetes. (2 Patients administered comprehensive yogic breathing program and monitored to regularly practice yoga in addition to standard treatment of diabetes. At 6 months, quality of life and postprandial plasma glucose signifi cantly improved in the group practicing yoga compared to baseline, but there was no significant improvement in the fasting plasma glucose and glycated hemoglobin. Results: On per protocol analysis, sympathetic cardiac autonomic functions signifi cantly improved from baseline in the group practicing comprehensive yogic breathing. Conclusion: This randomized control trial points towards the beneficial effect of yogic breathing program in preventing progression of cardiac neuropathy. This has important implications as cardiac autonomic neuropathy has been considered as one of the factors for sudden cardiac deaths.Keywords: comprehensive yogic breathing program, diabetes mellitus, cardiac autonomic function

  15. A group-enhanced sprint interval training program for amateur athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Luc J; Anderson, Scott H; Schmale, Matthew S; Hallworth, Jillian R; Hazell, Tom J

    2016-08-01

    Sprint interval training (SIT) can elicit improvements in aerobic and anaerobic capacity. While variations in SIT protocols have been investigated, the influence of social processes cannot be overlooked. As research supports the use of groups to influence individual cognitions and behaviours, the current project assessed the effectiveness of a group-based intervention with participants conducting SIT. Specifically, 53 amateur athletes (age, 21.9 ± 2.9 years; 53% females) took part in a 4-week training program (3 sessions per week, 30-s "all-out" efforts with 4 min active recovery, repeated 4-6 times per session), and were assigned to "true group", aggregate, or individual conditions. Results indicated no significant differences between groups for the physiological measures. With regards to training improvements from baseline for all participants- regardless of condition - significant main effects for time were identified for maximal oxygen uptake (2.5-2.8 mL·kg(-1)·min(-1), p motivation (p = 0.033, η(2) = 0.13), task self-efficacy (p = 0.018, η(2) = 0.15), and scheduling self-efficacy (p = 0.003, η(2) = 0.22). The true group experienced greater improvements in motivation than the individual condition, but the aggregate and individual conditions demonstrated greater increases in task and scheduling self-efficacy. Though the SIT paradigm employed induced training improvements similar to previous work, the group intervention was not able to further these improvements.

  16. The Effectiveness of a Multidisciplinary Group Rehabilitation Program on the Psychosocial Functioning of Elderly People Who Are Visually Impaired

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alma, Manna A.; Groothoff, Johan W.; Melis-Dankers, Bart J. M.; Suurmeijer, Theodorus; van der Mei, Sijrike F.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The pilot study reported here determined the effectiveness of a multidisciplinary group rehabilitation program, Visually Impaired Elderly Persons Participating (VIPP), on psychosocial functioning. Methods: The single-group pretest-posttest pilot study included 29 persons with visual

  17. External quality control program: Experience in the department of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To share experiences and lessons learned from 2002 National External Quality Assessment Schemes for Leukocyte Immunophenotyping (UK NEQAS) and College of American Pathologists (CAP) proficiency testing (PT) panels received and tested as part of External Quality Control Program Setting: Department ...

  18. Slim Chance: A Weight Control Program for the Learning Disabled.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotatori, Anthony J.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    A school-based diet program for learning disabled children stresses modifying eating behavior by learning alternative ways of interacting with the environment. Techniques stress the importance of self regulation, strategies for self monitoring, the establishment of realistic weight goals, use of stimulus control procedures, increased physical…

  19. Evaluation of resources for an interactive infection control instructional program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garland, Kandis V

    2014-04-01

    To evaluate educational resources used in developing and implementing an interactive infection control instructional program for first year (n=26) and second year (n=26) dental hygiene students in a baccalaureate program. An educator's toolkit was used to develop online and interactive learning modalities for teaching infection control content. Descriptive statistics were used to evaluate responses on a post instruction opinion survey on a 5-point Likert-type scale. Following the instructional program, most students reported on an opinion survey that they understood infection control principles (92% first year, 100% second year), felt prepared to work safely in clinic (96% first year, 100% second year) and liked working at their own pace (88% first year, 100% second year). First year students valued the online learning components and were less favorable toward supplemental textbook readings and the limited time to complete all 10 modules. Most second year students valued the interactive workshop but did not take the time to complete the online videos and did not watch all of them. Seventy-nine percent of second year students (n=20) preferred the interactive workshop method over traditional lecture instruction completed during their first year. This paper describes 1 institution's process of developing and implementing an infection control instructional program utilizing an educator's toolkit.

  20. Male leaders participate in Mrs. Ndere's family planning program. Case scenarios for training and group discussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    A case scenario for training of family planning (FP) managers in developing countries and for group discussion follows. A clinic director had learned that two FP programs in another part of the country worked with community members to promote their goals. In one, a manager of a food processing company organized weekly discussions about FP and reproductive health during lunch. The number of factory workers using contraception increased from 12-25%. The director returned to her clinic with plans to recruit influential male community leaders. If she could use male volunteers, she would not need to worry about resources to recruit, hire, and train new people for IEC activities. In her region, awareness of and access to FP were among the lowest countrywide. Less than 50% of men knew about condoms in her region, while more women knew about FP methods. She thought that if males knew more about the benefits of FP, they would support their wives' interest in FP. Increased FP knowledge would likely result in better reproductive health practices and prevention of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), which are prevalent in her region. She invited 8 male leaders to a meeting with 2 IEC outreach workers. The first meeting revolved around the benefits their participation would bestow on the program and community. The men were quite interested. During the second meeting, they examined the objectives of the FP program and produced their own goals. To help the program increase use of family planning methods 5%, the men aimed to increase knowledge of FP and STDs among males and to increase the number of condoms distributed through the program 2-fold in the first year. They wanted to involve other community males. The Ministry would provide condoms if a condom distribution system could be set up and some men suggested that males be trained to distribute condoms. Case discussion questions follow the scenario: e.g., How can community participation benefit the community and the FP

  1. Demanda por grupos, psicologia e controle Group demand, psychology and control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abrahão de Oliveira Santos

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo traz uma reflexão sobre uma capacitação para o trabalho grupal, destinado às equipes das UBSs (Unidades Básica de Saúde do SUS (Sistema Único de Saúde e agentes comunitários de saúde de um município do interior do Estado de São Paulo. Trata-se de analisar o pedido explicitado pela equipe, de mostrar a reflexão a respeito desse pedido, as circunstâncias dos problemas colocados, a experiência dos vários trabalhadores da equipe e a escuta do que se passa do lado da população. Parar para ouvir os parceiros do trabalho e refletir sobre a intervenção fez a equipe trabalhar sua sensibilidade diante das questões da população, do que vem a ser saúde e poder assumir outra postura que não seja a de servir ao controle da população e trabalhar para a construção da sociedade de controle.This article brings a reflection about a training for group work developed with UBSs (Basic Units of Health technical staff from SUS (Unified System of Health and agents of health from a county in the State of São Paulo, Brazil. The procedure involves: (1 to analyze the explicit demand form the crew, (2 to show a reflection about this demand, (3 to show the context of the problems, (4 to consider the experience of workers on the crew, and (5 to listen to what happens from population's standpoint. Stop listening to the job partners and reflecting about the intervention made the crew work.

  2. Exploring participant appreciation of group-based principles for action in community-based physical activity programs for socially vulnerable groups in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herens, Marion; Wagemakers, Annemarie; Vaandrager, Lenneke; Koelen, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Background: Physical inactivity is a core risk factor for non-communicable diseases. In the Netherlands, socially vulnerable groups are relatively less active than groups with higher socio-economic status. Community-based health-enhancing physical activity (CBHEPA) programs aim to empower

  3. Group participants' experiences of a patient-directed group-based education program for the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odgers-Jewell, Kate; Isenring, Elisabeth A; Thomas, Rae; Reidlinger, Dianne P

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to explore the experiences of individuals who participated in a group-based education program, including their motivators in relation to their diabetes management, and the perceived impact of group interactions on participants' experiences and motivation for self-management. Understanding individuals diagnosed with diabetes experiences of group-based education for the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus may guide the development and facilitation of these programs. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with all individuals who participated in the intervention. Using thematic analysis underpinned by self-determination theory, we developed themes that explored participants' motivators in relation to diabetes management and the impact of group interactions on their experiences and motivation. The key themes included knowledge, experience, group interactions and motivation. Participants perceived that the group interactions facilitated further learning and increased motivation, achieved through normalization, peer identification or by talking with, and learning from the experience of others. The results support the use of patient-centred programs that prioritize group interactions over the didactic presentation of content, which may address relevant psychological needs of people diagnosed with type 2 diabetes mellitus, and improve their motivation and health behaviours. Future group-based education programs may benefit from the use of self-determination theory as a framework for intervention design to enhance participant motivation.

  4. Control Systems Security Test Center - FY 2004 Program Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert E. Polk; Alen M. Snyder

    2005-04-01

    In May 2004, the US-CERT Control Systems Security Center (CSSC) was established at Idaho National Laboratory to execute assessment activities to reduce the vulnerability of the nation’s critical infrastructure control systems to terrorist attack. The CSSC implements a program to accomplish the five goals presented in the US-CERT National Strategy for Control Systems Security. This report summarizes the first year funding of startup activities and program achievements that took place in FY 2004 and early FY 2005. This document was prepared for the US-CERT Control Systems Security Center of the National Cyber Security Division of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS). DHS has been tasked under the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to coordinate the overall national effort to enhance the protection of the national critical infrastructure. Homeland Security Presidential Directive HSPD-7 directs federal departments to identify and prioritize the critical infrastructure and protect it from terrorist attack. The US-CERT National Strategy for Control Systems Security was prepared by the National Cyber Security Division to address the control system security component addressed in the National Strategy to Secure Cyberspace and the National Strategy for the Physical Protection of Critical Infrastructures and Key Assets. The US-CERT National Strategy for Control Systems Security identified five high-level strategic goals for improving cyber security of control systems.

  5. Annual report of the Summit Members' Working Group on Controlled Thermonuclear Fusion (Fusin Working Group (FWG))

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    1987-04-01

    The Summit Members' Working Group on Controlled Thermonuclear Fusion (Fusion Working Group (FWG)) was established in 1983 in response to the Declaration of the Heads of State and Government at the Versailles Economic Summit meeting of 1982, and in response to the subsequent report of the Working Group in Technology, Growth and Employment (TGE) as endorsed at the Williamsburg Summit meeting, 1983. This document contains the complete written record of each of the three FWG meetings which include the minutes, lists of attendees, agendas, statements, and summary conclusions as well as the full reports of the Technical Working Party. In addition, there is a pertinent exchange of correspondence between FWG members on the role of the Technical Working Party and a requested background paper on the modalities associated with a possible future ETR project.

  6. Behavioral Effects of an Enhanced Enrichment Program for Group-Housed Sooty Mangabeys (Cercocebus atys)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crast, Jessica; Bloomsmith, Mollie A; Jonesteller, Trina J

    2016-01-01

    Evaluating the behavioral effects of enrichment on animals housed in biomedical facilities is necessary to effectively support their care and wellbeing. We tested the cumulative effects of an enhanced enrichment program on sooty mangabey behavior: locomotion, feeding and foraging, manipulating items in the enclosure, social affiliation, aggression, and abnormal behavior. The enhanced enrichment program included the addition of a substrate (timothy hay), widely distributing small pieces of produce and a forage mixture in the hay, adding structures and perching, and increasing the variety of food items, foraging devices, and other manipulable items. We tested 10 groups living in runs (n = 54) by using an ABA experimental design (phase A, standard enrichment; phase B, enhanced enrichment) and Wilcoxon signed-rank tests to compare behavior across phases. During phase B, subjects significantly increased feeding, foraging, and manipulation of items, and they decreased self-grooming, social affiliation, and aggression. Combined enrichment use increased from approximately 10% to 21% of the mangabeys’ time. Enhanced enrichment did not affect locomotion or abnormal behavior. The increases in feeding, foraging, and manipulation during enhanced enrichment were driven primarily by the subjects’ preference for foraging in the hay: it was the most effective component of the program in promoting feeding and foraging behavior, which comprises the majority of wild sooty mangabeys’ daily activity. Developing an effective, species-appropriate, and comprehensive enrichment program is essential to successfully promote the health and wellbeing of captive NHP. PMID:27931313

  7. Core competencies for shared decision making training programs: insights from an international, interdisciplinary working group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Légaré, France; Moumjid-Ferdjaoui, Nora; Drolet, Renée; Stacey, Dawn; Härter, Martin; Bastian, Hilda; Beaulieu, Marie-Dominique; Borduas, Francine; Charles, Cathy; Coulter, Angela; Desroches, Sophie; Friedrich, Gwendolyn; Gafni, Amiram; Graham, Ian D; Labrecque, Michel; LeBlanc, Annie; Légaré, Jean; Politi, Mary; Sargeant, Joan; Thomson, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Shared decision making is now making inroads in health care professionals' continuing education curriculum, but there is no consensus on what core competencies are required by clinicians for effectively involving patients in health-related decisions. Ready-made programs for training clinicians in shared decision making are in high demand, but existing programs vary widely in their theoretical foundations, length, and content. An international, interdisciplinary group of 25 individuals met in 2012 to discuss theoretical approaches to making health-related decisions, compare notes on existing programs, take stock of stakeholders concerns, and deliberate on core competencies. This article summarizes the results of those discussions. Some participants believed that existing models already provide a sufficient conceptual basis for developing and implementing shared decision making competency-based training programs on a wide scale. Others argued that this would be premature as there is still no consensus on the definition of shared decision making or sufficient evidence to recommend specific competencies for implementing shared decision making. However, all participants agreed that there were 2 broad types of competencies that clinicians need for implementing shared decision making: relational competencies and risk communication competencies. Further multidisciplinary research could broaden and deepen our understanding of core competencies for shared decision making training. Copyright © 2013 The Alliance for Continuing Education in the Health Professions, the Society for Academic Continuing Medical Education, and the Council on CME, Association for Hospital Medical Education.

  8. Control group design: enhancing rigor in research of mind-body therapies for depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinser, Patricia Anne; Robins, Jo Lynne

    2013-01-01

    Although a growing body of research suggests that mind-body therapies may be appropriate to integrate into the treatment of depression, studies consistently lack methodological sophistication particularly in the area of control groups. In order to better understand the relationship between control group selection and methodological rigor, we provide a brief review of the literature on control group design in yoga and tai chi studies for depression, and we discuss challenges we have faced in the design of control groups for our recent clinical trials of these mind-body complementary therapies for women with depression. To address the multiple challenges of research about mind-body therapies, we suggest that researchers should consider 4 key questions: whether the study design matches the research question; whether the control group addresses performance, expectation, and detection bias; whether the control group is ethical, feasible, and attractive; and whether the control group is designed to adequately control for nonspecific intervention effects. Based on these questions, we provide specific recommendations about control group design with the goal of minimizing bias and maximizing validity in future research.

  9. Sleep Promotion Program for Improving Sleep Behaviors in Adolescents: A Randomized Controlled Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Bindu; Bellipady, Sumanth Shetty; Bhat, Shrinivasa Undaru

    2016-01-01

    Aims. The purpose of this pilot trial was to determine the efficacy of sleep promotion program to adapt it for the use of adolescents studying in various schools of Mangalore, India, and evaluate the feasibility issues before conducting a randomized controlled trial in a larger sample of adolescents. Methods. A randomized controlled trial design with stratified random sampling method was used. Fifty-eight adolescents were selected (mean age: 14.02 ± 2.15 years; intervention group, n = 34; control group, n = 24). Self-report questionnaires, including sociodemographic questionnaire with some additional questions on sleep and activities, Sleep Hygiene Index, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, The Cleveland Adolescent Sleepiness Questionnaire, and PedsQL™ Present Functioning Visual Analogue Scale, were used. Results. Insufficient weekday-weekend sleep duration with increasing age of adolescents was observed. The program revealed a significant effect in the experimental group over the control group in overall sleep quality, sleep onset latency, sleep duration, daytime sleepiness, and emotional and overall distress. No significant effect was observed in sleep hygiene and other sleep parameters. All target variables showed significant correlations with each other. Conclusion. The intervention holds a promise for improving the sleep behaviors in healthy adolescents. However, the effect of the sleep promotion program treatment has yet to be proven through a future research. This trial is registered with ISRCTN13083118.

  10. Sleep Promotion Program for Improving Sleep Behaviors in Adolescents: A Randomized Controlled Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bindu John

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. The purpose of this pilot trial was to determine the efficacy of sleep promotion program to adapt it for the use of adolescents studying in various schools of Mangalore, India, and evaluate the feasibility issues before conducting a randomized controlled trial in a larger sample of adolescents. Methods. A randomized controlled trial design with stratified random sampling method was used. Fifty-eight adolescents were selected (mean age: 14.02 ± 2.15 years; intervention group, n=34; control group, n=24. Self-report questionnaires, including sociodemographic questionnaire with some additional questions on sleep and activities, Sleep Hygiene Index, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, The Cleveland Adolescent Sleepiness Questionnaire, and PedsQL™ Present Functioning Visual Analogue Scale, were used. Results. Insufficient weekday-weekend sleep duration with increasing age of adolescents was observed. The program revealed a significant effect in the experimental group over the control group in overall sleep quality, sleep onset latency, sleep duration, daytime sleepiness, and emotional and overall distress. No significant effect was observed in sleep hygiene and other sleep parameters. All target variables showed significant correlations with each other. Conclusion. The intervention holds a promise for improving the sleep behaviors in healthy adolescents. However, the effect of the sleep promotion program treatment has yet to be proven through a future research. This trial is registered with ISRCTN13083118.

  11. Effects of an aquatic exercise program on inhibitory control in children with ADHD: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yu-Kai; Hung, Chiao-Ling; Huang, Chung-Ju; Hatfield, Bradley D; Hung, Tsung-Min

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of this preliminary study was to examine whether an aquatic exercise intervention that involves both aerobic and coordinative exercises influences restraint inhibition in children with ADHD. Thirty participants were assigned to either an aquatic exercise or a wait-list control group. Participants were assessed by Go/Nogo Task and motor ability prior to and after an 8-week exercise intervention (twice per week, 90 min per session) or a control intervention. Significant improvements in accuracy associated with the Nogo stimulus and the coordination of motor skills were observed over time in the exercise group compared with the control group. Only main effects of group were found for reaction time and accuracy associated with the Go stimulus. These findings suggest that an exercise program that involves both quantitative and qualitative exercise characteristics facilitates the restraint inhibition component of behavioral inhibition in children with ADHD.

  12. Communicating Program Outcomes to Encourage Policymaker Support for Evidence-Based State Tobacco Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allison M. Schmidt

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Tobacco use, the leading cause of preventable death in the U.S., can be reduced through state-level tobacco prevention and cessation programs. In the absence of research about how to communicate the need for these programs to policymakers, this qualitative study aimed to understand the motivations and priorities of policymakers in North Carolina, a state that enacted a strong tobacco control program from 2003–2011, but drastically reduced funding in recent years. Six former legislators (three Democrats, three Republicans and three lobbyists for health organizations were interviewed about their attitudes towards tobacco use, support of state-funded programs, and reactions to two policy briefs. Five themes emerged: (1 high awareness of tobacco-related health concerns but limited awareness of program impacts and funding, (2 the primacy of economic concerns in making policy decisions, (3 ideological differences in views of the state’s role in tobacco control, (4 the impact of lobbyist and constituent in-person appeals, and (5 the utility of concise, contextualized data. These findings suggest that building relationships with policymakers to communicate ongoing program outcomes, emphasizing economic data, and developing a constituent advocacy group would be valuable to encourage continued support of state tobacco control programs.

  13. Sand Fly Surveillance and Control on Camp Ramadi, Iraq, as Part of a Leishmaniasis Control Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Vol. 38, no. 2 Journal of Vector Ecology 411 Scientific Note Sand fly surveillance and control on Camp Ramadi, Iraq, as part of a leishmaniasis ...following the 2003 invasion experienced serious risk of infection by several vector-borne pathogens, specifically cutaneous (CL) and visceral leishmaniasis ...as part of a leishmaniasis control program 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e

  14. Intensive Versus Distributed Aphasia Therapy: A Nonrandomized, Parallel-Group, Dosage-Controlled Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dignam, Jade; Copland, David; McKinnon, Eril; Burfein, Penni; O'Brien, Kate; Farrell, Anna; Rodriguez, Amy D

    2015-08-01

    Most studies comparing different levels of aphasia treatment intensity have not controlled the dosage of therapy provided. Consequently, the true effect of treatment intensity in aphasia rehabilitation remains unknown. Aphasia Language Impairment and Functioning Therapy is an intensive, comprehensive aphasia program. We investigated the efficacy of a dosage-controlled trial of Aphasia Language Impairment and Functioning Therapy, when delivered in an intensive versus distributed therapy schedule, on communication outcomes in participants with chronic aphasia. Thirty-four adults with chronic, poststroke aphasia were recruited to participate in an intensive (n=16; 16 hours per week; 3 weeks) versus distributed (n=18; 6 hours per week; 8 weeks) therapy program. Treatment included 48 hours of impairment, functional, computer, and group-based aphasia therapy. Distributed therapy resulted in significantly greater improvements on the Boston Naming Test when compared with intensive therapy immediately post therapy (P=0.04) and at 1-month follow-up (P=0.002). We found comparable gains on measures of participants' communicative effectiveness, communication confidence, and communication-related quality of life for the intensive and distributed treatment conditions at post-therapy and 1-month follow-up. Aphasia Language Impairment and Functioning Therapy resulted in superior clinical outcomes on measures of language impairment when delivered in a distributed versus intensive schedule. The therapy progam had a positive effect on participants' functional communication and communication-related quality of life, regardless of treatment intensity. These findings contribute to our understanding of the effect of treatment intensity in aphasia rehabilitation and have important clinical implications for service delivery models. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  15. Organizational technologies of chronic disease management programs in large rural multispecialty group practice systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamm, Larry; Bolin, Jane Nelson; Kash, Bita A

    2005-01-01

    Four large rural multispecialty group practice systems employ a mix of organizational technologies to provide chronic disease management with measurable impacts on their patient populations and costs. Four technologies-administrative, clinical, information, and social-are proposed as key dimensions for examining disease management programs. The benefits of disease management are recognized by these systems despite marked variability in the organization of the programs. Committees spanning health plans and clinics in the 4 systems and electronic medical records and/or other disease management information systems are important coordinating mechanisms. Increased reliance on nurses for patient education and care coordination in all 4 systems reflects significant extension of clinical and social technologies in the management of patient care. The promise of disease management as offered by these systems and other auspices are considered.

  16. Evaluating the Maturity of Cybersecurity Programs for Building Control Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glantz, Clifford S.; Somasundaram, Sriram; Mylrea, Michael E.; Underhill, Ronald M.; Nicholls, Andrew K.

    2016-08-29

    The cyber-physical security threat to buildings is complex, non-linear, and rapidly evolving as operational and information technologies converge and connect buildings to cyberspace. Cyberattacks on buildings can exploit smart building controls and breach corporate networks, causing financial and reputational damage. This may result in the loss of sensitive building information or the disruption of, or damage to, the systems necessary for the safe and efficient operation of buildings. For the buildings and facility infrastructure, there is a need for a robust national cybersecurity strategy for buildings, guidance on the selection and implementation of appropriate cybersecurity controls for buildings, an approach to evaluate the maturity and adequacy of the cybersecurity programs. To provide an approach for evaluating the maturity of the cybersecurity programs for building control systems, the US Department of Energy’s widely used Cybersecurity Capability and Maturity Model (C2M2) has been adapted into a building control systems version. The revised model, the Buildings-C2M2 (B-C2M2) provides maturity level indicators for cybersecurity programmatic domains. A “B-C2M2 Lite” version allows facility managers and building control system engineers, or information technology personnel to perform rapid self-assessments of their cybersecurity program. Both tools have been pilot tested on several facilities. This paper outlines the concept of a maturity model, describes the B-C2M2 tools, presents results and observations from the pilot assessments, and lays out plans for future work.

  17. Self-Image Development: A Chicano Enfasis. Self-Programmed Counseling and Self-Programmed Control. Instructor's Guide = Desarrollo de la Imagen Propia: Enfasis en el Chicano. Sistema de Consejo y Control Auto-Programado. Manuel del Profesor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mireles, S. Raymond

    Self-Programmed Counseling, the instructor's guidance, and Self-Programmed Control (SPC), the student's response, was initially developed by Title III Project USTED (United Students and Teachers for Educational Development) for Mexican American students on academic probation to use on a non-credit, special group counseling basis. As part of a…

  18. Experimental control of a fluidic pinball using genetic programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raibaudo, Cedric; Zhong, Peng; Noack, Bernd R.; Martinuzzi, Robert J.

    2017-11-01

    The wake stabilization of a triangular cluster of three rotating cylinders was investigated in the present study. Experiments were performed at Reynolds number Re 6000, and compared with URANS-2D simulations at same flow conditions. 2D2C PIV measurements and constant temperature anemometry were used to characterize the flow without and with actuation. Open-loop actuation was first considered for the identification of particular control strategies. Machine learning control was also implemented for the experimental study. Linear genetic programming has been used for the optimization of open-loop parameters and closed-loop controllers. Considering a cost function J based on the fluctuations of the velocity measured by the hot-wire sensor, significant performances were achieved using the machine learning approach. The present work is supported by the senior author's (R. J. Martinuzzi) NSERC discovery Grant. C. Raibaudo acknowledges the financial support of the University of Calgary Eyes-High PDF program.

  19. Group participants? experiences of a patient-directed group-based education program for the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Kate Odgers-Jewell; Isenring, Elisabeth A.; Rae Thomas; Dianne P Reidlinger

    2017-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to explore the experiences of individuals who participated in a group-based education program, including their motivators in relation to their diabetes management, and the perceived impact of group interactions on participants? experiences and motivation for self-management. Understanding individuals diagnosed with diabetes experiences of group-based education for the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus may guide the development and facilitation of...

  20. Moderators of the effects of indicated group and bibliotherapy cognitive behavioral depression prevention programs on adolescents' depressive symptoms and depressive disorder onset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Sina; Rohde, Paul; Gau, Jeff M; Stice, Eric

    2015-12-01

    We investigated factors hypothesized to moderate the effects of cognitive behavioral group-based (CB group) and bibliotherapy depression prevention programs. Using data from two trials (N = 631) wherein adolescents (M age = 15.5, 62% female, 61% Caucasian) with depressive symptoms were randomized into CB group, CB bibliotherapy, or an educational brochure control condition, we evaluated the moderating effects of individual, demographic, and environmental factors on depressive symptom reductions and major depressive disorder (MDD) onset over 2-year follow-up. CB group and bibliotherapy participants had lower depressive symptoms than controls at posttest but these effects did not persist. No MDD prevention effects were present in the merged data. Relative to controls, elevated depressive symptoms and motivation to reduce depression amplified posttest depressive symptom reduction for CB group, and elevated baseline symptoms amplified posttest symptom reduction effects of CB bibliotherapy. Conversely, elevated substance use mitigated the effectiveness of CB group relative to controls on MDD onset over follow-up. Findings suggest that both CB prevention programs are more beneficial for youth with at least moderate depressive symptoms, and that CB group is more effective for youth motivated to reduce their symptoms. Results also imply that substance use reduces the effectiveness of CB group-based depression prevention. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Moderators of the Effects of Indicated Group and Bibliotherapy Cognitive Behavioral Depression Prevention Programs on Adolescents’ Depressive Symptoms and Depressive Disorder Onset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Sina; Rohde, Paul; Gau, Jeff M.; Stice, Eric

    2015-01-01

    We investigated factors hypothesized to moderate the effects of cognitive behavioral group-based (CB group) and bibliotherapy depression prevention programs. Using data from two trials (N = 631) wherein adolescents (M age = 15.5, 62% female, 61% Caucasian) with depressive symptoms were randomized into CB group, CB bibliotherapy, or an educational brochure control condition, we evaluated the moderating effects of individual, demographic, and environmental factors on depressive symptom reductions and major depressive disorder (MDD) onset over 2-year follow-up. CB group and bibliotherapy participants had lower depressive symptoms than controls at posttest but these effects did not persist. No MDD prevention effects were present in the merged data. Relative to controls, elevated depressive symptoms and motivation to reduce depression amplified posttest depressive symptom reduction for CB group, and elevated baseline symptoms amplified posttest symptom reduction effects of CB bibliotherapy. Conversely, elevated substance use mitigated the effectiveness of CB group relative to controls on MDD onset over follow-up. Findings suggest that both CB prevention programs are more beneficial for youth with at least moderate depressive symptoms, and that CB group is more effective for youth motivated to reduce their symptoms. Results also imply that substance use reduces the effectiveness of CB group-based depression prevention. PMID:26480199

  2. The implementation of problem-based learning in collaborative groups in a chiropractic program in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Win, Ni Ni; Nadarajah, Vishna Devi V; Win, Daw Khin

    2015-01-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) is usually conducted in small-group learning sessions with approximately eight students per facilitator. In this study, we implemented a modified version of PBL involving collaborative groups in an undergraduate chiropractic program and assessed its pedagogical effectiveness. This study was conducted at the International Medical University, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, and involved the 2012 chiropractic student cohort. Six PBL cases were provided to chiropractic students, consisting of three PBL cases for which learning resources were provided and another three PBL cases for which learning resources were not provided. Group discussions were not continuously supervised, since only one facilitator was present. The students' perceptions of PBL in collaborative groups were assessed with a questionnaire that was divided into three domains: motivation, cognitive skills, and perceived pressure to work. Thirty of the 31 students (97%) participated in the study. PBL in collaborative groups was significantly associated with positive responses regarding students' motivation, cognitive skills, and perceived pressure to work (Plearning resources increased motivation and cognitive skills (Plearning resources.

  3. The development and feasibility of an online aphasia group intervention and networking program - TeleGAIN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitt, Rachelle; Theodoros, Deborah; Hill, Anne J; Russell, Trevor

    2017-09-04

    Aphasia group therapy offers many benefits, however people with aphasia report difficulty accessing groups and speech-language pathologists are faced with many challenges in providing aphasia group therapy. Telerehabilitation may offer an alternative service delivery option. An online aphasia group therapy program - Telerehabilitation Group Aphasia Intervention and Networking (TeleGAIN) - has been developed according to the guidelines of the Medical Research Council (MRC) framework for complex interventions. The purpose of this paper is to describe the development of TeleGAIN and the results of a pilot trial to determine feasibility and acceptability. The development of TeleGAIN was informed through literature reviews in relevant topic areas, consideration of expert opinion and application of the social cognitive theory. TeleGAIN was then modelled through a feasibility pilot trial with four people with aphasia. TeleGAIN appeared to be feasible and acceptable to participants and able to be implemented as planned. Participant satisfaction with treatment was high and results suggested some potential for improvements in language functioning and communication-related quality of life. TeleGAIN appeared to be feasible and acceptable, however the study highlighted issues related to technology, clinical implementation and participant-specific factors that should be addressed prior to a larger trial.

  4. Strategies to optimize participation in diabetes prevention programs following gestational diabetes: a focus group study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaberi Dasgupta

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: We performed a qualitative study among women within 5 years of Gestational Diabetes (GDM diagnosis. Our aim was to identify the key elements that would enhance participation in a type 2 diabetes (DM2 prevention program. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Potential participants received up to three invitation letters from their GDM physician. Four focus groups were held. Discussants were invited to comment on potential facilitators/barriers to participation and were probed on attitudes towards meal replacement and Internet/social media tools. Recurring themes were identified through qualitative content analysis of discussion transcripts. RESULTS: Among the 1,201 contacted and 79 eligible/interested, 29 women attended a focus group discussion. More than half of discussants were overweight/obese, and less than half were physically active. For DM2 prevention, a strong need for social support to achieve changes in dietary and physical activity habits was expressed. In this regard, face-to-face interactions with peers and professionals were preferred, with adjunctive roles for Internet/social media. Further, direct participation of partners/spouses in a DM2 prevention program was viewed as important to enhance support for behavioural change at home. Discussants highlighted work and child-related responsibilities as potential barriers to participation, and emphasized the importance of childcare support to allow attendance. Meal replacements were viewed with little interest, with concerns that their use would provide a poor example of eating behaviour to children. CONCLUSIONS: Among women within 5 years of a GDM diagnosis who participated in a focus group discussion, participation in a DM2 prevention program would be enhanced by face-to-face interactions with professionals and peers, provision of childcare support, and inclusion of spouses/partners.

  5. Strategies to optimize participation in diabetes prevention programs following gestational diabetes: a focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, Kaberi; Da Costa, Deborah; Pillay, Sabrina; De Civita, Mirella; Gougeon, Réjeanne; Leong, Aaron; Bacon, Simon; Stotland, Stephen; Chetty, V Tony; Garfield, Natasha; Majdan, Agnieszka; Meltzer, Sara

    2013-01-01

    We performed a qualitative study among women within 5 years of Gestational Diabetes (GDM) diagnosis. Our aim was to identify the key elements that would enhance participation in a type 2 diabetes (DM2) prevention program. Potential participants received up to three invitation letters from their GDM physician. Four focus groups were held. Discussants were invited to comment on potential facilitators/barriers to participation and were probed on attitudes towards meal replacement and Internet/social media tools. Recurring themes were identified through qualitative content analysis of discussion transcripts. Among the 1,201 contacted and 79 eligible/interested, 29 women attended a focus group discussion. More than half of discussants were overweight/obese, and less than half were physically active. For DM2 prevention, a strong need for social support to achieve changes in dietary and physical activity habits was expressed. In this regard, face-to-face interactions with peers and professionals were preferred, with adjunctive roles for Internet/social media. Further, direct participation of partners/spouses in a DM2 prevention program was viewed as important to enhance support for behavioural change at home. Discussants highlighted work and child-related responsibilities as potential barriers to participation, and emphasized the importance of childcare support to allow attendance. Meal replacements were viewed with little interest, with concerns that their use would provide a poor example of eating behaviour to children. Among women within 5 years of a GDM diagnosis who participated in a focus group discussion, participation in a DM2 prevention program would be enhanced by face-to-face interactions with professionals and peers, provision of childcare support, and inclusion of spouses/partners.

  6. Randomized controlled trial of group cognitive behavioral therapy compared to a discussion group for co-morbid anxiety and depression in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuthrich, V M; Rapee, R M; Kangas, M; Perini, S

    2016-03-01

    Co-morbid anxiety and depression in older adults is associated with worse physical and mental health outcomes and poorer response to psychological and pharmacological treatments in older adults. However, there is a paucity of research focused on testing the efficacy of the co-morbid treatment of anxiety and depression in older adults using psychological interventions. Accordingly, the primary objective of the current study was to test the effects of a group cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) program in treating co-morbid anxiety and depression in a sample of older age adults. A total of 133 community-dwelling participants aged ⩾60 years (mean age = 67.35, s.d. = 5.44, male = 59) with both an anxiety disorder and unipolar mood disorder, as assessed on the Anxiety Disorder Interview Schedule (ADIS), were randomly allocated to an 11-week CBT group or discussion group. Participants with Mini-Mental State Examination scores Depression Scale. Both conditions resulted in significant improvements over time on all diagnostic, symptom and wellbeing measures. Significant group × time interaction effects emerged at post-treatment only for diagnostic severity of the primary disorder, mean severity of all anxiety disorders, mood disorders, and all disorders, and recovery rates on primary disorder. Group CBT produced faster and sustained improvements in anxiety and depression on diagnostic severity and recovery rates compared to an active control in older adults.

  7. Preliminary Evaluation of the Group Teen Triple P Program for Parents of Teenagers Making the Transition to High School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ralph, Alan; Sanders, Matthew R.

    2003-01-01

    Group Teen Triple P is a brief group parenting program for parents of teenagers. This paper describes the initial evaluation of a trial of the program offered to parents of students entering high school. Participating parents reported significant reductions in conflict with their teenager, and on measures of laxness, over-reactivity, and…

  8. Effects of an Integrated Stress Management Program (ISMP) for Psychologically Distressed Students: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sunah; Lee, Hyangkyu; Kim, Hyunlye; Noh, Dabok; Lee, Hyunhwa

    2016-07-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effects of an integrated stress management program (ISMP) on college life stress, stress coping, psychological distress, and cortisol among male college students. Out of 137 initially enrolled students, 99 participants were identified as distressed subjects and randomly assigned to either the ISMP or control group. Ultimately, 84 participants (43: experimental, 41: control) completed pretest-posttest. The experimental group received eight 2-hr sessions over 4 weeks. Stress and psychological distress decreased significantly, whereas stress coping and cortisol did not improve significantly. Further studies with longer follow-up periods and physiological interventions are required. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Control group design, contamination and drop-out in exercise oncology trials: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steins Bisschop, Charlotte N; Courneya, Kerry S; Velthuis, Miranda J; Monninkhof, Evelyn M; Jones, Lee W; Friedenreich, Christine; van der Wall, Elsken; Peeters, Petra H M; May, Anne M

    2015-01-01

    Important considerations for exercise trials in cancer patients are contamination and differential drop-out among the control group members that might jeopardize the internal validity. This systematic review provides an overview of different control groups design characteristics of exercise-oncology trials and explores the association with contamination and drop-out rates. Randomized controlled exercise-oncology trials from two Cochrane reviews were included. Additionally, a computer-aided search using Medline (Pubmed), Embase and CINAHL was conducted after completion date of the Cochrane reviews. Eligible studies were classified according to three control group design characteristics: the exercise instruction given to controls before start of the study (exercise allowed or not); and the intervention the control group was offered during (any (e.g., education sessions or telephone contacts) or none) or after (any (e.g., cross-over or exercise instruction) or none) the intervention period. Contamination (yes or no) and excess drop-out rates (i.e., drop-out rate of the control group minus the drop-out rate exercise group) were described according to the three design characteristics of the control group and according to the combinations of these three characteristics; so we additionally made subgroups based on combinations of type and timing of instructions received. 40 exercise-oncology trials were included based on pre-specified eligibility criteria. The lowest contamination (7.1% of studies) and low drop-out rates (excess drop-out rate -4.7±9.2) were found in control groups offered an intervention after the intervention period. When control groups were offered an intervention both during and after the intervention period, contamination (0%) and excess drop-out rates (-10.0±12.8%) were even lower. Control groups receiving an intervention during and after the study intervention period have lower contamination and drop-out rates. The present findings can be

  10. Four-year follow-up of a randomized controlled trial of triple p group for parent and child outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrichs, Nina; Kliem, Sören; Hahlweg, Kurt

    2014-04-01

    Approximately 15-20% of children experience behavioral and/or emotional difficulties. Evidence-based treatment will likely not be sufficient to reduce the prevalence of these difficulties in children and adolescents. Effective prevention programs are therefore also needed to enable families access to support at multiple points across the lifecourse. The aim of the current investigation was to evaluate the 4-year efficacy of the group-based Triple P (Positive Parenting Program) as a prevention program administered universally. Seventeen preschools were randomly assigned to Triple P (n = 11 preschools, 186 families) or a no parenting intervention control group (n = 6 preschools, 94 families). Long-term efficacy was analyzed with hierarchical linear models using maternal and paternal self-report measures. Mothers and fathers from the intervention preschool group reported significant reductions in dysfunctional parenting behavior (d = 0.24 and 0.19, respectively). Mothers also reported a less steep decline from pre- to post-intervention in positive parenting behavior, which was maintained 4 years later (d = 0.38). Fathers from intervention preschools reported a delayed less steep decline in positive parenting during the follow-up (d = 0.33). In addition, mothers from intervention preschools reported immediate improvement in child behavior problems during the program while mothers from control preschools did not report this immediate change. However, with mothers from intervention preschools reporting more child behavior problems at baseline, the effect disappeared by the fourth year (d = 0.19). The results support the long-term efficacy of the Triple P-group program as a universal prevention intervention for changing parenting behavior while there was little evidence for maintenance of change in behavior problems.

  11. Servicemembers' Group Life Insurance Traumatic Injury Protection program--genitourinary losses. Interim final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-02

    The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) is issuing this interim final rule that amends the regulations governing the Servicemembers' Group Life Insurance Traumatic Injury Protection (TSGLI) program by adding certain genitourinary (GU) system losses to the TSGLI Schedule of Losses and defining terms relevant to these new losses. This amendment is necessary to make qualifying GU losses a basis for paying GU-injured Servicemembers TSGLI benefits. The intended effect is to expand the list of losses for which TSGLI payments can be made.

  12. Servicemembers' Group Life Insurance Traumatic Injury Protection Program--genitourinary losses. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) is issuing this final rule that amends the regulations governing the Servicemembers' Group Life Insurance Traumatic Injury Protection (TSGLI) program by adding certain genitourinary (GU) system losses to the TSGLI Schedule of Losses and defining terms relevant to these new losses. This amendment is necessary to make qualifying GU losses a basis for paying TSGLI benefits to servicemembers with severe GU injuries. The intended effect is to expand the list of losses for which TSGLI payments can be made. This document adopts as a final rule, without change, the interim final rule published in the Federal Register on December 2, 2011.

  13. The quality of control groups in nonrandomized studies published in the Journal of Hand Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Shepard P; Malay, Sunitha; Chung, Kevin C

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate control group selection in nonrandomized studies published in the Journal of Hand Surgery American (JHS). We reviewed all papers published in JHS in 2013 to identify studies that used nonrandomized control groups. Data collected included type of study design and control group characteristics. We then appraised studies to determine whether authors discussed confounding and selection bias and how they controlled for confounding. Thirty-seven nonrandomized studies were published in JHS in 2013. The source of control was either the same institution as the study group, a different institution, a database, or not provided in the manuscript. Twenty-nine (78%) studies statistically compared key characteristics between control and study group. Confounding was controlled with matching, exclusion criteria, or regression analysis. Twenty-two (59%) papers explicitly discussed the threat of confounding and 18 (49%) identified sources of selection bias. In our review of nonrandomized studies published in JHS, papers had well-defined controls that were similar to the study group, allowing for reasonable comparisons. However, we identified substantial confounding and bias that were not addressed as explicit limitations, which might lead the reader to overestimate the scientific validity of the data. Incorporating a brief discussion of control group selection in scientific manuscripts should help readers interpret the study more appropriately. Authors, reviewers, and editors should strive to address this component of clinical importance. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Optimal traffic control in highway transportation networks using linear programming

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Yanning

    2014-06-01

    This article presents a framework for the optimal control of boundary flows on transportation networks. The state of the system is modeled by a first order scalar conservation law (Lighthill-Whitham-Richards PDE). Based on an equivalent formulation of the Hamilton-Jacobi PDE, the problem of controlling the state of the system on a network link in a finite horizon can be posed as a Linear Program. Assuming all intersections in the network are controllable, we show that the optimization approach can be extended to an arbitrary transportation network, preserving linear constraints. Unlike previously investigated transportation network control schemes, this framework leverages the intrinsic properties of the Halmilton-Jacobi equation, and does not require any discretization or boolean variables on the link. Hence this framework is very computational efficient and provides the globally optimal solution. The feasibility of this framework is illustrated by an on-ramp metering control example.

  15. Stochastic Control of Energy Efficient Buildings: A Semidefinite Programming Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Xiao [ORNL; Dong, Jin [ORNL; Djouadi, Seddik M [ORNL; Nutaro, James J [ORNL; Kuruganti, Teja [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    The key goal in energy efficient buildings is to reduce energy consumption of Heating, Ventilation, and Air- Conditioning (HVAC) systems while maintaining a comfortable temperature and humidity in the building. This paper proposes a novel stochastic control approach for achieving joint performance and power control of HVAC. We employ a constrained Stochastic Linear Quadratic Control (cSLQC) by minimizing a quadratic cost function with a disturbance assumed to be Gaussian. The problem is formulated to minimize the expected cost subject to a linear constraint and a probabilistic constraint. By using cSLQC, the problem is reduced to a semidefinite optimization problem, where the optimal control can be computed efficiently by Semidefinite programming (SDP). Simulation results are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness and power efficiency by utilizing the proposed control approach.

  16. Cyber Security Testing and Training Programs for Industrial Control Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel Noyes

    2012-03-01

    Service providers rely on industrial control systems (ICS) to manage the flow of water at dams, open breakers on power grids, control ventilation and cooling in nuclear power plants, and more. In today's interconnected environment, this can present a serious cyber security challenge. To combat this growing challenge, government, private industry, and academia are working together to reduce cyber risks. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is a key contributor to the Department of Energy National SCADA Test Bed (NSTB) and the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Control Systems Security Program (CSSP), both of which focus on improving the overall security posture of ICS in the national critical infrastructure. In support of the NSTB, INL hosts a dedicated SCADA testing facility which consists of multiple control systems supplied by leading national and international manufacturers. Within the test bed, INL researchers systematically examine control system components and work to identify vulnerabilities. In support of the CSSP, INL develops and conducts training courses which are designed to increase awareness and defensive capabilities for IT/Control System professionals. These trainings vary from web-based cyber security trainings for control systems engineers to more advanced hands-on training that culminates with a Red Team/ Blue Team exercise that is conducted within an actual control systems environment. INL also provides staffing and operational support to the DHS Industrial Control Systems Cyber Emergency Response Team (ICS-CERT) Security Operations Center which responds to and analyzes control systems cyber incidents across the 18 US critical infrastructure sectors.

  17. GrOup based physical Activity for oLder adults (GOAL) randomized controlled trial: study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beauchamp, Mark R; Harden, Samantha M; Wolf, Svenja A; Rhodes, Ryan E; Liu, Yan; Dunlop, William L; Schmader, Toni; Sheel, Andrew W; Zumbo, Bruno D; Estabrooks, Paul A

    2015-06-27

    Physical activity has health benefits across the lifespan, yet only 13 % of Canadian older adults are sufficiently active. Results from a number of observational studies indicate that adults display positive preferences for exercising with others of a similar age and same gender, and that intra-group age- and gender-similarity are associated with elevated exercise adherence. However, research has yet to experimentally examine the extent to which intra-group age- and gender-related similarity affect exercise adherence behaviors. The GrOup-based physical Activity for oLder adults (GOAL) trial is a three-arm randomized control trial that will examine the efficacy of two different group-based exercise programs for older adults (informed by the tenets of self-categorization theory) in relation to a standard group-based exercise program. Within this manuscript we outline the design and proposed evaluation of the GOAL trial. The first arm is comprised of exercise groups made up of participants of a similar-age and of the same gender; the second arm consists of groups with similar-aged mixed gender participants; the control arm is comprised of mixed-aged mixed gender participants. We aim to compare the adherence rates of participants across conditions, as well as potential moderation effects and mediating mechanisms. Results from this trial will inform intervention designs to improve the exercise adherence behaviors of older adult. At a systems-level, should support be derived for the efficacy of the interventions tested in this trial, changing group composition (i.e., age, gender) represents a feasible program adaptation for physical activity centers. ClinicalTrials.gov # NCT02023632 . Registered December 13, 2013.

  18. Using Exploratory Focus Groups to Inform the Development of a Peer-Supported Pulmonary Rehabilitation Program: DIRECTIONS FOR FURTHER RESEARCH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poureslami, Iraj; Camp, Pat; Shum, Jessica; Afshar, Rowshanak; Tang, Tricia; FitzGerald, John Mark

    2017-01-01

    There has been limited research on the role of peer support in self-management for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) attending pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) programs. This research explored patient acceptability of "peer supporters" in promoting sustained self-management practices after PR and to assess their perceived self-efficacy to manage their disease. This qualitative study used focus groups and individual interviews to identify perspectives of peer supporters and benefits of participation in a PR program. The analysis included systematically reading and reviewing transcripts of the sessions, establishing themes, and sorting responses into thematic categories. A total of 28 patients with COPD (15 males) participated in either a focus group or interview. The majority of participants considered peer supporters to be good facilitators for motivating ongoing exercise after completing PR. Exercise sessions were viewed as extremely beneficial for disease management, and many were satisfied with the care they had received. Most subjects wanted to receive followup sessions with either a professional or peer after the intensive phase of PR. Overall, the concept of having a peer supporter involved in ongoing maintenance of self-management efforts after PR was generally viewed as positive. Integrating a peer support model into PR programs may improve better long-term health outcomes for COPD management as many participants endorsed the need for continued support after the program. It also improved our understanding of the role of "peer supports" in exercise and self-care maintenance after PR. The selection of peers and the specific model used warrants further investigation in a randomized controlled trial.

  19. A Randomized Controlled Trial of a Parent Training and Emotion Socialization Program for Families of Hyperactive Preschool-Aged Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, Sharonne D.; Harvey, Elizabeth A.; Roberts, Jasmin L.; Wichowski, Kayla; Lugo-Candelas, Claudia I.

    2013-01-01

    The present study evaluated the effectiveness of a parent training and emotion socialization program designed specifically for hyperactive preschoolers. Participants were 31 preschool-aged children whose parents were randomly assigned to a parent training (PT) or waitlist (WL) control group. PT parents took part in a 14-week parenting program that…

  20. Assessing the Performance of the "Counterfactual as Self-Estimated by Program Participants": Results from a Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Christoph Emanuel; Gaus, Hansjoerg

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we test an alternative approach to creating a counterfactual basis for estimating individual and average treatment effects. Instead of using control/comparison groups or before-measures, the so-called Counterfactual as Self-Estimated by Program Participants (CSEPP) relies on program participants' self-estimations of their own…

  1. An urban intergenerational program for cancer control education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, J I; Barg, F K; Norman, S; Mccorkle, R

    1997-01-01

    Recognizing the disparities in cancer morbidity and mortality that exist between African Americans and whites, an urban university and its neighborhood community undertook the development of an education program to transfer state-of-the-art cancer prevention, detection, and treatment information from an academic medical center to community residents, including school-age children. An intergenerational, multilevel intervention was developed to: 1) assess the health beliefs of the community, 2) identify, develop, and train an intergenerational group of community residents who would serve as health educators, and 3) promote behavioral change among the target population. Ten community residents were trained as educators. Over the course of two years they conducted cancer education programs that reached 775 adults. During the same period, the school-based educational intervention reached 264 seventh-grade students. Implications for the design and implementation of community-based cancer education programs in this African American community are identified.

  2. Effectiveness of interactive discussion group in suicide risk assessment among general nurses in Taiwan: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chia-Yi; Lin, Yi-Yin; Yeh, Mei Chang; Huang, Lian-Hua; Chen, Shaw-Ji; Liao, Shih-Cheng; Lee, Ming-Been

    2014-11-01

    The evidence of suicide prevention training for nurses is scarce. Strategies to enhance general nurses' ability in suicide risk assessment are critical to develop effective training programs in general medical settings. This study was aimed to examine the effectiveness of an interactive discussion group in a suicide prevention training program for general nurses. In this randomized study with two groups of pre-post study design, the sample was recruited from the Medical, Surgical, and Emergency/Intensive Care Sectors of a 2000-bed general hospital via stratified randomization. Among the 111 nurses, 57 participants randomly assigned to the control group received a two-hour baseline suicide gatekeeper lecture, and 54 participants assigning to the experimental group received an additional five-hour group discussion about suicide risk assessment skills. Using a case vignette, the nurses discussed and assessed suicide risk factors specified in a 10-item Chinese SAD PERSONS Scale during a group discussion intervention. The findings revealed that the nurses achieved significant and consistent improvements of risk identification and assessment after the intervention without influencing their mental health status for assessing suicide risks. The result suggested an effective approach of interactive group discussion for facilitating critical thinking and learning suicide risk assessment skills among general nurses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Disease knowledge after an educational program in patients with GERD – a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petersen Hermod

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patient education has proved beneficial in several but not all chronic disease. Inconsistent findings may rely on varying educational effects of various programs and differential effects on subgroups of patients. Patients' increase in disease knowledge may serve as a feedback to the educator on how well the education program works – but may not be associated to relevant clinical outcomes like quality of life (QoL. This study aimed to investigate the effects of a group based education program for patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD on disease knowledge and the association between knowledge and QoL. Methods Patients with GERD were randomly allocated to education (102 patients or control (109 patients. The education program was designed as a structured dialogue conveying information about pathophysiology, pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatment of GERD, patients' rights and use of healthcare. Outcomes were a 24 item knowledge test on GERD (score 0 – 24 2 and 12 months after the educational program and disease specific and general QoL (Digestive symptoms and disease impact, DSIQ, and General Health Questionnaire, GHQ. Results Patients allocated to education achieved higher knowledge test scores than controls at 2 months (17.0 vs. 13.1, p Conclusion A group based education program for patients with GERD designed as a structured dialogue increased patients' disease knowledge, which was retained after 1 year. Changes in GERD-knowledge were not associated with change in QoL. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT0061850

  4. Diabetes self-care behaviors and disease control in support group attenders and nonattenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiou, Chii-Jun

    2014-12-01

    The prevalence rate and mortality rate of diabetes continue to increase annually. Complications associated with poor control of diabetes include renal dialysis, amputation, heart disease, stroke, retinopathy, and vascular disease, all of which have an impact at the individual, family, and national level. This study compares diabetes self-care behavior and disease control efficacy between attenders and nonattenders of a diabetes support group. We used a questionnaire with good validity and reliability to conduct a cross-sectional survey. Diabetes support groups have been established throughout Taiwan for around 2 years. Participants for this study were recruited randomly from a register of support group participants. Support group instructors were asked to collect questionnaires from those attending and not attending their support groups. Ten groups volunteered to participate in this study. We received 147 valid questionnaires from participants attending support groups (attenders) and 93 questionnaires from participants who did not (nonattenders). There were no statistically significant differences between support group attenders and nonattenders in terms of age, educational level, or time since diagnosis of diabetes. Thus, we assumed these two groups as adequately similar to conduct statistical comparisons. Scores for diabetes self-care behavior, disease control, and use of the diabetes passport were all significantly higher among support group attenders than their nonattender peers. Results indicate that people attending diabetes support groups are more likely to have better self-care behavior and disease control than nonattenders. Therefore, we suggest that the government actively promote policies supportive of diabetes support groups.

  5. A multi-site controlled trial of a cognitive skills program for mentally disordered offenders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rees-Jones Angharad

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The effectiveness of offending behaviour programs in forensic mental health settings is not well established. Thus this study aimed to evaluate the Reasoning and Rehabilitation Mental Health program (R&R2 MHP among a mentally disordered offender (MDO population. Methods A sample of 121 adult males drawn from 10 forensic mental health sites completed questionnaires at baseline and post-treatment to assess violent attitudes, locus of control, social problem-solving and anger. An informant measure of social and psychological functioning, including disruptive behaviour, was completed by unit staff at the same time. At three month follow-up patients completed again the violent attitudes and locus of control questionnaires. The data of 67 patients who participated in the group condition were compared with 54 waiting-list controls who received treatment as usual. Results 78% of group participants completed the program. In contrast to controls, significant treatment effects were found at outcome on self-reported measures of violent attitudes, rational problem-solving and anger cognitions. Improvements were endorsed by informant ratings of social and psychological functioning within the establishments. At follow-up significant treatment effects were found for both violent attitudes and locus of control. Conclusions R&R2 MHP was effective in a sample of MDOs and had a comparatively low drop-out rate. Future research should use a randomized controlled design.

  6. Brief Group Intervention Using Emotional Freedom Techniques for Depression in College Students: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawson Church

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Two hundred thirty-eight first-year college students were assessed using the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI. Thirty students meeting the BDI criteria for moderate to severe depression were randomly assigned to either a treatment or control group. The treatment group received four 90-minute group sessions of EFT (Emotional Freedom Techniques, a novel treatment that combines exposure, cognitive reprocessing, and somatic stimulation. The control group received no treatment. Posttests were conducted 3 weeks later on those that completed all requirements (N=18. The EFT group (n=9 had significantly more depression at baseline than the control group (n=9 (EFT BDI mean=23.44, SD=2.1 versus control BDI mean=20.33, SD=2.1. After controlling for baseline BDI score, the EFT group had significantly less depression than the control group at posttest, with a mean score in the “nondepressed” range (P=.001; EFT BDI mean=6.08, SE=1.8 versus control BDI mean=18.04, SE=1.8. Cohen's d was 2.28, indicating a very strong effect size. These results are consistent with those noted in other studies of EFT that included an assessment for depression and indicate the clinical usefulness of EFT as a brief, cost-effective, and efficacious treatment.

  7. FORMATION CONTROL OF MULTIPLE UNICYCLE-TYPE ROBOTS USING LIE GROUP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youwei Dong

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the formation control of a multi-robots system is investigated. The proposed control law, based on Lie group theory, is applied to control the formation of a group of unicycle-type robots. The communication topology is supposed to be a rooted directed acyclic graph and fixed. Some numerical simulations using Matlab are made to validate our results.

  8. A QUALITATIVE METHODOLOGY FOR THEORY ELUCIDATION, EXPLICATION, AND DEVELOPMENT APPLIED WITHIN AN INTENSIVE GROUP PSYCHOTHERAPY PROGRAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Williams

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Mental health day treatment (MHDT programs provide intensive group psychotherapy for patients with psychiatric pathology complicated by personality disorder. Recently, researchers have begun to examine specific components of these programs. Of importance is the theoretical rationale, which may be challenging to understand given the complexity of the treatment. The purpose of this project was to investigate the theory of one MHDT program. Community-based participatory research was chosen and accordingly, all stages of the project were collaborative with the MHDT clinical team. We engaged in a six-month, iterative process of weekly action-reflection cycles wherein material was discussed, analyzed for themes, and the findings presented back to the team to further the conversation. Results summarize this program’s Theories of Dysfunction and Therapeutic Change, which were primarily psychodynamic, but also integrative through assimilation of elements from other paradigms. Usefulness of the research process is discussed and recommendations are provided for others wishing to undergo a similar process.

  9. Overview of the fatigue/fracture/life working group program at the Lewis Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcgaw, Michael A.

    1989-01-01

    Constitutive and life prediction models are developed and verified for materials typically used in hot gas path components of reusable space propulsion systems over the range of relevant operating environments. The efforts were centered on the development of crack initiation life prediction methods, while the efforts of a counterpart group were centered on the development of cyclic crack propagation life prediction methods. The complexion of the active tasks are presented. A significant new task started this year will incorporate the various material constitutive and life prediction models developed in this program into a comprehensive creep-fatigue damage analysis and life assessment computer code. The program will function as a postprocessor to general structural analysis programs (such as finite element or boundary element codes) using the output of such analyses (stress, strain, and temperature fields as functions of time) as the input to the damage analysis and life assessment code. The code will be designed to execute on engineering/scientific workstations and will feature a windowing, mouse-driven user interface. Current plans call for the code to be finished and made available for use in mid 1991.

  10. A Multi-Family Group Intervention for Adolescent Depression: The BEST MOOD Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, Lucinda A; Lewis, Andrew J; Toumbourou, John W; Knight, Tess; Bertino, Melanie D; Pryor, Reima

    2017-06-01

    Depression is the most common mental disorder for young people, and it is associated with educational underachievement, self-harm, and suicidality. Current psychological therapies for adolescent depression are usually focused only on individual-level change and often neglect family or contextual influences. The efficacy of interventions may be enhanced with a broader therapeutic focus on family factors such as communication, conflict, support, and cohesion. This article describes a structured multi-family group approach to the treatment of adolescent depression: Behaviour Exchange Systems Therapy for adolescent depression (BEST MOOD). BEST MOOD is a manualized intervention that is designed to address both individual and family factors in the treatment of adolescent depression. BEST MOOD adopts a family systems approach that also incorporates psychoeducation and elements of attachment theories. The program consists of eight multifamily group therapy sessions delivered over 2 hours per week, where parents attend the first four sessions and young people and siblings join from week 5. The program design is specifically aimed to engage youth who are initially resistant to treatment and to optimize youth and family mental health outcomes. This article presents an overview of the theoretical model, session content, and evaluations to date, and provides a case study to illustrate the approach. © 2016 Family Process Institute.

  11. A Systematic Review of Peer-Support Programs for Smoking Cessation in Disadvantaged Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Pauline; Clifford, Anton; Gussy, Kim; Gartner, Coral

    2013-01-01

    The burden of smoking is borne most by those who are socially disadvantaged and the social gradient in smoking contributes substantially to the health gap between the rich and poor. A number of factors contribute to higher tobacco use among socially disadvantaged populations including social (e.g., low social support for quitting), psychological (e.g., low self-efficacy) and physical factors (e.g., greater nicotine dependence). Current evidence for the effectiveness of peer or partner support interventions in enhancing the success of quit attempts in the general population is equivocal, largely due to study design and lack of a theoretical framework in this research. We conducted a systematic review of peer support interventions for smoking cessation in disadvantaged groups. The eight studies which met the inclusion criteria showed that interventions that improve social support for smoking cessation may be of greater importance to disadvantaged groups who experience fewer opportunities to access such support informally. Peer-support programs are emerging as highly effective and empowering ways for people to manage health issues in a socially supportive context. We discuss the potential for peer-support programs to address the high prevalence of smoking in vulnerable populations and also to build capacity in their communities. PMID:24169412

  12. A cognitive behavioral based group intervention for children with a chronic illness and their parents: a multicentre randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schuengel Carlo

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coping with a chronic illness (CI challenges children's psychosocial functioning and wellbeing. Cognitive-behavioral intervention programs that focus on teaching the active use of coping strategies may prevent children with CI from developing psychosocial problems. Involvement of parents in the intervention program may enhance the use of learned coping strategies in daily life, especially on the long-term. The primary aim of the present study is to examine the effectiveness of a cognitive behavioral based group intervention (called 'Op Koers' 1 for children with CI and of a parallel intervention for their parents. A secondary objective is to investigate why and for whom this intervention works, in order to understand the underlying mechanisms of the intervention effect. Methods/design This study is a multicentre randomized controlled trial. Participants are children (8 to 18 years of age with a chronic illness, and their parents, recruited from seven participating hospitals in the Netherlands. Participants are randomly allocated to two intervention groups (the child intervention group and the child intervention combined with a parent program and a wait-list control group. Primary outcomes are child psychosocial functioning, wellbeing and child disease related coping skills. Secondary outcomes are child quality of life, child general coping skills, child self-perception, parental stress, quality of parent-child interaction, and parental perceived vulnerability. Outcomes are evaluated at baseline, after 6 weeks of treatment, and at a 6 and 12-month follow-up period. The analyses will be performed on the basis of an intention-to-treat population. Discussion This study evaluates the effectiveness of a group intervention improving psychosocial functioning in children with CI and their parents. If proven effective, the intervention will be implemented in clinical practice. Strengths and limitations of the study design are discussed

  13. A computer program for the algebraic determination of control coefficients in Metabolic Control Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, S; Fell, D A

    1993-06-01

    A computer program (MetaCon) is described for the evaluation of flux control, concentration control and branch-point distribution control coefficients of a metabolic pathway. Requiring only the reaction scheme as input, the program produces algebraic expressions for the control coefficients in terms of elasticity coefficients, metabolite concentrations and pathway fluxes. Any of these variables can be substituted by numeric or simple algebraic expressions; the expressions will then be automatically rearranged in terms of the remaining unknown variables. When all variables have been substituted, numeric values will be obtained for the control coefficients. The program is a computerized implementation of the matrix method for the determination of control coefficients. The features of MetaCon are compared with those of other programs available to workers in Metabolic Control Analysis. Potential benefits of, and methods of using, MetaCon are discussed. The mathematical background and validity of the matrix method rules are discussed, and the algorithm used by MetaCon is described. The matrix method is shown to be a specific case of a previously described general formalism for calculating control coefficients.

  14. Controlled 3-year follow-up of a multidisciplinary pain rehabilitation program in primary health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westman, Anders; Linton, Steven J; Ohrvik, John; Wahlén, Petra; Theorell, Töres; Leppert, Jerzy

    2010-01-01

    The high prevalence of musculoskeletal pain generates significant costs for primary health care and the whole of society. The development of appropriate interventions is therefore necessary. The aim of this effectiveness study was to assess the long-term effects of a primary health care multidisciplinary rehabilitation program in Sweden. An experimental group comprising 89 patients from two primary health care units received individualised treatment interventions after a multidisciplinary investigation. A control group of 69 patients with the same inclusion criteria from four other primary health care units were treated according to routine. All participants completed questionnaires measuring pain, sick leave, quality of life, health care utilisation, drug consumption and psychosocial factors at baseline and at 3-year follow-up. After 3 years, utilisation of primary health care was significantly lower in the experimental group and work capacity was slightly but not significantly higher. The control group showed a trend of having a higher risk of high consumption after 3 years compared to the intervention group. There was no significant difference between the two groups concerning remaining variables such as function, catastrophising and pain. Both groups demonstrated considerable improvement over the course of 3 years. The experimental group had lower health care utilisation and a reduced risk of using large amounts of medication at the 3-year follow-up, indicating that compared with participants in the control group they were coping in a better way with pain.

  15. Effectiveness of a Group-Based Culturally Tailored Lifestyle Intervention Program on Changes in Risk Factors for Type 2 Diabetes among Asian Indians in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rupal M. Patel

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study used an experimental, pretest-posttest control group repeated measures design to evaluate the effectiveness of a community-based culturally appropriate lifestyle intervention program to reduce the risk for type 2 diabetes (T2DM among Gujarati Asian Indians (AIs in an urban community in the US. Participants included 70 adult AIs in the greater Houston metropolitan area. The primary outcomes were reduction in weight and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c and improvement in physical activity. Participants were screened for risk factors and randomly assigned to a 12-week group-based lifestyle intervention program (n=34 or a control group (n=36 that received standard print material on diabetes prevention. Participants also completed clinical measures and self-reported questionnaires about physical activity, social, and lifestyle habits at 0, 3, and 6 months. No significant baseline differences were noted between groups. While a significant decline in weight and increase in physical activity was observed in all participants, the intervention group lowered their HbA1c (p<0.0005 and waist circumference (p=0.04 significantly as compared to the control group. Findings demonstrated that participation in a culturally tailored, lifestyle intervention program in a community setting can effectively reduce weight, waist circumference, and HbA1c among Gujarati AIs living in the US.

  16. Results of an Active Neurodynamic Mobilization Program in Patients With Fibromyalgia Syndrome: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Janet Rodríguez; Martos, Irene Cabrera; Sánchez, Irene Torres; Rubio, Araceli Ortíz; Pelegrina, Ana Díaz; Valenza, Marie Carmen

    2015-10-01

    To examine the effects of an active neurodynamic mobilization program on pain, neurodynamics, perceived health state, and fatigue in patients with fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS). Randomized controlled trial. Local fibromyalgia association. Patients with FMS (N=48). Patients were randomly allocated to an active neurodynamic mobilization program or a control group. The intervention was performed twice a week. Pain was assessed with the Brief Pain Inventory and Pain Catastrophizing Scale; neurodynamics were evaluated using neurodynamic tests for upper and lower limbs. The functional state was evaluated with the Health Assessment Questionnaire Disability Index, and perceived fatigue was evaluated with the Fatigue Severity Scale. Significant (Pneurodynamics, functional state, and fatigue. Also, significant pre- to postintervention within-group differences were found in the intervention group, whereas no significant changes were found in the control group. A neurodynamic mobilization program is effective in improving pain, neurodynamics, functional status, and fatigue in patients with FMS. Copyright © 2015 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Control system design and analysis using the INteractive Controls Analysis (INCA) program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Frank H.; Downing, John P.

    1987-01-01

    The INteractive Controls Analysis (INCA) program was developed at the Goddard Space Flight Center to provide a user friendly efficient environment for the design and analysis of linear control systems. Since its inception, INCA has found extensive use in the design, development, and analysis of control systems for spacecraft, instruments, robotics, and pointing systems. Moreover, the results of the analytic tools imbedded in INCA have been flight proven with at least three currently orbiting spacecraft. This paper describes the INCA program and illustrates, using a flight proven example, how the package can perform complex design analyses with relative ease.

  18. Comparing Acceptance and Commitment Group Therapy and 12-Steps Narcotics Anonymous in Addict's Rehabilitation Process: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azkhosh, Manoochehr; Farhoudianm, Ali; Saadati, Hemn; Shoaee, Fateme; Lashani, Leila

    2016-10-01

    Objective: Substance abuse is a socio-psychological disorder. The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of acceptance and commitment therapy with 12-steps Narcotics Anonymous on psychological well-being of opiate dependent individuals in addiction treatment centers in Shiraz, Iran. Method: This was a randomized controlled trial. Data were collected at entry into the study and at post-test and follow-up visits. The participants were selected from opiate addicted individuals who referred to addiction treatment centers in Shiraz. Sixty individuals were evaluated according to inclusion/ exclusion criteria and were divided into three equal groups randomly (20 participants per group). One group received acceptance and commitment group therapy (Twelve 90-minute sessions) and the other group was provided with the 12-steps Narcotics Anonymous program and the control group received the usual methadone maintenance treatment. During the treatment process, seven participants dropped out. Data were collected using the psychological well-being questionnaire and AAQ questionnaire in the three groups at pre-test, post-test and follow-up visits. Data were analyzed using repeated measure analysis of variance. Results: Repeated measure analysis of variance revealed that the mean difference between the three groups was significant (Pacceptance and commitment therapy group showed improvement relative to the NA and control groups on psychological well-being and psychological flexibility. Conclusion: The results of this study revealed that acceptance and commitment therapy can be helpful in enhancing positive emotions and increasing psychological well-being of addicts who seek treatment.

  19. Efficacy of the Positive Parenting Program (Triple-P for a Group of Parents of Children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Tehranidoost

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available "nObjective: To evaluate the efficacy of the Positive Parenting Program (Triple-P for parents of children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD. "nMethod:  Sixty families who had at least one child with clinically diagnosed ADHD aged between 6 to12 were recruited from the consecutive referrals to a child and adolescent psychiatric clinic. Families were randomly assigned to the intervention group (who participated in an 8- week- group Triple-P, N=30 and a control group (N=30. Parents completed the battery of self-report questionnaires of triple-P at the beginning and after the 8th session. "nResults: There were no significant differences in pre intervention measures between the two groups. Comparing the pre and post intervention data, the Triple- P group was associated with significantly lower levels of parent reported child behavior problems (P=0.001, lower levels of dysfunctional parenting (P=0.001 and greater parental competence (P=0.001 than the control group. The parents the in triple-P group had significant improvement on measures of depression, anxiety and stress, in comparison with the control group (P=0.001. This study did not follow the long term effect which marks its limitation. "nConclusion: The Triple-P program can be recommended for parents of children with ADHD to reduce the problem behavior of their children and to improve their abilities.

  20. Improving bovine udder health: a national mastitis control program in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, T J G M; van den Borne, B H P; Jansen, J; Huijps, K; van Veersen, J C L; van Schaik, G; Hogeveen, H

    2013-02-01

    Because of increasing bulk milk somatic cell counts and continuous clinical mastitis problems in a substantial number of herds, a national mastitis control program was started in 2005 to improve udder health in the Netherlands. The program started with founding the Dutch Udder Health Centre (UGCN), which had the task to coordinate the program. The program consisted of 2 parts: a research part and a knowledge-transfer part, which were integrated as much as possible. The knowledge-transfer part comprised 2 communication strategies: a central and a peripheral approach. The central approach was based on educating farmers using comprehensive science-based and rational argumentation about mastitis prevention and included on-farm study group meetings. Comprehensive education materials were developed for farmers that were internally motivated to improve udder health. In the peripheral approach it was tried to motivate farmers to implement certain management measures using nontechnical arguments. Mass media campaigns were used that focused on one single aspect of mastitis prevention. These communication strategies, as well as an integrated approach between various stakeholders and different scientific disciplines were used to reach as many farmers as possible. It should be noted that, because this intervention took place at a national level, no control group was available, as it would be impossible to isolate farmers from all forms of communication for 5 years. Based on several studies executed during and after the program, however, the results suggest that udder health seemed to have improved on a national level during the course of the program from 2005 to 2010. Within a cohort of dairy herds monitored during the program, the prevalence of subclinical mastitis did not change significantly (23.0 in 2004 vs. 22.2 in 2009). The incidence rate of clinical mastitis, however, decreased significantly, from 33.5 to 28.1 quarter cases per 100 cow years at risk. The most important

  1. Dedicated Programming Language for Small Distributed Control Divices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Per Printz; Borch, Ole

    2007-01-01

    Small control computers are more and more used in modern households. These computers are for instance in washing machines, heating systems, secure systems, televisions and stereos. In the future all these computers will communicate with each other to implement the intelligent house. This can only....... This paper describes a new, flexible and simple language for programming distributed control tasks. The compiler for this language generates a target code that is very easy to interpret. A interpreter, that can be easy ported to different hardwares, is described. The new language is simple and easy to learn...

  2. The Quality Control Program for Industrial Hygiene Laboratories in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hae Dong; Chung, Eun Kyo; Kim, Kiwoong

    2017-09-01

    In 1992, the quality control program was introduced in Republic of Korea to improve the reliability of the work environment monitoring, which was introduced in the 1980s. The commission entrusted by the Ministry of Employment and Labor, the Occupational Safety and Health Research Institute has conducted the program for industrial hygiene laboratories including designated monitoring institutions and spontaneously participating agencies. The number of institutions that participated in the program has increased from 30 to 161. The initial conformance ratio in the participants was 43% (organic solvents) and 52% (metals). Thereafter, the conformance ratio increased rapidly and it has remained in a stable state at more than 89% since 1996. As subject materials, 13 kinds of organic solvents and 7 kinds of metals were used. To improve the capability of measurement and analysis of private institutions, educational courses were conducted annually. An assessment at the actual sites of participants was additionally introduced into the program in 2013. Thus, the program turned into a system that administrates the overall process of participants. For the future, the scope of target materials will be extended through additional items. Thus, the reliability of the results of the work environment monitoring is expected to increase accordingly.

  3. A Group-Based Mobile Application to Increase Adherence in Exercise and Nutrition Programs: A Factorial Design Feasibility Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Honglu; Venkatakrishnan, Anusha; Youngblood, Gregory Michael; Ram, Ashwin; Pirolli, Peter

    2016-01-15

    Novel methods of promoting self-monitoring and social support are needed to ensure long-term maintenance of behavior change. In this paper, we directly investigate the effects of group support in an exercise and nutrition program delivered by an mHealth application called Fittle. Our first specific study aim was to explore whether social support improved adherence in wellness programs. Our second specific study aim was to assess whether media types (ePaper vs mobile) were associated with different levels of compliance and adherence to wellness programs. The third aim was to assess whether the use of an mHealth application led to positive changes to participants' eating behavior, physical activity, and stress level, compared to traditional paper-based programs. A 2 × 2 (eg, Media: Mobile vs ePaper × Group Type: Team vs Solo) factorial design feasibility study was conducted. A sample of 124 volunteers who were interested in improving eating behavior, increasing physical activity, or reducing stress participated in this study. The study duration was 8 weeks. All groups were self-directed with no ongoing human input from the research team. Participants in ePaper conditions had higher attrition rates compared to participants in Mobile conditions, χ3(2)=9.96, P=.02 (N=124). Participants in Mobile conditions reported their compliance with a much higher frequency closer to the time of challenge activity completion (2-sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov test comparing distributions was highly significant-KS=0.33, PMobile conditions-χ1(2)=25.25, Pmobile app allowed a more accurate method to report and track health behaviors over a longer period than traditional ePaper-based diaries or log books. There was a significant difference in the overall compliance score for Mobile-Solo (Mean [SD] 0.30 [0.39]) and Mobile-Team (Mean [SD] 0.49 [0.35]) conditions (t50.82=1.94, P=.05). This suggests that working in a team increased participants' overall compliance within Fittle. Survival

  4. Food group preferences and energy balance in moderately obese postmenopausal women subjected to brisk walking program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnier, Sophie; Vallée, Karine; Lemoine-Morel, Sophie; Joffroy, Sandra; Drapeau, Vicky; Tremblay, Angelo; Auneau, Gérard; Mauriège, Pascale

    2015-07-01

    The objective of the study was to examine the effects of a 16-week walking program on food group preferences and energy balance of sedentary, moderately obese (body mass index, 29-35 kg/m(2)), postmenopausal Caucasian women, aged 60 ± 5 years old. One hundred and fifty-six volunteers were subjected to 3 sessions/week of 45 min of walking at 60% of heart rate reserve. Total energy intake (TEI) and food group preferences (3-day dietary record), total energy expenditure (TEE, 3-day physical activity diary), cardiorespiratory fitness (2-km walking test), anthropometry, and body composition (bioelectrical impedance) were measured before and after walking. Data were statistically analyzed using an ANOVA with repeated measures on 1 factor (time). The modest increase in TEE of 151 ± 24 kcal/day (p < 0.0001) leads to body weight, fat mass losses, and waist girth reduction (p < 0.0001). TEI remained unchanged despite a slight decrease in carbohydrate intake and a minor increase in protein intake (p < 0.05). Analysis of food records revealed a decreased consumption of fruits (p < 0.05) and sweet and fatty foods (p < 0.01), but an increase in oil consumption (p < 0.0001) after walking. Women with the highest body weight loss showed the greatest reduction in the consumption of fruits, sugar, sweet foods, and fatty foods (p < 0.05). Women with the greatest fat mass loss showed the highest decrease in fatty food intake (p < 0.05). In conclusion, although our walking program changed some food group consumption patterns, body weight loss was primarily because of the increased TEE.

  5. A single blind randomized control trial on support groups for Chinese persons with mild dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Daniel K W; Kwok, Timothy C Y; Ng, Petrus Y N

    2014-01-01

    Persons with mild dementia experience multiple losses and manifest depressive symptoms. This research study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of a support group led by a social worker for Chinese persons with mild dementia. Participants were randomly assigned to either a ten-session support group or a control group. Standardized assessment tools were used for data collection at pretreatment and post-treatment periods by a research assistant who was kept blind to the group assignment of the participants. Upon completion of the study, 20 treatment group participants and 16 control group participants completed all assessments. At baseline, the treatment and control groups did not show any significant difference on all demographic variables, as well as on all baseline measures; over one-half (59%) of all the participants reported having depression, as assessed by a Chinese Geriatric Depression Scale score ≥8. After completing the support group, the depressive mood of the treatment group participants reduced from 8.83 (standard deviation =2.48) to 7.35 (standard deviation =2.18), which was significant (Wilcoxon signed-rank test; P=0.017, Pcontrol group's participants did not show any significant change. This present study supports the efficacy and effectiveness of the support group for persons with mild dementia in Chinese society. In particular, this present study shows that a support group can reduce depressive symptoms for participants.

  6. Comparison of serum and urine lead levels in opium addicts with healthy control group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatibi-Moghadam, H; Khadem-Rezaiyan, M; Afshari, R

    2016-08-01

    Lead-contaminated opium is one of the new sources of lead exposure in our region. As far as the literature review is concerned, there are limited comparative studies about comparison of blood lead level (BLL) in addict patients with healthy controls. We aimed to compare BLL and urine lead level (ULL) between opium addicts with the healthy control group. Forty opium addict subjects (mean age: 43 ± 10 years) as the patient group and 40 healthy subjects (mean age: 41 ± 9 years) as the control group participated. Three milliliter of whole blood and urine was obtained from both groups and lead level was assessed using atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The mean value of BLL in patient group was 7.14 ± 1.41 mcg/dL and that in the healthy control group was 5.42 ± 1.46 mcg/dL. The mean value of ULL was 2.62 ± 0.83 mcg/dL in the patient group and 2.50 ± 0.76 mcg/dL in the healthy control group.BLL was different in the two groups (p lead. Therefore, screening of blood lead concentration is helpful for opium-addict patients especially with nonspecific symptoms. © The Author(s) 2015.

  7. Bias from historical control groups used in orthodontic research: a meta-epidemiological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papageorgiou, Spyridon N; Koretsi, Vasiliki; Jäger, Andreas

    2017-02-01

    The validity of meta-analysis is dependent upon the quality of included studies. Here, we investigated whether the design of untreated control groups (i.e. source and timing of data collection) influences the results of clinical trials in orthodontic research. This meta-epidemiological study used unrestricted literature searching for meta-analyses in orthodontics including clinical trials with untreated control groups. Differences in standardized mean differences (ΔSMD) and their 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated according to the untreated control group through multivariable random-effects meta-regression controlling for nature of the interventional group and study sample size. Effects were pooled with random-effects synthesis, followed by mixed-effect subgroup and sensitivity analyses. Studies with historical control groups reported deflated treatment effects compared to studies with concurrent control groups (13 meta-analyses; ΔSMD = -0.31; 95% CI = -0.53, -0.10; P = 0.004). Significant differences were found according to the type of historical control group (based either on growth study or clinical archive; 11 meta-analyses; ΔSMD = 0.40; 95% CI = 0.21, 0.59; P groups in orthodontic clinical research was associated with deflation of treatment effects, which was independent from whether the interventional group was prospective or retrospective and from the study's sample size. Caution is warranted when interpreting clinical studies with historical untreated control groups or when interpreting systematic reviews that include such studies. PROSPERO (CRD42015024179). None. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Orthodontic Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Simulation training program for midwives to manage postpartum hemorrhage: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Chiho; Kataoka, Yaeko

    2017-04-01

    To explore the effectiveness of a simulation training program for midwives in performance and knowledge for the management of postpartum hemorrhage (PPH). The study design was a randomized controlled trial. Midwives working at one obstetrics ward in an urban area were randomly assigned to simulation training program or no training. This "simulation program" included pre study e-learning and simulation. Inclusion criteria were midwives who: 1) had two or three years of clinical experience, 2) worked in an obstetrics ward, and 3) had experience with birth assistance. There was one exclusion criterion namely prior experience of simulation training for PPH. Change in performance was evaluated using a PPH scenario performance test at one month after the simulation training. Change in knowledge was evaluated by a 25-item multiple-choice questionnaire completed shortly before the training and one month after the training. The ethical review committee of St Luke's International University granted approval (No. 14-096). Eighty-one midwives were randomly assigned to either the intervention group (n=40) or the control group (n=41). Performance in the simulation training group was significantly better in comparison to the no training group; mean performance score was 23.85(SD 2.71) in the training group versus 18.00(SD 3.01) in the no training group (MD 5.85 95% CI 4.85-7.12, t=9.17, psimulation training group; amount of knowledge score was 3.65(SD 3.40) in the training group versus -0.02(SD 3.02) in the no training group (MD 3.67 95% CI 2.25-5.10, t=5.14, psimulation training. However, assessments of long-term effects on performance, and knowledge and the clinical outcomes in managing of obstetric complications are necessary to adequately evaluate the effectiveness of simulation training. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. A modified yoga-based exercise program in hemodialysis patients: a randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurtkuran, M; Alp, A; Yurtkuran, M; Dilek, K

    2007-09-01

    To evaluate the effects of a yoga-based exercise program on pain, fatigue, sleep disturbance, and biochemical markers in hemodialysis patients. In 2004 a randomized controlled trial was carried out in the outpatient hemodialysis unit of the Nephrology Department, Uludag University Faculty of Medicine. Clinically stable hemodialysis patients (n=37) were included and followed in two groups: the modified yoga-based exercise group (n=19) and the control group (n=18). Yoga-based exercises were done in groups for 30 min/day twice a week for 3 months. All of the patients in the yoga and control groups were given an active range of motion exercises to do for 10 min at home. The main outcome measures were pain intensity (measured by the visual analogue scale, VAS), fatigue (VAS), sleep disturbance (VAS), and grip strength (mmHg); biochemical variables-- urea, creatinine, calcium, alkaline phosphatase, phosphorus, cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, triglyceride, erythrocyte, hematocrit--were evaluated. After a 12-week intervention, significant improvements were seen in the variables: pain -37%, fatigue -55%, sleep disturbance -25%, grip strength +15%, urea -29%, creatinine -14%, alkaline phosphatase -15%, cholesterol -15%, erythrocyte +11%, and hematocrit count +13%; no side-effects were seen. Improvement of the variables in the yoga-based exercise program was found to be superior to that in the control group for all the variables except calcium, phosphorus, HDL-cholesterol and triglyceride levels. A simplified yoga-based rehabilitation program is a complementary, safe and effective clinical treatment modality in patients with end-stage renal disease.

  10. AUTOMATION OF PLC PROGRAMMING WHEN IMPLEMENTING ALGORITHMS OF GUARANTEEING CONTROL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Levinskyi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available During developing programs for programmable logic controllers (PLCs the concept of model-oriented design is increasingly used. In particular, usage of Simulink PLC Coder is giving the opportunity to get SCL program codefrom Simulink model which contains certain dynamic elements. Then, for example, this SCL code can be transformed to functional blocks of the Simatic S7-300 (VIPA 300 PLC. This significantly reduces the timerequired to develop code in the language of SCL and reduces requirements for specialists’ qualification when developing control systems. In this article we provide an example of PLC programming automation whenimplementing algorithms of guaranteeing control (AGC. For certain types of technological processes it is typical to contain monotonically increasing function of the effectiveness with fixed one-way restriction in regulations. Forexample, in the grinders, presses, extruders the load current of the drive is stabilized using the change of feed. Energy efficiency of these plants will increase with increasing of the set point (SP to the controller of the drive loadcurrent stabilization loop. However, an increase in SP increases the probability of triggering appropriate protection, for example, as a result of random changes in the properties of raw materials. Therefore, to avoid this accident, thepower of driving motors is often unreasonably overrated. And in this case they are used with currents equal to the half of rated.Systems of guaranteeing control (SGC are used to solve the contradiction between the need to improvethe efficiency and increasing probability of an accident.

  11. Group cognitive behavioural therapy and group recreational activity for adults with autism spectrum disorders: a preliminary randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesselmark, Eva; Plenty, Stephanie; Bejerot, Susanne

    2014-08-01

    Although adults with autism spectrum disorder are an increasingly identified patient population, few treatment options are available. This preliminary randomized controlled open trial with a parallel design developed two group interventions for adults with autism spectrum disorders and intelligence within the normal range: cognitive behavioural therapy and recreational activity. Both interventions comprised 36 weekly 3-h sessions led by two therapists in groups of 6-8 patients. A total of 68 psychiatric patients with autism spectrum disorders participated in the study. Outcome measures were Quality of Life Inventory, Sense of Coherence Scale, Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale and an exploratory analysis on measures of psychiatric health. Participants in both treatment conditions reported an increased quality of life at post-treatment (d = 0.39, p autism spectrum disorder. The interventions' similar efficacy may be due to the common elements, structure and group setting. Cognitive behavioural therapy may be additionally beneficial in terms of increasing specific skills and minimizing dropout. © The Author(s) 2013.

  12. Summary of the Nevada Applied Ecology Group and correlative programs. Version 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friesen, H.N. [Raytheon Services Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    1992-10-01

    This summary document presents results in a broad context; it is not limited to findings of the Nevada Applied Ecology Group. This book is organized to present the findings of the Nevada Applied Ecology Group and correlative programs in accordance with the originally stated objectives of the Nevada Applied Ecology Group. This plan, in essence, traces plutonium from its injection into the environment to movement in the ecosystem to development of cleanup techniques. Information on other radionuclides was also obtained and will be presented briefly. Chapter 1 presents a brief description of the ecological setting of the Test Range Complex. The results of investigations for plutonium distribution are presented in Chapter 2 for the area surrounding the Test Range Complex and in Chapter 3 for on-site locations. Chapters 4 and 5 present the results of investigations concerned with concentrations and movement, respectively, of plutonium in the ecosystem of the Test Range Complex, and Chapter 6 summarizes the potential hazard from this plutonium. Development of techniques for cleanup and treatment is presented in Chapter 7, and the inventory of radionuclides other than plutonium is presented briefly in Chapter 8.

  13. Attitudes of Older Adults in a Group-Based Exercise Program Toward a Blended Intervention : A Focus-Group Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mehra, S.; Dadema, T.; Kröse, B.J.A.; Visser, B.; Engelbert, R.H.H.; Van Den Helder, J.; Weijs, P.J.M.

    2016-01-01

    Ageing is associated with a decline in daily functioning and mobility. A physically active life and physical exercise can minimize the decline of daily functioning and improve the physical-, psychological- and social functioning of older adults. Despite several advantages of group-based exercise

  14. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Koru: A Mindfulness Program for College Students and Other Emerging Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greeson, Jeffrey M.; Juberg, Michael K.; Maytan, Margaret; James, Kiera; Rogers, Holly

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of Koru, a mindfulness training program for college students and other emerging adults. Participants Ninety students (66% female, 62% white, 71% graduate students) participated between Fall 2012 and Spring 2013. Methods Randomized controlled trial. We hypothesized that Koru, compared to a wait-list control group, would reduce perceived stress and sleep problems, and increase mindfulness, self-compassion, and gratitude. Results As hypothesized, results showed significant Group (Koru, wait-list) X Time (pre, post) interactions for improvements in perceived stress (F=4.50, df [1, 76.40], p=.037, d=.45), sleep problems (F= 4.71, df [1,79.49], p=.033, d=.52), mindfulness (F=26.80, df [1, 79.09], pstress, sleep problems, mindfulness, and self-compassion. Conclusions Results support the effectiveness of the Koru program for emerging adults in the university setting. PMID:24499130

  15. Summary report of working group 5: Beam and radiation generation, monitoring, and control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Church, Mike; /Fermilab; Kim, Ki-Yong; /Maryland U.

    2010-01-01

    This paper summarizes the activities and presentations of Working Group 5 of the Advanced Accelerator Concepts Workshop held at Annapolis, Maryland in June 2010. Working Group 5 touched on a broad range of topics in the fields of beam and radiation generation and their monitoring and control. These topics were not comprehensively covered in this Workshop, but rather the Working Group concentrated on specific new developments and recent investigations. The Working Group divided its sessions into four broad categories: cathodes and electron guns, radiation generation, beam diagnostics, and beam control and dynamics. This summary is divided into the same structure.

  16. Effectiveness of Inclusion of Dry Needling in a Multimodal Therapy Program for Patellofemoral Pain: A Randomized Parallel-Group Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espí-López, Gemma V; Serra-Añó, Pilar; Vicent-Ferrando, Juan; Sánchez-Moreno-Giner, Miguel; Arias-Buría, Jose L; Cleland, Joshua; Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César

    2017-06-01

    Study Design Randomized controlled trial. Background Evidence suggests that multimodal interventions that include exercise therapy may be effective for patellofemoral pain (PFP); however, no study has investigated the effects of trigger point (TrP) dry needling (DN) in people with PFP. Objectives To compare the effects of adding TrP DN to a manual therapy and exercise program on pain, function, and disability in individuals with PFP. Methods Individuals with PFP (n = 60) recruited from a public hospital in Valencia, Spain were randomly allocated to manual therapy and exercises (n = 30) or manual therapy and exercise plus TrP DN (n = 30). Both groups received the same manual therapy and strengthening exercise program for 3 sessions (once a week for 3 weeks), and 1 group also received TrP DN to active TrPs within the vastus medialis and vastus lateralis muscles. The pain subscale of the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS; 0-100 scale) was used as the primary outcome. Secondary outcomes included other subscales of the KOOS, the Knee Society Score, the International Knee Documentation Committee Subjective Knee Evaluation Form (IKDC), and the numeric pain-rating scale. Patients were assessed at baseline and at 15-day (posttreatment) and 3-month follow-ups. Analysis was conducted with mixed analyses of covariance, adjusted for baseline scores. Results At 3 months, 58 subjects (97%) completed the follow-up. No significant between-group differences (all, P>.391) were observed for any outcome: KOOS pain subscale mean difference, -2.1 (95% confidence interval [CI]: -4.6, 0.4); IKDC mean difference, 2.3 (95% CI: -0.1, 4.7); knee pain intensity mean difference, 0.3 (95% CI: -0.2, 0.8). Both groups experienced similar moderate-to-large within-group improvements in all outcomes (standardized mean differences of 0.6 to 1.1); however, only the KOOS function in sport and recreation subscale surpassed the prespecified minimum important change. Conclusion The current

  17. The Demand-Control Model: Specific demands, specific Control, and well-defined groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonge, J. de; Dollard, M.F.; Dormann, C.; Blanc, P.M.; Houtman, I.L.D.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the Demand-Control Model (DCM), accompanied by three goals. Firstly, we used alternative, more focused, and multifaceted measures of both job demands and job control that are relevant and applicable to today's working contexts. Secondly, this study intended to

  18. Effects of Group Counseling Programs, Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, and Sports Intervention on Internet Addiction in East Asia: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Liu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the effects of group counseling programs, cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT, and sports intervention on Internet addiction (IA, a systematic search in ten databases was performed to identify eligible studies without language restrictions up to January 2017. A meta-analysis and trial sequential analysis (TSA was performed, respectively. A total of 58 randomized controlled trials (RCTs, which included 2871 participants, were incorporated into our meta-analysis. The results showed that group counseling programs, CBT, and sports intervention could significantly reduce IA levels (group counseling program: standardized mean difference (SMD, −1.37; 95% confidence interval (CI, −1.89 to −0.85; CBT: SMD, −1.88; 95% CI, −2.53 to −1.23; sports intervention: SMD, −1.70; 95% CI, −2.14 to −1.26. For group counseling programs, this treatment was more effective in four dimensions of IA, including time management, interpersonal and health issues, tolerance, and compulsive Internet use. For CBT, this treatment yielded a positive change in depression, anxiousness, aggressiveness, somatization, social insecurity, phobic anxiety, paranoid ideation, and psychoticism. For sports intervention, the significant effects were also observed in all dimensions of the IA scale. Each of group counseling programs, cognitive behavioral therapy, and sports intervention had a significant effect on IA and psychopathological symptoms. Sports intervention could improve withdrawal symptoms especially.

  19. Effects of Group Counseling Programs, Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, and Sports Intervention on Internet Addiction in East Asia: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Nie, Jing; Wang, Yafeng

    2017-11-28

    To evaluate the effects of group counseling programs, cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), and sports intervention on Internet addiction (IA), a systematic search in ten databases was performed to identify eligible studies without language restrictions up to January 2017. A meta-analysis and trial sequential analysis (TSA) was performed, respectively. A total of 58 randomized controlled trials (RCTs), which included 2871 participants, were incorporated into our meta-analysis. The results showed that group counseling programs, CBT, and sports intervention could significantly reduce IA levels (group counseling program: standardized mean difference (SMD), -1.37; 95% confidence interval (CI), -1.89 to -0.85; CBT: SMD, -1.88; 95% CI, -2.53 to -1.23; sports intervention: SMD, -1.70; 95% CI, -2.14 to -1.26). For group counseling programs, this treatment was more effective in four dimensions of IA, including time management, interpersonal and health issues, tolerance, and compulsive Internet use. For CBT, this treatment yielded a positive change in depression, anxiousness, aggressiveness, somatization, social insecurity, phobic anxiety, paranoid ideation, and psychoticism. For sports intervention, the significant effects were also observed in all dimensions of the IA scale. Each of group counseling programs, cognitive behavioral therapy, and sports intervention had a significant effect on IA and psychopathological symptoms. Sports intervention could improve withdrawal symptoms especially.

  20. Development of a group and family-based cognitive behavioural therapy program for youth at risk for psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landa, Yulia; Mueser, Kim T; Wyka, Katarzyna E; Shreck, Erica; Jespersen, Rachel; Jacobs, Michael A; Griffin, Kenneth W; van der Gaag, Mark; Reyna, Valerie F; Beck, Aaron T; Silbersweig, David A; Walkup, John T

    2016-12-01

    The onset of psychosis typically occurs during adolescence or early adulthood and can have a detrimental impact on social and cognitive development. Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) shows promise in reducing the risk of psychosis. Teaching families to apply CBT with their offspring may bolster therapeutic gains made in time-limited treatment. We developed a comprehensive group-and-family-based CBT (GF-CBT) program that aims to facilitate psychosocial recovery, decrease symptoms and prevent transition to psychosis in youth at risk. GF-CBT is grounded in ecological systems and cognitive theories, resilience models and research on information processing in delusions. The theoretical rationale and description of GF-CBT are presented together with a pilot study that evaluated the program's feasibility and explored participants' outcomes. Youth ages 16-21 at risk for psychosis and their families participated in an open trial with pre, post and 3-month follow-up assessments conducted by an independent evaluator. The Comprehensive Assessment of At-Risk Mental States was the primary clinical outcome measure. All enrolled participants (n = 6) completed GF-CBT and all remitted from at-risk mental state (ARMS). As a group participants showed statistically significant decreases in attenuated psychotic symptoms, negative symptoms, depression, cognitive biases and improvements in functioning. Family members showed significant improvements in use of CBT skills, enhanced communication with their offspring, and greater confidence in their ability to help. Gains were maintained at follow-up. GF-CBT may delay or prevent transition to psychosis in youth at risk, and potentially facilitate recovery from ARMS. More rigorous, controlled research is needed to further evaluate this program. © 2015 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  1. Surface developmental dyslexia is as prevalent as phonological dyslexia when appropriate control groups are employed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wybrow, Dean P; Hanley, J Richard

    2015-01-01

    Previous investigations of the incidence of developmental surface and phonological dyslexia using reading-age-matched control groups have identified many more phonological dyslexics (poor nonword reading relative to irregular-word reading) than surface dyslexics (poor irregular-word reading relative to nonword reading). However, because the measures that have been used to estimate reading age include irregular-word reading ability, they appear inappropriate for assessing the incidence of surface dyslexia. The current study used a novel method for generating control groups whose reading ability was matched to that of the dyslexic sample. The incidence of surface dyslexia was assessed by comparing dyslexic performance with that of a control group who were matched with the dyslexics on a test of nonword reading. The incidence of phonological dyslexia was assessed with reference to a control group who were matched with the dyslexics at irregular-word reading. These control groups led to the identification of an approximately equal number of children with surface and phonological dyslexia. It appeared that selecting control participants who were matched with dyslexics for reading age led to the recruitment of individuals with relatively high nonword reading scores relative to their irregular-word reading scores compared with other types of control group. The theoretical implications of these findings are discussed.

  2. Comparison for aphasic and control subjects of eye movements hypothesized in neurolinguistic programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dooley, K O; Farmer, A

    1988-08-01

    Neurolinguistic programming's hypothesized eye movements were measured independently using videotapes of 10 nonfluent aphasic and 10 control subjects matched for age and sex. Chi-squared analysis indicated that eye-position responses were significantly different for the groups. Although earlier research has not supported the hypothesized eye positions for normal subjects, the present findings support the contention that eye-position responses may differ between neurologically normal and aphasic individuals.

  3. SITUATIONAL CONTROL OF HOT BLAST STOVES GROUP BASED ON DECISION TREE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. I. Kobysh

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper was developed the control system of group of hot blast stoves, which operates on the basis of the packing heating control subsystem and subsystem of forecasting of modes duration in the hot blast stoves APCS of iron smelting in a blast furnace. With the use of multi-criteria optimization methods, implemented the adjustment of control system conduct, which takes into account the current production situation that has arisen in the course of the heating packing of each hot blast stove group. Developed a situation recognition algorithm and the choice of scenarios of control based on a decision tree.

  4. Carboy Security Testing and Training Programs for Industrial Control Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noyes, Daniel [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho (United States)

    2012-03-15

    Service providers rely on industrial control systems (ICS) to manage the flow of water at dams, open breakers on power grids, control ventilation and cooling in nuclear power plants, and more. In today's interconnected environment, this can present a serious cyber security challenge. To combat this growing challenge, government, private industry, and academia are working together to reduce cyber risks. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is a key contributor to the Department of Energy National SCADA Test Bed (NSTB) and the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Control Systems Security Program (CSSP), both of which focus on improving the overall security posture of ICS in the national critical infrastructure. In support of the NSTB, INL hosts a dedicated SCADA testing facility which consists of multiple control systems supplied by leading national and international manufacturers. Within the test bed, INL researchers systematically examine control system components and work to identify vulnerabilities. In support of the CSSP, INL develops and conducts training courses which are designed to increase awareness and defensive capabilities for IT/Control System professionals. These training vary from web-based cyber security training for control systems engineers to more advanced hands-on training that culminates with a Red Team/Blue Team exercise that is conducted within an actual control systems environment. INL also provides staffing and operational support to the DHS Industrial Control Systems Cyber Emergency Response Team (ICS-CERT) Security Operations Center which responds to and analyzes control systems cyber incidents across the 18 US critical infrastructure sectors.

  5. Development of a national sport event risk management training program for college command groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Stacey A

    2013-01-01

    The US Department of Homeland Security identified college sport venues as terrorist targets due to the potential for mass casualties and catastrophic social and economic impact. Therefore, it is critical for college sport safety and security personnel to implement effective risk management practices. However, deficiencies have been identified in the level of preparedness of college sport event security personnel related to risk management training and effective emergency response capabilities. To address the industry need, the National Center for Spectator Sports Safety and Security designed, developed, and evaluated a national sport event risk management training program for National Collegiate Athletic Association command groups. The purpose of this article was to provide an overview of the design, development, and evaluation process.

  6. Two distinct groups of non-attenders in an organized mammography screening program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aro, A R; de Koning, H J; Absetz, P

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To find out reasons for non-attendance and to study subgroup differences of the non-attenders in an organized mammography screening program. DESIGN: Prospective for background and psychosocial factors, retrospective for reasons of non-attendance. SETTING: Finnish screening based...... on personal first round invitations, with 89% attendance rate. PARTICIPANTS: Four hundred thirty six women with both pre-screening response to socioeconomic and psychosocial measures, and post-screening response reporting reasons of non-attendance. MAIN RESULTS: Most common single reason for non......-attendance was previous recent mammogram (53%), but also reasons related to practical obstacles, worry and fear, knowledge and attitudes, and organization of screening were mentioned. Two distinct groups of non-attenders were found based on the reasons for non-attendance. Those who did not attend because a mammogram...

  7. Group model building: a framework for organizing healthy community program and policy initiatives in Columbia, Missouri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Ian M; Reilly, Stacia R

    2015-01-01

    Between 2008 and 2012, the multidisciplinary Healthy Community Partnership of Columbia, Missouri, participated in a national program to address child obesity. This article describes a systems-level evaluation of their work to implement healthy eating and active living policy, system, and environmental changes to support healthier communities for children. In 2011, the partnership participated in a Group Model Building session, consisting of 2 primary activities. First, participants sketched behavior-over-time graphs, illustrating the evolution of community variables related to child obesity, such as prevalence of walking to school or the marketing of high-sugar drinks. Later, the graphs were arranged on a large area of wall space and connections were drawn between those variables that were believed to influence each other--either positively (reinforcing connections) or negatively (opposing connections). The resulting causal loop diagram is a visual representation of the interacting systems, as perceived by the partnership. In reviewing the diagram, the group identified areas where they felt the diagram "made sense" and other areas where there were inconsistencies between the diagram and their own mental model of the processes at work. To address the inconsistencies, participants were surveyed to determine which specific modifications should be made to the diagram so it would become an accurate representation of the group's shared concept of the relevant relationships. The group felt that the final Modified causal loop diagram achieved this goal and that it provides useful insight into how their work addresses child obesity. They believe the diagram also has the potential to improve community engagement by serving as a visual model, improve planning through better resource allocation, improve implementation by identifying policy leverage points, and increase resources when used in grant applications.

  8. Mitochondrial Translocation of High Mobility Group Box 1 Facilitates LIM Kinase 2-Mediated Programmed Necrotic Neuronal Death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyun, Hye-Won; Ko, Ah-Reum; Kang, Tae-Cheon

    2016-01-01

    High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) acts a signaling molecule regulating a wide range of inflammatory responses in extracellular space. HMGB1 also stabilizes nucleosomal structure and facilitates gene transcription. Under pathophysiological conditions, nuclear HMGB1 is immediately transported to the cytoplasm through chromosome region maintenance 1 (CRM1). Recently, we have reported that up-regulation of LIM kinase 2 (LIMK2) expression induces HMGB1 export from neuronal nuclei during status epilepticus (SE)-induced programmed neuronal necrosis in the rat hippocampus. Thus, we investigated whether HMGB1 involves LIMK2-mediated programmed neuronal necrosis, but such role is not reported. In the present study, SE was induced by pilocarpine in rats that were intracerebroventricularly infused with saline, control siRNA, LIMK2 siRNA or leptomycin B (LMB, a CRM1 inhibitor) prior to SE induction. Thereafter, we performed Fluoro-Jade B staining, western blots and immunohistochemical studies. LIMK2 knockdown effectively attenuated SE-induced neuronal death and HMGB1 import into mitochondria accompanied by inhibiting nuclear HMGB1 release and abnormal mitochondrial elongation. LMB alleviated SE-induced neuronal death and nuclear HMGB1 release. However, LMB did not prevent mitochondrial elongation induced by SE, but inhibited the HMGB1 import into mitochondria. The efficacy of LMB was less effective to attenuate SE-induced neuronal death than that of LIMK2 siRNA. These findings indicate that nuclear HMGB1 release and the subsequent mitochondrial import may facilitate and deteriorate programmed necrotic neuronal deaths. The present data suggest that the nuclear HMGB1 release via CRM1 may be a potential therapeutic target for the programmed necrotic neuronal death induced by SE. PMID:27147971

  9. The effects of live music groups versus an educational children's television program on the emergent literacy of young children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Register, Dena

    2004-01-01

    Research suggests that music is beneficial in teaching both social and academic skills to young children. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a music therapy program designed to teach reading skills versus the "Between the Lions" television program on the early literacy behaviors of Kindergarten children from a low socioeconomic background. Subjects (n = 86) were children, aged 5-7 years, enrolled in one of four different Kindergarten classes at a public elementary school in Northwest Florida. Each class was assigned one of four treatment conditions: Music/Video (sequential presentation of each condition), Music-Only, Video-Only, and no contact Control group. Growth in early literacy skills was measured using the Dynamic Indicators of Basic Early Literacy Skills (DIBELS) and 3 subtests of the Test of Early reading Ability-3rd edition (TERA-3). Teachers' perceptions of classroom literacy behaviors were measured using a pre and poststudy survey. This study also compared on- and off-task behavior of students during video versus music conditions. Results of the 7 subtests measuring early literacy were varied. The Music/Video and Music-Only groups achieved the highest increases in mean scores from pre to posttest on 4 of the 7 subtests. Students in the Video-Only group scored significantly better on the phonemic segmentation portion of the DIBELS than peers in the Music/Video condition. Furthermore, strong correlations were found between the Letter Naming, Initial Sounds Fluency tests, and total raw score of the TERA-3 tests for both pre and posttesting. Additionally, graphic analysis of mean off-task behavior per session indicated that students were more off-task during both video conditions (video alone and video portion of Music/Video condition) than during the music conditions. Off-task behavior was consistently lower during music sessions for the duration of the study. This study confirmed that music increases the on-task behavior of students

  10. The effect of a job placement and support program for workers with musculoskeletal injuries: a randomized control trial (RCT) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li-Tsang, C W P; Li, E J Q; Lam, C S; Hui, K Y L; Chan, C C H

    2008-09-01

    This is a randomized clinical trial (RCT) to investigate the efficacy of a job placement and support program designed for workers with musculoskeletal injuries and having difficulties in resuming the work role. The program was planned to help injured workers to successfully return to work (RTW) by overcoming the difficulties and problems during the process of job seeking and sustaining a job using a case management approach. A total of 66 injured workers were recruited and randomly assigned into the job placement and support group (PS group) or the self-placement group (SP group). A three-week job placement and support program was given to subjects in the PS group while subjects in the control group (SP group) were only given advice on job placement at a workers' health center. The PS program was comprised of an individual interview, vocational counseling, job preparation training, and assisted placement using the case management approach. The Chinese Lam Assessment of Stages of Employment Readiness (C-LASER), the Chinese State Trait and Anxiety Inventory (C-STAI), and the SF-36 were the outcome measures for the two groups before and after the training program to observe the changes in subjects' work readiness status, emotional status and their health related quality of life pre- and post-training program. The rate of return to work was measured for both groups of subjects after the training program. The results indicated that the rate of success in RTW (73%) was significantly higher in the job placement (PS) group than that of the self-placement (SP) group (51.6%) with P placement (PS) program appeared to have enhanced the employability of injured workers. Workers who participated in the program also showed higher levels of work readiness and emotional status in coping with their work injuries.

  11. Effectiveness of a psycho-oncology training program for oncology nurses: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, Yosuke; Okuyama, Toru; Uchida, Megumi; Umezawa, Shino; Nakaguchi, Tomohiro; Sugano, Koji; Ito, Yoshinori; Katsuki, Fujika; Nakano, Yumi; Nishiyama, Takeshi; Katayama, Yoshiko; Akechi, Tatsuo

    2016-06-01

    Oncology nurses are expected to play an important role in psychosocial care for cancer patients. The aim of this study was to examine whether a novel training program aimed at enhancing oncology nurses' ability to assess and manage common psychological problems in cancer patients would improve participants' self-reported confidence, knowledge, and attitudes regarding care of patients with common psychological problems (trial register: UMIN000008559). Oncology nurses were assigned randomly to either the intervention group (N = 50) or the waiting list control group (N = 46). The intervention group received a 16-h program, the content of which focused on four psychological issues: normal reactions, clinically significant distress, suicidal thoughts, and delirium. Each session included a role-play exercise, group work, and didactic lecture regarding assessment and management of each problem. Primary outcomes were changes in self-reported confidence, knowledge, and attitudes toward the common psychological problems between pre-intervention and 3 months post-intervention. Secondary outcomes were job-related stress and burnout. Intervention acceptability to participants was also assessed. In the intervention group, confidence and knowledge but not attitudes were significantly improved relative to the control group. No significant intervention effects were found for job- related stress and burnout. A high percentage (98%) of participants considered the program useful in clinical practice. This psycho-oncology training program improved oncology nurses' confidence and knowledge regarding care for patients with psychological problems. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Does Family Group Decision Making Affect Child Welfare Outcomes? Findings from a Randomized Control Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berzin, Stephanie Cosner; Cohen, Ed; Thomas, Karen; Dawson, William C.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the evaluation of two family group decision-making programs administered under the California Title IV-E Waiver Demonstration Project. This is the only evaluation using random assignment to examine FGDM. Overall, results did not indicate more positive outcomes for children receiving the intervention, but did indicate that…

  13. Determining the frequency of dry eye in computer users and comparing with control group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hossein Davari

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To determine the frequency of dry eye in computer users and to compare them with control group. METHODS: This study was a case control research conducted in 2015 in the city of Birjand. Sample size of study was estimated to be 304 subjects(152 subjects in each group, computer user group and control group. Non-randomized method of sampling was used in both groups. Schirmer test was used to evaluate dry eye of subjects. Then, subjects completed questionnaire. This questionnaire was developed based on objectives and reviewing the literature. After collecting the data, they were entered to SPSS Software and they were analyzed using Chi-square test or Fisher's test at the alpha level of 0.05.RESULTS: In total, 304 subjects(152 subjects in each groupwere included in the study. Frequency of dry eyes in the control group was 3.3%(5 subjectsand it was 61.8% in computer users group(94 subjects. Significant difference was observed between two groups in this regard(Pn=12, and it was 34.2% in computer users group(n=52, which significant difference was observed between two groups in this regard(PP=0.8. The mean working hour with computer per day in patients with dry eye was 6.65±3.52h, while it was 1.62±2.54h in healthy group(T=13.25, PCONCLUSION: This study showed a significant relationship between using computer and dry eye and ocular symptoms. Thus, it is necessary that officials need to pay particular attention to working hours with computer by employees. They should also develop appropriate plans to divide the working hours with computer among computer users. However, due to various confounding factors, it is recommended that these factors to be controlled in future studies.

  14. Carcinogenicity evaluation: comparison of tumor data from dual control groups in the Sprague-Dawley rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldrick, Paul

    2005-01-01

    Following recent clarification in Europe that a single control group is now acceptable for rodent carcinogenicity studies, the use of dual controls may be reduced or disappear. To date, virtually nothing has been published on whether this latter situation has improved the identification of tumorigenic risk potential in these studies. In this paper, the results of 13 rat carcinogenicity studies, performed between 1991 and 2002, with 2 control groups, are presented. Although no major differences in tumor incidences between these dual control groups were found, some interstudy variation occurred. In cases where a notable difference was seen, the use of 2 control groups, as well as robust, contemporary background data, allowed an easier interpretation of findings in drug-treated groups. Thus, the continued use of dual control groups has a vital role in the assessment of tumoriogenic risk. The paper also presents an update on survival, on the range and extent of background spontaneous neoplasms, and comments on genetic drift in this commonly used rat strain.

  15. Adaptive dynamic programming with applications in optimal control

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Derong; Wang, Ding; Yang, Xiong; Li, Hongliang

    2017-01-01

    This book covers the most recent developments in adaptive dynamic programming (ADP). The text begins with a thorough background review of ADP making sure that readers are sufficiently familiar with the fundamentals. In the core of the book, the authors address first discrete- and then continuous-time systems. Coverage of discrete-time systems starts with a more general form of value iteration to demonstrate its convergence, optimality, and stability with complete and thorough theoretical analysis. A more realistic form of value iteration is studied where value function approximations are assumed to have finite errors. Adaptive Dynamic Programming also details another avenue of the ADP approach: policy iteration. Both basic and generalized forms of policy-iteration-based ADP are studied with complete and thorough theoretical analysis in terms of convergence, optimality, stability, and error bounds. Among continuous-time systems, the control of affine and nonaffine nonlinear systems is studied using the ADP app...

  16. Effect of a postoperative exercise program on arteriovenous fistula maturation: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontseré, Néstor; Mestres, Gaspar; Yugueros, Xavier; López, Teresa; Yuguero, Anna; Bermudez, Patricia; Gomez, Fernando; Riambau, Vicenç; Maduell, Francisco; Campistol, Josep M

    2016-04-01

    Exercises after arteriovenous fistula (AVF) creation may help to improve maturation; however, their usefulness has only been examined in indirect, non-comparative studies or small trials. Between June 2013 and November 2014, we included all ambulatory patients with stages 5-5D chronic kidney disease who were candidates for the creation of a native AVF in our center. After surgery, all patients were randomized to an exercise group or a control group with single-blind control. At 1 month postoperatively, clinical maturation (expert nurse inspection) and ultrasonographic maturation (flow >500 mL/min, venous diameter >5 mm and depth patients. A total of 72 patients were randomized, 3 were lost to follow-up, and 69 were finally analyzed. The mean age was 66.8 years (standard deviation 13.8), 70.0% were men, and 65.2% were in pre-dialysis. After surgery (42.0% had distal AVF), the patients were randomized (31 controls, 38 exercise group). At 1 month after surgery, global clinical and ultrasonographic maturation was assessed in 88.4% and 78.3% of AVF, respectively (kappa = 0.539). Non-significant differences in clinical or ultrasonographic maturation were seen between exercise and control group (94.7% vs. 80.6%, P = 0.069; 81.6% vs. 74.2%, P = 0.459). A stepwise logistic regression was performed to control previously analyzed asymmetrically distributed confounding factors (AVF localization), revealing that the exercise group showed greater clinical, but not ultrasonographic, maturation (odds ratio [OR] 5.861, 95% confidence interval: 1.006-34.146 and OR 2.403, 0.66-8.754). A postoperative controlled exercise program after AVF creation seems to increase 1-month clinical AVF maturation in distal accesses. Furthermore, exercise programs should be taken into account, especially in distal accesses. © 2015 International Society for Hemodialysis.

  17. Improving Student Confidence in Using Group Work Standards: A Controlled Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macgowan, Mark J.; Wong, Stephen E.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: This is a replication of a study that examined the effects of teaching foundation competencies in group work to social work students and assessed their self-confidence in applying these skills. This study improves on the first by utilizing a controlled design. Method: Twenty-six master of social work students were taught group work…

  18. Analysis of postural control and muscular performance in young and elderly women in different age groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Matheus M; Reis, Júlia G; Carvalho, Regiane L; Tanaka, Erika H; Hyppolito, Miguel A; Abreu, Daniela C C

    2015-01-01

    muscle strength and power are two factors affecting balance. The impact of muscle strength and power on postural control has not been fully explored among different age strata over sixty. the aim of the present study was to assess the muscle strength and power of elderly women in different age groups and determine their correlation with postural control. eighty women were divided into four groups: the young 18-30 age group (n=20); the 60-64 age group (n=20); the 65-69 age group (n=20); and the 70-74 age group (n=20). The participants underwent maximum strength (one repetition maximum or 1-RM) and muscle power tests to assess the knee extensor and flexor muscles at 40%, 70%, and 90% 1-RM intensity. The time required by participants to recover their balance after disturbing their base of support was also assessed. the elderly women in the 60-64, 65-69, and 70-74 age groups exhibited similar muscle strength, power, and postural control (p>0.05); however, these values were lower than those of the young group (page difference, elderly women aged 60 to 74 years exhibited similar abilities to generate strength and power with their lower limbs, and this ability could be one factor that explains the similar postural control shown by these women.

  19. Doing Anger Differently: Two Controlled Trials of Percussion Group Psychotherapy for Adolescent Reactive Aggression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currie, Michael; Startup, Mike

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluates efficacy and effectiveness of "Doing Anger Differently" (DAD), a group treatment for reactively aggressive 12-15 year old males. DAD uses percussion exercises to aid treatment. Study 1 compared a ten-week treatment with a waitlist control at pre, post and 6 month (treatment group only) follow-up. Study 2 replicated Study 1,…

  20. Study of Social Capital Status in Patients With Primary Headache Compared to Control Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azar Pirdehghan

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Social capital, in general, is mutual relationships, interactions, and networks that emerge among human grouping and is the level of trust formed in the specific group as commitment and social norm. This issue is associated with many mental and physical disorders in the community. The objective of this study was to evaluate the level of social capital in some people with a primary headache in comparison with control group. Methods: This case-control study was performed on 60 patients with a primary headache who referred to one of neurology clinics in Yazd city, Iran, as the case group and 60 subjects without primary headache as the control group that had some similarities with case group in demographic features. Data was collected via social capital questionnaire containing demographic information. Results: The mean score of social capital in the case group was 193.5±30.82 while the mean score of social capital in the control group was 214.1±34.22 (P=0.001 that indicate a significant correlation between social capital level and catching primary headache. Conclusion: Further studies are needed on the effect of social capital on the level of response to treatment in patients with primary headache. It is also suggested to be conducted interventions regarding the impact of social capital on headaches and broader studies with larger scale (urban population in this regard.

  1. Development plan for the External Hazards Experimental Group. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coleman, Justin Leigh [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Smith, Curtis Lee [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Burns, Douglas Edward [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Kammerer, Annie [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-03-01

    This report describes the development plan for a new multi-partner External Hazards Experimental Group (EHEG) coordinated by Idaho National Laboratory (INL) within the Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) technical pathway of the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program. Currently, there is limited data available for development and validation of the tools and methods being developed in the RISMC Toolkit. The EHEG is being developed to obtain high-quality, small- and large-scale experimental data validation of RISMC tools and methods in a timely and cost-effective way. The group of universities and national laboratories that will eventually form the EHEG (which is ultimately expected to include both the initial participants and other universities and national laboratories that have been identified) have the expertise and experimental capabilities needed to both obtain and compile existing data archives and perform additional seismic and flooding experiments. The data developed by EHEG will be stored in databases for use within RISMC. These databases will be used to validate the advanced external hazard tools and methods.

  2. A Group Kickboxing Program for Balance, Mobility, and Quality of Life in Individuals With Multiple Sclerosis: A Pilot Study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jackson, Kurt; Edginton-Bigelow, Kimberly; Cooper, Christina; Merriman, Harold

    2012-01-01

    ...). The primary purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate the feasibility of a 5-week group kickboxing program and to measure changes in balance, mobility, and quality of life in individuals with MS...

  3. Effects of a cognitive-enhancement group training program on daily living activities, cognition, and depression in the demented elderly

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cho, MiLim; Kim, DeokJu; Chung, JaeYeop; Park, JuHyung; You, HeeCheon; Yang, YeongAe

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The effects of a cognitive enhancement group training program on daily living activities, cognition, and depression in the demented elderly population of a local Korean community were investigated...

  4. Group Navigation and Control for Marine Autonomous Robotic Complex Based on Hydroacoustic Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-09

    Abstract— This paper is devoted to the collective control and group navigation based on hydroacoustic communication intended for marine...moving on the depth of 3600 m and surface beacon. One of the mentioned purpose of ATM 900 modem is the providing AUV group communication and navigation...in near term future are connected with usage more vehicles in the group . Consequently we need to design communication protocol allowing the

  5. A single blind randomized control trial on support groups for Chinese persons with mild dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young DKW

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Daniel KW Young,1 Timothy CY Kwok,2 Petrus YN Ng1 1Department of Social Work, Hong Kong Baptist University, Kowloon Tong, Hong Kong; 2Department of Medicine and Therapeutics, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, Hong Kong Purpose: Persons with mild dementia experience multiple losses and manifest depressive symptoms. This research study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of a support group led by a social worker for Chinese persons with mild dementia. Research methods: Participants were randomly assigned to either a ten-session support group or a control group. Standardized assessment tools were used for data collection at pretreatment and post-treatment periods by a research assistant who was kept blind to the group assignment of the participants. Upon completion of the study, 20 treatment group participants and 16 control group participants completed all assessments. Results: At baseline, the treatment and control groups did not show any significant difference on all demographic variables, as well as on all baseline measures; over one-half (59% of all the participants reported having depression, as assessed by a Chinese Geriatric Depression Scale score ≥8. After completing the support group, the depressive mood of the treatment group participants reduced from 8.83 (standard deviation =2.48 to 7.35 (standard deviation =2.18, which was significant (Wilcoxon signed-rank test; P=0.017, P<0.05, while the control group’s participants did not show any significant change. Conclusion: This present study supports the efficacy and effectiveness of the support group for persons with mild dementia in Chinese society. In particular, this present study shows that a support group can reduce depressive symptoms for participants. Keywords: support group, mild dementia, Chinese, depression

  6. Building the evaluation capacity of California's local tobacco control programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treiber, Jeanette; Cassady, Diana; Kipke, Robin; Kwon, Nicole; Satterlund, Travis

    2011-11-01

    Successful evaluation capacity building requires a dynamic balance between responding to local agency needs and ensuring that local staff have appropriate skills to conduct rigorous evaluations. In 2004, the California Tobacco Control Program established the Tobacco Control Evaluation Center (TCEC), based at a public research university, to provide evaluation technical assistance to approximately 100 local agencies implementing tobacco control programs. TCEC has been responsive to local needs, for instance, by answering 512 technical assistance requests in the first 5 years of operation and by tailoring training according to needs assessment results. About 50% of the technical assistance requests were for new data collection instruments (n = 255). TCEC has sought proactively to improve local evaluation skills, most recently in a data analysis and report writing skill building campaign that included a webinar, newsletter, and seven regional training meetings. Preliminary analysis suggests a 20% improvement in scores for the local final evaluation reports as a result of this campaign. It is concluded that evaluation technical assistance can be provided effectively by a university as long as the local context is kept in mind, and a balance of responsive and proactive technical assistance is provided.

  7. Controlled Optimal Design Program for the Logit Dose Response Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiaqiao Hu

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The assessment of dose-response is an integral component of the drug development process. Parallel dose-response studies are conducted, customarily, in preclinical and phase 1, 2 clinical trials for this purpose. Practical constraints on dose range, dose levels and dose proportions are intrinsic issues in the design of dose response studies because of drug toxicity, efficacy, FDA regulations, protocol requirements, clinical trial logistics, and marketing issues. We provide a free on-line software package called Controlled Optimal Design 2.0 for generating controlled optimal designs that can incorporate prior information and multiple objectives, and meet multiple practical constraints at the same time. Researchers can either run the web-based design program or download its stand-alone version to construct the desired multiple-objective controlled Bayesian optimal designs. Because researchers often adopt ad-hoc design schemes such as the equal allocation rules without knowing how efficient such designs would be for the design problem, the program also evaluates the efficiency of user-supplied designs.

  8. Lifestyle Intervention for Weight Loss: a group-based program for Emiratis in Ajman, United Arab Emirates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadiya A

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Amena Sadiya,1,* Sarah Abdi,1,* Salah Abusnana2 1Lifestyle Clinic, 2Research and Education Department, Rashid Center for Diabetes and Research, Ajman, United Arab Emirates *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Lifestyle Intervention for Weight Loss (LIFE-8 is developed as a structured, group-based weight management program for Emiratis with obesity and type 2 diabetes. It is a 3-month program followed by a 1-year follow-up. The results from the first 2 years are presented here to indicate the possibility of its further adaptation and implementation in this region. Methodology: We recruited 45 participants with obesity and/or type 2 diabetes based on inclusion/exclusion criteria. The LIFE-8 program was executed by incorporating dietary modification, physical activity, and behavioral therapy, aiming to achieve up to 5% weight loss. The outcomes included body weight, fat mass, waist circumference, blood pressure, fasting blood glucose (FBG, hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c, and nutritional knowledge at 3 months and 12 months. Results: We observed a reduction of 5.0% in body weight (4.8±2.8 kg; 95% CI 3.7–5.8, fat mass (–7.8%, P<0.01, and waist circumference (Δ=4±4 cm, P<0.01 in the completed participants (n=28. An improvement (P<0.05 in HbA1c (7.1%±1.0% vs 6.6%±0.7% and FBG (8.2±2.0 mmol/L vs 6.8±0.8 mmol/L was observed in participants with obesity and type 2 diabetes after the program. Increase in nutritional knowledge (<0.01 and overall evaluation of the program (9/10 was favorable. On 1-year follow-up, we found that the participants could sustain weight loss (–4.0%, while obese, type 2 diabetic participants sustained HbA1c (6.6%±0.7% vs 6.4%±0.7% and further improved (P<0.05 the level of FBG (6.8±0.8 mmol/L vs 6.7±0.4 mmol/L. Conclusion: LIFE-8 could be an effective, affordable, acceptable, and adaptable lifestyle intervention program for the prevention and management of diabetes in Emiratis. It was successful not

  9. Enhancing a Cancer Prevention and Control Curriculum through Interactive Group Discussions

    OpenAIRE

    Forsythe, L.P.; Gadalla, S.M.; Hamilton, J G; Heckman-Stoddard, B.M.; Kent, E.E.; Lai, G Y; Lin, S. W.; Luhn, P.; Faupel-Badger, J.M.

    2012-01-01

    The Principles and Practice of Cancer Prevention and Control course (Principles course) is offered annually by the National Cancer Institute Cancer Prevention Fellowship Program. This four-week post-graduate course covers the spectrum of cancer prevention and control research (e.g. epidemiology, laboratory, clinical, social, and behavioral sciences) and is open to attendees from medical, academic, government, and related institutions across the world. In this report, we describe a new additio...

  10. Mountain gorilla tug-of-war: Silverbacks have limited control over reproduction in multimale groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Brenda J.; Robbins, Martha M.; Williamson, Elizabeth A.; Steklis, H. Dieter; Steklis, Netzin Gerald; Eckhardt, Nadin; Boesch, Christophe; Vigilant, Linda

    2005-01-01

    To determine who fathers the offspring in wild mountain gorilla groups containing more than one adult male silverback, we genotyped nearly one-fourth (n = 92) of the mountain gorillas (Gorilla beringei beringei) living in the Virunga Volcanoes region of Africa. Paternity analysis of 48 offspring born into four groups between 1985 and 1999 revealed that, although all infants were sired by within-group males, the socially dominant silverback did not always monopolize reproduction within his group. Instead, the second-ranking male sired an average of 15% of group offspring. This result, in combination with previous findings that second-ranking males fare best by not leaving the group but by staying and waiting to assume dominance even if no reproduction is possible while waiting, is not consistent with expectations from a reproductive skew model in which the silverback concedes controllable reproduction to the second-ranking male. Instead, the data suggest a “tug-of-war” scenario in which neither the dominant nor the second-ranking male has full control over his relative reproductive share. The two top-ranked males were typically unrelated and this, in combination with the mixed paternity of group offspring, means that multimale gorilla groups do not approximate family groups. Instead, as long-term assemblages of related and unrelated individuals, gorilla groups are similar to chimpanzee groups and so offer interesting possibilities for kin-biased interactions among individuals. PMID:15964984

  11. Comparison of two control groups for estimation of oral cholera vaccine effectiveness using a case-control study design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franke, Molly F; Jerome, J Gregory; Matias, Wilfredo R; Ternier, Ralph; Hilaire, Isabelle J; Harris, Jason B; Ivers, Louise C

    2017-10-13

    Case-control studies to quantify oral cholera vaccine effectiveness (VE) often rely on neighbors without diarrhea as community controls. Test-negative controls can be easily recruited and may minimize bias due to differential health-seeking behavior and recall. We compared VE estimates derived from community and test-negative controls and conducted bias-indicator analyses to assess potential bias with community controls. From October 2012 through November 2016, patients with acute watery diarrhea were recruited from cholera treatment centers in rural Haiti. Cholera cases had a positive stool culture. Non-cholera diarrhea cases (test-negative controls and non-cholera diarrhea cases for bias-indicator analyses) had a negative culture and rapid test. Up to four community controls were matched to diarrhea cases by age group, time, and neighborhood. Primary analyses included 181 cholera cases, 157 non-cholera diarrhea cases, 716 VE community controls and 625 bias-indicator community controls. VE for self-reported vaccination with two doses was consistent across the two control groups, with statistically significant VE estimates ranging from 72 to 74%. Sensitivity analyses revealed similar, though somewhat attenuated estimates for self-reported two dose VE. Bias-indicator estimates were consistently less than one, with VE estimates ranging from 19 to 43%, some of which were statistically significant. OCV estimates from case-control analyses using community and test-negative controls were similar. While bias-indicator analyses suggested possible over-estimation of VE estimates using community controls, test-negative analyses suggested this bias, if present, was minimal. Test-negative controls can be a valid low-cost and time-efficient alternative to community controls for OCV effectiveness estimation and may be especially relevant in emergency situations. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Effectiveness of the home-based alcohol prevention program "In control: No alcohol!": study protocol of a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verdurmen Jacqueline EE

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the Netherlands, children start to drink at an early age; of the Dutch 12-year olds, 40% reports lifetime alcohol use, while 9.7% reports last-month drinking. Starting to drink at an early age puts youth at risk of developing several alcohol-related problems later in life. Recently, a home-based prevention program called "In control: No alcohol!" was developed to delay the age of alcohol onset in children. The main aim of this project is to conduct a Randomized Controlled Trial (RCT to evaluate the effectiveness of the program. Methods/Design The prevention program will be tested with an RCT among mothers and their 6 grade primary school children (11-12 years old, randomly assigned to the prevention or control condition. The program consists of five printed magazines and an activity book designed to improve parental alcohol-specific socialization. Parent-child dyads in the control group receive a factsheet information brochure, which is the standard alcohol brochure of the Trimbos Institute (the Netherlands Institute for Mental Health and Addiction. Outcome measures are initiation of alcohol use (have been drinking at least one glass of alcohol, alcohol-specific parenting, susceptibility to drinking alcohol, alcohol expectancies, self-efficacy, and frequency and intensity of child alcohol use. Questionnaires will be administered online on secured Internet webpages, with personal login codes for both mothers and children. Mothers and children in both the experimental and control condition will be surveyed at baseline and after 6, 12, and 18 months (follow-ups. Discussion The present study protocol presents the design of an RCT evaluating the effectiveness of the home-based "In control: No alcohol!" program for 6 grade primary school children (11-12 years old. It is hypothesized that children in the prevention condition will be less likely to have their first glass of alcohol, compared to the control condition. When the

  13. Multistate case-control study of maternal risk factors for neonatal group B streptococcal disease. The Active Surveillance Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuchat, A; Deaver-Robinson, K; Plikaytis, B D; Zangwill, K M; Mohle-Boetani, J; Wenger, J D

    1994-07-01

    Risk factors for early onset disease (EOD) caused by Group B streptococci (GBS) that are the foundation of prevention guidelines were identified in studies conducted in a few hospital centers. We investigated cases of EOD identified through laboratory-based active surveillance during 1991 and 1992 in a multistate population of 17 million. Ninety-nine cases were compared with 253 controls matched for hospital, date of birth and birth weight. Prematurity (cases; 53% of case mothers had rupture of membranes > 12 hours; and 48% reported intrapartum fever. The incidence of EOD in each surveillance area was higher among blacks. By multivariate analysis, case mothers were more likely than controls to have rupture of membranes before labor onset (adjusted odds ratio 8.7, P case mothers had intrapartum fever, < 37 weeks of gestation and/or prolonged rupture of membranes, indicators previously used to select high risk women for intrapartum chemoprophylaxis. Our findings extend data from single hospitals and suggest prenatal screening and selective intrapartum chemoprophylaxis of high-risk mothers could potentially prevent the majority of EOD in the United States.

  14. Promoting Child Development through Group-Based Parent Support within a Cash Transfer Program: Experimental Effects on Children's Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernald, Lia C. H.; Kagawa, Rose M. C.; Knauer, Heather A.; Schnaas, Lourdes; Guerra, Armando Garcia; Neufeld, Lynnette M.

    2017-01-01

    We examined effects on child development of a group-based parenting support program ("Educación Inicial" - EI) when combined with Mexico's conditional cash transfer (CCT) program ("Prospera," originally 'Oportunidades" and "Progresa"). This cluster-randomized trial included 204 communities (n = 1,113 children in…

  15. Igniting interest in prevention: using firefighter focus groups to inform implementation and enhancement of an urban canvassing program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frattaroli, Shannon; McDonald, Eileen M; Tran, Nhan T; Trump, Alison R; OʼBrocki, Raymond C; Gielen, Andrea C

    2012-01-01

    Smoke alarm canvassing is recognized as an empirically based, effective intervention for increasing access to and the presence of smoke alarms in homes. We sought to inform the implementation of an intervention designed to enhance an existing fire department smoke alarm canvassing program through an empirically grounded, participatory process. We conducted a series of focus groups with fire union leaders and firefighters involved with the canvassing program in 1 US city, shared the results with the participants, and presented the resulting recommendations to fire department leadership. This research occurred in Baltimore, Maryland. Focus group participants included firefighters who participate in the Fire Department's smoke alarm canvassing program and representatives from the local firefighters' union. The focus groups sought to capture firefighters' experiences with and opinions about the canvassing program and how to improve it as well as challenges to canvassing work. We conducted 10 focus groups with 65 participants. Firefighters' perspectives on the canvassing program and their recommendations for improving it were expressed through 3 categories of themes concerning program management, canvassing challenges, and attitudes about the program and the community. We also discuss the process of presenting these findings and recommendations to the participants and the fire department leadership, and describe how implementation of some of the recommendations has progressed. Both the process and outcomes of this formative work inform how to develop and implement community-based public health interventions in real-world settings through academic-community partnerships. The findings also have implications for how canvassing programs are being implemented.

  16. Impact of an integrated intervention program on atorvastatin adherence: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goswami NJ

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Nilesh J Goswami,1 Mitch DeKoven,2 Andreas Kuznik,3 Jack Mardekian,3 Michelle R Krukas,2 Larry Z Liu,3,4 Patrick Bailey,1 Cynthia Deitrick,5 John Vincent3 1Prairie Heart Cardiovascular Consultants, Springfield, IL, USA; 2Health Economics and Outcomes Research, IMS Health, Alexandria, VA, USA; 3Pfizer Inc, New York, NY, USA; 4Weill Cornell Medical College, Cornell University, New York, NY, USA; 5Prairie Heart Education and Research Cooperative, Springfield, IL, USA Background: This trial evaluated the effectiveness of an integrated intervention program that included a 3-to-5-minute nurse counseling session, copay relief cards, and a monthly newsletter on adherence to atorvastatin treatment. Methods and results: A prospective, integrated (composed of nurse counseling, adherence tip sheet, copay relief card, opportunity to enroll in 12-week cholesterol management program randomized interventional study was designed involving patients >21 years of age who were prescribed atorvastatin at a large single-specialty cardiovascular physician practice in Illinois from March 2010 to May 2011. Data from the practice's electronic medical record were matched/merged to IMS Health's longitudinal data. A total of 500 patients were enrolled (125 in the control arm; 375 in the intervention arm. After data linkage, 53 control patients and 155 intervention patients were included in the analysis. Results: Mean age was 67.8 years (control and 69.5 years (intervention; 67.9% and 58.7%, respectively, were male. The mean 6-month adherence rate was 0.82 in both arms. The mean proportion of days covered for both the new-user control and intervention groups was the same, averaging 0.70 day (standard deviation [SD], 0.27 day; for continuing users, the proportion of days covered for the control group was 0.83 (SD, 0.24 and for the intervention group was 0.84 (SD, 0.22. For continuing users, the control group had mean persistent days of 151.6 (SD, 50.2 compared with 150.9 days

  17. Control Algorithms Along Relative Equilibria of Underactuated Lagrangian Systems on Lie Groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordkvist, Nikolaj; Bullo, F.

    2008-01-01

    We present novel algorithms to control underactuated mechanical systems. For a class of invariant systems on Lie groups, we design iterative small-amplitude control forces to accelerate along, decelerate along, and stabilize relative equilibria. The technical approach is based upon a perturbation...

  18. A Randomized Controlled Trial of an Internet-Based Mentoring Program for Type 1 Diabetes Patients with Inadequate Glycemic Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunghwan Suh

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundTo determine whether an internet-based mentoring program can improve glycemic control in subjects with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM.MethodsSubjects with T1DM on intensive insulin therapy and with hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c ≥8.0% were randomized to mentored (glucometer transmission with feedback from mentors or control (glucometer transmission without feedback groups and were examined for 12 weeks. Five mentors were interviewed and selected, of which two were T1DM patients themselves and three were parents with at least one child diagnosed with T1DM since more than 5 years ago.ResultsA total of 57 T1DM adult subjects with a mean duration after being diagnosed with diabetes of 7.4 years were recruited from Samsung Medical Center. Unfortunately, the mentored group failed to show significant improvements in HbA1c levels or other outcomes, including the quality of life, after completion of the study. However, the mentored group monitored their blood glucose (1.41 vs. 0.30 and logged into our website (http://ubisens.co.kr/ more frequently (20.59 times vs. 5.07 times than the control group.ConclusionA 12-week internet-based mentoring program for T1DM patients with inadequate glycemic control did not prove to be superior to the usual follow-up. However, the noted increase in the subjects' frequency of blood glucose monitoring may lead to clinical benefits.

  19. Enhancing the early home learning environment through a brief group parenting intervention: study protocol for a cluster randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Jan M; Cann, Warren; Matthews, Jan; Berthelsen, Donna; Ukoumunne, Obioha C; Trajanovska, Misel; Bennetts, Shannon K; Hillgrove, Tessa; Hamilton, Victoria; Westrupp, Elizabeth; Hackworth, Naomi J

    2016-06-02

    The quality of the home learning environment has a significant influence on children's language and communication skills during the early years with children from disadvantaged families disproportionately affected. This paper describes the protocol and participant baseline characteristics of a community-based effectiveness study. It evaluates the effects of 'smalltalk', a brief group parenting intervention (with or without home coaching) on the quality of the early childhood home learning environment. The study comprises two cluster randomised controlled superiority trials (one for infants and one for toddlers) designed and conducted in parallel. In 20 local government areas (LGAs) in Victoria, Australia, six locations (clusters) were randomised to one of three conditions: standard care (control); smalltalk group-only program; or smalltalk plus (group program plus home coaching). Programs were delivered to parents experiencing socioeconomic disadvantage through two existing age-based services, the maternal and child health service (infant program, ages 6-12 months), and facilitated playgroups (toddler program, ages 12-36 months). Outcomes were assessed by parent report and direct observation at baseline (0 weeks), post-intervention (12 weeks) and follow-up (32 weeks). Primary outcomes were parent verbal responsivity and home activities with child at 32 weeks. Secondary outcomes included parenting confidence, parent wellbeing and children's communication, socio-emotional and general development skills. Analyses will use intention-to-treat random effects ("multilevel") models to account for clustering. Across the 20 LGAs, 986 parents of infants and 1200 parents of toddlers enrolled and completed baseline measures. Eighty four percent of families demonstrated one or more of the targeted risk factors for poor child development (low income; receives government benefits; single, socially isolated or young parent; culturally or linguistically diverse background). This

  20. CR mammography: Design and implementation of a quality control program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno-Ramirez, A.; Brandan, M. E.; Villasenor-Navarro, Y.; Galvan, H. A.; Ruiz-Trejo, C. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, DF 04510 (Mexico); Departamento de Radiodiagnostico, Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia, DF 14080 (Mexico); Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, DF 04510 (Mexico)

    2012-10-23

    Despite the recent acquisition of significant quantities of computed radiography CR equipment for mammography, Mexican regulations do not specify the performance requirements for digital systems such as those of CR type. The design of a quality control program QCP specific for CR mammography systems was thus considered relevant. International protocols were taken as reference to define tests, procedures and acceptance criteria. The designed QCP was applied in three CR mammography facilities. Important deficiencies in spatial resolution, noise, image receptor homogeneity, artifacts and breast thickness compensation were detected.

  1. Structural mode significance using INCA. [Interactive Controls Analysis computer program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Frank H.; Downing, John P.; Thorpe, Christopher J.

    1990-01-01

    Structural finite element models are often too large to be used in the design and analysis of control systems. Model reduction techniques must be applied to reduce the structural model to manageable size. In the past, engineers either performed the model order reduction by hand or used distinct computer programs to retrieve the data, to perform the significance analysis and to reduce the order of the model. To expedite this process, the latest version of INCA has been expanded to include an interactive graphical structural mode significance and model order reduction capability.

  2. Does self-control improve with practice? Evidence from a six-week training program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Eleanor; Sheeran, Paschal; Baird, Harriet; Macdonald, Ian; Webb, Thomas L; Harris, Peter R

    2016-08-01

    Can self-control be improved through practice? Several studies have found that repeated practice of tasks involving self-control improves performance on other tasks relevant to self-control. However, in many of these studies, improvements after training could be attributable to methodological factors (e.g., passive control conditions). Moreover, the extent to which the effects of training transfer to real-life settings is not yet clear. In the present research, participants (N = 174) completed a 6-week training program of either cognitive or behavioral self-control tasks. We then tested the effects of practice on a range of measures of self-control, including lab-based and real-world tasks. Training was compared with both active and no-contact control conditions. Despite high levels of adherence to the training tasks, there was no effect of training on any measure of self-control. Trained participants did not, for example, show reduced ego depletion effects, become better at overcoming their habits, or report exerting more self-control in everyday life. Moderation analyses found no evidence that training was effective only among particular groups of participants. Bayesian analyses suggested that the data were more consistent with a null effect of training on self-control than with previous estimates of the effect of practice. The implication is that training self-control through repeated practice does not result in generalized improvements in self-control. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  3. Physical effects of a reconditioning program me in a group of chronic fatigue syndrome patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillamo, Elisabet; Barbany, Joan R; Blazquez, Alicia; Delicado, Mari C; Ventura, Josep L; Javierre, Casimiro

    2016-05-01

    Physical exercise can be part of treatment in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), where the aim would be to improve strength and endurance through increasing physical exercise (intensity and time) without aggravating symptomatology. The present study examines the effectiveness of a reconditioning programme (focusing on strength, endurance, balance and propioception) for achieving maximum functional capacity according to the clinical status of CFS patients. Sixty-eight patients with CFS were randomly assigned to two groups: a control group (CG) comprising 22 patients and an active group (AG) of 46 patients, the latter being invited to take part in a functional reconditioning programme based on 12 weeks of laboratory training followed by a further 12-week home training period. Functional assessments were as follows: before (I) and after (II) the laboratory training and after (III) the home training. In the AG, 22 patients (67%) completed the intervention (laboratory) stage and 20 finished the whole protocol (61%). Patients in the AG showed improved static and dynamic balance, as well as significantly greater maximum strength (F=7.059, P<0.05). Differences in resistance strength were also observed, with the AG showing a 19.9% improvement between functional assessments I and II (P=0.04). We do not found changes in the CG. A physical exercise programme of this kind might offer CFS patients the opportunity to improve their strength, balance and quality of life, there being only a very small risk of relapse and none of the adverse effects of other treatments.

  4. "Think aloud": a program for developing self-control in young aggressive boys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camp, B W; Blom, G E; Hebert, F; van Doorninck, W J

    1977-01-01

    "Think Aloud" was designed as a training program to improve self-control in 6- to 8-year-old boys. It involved modeling and verbalization of cognitive activity to foster use of verbal mediation skills in dealing with both cognitive and interpersonal problems. It was hypothesized that this training would lead to improvement in test performance and teacher ratings of classroom behavior in hyperaggressive boys. Twelve aggressive second grade boys participated in daily, 30-minute, individual sessions for 6 weeks. Normal and aggressive control subjects received no intervention. Teachers rated both trained and untrained aggressive boys as improving in aggressive behaviors but they rated the experimental group as showing improvement on a significantly larger number of prosocial behaviors. The pattern of performance on cognitive tests also changed significantly in the experimental group. On pretest, their pattern differed from normals and resembled the aggressive control group, while on posttest their pattern resembled normals and differed from agressive controls. Suggestions were made concerning additional refinements needed in the program, but overall results indicated potential value in the present approach for providing assistance to aggressive boys in the early grades.

  5. The immediate early gene product EGR1 and polycomb group proteins interact in epigenetic programming during chondrogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Spaapen

    Full Text Available Initiation of and progression through chondrogenesis is driven by changes in the cellular microenvironment. At the onset of chondrogenesis, resting mesenchymal stem cells are mobilized in vivo and a complex, step-wise chondrogenic differentiation program is initiated. Differentiation requires coordinated transcriptomic reprogramming and increased progenitor proliferation; both processes require chromatin remodeling. The nature of early molecular responses that relay differentiation signals to chromatin is poorly understood. We here show that immediate early genes are rapidly and transiently induced in response to differentiation stimuli in vitro. Functional ablation of the immediate early factor EGR1 severely deregulates expression of key chondrogenic control genes at the onset of differentiation. In addition, differentiating cells accumulate DNA damage, activate a DNA damage response and undergo a cell cycle arrest and prevent differentiation associated hyper-proliferation. Failed differentiation in the absence of EGR1 affects global acetylation and terminates in overall histone hypermethylation. We report novel molecular connections between EGR1 and Polycomb Group function: Polycomb associated histone H3 lysine27 trimethylation (H3K27me3 blocks chromatin access of EGR1. In addition, EGR1 ablation results in abnormal Ezh2 and Bmi1 expression. Consistent with this functional interaction, we identify a number of co-regulated targets genes in a chondrogenic gene network. We here describe an important role for EGR1 in early chondrogenic epigenetic programming to accommodate early gene-environment interactions in chondrogenesis.

  6. Effects of a resistance training program on balance and fatigue perception in patients with Parkinson's disease: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Rubio, Araceli; Cabrera-Martos, Irene; Torres-Sánchez, Irene; Casilda-López, Jesús; López-López, Laura; Valenza, Marie Carmen

    2017-11-22

    Fatigue and balance impairment leads to a loss of independence and are important to adequately manage. The objective of this study was to examine the effects of a resistance training program on dynamic balance and fatigue in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Randomized controlled trial. Forty-six patients with PD were randomly allocated to an intervention group receiving a 8-week resistance training program focused on lower limbs or to a control group. Balance was assessed using the Mini-BESTest and fatigue was assessed by the Piper Fatigue Scale. Patients in the intervention group improved significantly (p<0.05) on dynamic balance (reactive postural control and total values) and perceived fatigue. An 8-week resistance training program was found to be effective at improving dynamic balance and fatigue in patients with PD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. DETERMINATION OF BRAKING OPTIMAL MODE OF CONTROLLED CUT OF DESIGN GROUP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Dorosh

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The application of automation systems of breaking up process on the gravity hump is the efficiency improvement of their operation, absolute provision of trains breaking up safety demands, as well as improvement of hump staff working conditions. One of the main tasks of the indicated systems is the assurance of cuts reliable separation at all elements of their rolling route to the classification track. This task is a sophisticated optimization problem and has not received a final decision. Therefore, the task of determining the cuts braking mode is quite relevant. The purpose of this research is to find the optimal braking mode of control cut of design group. Methodology. In order to achieve the purpose is offered to use the direct search methods in the work, namely the Box complex method. This method does not require smoothness of the objective function, takes into account its limitations and does not require calculation of the function derivatives, and uses only its value. Findings. Using the Box method was developed iterative procedure for determining the control cut optimal braking mode of design group. The procedure maximizes the smallest controlled time interval in the group. To evaluate the effectiveness of designed procedure the series of simulation experiments of determining the control cut braking mode of design group was performed. The results confirmed the efficiency of the developed optimization procedure. Originality. The author formalized the task of optimizing control cut braking mode of design group, taking into account the cuts separation of design group at all elements (switches, retarders during cuts rolling to the classification track. The problem of determining the optimal control cut braking mode of design group was solved. The developed braking mode ensures cuts reliable separation of the group not only at the switches but at the retarders of brake position. Practical value. The developed procedure can be

  8. Small group employer participation in New Mexico's State Coverage Insurance program: lessons for federal reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommers, Anna S; Abraham, Jean Marie; Spicer, Laura; Mikow, Asher; Spaulding-Bynon, Mari

    2011-02-01

    To identify factors associated with small group employer participation in New Mexico's State Coverage Insurance (SCI) program. Telephone surveys of employers participating in SCI (N=269) and small employers who inquired about SCI (N=148) were fielded September 2008-January 2009. Descriptive and multivariate analyses investigated differences between employer samples, including employer characteristics, concerns that applied to the business when deciding whether to participate in SCI, prior offerings of insurance to workers, and perceived affordability of the program. Unweighted employer samples yielded 88 and 75 percent response rates for the participating and inquiring employers, respectively. The administrative issue most commonly selected by inquiring employers as applying to their business was difficulty understanding how eligibility requirements applied to their business and its employees (53.5 percent). Inquiring businesses were significantly more likely to report concern about affording to pay the premiums in the first month (35.6 versus 18.7 percent) and the cost to the business over the long run (46.5 versus 26.6 percent) relative to participating employers. From the model results, businesses with the fewest full-time employees (zero to two) were 19 percentage points less likely to participate relative to businesses with six or more full-time employees. Administrative and cost barriers to participation in SCI reported by employers suggest that the tax credit offered to small businesses under new federal provisions, which merely offsets the employer portion of premium, could be more effective if accompanied by additional supports to businesses. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  9. Construction: a model program for infection control compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidd, Francine; Buttner, Clark; Kressel, Amy B

    2007-06-01

    In the 21st century, one of the most challenging tasks for the infection control practitioner (ICP) is establishing collegiality and trust with contractors, architects, maintenance and engineering personnel. We describe how an urban teaching hospital's infection control program cooperated with contractors during a large demolition, construction, and renovation project in order to protect its large population of immunosuppressed patients. Most contractors are not accustomed to taking special precautions during demolition. Because of a previous Aspergillus outbreak in our heart transplant population, we already had an established infection control (IC) training program for contractors. We expanded and codified it in response to a major hospital renovation. The IC, in-house Design and Construction, and outside contractors meet before the initiation of all major renovation projects to anticipate IC concerns and proactively plan for infection control interventions. Now, all contractors and maintenance staff are required to receive IC training at the time of their employment. A hospital identification badge with attached sticker that indicates the IC training date is required. Infection Control Risk Assessments (ICRA) are initiated by project managers and completed jointly with IC. The ICPs make rounds on all projects at least weekly and large projects are visited daily. We established a team comprised of ICP, project manager, construction manager, and area nurse manager to monitor and make recommendations for improvement continually during the project. Staff are educated about construction so they can help monitor airflow and cleanliness. Our contractors are more compliant with our IC specifications since they now understand why we insist on them. Through the years of major construction, the workers have jumped on the bandwagon. It is not unusual for construction or maintenance staff to contact IC for advice. There were four years of extensive construction without any

  10. Annual Coded Wire Tag Program; Oregon Missing Production Groups, 1997 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, Mark A.; Mallette, Christine; Murray, William M.

    1998-03-01

    This annual report is in fulfillment of contract obligations with Bonneville Power Administration which is the funding source for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife's Annual Coded Wire Tag Program - Oregon Missing Production Groups Project. Tule stock fall chinook were caught primarily in British Columbia and Washington ocean, and Oregon freshwater fisheries. Up-river bright stock fall chinook contributed primarily to Alaska and British Columbia ocean commercial, and Columbia River gillnet and other freshwater fisheries. Contribution of Rogue stock fall chinook released in the lower Columbia River occurred primarily in Oregon ocean commercial and Columbia river gillnet fisheries. Willamette stock spring chinook contributed primarily to Alaska and British Columbia ocean commercial, Oregon freshwater sport and Columbia River gillnet fisheries. Willamette stock spring chinook released by CEDC contributed to similar ocean fisheries, but had much higher catch in gillnet fisheries than the same stocks released in the Willamette system. Up-river stocks of spring chinook contributed almost exclusively to Columbia River sport fisheries and other freshwater recovery areas. The up-river stocks of Columbia River summer steelhead contributed primarily to the Columbia River gillnet and other freshwater fisheries. Coho ocean fisheries from Washington to California were closed or very limited from 1994 through 1997 (1991 through 1994 broods). This has resulted in a greater average percent of catch for other fishery areas. Coho stocks released by ODFW below Bonneville Dam contributed mainly to Oregon and Washington ocean, Columbia Gillnet and other freshwater fisheries. Coho stocks released in the Klaskanine River and Youngs Bay area had similar ocean catch, but much higher contribution to gillnet fisheries than the other coho releases. Coho stocks released above Bonneville Dam had similar contribution to ocean fisheries as other coho releases. However, they

  11. The effect of a peer education program on combating violence against women: A randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürkan, Özlem C; Kömürcü, Nuran

    2017-10-01

    Student nurses in Turkey need to be exposed to appropriate undergraduate training if they are to acquire the required knowledge, attitudes and skills that will help them to fight the issue of violence against women (VAW). The aim of this research study was to assess the effect of a peer education program about combating VAW on the knowledge, attitudes and skills of nursing students. The study was designed as a randomized controlled trial. The participants in the intervention group received peer education on combating VAW. 136 nursing students (intervention group: n=63, control group: n=73) were included in the study. Participants in both the intervention and control groups were assessed at pre-training and at two months post-training. Pre-training and post-training knowledge and attitudes were significantly different in the intervention group (p<0.001). Moreover, the intervention group displayed a statistically significant difference in their ability to explain the correct interventions in a case study about VAW (p<0.001). Our results indicate that peer education should be used as a part of undergraduate nursing education on VAW. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The Effects of Program Control, Learner Control, and Learner Control with Advisement Lesson Control Strategies on Anxiety and Learning from Computer-Assisted Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coorough, Randall P.

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of three computer-assisted instruction (CAI) locus of instructional control strategies--learner control, learner control with advisement, and program control--on posttest performance and anxiety. The instructional content was a lesson addressing the effects of alcohol on the body. To examine the…

  13. Distress Tolerance Skills for College Students: A Pilot Investigation of a Brief DBT Group Skills Training Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhomba, Monicah; Chugani, Carla D.; Uliaszek, Amanda A.; Kannan, Divya

    2017-01-01

    This report outlines the evaluation of a brief dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) group skills training program for students presenting with serious psychological concerns (referral reasons included suicidality, self-injury, and substance use). Students were enrolled in distress tolerance groups ranging from 7-10 weeks. The majority of the…

  14. Estimates of Intraclass Correlation Coefficients from Longitudinal Group-Randomized Trials of Adolescent HIV/STI/Pregnancy Prevention Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glassman, Jill R.; Potter, Susan C.; Baumler, Elizabeth R.; Coyle, Karin K.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Group-randomized trials (GRTs) are one of the most rigorous methods for evaluating the effectiveness of group-based health risk prevention programs. Efficiently designing GRTs with a sample size that is sufficient for meeting the trial's power and precision goals while not wasting resources exceeding them requires estimates of the…

  15. Group Cognitive Behavioural Therapy Program Shows Potential in Reducing Symptoms of Depression and Stress among Young People with ASD

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGillivray, J. A.; Evert, H. T.

    2014-01-01

    We examined the efficacy of cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) delivered in groups on the reduction of symptoms of depression, anxiety and stress in young people on the autism spectrum. Utilising a quasi-experimental design, comparisons were made between individuals allocated to a group intervention program and individuals allocated to a…

  16. PLC and DTAM Software Programs for Pumping Instrumentation and Control Skid P

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KOCH, M.R.

    2000-05-11

    This document describe the software programs for the Programmable Logic Controller and the Datable Access Module for Pumping Instrumentation and Control skid ''P''. The Appendices contains copies of the printouts of these software programs.

  17. The Role of Exercise in a Weight-Loss Program on Clinical Control in Obese Adults with Asthma. A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Patricia D; Ferreira, Palmira G; Silva, Aline G; Stelmach, Rafael; Carvalho-Pinto, Regina M; Fernandes, Frederico L A; Mancini, Marcio C; Sato, Maria N; Martins, Milton A; Carvalho, Celso R F

    2017-01-01

    Clinical control is difficult to achieve in obese patients with asthma. Bariatric surgery has been recommended for weight loss and to improve asthma control; however, the benefits of nonsurgical interventions have been poorly investigated. To examine the effect of exercise training in a weight-loss program on asthma control, quality of life, inflammatory biomarkers, and lung function. Fifty-five obese patients with asthma were randomly assigned to either a weight-loss program plus exercise (WL + E group, n = 28) or a weight-loss program plus sham (WL + S group, n = 27), where the weight-loss program included nutrition (caloric restriction) and psychological therapies. The WL + E group incorporated aerobic and resistance muscle training, whereas the WL + S group incorporated breathing and stretching exercises. The primary outcome was clinical improvement in asthma control over 3 months. Secondary outcomes included quality of life, lung function, body composition, aerobic capacity, muscle strength, and inflammatory/antiinflammatory biomarkers. After 3 months, 51 patients were analyzed. Compared with the WL + S group, the WL + E group demonstrated improved clinical control scores (median [25th to 75th percentile], -0.7 [-1.3 to -0.3] vs. -0.3 [-0.9 to 0.4]; P = 0.01) and greater weight loss (mean ± SD, -6.8% ± 3.5 vs. -3.1% ± 2.6; P weight-loss program should be considered as a useful strategy for achieving clinical control of asthma in obese patients. Clinical trial registered with www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT 02188940).

  18. Positive and Negative Perfectionism in Migrainus Patients Compaired with Control Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Afshar

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Introduction & Objective: The positive and negative effects of perfectionism on human cognition, affection and behavior have been emphasized. Perfectionism has been conceptualized as a multidimensional construct, with both adaptive and maladaptive aspects, which is one of the common personality traits that cause lifelong stress in human and results in anxiety, depression and physical and mental distress.The aim of this study was to assess the positive and negative perfectionism in migrainus patients in comparison with control group. Materials & Methods: This is an analytical (Case-control study which was performed on 91 migraine patients and 88 healthy individuals. The pqtients and controls completed a standard 40 item questionnaire for perfectionism – PANPS (20 for positive and 20 for negative perfectionism . The patients in both groups were matched for gender and age. Mean of positive and negative perfectionism scores for two groups was statistically analysed using SPSS software. Results: Mean positive perfectionism score was 83.47±8.5 for migraine group and 65.47±7.54 for control group (p=0.0001. The difference between two groups was significant. Mean of negative perfectionism score was 74.12±10.6 for migraine group and 51.79±7.8 for control group(p=0.0001. Conclusion: The results show that migraine patients have higher mean of perfectionism scores than healthy individuals. Based on this study and other clinical experiences more attention to psychotherapy is necessary for better management of migraine and recognition of personality profile in migraine patient helps to reduce patient’s complaints.

  19. Analysis of postural control and muscular performance in young and elderly women in different age groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matheus M. Gomes

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: muscle strength and power are two factors affecting balance. The impact of muscle strength and power on postural control has not been fully explored among different age strata over sixty. OBJECTIVES: the aim of the present study was to assess the muscle strength and power of elderly women in different age groups and determine their correlation with postural control. METHOD: eighty women were divided into four groups: the young 18-30 age group (n=20; the 60-64 age group (n=20; the 65-69 age group (n=20; and the 70-74 age group (n=20. The participants underwent maximum strength (one repetition maximum or 1-RM and muscle power tests to assess the knee extensor and flexor muscles at 40%, 70%, and 90% 1-RM intensity. The time required by participants to recover their balance after disturbing their base of support was also assessed. RESULTS: the elderly women in the 60-64, 65-69, and 70-74 age groups exhibited similar muscle strength, power, and postural control (p>0.05; however, these values were lower than those of the young group (p<0.05 as expected. There was a correlation between muscle strength and power and the postural control performance (p<0.05. CONCLUSION: despite the age difference, elderly women aged 60 to 74 years exhibited similar abilities to generate strength and power with their lower limbs, and this ability could be one factor that explains the similar postural control shown by these women.

  20. The Effectiveness of a Group Counseling Program on the Mental Health of Parents of Hearing Impaired Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Mahshid Foroughan

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Most of the studies indicates that the parents of the hearing impaired children show many mental health problems after the diagnosis of their children's hearing impairment. Counselling with the parents of the hearing impaired children is one of the most important goals of any early intervention program. This paper describes a study to determine the effectiveness of a group counselling programme for parents of hearing impaired children. Materials and Method: It was a semi-experimental study with a single group pretest-post test design. The participants were all the parents of hearing impaired children attending in an early intervention center. First the parents' mental health were assessed.Then the group counselling program was implemented. Program has involved six weekly 1.5 hour sessions. The format of each session included both lecture presentation and group discussion using cognitive behavioral procedure. Subjects were assessed before and immediately after group therapy by means of General Health Questionnaire(GHQ and Symptom Check List 90 (SCL-90 questionnaires. Resuts: The first part of the project had shown that over the half of the parents had considerable psychosocial morbidity. Comparisons showed a significant reduction from pretreatment to posttreatment in depression, anxiety and most of other psychological problems. Conclusion: The study supports the effectiveness of group therapy programs in the treatment of parents of hearing impaired children. Concerning the progress of early detection programs for the children's hearing impairment more studies should be done in the field of counseling with their parents.

  1. Memory and phonological awareness in children with Benign Rolandic Epilepsy compared to a matched control group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northcott, Ellen; Connolly, Anne M; Berroya, Anna; McIntyre, Jenny; Christie, Jane; Taylor, Alan; Bleasel, Andrew F; Lawson, John A; Bye, Ann M E

    2007-06-01

    In a previous study we demonstrated children with Benign Rolandic Epilepsy have normal intelligence and language ability. However, difficulties in verbal and visual memory and aspects of phonological awareness were found compared to normative data. To address the methodological limitations related to the use of normative data, we compared the same cohort of children with Benign Rolandic Epilepsy to a matched control group. Controls (n=40) matched on age and gender to the Benign Rolandic Epilepsy cohort underwent neuropsychological assessment. The life functioning of the control group was assessed using a modified version of the Quality of Life in Childhood Epilepsy Questionnaire (QOLCE). The study confirmed the previous findings of memory and phonological awareness difficulties. In addition, the children with Benign Rolandic Epilepsy had significantly lower IQ scores than the matched control group. Paired sample t-tests showed that on 8 of 11 QOLCE scales, children with Benign Rolandic Epilepsy were rated by parents as having poorer life functioning compared to matched controls, including lower parental ratings on the subscales of memory and language. Benign Rolandic Epilepsy has an excellent seizure prognosis, but this study further emphasizes potential cognitive difficulties. Using an age and gender matched control group, the previous findings of memory and phonological awareness difficulties were validated. These problems in cognition were also identified by parents of children with Benign Rolandic Epilepsy as problematic and impacting upon the child's quality of life.

  2. Integrating spirituality into a group psychological therapy program for cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Alastair J

    2005-06-01

    Although the importance of spiritual issues to people with cancer is by now widely acknowledged, there has been almost no research on the value of interventions specifically designed to enhance the spiritual experience of these patients. The present report describes an exploratory study on the effects of a brief psychoeducational course emphasizing spiritual aspects of coping and healing. Ninety-seven patients with various types and stages of cancer took part in the 8-session course as the third stage in a progressive, stepwise program of support and psychological education. Standard psychometric tests were administered at entry, 8 weeks, and 6 months. Written home assignments, returned by participants, provided an insight into their experience. Significant improvements in scores were found immediately following the intervention; by 6 months, however, these improvements above entry level had declined to about half the 8-week value. In their written homework, patients grappled with such issues as doubts about the existence of a god, judgment and forgiveness, guilt, projection, self-importance, and the meaning of love. As the course progressed, many claimed to be better able to accept their condition and to experience an enhanced sense of meaning in their lives, coupled with a heightened appreciation for the events of everyday life and less tendency to conflict with others. These preliminary findings indicate that further, more rigorous investigation would be worthwhile and support the growing view that addressing spiritual issues within the framework of group therapy can be of great benefit to people with cancer.

  3. The efficacy of a brief group CBT program in treating patients diagnosed with bulimia nervosa: a brief report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Allan; Clausen, Loa

    2013-09-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the efficacy of a brief group cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) program in treating a large cohort of patients diagnosed with bulimia nervosa. Treatment outcome defined as reductions in bulimia related behavioral symptoms and bulimia related distress was examined in 205 consecutive new patients enrolled in an eight-session group CBT program. Significant reductions in eating disorder pathology were found on all measures of bulimia related behavioral symptoms, as well as on all measures of bulimia related distress. There is strong evidence for the efficacy of brief group CBT in treating patients with bulimia nervosa. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Development and evaluation of a cancer-related fatigue patient education program: protocol of a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Görres Stefan

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cancer-related fatigue (CRF and its impact on patients' quality of life has been an increasing subject of research. However, in Germany there is a lack of evidence-based interventions consistent with the multidimensional character of fatigue. The objective of this study is to develop and evaluate a self-management program for disease-free cancer patients to cope with CRF. Methods Based on evidence extracted from a literature review, a curriculum for the self-management program was elaborated. The curriculum was reviewed and validated by an interdisciplinary expert group and the training-modules will be pretested with a small number of participants and discussed in terms of feasibility and acceptance. To determine the efficacy of the program a randomised controlled trial will be carried out: 300 patients will be recruited from oncological practices in Bremen, Germany, and will be allocated to intervention or control group. The intervention group participates in the program, whereas the control group receives standard care and the opportunity to take part in the program after the end of the follow-up (waiting control group. Primary outcome measure is the level of fatigue, secondary outcome measures are quality of life, depression, anxiety, self-efficacy and physical activity. Data will be collected before randomisation, after intervention, and after a follow-up of 6 months. Discussion Because there are no comparable self-management programs for cancer survivors with fatigue, the development of the curriculum has been complex; therefore, the critical appraisal by the experts was an important step to validate the program and their contributions have been integrated into the curriculum. The experts appreciated the program as filling a gap in outpatient cancer care. If the results of the evaluation prove to be satisfactory, the outpatient care of cancer patients can be broadened and supplemented. Trial Registration Clinical

  5. Identification and prediction of group-based glycemic control trajectories during the transition to adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohan, Jennifer M; Rausch, Joseph R; Pendley, Jennifer Shroff; Delamater, Alan M; Dolan, Lawrence; Reeves, Grafton; Drotar, Dennis

    2014-10-01

    To identify trajectories of glycemic control over a period of 3 years in a pediatric sample of youth diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes transitioning to adolescence. A second aim was to examine a set of modifiable individual and family level baseline predictors of glycemic control group membership. This multisite, prospective study included 239 children and adolescents (ages 9-11 years at baseline) diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes and their caregivers. Glycemic control was based on hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) collected at 6-month intervals over a period of 3 years. Predictors of glycemic control membership included baseline global executive functioning, diabetes self-management, diabetes-specific family conflict, blood glucose monitoring frequency, and relevant individual and family level covariates. Group-based trajectory analyses were used to describe patterns of glycemic control from baseline to 36 months and 3 trajectories were identified: low risk (42.9%), elevated risk (44.6%), and high risk (12.1%) subgroups. Baseline maternal-reported family conflict, blood glucose monitoring frequency, and gender were significant predictors of glycemic control group membership. Higher levels of baseline family conflict, lower frequency of blood glucose monitoring, and female gender were associated with elevated and high-risk group membership. These findings underscore the importance of examining trajectories of HbA1c across time. These results suggest that problematic trajectories of glycemic control are evident during the transition to adolescence. Furthermore, there are modifiable individual and family level characteristics that predict group membership and hence could be targeted in interventions to ensure adequate glycemic control is maintained over time and that risks for diabetes-related complications are reduced.

  6. Meteorological Support Interface Control Working Group (MSICWG) Instrumentation, Data Format, and Networks Document

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenton, James; Roberts, Barry C.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide an overview of instrumentation discussed at the Meteorological Interface Control Working Group (MSICWG), a reference for data formats currently used by members of the group, a summary of proposed formats for future use by the group, an overview of the data networks of the group's members. This document will be updated as new systems are introduced, old systems are retired, and when the MSICWG community necessitates a change to the formats. The MSICWG consists of personnel from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Kennedy Space Center (KSC), NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration National Weather Service Spaceflight Meteorology Group (SMG), and the United States Air Force (USAF) 45th Space Wing and Weather Squadron. The purpose of the group is to coordinate the distribution of weather related data to support NASA space launch related activities.

  7. Let's face it: patient and parent perspectives on incorporating a Facebook group into a multidisciplinary weight management program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolford, Susan J; Esperanza Menchaca, Alicia D M; Sami, Areej; Blake, Natalie

    2013-08-01

    Social media may have the potential to enhance weight management efforts. However, the acceptability of incorporating this entity into pediatrics is unknown. The objective of this project was to explore patients' and parents' perspectives about developing a Facebook group as a component of a pediatric weight management program. Semistructured interviews were performed between September, 2011, and February, 2012, with patients and parents in a multidisciplinary weight management program. Interviews explored participants' perceptions of potential benefits, concerns, and preferences related to a program-specific Facebook group. Transcripts were reviewed and themes identified. The study concluded when thematic saturation was achieved. Participants (n=32) were largely enthusiastic about the idea of a program-specific Facebook group for adolescents. Most preferred a secret group, where only participants would know of the group's existence or group members' identity. No parents expressed concern about security or privacy related to a program-specific Facebook group; one parent expressed concern about undesirable advertisements. Participants endorsed a variety of ideas for inclusion on the page, including weight loss tips, live chats with providers, quizzes, and an incentive system where participants could gain points for making healthy choices. Many parents requested a separate parent-focused page, an idea that was supported by the adolescents. This study suggests that participants perceive potential benefits from incorporating social media interventions into pediatric weight management efforts. Privacy and security issues do not appear to be major parental concerns. Future work should explore the impact of program-specific social media interventions on outcomes for patients in weight management programs.

  8. A Controlled Evaluation of a High School Biomedical Pipeline Program: Design and Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkleby, Marilyn A.; Ned, Judith; Ahn, David; Koehler, Alana; Fagliano, Kathleen; Crump, Casey

    2013-07-01

    Given limited funding for school-based science education, non-school-based programs have been developed at colleges and universities to increase the number of students entering science- and health-related careers and address critical workforce needs. However, few evaluations of such programs have been conducted. We report the design and methods of a controlled trial to evaluate the Stanford Medical Youth Science Program's Summer Residential Program (SRP), a 25-year-old university-based biomedical pipeline program. This 5-year matched cohort study uses an annual survey to assess educational and career outcomes among four cohorts of students who participate in the SRP and a matched comparison group of applicants who were not chosen to participate in the SRP. Matching on sociodemographic and academic background allows control for potential confounding. This design enables the testing of whether the SRP has an independent effect on educational- and career-related outcomes above and beyond the effects of other factors such as gender, ethnicity, socioeconomic background, and pre-intervention academic preparation. The results will help determine which curriculum components contribute most to successful outcomes and which students benefit most. After 4 years of follow-up, the results demonstrate high response rates from SRP participants and the comparison group with completion rates near 90 %, similar response rates by gender and ethnicity, and little attrition with each additional year of follow-up. This design and methods can potentially be replicated to evaluate and improve other biomedical pipeline programs, which are increasingly important for equipping more students for science- and health-related careers.

  9. [Family planning programs and birth control in the third world].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohlschlagl, H

    1991-01-01

    The population explosion has been abating since the 2nd half of the 1960s. The birth rate of the 3rd World dropped from 45/1000 during 1950-55 to 31/1000 during 1985-90. From the 1st half of the 1960s to the 1st half of the 1980s the total fertility of such countries dropped from 6.1 to 4.2 children/woman. In Taiwan, Singapore, Hong Kong, South Korea, and Malaysia living standards improved as a result of industrialization, and fertility decreased significantly. In Sri Lanka, China, North Vietnam, and Thailand the drop of fertility is explained by cultural and religious factors. In 1982 about 78% of the population of developing countries lived in 39 states that followed an official policy aimed at reducing the population. Another 16% lived in countries supporting the concept of a desired family size. However, World Bank data showed that in the mid-1980s in 27 developing countries no state family planning (FP) programs existed. India adopted an official FP program in 1952, Pakistan followed suit in 1960, South Korea in 1961, and China in 1962. In Latin America a split policy manifested itself: in Brazil birth control was rejected, only Colombia had a FP policy. In 1986 the governments of 68 of 131 developing countries representing 3.1 billion people considered the number of children per woman too high. 31 of these countries followed concrete population control policies. On the other hand, in 1986 24 countries of Africa with 40% of the continent's population took no measures to influence population growth. In Latin America and the Caribbean 18 of 33 countries were idle, except for Mexico that had a massive state FP program. These programs also improve maternal and child health with birth spacing of at least 2 years, and the prevention of pregnancies of too young women or those over 40. The evaluation of rapidly spreading FP programs in the 1970s was carried out by the World Fertility Survey in 41 countries. The impact of FP programs was more substantial than

  10. Tuberculosis control in big cities and urban risk groups in the European Union: a consensus statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hest, N A; Aldridge, R W; de Vries, G; Sandgren, A; Hauer, B; Hayward, A; Arrazola de Oñate, W; Haas, W; Codecasa, L R; Caylà, J A; Story, A; Antoine, D; Gori, A; Quabeck, L; Jonsson, J; Wanlin, M; Orcau, Å; Rodes, A; Dedicoat, M; Antoun, F; van Deutekom, H; Keizer, St; Abubakar, I

    2014-03-06

    In low-incidence countries in the European Union (EU), tuberculosis (TB) is concentrated in big cities, especially among certain urban high-risk groups including immigrants from TB high-incidence countries, homeless people, and those with a history of drug and alcohol misuse. Elimination of TB in European big cities requires control measures focused on multiple layers of the urban population. The particular complexities of major EU metropolises, for example high population density and social structure, create specific opportunities for transmission, but also enable targeted TB control interventions, not efficient in the general population, to be effective or cost effective. Lessons can be learnt from across the EU and this consensus statement on TB control in big cities and urban risk groups was prepared by a working group representing various EU big cities, brought together on the initiative of the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control. The consensus statement describes general and specific social, educational, operational, organisational, legal and monitoring TB control interventions in EU big cities, as well as providing recommendations for big city TB control, based upon a conceptual TB transmission and control model.

  11. Tooth size in patients with supernumerary teeth and a control group measured by image analysis system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalaf, K; Robinson, D L; Elcock, C; Smith, R N; Brook, A H

    2005-02-01

    The aim of this study was to compare tooth size measurements between patients with supernumerary teeth and a control group. The supernumerary group consisted of 56 subjects (21 females and 35 males) and the control group of 40 subjects (20 females and 20 males). All available permanent teeth on the dental casts were imaged and measured from both buccal and occlusal views using an image analysis system. Mesio-distal, bucco-lingual or occluso-gingival dimensions, area and perimeter were measured from each view. Supernumerary tooth patients tended to have larger tooth size measurements for almost all variables than controls. Significant differences (psupernumerary teeth being a complex dental anomaly with a multifactorial aetiology in which both genetic and environmental factors are important. There is some evidence of a local effect with greater differences in tooth dimension adjacent to the site of the supernumeraries.

  12. Vibrotactile sense in patients with different upper limb disorders compared with a control group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Lise Hedegaard; Jepsen, Jørgen Riis; Sjøgaard, Gisela

    2006-01-01

    diagnostic tools to reveal underlying mechanisms for specific diagnoses. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the possible differences in vibration perception threshold (VPT) and tolerance to suprathreshold stimulation (STS) between controls and specific diagnostic ULD patient groups with uni- and bilateral neuropathy...... and/or MCD. METHODS: In 161 ULD patients and 40 controls, the VPT of the median, ulnar, and radial nerves innervating the hand was examined by vibrometry using the "method of limits". The tolerance to STS of the anterior forearm was tested in 128 of the patients and all controls. RESULTS: The ULD...... patients in all diagnostic groups had significantly higher VPT (Pcontrols. Only patient groups defined with neuropathy demonstrated significantly higher VPT in the limb with diagnoses compared with the contralateral limb without...

  13. Quality of life, treatment adherence, and locus of control: multiple family groups for chronic medical illnesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Larrosa, Silvia

    2013-12-01

    The Multiple Family Groups (MFGs) approach for patients with a chronic medical illness and their families is a structured psychoeducational program that unfolds in six weekly 90-minute sessions. In the MFGs, patients and family members explore new ways to balance illness and nonillness priorities in family life (Steinglass, 1998; Steinglass, 2000 Cuadernos de Terapia Familiar, 44-45, 11; Steinglass, Ostroff, & Steinglass, 2011 Family Process, 50, 393). © FPI, Inc.

  14. A national study of the psychological impact of bank robbery with a randomzed control group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Maj; Armour, Cherie; Shevlin, Mark

    2013-01-01

    also investigated several other forms of psychological sequelae and related factors in bank robbery victim for instance prior traumatic experience, anxiety symptoms, and general traumatic symptoms. The results were compared to a randomized control group of bank employees never exposed to bank robbery......Background. Despite, numerous annual bank robberies worldwide, research in the psychological sequelae of bank robberies is limited. Thus, research needs to investigate the prevalence of Acute Stress Disorder (ASD) and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) in bank employees, whilst comparing how bank...... that the control group scored significantly lower than the ASD robbery group but surprisingly significantly higher than the PTSD robbery group on for instance general traumatization and anxiety. Discussion and conclusions: The results are discussed in relation to existing research and the effect of other factors...

  15. Self-development groups reduce medical school stress: a controlled intervention study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stordal Kirsten I

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High stress levels and mental health problems are common among medical students and there is a lack of studies on group interventions that aim to reduce such distress during medical school. Methods A full class of students (n = 129 participated in group sessions during their third year of medical school in Bergen, Norway. The subsequent third-year class (n = 152 acted as control group, in order to create a quasi-experimental design. Two types of group intervention sessions were offered to the first class. One option was self-development groups led by trained group psychotherapists. Alternatively, students could choose discussion groups that focused on themes of special relevance to doctors, led by experienced general practitioners. The intervention comprised of 12 weekly group sessions each lasting 90 minutes. Data were gathered before the intervention (T1, and three months post intervention (T2. Distress was measured using the Perceived Medical School Stress (PMSS and Symptom Check List-5 (SCL-5 assessments. Results The intervention group showed a significant reduction in PMSS over the observation period. The subsequent year control group stayed on the same PMSS levels over the similar period. The intervention was a significant predictor of PMSS reduction in a multiple regression analysis adjusted for age and sex, β = -1.93 (-3.47 to -0.38, P = 0.02. When we analysed the effects of self-development and discussion groups with the control group as reference, self-development group was the only significant predictor of PMSS reduction, β = -2.18 (-4.03 to -0.33, P = 0.02. There was no interaction with gender in our analysis. This implicates no significant difference between men and women concerning the effect of the self-development group. There was no reduction in general mental distress (SCL-5 over this period. Conclusion A three-month follow-up showed that the intervention had a positive effect on perceived medical school