WorldWideScience

Sample records for program conservation elements

  1. 10 CFR Appendix D to Part 436 - Energy Program Conservation Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 436 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION FEDERAL ENERGY MANAGEMENT AND PLANNING PROGRAMS Pt... present management systems incorporate these elements. (1) Top Management Control. Top management must have a personal and sustained commitment to the program, provide active direction and motivation, and...

  2. Concentration of elements in whole-body fish, fish fillets, fish muscle plugs, and fish eggs from the 2008 Missouri Department of Conservation General Contaminant Monitoring Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Thomas W.; Walther, Michael J.; Brumbaugh, William G.; McKee, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    This report presents the results of a contaminant monitoring survey conducted annually by the Missouri Department of Conservation to examine the levels of selected elemental contaminants in whole-body fish, fish fillets, fish muscle plugs, and fish eggs. Whole-body, fillet, or egg samples of catfish (Ictalurus punctatus, Ictalurus furcatus, Pylodictis olivaris), largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides), walleye (Sander vitreus), crappie (Pomoxis annularis, Pomoxis nigromaculatus), shovelnose sturgeon (Scaphirhynchus platorynchus), northern hog sucker (Hypentelium nigricans), and Missouri saddled darter (Etheostoma tetrazonum) were collected from 23 sites as part of the Missouri Department of Conservation's Fish Contaminant Monitoring Program. Fish dorsal muscle plugs also were collected from walleye (Sander vitreus) at one of the sites.

  3. Concentrations of elements in fish fillets, fish muscle plugs, and crayfish from the 2007 Missouri Department of Conservation General Contaminant Monitoring Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Thomas W.; Walther, Michael J.; Brumbaugh, William G.; McKee, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    This report presents the results of a contaminant monitoring survey conducted annually by the Missouri Department of Conservation to examine the levels of selected elemental contaminants in fish fillets, fish muscle plugs, and crayfish. Fillets of channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus), bass (Micropterus salmoides, Micropterus dolomieu, Morone chrysops), walleye (Sander vitreus), common carp (Cyprinus carpio), lake sturgeon (Acipenser fulvescens), northern hog sucker (Hypentelium nigricans), and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were collected from 21 sites as part of the Department's Fish Contaminant Monitoring Program. Long-pincered crayfish (Orconectes longidigitus) were collected from one site to assess trophic transfer of metals to fish. Fish muscle plugs were collected from smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieu) at two different locations from one site.

  4. Concentrations of elements in fish fillets, fish muscle plugs, and crayfish from the 2011 Missouri Department of Conservation general contaminant monitoring program

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Thomas W.; Walther, Michael J.; Brumbaugh, William G.; McKee, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    This report presents the results of a contaminant monitoring survey conducted annually by the Missouri Department of Conservation to examine the levels of selected elemental contaminants in fish fillets, fish muscle plugs, and crayfish. Fillet samples of yellow bullhead (Ameiurus natalis), golden redhorse (Moxostoma erythrurum), longear sunfish (Lepomis megalotis), and channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) were collected from six sites as part of the Missouri Department of Conservation’s Fish Contaminant Monitoring Program. Fish dorsal muscle plugs were collected from largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) at eight of the sites, and crayfish from two sites. Following preparation and analysis of the samples, highlights of the data were as follows: cadmium and lead residues were most elevated in crayfish tissue samples from the Big River at Cherokee Landing, with 1 to 8 micrograms per gram dry weight and 22 to 45 micrograms per gram dry weight, respectively. Some dorsal muscle plugs from largemouth bass collected from Clearwater Lake, Lake St. Louis, Noblett Lake, Hazel Creek Lake, and Harrison County Lake contained mercury residues (1.7 to 4.7 micrograms per gram dry weight) that exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Water Quality Criterion of 1.5 micrograms per gram dry weight of fish tissue (equivalent to 0.30 micrograms per gram wet weight).

  5. Conservation and Renewable Energy Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaughan, K.H.

    1991-05-01

    This bibliography lists reports and selected papers published under the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Conservation and Renewable Energy Program from 1986 through February 1991. Information on documents published prior to 1986 can be obtained from ORNL. Most of the documents in the bibliography are available from Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  6. Programming the finite element method

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, I M; Margetts, L

    2013-01-01

    Many students, engineers, scientists and researchers have benefited from the practical, programming-oriented style of the previous editions of Programming the Finite Element Method, learning how to develop computer programs to solve specific engineering problems using the finite element method. This new fifth edition offers timely revisions that include programs and subroutine libraries fully updated to Fortran 2003, which are freely available online, and provides updated material on advances in parallel computing, thermal stress analysis, plasticity return algorithms, convection boundary c

  7. 75 FR 34924 - Conservation Stewardship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-21

    ... Commodity Credit Corporation 7 CFR Part 1470 RIN 0578-AA43 Conservation Stewardship Program AGENCY: Commodity Credit Corporation, Natural Resources Conservation Service, United States Department of..., Rulemaking Manager, Natural Resources Conservation Service. BILLING CODE 3410-16-P ...

  8. 77 FR 15933 - Conservation Loan Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-19

    ... Agency (FSA) implemented the new Conservation Loan (CL) Program authorized by the Food, Conservation, and... the conservation plan demonstrate NRCS Field Office Technical Guide quality criteria for at least... Farm Service Agency 7 CFR Parts 761, 762, 764, 765, and 766 RIN 0560-AI04 Conservation Loan Program...

  9. Forest gene conservation programs in Alberta, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jodie. Krakowski

    2017-01-01

    Provincial tree improvement programs in Alberta began in 1976. Early gene conservation focused on ex situ measures such as seed and clone banking, and research trials of commercial species with tree improvement programs. The gene conservation program now encompasses representative and unique populations of all native tree species in situ. The ex situ program aims to...

  10. 75 FR 54005 - Conservation Loan Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-03

    ..., 762, 764, 765, and 766 RIN 0560-AI04 Conservation Loan Program AGENCY: Farm Service Agency, USDA. ACTION: Interim final rule. SUMMARY: The Farm Service Agency (FSA) is implementing the new Conservation Loan (CL) Program authorized by the Food, Conservation, and Energy Act of 2008 (the 2008 Farm Bill...

  11. 75 FR 44067 - Conservation Reserve Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-28

    ... amending the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) regulations to implement provisions of the Food, Conservation, and Energy Act of 2008 (the 2008 Farm Bill). The 2008 Farm Bill generally extends the existing... Commodity Credit Corporation 7 CFR Part 1410 RIN 0560-AH80 Conservation Reserve Program AGENCY: Commodity...

  12. 75 FR 20111 - Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Residential Water Heaters, Direct...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-16

    ... Energy 10 CFR Part 430 Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Residential Water... Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Residential Water Heaters, Direct Heating... conservation standards for residential water heaters (other than tabletop and electric instantaneous models...

  13. Conservation and restoration of ornamental elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Rallo Gruss

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available Intervention on a building as complex and rich in ornamentation as the Palacio del Marqués de Dos Aguas requires special attention as regards the restoration of all the singular elements, both inside and outside, and the different finishes and furnishings. Within this methodology of integral restoration, it is worth pointing out especially the consolidation and cleaning of the emblematic alabaster portal, the restoration of the paintings and the treatment of the different collections of tiles.

  14. 75 FR 27165 - Conservation Reserve Program; Transition Incentives Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-14

    ... for CRP authorized by the Food, Conservation, and Energy Act of 2008 (2008 Farm Bill). Retired or... conservation, Technical assistance, Water resources, Wildlife. 0 For the reasons discussed above, this rule... Corporation 7 CFR Part 1410 RIN 0560-AH80 Conservation Reserve Program; Transition Incentives Program AGENCY...

  15. New alloys to conserve critical elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, J. R.

    1978-01-01

    Based on availability of domestic reserves, chromium is one of the most critical elements within the U.S. metal industry. New alloys having reduced chromium contents which offer potential as substitutes for higher chromium containing alloys currently in use are being investigated. This paper focuses primarily on modified Type 304 stainless steels having one-third less chromium, but maintaining comparable oxidation and corrosion properties to that of type 304 stainless steel, the largest single use of chromium. Substitutes for chromium in these modified Type 304 stainless steel alloys include silicon and aluminum plus molybdenum.

  16. 75 FR 48934 - Coral Reef Conservation Program Implementation Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-12

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-ZC19 Coral Reef Conservation Program... Implementation Guidelines for the Coral Reef Conservation Program. SUMMARY: This document provides NOAA's revised Grant Program Implementation Guidelines (Guidelines) for the Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP or...

  17. Evolutionary conservation of regulatory elements in vertebrate HOX gene clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santini, Simona; Boore, Jeffrey L.; Meyer, Axel

    2003-12-31

    Due to their high degree of conservation, comparisons of DNA sequences among evolutionarily distantly-related genomes permit to identify functional regions in noncoding DNA. Hox genes are optimal candidate sequences for comparative genome analyses, because they are extremely conserved in vertebrates and occur in clusters. We aligned (Pipmaker) the nucleotide sequences of HoxA clusters of tilapia, pufferfish, striped bass, zebrafish, horn shark, human and mouse (over 500 million years of evolutionary distance). We identified several highly conserved intergenic sequences, likely to be important in gene regulation. Only a few of these putative regulatory elements have been previously described as being involved in the regulation of Hox genes, while several others are new elements that might have regulatory functions. The majority of these newly identified putative regulatory elements contain short fragments that are almost completely conserved and are identical to known binding sites for regulatory proteins (Transfac). The conserved intergenic regions located between the most rostrally expressed genes in the developing embryo are longer and better retained through evolution. We document that presumed regulatory sequences are retained differentially in either A or A clusters resulting from a genome duplication in the fish lineage. This observation supports both the hypothesis that the conserved elements are involved in gene regulation and the Duplication-Deletion-Complementation model.

  18. Gila River Basin Native Fishes Conservation Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doug Duncan; Robert W. Clarkson

    2013-01-01

    The Gila River Basin Native Fishes Conservation Program was established to conserve native fishes and manage against nonnative fishes in response to several Endangered Species Act biological opinions between the Bureau of Reclamation and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service on Central Arizona Project (CAP) water transfers to the Gila River basin. Populations of some Gila...

  19. Conservation Education Outreach Program Accomplishment Report, 1998.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kindlund, Rod, Comp.; Boshart, Tihisia, Comp.

    In 1992, Elaine McKinney and six college interns set into motion an experiment in human relations at the Forest Service's Northeast Area and Station Headquarters in Radnor, PA. The program provides basic conservation education to urban youth who may never have been exposed to the concepts of conservation, recycling, or forest management. This…

  20. Conservation Reserve Program Acreage by County

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset contains information regarding the acreages of land currently (as of 2004) enrolled in the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) distributed by county and...

  1. Evolutionarily conserved elements in vertebrate, insect, worm, and yeast genomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siepel, Adam; Bejerano, Gill; Pedersen, Jakob Skou

    2005-01-01

    We have conducted a comprehensive search for conserved elements in vertebrate genomes, using genome-wide multiple alignments of five vertebrate species (human, mouse, rat, chicken, and Fugu rubripes). Parallel searches have been performed with multiple alignments of four insect species (three spe...... for RNA secondary structure....

  2. Dynamic Epigenetic Control of Highly Conserved Noncoding Elements

    KAUST Repository

    Seridi, Loqmane

    2014-10-07

    Background Many noncoding genomic loci have remained constant over long evolutionary periods, suggesting that they are exposed to strong selective pressures. The molecular functions of these elements have been partially elucidated, but the fundamental reason for their extreme conservation is still unknown. Results To gain new insights into the extreme selection of highly conserved noncoding elements (HCNEs), we used a systematic analysis of multi-omic data to study the epigenetic regulation of such elements during the development of Drosophila melanogaster. At the sequence level, HCNEs are GC-rich and have a characteristic oligomeric composition. They have higher levels of stable nucleosome occupancy than their flanking regions, and lower levels of mononucleosomes and H3.3, suggesting that these regions reside in compact chromatin. Furthermore, these regions showed remarkable modulations in histone modification and the expression levels of adjacent genes during development. Although HCNEs are primarily initiated late in replication, about 10% were related to early replication origins. Finally, HCNEs showed strong enrichment within lamina-associated domains. Conclusion HCNEs have distinct and protective sequence properties, undergo dynamic epigenetic regulation, and appear to be associated with the structural components of the chromatin, replication origins, and nuclear matrix. These observations indicate that such elements are likely to have essential cellular functions, and offer insights into their epigenetic properties.

  3. Massively Parallel Finite Element Programming

    KAUST Repository

    Heister, Timo

    2010-01-01

    Today\\'s large finite element simulations require parallel algorithms to scale on clusters with thousands or tens of thousands of processor cores. We present data structures and algorithms to take advantage of the power of high performance computers in generic finite element codes. Existing generic finite element libraries often restrict the parallelization to parallel linear algebra routines. This is a limiting factor when solving on more than a few hundreds of cores. We describe routines for distributed storage of all major components coupled with efficient, scalable algorithms. We give an overview of our effort to enable the modern and generic finite element library deal.II to take advantage of the power of large clusters. In particular, we describe the construction of a distributed mesh and develop algorithms to fully parallelize the finite element calculation. Numerical results demonstrate good scalability. © 2010 Springer-Verlag.

  4. Private landowners and environmental conservation: a case study of social-psychological determinants of conservation program participation in Ontario

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Drescher

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Preservation of biodiversity and continued provision of ecosystem services increasingly relies on environmental conservation on private lands. Despite a multitude of past studies, our knowledge of the motives, opportunities, and challenges of private land conservation, especially on nonworking lands, where financial incentives are less relevant, remains incomplete. A key reason is that a variety of theoretical approaches, resulting in diverging study results, have been used to investigate private land conservation. To help remedy this problem, the current study rigorously examined several established social-psychological determinants of proenvironmental behaviors and developed a comprehensive model, which merged elements from previous studies, to investigate landowner participation in a government-sponsored private land conservation program for nonworking lands. The results are based on analysis of a mailed survey of 800 program-eligible landowners. Contrasting program participants with nonparticipants, we elicited information such as about values, worldviews, socio-demographic characteristics, and property attributes that led landowners to participate in this conservation program. The results of our study illustrate the complex relationships among values, worldviews, norms, attitudes, and behaviors emphasizing the importance of proenvironmental worldviews and of formal education for increasing the likelihood of enrollment in this government-sponsored private land conservation program. Against expectation, neither personal norms, household income, political leaning, nor the size of the eligible property area were found to be important in directly determining the decision to enroll in this conservation program. However, an association of political leaning with stated personal obligation for private land conservation was found. Our results highlight the relationship between formal education and achievement of private land conservation goals

  5. 75 FR 9921 - San Diego County Water Authority Natural Communities Conservation Program/Habitat Conservation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-04

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service San Diego County Water Authority Natural Communities Conservation Program/Habitat Conservation Plan, San Diego and Riverside Counties, CA AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service... the Draft Water Authority Natural Communities Conservation Program/Habitat Conservation Plan (NCCP/HCP...

  6. 77 FR 43723 - Energy Efficiency and Conservation Loan Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-26

    ... Conservation programs (EE Programs) undertaken by an eligible utility system to finance demand side management... Energy Efficiency and Conservation Loan Program AGENCY: Rural Utilities Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of... implementing demand side management, energy efficiency and conservation programs, and on-grid and off-grid...

  7. Summary of commercial conservation programs environmental issues and program consistency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beachler, M.C.

    1989-06-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) conducted this study for the Office of Energy Resources of the Bonneville Power Administration. The purpose of the report is to compare and contrast the environmental requirements and issues involving Bonneville's residential conservation programs. In addition to environmental issues that Bonneville has addressed in environmental documents, this report also briefly examines new issues that may affect residential conservation programs. The key environmental concern confronting each of the programs with measures aimed at reducing air leakage in houses (both new and existing) is indoor air quality. There are inconsistencies in how the Weatherization Program and the New Homes programs approach indoor air quality. However, these differences make sense, given the character and constraints affecting how each program operates. Newer issues that have arisen include global warming, potential health effects of mineral and glass fibers, and possible fire hazards associated with plastic foam and cellulose insulation. Bonneville staff are aware of these issues as they relate to conservation programs. No action appears necessary at this time.

  8. 75 FR 41102 - Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Furnace Fans: Reopening of Public...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-15

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY 10 CFR Part 430 RIN 1904-AC22 Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards... establish energy conservation standards for the use of electricity for purposes of circulating air through... (DOE) initiated a rulemaking to consider establishing new energy conservation standards or energy use...

  9. 76 FR 57897 - Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Certain External Power Supplies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-19

    ... RIN 1904-AB57 Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Certain External Power... exclude external power supplies used in specific applications from certain energy conservation standards prescribed under the Energy Policy and Conservation Act (EPCA). Congress enacted this exclusion, which...

  10. 77 FR 10997 - Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Distribution Transformers; Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-24

    ... Part 431 RIN 1904-AC04 Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Distribution... regarding energy conservation standards for distribution transformers. It was recently discovered that... the Energy Policy and Conservation Act of 1975 (EPCA or the Act), Public Law 94-163 (42 U.S.C. 6291...

  11. 75 FR 27227 - Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Residential Central Air...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-14

    ... Part 431 RIN 1904-AB47 Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Residential... preliminary analyses performed by DOE for these products; and potential energy conservation standard levels... on the energy conservation standards notice of public meeting (NOPM) and availability of the...

  12. 76 FR 43941 - Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Direct Heating Equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-22

    ... Part 430 RIN 1904-AC56 Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Direct Heating... proposed rulemaking and announcement of public meeting. SUMMARY: The Energy Policy and Conservation Act of 1975 (EPCA), as amended, prescribes energy conservation standards for various consumer products and...

  13. Conserved Nonexonic Elements: A Novel Class of Marker for Phylogenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Scott V; Cloutier, Alison; Baker, Allan J

    2017-11-01

    Noncoding markers have a particular appeal as tools for phylogenomic analysis because, at least in vertebrates, they appear less subject to strong variation in GC content among lineages. Thus far, ultraconserved elements (UCEs) and introns have been the most widely used noncoding markers. Here we analyze and study the evolutionary properties of a new type of noncoding marker, conserved nonexonic elements (CNEEs), which consists of noncoding elements that are estimated to evolve slower than the neutral rate across a set of species. Although they often include UCEs, CNEEs are distinct from UCEs because they are not ultraconserved, and, most importantly, the core region alone is analyzed, rather than both the core and its flanking regions. Using a data set of 16 birds plus an alligator outgroup, and ∼3600-∼3800 loci per marker type, we found that although CNEEs were less variable than bioinformatically derived UCEs or introns and in some cases exhibited a slower approach to branch resolution as determined by phylogenomic subsampling, the quality of CNEE alignments was superior to those of the other markers, with fewer gaps and missing species. Phylogenetic resolution using coalescent approaches was comparable among the three marker types, with most nodes being fully and congruently resolved. Comparison of phylogenetic results across the three marker types indicated that one branch, the sister group to the passerine + falcon clade, was resolved differently and with moderate (>70%) bootstrap support between CNEEs and UCEs or introns. Overall, CNEEs appear to be promising as phylogenomic markers, yielding phylogenetic resolution as high as for UCEs and introns but with fewer gaps, less ambiguity in alignments and with patterns of nucleotide substitution more consistent with the assumptions of commonly used methods of phylogenetic analysis. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Systematic Biologists.

  14. 76 FR 70865 - Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Residential Refrigerators...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-16

    ... / Wednesday, November 16, 2011 / Rules and Regulations#0;#0; ] DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY 10 CFR Part 430 RIN 1904-AB79 Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Residential Refrigerators...

  15. Jersey City energy conservation demonstration program. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newbold, R.F.

    1978-08-01

    The Aerospace Corporation, the City Government, and the Board of Education of Jersey City have conducted a group of energy-conservation experiments to explore a number of conservation techniques believed to offer quick payback and to be of wide applicability. Experiments include the updating and/or rehabilitation of the energy-consuming features of old buildings and installation of devices designed to minimize energy losses caused by human error or laxity. Specific examples include: upgrading of the deteriorated and inefficient steam-distribution system of the city hall (originally constructed in 1894); an extensive program of reducing infiltration in an old school building; use of several timing devices in connection with heating, ventilation, and lighting systems to encourage energy-conservation practices; retrofit of school classrooms with high-pressure sodium lamps; and demonstration of practical and cost-effective ways of increasing the efficiency of conventional steam boilers. The report presents: the nature of the selected experiments; technical, human, and organizational factors that proved significant in performing and evaluating the experiments; discussions of observations and lessons learned; and general recommendations for an extended program of energy conservation in local governments. It is emphasized that, in retrofit of existing buildings, the unexpected is commonplace; and the habits and attitudes of building occupants are elements of the system that must always be taken into account. This report shows the benefits of energy saving, cost saving, and added comfort that may be attained by retrofitting old buildings, noting typical complications that arise. The effectiveness of the conservation methods is presented in terms of costs relative to effective payback periods calculated from results of their application in Jersey City.

  16. Explicit Instruction Elements in Core Reading Programs

    OpenAIRE

    Child, Angela R.

    2012-01-01

    Classroom teachers are provided instructional recommendations for teaching reading from their adopted core reading programs (CRPs). Explicit instruction elements or what is also called instructional moves, including direct explanation, modeling, guided practice, independent practice, discussion, feedback, and monitoring, were examined within CRP reading lessons. This study sought to answer the question: What elements of explicit instruction or instructional moves are included in the five most...

  17. Adaptive evolution of conserved noncoding elements in mammals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Yeon Kim

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Conserved noncoding elements (CNCs are an abundant feature of vertebrate genomes. Some CNCs have been shown to act as cis-regulatory modules, but the function of most CNCs remains unclear. To study the evolution of CNCs, we have developed a statistical method called the "shared rates test" to identify CNCs that show significant variation in substitution rates across branches of a phylogenetic tree. We report an application of this method to alignments of 98,910 CNCs from the human, chimpanzee, dog, mouse, and rat genomes. We find that approximately 68% of CNCs evolve according to a null model where, for each CNC, a single parameter models the level of constraint acting throughout the phylogeny linking these five species. The remaining approximately 32% of CNCs show departures from the basic model including speed-ups and slow-downs on particular branches and occasionally multiple rate changes on different branches. We find that a subset of the significant CNCs have evolved significantly faster than the local neutral rate on a particular branch, providing strong evidence for adaptive evolution in these CNCs. The distribution of these signals on the phylogeny suggests that adaptive evolution of CNCs occurs in occasional short bursts of evolution. Our analyses suggest a large set of promising targets for future functional studies of adaptation.

  18. Writing analytic element programs in Python.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakker, Mark; Kelson, Victor A

    2009-01-01

    The analytic element method is a mesh-free approach for modeling ground water flow at both the local and the regional scale. With the advent of the Python object-oriented programming language, it has become relatively easy to write analytic element programs. In this article, an introduction is given of the basic principles of the analytic element method and of the Python programming language. A simple, yet flexible, object-oriented design is presented for analytic element codes using multiple inheritance. New types of analytic elements may be added without the need for any changes in the existing part of the code. The presented code may be used to model flow to wells (with either a specified discharge or drawdown) and streams (with a specified head). The code may be extended by any hydrogeologist with a healthy appetite for writing computer code to solve more complicated ground water flow problems. Copyright © 2009 The Author(s). Journal Compilation © 2009 National Ground Water Association.

  19. Marketing: an approach to successful energy-conservation information programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hutton, R. B.; McNeill, D. L.

    1980-08-01

    This monograph shows how the adoption of a marketing approach can improve the quality of the development and delivery of energy-conservation programs. Several factors make the use of such a marketing approach to conservation particularly beneficial, namely: (1) goals of conservation programs can be quantified (e.g., specified amount of energy to be saved); in addition, intermediate effects necessary for program success are also measureable (e.g., knowledge, attitude change, etc); (2) there is an apparent and increasing need for conservation by different parts (or sectors) of the population; however, it is clear that the desire for conservation is not the same for all sectors; (3) conservation programs can be thought of in much the same way as products with benefits and costs; this necessitates an understanding of how the population makes conservation decisions so that the program can fit into that decision process; (4) the need to tailor programs to the needs of the population is heightened by the general competition for the consumer dollar; it is necessary to design and present programs in a way that the individual will view conservation as an attractive choice among many (e.g., bank savings, buying clothes, furniture, car, etc.); and (5) the population's response to, and need for conservation is constantly changing; consequently, it is important to realize that these changes may need to be reflected in the conservation programs themselves (both ongoing and new).

  20. 78 FR 55781 - Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Walk-In Coolers and Freezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-11

    ... Conservation Standards for Walk-In Coolers and Freezers; Proposed Rule #0;#0;Federal Register / Vol. 78 , No... 1904-AB86 Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Walk-In Coolers and Freezers... commercial and industrial equipment, including walk-in coolers and walk-in freezers. EPCA also requires the U...

  1. 76 FR 20089 - Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Fluorescent Lamp Ballasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-11

    ... Conservation Standards for Fluorescent Lamp Ballasts; Proposed Rule #0;#0;Federal Register / Vol. 76 , No. 69... Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Fluorescent Lamp Ballasts AGENCY: Office of Energy... standards for various consumer products and commercial and industrial equipment, including fluorescent lamp...

  2. Explicit Instruction Elements in Core Reading Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Child, Angela R.

    2012-01-01

    Classroom teachers are provided instructional recommendations for teaching reading from their adopted core reading programs (CRPs). Explicit instruction elements or what is also called instructional moves, including direct explanation, modeling, guided practice, independent practice, discussion, feedback, and monitoring, were examined within CRP…

  3. Elements of an Employee Motivation Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Ernest H.

    1974-01-01

    Ten elements which should be present in an employee motivation program are discussed in the context of achieving increased acceptance of organizational goals. They are: participation, performance measurement, knowledge of results, recognition; attitude measurement, communication, publicity, work assignment, work research, and supervisor motivation…

  4. 75 FR 31609 - Conservation Stewardship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-03

    ... Department of Agriculture. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: Section 2301 of the Food, Conservation, and Energy Act of 2008 (2008 Act) amended the Food Security Act of 1985 to establish the Conservation Stewardship...: Soil and Water Conservation Society. This review is available at http://www.nrcs.usda.gov/technical/NRI...

  5. 78 FR 48035 - Conservation Reserve Program, Re-Enrollment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-07

    ... Bill (Pub. L. 110-246, the Food, Conservation, and Energy Act of 2008), which allows that the... requirements, Soil conservation, Technical assistance, Water resources, Wildlife. For the reasons explained... Part 1410 RIN 0560-AH80 Conservation Reserve Program, Re-Enrollment AGENCY: Commodity Credit...

  6. Developmental hematopoiesis: ontogeny, genetic programming and conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciau-Uitz, Aldo; Monteiro, Rui; Kirmizitas, Arif; Patient, Roger

    2014-08-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) sustain blood production throughout life and are of pivotal importance in regenerative medicine. Although HSC generation from pluripotent stem cells would resolve their shortage for clinical applications, this has not yet been achieved mainly because of the poor mechanistic understanding of their programming. Bone marrow HSCs are first created during embryogenesis in the dorsal aorta (DA) of the midgestation conceptus, from where they migrate to the fetal liver and, eventually, the bone marrow. It is currently accepted that HSCs emerge from specialized endothelium, the hemogenic endothelium, localized in the ventral wall of the DA through an evolutionarily conserved process called the endothelial-to-hematopoietic transition. However, the endothelial-to-hematopoietic transition represents one of the last steps in HSC creation, and an understanding of earlier events in the specification of their progenitors is required if we are to create them from naïve pluripotent cells. Because of their ready availability and external development, zebrafish and Xenopus embryos have enormously facilitated our understanding of the early developmental processes leading to the programming of HSCs from nascent lateral plate mesoderm to hemogenic endothelium in the DA. The amenity of the Xenopus model to lineage tracing experiments has also contributed to the establishment of the distinct origins of embryonic (yolk sac) and adult (HSC) hematopoiesis, whereas the transparency of the zebrafish has allowed in vivo imaging of developing blood cells, particularly during and after the emergence of HSCs in the DA. Here, we discuss the key contributions of these model organisms to our understanding of developmental hematopoiesis. Copyright © 2014 ISEH - International Society for Experimental Hematology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Conservation and functional element discovery in 20 angiosperm plant genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hupalo, Daniel; Kern, Andrew D

    2013-07-01

    Here, we describe the construction of a phylogenetically deep, whole-genome alignment of 20 flowering plants, along with an analysis of plant genome conservation. Each included angiosperm genome was aligned to a reference genome, Arabidopsis thaliana, using the LASTZ/MULTIZ paradigm and tools from the University of California-Santa Cruz Genome Browser source code. In addition to the multiple alignment, we created a local genome browser displaying multiple tracks of newly generated genome annotation, as well as annotation sourced from published data of other research groups. An investigation into A. thaliana gene features present in the aligned A. lyrata genome revealed better conservation of start codons, stop codons, and splice sites within our alignments (51% of features from A. thaliana conserved without interruption in A. lyrata) when compared with previous publicly available plant pairwise alignments (34% of features conserved). The detailed view of conservation across angiosperms revealed not only high coding-sequence conservation but also a large set of previously uncharacterized intergenic conservation. From this, we annotated the collection of conserved features, revealing dozens of putative noncoding RNAs, including some with recorded small RNA expression. Comparing conservation between kingdoms revealed a faster decay of vertebrate genome features when compared with angiosperm genomes. Finally, conserved sequences were searched for folding RNA features, including but not limited to noncoding RNA (ncRNA) genes. Among these, we highlight a double hairpin in the 5'-untranslated region (5'-UTR) of the PRIN2 gene and a putative ncRNA with homology targeting the LAF3 protein.

  8. Farmer Participation in U.S. Farm Bill Conservation Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimer, Adam P.; Prokopy, Linda S.

    2014-02-01

    Conservation policy in agricultural systems in the United States relies primarily on voluntary action by farmers. Federal conservation programs, including the Environmental Quality Incentives Program, offer incentives, both financial and technical, to farmers in exchange for adoption of conservation practices. Understanding motivations for (as well as barriers to) participation in voluntary programs is important for the design of future policy and effective outreach. While a significant literature has explored motivations and barriers to conservation practice adoption and participation in single programs, few studies in the U.S. context have explored general participation by farmers in one place and time. A mixed-methods research approach was utilized to explore farmer participation in all U.S. Farm Bill programs in Indiana. Current and past program engagement was high, with nearly half of survey respondents reporting participation in at least one program. Most participants had experience with the Conservation Reserve Program, with much lower participation rates in other programs. Most interview participants who had experience in programs were motivated by the environmental benefits of practices, with incentives primarily serving to reduce the financial and technical barriers to practice adoption. The current policy arrangement, which offers multiple policy approaches to conservation, offers farmers with different needs and motivations a menu of options. However, evidence suggests that the complexity of the system may be a barrier that prevents participation by farmers with scarce time or resources. Outreach efforts should focus on increasing awareness of program options, while future policy must balance flexibility of programs with complexity.

  9. Use of a business excellence model to improve conservation programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Simon; Groombridge, Jim

    2010-12-01

    The current shortfall in effectiveness within conservation biology is illustrated by increasing interest in "evidence-based conservation," whose proponents have identified the need to benchmark conservation initiatives against actions that lead to proven positive effects. The effectiveness of conservation policies, approaches, and evaluation is under increasing scrutiny, and in these areas models of excellence used in business could prove valuable. Typically, conservation programs require years of effort and involve rigorous long-term implementation processes. Successful balance of long-term efforts alongside the achievement of short-term goals is often compromised by management or budgetary constraints, a situation also common in commercial businesses. "Business excellence" is an approach many companies have used over the past 20 years to ensure continued success. Various business excellence evaluations have been promoted that include concepts that could be adapted and applied in conservation programs. We describe a conservation excellence model that shows how scientific processes and results can be aligned with financial and organizational measures of success. We applied the model to two well-documented species conservation programs. In the first, the Po'ouli program, several aspects of improvement were identified, such as more authority for decision making in the field and better integration of habitat management and population recovery processes. The second example, the black-footed ferret program, could have benefited from leadership effort to reduce bureaucracy and to encourage use of best-practice species recovery approaches. The conservation excellence model enables greater clarity in goal setting, more-effective identification of job roles within programs, better links between technical approaches and measures of biological success, and more-effective use of resources. The model could improve evaluation of a conservation program's effectiveness and may be

  10. Colorimetric measurements as control elements in wood conservation status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ovidia Soto-Martín

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is a methodological proposal for the study of altarpieces on wooden supports. The process was implemented to study the altarpiece of San Antonio de Padua in Garachico, Tenerife. For this, we conducted a review of key aspects appropriate to the discipline of wood identification carried out by macroscopic examination and for the characterization of the status of deterioration by colorimetric analysis. For the evaluation of the wood conservation status, the samples were subjected for the first time to colorimetric measurement. As a result we have created an online database to provide information for conservation professionals permitting them to design a proposal for preventive conservation and intervention individually for each object.

  11. Assessment of USDA-NRCS rangeland conservation programs: recommendation for an evidence-based conservation platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briske, D D; Bestelmeyer, B T; Brown, J R; Brunson, M W; Thurow, T L; Tanaka, J A

    2017-01-01

    The Conservation Effects Assessment Project (CEAP) was created in response to a request from the Office of Management and Budget that the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Natural Resource Conservation Service (USDA-NRCS) document the societal benefits anticipated to accrue from a major increase in conservation funding authorized by the 2002 Farm Bill. A comprehensive evaluation of the efficacy of rangeland conservation practices cost-shared with private landowners was unable to evaluate conservation benefits because outcomes were seldom documented. Four interrelated suppositions are presented to examine the causes underlying minimal documentation of conservations outcomes. These suppositions are (1) the benefits of conservation practices are considered a certainty so that documentation in not required, (2) there is minimal knowledge exchange between the USDA-NRCS and research organizations, (3) and a paucity of conservation-relevant science, as well as (4) inadequate technical support for land owners following implementation of conservation practices. We then follow with recommendations to overcome potential barriers to documentation of conservation outcomes identified for each supposition. Collectively, this assessment indicates that the existing conservation practice standards are insufficient to effectively administer large conservation investments on rangelands and that modification of these standards alone will not achieve the goals explicitly stated by CEAP. We recommend that USDA-NRCS modify its conservation programs around a more comprehensive and integrative platform that is capable of implementing evidence-based conservation. Collaborative monitoring organized around landowner-agency-scientist partnerships would represent the focal point of a Conservation Program Assessment Network (CPAN). The primary network objective would be to establish missing information feedback loops between conservation practices and their agricultural and environmental outcomes

  12. Elements of programming interviews the insider's guide

    CERN Document Server

    Aziz, Adnan; Prakash, Amit

    2015-01-01

    This is a larger-format version of Elements of Programming Interviews. The language is C++. Specifically, the font size is larger, and the page size is 7"x10" (the regular format uses 6"x9"). The content is identical. Have you ever... Wanted to work at an exciting futuristic company? Struggled with an interview problem that could have been solved in 15 minutes? Wished you could study real-world computing problems? If so, you need to read Elements of Programming Interviews (EPI). EPI is your comprehensive guide to interviewing for software development roles. The core of EPI is a collection of over 250 problems with detailed solutions. The problems are representative of interview questions asked at leading software companies. The problems are illustrated with 200 figures, 300 tested programs, and 150 additional variants. The book begins with a summary of the nontechnical aspects of interviewing, such as strategies for a great interview, common mistakes, perspectives from the other side of the table,...

  13. 76 FR 31795 - Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Walk-In Coolers and Freezers...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-02

    ... Part 431 RIN 1904-AB85 Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Walk-In Coolers... regulations pertaining to the test procedure for walk-in coolers and freezers. The correction addresses an erroneous temperature condition for walk-in freezers. DATES: Effective Date: June 2, 2011. FOR FURTHER...

  14. 75 FR 11194 - San Diego County Water Authority Natural Communities Conservation Program/Habitat Conservation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-10

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service San Diego County Water Authority Natural Communities Conservation Program/Habitat Conservation Plan, San Diego and Riverside Counties, CA AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service... application, and notice of public meetings for the San Diego County Water Authority's (Water Authority...

  15. 75 FR 21981 - Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Residential Water Heaters, Direct...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY 10 CFR Part 430 RIN 1904-AA90 Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Residential Water Heaters, Direct Heating Equipment, and Pool Heaters Correction In rule document 2010-7611 beginning on...

  16. 78 FR 25627 - Energy Conservation Program for Certain Industrial Equipment: Energy Conservation Standards for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-02

    ... CFR Part 431 Energy Conservation Program for Certain Industrial Equipment: Energy Conservation... to each of the analyses (e.g., market assessment, engineering analysis, energy use analysis, life.... Introduction A. Authority B. Background C. Rulemaking Process II. Planned Rulemaking Analyses A. Market...

  17. ERDA programs and objectives: energy conservation in food processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Towne, E A [ed.

    1977-07-01

    A workshop on energy conservation in the agriculture processing industry sponsored by ERDA in March 1976 resulted in 87 conservation research recommendations to ERDA. These recommendations and their incorporation into ongoing and planned ERDA research and development programs are discussed. Information is included on using food processing wastes, energy conservation in hot processes and waste heat recovery, ERDA responses to specific workshop recommendations on the processing of chemical fertilizers, dairy products, fruits, meats, vegetables, grain, and textiles.

  18. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of a Military Hearing Conservation Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Seth L; Smith, Kenneth J; Palmer, Catherine

    2018-02-07

    Occupational noise threatens U.S. worker health and safety and commands a significant financial burden on state and federal government worker compensation programs. Previous studies suggest that hearing conservation programs have contributed to reduced occupational hearing loss for noise-exposed workers. Many military personnel are overexposed to noise and are provided hearing conservation services. Select military branches require all active duty personnel to follow hearing conservation program guidelines, regardless of individual noise exposure. We evaluated the cost-effectiveness of a military hearing conservation program, relative to no intervention, in relation to cases of hearing loss prevented. We employed cost-effectiveness analytic methods to compare the costs and effectiveness, in terms of hearing loss cases prevented, of a military hearing conservation program relative to no program. We used costs and probability estimates available in the literature and publicly available sources. The effectiveness of the interventions was analyzed based on whether hearing loss occurred over a 20-yr time frame. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of the hearing conservation program compared with no intervention was $10,657 per case of hearing loss prevented. Workers were 28% less likely to sustain hearing loss in our model when they received the hearing conservation program compared with no intervention, which reflected the greater effectiveness of the hearing conservation program. Cost-effectiveness results were sensitive to estimated values for the probability of acquiring hearing loss from both interventions and the cost of hearing protection. We performed a Monte Carlo probabilistic sensitivity analysis where we simultaneously varied all the model parameters to their extreme plausible bounds. When we ran 10,000 Monte Carlo iterations, we observed that the hearing conservation program was more cost-effective in 99% of cases when decision makers were willing to

  19. The Role of Communicative Feedback in Successful Water Conservation Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tom, Gail; Tauchus, Gail; Williams, Jared; Tong, Stephanie

    2011-01-01

    The Sacramento County Water Agency has made available 2 water conservation programs to its customers. The Data Logger Program attaches the Meter Master Model 100 EL data logger to the customer's water meter for 1 week and provides a detailed report of water usage from each fixture. The Water Wise House Call Program provides findings and…

  20. 75 FR 70083 - Emergency Forest Restoration Program and Emergency Conservation Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-17

    ... CFR Part 701 RIN 0560-AH89 Emergency Forest Restoration Program and Emergency Conservation Program... implement the new Emergency Forest Restoration Program (EFRP). EFRP will provide financial assistance to... after January 1, 2010. This interim rule also reorganizes existing Emergency Conservation Program (ECP...

  1. Soil and Moisture Conservation Program Report Fiscal Year 1969

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the progress of the soil and moisture conservation program for Pungo National Wildlife Refuge for fiscal year 1969. Surveys and maps are...

  2. New alloys to conserve critical elements. [replacing chromium in steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, J. R.

    1978-01-01

    Previous studies and surveys on availability of domestic reserves have shown that chromium is a most critical element within the U.S. metal industry. More precisely, the bulk of chromium is consumed in the production of stainless steels, specifically Type 304 stainless steel (304SS) which contains 18% Cr. The present paper deals with means of reducing chromium in commercial stainless steels by substituting more abundant or less expensive elements with the intent of maintaining the properties of 304SS. The discussion focuses on some of the oxidation and corrosion properties of new substitute stainless steels with only 12% Cr, which represents a potential saving of 33% of the chromium consumed in the production of 304SS. The alloying elements substituted for Cr in 304SS are selected according to their potential for protective oxide formation during high-temperature oxidation; these are Al, Si, Ti, Y, and misch metal which is 99.7% rare-earth metals containing 50 to 55% cerium. Other alloying elements to impart corrosion resistance are Mn, Mo, and V.

  3. A Producer's Propensity to Conserve Framework: Application to a US and Australian Conservation Program

    OpenAIRE

    Eigenraam, Mark; Doering, Otto C.; Spinelli, Felix

    2006-01-01

    Increasing recognition of the environmental impact of agriculture has led to increasing public activity around the world encouraging public conservation programs. Different countries have taken different program approaches to accomplish this. The comparison and contrast here is between Australia and the United States, examining the CREP program in the U.S. and the Eco Tender program in Australia. A different historical experience in the U.S. sets certain parameters that are expected in their ...

  4. 76 FR 51943 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; International Dolphin Conservation Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-19

    ...; International Dolphin Conservation Program AGENCY: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA... (NOAA) collects information to implement the International Dolphin Conservation Program Act (Act). The... ] nations in the International Dolphin Conservation Program that would otherwise be under embargo. The Act...

  5. Maximum-principle-satisfying space-time conservation element and solution element scheme applied to compressible multifluids

    KAUST Repository

    Shen, Hua

    2016-10-19

    A maximum-principle-satisfying space-time conservation element and solution element (CE/SE) scheme is constructed to solve a reduced five-equation model coupled with the stiffened equation of state for compressible multifluids. We first derive a sufficient condition for CE/SE schemes to satisfy maximum-principle when solving a general conservation law. And then we introduce a slope limiter to ensure the sufficient condition which is applicative for both central and upwind CE/SE schemes. Finally, we implement the upwind maximum-principle-satisfying CE/SE scheme to solve the volume-fraction-based five-equation model for compressible multifluids. Several numerical examples are carried out to carefully examine the accuracy, efficiency, conservativeness and maximum-principle-satisfying property of the proposed approach.

  6. Maximum-principle-satisfying space-time conservation element and solution element scheme applied to compressible multifluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Hua; Wen, Chih-Yung; Parsani, Matteo; Shu, Chi-Wang

    2017-02-01

    A maximum-principle-satisfying space-time conservation element and solution element (CE/SE) scheme is constructed to solve a reduced five-equation model coupled with the stiffened equation of state for compressible multifluids. We first derive a sufficient condition for CE/SE schemes to satisfy maximum-principle when solving a general conservation law. And then we introduce a slope limiter to ensure the sufficient condition which is applicative for both central and upwind CE/SE schemes. Finally, we implement the upwind maximum-principle-satisfying CE/SE scheme to solve the volume-fraction-based five-equation model for compressible multifluids. Several numerical examples are carried out to carefully examine the accuracy, efficiency, conservativeness and maximum-principle-satisfying property of the proposed approach.

  7. Dolphin shows and interaction programs: benefits for conservation education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, L J; Zeigler-Hill, V; Mellen, J; Koeppel, J; Greer, T; Kuczaj, S

    2013-01-01

    Dolphin shows and dolphin interaction programs are two types of education programs within zoological institutions used to educate visitors about dolphins and the marine environment. The current study examined the short- and long-term effects of these programs on visitors' conservation-related knowledge, attitude, and behavior. Participants of both dolphin shows and interaction programs demonstrated a significant short-term increase in knowledge, attitudes, and behavioral intentions. Three months following the experience, participants of both dolphin shows and interaction programs retained the knowledge learned during their experience and reported engaging in more conservation-related behaviors. Additionally, the number of dolphin shows attended in the past was a significant predictor of recent conservation-related behavior suggesting that repetition of these types of experiences may be important in inspiring people to conservation action. These results suggest that both dolphin shows and dolphin interaction programs can be an important part of a conservation education program for visitors of zoological facilities. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Space Radiation Program Element Tissue Sharing Forum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, H.; Mayeaux, B M.; Huff, J. L.; Simonsen, L. C.

    2016-01-01

    Over the years, a large number of animal experiments have been conducted at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory and other facilities under the support of the NASA Space Radiation Program Element (SRPE). Studies using rodents and other animal species to address the space radiation risks will remain a significant portion of the research portfolio of the Element. In order to maximize scientific return of the animal studies, the SRPE has recently released the Space Radiation Tissue Sharing Forum. The Forum provides access to an inventory of investigator-stored tissue samples and enables both NASA SRPE members and NASA-funded investigators to exchange information regarding stored and future radiobiological tissues available for sharing. Registered users may review online data of available tissues, inquire about tissues posted, or request tissues for an upcoming study using an online form. Investigators who have upcoming sacrifices are also encouraged to post the availability of samples using the discussion forum. A brief demo of the forum will be given during the presentation

  9. 40 CFR 145.22 - Elements of a program submission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Elements of a program submission. 145.22 Section 145.22 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STATE UIC PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS State Program Submissions § 145.22 Elements of a...

  10. A conservation program for Alaska's commercial fisheries

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — It is the purpose of this report to show how the present programs of the Alaska Region of the Bureau of Commercial Fisheries relate to problems of the various...

  11. The role of conservation programs in drought risk adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steven Wallander; Marcel Aillery; Daniel Hellerstein; Michael Hand

    2013-01-01

    This report evaluates the extent to which farms facing higher levels of drought risk are more likely to participate in conservation programs, and fi nds a strong link between drought risk and program participation. Prior research has shown that climate-related risk exposure infl uences production decisions such as crop choice; our research shows that adaptation also...

  12. 40 CFR 271.5 - Elements of a program submission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Elements of a program submission. 271.5 Section 271.5 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES... Authorization § 271.5 Elements of a program submission. (a) Any State that seeks to administer a program under...

  13. 7 CFR 18.4 - Elements of program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Elements of program. 18.4 Section 18.4 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY IN THE STATE COOPERATIVE EXTENSION SERVICES § 18.4 Elements of program. A satisfactory program shall include: (a) A statement of policy...

  14. Optimum allocation of conservation funds and choice of conservation programs for a set of African cattle breeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulai Awudu

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Although funds for livestock conservation are limited there is little known about the optimal allocation of conservation funds. A new algorithm was used to allocate Mio US$ 1, 2, 3, 5 or unlimited funds, discounted over 50 years, on 23 African cattle breeds conserved with four different possible conservation programs. Additionally, Mio US$ 1 was preferably allocated to breeds with special traits. The conceptional in situ conservation programs strongly involve breeders and give them part of the responsibility for the conservation of the breed. Therefore, the pure in situ conservation was more efficient than cryoconservation or combined in situ and cryoconservation. The average annual discounted conservation cost for a breed can be as low as US$ 1000 to US$ 4400 depending on the design of the conservation program and the economic situation of the country of conservation. The choice of the breeds and the optimal conservation program and the amount of money allocated to each breed depend on many factors such as the amount of funds available, the conservation potential of each breed, the effects of the conservation program as well as its cost. With Mio US$ 1, 64% of the present diversity could be maintained over 50 years, which is 13% more than would be maintained if no conservation measures were implemented. Special traits could be conserved with a rather small amount of the total funds. Diversity can not be conserved completely, not even with unlimited funds. A maximum of 92% of the present diversity could be conserved with Mio US$ 10, leaving 8% of the diversity to unpredictable happenings. The suggested algorithm proved to be useful for optimal allocation of conservation funds. It allocated the funds optimally among breeds by identifying the most suited conservation program for each breed, also accounting for differences in currency exchange rates between the different countries.

  15. 78 FR 12969 - Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products: Energy Conservation Standards for Residential...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-26

    ... key component of utility ETS programs that target electric water heaters because these larger- volume... conservation standard levels for electric storage water heaters and the impact of these standards on electric... implementation of the April 2010 standard levels by allowing for the manufacture of certain large-volume electric...

  16. I-SAVE conservation program. Implementing title II of NECPA residential conservation service. Final draft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-05-30

    The I-SAVE (Iowa Saves America's Vital Energy) conservation plan provides comprehensive energy-conservation information and services to residential consumers served by large investor-owned electric and gas utilities and participating home-heating suppliers. The overall objective of the I-SAVE plan is to conserve energy by facilitating cost-effective retrofit of existing housing and promoting more-efficient energy use. The ultimate benefit available to the customer under the I-SAVE plan - reduction in energy use - is dependent upon the action he or she takes as a result of the program audit. Benefits to the utility and the ratepayers as a whole, however, will accrue only upon widespread customer acceptance and utilization of program services. This degree of program acceptance and the resulting benefits to ratepayers can be attained only through an aggressive educational and promotional effort by the covered utilities. All electric and gas utilities which have sales, other than resale, exceeding 750 million kWh of electricity or 10 billion cubic feet of gas and participating home-heating suppliers, shall provide a program announcement and shall offer conservation services to their customers who occupy a residential building containing at least one, but not more than four units, in a manner as provided by the rules. The text of the rules is presented. (MCW)

  17. Alternative utility conservation program designs: an evaluation based on case study program experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kreitler, V.

    1985-01-01

    Utilities around the nation are promoting residential conservation through a variety of program activities, ranging from customer education programs to financial incentive programs to direct installation programs. This report was undertaken to evaluate some of these alternative program designs, to compare their achievements against those of the RCS program, and to suggest program planning directions that seem most promising. Interviews with program managers were used to elucidate the rationale behind the alternative programs and to discuss program effectiveness. The experiences of nine utilities and one nonutility organization are reviewed. Program managers' opinions about RCS and their experiences with thirteen other programs are summarized. The effectiveness of the alternative program designs are compared and some implications for conservation program planning and implementation are highlighted.

  18. Recovery Act. Development of a Model Energy Conservation Training Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2012-07-05

    The overall objective of this project was to develop an updated model Energy Conservation training program for stationary engineers. This revision to the IUOE National Training Fund’s existing Energy Conservation training curriculum is designed to enable stationary engineers to incorporate essential energy management into routine building operation and maintenance tasks. The curriculum uses a blended learning approach that includes classroom, hands-on, computer simulation and web-based training in addition to a portfolio requirement for a workplace-based learning application. The Energy Conservation training program goal is development of a workforce that can maintain new and existing commercial buildings at optimum energy performance levels. The grant start date was July 6, 2010 and the project continued through September 30, 2012, including a three month non-funded extension.

  19. DOE conservation/solar applications FY 79 budget program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1981-01-01

    The FY 1979 DOE budget is presented pictorially and graphically. Information on the programs in the organization (solar applications, residential and commercial, industrial, transportation, state and local, and multisector) is included for such areas as major markets; energy contribution; development; strategies; standards; research; energy conservation; and commercialization. A final chart on funding depicts comparisons of the 1978 and 1979 budgets briefly.

  20. Vegetation changes in Conservation Reserve Program Lands in Interior Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Over 14 million ha of cropland in the United States has been converted into grasslands through the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) administered by the United States Department of Agriculture, however, studies of the effects of CRP enrollment on plant communities and plant succession are largely l...

  1. 78 FR 67128 - Coral Reef Conservation Program; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-08

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Coral Reef Conservation Program; Meeting AGENCY: Coral Reef... of public comment. SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given of a public meeting of the U.S. Coral Reef Task.../uscrtf-registration-form . Commenters may address the meeting, the role of the USCRTF, or general coral...

  2. 49 CFR 227.107 - Hearing conservation program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION OCCUPATIONAL NOISE EXPOSURE Occupational Noise Exposure for Railroad Operating Employees. § 227.107 Hearing conservation program. (a) Consistent with the requirements of the... exposure shall be computed in accordance with the tables in appendix A of this part, and without regard to...

  3. Conservation education for Fire, Fuel and Smoke Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wayne Cook

    2009-01-01

    The mission of Conservation Education for the Fire, Fuel and Smoke (FFS) Program is to develop and deliver high-quality, science-based education about wildland fire to students, educators, the general public, and agency staff. Goals: 1) Increase awareness of the scope and content of FFS research. 2) Improve understanding of fundamental concepts in wildland fire science...

  4. Translational co-regulation of a ligand and inhibitor by a conserved RNA element

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zaucker, Andreas; Nagorska, Agnieszka; Kumari, Pooja

    2017-01-01

    ), whereas deletions in the DLE abolish binding to Ybx1. Analysis of zebrafish ybx1 mutants shows that Ybx1 represses lefty1 translation in embryos. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated inactivation of human YBX1 also results in human NODAL translational de-repression, suggesting broader conservation of the DLE RNA element...

  5. Structural relationships between highly conserved elements and genes in vertebrate genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Sun

    Full Text Available Large numbers of sequence elements have been identified to be highly conserved among vertebrate genomes. These highly conserved elements (HCEs are often located in or around genes that are involved in transcription regulation and early development. They have been shown to be involved in cis-regulatory activities through both in vivo and additional computational studies. We have investigated the structural relationships between such elements and genes in six vertebrate genomes human, mouse, rat, chicken, zebrafish and tetraodon and detected several thousand cases of conserved HCE-gene associations, and also cases of HCEs with no common target genes. A few examples underscore the potential significance of our findings about several individual genes. We found that the conserved association between HCE/HCEs and gene/genes are not restricted to elements by their absolute distance on the genome. Notably, long-range associations were identified and the molecular functions of the associated genes do not show any particular overrepresentation of the functional categories previously reported. HCEs in close proximity are found to be linked with different set of gene/genes. The results reflect the highly complex correlation between HCEs and their putative target genes.

  6. Split diversity in constrained conservation prioritization using integer linear programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernomor, Olga; Minh, Bui Quang; Forest, Félix; Klaere, Steffen; Ingram, Travis; Henzinger, Monika; von Haeseler, Arndt

    2015-01-01

    Phylogenetic diversity (PD) is a measure of biodiversity based on the evolutionary history of species. Here, we discuss several optimization problems related to the use of PD, and the more general measure split diversity (SD), in conservation prioritization.Depending on the conservation goal and the information available about species, one can construct optimization routines that incorporate various conservation constraints. We demonstrate how this information can be used to select sets of species for conservation action. Specifically, we discuss the use of species' geographic distributions, the choice of candidates under economic pressure, and the use of predator-prey interactions between the species in a community to define viability constraints.Despite such optimization problems falling into the area of NP hard problems, it is possible to solve them in a reasonable amount of time using integer programming. We apply integer linear programming to a variety of models for conservation prioritization that incorporate the SD measure.We exemplarily show the results for two data sets: the Cape region of South Africa and a Caribbean coral reef community. Finally, we provide user-friendly software at http://www.cibiv.at/software/pda.

  7. Conservation and solar energy program: congressional budget request, FY 1982

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1981-01-01

    Funding summaries are presented for the Conservation and Solar Energy Program funding information and program overview on energy conservation (Volume 7 of 7, DOE/CR-0011/2) are included for the Buildings and Community Systems, Industrial, Transportation; State and Local, Multi-Sector, Energy Impact Assistance, and Residential/Commercial retrofit programs. Funding information and program overviews on solar technology (Volume 2 of 7, DOE/CR-011/2) are included for Active and Passive Solar Heating and Cooling, Photovoltaics Energy Systems, Solar Thermal Power Systems, Biomass Energy Systems, Wind Energy Conversion Systems, Ocean Systems, Solar International Activities, Solar Information Systems, SERI Facility, MX-RES, Program Direction, and Alcohol Fuels programs. Information and overviews on energy production, demonstration, and distribution (Volume 6 of 7, DOE/CR-0011/2) are given for the solar program. A funding summary and a program overview are included for electrochemical and physical and chemical storage systems as appearing in DOE/CR-0011/2, Volume 3 of 7. Relevant tabulated data from the FY 1981. Request to the Congress are presented for Supplementals, Rescissions, and Deferrals. (MCW)

  8. Thermographic Inspections And The Residential Conservation Service Program (RCS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Ronald J.

    1983-03-01

    Rhode Islanders Saving Energy (RISE) is a non-profit corporation founded in 1977 to provide Rhode Island residents with a variety of energy conservation services. Since January of 1981, it has been performing energy audits in compliance with the Department of Energy's (DOE) Residential Conservation Service Program (RCS). One aspect of the RCS program is the performance of inspections on energy conservation activities completed according to RCS installation guidelines. This paper will describe both the use and results of thermographic inspections within the RISE program. The primary objective of these inspections has been to assure the quality of the building envelope after completion of retrofit measures. Thermal anamolies have been detected that vary in size, location and probable cause. Approximately 37% of all jobs performed through RISE in conjunction with the RCS program have required remedial work as a result of problems that were identi-fied during the thermographic inspection. This percentage was much higher when infra-red inspections were conducted on "Non-RCS" retrofits. Statistics will be presented that provide an interesting insight on the quality of retrofit work when performed in associa-tion with a constant inspection process.

  9. Efficacy of two lion conservation programs in Maasailand, Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazzah, Leela; Dolrenry, Stephanie; Naughton-Treves, Lisa; Naughton, Lisa; Edwards, Charles T T; Mwebi, Ogeto; Kearney, Fiachra; Frank, Laurence

    2014-06-01

    Lion (Panthera leo) populations are in decline throughout most of Africa. The problem is particularly acute in southern Kenya, where Maasai pastoralists have been spearing and poisoning lions at a rate that will ensure near term local extinction. We investigated 2 approaches for improving local tolerance of lions: compensation payments for livestock lost to predators and Lion Guardians, which draws on local cultural values and knowledge to mitigate livestock-carnivore conflict and monitor carnivores. To gauge the overall influence of conservation intervention, we combined both programs into a single conservation treatment variable. Using 8 years of lion killing data, we applied Manski's partial identification approach with bounded assumptions to investigate the effect of conservation treatment on lion killing in 4 contiguous areas. In 3 of the areas, conservation treatment was positively associated with a reduction in lion killing. We then applied a generalized linear model to assess the relative efficacy of the 2 interventions. The model estimated that compensation resulted in an 87-91% drop in the number of lions killed, whereas Lion Guardians (operating in combination with compensation and alone) resulted in a 99% drop in lion killing. © 2014 Society for Conservation Biology.

  10. A brief description of a new numerical framework for solving conservation laws: The method of space-time conservation element and solution element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Sin-Chung; To, Wai-Ming

    1992-01-01

    A new numerical method for solving conservation laws is being developed. It differs substantially from the well established methods, i.e., finite difference, finite volume, finite element, and spectral methods, in both concept and methodology. It is much simpler than a typical high resolution method. No flux limiter or any technique related to characteristics is involved. No artificial viscosity or smoothing is introduced, and no moving mesh is used. Yet this method is capable of generating highly accurate shock tube solutions. The slight numerical overshoot and/or oscillations generated can be removed if a simple averaging formula initially used is replaced by a weighted formula. This modification has little effect on other parts of the solution. Because of its simplicity, generalization of this new method for multi-dimensional problems is straightforward.

  11. Fundamental Elements of Transition Program Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmelita, Courtney

    2017-01-01

    Adult learners require supports and services to help them successfully transition into taking on the demands and expectations of college students. Transition programs have grown in popularity as a means to aid adult learners as they transition to higher education. Unfortunately, previous research on adult learner participation in transition…

  12. Evidence, models, conservation programs and limits to management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, J.D.

    2012-01-01

    Walsh et al. (2012) emphasized the importance of obtaining evidence to assess the effects of management actions on state variables relevant to objectives of conservation programs. They focused on malleefowl Leipoa ocellata, ground-dwelling Australian megapodes listed as vulnerable. They noted that although fox Vulpes vulpes baiting is the main management action used in malleefowl conservation throughout southern Australia, evidence of the effectiveness of this action is limited and currently debated. Walsh et al. (2012) then used data from 64 sites monitored for malleefowl and foxes over 23 years to assess key functional relationships relevant to fox control as a conservation action for malleefowl. In one set of analyses, Walsh et al. (2012) focused on two relationships: fox baiting investment versus fox presence, and fox presence versus malleefowl population size and rate of population change. Results led to the counterintuitive conclusion that increases in investments in fox control produced slight decreases in malleefowl population size and growth. In a second set of analyses, Walsh et al. (2012) directly assessed the relationship between investment in fox baiting and malleefowl population size and rate of population change. This set of analyses showed no significant relationship between investment in fox population control and malleefowl population growth. Both sets of analyses benefited from the incorporation of key environmental covariates hypothesized to influence these management relationships. Walsh et al. (2012) concluded that "in most situations, malleefowl conservation did not effectively benefit from fox baiting at current levels of investment." In this commentary, I discuss the work of Walsh et al. (2012) using the conceptual framework of structured decision making (SDM). In doing so, I accept their analytic results and associated conclusions as accurate and discuss basic ideas about evidence, conservation and limits to management.

  13. In silico identification of conserved intercoding sequences in Leishmania genomes: unraveling putative cis-regulatory elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasconcelos, E J R; Terrão, M C; Ruiz, J C; Vêncio, R Z N; Cruz, A K

    2012-06-01

    In silico analyses of Leishmania spp. genome data are a powerful resource to improve the understanding of these pathogens' biology. Trypanosomatids such as Leishmania spp. have their protein-coding genes grouped in long polycistronic units of functionally unrelated genes. The control of gene expression happens by a variety of posttranscriptional mechanisms. The high degree of synteny among Leishmania species is accompanied by highly conserved coding sequences (CDS) and poorly conserved intercoding untranslated sequences. To identify the elements involved in the control of gene expression, we conducted an in silico investigation to find conserved intercoding sequences (CICS) in the genomes of L. major, L. infantum, and L. braziliensis. We used a combination of computational tools, such as Linux-Shell, PERL and R languages, BLAST, MSPcrunch, SSAKE, and Pred-A-Term algorithms to construct a pipeline which was able to: (i) search for conservation in target-regions, (ii) eliminate CICS redundancy and mask repeat elements, (iii) predict the mRNA's extremities, (iv) analyze the distribution of orthologous genes within the generated LeishCICS-clusters, (v) assign GO terms to the LeishCICS-clusters, and (vi) provide statistical support for the gene-enrichment annotation. We associated the LeishCICS-cluster data, generated at the end of the pipeline, with the expression profile of L. donovani genes during promastigote-amastigote differentiation, as previously evaluated by others (GEO accession: GSE21936). A Pearson's correlation coefficient greater than 0.5 was observed for 730 LeishCICS-clusters containing from 2 to 17 genes. The designed computational pipeline is a useful tool and its application identified potential regulatory cis elements and putative regulons in Leishmania. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. The structure of a rigorously conserved RNA element within the SARS virus genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael P Robertson

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We have solved the three-dimensional crystal structure of the stem-loop II motif (s2m RNA element of the SARS virus genome to 2.7-A resolution. SARS and related coronaviruses and astroviruses all possess a motif at the 3' end of their RNA genomes, called the s2m, whose pathogenic importance is inferred from its rigorous sequence conservation in an otherwise rapidly mutable RNA genome. We find that this extreme conservation is clearly explained by the requirement to form a highly structured RNA whose unique tertiary structure includes a sharp 90 degrees kink of the helix axis and several novel longer-range tertiary interactions. The tertiary base interactions create a tunnel that runs perpendicular to the main helical axis whose interior is negatively charged and binds two magnesium ions. These unusual features likely form interaction surfaces with conserved host cell components or other reactive sites required for virus function. Based on its conservation in viral pathogen genomes and its absence in the human genome, we suggest that these unusual structural features in the s2m RNA element are attractive targets for the design of anti-viral therapeutic agents. Structural genomics has sought to deduce protein function based on three-dimensional homology. Here we have extended this approach to RNA by proposing potential functions for a rigorously conserved set of RNA tertiary structural interactions that occur within the SARS RNA genome itself. Based on tertiary structural comparisons, we propose the s2m RNA binds one or more proteins possessing an oligomer-binding-like fold, and we suggest a possible mechanism for SARS viral RNA hijacking of host protein synthesis, both based upon observed s2m RNA macromolecular mimicry of a relevant ribosomal RNA fold.

  15. CONDOR: a database resource of developmentally associated conserved non-coding elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith Sarah

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Comparative genomics is currently one of the most popular approaches to study the regulatory architecture of vertebrate genomes. Fish-mammal genomic comparisons have proved powerful in identifying conserved non-coding elements likely to be distal cis-regulatory modules such as enhancers, silencers or insulators that control the expression of genes involved in the regulation of early development. The scientific community is showing increasing interest in characterizing the function, evolution and language of these sequences. Despite this, there remains little in the way of user-friendly access to a large dataset of such elements in conjunction with the analysis and the visualization tools needed to study them. Description Here we present CONDOR (COnserved Non-coDing Orthologous Regions available at: http://condor.fugu.biology.qmul.ac.uk. In an interactive and intuitive way the website displays data on > 6800 non-coding elements associated with over 120 early developmental genes and conserved across vertebrates. The database regularly incorporates results of ongoing in vivo zebrafish enhancer assays of the CNEs carried out in-house, which currently number ~100. Included and highlighted within this set are elements derived from duplication events both at the origin of vertebrates and more recently in the teleost lineage, thus providing valuable data for studying the divergence of regulatory roles between paralogs. CONDOR therefore provides a number of tools and facilities to allow scientists to progress in their own studies on the function and evolution of developmental cis-regulation. Conclusion By providing access to data with an approachable graphics interface, the CONDOR database presents a rich resource for further studies into the regulation and evolution of genes involved in early development.

  16. Detecting conserved regulatory elements with the model genome of the Japanese puffer fish, Fugu rubripes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aparicio, S; Morrison, A; Gould, A; Gilthorpe, J; Chaudhuri, C; Rigby, P; Krumlauf, R; Brenner, S

    1995-01-01

    Comparative vertebrate genome sequencing offers a powerful method for detecting conserved regulatory sequences. We propose that the compact genome of the teleost Fugu rubripes is well suited for this purpose. The evolutionary distance of teleosts from other vertebrates offers the maximum stringency for such evolutionary comparisons. To illustrate the comparative genome approach for F. rubripes, we use sequence comparisons between mouse and Fugu Hoxb-4 noncoding regions to identify conserved sequence blocks. We have used two approaches to test the function of these conserved blocks. In the first, homologous sequences were deleted from a mouse enhancer, resulting in a tissue-specific loss of activity when assayed in transgenic mice. In the second approach, Fugu DNA sequences showing homology to mouse sequences were tested for enhancer activity in transgenic mice. This strategy identified a neural element that mediates a subset of Hoxb-4 expression that is conserved between mammals and teleosts. The comparison of noncoding vertebrate sequences with those of Fugu, coupled to a transgenic bioassay, represents a general approach suitable for many genome projects. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7878040

  17. Influence of landscape elements in riparian buffers on the conservation of semiaquatic amphibians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ficetola, Gentile Francesco; Padoa-Schioppa, Emilio; De Bernardi, Fiorenza

    2009-02-01

    Studies on riparian buffers have usually focused on the amount of land needed as habitat for the terrestrial life stages of semiaquatic species. Nevertheless, the landscape surrounding wetlands is also important for other key processes, such as dispersal and the dynamics of metapopulations. Multiple elements that influence these processes should therefore be considered in the delineation of buffers. We analyzed landscape elements (forest cover, density of roads, and hydrographic network) in concentric buffers to evaluate the scale at which they influence stream amphibians in 77 distinct landscapes. To evaluate whether our results could be generalized to other contexts, we determined whether they were consistent across the study areas. Amphibians required buffers of 100-400 m of suitable terrestrial habitat, but interspecific differences in the amount of habitat were large. The presence of amphibians was related to roads and the hydrographic network at larger spatial scales (300-1500 m), which suggests that wider buffers are needed with these elements. This pattern probably arose because these elements influence dispersal and metapopulation persistence, processes that occur at large spatial scales. Furthermore, in some cases, analyses performed on different sets of landscapes provided different results, which suggests caution should be used when conservation recommendations are applied to disparate areas. Establishment of riparian buffers should not be focused only on riparian habitat, but should take a landscape perspective because semiaquatic species use multiple elements for different functions. This approach can be complex because different landscape elements require different spatial extents. Nevertheless, a shift of attention toward the management of different elements at multiple spatial scales is necessary for the long-term persistence of populations.

  18. A strongly conservative finite element method for the coupling of Stokes and Darcy flow

    KAUST Repository

    Kanschat, G.

    2010-08-01

    We consider a model of coupled free and porous media flow governed by Stokes and Darcy equations with the Beavers-Joseph-Saffman interface condition. This model is discretized using divergence-conforming finite elements for the velocities in the whole domain. Discontinuous Galerkin techniques and mixed methods are used in the Stokes and Darcy subdomains, respectively. This discretization is strongly conservative in Hdiv(Ω) and we show convergence. Numerical results validate our findings and indicate optimal convergence orders. © 2010 Elsevier Inc.

  19. A maximum-principle preserving finite element method for scalar conservation equations

    KAUST Repository

    Guermond, Jean-Luc

    2014-04-01

    This paper introduces a first-order viscosity method for the explicit approximation of scalar conservation equations with Lipschitz fluxes using continuous finite elements on arbitrary grids in any space dimension. Provided the lumped mass matrix is positive definite, the method is shown to satisfy the local maximum principle under a usual CFL condition. The method is independent of the cell type; for instance, the mesh can be a combination of tetrahedra, hexahedra, and prisms in three space dimensions. © 2014 Elsevier B.V.

  20. A Second-Order Maximum Principle Preserving Lagrange Finite Element Technique for Nonlinear Scalar Conservation Equations

    KAUST Repository

    Guermond, Jean-Luc

    2014-01-01

    © 2014 Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics. This paper proposes an explicit, (at least) second-order, maximum principle satisfying, Lagrange finite element method for solving nonlinear scalar conservation equations. The technique is based on a new viscous bilinear form introduced in Guermond and Nazarov [Comput. Methods Appl. Mech. Engrg., 272 (2014), pp. 198-213], a high-order entropy viscosity method, and the Boris-Book-Zalesak flux correction technique. The algorithm works for arbitrary meshes in any space dimension and for all Lipschitz fluxes. The formal second-order accuracy of the method and its convergence properties are tested on a series of linear and nonlinear benchmark problems.

  1. Modeling of rolling element bearing mechanics. Computer program user's manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhill, Lyn M.; Merchant, David H.

    1994-10-01

    This report provides the user's manual for the Rolling Element Bearing Analysis System (REBANS) analysis code which determines the quasistatic response to external loads or displacement of three types of high-speed rolling element bearings: angular contact ball bearings, duplex angular contact ball bearings, and cylindrical roller bearings. The model includes the defects of bearing ring and support structure flexibility. It is comprised of two main programs: the Preprocessor for Bearing Analysis (PREBAN) which creates the input files for the main analysis program, and Flexibility Enhanced Rolling Element Bearing Analysis (FEREBA), the main analysis program. This report addresses input instructions for and features of the computer codes. A companion report addresses the theoretical basis for the computer codes. REBANS extends the capabilities of the SHABERTH (Shaft and Bearing Thermal Analysis) code to include race and housing flexibility, including such effects as dead band and preload springs.

  2. An Ex Post Evaluation of the Conservation Reserve, Federal Crop Insurance, and Other Government Programs: Program Participation and Soil Erosion

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Vincent H.; Goodwin, Barry K.

    2003-01-01

    Recent research has questioned the extent to which government policies, including conservation and risk management programs, have influenced environmental indicators. The impacts of income-supporting and risk management programs on soil erosion are considered. An econometric model of the determinants of soil erosion, program participation, conservation effort, and input usage is estimated. While the Conservation Reserve Program has reduced erosion an average of 1.02 tons per acre from 1982 to...

  3. Identification of an evolutionarily conserved regulatory element of the zebrafish col2a1a gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, Rodney M.; Topczewski, Jacek

    2011-01-01

    Zebrafish (Danio rerio) is an excellent model organism for the study of vertebrate development including skeletogenesis. Studies of mammalian cartilage formation were greatly advanced through the use of a cartilage specific regulatory element of the Collagen type II alpha 1 (Col2a1) gene. In an effort to isolate such an element in zebrafish, we compared the expression of two col2a1 homologues and found that expression of col2a1b, a previously uncharacterized zebrafish homologue, only partially overlaps with col2a1a. We focused our analysis on col2a1a, as it is expressed in both the stacked chondrocytes and the perichondrium. By comparing the genomic sequence surrounding the predicted transcriptional start site of col2a1a among several species of teleosts we identified a small highly conserved sequence (R2) located 1.7 kb upstream of the presumptive transcriptional initiation site. Interestingly, neither the sequence nor location of this element is conserved between teleost and mammalian Col2a1. We generated transient and stable transgenic lines with just the R2 element or the entire 1.7 kb fragment 5’ of the transcriptional initiation site. The identified regulatory elements enable the tracking of cellular development in various tissues by driving robust reporter expression in craniofacial cartilage, ear, notochord, floor plate, hypochord and fins in a pattern similar to the expression of endogenous col2a1a. Using a reporter gene driven by the R2 regulatory element, we analyzed the morphogenesis of the notochord sheath cells as they withdraw from the stack of initially uniform cells and encase the inflating vacuolated notochord cells. Finally, we show that like endogenous col2a1a, craniofacial expression of these reporter constructs depends on Sox9a transcription factor activity. At the same time, notochord expression is maintained after Sox9a knockdown, suggesting that other factors can activate expression through the identified regulatory element in this tissue

  4. The New York State Bird Conservation Area (BCA) Program: A Model for the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    M. F. Burger; D. J. Adams; T. Post; L. Sommers; B. Swift

    2005-01-01

    The New York State Bird Conservation Area (BCA) Program, modeled after the National Audubon Society?s Important Bird Areas Program, is based on legislation signed by Governor Pataki in 1997. New York is the first state in the nation to enact such a program. The BCA Program seeks to provide a comprehensive, ecosystem approach to conserving birds and their habitats on...

  5. 76 FR 72332 - Energy Conservation Program: Test Procedure for Microwave Ovens

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-23

    ... the November 2007 ANOPR) concerning energy conservation standards for commercial clothes washers and... conservation standards rulemaking. AHAM commented that it opposes the inclusion of thermal elements designed... including microwave ovens with thermal elements in the definition of microwave ovens, that same unworkable...

  6. Conservation of CD44 exon v3 functional elements in mammals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernández-Bellon Hugo

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The human CD44 gene contains 10 variable exons (v1 to v10 that can be alternatively spliced to generate hundreds of different CD44 protein isoforms. Human CD44 variable exon v3 inclusion in the final mRNA depends on a multisite bipartite splicing enhancer located within the exon itself, which we have recently described, and provides the protein domain responsible for growth factor binding to CD44. Findings We have analyzed the sequence of CD44v3 in 95 mammalian species to report high conservation levels for both its splicing regulatory elements (the 3' splice site and the exonic splicing enhancer, and the functional glycosaminglycan binding site coded by v3. We also report the functional expression of CD44v3 isoforms in peripheral blood cells of different mammalian taxa with both consensus and variant v3 sequences. Conclusion CD44v3 mammalian sequences maintain all functional splicing regulatory elements as well as the GAG binding site with the same relative positions and sequence identity previously described during alternative splicing of human CD44. The sequence within the GAG attachment site, which in turn contains the Y motif of the exonic splicing enhancer, is more conserved relative to the rest of exon. Amplification of CD44v3 sequence from mammalian species but not from birds, fish or reptiles, may lead to classify CD44v3 as an exclusive mammalian gene trait.

  7. Hearing of Personnel Included in the USAF Hearing Conservation Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-02-01

    ORGNIZTIO NAE AN ADRES - 10. PROGRAM ELEMENT. PROJECT. TASK 9. PFORINGORGAIZAIONNAMEANDADDESSAREA ft WORK UNIT NUMBERS USAF School of Aerospace Medicine...0 0)~’ to (00w " 0 -q N~ m M VC0 CO~j 0 N 01) a)inUjU) tD -4 N o O 0 N 0 a) m m~0 di .. 0 alO1 O0- cn cO N - m -4N (0-00N (0 it) W N n N . o4Ca 0 0

  8. Building an Interdisciplinary Research Program in Water Conservation: Approach, preliminary findings, and next steps

    OpenAIRE

    Rosenberg, David E.; Endter-Wada, Joanna; Caplan, Arthur; Glenn, Diana T.; Ballard, Guy; Henderson, Katie

    2011-01-01

    Effective urban water conservation programs must harness a synergy of new technologies, public policies, social cost pricing, information dissemination, citizen engagement, and coordinated actions across decision making scales. Together, these factors affect the volume of water an individual user ultimately saves and the overall success of a conservation program or programs. Over the past 18 months, we have started building an interdisciplinary research program in urban water conservation to ...

  9. Conserved Gene Expression Programs in Developing Roots from Diverse Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ling; Schiefelbein, John

    2015-08-01

    The molecular basis for the origin and diversification of morphological adaptations is a central issue in evolutionary developmental biology. Here, we defined temporal transcript accumulation in developing roots from seven vascular plants, permitting a genome-wide comparative analysis of the molecular programs used by a single organ across diverse species. The resulting gene expression maps uncover significant similarity in the genes employed in roots and their developmental expression profiles. The detailed analysis of a subset of 133 genes known to be associated with root development in Arabidopsis thaliana indicates that most of these are used in all plant species. Strikingly, this was also true for root development in a lycophyte (Selaginella moellendorffii), which forms morphologically different roots and is thought to have evolved roots independently. Thus, despite vast differences in size and anatomy of roots from diverse plants, the basic molecular mechanisms employed during root formation appear to be conserved. This suggests that roots evolved in the two major vascular plant lineages either by parallel recruitment of largely the same developmental program or by elaboration of an existing root program in the common ancestor of vascular plants. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  10. 75 FR 73027 - Cooperative Conservation Partnership Initiative and Wetlands Reserve Enhancement Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-29

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Commodity Credit Corporation Cooperative Conservation Partnership Initiative and Wetlands Reserve Enhancement Program AGENCY: Commodity Credit Corporation and Natural Resources... producers to voluntarily implement conservation practices that avoid, control, and trap nutrient runoff...

  11. Energy efficient engine program contributions to aircraft fuel conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batterton, P. G.

    1984-01-01

    Significant advances in high bypass turbofan technologies that enhance fuel efficiency have been demonstrated in the NASA Energy Efficient Engine Program. This highly successful second propulsion element of the NASA Aircraft Energy Efficiency Program included major contract efforts with both General Electric and Pratt & Whitney. Major results of these efforts will be presented including highlights from the NASA/General Electric E3 research turbofan engine test. Direct application of all the E3 technologies could result in fuel savings of over 18% compared to the CF6-50 and JT9D-7. Application of the E3 technologies to new and derivative engines such as the CF6-80C and PW 2037, as well as others, will be discussed. Significant portions of the fuel savings benefit for these new products can be directly related to the E3 technology program. Finally, results of a study looking at far term advanced turbofan engines will be briefly described. The study shows that substantial additional fuel savings over E3 are possible with additional turbofan technology programs.

  12. Training program for energy conservation in new-building construction. Volume I. Energy conservation technology: management and energy conservation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1977-12-01

    A Model Code for Energy Conservation in New Building Construction was developed by those national organizations primarily concerned with the development and promulgation of model codes. The technical provisions are based on ASHRAE Standard 90-75 and are intended for use by state and local officials. This training manual is both an introduction to the need for energy conservation in buildings and a definition of the need for and the role of the enforcement official for energy conservation.

  13. Recurrent modification of a conserved cis-regulatory element underlies fruit fly pigmentation diversity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William A Rogers

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The development of morphological traits occurs through the collective action of networks of genes connected at the level of gene expression. As any node in a network may be a target of evolutionary change, the recurrent targeting of the same node would indicate that the path of evolution is biased for the relevant trait and network. Although examples of parallel evolution have implicated recurrent modification of the same gene and cis-regulatory element (CRE, little is known about the mutational and molecular paths of parallel CRE evolution. In Drosophila melanogaster fruit flies, the Bric-à-brac (Bab transcription factors control the development of a suite of sexually dimorphic traits on the posterior abdomen. Female-specific Bab expression is regulated by the dimorphic element, a CRE that possesses direct inputs from body plan (ABD-B and sex-determination (DSX transcription factors. Here, we find that the recurrent evolutionary modification of this CRE underlies both intraspecific and interspecific variation in female pigmentation in the melanogaster species group. By reconstructing the sequence and regulatory activity of the ancestral Drosophila melanogaster dimorphic element, we demonstrate that a handful of mutations were sufficient to create independent CRE alleles with differing activities. Moreover, intraspecific and interspecific dimorphic element evolution proceeded with little to no alterations to the known body plan and sex-determination regulatory linkages. Collectively, our findings represent an example where the paths of evolution appear biased to a specific CRE, and drastic changes in function were accompanied by deep conservation of key regulatory linkages.

  14. GPU accelerated Discrete Element Method (DEM) molecular dynamics for conservative, faceted particle simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spellings, Matthew [Chemical Engineering, University of Michigan, 2800 Plymouth Rd., Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Biointerfaces Institute, University of Michigan, 2800 Plymouth Rd., Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Marson, Ryan L. [Materials Science & Engineering, University of Michigan, 2300 Hayward St., Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Biointerfaces Institute, University of Michigan, 2800 Plymouth Rd., Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Anderson, Joshua A. [Chemical Engineering, University of Michigan, 2800 Plymouth Rd., Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Biointerfaces Institute, University of Michigan, 2800 Plymouth Rd., Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Glotzer, Sharon C., E-mail: sglotzer@umich.edu [Chemical Engineering, University of Michigan, 2800 Plymouth Rd., Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Materials Science & Engineering, University of Michigan, 2300 Hayward St., Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Biointerfaces Institute, University of Michigan, 2800 Plymouth Rd., Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2017-04-01

    Faceted shapes, such as polyhedra, are commonly found in systems of nanoscale, colloidal, and granular particles. Many interesting physical phenomena, like crystal nucleation and growth, vacancy motion, and glassy dynamics are challenging to model in these systems because they require detailed dynamical information at the individual particle level. Within the granular materials community the Discrete Element Method has been used extensively to model systems of anisotropic particles under gravity, with friction. We provide an implementation of this method intended for simulation of hard, faceted nanoparticles, with a conservative Weeks–Chandler–Andersen (WCA) interparticle potential, coupled to a thermodynamic ensemble. This method is a natural extension of classical molecular dynamics and enables rigorous thermodynamic calculations for faceted particles.

  15. Amur tiger conservation education program: A pilot study on program effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhacheva, Anna S; Derugina, Vasilissa V; Maksimova, Galina D; Soutyrina, Svetlana V

    2015-07-01

    Anthropogenic impacts are the primary threats to Amur tigers (Panthera tigris altaica) and their habitat. Villagers living in proximity to tigers tend to view them negatively and, often, as a source of revenue on black markets. We aim to reduce human-tiger conflict by working with young students of Ternei County in the heart of tiger habitat in Primorskii Krai (Province). To inform and influence Ternei County's future decision-makers, we developed "Safe Conduct", a year-long education program held in 6 villages, culminating in a multi-school conference. We tested the efficacy of Safe Conduct as a potential model for tiger conservation educational programs. We measured levels of student knowledge about tiger ecology, their attitude towards tigers, and their willingness to engage in tiger conservation activites prior to, immediately after and 6 months following the completion of our program. Results supported the fundamental premise of Safe Conduct that knowledge and attitude towards tigers are correlated. Knowledge of tiger ecology and attitude towards tigers increased by the project's completion; both remained high after 6 months. However, commitment to participation in conservation efforts rose temporarily post-program and then dropped. Results varied by village. We recommend that the reasons for the high performance measures of students in 2 villages be investigated, and that lessons learned be applied to villages that underperformed. Safe Conduct represents a potential model for environmental education programs in Ternei County and elsewhere to educate future generations, to eventually develop a strong commitment to Amur tiger conservation at the community level. © 2015 International Society of Zoological Sciences, Institute of Zoology/Chinese Academy of Sciences and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  16. A human-centered framework for innovation in conservation incentive programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorice, Michael G; Donlan, C Josh

    2015-12-01

    The promise of environmental conservation incentive programs that provide direct payments in exchange for conservation outcomes is that they enhance the value of engaging in stewardship behaviors. An insidious but important concern is that a narrow focus on optimizing payment levels can ultimately suppress program participation and subvert participants' internal motivation to engage in long-term conservation behaviors. Increasing participation and engendering stewardship can be achieved by recognizing that participation is not simply a function of the payment; it is a function of the overall structure and administration of the program. Key to creating innovative and more sustainable programs is fitting them within the existing needs and values of target participants. By focusing on empathy for participants, co-designing program approaches, and learning from the rapid prototyping of program concepts, a human-centered approach to conservation incentive program design enhances the propensity for discovery of novel and innovative solutions to pressing conservation issues.

  17. Computational Analysis of an Evolutionarily Conserved VertebrateMuscle Alternative Splicing Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Debopriya; Clark, Tyson A.; Schweitzer, Anthony; Marr,Henry; Yamamoto, Miki L.; Parra, Marilyn K.; Arribere, Josh; Minovitsky,Simon; Dubchak, Inna; Blume, John E.; Conboy, John G.

    2006-06-15

    A novel exon microarray format that probes gene expression with single exon resolution was employed to elucidate critical features of a vertebrate muscle alternative splicing program. A dataset of 56 microarray-defined, muscle-enriched exons and their flanking introns were examined computationally in order to investigate coordination of the muscle splicing program. Candidate intron regulatory motifs were required to meet several stringent criteria: significant over-representation near muscle-enriched exons, correlation with muscle expression, and phylogenetic conservation among genomes of several vertebrate orders. Three classes of regulatory motifs were identified in the proximal downstream intron, within 200nt of the target exons: UGCAUG, a specific binding site for Fox-1 related splicing factors; ACUAAC, a novel branchpoint-like element; and UG-/UGC-rich elements characteristic of binding sites for CELF splicing factors. UGCAUG was remarkably enriched, being present in nearly one-half of all cases. These studies suggest that Fox and CELF splicing factors play a major role in enforcing the muscle-specific alternative splicing program, facilitating expression of a set of unique isoforms of cytoskeletal proteins that are critical to muscle cell differentiation. Supplementary materials: There are four supplementary tables and one supplementary figure. The tables provide additional detailed information concerning the muscle-enriched datasets, and about over-represented oligonucleotide sequences in the flanking introns. The supplementary figure shows RT-PCR data confirming the muscle-enriched expression of exons predicted from the microarray analysis.

  18. Chapter 1: Assessing pollinator habitat services to optimize conservation programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iovanna, Richard; Ando , Amy W.; Swinton, Scott; Hellerstein, Daniel; Kagan, Jimmy; Mushet, David M.; Otto, Clint R.; Rewa, Charles A.

    2017-01-01

    Pollination services have received increased attention over the past several years, and protecting foraging area is beginning to be reflected in conservation policy. This case study considers the prospects for doing so in a more analytically rigorous manner, by quantifying the pollination services for sites being considered for ecological restoration. The specific policy context is the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP), which offers financial and technical assistance to landowners seeking to convert sensitive cropland back to some semblance of the prairie (or, to a lesser extent, forest or wetland) ecosystem that preceded it. Depending on the mix of grasses and wildflowers that are established, CRP enrollments can provide pollinator habitat. Further, depending on their location, they will generate related services, such as biological control of crop pests, recreation, and aesthetics. While offers to enroll in CRP compete based on cost and some anticipated benefits, the eligibility and ranking criteria do not reflect these services to a meaningful degree. Therefore, we develop a conceptual value diagram to identify the sequence of steps and associated models and data necessary to quantify the full range of services, and find that critical data gaps, some of which are artifacts of policy, preclude the application of benefit-relevant indicators (BRIs) or monetization. However, we also find that there is considerable research activity underway to fill these gaps. In addition, a modeling framework has been developed that can estimate field-level effects on services as a function of landscape context. The approach is inherently scalable and not limited in geographic scope, which is essential for a program with a national footprint. The parameters in this framework are sufficiently straightforward that expert judgment could be applied as a stopgap approach until empirically derived estimates are available. While monetization of benefit-relevant indicators of yield

  19. 40 CFR 73.80 - Operation of allowance reserve program for conservation and renewable energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... for conservation and renewable energy. 73.80 Section 73.80 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... and Renewable Energy Reserve § 73.80 Operation of allowance reserve program for conservation and renewable energy. (a) General. The Administrator will allocate allowances from the Conservation and...

  20. 75 FR 9380 - Cooperative Conservation Partners Initiative; Wetlands Reserve Enhancement Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-02

    ... INFORMATION: Paperwork Reduction Act Section 2904 of the Food, Conservation, and Energy Act of 2008 (2008 Act..., and processes of conservation programs under Subtitle D of Title XII of the Food Security Act....nrcs.usda.gov/technical/standards/ . For each conservation practice, estimate the practice extent (feet...

  1. 76 FR 18861 - Food Distribution Program on Indian Reservations: Amendments Related to the Food, Conservation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-06

    ... to the Food, Conservation, and Energy Act of 2008 AGENCY: Food and Nutrition Service, USDA. ACTION...) regulations to conform FDPIR policy to the requirements included in the Food, Conservation, and Energy Act of... Assistance Program (SNAP) relative to the requirements set forth in the Food, Conservation, and Energy Act of...

  2. 78 FR 12349 - Proposed Information Collection; Land and Water Conservation Fund State Assistance Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-22

    ... National Park Service Proposed Information Collection; Land and Water Conservation Fund State Assistance... INFORMATION: I. Abstract The Land and Water Conservation Fund Act of 1965 (LWCF Act) (16 U.S.C. 460l-4 et seq... discussed in detail in the Land and Water Conservation Fund State Assistance Program Federal Financial...

  3. 76 FR 6491 - San Diego County Water Authority Subregional Natural Community Conservation Program/Habitat...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-04

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service San Diego County Water Authority Subregional Natural Community Conservation Program/Habitat Conservation Plan, San Diego and Riverside Counties, CA; Final Environmental Impact Statement and Habitat Conservation Plan AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of...

  4. Mixed finite element-based fully conservative methods for simulating wormhole propagation

    KAUST Repository

    Kou, Jisheng

    2015-10-11

    Wormhole propagation during reactive dissolution of carbonates plays a very important role in the product enhancement of oil and gas reservoir. Because of high velocity and nonuniform porosity, the Darcy–Forchheimer model is applicable for this problem instead of conventional Darcy framework. We develop a mixed finite element scheme for numerical simulation of this problem, in which mixed finite element methods are used not only for the Darcy–Forchheimer flow equations but also for the solute transport equation by introducing an auxiliary flux variable to guarantee full mass conservation. In theoretical analysis aspects, based on the cut-off operator of solute concentration, we construct an analytical function to control and handle the change of porosity with time; we treat the auxiliary flux variable as a function of velocity and establish its properties; we employ the coupled analysis approach to deal with the fully coupling relation of multivariables. From this, the stability analysis and a priori error estimates for velocity, pressure, concentration and porosity are established in different norms. Numerical results are also given to verify theoretical analysis and effectiveness of the proposed scheme.

  5. A higher-order conservation element solution element method for solving hyperbolic differential equations on unstructured meshes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilyeu, David

    This dissertation presents an extension of the Conservation Element Solution Element (CESE) method from second- to higher-order accuracy. The new method retains the favorable characteristics of the original second-order CESE scheme, including (i) the use of the space-time integral equation for conservation laws, (ii) a compact mesh stencil, (iii) the scheme will remain stable up to a CFL number of unity, (iv) a fully explicit, time-marching integration scheme, (v) true multidimensionality without using directional splitting, and (vi) the ability to handle two- and three-dimensional geometries by using unstructured meshes. This algorithm has been thoroughly tested in one, two and three spatial dimensions and has been shown to obtain the desired order of accuracy for solving both linear and non-linear hyperbolic partial differential equations. The scheme has also shown its ability to accurately resolve discontinuities in the solutions. Higher order unstructured methods such as the Discontinuous Galerkin (DG) method and the Spectral Volume (SV) methods have been developed for one-, two- and three-dimensional application. Although these schemes have seen extensive development and use, certain drawbacks of these methods have been well documented. For example, the explicit versions of these two methods have very stringent stability criteria. This stability criteria requires that the time step be reduced as the order of the solver increases, for a given simulation on a given mesh. The research presented in this dissertation builds upon the work of Chang, who developed a fourth-order CESE scheme to solve a scalar one-dimensional hyperbolic partial differential equation. The completed research has resulted in two key deliverables. The first is a detailed derivation of a high-order CESE methods on unstructured meshes for solving the conservation laws in two- and three-dimensional spaces. The second is the code implementation of these numerical methods in a computer code. For

  6. The Intelligent Data Understanding Element of NASA's Intelligent Systems Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coughlan, Joseph C.; Tilton, James C.; Rood, Richard (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Within the NASA Intelligent Systems Program, the Intelligent Data Understanding (IDU) element develops techniques for transforming data into scientific understanding. Automating such tools is critical for space science, space-based earth science, and planetary exploration with onboard scientific data analysis. Intelligent data understanding (IDU) is about extracting meaning from large, diverse science and engineering databases, via autonomous techniques that transform very large datasets into understanding. The earth science community in particular needs new tools for analyzing multi-formatted and geographically distributed datasets and for identifying cause-effect relationships in the complex data. Research within the IDU program element seeks to automate data analysis tasks so that humans can focus on creative hypothesis generation and knowledge synthesis. It may also enable NASA space missions in which autonomous agents must generate knowledge and take actions, and missions where limited bandwidth permits transmission of only the most interesting scientific observations, summaries, and conclusions. Twenty-seven research projects are-currently funded.

  7. A locally conservative stabilized continuous Galerkin finite element method for two-phase flow in poroelastic subsurfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Q.; Ginting, V.; McCaskill, B.; Torsu, P.

    2017-10-01

    We study the application of a stabilized continuous Galerkin finite element method (CGFEM) in the simulation of multiphase flow in poroelastic subsurfaces. The system involves a nonlinear coupling between the fluid pressure, subsurface's deformation, and the fluid phase saturation, and as such, we represent this coupling through an iterative procedure. Spatial discretization of the poroelastic system employs the standard linear finite element in combination with a numerical diffusion term to maintain stability of the algebraic system. Furthermore, direct calculation of the normal velocities from pressure and deformation does not entail a locally conservative field. To alleviate this drawback, we propose an element based post-processing technique through which local conservation can be established. The performance of the method is validated through several examples illustrating the convergence of the method, the effectivity of the stabilization term, and the ability to achieve locally conservative normal velocities. Finally, the efficacy of the method is demonstrated through simulations of realistic multiphase flow in poroelastic subsurfaces.

  8. Evaluation of a Nonlinear Finite Element Program - ABAQUS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-03-15

    Elastic-plastic material and small deformation Material Properties: A Ramberg - Osgood stress-strain curve was assumed to represent the strain-hardening...NONLINEAR FINITE ELEMENT PROGRAM - ABAQUS T. Y. Chang S. M. Wang Department of Civil Engineering The University of Akron Akron, Ohio 44325 August 1, 1982... ABAQUS T. Y. Chang S. M. Wang Department of Civil Engineering The University of Akron Akron, Ohio 44325 August 1, 1982 (Revised on March 15, 1983

  9. 77 FR 28927 - Energy Conservation Program for Certain Industrial Equipment: Energy Conservation Standards and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-16

    ... test procedures, the new/amended energy conservation standards, and the representation requirements by... Federal Energy Conservation Standards, and Representations for Certain ASHRAE Equipment III. General.... Rheem argued that the industry would need a minimum of 6 months to revise its technical literature if...

  10. Successes and challenges from formation to implementation of eleven broad-extent conservation programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beever, Erik A; Mattsson, Brady J; Germino, Matthew J; Burg, Max Post Van Der; Bradford, John B; Brunson, Mark W

    2014-04-01

    Integration of conservation partnerships across geographic, biological, and administrative boundaries is increasingly relevant because drivers of change, such as climate shifts, transcend these boundaries. We explored successes and challenges of established conservation programs that span multiple watersheds and consider both social and ecological concerns. We asked representatives from a diverse set of 11 broad-extent conservation partnerships in 29 countries 17 questions that pertained to launching and maintaining partnerships for broad-extent conservation, specifying ultimate management objectives, and implementation and learning. Partnerships invested more funds in implementing conservation actions than any other aspect of conservation, and a program's context (geographic extent, United States vs. other countries, developed vs. developing nation) appeared to substantially affect program approach. Despite early successes of these organizations and benefits of broad-extent conservation, specific challenges related to uncertainties in scaling up information and to coordination in the face of diverse partner governance structures, conflicting objectives, and vast uncertainties regarding future system dynamics hindered long-term success, as demonstrated by the focal organizations. Engaging stakeholders, developing conservation measures, and implementing adaptive management were dominant challenges. To inform future research on broad-extent conservation, we considered several challenges when we developed detailed questions, such as what qualities of broad-extent partnerships ensure they complement, integrate, and strengthen, rather than replace, local conservation efforts and which adaptive management processes yield actionable conservation strategies that account explicitly for dynamics and uncertainties regarding multiscale governance, environmental conditions, and knowledge of the system? © 2014 Society for Conservation Biology.

  11. 75 FR 14287 - Energy Conservation Program: Test Procedures for Fluorescent Lamp Ballasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-24

    ... Energy 10 CFR Part 430 Energy Conservation Program: Test Procedures and Standards for Fluorescent Lamp... OF ENERGY 10 CFR Part 430 RIN 1904-AB99 Energy Conservation Program: Test Procedures for Fluorescent... major revisions to its test procedures for fluorescent lamp ballasts established under the Energy Policy...

  12. 78 FR 7939 - Energy Conservation Program: Test Procedures for Microwave Ovens (Active Mode)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-04

    ... 430 Energy Conservation Program: Test Procedures for Microwave Ovens (Active Mode); Proposed Rule #0... Conservation Program: Test Procedures for Microwave Ovens (Active Mode) AGENCY: Office of Energy Efficiency and... mode energy use for microwave ovens, including both microwave-only ovens and convection microwave ovens...

  13. 75 FR 37593 - Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products: Test Procedures for Clothes Dryers and Room...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-29

    ... Energy 10 CFR Part 430 Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products: Test Procedures for Clothes... Conservation Program for Consumer Products: Test Procedures for Clothes Dryers and Room Air Conditioners AGENCY... residential clothes dryers and room air conditioners to provide for measurement of standby mode and off mode...

  14. Snakes. A Conservation Education Program of the Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, Kelly; Theiss, Nancy S.

    The Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources is charged with the responsibility to preserve, protect, and perpetuate the fish and wildlife in Kentucky. Involved in this broad program are a number of services, including the Wildlife Conservation Education Program. During the months of September through April, Conservation Club leaders…

  15. NOAA's Coral Reef Conservation Program: 2016 projects to address coral reef conservation issues

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In 2016 the following projects will take place to address aspects of coral reef conservation: Enhancing Management of Pacific ESA-listed Corals with Improved Utility...

  16. 49 CFR 350.109 - What are the national program elements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What are the national program elements? 350.109... COMMERCIAL MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY ASSISTANCE PROGRAM General § 350.109 What are the national program elements? The national program elements include the following five activities: (a) Driver/vehicle inspections...

  17. Evolutionary conservation of an atypical glucocorticoid-responsive element in the human tyrosine hydroxylase gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheela Rani, C S; Soto-Pina, Alexandra; Iacovitti, Lorraine; Strong, Randy

    2013-07-01

    The human tyrosine hydroxylase (hTH) gene has a 42 bp evolutionarily conserved region designated (CR) II at -7.24 kb, which bears 93% homology to the region we earlier identified as containing the glucocorticoid response element, a 7 bp activator protein-1 (AP-1)-like motif in the rat TH gene. We cloned this hTH-CRII region upstream of minimal basal hTH promoter in luciferase (Luc) reporter vector, and tested glucocorticoid responsiveness in human cell lines. Dexamethasone (Dex) stimulated Luc activity of hTH-CRII in HeLa cells, while mifepristone, a glucocorticoid receptor (GR) antagonist, prevented Dex stimulation. Deletion of the 7 bp 5'-TGACTAA at -7243 bp completely abolished the Dex-stimulated Luc activity of hTH-CRII construct. The AP-1 agonist, tetradeconoyl-12,13-phorbol acetate (TPA), also stimulated hTH promoter activity, and Dex and TPA together further accentuated this response. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed the presence of both GR and AP-1 proteins, especially Jun family members, at this hTH promoter site. Dex did not stimulate hTH promoter activity in a catecholaminergic cell line, which had low endogenous GR levels, but did activate the response when GR was expressed exogenously. Thus, our studies have clearly identified a glucocorticoid-responsive element in a 7 bp AP-1-like motif in the promoter region at -7.24 kb of the human TH gene. © 2013 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  18. Repetitive elements dynamics in cell identity programming, maintenance and disease

    KAUST Repository

    Bodega, Beatrice

    2014-12-01

    The days of \\'junk DNA\\' seem to be over. The rapid progress of genomics technologies has been unveiling unexpected mechanisms by which repetitive DNA and in particular transposable elements (TEs) have evolved, becoming key issues in understanding genome structure and function. Indeed, rather than \\'parasites\\', recent findings strongly suggest that TEs may have a positive function by contributing to tissue specific transcriptional programs, in particular as enhancer-like elements and/or modules for regulation of higher order chromatin structure. Further, it appears that during development and aging genomes experience several waves of TEs activation, and this contributes to individual genome shaping during lifetime. Interestingly, TEs activity is major target of epigenomic regulation. These findings are shedding new light on the genome-phenotype relationship and set the premises to help to explain complex disease manifestation, as consequence of TEs activity deregulation.

  19. The cost of policy simplification in conservation incentive programs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Armsworth, Paul R.; Acs, Szvetlana; Dallimer, Martin

    2012-01-01

    of biodiversity. Common policy simplifications result in a 49100% loss in biodiversity benefits depending on the conservation target chosen. Failure to differentiate prices for conservation improvements in space is particularly problematic. Additional implementation costs that accompany more complicated policies......Incentive payments to private landowners provide a common strategy to conserve biodiversity and enhance the supply of goods and services from ecosystems. To deliver cost-effective improvements in biodiversity, payment schemes must trade-off inefficiencies that result from over-simplified policies...

  20. Conservative site-specific and single-copy transgenesis in human LINE-1 elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijaya Chandra, Shree Harsha; Makhija, Harshyaa; Peter, Sabrina; Myint Wai, Cho Mar; Li, Jinming; Zhu, Jindong; Ren, Zhonglu; D'Alcontres, Martina Stagno; Siau, Jia Wei; Chee, Sharon; Ghadessy, Farid John; Dröge, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Genome engineering of human cells plays an important role in biotechnology and molecular medicine. In particular, insertions of functional multi-transgene cassettes into suitable endogenous sequences will lead to novel applications. Although several tools have been exploited in this context, safety issues such as cytotoxicity, insertional mutagenesis and off-target cleavage together with limitations in cargo size/expression often compromise utility. Phage λ integrase (Int) is a transgenesis tool that mediates conservative site-specific integration of 48 kb DNA into a safe harbor site of the bacterial genome. Here, we show that an Int variant precisely recombines large episomes into a sequence, termed attH4X, found in 1000 human Long INterspersed Elements-1 (LINE-1). We demonstrate single-copy transgenesis through attH4X-targeting in various cell lines including hESCs, with the flexibility of selecting clones according to transgene performance and downstream applications. This is exemplified with pluripotency reporter cassettes and constitutively expressed payloads that remain functional in LINE1-targeted hESCs and differentiated progenies. Furthermore, LINE-1 targeting does not induce DNA damage-response or chromosomal aberrations, and neither global nor localized endogenous gene expression is substantially affected. Hence, this simple transgene addition tool should become particularly useful for applications that require engineering of the human genome with multi-transgenes. PMID:26673710

  1. Structure-aided prediction of mammalian transcription factor complexes in conserved non-coding elements

    KAUST Repository

    Guturu, H.

    2013-11-11

    Mapping the DNA-binding preferences of transcription factor (TF) complexes is critical for deciphering the functions of cis-regulatory elements. Here, we developed a computational method that compares co-occurring motif spacings in conserved versus unconserved regions of the human genome to detect evolutionarily constrained binding sites of rigid TF complexes. Structural data were used to estimate TF complex physical plausibility, explore overlapping motif arrangements seldom tackled by non-structure-aware methods, and generate and analyse three-dimensional models of the predicted complexes bound to DNA. Using this approach, we predicted 422 physically realistic TF complex motifs at 18% false discovery rate, the majority of which (326, 77%) contain some sequence overlap between binding sites. The set of mostly novel complexes is enriched in known composite motifs, predictive of binding site configurations in TF-TF-DNA crystal structures, and supported by ChIP-seq datasets. Structural modelling revealed three cooperativity mechanisms: direct protein-protein interactions, potentially indirect interactions and \\'through-DNA\\' interactions. Indeed, 38% of the predicted complexes were found to contain four or more bases in which TF pairs appear to synergize through overlapping binding to the same DNA base pairs in opposite grooves or strands. Our TF complex and associated binding site predictions are available as a web resource at http://bejerano.stanford.edu/complex.

  2. Linking Shorebird Conservation and Education Along Flyways: An Overview of the Shorebird Sister Schools Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillary Chapman; Heather Johnson

    2005-01-01

    The Shorebird Sister Schools Program (SSSP) is an internet-based environmental education program that provides a forum for students, biologists, and shorebird enthusiasts to track shorebird migration and share observations along flyways. The program?s vision is to engage public participation in the conservation of shorebirds and their wetland, grassland, and shoreline...

  3. NASA'S Water Resources Element Within the Applied Sciences Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toll, David; Doorn, Bradley; Engman, Edwin

    2010-01-01

    The NASA Applied Sciences Program works within NASA Earth sciences to leverage investment of satellite and information systems to increase the benefits to society through the widest practical use of NASA research results. Such observations provide a huge volume of valuable data in both near-real-time and extended back nearly 50 years about the Earth's land surface conditions such as land cover type, vegetation type and health, precipitation, snow, soil moisture, and water levels and radiation. Observations of this type combined with models and analysis enable satellite-based assessment of numerous water resources management activities. The primary goal of the Earth Science Applied Science Program is to improve future and current operational systems by infusing them with scientific knowledge of the Earth system gained through space-based observation, model results, and development and deployment of enabling technologies, systems, and capabilities. Water resources is one of eight elements in the Applied Sciences Program and it addresses concerns and decision making related to water quantity and water quality. With increasing population pressure and water usage coupled with climate variability and change, water issues are being reported by numerous groups as the most critical environmental problems facing us in the 21st century. Competitive uses and the prevalence of river basins and aquifers that extend across boundaries engender political tensions between communities, stakeholders and countries. Mitigating these conflicts and meeting water demands requires using existing resources more efficiently. The potential crises and conflicts arise when water is competed among multiple uses. For example, urban areas, environmental and recreational uses, agriculture, and energy production compete for scarce resources, not only in the Western U.S. but throughout much of the U.S. but also in many parts of the world. In addition to water availability issues, water quality related

  4. Factors that influence the success of conservation programs in communal property areas in Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verónica Bunge-Vivier

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available More than half of the natural vegetation in Mexico is managed collectively within common property systems. The appropriation and continuity of government programs related to the conservation of land that is communally used is proposed to depend on the level of organization of the communities and the interaction between the local and governmental institutions, as well as the benefits derived from conservation projects. Patterns of what drives the conservation of common natural resources were analyzed in order to propose improvements to conservation policy. Changes in primary and secondary vegetation cover in common and private properties were identified by performing a historical spatial analysis. Questionnaires were used to survey 32 populations of seven states of the Mexican Republic to determine the conservation status of common property resources, as well as the ability of the community to continue conservation activities initially undertaken by government programs. Some 53% of the primary and secondary vegetation in Mexico is found in common property areas, but the change from primary and secondary vegetation to other uses is the same for common and private property. Communities with a high level of conservation of communal areas and with the ability to continue conservation projects were those that had dedicated the areas to recreation and conservation, had stronger community organization and were less marginalized. A recognition of the heterogeneity of the socioeconomic and cultural context of communities with common property is necessary to design governmental conservation programs that achieve long-term conservation. To meet the needs of a region that is both degraded and marginalized, the creation of synergies between programs that combat poverty and programs that promote conservation is needed. In addition, the continuation of payments with public funds for work that preserves or rehabilitates natural areas is needed, thereby

  5. Successes and challenges from formation to implementation of eleven broad-extent conservation programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beever, Erik A.; Bradford, John B.; Germino, Matthew J.; Mattsson, Brady J.; Post van der Burg, Max; Brunson, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Integration of conservation partnerships across geographic, biological, and administrative boundaries is increasingly relevant because drivers of change, such as climate shifts, transcend these boundaries. We explored successes and challenges of established conservation programs that span multiple watersheds and consider both social and ecological concerns. We asked representatives from a diverse set of 11 broadextent conservation partnerships in 29 countries 17 questions that pertained to launching and maintaining partnerships for broad-extent conservation, specifying ultimate management objectives, and implementation and learning. Partnerships invested more funds in implementing conservation actions than any other aspect of conservation, and a program’s context (geographic extent, United States vs. other countries, developed vs. developing nation) appeared to substantially affect program approach. Despite early successes of these organizations and benefits of broad-extent conservation, specific challenges related to uncertainties in scaling up information and to coordination in the face of diverse partner governance structures, conflicting objectives, and vast uncertainties regarding future system dynamics hindered long-term success, as demonstrated by the focal organizations. Engaging stakeholders, developing conservation measures, and implementing adaptive management were dominant challenges. To inform future research on broad-extent conservation, we considered several challenges when we developed detailed questions, such as what qualities of broad-extent partnerships ensure they complement, integrate, and strengthen, rather than replace, local conservation efforts and which adaptive management processes yield actionable conservation strategies that account explicitly for dynamics and uncertainties regarding multiscale governance, environmental conditions, and knowledge of the system?

  6. 75 FR 17036 - Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Small Electric Motors; Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-05

    ... CONTACT: James Raba, U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Building... Motors; Correction AGENCY: Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Department of Energy. ACTION... and Renewable Energy published a final rule titled ``Energy Conservation Standards for Small Electric...

  7. 78 FR 25093 - Multistate Conservation Grant Program; Priority List and Approval for Conservation Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-29

    ............ Building Capabilities within Council to 200,906 0 200,906 State Fish and Wildlife Advance Hunting Agencies... Conservation Projects AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior. ACTION: Notice of receipt of priority list and approval of projects. SUMMARY: We, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS...

  8. 76 FR 793 - Multistate Conservation Grant Program; Priority List for Conservation Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-06

    ... carrying out the National Survey of Fishing, Hunting and Wildlife-Associated Recreation, we may award... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR... the FY 2011 priority list of wildlife and sport fish conservation projects from the Association of...

  9. 77 FR 7281 - Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Distribution Transformers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-10

    ... certain equipment, such as distribution transformers, shall be designed to achieve the maximum improvement... transformer's kVA rating represents its output power when it is fully loaded (i.e., 100 percent). Table I.1... Conservation Standards for Distribution Transformers; Proposed Rule #0;#0;Federal Register / Vol. 77 , No. 28...

  10. 78 FR 73589 - Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Commercial and Industrial Electric...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-06

    ... finalized key provisions related to small electric motor testing in a 2009 final rule at 74 FR 32059 (July 7... Conservation Standards for Commercial and Industrial Electric Motors; Proposed Rule #0;#0;Federal Register... Industrial Electric Motors AGENCY: Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Department of Energy...

  11. 76 FR 67037 - Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Residential Furnaces and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-31

    ..., Montana, Nebraska, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, North Dakota, Ohio, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode... are unlikely to alter their current behavior on the basis of amended energy conservation standards... prices are in theory preferable when evaluating the life-cycle-cost savings associated with standards...

  12. 76 FR 22453 - Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Residential Clothes Dryers and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-21

    ...) prescribes energy conservation standards for various consumer products and commercial and industrial.... Screening Analysis 1. Clothes Dryers 2. Room Air Conditioners C. Engineering Analysis 1. Technologies Not... price trends. The high end of this range corresponds to a constant real equipment price trend. Using the...

  13. 77 FR 32381 - Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Residential Clothes Washers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-31

    ... energy conservation standards for various consumer products and certain commercial and industrial..., engineering resources, and other conversion activities over a longer period of time depending on the..., respectively. In addition, incremental product costs reflect a declining trend using the default product price...

  14. Conservation and Renewable Energy Program: Bibliography, 1988 edition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaughan, K.H. (comp.)

    1988-04-01

    The 831 references covering the period 1980 through Feb. 1988, are arranged under the following: analysis and evaluation, building equipment, building thermal envelope systems and materials, community systems and cogeneration, residential conservation service, retrofit, advanced heat engine ceramics, alternative fuels, microemulsion fuels, industrial chemical heat pumps, materials for waste heat utilization, energy conversion and utilization materials, tribology, emergency energy conservation,inventions, electric energy systems, thermal storage, biofuels production, biotechnology, solar technology, geothermal, and continuous chromatography in multicomponent separations. An author index is included.

  15. Earth is a Marine Habitat. Habitat Conservation Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (DOC), Rockville, MD.

    This brochure is intended to educate the public about the need to conserve and preserve the earth's environment (man's habitat). It contains an introduction to the ocean world and threats to coastal habitat. Photos and narrative revolve around the theme "Earth is a Marine Habitat." Sections include: "The Web of…

  16. Effectiveness of hearing conservation program at a large surface ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study conducted to determine the effectiveness of a Hearing Conservation Programme (HcP) was conducted in a surface gold mining Company in Ghana. The procedure adopted included a retrospective review and comparison of individual Audiograms from 1999-2003. The analysis of data was based on 200 workers at ...

  17. Using Audience Segmentation to Tailor Residential Irrigation Water Conservation Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Laura A.; Chaudhary, Anil Kumar; Rumble, Joy N.; Lamm, Alexa J.; Momol, Esen

    2017-01-01

    Today's complex issues require technical expertise as well as the application of innovative social science techniques within Extension contexts. Researchers have suggested that a social science approach will play a critical role in water conservation, and people who use home landscape irrigation comprise a critical target audience for agriculture…

  18. Acquisition Program Transition Workshops: An Element of the DSMC Program Manager Mission Assistance Capability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-01

    Acquisition Sustainment =Decision Point =Milestone Review =Decision Point if PDR is not conducted before Milestone B ProgramA B Initiation) C IOC FOC...workshop deteriorating into a social event. 5.4 Further Detail Appendix A, Module 0, contains detailed planning elements for the pre-workshop agenda...brief Joint Charter, Issues and Actions PMs Establish Workshop Action Items Figure 5-1 Workshop Participants— More Attendees Means Program Socialization

  19. 78 FR 13566 - Energy Conservation Program for High-Intensity Discharge Lamps: Public Meeting and Availability...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-28

    ... Part 431 RIN 1904-AC36 Energy Conservation Program for High-Intensity Discharge Lamps: Public Meeting... conservation standards for high-intensity discharge (HID) lamps. The meeting will cover the analytical... High-Intensity Discharge Lamps, EERE-2010-BT-STD-0043 and/or RIN 1904-AC36, 1000 Independence Avenue SW...

  20. 78 FR 62488 - Energy Conservation Program: Compliance Date for the Dehumidifier Test Procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-22

    ... Part 430 RIN 1904-AD06 Energy Conservation Program: Compliance Date for the Dehumidifier Test Procedure... for the dehumidifier test procedures established under the Energy Policy and Conservation Act (EPCA). The proposed amendments would require manufacturers to test using only the active mode provisions in...

  1. 78 FR 39548 - Food Distribution Program on Indian Reservations: Amendments Related to the Food, Conservation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-02

    ... Food and Nutrition Service 7 CFR Part 253 RIN 0584-AD95 Food Distribution Program on Indian Reservations: Amendments Related to the Food, Conservation, and Energy Act of 2008; Approval of Information... Reservations: Amendments Related to the Food, Conservation, and Energy Act of 2008 was published on April 6...

  2. 75 FR 71570 - Energy Conservation Program: Test Procedures for Fluorescent Lamp Ballasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-24

    ... Part 430 RIN 1904-AB99 Energy Conservation Program: Test Procedures for Fluorescent Lamp Ballasts... procedures for fluorescent lamp ballasts established under the Energy Policy and Conservation Act. The... BLE test procedure would measure the performance of a ballast while operating a fluorescent lamp...

  3. Assessing the effects of USDA conservation programs on ecosystem services provided by wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Conservation Effects Assessment Project (CEAP) is led by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) in an effort to quantify the environmental effects of conservation programs and practices on privately owned agricultural landscapes across the United States. CEAP’s approach includes application ...

  4. Water Conservation and Reuse. Instructor Guide. Working for Clean Water: An Information Program for Advisory Committees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennsylvania State Univ., Middletown. Inst. of State and Regional Affairs.

    Described is a learning session on water conservation intended for citizen advisory groups interested in water quality planning. Topics addressed in this instructor's manual include water conservation needs, benefits, programs, technology, and problems. These materials are components of the Working for Clean Water Project. (Author/WB)

  5. Review of financial incentive, low-income, elderly and multifamily residential conservation programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berry, L.; Hubbard, M.; White, D.

    1986-09-01

    This report describes thirty-nine utility-sponsored residential conservation programs for four types of markets. The program types considered are: (1) financial incentive programs for the general residential market, (2) programs for low-income households, (3) programs for the elderly, and (4) programs for the multifamily market. Each program description contains information on incentive terms, eligibility, conservation measures, program history, design and marketing, and the utility/agency motivation for operating the program. The names, addresses and phone numbers of contact persons also are included. Two methods were used to select the programs to be described. First, nominations of successful programs of each type were solicited from experts on residential energy conservation. Second, managers of the programs on this initial list were asked to describe their programs and to suggest other successful programs that should be included in the sample. Because of the selection process used, this report covers mainly the best known and most frequently studied programs that are aimed at the four market types.

  6. 77 FR 13261 - Request for Applications: The Community Forest and Open Space Conservation Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-06

    ... section 2 (Award). ADDRESSES: All local governments' and qualified nonprofit organizations' applications... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Request for Applications: The Community Forest and Open Space Conservation Program AGENCY...

  7. What happens to soil ecological properties when conservation reserve program land is disturbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Each year, expiring Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) contracts results in the conversion of restored CRP land back to croplands, potentially reversing multiple ecological benefits including C sequestration potential and microbial biodiversity. We evaluated microbial community composition (fatty ac...

  8. 76 FR 59394 - Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products: Publication of the Extension of Interim Waiver...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-26

    ... Department of Energy Residential Refrigerator and Refrigerator-Freezer Test Procedure AGENCY: Office of... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products...

  9. 76 FR 19077 - Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products: Decision and Order Granting a Waiver to...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-06

    ... and Refrigerator-Freezer Test Procedures AGENCY: Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products...

  10. The function of the conserved regulatory element within the second intron of the mammalian Csf1r locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauter, Kristin A; Bouhlel, M Amine; O'Neal, Julie; Sester, David P; Tagoh, Hiromi; Ingram, Richard M; Pridans, Clare; Bonifer, Constanze; Hume, David A

    2013-01-01

    The gene encoding the receptor for macrophage colony-stimulating factor (CSF-1R) is expressed exclusively in cells of the myeloid lineages as well as trophoblasts. A conserved element in the second intron, Fms-Intronic Regulatory Element (FIRE), is essential for macrophage-specific transcription of the gene. However, the molecular details of how FIRE activity is regulated and how it impacts the Csf1r promoter have not been characterised. Here we show that agents that down-modulate Csf1r mRNA transcription regulated promoter activity altered the occupancy of key FIRE cis-acting elements including RUNX1, AP1, and Sp1 binding sites. We demonstrate that FIRE acts as an anti-sense promoter in macrophages and reversal of FIRE orientation within its native context greatly reduced enhancer activity in macrophages. Mutation of transcription initiation sites within FIRE also reduced transcription. These results demonstrate that FIRE is an orientation-specific transcribed enhancer element.

  11. 78 FR 20842 - Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Residential Clothes Dryers and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-08

    ... Renewable Energy, Building Technologies Program, EE-2J, 1000 Independence Avenue SW., Washington, DC 20585... Clothes Dryers and Room Air Conditioners AGENCY: Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.../Courier: Ms. Brenda Edwards, U.S. Department of Energy, Building Technologies Program, 950 L'Enfant Plaza...

  12. 76 FR 22324 - Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Residential Clothes Dryers and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-21

    .... Changing all electric models to use heat pump technology would be extremely disruptive to current.... Department of Energy, Building Technologies Program, Mailstop EE-2J, 1000 Independence Avenue, SW... Technologies Program, 950 L'Enfant Plaza, SW., Suite 600, Washington, DC 20024. Telephone: (202) 586-2945. If...

  13. 78 FR 62988 - Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Certain Consumer Products and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-23

    ... applicable to SOC-SC-Ms is the ``TDA'' (total display area) of the equipment. (42 U.S.C. 6313(c)(4)) The AEMTCA adds to EPCA a definition of TDA, as being the display area of the case as defined in AHRI... TDA that it also adopts. Finally, because TDA is an element of many of DOE's existing CRE standards...

  14. Robotic Surgery Simulator: Elements to Build a Training Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillou, Xavier; Collon, Sylvie; Martin-Francois, Sandrine; Doerfler, Arnaud

    2016-01-01

    Face, content, and construct validity of robotic surgery simulators were confirmed in the literature by several studies, but elements to build a training program are still lacking. The aim of our study was to validate a progressive training program and to assess according to prior surgical experience the amount of training needed with a robotic simulator to complete the program. Exercises using the Da Vinci Skill Simulator were chosen to ensure progressive learning. A new exercise could only be started if a minimal score of 80% was achieved in the prior one. The number of repetitions to achieve an exercise was not limited. We devised a "performance index" by calculating the ratio of the sum of scores for each exercise over the number of repetitions needed to complete the exercise with at least an 80% score. The study took place at the François Baclesse Cancer Center. Participants all work at the primary care university Hospital located next to the cancer center. A total of 32 surgeons participated in the study- 2 experienced surgeons, 8 junior and 8 senior residents in surgery, 6 registrars, and 6 attending surgeons. There was no difference between junior and senior residents, whereas the registrars had better results (p surgery console in a specific and progressive order enables rapid progress. The level of prior experience in laparoscopic surgery affects outcomes. More advanced laparoscopic expertise seems to slow down learning, surgeons having to "unlearn" to acquire a new technique. Copyright © 2016 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. vanG element insertions within a conserved chromosomal site conferring vancomycin resistance to Streptococcus agalactiae and Streptococcus anginosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Velusamy; Metcalf, Benjamin J; Knipe, Kristen M; Ouattara, Mahamoudou; McGee, Lesley; Shewmaker, Patricia L; Glennen, Anita; Nichols, Megin; Harris, Carol; Brimmage, Mary; Ostrowsky, Belinda; Park, Connie J; Schrag, Stephanie J; Frace, Michael A; Sammons, Scott A; Beall, Bernard

    2014-07-22

    Three vancomycin-resistant streptococcal strains carrying vanG elements (two invasive Streptococcus agalactiae isolates [GBS-NY and GBS-NM, both serotype II and multilocus sequence type 22] and one Streptococcus anginosus [Sa]) were examined. The 45,585-bp elements found within Sa and GBS-NY were nearly identical (together designated vanG-1) and shared near-identity over an ~15-kb overlap with a previously described vanG element from Enterococcus faecalis. Unexpectedly, vanG-1 shared much less homology with the 49,321-bp vanG-2 element from GBS-NM, with widely different levels (50% to 99%) of sequence identity shared among 44 related open reading frames. Immediately adjacent to both vanG-1 and vanG-2 were 44,670-bp and 44,680-bp integrative conjugative element (ICE)-like sequences, designated ICE-r, that were nearly identical in the two group B streptococcal (GBS) strains. The dual vanG and ICE-r elements from both GBS strains were inserted at the same position, between bases 1328 and 1329, within the identical RNA methyltransferase (rumA) genes. A GenBank search revealed that although most GBS strains contained insertions within this specific site, only sequence type 22 (ST22) GBS strains contained highly related ICE-r derivatives. The vanG-1 element in Sa was also inserted within this position corresponding to its rumA homolog adjacent to an ICE-r derivative. vanG-1 insertions were previously reported within the same relative position in the E. faecalis rumA homolog. An ICE-r sequence perfectly conserved with respect to its counterpart in GBS-NY was apparent within the same site of the rumA homolog of a Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis strain. Additionally, homologous vanG-like elements within the conserved rumA target site were evident in Roseburia intestinalis. Importance: These three streptococcal strains represent the first known vancomycin-resistant strains of their species. The collective observations made from these strains reveal a specific

  16. Are we making the grade? Practices and reported efficacy measures of primate conservation education programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kling, Katherine J; Hopkins, Mariah E

    2015-04-01

    Conservation education is often employed alongside primate conservation efforts with the aim of changing knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors toward non-human primates. Recommended best-use practices include longevity, use of program incentives, collaboration among educators, and adaptive program assessment, among others. This study surveys primate conservation education programs (PCEPs) to assess the frequency of suggested best-use practices, and to investigate impacts on program efficacy. Online surveys were collected from PCEPs in 2013-2014 (N = 43). The majority of programs reported lengths of 5-10 years, with participant involvement ranging widely from a day to several years. Non-economic and economic incentives were distributed by approximately half of all programs, with programs that provided economic incentives reporting positive participant attitude changes more frequently than those that did not (P = 0.03). While >70% of PCEPs consulted with community leaders, local teachers, and research scientists, only 45.9% collaborated with other conservation educators and only 27% collaborated with cultural experts such as cultural anthropologists. Programs that collaborated with other conservation educators were more likely to report reductions in threats to primates, specifically to bushmeat hunting and capture of primates for the pet trade (P = 0.07). Formal program evaluations were employed by 72.1% of all programs, with the majority of programs using surveys to assess changes to participant attitudes and knowledge. Formal evaluations of participant behavior, community attitudes and behaviors, and threats to primate populations were less common. While results indicate that PCEPs follow many suggested best-use practices, program impacts may be enhanced by greater discussion of economic incentivization, increased collaboration between conservation educators, and improved commitment to adaptive evaluation of changes to behaviors in addition to attitudes and

  17. Identification of a conserved non-protein-coding genomic element that plays an essential role in Alphabaculovirus pathogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Kikhno

    Full Text Available Highly homologous sequences 154-157 bp in length grouped under the name of "conserved non-protein-coding element" (CNE were revealed in all of the sequenced genomes of baculoviruses belonging to the genus Alphabaculovirus. A CNE alignment led to the detection of a set of highly conserved nucleotide clusters that occupy strictly conserved positions in the CNE sequence. The significant length of the CNE and conservation of both its length and cluster architecture were identified as a combination of characteristics that make this CNE different from known viral non-coding functional sequences. The essential role of the CNE in the Alphabaculovirus life cycle was demonstrated through the use of a CNE-knockout Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV bacmid. It was shown that the essential function of the CNE was not mediated by the presumed expression activities of the protein- and non-protein-coding genes that overlap the AcMNPV CNE. On the basis of the presented data, the AcMNPV CNE was categorized as a complex-structured, polyfunctional genomic element involved in an essential DNA transaction that is associated with an undefined function of the baculovirus genome.

  18. Conservation efforts of captive golden takin (Budorcas taxicolor bedfordi) are potentially compromised by the elevated chemical elements exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qiang; Chen, Yi-Ping; Maltby, Lorraine; Ma, Qing-Yi

    2017-09-01

    Chemical elements exposure of endangered golden takins (Budorcas taxicolor bedfordi) living in the Qinling Mountains and in a captive breeding center was assessed by analyzing fecal samples. Concentrations of As, Co, Cr, Cu, Ni and Se were significantly higher in the feces of captive golden takins than the wild. There was no significant difference in the fecal concentrations of Cd, Mn, Hg, Pb or Zn for wild and captive animals. The element concentration of fecal samples collected from captive animals varied seasonally, with concentrations being lowest in spring and highest in winter and/or autumn. The food provided to captive animals varied both in the composition and the concentration of element present. Consumptions of feedstuff and additional foods such as D. sanguinalis and A. mangostanus for the captive golden takins were identified as the possible sources of chemical element exposure. The estimations of dietary intake of most elements by captive takins were below the oral reference dose, except for As and Pb, indicating that As and Pb were the key components which contributed to the potential non-carcinogenic risk for captive golden takins. In conclusion, captive golden takins were exposed to higher concentrations of chemical elements compared with the wild, which were likely due to their dietary difference. Conservation efforts of captive golden takin are potentially compromised by the elevated chemical element exposure and effort should focus on providing uncontaminated food for captive animals. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Effectiveness and Successful Program Elements of SOAR’s Afterschool Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet L. Johnson

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Project SOAR provided after-school programs that afforded expanded learning opportunities to help students succeed in local public schools and to contribute to the general welfare of the community. Program components focused on building students’ academic skills and positive attitudes, aided by teachers, mentors, parent education, and local agencies. Instructional programs were conducted to help reduce drug use and violence. Activities included academic assistance, technology training, mentoring, service learning projects, and education in life skills and the arts. Parent involvement was encouraged. Behavioral and academic outcomes—especially at the high school level—were analyzed to determine program effectiveness regarding academic achievement, dropout rates, and rates and frequency of suspensions. Successful program elements and strategies are noted.

  20. Training program for energy conservation in new building construction. Volume III. Energy conservation technology for plan examiners and code administrators. Energy Conservation Technology Series 200

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1977-12-01

    Under the sponsorship of the United States Department of Energy, a Model Code for Energy Conservation in New Building Construction has been developed by those national organizations primarily concerned with the development and promulgation of model codes. The technical provisions are based on ASHRAE Standard 90-75 and are intended for use by state and local officials. The subject of regulation of new building construction to assure energy conservation is recognized as one in which code officials have not had previous exposure. It was also determined that application of the model code would be made at varying levels by officials with both a specific requirement for knowledge and a differing degree of prior training in the state-of-the-art. Therefore, a training program and instructional materials were developed for code officials to assist them in the implementation and enforcement of energy efficient standards and codes. The training program for Energy Conservation Tehnology for Plan Examiners and Code Administrators (ECT Series 200) is presented.

  1. 75 FR 34656 - Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products: Energy Conservation Standards for Certain...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-18

    ... Perkins, U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Building... AGENCY: Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Department of Energy. ACTION: Proposed rule.... Postal Mail: Ms. Brenda Edwards, U.S. Department of Energy, Building Technologies Program, Mailstop EE-2J...

  2. 77 FR 22472 - Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Certain External Power Supplies...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-16

    .... Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Building Technologies Program, EE-2J... and Renewable Energy. For the reasons set forth in the preamble, DOE corrects 10 CFR part 430 as set... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY 10 CFR...

  3. 76 FR 39245 - Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Residential Furnaces and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-06

    ... of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Building Technologies Program, EE-2J... Efficiency and Renewable Energy, U.S. Department of Energy. ACTION: Direct final rule; correction. SUMMARY... Technology Development, Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. BILLING CODE 6450-01-P ...

  4. 77 FR 13026 - Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standard for Automatic Commercial Ice Makers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-05

    .... Charles Llenza, U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Building... Commercial Ice Makers AGENCY: Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Department of Energy. ACTION..., U.S. Department of Energy, Building Technologies Program, Mailstop EE-2J, Preliminary TSD for...

  5. 78 FR 25626 - Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products: Energy Conservation Standards for Ceiling Fans...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-02

    .... Lucy deButts, U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Building... for Ceiling Fans and Ceiling Fan Light Kits AGENCY: Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.... Postal Mail: Ms. Brenda Edwards, U.S. Department of Energy, Building Technologies Program, Mailstop EE-2J...

  6. 75 FR 19296 - Energy Conservation Program: Test Procedures and Energy Conservation Standards for Residential...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-14

    ... Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Department of Energy. ACTION: Proposed rule; extension of public comment... form of encryption. Postal Mail: Ms. Brenda Edwards, U.S. Department of Energy, Building Technologies.... Department of Energy, Building Technologies Program, 950 L'Enfant Plaza, SW., 6th Floor, Washington, DC 20024...

  7. 75 FR 5544 - Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Metal Halide Lamp Fixtures: Public...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-03

    ...: Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of extension of... Edwards, U.S. Department of Energy, Building Technologies Program, 950 L'Enfant Plaza, SW., 6th Floor... background documents or comments received, visit the U.S. Department of Energy, Resource Room of the Building...

  8. 76 FR 69122 - Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Certain Consumer Products...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-08

    ... Renewable Energy, Building Technologies Program, EE-2J, 1000 Independence Avenue SW., Washington, DC 20585...: Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Department of Energy. ACTION: Final rule; correction.... Kathleen B. Hogan, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency, Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy...

  9. 78 FR 7296 - Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Small, Large, and Very Large...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    ... Unit Challenge (RTU Challenge). This program provides a market mechanism that reduces barriers for...-drive fans. High efficiency propeller condenser. High-side solenoid valve or discharge line check-valve to minimize pressure equalization. Heat-pipes (for high latent loads). Sub-coolers. Demand-control...

  10. 75 FR 10873 - Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Small Electric Motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-09

    ...-Standard Horsepower and Kilowatt Ratings i. Summary 2. Product Classes B. Screening Analysis C. Engineering... Period Analysis 1. Installation Cost 2. Energy Prices 3. Energy Price Trend 4. Maintenance and Repair... program for ``Certain Industrial Equipment,'' which includes small electric motors, the subject of this...

  11. Conservation program delivery in the southern U.S.: Preferences and interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galik, Christopher S; Grala, Robert K

    2017-08-01

    A lingering challenge in implementation of ecosystem-based planning is translating high-level conservation objectives to discrete management initiatives. Recent research underscores this, emphasizing the importance of the processes by which plans are developed and how programs to implement plans are delivered to stakeholders. This study contributes to the existing program design, research methodology, and conservation practice literature through an assessment of landowner and conservation practitioner relationships in the Gulf Coastal Plains and Ozarks (GCPO) region of the southern U.S. The study utilizes online and mail surveys to gather data on landowner interactions with conservation practitioner organizations and interactions between practitioner organizations themselves. Data from the surveys suggest different patterns of interaction as reported by landowners and those reported by practitioner organizations working in the region, with landowners generally interacting more with extension and industry organizations and conservation practitioners interacting more with state and federal agencies. Key informant data also allows for analysis of the conservation practitioner network in the GCPO region. Resulting analysis suggests a well-connected network among the state and federal organizations critical to development and delivery of conservation programs in the GCPO LCC region. Though such configurations may be beneficial for the diffusion of innovative practices across a network, they may nonetheless require continued efforts to coordinate activities at the regional scale, an important component of practice-driven, ecosystem-level management. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Evaluation model for developing, implementing, and assessing conservation education programs: Examples from Belize and Costa Rica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Susan K.

    1991-03-01

    Evaluation of conservation education programs can: (1) provide accountability in demonstrating a program's worth, (2) offer an opportunity for receiving feedback and improving programs, (3) further our understanding of the process of program development, and (4) promote conservation education by substantiating claims about its benefits. The Planning-Process-Product systems evaluation model provides feedback needed for making decisions about the development, implementation, and outcome of a program. Planning evaluation was useful in assessing the needs, goals, opportunities, and constraints of a number of programs in Costa Rica and Belize, such as a forestry education project and a zoo outreach program. It provided a basis for making planning decisions incorporating specific objectives, such as the reforestation of a region or a change in knowledge and attitudes in program participants. Process evaluation provided a Costa Rican sustainable development program with feedback during its implementation and enabled it to modify and improve its newsletter for local farmers and its ecology classes for school children. Product evaluation assessed project accomplishments, such as the 700,000 raised by the Children's Rainforest group and the 20 miles of riparian land under conservation management as part of the Belize Community Baboon Sanctuary project. Outcomes are compared with the programs original monetary or land management objectives to determine the success of the programs and to provide feedback for improvement.

  13. 75 FR 22027 - Food Distribution Program on Indian Reservations: Amendments Related to the Food, Conservation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-27

    ... Food and Nutrition Service 7 CFR Part 253 RIN 0584-AD95 Food Distribution Program on Indian Reservations: Amendments Related to the Food, Conservation, and Energy Act of 2008 AGENCY: Food and Nutrition Service, USDA. ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: This rule proposes to amend Food Distribution Program on...

  14. Impacts of the Conservation Education Program in Serra Malagueta Natural Park, Cape Verde

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnett, Edmund; Sills, Erin; Peterson, M. Nils; DePerno, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Environmental and conservation education programs are commonly offered in the rapidly expanding network of protected areas in developing countries. There have been few evaluations of these programs and their impacts on participants. At Serra Malagueta Natural Park in Cape Verde, we assessed changes in environmental knowledge, opinions, and…

  15. Empirical Evidence in Support of a Research-Informed Water Conservation Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Ruthanne; Serna, Victoria Faubion

    2016-01-01

    Based on results from a 2008 research study of regional citizen knowledge concerning watershed issues, a water conservation education program was designed and implemented. Findings from the initial study demonstrated program success as evidenced by knowledge gain and willingness to "commit" to water saving behaviors in 94% of students. A…

  16. Conservation Compromises: The MAB and the Legacy of the International Biological Program, 1964-1974.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleper, Simone

    2017-02-01

    This article looks at the International Biological Program (IBP) as the predecessor of UNESCO's well-known and highly successful Man and the Biosphere Programme (MAB). It argues that international conservation efforts of the 1970s, such as the MAB, must in fact be understood as a compound of two opposing attempts to reform international conservation in the 1960s. The scientific framework of the MAB has its origins in disputes between high-level conservationists affiliated with the International Union for the Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN) about what the IBP meant for the future of conservation. Their respective visions entailed different ecological philosophies as much as diverging sets of political ideologies regarding the global implementation of conservation. Within the IBP's Conservation Section, one group propagated a universal systems approach to conservation with a centralized, technocratic management of nature and society by an elite group of independent scientific experts. Within IUCN, a second group based their notion of environmental expert roles on a more descriptive and local ecology of resource mapping as practiced by UNESCO. When the IBP came to an end in 1974, both groups' ecological philosophies played into the scientific framework underlying the MAB's World Network or Biosphere Reserves. The article argues that it is impossible to understand the course of conservation within the MAB without studying the dynamics and discourses between the two underlying expert groups and their respective visions for reforming conservation.

  17. National Waste Terminal Storage Program: critical element management concept. Volume I. Management summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-05-01

    CEM is oriented towards identifying, quantifying and curtailing probable impediments to a program originating from both the internal and external program environments. Critical elements are defined as events, trends or conditions that could generate potential uncertainties in the program. The critical elements are broken down into components against which management action is initiated.

  18. 40 CFR 501.11 - Elements of a sludge management program submission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Elements of a sludge management program submission. 501.11 Section 501.11 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Programs § 501.11 Elements of a sludge management program submission. (a) Any State that seeks to...

  19. Management of conservation reserve program grasslands to meet wildlife habitat objectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandever, Mark W.; Allen, Arthur W.

    2015-01-01

    Numerous studies document environmental and social benefits of the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP). This report offers a synopsis of findings regarding effects of establishing CRP conservation practices on the quality and distribution of wildlife habitat in agricultural landscapes. On individual farms, year-round provision of wildlife habitat by the CRP may appear relatively insignificant. However, considered from multi-farm to National scales, such improvements in habitat and wildlife response have proven to be extensive and profound.

  20. Expansion of the residential conservation service program to multi-family and small commercial buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-11-01

    Alternative regulatory provisions are considered which might permit achievement of the building energy conservation regulatory goals at a lower cost. Major issues, regulatory and legislative options, and cost-benefit analyses are discussed for multi-family and commercial buildings. The following are presented: related government programs, urban and community impact analysis, institutional impacts, energy cost, Residential Conservation Service coverage, methods of analysis, and regional studies. (MHR)

  1. Mutations of conserved non-coding elements of PITX2 in patients with ocular dysgenesis and developmental glaucoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protas, Meredith E; Weh, Eric; Footz, Tim; Kasberger, Jay; Baraban, Scott C; Levin, Alex V; Katz, L Jay; Ritch, Robert; Walter, Michael A; Semina, Elena V; Gould, Douglas B

    2017-09-15

    Mutations in FOXC1 and PITX2 constitute the most common causes of ocular anterior segment dysgenesis (ASD), and confer a high risk for secondary glaucoma. The genetic causes underlying ASD in approximately half of patients remain unknown, despite many of them being screened by whole exome sequencing. Here, we performed whole genome sequencing on DNA from two affected individuals from a family with dominantly inherited ASD and glaucoma to identify a 748-kb deletion in a gene desert that contains conserved putative PITX2 regulatory elements. We used CRISPR/Cas9 to delete the orthologous region in zebrafish in order to test the pathogenicity of this structural variant. Deletion in zebrafish reduced pitx2 expression during development and resulted in shallow anterior chambers. We screened additional patients for copy number variation of the putative regulatory elements and found an overlapping deletion in a second family and in a potentially-ancestrally-related index patient with ASD and glaucoma. These data suggest that mutations affecting conserved non-coding elements of PITX2 may constitute an important class of mutations in patients with ASD for whom the molecular cause of their disease have not yet been identified. Improved functional annotation of the human genome and transition to sequencing of patient genomes instead of exomes will be required before the magnitude of this class of mutations is fully understood. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Considering the needs of indigenous and local populations in conservation programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Florent; Brondizio, Eduardo S

    2017-04-01

    Local rural and indigenous communities have assumed increasing responsibility for conservation within and between areas buffering the impacts of agricultural or resource-extraction zones and protected areas. Empowering local communities as central partners in conservation and climate-change mitigation has allowed many people to gain access to land and citizenship rights but has provided limited improvements in access to social services and economic opportunities even as expectation about their role as environmental stewards grows. These expectations, however, are inconsistent with reality. We conducted multiple field studies in Brazil since the mid-1980s to illustrate the discrepancies between conservation programs and local conditions and expectations. We suggest that public policies and conservation programs should not delegate responsibility for managing protected areas to local and indigenous communities without considering local needs and expectations and locals' attitudes toward conservation. In other words, behavior that maintains or improves the environment should not be treated as traditional based on the expectations of outsiders. Framing local populations as traditional environmentalists creates contradictions and frustrations for local populations and for conservation professionals and policy makers. © 2016 Society for Conservation Biology.

  3. San Diego Multiple Species Conservation Program (MSCP) Rare Plant Monitoring Review and Revision

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEachern, Kathryn; Pavlik, Bruce M.; Rebman, Jon; Sutter, Rob

    2007-01-01

    Introduction The San Diego Multiple Species Conservation Program (MSCP) was developed for the conservation of plants and animals in the south part of San Diego County, under the California Natural Community Conservation Planning Act of 1991 (California Department of Fish and Game) and the Federal Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended (16 U.S. Code 1531-1544.) The Program is on the leading edge of conservation, as it seeks to both guide development and conserve at-risk species with the oversight of both State and Federal agencies. Lands were identified for inclusion in the MSCP based on their value as habitat for at-risk plants or plant communities (Natural Community Conservation Planning, 2005). Since its inception in the mid-1990s the Program has protected over 100,000 acres, involving 15 jurisdictions and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) and California Department of Fish and Game (CDFG) in the conservation of 87 taxa. Surveys for covered species have been conducted, and management and monitoring have been implemented at some high priority sites. Each jurisdiction or agency manages and monitors their conservation areas independently, while collaborating regionally for long-term protection. The San Diego MSCP is on the forefront of conservation, in one of the most rapidly growing urban areas of the country. The planning effort that developed the MSCP was state-of-the-art, using expert knowledge, spatial habitat modeling, and principles of preserve design to identify and prioritize areas for protection. Land acquisition and protection are ahead of schedule for most jurisdictions. Surveys have verified the locations of many rare plant populations known from earlier collections, and they provide general information on population size and health useful for further conservation planning. Management plans have been written or are in development for most MSCP parcels under jurisdictional control. Several agencies are developing databases for implementation

  4. Three essays on the incentive structure of energy conservation programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okwelum, Edson Ogochukwu

    This dissertation is comprised of three related essays examining the potential effectiveness of government energy efficiency programs from both the producer and consumer perspectives. The first chapter is based on a paper I coauthored with Corey Lang. In this manuscript, I address the question of whether strategic behavior by consumers could result in the erosion of energy savings in a demand response program. Understanding how the strategic behavior of consumers affects the net benefits from a demand response program has policy implications because of the increasing importance that demand response has come to play in utility load and reliability management during peak times. Using data from a large field experiment in California in 2007, we test the hypothesis that under a technology program, consumers' strategic behavior results in outcomes that are opposite what is obtainable under a program with price incentive or based of behavior. Chapter II is also an empirical study which explores how the preferences of consumers for large and heavy vehicles imposes costs on society in the form of external costs of accident. This chapter looks at how fleet changes in weight distribution due to corporate average fuel economy and consumer demand for heavier vehicles results in fatalities. It is important to understand how consumer behavior affects the accident rates so that one can obtain unbiased estimates of accident costs that go into benefit-cost analysis of the impact of regulations in automobiles. Chapter three addresses how unobserved heterogeneity and sorting affect the estimates of the consumer willingness to pay for reduction in future gasoline costs. This tradeoff is important to policy makers and manufactures because it could help explain why manufacturers fail to adopt technologies for which the fuel savings far outweigh the costs. The remainder of the abstract provides a more detailed outlines of the three essays. Chapter 1 explores strategic behavior by

  5. The effects of dolphin education programs on visitors' conservation-related knowledge, attitude, and behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Lance Joseph

    Zoological institutions typically exhibit dolphins in educational programs such as dolphin shows and interaction programs. The goal of these programs is to entertain visitors while increasing their conservation-related knowledge, attitude and behavior towards dolphins and the marine environment. The purpose of the current study was to examine dolphin shows and interaction programs in terms of their effectiveness in meeting these goals. A multi-institutional study was conducted at six different facilities throughout the United States. A repeated measures design was used to examine the knowledge, attitude and behavior of visitors before, immediately after and three months following participation in dolphin shows or interaction programs. Participants of dolphin shows reflected a significant short-term increase in knowledge, attitudes and behavioral intentions. These participants' attitudes and behavioral intentions returned to entry levels three months following the shows. However, knowledge and reported behavior were significantly higher three months following the show compared to entry levels. Participants of interaction programs had a short-term increase in knowledge, attitudes and behavioral intentions immediately following the program and levels were significantly higher three months following the program when compared to entry levels. Additionally, these participants also reported engaging in more conservation-related behavior than during the entry surveys. Results from the current study suggest that both dolphin shows and dolphin interaction programs can be an important part of a conservation education program within zoological facilities. Understanding the aspects of these types of programs that lead people to conservation action will help zoological facilities in meeting their goals.

  6. Persepsi Guru dan Siswa SD di Yogyakarta terhadap Program Conservation Scout

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wahyu Wido Sari

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Penanaman karakter cinta lingkungan dan pemahaman akan pentingnya konservasi perlu dilakukan sejak dini. Program conservation scout atau pandu konservasi menawarkan edukasi dan empowering siswa SD mengenai konservasi. Kegiatan ini bertempat di Pusat Studi Lingkungan, Universitas Sanata Dharma dan melibatkan 38 SD di Yogyakarta. Peserta conservation scout terdiri dari 32 guru dan 70 siswa SD.Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk melihat respon sekolah, persepsi guru, persepsi siswa, dan keberhasilan sekolah dalam mendukung program conservation scout. Metode yang digunakan adalah action reseach, survey, dan diskriptif kualitatif. Instrumen yang digunakan adalah kuesioner dengan hasil validasi sangat baik.Sekolah memberikan respon sangat positif (84% terhadap program conservation scout, dari 38 sekolah yang diundang, ada 32 sekolah yang mengikuti program ini. Guru memberikan persepsi negatif (2,50, bukan pada esensi program melainkan pada teknik pelaksanaan program. Siswa memberikan persepsi positif (3,51 dan 36 dari 70 siswa berhasil melakukan peer tutoring dan kampanye mengenai konservasi. Ada 53, 12 % SD yang siswanya menjadi duta konservasi lingkungan.

  7. Estimating landholders' probability of participating in a stewardship program, and the implications for spatial conservation priorities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa M Adams

    Full Text Available The need to integrate social and economic factors into conservation planning has become a focus of academic discussions and has important practical implications for the implementation of conservation areas, both private and public. We conducted a survey in the Daly Catchment, Northern Territory, to inform the design and implementation of a stewardship payment program. We used a choice model to estimate the likely level of participation in two legal arrangements--conservation covenants and management agreements--based on payment level and proportion of properties required to be managed. We then spatially predicted landholders' probability of participating at the resolution of individual properties and incorporated these predictions into conservation planning software to examine the potential for the stewardship program to meet conservation objectives. We found that the properties that were least costly, per unit area, to manage were also the least likely to participate. This highlights a tension between planning for a cost-effective program and planning for a program that targets properties with the highest probability of participation.

  8. 76 FR 12825 - Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products: Test Procedure for Microwave Ovens

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-09

    .... Department of Energy, Building Technologies Program, 6th Floor, 950 L'Enfant Plaza, SW., Washington, DC 20024... with or without thermal elements designed for surface browning of food and combination ovens. DOE..., including microwave ovens with or without thermal elements designed for surface browning of food. DOE stated...

  9. System for Conservation of Specially Protected Natural Areas as Sustainable Urban Development Element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kryakhtunov, A.; Pelymskaya, O.; Chernykh, E.

    2017-11-01

    The article is devoted to the problem of the conservation of specially protected natural territories. The research topic is especially interesting for urban areas that provide sustainable urban development. The authors consider the main aspects of the sustainable settlement development and substantiate the direct dependence of the evolution of territories in the implementation of urban development activities with the ecological framework of a city. The object of the study is a specially protected natural area located in Western Siberia in the city of Tyumen, the Tyumen region. As a result of the analysis, the main problems of preservation of the nature monument of regional importance were revealed as well as a set of measures and management decisions regarding the conservation of the forest park.

  10. Parallel embryonic transcriptional programs evolve under distinct constraints and may enable morphological conservation amidst adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Assaf; Gildor, Tsvia; Sher, Noa; Layous, Majed; Ben-Tabou de-Leon, Smadar

    2017-10-01

    Embryonic development evolves by balancing stringent morphological constraints with genetic and environmental variation. The design principle that allows developmental transcriptional programs to conserve embryonic morphology while adapting to environmental changes is still not fully understood. To address this fundamental challenge, we compare developmental transcriptomes of two sea urchin species, Paracentrotus lividus and Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, that shared a common ancestor about 40 million years ago and are geographically distant yet show similar morphology. We find that both developmental and housekeeping genes show highly dynamic and strongly conserved temporal expression patterns. The expression of other gene sets, including homeostasis and response genes, show divergent expression which could result from either evolutionary drift or adaptation to local environmental conditions. The interspecies correlations of developmental gene expressions are highest between morphologically similar developmental time points whereas the interspecies correlations of housekeeping gene expression are high between all the late zygotic time points. Relatedly, the position of the phylotypic stage varies between these two groups of genes: developmental gene expression shows highest conservation at mid-developmental stage, in agreement with the hourglass model while the conservation of housekeeping genes keeps increasing with developmental time. When all genes are combined, the relationship between conservation of gene expression and morphological similarity is partially masked by housekeeping genes and genes with diverged expression. Our study illustrates various transcriptional programs that coexist in the developing embryo and evolve under different constraints. Apparently, morphological constraints underlie the conservation of developmental gene expression while embryonic fitness requires the conservation of housekeeping gene expression and the species

  11. Snake River Sockeye Salmon Captive Broodstock Program; Hatchery Element, 2001 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kline, Paul A.; Willard, Catherine; Baker, Dan J. (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, ID)

    2003-08-01

    On November 20, 1991, the National Marine Fisheries Service listed Snake River sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka as endangered under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. In 1991, the Idaho Department of Fish and Game, the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes, and the National Marine Fisheries Service initiated efforts to conserve and rebuild populations in Idaho. Initial steps to recover sockeye salmon included the establishment of a captive broodstock program at the Idaho Department of Fish and Game Eagle Fish Hatchery. Sockeye salmon broodstock and culture responsibilities are shared with the National Marine Fisheries Service at two locations adjacent to Puget Sound in Washington State. Activities conducted by the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes and the National Marine Fisheries Service are reported under separate cover. Idaho Department of Fish and Game monitoring and evaluation activities of captive broodstock program fish releases (annual report to the Bonneville Power Administration for the research element of the program) are also reported separately. Captive broodstock program activities conducted between January 1, 2001 and December 31, 2001 for the hatchery element of the program are presented in this report. In 2001, 26 anadromous sockeye salmon returned to the Sawtooth Basin. Twenty-three of these adults were captured at adult weirs located on the upper Salmon River and on Redfish Lake Creek. Three of the anadromous sockeye salmon that returned were observed below the Sawtooth Fish Hatchery weir and allowed to migrate upstream volitionally (following the dismantling of the weir on October 12, 2001). Nine anadromous adults were incorporated into the captive broodstock program spawning design in 2001. The remaining adults were released to Redfish Lake for natural spawning. Based on their marks, returning adult sockeye salmon originated from a variety of release options. Two sockeye salmon females from the anadromous group and 152 females from the brood year 1998 captive

  12. Discontinuous Galerkin finite element methods for (non)conservative partial differential equations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rhebergen, Sander

    2010-01-01

    The first research topic in this thesis is the development of discontinuous Galerkin (DG) finite element methods for partial differential equations containing nonconservative products, which are present in many two-phase flow models. For this, we combine the theory of Dal Maso, LeFloch and Murat, in

  13. The function of the conserved regulatory element within the second intron of the mammalian Csf1r locus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin A Sauter

    Full Text Available The gene encoding the receptor for macrophage colony-stimulating factor (CSF-1R is expressed exclusively in cells of the myeloid lineages as well as trophoblasts. A conserved element in the second intron, Fms-Intronic Regulatory Element (FIRE, is essential for macrophage-specific transcription of the gene. However, the molecular details of how FIRE activity is regulated and how it impacts the Csf1r promoter have not been characterised. Here we show that agents that down-modulate Csf1r mRNA transcription regulated promoter activity altered the occupancy of key FIRE cis-acting elements including RUNX1, AP1, and Sp1 binding sites. We demonstrate that FIRE acts as an anti-sense promoter in macrophages and reversal of FIRE orientation within its native context greatly reduced enhancer activity in macrophages. Mutation of transcription initiation sites within FIRE also reduced transcription. These results demonstrate that FIRE is an orientation-specific transcribed enhancer element.

  14. Snake River Sockeye Salmon Captive Broodstock Program; Hatchery Element, 1997 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kline, Paul A.; Heindel, Jeff A.; Willard, Catherine (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, ID)

    2003-08-01

    On November 20, 1991, the National Marine Fisheries Service listed Snake River sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka as endangered under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. In 1991, the Idaho Department of Fish and Game, the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes, and the National Marine Fisheries Service initiated efforts to conserve and rebuild populations in Idaho. Initial steps to recover sockeye salmon included the establishment of a captive broodstock program at the Idaho Department of Fish and Game Eagle Fish Hatchery. Sockeye salmon broodstock and culture responsibilities are shared with the National Marine Fisheries Service at two locations adjacent to Puget Sound in Washington State. Activities conducted by the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes and the National Marine Fisheries Service are reported under separate cover. Idaho Department of Fish and Game monitoring and evaluation activities of captive broodstock program fish releases (annual report to the Bonneville Power Administration for the research element of the program) are also reported under separate cover. Captive broodstock program activities conducted between January 1, 1997 and December 31, 1997 are presented in this report. One hundred twenty-six female sockeye salmon from one captive broodstock group were spawned at the Eagle Fish Hatchery in 1997. Successful spawn pairings produced approximately 148,781 eyed-eggs with a cumulative mean survival to eyed-egg rate of 57.3%. Approximately 361,600 sockeye salmon were released to Sawtooth basin waters in 1997. Reintroduction strategies included eyed-eggs (brood year 1997), presmolts (brood year 1996), and prespawn adults for volitional spawning (brood year 1994). Release locations included Redfish Lake, Alturas Lake, and Pettit Lake. During this reporting period, four broodstocks and two unique production groups were in culture at the Eagle Fish Hatchery. Two of the four broodstocks were incorporated into the 1997 spawning design, and one broodstock was terminated following

  15. 49 CFR 452.9 - Elements of a continuous examination program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Elements of a continuous examination program. 452.9 Section 452.9 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) COAST GUARD... Elements of a continuous examination program. (a) Examinations required by § 452.7 must conform to the...

  16. 36 CFR 1223.14 - What elements must a vital records program include?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What elements must a vital... RECORDS ADMINISTRATION RECORDS MANAGEMENT MANAGING VITAL RECORDS § 1223.14 What elements must a vital records program include? To achieve compliance with this section, an agency's vital records program must...

  17. 41 CFR 102-118.330 - What are the elements of an acceptable prepayment audit program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What are the elements of... Approved Program § 102-118.330 What are the elements of an acceptable prepayment audit program? An... before payment; (b) Comply with the Prompt Payment Act (31 U.S.C. 3901, et seq.); (c) Allow for your...

  18. 49 CFR 192.911 - What are the elements of an integrity management program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What are the elements of an integrity management... Transmission Pipeline Integrity Management § 192.911 What are the elements of an integrity management program? An operator's initial integrity management program begins with a framework (see § 192.907) and...

  19. New Technique for Soil Reclamation and Conservation: In Situ Stabilization of Trace Elements in Contaminated Soils

    OpenAIRE

    Negim, Osama

    2009-01-01

    The accumulation of toxic metals in the soil is mainly inherited from parent materials or inputs through human activities. New techniques are being developed to remediate trace elements in contaminated soils such as phytoremediation and in situ stabilization. In situ stabilization technique is one of the common practices for reducing negative effects of metals and metalloids such as As, Cr, Cu and Zn in contaminated soils by adding amendments. The application of alkaline materials such as bas...

  20. Predicting compliance with an information-based residential outdoor water conservation program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landon, Adam C.; Kyle, Gerard T.; Kaiser, Ronald A.

    2016-05-01

    Residential water conservation initiatives often involve some form of education or persuasion intended to change the attitudes and behaviors of residential consumers. However, the ability of these instruments to change attitudes toward conservation and their efficacy in affecting water use remains poorly understood. In this investigation the authors examine consumer attitudes toward complying with a persuasive water conservation program, the extent to which those attitudes predict compliance, and the influence of environmental contextual factors on outdoor water use. Results indicate that the persuasive program was successful in developing positive attitudes toward compliance, and that those attitudes predict water use. However, attitudinal variables explain a relatively small proportion of the variance in objectively measured water use behavior. Recommendations for policy are made stressing the importance of understanding both the effects of attitudes and environmental contextual factors in behavior change initiatives in the municipal water sector.

  1. Snake River Sockeye Salmon Captive Broodstock Program; Hatchery Element, 2002 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willard, Catherine; Baker, Dan J.; Heindel, Jeff A. (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, ID)

    2003-12-01

    On November 20, 1991, the National Marine Fisheries Service listed Snake River sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka as endangered under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. In 1991, the Idaho Department of Fish and Game, the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes, and the National Marine Fisheries Service initiated efforts to conserve and rebuild populations in Idaho. Initial steps to recover sockeye salmon included the establishment of a captive broodstock program at the Idaho Department of Fish and Game Eagle Fish Hatchery. Sockeye salmon broodstock and culture responsibilities are shared with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration at two locations adjacent to Puget Sound in Washington State. Activities conducted by the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration are reported under separate cover. Idaho Department of Fish and Game monitoring and evaluation activities of captive broodstock program fish releases (annual report to the Bonneville Power Administration for the research element of the program) are also reported separately. Captive broodstock program activities conducted between January 1, 2002 and December 31, 2002 for the hatchery element of the program are presented in this report. n 2002, 22 anadromous sockeye salmon returned to the Sawtooth Valley. Fifteen of these adults were captured at adult weirs located on the upper Salmon River and on Redfish Lake Creek. Seven of the anadromous sockeye salmon that returned were observed below the Sawtooth Fish Hatchery weir and allowed to migrate upstream volitionally (following the dismantling of the weir on September 30, 2002). All adult returns were released to Redfish Lake for natural spawning. Based on their marks, returning adult sockeye salmon originated from a variety of release options. Sixty-six females from brood year 1999 and 28 females from brood year 2000 captive broodstock groups were spawned at the Eagle Hatchery in 2002. Spawn pairings produced approximately 65

  2. 01010000 01001100 01000001 01011001: Play Elements in Computer Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breslin, Samantha

    2013-01-01

    This article explores the role of play in human interaction with computers in the context of computer programming. The author considers many facets of programming including the literary practice of coding, the abstract design of programs, and more mundane activities such as testing, debugging, and hacking. She discusses how these incorporate the…

  3. 78 FR 73737 - Energy Efficiency Program for Consumer Products: Energy Conservation Standards for General...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-09

    ..., Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Building Technologies Program, EE-2J, 1000 Independence... Conservation Standards for General Service Lamps AGENCY: Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy... available at: http://www1.eere.energy.gov/buildings/appliance_standards/product.aspx?productid=82 . DATES...

  4. 78 FR 54197 - Energy Efficiency Program for Commercial and Industrial Equipment: Energy Conservation Standards...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-03

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY 10 CFR Part 431 RIN 1904-AD01 Energy Efficiency Program for Commercial and Industrial Equipment: Energy Conservation Standards for Commercial Packaged Boilers AGENCY: Office of Energy Efficiency... Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Building Technologies Office, EE-2J, 1000 Independence Avenue SW...

  5. 78 FR 50026 - Energy Efficiency and Conservation Loan Program Finding of No Significant Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-16

    ... Rural Utilities Service Energy Efficiency and Conservation Loan Program Finding of No Significant Impact... (RUS) has made a finding of no significant impact (FONSI) for implementing its new Energy Efficiency... 12 to authorize energy audits and energy efficiency measures and devices to reduce demand on electric...

  6. 75 FR 57556 - Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products: Test Procedure for Residential Clothes Washers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-21

    ... technologies not covered by the current procedure; (2) more accurately reflect current consumer behavior and... amendments are based on recent data that more accurately describe current consumer behavior and updated... Energy 10 CFR Part 430 Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products: Test Procedure for Residential...

  7. 78 FR 6232 - Energy Conservation Program: Test Procedures for Conventional Cooking Products With Induction...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-30

    ... blocks currently specified in Appendix I reflect consumer cooking behavior. DOE is not aware of... acknowledges that the water-heating tests may better reflect actual consumer behavior for cooking tops, and... Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products, subpart B, appendix I (Appendix I). The proposed...

  8. 75 FR 57555 - Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products: Test Procedure for Residential Clothes Washers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-21

    ... technologies not covered by the current procedure; (2) more accurately reflect current consumer behavior and... amendments are based on recent data that more accurately describe current consumer behavior and updated... Energy 10 CFR Part 430 Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products: Test Procedure for Residential...

  9. 76 FR 19759 - Energy Conservation Program for Certain Industrial Equipment: Publication of the Petition for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-08

    ... Conservation Program for Consumer Products Other Than Automobiles.'' (42 U.S.C. 6291-6309) Part C of Title III.... John Galbraith, VP of RCS Engineering, Carrier Corporation, 7310 West Morris Street, Indianapolis, IN... for RCS Engineering. BILLING CODE 6450-01-P ...

  10. 77 FR 28805 - Energy Conservation Program: Test Procedures for Microwave Ovens

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-16

    ... Parts 429 and 430 RIN 1904-AB78 Energy Conservation Program: Test Procedures for Microwave Ovens AGENCY... supplemental notice of proposed rulemaking (SNOPR) to amend the test procedures for microwave ovens. That SNOPR... for measuring the standby mode and off mode energy use of products that combine a microwave oven with...

  11. 78 FR 4015 - Energy Conservation Program: Test Procedures for Microwave Ovens

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-18

    ... RIN 1904-AB78 Energy Conservation Program: Test Procedures for Microwave Ovens AGENCY: Office of...) to amend the test procedures for microwave ovens. That SNOPR proposed amendments to the DOE test... measuring the standby mode and off mode energy use of products that combine a microwave oven with other...

  12. 77 FR 26607 - Energy Conservation Program: Test Procedures for Electric Motors and Small Electric Motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-04

    ... finalized key provisions related to small electric motor testing in the July 2009 final rule, but opted to... for Electric Motors and Small Electric Motors; Final Rules #0;#0;Federal Register / Vol. 77, No. 87... Energy Conservation Program: Test Procedures for Electric Motors and Small Electric Motors AGENCY: Office...

  13. 77 FR 35299 - Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products and Certain Commercial and Industrial Equipment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-13

    ... that the ability of electric resistance water heaters to `super heat' water to 170 F is a key component... of its recently amended energy conservation standards for residential electric water heaters on utility programs that use high-storage-volume (above 55 gallons) electric storage water heaters to reduce...

  14. Ground beetle (Coleoptera: Carabidae) assemblages in the Conservation Reserve Program crop rotation systems in Interior Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adult ground beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae) abundance and diversity were documented on Conservation Research Program (CRP) agricultural lands in Delta Junction, Alaska (64ºN, 145º W). Twenty species were documented based on a total sample of 6,116 specimens collected during 2006 and 2007. Two speci...

  15. Priority setting for bird conservation in Mexico: the role of the Important Bird Areas program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma. del Coro Arizmendi; Laura Marquez Valdelamar; Humberto Berlanga

    2005-01-01

    Many species in Mexico are threatened and in need of protection. At least seventy species are considered to be globally threatened, yet conservation actions have been scarce and not coordinated. In 1996 BirdLife International’s Important Bird Areas Program was initiated in Mexico to identify a network of the most important places in Mexico for birds, with the...

  16. 76 FR 971 - Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products: Test Procedures for Clothes Dryers and Room...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-06

    ...--Clothes Dryers C. Active Mode--Room Air Conditioners V. Procedural Requirements A. Review Under Executive... Dryers and Room Air Conditioners; Final Rule #0;#0;Federal Register / Vol. 76 , No. 4 / Thursday, January... Conservation Program for Consumer Products: Test Procedures for Clothes Dryers and Room Air Conditioners AGENCY...

  17. 78 FR 21215 - Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products: Association of Home Appliance Manufacturers...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-10

    ... Conservation Program for Consumer Products: Association of Home Appliance Manufacturers Petition for... (DOE) denial of a petition from the Association of Home Appliance Manufacturers (AHAM) requesting... DOE's responses are set forth in the paragraphs that follow. BSH Home Appliances Corporation (BSH) \\4...

  18. 77 FR 76952 - Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products: Association of Home Appliance Manufacturers...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-31

    ... Part 430 Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products: Association of Home Appliance Manufacturers...) received a petition from the Association of Home Appliance Manufacturers (AHAM) requesting reconsideration..., amendment, or repeal of a rule.'' (5 U.S.C. 553(e)). The Association of Home Appliance Manufacturers (AHAM...

  19. Department of Energy programs and objectives: energy conservation in agricultural production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-12-01

    This document describes the current Department of Energy agriculture research program as it relates to the research recommendations submitted by a 1976 workshop on energy conservation in agricultural production. In-depth discussions on fertilizers, irrigation, crop drying, fuel substitution, crop and animal production systems, greenhouses, materials handling, and transport systems are included. (MCW)

  20. 76 FR 647 - Energy Conservation Program: Test Procedures for Electric Motors and Small Electric Motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-05

    ... Energy 10 CFR Part 431 Energy Conservation Program: Test Procedures for Electric Motors and Small Electric Motors; Proposed Rule #0;#0;Federal Register / Vol. 76, No. 3 / Wednesday, January 5, 2011... Procedures for Electric Motors and Small Electric Motors AGENCY: Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable...

  1. Is Energy Conservation Education Effective? An Evaluation of the Powersave Schools Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiMatteo, Julie; Radnitz, Cynthia; Zibulsky, Jamie; Brown, Jeffrey; Deleasa, Courtney; Jacobs, Stephanie

    2014-01-01

    To strengthen energy conservation knowledge and behaviors in youth, the PowerSave Schools Program (PSP) instructs students using hands-on projects. However, there is a lack of empirical support for the PSP. The present study is the first to use a repeated measures design to assess its effectiveness in two school districts. In District 1, there was…

  2. 75 FR 22584 - Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products: Decision and Order Granting a Waiver to...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-29

    ... Residential Refrigerator and Refrigerator-Freezer Test Procedure AGENCY: Office of Energy Efficiency and... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products: Decision...

  3. 75 FR 9120 - Energy Conservation Program: Public Meeting and Availability of the Notice of Proposed Rulemaking...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY 10 CFR Part 431 RIN 1904-AB85 Energy Conservation Program: Public Meeting and Availability of the Notice of Proposed Rulemaking for Walk-In Coolers and Walk-In Freezers; Date Change AGENCY: Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Department of Energy. ACTION: Proposed rulemaking; date...

  4. 78 FR 42480 - Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products: Test Procedures for Refrigerators...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-16

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY 10 CFR Parts 429 and 430 RIN 1904-AC76 Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products: Test Procedures for Refrigerators, Refrigerator-Freezers, and Freezers Correction In proposed rule... lines, the electronic-mail address in item number ``2.'' that reads `` Res-Refrig-Freezer-2012-BT-TP...

  5. 75 FR 45623 - Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products: Decision and Order Granting a Waiver to...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-03

    ... Residential Refrigerator and Refrigerator-Freezer Test Procedure AGENCY: Office of Energy Efficiency and... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products: Decision...

  6. 75 FR 11530 - Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products: Decision and Order Granting a Waiver to...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-11

    ... and Refrigerator-Freezer Test Procedure AGENCY: Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products: Decision and Order...

  7. 75 FR 19953 - Agency Information Collection: Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products: Survey of Field...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Agency Information Collection: Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products: Survey of Field Energy Consumption of Residential Refrigerators, Refrigerator-Freezers, and Freezers AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy...

  8. 76 FR 50145 - Energy Conservation Program: Test Procedures for Residential Clothes Dryers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-12

    ... final RMC, with an average RMC of 2.0 percent. In comparison, the same clothes dryer under the same cycle settings dried the DOE test load to 0.3 to 1.2 percent RMC, with an average RMC of 0.7 percent...; ] DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY 10 CFR Part 430 RIN 1904-AC63 Energy Conservation Program: Test Procedures for...

  9. 78 FR 41265 - Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products: Test Procedures for Residential Furnaces and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-10

    ... full-fuel cycle as part of the residential furnace and boiler test procedure. (APGA, No. 7 at p. 1... Part 430 RIN 1904-AC96 Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products: Test Procedures for... notice of proposed rulemaking (NOPR) to amend its test procedure for residential furnaces and boilers...

  10. 78 FR 675 - Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products: Test Procedure for Residential Furnaces and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-04

    ... reducing the test burden, test conditions impacting the annual fuel utilization efficiency (AFUE) metric... that could be considered for this cycle of test procedure amendments. F. Alternative Methods for... Part 430 RIN 1904-AC79 Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products: Test Procedure for...

  11. 77 FR 1591 - Energy Conservation Program: Test Procedure for Automatic Commercial Ice Makers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-11

    ... stirring Location of temperature sensor in the ice bucket Variation in ambient conditions Difference...-AC38 Energy Conservation Program: Test Procedure for Automatic Commercial Ice Makers AGENCY: Office of... (NOPR) to amend the test procedure for automatic commercial ice makers (ACIM). That NOPR serves as the...

  12. 75 FR 29823 - Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products: Test Procedures for Refrigerators...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-27

    ...'' means an electric refrigerator-freezer. ``Electric refrigerator'' means a cabinet designed for the... Refrigerators, Refrigerator-Freezers, and Freezers; Proposed Rule #0;#0;Federal Register / Vol. 75, No. 102... Conservation Program for Consumer Products: Test Procedures for Refrigerators, Refrigerator-Freezers, and...

  13. 76 FR 25211 - Energy Conservation Program: Test Procedures for Fluorescent Lamp Ballasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-04

    ... Energy Conservation Program: Test Procedures for Fluorescent Lamp Ballasts AGENCY: Office of Energy... Energy (DOE) issues a final rule amending the existing test procedures for fluorescent lamp ballasts at... operation. The test procedure specifies use of a fluorescent lamp load during testing, allowing ballasts to...

  14. 75 FR 61361 - Energy Conservation Program: Certification, Compliance, and Enforcement for Consumer Products and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-05

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY 10 CFR Part 429 RIN 1904-AC24 Energy Conservation Program: Certification, Compliance...: (1) The mean of the sample, or (2) The upper 97\\1/2\\ percent confidence limit of the true mean... than the lower of: (1) The mean of the sample or (2) The lower 97\\1/2\\ percent confidence limit of the...

  15. 76 FR 46202 - Energy Conservation Program: Certification, Compliance, and Enforcement for Consumer Products and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY 10 CFR Parts 429 and 430 RIN 1904-AC23 Energy Conservation Program: Certification, Compliance, and Enforcement... the sample mean; s is the sample standard deviation; n is the number of samples; and t 0.99 is the t...

  16. 76 FR 70918 - Energy Conservation Program: Test Procedures for Residential Clothes Washers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY 10 CFR Parts 429 and 430 RIN 1904-AC08 Energy Conservation Program: Test Procedures for Residential Clothes Washers Correction In proposed rule document 2011-28543 appearing on pages 69870-69893 in the issue of...

  17. The climate adaptation programs and activities of the Yellowstone to Yukon Conservation Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendy L. Francis

    2011-01-01

    The Yellowstone to Yukon Conservation Initiative (Y2Y) is an innovative transboundary effort to protect biodiversity and facilitate climate adaptation by linking large protected core areas through compatible land uses on matrix lands. The Y2Y organization acts as the keeper of the Y2Y vision and implements two interconnected programs - Science and Action, and Vision...

  18. The design and implementation of a conservation corps program in Nuristan, Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danny Markus; John W. Groninger

    2011-01-01

    Nuristan ranks among the least prosperous and educated provinces of Afghanistan. In 2008, the Nuristan Conservation Corps (NCC) was initiated to provide work, education, and training for 90 fighting-age males. Participants in this 1-year pilot program received basic education and natural resource management job skills training. Irrigation infrastructure was built on 26...

  19. Design and Implementation of a Research-Informed Water Conservation Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Ruthanne; Coe, Alice; Klaver, Irene; Dickson, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    Informed by the results of a baseline research study of regional citizen knowledge and understanding concerning watershed issues, a team of university faculty and classroom teachers designed and implemented a water conservation education program to address lacking areas of watershed knowledge. The authors developed age-appropriate, hands-on…

  20. Using Home Irrigation Users' Perceptions to Inform Water Conservation Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Laura A.; Chaudhary, Anil Kumar; Lamm, Alexa J.; Rumble, Joy N.; Momol, Esen

    2017-01-01

    Targeted agricultural education programs can play a role in solving complex water issues. This article applies importance-performance analysis to examine dimensions of water resources that may inform local water conservation campaigns in the United States. The purpose of this study was to generate a deep understanding of home irrigation users'…

  1. Energy conservation programs developed by PETROBRAS; Programas de eficiencia energetica desenvolvidos pela PETROBRAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maues, Jair Arone; Marinho, Frederico Augusto Varejao [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    The two oil shocks of the 70s provoked a great swerve of course in PETROBRAS during the 80s and 90s. The most important and well known was the strategic decision of exploring oil under the sea. Another important area of the Company includes internal programs for cutting its own energy use and external programs, encouraging their products end-users to rationalize fuel's use. After 1974, our refineries concentrated efforts in level reduction of self-consumption fuel. In the 90s, the Federal Government introduced two energy conservation programs. One created Energy Saving Internal Committees - CICE - in all PETROBRAS' operational units. Another one established a National Program for Oil and Natural Gas Conservation - CONPET. PETROBRAS is in charge of the development and implementation of projects related to this. All these efforts were thoroughly successful. The currently oil production is higher than the country consumption. Nonetheless, as new exploratory frontiers must develop to hold this self-sufficiency in progress, conservation energy programs also have to be continuously updated. This paper presents a balance of the projects implemented since the creation of both programs, a critical analysis on the achieved results and, finally, suggestions on how to improve the effective accomplishment of the initially proposed targets. (author)

  2. Fanconi anemia core complex gene promoters harbor conserved transcription regulatory elements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Meier

    Full Text Available The Fanconi anemia (FA gene family is a recent addition to the complex network of proteins that respond to and repair certain types of DNA damage in the human genome. Since little is known about the regulation of this novel group of genes at the DNA level, we characterized the promoters of the eight genes (FANCA, B, C, E, F, G, L and M that compose the FA core complex. The promoters of these genes show the characteristic attributes of housekeeping genes, such as a high GC content and CpG islands, a lack of TATA boxes and a low conservation. The promoters functioned in a monodirectional way and were, in their most active regions, comparable in strength to the SV40 promoter in our reporter plasmids. They were also marked by a distinctive transcriptional start site (TSS. In the 5' region of each promoter, we identified a region that was able to negatively regulate the promoter activity in HeLa and HEK 293 cells in isolation. The central and 3' regions of the promoter sequences harbor binding sites for several common and rare transcription factors, including STAT, SMAD, E2F, AP1 and YY1, which indicates that there may be cross-connections to several established regulatory pathways. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays and siRNA experiments confirmed the shared regulatory responses between the prominent members of the TGF-β and JAK/STAT pathways and members of the FA core complex. Although the promoters are not well conserved, they share region and sequence specific regulatory motifs and transcription factor binding sites (TBFs, and we identified a bi-partite nature to these promoters. These results support a hypothesis based on the co-evolution of the FA core complex genes that was expanded to include their promoters.

  3. Translational co-regulation of a ligand and inhibitor by a conserved RNA element

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zaucker, Andreas; Nagorska, Agnieszka; Kumari, Pooja

    2018-01-01

    In many organisms, transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of components of pathways or processes has been reported. However, to date, there are few reports of translational co-regulation of multiple components of a developmental signaling pathway. Here, we show that an RNA element...... which we previously identified as a dorsal localization element (DLE) in the 3'UTR of zebrafish nodal-related1/squint (ndr1/sqt) ligand mRNA, is shared by the related ligand nodal-related2/cyclops (ndr2/cyc) and the nodal inhibitors, lefty1 (lft1) and lefty2 mRNAs. We investigated the activity...... of the DLEs through functional assays in live zebrafish embryos. The lft1 DLE localizes fluorescently labeled RNA similarly to the ndr1/sqt DLE. Similar to the ndr1/sqt 3'UTR, the lft1 and lft2 3'UTRs are bound by the RNA-binding protein (RBP) and translational repressor, Y-box binding protein 1 (Ybx1...

  4. Influence of conservation programs on amphibians using seasonal wetlands in the Prairie Pothole Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balas, Caleb J.; Euliss, Ned H.; Mushnet, David M.

    2012-01-01

    Extensive modification of upland habitats surrounding wetlands to facilitate agricultural production has negatively impacted amphibian communities in the Prairie Pothole Region of North America. In attempts to mitigate ecosystem damage associated with extensive landscape alteration, vast tracks of upland croplands have been returned to perennial vegetative cover (i.e., conservation grasslands) under a variety of U.S. Department of Agriculture programs. We evaluated the influence of these conservation grasslands on amphibian occupancy of seasonal wetlands in the Prairie Pothole Region. Using automated call surveys, aquatic funnel traps, and visual encounter surveys, we detected eight amphibian species using wetlands within three land-use categories (farmed, conservation grasslands, and native prairie grasslands) during the summers of 2005 and 2006. Seasonal wetlands within farmlands were used less frequently by amphibians than those within conservation and native prairie grasslands, and wetlands within conservation grasslands were used less frequently than those within native prairie grasslands by all species and life-stages we successfully modeled. Our results suggest that, while not occupied as frequently as wetlands within native prairie, wetlands within conservation grasslands provide important habitat for maintaining amphibian biodiversity in the Prairie Pothole Region

  5. Marketing and design of residential energy conservation programs for the elderly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berry, L.; Schweitzer, M.; Freeman, E.

    1988-02-01

    This report describes barriers to energy conservation by the elderly. Because of these barriers, they have a greater need for programs that assist with the installation of energy-efficiency improvements. In response to this need, a number of specialized programs are operated for the elderly. This report contains descriptions of 39 energy conservation programs for the elderly. Telephone interviews were conducted with the managers of these programs to identify marketing techniques and organizational structures. Interagency networking, presentations and referrals are the most common methods of recruiting clients. Other marketing techniques in order of the frequency of use are: direct mail, bill inserts, television, radio, printed materials, and telemarketing. Many managers consider word-of-mouth advertising from satisfied clients the most effective form of marketing. Interagency networking and support (financial, structural and in-kind) can offer real advantages in the operation of conservation programs for the elderly. The use of specific marketing techniques is probably less important to success in recruiting clients than the degree of trust potential clients have in the sponsoring organization(s). 4 figs., 10 tabs.

  6. Egr-1 induces DARPP-32 expression in striatal medium spiny neurons via a conserved intragenic element.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keilani, Serene; Chandwani, Samira; Dolios, Georgia; Bogush, Alexey; Beck, Heike; Hatzopoulos, Antonis K; Rao, Gadiparthi N; Thomas, Elizabeth A; Wang, Rong; Ehrlich, Michelle E

    2012-05-16

    DARPP-32 (dopamine and adenosine 3', 5'-cyclic monophosphate cAMP-regulated phosphoprotein, 32 kDa) is a striatal-enriched protein that mediates signaling by dopamine and other first messengers in the medium spiny neurons. The transcriptional mechanisms that regulate striatal DARPP-32 expression remain enigmatic and are a subject of much interest in the efforts to induce a striatal phenotype in stem cells. We report the identification and characterization of a conserved region, also known as H10, in intron IV of the gene that codes for DARPP-32 (Ppp1r1b). This DNA sequence forms multiunit complexes with nuclear proteins from adult and embryonic striata of mice and rats. Purification of proteins from these complexes identified early growth response-1 (Egr-1). The interaction between Egr-1 and H10 was confirmed in vitro and in vivo by super-shift and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, respectively. Importantly, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a known inducer of DARPP-32 and Egr-1 expression, enhanced Egr-1 binding to H10 in vitro. Moreover, overexpression of Egr-1 in primary striatal neurons induced the expression of DARPP-32, whereas a dominant-negative Egr-1 blocked DARPP-32 induction by BDNF. Together, this study identifies Egr-1 as a transcriptional activator of the Ppp1r1b gene and provides insight into the molecular mechanisms that regulate medium spiny neuron maturation.

  7. Analysis to develop a program for energy conservation in irrigated agriculture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cone, B.W.; Brix, V.L.; Eakin, D.E.; Laughlin, B.M.

    1978-09-01

    It is estimated by the FEA that 0.26 quadrillion Btus of energy is annually required to irrigate crops in the USA. The development of a DOE program for energy conservation in irrigation is described. Information is included on: studies of how this energy consumption can be reduced and by how much; engineering and economic studies of irrigation equipment and methods; proposals for improving the efficiency of pumps and prime movers; projects selected for demonstrating irrigation energy conservation; and recommendations for further research. (LCL)

  8. A new technology transfer process for DOE's residential and commercial conservation program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, M.A.; White, D.L.; Vories, R.; Kirchen, S.

    1988-10-01

    This report provides a technology transfer plan for DOE's Residential and Commercial Conservation Program (RCCP). It catalogues and classifies the types of research results and lessons developed and disseminated by the Program, and examines the audiences for these results. It then describes the process of assessing needs, analyzing potential technology transfer mechanisms, and evaluating progress that should be part of the technology transfer process for RCCP and its individual projects. A technology transfer strategy is proposed along with recommended future technology transfer activities. A set of seven worksheets is also developed to help RCCP program managers design outreach efforts for their current and future projects. 28 refs., 12 figs.

  9. Highly conserved gene order and numerous novel repetitive elements in genomic regions linked to wing pattern variation in Heliconius butterflies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halder Georg

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With over 20 parapatric races differing in their warningly colored wing patterns, the butterfly Heliconius erato provides a fascinating example of an adaptive radiation. Together with matching races of its co-mimic Heliconius melpomene, H. erato also represents a textbook case of Müllerian mimicry, a phenomenon where common warning signals are shared amongst noxious organisms. It is of great interest to identify the specific genes that control the mimetic wing patterns of H. erato and H. melpomene. To this end we have undertaken comparative mapping and targeted genomic sequencing in both species. This paper reports on a comparative analysis of genomic sequences linked to color pattern mimicry genes in Heliconius. Results Scoring AFLP polymorphisms in H. erato broods allowed us to survey loci at approximately 362 kb intervals across the genome. With this strategy we were able to identify markers tightly linked to two color pattern genes: D and Cr, which were then used to screen H. erato BAC libraries in order to identify clones for sequencing. Gene density across 600 kb of BAC sequences appeared relatively low, although the number of predicted open reading frames was typical for an insect. We focused analyses on the D- and Cr-linked H. erato BAC sequences and on the Yb-linked H. melpomene BAC sequence. A comparative analysis between homologous regions of H. erato (Cr-linked BAC and H. melpomene (Yb-linked BAC revealed high levels of sequence conservation and microsynteny between the two species. We found that repeated elements constitute 26% and 20% of BAC sequences from H. erato and H. melpomene respectively. The majority of these repetitive sequences appear to be novel, as they showed no significant similarity to any other available insect sequences. We also observed signs of fine scale conservation of gene order between Heliconius and the moth Bombyx mori, suggesting that lepidopteran genome architecture may be conserved

  10. Combining finite element and finite difference methods for isotropic elastic wave simulations in an energy-conserving manner

    KAUST Repository

    Gao, Longfei

    2018-02-22

    We consider numerical simulation of the isotropic elastic wave equations arising from seismic applications with non-trivial land topography. The more flexible finite element method is applied to the shallow region of the simulation domain to account for the topography, and combined with the more efficient finite difference method that is applied to the deep region of the simulation domain. We demonstrate that these two discretization methods, albeit starting from different formulations of the elastic wave equation, can be joined together smoothly via weakly imposed interface conditions. Discrete energy analysis is employed to derive the proper interface treatment, leading to an overall discretization that is energy-conserving. Numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed interface treatment.

  11. Detecting the limits of regulatory element conservation anddivergence estimation using pairwise and multiple alignments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pollard, Daniel A.; Moses, Alan M.; Iyer, Venky N.; Eisen,Michael B.

    2006-08-14

    Background: Molecular evolutionary studies of noncodingsequences rely on multiple alignments. Yet how multiple alignmentaccuracy varies across sequence types, tree topologies, divergences andtools, and further how this variation impacts specific inferences,remains unclear. Results: Here we develop a molecular evolutionsimulation platform, CisEvolver, with models of background noncoding andtranscription factor binding site evolution, and use simulated alignmentsto systematically examine multiple alignment accuracy and its impact ontwo key molecular evolutionary inferences: transcription factor bindingsite conservation and divergence estimation. We find that the accuracy ofmultiple alignments is determined almost exclusively by the pairwisedivergence distance of the two most diverged species and that additionalspecies have a negligible influence on alignment accuracy. Conservedtranscription factor binding sites align better than surroundingnoncoding DNA yet are often found to be misaligned at relatively shortdivergence distances, such that studies of binding site gain and losscould easily be confounded by alignment error. Divergence estimates frommultiple alignments tend to be overestimated at short divergencedistances but reach a tool specific divergence at which they cease toincrease, leading to underestimation at long divergences. Our moststriking finding was that overall alignment accuracy, binding sitealignment accuracy and divergence estimation accuracy vary greatly acrossbranches in a tree and are most accurate for terminal branches connectingsister taxa and least accurate for internal branches connectingsub-alignments. Conclusions: Our results suggest that variation inalignment accuracy can lead to errors in molecular evolutionaryinferences that could be construed as biological variation. Thesefindings have implications for which species to choose for analyses, whatkind of errors would be expected for a given set of species and howmultiple alignment tools and

  12. Divergent and Conserved Elements Comprise the Chemoreceptive Repertoire of the Nonblood-Feeding Mosquito Toxorhynchites amboinensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaofan; Rinker, David C.; Pitts, Ronald Jason; Rokas, Antonis; Zwiebel, Laurence J.

    2014-01-01

    Many mosquito species serve as vectors of diseases such as malaria and yellow fever, wherein pathogen transmission is tightly associated with the reproductive requirement of taking vertebrate blood meals. Toxorhynchites is one of only three known mosquito genera that does not host-seek and initiates egg development in the absence of a blood-derived protein bolus. These remarkable differences make Toxorhynchites an attractive comparative reference for understanding mosquito chemosensation as it pertains to host-seeking. We performed deep transcriptome profiling of adult female Toxorhynchites amboinensis bodies, antennae and maxillary palps, and identified 25,084 protein-coding “genes” in the de novo assembly. Phylogenomic analysis of 4,266 single-copy “genes” from T. amboinensis, Aedes aegypti, Anopheles gambiae, and Culex quinquefasciatus robustly supported Ae. aegypti as the closest relative of T. amboinensis, with the two species diverged approximately 40 Ma. We identified a large number of T. amboinensis chemosensory “genes,” the majority of which have orthologs in other mosquitoes. Finally, cross-species expression analyses indicated that patterns of chemoreceptor transcript abundance were very similar for chemoreceptors that are conserved between T. amboinensis and Ae. aegypti, whereas T. amboinensis appeared deficient in the variety of expressed, lineage-specific chemoreceptors. Our transcriptome assembly of T. amboinensis represents the first comprehensive genomic resource for a nonblood-feeding mosquito and establishes a foundation for future comparative studies of blood-feeding and nonblood-feeding mosquitoes. We hypothesize that chemosensory genes that display discrete patterns of evolution and abundance between T. amboinensis and blood-feeding mosquitoes are likely to play critical roles in host-seeking and hence the vectorial capacity. PMID:25326137

  13. Divergent and conserved elements comprise the chemoreceptive repertoire of the nonblood-feeding mosquito Toxorhynchites amboinensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaofan; Rinker, David C; Pitts, Ronald Jason; Rokas, Antonis; Zwiebel, Laurence J

    2014-10-16

    Many mosquito species serve as vectors of diseases such as malaria and yellow fever, wherein pathogen transmission is tightly associated with the reproductive requirement of taking vertebrate blood meals. Toxorhynchites is one of only three known mosquito genera that does not host-seek and initiates egg development in the absence of a blood-derived protein bolus. These remarkable differences make Toxorhynchites an attractive comparative reference for understanding mosquito chemosensation as it pertains to host-seeking. We performed deep transcriptome profiling of adult female Toxorhynchites amboinensis bodies, antennae and maxillary palps, and identified 25,084 protein-coding "genes" in the de novo assembly. Phylogenomic analysis of 4,266 single-copy "genes" from T. amboinensis, Aedes aegypti, Anopheles gambiae, and Culex quinquefasciatus robustly supported Ae. aegypti as the closest relative of T. amboinensis, with the two species diverged approximately 40 Ma. We identified a large number of T. amboinensis chemosensory "genes," the majority of which have orthologs in other mosquitoes. Finally, cross-species expression analyses indicated that patterns of chemoreceptor transcript abundance were very similar for chemoreceptors that are conserved between T. amboinensis and Ae. aegypti, whereas T. amboinensis appeared deficient in the variety of expressed, lineage-specific chemoreceptors. Our transcriptome assembly of T. amboinensis represents the first comprehensive genomic resource for a nonblood-feeding mosquito and establishes a foundation for future comparative studies of blood-feeding and nonblood-feeding mosquitoes. We hypothesize that chemosensory genes that display discrete patterns of evolution and abundance between T. amboinensis and blood-feeding mosquitoes are likely to play critical roles in host-seeking and hence the vectorial capacity. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and

  14. Phase 1 user instruction manual. A geological formation - drill string dynamic interaction finite element program (GEODYN)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tinianow, M.A.; Rotelli, R.L. Jr.; Baird, J.A.

    1984-06-01

    User instructions for the GEODYN Interactive Finite Element Computer Program are presented. The program is capable of performing the analysis of the three-dimensional transient dynamic response of a Polycrystalline Diamond Compact Bit - Bit Sub arising from the intermittent contact of the bit with the downhole rock formations. The program accommodates non-linear, time dependent, loading and boundary conditions.

  15. Geological formation - drill string dynamic interaction finite-element program (GEODYN). Phase 1. Theoretical description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baird, J.A.; Apostal, M.C.; Rotelli, R.L. Jr.; Tinianow, M.A.; Wormley, D.N.

    1984-06-01

    The Theoretical Description for the GEODYN interactive finite-element computer program is presented. The program is capable of performing the analysis of the three-dimensional transient dynamic response of a Polycrystalline Diamond Compact Bit-Bit Sub arising from the intermittent contact of the bit with the downhole rock formations. The program accommodates nonlinear, time-dependent, loading and boundary conditions.

  16. An Interactive Preprocessor Program with Graphics for a Three-Dimensional Finite Element Code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Claude Hayden, III

    The development and capabilities of an interactive preprocessor program with graphics for an existing three-dimensional finite element code is presented. This preprocessor program, EDGAP3D, is designed to be used in conjunction with the Texas Three Dimensional Grain Analysis Program (TXCAP3D). The code presented in this research is capable of the…

  17. Steps to a HealthierUS Cooperative Agreement Program: foundational elements for program evaluation planning, implementation, and use of findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Goldie; Garcia, Danyael; Zaza, Stephanie; Schooley, Michael; Compton, Don; Bryant, Terry; Bagnol, Lulu; Edgerly, Cathy; Haverkate, Rick

    2006-01-01

    The Steps to a HealthierUS Cooperative Agreement Program (Steps Program) enables funded communities to implement chronic disease prevention and health promotion efforts to reduce the burden of diabetes, obesity, asthma, and related risk factors. At both the national and community levels, investment in surveillance and program evaluation is substantial. Public health practitioners engaged in program evaluation planning often identify desired outcomes, related indicators, and data collection methods but may pay only limited attention to an overarching vision for program evaluation among participating sites. We developed a set of foundational elements to provide a vision of program evaluation that informs the technical decisions made throughout the evaluation process. Given the diversity of activities across the Steps Program and the need for coordination between national- and community-level evaluation efforts, our recommendations to guide program evaluation practice are explicit yet leave room for site-specific context and needs. Staff across the Steps Program must consider these foundational elements to prepare a formal plan for program evaluation. Attention to each element moves the Steps Program closer to well-designed and complementary plans for program evaluation at the national, state, and community levels.

  18. Role of Conservation Adoption Premiums on Participation in Water Quality Trading Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzieh Motallebi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Over half of lakes, reservoirs, and ponds in the United States are threatened or impaired, mostly by nutrients. One policy to improve water quality is water quality trading (WQT. While the concept is appealing, adoption of conservation practices in these programs has been anemic at best. Using a case study in the newly-formed WQT market in Jordan Lake, North Carolina, we propose that part of the problem is a large adoption premium (AP for this program. AP is the amount that farmers require over and above direct adoption costs to participate. In this study, farmers were asked at in-person interviews about their willingness to accept (WTA a payment to adopt a particular conservation practice (riparian buffers in order to generate and sell credits. We compared farmers’ WTA to their direct cost of participation, which allowed us to estimate an AP. On average, the AP more than doubles the cost of purchasing credits. The AP sums all of the known indirect costs already cited in the literature, and more, into a single value and is relatively simple to estimate. Knowing the AP would improve the ability of policy makers to accurately estimate what is needed to boost adoption rates in WQT programs and other conservation programs as well.

  19. Driver energy conservation awareness training. Review and recommendations for a national program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greene, D.L.

    1986-05-01

    The idea of driver energy conservation awareness was formalized as a training program (DECAT) by the Department of Energy in the late 1970's. This report reviews the curriculum of that program, its basis in engineering tests and principles, its past activities and achievements, and its potential, and makes recommendations for a renewed program. There is ample evidence that typical drivers can reduce fuel consumption by at least 10% by the way they maintain and operate their vehicles. The original DOE program was reasonably successful in reaching motor vehicle fleets, especially in government. Challenges for a new DECAT program include increasing its outreach to the general motoring public, fostering research and transfer to the marketplace of effective driver feedback devices, and incorporating DECAT training into the driver education and licensing process, nationwide. Depending on the effectiveness of DECAT, motor fuel savings could range up to 10 billion gallons annual.

  20. Forest and farmland conservation effects of Oregon's (USA) land-use planning program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kline, Jeffrey D

    2005-04-01

    Oregon's land-use planning program is often cited as an exemplary approach to forest and farmland conservation, but analyses of its effectiveness are limited. This article examines Oregon's land-use planning program using detailed spatial data describing building densities in western Oregon. An empirical model describes changes in building densities on forest and agricultural lands from 1974 to 1994, as a function of a gravity index of land's commuting distance to cities of various sizes, topographic characteristics, and zoning adopted under Oregon's land-use planning program. The effectiveness of Oregon's land-use planning program is evaluated based on the statistical significance of zoning variables and by computing estimated areas of forest and agricultural lands falling into undeveloped, low-density developed, and developed building density categories, with and without land-use zoning in effect. Results suggest that Oregon's land-use planning program has provided a measurable degree of protection to forest and agricultural lands since its implementation.

  1. Association of wintering raptors with Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program grasslands in Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, A.; Brittingham, M.; Grove, G.

    2010-01-01

    Conservation grasslands can provide valuable habitat resource for breeding songbirds, but their value for wintering raptors has received little attention. We hypothesized that increased availability of grassland habitat through the Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program (CREP) has resulted in an increase or redistribution in numbers of four species of raptors in Pennsylvania since 2001. We tested this by analyzing winter raptor counts from volunteer surveys, conducted from 2001 to 2008, for Red-tailed Hawks (Buteo jamaicensis), Rough-legged Hawks (Buteo lagopus), Northern Harriers (Circus cyaneus), and American Kestrels (Falco sparverius). During that period, numbers of wintering Northern Harriers increased by more than 20% per year. Log-linear Poisson regression models show that all four species increased in the region of Pennsylvania that had the most and longest-established conservation grasslands. At the county scale (N= 67), Bayesian spatial models showed that spatial and temporal population trends of all four species were positively correlated with the amount of conservation grassland. This relationship was particularly strong for Northern Harriers, with numbers predicted to increase by 35.7% per year for each additional 1% of farmland enrolled in CREP. Our results suggest that conservation grasslands are likely the primary cause of the increase in numbers of wintering Northern Harriers in Pennsylvania since 2001. ?? 2010 The Authors. Journal of Field Ornithology ?? 2010 Association of Field Ornithologists.

  2. Cis-regulatory PLETHORA promoter elements directing root and nodule expression are conserved between Arabidopsis thaliana and Medicago truncatula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franssen, Henk J; Kulikova, Olga; Willemsen, Viola; Heidstra, Renze

    2017-02-01

    Nodules are unique organs formed on roots of legumes by soil-borne bacteria, collectively known as rhizobium. Recently, we have shown that orthologs of the AINTEGUMENTA-like (AIL) AP2 transcription factors PLETHORA (PLT) 1 to 4, that redundantly regulate Arabidopsis thaliana root development are involved in root and nodule growth in Medicago truncatula. Hence, it is conceivable that rhizobium has co-opted these genes for nodule development. Whether this co-option requires the presence of specific cis-elements in the promoters and/or specialization of PLT protein function is not clear. Here, we analyzed the qualitative expression patterns of the Arabidopsis PLT1 to 4 promoters in Medicago roots and nodules and compared these with the described expression patterns of the Medicago PLT genes. Our studies reveal that the expression patterns of the investigated promoters and their Medicago orthologs are very similar, indicating that at least all cis-elements regulating spatial PLT expression are conserved among the Arabidopsis and Medicago PLT1 to 4 promoters.

  3. Profiling of conserved non-coding elements upstream of SHOX and functional characterisation of the SHOX cis-regulatory landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdin, Hannah; Fernández-Miñán, Ana; Benito-Sanz, Sara; Janssens, Sandra; Callewaert, Bert; De Waele, Kathleen; De Schepper, Jean; François, Inge; Menten, Björn; Heath, Karen E; Gómez-Skarmeta, José Luis; De Baere, Elfride

    2015-12-03

    Genetic defects such as copy number variations (CNVs) in non-coding regions containing conserved non-coding elements (CNEs) outside the transcription unit of their target gene, can underlie genetic disease. An example of this is the short stature homeobox (SHOX) gene, regulated by seven CNEs located downstream and upstream of SHOX, with proven enhancer capacity in chicken limbs. CNVs of the downstream CNEs have been reported in many idiopathic short stature (ISS) cases, however, only recently have a few CNVs of the upstream enhancers been identified. Here, we set out to provide insight into: (i) the cis-regulatory role of these upstream CNEs in human cells, (ii) the prevalence of upstream CNVs in ISS, and (iii) the chromatin architecture of the SHOX cis-regulatory landscape in chicken and human cells. Firstly, luciferase assays in human U2OS cells, and 4C-seq both in chicken limb buds and human U2OS cells, demonstrated cis-regulatory enhancer capacities of the upstream CNEs. Secondly, CNVs of these upstream CNEs were found in three of 501 ISS patients. Finally, our 4C-seq interaction map of the SHOX region reveals a cis-regulatory domain spanning more than 1 Mb and harbouring putative new cis-regulatory elements.

  4. NASA'S Water Resources Element Within the Applied Sciences Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toll, David; Doorn, Bradley; Engman, Edwin

    2011-01-01

    The NASA Earth Systems Division has the primary responsibility for the Applied Science Program and the objective to accelerate the use of NASA science results in applications to help solve problems important to society and the economy. The primary goal of the NASA Applied Science Program is to improve future and current operational systems by infusing them with scientific knowledge of the Earth system gained through space-based observation, assimilation of new observations, and development and deployment of enabling technologies, systems, and capabilities. This paper discusses major problems facing water resources managers, including having timely and accurate data to drive their decision support tools. It then describes how NASA's science and space based satellites may be used to overcome this problem. Opportunities for the water resources community to participate in NASA's Water Resources Applications Program are described.

  5. The finite element analysis program MSC Marc/Mentat a first introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Öchsner, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Based on simple examples, this book offers a short introduction to the general-purpose finite element program MSC Marc, a specialized program for non-linear problems (implicit solver) distributed by the MSC Software Corporation, which is commonly used in academia and industry. Today the documentation of all finite element programs includes a variety of step-by-step examples of differing complexity, and in addition, all software companies offer professional workshops on different topics. As such, rather than competing with these, the book focuses on providing simple examples, often single-element problems, which can easily be related to the theory that is discussed in finite element lectures. This makes it an ideal companion book to classical introductory courses on the finite element method.

  6. Effects of wind turbines on upland nesting birds in Conservation Reserve Program grasslands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leddy, K.L.; Higgins, K.F.; Naugle, D.E.

    1999-01-01

    Grassland passerines were surveyed during summer 1995 on the Buffalo Ridge Wind Resource Area in southwestern Minnesota to determine the relative influence of wind turbines on overall densities of upland nesting birds in Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) grasslands. Birds were surveyed along 40 m fixed width transects that were placed along wind turbine strings within three CRP fields and in three CRP fields without turbines. Conservation Reserve Program grasslands without turbines and areas located 180 m from turbines supported higher densities (261.0-312.5 males/100 ha) of grassland birds than areas within 80 m of turbines (58.2-128.0 males/100 ha). Human disturbance, turbine noise, and physical movements of turbines during operation may have disturbed nesting birds. We recommend that wind turbines be placed within cropland habitats that support lower densities of grassland passerines than those found in CRP grasslands.

  7. Research and development separation technology: The DOE Industrial Energy Conservation Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-07-01

    This brochure summarizes the Office of Industrial Programs' RandD efforts in the advancement of separation technology. The purpose of this brochure is to provide interested parties with information on federal industrial energy conservation activities in separation technology. The brochure is comprised of the following sections: Separation Technology, summarizes the current state of separation technology and its uses. Potential Energy Savings, discusses the potential for industrial energy conservation through the implementation of advanced separation processes. Office of Industrial Programs' RandD Efforts in Separation Technology Development, describes the separation RandD projects conducted by IP. RandD Data Base, lists contractor, principal investigator, and location of each separation-related RandD effort sponsored by IP.

  8. An insulator element located at the cyclin B1 interacting protein 1 gene locus is highly conserved among mammalian species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Wataru; Tomikawa, Junko; Inaki, Makoto; Kimura, Hiroshi; Onodera, Masafumi; Hata, Kenichiro; Nakabayashi, Kazuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Insulators are cis-elements that control the direction of enhancer and silencer activities (enhancer-blocking) and protect genes from silencing by heterochromatinization (barrier activity). Understanding insulators is critical to elucidate gene regulatory mechanisms at chromosomal domain levels. Here, we focused on a genomic region upstream of the mouse Ccnb1ip1 (cyclin B1 interacting protein 1) gene that was methylated in E9.5 embryos of the C57BL/6 strain, but unmethylated in those of the 129X1/SvJ and JF1/Ms strains. We hypothesized the existence of an insulator-type element that prevents the spread of DNA methylation within the 1.8 kbp segment, and actually identified a 242-bp and a 185-bp fragments that were located adjacent to each other and showed insulator and enhancer activities, respectively, in reporter assays. We designated these genomic regions as the Ccnb1ip1 insulator and the Ccnb1ip1 enhancer. The Ccnb1ip1 insulator showed enhancer-blocking activity in the luciferase assays and barrier activity in the colony formation assays. Further examination of the Ccnb1ip1 locus in other mammalian species revealed that the insulator and enhancer are highly conserved among a wide variety of species, and are located immediately upstream of the transcriptional start site of Ccnb1ip1. These newly identified cis-elements may be involved in transcriptional regulation of Ccnb1ip1, which is important in meiotic crossing-over and G2/M transition of the mitotic cell cycle.

  9. An Insulator Element Located at the Cyclin B1 Interacting Protein 1 Gene Locus Is Highly Conserved among Mammalian Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Wataru; Tomikawa, Junko; Inaki, Makoto; Kimura, Hiroshi; Onodera, Masafumi; Hata, Kenichiro; Nakabayashi, Kazuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Insulators are cis-elements that control the direction of enhancer and silencer activities (enhancer-blocking) and protect genes from silencing by heterochromatinization (barrier activity). Understanding insulators is critical to elucidate gene regulatory mechanisms at chromosomal domain levels. Here, we focused on a genomic region upstream of the mouse Ccnb1ip1 (cyclin B1 interacting protein 1) gene that was methylated in E9.5 embryos of the C57BL/6 strain, but unmethylated in those of the 129X1/SvJ and JF1/Ms strains. We hypothesized the existence of an insulator-type element that prevents the spread of DNA methylation within the 1.8 kbp segment, and actually identified a 242-bp and a 185-bp fragments that were located adjacent to each other and showed insulator and enhancer activities, respectively, in reporter assays. We designated these genomic regions as the Ccnb1ip1 insulator and the Ccnb1ip1 enhancer. The Ccnb1ip1 insulator showed enhancer-blocking activity in the luciferase assays and barrier activity in the colony formation assays. Further examination of the Ccnb1ip1 locus in other mammalian species revealed that the insulator and enhancer are highly conserved among a wide variety of species, and are located immediately upstream of the transcriptional start site of Ccnb1ip1. These newly identified cis-elements may be involved in transcriptional regulation of Ccnb1ip1, which is important in meiotic crossing-over and G2/M transition of the mitotic cell cycle. PMID:26110280

  10. Elements of Quality in Agricultural Business Education Programs

    OpenAIRE

    Scott, Donald F.; Dobson, William D.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes strategies for developing quality agribusiness management educational programs that include appropriate amounts of management and marketing subject matter, emphasize lifelong learning, avoid weak options, avoid mistakes made by business schools in the accreditation process, and hold potential for reversing the decline in undergraduate enrollments in agricultural economics.

  11. Snakes Have Feelings, Too: Elements of a Camp Snake Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Robert Ross

    2001-01-01

    A camp snake program can help campers overcome their fear of snakes, and people cannot truly enjoy nature when they carry a phobia about any one part of it. It can also help overcome prejudice by teaching truth and respect, instilling compassion, and helping campers develop empathy. Advice on catching, handling, identifying, keeping, and feeding…

  12. The Study Abroad Experience: A Crucial Element in Globalizing Business School Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangiero, George A.; Kraten, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Globalization is a fundamental reality of modern business practice. Participation in a study abroad program is a crucial element in helping students become well rounded global business leaders; it is an increasingly important element of a well rounded business curriculum. A semester or summer abroad, properly conceived and designed, can provide…

  13. A novel application of cultural consensus models to evaluate conservation education programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nekaris, K A I; McCabe, Sharon; Spaan, Denise; Ali, Muhammad Imron; Nijman, Vincent

    2017-09-01

    Conservation professionals recognize the need to evaluate education initiatives with a flexible approach that is culturally appropriate. Cultural-consensus theory (CCT) provides a framework for measuring the extent to which beliefs are communally held and has long been applied by social scientists. In a conservation-education context, we applied CCT and used free lists (i.e., a list of items on a topic stated in order of cultural importance) and domain analysis (analysis of how free lists go together within a cultural group) to evaluate a conservation education program in which we used a children's picture book to increase knowledge about and empathy for a critically endangered mammal, the Javan slow loris (Nycticebus javanicus). We extracted free lists of keywords generated by students (n = 580 in 18 schools) from essays they wrote before and after the education program. In 2 classroom sessions conducted approximately 18 weeks apart, we asked students to write an essay about their knowledge of the target species and then presented a book and several activities about slow loris ecology. Prior to the second session, we asked students to write a second essay. We generated free lists from both essays, quantified salience of terms used, and conducted minimal residuals factor analysis to determine presence of cultural domains surrounding slow lorises in each session. Students increased their use of words accurately associated with slow loris ecology and conservation from 43% in initial essays to 76% in final essays. Domain coherence increased from 22% to 47% across schools. Fifteen factors contributed to the domain slow loris. Between the first and second essays, factors that showed the greatest change were feeding ecology and slow loris as a forest protector, which increased 7-fold, and the humancentric factor, which decreased 5-fold. As demonstrated by knowledge retention and creation of unique stories and conservation opinions, children achieved all six levels of

  14. Development of a community energy conservation program. Volume II. Energy saving techniques for use by local governments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-11-26

    This volume contains technical material related to community energy conservation programs, and supplements the organizational material in Volume I. It is in looseleaf format so that sections related to specific topics can be easily copied or transferred to individuals responsible for various sorts of conservation, such as carpooling programs, building improvements, and community outreach. Three technical chapters are included, discussing topics in the areas of: internal city and county operations; community powers and regulations, and outreach programs. In the first, the concern is with what the community can do to reduce energy use in its own operations, an effective first step in promoting comprehensive energy conservation. The second chapter analyzes ways that the police power and fiscal powers of the community can be used for energy conservation, through building codes, zoning, and similar measures. In the final chapter, ways to promote energy conservation in the community are discussed: programs include outreach to households and firms, carpool promotion, waste oil recycling, etc.

  15. Handbook for the marketing of conservation and solar-energy programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mick, C K; Callahan, D

    1980-07-09

    A process-oriented approach is described for encouraging community level energy conservation and planning programs. The approach is designed to augment existing energy programs by focusing on the major barriers to changing current energy-related behavior and attitudes. A variety of concepts, tools and techniques which can be used to overcome these barriers are described. Suggestions are offered on how to design community energy campaign based on the concepts, tools and techniques described. Some brief case studies are provided as examples. (LEW)

  16. Materials/manufacturing element of the Advanced Turbine Systems Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karnitz, M.A.; Holcomb, R.S.; Wright, I.G. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

    1995-10-01

    The technology based portion of the Advanced Turbine Systems Program (ATS) contains several subelements which address generic technology issues for land-based gas-turbine systems. One subelement is the Materials/Manufacturing Technology Program which is coordinated by DOE-Oak Ridge Operations and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The work in this subelement is being performed predominantly by industry with assistance from universities and the national laboratories. Projects in this subelement are aimed toward hastening the incorporation of new materials and components in gas turbines. A materials/manufacturing plan was developed in FY 1994 with input from gas turbine manufacturers, materials suppliers, universities, and government laboratories. The plan outlines seven major subelements which focus on materials issues and manufacturing processes. Work is currently under way in four of the seven major subelements. There are now major projects on coatings and process development, scale-up of single crystal airfoil manufacturing technology, materials characterization, and technology information exchange.

  17. Revised congressional budget request, FY 1982. Conservation and renewable energy program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-03-01

    Programs dealing with conservation and renewable energy are reprinted from the Revised Congressional Budget Request FY 1982. From Volume 7, Energy Conservation, information is presented on: buildings and community systems; industrial programs; transportation programs; state and local programs; inventor's program energy conversion technology; energy impact assistance; and residential/commercial retrofit. From Volume 2, Energy Supply Research and Development, information and data are presented on: solar building applications; solar industrial applications; solar power applications; solar information systems; SERI facility; solar international activities; alcohol fuels; geothermal; and hydropower. From Volume 6, Energy Production, Demonstration, and Distribution, information and data on solar energy production, demonstration, and distribution are presented. From Volume 3, Energy Supply and R and D Appropriation, information and data on electric energy systems and energy storage systems are included. From Volume 4, information and data are included on geothermal resources development fund. In Volume 5, Power Marketing Administrations, information and data are presented on estimates by appropriations, positions and staff years by appropriation, staffing distribution, and power marketing administrations. Recissions and deferrals for FY 1981 are given. (MCW)

  18. Highly conserved elements discovered in vertebrates are present in non-syntenic loci of tunicates, act as enhancers and can be transcribed during development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanges, Remo; Hadzhiev, Yavor; Gueroult-Bellone, Marion; Roure, Agnes; Ferg, Marco; Meola, Nicola; Amore, Gabriele; Basu, Swaraj; Brown, Euan R.; De Simone, Marco; Petrera, Francesca; Licastro, Danilo; Strähle, Uwe; Banfi, Sandro; Lemaire, Patrick; Birney, Ewan; Müller, Ferenc; Stupka, Elia

    2013-01-01

    Co-option of cis-regulatory modules has been suggested as a mechanism for the evolution of expression sites during development. However, the extent and mechanisms involved in mobilization of cis-regulatory modules remains elusive. To trace the history of non-coding elements, which may represent candidate ancestral cis-regulatory modules affirmed during chordate evolution, we have searched for conserved elements in tunicate and vertebrate (Olfactores) genomes. We identified, for the first time, 183 non-coding sequences that are highly conserved between the two groups. Our results show that all but one element are conserved in non-syntenic regions between vertebrate and tunicate genomes, while being syntenic among vertebrates. Nevertheless, in all the groups, they are significantly associated with transcription factors showing specific functions fundamental to animal development, such as multicellular organism development and sequence-specific DNA binding. The majority of these regions map onto ultraconserved elements and we demonstrate that they can act as functional enhancers within the organism of origin, as well as in cross-transgenesis experiments, and that they are transcribed in extant species of Olfactores. We refer to the elements as ‘Olfactores conserved non-coding elements’. PMID:23393190

  19. Annual report of the wind characterisitics program element, April 1976--June 1977. [USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramsdell, J. V.

    1977-07-01

    Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories (PNL), has been providing technical and management support for the Wind Characteristics Program Element (WCPE) of the Wind Energy Conversion Program since April 1976. This first annual report to the Wind Systems Branch (WSB) of ERDA's Division of Solar Energy describes the technical progress within the Program Element from April 1976 through June 1977. Within the Wind Energy Conversion Program, the WCPE is a service element to provide information on wind characteristics to those involved in energy program planning, design and evaluation of performance of wind energy conversion systems(WECS), selection of sites for installation of WECS, and operation of WECS. To identify pertinent wind characteristics and collect and present that information in formats that are usable, the WCPE has been divided into four technical areas: Design and Performance Evaluation; Site Selection; Presiting Evaluation; and Planning and Operation.

  20. STARS: A general-purpose finite element computer program for analysis of engineering structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, K. K.

    1984-01-01

    STARS (Structural Analysis Routines) is primarily an interactive, graphics-oriented, finite-element computer program for analyzing the static, stability, free vibration, and dynamic responses of damped and undamped structures, including rotating systems. The element library consists of one-dimensional (1-D) line elements, two-dimensional (2-D) triangular and quadrilateral shell elements, and three-dimensional (3-D) tetrahedral and hexahedral solid elements. These elements enable the solution of structural problems that include truss, beam, space frame, plane, plate, shell, and solid structures, or any combination thereof. Zero, finite, and interdependent deflection boundary conditions can be implemented by the program. The associated dynamic response analysis capability provides for initial deformation and velocity inputs, whereas the transient excitation may be either forces or accelerations. An effective in-core or out-of-core solution strategy is automatically employed by the program, depending on the size of the problem. Data input may be at random within a data set, and the program offers certain automatic data-generation features. Input data are formatted as an optimal combination of free and fixed formats. Interactive graphics capabilities enable convenient display of nodal deformations, mode shapes, and element stresses.

  1. Energy management: a program of energy conservation for the community college facility. [Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Various Authors

    1978-01-01

    This handbook developes helps for assessing and improving the energy efficiency of the community-college facility. The TEEM approach (Total Educational Energy Management) is a labor-intensive approach which requires the commitment and participation of all segments of the college community. The TEEM program presented here defines a series of tasks selected, ordered, and implemented in such a way as to achieve two basic objectives: (1) reducing campus energy requirements, and (2) meeting those reduced energy requirements more efficiently without adversely affecting the quality of educational programs. This guide to large-scale energy conservation on college campuses includes step-by-step procedures for establishing a program task force, defining specific tasks, and assigning responsibilities. Action plans are developed, energy consumption monitored, goals set, and conservation measures implemented. A series of appendices provides more detailed information, charts, and worksheets related to all aspects of energy use. The TEEM program provides the basic structure for achieving a significant reduction in campus energy costs.

  2. FOCUS: Essential Elements of Quality for State-Funded Preschool Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    New Mexico Public Education Department, 2016

    2016-01-01

    The "FOCUS: Essential Elements of Quality, New Mexico's Tiered Quality Rating and Improvement System (TQRIS)," provides early childhood program personnel with the criteria, tools, and resources they need to improve the quality of their program. These quality improvements focus on children's growth, development, and learning--so that each…

  3. Integrating between Malay culture and conservation in Green campus program: Best practices from Universitas Riau, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwondo, Darmadi, Yunus, Mohd.

    2017-11-01

    Green campus program (GCP) is a policy to optimize the role of the University of Riau in implementing sustainable development. Green campus development is done by integrating Malay culture and conservation in every implementation of the program. We identify the biophysical, economic and socio-cultural characteristics as well as the problems encountered in the campus environment. This study uses desk study, survey, and focus group discussion (FGD). GCP analysis is divided into several stages, namely assess problem, design, implementation, monitor, evaluate and adjust. Bina Widya Campus of Universitas Riau has a good biodiversity of flora and fauna with species characteristics in lowland tropical forest ecosystems. Plant species of the Dipterocarpaceae family are the dominant species, whereas fauna is from reptile, leaves, and mammals. Efforts to maintain and enhance species diversity are undertaken by designing and constructing Arboretum and Ecoedupark for the ex situ conservation of flora and fauna. The enrichment of species is carried out by planting vegetation types that are closely related to Malay culture. On the other hand, the management of the green campus faces challenges in the diverse perceptions of stakeholders with low levels of academic participation. Economically the existence of the campus provides a multiplier effect on the emergence of various economic activities of the community around the campus. Implementation of green university campus of Riau University by integrating Melayu culture and conservation contributes to the creation of green open space which is increasingly widespread and able to support sustainable development, especially in Pekanbaru City.

  4. The Adopt-a-Herring program as a fisheries conservation tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Holly J.; Mather, Martha E.; Muth, Robert M.; Pautzke, Sarah M.; Smith, Joseph M.; Finn, John T.

    2009-01-01

    Successful conservation depends on a scientifically literate public. We developed the adopt-a-Herring program to educate nonscientists about fisheries and watershed restoration. this interactive educational and outreach project encouraged coastal residents to be involved in local watershed restoration. In the northeastern United States, river herring (Alosa spp.) are an important component of many coastal watersheds and often are the object of conservation efforts. In order to understand river herring spawning behavior and to improve the effectiveness of restoration efforts, our research tracked these fish via radiotelemetry in the Ipswich River, Massachusetts. In our adopt-a-Herring Program, participating stakeholder organizations adopted and named individual tagged river herring and followed their movements online. We also made information available to our adopters on our larger research goals, the mission and activities of other research and management agencies, examples of human actions that adversely affect watersheds, and opportunities for proactive conservation. Research results were communicated to adopters through our project web page and end-of-the-season summary presentations. Both tools cultivated a personal interest in river herring, stimulated discussion about fisheries and watershed restoration, educated participants about the goals and methods of scientists in general, and initiated critical thinking about human activities that advance or impede sustainability.

  5. The conserved domain in MORF proteins has distinct affinities to the PPR and E elements in PPR RNA editing factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayer-Császár, Eszter; Haag, Sascha; Jörg, Anja; Glass, Franziska; Härtel, Barbara; Obata, Toshihiro; Meyer, Etienne H; Brennicke, Axel; Takenaka, Mizuki

    2017-08-01

    In plant organelles specific nucleotide motifs at C to U RNA editing sites are recognized by the PLS-class of pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) proteins, which are additionally characterized by a C-terminal E domain. The PPR elements bind the nucleotides in the target RNA, while the function of the E domain has remained unknown. At most sites RNA editing also requires multiple organellar RNA editing factor (MORF) proteins. To understand how these two types of proteins are involved in RNA editing complexes, we systematically analyzed their protein-protein interactions. In vivo pull-down and yeast two-hybrid assays show that MORF proteins connect with selected PPR proteins. In a loss of function mutant of MORF1, a single amino acid alteration in the conserved MORF domain abrogates interactions with many PLS-class PPR proteins, implying the requirement of direct interaction to PPR proteins for the RNA editing function of MORF1. Subfragment analyses show that predominantly the N-terminal/central regions of the MORF domain in MORF1 and MORF3 bind the PPR proteins. Within the PPR proteins, the E domains in addition to PPR elements contact MORF proteins. In chimeric PPR proteins, different E domains alter the specificity of the interaction with MORF proteins. The selective interactions between E domain containing PPR and MORF proteins suggest that the E domains and MORF proteins play a key role for specific protein complexes to assemble at different RNA editing sites. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Snake River Sockeye Salmon Captive Broodstock Program; Hatchery Element, 2004 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, Dan J.; Heindel, Jeff A.; Redding, Jeremy (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, ID)

    2006-05-01

    On November 20, 1991, the National Marine Fisheries Service listed Snake River sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka as endangered under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. In 1991, the Idaho Department of Fish and Game, the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes, and the National Marine Fisheries Service initiated efforts to conserve and rebuild populations in Idaho. Initial steps to recover sockeye salmon included the establishment of a captive broodstock program at the Idaho Department of Fish and Game Eagle Fish Hatchery. Sockeye salmon broodstock and culture responsibilities are shared with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration at two locations adjacent to Puget Sound in Washington State. Activities conducted by the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration are reported under separate cover. Idaho Department of Fish and Game monitoring and evaluation activities of captive broodstock program fish releases (annual report to the Bonneville Power Administration for the research element of the program) are also reported separately. Captive broodstock program activities conducted between January 1, 2004 and December 31, 2004 for the hatchery element of the program are presented in this report. In 2004, twenty-seven anadromous sockeye salmon returned to the Sawtooth Valley. Traps on Redfish Lake Creek and the upper Salmon River at the Sawtooth Fish Hatchery intercepted one and four adults, respectively. Additionally, one adult sockeye salmon was collected at the East Fork Salmon River weir, 18 were seined from below the Sawtooth Fish Hatchery weir, one adult sockeye salmon was observed below the Sawtooth Fish Hatchery weir but not captured, and two adult sockeye salmon were observed in Little Redfish Lake but not captured. Fish were captured/collected between July 24 and September 14, 2004. The captured/collected adult sockeye salmon (12 females and 12 males) originated from a variety of release strategies and were transferred to

  7. The effects of a conservative rehabilitation program for multidirectional instability of the shoulder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Lyn; Balster, Simon; Lenssen, Ross; Hoy, Greg; Pizzari, Tania

    2018-01-01

    Conservative management is commonly recommended as the first-line treatment for multidirectional instability (MDI) of the shoulder. Despite this, the evidence for efficacy of treatment is limited, and until recently, guidance for clinicians on conservative rehabilitation programs has been inadequate. This study evaluated the effectiveness of a physiotherapy-led exercise program for participants with MDI. In a single-group study design, 43 participants (16 male, 27 female; mean age, 19.8 years, standard deviation, 4.9 years) diagnosed with MDI undertook a 12-week exercise program. Primary outcome measures were the Melbourne Instability Shoulder Score, Western Ontario Shoulder Instability Index, and Oxford Shoulder Instability Score. Secondary outcomes were strength and scapular position. All measures were taken at baseline and repeated at the conclusion of the program. Test differences before and after rehabilitation were evaluated with dependent t tests and single-group effect size calculations (standardized mean difference [SMD]) to provide a measure of the magnitude of the difference. Large effects were found between pre- and postrehabilitation scores on all functional instability questionnaires, with the Western Ontario Shoulder Instability Index demonstrating the largest effect (SMD, -3.04). Scapular upward rotation improved significantly in the early ranges of abduction (0°-60°), with moderate to large effects (SMDs, 0.54-0.95). All strength measures significantly improved, with large differences identified (SMDs, 0.69-2.08). The identified improvement in functional status, shoulder muscle strength, and scapular positioning after rehabilitation allows greater confidence in the value of conservative management of MDI and informs further research by way of clinical trials in the area. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Training program for energy conservation in new-building construction. Volume II. Energy conservation technology: for the building inspector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1977-12-01

    A Model Code for Energy Conservation in New Building Construction has been developed by those national organizations primarily concerned with the development and promulgation of model codes. The technical provisions are based on ASHRAE Standard 90-75 and are intended for use by state and local officials. This training manual contains the basic information necessary to acquaint the field building inspector with the concepts of energy conservation in buildings and instructs him in the basic techniques of field inspection of energy compliance.

  9. Structure of Fusarium poae virus 1 shows conserved and variable elements of partitivirus capsids and evolutionary relationships to picobirnavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jinghua; Ochoa, Wendy F; Li, Hua; Havens, Wendy M; Nibert, Max L; Ghabrial, Said A; Baker, Timothy S

    2010-12-01

    Filamentous fungus Fusarium poae is a worldwide cause of the economically important disease Fusarium head blight of cereal grains. The fungus is itself commonly infected with a bisegmented dsRNA virus from the family Partitiviridae. For this study, we determined the structure of partitivirus Fusarium poae virus 1 (FpV1) to a resolution of 5.6Å or better by electron cryomicroscopy and three-dimensional image reconstruction. The main structural features of FpV1 are consistent with those of two other fungal partitiviruses for which high-resolution structures have been recently reported. These shared features include a 120-subunit T=1 capsid comprising 60 quasisymmetrical capsid protein dimers with both shell and protruding domains. Distinguishing features are evident throughout the FpV1 capsid, however, consistent with its more massive subunits and its greater phylogenetic divergence relative to the other two structurally characterized partitiviruses. These results broaden our understanding of conserved and variable elements of fungal partitivirus structure, as well as that of vertebrate picobirnavirus, and support the suggestion that a phylogenetic subcluster of partitiviruses closely related to FpV1 should constitute a separate taxonomic genus. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Heavy Ion Inertial Fusion Energy: Summaries of Program Elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedman, A; Barnard, J J; Kaganovich, I; Seidl, P A; Briggs, R J; Faltens, A; Kwan, J W; Lee, E P; Logan, B G

    2011-02-28

    The goal of the Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF) Program is to apply high-current accelerator technology to IFE power production. Ion beams of mass {approx}100 amu and kinetic energy {>=} 1 GeV provide efficient energy coupling into matter, and HIF enjoys R&D-supported favorable attributes of: (1) the driver, projected to be robust and efficient; see 'Heavy Ion Accelerator Drivers.'; (2) the targets, which span a continuum from full direct to full indirect drive (and perhaps fast ignition), and have metal exteriors that enable injection at {approx}10 Hz; see 'IFE Target Designs'; (3) the near-classical ion energy deposition in the targets; see 'Beam-Plasma Interactions'; (4) the magnetic final lens, robust against damage; see 'Final Optics-Heavy Ion Beams'; and (5) the fusion chamber, which may use neutronically-thick liquids; see 'Liquid-Wall Chambers.' Most studies of HIF power plants have assumed indirect drive and thick liquid wall protection, but other options are possible.

  11. The impact of a shade coffee certification program on forest conservation using remote sensing and household data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Ryo, E-mail: inter.takahashi@gmail.com [Policy Research Center, National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies, 7-22-1, Roppongi, Minato-ku, Tokyo 106-8677 (Japan); Todo, Yasuyuki, E-mail: yastodo@k.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of International Studies, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8563 (Japan)

    2014-01-15

    In recent years, shade coffee certification programs have attracted increasing attention from forest conservation and development organizations. The certification programs could be expected to promote forest conservation by providing a premium price to shade coffee producers. However, little is known about the significance of the conservation efforts generated by certification programs. In particular, the relationship between the impact of the certification and producer characteristics has yet to be examined. The purpose of this study, which was conducted in Ethiopia, was to examine the impact of a shade coffee certification program on forest conservation and its relationship with the socioeconomic characteristics of the producers. Remote sensing data of 2005 and 2010 was used to gauge the changes in forest area. Employing a probit model, we found that a forest coffee area being certified increased the probability of forest conservation by 19.3 percentage points relative to forest coffee areas lacking certification. We also found that although economically poor producers tended to engage in forest clearing, the forest coffee certification program had a significant impact on these producers. This result suggests that the certification program significantly affects the behaviors of economically poor producers and motivates these producers to conserve the forest. -- Highlights: • We employed the probit mode to evaluate the impact of the shade coffee certification on forest conservation in Ethiopia. • We estimated how the impact of the certification varied among producers with different characteristics. • The certification increased the probability of conserving forest by 19.3 percentage points. • Certification program motivated the economically poor producers to conserve the forest.

  12. Implementation of genetic conservation practices in a muskellunge propagation and stocking program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Martin J.; Sloss, Brian L.; Hatzenbeler, Gene R.; Kampa, Jeffrey M.; Simonson, Timothy D.; Avelallemant, Steven P.; Lindenberger, Gary A.; Underwood, Bruce D.

    2010-01-01

    Conservation of genetic resources is a challenging issue for agencies managing popular sport fishes. To address the ongoing potential for genetic risks, we developed a comprehensive set of recommendations to conserve genetic diversity of muskellunge (Esox masquinongy) in Wisconsin, and evaluated the extent to which the recommendations can be implemented. Although some details are specific to Wisconsin's muskellunge propagation program, many of the practical issues affecting implementation are applicable to other species and production systems. We developed guidelines to restrict future broodstock collection operations to lakes with natural reproduction and to develop a set of brood lakes to use on a rotational basis within regional stock boundaries, but implementation will require considering lakes with variable stocking histories. Maintaining an effective population size sufficient to minimize the risk of losing alleles requires limiting broodstock collection to large lakes. Recommendations to better approximate the temporal distribution of spawning in hatchery operations and randomize selection of brood fish are feasible. Guidelines to modify rearing and distribution procedures face some logistic constraints. An evaluation of genetic diversity of hatchery-produced fish during 2008 demonstrated variable success representing genetic variation of the source population. Continued evaluation of hatchery operations will optimize operational efficiency while moving toward genetic conservation goals.

  13. Virtual garden computer program for use in exploring the elements of biodiversity people want in cities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shwartz, Assaf; Cheval, Helene; Simon, Laurent; Julliard, Romain

    2013-08-01

    Urban ecology is emerging as an integrative science that explores the interactions of people and biodiversity in cities. Interdisciplinary research requires the creation of new tools that allow the investigation of relations between people and biodiversity. It has been established that access to green spaces or nature benefits city dwellers, but the role of species diversity in providing psychological benefits remains poorly studied. We developed a user-friendly 3-dimensional computer program (Virtual Garden [www.tinyurl.com/3DVirtualGarden]) that allows people to design their own public or private green spaces with 95 biotic and abiotic features. Virtual Garden allows researchers to explore what elements of biodiversity people would like to have in their nearby green spaces while accounting for other functions that people value in urban green spaces. In 2011, 732 participants used our Virtual Garden program to design their ideal small public garden. On average gardens contained 5 different animals, 8 flowers, and 5 woody plant species. Although the mathematical distribution of flower and woody plant richness (i.e., number of species per garden) appeared to be similar to what would be expected by random selection of features, 30% of participants did not place any animal species in their gardens. Among those who placed animals in their gardens, 94% selected colorful species (e.g., ladybug [Coccinella septempunctata], Great Tit [Parus major], and goldfish), 53% selected herptiles or large mammals, and 67% selected non-native species. Older participants with a higher level of education and participants with a greater concern for nature designed gardens with relatively higher species richness and more native species. If cities are to be planned for the mutual benefit of people and biodiversity and to provide people meaningful experiences with urban nature, it is important to investigate people's relations with biodiversity further. Virtual Garden offers a standardized

  14. Urban transportation energy conservation. SRGP operating instructions and program documentation. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacMann, J. F.; Nestle, R. E.

    1979-10-01

    SRGP is a computer program for Short Range Generalized transportation Policy analysis for use in analyzing the energy conservation potential of a broad spectrum of transit, carpooling, vanpooling, parking, pricing, and other transportation system management measures. It is intended for use in either an areawide or corridor context and in what is referred to as a sketch planning style of analysis. Outputs include changes in fuel consumption, vehicle emissions, vehicle miles of travel and modal shares for drive alone, shared ride, and transit. Changes in travel behavior are forecast relating to auto ownership, work trip mode choice, and the frequency, destination, and mode choice for both shopping and social/recreational non-work travel. Using a random sample household forecasting procedure, SRGP is a modified version of the program UMODEL, distributed by the US Urban Mass Transportation Administration as part of UTPS, the Urban Transportation Planning System.

  15. 76 FR 78174 - Energy Conservation Program: Test Procedure and Energy Conservation Standard for Set-Top Boxes...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-16

    ... Contents I. Introduction II. Discussion A. Energy Conservation Standard 1. Product Classes 2. Lower Power... Procedure 1. Impact of Service Provider Software 2. Live Network Testing 3. Video Source 4. Digital Video...). \\6\\ IEC-62087: Methods of measurement for the power consumption of audio, video and related equipment...

  16. Description and evaluation of a hearing conservation program in use in a professional symphony orchestra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Ian; Driscoll, Tim; Ackermann, Bronwen

    2015-04-01

    Professional orchestral musicians risk permanent hearing loss while playing their instruments. Protecting the hearing of these musicians in the workplace is critical to their ongoing ability to play their instruments, but typical workplace hearing conservation measures can have very damaging effects on the product (music) and the musicians' abilities to hear one another sufficiently. To enable effective intervention, orchestras as employers must encourage engagement with hearing protection programs and implement controls while preserving the integrity of the music. To achieve this, typical approaches used in other industries must be redesigned to suit this unique workplace. In response to these challenges, the Queensland Symphony Orchestra (Brisbane, Australia) introduced a comprehensive hearing conservation strategy in 2005 based upon best practice at the time. This strategy-which has been regularly refined-continues to be implemented on a daily basis. This investigation aimed to assess the successes, difficulties, and practical viability of the program. To achieve this a process evaluation was carried out, incorporating archival analyses, player and management focus groups, and an interview with the program's administrator. Results show the program has successfully become integrated into the orchestra's and the musicians' daily operations and significantly contributes to managing the risk of hearing loss in this population. While there is room for improvement in the orchestra's approach-particularly regarding usable personal protective devices and improved education and training, results are encouraging. This study provides a basis for those wishing to implement or evaluate similar paradigms. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Occupational Hygiene Society.

  17. Effects of the Conservation Reserve Program on Hydrologic Processes in the Southern High Plains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haacker, E. M.; Smidt, S. J.; Kendall, A. D.; Basso, B.; Hyndman, D. W.

    2015-12-01

    The Southern High Plains Aquifer is a rapidly depleting resource that supports agriculture in parts of New Mexico and the Texas Panhandle. The development of the aquifer has changed the landscape and the water cycle of the region. This study illustrates the evolving patterns of land use and the effects of cultivation, from irrigated to dryland farming to the countermanding influence of the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP). Previous research indicates that greater recharge rates occur under cultivated land in the Southern High Plains than under unbroken soil: the transition to cultivation causes increased recharge, under both dryland and irrigated management, though most recharge still occurs through playa lakes. The Conservation Reserve Program takes land out of crop production, replacing the land cover with something more like the natural ecosystem. This may decrease recharge below fields, and reduce runoff that feeds playa lakes; or, CRP may help stabilize playa lakes, increasing recharge. Changes to the water cycle are investigated at the field scale using the System Approach to Land Use Sustainability (SALUS) crop model, and at the regional scale with the Landscape Hydrology Model (LHM), and compared with historical data and water table elevations.

  18. Energy Conservation Program of the Division of Substation and Control Engineering : An Interim Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ,

    1981-04-01

    Energy conservation projects undertaken by BPA that could benefit residential and commercial users and development of prototype equipment are described. Progress reports are presented and directions that the projects will take are indicated. The first projects presented are those being done at BPA's Midway Residential Community: studies on air infiltration and weatherization, and evaluation of such energy conservation measures as heat pump and solar water heaters. The next section involves an energy audit and retrofit program undertaken to reduce energy consumption in BPA's own buildings. The third section, also concerned with BPA's efforts to reduce internal energy consumption, presents the application of passive solar techniques to the design of new BPA buildings. The fourth section reports on a system developed to utilize waste thermal energy from transformers and solar energy for space heating and cooling. The fifth section also involves the development of a prototype system, one to monitor energy usage of industrial equipment. The final sections report on projects involving solar and wind energy, the Photovoltaic Applications Program, and the Mod-2 Wind Generator project at Goodnoe Hills. (MCW)

  19. Rare earth elements as a by-catch of sedimentary deposits. Exploration program of rare earth elements; Selten Erd Elemente als Beifang sedimentaerer Lagerstaetten. Erkundungsprogramm Selten Erd Elemente

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linhardt, E.; Gebhardt, A. (comps.)

    2014-02-15

    The increasing demand for rare earth elements (REE) in the field of ''green technologies'' on the one hand and the shortage of raw materials on the world markets on the other hand confronted also Bavaria as an industrial location with growing supply problems in these ''high tech raw materials''. The aim of exploration was the clarification of the feedstock REE potential of heavy mineral concentrates which are obtained in the industrial extraction and processing of sand and kaolin in existing extraction operations in northern Bavaria as by catch and are potentially winnable or marketable. The in-depth investigation enabled the potential of found rare earth elements and other high-tech metal oxides that can be classified as very likely find it in terms of an economic recovery. [German] Der zunehmende Bedarf an Selten Erd Elementen (SEE) im Bereich der ''Gruenen Technologien'' zum Einen sowie die Rohstoffverknappung auf den Weltmaerkten zum Anderen konfrontiert auch Bayern als Industriestandort mit wachsenden Versorgungsproblemen bei diesen ''high tech-Grundstoffen''. Ziel der Erkundung war die Klaerung des rohstofflichen SEE-Potenzials von Schwermineralkonzentraten, die bei der grosstechnischen Gewinnung und Aufbereitung von Sand und Kaolin in vorhandenen Gewinnungsbetrieben Nordbayerns als Beifang anfallen und potenziell gewinn- bzw. vermarktbar sind. Im Zuge der Untersuchung konnten nutzbare Potenziale von Selten Erd Elementen und anderen high-tech - Metalloxiden gefunden werden, die sehr wahrscheinlich als fuendig im Hinblick auf eine wirtschaftliche Gewinnung eingestuft werden koennen.

  20. Modified Delphi Consensus to Suggest Key Elements of Stepping On Falls Prevention Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahoney, Jane E; Clemson, Lindy; Schlotthauer, Amy; Mack, Karin A; Shea, Terry; Gobel, Vicki; Cech, Sandy

    2017-01-01

    Falls among older adults result in substantial morbidity and mortality. Community-based programs have been shown to decrease the rate of falls. In 2007, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention funded a research study to determine how to successfully disseminate the evidence-based fall prevention program (Stepping On) in the community setting. As the first step for this study, a panel of subject matter experts was convened to suggest which parts of the Stepping On fall prevention program were considered key elements, which could not be modified by implementers. Older adult fall prevention experts from the US, Canada, and Australia participated in a modified Delphi technique process to suggest key program elements of Stepping On. Forty-four experts were invited to ensure that the panel of experts would consist of equal numbers of physical therapists, occupational therapists, geriatricians, exercise scientists, and public health researchers. Consensus was determined by percent of agreement among panelists. A Rasch analysis of item fit was conducted to explore the degree of diversity and/or homogeneity of responses across our panelists. The Rasch analysis of the 19 panelists using fit statistics shows there was a reasonable and sufficient range of diverse perspectives (Infit MnSQ 1.01, Z score -0.1, Outfit MnSQ 0.96, Z score -0.2 with a separation of 4.89). Consensus was achieved that these elements were key: 17 of 18 adult learning elements, 11 of 22 programming, 12 of 15 exercise, 7 of 8 upgrading exercises, 2 of 4 peer co-leader's role, and all of the home visits, booster sessions, group leader's role, and background and training of group leader elements. The top five key elements were: (1) use plain language, (2) develop trust, (3) engage people in what is meaningful and contextual for them, (4) train participants for cues in self-monitoring quality of exercises, and (5) group leader learns about exercises and understands how to progress them. The Delphi

  1. Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) contributions to wildlife habitat, management issues, challenges and policy choices--an annotated bibliography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Arthur W.; Vandever, Mark W.

    2012-01-01

    The following bibliography presents brief summaries of documents relevant to Conservation Reserve Program relations to wildlife habitat, habitat management in agriculturally dominated landscapes, and conservation policies potentially affecting wildlife habitats in agricultural ecosystems. Because the literature summaries furnished provide only sweeping overviews, users are urged to obtain and evaluate those papers appearing useful to obtain a more complete understanding of study findings and their implications to conservation in agricultural ecosystems. The bibliography contains references to reports that reach beyond topics that directly relate to the Conservation Reserve Program. Sections addressing grassland management and landowner surveys/opinions, for example, furnish information useful for enhancing development and administration of conservation policies affecting lands beyond those enrolled in conservation programs. Some sections of the bibliography (for example, agricultural conservation policy, economics, soils) are far from inclusive of all relevant material written on the subject. Hopefully, these sections will serve as fundamental introductions to related issues. In a few instances, references may be presented in more than one section of the bibliography. For example, individual papers specifically addressing both non-game and game birds are included in respective sections of the bibliography. Duplication of citations and associated notes has, however, been kept to a minimum.

  2. Starting a local conservation and passive solar retrofit program: an energy planning sourcebook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barber, V; Mathews, R

    1982-02-01

    A city planner or a neighborhood activist may wish to initiate a local conservation and passive solar retrofit program but may not have previous experience in doing so. This sourcebook is designed to assist interested individuals with their energy planning efforts, from determining retrofit potential, to financing and implementing the program. An approach or methodology is provided which can be applied to determine retrofit potential in single-family residences, mobile homes, multifamily residences, and nonresidential buildings. Case studies in Albuquerque, New Mexico, are given as examples. Guidelines are provided for evaluating the economic benefits of a retrofit program through benefit-cost analysis and economic base studies at the city and neighborhood levels. Also included are approaches to community outreach, detailing how to get started, how to gain local support, and examples of successful programs throughout the US. The need for financing, the development of a local strategy, public and private financing techniques, and community energy service organizations are examined. In addition to the Albuquerque case studies, a brief technology characterization, heat-loss calculations, economic tools, and a list of resources are appended.

  3. Framework and criteria for program evaluation in the Office of Conservation and Renewable Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-04-30

    This study addresses the development of a framework and generic criteria for conducting program evaluation in the Office of Conservation and Renewable Energy. The evaluation process is intended to provide the Assistant Secretary with comprehensive and consistent evaluation data for management decisions regarding policy and strategy, crosscutting energy impacts and resource allocation and justification. The study defines evaluation objectives, identifies basic information requirements (criteria), and identifies a process for collecting evaluation results at the basic program level, integrating the results, and summarizing information upward through the CE organization to the Assistant Secretary. Methods are described by which initial criteria were tested, analyzed, and refined for CE program applicability. General guidelines pertaining to evaluation and the Sunset Review requirements are examined and various types, designs, and models for evaluation are identified. Existing CE evaluation reports are reviewed and comments on their adequacy for meeting current needs are provided. An inventory and status survey of CE program evaluation activities is presented, as are issues, findings, and recommendations pertaining to CE evaluation and Sunset Review requirements. Also, sources of data for use in evaluation and the Sunset Review response are identified. An inventory of CE evaluation-related documents and reports is provided.

  4. Snake River Sockeye Salmon Captive Broodstock Program; Hatchery Element, 1998 Annual Progress Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kline, Paul A.; Heindel, Jeff A.

    1999-12-01

    On November 20, 1991, the National Marine Fisheries Service listed Snake River sockeye salmon as endangered under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. In 1991, the Idaho Department of Fish and Game, the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes, and NMFS initiated efforts to conserve and rebuild populations in Idaho. Captive broodstock program activities conducted between January 1, 1998 and December 31, 1998, are presented in this report.

  5. Bainbridge Energy Challenge. Energy efficiency and conservation block grant (EECBG) - Better buildings neighborhood program. Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraus, Yvonne X.

    2014-02-14

    RePower Bainbridge and Bremerton (RePower) is a residential energy-efficiency and conservation program designed to foster a sustainable, clean, and renewable energy economy. The program was a 3.5 year effort in the cities of Bainbridge Island and Bremerton, Washington, to conserve and reduce energy use, establish a trained home performance trade ally network, and create local jobs. RePower was funded through a $4.8 million grant from the US Department of Energy, Better Buildings Program. The grant’s performance period was August 1, 2010 through March 30, 2014.

  6. How well can captive breeding programs conserve biodiversity? A review of salmonids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Dylan J

    2008-11-01

    Captive breeding programs are increasingly being initiated to prevent the imminent extinction of endangered species and/or populations. But how well can they conserve genetic diversity and fitness, or re-establish self-sustaining populations in the wild? A review of these complex questions and related issues in salmonid fishes reveals several insights and uncertainties. Most programs can maintain genetic diversity within populations over several generations, but available research suggests the loss of fitness in captivity can be rapid, its magnitude probably increasing with the duration in captivity. Over the long-term, there is likely tremendous variation between (i) programs in their capacity to maintain genetic diversity and fitness, and (ii) species or even intraspecific life-history types in both the severity and manner of fitness-costs accrued. Encouragingly, many new theoretical and methodological approaches now exist for current and future programs to potentially reduce these effects. Nevertheless, an unavoidable trade-off exists between conserving genetic diversity and fitness in certain instances, such as when captive-bred individuals are temporarily released into the wild. Owing to several confounding factors, there is also currently little evidence that captive-bred lines of salmonids can or cannot be reintroduced as self-sustaining populations. Most notably, the root causes of salmonid declines have not been mitigated where captive breeding programs exist. Little research has also addressed under what conditions an increase in population abundance due to captive-rearing might offset fitness reductions induced in captivity. Finally, more empirical investigation is needed to evaluate the genetic/fitness benefits and risks associated with (i) maintaining captive broodstocks as either single or multiple populations within one or more facilities, (ii) utilizing cryopreservation or surrogate broodstock technologies, and (iii) adopting other alternatives to

  7. Incentive-Based Conservation Programs in Developing Countries: A Review of Some Key Issues and Suggestions for Improvements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiteri, Arian; Nepalz, Sanjay K.

    2006-01-01

    Biodiversity conservation in developing countries has been a challenge because of the combination of rising human populations, rapid technological advances, severe social hardships, and extreme poverty. To address the social, economic, and ecological limitations of people-free parks and reserves, incentives have been incorporated into conservation programs in the hopes of making conservation meaningful to local people. However, such incentive-based programs have been implemented with little consideration for their ability to fulfill promises of greater protection of biodiversity. Evaluations of incentive-based conservation programs indicate that the approach continually falls short of the rhetoric. This article provides an overview of the problems associated with incentive-based conservation approaches in developing countries. It argues that existing incentive-based programs (IBPs) have yet to realize that benefits vary greatly at different “community” scales and that a holistic conceptualization of a community is essential to incorporate the complexities of a heterogeneous community when designing and implementing the IBPs. The spatial complexities involved in correctly identifying the beneficiaries in a community and the short-term focus of IBPs are two major challenges for sustaining conservation efforts. The article suggests improvements in three key areas: accurate identification of “target” beneficiaries, greater inclusion of marginal communities, and efforts to enhance community aptitudes.

  8. A systematic enhancer screen using lentivector transgenesis identifies conserved and non-conserved functional elements at the Olig1 and Olig2 locus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Friedli

    Full Text Available Finding sequences that control expression of genes is central to understanding genome function. Previous studies have used evolutionary conservation as an indicator of regulatory potential. Here, we present a method for the unbiased in vivo screen of putative enhancers in large DNA regions, using the mouse as a model. We cloned a library of 142 overlapping fragments from a 200 kb-long murine BAC in a lentiviral vector expressing LacZ from a minimal promoter, and used the resulting vectors to infect fertilized murine oocytes. LacZ staining of E11 embryos obtained by first using the vectors in pools and then testing individual candidates led to the identification of 3 enhancers, only one of which shows significant evolutionary conservation. In situ hybridization and 3C/4C experiments suggest that this enhancer, which is active in the neural tube and posterior diencephalon, influences the expression of the Olig1 and/or Olig2 genes. This work provides a new approach for the large-scale in vivo screening of transcriptional regulatory sequences, and further demonstrates that evolutionary conservation alone seems too limiting a criterion for the identification of enhancers.

  9. Energy-Integrating Master Plan for the City of Atlantic City, New Jersey: energy conservation element. Volume 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-11-01

    The Master Plan describes a coordinated energy-conservation effort for the City, the effective application and ultimate success of which depend primarily on the active involvement of the City government and its functional departments. Following an introductory section, Section XXI, Community Energy Determinants, describes the natural and man-made environment, growth and energy profiles, and the institutional environment. Additional sections are entitled: Energy-Conservation Options (passive energy options and active energy-conservation options); Energy Integration; Community Energy Management; Energy-Conservation Implementation Plan; and an appendix containing an energy-related glossary, a directory to various sources of information on energy conservation, various technical documents, a copy of the National Energy Act, and a bibliography. (MCW)

  10. based conservation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/mcd.v10i2.1. Increasing women's par- ticipation in community- based conservation: key to success? Ensuring that both men and women benefit equitably from conservation and development programs is likely to increase the long-term success of both conservation and development goals. However ...

  11. AlterBBN: A program for calculating the BBN abundances of the elements in alternative cosmologies

    CERN Document Server

    Arbey, Alexandre

    2012-01-01

    We describe AlterBBN, a public C program for evaluating the abundances of the elements generated by Big-Bang nucleosynthesis (BBN). This program enables the user to compute the abundances of the elements in the standard model of cosmology, and additionally provides possibilities to alter the assumptions of the cosmological model in order to study their consequences on the abundances of the elements. In particular the baryon-to-photon ratio and the effective number of neutrinos, as well as the expansion rate and the entropy content of the Universe during BBN can be modified in AlterBBN. Such features allow the user to test the cosmological models by confronting them to BBN constraints. A presentation of the physics of BBN and the features of AlterBBN is provided here under the form of a manual.

  12. Application of the Single Hardening Model in the Finite Element Program ABAQUS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Kim Parsberg

    that several conceptual models, describing the non-linear and irreversible behaviour of soil, have been developed over the last three decades few of them are accessible in commercial finite element programs. In the present study the Single Hardening Model, that is a time independent elastoplastic constitutive...

  13. Ultimate limit state design of sheet pile walls by finite elements and nonlinear programming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krabbenhøft, Kristian; Damkilde, Lars; Krabbenhøft, Sven

    2005-01-01

    as a nonlinear programming problem where the yield moment of the wall is minimized subject to equilibrium and yield conditions. The finite element discretization used enables exact fulfillment of these conditions and thus, according to the lower bound theorem, the solutions are safe....

  14. Ultimate Limit State Design Of Sheet Pile Walls By Finite Elements And Nonlinear Programming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krabbenhøft, Kristian; Damkilde, Lars; Krabbenhøft, Sven

    2005-01-01

    as a nonlinear programming problem where the yield moment of the wall is minimized subject to equilibrium and yield conditions. The finite element discretization used enables exact fulfillment of these conditions and thus, according to the lower bound theorem, the solutions are safe...

  15. Elements of Mathematics, Book O: Intuitive Background. Chapter 16, Introduction to Computer Programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exner, Robert; And Others

    The sixteen chapters of this book provide the core material for the Elements of Mathematics Program, a secondary sequence developed for highly motivated students with strong verbal abilities. The sequence is based on a functional-relational approach to mathematics teaching, and emphasizes teaching by analysis of real-life situations. This text is…

  16. Pest rodents as the essential elements of Mycobacterium bovis controlling programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elahe Moradi

    2015-01-01

    Discussion: This study was unable to track tangible evidence of tuberculosis transmission by mice. Hence to prove this hypothesis, further studies are advised. However, it was found that mice are potentially a reservoir of zoonotic pathogens, and therefore its importance in this regard must be considered as an effective element of any controlling program.

  17. Workplace Violence Training Programs for Health Care Workers: An Analysis of Program Elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbury, Sheila; Hodgson, Michael; Zankowski, Donna; Lipscomb, Jane

    2017-06-01

    Commercial workplace violence (WPV) prevention training programs differ in their approach to violence prevention and the content they present. This study reviews 12 such programs using criteria developed from training topics in the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's (OSHA) Guidelines for Preventing Workplace Violence for Healthcare and Social Service Workers and a review of the WPV literature. None of the training programs addressed all the review criteria. The most significant gap in content was the lack of attention to facility-specific risk assessment and policies. To fill this gap, health care facilities should supplement purchased training programs with specific training in organizational policies and procedures, emergency action plans, communication, facility risk assessment, and employee post-incident debriefing and monitoring. Critical to success is a dedicated program manager who understands risk assessment, facility clinical operations, and program management and evaluation.

  18. 76 FR 56126 - Energy Conservation Program: Treatment of “Smart” Appliances in Energy Conservation Standards and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-12

    .... Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Building Technologies Program, EE-2J... Standards and Test Procedures AGENCY: Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Department of Energy... Mail: Ms. Brenda Edwards, U.S. Department of Energy, Building Technologies Program, Mailstop EE-2J...

  19. 77 FR 4698 - Energy Conservation Program: Test Procedure and Energy Conservation Standard for Set-Top Boxes...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-31

    .... Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Building Technologies Program, EE-2J... Set-Top Boxes and Network Equipment AGENCY: Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.... Brenda Edwards, U.S. Department of Energy, Building Technologies Program, Mailstop EE-2J, Request for...

  20. Meta-analysis of breast cancer microarray studies in conjunction with conserved cis-elements suggest patterns for coordinate regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lundberg Cathryn

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene expression measurements from breast cancer (BrCa tumors are established clinical predictive tools to identify tumor subtypes, identify patients showing poor/good prognosis, and identify patients likely to have disease recurrence. However, diverse breast cancer datasets in conjunction with diagnostic clinical arrays show little overlap in the sets of genes identified. One approach to identify a set of consistently dysregulated candidate genes in these tumors is to employ meta-analysis of multiple independent microarray datasets. This allows one to compare expression data from a diverse collection of breast tumor array datasets generated on either cDNA or oligonucleotide arrays. Results We gathered expression data from 9 published microarray studies examining estrogen receptor positive (ER+ and estrogen receptor negative (ER- BrCa tumor cases from the Oncomine database. We performed a meta-analysis and identified genes that were universally up or down regulated with respect to ER+ versus ER- tumor status. We surveyed both the proximal promoter and 3' untranslated regions (3'UTR of our top-ranking genes in each expression group to test whether common sequence elements may contribute to the observed expression patterns. Utilizing a combination of known transcription factor binding sites (TFBS, evolutionarily conserved mammalian promoter and 3'UTR motifs, and microRNA (miRNA seed sequences, we identified numerous motifs that were disproportionately represented between the two gene classes suggesting a common regulatory network for the observed gene expression patterns. Conclusion Some of the genes we identified distinguish key transcripts previously seen in array studies, while others are newly defined. Many of the genes identified as overexpressed in ER- tumors were previously identified as expression markers for neoplastic transformation in multiple human cancers. Moreover, our motif analysis identified a collection of

  1. Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG)- Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Donisha; Harris, Barbara; Blue, Cynthia; Gaskins, Charla

    2014-09-16

    The original BetterBuildings for Greensboro grant program included an outreach campaign to inform 100% of the Greensboro community about the benefits of reducing energy use; a plan to reduce energy consumption in at least 34% of the homes and 10% of the other buildings in the east Greensboro target area; and a plan to create and retain jobs in the energy conservation industry. Under the original program structure the City of Greensboro planned to partner with local and regional lenders to create a diversified portfolio of loan products to meet the needs of various income levels and building types. All participants would participate in the loan programs as a method of meeting the program’s 5 to1 private capital match/leverage requirements. In June 2011 the program was restructured to include partnerships with large commercial and multifamily projects, with these partners providing the greater portion of the required match/leverage. The geographic focus was revised to include reducing energy consumption across the entire City of Greensboro, targeting neighborhoods with high concentrations of low-moderate income households and aged housing stock. The community outreach component used a neighborhood-based approach to train community residents and volunteers to conduct door-to-door neighborhood sweeps; delivered high quality information on available program resources; helped residents to evaluate alternative energy efficiency measures and alternative financing sources; assisted with contractor selections and monitoring/evaluation of work; coordinated activities with BetterBuildings program partners; and collected data required by the Department of Energy. Additionally, HERO (Home Energy Response Officers) delivered intro packages (energy efficiency information and products) to thousands of households at the initial point of contact. A pilot program (Early Adopters) was offered from March 1, 2011 through June 30, 2011. The Early Adopters program was designed to offer

  2. 75 FR 77821 - Agricultural Water Enhancement Program and Cooperative Conservation Partnership Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-14

    ... the Food, Conservation, and Energy Act of 2008 (2008 Act). AWEP and CCPI are voluntary conservation..., section 2510 of the Food, Conservation, and Energy Act of 2008 (2008 Act), Public Law 110-246. The.../technical/standards/ . c. Include the total acres that need conservation treatment and the priority...

  3. Training program for energy conservation in new-building construction. Volume IV. Energy conservation technology: advanced course for plan examiners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1977-12-01

    A Model Code for Energy Conservation in New Building Construction has been developed by those national organizations primarily concerned with the development and promulgation of model codes. The technical provisions are based on ASHRAE Standard 90-75 and are intended for use by state and local officials. This manual contains a more in-depth training in the review techniques and concepts required by the plan examiners and code officials in administering the code for conventional (buildings of 3 stories or less) construction.

  4. The effect of a hearing conservation program on adolescents′ attitudes towards noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shawna M Dell

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Crandell et al., reported that education programs such as hearing conservation programs (HCPs represent the most common and well-recognized procedure in reducing the incidence of noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL. The purpose of this study was to assess the effectiveness of an HCP in changing knowledge and attitudes toward exposures to high intensity sounds or noise among adolescents aged 12-14 years. Local middle school students in physical education classes were recruited for participation. Sixty-four middle school students between the ages of 12 and 14 received pre- and post-test measures and participated in the HCP. The pre-test measure had 24 questions that included 5 demographic questions and 19 Likert-type questions [modified from the Youth Attitude to Noise Scale] that assess adolescents′ attitudes towards noise; and a post-test measure included the identical 24 questions of the pre-test measure in addition to three subjective questions. A Wilcoxon signed rank test and a Two-Factor Analysis of Variance were completed to assess changes in knowledge and attitudes toward noise among the study population after receiving the HCP. A statistically significant reduction (P< 0.003 in pro-noise attitudes among the adolescents was present after the intervention. It was established that an HCP facilitated a change in pro-noise attitudes among adolescents. Further, the students thought this program facilitated learning of the auditory system and healthy hearing behaviors.

  5. Conserved alternative and antisense transcripts at the programmed cell death 2 locus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trachtulec Zdenek

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The programmed cell death 2 (Pdcd2 gene on mouse chromosome 17 was evaluated as a member of a highly conserved synteny, a candidate for an imprinted locus, and a candidate for the Hybrid sterility 1 (Hst1 gene. Results New mouse transcripts were identified at this locus: an alternative Pdcd2 mRNA skipping the last two coding exons and two classes of antisense RNAs. One class of the antisense RNA overlaps the alternative exon and the other the entire Pdcd2 gene. The antisense RNAs are alternative transcripts of the neighboring TATA-binding protein gene (Tbp that are located mainly in the cell nucleus. Analogous alternative PDCD2 forms truncating the C-terminal domain were also detected in human and chicken. Alternative transcripts of the chicken PDCD2 and TBP genes also overlap. No correlation in the transcription of the alternative and overlapping mRNAs was detected. Allelic sequencing and transcription studies did not reveal any support for the candidacy of Pdcd2 for Hst1. No correlated expression of Pdcd2 with the other two genes of the highly conserved synteny was observed. Pdcd2, Chd1, and four other genes from this region were not imprinted in the embryo. Conclusion The conservation of alternative transcription of the Pdcd2 gene in mouse, human and chicken suggests the biological importance of such truncated protein. The biological function of the alternative PDCD2 is likely to be opposite to that of the constitutive form. The ratio of the constitutive and alternative Pdcd2 mRNAs differs in the tissues, suggesting a developmental role. The identified Tbp-alternative Pdcd2-antisense transcripts may interfere with the transcription of the Pdcd2 gene, as they are transcribed at a comparable level. The conservation of the Pdcd2/Tbp sense-antisense overlap in the mouse and chicken points out its biological relevance. Our results also suggest that some cDNAs in databases labeled as noncoding are incomplete alternative cDNAs of

  6. Nerva Fuel Element Development Program Summary Report - July 1966 through June 1972 Extrusion Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Napier, J. M.

    1973-09-21

    This part of the completion report pertaining to the NERVA graphite fuel element program covers data collected during the extrusion studies. The physical properties of the fuel element reached the following values: coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) - 7.0 x 10-6/o C (25 - l,OOOo C); modulus of elasticity - 1.5 x lo6 psi; flexural strength - - 8,000 psi; ultimate strain to failure - 5,500 pidin; good thermal stress resistance. Matrices were produced which could be vapor coated with crack-free films of zirconium carbide. The CTE of the matrix was almost equal to the CTE of the zirconium carbide coating.

  7. MAPVAR - A Computer Program to Transfer Solution Data Between Finite Element Meshes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wellman, G.W.

    1999-03-01

    MAPVAR, as was the case with its precursor programs, MERLIN and MERLIN II, is designed to transfer solution results from one finite element mesh to another. MAPVAR draws heavily from the structure and coding of MERLIN II, but it employs a new finite element data base, EXODUS II, and offers enhanced speed and new capabilities not available in MERLIN II. In keeping with the MERLIN II documentation, the computational algorithms used in MAPVAR are described. User instructions are presented. Example problems are included to demonstrate the operation of the code and the effects of various input options.

  8. Identification and solution structure of a highly conserved C-terminal domain within ORF1p required for retrotransposition of long interspersed nuclear element-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Januszyk, Kurt; Li, Patrick Wai-Lun; Villareal, Valerie; Branciforte, Dan; Wu, Haihong; Xie, Yongming; Feigon, Juli; Loo, Joseph A; Martin, Sandra L; Clubb, Robert T

    2007-08-24

    Long interspersed nuclear element-1 (LINE-1 or L1) retrotransposons comprise a large fraction of the human and mouse genomes. The mobility of these successful elements requires the protein encoded by open reading frame-1 (ORF1p), which binds single-stranded RNA with high affinity and functions as a nucleic acid chaperone. In this report, we have used limited proteolysis, filter binding, and NMR spectroscopy to characterize the global structure of ORF1p and the three-dimensional structure of a highly conserved RNA binding domain. ORF1p contains three structured regions, a coiled-coil domain, a middle domain of unknown function, and a C-terminal domain (CTD). We show that high affinity RNA binding by ORF1p requires the CTD and residues within an amino acid protease-sensitive segment that joins the CTD to the middle domain. Insights in the mechanism of RNA binding were obtained by determining the solution structure of the CTD, which is shown to adopt a novel fold consisting of a three-stranded beta sheet that is packed against three alpha-helices. An RNA binding surface on the CTD has been localized using chemical shift perturbation experiments and is proximal to residues previously shown to be essential for retrotransposition, RNA binding, and chaperone activity. A similar structure and mechanism of RNA binding is expected for all vertebrate long interspersed nuclear element-1 elements, since residues encoding the middle, protease-sensitive segment, and CTD are highly conserved.

  9. Government-to-private sector energy programs: Identification of common elements leading to successful implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockton, Keith M.

    This dissertation examines six distinct government energy programs implemented in the United States during the last three decades. A common element within these programs is an attempt by government to drive commercialization of energy technologies leading to changes in energy production or consumptive behavior. We seek to understand the factors that lead to success or failure of these programs with two goals in mind. The first is theoretical in that we test a hypothesis that market-based energy programs have substantially higher success rates than command-and-control programs. The second goal is operational in nature, in which we desire to identify common factors within energy programs that lead either to program success or to failure. We investigate and evaluate three market-based and three command-and-control energy programs. The market-based programs include the federal Corporate Average Fuel Economy and Sulfur Dioxide Emissions Control programs as well as Colorado's Amendment 37. The command-and-control programs include the federal Synthetic Fuels Corporation and Corn Based Ethanol programs as well as Colorado's Solar Electric Power program. We conduct the analysis of each program based on composite methodology derived from leading academics within the Policy Sciences. From our research findings, we conclude that both market-based and command-and-control programs can achieve their legislative goals and objectives, resulting in permanent changes in energy production or consumptive behavior. However, we also find that the economic efficiency is the differentiator between market-based and command-and-control programs. Market-based programs, because of the inherent flexibility, allow participants to react to changing economic and/or technical conditions. In contrast, command-and-control programs lack such flexibility and often result in economic inefficiency when economic conditions change. The financial incentives incorporated in the three command

  10. Snake River Sockeye Salmon Captive Broodstock Program : Hatchery Element : Annual Progress Report, 2000.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kline, Paul A.; Willard, Catherine

    2001-04-01

    On November 20, 1991, the National Marine Fisheries Service listed Snake River sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka as endangered under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. In 1991, the Idaho Department of Fish and Game, the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes, and the National Marine Fisheries Service initiated efforts to conserve and rebuild populations in Idaho. Initial steps to recover sockeye salmon included the establishment of a captive broodstock program at the Idaho Department of Fish and Game Eagle Fish Hatchery. Sockeye salmon broodstock and culture responsibilities are shared with the National Marine Fisheries Service at two locations adjacent to Puget Sound in Washington State. Activities conducted by the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes and the National Marine Fisheries Service are reported under separate cover. Idaho Department of Fish and Game monitoring and evaluation activities of captive broodstock program fish releases are also reported under separate cover. Captive broodstock program activities conducted between January 1, 2000 and December 31, 2000 are presented in this report.

  11. Conserved loci of leaf and stem rust fungi of wheat share synteny interrupted by lineage-specific influx of repeat elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fellers John P

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Wheat leaf rust (Puccinia triticina Eriks; Pt and stem rust fungi (P. graminis f.sp. tritici; Pgt are significant economic pathogens having similar host ranges and life cycles, but different alternate hosts. The Pt genome, currently estimated at 135 Mb, is significantly larger than Pgt, at 88 Mb, but the reason for the expansion is unknown. Three genomic loci of Pt conserved proteins were characterized to gain insight into gene content, genome complexity and expansion. Results A bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC library was made from P. triticina race 1, BBBD and probed with Pt homologs of genes encoding two predicted Pgt secreted effectors and a DNA marker mapping to a region of avirulence. Three BACs, 103 Kb, 112 Kb, and 166 Kb, were sequenced, assembled, and open reading frames were identified. Orthologous genes were identified in Pgt and local conservation of gene order (microsynteny was observed. Pairwise protein identities ranged from 26 to 99%. One Pt BAC, containing a RAD18 ortholog, shares syntenic regions with two Pgt scaffolds, which could represent both haplotypes of Pgt. Gene sequence is diverged between the species as well as within the two haplotypes. In all three BAC clones, gene order is locally conserved, however, gene shuffling has occurred relative to Pgt. These regions are further diverged by differing insertion loci of LTR-retrotransposon, Gypsy, Copia, Mutator, and Harbinger mobile elements. Uncharacterized Pt open reading frames were also found; these proteins are high in lysine and similar to multiple proteins in Pgt. Conclusions The three Pt loci are conserved in gene order, with a range of gene sequence divergence. Conservation of predicted haustoria expressed secreted protein genes between Pt and Pgt is extended to the more distant poplar rust, Melampsora larici-populina. The loci also reveal that genome expansion in Pt is in part due to higher occurrence of repeat-elements in this species.

  12. Optimal Control of Scalar Conservation Laws Using Linear/Quadratic Programming: Application to Transportation Networks

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Yanning

    2014-03-01

    This article presents a new optimal control framework for transportation networks in which the state is modeled by a first order scalar conservation law. Using an equivalent formulation based on a Hamilton-Jacobi (H-J) equation and the commonly used triangular fundamental diagram, we pose the problem of controlling the state of the system on a network link, in a finite horizon, as a Linear Program (LP). We then show that this framework can be extended to an arbitrary transportation network, resulting in an LP or a Quadratic Program. Unlike many previously investigated transportation network control schemes, this method yields a globally optimal solution and is capable of handling shocks (i.e., discontinuities in the state of the system). As it leverages the intrinsic properties of the H-J equation used to model the state of the system, it does not require any approximation, unlike classical methods that are based on discretizations of the model. The computational efficiency of the method is illustrated on a transportation network. © 2014 IEEE.

  13. Exact solutions to robust control problems involving scalar hyperbolic conservation laws using Mixed Integer Linear Programming

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Yanning

    2013-10-01

    This article presents a new robust control framework for transportation problems in which the state is modeled by a first order scalar conservation law. Using an equivalent formulation based on a Hamilton-Jacobi equation, we pose the problem of controlling the state of the system on a network link, using boundary flow control, as a Linear Program. Unlike many previously investigated transportation control schemes, this method yields a globally optimal solution and is capable of handling shocks (i.e. discontinuities in the state of the system). We also demonstrate that the same framework can handle robust control problems, in which the uncontrollable components of the initial and boundary conditions are encoded in intervals on the right hand side of inequalities in the linear program. The lower bound of the interval which defines the smallest feasible solution set is used to solve the robust LP (or MILP if the objective function depends on boolean variables). Since this framework leverages the intrinsic properties of the Hamilton-Jacobi equation used to model the state of the system, it is extremely fast. Several examples are given to demonstrate the performance of the robust control solution and the trade-off between the robustness and the optimality. © 2013 IEEE.

  14. Basic-research foundations for public-education programs in energy conservation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Margolin, J B; Misch, M R

    1980-09-01

    The processes whereby people make decisions about specific behavior, the forces that operate on these decisions, and the interaction of several decisions and their modifying effect upon each other are studied. An overview of the current approach to decision study and behavior-change studies is presented. Brief papers prepared by such experts as Maccoby, Tversky, Cialdine, Margolin, Simon, Heider, Festinger, and Lervin are presented. Methodological considerations are discussed. Task B focuses on the specific issue of the purchase of energy-efficient appliances. Task C investigates individual and small-group data-quantification techniques. Task D explains monitoring of ongoing energy-relevant consumer/purchaser surveys. A cost-benefit analysis is made and discussed in Task E of other public and private information programs designed to serve the public welfare. A number of useful findings are presented with the caveat that cost-benefit analysis is not a precise technique. The application of this study to the needs of the energy-conservation program is summarized. (MCW)

  15. Impact of Years of Enrollment in the Conservation Reserve Program on Depth of Rain Infiltration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goebel, T.; Lascano, R. J.; Acosta-Martinez, V.

    2014-12-01

    The Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) is a USDA program administered by the Farm Service Agency (FSA) introduced in 1985 to reduce soil erosion by increasing vegetative cover of highly erodible land. The Texas High Plains (THP) leads the US with >890,000 ha enrolled in CRP. Potential benefits of the CRP include, e.g., increased infiltration of rainfall and organic matter, and better soil structure. However, impact of these benefits is not well characterized. Participation in the CRP is done via contracts (10-15 years in length) and since its inception land area of the THP enrolled in CRP has varied significantly allowing the evaluation of years of enrollment (age) on soil structure and impact on rain infiltration. This information is critical for land users to determine how long it is necessary to enroll their land in the CRP to improve soil structure and impact rain infiltration and increase the water holding capacity of the soil. Stable isotopes of water present a useful technique that is used in ecology and hydrology to study water movement through ecosystems and can be used to evaluate the depth of infiltration of rainwater under CRP management. We compared the infiltration depth of rain in land under CRP management to land under continuous dryland cotton with no irrigation. Two locations, in Terry and Lynn counties, were used for this study. The site in Terry County was enrolled in CRP for 25 years (1985) and 22 years (1992) in Lynn County.

  16. The Human Dimension of Energy Conservation and Sustainability: A Case Study of the University of Michigan's Energy Conservation Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marans, Robert W.; Edelstein, Jack Y.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to determine the behaviors, attitudes, and levels of understanding among faculty, staff, and students in efforts to design programs aimed at reducing energy use in University of Michigan (UM) buildings. Design/methodology/approach: A multi-method approach is used in five diverse pilot buildings including focus…

  17. 77 FR 73 - Cooperative Conservation Partnership Initiative and Wetlands Reserve Enhancement Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-03

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Natural Resources Conservation Service Commodity Credit Corporation Cooperative... Conservation Service and Commodity Credit Corporation, United States Department of Agriculture. ACTION: Notice... nutrient runoff; improve wildlife habitat; restore wetlands; and maintain agricultural productivity. These...

  18. Annual Report of the Wind Characteristics Program Element for the Period April 1976 Through June 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elderkin, C. E.; Ramsdell, J. V.

    1977-07-01

    The Wind Characteristics Program Element (WCPE) is a service element to provide meteorological information to other parts of the Wind Energy Conversion Program. In this role, the WCPE has as its general objective acceleration of the development, commercialization and utilization of reliable and economically viable wind energy conversion systems (WECS). This report discusses the work undertaken in the areas of design and performance evaluation, site selection, and presiting evaluation from April 1976 through June 1977. A systematic evaluation of wind descriptors has begun in the Design and Performance Evaluation Program Areas and is leading to the preparation of handbooks of meteorological information for use in design and performance evaluation. A conceptual framework has been established within the Site Selection Program Area that clearly defines the relationships between siting tools. The Presiting Evaluation Program Area is involved in the identification of large areas of high wind energy potential throughout the United States, and in the determination of wind characteristics related to the economic viability of wind energy conversion within these areas.

  19. 75 FR 56795 - Energy Conservation Program: Certification, Compliance, and Enforcement for Consumer Products and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-16

    ... Responsible for Compliance for Walk- In Coolers or Freezers 2. Submission of Data Requirements for Fluorescent...'' or, in context, ``the Act'') sets forth a variety of provisions designed to improve energy efficiency... Federal conservation standards, which include energy conservation, water conservation and design standards...

  20. Effect of a three-month football training program on trace element ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was conducted to examine the effects of a three-month football training program on some trace elements in the serum in male kids aged between eight and twelve years. The study registered eight boys whose mean age was 10.25 ± 0.75 years, mean height was 138.63 ± 3.28 cm and mean weight was 32.13 ...

  1. Quantum Biology at the Cellular Level - elements of the research program

    OpenAIRE

    Bordonaro, Michael; Ogryzko, Vasily

    2013-01-01

    Quantum Biology is emerging as a new field at the intersection between fundamental physics and biology, promising novel insights into the nature and origin of biological order. We discuss several elements of QBCL (Quantum Biology at Cellular Level), a research program designed to extend the reach of quantum concepts to higher than molecular levels of biological organization. Key words. decoherence, macroscopic superpositions, basis-dependence, formal superposition, non-classical correlations,...

  2. MP Salsa: a finite element computer program for reacting flow problems. Part 1--theoretical development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shadid, J.N.; Moffat, H.K.; Hutchinson, S.A.; Hennigan, G.L.; Devine, K.D.; Salinger, A.G.

    1996-05-01

    The theoretical background for the finite element computer program, MPSalsa, is presented in detail. MPSalsa is designed to solve laminar, low Mach number, two- or three-dimensional incompressible and variable density reacting fluid flows on massively parallel computers, using a Petrov-Galerkin finite element formulation. The code has the capability to solve coupled fluid flow, heat transport, multicomponent species transport, and finite-rate chemical reactions, and to solver coupled multiple Poisson or advection-diffusion- reaction equations. The program employs the CHEMKIN library to provide a rigorous treatment of multicomponent ideal gas kinetics and transport. Chemical reactions occurring in the gas phase and on surfaces are treated by calls to CHEMKIN and SURFACE CHEMKIN, respectively. The code employs unstructured meshes, using the EXODUS II finite element data base suite of programs for its input and output files. MPSalsa solves both transient and steady flows by using fully implicit time integration, an inexact Newton method and iterative solvers based on preconditioned Krylov methods as implemented in the Aztec solver library.

  3. 77 FR 25192 - Wild Bird Conservation Act; Receipt of Application for Approval of a Cooperative Breeding Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-27

    ... Flora (CITES). Under the WBCA, we, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, issue permits for import of... Fish and Wildlife Service Wild Bird Conservation Act; Receipt of Application for Approval of a Cooperative Breeding Program AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of receipt of...

  4. 75 FR 51262 - Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products: Decision and Order Granting a Waiver to GE...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-19

    ... Refrigerator-Freezer Test Procedure AGENCY: Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Department of... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products: Decision...

  5. 75 FR 51264 - Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products: Decision and Order Granting a Waiver to LG...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-19

    ... Refrigerator-Freezer Test Procedure AGENCY: Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Department of... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products: Decision...

  6. 75 FR 55067 - Energy Conservation Program: Test Procedures for Walk-In Coolers and Walk-In Freezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-09

    ... Energy 10 CFR Part 431 Energy Conservation Program: Test Procedures for Walk-In Coolers and Walk-In... Procedures for Walk-In Coolers and Walk-In Freezers AGENCY: Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy... the energy consumption of walk-in coolers and walk-in freezers, pursuant to the Energy Policy and...

  7. 76 FR 21579 - Energy Conservation Program: Test Procedures for Walk-In Coolers and Walk-In Freezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-15

    ... Procedures for Walk-In Coolers and Walk-In Freezers; Final Rule #0;#0;Federal Register / Vol. 76, No. 73... Energy Conservation Program: Test Procedures for Walk-In Coolers and Walk-In Freezers AGENCY: Office of... establish new test procedures for walk-in coolers and walk-in freezers (WICF or walk- ins). On September 9...

  8. 76 FR 33631 - Energy Conservation Program: Test Procedures for Walk-In Coolers and Walk-In Freezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-09

    ... Part 431 RIN 1904-AB85 Energy Conservation Program: Test Procedures for Walk-In Coolers and Walk-In... concerning walk-in coolers and walk-in freezers. * * * * * Display door means a door designed for product... of movement. For walk-in coolers and walk-in freezers, a door includes the door panel, glass, framing...

  9. Zoos through the lens of the IUCN Red List: a global metapopulation approach to support conservation breeding programs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conde, Dalia Amor; Colchero, Fernando; Pearce-Kelly, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Given current extinction trends, the number of species requiring conservation breeding programs (CBPs) is likely to increase dramatically. To inform CBP policies for threatened terrestrial vertebrates, we evaluated the number and representation of threatened vertebrate species on the IUCN Red List...

  10. 75 FR 25228 - Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products: Decision and Order Denying a Waiver to PB Heat...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-07

    ... seasonal efficiency, save money on fuel costs and apply for the Energy Tax Credit that is part of the... of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products: Decision... Boiler Test Procedures AGENCY: Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Department of Energy...

  11. California Institute of Technology: Caltech Energy Conservation Investment Program. Green Revolving Funds in Action: Case Study Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caine, Rebecca

    2011-01-01

    The Caltech Energy Conservation Investment Program (CECIP) was initiated in 2009. It manages $8 million within an existing fund in the school's endowment, which had been created to finance capital projects. Any member of the Caltech community may submit a project proposal, and projects are considered for approval as long as they have at least a 15…

  12. The New York State Program for the Conservation and Preservation of Library Research Materials. Discretionary Grant Application Workbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York State Library, Albany. Div. of Library Development.

    This workbook is intended to aid in the preparation of the New York State Conservation/Preservation Discretionary Grant Program application and should be used in conjunction with the current Discretionary Grant Guidelines. The workbook contains hints on grant writing, a completed sample cover sheet and other application forms, good and…

  13. Spatially conserved regulatory elements identified within human and mouse Cd247 gene using high-throughput sequencing data from the ENCODE project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pundhir, Sachin; Hannibal, Tine Dahlbæk; Bang-Berthelsen, Claus Heiner

    2014-01-01

    , supported by histone marks and ChIP-seq data, that specifically have features of an enhancer and a promoter, respectively. We also identified a putative long non-coding RNA from the characteristically long first intron of the Cd247 gene. The long non-coding RNA annotation is supported by manual annotations...... from the GENCODE project in human and our expression quantification analysis performed in NOD and B6 mice using qRT-PCR. Furthermore, 17 of the 23 SNPs already known to be implicated with T1D were observed within the long non-coding RNA region in mouse. The spatially conserved regulatory elements...

  14. HTJoinSolver: Human immunoglobulin VDJ partitioning using approximate dynamic programming constrained by conserved motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russ, Daniel E; Ho, Kwan-Yuet; Longo, Nancy S

    2015-05-23

    Partitioning the human immunoglobulin variable region into variable (V), diversity (D), and joining (J) segments is a common sequence analysis step. We introduce a novel approximate dynamic programming method that uses conserved immunoglobulin gene motifs to improve performance of aligning V-segments of rearranged immunoglobulin (Ig) genes. Our new algorithm enhances the former JOINSOLVER algorithm by processing sequences with insertions and/or deletions (indels) and improves the efficiency for large datasets provided by high throughput sequencing. In our simulations, which include rearrangements with indels, the V-matching success rate improved from 61% for partial alignments of sequences with indels in the original algorithm to over 99% in the approximate algorithm. An improvement in the alignment of human VDJ rearrangements over the initial JOINSOLVER algorithm was also seen when compared to the Stanford.S22 human Ig dataset with an online VDJ partitioning software evaluation tool. HTJoinSolver can rapidly identify V- and J-segments with indels to high accuracy for mutated sequences when the mutation probability is around 30% and 20% respectively. The D-segment is much harder to fit even at 20% mutation probability. For all segments, the probability of correctly matching V, D, and J increases with our alignment score.

  15. A novel and cost-effective monitoring approach for outcomes in an Australian biodiversity conservation incentive program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindenmayer, David B; Zammit, Charles; Attwood, Simon J; Burns, Emma; Shepherd, Claire L; Kay, Geoff; Wood, Jeff

    2012-01-01

    We report on the design and implementation of ecological monitoring for an Australian biodiversity conservation incentive scheme - the Environmental Stewardship Program. The Program uses competitive auctions to contract individual land managers for up to 15 years to conserve matters of National Environmental Significance (with an initial priority on nationally threatened ecological communities). The ecological monitoring was explicitly aligned with the Program's policy objective and desired outcomes and was applied to the Program's initial Project which targeted the critically endangered White Box-Yellow Box-Blakely's Red Gum Grassy Woodland and Derived Native Grassland ecological community in south eastern Australia. These woodlands have been reduced to Program's investment in the first four years and hence are in broad accord with the general rule of thumb that 5-10% of a program's funding should be invested in monitoring. Once initial monitoring and site benchmarking are completed we propose to implement a novel rotating sampling approach that will maintain scientific integrity while achieving an annual cost-efficiency of up to 23%. We discuss useful lessons relevant to other monitoring programs where there is a need to provide managers with reliable early evidence of program effectiveness and to demonstrate opportunities for cost-efficiencies.

  16. 78 FR 65629 - Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products: Decision and Order Granting a Waiver to...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-01

    ....\\1\\ Part B includes definitions, test procedures, labeling provisions, energy conservation standards... have a ``drain out'' event. In reality, consumers with greater than 3-day average intervals between...

  17. Community-based conservation programs and local people willingness to pay for wildlife protection: The case of the cotton-top tamarin in the Colombian Caribbean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés Vargas

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Community-Based Conservation programs (CBC are designed on the assumption that local communities are crucial to the success of the conservation agenda. There is the expectation that, by providing benefits to the local people, they will support conservation because it is economically beneficial. This paper uses willingness to pay (WTP for habitat preservation of the cotton-top tamarin in the Colombian Caribbean as a means to assess the effect of participation in a CBC program on the support for additional conservation. Using the contingent valuation method, we found that: First, households deriving income from conservation activities are more supportive of additional habitat preservation; second, participants and non-participants in the CBC program are equally sensitive to increments in the costs of conservation; and, third, the CBC program is not a burden for non-participant households.

  18. Conservation Reserve Program mitigates grassland loss in the lesser prairie-chicken range of Kansas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Spencer

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the beginning of the 20th century, the overall occupied range of the lesser prairie-chicken (Tympanuchus pallidicinctus has declined by 84% commensurate with population trends. Much of this decline has been attributed to the loss and fragmentation of native grasslands throughout the lesser prairie-chicken range. However, quantification of changes in land cover in the distribution of the lesser prairie-chicken is lacking. Our objectives were to (1 document changes in the areal extent and connectivity of grasslands in the identified lesser prairie-chicken range in Kansas, USA, (>60% of extant lesser prairie-chicken population from the 1950s to 2013 using remotely sensed data and (2 assess the potential of the Conservation Reserve Program (U.S. Department of Agriculture Program converting cropland to permanent cover; CRP to mitigate grassland loss. Digital land cover maps were generated on a decadal time step through spectral classification of LANDSAT images and visual analysis of aerial photographs (1950s and 1960s. Landscape composition and configuration were assessed using FRAGSTATS to compute a variety of landscape metrics measuring changes in the amount of grassland present as well as changes in the size and configuration of grassland patches. With the exception of a single regional portion of the range, nearly all of the grassland converted to cropland in the lesser prairie-chicken range of Kansas occurred prior to the 1950s. Prior to the implementation of CRP, the amount of grassland decreased 3.6% between the 1950s and 1985 from 18,455 km2 to 17,788 km2. Since 1985, the overall amount of grassland in the lesser prairie-chicken range has increased 11.9% to 19,898 km2 due to implementation of CRP, although the area of grassland decreased between 1994 and 2013 as CRP contracts were not renewed by landowners. Since 1986 grassland in Kansas became more connected and less fragmented in response to the CRP. While the CRP has been successful

  19. Conservation Reserve Program mitigates grassland loss in the lesser prairie-chicken range of Kansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haukos, David A.; Spencer, David; Hagen, Christian A.; Daniels, Melinda D.; Goodin, Doug

    2017-01-01

    Since the beginning of the 20th century, the overall occupied range of the lesser prairie-chicken (Tympanuchus pallidicinctus) has declined by 84% commensurate with population trends. Much of this decline has been attributed to the loss and fragmentation of native grasslands throughout the lesser prairie-chicken range. However, quantification of changes in land cover in the distribution of the lesser prairie-chicken is lacking. Our objectives were to (1) document changes in the areal extent and connectivity of grasslands in the identified lesser prairie-chicken range in Kansas, USA, (>60% of extant lesser prairie-chicken population) from the 1950s to 2013 using remotely sensed data and (2) assess the potential of the Conservation Reserve Program (U.S. Department of Agriculture Program converting cropland to permanent cover; CRP) to mitigate grassland loss. Digital land cover maps were generated on a decadal time step through spectral classification of LANDSAT images and visual analysis of aerial photographs (1950s and 1960s). Landscape composition and configuration were assessed using FRAGSTATS to compute a variety of landscape metrics measuring changes in the amount of grassland present as well as changes in the size and configuration of grassland patches. With the exception of a single regional portion of the range, nearly all of the grassland converted to cropland in the lesser prairie-chicken range of Kansas occurred prior to the 1950s. Prior to the implementation of CRP, the amount of grassland decreased 3.6% between the 1950s and 1985 from 18,455 km2 to 17,788 km2. Since 1985, the overall amount of grassland in the lesser prairie-chicken range has increased 11.9% to 19,898 km2 due to implementation of CRP, although the area of grassland decreased between 1994 and 2013 as CRP contracts were not renewed by landowners. Since 1986 grassland in Kansas became more connected and less fragmented in response to the CRP. While the CRP has been successful in

  20. South Fork Flathead Watershed Westslope Cutthroat Trout Conservation Program, Annual Report 2002.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grisak, Grant; Marotz, Brian

    2003-06-01

    In 1999, Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks (MFWP) began a program aimed at conserving the genetically pure populations of westslope cutthroat trout in the South Fork Flathead River drainage. The objective of this program is to eliminate all of the exotic and hybrid trout that threaten the genetically pure westslope cutthroat populations in the South Fork Flathead. The exotic and hybrid trout populations occur in several headwater lakes and their outflow streams. In 2001 MFWP released a draft environmental assessment, pursuant to the Montana Environmental Policy Act (MEPA), that addressed the use of motorized equipment to deliver personnel and materials to some of these lakes in the Bob Marshall and Great Bear Wildernesses (Grisak 2001). After a 30-day public comment period, MFWP determined that the complexity of issues was too great and warranted a more detailed analysis. These issues included transportation options for personnel, equipment and materials, the use of motorized equipment in wilderness, fish removal methods, fish stocking, and the status and distribution of amphibian populations in the project area. Because the program also involves the U.S. Forest Service (USFS) and Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the environmental analysis needs to comply with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). In October 2001, pursuant to NEPA, MFWP, along with the USFS and BPA initiated an environmental assessment to address these issues. In June 2002, the three agencies determined that the scope of these issues warranted an Environmental Impact Statement. This specialist report describes the logistical, technical and biological issues associated with this project and provides an analysis of options for fish removal, transportation and fish stocking. It further analyzes issues and concerns associated with amphibian populations and creating new domesticated stocks of westslope cutthroat trout. Finally, this document provides a description of each lake, the best

  1. Estimating the Counterfactual Impact of Conservation Programs on Land Cover Outcomes: The Role of Matching and Panel Regression Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Kelly W; Lewis, David J

    2015-01-01

    Deforestation and conversion of native habitats continues to be the leading driver of biodiversity and ecosystem service loss. A number of conservation policies and programs are implemented--from protected areas to payments for ecosystem services (PES)--to deter these losses. Currently, empirical evidence on whether these approaches stop or slow land cover change is lacking, but there is increasing interest in conducting rigorous, counterfactual impact evaluations, especially for many new conservation approaches, such as PES and REDD, which emphasize additionality. In addition, several new, globally available and free high-resolution remote sensing datasets have increased the ease of carrying out an impact evaluation on land cover change outcomes. While the number of conservation evaluations utilizing 'matching' to construct a valid control group is increasing, the majority of these studies use simple differences in means or linear cross-sectional regression to estimate the impact of the conservation program using this matched sample, with relatively few utilizing fixed effects panel methods--an alternative estimation method that relies on temporal variation in the data. In this paper we compare the advantages and limitations of (1) matching to construct the control group combined with differences in means and cross-sectional regression, which control for observable forms of bias in program evaluation, to (2) fixed effects panel methods, which control for observable and time-invariant unobservable forms of bias, with and without matching to create the control group. We then use these four approaches to estimate forest cover outcomes for two conservation programs: a PES program in Northeastern Ecuador and strict protected areas in European Russia. In the Russia case we find statistically significant differences across estimators--due to the presence of unobservable bias--that lead to differences in conclusions about effectiveness. The Ecuador case illustrates that

  2. Estimating the Counterfactual Impact of Conservation Programs on Land Cover Outcomes: The Role of Matching and Panel Regression Techniques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly W Jones

    Full Text Available Deforestation and conversion of native habitats continues to be the leading driver of biodiversity and ecosystem service loss. A number of conservation policies and programs are implemented--from protected areas to payments for ecosystem services (PES--to deter these losses. Currently, empirical evidence on whether these approaches stop or slow land cover change is lacking, but there is increasing interest in conducting rigorous, counterfactual impact evaluations, especially for many new conservation approaches, such as PES and REDD, which emphasize additionality. In addition, several new, globally available and free high-resolution remote sensing datasets have increased the ease of carrying out an impact evaluation on land cover change outcomes. While the number of conservation evaluations utilizing 'matching' to construct a valid control group is increasing, the majority of these studies use simple differences in means or linear cross-sectional regression to estimate the impact of the conservation program using this matched sample, with relatively few utilizing fixed effects panel methods--an alternative estimation method that relies on temporal variation in the data. In this paper we compare the advantages and limitations of (1 matching to construct the control group combined with differences in means and cross-sectional regression, which control for observable forms of bias in program evaluation, to (2 fixed effects panel methods, which control for observable and time-invariant unobservable forms of bias, with and without matching to create the control group. We then use these four approaches to estimate forest cover outcomes for two conservation programs: a PES program in Northeastern Ecuador and strict protected areas in European Russia. In the Russia case we find statistically significant differences across estimators--due to the presence of unobservable bias--that lead to differences in conclusions about effectiveness. The Ecuador case

  3. COYOTE : a finite element computer program for nonlinear heat conduction problems. Part I, theoretical background.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glass, Micheal W.; Hogan, Roy E., Jr.; Gartling, David K.

    2010-03-01

    The need for the engineering analysis of systems in which the transport of thermal energy occurs primarily through a conduction process is a common situation. For all but the simplest geometries and boundary conditions, analytic solutions to heat conduction problems are unavailable, thus forcing the analyst to call upon some type of approximate numerical procedure. A wide variety of numerical packages currently exist for such applications, ranging in sophistication from the large, general purpose, commercial codes, such as COMSOL, COSMOSWorks, ABAQUS and TSS to codes written by individuals for specific problem applications. The original purpose for developing the finite element code described here, COYOTE, was to bridge the gap between the complex commercial codes and the more simplistic, individual application programs. COYOTE was designed to treat most of the standard conduction problems of interest with a user-oriented input structure and format that was easily learned and remembered. Because of its architecture, the code has also proved useful for research in numerical algorithms and development of thermal analysis capabilities. This general philosophy has been retained in the current version of the program, COYOTE, Version 5.0, though the capabilities of the code have been significantly expanded. A major change in the code is its availability on parallel computer architectures and the increase in problem complexity and size that this implies. The present document describes the theoretical and numerical background for the COYOTE program. This volume is intended as a background document for the user's manual. Potential users of COYOTE are encouraged to become familiar with the present report and the simple example analyses reported in before using the program. The theoretical and numerical background for the finite element computer program, COYOTE, is presented in detail. COYOTE is designed for the multi-dimensional analysis of nonlinear heat conduction

  4. 76 FR 12421 - Energy Conservation Program: Certification, Compliance, and Enforcement for Consumer Products and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-07

    ... Walk- In Coolers or Freezers (WICFs) 2. Basic Model Definition for Walk-In Coolers or Freezers (WICFs... forth a variety of provisions designed to improve energy efficiency. Part A of Title III (42 U.S.C. 6291... meets the applicable energy conservation, water conservation, and/or design standard before distributing...

  5. Finding Freedom Abroad: Working with Conservative Christian Students in Study Abroad Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer, Calvin

    2015-01-01

    Conservative (fundamentalist, evangelical) Christian students present a general theological worldview that often correlates with significant anxiety. In a foreign setting, the anxiety of conservative students, removed from their supportive infrastructure, can be considerably heightened. This structure of thinking and emotion presents distinctive…

  6. Two conservative multi-tracer efficient semi-Lagrangian schemes for multiple processor systems integrated in a spectral element (climate dynamical core

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erath Christoph

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In today’s atmospheric numerical modeling, scalable and highly accurate numerical schemes are of particular interest. To address these issues Galerkin schemes, such as the spectral element method, have received more attention in the last decade. They also provide other state-of-the-art capabilities such as improved conservation. However, the tracer transport of hundreds of tracers, e.g., in the chemistry version of the Community Atmosphere Model, is still a performance bottleneck. Therefore, we consider two conservative semi-Lagrangian schemes. Both are designed to be multi-tracer efficient, third order accurate, and allow significantly longer time steps than explicit Eulerian formulations. We address the difficulties arising on the cubed-sphere projection and on parallel computers and show the high scalability of our approach. Additionally, we use the two schemes for the transport of passive tracers in a dynamical core and compare our results with a current spectral element tracer transport advection used by the High-Order Method Modeling Environment.

  7. Program design by a multidisciplinary team. [for structural finite element analysis on STAR-100 computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigt, S.

    1975-01-01

    The use of software engineering aids in the design of a structural finite-element analysis computer program for the STAR-100 computer is described. Nested functional diagrams to aid in communication among design team members were used, and a standardized specification format to describe modules designed by various members was adopted. This is a report of current work in which use of the functional diagrams provided continuity and helped resolve some of the problems arising in this long-running part-time project.

  8. Screening of feral and wood pigeons for viruses harbouring a conserved mobile viral element: characterization of novel Astroviruses and Picornaviruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tone Kofstad

    Full Text Available A highly conserved RNA-motif of yet unknown function, called stem-loop-2-like motif (s2m, has been identified in the 3' end of the genomes of viruses belonging to different RNA virus families which infect a broad range of mammal and bird species, including Astroviridae, Picornaviridae, Coronaviridae and Caliciviridae. Since s2m is such an extremely conserved motif, it is an ideal target for screening for viruses harbouring it. In this study, we have detected and characterized novel viruses harbouring this motif in pigeons by using a s2m-specific amplification. 84% and 67% of the samples from feral pigeons and wood pigeons, respectively, were found to contain a virus harbouring s2m. Four novel viruses were identified and characterized. Two of the new viruses belong to the genus Avastrovirus in the Astroviridae family. We propose two novel species to be included in this genus, Feral pigeon astrovirus and Wood pigeon astrovirus. Two other novel viruses, Pigeon picornavirus A and Pigeon picornavirus B, belong to the Picornaviridae family, presumably to the genus Sapelovirus. Both of the novel picornaviruses harboured two adjacent s2m, called (s2m(2, suggesting a possible increased functional effect of s2m when present in two copies.

  9. Annual Report on Federal Government Energy Management and Conservation Programs, Fiscal Year 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2014-03-01

    Annual reports on Federal energy management respond to section 548 of the National Energy Conservation Policy Act (NECPA, Pub. L. No. 95-619), as amended, and provide information on energy consumption in Federal buildings, operations, and vehicles. Compiled by the Federal Energy Management Program, these reports document activities conducted by Federal agencies under the: Energy management and energy consumption requirements of section 543 of NECPA, as amended (42 U.S.C. § 8253); Energy savings performance contract authority of section 801 of NECPA, Pub. L. No. 95-619, as amended (42 U.S.C. §§ 8287-8287d); Renewable energy purchase goal of section 203 of the Energy Policy Act (EPAct) of 2005, Pub. L. No. 109-58 (codified at 42 U.S.C. § 15852); Federal building performance standard requirements under Section 109 of EPAct 2005, Pub. L. No. 109-58 (codified at 42 U.S.C. § 6834(a)); Requirements on the procurement and identification of energy efficient products under section 161 of EPAct 1992, Pub. L. No. 102-486 (codified at 42 U.S.C. § 8262g); Sections 431, 432, and 434 of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA), Pub. L. No. 110-140 (42 U.S.C. § 8253) and section 527 of EISA (42 U.S.C. § 17143); Executive Order 13423, Strengthening Federal Environmental, Energy, and Transportation Management, 72 Fed. Reg. 3,919 (Jan. 26, 2007); Executive Order 13514, Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy, and Economic Performance, 74 Fed. Reg. 52,117 (Oct. 5, 2009).

  10. Annual Report on Federal Government Energy Management and Conservation Programs, Fiscal Year 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2014-03-01

    Annual reports on Federal energy management respond to section 548 of the National Energy Conservation Policy Act (NECPA, Pub. L. No. 95-619), as amended, and provide information on energy consumption in Federal buildings, operations, and vehicles. Compiled by the Federal Energy Management Program, these reports document activities conducted by Federal agencies under the: Energy management and energy consumption requirements of section 543 of NECPA, as amended (42 U.S.C. § 8253); Energy savings performance contract authority of section 801 of NECPA, Pub. L. No. 95-619, as amended (42 U.S.C. §§ 8287-8287d); Renewable energy purchase goal of section 203 of the Energy Policy Act (EPAct) of 2005, Pub. L. No. 109-58 (codified at 42 U.S.C. § 15852); Federal building performance standard requirements under Section 109 of EPAct 2005, Pub. L. No. 109-58 (codified at 42 U.S.C. § 6834(a)); Requirements on the procurement and identification of energy efficient products under section 161 of EPAct 1992, Pub. L. No. 102-486 (codified at 42 U.S.C. § 8262g); Sections 431, 432, and 434 of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA), Pub. L. No. 110-140 (42 U.S.C. § 8253) and section 527 of EISA (42 U.S.C. § 17143); Executive Order 13423, Strengthening Federal Environmental, Energy, and Transportation Management, 72 Fed. Reg. 3,919 (Jan. 26, 2007); Executive Order 13514, Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy, and Economic Performance, 74 Fed. Reg. 52,117 (Oct. 5, 2009).

  11. Annual Report on Federal Government Energy Management and Conservation Programs, Fiscal Year 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2015-03-01

    Annual reports on Federal energy management respond to section 548 of the National Energy Conservation Policy Act (NECPA, Pub. L. No. 95-619), as amended, and provide information on energy consumption in Federal buildings, operations, and vehicles. Compiled by the Federal Energy Management Program, these reports document activities conducted by Federal agencies under the: Energy management and energy consumption requirements of section 543 of NECPA, as amended (42 U.S.C. § 8253); Energy savings performance contract authority of section 801 of NECPA, Pub. L. No. 95-619, as amended (42 U.S.C. §§ 8287-8287d); Renewable energy purchase goal of section 203 of the Energy Policy Act (EPAct) of 2005, Pub. L. No. 109-58 (codified at 42 U.S.C. § 15852); Federal building performance standard requirements under Section 109 of EPAct 2005, Pub. L. No. 109-58 (codified at 42 U.S.C. § 6834(a)); Requirements on the procurement and identification of energy efficient products under section 161 of EPAct 1992, Pub. L. No. 102-486 (codified at 42 U.S.C. § 8262g); Sections 431, 432, and 434 of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA), Pub. L. No. 110-140 (42 U.S.C. § 8253) and section 527 of EISA (42 U.S.C. § 17143); Executive Order 13423, Strengthening Federal Environmental, Energy, and Transportation Management, 72 Fed. Reg. 3,919 (Jan. 26, 2007); Executive Order 13514, Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy, and Economic Performance, 74 Fed. Reg. 52,117 (Oct. 5, 2009).

  12. Annual Report on Federal Government Energy Management and Conservation Programs, Fiscal Year 2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2015-04-01

    Annual reports on Federal energy management respond to section 548 of the National Energy Conservation Policy Act (NECPA, Pub. L. No. 95-619), as amended, and provide information on energy consumption in Federal buildings, operations, and vehicles. Compiled by the Federal Energy Management Program, these reports document activities conducted by Federal agencies under the: Energy management and energy consumption requirements of section 543 of NECPA, as amended (42 U.S.C. § 8253); Energy savings performance contract authority of section 801 of NECPA, Pub. L. No. 95-619, as amended (42 U.S.C. §§ 8287-8287d); Renewable energy purchase goal of section 203 of the Energy Policy Act (EPAct) of 2005, Pub. L. No. 109-58 (codified at 42 U.S.C. § 15852); Federal building performance standard requirements under Section 109 of EPAct 2005, Pub. L. No. 109-58 (codified at 42 U.S.C. § 6834(a)); Requirements on the procurement and identification of energy efficient products under section 161 of EPAct 1992, Pub. L. No. 102-486 (codified at 42 U.S.C. § 8262g); Sections 431, 432, and 434 of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA), Pub. L. No. 110-140 (42 U.S.C. § 8253) and section 527 of EISA (42 U.S.C. § 17143); Executive Order 13423, Strengthening Federal Environmental, Energy, and Transportation Management, 72 Fed. Reg. 3,919 (Jan. 26, 2007); Executive Order 13514, Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy, and Economic Performance, 74 Fed. Reg. 52,117 (Oct. 5, 2009).

  13. Genetic Variability and Population Structure of Salvia lachnostachys: Implications for Breeding and Conservation Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianna Erbano

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The genetic diversity and population structure of Salvia lachnostachys Benth were assessed. Inter Simple Sequence Repeat (ISSR molecular markers were used to investigate the restricted distribution of S. lachnostachys in Parana State, Brazil. Leaves of 73 individuals representing three populations were collected. DNA was extracted and submitted to PCR-ISSR amplification with nine tested primers. Genetic diversity parameters were evaluated. Our analysis indicated 95.6% polymorphic loci (stress value 0.02 with a 0.79 average Simpson’s index. The Nei-Li distance dendrogram and principal component analysis largely recovered the geographical origin of each sample. Four major clusters were recognized representing each collected population. Nei’s gene diversity and Shannon’s information index were 0.25 and 0.40 respectively. As is typical for outcrossing herbs, the majority of genetic variation occurred at the population level (81.76%. A high gene flow (Nm = 2.48 was observed with a correspondingly low fixation index. These values were generally similar to previous studies on congeneric species. The results of principal coordinate analysis (PCA and of arithmetic average (UPGMA were consistent and all three populations appear distinct as in STRUCTURE analysis. In addition, this analysis indicated a majority intrapopulation genetic variation. Despite the human pressure on natural populations our study found high levels of genetic diversity for S. lachnostachys. This was the first molecular assessment for this endemic species with medicinal proprieties and the results can guide for subsequent bioprospection, breeding programs or conservation actions.

  14. Genetic Variability and Population Structure of Salvia lachnostachys: Implications for Breeding and Conservation Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erbano, Marianna; Schühli, Guilherme Schnell e; dos Santos, Élide Pereira

    2015-01-01

    The genetic diversity and population structure of Salvia lachnostachys Benth were assessed. Inter Simple Sequence Repeat (ISSR) molecular markers were used to investigate the restricted distribution of S. lachnostachys in Parana State, Brazil. Leaves of 73 individuals representing three populations were collected. DNA was extracted and submitted to PCR-ISSR amplification with nine tested primers. Genetic diversity parameters were evaluated. Our analysis indicated 95.6% polymorphic loci (stress value 0.02) with a 0.79 average Simpson’s index. The Nei-Li distance dendrogram and principal component analysis largely recovered the geographical origin of each sample. Four major clusters were recognized representing each collected population. Nei’s gene diversity and Shannon’s information index were 0.25 and 0.40 respectively. As is typical for outcrossing herbs, the majority of genetic variation occurred at the population level (81.76%). A high gene flow (Nm = 2.48) was observed with a correspondingly low fixation index. These values were generally similar to previous studies on congeneric species. The results of principal coordinate analysis (PCA) and of arithmetic average (UPGMA) were consistent and all three populations appear distinct as in STRUCTURE analysis. In addition, this analysis indicated a majority intrapopulation genetic variation. Despite the human pressure on natural populations our study found high levels of genetic diversity for S. lachnostachys. This was the first molecular assessment for this endemic species with medicinal proprieties and the results can guide for subsequent bioprospection, breeding programs or conservation actions. PMID:25856679

  15. 20 CFR 655.1111 - Element I-What hospitals are eligible to participate in the H-1C program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Element I-What hospitals are eligible to... I—What hospitals are eligible to participate in the H-1C program? (a) The first attestation element... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TEMPORARY EMPLOYMENT OF FOREIGN WORKERS IN THE UNITED STATES What...

  16. Conservative Protective Program of Development of the Russian Society during the Reign of Alexander II (1860-1880s

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maksim N. Krot

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The article is focused on the conservative protective concept of the development of the Russian society during the first post-reform decades (60-80s of the XIX century. The author determines and considers key features of conservative understanding of social progress, such as the priority of spiritual values over material, abandoment of society reforming in accordance with abstract concepts, intention to proceed from the existing social and political realias of the Russian society. Special attention is attached to the disclosure of concervative concept of country modernization within the framework of the estates strata in accordance with the dictates of the times and the model of the correlation of new establishments and institutes with the existing social, economic, cultural and moral principles of the country, offered by the conservatives. The author came to the conclusion that conservative concept of the development of post-reform Russia is the integral element of the country modernization. Its authors and supporters considered that its essence is the addition and balancing of liberal and reform component of this process.

  17. STARS: An Integrated, Multidisciplinary, Finite-Element, Structural, Fluids, Aeroelastic, and Aeroservoelastic Analysis Computer Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, K. K.

    1997-01-01

    A multidisciplinary, finite element-based, highly graphics-oriented, linear and nonlinear analysis capability that includes such disciplines as structures, heat transfer, linear aerodynamics, computational fluid dynamics, and controls engineering has been achieved by integrating several new modules in the original STARS (STructural Analysis RoutineS) computer program. Each individual analysis module is general-purpose in nature and is effectively integrated to yield aeroelastic and aeroservoelastic solutions of complex engineering problems. Examples of advanced NASA Dryden Flight Research Center projects analyzed by the code in recent years include the X-29A, F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle/Thrust Vectoring Control System, B-52/Pegasus Generic Hypersonics, National AeroSpace Plane (NASP), SR-71/Hypersonic Launch Vehicle, and High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) projects. Extensive graphics capabilities exist for convenient model development and postprocessing of analysis results. The program is written in modular form in standard FORTRAN language to run on a variety of computers, such as the IBM RISC/6000, SGI, DEC, Cray, and personal computer; associated graphics codes use OpenGL and IBM/graPHIGS language for color depiction. This program is available from COSMIC, the NASA agency for distribution of computer programs.

  18. Human Health Countermeasures (HHC) Element Management Plan: Human Research Program. Revision B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norsk, Peter; Baumann, David

    2012-01-01

    NASA s Human Research Program (HRP) is an applied research and technology program within the Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate (HEOMD) that addresses human health and performance risk mitigation strategies in support of exploration missions. The HRP research and technology development is focused on the highest priority risks to crew health and safety with the goal of ensuring mission success and maintaining long-term crew health. Crew health and performance standards, defined by the NASA Chief Health and Medical Officer (CHMO), set the acceptable risk level for exploration missions. The HRP conducts research to inform these standards as well as provide deliverables, such as countermeasures, that ensure standards can be met to maximize human performance and mission success. The Human Health Countermeasures (HHC) Element was formed as part of the HRP to develop a scientifically-based, integrated approach to understanding and mitigating the health risks associated with human spaceflight. These health risks have been organized into four research portfolios that group similar or related risks. A fifth portfolio exists for managing technology developments and infrastructure projects. The HHC Element portfolios consist of: a) Vision and Cardiovascular; b) Exercise and Performance; c) Multisystem; d) Bone; and e) Technology and Infrastructure. The HHC identifies gaps associated with the health risks and plans human physiology research that will result in knowledge required to more fully understand risks and will result in validated countermeasures to mitigate risks.

  19. 78 FR 2340 - Energy Conservation Program: Test Procedures for Residential Water Heaters and Commercial Water...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-11

    ... energy conservation standards adopted pursuant to EPCA, and for making representations about the... product literature, product markings, product marketing, or product installation and operation..., and allow for an accurate representation of efficiency of a wide range of different water heaters...

  20. Forestland Restoration Partnership with The Conservation Fund’s Go Zero Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Conservation Fund Intends to Purchase a total of 1,182 acres of private, marginal agricultural land, reduce climate change through carbon sequestration, and restore...

  1. Conservation of monasteries by adaptive reuse: diversified program as a source of inspiration in past and future?

    OpenAIRE

    Lens, Karen

    2014-01-01

    Adaptive reuse has proven to be an important strategy in conserving historical buildings. Nevertheless, reprogramming underused religious heritage sites in Western Europe is a sensitive subject because of its sacred aspects, history and connection to the surroundings. They represent strong intangible qualities. What can we learn from this original hybrid structures for adaptive reuse focusing on four monasteries and their diversified programs that made them selfsufficient? White Sisters an...

  2. Energy Policy and Conservation Act (Public Law 94-163) as amended by the National Energy Conservation Policy Act (Public Law 95-619). Title 10. Energy. Chapter II. Department of Energy. Subchapter D. Energy conservation. Part 430. Energy conservation program for Consumer Products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-01-01

    The text of Part B--Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products Other Than Automobiles--from Energy Policy and Conservation Act (PL 94-163) as amended by National Energy Conservation Policy Act (PL-619) is given. All terms are defined in 18 items. The text includes also the following subjects: coverage, test procedures, labeling, energy efficiency standards, requirements of manufacturers, effect on other law, rules, authority to obtain information, exports, imports, prohibited acts, enforcement, injunctive enforcement, citizen suits, administrative procedure and judicial review, consumer education, annual report, and authorization of appropriations. (MCW)

  3. Automated evaluation of matrix elements between contracted wavefunctions: A Mathematica version of the FRODO program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angeli, C.; Cimiraglia, R.

    2013-02-01

    A symbolic program performing the Formal Reduction of Density Operators (FRODO), formerly developed in the MuPAD computer algebra system with the purpose of evaluating the matrix elements of the electronic Hamiltonian between internally contracted functions in a complete active space (CAS) scheme, has been rewritten in Mathematica. New version : A program summaryProgram title: FRODO Catalogue identifier: ADV Y _v2_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADVY_v2_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 3878 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 170729 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Mathematica Computer: Any computer on which the Mathematica computer algebra system can be installed Operating system: Linux Classification: 5 Catalogue identifier of previous version: ADV Y _v1_0 Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Comm. 171(2005)63 Does the new version supersede the previous version?: No Nature of problem. In order to improve on the CAS-SCF wavefunction one can resort to multireference perturbation theory or configuration interaction based on internally contracted functions (ICFs) which are obtained by application of the excitation operators to the reference CAS-SCF wavefunction. The previous formulation of such matrix elements in the MuPAD computer algebra system, has been rewritten using Mathematica. Solution method: The method adopted consists in successively eliminating all occurrences of inactive orbital indices (core and virtual) from the products of excitation operators which appear in the definition of the ICFs and in the electronic Hamiltonian expressed in the second quantization formalism. Reasons for new version: Some years ago we published in this journal a couple of papers [1, 2

  4. Lessons Learned: A review of utility experience with conservation and load management programs for commercial and industrial customers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nadel, S.

    1990-10-01

    This report examines utility experience with conservation and load management (C LM) programs of commercial and industrial (C I) customers in order to summarize the lessons learned from program experiences to date and what these teach us about how to operate successful programs in the future. This analysis was motivated by a desire to learn about programs which achieve high participation rates and high electricity savings while remaining cost effective. Also, we wanted to review the very latest experiences with innovative program approaches -- approaches that might prove useful to utilities as they scale up their C LM activities. Specific objectives of this phase of the study are threefold: (1) To disseminate information on utility C LM experience to a nationwide audience. (2) To review current New York State utility programs and make suggestions on how these programs can be improved. (3) To collect data for the final phase of the American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy/New York State Energy Research and Development Authority project, which will examine the savings that are achievable if C LM programs are pushed to the limit'' of current knowledge on how to structure and run cost-effective C LM programs. 19 tabs.

  5. Conservation and retrieval of information - Elements of a strategy to inform future societies about nuclear waste repositories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, M. [ed.] [National Inst. of Radiation Protection, Stockholm (Sweden)

    1996-12-01

    Two main strategies exist for long-term information transfer, one which links information through successive transfers of archived material and other forms of knowledge in society, and one - such as marking the site with a monument - relying upon a direct link from the present to the distant future. Digital methods are not recommended for long-term storage, but digital processing may be a valuable tool to structure information summaries, and in the creation of better long-lasting records. Advances in archive management should also be pursued to widen the choice of information carriers of high durability. In the Nordic countries, during the first few thousand years, and perhaps up to the next period of glaciation, monuments at a repository site may be used to warn the public of the presence of dangerous waste. But messages from such markers may pose interpretation problems as we have today for messages left by earlier societies such as rune inscriptions. Since the national borders may change in the time scale relevant for nuclear waste, the creation of an international archive for all radioactive wastes would represent an improvement as regards conservation and retrieval of information. (EG).

  6. Element Partition Trees For H-Refined Meshes to Optimize Direct Solver Performance. Part I: Dynamic Programming

    KAUST Repository

    AbouEisha, Hassan M.

    2017-07-13

    We consider a class of two-and three-dimensional h-refined meshes generated by an adaptive finite element method. We introduce an element partition tree, which controls the execution of the multi-frontal solver algorithm over these refined grids. We propose and study algorithms with polynomial computational cost for the optimization of these element partition trees. The trees provide an ordering for the elimination of unknowns. The algorithms automatically optimize the element partition trees using extensions of dynamic programming. The construction of the trees by the dynamic programming approach is expensive. These generated trees cannot be used in practice, but rather utilized as a learning tool to propose fast heuristic algorithms. In this first part of our paper we focus on the dynamic programming approach, and draw a sketch of the heuristic algorithm. The second part will be devoted to a more detailed analysis of the heuristic algorithm extended for the case of hp-adaptive

  7. Snake River Sockeye Salmon Captive Broodstock Program; Research Element, 2002 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willard, Catherine; Hebdon, J. Lance; Castillo, Jason (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, ID)

    2004-06-01

    On November 20, 1991, the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration listed Snake River sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka as endangered under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. In 1991, the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes and Idaho Department of Fish and Game initiated the Snake River Sockeye Salmon Sawtooth Valley Project to conserve and rebuild populations in Idaho. Restoration efforts are focusing on Redfish, Pettit, and Alturas lakes within the Sawtooth Valley. The first release of hatchery-produced juvenile sockeye salmon from the captive broodstock program occurred in 1994. The first anadromous adult returns from the captive broodstock program were recorded in 1999 when six jacks and one jill were captured at IDFG's Sawtooth Fish Hatchery. In 2002, progeny from the captive broodstock program were released using four strategies: age-0 presmolts were released to Alturas, Pettit, and Redfish lakes in August and to Pettit and Redfish lakes in October, age-1 smolts were released to Redfish Lake Creek in May, eyed-eggs were planted in Pettit Lake in December, and hatchery-produced and anadromous adult sockeye salmon were released to Redfish Lake for volitional spawning in September. Oncorhynchus nerka population monitoring was conducted on Redfish, Alturas, and Pettit lakes using a midwater trawl in September 2002. Age-0, age-1, and age-2 O. nerka were captured in Redfish Lake, and population abundance was estimated at 50,204 fish. Age-0, age-1, age-2, and age-3 kokanee were captured in Alturas Lake, and population abundance was estimated at 24,374 fish. Age-2 and age-3 O. nerka were captured in Pettit Lake, and population abundance was estimated at 18,328 fish. The ultimate goal of the Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) captive broodstock development and evaluation efforts is to recover sockeye salmon runs in Idaho waters. Recovery is defined as reestablishing sockeye salmon runs and providing for utilization of sockeye salmon and kokanee resources by anglers

  8. A novel and cost-effective monitoring approach for outcomes in an Australian biodiversity conservation incentive program.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David B Lindenmayer

    Full Text Available We report on the design and implementation of ecological monitoring for an Australian biodiversity conservation incentive scheme - the Environmental Stewardship Program. The Program uses competitive auctions to contract individual land managers for up to 15 years to conserve matters of National Environmental Significance (with an initial priority on nationally threatened ecological communities. The ecological monitoring was explicitly aligned with the Program's policy objective and desired outcomes and was applied to the Program's initial Project which targeted the critically endangered White Box-Yellow Box-Blakely's Red Gum Grassy Woodland and Derived Native Grassland ecological community in south eastern Australia. These woodlands have been reduced to <3% of their original extent and persist mostly as small remnants of variable condition on private farmland. We established monitoring sites on 153 farms located over 172,232 sq km. On each farm we established a monitoring site within the woodland patch funded for management and, wherever possible, a matched control site. The monitoring has entailed gathering data on vegetation condition, reptiles and birds. We also gathered data on the costs of experimental design, site establishment, field survey, and data analysis. The costs of monitoring are approximately 8.5% of the Program's investment in the first four years and hence are in broad accord with the general rule of thumb that 5-10% of a program's funding should be invested in monitoring. Once initial monitoring and site benchmarking are completed we propose to implement a novel rotating sampling approach that will maintain scientific integrity while achieving an annual cost-efficiency of up to 23%. We discuss useful lessons relevant to other monitoring programs where there is a need to provide managers with reliable early evidence of program effectiveness and to demonstrate opportunities for cost-efficiencies.

  9. Evaluating Safeguards in a Conservation Incentive Program: Participation, Consent, and Benefit Sharing in Indigenous Communities of the Ecuadorian Amazon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torsten Krause

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Critics suggest that Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and forest Degradation (REDD+ may not generate improvements in well-being for participating stakeholders, and may in fact undermine indigenous rights. To ensure positive social benefits from REDD+ projects, the United Nations REDD Programme has proposed core safeguards, including local stakeholder participation; free, prior, and informed consent; and equitable distribution of benefits. However, there is little experience to date in implementing and evaluating these safeguards. We apply these core safeguards as a framework to study how people in indigenous communities in the Ecuadorian Amazon perceive and benefit from Programa Socio Bosque, a conservation incentive program in Ecuador's national REDD+ Programme portfolio. We interviewed 101 individuals in five communities that had participated in the Programa Socio Bosque for at least 18 months. Close to 80% of respondents reported that the decision to join Socio Bosque was made democratically, that they were familiar with the conservation goals of Socio Bosque, and that they were aware which area their community had selected for conservation. However, only 17% were familiar with the overall terms of the conservation agreement, implying that they were either not fully informed of or did not fully understand what they were consenting to in joining the program. Although the terms of the program require a community investment plan to be democratically developed by community members, less than half of respondents were aware of the existence of the investment plan, and fewer than 20% had participated in its development. The majority of respondents (61% reported that they did not know the amount of incentives that their community currently receives, and only 44% stated that incentives were managed democratically in communal assemblies. Moreover, although a slight majority (53% said they had noticed benefits to the community from participating in

  10. Archaeal Haloarcula californiae Icosahedral Virus 1 Highlights Conserved Elements in Icosahedral Membrane-Containing DNA Viruses from Extreme Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana A. Demina

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Despite their high genomic diversity, all known viruses are structurally constrained to a limited number of virion morphotypes. One morphotype of viruses infecting bacteria, archaea, and eukaryotes is the tailless icosahedral morphotype with an internal membrane. Although it is considered an abundant morphotype in extreme environments, only seven such archaeal viruses are known. Here, we introduce Haloarcula californiae icosahedral virus 1 (HCIV-1, a halophilic euryarchaeal virus originating from salt crystals. HCIV-1 also retains its infectivity under low-salinity conditions, showing that it is able to adapt to environmental changes. The release of progeny virions resulting from cell lysis was evidenced by reduced cellular oxygen consumption, leakage of intracellular ATP, and binding of an indicator ion to ruptured cell membranes. The virion contains at least 12 different protein species, lipids selectively acquired from the host cell membrane, and a 31,314-bp-long linear double-stranded DNA (dsDNA. The overall genome organization and sequence show high similarity to the genomes of archaeal viruses in the Sphaerolipoviridae family. Phylogenetic analysis based on the major conserved components needed for virion assembly—the major capsid proteins and the packaging ATPase—placed HCIV-1 along with the alphasphaerolipoviruses in a distinct, well-supported clade. On the basis of its virion morphology and sequence similarities, most notably, those of its core virion components, we propose that HCIV-1 is a member of the PRD1-adenovirus structure-based lineage together with other sphaerolipoviruses. This addition to the lineage reinforces the notion of the ancient evolutionary links observed between the viruses and further highlights the limits of the choices found in nature for formation of a virion.

  11. Snake River Sockeye Salmon Captive Broodstock Program Hatchery Element : Project Progress Report 2007 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, Dan J.; Heindel, Jeff A.; Green, Daniel G.; Kline, Paul A.

    2008-12-17

    Numbers of Snake River sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka have declined dramatically in recent years. In Idaho, only the lakes of the upper Salmon River (Sawtooth Valley) remain as potential sources of production (Figure 1). Historically, five Sawtooth Valley lakes (Redfish, Alturas, Pettit, Stanley, and Yellowbelly) supported sockeye salmon (Bjornn et al. 1968; Chapman et al. 1990). Currently, only Redfish Lake receives a remnant anadromous run. On April 2, 1990, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries Service (NOAA - formerly National Marine Fisheries Service) received a petition from the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes (SBT) to list Snake River sockeye salmon as endangered under the United States Endangered Species Act (ESA) of 1973. On November 20, 1991, NOAA declared Snake River sockeye salmon endangered. In 1991, the SBT, along with the Idaho Department of Fish & Game (IDFG), initiated the Snake River Sockeye Salmon Sawtooth Valley Project (Sawtooth Valley Project) with funding from the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). The goal of this program is to conserve genetic resources and to rebuild Snake River sockeye salmon populations in Idaho. Coordination of this effort is carried out under the guidance of the Stanley Basin Sockeye Technical Oversight Committee (SBSTOC), a team of biologists representing the agencies involved in the recovery and management of Snake River sockeye salmon. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries Service ESA Permit Nos. 1120, 1124, and 1481 authorize IDFG to conduct scientific research on listed Snake River sockeye salmon. Initial steps to recover the species involved the establishment of captive broodstocks at the Eagle Fish Hatchery in Idaho and at NOAA facilities in Washington State (for a review, see Flagg 1993; Johnson 1993; Flagg and McAuley 1994; Kline 1994; Johnson and Pravecek 1995; Kline and Younk 1995; Flagg et al. 1996; Johnson and Pravecek 1996; Kline and Lamansky 1997; Pravecek and

  12. Differential DNA methylation at conserved non-genic elements and evidence for transgenerational inheritance following developmental exposure to mono(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate and 5-azacytidine in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamstra, Jorke H; Sales, Liana Bastos; Aleström, Peter; Legler, Juliette

    2017-01-01

    Exposure to environmental stressors during development may lead to latent and transgenerational adverse health effects. To understand the role of DNA methylation in these effects, we used zebrafish as a vertebrate model to investigate heritable changes in DNA methylation following chemical-induced stress during early development. We exposed zebrafish embryos to non-embryotoxic concentrations of the biologically active phthalate metabolite mono(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (MEHP, 30 µM) and the DNA methyltransferase 1 inhibitor 5-azacytidine (5AC, 10 µM). Direct, latent and transgenerational effects on DNA methylation were assessed using global, genome-wide and locus-specific DNA methylation analyses. Following direct exposure in zebrafish embryos from 0 to 6 days post-fertilization, genome-wide analysis revealed a multitude of differentially methylated regions, strongly enriched at conserved non-genic elements for both compounds. Pathways involved in adipogenesis were enriched with the putative obesogenic compound MEHP. Exposure to 5AC resulted in enrichment of pathways involved in embryonic development and transgenerational effects on larval body length. Locus-specific methylation analysis of 10 differentially methylated sites revealed six of these loci differentially methylated in sperm sampled from adult zebrafish exposed during development to 5AC, and in first and second generation larvae. With MEHP, consistent changes were found at 2 specific loci in first and second generation larvae. Our results suggest a functional role for DNA methylation on cis-regulatory conserved elements following developmental exposure to compounds. Effects on these regions are potentially transferred to subsequent generations.

  13. A pedagogical model for integrative training in conservation and sustainability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meredith Welch-Devine

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The benefits and challenges of interdisciplinary training are well documented, and several reviews have discussed the particular importance of interdisciplinary training for conservation scholars and practitioners. We discuss the progress within one university program to implement specific training models, elements, and tools designed to move beyond remaining barriers to graduate-level, interdisciplinary conservation education.

  14. Part A - Advanced turbine systems. Part B - Materials/manufacturing element of the Advanced Turbine Systems Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karnitz, M.A.

    1996-06-01

    The DOE Offices of Fossil Energy and Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy have initiated a program to develop advanced turbine systems for power generation. The objective of the Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Program is to develop ultra-high efficiency, environmentally superior, and cost competitive gas turbine systems for utility and industrial applications. One of the supporting elements of the ATS Program is the Materials/Manufacturing Technologies Task. The objective of this element is to address the critical materials and manufacturing issues for both industrial and utility gas turbines.

  15. Annual report to Congress on Federal Government Energy Management and Conservation Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-02-01

    This report on Federal Energy Management for Fiscal year (FY) 1992 provides information on energy consumption in Federal buildings and operations and documents activities conducted by Federal agencies to meet the statutory requirements of Title V, Part 3, of the National Energy Conservation Policy Act (NECPA), as amended, 42 U.S.C. 8251-8261, and Title VIII of NECPA, 42 U.S.C. 8287-8287b. This report also describes the energy conservation and management activities of the Federal Government under the authorization of section 381 of the Energy Policy and Conservation Act (EPCA), as amended, 42 U.S.C. 6361. Implementation activities undertaken during FY 1992 by the Federal agencies under Executive Order 12759 on Federal Energy Management are also described in this report.

  16. Annual report to Congress on Federal Government energy management and conservation programs, Fiscal year 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-10-06

    This report provides sinformation on energy consumption in Federal buildings and operations and documents activities conducted by Federal agencies to meet statutory requirements of the National Energy Conservation Policy Act. It also describes energy conservation and management activities of the Federal Government under section 381 of the Energy Policy and Conservation Act. Implementation activities undertaken during FY94 by the Federal agencies under the Energy Policy Act of 1992 and Executive Orders 12759 and 12902 are also described. During FY94, total (gross) energy consumption of the US Government, including energy consued to produce, process, and transport energy, was 1.72 quadrillion Btu. This represents {similar_to}2.0% of the total 85.34 quads used in US.

  17. Hyper conserved elements in vertebrate mRNA 3'-UTRs reveal a translational network of RNA-binding proteins controlled by HuR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dassi, Erik; Zuccotti, Paola; Leo, Sara; Provenzani, Alessandro; Assfalg, Michael; D'Onofrio, Mariapina; Riva, Paola; Quattrone, Alessandro

    2013-03-01

    Little is known regarding the post-transcriptional networks that control gene expression in eukaryotes. Additionally, we still need to understand how these networks evolve, and the relative role played in them by their sequence-dependent regulatory factors, non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) and RNA-binding proteins (RBPs). Here, we used an approach that relied on both phylogenetic sequence sharing and conservation in the whole mapped 3'-untranslated regions (3'-UTRs) of vertebrate species to gain knowledge on core post-transcriptional networks. The identified human hyper conserved elements (HCEs) were predicted to be preferred binding sites for RBPs and not for ncRNAs, namely microRNAs and long ncRNAs. We found that the HCE map identified a well-known network that post-transcriptionally regulates histone mRNAs. We were then able to discover and experimentally confirm a translational network composed of RNA Recognition Motif (RRM)-type RBP mRNAs that are positively controlled by HuR, another RRM-type RBP. HuR shows a preference for these RBP mRNAs bound in stem-loop motifs, confirming its role as a 'regulator of regulators'. Analysis of the transcriptome-wide HCE distribution revealed a profile of prevalently small clusters separated by unconserved intercluster RNA stretches, which predicts the formation of discrete small ribonucleoprotein complexes in the 3'-UTRs.

  18. Zoos through the lens of the IUCN Red List: a global metapopulation approach to support conservation breeding programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conde, Dalia A; Colchero, Fernando; Gusset, Markus; Pearce-Kelly, Paul; Byers, Onnie; Flesness, Nate; Browne, Robert K; Jones, Owen R

    2013-01-01

    Given current extinction trends, the number of species requiring conservation breeding programs (CBPs) is likely to increase dramatically. To inform CBP policies for threatened terrestrial vertebrates, we evaluated the number and representation of threatened vertebrate species on the IUCN Red List held in the ISIS zoo network and estimated the complexity of their management as metapopulations. Our results show that 695 of the 3,955 (23%) terrestrial vertebrate species in ISIS zoos are threatened. Only two of the 59 taxonomic orders show a higher proportion of threatened species in ISIS zoos than would be expected if species were selected at random. In addition, for most taxa, the management of a zoo metapopulation of more than 250 individuals will require the coordination of a cluster of 11 to 24 ISIS zoos within a radius of 2,000 km. Thus, in the zoo network, the representation of species that may require CBPs is currently low and the spatial distribution of these zoo populations makes management difficult. Although the zoo community may have the will and the logistical potential to contribute to conservation actions, including CBPs, to do so will require greater collaboration between zoos and other institutions, alongside the development of international agreements that facilitate cross-border movement of zoo animals. To maximize the effectiveness of integrated conservation actions that include CBPs, it is fundamental that the non-zoo conservation community acknowledges and integrates the expertise and facilities of zoos where it can be helpful.

  19. Celebrating minority professionals in forestry and natural resources conservation: proceedings of the symposium on the tenth anniversary of the 2 + 2 joint degree program in forestry and natural resources conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oghenekome U. Onokpise; Don L. Rockwood; Dreamal H. Worthen; Ted Willis

    2008-01-01

    The 22 papers in this symposium highlight the program and its contribution to increasing minority professionals in forestry and natural resources conservation. The tenth anniversary symposium brought together graduates of the program, current students and officials from the universities, the U.S. Forest Service, other agencies, and private industry. The theme of the...

  20. Clinician use of standardized assessments following a common elements psychotherapy training and consultation program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Aaron R; Dorsey, Shannon; Pullmann, Michael; Silbaugh-Cowdin, Jessica; Berliner, Lucy

    2015-01-01

    Despite increasing emphasis on the implementation of evidence-based treatments in community service settings, little attention has been paid to supporting the use of evidence-based assessment (EBA) methods and processes, a parallel component of evidence-based practice. Standardized assessment (SA) tools represent a key aspect of EBA and are central to data-driven clinical decision making. The current study evaluated the impact of a statewide training and consultation program in a common elements approach to psychotherapy. Practitioner attitudes toward, skill applying, and use of SA tools across four time points (pre-training, post-training, post-consultation, and follow-up) were assessed. Results indicated early increases in positive SA attitudes, with more gradual increases in self-reported SA skill and use. Implications for supporting the sustained use of SA tools are discussed, including the use of measurement feedback systems, reminders, and SA-supportive supervision practices.

  1. Pengenalan Ababil: Program Finite Element Analysis (FEA 3-Dimensi Untuk Struktur Rangka-Batang

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sugeng Waluyo

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Ababil is an open source computer program working on the basis offinite element method (FEM which is aimed to analyze frame structures. It is mainly designed as a solver without embedded pre-or/and post-processing units. Recently, the solver is compatible only for reading and writing in the Gmsh [1] pre- and post-processing software environment. The FEM kinematics formulation applied here is relied on the Timoshenko Beam Theory (TBT using linear shape function. Finally, the well-known FEM software MSC.Nastranis used to ensure the capability of Ababil in the prediction of frame deformation by means of FEMsimulation

  2. Human Research Program Human Health Countermeasures Element Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Risk Standing Review Panel (SRP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norfleet, William; Harris, Bernard

    2009-01-01

    The Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Risk Standing Review Panel (SRP) was favorably impressed by the operational risk management approach taken by the Human Research Program (HRP) Integrated Research Plan (IRP) to address the stated life sciences issues. The life sciences community at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) seems to be focused on operational risk management. This approach is more likely to provide risk managers with the information they need at the time they need it. Concerning the information provided to the SRP by the EVA Physiology, Systems, and Performance Project (EPSP), it is obvious that a great deal of productive activity is under way. Evaluation of this information was hampered by the fact that it often was not organized in a fashion that reflects the "Gaps and Tasks" approach of the overall Human Health Countermeasures (HHC) effort, and that a substantial proportion of the briefing concerned subjects that, while interesting, are not part of the HHC Element (e.g., the pressurized rover presentation). Additionally, no information was provided on several of the tasks or how they related to work underway or already accomplished. This situation left the SRP having to guess at the efforts and relationship to other elements, and made it hard to easily map the EVA Project efforts currently underway, and the data collected thus far, to the gaps and tasks in the IRP. It seems that integration of the EPSP project into the HHC Element could be improved. Along these lines, we were concerned that our SRP was split off from the other participating SRPs at an early stage in the overall agenda for the meeting. In reality, the concerns of EPSP and other projects share much common ground. For example, the commonality of the concerns of the EVA and exercise physiology groups is obvious, both in terms of what reduced exercise capacity can do to EVA capability, and how the exercise performed during an EVA could contribute to an overall exercise countermeasure prescription.

  3. The value of countryside elements in the conservation of a threatened arboreal marsupial Petaurus norfolcensis in agricultural landscapes of south-eastern Australia--the disproportional value of scattered trees.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mason J Crane

    Full Text Available Human activities, particularly agriculture, have transformed much of the world's terrestrial environment. Within these anthropogenic landscapes, a variety of relictual and semi-natural habitats exist, which we term countryside elements. The habitat value of countryside elements (hereafter termed 'elements' is increasingly recognised. We quantify the relative value of four kinds of such 'elements' (linear roadside remnants, native vegetation patches, scattered trees and tree plantings used by a threatened Australian arboreal marsupial, the squirrel glider (Petaurus norfolcensis. We examined relationships between home range size and the availability of each 'element' and whether the usage was relative to predicted levels of use. The use of 'elements' by gliders was largely explained by their availability, but there was a preference for native vegetation patches and scattered trees. We found home range size was significantly smaller with increasing area of scattered trees and a contrasting effect with increasing area of linear roadside remnants or native vegetation patches. Our work showed that each 'element' was used and as such had a role in the conservation of the squirrel glider, but their relative value varied. We illustrate the need to assess the conservation value of countryside elements so they can be incorporated into the holistic management of agricultural landscapes. This work demonstrates the disproportional value of scattered trees, underscoring the need to specifically incorporate and/or enhance the protection and recruitment of scattered trees in biodiversity conservation policy and management.

  4. The value of countryside elements in the conservation of a threatened arboreal marsupial Petaurus norfolcensis in agricultural landscapes of south-eastern Australia--the disproportional value of scattered trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, Mason J; Lindenmayer, David B; Cunningham, Ross B

    2014-01-01

    Human activities, particularly agriculture, have transformed much of the world's terrestrial environment. Within these anthropogenic landscapes, a variety of relictual and semi-natural habitats exist, which we term countryside elements. The habitat value of countryside elements (hereafter termed 'elements') is increasingly recognised. We quantify the relative value of four kinds of such 'elements' (linear roadside remnants, native vegetation patches, scattered trees and tree plantings) used by a threatened Australian arboreal marsupial, the squirrel glider (Petaurus norfolcensis). We examined relationships between home range size and the availability of each 'element' and whether the usage was relative to predicted levels of use. The use of 'elements' by gliders was largely explained by their availability, but there was a preference for native vegetation patches and scattered trees. We found home range size was significantly smaller with increasing area of scattered trees and a contrasting effect with increasing area of linear roadside remnants or native vegetation patches. Our work showed that each 'element' was used and as such had a role in the conservation of the squirrel glider, but their relative value varied. We illustrate the need to assess the conservation value of countryside elements so they can be incorporated into the holistic management of agricultural landscapes. This work demonstrates the disproportional value of scattered trees, underscoring the need to specifically incorporate and/or enhance the protection and recruitment of scattered trees in biodiversity conservation policy and management.

  5. Human Research Program Human Health Countermeasures Element Nutrition Risk Standing Review Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bistrian, Bruce

    2009-01-01

    The Nutrition Risk Standing Review Panel (SRP) reviewed and discussed the specific gaps and tasks for the Human Health Countermeasures (HHC) Element related to nutrition identified in the Human Research Program (HRP) Integrated Research Plan. There was general consensus that the described gaps and proposed tasks were critical to future NASA mission success. The SRP acknowledged the high scientific quality of the work currently being undertaken by the Nutritional Biochemistry group under the direction of Dr. Scott Smith. In review of the entire HRP, four new gaps were identified that complement the Element's existing research activities. Given the limitations of ground-based analogs for many of the unique physiological and metabolic alterations in space, future studies are needed to quantify nutritional factors that change during actual space flight. In addition, future tasks should seek to better evaluate the time course of physiological and metabolic alterations during flight to better predict alterations during longer duration missions. Finally, given the recent data suggesting a potential role for increased inflammatory responses during space flight, the role of inflammation needs to be explored in detail, including the development of potential countermeasures and new ground based analogs, if this possibility is confirmed.

  6. Background and elements of the linkage between the Brazilian school feeding program and family farming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartzman, Flavia; Mora, Claudia Andrea Rodriguez; Bogus, Claudia Maria; Villar, Betzabeth Slater

    2017-12-18

    Since 2009, legislation of the National School Feeding Program of Brazil (PNAE) institutionalizes its linkage with family farming as it establishes the requirement that at least 30% out of the total financial resources allocated by the federal government to the states and municipalities for school feeding must be used in the purchase of products directly from this sector. This study analyzes the process of drafting this legislation, focusing on the elements related to the procurement from family farming, through a historical contextualization, and it also presents a graphical representation with the main elements of this linkage: its objectives, target population, actions implemented and expected results. Actors involved with the drafting of the legislation were interviewed. The analyses show that the procurement from family farming is a far-reaching initiative in terms of the concept, execution and results. It has also showed that a strong articulation between the actors and institutions of the different sectors involved is critical to its success. The education, agriculture, planning, procurement and civil society sectors should work articulately at national, state and local level. The results of this study demonstrate that initiatives like this, of institutional procurement from family farming, which are currently being implemented in several countries, constitute as an important strategy of food and nutrition security, for the fulfillment of the human right to adequate food and the promotion of long-term sustainable development.

  7. Investment risk evaluation techniques: use in energy-intensive industries and implications for ERDA's Industrial Conservation Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1977-07-13

    The trade-off between risk and rate-of-return in investment evaluations is crucial in assessing the commercial potential of future energy-conservation technologies. The focus of the Industrial Conservation Program at ERDA is to reduce the perceived risks of a given technology to the extent that the private sector will adopt the technology within the normal course of its business operations. These perceived risks may emanate from technical, institutional, or commercial uncertainties, or in many cases they may result merely from a company's or industry's lack of previous experience with a particular technology. Regardless of the source of the risk surrounding a project, the uncertainty it poses to the private sector will serve to inhibit decisions to invest. This study evaluates the treatment of risk in capital investments in certain energy-intensive industries which are the primary targets of ERDA's Industrial Conservation Program. These risks evaluation considerations were placed within a context that includes capital budgeting practices and procedures, organizational considerations, and basic rate-of-return evaluation procedures in the targeted energy-intensive industries (petroleum, chemicals, paper, textiles, cement, food processing, aluminum, steel, glass, and agriculture).

  8. Building an evidence-informed service array: Considering evidence-based programs as well as their practice elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Adam; Chorpita, Bruce F; Daleiden, Eric L; Ebesutani, Chad K; Rosenblatt, Abram

    2015-12-01

    This study empirically examined options for building an evidence-informed service array, comparing strategies to maximize the application of evidence-based treatment literature in a clinical service system. The overall goal was to determine the smallest set of treatments that could serve the largest percentage of clients. Solutions to this problem differ depending on how one defines "treatment." Treatments were conceptualized as (a) programs (integrated treatments produced by specific research laboratories or investigators), and (b) collections of their constituent common procedures, referred to as practice elements. Programs listed by 2 separate government-sanctioned registries were selected to illustrate the effects of "program" conceptualizations, and all available clinical trials testing the programs were analyzed. Practice elements were identified from these same studies and from studies of other treatments that met a standard of evidence but had not been organized into programs on these lists. Relevance mapping methodology was used to identify optimal sets of programs and practice elements. Among a large, diverse clinical population, results identified 11%-22% of youths for whom practice elements provide an evidence-informed treatment option whereas no programs meeting the standard of evidence were available on the registries. Results for the practice elements were able to be matched by a hybrid combination: "best" programs, which were then extended by practice elements. These results demonstrated that there are multiple ways to conceptualize treatments when planning a service array, and these options have significant implications regarding who can be served by treatments supported by evidence. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  9. 78 FR 79419 - Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products and Commercial and Industrial Equipment: Effect...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-30

    ... Revised Estimates of the Social Cost of Carbon AGENCY: Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy... Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Building Technologies Office, EE-2J, 1000 Independence Avenue SW... benefits of reductions in CO 2 emissions associated with energy conservation standards using the May 2013...

  10. Water Wizards: School Program on Water Conservation for Third and Fourth Grade Levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massachusetts State Water Resources Authority, Boston.

    Water is precious. It is also easy to take for granted. Many people recognize that water is scarce in desert areas. but it is harder to realize that places like Massachusetts could face a shortage of pure drinking water. This manual provides teachers with curriculum resources to introduce concepts of water supply and water conservation to third…

  11. 75 FR 27170 - Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products: Determination Concerning the Potential for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-14

    ...-Voltage EPS for a Video Game Console Efficiency- Reference point for Minimum active- Maximum no- related... effect should be amended and to include any amended standards as part of that final rule. (42 U.S.C. 6295..., and will detail the potential effects of proposed energy conservation standards for non-Class A EPSs...

  12. 77 FR 28673 - Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products: Test Procedures for Residential Furnace Fans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-15

    ... applicable energy conservation standards adopted pursuant to EPCA and for making representations about the... a furnace fan at a single operating point would not likely provide a full representation of energy... literature that detailed characteristics of the cooling system are not provided in the product literature for...

  13. Conservation program works as an alternative irrigation districts in sustainable water management of agricultural use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Víctor Manuel Peinado Guevara

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Water scarcity is an issue of worldwide concern since it is already having an impact on social development. Mexico is not an exception to this problem because in several regions of the country are great difficulties in supplying water, primarily for agricultural use. In Sinaloa, it had been mentioned repeatedly by the media that in the Irrigation District 063, located in the northern of the state, there are problems of water scarcity, and yet there still exist difficulties in conserving the resource. More than 49% of the water used for agriculture is wasted. To resolve this problem, producers and government agencies spend significant resources for investment in water conservation. However, the results have not been entirely satisfactory because the waste is high, a situation that motivates them to study more deeply the main weaknesses that affect sustainable resource use. Farmer’s participation in the administration of water infrastructure is important, as well as providing financial resources for the conservation of water system; and participation in activities of construction and repaired of water infrastructure. Farmer’s should also plan and design strategies for water conservation. This situation requires an appropriate level of technology and intellectual, rather than local producers and thus no complicated sustainable resource management. That is what local producers don’t have and therefore it complicates the sustainable management of the resource.

  14. Cognitive and Emotional Evaluation of an Amphibian Conservation Program for Elementary School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randler, Christoph; Ilg, Angelika; Kern, Janina

    2005-01-01

    The authors describe a study aimed at enhancing knowledge about amphibian species. Two classes of 3rd and 4th graders aged 9-11 years participated in the study. In addition, approximately one half of the students participated in an environmental conservation action designated to preserve migrating amphibians. During this action, students…

  15. 77 FR 38743 - Energy Efficiency Program for Consumer Products: Energy Conservation Standards for Battery...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-29

    ... for Battery Chargers and External Power Supplies AGENCY: Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable... proposed rulemaking to establish energy conservation standards for battery chargers and external power... Standards for Battery Chargers and External Power Supplies'') and provide the appropriate docket number...

  16. 78 FR 49975 - Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products: Landmark Legal Foundation; Petition for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-16

    ... pertaining to microwave oven standards does not withstand scrutiny under the APA. It appears that DOE... Conservation Standards for Standby Mode and Off Mode for Microwave Ovens, Docket No. EERE-2011-BT-STD-0048, RIN... Administrative Procedure Act (APA), 5 U.S.C. 551 et seq., provides among other things that, `` ach agency shall...

  17. Primate Conservation--An Evaluation of Two Different Educational Programs in Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seybold, Brigitte; Braunbeck, Thomas; Randler, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    Nearly all primate species are globally threatened. Conservation approaches need to focus on local people and users of resources from the habitats of the apes. Students worldwide should become aware of the context and relationships in school, and they should change their usage and behaviour as the ultimate goals. This study explored the…

  18. Farmers' Cynicism toward Nature and Distrust of the Government: Where Does that Leave Conservation Buffer Programs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gronewold, Katherine L.; Burnett, Ann; Meister, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Farmers are commonly regarded as stewards of the land. Farmers have, however, become cynical toward nature (Meister, Hest, & Burnett, 2009) and distrustful of the government (Cantrill, 2003). This study examines whether or not that cynicism and distrust is reflected in U.S. farmers' opinions of and future participation in conservation buffer…

  19. The Impact of Soil and Water Conservation Program on the Income ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Land degradation due to soil erosion and nutrient depletion is one of the main problems constraining the development of the agricultural sector in Ethiopia. As part of intervention activities a number of soil and water conservation (SWC) practices have been promoted to smallholder farmers living in highly degraded and ...

  20. Industrial sector energy conservation programs in the People`s Republic of China during the seventh five-year plan (1986--1990)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Zhiping [State Planning Commission, Beijing (China). Energy Research Inst.; Sinton, J.E.; Yang Fuqiang; Levine, M.D.; Ting, M.K. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-09-01

    The impetus at the national level to invest in energy conservation is quite strong and has long been reflected not only in official pronouncements, but also in the investments and organizational activities of the Chinese government. In the early 1980s the central government began a program of direct investments in industrial energy conservation that continues to the present. In addition, concurrently established governmental and quasi-governmental agencies have pursued conservation through administrative and educational measures. In Section 2 of this paper the authors outline the policies and institutions that supported China`s program of energy conservation investments in the Sixth and Seventh Five-Year Plans (FYPs) (1981--1985 and 1986--1990). In Section 3 they describe examples of the types of conservation projects pursued in four industrial subsectors: ferrous metals manufacturing; non-ferrous metals mining and manufacturing; chemicals manufacturing; and building materials manufacturing. Section 4 presents a simple methodology for comparing the costs of energy conservation to those of energy supply. Further discussion points out the applicability and limitations of this methodology to State Planning Commission published statistical material on the overall results of energy conservation investments. Though problematic, such analysis indicates that energy conservation investments were probably substantially cheaper than investments in equivalent energy supply would have been. They end with a discussion of some of the difficulties encountered in carrying out the conservation investment programs.

  1. Development of an industry-government cooperative energy conservation program for small manufacturers: phase I. Final report, Project 8978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fejer, M. E.; Ketels, P. A.

    1976-11-01

    The ultimate objective of this program is to determine the industrial energy conservation measures for small manufacturers that are practical, specific, rapidly implementable, and of reasonable cost. The approach being taken in this program is one in which the trade associations representing the various small manufacturers agree to cooperate in providing the necessary contacts and data for evaluating their respective industries. The program is divided into three phases, and this is the final report for the first phase. The objective of this phase was to seek the participation of the trade associations in the next two phases. At the conclusion of this phase, eight associations had volunteered to participate. These include: Aluminum Recycling Association; American Die Casting Institute; American Foundrymen's Society; Forging Industry Association; Glass Crafts of America; Metal Treating Institute; Non-Ferrous Founders Society; and The Fertilizer Institute.

  2. Le Conte's sparrows breeding in Conservation Reserve Program fields: precipitation and patterns of population change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igl, Lawrence D.; Johnson, Douglas H.

    1999-01-01

    ). Like populations of many grassland breeding birds in North America (Fretwell 1986, Igl and Johnson 1997), Le Conte's Sparrow populations exhibit numerical highs and lows depending on local moisture conditions (Peabody 1901, Stewart 1975, Knapton 1979, Zimmer 1979, Madden 1996). This observation, however, is based largely on anecdotal evidence or short-term observations. Long-term studies of Le Conte's Sparrow populations are limited. Le Conte's Sparrow is poorly represented on the North American Breeding Bird Survey (BBS) because of small sample sizes, poor coverage in the northern portion of its breeding range, and the species' furtive behavior (Sauer et al. 1995). Moreover, dramatic fluctuations in Le Conte's Sparrow abundance tend to obscure the species' long-term population trends on the BBS (Sauer et al. 1995). In this paper we examine long-term population changes of Le Conte's Sparrows breeding in perennial grassland fields enrolled in the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) on the northern Great Plains. We discuss patterns of population change of Le Conte's Sparrows associated with changes in precipitation and moisture conditions.

  3. 76 FR 59003 - Energy Conservation Program: Compliance Certification for Electric Motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-23

    ... Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Building Technologies Program, EE-2J, 1000..., Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Building Technologies Program, EE-2J, Forrestal... Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Building Technologies Program, EE-2J, Forrestal...

  4. Snake River Sockeye Salmon Captive Broodstock Program; Hatchery Element, 1999 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, Dan J,; Heindel, Jeff A.; Kline, Paul A. (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, ID)

    2005-08-01

    On November 20, 1991, the National Marine Fisheries Service listed Snake River sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka as endangered under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. In 1991, the Idaho Department of Fish and Game, the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes, and the National Marine Fisheries Service initiated efforts to conserve and rebuild populations in Idaho. Initial steps to recover sockeye salmon included the establishment of a captive broodstock program at the Idaho Department of Fish and Game Eagle Fish Hatchery. Sockeye salmon broodstock and culture responsibilities are shared with the National Marine Fisheries Service at two locations adjacent to Puget Sound in Washington State. Activities conducted by the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes and the National Marine Fisheries Service are reported under separate cover. Idaho Department of Fish and Game monitoring and evaluation activities of captive broodstock program fish releases are also reported under separate cover. Captive broodstock program activities conducted between January 1, 1999 and December 31, 1999 are presented in this report. In 1999, seven anadromous sockeye salmon returned to the Sawtooth Valley and were captured at the adult weir located on the upper Salmon River. Four anadromous adults were incorporated in the captive broodstock program spawning design for year 1999. The remaining three adults were released to Redfish Lake for natural spawning. All seven adults were adipose and left ventral fin-clipped, indicating hatchery origin. One sockeye salmon female from the anadromous group and 81 females from the captive broodstock group were spawned at the Eagle Fish Hatchery in 1999. Spawn pairings produced approximately 63,147 eyed-eggs with egg survival to eyed-stage of development averaging 38.97%. Eyed-eggs (20,311), presmolts (40,271), smolts (9,718), and adults (21) were planted or released into Sawtooth Valley waters in 1999. Supplementation strategies involved releases to Redfish Lake, Redfish Lake Creek

  5. Development and program implementation of elements for identification of the electromagnet condition for movable element position control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leukhin, R. I.; Shaykhutdinov, D. V.; Shirokov, K. M.; Narakidze, N. D.; Vlasov, A. S.

    2017-02-01

    Developing the experimental design of new electromagnetic constructions types in engineering industry enterprises requires solutions of two major problems: regulator’s parameters setup and comprehensive testing of electromagnets. A weber-ampere characteristic as a data source for electromagnet condition identification was selected. Present article focuses on development and implementation of the software for electromagnetic drive control system based on the weber-ampere characteristic measuring. The software for weber-ampere characteristic data processing based on artificial neural network is developed. Results of the design have been integrated into the program code in LabVIEW environment. The license package of LabVIEW graphic programming was used. The hardware is chosen and possibility of its use for control system implementation was proved. The trained artificial neural network defines electromagnetic drive effector position with minimal error. Developed system allows to control the electromagnetic drive powered by the voltage source, the current source and hybrid sources.

  6. EnviroAtlas - Acres of USDA Farm Service Agency Conservation Reserve Program land by 12-Digit HUC for the Conterminous United States.

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset shows the acres of land enrolled in the US Department of Agriculture (USDA)'s Conservation Reserve Program (CRP). The CRP is administered by...

  7. Assessing the effectiveness of a place-based conservation education program by applying utilization-focused evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flowers, Alice Blood

    Lack of personal connection to the natural world by most American youth builds reason for assessing effectiveness of conservation education programs. Place-based learning is important in helping youth understand how their personal and societal well-being are linked and dependent upon their local habitats. Across Montana 2277 students in grades 3--10 participate in an interactive year long fishing education program with their teachers called Hooked on Fishing (HOF). The purpose of my study was to assess the effectiveness of HOF, a place-based conservation education program established in 1996, and modeled after the national Hooked on Fishing, Not on Drugs program. Using a quasi-experimental nonequivalent group study design, students received a pre-survey during the beginning of the program, a post-survey after the program, and an extended post-survey 12 to 14 weeks later. Teachers voluntarily participated in an Internet survey during May 2006, and program instructors voluntarily participated in a structured open-ended telephone interview in June 2006. A key component of my study was the decision to conduct the evaluation process using an approach which included stakeholders in the development of the instruments to measure student outcomes. This approach is called utilization-focused evaluation and was developed by Michael Q. Patton. The motive of this approach is to promote the usability of the evaluation results. The results are considered to have a better chance to be applied by the program stakeholders to not only gauge program effectiveness, but to be used to improve the program. Two research questions were: (1) does the frequency of outdoor experiences have significant affects on students' knowledge, skills, attitudes, and intended stewardship behaviors; and (2) does improved knowledge of local natural resources have significant affects on students' skills, attitudes and intended stewardship behavior. Nonparametric statistical analyses calculated statistical

  8. Importance of well-designed monitoring programs for the conservation of endangered species: case study of the Snail Kite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, J.; Kitchens, W.M.; Hines, J.E.

    2007-01-01

    Monitoring natural populations is often a necessary step to establish the conservation status of species and to help improve management decisions. Nevertheless, many monitoring programs do not effectively address primary sources of variability in monitoring data, which ultimately may limit the utility of monitoring in identifying declines and improving management. To illustrate the importance of taking into account detectability and spatial variation, we used a recently proposed estimator of abundance (superpopulation estimator) to estimate population size of and number of young produced by the Snail Kite (Rostrhamus sociabilis plumbeus) in Florida. During the last decade, primary recovery targets set by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for the Snail Kite that were based on deficient monitoring programs (i.e., uncorrected counts) were close to being met (by simply increasing search effort during count surveys). During that same period, the Snail Kite population declined dramatically (by 55% from 1997 to 2005) and the number of young decreased by 70% between 1992?1998 and 1999?2005. Our results provide a strong practical case in favor of the argument that investing a sufficient amount of time and resources into designing and implementing monitoring programs that carefully address detectability and spatial variation is critical for the conservation of endangered species.

  9. Hearing Conservation Live #2430

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chochoms, Michael [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-08-09

    Occupational hearing loss is one of the most common work-related illnesses in the United States (US). From 22 to 30 million US workers are exposed to hazardous noise levels at work, and 25% of these workers will develop permanent hearing loss. Hearing loss from noise is slow and painless, and you can have a disability before you notice it. This course presents the hazards associated with workplace noise, the purpose and elements of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Hearing Conservation Program (HCP), and controls that are available to reduce your exposure to hazardous levels of noise.

  10. NATIONAL QUESTION IN PROGRAM DOCUMENTS OF UKRAINIAN POLITICAL ASSOCIATIONS OF CONSERVATIVE-CLERICAL DIRECTION IN WESTERN UKRAINE (1920-1930

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruslan Demczyszak

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In the article activity of Ukrainian parties and social and political associations of conservative-clerical direction in Western Ukraine –UKA, UKS, UKNP (UNA– is explored. The place of national question in their programs is found out. The attitude to the slogan of autonomy of Western Ukraine within Poland and possible independence of Ukraine was researched. It analyzes the decision of party conferences, discussions on this subject on the pages of print media related to political organizations. Looks to character of Ukrainian-Polish relations of metropolitan Andrey Sheptytskyi and bishop Hrygory Khomyshyn are exposed.

  11. The bacteriophage WORiC is the active phage element in wRi of Drosophila simulans and represents a conserved class of WO phages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biliske Jennifer A

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The alphaproteobacterium Wolbachia pipientis, the most common endosymbiont in eukaryotes, is found predominantly in insects including many Drosophila species. Although Wolbachia is primarily vertically transmitted, analysis of its genome provides evidence for frequent horizontal transfer, extensive recombination and numerous mobile genetic elements. The genome sequence of Wolbachia in Drosophila simulans Riverside (wRi is available along with the integrated bacteriophages, enabling a detailed examination of phage genes and the role of these genes in the biology of Wolbachia and its host organisms. Wolbachia is widely known for its ability to modify the reproductive patterns of insects. One particular modification, cytoplasmic incompatibility, has previously been shown to be dependent on Wolbachia density and inversely related to the titer of lytic phage. The wRi genome has four phage regions, two WORiBs, one WORiA and one WORiC. Results In this study specific primers were designed to distinguish between these four prophage types in wRi, and quantitative PCR was used to measure the titer of bacteriophages in testes, ovaries, embryos and adult flies. In all tissues tested, WORiA and WORiB were not found to be present in excess of their integrated prophages; WORiC, however, was found to be present extrachromosomally. WORiC is undergoing extrachromosomal replication in wRi. The density of phage particles was found to be consistent in individual larvae in a laboratory population. The WORiC genome is organized in conserved blocks of genes and aligns most closely with other known lytic WO phages, WOVitA and WOCauB. Conclusions The results presented here suggest that WORiC is the lytic form of WO in D. simulans, is undergoing extrachromosomal replication in wRi, and belongs to a conserved family of phages in Wolbachia.

  12. Motivations for enrollment into the Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program in the James River Basin of South Dakota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfrimmer, Jarrett; Gigliotti, Larry M.; Stafford, Joshua; Schumann, David; Bertrand, Katie

    2017-01-01

    The Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program (CREP) targets high-priority conservation needs (e.g., water quality, wildlife habitat) by paying landowners an annual rental rate to remove environmentally sensitive or agriculturally unproductive lands from rowcrop production, and then implement conservation practices on these lands. This study examined motivations of South Dakota landowners for enrolling in the James River Basin CREP. All 517 newly enrolled landowners were mailed a questionnaire in 2014 measuring demographics, behaviors, opinions, and motivations (60% response rate). Cluster analysis of 10 motivations for enrolling identified three motivation groups (wildlife = 40%, financial = 35%, environmental = 25%). The financial group had the youngest mean age (62 years), followed by the wildlife (65) and environmental groups (68). Among respondents, 43% favored the public access requirement of this CREP with the environmental group most in favor. Understanding landowner enrollment motivations and decision criteria will assist in strategies (e.g., financial incentives, increasing yield via habitat restoration) for increasing future participation.

  13. 78 FR 48821 - Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products and Certain Commercial and Industrial Equipment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-12

    .... Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Building Technologies Program, EE-2J... Consumer Product AGENCY: Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Department of Energy. ACTION... message. Mail: Ms. Brenda Edwards, U.S. Department of Energy, Building Technologies Program, Mailstop EE...

  14. 76 FR 38618 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Coral Reef Conservation Program Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    ... 6616, 14th and Constitution Avenue, NW., Washington, DC 20230 (or via the Internet at [email protected] allow CRCP staff to ensure programs are designed appropriately at the start, future program evaluation... expect to use face-to-face interviews in American Samoa, internet-based survey techniques in Hawaii and...

  15. 76 FR 65616 - Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products: Test Procedures for Residential Central Air...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-24

    .... Both the American Heating and Refrigeration Institute (AHRI) and Trane stated that the proposed off... hourly values of solar radiation and meteorological elements for a 1-year period recorded in 1,029...://rredc.nrel.gov/solar/old_data/nsrdb/1991-2005/tmy3/ for additional information. The commenters did not...

  16. Institutional Conservation Program evaluation project: Results of higher education survey pretest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernard, M.J. III; Collins, N.E.; Ettinger, G.; Hatfield, B.; Kammerud, R.; Kier, P.H.; Melillo, J.; Vine, E.

    1987-04-01

    Teams from Argonne National Laboratory, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, and the US Department of Energy visited 14 colleges and universities to pretest a survey instrument that will be mailed to all US colleges and universities to solicit information about energy conservation activities and decision-making processes. The results of the pretest, the final higher education questionnaire, and implications for an elementary and secondary education questionnaire are the primary subjects of this report. Because interviewees offered anecdotes and advice about equipment, management, finances, and maintenance that may be useful to others, narrative summaries of each visit are included. The report also contains the interviewees' responses to the pretest questions.

  17. Human Research Program Human Health Countermeasures Element Sensorimotor Risk Standing Review Panel (SRP) Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Barry

    2009-01-01

    The Sensorimotor Risk Standing Review Panel (SRP) met at the NASA Johnson Space Center on October 4-6, 2009 to discuss the areas of future research targeted by the Human Health Countermeasures (HHC) Element of the Human Research Program (HRP). Using evidence-based knowledge as a background for risks, NASA had identified gaps in knowledge to address those risks. Ongoing and proposed tasks were presented to address the gaps. The charge to the Sensorimotor Risk SRP was to review the gaps, evaluate whether the tasks addressed these gaps and to make recommendations to NASA s HRP Science Management Office regarding the SRP's review. The SRP was requested to evaluate the practicality of the proposed efforts in light of the realistic demands placed on the HRP. In short, all tasks presented in the Integrated Research Plan (IRP) should address specific risks related to the challenges faced by the astronauts as a result of prolonged exposure to microgravity. All tasks proposed to fill the gaps in knowledge should provide applied, translational data necessary to address the specific risks. Several presentations were made to the SRP during the site visit and the SRP spent sufficient time to address the panel charge, either as a group or in separate sessions. The SRP made a final debriefing to the HRP Program Scientist. Taking the evidence and the risk as givens, the SRP reached the following conclusions: 1) the panel is very supportive of and endorses the present activities of the Sensorimotor Risk; and the panel is likewise supportive of the gaps and associated tasks in the IRP; 2) overall, the tasks addressed the gaps in the IRP; 3) there were some gaps and tasks that merit further enhancement and some new gaps/tasks that the SRP recommends.

  18. Thirty-Two Nodes Hexahedronal Element Subroutine for Multi-Purpose Program MEF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-09-01

    diciplines . A cubic, thirty-two node, three dimensional * isoiparametric element was developed. With such an element very complex structures could be solved...library of one, two, and three-dimensional elements for the solution of problems from a wide variety of diciplines . A cubic, thirty-two node, three...Problem Definition (data base): ............................ 8 2. Element Computations: ................................... 8 3. Assem bly Operations

  19. Computation of vibration mode elastic-rigid and effective weight coefficients from finite-element computer program output

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, R.

    1991-01-01

    Post-processing algorithms are given to compute the vibratory elastic-rigid coupling matrices and the modal contributions to the rigid-body mass matrices and to the effective modal inertias and masses. Recomputation of the elastic-rigid coupling matrices for a change in origin is also described. A computational example is included. The algorithms can all be executed by using standard finite-element program eigenvalue analysis output with no changes to existing code or source programs.

  20. Quantum biology at the cellular level--elements of the research program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordonaro, Michael; Ogryzko, Vasily

    2013-04-01

    Quantum biology is emerging as a new field at the intersection between fundamental physics and biology, promising novel insights into the nature and origin of biological order. We discuss several elements of QBCL (quantum biology at cellular level) - a research program designed to extend the reach of quantum concepts to higher than molecular levels of biological organization. We propose a new general way to address the issue of environmentally induced decoherence and macroscopic superpositions in biological systems, emphasizing the 'basis-dependent' nature of these concepts. We introduce the notion of 'formal superposition' and distinguish it from that of Schroedinger's cat (i.e., a superposition of macroscopically distinct states). Whereas the latter notion presents a genuine foundational problem, the former one contradicts neither common sense nor observation, and may be used to describe cellular 'decision-making' and adaptation. We stress that the interpretation of the notion of 'formal superposition' should involve non-classical correlations between molecular events in a cell. Further, we describe how better understanding of the physics of Life can shed new light on the mechanism driving evolutionary adaptation (viz., 'Basis-Dependent Selection', BDS). Experimental tests of BDS and the potential role of synthetic biology in closing the 'evolvability mechanism' loophole are also discussed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Prediction of settlement by using finite element simulation 2D program at Seksyen 7, Shah Alam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razak, Zakiah; Mukri, Mazidah; Kasim, Nur Aisyah

    2017-08-01

    Construction on soft ground often involves a number of geotechnical issues especially that related to settlements. Excessive post-construction settlements may they be total or differential have always caused serious problem to all parties in the project. Insufficient knowledge on existing ground conditions due to lacking of a proper site investigation coupled with inadequacy in design especially in the foundation for supporting structure could be the likely reasons for causing this problem and lead to eventual instability of the structure above. In general, a reasonably accurate assessment on the rate of settlement of soil is a very important factor in ensuring the achievement of structurally sound building and/or infrastructural work on soft ground without the development of excessive post-construction settlement. In the current investigation, sensitivity analysis to enhance prediction of settlement is carried out using the PLAXIS Finite Element 2D Program by setting the relevant control parameters. This would allow post-construction settlement be predicted during the pre-construction stage be predicted. It is believed that this is useful in assisting the design engineer in arriving at a satisfactory solution subsequently.

  2. The Challenges of Red Wolf Conservation and the Fate of an Endangered Species Recovery Program

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Murray, Dennis L; Bastille‐Rousseau, Guillaume; Adams, Jennifer R; Waits, Lisette P

    2015-01-01

    ... by hybridization with closely related coyotes ( C. latrans ) and illegal human‐caused mortality. Ongoing review of the red wolf program in the single recovery area in North Carolina prompted us to compare demography...

  3. Methods for evaluating and ranking transportation energy conservation programs. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-04-30

    Methods for comparative evaluations of the Office of Transportation programs designed to help achieve significant reductions in the consumption of petroleum by different forms of transportation while maintaining public, commercial, and industrial mobility are described. Assessments of the programs in terms of petroleum savings, incremental costs to consumers of the technologies and activities, probability of technical and market success, and external impacts due to environmental, economic, and social factors are inputs to the evaluation methodologies presented. The methods described for evaluating the programs on a comparative basis are three ranking functions and a policy matrix listing important attributes of the programs and the technologies and activities with which they are concerned and include the traditional net present value measure which computes the present worth of petroleum savings less the present worth of costs. This is modified by dividing by the present value of DOE funding to obtain a net present value per program dollar, which is the second ranking function. The third ranking function is broader in that it takes external impacts into account and is known as the comprehensive ranking function. Procedures are described for making computations of the ranking functions and the attributes that require computation. Computations are made for the electric vehicle, Stirling engine, gas turbine, and MPG mileage guide program. (MCW)

  4. Application of Multio-bjective Fuzzy Goal Programming to Optimize Cropping Pattern with Emphasis on Using Conservation Tillage Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    samad erfanifar

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the optimal cropping patterns based on individual aims are presented and followed by a multi-objective cropping pattern with emphasize on the use of conservation tillage methods in Darab region presented. Individual goals consisted of maximizing gross margin and food secIn this study, the optimal cropping patterns based on individual aims were presented and followed by using a multi-objective fuzzy goal programming with emphasize on the use of conservation tillage methods in the Darab region. Individual goals consisted of maximizing gross margin and food security and minimizing water consumption and urea fertilizer use. The results showed that in the multi-objective cropping pattern, gross margin and food security increased by 23.5% and 6.1% , while water and energy consumption decreased by 4% and 5.1%, respectively as compared to the current cropping pattern. The fuzzy composite distance improved by %36, as compared to the current condition. Moreover, having replaced the conventional tillage methods with conservation tillage methods in the cropping pattern, the diesel fuel consumption reduced by 27%. Therefore, replacing multi-objective cropping pattern ,on which the conservation tillage methods are emphasized, with the conventional cropping patterns improves economic and environmental conditions. urity index and minimizing water and urea fertilizer.The results showed that in the multi-objective cropping pattern, gross margin and food security index respectively increase by 23.5% and 6.1% and water and energy consumption decrease by 4% and 5.1% respectively as compared to current cropping pattern. The fuzzy composite distance improves by %36 compares to current condition and represents better cropping pattern than the others. Morever in this cropping pattern, conventional tillage method will be replaced by conservation tillage practices, therefore the amount of diesel fuel consumption reduces by 27% that is equivalent to an

  5. Program for conservation of electric energy, its developments and needs for consolidation; Programa de conservacao de energia eletrica, seus desdobramentos e necessidades para consolidacao

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vianna, Luiz Gustavo de Vargas; Ramos, Maria Olivia de Souza; Pereira, Osvaldo Soliano [Universidade Salvador (UNIFACS), BA (Brazil)

    2010-07-01

    The object of this article is to present the National Program for Conservation of Electric Energy (PROCEL), used in Brazil as a solution for the problems of rational use of electric energy by the federal government. It presents a brief history of its creation, several activities areas that it is proposing to act and some results obtained at the moment. It discusses the program's expectation and the potential gains, tracing a brief parallel with the National Plan of Climate Changes. The weak points are presented as suggestions for improvement. Other programs in different stages also are presented like a solution for the conservation of electric energy. Finally, the article presents the actual stage of discussions and actions from society in response to the question of the continuation of the conservation of electric energy's programs and its necessary improvement in Brazil. (author)

  6. Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG): Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donnelly, Kat A.

    2014-01-10

    The Neighbor to Neighbor Energy Challenge (N2N) brought together a consortium of 14 leading clean energy rural, suburban, and low income communities throughout Connecticut. N2N was awarded $4.2 million from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) competitive BetterBuildings Neighborhood Program on August 10, 2010 to run a two-year pilot program (plus one year of transition and evaluation) (Award No. EMCBC- 00969-10). N2N tested innovative program models and hypotheses for improving Connecticut’s existing residential energy efficiency programs that are overseen by the ratepayer fund board and administered by CT utilities. N2N’s original goal was to engage 10 percent of households in participating communities to reduce their energy usage by 20 percent through energy upgrades and clean energy measures. N2N planned for customers to complete more comprehensive whole-home energy efficiency and clean energy measures and to achieve broader penetration than existing utility-administered regulated programs. Since this was an ARRA award, we report the following figures on job creation in Table 1. Since N2N is not continuing in its current form, we do not provide figures on job retention. Table 1 N2N Job Creation by Quarter Jobs Created 2010 Q4 6.65 2011 Q1 7.13 2011 Q2 4.98 2011 Q3 9.66 2011 Q4 5.43 2012 Q1 11.11 2012 Q2 6.85 2012 Q3 6.29 2012 Q4 6.77 2013 Q1 5.57 2013 Q2 8.35 2013 Q3 6.52 Total 85.31 The N2N team encountered several gaps in the existing efficiency program performance that hindered meeting N2N’s and DOE’s short-term program goals, as well as the State of Connecticut’s long-term energy, efficiency, and carbon reduction goals. However, despite the slow program start, N2N found evidence of increasing upgrade uptake rates over time, due to delayed customer action of one to two years from N2N introduction to completion of deeper household upgrades. Two main social/behavioral principles have contributed to driving deeper upgrades in CT: 1. Word of mouth

  7. 78 FR 20503 - Energy Conservation Program: Availability of the Interim Technical Support Document for High...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-05

    ... Renewable Energy, Building Technologies, EE-2J, 1000 Independence Avenue SW, Washington, DC 20585- 0121... Document for High-Intensity Discharge Lamps AGENCY: Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.... Mail: Ms. Brenda Edwards, U.S. Department of Energy, Building Technologies Program, Mailstop EE-2J...

  8. 78 FR 9631 - Energy Efficiency Program for Consumer Products: Energy Conservation Standards for Residential...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-11

    ... Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Building Technologies Program, EE-2J, 1000 Independence Avenue SW.... Brenda Edwards, U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Building... for Residential Boilers AGENCY: Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Department of Energy...

  9. 76 FR 40285 - Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products and Certain Commercial and Industrial Equipment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-08

    ..., U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Building Technologies... Product AGENCY: Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of.... Department of Energy, Building Technologies Program, Mailstop EE-2J, 1000 Independence Avenue, SW...

  10. 78 FR 53374 - Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products: Test Procedures for Refrigerators...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-29

    ... Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Building Technologies, EE-2J, 1000 Independence... Refrigerators, Refrigerator-Freezers, and Freezers AGENCY: Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy... Edwards, U.S. Department of Energy, Building Technologies Program, Mailstop EE-2J, 1000 Independence...

  11. 77 FR 24341 - Energy Conservation Program: Test Procedures for Residential Clothes Washers; Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-24

    .... Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Building Technologies Program, EE-2J... of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Department of Energy. ACTION: Final rule; correction... Renewable Energy. For the reasons stated in the preamble, part 430 of title 10 of the Code of Federal...

  12. 77 FR 49701 - Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products and Certain Commercial and Industrial Equipment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-17

    ... Dommu, U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Building... and Renewable Energy, Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of policy amendment. SUMMARY: On August 18... Edwards, U.S. Department of Energy, Building Technologies Program, Mailstop EE-2J, Notice of Policy...

  13. 76 FR 56125 - Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products and Certain Commercial and Industrial Equipment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-12

    ..., U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Building Technologies... Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of extension of public comment period.... Brenda Edwards, U.S. Department of Energy, Building Technologies Program, Mailstop EE-2J, 1000...

  14. 77 FR 11785 - Energy Conservation Program: Public Meeting and Availability of the Framework Document for High...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-28

    ... of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Building Technologies Program, EE-2J, 1000 Independence... Document for High-Intensity Discharge Lamps AGENCY: Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy..., 2012. ADDRESSES: The public meeting will be held at the U.S. Department of Energy, Forrestal Building...

  15. 76 FR 19902 - Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products: Decision and Order Granting 180-Day Extension...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-11

    .... Brenda Edwards, U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Building...; Correction AGENCY: Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Department of Energy. ACTION: Decision.... Raymond, U.S. Department of Energy, Building Technologies Program, Mail Stop EE-2J, 1000 Independence...

  16. 75 FR 31323 - Energy Efficiency Program: Energy Conservation Standards Furnace Fans: Public Meeting and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-03

    ... Renewable Energy, Building Technologies, EE-2J, 1000 Independence Avenue, SW., Washington, DC 20585-0121... Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Building Technologies Program, EE-2J, 1000... Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of public meeting and availability of...

  17. 75 FR 42611 - Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products: Test Procedure for Microwave Ovens

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-22

    ..., Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Building Technologies Program, EE-2J, 1000 Independence Avenue... Procedure for Microwave Ovens AGENCY: Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Department of Energy... of Energy, Forrestal Building, Room 8E-089, 1000 Independence Avenue, SW., Washington, DC 20585-0121...

  18. 78 FR 8998 - Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products and Certain Commercial and Industrial Equipment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-07

    .... James Raba, U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Building... AGENCY: Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of.... Department of Energy, Building Technologies Program, Mailstop EE-2J, 1000 Independence Avenue SW., Washington...

  19. 77 FR 20291 - Energy Conservation Program: Test Procedures for Residential Clothes Washers; Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-04

    ..., Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Building Technologies Program, EE-2J, 1000 Independence...; Correction AGENCY: Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Department of Energy. ACTION: Final rule... Assistant Secretary, Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. BILLING CODE 6450-01-P ...

  20. 78 FR 16443 - Energy Efficiency Program for Consumer Products: Energy Conservation Standards for Ceiling Fans...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-15

    ... Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, ] Building Technologies Program, EE-2J, 1000... Renewable Energy, Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of public meeting and availability of the Framework....gov/buildings/appliance_standards/rulemaking.aspx/ruleid/65 and http://www1.eere.energy.gov/buildings...

  1. 75 FR 22213 - Energy Conservation Program: Test Procedures for General Service Fluorescent Lamps, Incandescent...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-28

    ... Renewable Energy, Building Technologies Program, EE-2J, 1000 Independence Avenue, SW., Washington, DC, 20585... of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Department of Energy. ACTION: Final rule; technical... On July 6, 2009, DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy published a test procedure...

  2. 78 FR 26711 - Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products and Certain Commercial and Industrial Equipment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-08

    .... Lucas Adin, U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Building..., Urinals and Commercial Prerinse Spray Valves AGENCY: Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy..., U.S. Department of Energy, Building Technologies Program, Mailstop EE-2J, 1000 Independence Avenue...

  3. 78 FR 38455 - Energy Conservation Program: Test Procedures for Electric Motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-26

    .... DOE finalized key provisions related to small electric motor testing in a 2009 final rule at 74 FR... for Electric Motors; Proposed Rule #0;#0;Federal Register / Vol. 78, No. 123 / Wednesday, June 26... Program: Test Procedures for Electric Motors AGENCY: Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy...

  4. 78 FR 75961 - Energy Conservation Program: Test Procedures for Electric Motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-13

    ... electric motors. 73 FR 78220. After considering comments from interested parties, DOE finalized key... for Electric Motors; Final Rule #0;#0;Federal Register / Vol. 78 , No. 240 / Friday, December 13, 2013... Program: Test Procedures for Electric Motors AGENCY: Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy...

  5. 78 FR 52900 - Request for Applications: The Community Forest and Open Space Conservation Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-27

    ... including clean air, water, and wildlife habitat; benefits from forest-based educational programs; benefits... behalf of any Indian tribe, must not be Tribal allotment lands, must be offered for sale by a willing... applications to the State Forester. Tribal applicants must submit applications to the appropriate Tribal...

  6. 77 FR 1649 - Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products and Certain Commercial and Industrial Equipment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-11

    ... of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Department of Energy. ACTION: Proposed determination... Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Building Technologies Program, EE-2J, 1000 Independence Avenue SW... benefits on energy supply, distribution, and use. DOE has concluded that today's regulatory action...

  7. 78 FR 79637 - Energy Conservation Program: Test Procedure for Set-Top Boxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-31

    ...: Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Department of Energy. ACTION: Proposed rule; withdrawal... Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Building Technologies Program, EE-2J, 1000 Independence Avenue SW... maximum economic benefits and energy savings occur through increasing the efficiency of STBs. DOE believes...

  8. 76 FR 65631 - Energy Conservation Program: Test Procedures for Microwave Ovens

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-24

    ... encryption. Postal Mail: Ms. Brenda Edwards, U.S. Department of Energy, Building Technologies Program... submit one signed original paper copy. Hand Delivery/Courier: Ms. Brenda Edwards, U.S. Department of... cooking, and initial and final temperatures, as well as the racks or plates used to hold the food load...

  9. 78 FR 8444 - Energy Efficiency and Conservation Loan Program Programmatic Environmental Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-06

    ... of the EE program would not significantly affect the human or natural environment. ] However, to... footprint of existing structures, or (2) not restricted to the footprint of existing structures, but a... activity is: (1) Restricted to the footprint of the existing structures or area of previous disturbance, or...

  10. Defining Audience Segments for Extension Programming Using Reported Water Conservation Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monaghan, Paul; Ott, Emily; Wilber, Wendy; Gouldthorpe, Jessica; Racevskis, Laila

    2013-01-01

    A tool from social marketing can help Extension agents understand distinct audience segments among their constituents. Defining targeted audiences for Extension programming is a first step to influencing behavior change among the public. An online survey was conducted using an Extension email list for urban households receiving a monthly lawn and…

  11. Human Research Program Human Health Countermeasures Element Bone and Muscle Risk Standing Review Panel (SRP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glowacki, Julie; Gregor, Robert

    2009-01-01

    The Bone and Muscle Risk Standing Review Panel (SRP) met at the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) on October 4-6, 2009 to discuss the areas of current and future research targeted by the Human Health Countermeasures (HHC) Element of the Human Research Program (HRP). Using evidence-based knowledge as a background for identified risks to astronaut health and performance, NASA had identified gaps in knowledge to address those risks. Ongoing and proposed tasks were presented to address the gaps. The charge to the Bone and Muscle Risk SRP was to review the gaps, evaluate whether the tasks addressed these gaps and to make recommendations to NASA s HRP Science Management Office regarding the Panel's review. The Bone and Muscle Risk SRP consisted of scientists who are experts in muscle, bone, or both and could evaluate the existing evidence with sufficient knowledge of the potential effects of long duration exposure to microgravity. More important, although expertise in basic science is important, the SRP was requested to evaluate the practicality of the proposed efforts in light of the realistic demands placed on the HRP. In short, all tasks presented in the Integrated Research Plan (IRP) should address specific questions related to the challenges faced by the astronauts as a result of prolonged exposure to microgravity. All tasks proposed to fill the gaps in knowledge should provide applied, translational data necessary to answer the specific questions. Several presentations were made to the SRP during the site visit and the SRP spent sufficient time to address the panel charge, either as a group or in separate sessions for the Bone and Muscle Risk subgroups. The SRP made a final debriefing to the HRP Program Scientist, Dr. John B. Charles, on October 6, 2009. Taking the evidence and identified risks as givens, the SRP concluded that 1) integration of information should lead to a more comprehensive approach to identifying the gaps, 2) not all tasks addressed the gaps as

  12. Snake River Sockeye Salmon Sawtooth Valley Project Conservation and Rebuilding Program : Supplemental Fnal Environmental Assessment.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1995-03-01

    This document announces Bonneville Power Administration`s (BPA) proposal to fund three separate but interrelated actions which are integral components of the overall Sawtooth Valley Project to conserve and rebuild the Snake River Sockeye salmon run in the Sawtooth Valley of south-central Idaho. The three actions are as follows: (1) removing a rough fish barrier dam on Pettit Lake Creek and constructing a weir and trapping facilities to monitor future sockeye salmon adult and smolt migration into and out of Pettit Lake; (2) artificially fertilizing Readfish Lake to enhance the food supply for Snake River sockeye salmon juveniles released into the lake; and (3) trapping kokanee fry and adults to monitor the fry population and to reduce the population of kokanee in Redfish Lake. BPA has prepared a supplemental EA (included) which builds on an EA compled in 1994 on the Sawtooth Valley Project. Based on the analysis in this Supplemental EA, BPA has determined that the proposed actions are not major Federal actions significantly affecting the quality of the human environment. Therefore an Environmental Impact Statement is not required.

  13. Costs and effectiveness of hearing conservation programs at 14 US metal manufacturing facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayler, Stephanie K; Rabinowitz, Peter M; Cantley, Linda F; Galusha, Deron; Neitzel, Richard L

    2017-12-07

    This study characterised overall and specific costs associated with hearing conservation programmes (HCPs) at US metal manufacturing sites, and examined the association between these costs and several noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) outcomes. We interviewed personnel and reviewed records at participating facilities. We also measured noise for comparison to the ten-year average of measurements made by each facility. NIHL outcomes assessed included rates of standard threshold shifts (STS) and high-frequency hearing loss, as well as prevalence of hearing impairment, for each participating facility. We used linear regression to identify per-person HCP costs that best predicted the NIHL outcomes. We evaluated 14 US metal manufacturing facilities operated by a single company. Annual HCP costs ranged from roughly $67,000 to $397,000 (average $308 ± 80 per worker). Our full-shift noise measurements (mean 83.1 dBA) showed good agreement with the facilities' measurements (mean 82.6 dBA). Hearing impairment prevalence was about 15% overall. Higher expenditures for training and hearing protector fit-testing were significantly associated with reduced STS prevalence. Higher training expenditures were also related to lower hearing impairment prevalence and high-frequency hearing loss rates. HCP costs were substantial and variable. Increased workplace spending on training and fit-testing may help minimise NIHL.

  14. Snake River Sockeye Salmon Captive Broodstock Program Research Elements : 2007 Annual Project Progess Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, Mike; Plaster, Kurtis; Redfield, Laura; Heindel, Jeff; Kline, Paul

    2008-12-17

    On November 20, 1991, the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration listed Snake River sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka as endangered under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. In 1991, the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes (SBT) and Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) initiated the Snake River Sockeye Salmon Captive Broodstock Program to conserve and rebuild populations in Idaho. Restoration efforts are focused on Redfish, Pettit, and Alturas lakes within the Sawtooth Valley. The first release of hatchery-produced adults occurred in 1993. The first release of juvenile sockeye salmon from the captive broodstock program occurred in 1994. In 1999, the first anadromous adult returns from the captive broodstock program were recorded when six jacks and one jill were captured at the IDFG Sawtooth Fish Hatchery. In 2007, progeny from the captive broodstock program were released using four strategies: (1) eyed-eggs were planted in Pettit Lake in November; (2) age-0 presmolts were released to Alturas, Pettit, and Redfish lakes in October; (3) age-1 smolts were released into Redfish Lake Creek and the upper Salmon River in May; and (4) hatchery-produced adult sockeye salmon were released to Redfish Lake for volitional spawning in September. Oncorhynchus nerka population monitoring was conducted on Redfish, Alturas, and Pettit lakes using a midwater trawl in September 2007. Population abundances were estimated at 73,702 fish for Redfish Lake, 124,073 fish for Alturas Lake, and 14,746 fish for Pettit Lake. Angler surveys were conducted from May 26 through August 7, 2007 on Redfish Lake to estimate kokanee harvest. On Redfish Lake, we interviewed 102 anglers and estimated that 56 kokanee were harvested. The calculated kokanee catch rate was 0.03 fish/hour for each kokanee kept. The juvenile out-migrant trap on Redfish Lake Creek was operated from April 14 to June 13, 2007. We estimated that 5,280 natural origin and 14,256 hatchery origin sockeye salmon smolts out-migrated from

  15. Regional estimates of ecological services derived from U.S. Department of Agriculture conservation programs in the Mississippi Alluvial Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faulkner, Stephen P.; Baldwin, Michael J.; Barrow, Wylie C.; Waddle, Hardin; Keeland, Bobby D.; Walls, Susan C.; James, Dale; Moorman, Tom

    2010-01-01

    The Mississippi Alluvial Valley (MAV) is the Nation?s largest floodplain and this once predominantly forested ecosystem provided significant habitat for a diverse flora and fauna, sequestered carbon in trees and soil, and stored floodwater, sediments, and nutrients within the floodplain. This landscape has been substantially altered by the conversion of nearly 75% of the riparian forests, predominantly to agricultural cropland, with significant loss and degradation of important ecosystem services. Large-scale efforts have been employed to restore the forest and wetland resources and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Wetlands Reserve Program (WRP) and Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) represent some of the most extensive restoration programs in the MAV. The objective of the WRP is to restore and protect the functions and values of wetlands in agricultural landscapes with an emphasis on habitat for migratory birds and wetland-dependent wildlife, protection and improvement of water quality, flood attenuation, ground water recharge, protection of native flora and fauna, and educational and scientific scholarship.

  16. Energy audit of three energy-conserving devices in a steel industry demonstration program. Task III. GTE high temperature recuperation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holden, F.C.; Hoffman, A.O.; Lownie, H.W.

    1983-06-01

    The Office of Industrial Programs of the Department of Energy has undertaken a program to demonstrate to industry the benefits of installing various energy-conserving devices and equipment. This report presents results on one of those systems, a high-temperature ceramic recuperator designed and manufactured by Sylvania Chemical and Metallurgical Division, GTE Products Corporation of Towanda, Pennsylvania. The ceramic cross-flow recuperator unit recovers waste heat from the hot combustion gases and delivers preheated air to high-temperature burners of various manufacture. Of the 38 host site installations included in the program, sufficient operating data were obtained from 28 sites to evaluate the benefits in terms of energy and economic savings that can be achieved. Performance and cost data are analyzed and presented for those 28 installations, which covered a variety of applications, sizes, and industry types. Except for 5 sites where unusual operating or data-collection problems were encountered, the improvements in performance of the recuperated furnaces equalled or exceeded estimates; the average of the total fuel savings for these 23 sites was 44.0 percent, some portion of which resulted from furnace improvements other than recuperation. Payback times were calculated for both total costs and for recuperator-related costs, using a cumulative annual after-tax cash flow method which includes tax investment credits, estimates of general and fuel-price inflation, and maintenance costs.

  17. Local Responses to Participatory Conservation in Annapurna Conservation Area, Nepal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khadka, Damodar; Nepal, Sanjay K.

    2010-02-01

    Biodiversity conservation has undergone a profound change in philosophy, policies and management approaches over the last forty years. The traditional top-down approach to nature protection has been widely criticized for failing to include critical social elements in management practices, and is being gradually replaced by a slew of participatory strategies under the rubric of bottom-up conservation. The new approach recognizes local communities as key partners in wildlife management and seeks their participation in social development and biodiversity conservation. However, every social context is different in its structure and functions, and in the way social groups respond to calls for participation. In order to gain a better understanding of the approach and the barriers encountered in its implementation, a questionnaire survey of 188 households was employed in the communities of the Upper Mustang extension of Annapurna Conservation Area (ACA) in Nepal. The study provides a comparative analysis of community participation and its barriers between Non-Tourist (NT) and Tourist (TV) villages. The results revealed important differences between the two groups in terms of their participation in community programs, barriers to participation, and perception of benefits from participation. Owing to their distinct spatial, demographic and attitudinal differences, the two village groups have their own sets of needs, values and motivation factors which cannot be generalized and treated as such. The research clearly identifies the need for the conservation agency to be creative in devising strategies and initiatives appropriate to specific social groups so as to optimize their input in participatory conservation.

  18. Local responses to participatory conservation in Annapurna conservation area, Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khadka, Damodar; Nepal, Sanjay K

    2010-02-01

    Biodiversity conservation has undergone a profound change in philosophy, policies and management approaches over the last forty years. The traditional top-down approach to nature protection has been widely criticized for failing to include critical social elements in management practices, and is being gradually replaced by a slew of participatory strategies under the rubric of bottom-up conservation. The new approach recognizes local communities as key partners in wildlife management and seeks their participation in social development and biodiversity conservation. However, every social context is different in its structure and functions, and in the way social groups respond to calls for participation. In order to gain a better understanding of the approach and the barriers encountered in its implementation, a questionnaire survey of 188 households was employed in the communities of the Upper Mustang extension of Annapurna Conservation Area (ACA) in Nepal. The study provides a comparative analysis of community participation and its barriers between Non-Tourist (NT) and Tourist (TV) villages. The results revealed important differences between the two groups in terms of their participation in community programs, barriers to participation, and perception of benefits from participation. Owing to their distinct spatial, demographic and attitudinal differences, the two village groups have their own sets of needs, values and motivation factors which cannot be generalized and treated as such. The research clearly identifies the need for the conservation agency to be creative in devising strategies and initiatives appropriate to specific social groups so as to optimize their input in participatory conservation.

  19. Distilling Common History and Practice Elements to Inform Dissemination: Hanf-Model BPT Programs as an Example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaehler, Laura A.; Jacobs, Mary; Jones, Deborah J.

    2016-01-01

    There is a shift in evidence-based practice toward an understanding of the treatment elements that characterize empirically-supported interventions in general and the core components of specific approaches in particular. The evidence-base for Behavioral Parent Training (BPT), the standard of care for early-onset disruptive behavior disorders (Oppositional Defiant Disorder and Conduct Disorder), which frequently co-occur with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, is well-established; yet, an ahistorical, program-specific lens tells little regarding how leaders, including Constance Hanf at the University of Oregon, shaped the common practice elements of contemporary evidence-based BPT. Accordingly, this review summarizes the formative work of Hanf, as well as the core elements, evolution, and extensions of her work, represented in Community Parent Education (COPE; Cunningham, Bremner, & Boyle, 1995; Cunningham, Bremner, Secord, & Harrison, 2009), Defiant Children (DC; Barkley 1987; Barkley, 2013), Helping the Noncompliant Child (HNC; Forehand & McMahon, 1981; McMahon & Forehand, 2003), Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT; Eyberg, & Robinson, 1982; Eyberg, 1988; Eyberg & Funderburk, 2011), and the Incredible Years (IY; Webster-Stratton, 1981; 1982; 2008). Our goal is not to provide an exhaustive review of the evidence-base for the Hanf-Model programs; rather, our intention is to provide a template of sorts from which agencies and clinicians can make informed choices about how and why they are using one program versus another, as well as how to make inform flexible use one program or combination of practice elements across programs, to best meet the needs of child clients and their families. Clinical implications and directions for future work are discussed. PMID:27389606

  20. Snake River Sockeye Salmon Captive Broodstock Program; Research Element, 2003 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willard, Catherine; Plaster, Kurtis; Castillo, Jason (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, ID)

    2005-01-01

    On November 20, 1991, the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration listed Snake River sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka as endangered under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. In 1991, the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes (SBT) and Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) initiated the Snake River Sockeye Salmon Captive Broodstock Program to conserve and rebuild populations in Idaho. Restoration efforts are focused on Redfish, Pettit, and Alturas lakes within the Sawtooth Valley. The first release of hatchery-produced adults occurred in 1993. The first release of juvenile sockeye salmon from the captive broodstock program occurred in 1994. In 1999, the first anadromous adult returns from the captive broodstock program were recorded when six jacks and one jill were captured at the IDFG Sawtooth Fish Hatchery. In 2003, progeny from the captive broodstock program were released using three strategies: eyed-eggs were planted in Pettit and Alturas lakes in November and December, age-0 presmolts were released to Alturas, Pettit, and Redfish lakes in October, and hatchery-produced adult sockeye salmon were released to Redfish Lake for volitional spawning in September. Oncorhynchus nerka population monitoring was conducted on Redfish, Alturas, and Pettit lakes using a midwater trawl in September 2003. Age-0 through age-4 O. nerka were captured in Redfish Lake, and population abundance was estimated at 81,727 fish. Age-0 through age-3 O. nerka were captured in Alturas Lake, and population abundance was estimated at 46,234 fish. Age-0 through age-3 O. nerka were captured in Pettit Lake, and population abundance was estimated at 11,961 fish. Angler surveys were conducted from May 25 through August 7, 2003 on Redfish Lake to estimate kokanee harvest. On Redfish Lake, we interviewed 179 anglers and estimated that 424 kokanee were harvested. The calculated kokanee catch rate was 0.09 fish/hour. The juvenile out-migrant trap on Redfish Lake Creek was operated from April 15 to May 29