WorldWideScience

Sample records for program committee member

  1. Pesticide Program Dialogue Committee (PPDC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Pesticide Program Dialogue Committee, a permanent, broadly representative advisory committee, meets with EPA on a regular basis to discuss pesticide regulatory, policy, and program implementation issues.

  2. Members of the Committee | Women in Science | Initiatives | Indian ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Members of the Committee. Rohini M Godbole; Rajinder J Hans-Gill; D. Balasubramanian. Charge of the Committee. The members of the committee were assigned to formulate the terms of reference and to define appropriate action points to be followed for its work. The committee had come up with many initiatives and ...

  3. Members of House Committee on Science and Astronautics Visited MSFC

    Science.gov (United States)

    1962-01-01

    The members of the House Committee on Science and Astronautics visited the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) on March 9, 1962 to gather first-hand information of the nation's space exploration program. The congressional group was composed of members of the Subcommittee on Marned Space Flight. Headed by Representative Olin E. Teague of Texas, other members were James G. Fulton, Pennsylvania; Ken Heckler, West Virginia; R. Walter Riehlman, New York; Richard L. Roudebush,, Indiana; John W. Davis, Georgia; James C. Corman, California; Joseph Waggoner, Louisiana; J. Edgar Chenoweth, Colorado; and William G. Bray, Indiana.

  4. Education of ethics committee members: experiences from Croatia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borovecki, A.; Have, H.A.M.J. ten; Oreskovic, S.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To study knowledge and attitudes of hospital ethics committee members at the first workshop for ethics committees in Croatia. DESIGN: Before/after cross-sectional study using a self administered questionnaire. SETTING: Educational workshop for members of hospital ethics committees,

  5. 5 CFR 591.243 - How many members are on each COLA Advisory Committee?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false How many members are on each COLA Advisory Committee? 591.243 Section 591.243 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL... Areas Program Administration § 591.243 How many members are on each COLA Advisory Committee? A COLA...

  6. Education of ethics committee members: experiences from Croatia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borovecki, A; ten Have, H; Oresković, S

    2006-03-01

    To study knowledge and attitudes of hospital ethics committee members at the first workshop for ethics committees in Croatia. Before/after cross-sectional study using a self administered questionnaire. Educational workshop for members of hospital ethics committees, Zagreb, 2003. Knowledge and attitudes of participants before and after the workshop; everyday functioning of hospital ethics committees. The majority of the respondents came from committees with at least five members. The majority of ethics committees were appointed by the governing bodies of their hospitals. Most committees were founded after the implementation of the law on health protection in 1997. Membership structure (three physicians and two members from other fields) and functions were established on the basis of that law. Analysis of research protocols was the main part of their work. Other important functions-education, case analysis, guidelines formation-were neglected. Members' level of knowledge was not sufficient for the complicated tasks they were supposed to perform. However, it was significantly higher after the workshop. Most respondents felt their knowledge should be improved by additional education. Their views on certain issues and bioethical dilemmas displayed a high level of paternalism and over protectiveness, which did not change after the workshop. The committees developed according to bureaucratic requirements. Furthermore, there are concerns about members' knowledge levels. More efforts need to be made to use education to improve the quality of the work. Additional research is necessary to explore ethics committees' work in Croatia especially in the hospital setting.

  7. 76 FR 38348 - Notice of Appointment of Committee Members to the Advisory Committee on Biotechnology and 21st...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-30

    ... Service Notice of Appointment of Committee Members to the Advisory Committee on Biotechnology and 21st.... ACTION: Notice of Appointment of Committee Members to the Advisory Committee on Biotechnology and 21st... the appointment of members to the Advisory Committee on Biotechnology and 21st Century Agriculture...

  8. Perceptions of veterinary admissions committee members of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Veterinary admission committees are asked to create and implement a fair, reliable, and valid system to select the candidates most likely to succeed in veterinary school from a large pool of applicants. Although numerous studies have explored grade point average (GPA) as a predictive value of later academic success, ...

  9. [Food hygiene training of members of corporate public catering committees].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaranta, Gianluigi; Laurenti, Patrizia; Gerardo Cairo, Antonio; Ricciardi, Gualtiero

    2007-01-01

    A food hygiene training course was offered to 25 members of the public catering committees of seven corporate restaurants. In order to evaluate the effectiveness of the course and identify critical topics, participants were asked to complete a questionnaire before and after completing the training course. Results are presented in this article and underscore the importance of training members of public catering committees in addition to food handlers.

  10. 76 FR 2686 - Video Programming and Emergency Access Advisory Committee; Announcement of Establishment and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-14

    ... FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION [DA 10-2320] Video Programming and Emergency Access Advisory... appointment of members of the Video Programming and Emergency Access Advisory Committee (``Committee'' or... change of the Committee's popular name to the Video Programming Accessibility Advisory Committee (``VPAAC...

  11. 21 CFR 14.95 - Compensation of advisory committee members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... employees, but are reimbursed by the Food and Drug Administration for travel expenses. (b) Notwithstanding... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Compensation of advisory committee members. 14.95 Section 14.95 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL...

  12. 76 FR 74842 - RTCA Program Management Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    ... Minimum Aviation System Performance Standards (MASPS) for Advanced VHF Digital Data Communications... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration RTCA Program Management Committee... RTCA Program Management Committee meeting. SUMMARY: The FAA is issuing this notice to advise the public...

  13. Ethical Competence Training for Members on Clinical Ethics Committees (CEC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knox, Jeanette Bresson Ladegaard

    2017-01-01

    To address the moral questions in patient care and medical practice, Danish hospitals are starting to solicit clinical ethics committees (CEC). As in other places around the world, CECs in Denmark is an interdisciplinary group that includes physicians, nurses, social workers, psychologists, lawyers...... lingering moral quandaries. Thus, the creation of CECs in Denmark has raised the question of qualifications for those who serve on a committee. When the Danish Society of Clinical Ethics was formed in 2012, it was therefore at the forefront of its agenda to establish a training program that would offer...... valuable contributions to the ethical aspect of medical decision making and to serve as an important resource for health care providers, patients and their families. This article describes the history, development and preliminary results of the current training program as well as reflects on future ideas...

  14. Direct Student Loan Program: Management Actions Could Enhance Customer Service. Report to the Ranking Minority Member, Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions, U.S. Senate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC.

    This report suggests to congress that they consider clarifying whether Education may regulate the fees charged to borrowers under the Direct Loan Program. It also suggests that FSA collect information from schools that could be used to make improvements to the Direct Loan Program. (Author)

  15. Gas-cooled fast reactor (GCFR) program review committee (PRC). Report No. 13 to members of Helium Breeder Associates (HBA), May 1979 -February 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    The responsiveness of the GCFR program structure to changes in design, schedule, and safety issues caused by the decisions to adopt the three-loop over the two-loop primary cooling loop design, to use upflow cooling, and to enhance the natural convection cooling of the plant in a shutdown mode was excellent. The PRC now feels that the criteria for design of a demonstration plant will be manageable and safe. Because of effort to resolve past issues, the PRC has not requested a cost breakdown at this time. It is felt that the HBA effort is properly directed in lieu of the current political malaise regarding future energy supplies and the breeder program in particular. The GCFR is responsive to change and could provide a commercial GCFR before the year 2000

  16. 78 FR 49276 - Advisory Committee on Organ Transplantation; Request for Nominations for Voting Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-13

    ... 25 members, who are Special Government Employees, and 5 ex-officio, non-voting members. Members and... committees; and therefore, extends particular encouragement to nominations for appropriately qualified female...

  17. 75 FR 62509 - Technical Advisory Committees; Notice of Recruitment of Private-Sector Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-12

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Bureau of Industry and Security Technical Advisory Committees; Notice of Recruitment of Private- Sector Members SUMMARY: Seven Technical Advisory Committees (TACs) advise the Department of Commerce on the technical parameters for export controls applicable to dual-use commodities and...

  18. 77 FR 2271 - Technical Advisory Committees; Notice of Recruitment of Private-Sector Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-17

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Bureau of Industry and Security Technical Advisory Committees; Notice of Recruitment of Private- Sector Members SUMMARY: Seven Technical Advisory Committees (TACs) advise the Department of Commerce on the technical parameters for export controls applicable to dual-use commodities and...

  19. 78 FR 5774 - Technical Advisory Committees; Notice of Recruitment of Private-Sector Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-28

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Bureau of Industry and Security Technical Advisory Committees; Notice of Recruitment of Private- Sector Members SUMMARY: Seven Technical Advisory Committees (TACs) advise the Department of Commerce on the technical parameters for export controls applicable to dual-use commodities and...

  20. Perceptions of admission committee members: some aspects on individual admission to dental education at Karolinska Institutet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röding, Karin

    2005-08-01

    The aim of the study was to generate an overall impression of the admission committee's (AC) perspective on individualised admission procedures, derived from some perceived experience of the individual committee members using semi-structured interviews. Qualitative research was used and data were collected by use of interviews. The results show that the committee members are highly committed to the task and try to identify desirable, non-cognitive attributes in the applicants, such as motivation, empathy, drive, and tenacity: 'emotional intelligence'. The committee members were of the opinion that it was possible to identify these attributes in an applicant. The AC further believes that the admissions procedure influences academic achievements because students regard themselves as specially selected and therefore aspire to higher achievements.

  1. 7 CFR 917.122 - Qualification requirements and nominiation procedure for public members of Commodity Committees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits... members of Commodity Committees. (a) Public members shall not have a financial interest in or be associated with production, processing, financing, or marketing (except as consumers) of the commodities...

  2. Minutes of the meeting of the international program committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    The meeting of the International Program Committee occurred on 5 June 2012. The agenda consisted of the following items: - Information on conference participants, contributions and grants - Information on the financial support received by the conference - Committee membership - Organizers of the next two meeting of the ICSLS Conference participants and contributions There were about 100 registered participants for the ICSLS. They presented more than 100 contributions, namely, 19 invited talks, 20 oral contributions and more than 61 contributed papers. It was noted that only very few participants came from North America. Reasons quoted were finacial problems of laboratories and overlapping of several conferences. Finacial support received The conference received grants from St. Petersburg University, the Russian Foundation for Basic Research, and the non-profit Dynasty Foundation. About 40% of the budget was collected in the form of registration fees. Discounted fees and fee waives were provided for 40 participants. Committee membership The Committee instructed Professor A Devdariani to contact the absent members who had missed two successive conferences and ask them whether they intended to prolong their membership on the Committee, and inform other Committee members accordingly. Organizers of the next meetings of the ICSLS The 20th ICSLS held in St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada decided to hold the 22nd ICSLS at the University of Tennessee. The event will be organized by Christian Parriger. All issues regarding the next conference were discussed including budget, travel, conference site, accommodation, and proceedings. Torun, Poland was proposed for the 23d ICSLS by Roman Ciurylo. Roland Stamm proposed the Aix-Marseille University as a backup to the first proposal.

  3. Informed consent in Sri Lanka: A survey among ethics committee members

    OpenAIRE

    Sumathipala, Athula; Siribaddana, Sisira; Hewage, Suwin; Lekamwattage, Manura; Athukorale, Manjula; Siriwardhana, Chesmal; Murray, Joanna; Prince, Martin

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Approval of the research proposal by an ethical review committee from both sponsoring and host countries is a generally agreed requirement in externally sponsored research. However, capacity for ethics review is not universal. Aim of this study was to identify opinions and views of the members serving in ethical review and ethics committees in Sri Lanka on informed consent, essential components in the information leaflet and the consent form. Methods We obtained ethical ap...

  4. Evaluating the Training, Responsibilities, and Practices of P&T Committee Members and Nonmember Contributors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Ryan; Kelly, Brett J; Moody, Mary

    2017-08-01

    Pharmacy and therapeutics (P&T) committees are responsible for managing drug formularies in numerous health care settings. Although pharmacy practice and health care organizations provide general recommendations of responsibilities and skills for members and nonmember contributors of P&T committees, the study investigators hypothesized that there is diversity in the training, responsibilities, and practices of these members and contributors. To describe the training, responsibilities, and practices of members and nonmember contributors of P&T committees in a variety of health care settings, using an online survey. In December 2015, an online survey was delivered to clinicians who were considered likely to be involved in P&T committee service from hospitals ranked by U.S. News & World Report and a convenience sample of clinicians practicing in managed care settings. The survey instrument was designed to assess various domains and perceptions of P&T committee processes. Sixty-nine respondents representing various health care delivery settings in the United States were eligible for and completed the survey. The majority of the respondents were pharmacists (94.2%), and 72.5% of the respondents were P&T committee members. The remainder of the respondents were nonmember P&T committee contributors. Approximately 60% of the respondents had served in P&T committee roles for ≥ 10 years. Specialized postgraduate training incorporating literature evaluation and formulary management was possessed by 21.7% and 17.4% of the respondents, respectively; however, most of the respondents received on-the-job training. Approximately half of the respondents were responsible for preparation of P&T committee documents, and 58% reported that nonmember contributors typically write and prepare these documents. Skill in literature evaluation was the most important criterion in selecting authors of P&T committee documents, while 10.1% of the respondents indicated that their committees did not

  5. 20 CFR 200.9 - Selection of members of Actuarial Advisory Committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Selection of members of Actuarial Advisory Committee. 200.9 Section 200.9 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD GENERAL ADMINISTRATION GENERAL... railroad subject to the Interstate Commerce Act which own or control more than 50 percent of the total...

  6. 77 FR 55180 - Request for Nominations of Members To Serve on the Federal Economic Scientific Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-07

    ... (SGEs) and are subject to ethics rules applicable to SGEs. b. Members serve three-year terms. Members... equal opportunity in the workplace and seeks diverse Committee membership. Dated: August 30, 2012...

  7. 75 FR 21000 - Draft Guidance for the Public, Food and Drug Administration Advisory Committee Members, and Food...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-22

    ...] (formerly Docket No. 02D-0049) Draft Guidance for the Public, Food and Drug Administration Advisory Committee Members, and Food and Drug Administration Staff: Public Availability of Advisory Committee Members... and Drug Administration Amendments Act of 2007, Public Law No. 110-85), and section 701 (21 U.S.C. 371...

  8. 75 FR 25844 - Federal Advisory Committee; National Security Education Board Members Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-10

    ... DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary Federal Advisory Committee; National Security... June 23, 2010, from 8 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. ADDRESSES: The meeting will be held at the National Security.... Kevin Gormley, Program Officer, National Security Education Program, 1101 Wilson Boulevard, Suite 1210...

  9. HEALS Hypertension Control Program: Training Church Members as Program Leaders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodani, Sunita; Beayler, Irmatine; Lewis, Jennifer; Sowders, Lindsey A

    2014-01-01

    Health disparities related to cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) including stroke have remained higher in the African-Americans (AAs) than in other populations. HEALS is a faith-based hypertension (HTN) control program modified according to AA community needs, and delivered by the church-lay members called church health advisors (CHAs). This study examined the feasibility and acceptability of training CHAs as HEALS program leaders. Four CHAs completed a 10-hour HEALS program training workshop at the Church, conducted by the nutrition experts. Workshop was evaluated by CHAs on their level of satisfaction, clarity of contents covered and comfort in delivery the program to the church congregation. The overall six main HEALS curriculum components were completed. Workshop was highly evaluated by CHAs on length of training, balance between content and skills development, and level of satisfaction with program delivery. Church-based culturally modified health promotion interventions conducted by the community lay members may be a way to reduce health disparities in ethnic minorities.

  10. Strong Internal Controls at Service Delivery Level Will Help Prevent CETA-Type Fraud and Abuse in Job Training Partnership Act Programs. Report to Senator Sam Nunn, Ranking Minority Member, Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations, Senate Committee on Governmental Affairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC.

    The Government Accounting Office (GAO) conducted an examination of patterns and causes of fraud in Comprehensive Employment and Training Act (CETA) programs to determine how implementation of Job Training Partnership Act (JTPA) programs might be made less vulnerable to exploitation. GAO's investigation found that fraud and abuse in CETA programs…

  11. 77 FR 70182 - Reopening of Nomination Period for Members of the Advisory Committee on Climate Change and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-23

    ... Nomination Period for Members of the Advisory Committee on Climate Change and Natural Resource Science AGENCY... published a notice announcing the establishment of the Advisory Committee on Climate Change and Natural.... ADDRESSES: Send nominations to: Robin O'Malley, Policy and Partnership Coordinator, National Climate Change...

  12. 76 FR 23644 - Solicitation of Nominations for Members of the Transit Rail Advisory Committee for Safety (TRACS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-27

    ... communication of information from knowledgeable and independent perspectives regarding transit rail safety... evaluated mainly on academic experience but also the following factors: Leadership and organizational skills... committee member's name and organizational affiliation, a cover letter describing the nominee's...

  13. Informed consent in Sri Lanka: a survey among ethics committee members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumathipala, Athula; Siribaddana, Sisira; Hewage, Suwin; Lekamwattage, Manura; Athukorale, Manjula; Siriwardhana, Chesmal; Murray, Joanna; Prince, Martin

    2008-05-20

    Approval of the research proposal by an ethical review committee from both sponsoring and host countries is a generally agreed requirement in externally sponsored research.However, capacity for ethics review is not universal. Aim of this study was to identify opinions and views of the members serving in ethical review and ethics committees in Sri Lanka on informed consent, essential components in the information leaflet and the consent form. We obtained ethical approval from UK and Sri Lanka. A series of consensus generation meetings on the protocol were conducted. A task oriented interview guide was developed. The interview was based on open-ended questionnaire. Then the participants were given a WHO checklist on informed consent and requested to rate the items on a three point scale ranging from extremely important to not important. Twenty-nine members from ethics committees participated. Majority of participants (23), believed a copy of the information leaflet and consent form, should accompany research proposal. Opinions about the items that should be included in the information leaflets varied. Participants identified 18 criteria as requirements in the information leaflet and 19 for the consent form. The majority, 20 (69%), believed that all research need ethical approval but identified limited human resource, time and inadequate capacity as constraints. Fifteen (52%) believed that written consent is not required for all research. Verbal consent emerged as an alternative to written consent. The majority of participants rated all components of the WHO checklist as important. The number of themes generated for the consent form (N = 18) is as many as for the information leaflet (N = 19) and had several overlaps. This suggests that the consent form should be itemized to reflect the contents covered in the information leaflet. The participants' opinion on components of the information leaflets and consent forms proved to be similar with WHO checklist on informed

  14. Informed consent in Sri Lanka: A survey among ethics committee members

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siriwardhana Chesmal

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Approval of the research proposal by an ethical review committee from both sponsoring and host countries is a generally agreed requirement in externally sponsored research. However, capacity for ethics review is not universal. Aim of this study was to identify opinions and views of the members serving in ethical review and ethics committees in Sri Lanka on informed consent, essential components in the information leaflet and the consent form. Methods We obtained ethical approval from UK and Sri Lanka. A series of consensus generation meetings on the protocol were conducted. A task oriented interview guide was developed. The interview was based on open-ended questionnaire. Then the participants were given a WHO checklist on informed consent and requested to rate the items on a three point scale ranging from extremely important to not important. Results Twenty-nine members from ethics committees participated. Majority of participants (23, believed a copy of the information leaflet and consent form, should accompany research proposal. Opinions about the items that should be included in the information leaflets varied. Participants identified 18 criteria as requirements in the information leaflet and 19 for the consent form. The majority, 20 (69%, believed that all research need ethical approval but identified limited human resource, time and inadequate capacity as constraints. Fifteen (52% believed that written consent is not required for all research. Verbal consent emerged as an alternative to written consent. The majority of participants rated all components of the WHO checklist as important. Conclusion The number of themes generated for the consent form (N = 18 is as many as for the information leaflet (N = 19 and had several overlaps. This suggests that the consent form should be itemized to reflect the contents covered in the information leaflet. The participants' opinion on components of the information leaflets and

  15. 77 FR 55895 - Meeting: RTCA Program Management Committee (PMC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-11

    ... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration Meeting: RTCA Program Management Committee (PMC) AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT...--Concept of Use for Aeronautical Information Services (AIS) and Meteorological (MET) Data Link Services...

  16. Implementing an interprofessional patient safety learning initiative: insights from participants, project leads and steering committee members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffs, Lianne; Abramovich, Ilona Alex; Hayes, Chris; Smith, Orla; Tregunno, Deborah; Chan, Wai-Hin; Reeves, Scott

    2013-11-01

    Effective teamwork and interprofessional collaboration are vital for healthcare quality and safety; however, challenges persist in creating interprofessional teamwork and resilient professional teams. A study was undertaken to delineate perceptions of individuals involved with the implementation of an interprofessional patient safety competency-based intervention and intervention participants. The study employed a qualitative study design that triangulated data from interviews with six steering committee members and five members of the project team who developed and monitored the intervention and six focus groups with clinical team members who participated in the intervention and implemented local patient safety projects within a large teaching hospital in Canada. Our study findings reveal that healthcare professionals and support staff acquired patient safety competencies in an interprofessional context that can result in improved patient and work flow processes. However, key challenges exist including managing projects amidst competing priorities, lacking physician engagement and sustaining projects. Our findings point to leaders to provide opportunities for healthcare teams to engage in interprofessional teamwork and patient safety projects to improve quality of patient care. Further research efforts should examine the sustainability of interprofessional safety projects and how leaders can more fully engage the participation of all professions, specifically physicians.

  17. The Pennsylvania certified safety committee program: an evaluation of participation and effects on work injury rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hangsheng; Burns, Rachel M; Schaefer, Agnes G; Ruder, Teague; Nelson, Christopher; Haviland, Amelia M; Gray, Wayne B; Mendeloff, John

    2010-08-01

    Since 1994, Pennsylvania, like several other states, has provided a 5% discount on workers' compensation insurance premiums for firms with a certified joint labor management safety committee. This study explored the factors affecting program participation and evaluated the effect of this program on work injuries. Using Pennsylvania unemployment insurance data (1996-2006), workers' compensation data (1998-2005), and the safety committee audit data (1999-2007), we conducted propensity score matching and regression analysis on the program's impact on injury rates. Larger firms, firms with higher injury rates, firms in high risk industries, and firms without labor unions were more likely to join the safety committee program and less likely to drop out of the program. The injury rates of participants did not decline more than the rates for non-participants; however, rates at participant firms with good compliance dropped more than the rates at participant firms with poor compliance. Firm size and prior injury rates are key predictors of program participation. Firms that complied with the requirement to train their safety committee members did experience reductions in injuries, but non-compliance with that and other requirements was so widespread that no overall impact of the program could be detected. Copyright 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. Understanding the Everyday Practice of Individualized Education Program Team Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Elizabeth S.

    2016-01-01

    The Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act of 2004 states that individualized education program (IEP) teams are composed of members with distinct identities, roles, expertise, and histories. Although team members must work together to implement educational and related services for learners with special needs, little is known about…

  19. Mr Huidong LI Deputy Chairman and Secretary-General, Rev. Committee of Chinese Nationalist Party Vice President, Sun Yat-Sen Culture Interchange Association of China Member, Committee for Internal and Judicial Affairs of the National People's Congress of China

    CERN Multimedia

    Bennett, Sophia Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    Mr Huidong LI Deputy Chairman and Secretary-General, Rev. Committee of Chinese Nationalist Party Vice President, Sun Yat-Sen Culture Interchange Association of China Member, Committee for Internal and Judicial Affairs of the National People's Congress of China

  20. Pesticide Program Dialogue Committee and Pesticide Regulatory Reform Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA’s Office of Pesticide Programs will hold a public meeting of the Pesticide Program Dialogue Committee (PPDC) on Wednesday, May 3, from 9:00 a.m. to 4:45 p.m., and on Thursday, May 4, from 8:30 a.m. to noon.

  1. 78 FR 43962 - Meeting: RTCA Program Management Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-22

    ... Washington, DC, on June 28, 2013. Paige Williams, Management Analyst, NextGen, Business Operations Group... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration Meeting: RTCA Program Management...: Notice of RTCA Program Management Committee Meeting. SUMMARY: The FAA is issuing this notice to advise...

  2. AGU Committee on Education and Human Resources Sub-Committee on Diversity Program for the term 2004-2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, C. J.; Hiza, M.; Jenkins, G.; Karsten, J.; Molina, L.; Pyrtle, A.; Runyon, C.

    2004-12-01

    The American Geophysical Union (AGU) founded the Diversity Subcommittee in 2000 to address what the AGU felt were important issues for the future of the geoscience community. A recent AGU statement of commitment and concern about issues of diversity reads, in part: It is essential that new strategies for educating, recruiting, and retaining geoscientists from currently under-represented populations be developed (a) for individual investigators seeking students to fill classes or work in their research programs; (b) for institutions looking to replace faculty and researchers; (c) for the larger community looking to the public for continued research funding, and (d) for the future US membership of AGU. In an effort to fulfill its charge, the majority of the 2004-2006 sub-committee's activities will be directed towards: (1) Education of the AGU Membership, including the sub-committee itself, on the salient issues of Diversity; (2) Mentoring and supporting minority students in the pipeline of Earth and Space Science education as well as minority faculty seeking to establish successful collaborations; (3) Establishing a mechanism for quantitative assessment of (a) the AGU demographics, (b) member knowledge, and (c) success of programs in the area of Diversity; (4) Conducting the first ever Chapman Conference on the needs of investigators with disabilities (July, 2005); (5) Partnering with other agencies and societies to build bridges; (6) Creating mechanisms for marketing the Earth and Space sciences to minority audiences; (7) Nurturing of minority members already in the AGU; promoting these members for honors and awards within AGU. Details, goals, and milestones of this program will be presented.

  3. 76 FR 11195 - Request for Nominations of Members To Serve on the Census Scientific Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    ... technical expertise from the following disciplines: demography, economics, geography, psychology, statistics... Advisory Committee are essential for sustained Advisory Committee membership as well as submission of... must have scientific and technical expertise in such areas as demography, economics, geography...

  4. Organizando Comites Consejeros de Padres Para Programas de Educacion Migrante (Organizing Parent Advisory Committees for Migrant Education Programs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Ramon

    In order to help parents and community members participate more effectively and better understand the importance of their involvement in the planning and administration of migrant education programs in Oregon, the English-Spanish booklet suggests general procedures for organizing, leading, and training Parent Advisory Committees (PACs), required…

  5. How Do Emergency Medicine Residency Programs Structure Their Clinical Competency Committees? A Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doty, Christopher I; Roppolo, Lynn P; Asher, Shellie; Seamon, Jason P; Bhat, Rahul; Taft, Stephanie; Graham, Autumn; Willis, James

    2015-11-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) recently has mandated the formation of a clinical competency committee (CCC) to evaluate residents across the newly defined milestone continuum. The ACGME has been nonproscriptive of how these CCCs are to be structured in order to provide flexibility to the programs. No best practices for the formation of CCCs currently exist. We seek to determine common structures of CCCs recently formed in the Council of Emergency Medicine Residency Directors (CORD) member programs and identify unique structures that have been developed. In this descriptive study, an 18-question survey was distributed via the CORD listserv in the late fall of 2013. Each member program was asked questions about the structure of its CCC. These responses were analyzed with simple descriptive statistics. A total of 116 of the 160 programs responded, giving a 73% response rate. Of responders, most (71.6%) CCCs are chaired by the associate or assistant program director, while a small number (14.7%) are chaired by a core faculty member. Program directors (PDs) chair 12.1% of CCCs. Most CCCs are attended by the PD (85.3%) and selected core faculty members (78.5%), leaving the remaining committees attended by any core faculty. Voting members of the CCC consist of the residency leadership either with the PD (53.9%) or without the PD (36.5%) as a voting member. CCCs have an average attendance of 7.4 members with a range of three to 15 members. Of respondents, 53.1% of CCCs meet quarterly while 37% meet monthly. The majority of programs (76.4%) report a system to match residents with a faculty mentor or advisor. Of respondents, 36% include the resident's faculty mentor or advisor to discuss a particular resident. Milestone summaries (determination of level for each milestone) are the primary focus of discussion (93.8%), utilizing multiple sources of information. The substantial variability and diversity found in our CORD survey of CCC structure

  6. 21 CFR 14.80 - Qualifications for members of standing policy and technical advisory committees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... with interested organizations. Nonvoting members— (i) Shall be selected by the interested organizations... cause. Good cause includes excessive absenteeism from committee meetings, a demonstrated bias that...

  7. 76 FR 67484 - National Industrial Security Program Policy Advisory Committee (NISPPAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-01

    ... NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION Information Security Oversight Office National Industrial Security Program Policy Advisory Committee (NISPPAC) AGENCY: Information Security Oversight Office... made for the following committee meeting to discuss National Industrial Security Program policy matters...

  8. 78 FR 38077 - National Industrial Security Program Policy Advisory Committee (NISPPAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-25

    ... NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION Information Security Oversight Office [NARA-13-0030] National Industrial Security Program Policy Advisory Committee (NISPPAC) AGENCY: National Archives and... following committee meeting to discuss National Industrial Security Program policy matters. DATES: The...

  9. 78 FR 64024 - National Industrial Security Program Policy Advisory Committee (NISPPAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-25

    ... NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION Information Security Oversight Office [NARA-2014-001] National Industrial Security Program Policy Advisory Committee (NISPPAC) AGENCY: National Archives and... following committee meeting to discuss National Industrial Security Program policy matters. DATES: The...

  10. 76 FR 28099 - National Industrial Security Program Policy Advisory Committee (NISPPAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-13

    ... NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION Information Security Oversight Office National Industrial Security Program Policy Advisory Committee (NISPPAC) AGENCY: Information Security Oversight Office... made for the following committee meeting to discuss National Industrial Security Program policy matters...

  11. 76 FR 6636 - National Industrial Security Program Policy Advisory Committee (NISPPAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-07

    ... NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION Information Security Oversight Office National Industrial Security Program Policy Advisory Committee (NISPPAC) AGENCY: Information Security Oversight Office... made for the following committee meeting. To discuss National Industrial Security Program policy...

  12. 75 FR 65526 - National Industrial Security Program Policy Advisory Committee (NISPPAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-25

    ... NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION Information Security Oversight Office National Industrial Security Program Policy Advisory Committee (NISPPAC) AGENCY: Information Security Oversight Office..., announcement is made for the following committee meeting, to discuss National Industrial Security Program...

  13. The first twenty years of the ASME Committee on nuclear air and gas treatment - a retrospective by a founding member

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacox, J. [Jacox Associates, Columbus, OH (United States)

    1997-08-01

    Since the 1996 Winter Meeting of CONAGT was the twentieth anniversary of CONAGT a review of the Committee and its members seems in order. This Paper will cover the background and formation of CONAGT as well as the history to date. This history will include not only the basic accomplishments but some of the less successfully met goals and a look at some of the personalities involved in the Committee work. General future plans will be included. The intent of the Paper is less a formal history than a personal recollection of the Committee and those who worked so hard to create the best possible Codes and Standards for the industry to use. 10 refs.

  14. 75 FR 29311 - Solicitation of Nominations for Members of the USDA Grain Inspection Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-25

    ... the nominations of men and women of all racial and ethnic groups. The Advisory Committee meets twice... or regular places of business in performance of Advisory Committee service (see 5 U.S.C. 5703). A..., individuals with demonstrated ability and experience to represent the interests of racial and ethnic...

  15. Revisiting Financial (Accounting) Literacy: A Comparison of Audit Committee Members and Business Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacomino, Don E.; Wall, Joseph; Akers, Michael D.

    2009-01-01

    While financial literacy is important for an audit committee in discharging its duties there is no authoritative guidance or definition and limited empirical research as to what constitutes financial literacy of audit committees and business students. Coates et al. conducted a study that examined the financial literacy of corporate board members…

  16. Perceptions of veterinary admissions committee members of undergraduate credits earned from community colleges or online compared to traditional 4-year institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogan, L R; Stewart, S M; Schoenfeld-Tacher, R; Hellyer, P W

    2015-01-01

    Veterinary admission committees are asked to create and implement a fair, reliable, and valid system to select the candidates most likely to succeed in veterinary school from a large pool of applicants. Although numerous studies have explored grade point average (GPA) as a predictive value of later academic success, there has been little attention paid to how and where an applicant acquires his/her undergraduate coursework. Quality of academic program is an important component of applicant files, and it is suggested that the source of a candidate's coursework might influence admissions committee decisions, perhaps even outside of the committee's immediate awareness. Options for undergraduate education include taking classes at a traditional four-year institution, a community college, or online. This study provides an overview of the current state of online courses and community colleges in the US as a foundation to explore the views of veterinary admissions committee members pertaining to coursework completed at traditional residential 4-year schools or at community colleges and whether they are delivered on campus or online (at either type of institution). Survey participants reported a pattern of preference for traditional four-year residential coursework compared to online or community college courses. These results are interesting given the exponential growth of students taking online courses and data showing community colleges are providing a successful gateway to obtaining a four-year degree. This also points to the need for admission committees to discuss potential biases since the information about type of school and/or course may not be consistently available for all applicants. Finally, at a time when admitting a diverse class of students is a goal of many programs, it is of special concern that there are potential biases against courses taken online or from community colleges - venues that tend to draw a more diverse population than traditional 4-year

  17. 76 FR 80949 - Request for Nominations for Voting Members on Public Advisory Panels or Committees

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-27

    .... Orthopedic and Rehabilitation Devices Panel. Jamie Waterhouse, Center for Devices Circulatory System Devices... Advisory Committee--Neurosurgeons (cerebrovascular and pediatric), neurologists (stroke, pediatric, pain... ophthalmic clinical trials. Orthopaedic and 2 September 1, 2012. Rehabilitation Devices Panel of the Medical...

  18. 76 FR 45578 - Request for Nominations for Members on a Public Advisory Committee; Medical Imaging Drugs...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-29

    ... committees and, therefore, extends particular encouragement to nominations for appropriately qualified female... each nominee, current business and/or home address, telephone number, and e-mail address if available...

  19. 75 FR 57807 - Advisory Committee on Organ Transplantation; Request for Nominations for Voting Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-22

    ... consists of up to 25 members, who are Special Government Employees, and 5 ex-officio, non-voting members... for appropriately qualified female, minority, or disabled candidates. Dated: September 15, 2010...

  20. Perceptions of veterinary admissions committee members of undergraduate credits earned from community colleges or online compared to traditional 4-year institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.R. Kogan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Veterinary admission committees are asked to create and implement a fair, reliable, and valid system to select the candidates most likely to succeed in veterinary school from a large pool of applicants. Although numerous studies have explored grade point average (GPA as a predictive value of later academic success, there has been little attention paid to how and where an applicant acquires his/her undergraduate coursework. Quality of academic program is an important component of applicant files, and it is suggested that the source of a candidate’s coursework might influence admissions committee decisions, perhaps even outside of the committee’s immediate awareness. Options for undergraduate education include taking classes at a traditional four-year institution, a community college, or online. This study provides an overview of the current state of online courses and community colleges in the US as a foundation to explore the views of veterinary admissions committee members pertaining to coursework completed at traditional residential 4-year schools or at community colleges and whether they are delivered on campus or online (at either type of institution. Survey participants reported a pattern of preference for traditional four-year residential coursework compared to online or community college courses. These results are interesting given the exponential growth of students taking online courses and data showing community colleges are providing a successful gateway to obtaining a four-year degree. This also points to the need for admission committees to discuss potential biases since the information about type of school and/or course may not be consistently available for all applicants. Finally, at a time when admitting a diverse class of students is a goal of many programs, it is of special concern that there are potential biases against courses taken online or from community colleges - venues that tend to draw a more diverse population than

  1. 77 FR 61004 - Request for Nominations for Voting Members on Public Advisory Committees

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-05

    ..., engineering, biological and physical sciences, biotechnology, computer technology, statistics, epidemiology... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2012-N-0001... specific Committee questions, contact the following persons listed in Table 1 of this document: Table 1...

  2. 78 FR 64505 - Request for Nominations for Voting Members on a Public Advisory Committee; Tobacco Products...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-29

    ... medicine, medical ethics, science, or technology involving the manufacture, evaluation, or use of tobacco... Advisory Committee, Office of Science, Center for Tobacco Products. FDA seeks to include the views of women... membership, the primary contact is: Caryn Cohen, Office of Science, Center for Tobacco Products, Food and...

  3. Members of research ethics committees accepted a modification of the randomized consent design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellings, Ron; Kessels, Alfons G.; ter Riet, Gerben; Kleijnen, Jos; Leffers, Pieter; Knottnerus, J. André; Sturmans, Ferd

    2005-01-01

    Background and Objective: The use of randomized consent designs has been subject of methodologic and ethical controversy. In most Western countries, research ethics committees make the decision as to whether a randomized consent design can be applied. The purpose of the study is to assess to what

  4. 76 FR 80952 - Request for Nominations for Voting Members on a Public Advisory Committee; Food Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-27

    ...: Nominations received on or before February 27, 2012 will be given first consideration for membership on the...-related health issues that FDA considers of primary importance for its food and cosmetics programs. The... concerning such matters related to financial holdings, employment, and research grants and/or contracts to...

  5. Development of Virtual Environment under Member State Support Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koh, Byungmarn; Lee, Nayoung

    2013-01-01

    Member State Support Program (MSSP) is comprised of various programs such as development of safeguards approach, training, information analysis and so on. Each support programs would be evaluated biennially through coordinators' meeting. IAEA publish 'Development and Implementation Support Programme for Nuclear Verification' so that the member state can review it. In the program, IAEA specify the need to develop the virtual reality based training tools. The objective of this project is to develop comprehensive training software dedicated to verification activities in the field based on the virtual environment. The training for the IAEA inspector is indispensable to maintain or improve their verification capability and to be prepared for the inspection of the complicated facilities. However, the grabbing of the available facility is not easy due to following limitations such as security, confidentiality, interference of the commercial operation and so on. Therefore, the virtual environment, which can replace a real facility, is required for the IAEA training. The objective of this software is to support the IAEA's verification capability. It is useful for the trainer and trainee to better understand how nuclear materials are processed in the fuel fabrication facility and what kind safeguards approaches are needed at each process before inspections. The final product will be integrated in the IAEA safeguards training courses to improve the efficiency of the safeguards training. Also we are going to make a decision if additional projects such as CANDU fuel parts or other facilities depending on evaluation results at the IAEA training course will be held on Korea in this year

  6. Development of Virtual Environment under Member State Support Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koh, Byungmarn; Lee, Nayoung [Korea Institute of Nuclear Non-proliferation and Control, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    Member State Support Program (MSSP) is comprised of various programs such as development of safeguards approach, training, information analysis and so on. Each support programs would be evaluated biennially through coordinators' meeting. IAEA publish 'Development and Implementation Support Programme for Nuclear Verification' so that the member state can review it. In the program, IAEA specify the need to develop the virtual reality based training tools. The objective of this project is to develop comprehensive training software dedicated to verification activities in the field based on the virtual environment. The training for the IAEA inspector is indispensable to maintain or improve their verification capability and to be prepared for the inspection of the complicated facilities. However, the grabbing of the available facility is not easy due to following limitations such as security, confidentiality, interference of the commercial operation and so on. Therefore, the virtual environment, which can replace a real facility, is required for the IAEA training. The objective of this software is to support the IAEA's verification capability. It is useful for the trainer and trainee to better understand how nuclear materials are processed in the fuel fabrication facility and what kind safeguards approaches are needed at each process before inspections. The final product will be integrated in the IAEA safeguards training courses to improve the efficiency of the safeguards training. Also we are going to make a decision if additional projects such as CANDU fuel parts or other facilities depending on evaluation results at the IAEA training course will be held on Korea in this year.

  7. Antibody Scientific Committee | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Antibody Scientific Committee provides scientific insight and guidance to the NCI's Antibody Characterization Program. Specifically, the members of this committee evaluate request from the external scientific community for development and characterization of antibodies by the program. The members of the Antibody Scientific Committee include:

  8. Committees

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-01

    -RESIGA Politehnica University of Timisoara Romania Kazuhiro TANAKA Kyushu Institute of Technology Japan Yoshinobu TSUJIMOTO Osaka University Japan Local Organizing Committee Chairman Yulin WU Tsinghua University Beijing Executive Chairman Zhengwei WANG Tsinghua University Beijing Members Shuliang CAO Tsinghua University Beijing Cichang CHEN South West University of Petroleum Chengdu Hongxun CHEN Shanghai University Shanghai Jiang DAI China Sanxia General Co Yichang Huashu DOU National University of Singapore Singapore Fengqin HAN Huanan University of Sci & Tech Guangzhou Kun LI Hefei Inst of General Machinery Hefei Rennian LI Lanzhou University of Sci & Tech Lanzhou Wanhong LI National Natural Science Foundation of China Beijing Chao LIU Yangzhou University Yangzhou Li LU China Inst of Water Resources and Hydropower Research Beijing Xingqi LUO Xi'an University of Tech Xi'an Zhenyue MA Dalian University of Sci & Tech Dalian Jiegang MU Zhejiang University of Tech Hangzhou Daqing QIN Harbin Electric Machinery Group Harbin Fujun WANG China Agriculture University Beijing Guoyu WANG Beijing Institute of Technology (BIT) Beijing Leqin WANG Zhejiang University Hangzhou Yuzhen WU NERCSPV Beijing Hongyuan XU Tsinghua University Beijing Jiandong YANG Wuhan University Wuhan Minguan YANG Jiangsu University Zhenjiang Shouqi YUAN Jiangsu University Zhenjiang Lefu ZHANG Harbin Electric Machinery Group Harbin Lixiang ZHANG Yunnan University of Sci & Tech Kunming Shengchang ZHANG Zhejiang University of Tech Hangzhou Kun ZHAO China Water & Electric Consulting Corp Beijing Yuan ZHENG Hehai University Nanjing Jianzhong ZHOU Huazhong University of Sci & Tech Wuhan Lingjiu ZHOU China Agriculture University Beijing Hongwu ZHU China Petroleum University Beijing Zuchao ZHU Zhejiang Sci-Tech University Hangzhou Secretaries Shuhong LIU (Academic), liushuhong@tsinghua.edu.cn Xianwu LUO (Registration), luoxw@tsinghua.edu.cn Baoshan ZHU (Finance), bszhu@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn

  9. 78 FR 29757 - Request for Nominations for Voting Members on Public Advisory Panels or Committees

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-21

    ... views of women and men, members of all racial and ethnic groups, and individuals with and without... contracts to permit evaluation of possible sources of conflicts of interest. This notice is issued under the...

  10. 77 FR 57640 - Intelligent Transportation Systems Program Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-18

    ... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Intelligent Transportation Systems Program Advisory Committee; Notice.... Department of Transportation. ACTION: Notice. The Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) Program Advisory... intelligent transportation systems. Through its sponsor, the ITS Joint Program Office, the ITS PAC makes...

  11. 78 FR 64048 - Intelligent Transportation Systems Program Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-25

    ... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Intelligent Transportation Systems Program Advisory Committee; Notice.... Department of Transportation. ACTION: Notice. The Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) Program Advisory... implementation of intelligent transportation systems. Through its sponsor, the ITS Joint Program Office (JPO...

  12. 77 FR 26067 - Intelligent Transportation Systems Program Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-02

    ... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Intelligent Transportation Systems Program Advisory Committee; Notice.... Department of Transportation. ACTION: Notice. The Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) Program Advisory... of intelligent transportation systems. Through its sponsor, the ITS Joint Program Office, the ITS PAC...

  13. 75 FR 39582 - National Industrial Security Program Policy Advisory Committee (NISPPAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-09

    ... Industrial Security Program Policy Advisory Committee (NISPPAC) AGENCY: Information Security Oversight Office..., announcement is made for a meeting of the National Industrial Security Program Policy Advisory Committee. The meeting will be held to discuss National Industrial Security Program policy matters. DATES: The meeting...

  14. 77 FR 12623 - National Industrial Security Program Policy Advisory Committee (NISPPAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    ... NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION Information Security Oversight Office National Industrial Security Program Policy Advisory Committee (NISPPAC) AGENCY: National Archives and Records... discuss National [[Page 12624

  15. 77 FR 10755 - Request for Nominations for Voting Members on a Public Advisory Committee; Risk Communication...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-23

    ... in ensuring that women, minority groups, and individuals with disabilities are adequately represented... who use FDA-regulated products. The latter may include patients and patients' family members, health... business address and/or home address, telephone number, and email address if available. Nominations must...

  16. Open letter to all Member State Delegates to CERN Finance Committee and CERN Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2014-01-01

    Geneva, 17 September 2014 Dear Delegate, We are surprised to read that the “Terms of reference of a Council Working Group on the CERN Pension Fund” is on the agenda of the Council Session of 18 September 2014. Once more the transformation of the current defined benefit scheme into a defined contribution scheme, as well as the question of how to “re-define” the pension conditions for members and beneficiaries will be investigated. Already in the framework of the Working Group 2 (WG2) studies, two legal experts demonstrated that the political and administrative bodies of an international organization which are responsible as employer for managing the staff, must respect the general principles inherent in the law of the international civil service in all their actions, especially when proposing changes in employment conditions. In particular Council must respect the principle of acquired rights of active or retired members of personnel. To reach full funding on a 30-...

  17. Assessment of the industrial energy-conservation program. Final report of the Committee on Assessment of the Industrial Energy Conservation Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1982-01-01

    Industrial operations in the United States account for some 37% of the nation's consumptions of energy. It has been estimated that this figure will increase to 50% by 1990 unless appropriate industrial energy conservation measures are adopted. However, such measures are difficult to implement in spite of the potential of various existing, emerging, and advanced technologies that can be applied to the problem. Specifically, the application of many industrial energy conservation measures entails high economic, technological, and institutional risks and uncertainties that constrain industries from adopting such measures. Accordingly, in 1975 the federal government started a program designed to mitigate these risks and uncertainties via government-industry partnership arrangements in the interests of national energy conservation. An important element of this program is the Industrial Energy Conservation Program in the Federal Department of Energy (DOE). In June 1980, DOE asked the National Materials Advisory Board, a unit of the National Academy of Sciences-National Research Council, to form a study committee to assess the effectiveness of the Industrial Energy Conservation Program. The committee concluded that federal support embodied in the DOE program, present and planned, is important to conserving additional industrial energy. However, the committee also concluded that the program needs various improvements in project selection and management and in transfer of results to industry. The committee's findings and recommendations and the results of the deliberation of the committee's three panels, a special report on heat and power, and a report on the visit by four members of the committee to Japan are presented.

  18. Report of ad hoc committee for appraisal of ABCC Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francis, T Jr; Jablon, S; Moore, F E

    1955-11-06

    The function of the Committee, according to its understanding, is to make an objective, scientific appraisal of the ABCC program as to its organization, plan of study, pattern of procedure, adequacy of data, caliber of performance, future outlook, and to report thereon with recommendations. It is apparent that the ABCC program had bogged down because of deficiencies in understanding of purpose, in ideas, in initiative, and in outlook. There has been a lack of investigative leadership and stimulating support. Significant observations have been made and, while gross evidence of radiation effects are not being detected at present, the data not yet analyzed may contain valuable information. If intimations of a shortening in life span should be substantiated, an impetus to investigations of underlying mechanisms will be provided. In any event, the continued imaginative investigation of the study population should yield knowledge of great value to medicine, to human biology, and to peaceful uses of atomic energy. It is believed that the program should be strengthened and given increased support. A unified plan of study is proposed. It should furnish more adequate data by coordination of effort, integration of information, and by maintaining analyses of data at a current level. It offers advantages to the stimulation and carrying out of research. Suggestions as to future plans of maintenance are briefly discussed.

  19. 76 FR 12978 - Advisory Committee on the Maternal, Infant and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program Evaluation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-09

    ... and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program Evaluation will meet for its first session on Wednesday... Administration for Children and Families Advisory Committee on the Maternal, Infant and Early Childhood Home...: Advisory Committee on the Maternal, Infant and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program Evaluation. Date and...

  20. The Challenge of Timely, Responsive and Rigorous Ethics Review of Disaster Research: Views of Research Ethics Committee Members.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Hunt

    Full Text Available Research conducted following natural disasters such as earthquakes, floods or hurricanes is crucial for improving relief interventions. Such research, however, poses ethical, methodological and logistical challenges for researchers. Oversight of disaster research also poses challenges for research ethics committees (RECs, in part due to the rapid turnaround needed to initiate research after a disaster. Currently, there is limited knowledge available about how RECs respond to and appraise disaster research. To address this knowledge gap, we investigated the experiences of REC members who had reviewed disaster research conducted in low- or middle-income countries.We used interpretive description methodology and conducted in-depth interviews with 15 respondents. Respondents were chairs, members, advisors, or coordinators from 13 RECs, including RECs affiliated with universities, governments, international organizations, a for-profit REC, and an ad hoc committee established during a disaster. Interviews were analyzed inductively using constant comparative techniques.Through this process, three elements were identified as characterizing effective and high-quality review: timeliness, responsiveness and rigorousness. To ensure timeliness, many RECs rely on adaptations of review procedures for urgent protocols. Respondents emphasized that responsive review requires awareness of and sensitivity to the particularities of disaster settings and disaster research. Rigorous review was linked with providing careful assessment of ethical considerations related to the research, as well as ensuring independence of the review process.Both the frequency of disasters and the conduct of disaster research are on the rise. Ensuring effective and high quality review of disaster research is crucial, yet challenges, including time pressures for urgent protocols, exist for achieving this goal. Adapting standard REC procedures may be necessary. However, steps should be

  1. Do Loyalty Programs Really Enhance Behavioral Loyalty? An Empirical Analysis Accounting for Self-Selecting Members

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Leenheer (Jorna); H.J. van Heerde (Harald); T.H.A. Bijmolt (Tammo); A. Smidts (Ale)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractOne of the pressing issues in marketing is whether loyalty programs really enhance behavioral loyalty. Loyalty program members may have a much higher share-of-wallet at the firm with the loyalty program than non-members have, but this does not necessarily imply that loyalty programs are

  2. Do loyalty programs really enhance behavioral loyalty? An empirical analysis accounting for self-selecting members

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leenheer, Jorna; van Heerde, Harald J.; Bijmolt, Tammo H. A.; Smidts, Ale

    One of the pressing issues in marketing is whether loyalty programs really enhance behavioral loyalty. Loyalty program members may have a much higher share-of-wallet at the firm with the loyalty program than non-members have, but this does not necessarily imply that loyalty programs are effective.

  3. 77 FR 20872 - Intelligent Transportation Systems Program Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-06

    ... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Intelligent Transportation Systems Program Advisory Committee; Notice.... Department of Transportation. ACTION: Notice. The Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) Program Advisory..., development, and implementation of intelligent transportation systems. Through its sponsor, the ITS Joint...

  4. 77 FR 51845 - Intelligent Transportation Systems Program Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-27

    ... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Intelligent Transportation Systems Program Advisory Committee; Notice.... Department of Transportation. ACTION: Notice. The Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) Program Advisory..., development, and implementation of intelligent transportation systems. Through its sponsor, the ITS Joint...

  5. 75 FR 77955 - Intelligent Transportation Systems Program Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-14

    ... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Research and Innovative Technology Administration Intelligent... the Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) Program Advisory Committee (ITSPAC). The meeting will be... of intelligent transportation systems. Through its sponsor, the ITS Joint Program Office (JPO), the...

  6. 78 FR 16030 - Intelligent Transportation Systems Program Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-13

    ... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Intelligent Transportation Systems Program Advisory Committee; Notice.... Department of Transportation. ACTION: Notice. The Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) Program Advisory... Transportation on all matters relating to the study, development, and implementation of intelligent...

  7. 78 FR 9431 - National Industrial Security Program Policy Advisory Committee (NISPPAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-08

    ... NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION Information Security Oversight Office National Industrial Security Program Policy Advisory Committee (NISPPAC) AGENCY: National Archives and Records... meeting to discuss National Industrial Security Program policy matters. DATES: The meeting will be held on...

  8. 77 FR 63893 - National Industrial Security Program Policy Advisory Committee (NISPPAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-17

    ... NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION Information Security Oversight Office National Industrial Security Program Policy Advisory Committee (NISPPAC) AGENCY: National Archives and Records... meeting to discuss National Industrial Security Program policy matters. DATES: The meeting will be held on...

  9. Familiar ethical issues amplified: how members of research ethics committees describe ethical distinctions between disaster and non-disaster research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tansey, Catherine M; Anderson, James; Boulanger, Renaud F; Eckenwiler, Lisa; Pringle, John; Schwartz, Lisa; Hunt, Matthew

    2017-06-28

    The conduct of research in settings affected by disasters such as hurricanes, floods and earthquakes is challenging, particularly when infrastructures and resources were already limited pre-disaster. However, since post-disaster research is essential to the improvement of the humanitarian response, it is important that adequate research ethics oversight be available. We aim to answer the following questions: 1) what do research ethics committee (REC) members who have reviewed research protocols to be conducted following disasters in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) perceive as the key ethical concerns associated with disaster research?, and 2) in what ways do REC members understand these concerns to be distinct from those arising in research conducted in non-crisis situations? This qualitative study was developed using interpretative description methodology; 15 interviews were conducted with REC members. Four key ethical issues were identified as presenting distinctive considerations for disaster research to be implemented in LMICs, and were described by participants as familiar research ethics issues that were amplified in these contexts. First, REC members viewed disaster research as having strong social value due to its potential for improving disaster response, but also as requiring a higher level of justification compared to other research settings. Second, they identified vulnerability as an overarching concern for disaster research ethics, and a feature that required careful and critical appraisal when assessing protocols. They noted that research participants' vulnerabilities frequently change in the aftermath of a disaster and often in unpredictable ways. Third, they identified concerns related to promoting and maintaining safety, confidentiality and data security in insecure or austere environments. Lastly, though REC members endorsed the need and usefulness of community engagement, they noted that there are significant challenges in a disaster

  10. 32 CFR 199.16 - Supplemental Health Care Program for active duty members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Supplemental Health Care Program for active duty... (CHAMPUS) § 199.16 Supplemental Health Care Program for active duty members. (a) Purpose and applicability... the supplemental health care program for active duty members of the uniformed services, the provision...

  11. 78 FR 48337 - Federal Employees Health Benefits Program: Members of Congress and Congressional Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-08

    ... personal staffs, staffs of House and Senate leadership committees, other committee staff and administrative... percentage of work as committee or leadership committee staff. It also is [[Page 48338

  12. 78 FR 43273 - Intelligent Transportation Systems Program Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-19

    ... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Research and Innovative Technology Administration Intelligent... Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) Program Advisory Committee (ITS PAC) will hold a meeting on August 7..., development, and implementation of intelligent transportation systems. Through its sponsor, the ITS Joint...

  13. 77 FR 19056 - Information Reporting Program Advisory Committee (IRPAC); Nominations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-29

    ... IRS has special interest in assuring that women and men, members of all races and national origins.... Members are not paid for their services. However, travel expenses for working sessions, public meetings...

  14. 78 FR 19582 - Information Reporting Program Advisory Committee (IRPAC); Nominations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    ... Treasury and IRS policies. The IRS has special interest in assuring that women and men, members of all... administration issues specific to information reporting. Members are not paid for their services. However, travel...

  15. 76 FR 22940 - Intelligent Transportation Systems Program Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-25

    ... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Intelligent Transportation Systems Program Advisory Committee; Notice...-363; 5 U.S.C. app. 2), a Web conference of the Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) Program... implementation of intelligent transportation systems. Through its sponsor, the ITS Joint Program Office (JPO...

  16. Older members perform better in an internet-based behavioral weight loss program compared to younger members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Mark, Marianne; Jonasson, Josefine; Svensson, Madeleine; Linné, Yvonne; Rossner, Stephan; Lagerros, Ylva Trolle

    2009-01-01

    New technology offers increased opportunities for weight control. However, it is not clear whether older people with less computer training can make use of this tool. Our objective was to examine how members above the age of 65 years performed in an internet-based behavioral weight loss program, compared to younger members. Data from members (n = 23,233) of an internet-based behavioral weight loss program were analyzed. We restricted our study to active participants accessing the weight club, during a 6-month period (n = 4,440). The number of logins, food intake, and weight records were examined. Participants were divided into age tertiles separately for men and women. The oldest tertile was further subdivided into two groups: above and below the age of 65 years. Participants aged 65 or older were more likely to remain active in the weight club for at least 6 months compared to younger age groups. They had the highest frequency of recordings of food intake and current weight. Among women, those older than 65 years had on average the highest percentage of weight loss (5.6 kg, 6.8%). Men above 65 years of age had the highest number of logins, on average 161 times during the 6-month period. Older participants are performing equally well or even better in an internet-based behavioral weight loss program than younger participants. Internet-based programs could be a promising and attractive option for older adults requiring assistance in losing weight. 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Evaluation of clinical trials by Ethics Committees in Germany: Experience of applicants with the review of requests for opinion of the Ethics Committees - results of a survey among members of the German Association of Research-Based Pharmaceutical Companies (VFA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russ, Hagen

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The review of requests for a positive opinion of the ethics committees (application procedure as a requirement to start a clinical trial in Germany has been completely redesigned with the transposition of EU Directive 2001/20/EC in the 12th Amendment of the German Medicines Act in August 2004. The experience of applicants (sponsors, legal representatives of sponsors in the EU and persons or organizations authorized by the sponsors to make the application, respectively in terms of interactions with the ethics committees in Germany has been positive overall, especially with respect to ethics committee adherence to the statutory timelines applicable for review of requests. However, inconsistencies between ethics committees exist in terms of the form and content of the requirements for application documents and their evaluation.With the objective of further improving both the quality of applications and the evaluation of those applications by ethics committees, a survey among members of the German Association of Research-Based Pharmaceutical Companies (VFA was conducted from January to April 2008. Based on reasoned opinions issued by the respective ethics committee in charge of the coordinating principal investigator (coordinating ethics committee, the type and frequency of formal and content-related objections to applications according to § 7 of the German Good Clinical Practice (GCP Regulation were systematically documented, and qualitative and quantitative analyses performed. 21 out of 44 members of the VFA participated in the survey. 288 applications for Phase I–IV studies submitted between January and December 2007 to 40 ethics committees were evaluated.This survey shows that about one in six applications is incomplete and has formal and/or content objections, respectively, especially those that pertain to documents demonstrating the qualification of the investigator and/or suitability of the facilities. These objections are attributable to

  18. NCRP Program Area Committee 5: Environmental Radiation and Radioactive Waste Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, S Y; Napier, Bruce

    2016-02-01

    Program Area Committee 5 of the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) focuses its activities on environmental radiation and radioactive waste issues. The Committee completed a number of reports in these subject areas, most recently NCRP Report No. 175, Decision Making for Late-Phase Recovery from Major Nuclear or Radiological Incidents. Historically this Committee addressed emerging issues of the nation pertaining to radioactivity or radiation in the environment or radioactive waste issues due either to natural origins or to manmade activities.

  19. 34 CFR 350.35 - What are the requirements for the composition of an advisory committee?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... DISABILITY AND REHABILITATION RESEARCH PROJECTS AND CENTERS PROGRAM What Rehabilitation Engineering Research... committee? The majority of a Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center advisory committee's members must be comprised of individuals with disabilities who are users of rehabilitation technology, or their parents...

  20. NCRP Program Area Committee 3: Nuclear and Radiological Security and Safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Tammy P; Buddemeier, Brooke

    2016-02-01

    Program Area Committee (PAC) 3 provides guidance and recommendations for response to nuclear and radiological incidents of both an accidental and deliberate nature. Leadership of PAC 3 was transitioned in March 2015, and the newly composed PAC has been working to delineate and then prioritize the landscape of possible activities for PAC 3. The major activity of PAC 3 during the past year was the establishment of Scientific Committee 3-1 to begin producing a report on Guidance for Emergency Responder Dosimetry.

  1. Evaluation of Pharmacy and Therapeutic (P&T) Committee member knowledge, attitudes and ability regarding the use of comparative effectiveness research (CER) in health care decision-making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, D H; Warholak, T L; Hines, L E; Hurwitz, J; Brown, M; Taylor, A M; Brixner, D; Malone, D C

    2014-01-01

    Comparative effectiveness research (CER) is a constellation of research methods designed to improve health care decision making. Educational programs that improve health care decision makers' CER knowledge and awareness may ultimately lead to more cost-effective use of health care resources. This study was conducted to evaluate changes in CER knowledge, attitudes, and ability among Pharmacy and Therapeutics (P&T) Committee members and support staff after attending a tailored educational program. Physicians and pharmacists from two professional societies and the Indian Health Service who participated in the P&T process were invited via email to participate in this study. Participants completed a questionnaire, designed specifically for this study, prior to and following the 4-hour live, educational program on CER to determine the impact on their related knowledge, attitudes, and ability to use CER in decision-making. Rasch analysis was used to assess validity and reliability of subsections of the questionnaire and regression analysis was used to assess programmatic impact on CER knowledge, attitude, and ability. One hundred and forty of the 199 participants completed both the pre- and post-CER session questionnaires (response rate = 70.4%). Most participants (>75%) correctly answered eight of the ten knowledge items after attending the educational session. More than 60% of the respondents had a positive attitude toward CER both before and after the program. Compared to baseline (pretest), participants reported significant improvements in their perceived ability to use CER after attending the session in these areas: using CER reviews, knowledge of CER methods, identifying problems with randomized controlled trials, identifying threats to validity, understanding of evidence synthesis approaches, and evaluating the quality of CER (all P values CER educational program was effective in increasing participants' CER knowledge and self-perceived ability to evaluate

  2. Scholarly Productivity of School Psychology Faculty Members in Specialist-Level Programs: 2002-2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurent, Jeff; Runia, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    The scholarly productivity of school psychology faculty members in specialist-level only programs was examined. Information was gathered from the School Psychology Program Information portion of the website for the National Association of School Psychologists. A total of 137 specialist-level only school psychology programs were identified.…

  3. Review of the Fusion Theory and Computing Program. Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (FESAC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antonsen, Thomas M.; Berry, Lee A.; Brown, Michael R.; Dahlburg, Jill P.; Davidson, Ronald C.; Greenwald, Martin; Hegna, Chris C.; McCurdy, William; Newman, David E.; Pellegrini, Claudio; Phillips, Cynthia K.; Post, Douglass E.; Rosenbluth, Marshall N.; Sheffield, John; Simonen, Thomas C.; Van Dam, James

    2001-01-01

    At the November 14-15, 2000, meeting of the Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee, a Panel was set up to address questions about the Theory and Computing program, posed in a charge from the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences (see Appendix A). This area was of theory and computing/simulations had been considered in the FESAC Knoxville meeting of 1999 and in the deliberations of the Integrated Program Planning Activity (IPPA) in 2000. A National Research Council committee provided a detailed review of the scientific quality of the fusion energy sciences program, including theory and computing, in 2000.

  4. 77 FR 34411 - National Industrial Security Program Policy Advisory Committee (NISPPAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-11

    ... NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION National Industrial Security Program Policy Advisory... CFR 101-6, announcement is made for the following committee meeting. To discuss National Industrial Security Program policy matters. DATES: This meeting will be held on Wednesday, July 11, 2012 from 10:00 a...

  5. 78 FR 65716 - Sunshine Act Meeting; Finance, Budget & Program Committee Meeting of the Board of Directors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-01

    ... NEIGHBORHOOD REINVESTMENT CORPORATION Sunshine Act Meeting; Finance, Budget & Program Committee Meeting of the Board of Directors TIME & DATE: 2:00 p.m., Thursday, November 7, 2013. PLACE: Telephonic.... Quarterly Program Reports C. Corporate Scorecard Report D. HUD Counseling Rule E. Grants Report VIII...

  6. Improving Citation Network Scoring by Incorporating Author and Program Committee Reputation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dineshi Peiris

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Publication venues play an important role in the scholarly communication process. The number of publication venues has been increasing yearly, making it difficult for researchers to determine the most suitable venue for their publication. Most existing methods use citation count as the metric to measure the reputation of publication venues. However, this does not take into account the quality of citations. Therefore, it is vital to have a publication venue quality estimation mechanism. The ultimate goal of this research project is to develop a novel approach for ranking publication venues by considering publication history. The main aim of this research work is to propose a mechanism to identify the key Computer Science journals and conferences from various fields of research. Our approach is completely based on the citation network represented by publications. A modified version of the PageRank algorithm is used to compute the ranking scores for each publication. In our publication ranking method, there are many aspects that contribute to the importance of a publication, including the number of citations, the rating of the citing publications, the time metric and the authors’ reputation. Known publication venue scores have been formulated by using the scores of the publications. New publication venue ranking is taken care by the scores of Program Committee members which derive from their ranking scores as authors. Experimental results show that our publication ranking method reduces the bias against more recent publications, while also providing a more accurate way to determine publication quality.

  7. Competency, Programming, and Emerging Innovation in Graduate Education within Schools of Pharmacy: The Report of the 2016-2017 Research and Graduate Affairs Committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poloyac, Samuel M; Block, Kirsten F; Cavanaugh, Jane E; Dwoskin, Linda P; Melchert, Russell B; Nemire, Ruth E; O'Donnell, James M; Priefer, Ronny; Touchette, Daniel R

    2017-10-01

    Graduate education in the pharmaceutical sciences is a cornerstone of research within pharmacy schools. Pharmaceutical scientists are critical contributors to addressing the challenges of new drug discovery, delivery, and optimal care in order to ensure improved therapeutic outcomes in populations of patients. The American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy (AACP) charged the 2016-2017 Research and Graduate Affairs Committee (RGAC) to define the competencies necessary for graduate education in the pharmaceutical sciences (Charge 1), recommend collaborative curricular development across schools of pharmacy (Charge 2), recommend AACP programing for graduate education (Charge 3), and provide guidance on emerging areas for innovation in graduate education (Charge 4). With respect to Charges 1 and 2, the RGAC committee developed six domains of core competencies for graduate education in the pharmaceutical sciences as well as recommendations for shared programming. For Charge 3, the committee made 3 specific programming recommendations that include AACP sponsored regional research symposia, a professional development forum at the AACP INterim Meeting, and the addition of a graduate research and education poster session at the AACP Annual Meeting. For Charge 4, the committee recommended that AACP develop a standing committee of graduate program deans and directors to provide guidance to member schools in support of graduate program representation at AACP meetings, develop skills for interprofessional teamwork and augment research through integration of Pharm.D., Ph.D., postdoctoral associates, resident, and fellow experiences. Two proposed policy statements by the committee are that AACP believes core competencies are essential components of graduate education and AACP supports the inclusion of research and graduate education focuses in its portfolio of meetings and programs.

  8. Evaluation of doctoral nursing programs in Japan by faculty members and their educational and research activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arimoto, Azusa; Gregg, Misuzu F; Nagata, Satoko; Miki, Yuko; Murashima, Sachiyo

    2012-07-01

    Evaluation of doctoral programs in nursing is becoming more important with the rapid increase in the programs in Japan. This study aimed to evaluate doctoral nursing programs by faculty members and to analyze the relationship of the evaluation with educational and research activities of faculty members in Japan. Target settings were all 46 doctoral nursing programs. Eighty-five faculty members from 28 programs answered the questionnaire, which included 17 items for program evaluation, 12 items for faculty evaluation, 9 items for resource evaluation, 3 items for overall evaluations, and educational and research activities. A majority gave low evaluations for sources of funding, the number of faculty members and support staff, and administrative systems. Faculty members who financially supported a greater number of students gave a higher evaluation for extramural funding support, publication, provision of diverse learning experiences, time of supervision, and research infrastructure. The more time a faculty member spent on advising doctoral students, the higher were their evaluations on the supportive learning environment, administrative systems, time of supervision, and timely feedback on students' research. The findings of this study indicate a need for improvement in research infrastructure, funding sources, and human resources to achieve quality nursing doctoral education in Japan. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. NCRP Program Area Committee 7: Radiation Education, Risk Communication, Outreach, and Policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, S M; Locke, P A

    2016-02-01

    Recognizing the central importance of effective communication, education, and policy across all of the domains of radiation safety and radiation protection, the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) established a new committee in 2013. Program Area Committee 7 (PAC 7) was created to develop projects and provide guidance on "Radiation Education, Risk Communication, Outreach, and Policy." After identifying individuals with relevant expertise who were willing to serve, the Committee held its inaugural meeting in 2014. In 2015, the Committee increased its membership and began carrying out an expanded program of activities. One area of activity has involved providing input and feedback on risk communication issues to NCRP and other agencies. Another area of work has involved liaising with other NCRP committees (e.g., Council Committee 1 and PAC 3) to help incorporate psychosocial and risk communication issues into projects. Future efforts of NCRP's newest PAC are expected to include the development of authoritative reports and commentaries dealing with critical issues and challenges in radiation risk communication, education, and policy.

  10. An evaluation of knowledge, attitude, and practice of institutional ethics committee members from eastern India regarding ethics committee functioning and pharmacovigilance activities conducted during clinical trials: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subhrojyoti Bhowmick

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose of study: The vital responsibility of Institutional Ethics Committee (IEC members is to ensure the safety of the subjects participating in clinical trials. Hence, it is essential for IEC members to be aware of the common pharmacovigilance strategies followed during clinical trials. However, the information about the knowledge, attitude, and practice of IEC members regarding the pharmacovigilance activities followed during clinical trials is scarce worldwide, especially in India. Hence, this cross-sectional study was designed to assess the knowledge, attitude, and practice of IEC members of 10 hospitals of Kolkata, India. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study using a self-administered, validated questionnaire was conducted among 10 hospitals (five government and five corporate hospitals in Kolkata conducting active clinical research and having functional Ethics Committees (ECs in the month of September-November, 2012. An IEC approval was taken for this study. Two reminders were given to all EC members through telephone/e-mail for completion and returning of the forms. The filled in forms were returned to their respective Member Secretaries, from whom authors′ collected the forms. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 16.0 software and MS-Excel 2007. Categorical data were analyzed using Chi-square test and a P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: Out of the 100 distributed questionnaires, 40 were returned of which 10 were not filled properly. Overall awareness regarding different pharmacovigilance terminologies and activities among EC members from nonmedical background (71.43% was found to be more than that of the medical members (68.75%, though the figure was not statistically significant. Majority of the members (75% felt that EC should decide compensation in case of a serious adverse event. Conclusion: The present study signifies that there is a low level of awareness in IEC members of Kolkata regarding

  11. From "a Fair Game" to "a Form of Covert Research": Research Ethics Committee Members' Differing Notions of Consent and Potential Risk to Participants Within Social Media Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibbin, R A; Samuel, G; Derrick, G E

    2018-04-01

    Social media (SM) research presents new challenges for research ethics committees (RECs) who must balance familiar ethical principles with new notions of public availability. This article qualitatively examines how U.K. REC members view this balance in terms of risk and consent. While it found significant variance overall, there were discernible experience-based trends. REC members with less experience of reviewing SM held inflexible notions of consent and risk that could be categorized as either relying on traditional notions of requiring direct consent, or viewing publicly available data as "fair game." More experienced REC members took a more nuanced approach to data use and consent. We conclude that the more nuanced approach should be best practice during ethical review of SM research.

  12. 09 September 2013 - Japanese Members of Internal Affairs and Communications Committee House of Representatives visiting the ATLAS experimental cavern with ATLAS Spokesperson D. Charlton. T. Kondo and K. Yoshida present.

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Gadmer

    2013-01-01

    09 September 2013 - Japanese Members of Internal Affairs and Communications Committee House of Representatives visiting the ATLAS experimental cavern with ATLAS Spokesperson D. Charlton. T. Kondo and K. Yoshida present.

  13. 29th November 2011 - Czech Parliament Members of the Social Committee of the Lower Chamber visiting CERN permanent exhibition Microcosm and ATLAS visitor centre with Senior Czech Physicist and ILO I. Lehraus.

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Gadmer

    2011-01-01

    29th November 2011 - Czech Parliament Members of the Social Committee of the Lower Chamber visiting CERN permanent exhibition Microcosm and ATLAS visitor centre with Senior Czech Physicist and ILO I. Lehraus.

  14. Plane stress analysis of wood members using isoparametric finite elements, a computer program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gary D. Gerhardt

    1983-01-01

    A finite element program is presented which computes displacements, strains, and stresses in wood members of arbitrary shape which are subjected to plane strain/stressloading conditions. This report extends a program developed by R. L. Taylor in 1977, by adding both the cubic isoparametric finite element and the capability to analyze nonisotropic materials. The...

  15. 78 FR 21908 - Request for Nominations of Members To Serve on the National Advisory Committee on Racial, Ethnic...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-12

    ... National Advisory Committee on Racial, Ethnic, and Other Populations AGENCY: Bureau of the Census, Commerce..., students and youth, aging populations, American Indian and Alaska Native tribal considerations, new... technology and video/web conferencing to reduce meeting and travel costs, and to more fully engage local and...

  16. 76 FR 17992 - Information Reporting Program Advisory Committee (IRPAC); Nominations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-31

    ... and other IRS leadership to provide recommendations on a wide range of information reporting... issues intended to improve the information reporting program and achieve fairness to taxpayers. Conveying...

  17. 75 FR 16910 - Information Reporting Program Advisory Committee (IRPAC); Nominations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-02

    ... leadership to provide recommendations on a wide range of information reporting administration issues... information reporting program and achieve fairness to taxpayers. Conveying the public's perception of IRS...

  18. The effect of an anger management program for family members of patients with alcohol use disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Ju-Young; Choi, Yun-Jung

    2010-02-01

    This study was aimed to test the structured anger management nursing program for the family members of patients with alcohol use disorders (AUDs). Families with the AUDs suffer from the dysfunctional family dynamic caused by the patients' deteriorative disease processes of alcohol dependence. Family members of AUDs feel bitter and angry about the uncontrolled behaviors and relapses of the patients in spite of great effort for a long time. This chronic anger threatens the optimal function of the family as well as obstructs the family to help the patients who are suffering from AUDs. Sixty three subjects were participated who were referred from community mental health centers, alcohol consultation centers, and an alcohol hospital in Korea. Pre-post scores of the Korean Anger Expression Inventory were used to test the program. An anger management program was developed and implemented to promote anger expression and anger management for the family members of the patients with AUDs. The total anger expression score of the experimental group was significantly more reduced as compared with that of the control group. Subjects in the experimental group reported after the program that they felt more comfortable and their life was changed in a better way. The anger management program was effective to promote anger expression and anger management for family members of AUDs. Nurses need to include family members in their nursing process as well as to care of patients with AUDs to maximize nursing outcome and patient satisfaction. 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. 24 CFR 984.202 - Program Coordinating Committee (PCC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... private education or training institutions, child care providers, nonprofit service providers, private business, and any other public and private service providers with resources to assist the FSS program. (c... private resources for the operation of the FSS program within the PHA's jurisdiction, including assistance...

  20. 76 FR 67764 - Finance, Budget & Program Committee Board of Directors Meeting; Sunshine Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-02

    ... NEIGHBORHOOD REINVESTMENT CORPORATION Finance, Budget & Program Committee Board of Directors..., Assistant Corporate Secretary (202) 220-2376; [email protected] . Agenda: I. Call To Order II. Executive Session III. Financial Report III. Budget Report IV. Lease Update V. Corporate Scorecard VI. NFMC & EHLP VII...

  1. 76 FR 55125 - Finance, Budget & Program Committee Meeting of the Board of Directors; Sunshine Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-06

    ... NEIGHBORHOOD REINVESTMENT CORPORATION Finance, Budget & Program Committee Meeting of the Board of..., Assistant Corporate Secretary, (202) 220-2376; [email protected] . AGENDA: I. CALL TO ORDER II. Financial Report III. Budget Report IV. Lease Update V. Corporate Scorecard VI. National Foreclosure Mitigation...

  2. 78 FR 8193 - Sunshine Act Meeting; Finance, Budget & Program Committee Meeting of the Board of Directors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-05

    ... NEIGHBORHOOD REINVESTMENT CORPORATION Sunshine Act Meeting; Finance, Budget & Program Committee...: Erica Hall, Assistant Corporate Secretary, (202) 220-2376; [email protected] . AGENDA: I. Call To Order II.../Treasury Initiative VI. Lease and Move VII. FY 13 Corporate Milestone Report and Dashboard VIII. NFMC and...

  3. 78 FR 24438 - Board of Directors Finance, Budget & Program Committee: Sunshine Act Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-25

    ... NEIGHBORHOOD REINVESTMENT CORPORATION Board of Directors Finance, Budget & Program Committee... Corporate Secretary (202) 220-2376; [email protected] . AGENDA: I. CALL TO ORDER II. FY 2013 Budget Update III... Corporate Milestone Report and Dashboard IX. NFMC, EHLP & MHA X. NeighborhoodLIFT & CityLIFT XI. Recent...

  4. 77 FR 56238 - Finance, Budget & Program. Committee Meeting of the Board of Directors; Sunshine Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-12

    ... NEIGHBORHOOD REINVESTMENT CORPORATION Finance, Budget & Program. Committee Meeting of the Board of..., Assistant Corporate Secretary, (202) 220-2376; [email protected] . AGENDA: I. Call to Order II. Executive Session... Associated Budget VI. FY 12 Corporate Milestone Report and Dashboard VII. National Foreclosure Mitigation...

  5. 77 FR 23810 - Advisory Committee on Prosthetics and Special-Disabilities Programs, Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-20

    ...; Director of National Veterans Sports Programs and Special Events; Chief Procurement and Logistics Officer... Consultant for Telehealth Services. No time will be allocated for receiving oral presentations from the... Drake, Committee Management Officer. [FR Doc. 2012-9498 Filed 4-19-12; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 8320-01-P ...

  6. 76 FR 19095 - Pesticide Program Dialogue Committee; Notice of Public Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-06

    ... EPA Administrator on issues associated with pesticide regulatory development and reform initiatives... Program Dialogue Committee (PPDC) is scheduled for April 20-21, 2011. A draft agenda is under development that will include Integrated Pest Management, Pollinator Protection, Children/Worker Risk Policy...

  7. Computational physics and applied mathematics capability review June 8-10, 2010 (Advance materials to committee members)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Stephen R [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory will review its Computational Physics and Applied Mathematics (CPAM) capabilities in 2010. The goals of capability reviews are to assess the quality of science, technology, and engineering (STE) performed by the capability, evaluate the integration of this capability across the Laboratory and within the scientific community, examine the relevance of this capability to the Laboratory's programs, and provide advice on the current and future directions of this capability. This is the first such review for CPAM, which has a long and unique history at the laboratory, starting from the inception of the Laboratory in 1943. The CPAM capability covers an extremely broad technical area at Los Alamos, encompassing a wide array of disciplines, research topics, and organizations. A vast array of technical disciplines and activities are included in this capability, from general numerical modeling, to coupled mUlti-physics simulations, to detailed domain science activities in mathematics, methods, and algorithms. The CPAM capability involves over 12 different technical divisions and a majority of our programmatic and scientific activities. To make this large scope tractable, the CPAM capability is broken into the following six technical 'themes.' These themes represent technical slices through the CP AM capability and collect critical core competencies of the Laboratory, each of which contributes to the capability (and each of which is divided into multiple additional elements in the detailed descriptions of the themes in subsequent sections): (1) Computational Fluid Dynamics - This theme speaks to the vast array of scientific capabilities for the simulation of fluids under shocks, low-speed flow, and turbulent conditions - which are key, historical, and fundamental strengths of the laboratory; (2) Partial Differential Equations - The technical scope of this theme is the applied mathematics and numerical solution of partial

  8. Update of technical coordinating committee activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarado, R.A.

    1995-01-01

    The Technical Coordinating Committee has its origins in the earliest days of implementing the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act. Between 1982 and 1985, individuals in several of the states felt that coordination among the states would be beneficial to all by affording states a cost-effective method for sharing ideas, discussing alternatives, and presenting solutions to common problems. At the current time, the committee comprises members from each of the sited states. Various compacts, federal agencies, and industry groups participate in committee activities. The Low-Level Management Program provides support for the committee through the provision of logistical support and limited manpower allocation. Activities of the committee have recently focused on waste treatment and minimization technologies. The committee also has worked diligently to see the review of the 3RSTAT computer code completed. The committee has taken a position on various regulatory proposals the past year. The committee expects to continue its work until new sites are brought online

  9. Update of technical coordinating committee activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarado, R.A.

    1995-12-31

    The Technical Coordinating Committee has its origins in the earliest days of implementing the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act. Between 1982 and 1985, individuals in several of the states felt that coordination among the states would be beneficial to all by affording states a cost-effective method for sharing ideas, discussing alternatives, and presenting solutions to common problems. At the current time, the committee comprises members from each of the sited states. Various compacts, federal agencies, and industry groups participate in committee activities. The Low-Level Management Program provides support for the committee through the provision of logistical support and limited manpower allocation. Activities of the committee have recently focused on waste treatment and minimization technologies. The committee also has worked diligently to see the review of the 3RSTAT computer code completed. The committee has taken a position on various regulatory proposals the past year. The committee expects to continue its work until new sites are brought online.

  10. 11. annual report of the technical advisory committee on the nuclear fuel waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-10-01

    The Eleventh Annual Report of the Technical Advisory Committee (TAC) assesses the scientific and technical progress made within the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program (NFWMP) during the period July 1989 to June 1990. The Committee notes that the general concept of a multibarrier system involving geologic media and engineered systems is based on known technologies and current scientific knowledge, and has gained strong international scientific and engineering support as currently the most feasible and practical. TAC continues to endorse the full investigation of the concept of nuclear waste disposal deep in plutonic formations, such as those in the Canadian Shield

  11. 78 FR 19191 - Request for Nominations of Members to Serve on the Federal Economic Statistics Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-29

    ... pleasure of the Secretary of Commerce. 2. Members are nominated by the Department of Commerce, in...., Senior Advisor Performing the Duties of the Director, Bureau of the Census. [FR Doc. 2013-07344 Filed 3...

  12. 76 FR 6841 - ITS Joint Program Office; Intelligent Transportation Systems Program Advisory Committee; Notice...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-08

    ... Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Research and Innovative Technology Administration, U.S... Hotel at Eagle Crest, 1275 S. Huron Street, Ypsilanti, Michigan 48197. The ITSPAC, established under...) Technology and Communications Discussion. March 3: (1) Transformation Discussion; (2) Sub-committee Breakout...

  13. New Clinical Faculty Training Program: Transforming Practicing Dentists into Part-Time Dental Faculty Members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Brooke N; Kirkup, Michele L; Willis, Lisa H; Reifeis, Paul E

    2017-06-01

    At Indiana University School of Dentistry, a New Clinical Faculty Training (NCFT) program was created with the primary goals of informing new part-time faculty members of clinical policies and assessment guidelines and thus developing qualified and satisfied faculty members. The aim of this study was to determine if participation in the training program improved the participants' satisfaction and competence in comparison to their colleagues who did not participate in the program. Two cohorts were compared: a control group of part-time faculty members who did not receive formal training when they were hired (n=21; response rate 58.3%); and the intervention group, who had participated in the NCFT program (n=12; response rate 80%). A survey of faculty members in the control group gathered information on their experiences when initially hired, and a pretest was administered to measure their knowledge of clinical policies. After the control group was given an overview of the program, their feedback was collected through post surveys, and a posttest identical to the pretest was given that found statistically significant increases on questions one (p=0.003) and four (p=0.025). In February 2014, 15 new faculty members participated in the pilot implementation of the NCFT program. Of those 15, 12 (the intervention group) completed follow-up surveys identical to the pre survey used with the control group. Statistically significant differences were found for the factors clinical teaching (p=0.005) and assessment training (p=0.008) with better responses for the NCFT group. These results suggest that participation in the program was associated with improved clinical teaching knowledge and job satisfaction.

  14. E-survey with researchers, members of ethics committees and sponsors of clinical research in Brazil: an emerging methodology for scientific research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dainesi, Sonia Mansoldo; Goldbaum, Moisés

    2012-12-01

    The growth of Internet users enables epidemiological studies to be conducted electronically, representing a promising methodology for data collection. Members of Ethics Committees, Clinical Researchers and Sponsors were interviewed using questionnaires sent over the Internet. Along with the questionnaire, participants received a message explaining the survey and also the informed consent. Returning the questionnaire meant the consent of the participant was given. No incentive was offered; two reminders were sent. The response rate was 21% (124/599), 20% (58/290) and 45% (24/53) respectively for Ethics Committees, Researchers and Sponsors. The percentage of return before the two reminders was about 62%. Reasons for non-response: participant not found, refusal to participate, lack of experience in clinical research or in the therapeutic field. Characteristics of participants: 45% of Ethics Committee participants, 64% of Researchers and 63% of Sponsors were male; mean age (range), respectively: 47 (28-74), 53 (24-72) and 40 (29-65) years. Among Researchers and Sponsors, all respondents had at least a university degree and, in the Ethics Committees group, only two (1.7%) did not have one. Most of the questionnaires in all groups came from the Southeast Region of Brazil, probably reflecting the highest number of clinical trials and research professionals in this region. Despite the potential limitations of a survey done through the Internet, this study led to a response rate similar to what has been observed with other models, efficiency in obtaining responses (speed and quality), convenience for respondents and low cost.

  15. Integer Linear Programming for Constrained Multi-Aspect Committee Review Assignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimzadehgan, Maryam; Zhai, ChengXiang

    2011-01-01

    Automatic review assignment can significantly improve the productivity of many people such as conference organizers, journal editors and grant administrators. A general setup of the review assignment problem involves assigning a set of reviewers on a committee to a set of documents to be reviewed under the constraint of review quota so that the reviewers assigned to a document can collectively cover multiple topic aspects of the document. No previous work has addressed such a setup of committee review assignments while also considering matching multiple aspects of topics and expertise. In this paper, we tackle the problem of committee review assignment with multi-aspect expertise matching by casting it as an integer linear programming problem. The proposed algorithm can naturally accommodate any probabilistic or deterministic method for modeling multiple aspects to automate committee review assignments. Evaluation using a multi-aspect review assignment test set constructed using ACM SIGIR publications shows that the proposed algorithm is effective and efficient for committee review assignments based on multi-aspect expertise matching. PMID:22711970

  16. AGU Committees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Administrative Committees are responsible for those functions required for the overall performance or well-being of AGU as an organization. These committees are Audit and Legal Affairs, Budget and Finance*, Development, Nominations*, Planning, Statutes and Bylaws*, Tellers.Operating Committees are responsible for the policy direction and operational oversight of AGU's primary programs. The Operating Committees are Education and Human Resources, Fellows*, Information Technology, International Participation*, Meetings, Public Affairs, Public Information, Publications*.

  17. An overview of Compassionate Use Programs in the European Union member states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramanian, Gayathri; Morampudi, Suman; Chhabra, Pankdeep; Gowda, Arun; Zomorodi, Behsad

    2016-11-01

    The past decade witnessed rapid development of novel drugs and therapeutic biological agents. The marketing authorization for novel therapies is often time consuming and distressing for patients. Earlier clinical trials were the only way to access new drugs under development. However, not every patient meets the enrolment criteria, and participation is difficult for patients with life-threatening, long-lasting or seriously debilitating diseases like rare diseases. Early access programs like "Compassionate Use Program (CUP)" have generated alternative channels for such patients. The European Medical Agency provides regulations and recommendations for compassionate use, upon which every European Union (EU) member state has developed its own rules and regulations. Despite previous reviews and studies, the available information is limited and gaps exist. This literature review explores CUP in 28 EU member states. Data was collected through literature review and use of country-specific search terms from the healthcare domain. Data sources were not limited to databases and articles published in journals, but also included grey literature. The results implied that CUP was present in 20 EU member states (71%). Of 28 EU states, 18 (∼64%) had nationalized regulations and processes were well-defined. Overall, this review identified CUP and its current status and legislation in 28 EU member states. The established legislation for CUP in the EU member states suggest their willingness to adopt processes that facilitate earlier and better access to new medicines. Further research and periodic reviews are warranted to understand the contemporary and future regulatory trends in early access programs.

  18. The Effectiveness of Stress Management Program on Quality of Life among Methadone Maintenance Treatment Members

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    s Zarei

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of present study was to investigate the effectiveness of stress management program on quality of life among methadone maintenance treatment members. Method: In this pre-test, post-test experimental study, 30 individual who referred to Saba MMT center in Pakdasht were randomly divided into experimental group (n=15 participants and control group (n=15 participants. The experimental group was undergone ten 90 minutes sessions of stress management program and the control group didn’t receive any treatment program. Quality of life questionnaire (SF-36 was administered. Result: The results showed that the mean sf-36 score in the experimental group had significant higher increased in comparison of control group. Conclusion: It can be concluded stress management program is effective on increasing of quality of life among methadone maintenance treatment members.

  19. A Mentoring Program to Help Junior Faculty Members Achieve Scholarship Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The University of North Carolina Eshelman School of Pharmacy launched the Bill and Karen Campbell Faculty Mentoring Program (CMP) in 2006 to support scholarship-intensive junior faculty members. This report describes the origin, expectations, principles, and best practices that led to the introduction of the program, reviews the operational methods chosen for its implementation, provides information about its successes, and analyzes its strengths and limitations. PMID:24672062

  20. Professional Socialization in Nurse Anesthesia Educational Programs: Attitudes and Beliefs of Faculty Members and Recent Graduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buettner, Kevin Charles

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to better understand professional socialization in nurse anesthesia educational programs through an exploration of the attitudes and beliefs of faculty members and recent graduates. Participants for this cross-sectional, quasi-experimental online study included a convenience sample of 178 nurse anesthesia faculty…

  1. Decomposing the promotional revenue bump for loyalty program members versus nonmembers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Heerde, H.J.; Bijmolt, T.H.A.

    Loyalty programs lead to a natural split of a firm's customer base into members and nonmembers. To manage both groups effectively, it is essential to know how marketing activities, such as promotions, affect both groups' contributions to revenues. The authors model each group's contribution as the

  2. Report of the review committee on the Fermilab HGQ R and D program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devred, A.; Anerella, M.; Leroy, D.; Ostojic, R.; Schermer, R.; Vedrine, P.

    1999-04-01

    This document is the report of the committee which met at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory on 18 and 19 March 1999 to review the Fermilab R and D program on High Gradient Quadrupole magnets for the Large Hadron Collider Insertion Regions. The promising results of model magnet HGQ05 constitute a significant step forward and provide a solid basis upon which to base the magnet program. Although, the quench performance of magnet HGQ05 shows good progress, it is not yet fully satisfactory and can still be improved. The committee recommends that particular attention be paid to the first training quenches at 1.9 K and that more analyses be carried out to find possible correlations between quench start localization and specific mechanical features. In particular, the committee recommends analyzing in detail collar deflection data that seem to indicate that the first training quenches at 1.9 K may have originated in a region of low azimuthal coil pre-compression. The relative success of magnet HGQ05 and a detailed understanding of the reason behind it should help focus the magnet program on a limited number of clearly identified issues. The magnet program should be revised immediately to incorporate the lessons learned from magnet HGQ05 and to address the most outstanding issues. (authors)

  3. 77 FR 68155 - Finance, Budget & Program Committee Meeting of the Board of Directors; Sunshine Act Meeting Notice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-15

    ... NEIGHBORHOOD REINVESTMENT CORPORATION Finance, Budget & Program Committee Meeting of the Board of...: Erica Hall, Assistant Corporate Secretary, (202) 220-2376; [email protected] . AGENDA: I. Call To Order II. Executive Session III. Budget Update IV. Committee Charter Review V. Financial Report VI. Corporate...

  4. Report on the Concept Review Committee recommendations for proof-of-principle alternate concept programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-03-01

    The report is organized as follows: Section II contains a discussion of the meeting procedures used on October 16--18, 1978, and the rules employed for technical consultants and advisors to the CRC. Section III contains a discussion of the CRC recommendations and some of the factors taken into consideration by the Committee. Section IV briefly discusses where do we go from here in DOE's alternate concepts program

  5. Assessment of a Post-deployment Yellow Ribbon Reintegration Program for National Guard Members and Supporters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherrer, Jeffrey F.; Widner, Greg; Shroff, Manan; Matthieu, Monica; Balan, Sundari; van den Berk-Clark, Carissa; Price, Rumi Kato

    2014-01-01

    The Yellow Ribbon Reintegration Program (YRRP) was created to meet the needs of National Guard members and their families throughout the deployment cycle. This study examined the perceived utility of the YRRP’s delivery of information and assistance during the post-deployment reintegration period by National Guard members and accompanying supporters who were mostly spouses. Over 22 months, from 10 YRRP events, 683 service members and 411 supporters completed questionnaires immediately after the YRRP. We analyzed questions on information and help provision, timeliness and concerns related to education, employment, legal, family, and health. Service members and supporters most often endorsed education needs being met (76.8% and 78.2% respectively) and were least likely to endorse legal needs being met (63.5% and 60% respectively). Significantly more supporters than service members (p family. Results suggest the YRRP fills gaps in supporter knowledge and provides needed information and resources to most National Guard families 2-4 months after a deployment. PMID:25373071

  6. Assessment of a postdeployment Yellow Ribbon Reintegration Program for National Guard members and supporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherrer, Jeffrey F; Widner, Greg; Shroff, Manan; Matthieu, Monica; Balan, Sundari; van den Berk-Clark, Carissa; Price, Rumi K

    2014-11-01

    The Yellow Ribbon Reintegration Program (YRRP) was created to meet the needs of National Guard members and their families throughout the deployment cycle. This study examined the perceived utility of the YRRP's delivery of information and assistance during the postdeployment reintegration period by National Guard members and accompanying supporters who were mostly spouses. Over 22 months, from 10 YRRP events, 683 service members and 411 supporters completed questionnaires immediately after the YRRP. We analyzed questions on information and avenues for help, timeliness and concerns related to education, employment, legal, family, and health. Service members and supporters most often endorsed information delivery on education being met (76.8% and 78.2%, respectively) and were least likely to endorse legal information delivery (63.5% and 60%, respectively). Significantly more supporters than service members (p family. Results suggest the YRRP fills gaps in supporter knowledge and provides needed information and resources to most National Guard families 2 to 4 months after a deployment. Reprint & Copyright © 2014 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  7. Skill improvement among coalition members in the California Healthy Cities and Communities Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kegler, Michelle C; Norton, Barbara L; Aronson, Robert

    2007-06-01

    Community-driven, collaborative approaches to health promotion have the potential to enhance skills among community members and, in turn, increase community capacity. This study uses data from an evaluation of the California Healthy Cities and Communities (CHCC) Program to examine whether, and how, community problem-solving and collaboration skills are improved among coalition members and local coordinators in 20 participating communities. Methods include semi-structured interviews with coordinators and mailed surveys with coalition members (n=330 in planning phase and n=243 in implementation phase). The largest number of coordinators reported skill improvement in defining health broadly and assessing needs and assets. Similarly, coalition members reported greatest skill improvement for defining health broadly, assessing needs and assets and setting priorities and developing action plans. Modest correlations were observed between number of roles played in the local healthy cities and communities project and each skill area assessed. Time committed to the local CHCC coalition and its activities was not meaningfully correlated with any of the skills. Types of skill-building opportunities may be more important than number of hours devoted to meetings and activities in strengthening community problem-solving and collaboration skills among coalition members.

  8. Helping concerned family members of individuals with substance use and concurrent disorders: An evaluation of a family member-oriented treatment program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denomme, William James; Benhanoh, Orry

    2017-08-01

    There is a growing body of research demonstrating that families of individuals with substance use and concurrent disorders (SUCD) experience a wide range of biopsychosocial problems that significantly impedes their quality of life and health. However, there has been a relative lack of treatment programs primarily focused on improving the well-being and quality of life of these family members. The current study assessed the efficacy of such a program at reducing stress, increasing perceived social support from family and friends, and increasing general, dyadic, and self-rated family functioning within these concerned family members. A sample of 125 family members of individuals with SUCDs was recruited, of which 97 participated in the treatment program and 28 were used as the comparison group. Results indicated that the treatment program significantly reduced stress, increased perceived social support from family and friends, and increased general, dyadic and self-rated family functioning. A perceived personal benefits questionnaire demonstrated that participants had a better understanding of SUCDs, better coping capabilities in regard to emotional difficulties, adopted stronger coping methods, participated in more leisure activities, and improved their relationship with the individual with a SUCD. The results of the current study further demonstrate the need to implement more of these family-member oriented psycho-educational treatment programs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Federal Educational Assistance Programs Available to Service Members: Program Features and Recommendations for Improved Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    results suggest a need to modify the original program design or the logic model (W.K. Kellogg Foundation, 2010). Figure 3.1 outlines the proposed RAND... Kellogg Foundation, 2004). This logic model also illustrates a number of broader impacts. The expectation is that, ultimately, these programs will...Veterans Affairs. W.K. Kellogg Foundation, Using Logic Models to Bring Together Planning, Evaluation, and Action: Logic Model Development Guide

  10. Environmental components of OCS policy committee recommendations regarding national oil spill prevention and response program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groat, C.G.; Thorman, J.

    1991-01-01

    The Exxon Valdez oil spill of March 24, 1989 resulted in thousands of pages of analytical reports assessing the environmental, organizational, legal, procedural, social, economic, and political aspects of the event. Even though the accident was a transportation incident, it had a major impact on the public and political perception of offshore oil operations. This caused the OCS Policy Committee, which advises the Secretary of the Interior and the Minerals Management Service on Outer Continental Shelf resource development and environmental matters, to undertake a review of the reports for the purpose of developing recommendations to the secretary for improvements in OCS operations that would insure maximum efforts to prevent spills and optimal ability to deal with any that occur. The Committee felt strongly that 'a credible national spill prevention and response program from both OCS and non-OCS oil spills in the marine environment is needed to create the political climate for a viable OCS program.' The report of the Committee described eight essential elements of this program; four of these focused on the environmental aspects of oil spills, calling for (1) adequate characterization of the marine and coastal environment, including both information and analysis, accessible to decision makers, (2) the capacity to restore economic and environmental resources as quickly as possible if damage occurs, (3) a mechanism for research on oil spill impacts, and (4) a meaningful role for all interested and responsible parties, including the public, in as many of these activities as possible, from spill prevention and contingency planning to environmental oversight of ongoing operations and participation in clean-up and restoration activities

  11. Comparative analysis of diabetes self-management education programs in the European Union Member States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Sarama; Riemenschneider, Henna; Müller, Gabriele; Levin-Zamir, Diane; Van den Broucke, Stephan; Schwarz, Peter E H

    2017-12-01

    Diabetes self-management education (DSME) is generally considered as an integral part of diabetes care. The availability of different types of self-management in the European Union Member States (EUMS) remains uncertain. The aim of this study is to perform a comparative analysis of existing DSME programs (DSMEP) implemented in EUMS. Unpublished data regarding DSME in the EUMS was assessed with Diabetes Literacy Survey using wiki tool (WT) targeting patients and different stakeholders. An additional literature review (LR) was performed in PubMed to identify published studies regarding DSMEP in the EUMS from 2004 to 2014. A total of 102 DSMEP implemented in EUMS were reported in the WT and 154 programs were identified from the LR. Comparative analysis of the data indicated that a majority of programs are aimed at adults and only a minority at children and elderly. Only a small percentage of the programs utilize information technology for teaching and learning, and only one out of five programs pay attention to depression. The identified DSMEP aimed primarily to empower patients through increasing knowledge and changing attitudes and beliefs towards diabetes. This study provides an overview of the present state-of-the-art on diabetes self-management education programs in the 28 EUMS. To increase participation, existing DSMEP should be made more accessible to the patients as well as tailored to specific patient groups. Copyright © 2017 Primary Care Diabetes Europe. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Financial "risk-sharing" or refund programs in assisted reproduction: an Ethics Committee opinion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Financial "risk-sharing" fee structures in assisted reproduction programs charge patients a higher initial fee but provide reduced fees for subsequent cycles and often a partial or complete refund if treatment fails. This opinion of the ASRM Ethics Committee analyzes the ethical issues raised by these fee structures, including patient selection criteria, conflicts of interest, success rate transparency, and patient informed consent. This document replaces the document of the same name, last published in 2013 (Fertil Steril 2013;100:334-6). Copyright © 2016 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Thirteenth annual report of the Technical Advisory Committee on the Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-05-15

    This report details activities since the last reporting period by the Technical Advisory Committee (TAC). The emphasis of the work in the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program (CNFWMP) has been on the writing of the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) and the associated set of the primary reference document as well as supporting documents. These are in preparation for submission to the Environmental Assessment Review Panel who will lead the national evaluation of the disposal concept under the auspices of the Federal Environmental Assessment Review Office (FEARO).

  14. Member Perceptions of Informal Science Institution Graduate Certificate Program: Case Study of a Community of Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Lois A.

    This research attempted to understand the experiences of a cohort of informal and formal science educators and informal science institution (ISI) community representatives during and after completion of a pilot graduate certificate program. Informal science educators (ISEs) find limited opportunities for professional development and support which influence their contributions to America's science literacy and school science education. This emergent design nested case study described how an innovative program provided professional development and enabled growth in participants' abilities to contribute to science literacy. Data were collected through interviews, participant observations, and class artifacts. The program by design and constituency was the overarching entity that accounted for members' experiences. Three principal aspects of the ISI certificate program and cohort which influenced perceptions and reported positive outcomes were (1) the cohort's composition and their collaborative activities which established a vigorous community of practice and fostered community building, mentoring, and networking, (2) long term program design and implementation which promoted experiential learning in a generative classroom, and (3) ability of some members who were able to be independent or autonomous learners to embrace science education reform strategies for greater self-efficacy and career advancement. This research extends the limited literature base for professional development of informal science educators and may benefit informal science institutions, informal and formal science educators, science education reform efforts, and public education and science-technology-society understanding. The study may raise awareness of the need to establish more professional development opportunities for ISEs and to fund professional development. Further, recognizing and appreciating informal science educators as a diverse committed community of professionals who positively

  15. 12 CFR Appendix B to Part 748 - Guidance on Response Programs for Unauthorized Access to Member Information and Member Notice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ..., SUSPICIOUS TRANSACTIONS, CATASTROPHIC ACTS AND BANK SECRECY ACT COMPLIANCE Pt. 748, App. B Appendix B to Part... Catastrophic Act and Bank Secrecy Act Compliance regulation, 29 interprets section 501(b) of the Gramm-Leach... response program. 38 See FFIEC Information Technology Examination Handbook, Outsourcing Technology Services...

  16. Evaluation of a nursing student health fair program: Meeting curricular standards and improving community members' health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salerno, John P; McEwing, Evan; Matsuda, Yui; Gonzalez-Guarda, Rosa M; Ogunrinde, Olutola; Azaiza, Mona; Williams, Jessica R

    2018-04-17

    Public health nursing (PHN) is an essential component of baccalaureate nursing education. In order to build PHN competencies, universities must design and operationalize meaningful clinical activities addressing community and population health. Currently, there is a paucity of literature delineating best practices for promoting competency in PHN. The purpose of this manuscript is to describe a PHN-student health fair program as a means for meeting undergraduate PHN curricular standards, and to report results of an evaluation conducted examining its effectiveness in improving community member's health knowledge. Health fairs were held at community agencies that served the homeless or victims of intimate partner violence. A total of 113 community members that attended a health fair were assessed at baseline and immediate posttest using open-ended questionnaires. The design of the health fairs included a community assessment, intervention, and evaluation flow that followed the nursing process. We report that results from participants surveyed indicated that PHN-student delivered health fairs improved health knowledge among community members in this sample (p = .000). Health fairs conducted by PHN students appear to be promising community health promotion and disease prevention interventions that can serve as an effective strategy for teaching PHN student competencies and facilitating engagement with the community. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Service dog training program for treatment of posttraumatic stress in service members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yount, Rick A; Olmert, Meg D; Lee, Mary R

    2012-01-01

    In July 2008, social worker and certified service dog trainer Rick Yount created the first Warrior dog-training program designed to be a safe, effective, nonpharmaceutical intervention to treat the symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and traumatic brain injury in Veterans and service members undergoing treatment at a large Veterans Administration residential treatment facility. In 2009, Yount was asked to establish the program at a prominent Department of Defense medical center. In October 2010, Yount was invited to create a service dog training program to support the research and treatment mission at the new National Intrepid Center of Excellence (NICoE), in Bethesda, Maryland. This program, now being offered through the nonprofit foundation Warrior Canine Connection, continues to produce anecdotal evidence that training service dogs reduces the PTSD symptoms of Warrior-trainers and that the presence of the dogs enhances the sense of wellness in the NICoE staff and the families of our Wounded Warriors. Under the research leadership of the NICoE, the Warrior Canine Connection research team plans to systematically investigate the physiological, psychological, and behavioral benefits of this program.

  18. Survey of gadolinium-based contrast agent utilization among the members of the Society for Pediatric Radiology: a Quality and Safety Committee report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blumfield, Einat; Moore, Michael M.; Drake, Mary K.; Goodman, Thomas R.; Lewis, Kristopher N.; Meyer, Laura T.; Ngo, Thang D.; Sammet, Christina; Stanescu, Arta Luana; Iyer, Ramesh S.; Swenson, David W.; Slovis, Thomas L.

    2017-01-01

    Gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs) have been used for magnetic resonance (MR) imaging over the last three decades. Recent reports demonstrated gadolinium retention in patients' brains following intravenous administration. Since gadolinium is a highly toxic heavy metal, there is a potential for adverse effects from prolonged retention or deposition, particularly in children. For this reason, the Society (SPR) for Pediatric Radiology Quality and Safety committee conducted a survey to evaluate the current status of GBCAs usage among pediatric radiologists. To assess the usage of GBCAs among SPR members. An online 15-question survey was distributed to SPR members. Survey questions pertained to the type of GBCAs used, protocoling workflow, requirement of renal function or pregnancy tests, and various clinical indications for contrast-enhanced MRI examinations. A total of 163 survey responses were compiled (11.1% of survey invitations), the majority of these from academic institutions in the United States. Ninety-four percent reported that MR studies are always or usually protocoled by pediatric radiologists. The most common GBCA utilized by survey respondents were Eovist (60.7%), Ablavar (45.4%), Gadovist (38.7%), Magnevist (34.4%) and Dotarem (32.5%). For several clinical indications, survey responses regarding GBCA administration were concordant with American College of Radiology (ACR) Appropriateness Criteria, including seizures, headache and osteomyelitis. For other indications, including growth hormone deficiency and suspected vascular ring, survey responses revealed potential overutilization of GBCAs when compared to ACR recommendations. Survey results demonstrate that GBCAs are administered judiciously in children, yet there is an opportunity to improve their utilization with the goal of reducing potential future adverse effects. (orig.)

  19. Survey of gadolinium-based contrast agent utilization among the members of the Society for Pediatric Radiology: a Quality and Safety Committee report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumfield, Einat; Moore, Michael M; Drake, Mary K; Goodman, Thomas R; Lewis, Kristopher N; Meyer, Laura T; Ngo, Thang D; Sammet, Christina; Stanescu, Arta Luana; Swenson, David W; Slovis, Thomas L; Iyer, Ramesh S

    2017-05-01

    Gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs) have been used for magnetic resonance (MR) imaging over the last three decades. Recent reports demonstrated gadolinium retention in patients' brains following intravenous administration. Since gadolinium is a highly toxic heavy metal, there is a potential for adverse effects from prolonged retention or deposition, particularly in children. For this reason, the Society (SPR) for Pediatric Radiology Quality and Safety committee conducted a survey to evaluate the current status of GBCAs usage among pediatric radiologists. To assess the usage of GBCAs among SPR members. An online 15-question survey was distributed to SPR members. Survey questions pertained to the type of GBCAs used, protocoling workflow, requirement of renal function or pregnancy tests, and various clinical indications for contrast-enhanced MRI examinations. A total of 163 survey responses were compiled (11.1% of survey invitations), the majority of these from academic institutions in the United States. Ninety-four percent reported that MR studies are always or usually protocoled by pediatric radiologists. The most common GBCA utilized by survey respondents were Eovist (60.7%), Ablavar (45.4%), Gadovist (38.7%), Magnevist (34.4%) and Dotarem (32.5%). For several clinical indications, survey responses regarding GBCA administration were concordant with American College of Radiology (ACR) Appropriateness Criteria, including seizures, headache and osteomyelitis. For other indications, including growth hormone deficiency and suspected vascular ring, survey responses revealed potential overutilization of GBCAs when compared to ACR recommendations. Survey results demonstrate that GBCAs are administered judiciously in children, yet there is an opportunity to improve their utilization with the goal of reducing potential future adverse effects.

  20. Survey of gadolinium-based contrast agent utilization among the members of the Society for Pediatric Radiology: a Quality and Safety Committee report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blumfield, Einat [Jacobi Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, South Bronx, NY (United States); Moore, Michael M. [The Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Penn State Hershey Children' s Hospital, Hershey, PA (United States); Drake, Mary K. [University of Nebraska Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Children' s Hospital and Medical Center, Omaha, NE (United States); Goodman, Thomas R. [Yale School of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, New Haven, CT (United States); Lewis, Kristopher N. [Augusta University, Department of Radiology, Children' s Hospital of Georgia, Augusta, GA (United States); Meyer, Laura T. [Wake Radiology, Raleigh, NC (United States); Ngo, Thang D. [Nemours Children' s Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging, Orlando, FL (United States); Sammet, Christina [Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Department of Radiology, Chicago, IL (United States); Stanescu, Arta Luana; Iyer, Ramesh S. [Seattle Children' s Hospital, University of Washington School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seattle, WA (United States); Swenson, David W. [Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Providence, RI (United States); Slovis, Thomas L. [Children' s Hospital of Michigan, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2017-05-15

    Gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs) have been used for magnetic resonance (MR) imaging over the last three decades. Recent reports demonstrated gadolinium retention in patients' brains following intravenous administration. Since gadolinium is a highly toxic heavy metal, there is a potential for adverse effects from prolonged retention or deposition, particularly in children. For this reason, the Society (SPR) for Pediatric Radiology Quality and Safety committee conducted a survey to evaluate the current status of GBCAs usage among pediatric radiologists. To assess the usage of GBCAs among SPR members. An online 15-question survey was distributed to SPR members. Survey questions pertained to the type of GBCAs used, protocoling workflow, requirement of renal function or pregnancy tests, and various clinical indications for contrast-enhanced MRI examinations. A total of 163 survey responses were compiled (11.1% of survey invitations), the majority of these from academic institutions in the United States. Ninety-four percent reported that MR studies are always or usually protocoled by pediatric radiologists. The most common GBCA utilized by survey respondents were Eovist (60.7%), Ablavar (45.4%), Gadovist (38.7%), Magnevist (34.4%) and Dotarem (32.5%). For several clinical indications, survey responses regarding GBCA administration were concordant with American College of Radiology (ACR) Appropriateness Criteria, including seizures, headache and osteomyelitis. For other indications, including growth hormone deficiency and suspected vascular ring, survey responses revealed potential overutilization of GBCAs when compared to ACR recommendations. Survey results demonstrate that GBCAs are administered judiciously in children, yet there is an opportunity to improve their utilization with the goal of reducing potential future adverse effects. (orig.)

  1. 78 FR 53790 - Sunshine Act Meeting; Finance, Budget and Program Committee Meeting of the Board of Directors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-30

    ... NEIGHBORHOOD REINVESTMENT CORPORATION Sunshine Act Meeting; Finance, Budget and Program Committee... PERSON FOR MORE INFORMATION: Erica Hall, Assistant Corporate Secretary (202) 220-2376; [email protected] Education & Counseling VII. Quarterly Program Reports VIII. Financial Report IX. FY13 Corporate Scorecard...

  2. Race, Ethnicity, and Gender of Faculty Members in APA- and CACREP-Accredited Programs: Changes over Five Decades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baggerly, Jennifer; Tan, Tony Xing; Pichotta, David; Warner, Aisha

    2017-01-01

    This study examined changes in race, ethnicity, and gender of faculty members in APA- and CACREP-accredited counseling programs over 5 decades based on the year of their degree. Of those faculty members working in accredited programs who graduated in the 1960s/1970s, 26.7% were female, 5.6% were racially diverse, and 1.7% were Latina/o. Of those…

  3. Magnetic Fusion Advisory Committee report on recommended fusion program priorities and strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-09-01

    The Magnetic Fusion Advisory Committee recommends a new program strategy with the following principal features: (1) Initiation in FY86 of the Tokamak Fusion Core Experiment (TFCX), a moderate-cost tokamak reactor device (less than $1 B PACE) designed to achieve ignition and long-pulse equilibrium burn. Careful trade-off studies are needed before making key design choices in interrelated technology areas. Cost reductions relative to earlier plans can be realized by exploiting new plasma technology, by locating the TFCX at the TFTR site, and by assigning responsibility for complementary reactor engineering tasks to other sectors of the fusion program. (2) Potential utilization of the MFTF Upgrade to provide a cost-effective means for quasi-steady-state testing of blanket and power-system components, complementary to TFCX. This will depend on future assessments of the data base for tandem mirrors. (3) Vigorous pursuit of the broad US base program in magnetic confinement, including new machine starts, where appropriate, at approximately the present total level of support. (4) Utilization of Development and Technology programs in plasma and magnet technology in support of specific hardware requirements of the TFCX and of other major fusion facilities, so as to minimize overall program cost

  4. Building a Co-Created Citizen Science Program with Community Members Neighboring a Hazardous Waste Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez-Andreotta, M.; Brusseau, M. L. L.; Artiola, J. F.; Maier, R. M.; Gandolfi, A. J.

    2015-12-01

    A research project that is only expert-driven may ignore the role of local knowledge in research, often gives low priority to the development of a comprehensive strategy to engage the community, and may not deliver the results of the study to the community in an effective way. To date, only a limited number of co-created citizen science projects, where community members are involved in most or all steps of the scientific process, have been initiated at contaminated sites and even less in conjunction with risk communication. Gardenroots: The Dewey-Humboldt AZ Garden Project was a place-based, co-created citizen science project where community members and researchers together: defined the question for study, developed hypotheses, collected environmental samples, disseminated results broadly, translated the results into action, and posed new research questions. This co-created environmental research project produced new data and addressed an additional exposure route (consumption of vegetables grown in soils with elevated arsenic levels) that was not being evaluated in the current site assessment. Furthermore, co-producing science led to both individual learning and social-ecological outcomes. This approach illustrates the benefits of a co-created citizen-science program in addressing the complex problems that arise in communities neighboring a hazardous waste sites. Such a project increased the community's involvement in regional environmental assessment and decision-making, which has the potential to help mitigate environmental exposures and thereby reduce associated risks.

  5. The Value of the Junior Professional Officer Program to the IAEA and its Member States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pepper, Susan E.; Scholz, Melissa; Irola, Gisele; Amundson, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Benefits: • Augmented human resource: • JPOs are a form of extrabudgetary support and supplement the human resources that are supported by the regular budget; • Efficiency: • JPOs perform basic, yet essential work, and free experience staff to concentrate on more complex activities; • Increased input to the recruitment process: • Former JPOs who apply for regular staff positions can be evaluated based on past performance. • Improved communication: • Former JPOs can improve communication by acting as points-of-contact between member states and the IAEA due to their knowledge of the IAEA; • Experience for future positions at the IAEA: • JPO positions provide job experience that qualifies them for regular staff positions. • Insight into IAEA: • Insight to programs, work environment, and technical needs; • JPOs learn the procedures and techniques used by the IAEA; • JPOs transfer knowledge from the IAEA to employers and co-workers

  6. Leadership development programs for health care middle managers: An exploration of the top management team member perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whaley, Alan; Gillis, William E

    Hospitals throughout the United States establish leadership and management programs for their middle managers. Despite their pervasiveness and an increased emphasis on physician leadership, there is limited research regarding the development programs designed for clinical and nonclinical health care middle managers. Using two theoretical lenses, signaling and institutional theory, this exploratory study investigates mid-sized hospital development programs from the perspective of top management team (TMT) members. Our objective is to find out what types of programs hospitals have, how they are developed, and how they are evaluated. We conducted semistructured interviews with 13 TMT members in six purposefully selected hospitals and matched these interviews with program curricula. Careful coding of the data allowed us not only to show our data in a meaningful visual representation but also to show the progression of the data from raw form to aggregate themes in the qualitative research process. We identified four types of development programs used in the selected hospitals: (a) ongoing series, (b) curriculum-based, (c) management orientation, and (d) mentoring. Challenges existed in aligning the need for the program with program content. Communication occurred both through direct messaging regarding policies and procedures and through hidden signals. TMT members referenced other programs for guidance but were not always clear about what it is they wanted the programs to accomplish. Finally, there was limited program outcome measurement. Our small sample indicates that specific, structured, and comprehensive programs perform best. The better programs were always trying to improve but that most needed better accountability of tracking outcomes. In setting up a program, a collaborative approach among TMT members to establish what the needs are and how to measure outcomes worked well. Successful programs also tied in their leadership development with overall employee

  7. 45 CFR 2522.940 - What are the requirements for a program in which AmeriCorps members serve as tutors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What are the requirements for a program in which..., PROGRAMS, AND APPLICANTS Program Management Requirements for Grantees § 2522.940 What are the requirements for a program in which AmeriCorps members serve as tutors? A program in which members engage in...

  8. Hydrogen Energy Coordinating Committee annual report: Summary of DOE hydrogen programs for FY 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-07-01

    The HECC was established over 13 years ago to ensure that the many varied aspects of hydrogen technology within the Department are coordinated. Each year the committee brings together technical representative within the Department to coordinate activities, share research results and discuss future priorities and directions. This FY 1990 summary is the thirteenth consecutive yearly report. It provides an overview of the hydrogen-related programs of the DOE offices represented in the HECC for the fiscal year. For the purposes of this report, the research projects within each division have been organized into two categories: Fuels-related Research and Non-fuels-related Research. An historical summary of the hydrogen budgets of the several divisions is given. Total DOE funding in FY 1990 was $6.8 million for fuels-related research and $32.9 million for non-fuels-related research. The individual program elements are described in the body of this report, and more specific program information can be found in the Technology Summary Forms in Appendix A

  9. International Project Management Committee: Overview and Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Edward

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation discusses the purpose and composition of the International Project Management Committee (IMPC). The IMPC was established by members of 15 space agencies, companies and professional organizations. The goal of the committee is to establish a means to share experiences and best practices with space project/program management practitioners at the global level. The space agencies that are involved are: AEB, DLR, ESA, ISRO, JAXA, KARI, and NASA. The industrial and professional organizational members are Comau, COSPAR, PMI, and Thales Alenia Space.

  10. 77 FR 53920 - NASA Federal Advisory Committees

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-04

    ... Administration, and in accordance with the Memorandum for the Heads of Executive Departments and Agencies signed... Council and eight (8) Committees: Aeronautics; Audit, Finance and Analysis; Commercial Space; Education... agencies, of which NASA is a member) on U.S. space- based PNT policy, planning, program management, and...

  11. 76 FR 29722 - Elko Resource Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-23

    ... (Pub. L. 110-343) (the Act) and operates in compliance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act. The...- Determination Act; (2) Review roles of RAC committee members and Committee Chairman; (3) Overview of project...

  12. 75 FR 8982 - Medicare Program; Request for Nominations for Members for the Medicare Evidence Development...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-26

    ... and men, members of all racial and ethnic groups, and physically challenged individuals are adequately..., members of all racial and ethnic groups, and physically challenged individuals are adequately represented... appears to have no conflict of interest that would preclude membership. We are requesting that all...

  13. 75 FR 78705 - Medicare Program; Request for Nominations for Members for the Medicare Evidence Development...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-16

    ... interests of both women and men, members of all racial and ethnic groups, and physically challenged... that the nominee is willing to serve as a member of the MEDCAC and appears to have no conflict of..., consultancies, and research grants or contracts in order to permit evaluation of possible sources of conflict of...

  14. 32 CFR 728.44 - Members of security assistance training programs, foreign military sales, and their ITO...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., foreign military sales, and their ITO authorized dependents. 728.44 Section 728.44 National Defense... § 728.44 Members of security assistance training programs, foreign military sales, and their ITO... patient is an ITO authorized dependent), grade or rate, country of origin, diagnosis, type of elective...

  15. Sports medicine and drug control programs of the U.S. Olympic Committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, K S

    1984-05-01

    The Amateur Sports Act of 1978 reconstituted the U.S. Olympic Committee ( USOC ), giving it new responsibilities and opportunities as a unifying force in amateur sports, including sports medicine. Sports medicine is the sum of attentions that promote and protect the health of the active person. Olympic sports medicine includes attention to the needs of both the elite athlete and the developing athlete. In some instances the attentions are the same; in others they are not. Those in Olympic sports medicine must thereby reduce the increasing array of general concepts and issues to the applicable specifics of the respective occasion, sport, and individual. The USOC Sports Medicine Program is guided by a 15-person volunteer Sports Medicine Council and implemented by a core Sports Medicine Division staff. Services are provided at the Olympic training centers in Colorado Springs and Lake Placid and extended through a budding network of colleagues in the field to clusters of athletes across the nations. Organizationally , the Division is composed of departments of biomechanics, sports physiology, clinical services, and educational services. Special projects are developed as warranted to provide focal attention to sports psychology, nutrition, chronobiology, vision enhancement, and drug control. The USOC Drug Control Program was born at the 1983 Pan American Games in Caracas after a long gestation period. Drug education in sports has been a frequent activity for the past 20 yr. sometimes focusing on illicit drugs (e.g., marijuana and cocaine) and sometimes on sports performance drugs (e.g., amphetamines and anabolic steroids).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. EVALUATION PROGRAM SEVEN A SIDE FOOTBALL COACHING NATIONAL PARALIMPIC COMMITTEE (NPC) OF INDONESIA AT ASEAN PARAGAMES 2015 IN SINGAPORE

    OpenAIRE

    Asmawi, Moch.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate program seven a side football National Paralimpic Committee (NPC) of Indonesia at ASEAN Paragames 2015 in Singapore. The research is qualitative research approach to evaluation using the model Context, Input, Process, and Product (CIPP). Triangulation method of collecting data using questionnaires, interviews, document study and observation. Research result that: 1) Evaluation of Context: have a legal basis and strong government policy, vision mission ...

  17. Evidence-based practice instruction by faculty members and librarians in North American optometry and ophthalmology programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Katherine A; Hrynchak, Patricia K; Spafford, Marlee M

    2014-07-01

    North American optometry and ophthalmology faculty members and vision science librarians were surveyed online (14% response rate) about teaching evidence-based practice (EBP). Similar to studies of other health care programs, all five EBP steps (Ask, Acquire, Appraise, Apply, Assess) were taught to varying degrees. Optometry and ophthalmology EBP educators may want to place further emphasis on (1) the Apply and Assess steps, (2) faculty- and student-generated questions and self-assessment in clinical settings, (3) online teaching strategies, (4) programmatic integration of EBP learning objectives, and (5) collaboration between faculty members and librarians.

  18. Proceedings of the technical committee on high conversion and high burnup reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiroya, Seiji; Kanda, Keiji; Sekiya, Tamotsu

    1990-02-01

    The present issue is the proceedings of 'the Technical Committee on High Conversion and High Burnup Reactors' held at Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute (KURRI) on December 12 and 22, 1988. In this committee, members so much concerned with this theme were asked to report their recent accomplishment and activities. By such a program, the committee was intended to make a survey of future direction of research in this type of reactor. (J.P.N.)

  19. Training for an effective health and safety committee in a small business setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crollard, Allison; Neitzel, Richard L; Dominguez, Carlos F; Seixas, Noah S

    2013-01-01

    Health and safety committees are often heralded as a key element of successful health and safety programs, and are thought to represent a means of engaging workers in health and safety efforts. While the understanding of the factors that make these committees effective is growing, there are few resources for how to assist committees in developing these characteristics. This paper describes one approach to creating and implementing a training intervention aimed at improving health and safety committee function at one multilingual worksite. Short-term impacts were evaluated via questionnaire and qualitative observations of committee function. Results indicated high satisfaction with the training as well as modest increases in participation, cooperation, role clarity, and comfort with health and safety skills among committee members. The committee also made considerable achievements in establishing new processes for effective function. Similar interventions may be useful in other workplaces to increase health and safety committee success.

  20. State safety oversight program : audit of the tri-state oversight committee and the Washington metropolitan area transit authority, final audit report, March 4, 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-04

    The Federal Transit Administration (FTA) conducted an on-site audit of the safety program implemented by the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority (WMATA) and overseen by the Tri-State Oversight Committee (TOC) between December 14 and 17, 20...

  1. Technical Advisory Committee on the nuclear fuel waste management program : thirteenth annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shemilt, L.W.

    1993-03-01

    Since the last reporting period by the Technical Advisory Committee (TAC) the emphasis of the work in the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program (CNFWMP) has been on the writing of the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) and the associated set of nine primary reference documents as well as supporting documents. These are in preparation for submission to the Environmental Assessment Review Panel who will lead the national evaluation of the disposal concept under the auspices of the Federal Environmental Assessment Review Office (FEARO). The disposal concept developed over the last fourteen years by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) and anticipated to be presented by means of the EIS in 1994, is based on a multiple system of natural and man-made barriers wherein nuclear waste is first enclosed in corrosion-resistant containers, designed to last at least 500 years, and then placed in a vault excavated 500 - 1000 m deep in granitic rocks of the Canadian Shield. After container emplacement either in or on the floor of the vault, and with a surrounding buffer material of a bentonite clay/sand mixture, the vault will be backfilled and sealed with crushed rock, buffer and sand, as will be the shafts and exploratory boreholes. The case study being presented by AECL to demonstrate the safety of this concept and the technology to implement it, relies on computer simulations of a hypothetical disposal site with geological characteristics similar to those at the Underground Research Laboratory (URL) in the Whiteshell Research Area (WRA) located in Manitoba. The preliminary simulation results suggest that safe containment can be achieved provided that the waste is surrounded by a sparsely-fractured zone of rock wherein movement of contaminants carried by groundwater is modelled as a diffusive as opposed to a advective process. The principal focus of work during the past year within the environmental and safety assessment has been to complete the Post

  2. Co-ordination of satellite and data programs: The committee on earth observation satellites' approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Embleton, B. J. J.; Kingwell, J.

    1997-01-01

    Every year, an average of eight new civilian remote sensing satellite missions are launched. Cumulatively, over 250 such missions, each with a cost equivalent in current value to between US 100 million to US 1000 million, have been sponsored by space agencies in perhaps two dozen countries. These missions produce data and information products which are vital for informed decision making all over the world, on matters relating to natural resource exploitation, health and safety, sustainable national development, infrastructure planning, and a host of other applications. By contributing to better scientific understanding of global changes in the atmosphere, land surface, oceans and ice caps, these silently orbiting sentinels in the sky make it possible for governments and industries to make wiser environmental policy decisions and support the economic development needs of humanity. The international Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS) is the premier world body for co-ordinating and planning civilian satellite missions for Earth observation. Through its technical working groups and special task teams, it endeavours to: • maximise the international benefits from Earth observation satellites; and • harmonise practice in calibration, validation, data management and information systems for Earth observation. CEOS encompasses not only space agencies (data providers), but also the great international scientific and operational programs which rely on Earth science data from space. The user organisations affiliated with CEOS, together with the mission operators, attempt to reconcile user needs with the complex set of considerations — including national interests, cost, schedule — which affect the undertaking of space missions. Without such an internationally co-ordinated consensual approach, there is a much greater risk of waste through duplication, and of missed opportunity, or through the absence of measurements of some vital physical or biological

  3. Building upon Bystander Intervention: A Multi-Component Prevention Programming Approach for University Sorority Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steward, Jennifer M.

    2017-01-01

    Sexual violence on college campuses is a pervasive problem with the potential for extensive physical and psychological health consequences. Institutions have begun implementing prevention programs; however, more research is needed to understand whether these programs are effective. Bystander intervention programs have increased in popularity…

  4. 78 FR 60653 - Federal Employees Health Benefits Program: Members of Congress and Congressional Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-02

    ... authority to administer health benefits to Federal employees (as defined in 5 U.S.C. 8901(1)). Because..., in essence, an employer contribution, the final rule clarifies that Members of Congress and... paragraph (c), but may purchase health benefit plans, as defined in 5 U.S.C. 8901(6), that are offered by an...

  5. Development of a Safeguards Approach for a Pyroprocessing Plant by IAEA Member State Support Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, H. S.; Kim, H. D.; Song, D. Y.; Eom, S. H.; Lee, T. H.; Ahn, S. K.; Park, S. H.; Han, B. Y.; Choi, Y.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this project is to analyze the safeguard ability of pyroprocess facility and to establish the safeguards system for pyroprocess by developing the technology of nuclear material accounting for unit process, surveillance technology and nuclear characteristic analysis technology which are needed to demonstrate the safeguards technology of pyroprocess. Therefore, the development of a safeguards approach for pyroprocessing facilities is required as the interest of pyroprocessing increases. Regarding this issue, the IAEA made a contract the 3-years long Member State Support Program (MSSP) for the 'Support for Development of a Safeguards Approach for a Pyroprocessing Plant' with the Republic of Korea (ROK) in July 2008. Even though the pyroprocess technology is currently being developed all over the world, its safeguards approach has not been established yet, and especially, nuclear material accountancy technology which is the core of safeguards has not been established as well. Therefore, the development of new accountancy technology which is appropriate for the construction of pyroprocess facility is needed. Due to the nature of the process, pyroprocess has various kinds of process material form, and the composition of Pu and U isotopes included in process material is not homogeneous. Also, the existing nuclear material accountancy technology for a wet reprocessing facility is hard to apply because of a large quantity of gamma-ray radiation which is emitted from the fissile products in process material. In this report, the study for the development of a safeguards approach for a pyroprocessing plant pyroprocessing has been described. As the previous results six pyroprocessing facility concepts suggested by US, Japan, and Republic of Korea had been summarized and analyzed, and the determination principles were established to determine a reference pyroprocessing facility concept. The reference pyroprocessing facility was determined to be the ESPF of KAERI

  6. Teen Pregnancy Prevention Program Recommendations from Urban and Reservation Northern Plains American Indian Community Members

    OpenAIRE

    McMahon, Tracey R.; Hanson, Jessica D.; Griese, Emily R.; Kenyon, DenYelle Baete

    2015-01-01

    Despite declines over the past few decades, the United States has one of the highest rates of teen pregnancy compared to other industrialized nations. American Indian youth have experienced higher rates of teen pregnancy compared to the overall population for decades. Although it's known that community and cultural adaptation enhance program effectiveness, few teen pregnancy prevention programs have published on recommendations for adapting these programs to address the specific needs of Nort...

  7. Assessing the Impact of a Program Designed to Develop Sustainability Leadership amongst Staff Members in Higher Education Institutes: A Case Study from a Community of Practice Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkaher, Iris; Avissar, Ilana

    2018-01-01

    This study focuses on the impact of a sustainability leadership development program (SLDP) designed to develop staff members as leaders who encourage sustainability practices within institutions of higher education (IHE). Using the framework of community of practice (CoP), we explored the program's contribution by interviewing 16 staff members who…

  8. 76 FR 41246 - Pesticide Program Dialogue Committee, Pesticide Registration Improvement Act Process Improvement...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-13

    ... Committee, Pesticide Registration Improvement Act Process Improvement Workgroup; Notice of Public Meeting...) Process Improvement Work Group. EPA plans to meet its ESA consultation obligations through the pesticide... a pesticide during the registration review process. This meeting of the PRIA Process Improvement...

  9. Mission and work program of the Joint Committee on Structural Safety

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrouwenvelder, A.C.W.M.; Faber, M.H.; Chryssanthopoulos, M.

    2003-01-01

    The Joint Committee on Structural Safety (JCSS for short) is concerned with fundamental and pre-normative research in the field of Structural Reliability and Risk Assessment, and is directly and indirectly involved in the development of ISO-standards and Eurocodes. The JCSS acts on behalf of five

  10. Participatory Assessment of a Matched Savings Program for Human Trafficking Survivors and their Family Members in the Philippines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Cordisco Tsai

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Survivors of human trafficking often experience considerable financial difficulties upon exiting human trafficking, including pressure to provide financially for their families, challenges securing employment, lack of savings, and familial debt. Few evaluations have been conducted of reintegration support interventions addressing financial vulnerability among trafficking survivors. In this article, we present findings from a participatory assessment of the BARUG program, a matched savings and financial capability program for survivors of human trafficking and their family members in the Philippines. Photovoice was used to understand the experiences of two cohorts of BARUG participants. Survivors collaborated with research team members in conducting thematic analysis of transcripts from the photovoice sessions. Themes included: the positive emotional impact of financial wellness, overcoming the challenges of saving, applying financial management skills in daily decision making, developing a habit of savings, building a future-oriented mindset, receiving guidance and enlightenment, the learning process, and the change process. Findings reinforce the importance of interventions to support trafficked persons and their family members in getting out of debt and accumulating emergency savings, while also providing emotional support to survivors in coping with family financial pressures. The study also highlights the value of using participatory research methods to understand the experiences of trafficked persons. URN: http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs1702116

  11. Colleges Finding 'Wellness' Programs Cut Absenteeism, Boost Productivity and Morale of Their Staff Members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillen, Liz

    1986-01-01

    Health-promotion programs provided for higher education staff are increasing. They draw on the expertise of physical education and athletic staff, counseling services, and medical centers to encourage employees to adopt lifetime regimens of healthy living. (MSE)

  12. 76 FR 57989 - Video Programming and Accessibility Advisory Committee; Announcement of Date of Next Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-19

    ... FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION [DA 11-1527] Video Programming and Accessibility Advisory.... SUMMARY: This document announces the next meeting of the Video Programming Accessibility Advisory... programming, and the interoperability and user interface of the equipment used to deliver video programming...

  13. Indian School Equalization Program. Oversight Hearing on 1991-93 Budgeting for the Indian School Equalization Program. Joint Hearing before the Select Committee on Indian Affairs, United States Senate and the Subcommittee on Elementary, Secondary, and Vocational Education of the Committee on Education and Labor. House of Representatives, One Hundred Second Congress, Second Session.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Select Committee on Indian Affairs.

    This report represents a hearing on the Indian School Equalization Program (ISEP) administered by the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA). The hearing began with opening remarks by the acting committee chairman of the Senate Select Committee on Indian Affairs, Paul Simon. Testimonies concerning the inadequacies of the ISEP funding formula are provided…

  14. Inter-Society Research Committee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akiyama, Mamoru; Higuchi, Masahisa.

    1996-01-01

    World-wide tendencies and circumstances for nuclear power cannot be said to be moving full of sail with a favorable wind, due to nuclear power plant accidents and comparatively little economical benefit. The present Nuclear Power Plant situation is that some personnel understand a need for the development from the viewpoint of efficient energy usage in the world and environmental problems like global warming. At the same time others oppose future nuclear development from the viewpoint of safety problems and economic cost. These issues may end nuclear development worldwide. Nuclear development must be considered from an international viewpoint and other various aspects. Therefore, all countries concerned should cooperative in the adjustment of research carried out by each country. Nuclear power's future must be efficient in the utilization of limited resources (money, manpower and facilities). It is concluded that the ISRC should only discuss technical matters on nuclear engineering, independent from political influence. Societies agreeing to this idea, provide the ISRC with money and/or manpower and/or facilities. The ISRC will consist of a research program committee and research task forces. Members of the Research Program Committee are the chairmen of the research task forces who are also society representatives. The Committee will discuss research programs and resources. The research task forces will consist of one society representative chairman and specialists on the program

  15. Fusion Energy Advisory Committee report on program strategy for US magnetic fusion energy research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conn, R.W.; Berkner, K.H.; Culler, F.L.; Davidson, R.C.; Dreyfus, D.A.; Holdren, J.P.; McCrory, R.L.; Parker, R.R.; Rosenbluth, M.N.; Siemon, R.E.; Staudhammer, P.; Weitzner, H.

    1992-09-01

    The Fusion Energy Advisory Committee (FEAC) was charged by the Department of Energy (DOE) with developing recommendations on how best to pursue the goal of a practical magnetic fusion reactor in the context of several budget scenarios covering the period FY 1994-FY 1998. Four budget scenarios were examined, each anchored to the FY 1993 figure of $337.9 million for fusion energy (less $9 million for inertial fusion energy which is not examined here)

  16. 12 CFR 723.5 - How do you implement a member business loan program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... with the type of lending the credit union will be engaging in. The experience must provide the credit.... However, the actual decision to grant a loan must reside with the credit union. (b) Conflicts of Interest... program? 723.5 Section 723.5 Banks and Banking NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS AFFECTING...

  17. SENIOR STAFF ADVANCEMENT COMMITTEE (SSAC)

    CERN Document Server

    2000-01-01

    Composition and mandateThe Senior Staff Advancement Committee is composed of members nominated ad persona by the Director-General.The Committee examines proposals from Divisions concerning promotions to grade 13 in Career Path IX, changes of career path to Career Path IX and advancements to the exceptional grade in Career path VIII.The Director-General may consult the Committee on any matter related to senior staff careers.The Committee makes its recommendations to the Director-General.

  18. 77 FR 6113 - Video Programming and Accessibility Advisory Committee; Announcement of Date of Next Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-07

    ... FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION [DA 12-15] Video Programming and Accessibility Advisory.... SUMMARY: This document announces the next meeting of the Video Programming Accessibility Advisory... Commission regarding the provision of video description, access to emergency programming, and access to user...

  19. Report from the Committee of Visitors on its Review of the Processes and Procedures used to Manage the Theory and Computations Program, Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    A Committee of Visitors (COV) was formed to review the procedures used by the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences to manage its Theory and Computations program. The COV was pleased to conclude that the research portfolio supported by the OFES Theory and Computations Program was of very high quality. The Program supports research programs at universities, research industries, and national laboratories that are well regarded internationally and address questions of high relevance to the DOE. A major change in the management of the Theory and Computations program over the past few years has been the introduction of a system of comparative peer review to guide the OFES Theory Team in selecting proposals for funding. The COV was impressed with the success of OFES in its implementation of comparative peer review and with the quality of the reviewers chosen by the OFES Theory Team. The COV concluded that the competitive peer review process has improved steadily over the three years that it has been in effect and that it has improved both the fairness and accountability of the proposal review process. While the COV commends OFES in its implementation of comparative review, the COV offers the following recommendations in the hope that they will further improve the comparative peer review process: The OFES should improve the consistency of peer reviews. We recommend adoption of a results-oriented scoring system in their guidelines to referees (see Appendix II), a greater use of review panels, and a standard format for proposals; The OFES should further improve the procedures and documentation for proposal handling. We recommend that the folders documenting funding decisions contain all the input from all of the reviewers, that OFES document their rationale for funding decisions which are at variance with the recommendation of the peer reviewers, and that OFES provide a Summary Sheet within each folder; The OFES should better communicate the procedures used to determine funding

  20. Genetic screening: programs, principles, and research--thirty years later. Reviewing the recommendations of the Committee for the Study of Inborn Errors of Metabolism (SIEM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simopoulos, A P

    2009-01-01

    Screening programs for genetic diseases and characteristics have multiplied in the last 50 years. 'Genetic Screening: Programs, Principles, and Research' is the report of the Committee for the Study of Inborn Errors of Metabolism (SIEM Committee) commissioned by the Division of Medical Sciences of the National Research Council at the National Academy of Sciences in Washington, DC, published in 1975. The report is considered a classic in the field worldwide, therefore it was thought appropriate 30 years later to present the Committee's modus operandi and bring the Committee's recommendations to the attention of those involved in genetics, including organizational, educational, legal, and research aspects of genetic screening. The Committee's report anticipated many of the legal, ethical, economic, social, medical, and policy aspects of genetic screening. The recommendations are current, and future committees should be familiar with them. In 1975 the Committee stated: 'As new screening tests are devised, they should be carefully reviewed. If the experimental rate of discovery of new genetic characteristics means an accelerating rate of appearance of new screening tests, now is the time to develop the medical and social apparatus to accommodate what later on may otherwise turn out to be unmanageable growth.' What a prophetic statement that was. If the Committee's recommendations had been implemented on time, there would be today a federal agency in existence, responsive and responsible to carry out the programs and support research on various aspects of genetic screening, including implementation of a federal law that protects consumers from discrimination by their employers and the insurance industry on the basis of genetic information. Copyright 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Accreditation of nuclear engineering programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williamson, T.G.

    1989-01-01

    The American Nuclear Society (ANS) Professional Development and Accreditation Committee (PDAC) has the responsibility for accreditation of engineering and technology programs for nuclear and similarly named programs. This committee provides society liaison with the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET), is responsible for the appointment and training of accreditation visitors, nomination of members for the ABET Board and Accreditation Commissions, and review of the criteria for accreditation of nuclear-related programs. The committee is composed of 21 members representing academia and industry. The ABET consists of 19 participating bodies, primarily professional societies, and 4 affiliate bodies. Representation on ABET is determined by the size of the professional society and the number of programs accredited. The ANS, as a participating body, has one member on the ABET board, two members on the Engineering Accreditation Commission, and one on the Technology Accreditation Commission. The ABET board sets ABET policy and the commissions are responsible for accreditation visits

  2. Cooperation with COMECON members in coke chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medricky. Z

    1987-05-01

    Discusses activities of the coking industry division of the standing committee for iron metallurgy of the COMECON. The following cooperation fields are analyzed: raw material basis for coking industry, coal charge preparation and methods for reducing proportion of coking coal in a coal charge (heat treatments, formed coke processes, partial briquetting, pelletizing, increasing coking temperature, packing etc.), coking technology, coke quenching, screening, chemical processing of coal gas, environmental protection in the coking industry, environmental effects of coking, pitch coke production, methods for increasing labor productivity. Research programs coordinated by member countries are reviewed. Programs in which Czechoslovakia participates are discussed.

  3. Education About Dental Hygienists' Roles in Public Dental Prevention Programs: Dental and Dental Hygiene Students' and Faculty Members' and Dental Hygienists' Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pervez, Anushey; Kinney, Janet S; Gwozdek, Anne; Farrell, Christine M; Inglehart, Marita R

    2016-09-01

    In 2005, Public Act No. 161 (PA 161) was passed in Michigan, allowing dental hygienists to practice in approved public dental prevention programs to provide services for underserved populations while utilizing a collaborative agreement with a supervising dentist. The aims of this study were to assess how well dental and dental hygiene students and faculty members and practicing dental hygienists have been educated about PA 161, what attitudes and knowledge about the act they have, and how interested they are in additional education about it. University of Michigan dental and dental hygiene students and faculty members, students in other Michigan dental hygiene programs, and dental hygienists in the state were surveyed. Respondents (response rate) were 160 dental students (50%), 63 dental hygiene students (82%), 30 dental faculty members (26%), and 12 dental hygiene faculty members (52%) at the University of Michigan; 143 dental hygiene students in other programs (20%); and 95 members of the Michigan Dental Hygienists' Association (10%). The results showed that the dental students were less educated about PA 161 than the dental hygiene students, and the dental faculty members were less informed than the dental hygiene faculty members and dental hygienists. Responding dental hygiene faculty members and dental hygienists had more positive attitudes about PA 161 than did the students and dental faculty members. Most of the dental hygiene faculty members and dental hygienists knew a person providing services in a PA 161 program. Most dental hygiene students, faculty members, and dental hygienists wanted more education about PA 161. Overall, the better educated about the program the respondents were, the more positive their attitudes, and the more interested they were in learning more.

  4. DUBNA: Member States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    The political upheaval in what was the Soviet Union was reflected in an Extraordinary Plenipotentiaries Committee of Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR) Member States, held in Dubna, near Moscow, on 10-13 December, with representatives of eleven sovereign republics of the former Soviet State taking part

  5. Royal College surgical objectives of urologic training: A survey of faculty members from Canadian training programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakaria, Ahmed S.; Haddad, Richard; Dragomir, Alice; Kassouf, Wassim; Andonian, Sero; Aprikian, Armen G.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: According to the Royal College objectives of training in urology, urologic surgical procedures are divided as category A, B and C. We wanted to determine the level of proficiency required and achieved by urology training faculty for Royal College accreditation. Methods: We conducted a survey that was sent electronically to all Canadian urology training faculty. Questions focused on demographics (i.e., years of practice, geographic location, subspecialty, access to robotic surgery), operating room contact with residents, opinion on the level of proficiency required from a list of 54 surgical procedures, and whether their most recent graduates attained category A proficiency in these procedures. Results: The response rate was 43.7% (95/217). Among respondents, 92.6% were full timers, 21.1% practiced urology for less than 5 years and 3.2% for more than 30 years. Responses from Quebec and Ontario formed 69.4% (34.7% each). Of the respondents, 37.9% were uro-oncologists and 75.7% reported having access to robotic surgery. Sixty percent of faculty members operate with R5 residents between 2 to 5 days per month. When respondents were asked which categories should be listed as category A, only 8 procedures received 100% agreement. Also, results varied significantly when analyzed by sub-specialty. For example, almost 50% or more of uro-oncologists believed that radical cystectomy, anterior pelvic exenteration and extended pelvic lymphadenectomy should not be category A. The following procedures had significant disagreement suggesting the need for re-classification: glanular hypospadias repair, boari flap, entero-vesical and vesicovaginal fistulae repair. Overall, more than 80% of faculty reported that their recent graduating residents had achieved category A proficiency, in a subset of procedures. However, more than 50% of all faculty either disagreed or were ambivalent that all of their graduating residents were Category A proficient in several procedures

  6. Consumer-operated service program members' explanatory models of mental illness and recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoy, Janet M

    2014-10-01

    Incorporating individuals' understandings and explanations of mental illness into service delivery offers benefits relating to increased service relevance and meaning. Existing research delineates explanatory models of mental illness held by individuals in home, outpatient, and hospital-based contexts; research on models held by those in peer-support contexts is notably absent. In this article, I describe themes identified within and across explanatory models of mental illness and recovery held by mental health consumers (N = 24) at one peer center, referred to as a consumer-operated service center (COSP). Participants held explanatory models inclusive of both developmental stressors and biomedical causes, consistent with a stress-diathesis model (although no participant explicitly referenced such). Explicit incorporation of stress-diathesis constructs into programming at this COSP offers the potential of increasing service meaning and relevance. Identifying and incorporating shared meanings across individuals' understandings of mental illness likewise can increase relevance and meaning for particular subgroups of service users. © The Author(s) 2014.

  7. 78 FR 45253 - National Toxicology Program Scientific Advisory Committee on Alternative Toxicological Methods...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-26

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Toxicology Program... Alternative Methods (ICCVAM), the National Toxicology Program (NTP) Interagency Center for the Evaluation of... Director, National Toxicology Program. [FR Doc. 2013-17919 Filed 7-25-13; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4140-01-P ...

  8. Committee Opinion No. 715: Social Etiquette for Program Directors and Faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    Educators in obstetrics and gynecology work within a changing clinical learning environment. Ethnic, cultural, and social diversity among colleagues and learners have increased, and methods of communication have expanded in ever more novel ways. Clerkship, residency, and fellowship directors, in partnership with chairs and senior faculty, are urged to take the lead in setting the tone for workplace etiquette, communication, and social behavior of faculty and trainees to promote a high standard of civility and citizenship. The Council on Resident Education in Obstetrics and Gynecology (CREOG) Education Committee has promulgated recommendations that can be used to help address professional relationships, professional appearance, and social media usage. These recommendations also address communications pertinent to educational processes such as interviewing, teaching, evaluation, and mentoring.

  9. Committee Opinion No. 715 Summary: Social Etiquette for Program Directors and Faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    Educators in obstetrics and gynecology work within a changing clinical learning environment. Ethnic, cultural, and social diversity among colleagues and learners have increased, and μethods of communication have expanded in ever more novel ways. Clerkship, residency, and fellowship directors, in partnership with chairs and senior faculty, are urged to take the lead in setting the tone for workplace etiquette, communication, and social behavior of faculty and trainees to promote a high standard of civility and citizenship. The Council on Resident Education in Obstetrics and Gynecology (CREOG) Education Committee has promulgated recommendations that can be used to help address professional relationships, professional appearance, and social media usage. These recommendations also address communications pertinent to educational processes such as interviewing, teaching, evaluation, and mentoring.

  10. 75 FR 28543 - GMUG Resource Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-21

    ...) and in compliance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act. The purpose of the meeting is to gather the... about the roles of members, support of the committee and other pertinent information, elect a...

  11. Longitudinal spirometry among patients in a treatment program for community members with World Trade Center (WTC)-related illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mengling; Qian, Meng; Cheng, Qinyi; Berger, Kenneth I.; Shao, Yongzhao; Turetz, Meredith; Kazeros, Angeliki; Parsia, Sam; Goldring, Roberta M.; Fernandez-Beros, Maria Elena; Marmor, Michael; Reibman, Joan

    2013-01-01

    Objective The course of lung function in community members exposed to World Trade Center (WTC) dust and fumes remains undefined. We studied longitudinal spirometry among patients in the WTC Environmental Health Center (WTCEHC) treatment program. Methods Observational study of 946 WTCEHC patients with repeated spirometry measures analyzed on the population as a whole and stratified by smoking status, initial spirometry pattern and WTC-related exposure category. Results Improvement in forced expiratory volume (FVC; 54.4 ml/year; 95% CI: 45.0-63.8) and forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1; 36.8 ml/year; 95% CI: 29.3-44.3) was noted for the population as a whole. Heavy smokers did not improve. Spirometry changes differed depending on initial spirometry pattern and exposure category. Conclusions These data demonstrate spirometry improvement in select populations suggesting reversibility in airway injury and reinforcing the importance of continued treatment. PMID:22995806

  12. Review of laboratory programs for women Points-of-Contact Committee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duke, D.; Magrini, K. [comps.] [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); McLane, V. [comp.] [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Wieda, K. [comp.] [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-06-01

    The mission of the DOE Review of Laboratory Programs for Women is to: provide DOE and its Laboratories with effective strategies, targeting women, for establishing aggressive outreach programs which improve the access of women to careers in science, engineering, and mathematics. Ensure that the Department and its Laboratories are exemplary places of employment by providing programs which enhance opportunity, remove barriers, and assist women in achieving full professional development. A survey of the DOE facilities was undertaken by the Points-of-Contact for the DOE Review of Laboratory Programs for Women in order to gather data to be used as a baseline against which to measure future progress. We plan to look at current programs already in place and evaluate them with a view to deciding which programs are most effective, and selecting model programs suitable for implementation at other facilities. The survey focused on four areas: statistical data, laboratory policy, formal and informal programs which affect the quality of life in the work environment, and career development and advancement, and educational programs. Although this report focuses on women, the problems discussed affect all DOE facility employees.

  13. 78 FR 48941 - Advisory Committee on Prosthetics and Special-Disabilities Programs, Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-12

    ... receive briefings on the Blind Rehabilitation Program, Chiropractic Care, Audiology and Speech Pathology... briefing on Telemedicine. No time will be allocated for receiving oral presentations from the public...

  14. 76 FR 7531 - Yavapai County Resource Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-10

    ...) and in compliance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act. The purpose of the meeting is to orientate new committee members to the Secural Rural Schools Act, roles of members, guidelines for Title II, and...

  15. Welfare to Work: Effectiveness of Tribal JOBS Programs Unknown. Briefing Report to Congressional Committees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC. Div. of Human Resources.

    This report presents the results of a study of the Job Opportunities and Basic Skills Training (JOBS) programs operated by Indian tribes and Alaska Native organizations. Congress established the JOBS program to give recipients of Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) the education, training, work experience, and supportive services they…

  16. Goals and Methodology for a Surgery Residency Program: A Committee Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knecht, Charles D.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Written goals of a small animal residency program established by Purdue University are identified and an elaborate list of methodology for goals is provided. Tables include: summary of required activities of residents, checklist of residency progress, and comparable effort for surgery residency and masters program. (Author/MLW)

  17. Graduate Education in Chemistry. The ACS Committee on Professional Training: Surveys of Programs and Participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Chemical Society, Washington, DC.

    This document reports on graduate education in chemistry concerning the nature of graduate programs. Contents include: (1) "Graduate Education in Chemistry in the United States: A Snapshot from the Late Twentieth Century"; (2) "A Survey of Ph.D. Programs in Chemistry"; (4) "The Master's Degree in Chemistry"; (5) "A Survey of Ph.D. Recipients in…

  18. Opinion of the committee of experts for energy transition on the energy multi-year programming (PPE). Opinion of the committee of experts for energy transition for energy multi-year programming for Corsica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    After a discussion on the whole project of energy multi-year programming (PPE), a first document more particularly discusses issues related to the management of energy demand, to the security of supply (for the electric power sector, the gas sector, the gas/power sector), and to the development of infrastructures and flexibility for the power system. The issue of energy supply is then addressed. Then, the authors discuss some statements present in various appendices to the PPE: its legal framework with its articulation to other planning documents, its energy hypotheses (for buildings), its measures related to the preservation of consumer purchasing power and to that of company competitiveness, its definition of a maximum envelope of public funds dedicated to the achievement of PPE quantitative objectives, its assessment of needs of professional abilities in the field of energy and the adaptation of education and training to these needs, its strategic environmental assessment. Then, the committee discusses the content of the strategy of development of a clean mobility which has been elaborated as foreseen by the law on energy transition, and has been attached to the PPE project. A second document addresses some of these issues in the specific case of Corsica. It more particularly states recommendations on the PPE general framework, on objectives related to energy demand, on objectives related to security of supply, on energy supply, on energy infrastructures, on the elaboration and consultation process, on economic assessment, on social assessment, on environmental assessment, and on the follow-up of the Corsica PPE. Some propositions are finally made by the committee at the attention of writers of the Corsica PPE

  19. Material presented to advisory committee on reactor safeguards, subcommittee on extreme external phenomena, January 29-30, 1981, Los Angeles, California. Seismic safety margins research program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, P.D.; Bernreuter, D.L.; Bohn, M.P.; Chuang, T.Y.; Cummings, G.E.; Dong, R.G.; Johnson, J.J.; Wells, J.E.

    1981-01-01

    The January 29-30, 1981, meeting of the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS), Subcommittee on Extreme External Phenomena, mark the close of Phase I efforts on the Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP). Presentations at the meeting focused on results produced. These included computer codes, response computations, failure and release probabilities, data bases, and fragilities and parameter characteristics

  20. Fuel cycle industrialization program prepared by N-Fuel Research Committee, ANRE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-09-01

    To meet the new situation resulting from the scaling down of nuclear power development plan in Japan, and the changes due to the new U.S. nuclear non-proliferation policy, the Nuclear Fuel Research Committee of the Agency of Natural Resources and Energy of MITI has prepared the ''Interim Report on the Nuclear Fuel Cycle''. It sets out in precise terms the methods that should be followed for establishing the nuclear fuel cycle in Japan. Major items treated in this report are; uranium ore development, promotion of uranium stockpiling, construction of domestic uranium enrichment plant, promotion of the construction of a nuclear fuel park, Pu utilization and cooperation in international movement for nuclear non-proliferation, and the establishment of measures for radioactive waste management. Discussions are made from technological, economical, and political view points. Also attached are a table of the comprehensive industrialization plan up to the year 2000 and a table of estimated nuclear fuel demand and supply in Japan.

  1. Association of Finnish Members of Parliament and Researchers: Social Democratic Parliamentary group MP K. Olin, Former Finnish MP M. Tiuri, Finnish Centre Party MP P. Vilkuna, Senior Assistant Professor I. Ruostetsaari and Finnish Parliament Committee of Future Researcher U. Gabrielsson at ATLAS experiment with P. Jenn, M. Nordberg and M. Kotamaki on 15 September 2006.

    CERN Document Server

    Maximilien Brice

    2006-01-01

    Association of Finnish Members of Parliament and Researchers: Social Democratic Parliamentary group MP K. Olin, Former Finnish MP M. Tiuri, Finnish Centre Party MP P. Vilkuna, Senior Assistant Professor I. Ruostetsaari and Finnish Parliament Committee of Future Researcher U. Gabrielsson at ATLAS experiment with P. Jenn, M. Nordberg and M. Kotamaki on 15 September 2006.

  2. Hydrogen Energy Coordinating Committee annual report: Summary of DOE hydrogen programs for FY 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    The FY 1988 Summary is the eleventh consecutive yearly report providing an overview of the hydrogen-related programs of the DOE offices represented on the HECC. A historical summary of the hydrogen budgets of these offices is given. The distribution by mission-related program element for FY 1988, and the non-mission-related activities are given. Total DOE funding in FY 1988 for mission-related hydrogen research was $5.2 million; DOE non-mission-related hydrogen research funding totaled $30.0 million. The individual program elements are described in the body of this report, and more specific program information is given in the Technology Summary Forms in Appendix A. 2 tabs

  3. 76 FR 22713 - Advisory Committee on the Maternal, Infant and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program Evaluation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-22

    ... specified in the Affordable Care Act (such as maternal and child health status, school readiness, and domestic violence, among others); (b) the effectiveness of such programs on different populations...

  4. 76 FR 19176 - Shipping Coordinating Committee; Notice of Committee Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-06

    ...) Maritime Safety Committee (MSC 89) to be held May 11-20, 2011. The primary matters to be considered at MSC... --Technical assistance sub-programme in maritime safety and security --Capacity-building for the... business --Report of the Maritime Safety Committee Members of the public may attend these two meetings up...

  5. 78 FR 32699 - Shipping Coordinating Committee; Notice of Committee Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-31

    ... Session of the International Maritime Organization's (IMO) Sub-Committee on Safety of Navigation to be... --Report to the Maritime Safety Committee Members of the public may attend this meeting up to the seating... system ``BeiDou'' in the maritime field --International Telecommunication Union (ITU) matters, including...

  6. 77 FR 47491 - Shipping Coordinating Committee; Notice of Committee Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-08

    ... to the Maritime Safety Committee Members of the public may attend this meeting up to the seating... Session of the International Maritime Organization's (IMO) Sub-Committee on Dangerous Goods, Solid Cargoes... --Amendment 37-14 to the International Maritime Dangerous Goods (IMDG) Code and supplements, including...

  7. 76 FR 19356 - Video Programming and Accessibility Advisory Committee; Announcement of Date of Next Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-07

    ... you will need and tell us how to contact you if we need more information. Make your request as early...-418-2498 (voice), 202-418-1169 (TTY), or [email protected] (e-mail); or Alison Neplokh, Media Bureau... or digital broadcast television; accessible user interfaces on video programming devices; and...

  8. Water Conservation and Reuse. Instructor Guide. Working for Clean Water: An Information Program for Advisory Committees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennsylvania State Univ., Middletown. Inst. of State and Regional Affairs.

    Described is a learning session on water conservation intended for citizen advisory groups interested in water quality planning. Topics addressed in this instructor's manual include water conservation needs, benefits, programs, technology, and problems. These materials are components of the Working for Clean Water Project. (Author/WB)

  9. Report of Investigation Committee on Programs for Research and Development of Strategic Software for Advanced Computing; Kodo computing yo senryakuteki software no kenkyu kaihatsu program kento iinkai hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-12-26

    The committee met on December 26, 2000, with 32 people in attendance. Discussion was made on the results of surveys conducted for the development of strategic software for advanced computing and on candidate projects for strategic software development. Taken up at the meeting were eight subjects which were the interim report on the survey results, semiconductor TCAD (technology computer-aided design) system, nanodevice surface analysis system, network distribution parallel processing platform (tentative name), fatigue simulation system, chemical reaction simulator, protein structure analysis system, and a next-generation fluid analysis system. In this report, the author uses his own way in arranging the discussion results into the four categories of (1) a strategic software development system, (2) popularization method and maintenance system, (3) handling of the results, and (4) the evaluation of the program for research and development. In relation to category (1), it is stated that the software grows up with the passage of time, that the software is a commercial program, and that in the development of a commercial software program the process of basic study up to the preparation of a prototype should be completely separated from the process for its completion. (NEDO)

  10. Youth Voice in Nigerian School-based Management Committees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bashiru Bako Umar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In Nigeria, School-Based Management Committees (SBMCs aim to provide an opportunity for all stakeholders, particularly the vulnerable groups in the school’s host communities such as young people and women to partake in school governance. Research on the experiences of youth voice in the committees is scant, however, as much of the existing literature on SBMCs focuses on program outcomes. Using qualitative research interviews, observations, and document analysis, this study addressed this gap by exploring how youth participate and express themselves in two SBMCs in Niger State, Nigeria. The findings, which were derived from 19 youth and adult participants, were drawn from SBMC members out of which 12 were youth between the ages 13 and 25, while 7 were adults aged 40 and above. The participants revealed that youth committee members expressed their voice in the committees through participating in a number of committee activities. Specifically, the youth participated in decision-making during meetings, aided in the construction of committee projects, undertook administrative/managerial functions and monitored the committee’s projects. They also participated in revenue generation, planning, school visits and supervision, advocacy, and sensitization campaigns.

  11. Evaluation and Reauthorization of the Special Supplemental Food Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC). Hearings before the Committee on Agriculture, Nutrition, and Forestry, United States Senate; and the Subcommittee on Nutrition of the Committee on Agriculture, Nutrition, and Forestry, United States Senate. Ninety-Eighth Congress Second Session, March 15 and April 9, 1984.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on Agriculture, Nutrition, and Forestry.

    This document records hearings before the U.S. Senate Committee on Agriculture, Nutrition, and Forestry and its sub-committee on Nutrition. The hearings, dated March 15 and April 9, 1984, were conducted in order to evaluate and reauthorize the special supplemental food program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC), due to expire in 1984. Testimony…

  12. Perceptions of veterinary admissions committee members of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-06-26

    Jun 26, 2015 ... including communication; sensitivities to other cultures and people; scientific and professional behavior; desire for knowledge; personal management skills; compassion for animals and people; and personal integrity and ethics. All of these factors have been identified as important in selecting for successful.

  13. 78 FR 49260 - Trademark Public Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-13

    ... office automation.'' 35 U.S.C. 5(b)(3). The Committee also includes three (3) non-voting members.... While away from home or regular place of business, each member shall be allowed travel expenses...

  14. Perceptions of academic administrators of the effect of involvement in doctoral programs on faculty members' research and work-life balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeltzer, Suzanne C; Sharts-Hopko, Nancy C; Cantrell, Mary Ann; Heverly, Mary Ann; Wise, Nancy; Jenkinson, Amanda

    Support for research strongly predicts doctoral program faculty members' research productivity. Although academic administrators affect such support, their views of faculty members' use of support are unknown. We examined academic administrators' perceptions of institutional support and their perceptions of the effects of teaching doctoral students on faculty members' scholarship productivity and work-life balance. An online survey was completed by a random sample of 180 deans/directors of schools of nursing and doctoral programs directors. Data were analyzed with descriptive statistics, chi-square analysis, and analysis of variance. Deans and doctoral program directors viewed the level of productivity of program faculty as high to moderately high and unchanged since faculty started teaching doctoral students. Deans perceived better administrative research supports, productivity, and work-life balance of doctoral program faculty than did program directors. Findings indicate the need for greater administrative support for scholarship and mentoring given the changes in the composition of doctoral program faculty. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Pulsed Power Peer Review Committee Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BLOOMQUIST, DOUGLAS D.

    2002-01-01

    In 1993, the Government Performance and Results Act (GPRA, PL 103-62) was enacted. GPRA, which applies to all federal programs, has three components: strategic plans, annual performance plans, and metrics to show how well annual plans are being followed. As part of meeting the GRPA requirement in FY2002, a 15-member external review committee chaired by Dr. Alvin Trivelpiece (the Trivelpiece Committee) was convened by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) on May 7-9, 2002 to review Sandia National Laboratories' Pulsed Power Programs as a component of the Performance Appraisal Process negotiated with the National Nuclear Security Administration of the Department of Energy (NNSA/DOE). The scope of the review included activities in high energy density physics (HEDP), inertial confinement fusion (ICF), radiation/weapon physics, the petawatt laser initiative (PW) and fast ignition, equation-of-state studies, radiation effects science and lethality, x-ray radiography, ZR development, basic research and pulsed power technology research and development, as well as electromagnetics and work for others. In his charge to the Committee, Dr. Jeffrey P. Quintenz, Director of Pulsed Power Sciences (Org. 1600) asked that the evaluation and feedback be based on three criteria: (1) quality of technical activities in science, technology, and engineering, (2) programmatic performance, management, and planning, and (3) relevance to national needs and agency missions. In addition, the director posed specific programmatic questions. The accompanying report, produced as a SAND document, is the report of the Committee's finding

  16. 7 CFR 983.42 - Initial members and nomination of successor members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF... alternate is selected shall serve in place of that member on the committee, and shall have and be able to... members of the committee shall serve for terms of two years: Provided, That four of the initially selected...

  17. The ESO Scientific and Technical Committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Léna, P.

    1982-03-01

    Since 1978, the structure of ESO involves a Scientific and Technical Committee (STC) which advises the Council on scientific and technical matters. This committee meets twice a year, usually at Garehing; its members are nominated by the Council and their term is 4 years. The STC has 10 members, who are as evenly distributed as possible among member countries, although indeed mainly chosen for their scientific abilities. The chairman is invited to attend Council meetings and to report to the members.

  18. Recommendations for data monitoring committees from the Clinical Trials Transformation Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calis, Karim A; Archdeacon, Patrick; Bain, Raymond; DeMets, David; Donohue, Miriam; Elzarrad, M Khair; Forrest, Annemarie; McEachern, John; Pencina, Michael J; Perlmutter, Jane; Lewis, Roger J

    2017-08-01

    meetings may vary depending on specific goals or topics for deliberation. To guide data monitoring committee conduct and communication plans, a charter consistent with the protocol's research design and statistical analysis plan should be developed and agreed upon by the sponsor and the data monitoring committee prior to patient enrollment. We recommend concise and flexible charters that explain roles, responsibilities, operational issues, and how data monitoring committee recommendations are generated and communicated. The demand for data monitoring committee members appears to exceed the current pool of qualified individuals. To prepare a new generation of trained data monitoring committee members, we encourage a combination of didactic educational programs, practical experience, and skill development through apprenticeships and mentoring by experienced data monitoring committee members. Conclusion Our recommendations address data monitoring committee use, conduct, communication practices, and member preparation and training. Furthermore recommendations form the foundation for ongoing efforts to improve clinical trial oversight and enhance the safety and integrity of clinical research. These recommendations serve as a call to action for implementation of best practices that benefit study participants, study sponsors, and society.

  19. An Overview of Head Start Program Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hines, Jeanne Morris

    2017-01-01

    Johnson's "War on Poverty" administrative team campaigned for committee members to join the War on Poverty efforts to create and develop programs for children born into poverty (Zigler, 2003). Poverty based programs, such as the Head Start program, continue to put into place proactive measures to increase preschooler's cognitive…

  20. The teachers at Sea program of the Committee on Education of EGU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laj, Carlo; Kissel, Catherine; Leau, Hélène

    2015-04-01

    "Teachers at sea" is an Educational Program making it possible for high school teachers to participate to oceanographic cruises together with the scientists. With the support of the French Polar Insitute (IPEV) and of EGU, 3 editions of this program have taken place on board the R/V Marion Dufresne during cruises PACHIDERME in 2007 (along the Coast and in the fiords of Southern Chile), AMOCINT in 2008 (in the North Atlantic Ocean), and CIRCEA (in the South China Sea in 2012) Another edition took place in 2014, aboard the oceanographic cruise PREPARED (PREsent and PAst flow REgime on contourite Drifts west of Spitsbergen, onboard the Norwegian Research Vessel G.O Sars from 05 to 15 June 2014. The expedition was part of the EUROFLEETS On board, the teachers participated to all the scientific activities. In order to be fully immersed in the scientific work, the teachers also participated together with the scientists and technicians to two 4-hours shifts per day (8h total per day). During these shifts, they were involved in every step of the process of obtaining the cores, cutting, opening and labelling them, archiving, and measuring some of the physical parameters, and finally sediment description. It was possible to establish almost daily reports of the scientific progress of the cruise and to send regular logs to the participating land-based teachers in different schools mainly in Europe and in the USA, taking advantage of a list of addresses of teachers having participated to the Geosciences Information for teachers (GIFT) workshops of the European Geosciences Union. This should bring authentic science in the classroom, and indeed we received enthusiastic responses from many teachers. Exposure to authentic science, such as that the teachers have experienced during these oceanographic cruises, may be a pivotal experience for them, causing them to change at least in part their teaching methods, possibly creating more future scientists or at least adults with positive

  1. Obstacles Faced by Heads of Departments and Faculty Members in the Jordanian Public Universities in the Implementation of Vocational and Technical Education Programs from Their Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammad, Heba Ibraheem; Airout, Mostafa Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to find out the obstacles faced by heads of departments and faculty members at Jordanian public universities in the implementation of vocational and technical education programs from their perspective, and to find out the effect of gender, experience, and academic rank on their perspective. To achieve the aim of the…

  2. Effect of the Strong4Life School Nutrition Program on Cafeterias and on Manager and Staff Member Knowledge and Practice, Georgia, 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajbhandari-Thapa, Janani; Bennett, Ashley; Keong, Farrah; Palmer, Wendy; Hardy, Trisha; Welsh, Jean

    The goal of the Strong4Life School Nutrition Program is to promote healthy eating in school cafeterias in Georgia by training school nutrition managers and staff members to implement changes in the cafeteria to nudge children to make healthier choices. The objective of our study was to evaluate program effect on (1) school nutrition manager and staff member knowledge of evidence-based strategies and their self-efficacy to make positive changes, (2) the school cafeteria environment, and (3) National School Lunch Program participation. We assessed changes in participant knowledge, beliefs, and self-efficacy by administering a survey before and after training (February-July 2015); a follow-up survey (3 school months posttraining) assessed changes in the cafeteria. A total of 842 school nutrition managers and staff members were trained and completed pre- and posttraining surveys; 325 managers completed the follow-up survey. We used cafeteria records from a subsample of the first schools trained (40 intervention and 40 control) to assess National School Lunch Program participation. From pretraining to posttraining, we found a significant increase in manager and staff member (n = 842) knowledge of strategies for enhancing taste perception through the use of creative menu item names (from 78% to 95%, P managers (n = 325) reported increased use of evidence-based serving strategies: visibility (from 84% to 96% for placing healthy options in >2 locations, P managers and staff members in Smarter Lunchrooms Movement techniques may be an effective way to make changes in the school cafeteria environment to encourage healthier choices among students. Additional studies allowing time for more complex changes to be implemented are needed to assess the full effect of the program.

  3. 1976 compilation of national nuclear data committees

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    This list of currently existing National Nuclear Data Committees, and their memberships, is published with the object of promoting the interaction and enhance the awareness of nuclear data activities in IAEA Member States. The following Member States have indicated the existence of a nuclear data committee in their countries: Bangladesh, Bolivia, Bulgaria, France, Hungary, India, Japan, Romania, Sweden, USSR, United Kingdom, USA, Yugoslavia

  4. 45 CFR 703.9 - Reimbursement of members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Reimbursement of members. 703.9 Section 703.9... AND FUNCTIONS OF STATE ADVISORY COMMITTEES § 703.9 Reimbursement of members. (a) Advisory Committee members may be reimbursed by the Commission by a per diem subsistence allowance and for travel expenses at...

  5. Viewpoint: Decision-making in committees

    OpenAIRE

    Li Hao; Wing Suen

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews recent developments in the theory of committee decision-making. A committee consists of self-interested members who make a public decision by aggregating imperfect information dispersed among them according to a pre-specified decision rule. We focus on costly information acquisition, strategic information aggregation, and rules and processes that enhance the quality of the committee decision. Seeming inefficiencies of the committee decision-making process such as over-cau...

  6. A Committee on Well-Being of Medical Students and House Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, Harvey M.

    1983-01-01

    A committee was established in a university medical center to address socioemotional aspects of medical training and to enhance the learning environment. Problem areas identified for program development included poor communication, stress on self and relationships, need for advocacy, and lack of support for house staff members. (MSE)

  7. 78 FR 17993 - Request for Nominations for the General Advisory Committee and the Scientific Advisory...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-25

    ...-governmental conservation organizations. Members of the Committee shall be invited to attend all non-executive... from the public and private sectors, including non- governmental conservation organizations. The... the International Dolphin Conservation Program (AIDCP). The United States Section to the IATTC is...

  8. Report to the DOE Nuclear Data Committee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundy, J.C.; Perey, F.G.

    1981-04-01

    This report was prepared for the DOE Nuclear Data Committee, and covers work performed at ORNL since April 1980 in areas of nuclear data of relevance to the US applied nuclear energy program. The report was mostly generated through a review of abstracts of work completed to the point of being subjected to some form of publication in the open literature, formal ORNL reports, ORNL technical memoranda, progress reports, or presentation at technical conferences. As much as possible the complete abstract of the original publication has been reproduced with only minor editing. In a few cases progress reports were written specifically for this publication. The editors have selected the material to be included in this report on the basis of perceived interests of DOE Nuclear Data Committee members

  9. Report to the DOE Nuclear Data Committee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundy, J.C.; Perey, F.G.

    1980-04-01

    This report was prepared for the DOE Nuclear Data Committee and covers work performed at ORNL since April 1979 in areas of nuclear data of relevance to the US applied nuclear energy program. The report was mostly generated through a review of abstracts of work completed to the point of being subjected to some form of publication in the open literature, formal ORNL reports, ORNL technical memoranda, progress reports, or presentation at technical conferences. As much as possible the complete abstract of the original publication is reproduced with only minor editing. In a few cases progress reports were written specifically for this publication. The editors selected the materials to be included in this report on the basis of perceived interests of DOE Nuclear Data Committee members and cannot claim completeness. Material is grouped as follows: Nuclear Cross Sections for Technology conference, cross section measurements, data analyses, and Nuclear Data Project activities for 1979. 2 figures

  10. 76 FR 72204 - Renewal of Advisory Committee Charter

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-22

    .... II. Structure The Committee shall consist of 17 members appointed by the Bank's Board of Directors on..., services, and State government, with not less than three members being representative of the small business... members being representative of the [[Page 72205

  11. Pulsed Power Peer Review Committee Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloomquist, Douglas D.

    2000-01-01

    In 1993, the Government Performance and Results Act (GPRA, PL 103-62) was enacted. GPRA, which applies to all federal programs, has three components: strategic plans, annual performance plans, and metrics to show how well annual plans are being followed. As part of meeting the GRPA requirement in FY2000, a 14-member external peer review panel (the Garwin Committee) was convened on May 17-19, 2000 to review Sandia National Laboratories' Pulsed Power Programs as a component of the Performance Appraisal Process negotiated with the Department of Energy (DOE). The scope of the review included activities in inertial confinement fission (ICF), weapon physics, development of radiation sources for weapons effects simulation, x-ray radiography, basic research in high energy density physics (HEDP), and pulsed power technology research and development. In his charge to the committee, Jeffrey Quintenz, Director of Pulsed Power Sciences (1600) asked that the review be based on four criteria (1) quality of science, technology, and engineering, (2) programmatic performance, management, and planning, (3) relevance to national needs and agency missions, and (4) performance in the operation and construction of major research facilities. In addition, specific programmatic questions were posed by the director and by the DOE-Defense Programs (DP). The accompanying report, produced as a SAND document, is the report of the committee's findings

  12. The ESO Observing Programmes Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerlund, B. E.

    1982-06-01

    Since 1978 the ESO Observing Programmes Committee (OPC) has "the function to inspect and rank the proposals made for observing programmes at La Silla, and thereby to advise the Director General on the distribution of observing time". The members (one from each member country) and their alternates are nominated by the respective national committees for five-year terms (not immediately renewable). The terms are staggered so that each year one or two persons are replaced. The Chairman is appointed annually by the Council. He is invited to attend Council meetings and to report to its members.

  13. RILEM technical committee 195-DTD recommendation for test methods for AD and TD of early age concrete Round Robin documentation report : program, test results and statistical evaluation

    CERN Document Server

    Bjøntegaard, Øyvind; Krauss, Matias; Budelmann, Harald

    2015-01-01

    This report presents the Round-Robin (RR) program and test results including a statistical evaluation of the RILEM TC195-DTD committee named “Recommendation for test methods for autogenous deformation (AD) and thermal dilation (TD) of early age concrete”. The task of the committee was to investigate the linear test set-up for AD and TD measurements (Dilation Rigs) in the period from setting to the end of the hardening phase some weeks after. These are the stress-inducing deformations in a hardening concrete structure subjected to restraint conditions. The main task was to carry out an RR program on testing of AD of one concrete at 20 °C isothermal conditions in Dilation Rigs. The concrete part materials were distributed to 10 laboratories (Canada, Denmark, France, Germany, Japan, The Netherlands, Norway, Sweden and USA), and in total 30 tests on AD were carried out. Some supporting tests were also performed, as well as a smaller RR on cement paste. The committee has worked out a test procedure recommenda...

  14. 76 FR 44017 - Risk Communication Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-22

    ...] Risk Communication Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS... Communication Advisory Committee. General Function of the Committee: To provide advice and recommendations to... and former members of the Risk Communication Advisory Committee. FDA intends to make background...

  15. Experiences of a Community-Based Lymphedema Management Program for Lymphatic Filariasis in Odisha State, India: An Analysis of Focus Group Discussions with Patients, Families, Community Members and Program Volunteers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tali Cassidy

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Globally 68 million people are infected with lymphatic filariasis (LF, 17 million of whom have lymphedema. This study explores the effects of a lymphedema management program in Odisha State, India on morbidity and psychosocial effects associated with lymphedema.Focus groups were held with patients (eight groups, separated by gender, their family members (eight groups, community members (four groups and program volunteers (four groups who had participated in a lymphedema management program for the past three years. Significant social, physical, and economic difficulties were described by patients and family members, including marriageability, social stigma, and lost workdays. However, the positive impact of the lymphedema management program was also emphasized, and many family and community members indicated that community members were accepting of patients and had some improved understanding of the etiology of the disease. Program volunteers and community members stressed the role that the program had played in educating people, though interestingly, local explanations and treatments appear to coexist with knowledge of biomedical treatments and the mosquito vector.Local and biomedical understandings of disease can co-exist and do not preclude individuals from participating in biomedical interventions, specifically lymphedema management for those with lymphatic filariasis. There is a continued need for gender-specific psychosocial support groups to address issues particular to men and women as well as a continued need for improved economic opportunities for LF-affected patients. There is an urgent need to scale up LF-related morbidity management programs to reduce the suffering of people affected by LF.

  16. 77 FR 75182 - President's National Security Telecommunications Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-19

    ... Telecommunications Advisory Committee AGENCY: National Protection and Programs Directorate, DHS. ACTION: Committee... Security Telecommunications Advisory Committee (NSTAC) will meet on Friday, January 11, 2013, via... related to national security and emergency preparedness telecommunications policy. Agenda: The NSTAC...

  17. 75 FR 29781 - President's National Security Telecommunications Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-27

    ...] President's National Security Telecommunications Advisory Committee AGENCY: National Protection and Programs... Security Telecommunications Advisory Committee (NSTAC) will be meeting by teleconference; the meeting will... telecommunications policy. Notice of this meeting is given under the Federal Advisory Committee Act (FACA), Public...

  18. Screening Out Controversy: Human Genetics, Emerging Techniques of Diagnosis, and the Origins of the Social Issues Committee of the American Society of Human Genetics, 1964-1973.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, M X

    2017-05-01

    In the years following World War II, and increasingly during the 1960s and 1970s, professional scientific societies developed internal sub-committees to address the social implications of their scientific expertise (Moore, Disrupting Science: Social Movements, American Scientists, and the Politics of the Military, 1945-1975. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2008). This article explores the early years of one such committee, the American Society of Human Genetics' "Social Issues Committee," founded in 1967. Although the committee's name might suggest it was founded to increase the ASHG's public and policy engagement, exploration of the committee's early years reveals a more complicated reality. Affronted by legislators' recent unwillingness to seek the expert advice of human geneticists before adopting widespread neonatal screening programs for phenylketonuria (PKU), and feeling pressed to establish their relevance in an increasingly resource-scarce funding environment, committee members sought to increase the discipline's expert authority. Painfully aware of controversy over abortion rights and haunted by the taint of the discipline's eugenic past, however, the committee proceeded with great caution. Seeking to harness interest in and assert professional control over emerging techniques of genetic diagnosis, the committee strove to protect the society's image by relegating ethical and policy questions about their use to the individual consciences of member scientists. It was not until 1973, after the committee's modest success in organizing support for a retrospective public health study of PKU screening and following the legalization of abortion on demand, that the committee decided to take a more publicly engaged stance.

  19. Annex 5. Monitoring committee

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Head of monitoring committee: the Research Commission of the govern­ment of French Polynesia. Panel members Representatives of the following organisations: IRD centre in Papeete Oceanologic Center of the Pacific/Ifremer Investment Promotion Authority Environment Division EPIC Vanille Institut Louis-Malardé Gepsun “Natural Substances process engineering” technology platform (cf. Abbreviations) Fisheries Division Economic Affairs Division External Trade Division Development of Industry and the...

  20. Standing Concertation Committee

    CERN Document Server

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    Main points examined at the meeting of 24 June 2009 Results of the 2009 MARS exercise The Committee took note of the results of the 2009 MARS exercise presented by the Head of the HR Department, expressing satisfaction for the early availability of the statistics and for the fact that the analysis of the results covered the last three years. Status report on the work on the five-yearly review The Committee took note of a presentation by P. Gildemyn on the data collection procedure for the 2010 five-yearly review (staff, fellows, associate members of the personnel, CHIS) and of the proposed work schedule. Implications for employment conditions of the discussions at the Finance Committee and Council on 17 and 18 June 2009 The Chairman briefly reported on the discussions at the meetings of the Finance Committee and Council in June 2009, on the 2010-2014 medium-term plan and the 2010 preliminary draft budget, as well as on the modified strategy and goals for 2009. The Committee ...

  1. Factors influencing the effectiveness of research ethics committees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuppli, C A; Fraser, D

    2007-05-01

    Research ethics committees - animal ethics committees (AECs) for animal-based research and institutional research boards (IRBs) for human subjects - have a key role in research governance, but there has been little study of the factors influencing their effectiveness. The objectives of this study were to examine how the effectiveness of a research ethics committee is influenced by committee composition and dynamics, recruitment of members, workload, participation level and member turnover. As a model, 28 members of AECs at four universities in western Canada were interviewed. Committees were selected to represent variation in the number and type of protocols reviewed, and participants were selected to include different types of committee members. We found that a bias towards institutional or scientific interests may result from (1) a preponderance of institutional and scientist members, (2) an intimidating atmosphere for community members and other minority members, (3) recruitment of community members who are affiliated with the institution and (4) members joining for reasons other than to fulfil the committee mandate. Thoroughness of protocol review may be influenced by heavy workloads, type of review process and lack of full committee participation. These results, together with results from the literature on research ethics committees, suggested potential ways to improve the effectiveness of research ethics committees.

  2. 77 FR 40323 - Notice of Invitation for Nominations to the Advisory Committee on Agriculture Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-09

    ... Nominations to the Advisory Committee on Agriculture Statistics AGENCY: National Agricultural Statistics..., State agriculture representatives, and agriculture-related business and marketing experts. Members serve... annually. All meetings are open to the public. Committee members are reimbursed for official travel...

  3. Evaluation of clinical trials by Ethics Committees in Germany – results and a comparison of two surveys performed among members of the German Association of Research-Based Pharmaceutical Companies (vfa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russ, Hagen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available [english] Objective: The objective of this project was to evaluate the quality and quantity of initial applications for a clinical trial according to § 7 of the German Good Clinical Practice (GCP ordinance (German: GCP-Verordnung, GCP-V, the quality of evaluations of those applications by Ethics Committees (ECs/Investigational Review Boards (IRBs in Germany as well as the pattern of EC objections in their reasoned opinions (vote. In order to identify a change over time, the results of the present survey were also compared with a survey performed in 2008.Methods: Based on reasoned opinions issued by the respective EC in charge of the coordinating principle investigator (coordinating EC in 2011, a written survey among members of the German Association of Research-Based Pharmaceutical Companies (vfa was conducted in 2012. The answers to the questionnaire were analyzed descriptively. Since the data set collected in 2011 was structurally identical with the data set gained in 2007 both surveys were compared.Results: Of the 24 companies represented on the vfa Clinical Research/Quality Assurance Subcommittee, 75% (18 took part in the survey. Survey evaluation was based on a total of 251 applications of these 18 companies submitted to 43 ECs. These account for about 21% of 1,214 applications for authorization of commercial and non-commercial phase I–IV clinical trials submitted to the regulatory authorities (BfArM and PEI in 2011.In comparison to 2007, a lower amount of applications (n=251 in 2011 vs. n=288 in 2007 was submitted to a slightly higher number of ECs (43 in 2011 vs. 40 in 2007. The amount of objections increased by 21% from 1,299 (2007 to 1,574 (2011 resulting in an average of 4.5 (2007 vs. 6.3 (2011 objections per application. Overall, the analysis of both formal and content related objections revealed almost the same pattern as in the previous survey. In total, the most frequent objections applied to the patient information and consent

  4. Evaluation of clinical trials by Ethics Committees in Germany--results and a comparison of two surveys performed among members of the German Association of Research-Based Pharmaceutical Companies (vfa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russ, Hagen; Busta, Susanne; Jost, Bertfried; Bethke, Thomas D

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this project was to evaluate the quality and quantity of initial applications for a clinical trial according to § 7 of the German Good Clinical Practice (GCP) ordinance (German: GCP-Verordnung, GCP-V), the quality of evaluations of those applications by Ethics Committees (ECs)/Investigational Review Boards (IRBs) in Germany as well as the pattern of EC objections in their reasoned opinions (vote). In order to identify a change over time, the results of the present survey were also compared with a survey performed in 2008. Based on reasoned opinions issued by the respective EC in charge of the coordinating principle investigator (coordinating EC) in 2011, a written survey among members of the German Association of Research-Based Pharmaceutical Companies (vfa) was conducted in 2012. The answers to the questionnaire were analyzed descriptively. Since the data set collected in 2011 was structurally identical with the data set gained in 2007 both surveys were compared. Of the 24 companies represented on the vfa Clinical Research/Quality Assurance Subcommittee, 75% (18) took part in the survey. Survey evaluation was based on a total of 251 applications of these 18 companies submitted to 43 ECs. These account for about 21% of 1,214 applications for authorization of commercial and non-commercial phase I-IV clinical trials submitted to the regulatory authorities (BfArM and PEI) in 2011. In comparison to 2007, a lower amount of applications (n=251 in 2011 vs. n=288 in 2007) was submitted to a slightly higher number of ECs (43 in 2011 vs. 40 in 2007). The amount of objections increased by 21% from 1,299 (2007) to 1,574 (2011) resulting in an average of 4.5 (2007) vs. 6.3 (2011) objections per application. Overall, the analysis of both formal and content related objections revealed almost the same pattern as in the previous survey. In total, the most frequent objections applied to the patient information and consent form followed in descending order by trial

  5. 75 FR 22757 - Federal Advisory Committee; Army Education Advisory Committee; Charter Renewal

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-30

    ..., school curriculums, educational philosophy and objectives, program effectiveness, facilities, staff and... DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary Federal Advisory Committee; Army Education Advisory... Defense gives notice that it is renewing the charter for the Army Education Advisory Committee (hereafter...

  6. CIRMS role in coordinating MQA programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cleland, M.R. [Radiation Dynamics, Inc., Edgewood, NY (United States)

    1993-12-31

    This paper presents the purposes, functions, and expected benefits of the Council on Ionizing Radiation Measurements and Standards (CIRMS), a new association of ionizing radiation measurers and users. The initial activities are reported, including the program of the inaugural meeting. The organizational structure, members of the executive committee, and chairmen of the standing committees are also given. Governmental and professional organizations, industrial corporations, and interested individuals may join. Broad participation in CIRMS will support the principles of measurement quality assurance for ionizing radiation.

  7. Examination of Sign Language Education According to the Opinions of Members from a Basic Sign Language Certification Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akmese, Pelin Pistav

    2016-01-01

    Being hearing impaired limits one's ability to communicate in that it affects all areas of development, particularly speech. One of the methods the hearing impaired use to communicate is sign language. This study, a descriptive study, intends to examine the opinions of individuals who had enrolled in a sign language certification program by using…

  8. Human research ethics committees: examining their roles and practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillemin, Marilys; Gillam, Lynn; Rosenthal, Doreen; Bolitho, Annie

    2012-07-01

    Considerable time and resources are invested in the ethics review process. We present qualitative data on how human research ethics committee members and health researchers perceive the role and function of the committee. The findings are based on interviews with 34 Australian ethics committee members and 54 health researchers. Although all participants agreed that the primary role of the ethics committee was to protect participants, there was disagreement regarding the additional roles undertaken by committees. Of particular concern were the perceptions from some ethics committee members and researchers that ethics committees were working to protect the institution's interests, as well as being overprotective toward research participants. This has the potential to lead to poor relations and mistrust between ethics committees and researchers.

  9. Surveillance program for former PCB-exposed workers of a transformer and capacitor recycling company, family members, employees of surrounding companies, and area residents--executive summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Thomas; Gube, Monika; Lang, Jessica; Esser, Andre; Sturm, Walter; Fimm, Bruno; Willmes, Klaus; Neulen, Joseph; Baron, Jens Malte; Merk, Hans; Schettgen, Thomas; Konrad, Kerstin; Deisz, Sabine; Rink, Lothar; Hagmann, Michael; Fillies, Birgit; Zschiesche, Wolfgang; Wittsiepe, Jürgen; Wilhelm, Michael

    2012-01-01

    In a German company polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB)-containing transformers and capacitors were recycled on a large scale. Human biomonitoring revealed a high PCB body burden in workers of the recycling company, in surrounding locations of this plant, in companies in the neighborhood of this plant, and in family members of these employees. In order to clarify whether possible adverse health effects occurred or may occur in the future, a prospective surveillance program was initiated. After an extensive literature search, an interdisciplinary group of experts developed a surveillance program based on current knowledge with respect to possible adverse health effects that might occur in the recycling process of transformers and capacitors. Exposure to various hazardous substances (PCB, polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzo-furans [PCDD/F], metals, solvents) was considered. Criteria derived from human biomonitoring results of PCB were used for admission to the program. Participants in the surveillance program are first informed about risks and aims of the program. Subsequently, physicians started a detailed documentation of participants' general and occupational history, with their complaints, diseases, and nutritional habits, as well as information regarding their living areas, by means of a standardized questionnaire. In addition, separate examinations were performed to detect possible neurological, immunological, (neuro)psychological, hormonal, and skin effects. Moreover, DNA exposure as assessed by the comet assay and antioxidative status were determined. The program will be offered at yearly intervals for 3 years, and then at 5 and 10 years after program onset. Until now the program has proved to be feasible, and acceptance among workers and their families has been high. Based on the results, criteria will be developed to define adverse health effects that might be attributable to a hazardous substance exposure.

  10. Introductory materials for committee members: 1) instructions for the Los Alamos National Laboratory fiscal year 2010 capability reviews 2) NPAC strategic capability planning 3) Summary self-assessment for the nuclear and particle physics, astrophysics an

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redondo, Antonio [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) uses external peer review to measure and continuously improve the quality of its science, technology and engineering (STE). LANL uses capability reviews to assess the STE quality and institutional integration and to advise Laboratory Management on the current and future health of the STE. Capability reviews address the STE integration that LANL uses to meet mission requirements. STE capabilities are define to cut across directorates providing a more holistic view of the STE quality, integration to achieve mission requirements, and mission relevance. The scope of these capabilities necessitate that there will be significant overlap in technical areas covered by capability reviews (e.g., materials research and weapons science and engineering). In addition, LANL staff may be reviewed in different capability reviews because of their varied assignments and expertise. LANL plans to perform a complete review of the Laboratory's STE capabilities (hence staff) in a three-year cycle. The principal product of an external review is a report that includes the review committee's assessments, commendations, and recommendations for STE. The Capability Review Committees serve a dual role of providing assessment of the Laboratory's technical contributions and integration towards its missions and providing advice to Laboratory Management. The assessments and advice are documented in reports prepared by the Capability Review Committees that are delivered to the Director and to the Principal Associate Director for Science, Technology and Engineering (PADSTE). This report will be used by Laboratory Management for STE assessment and planning. The report is also provided to the Department of Energy (DOE) as part of LANL's Annual Performance Plan and to the Los Alamos National Security (LANS) LLC's Science and Technology Committee (STC) as part of its responsibilities to the LANS Board of Governors.

  11. Ethics Committee or Community? Examining the identity of Czech Ethics Committees in the period of transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simek, Jiri; Zamykalova, Lenka; Mesanyova, Marie

    2010-09-01

    Reflecting on a three year long exploratory research of ethics committees in the Czech Republic authors discuss the current role and identity of research ethics committees. The research of Czech ethics committees focused on both self-presentation and self-understanding of ECs members, and how other stakeholders (representatives of the pharmaceutical industry) view them. The exploratory research was based on formal and informal communication with the members of the ethics committees. Members of the research team took part at six regular voluntary meetings of the ethics committees' members, organised by the Forum of Czech Ethics Committees, and at three summer schools of medical ethics. There were realised twenty-five semi-structured interviews as well as six focus group sessions and a participant observation of several regular meetings of three ethics committees. On the grounds of experience from the interviews a simple questionnaire survey was realised among the members of the ethics committees. The ethics committees comprise a community of members working voluntarily, without claims to remuneration or prestige; the unifying goal is protection of subjects of research. The principal working methods are dialogue and agreement. The members of the ethics committees thus, among other things, create an informal community, which can be to a certain extent seen as a Kantian ethical community in a weak sense. The phenomenon of ethics committees can also be described by terms of an epistemic community and a community of practice. These concepts, which are borrowed from other authors and areas, are used as a way how to think of ECs role and identity a bit differently and are meant as a contribution to the current international debate on the topic.

  12. Standing Concertation Committee

    CERN Document Server

    HR Department

    2007-01-01

    ORDINARY MEETING ON 27 FEBRUARY 2007 The main items discussed at the meeting of the Standing Concertation Committee on 27 February 2007 included: Saved Leave Scheme (SLS): It was announced that a Management/Staff Association working group had been set up to discuss the Saved Leave Scheme (SLS): Members : M. Büttner, E. Chiaveri (chair), Ph. Defert, D. Klem, M. Vitasse, J.-M. Saint-Viteux. It was noted that the Staff Association was launching a questionnaire on SLS and distributed to all members of the personnel. Merit Recognition Guidelines: In the context of the new Merit Appraisal and Recognition Scheme (MARS), the committee took note of the CERN-wide 2007 Merit Recognition Guidelines, including the Frequently Asked Questions on HR Department's dedicated website. Information on CERN's medium and long-term plans (MTP-LTP)/Contract renewals/ External mobility The Committee took note of the information provided on CERN's MTP-LTP and of documentation distributed at the meeting by the Staff ...

  13. 75 FR 28542 - Superior Resource Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-21

    ... Self-Determination Act (Pub. L. 110-343) and in compliance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act. The purpose of the meeting is to orient the new Superior Resource Advisory Committee members on their roles... following business will be conducted: Overview of the roles and responsibilities of the Superior Resource...

  14. 12 CFR 620.30 - Audit committees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... shareholders; review the impact of any significant accounting and auditing developments; review accounting policy changes relating to preparation of financial statements; and review annual and quarterly reports..., financial reporting and disclosure, or accounting procedures. (b) Independence. Every audit committee member...

  15. 77 FR 47490 - Shipping Coordinating Committee; Notice of Committee Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-08

    ...: --Adoption of the agenda --Decisions of other IMO bodies --Global Maritime Distress and Safety System (GMDSS... facilities --Consideration of operational and technical coordination provisions of maritime safety... Vice-Chairman for 2014 --Any other business --Report to the Maritime Safety Committee Members of the...

  16. 77 FR 72431 - Shipping Coordinating Committee; Notice of Committee Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-05

    ... other IMO bodies --Global Maritime Distress and Safety System (GMDSS): --Review and modernization of the... operational and technical coordination provisions of maritime safety information (MSI) services, including the... business --Report to the Maritime Safety Committee Members of the public may attend this meeting up to the...

  17. The Zero Suicide Program (ZSP) as a Strategy for Reduction and Prevention of Suicides Among Active Duty United States Air Force Members: A Program and Evaluation Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    58 D. Budget Proposal……………………………………………………………...59 E. USAF Suicide Data…………………………………………………………..62 F. ZSP Proposed Outline vs . AFSPP... unmarried members (excess relative risk of 18%). Discussion The goals of the AFSPP seems to have been accomplished with the results as outlined in this...95.4% had never experienced combat.16 Unlike their civilian counterparts being married does not appear to have a protective effect on suicidal rates

  18. 78 FR 42945 - Health Information Technology Policy Committee Vacancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-18

    ... GOVERNMENT ACCOUNTABILITY OFFICE Health Information Technology Policy Committee Vacancy AGENCY... American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) established the Health Information Technology Policy... its 20 members. ARRA requires that one member have expertise in health information privacy and...

  19. Fast breeder reactor program. Hearings before the Joint Economic Committee, Congress of the United States, Ninety-Fourth Congress, First Session

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1976-01-01

    The economics of the liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) was the subject of hearings of the Joint Economic Committee, chaired by Sen. Hubert Humphrey. FY '76 funding for the breeder program is $450 million, the largest single item of the Federal energy program. Elmer B. Staats, U.S. Comptroller General, testified on the rising costs of demonstration facilities and pointed out that Federal agencies are required to make all estimates of costs and benefits in constant dollars rather than projecting for inflation. Staats recommended a joint ERDA-Congressional study of the possible use of foreign breeder technology. Sheldon Meyers of the Environmental Protection Agency, while not opposing the breeder program, recommended a delay to resolve three problem areas: (1) base energy demand projections; (2) timing of the commercial introduction of the LMFBR; and (3) uncertainties over possible benefits from the LMFBR program. Theodore B. Taylor, International Research and Technology Corp., discussed the costs and security safeguards of the LMFBR, which produces more spent fuel than the light water reactor. Other witnesses included Robert Seamans and officials from ERDA, Ralph Nader, and speakers from private study groups

  20. "The President" Was a Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcoran, George C.

    1976-01-01

    From 1970 until 1974, the Seattle Community College District was directed by a four-member executive committee, rather than by one chief executive officer. The history of this period is recounted, and advantages and disadvantages of the management system are identified. In sum, the system is satisfactory only in the short-run. (NHM)

  1. 78 FR 71706 - Advisory Committee for Aviation Consumer Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-29

    ... Committee for Aviation Consumer Protection AGENCY: Office of the Secretary (OST), Department of... fifth meeting of the Advisory Committee for Aviation Consumer Protection. DATES: The fifth meeting of... Aviation Consumer Protection (ACACP) and announced those persons appointed as members. The committee's...

  2. 78 FR 55327 - Advisory Committee for Aviation Consumer Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-10

    ... Committee for Aviation Consumer Protection AGENCY: Office of the Secretary (OST), Department of... fifth meeting of the Advisory Committee for Aviation Consumer Protection. DATES: The fifth meeting of... Consumer Protection and announced those persons appointed as members. The committee's charter, drafted in...

  3. 75 FR 57279 - Risk Communication Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-20

    ...] Risk Communication Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS... Communication Advisory Committee. General Function of the Committee: To provide advice and recommendations to... Committee will hear and discuss developments in FDA's ongoing communications programs, such as FDA's...

  4. Department of Energy Review of Laboratory Programs for Women Points-of-Contact Committee: Comparative Report, June 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLane, V.; Layne, A.

    1995-06-01

    A survey of the DOE facilities was undertaken by the Points-of-Contact for the DOE Review of Laboratory Programs for Women in order to gather data to be used as a baseline against which to measure future progress. We plan to look at current programs already in place and evaluate them with a view to deciding which programs are most effective, and selecting model programs suitable for implementation at other facilities. The survey focused on four areas: 1) statistical data, 2) laboratory policy, 3) formal and informal programs which affect the quality of life in the work environment, and career development and advancement, and 4) educational programs. Although this report focuses on women, the problems discussed affect all DOE facility employees.

  5. Implementation of a Novel Structured Social and Wellness Committee in a Surgical Residency Program: A Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Orden, Kathryn E; Talutis, Stephanie D; Ng-Glazier, Joanna H; Richman, Aaron P; Pennington, Elliot C; Janeway, Megan G; Kauffman, Douglas F; Dechert, Tracey A

    2017-01-01

    This article provides a theoretical and practical rational for the implementation of an innovative and comprehensive social wellness program in a surgical residency program at a large safety net hospital on the East Coast of the United States. Using basic needs theory, we describe why it is particularly important for surgical residency programs to consider the residents sense of competence, autonomy, and belonging during residence. We describe how we have developed a comprehensive program to address our residents' (and residents' families) psychological needs for competence, autonomy, and belongingness.

  6. 76 FR 46279 - Smart Grid Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-02

    ...The Smart Grid Advisory Committee (SGAC or Committee) will hold a meeting via teleconference on Tuesday, August 23, 2011 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Eastern Time (E.T.). The primary purpose of this meeting is to review sections of the Committee's draft report to the NIST Director. The sections of the draft report that the Committee will consider at the meeting will be posted on the SGAC Web site at http:// www.nist.gov/smartgrid. Interested members of the public will be able to participate in the meeting from remote locations by calling into a central phone number.

  7. School Safety: Promising Initiatives for Addressing School Violence. Report to the Ranking Minority Member, Subcommittee on Children and Families, Committee on Labor and Human Resources, U.S. Senate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC. Health, Education, and Human Services Div.

    This report presents findings of a study, conducted by the United States General Accounting Office (GAO), that investigated programs used by schools to curb violence. Specifically, the study examined four promising school-based violence-prevention programs. Data were obtained from: (1) interviews with violence-prevention program directors, federal…

  8. 77 FR 24538 - Sunshine Act Meeting Notice; Finance, Budget & Program; Committee Meeting of the Board of Directors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-24

    ... NEIGHBORHOOD REINVESTMENT CORPORATION Sunshine Act Meeting Notice; Finance, Budget & Program...: Erica Hall, Assistant Corporate Secretary, (202) 220-2376; [email protected] . AGENDA: I. Call to Order II.../Dashboard VII. NFMC & EHLP VIII. Program Updates IX. Adjournment Erica Hall, Assistant Corporate Secretary...

  9. VA Education Benefits: Actions Taken, but Outreach and Oversight Could Be Improved. Report to the Ranking Member, Subcommittee on Military Personnel, Committee on Armed Services, House of Representatives. GAO-11-256

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertoni, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) provided $9 billion in education benefits to service-members and veterans in fiscal year 2010, mostly through the new Post-9/11 GI Bill. In providing education benefits, VA relies on State Approving Agencies (SAA) to approve schools; and on schools to report students' enrollment status. US Government…

  10. Vietnam Education Foundation: Recent Improvements Made in Internal Controls, but Weaknesses Persist. Report to the Chairman and Ranking Member, Committee on Foreign Relations, U.S. Senate. GAO-10-442

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Jess T.

    2010-01-01

    The Vietnam Education Foundation (VEF) Act of 2000 established VEF as an independent agency of the executive branch. A 13-member board of directors provides primary oversight. VEF also receives guidance from other entities in carrying out its mission to further bilateral relations between the United States and Vietnam through educational exchanges…

  11. Organizing Committee Advisory Committee 187

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Organizing Committee. V M Datar (Chairman). Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai, India. D C Biswas (Convener). Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai, India. K Mahata (Secretary). Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai, India. Z Ahmed. Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai, India. P V Bhagwat.

  12. Staff Exchange or Legal Alien Programs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Rune Nørgaard

    2016-01-01

    SRA would very much like to support the exchange of best practice between members throughout the year and the Membership Committee is presently looking into the opportunities for a Staff Exchange or Legal Alien Program. However the International Section has already had the chance to provide...

  13. Report on the PWR-radiation protection/ALARA Committee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malone, D.J. [Consumers Power Co., Covert, MI (United States)

    1995-03-01

    In 1992, representatives from several utilities with operational Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) formed the PWR-Radiation Protection/ALARA Committee. The mission of the Committee is to facilitate open communications between member utilities relative to radiation protection and ALARA issues such that cost effective dose reduction and radiation protection measures may be instituted. While industry deregulation appears inevitable and inter-utility competition is on the rise, Committee members are fully committed to sharing both positive and negative experiences for the benefit of the health and safety of the radiation worker. Committee meetings provide current operational experiences through members providing Plant status reports, and information relative to programmatic improvements through member presentations and topic specific workshops. The most recent Committee workshop was facilitated to provide members with defined experiences that provide cost effective ALARA performance.

  14. 29 October 2013 - Former Director-General of IAEA H. Blix on the occasion of the Thorium Energy Conference at CERN with Chair of the ThEC13 Organization Committee E. Lillestol and Author of the book “Atome Vert” (Green Atom) J.-C. de Mestral; in the LHC tunnel at Point 1 with Technology Department, Machine Protection & Electrical Integrity Group, Performance Evaluation Section Member A. Verweij.

    CERN Multimedia

    Anna Pantelia

    2013-01-01

    29 October 2013 - Former Director-General of IAEA H. Blix on the occasion of the Thorium Energy Conference at CERN with Chair of the ThEC13 Organization Committee E. Lillestol and Author of the book “Atome Vert” (Green Atom) J.-C. de Mestral; in the LHC tunnel at Point 1 with Technology Department, Machine Protection & Electrical Integrity Group, Performance Evaluation Section Member A. Verweij.

  15. Exceptional Family Member Program EFM

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    official. A legible copy of the most current Individualized Education Plan ( IEP ) must be submitted with NA\\’PERS 1754/4. SNAVPERS 1754/3 and 1754/4 must be...Center National Easter Seal Society (Mobiltv / Hearing /Sight) iEarlv Intervention) 1-800-833 3232 - * 1-800-221-6821 -- (312) 726-6200 Autism

  16. Supporting Members and Friends

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-10-01

    Thank you! Over the past year, AGU has received 12,104 gifts, both large and small, from members and friends. The Union has also received corporate contributions, National Science Foundation grants, and support from the National Oceanographic Partnership Program and National Association of Geoscience Teachers. Together their generosity has benefited AGU non revenue producing programs that are critical to our science and the future health of the Union. The following list gratefully acknowledges annual gifts of $100 or more and cumulative giving of $5,000 or more. The 1919 Society ($100,000 or more) and Benefactors ($5,000-$99,999) recognize single major gifts and cumulative contributions. Three circles acknowledge annual giving: President's Circle ($1,000 or more), Leadership Circle ($200-$999), and Supporters Circle ($100-$199). Supporting Life Members, who contribute a one-time gift of $1,200 in addition to lifetime dues, are among our most loyal Supporters.

  17. 77 FR 22297 - Renewal of Department of Defense Federal Advisory Committees

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-13

    ... the exception of travel and per diem for official Committee related travel, Committee members shall... point of view and in a manner that is free from conflict of interest. The Department, when necessary... exception of travel and per diem for official Committee related travel, subcommittee members shall serve...

  18. 77 FR 68747 - Reestablishment of Department of Defense Federal Advisory Committees

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-16

    ... establishment of wage schedules for all appropriated fund and non-appropriated fund wage areas of blue-collar... per diem for official Committee related travel, Committee members shall serve without compensation... per diem for official Committee-related travel, Subcommittee members shall serve without compensation...

  19. Report of the evaluation by the Ad Hoc Review Committee on advance science research. Result evaluation, interim evaluation, in-advance evaluation in fiscal year 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-11-01

    The Research Evaluation Committee, which consisted of 13 members from outside of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), set up an Ad Hoc Review Committee on Advanced Science Research in accordance with the Fundamental Guideline for the Evaluation of Research and Development (R and D) at JAERI' and its subsidiary regulations in order to evaluate the accomplishments of the research completed in Fiscal Year 2002, the accomplishments of the research started in Fiscal Year 2001, and the adequacy of the programs of the research to be started in Fiscal Year 2004 at Advanced Science Research Center of JAERI. The Ad Hoc Review Committee consisted of nine specialists from outside of JAERI. The Ad Hoc Review Committee conducted its activities from May to July 2003. The evaluation was performed on the basis of the materials submitted in advance and of the oral presentations made at the Ad Hoc Review Committee meeting which was held on June 24, 2003, in line with the items, viewpoints, and criteria for the evaluation specified by the Research Evaluation Committee. The result of the evaluation by the Ad Hoc Review Committee was submitted to the Research Evaluation Committee, and was judged to be appropriate at its meeting held on August 4, 2003. This report describes the result of the evaluation by the Ad Hoc Review Committee on Advanced Science Research. (author)

  20. Report of the evaluation by the ad hoc review committee on advanced photon and synchrotron radiation research. In-advance evaluation in fiscal year 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-11-01

    The Research Evaluation Committee, which consisted of 13 members from outside of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), set up an Ad Hoc Review Committee on Advanced Photon and Synchrotron Radiation Research in accordance with the 'Fundamental Guideline for the Evaluation of Research and Development (R and D) at JAERI' and its subsidiary regulations in order to evaluate the adequacy of the R and D programs to be implemented for five years starting in Fiscal Year 2002 at Advanced Photon Research Center and at Synchrotron Radiation Research Center in Kansai Research Establishment of JAERI. The Ad Hoc Review Committee consisted of ten specialists from outside of JAERI. The Ad Hoc Review Committee conducted its activities from May to July 2001. The evaluation was performed on the basis of the materials submitted in advanced and of the oral presentations made at the Ad Hoc Review Committee meeting which was held on June 21, 2001, in line with the items, viewpoints, and criteria for the evaluation specified by the Research Evaluation Committee. The result of the evaluation by the Ad Hoc Review Committee was submitted to the Research Evaluation Committee, and was judged to be appropriate at its meeting held on July 12, 2001. This report describes the result of the evaluation by the Ad Hoc Review Committee on Advanced Photon and Synchrotron Radiation Research. (author)

  1. Report of the evaluation by the Ad Hoc Review Committee on Information Technology. In-advance evaluation in fiscal year 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-06-01

    The Research Evaluation Committee, which consisted of 14 members from outside of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), set up an Ad Hoc Review Committee on Information Technology in accordance with the Fundamental Guideline for the Evaluation of Research and Development (R and D) at JAERI' and its subsidiary regulations in order to evaluate the adequacy of the R and D programs pertaining to the establishment and utilization of the Information Technology Based Laboratory (ITBL) to be implemented for five years starting in Fiscal Year 2001 at Center for Promotion of Computational Science and Engineering and Department of Environmental Sciences of JAERI. The Ad Hoc Review Committee consisted of eight specialists from outside of JAERI. The Ad Hoc Review Committee conducted its activities from February to March 2001. The evaluation was performed on the basis of the materials submitted in advance and of the oral presentations made at the Ad Hoc Review Committee meeting which was held on February 9, 2001, in line with the items, viewpoints, and criteria for the evaluation specified by the Research Evaluation Committee. The result of the evaluation by the Ad Hoc Review Committee was submitted to the Research Evaluation Committee, and was judged to be appropriate at its meeting held on March 16, 2001. This report describes the result of the evaluation by the Ad Hoc Review Committee on Information Technology. (author)

  2. Report of the evaluation by the ad hoc review committee on radiation application research. In-advance evaluation in fiscal year 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-11-01

    The Research Evaluation Committee, which consisted of 13 members from outside of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), set up an Ad Hoc Review Committee on Radiation Application Research in accordance with the Fundamental Guideline for the Evaluation of Research and Development (R and D) at JAERI' and its subsidiary regulations in order to evaluate the adequacy of the R and D programs to be implemented for five years starting in Fiscal Year 2002 at Department of Material Development, at Department of Ion-Beam-Applied Biology and at Advanced Radiation Technology Center in Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment of JAERI. The Ad Hoc Review Committee consisted of ten specialists from outside of JAERI. The Ad Hoc Review Committee conducted its activities from May to July 2001. The evaluation was performed on the basis of the materials submitted in advance and of the oral presentations made at the Ad Hoc Review Committee meeting which was held on June 25, 2001, in line with the items, viewpoints, and criteria for the evaluation specified by the Research Evaluation Committee. The result of the evaluation by the Ad Hoc Review Committee was submitted to the Research Evaluation Committee, and was judged to be appropriate at its meeting held on July 12, 2001. This report describes the result of the evaluation by the Ad Hoc Review Committee on Radiation Application Research. (author)

  3. Report of the evaluation by the Ad Hoc Review Committee on Materials Science Research. In-advance evaluation in fiscal year 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-11-01

    The Research Evaluation Committee, which consisted of 13 members from outside of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), set up an Ad Hoc Review Committee on Materials Science Research in accordance with the Fundamental Guideline for the Evaluation of Research and Development (R and D) at JAERI' and its subsidiary regulations in order to evaluate the adequacy of the R and D programs to be implemented for five years starting in Fiscal Year 2003 at Department of Materials Science in Tokai Research Establishment of JAERI. The Ad Hoc Review Committee consisted of eight specialists from outside of JAERI. The Ad Hoc Review Committee conducted its activities from April 2002 to August 2002. The evaluation was performed on the basis of the materials submitted in advance and of the oral presentations made at the Ad Hoc Review Committee meeting which was held on June 5th, 2002, in line with the items, viewpoints, and criteria for the evaluation specified by the Research Evaluation Committee. The result of the evaluation by the Ad Hoc Review Committee was submitted to the Research Evaluation Committee, and was judged to be appropriate at its meeting held on August 5th, 2002. This report describes the result of the evaluation by the Ad Hoc Review Committee on Materials Science Research. (author)

  4. Report of the evaluation by the Ad Hoc Review Committee on Advance Science Research. Result evaluation, interim evaluation, in-advance evaluation in fiscal year 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-11-01

    The Research Evaluation Committee, which consisted of 13 members from outside of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), set up an Ad Hoc Review Committee on Advanced Science Research in accordance with the Fundamental Guideline for the Evaluation of Research and Development (R and D) at JAERI' and its subsidiary regulations in order to evaluate the accomplishments of the research completed in Fiscal Year 2001, the accomplishments of the research started in Fiscal Year 2000, and the adequacy of the programs of the research to be started in Fiscal Year 2003 at Advanced Science Research Center of JAERI. The Ad Hoc Review Committee consisted of eight specialists from outside of JAERI. The Ad Hoc Review Committee conducted its activities from May to July 2002. The evaluation was performed on the basis of the materials submitted in advance and of the oral presentations made at the Ad Hoc Review Committee meeting which was held on June 4, 2002, in line with the items, viewpoints, and criteria for the evaluation specified by the Research Evaluation Committee. The result of the evaluation by the Ad Hoc Review Committee was submitted to the Research Evaluation Committee, and was judged to be appropriate at its meeting held on August 5, 2002. This report describes the result of the evaluation by the Ad Hoc Review Committee on Advanced Science Research. (author)

  5. Report of the evaluation by the Ad Hoc Review Committee on Materials Science Research. In-advance evaluation in fiscal year 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-11-01

    The Research Evaluation Committee, which consisted of 13 members from outside of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), set up an Ad Hoc Review Committee on Materials Science Research in accordance with the Fundamental Guideline for the Evaluation of Research and Development (R and D) at JAERI' and its subsidiary regulations in order to evaluate the adequacy of the R and D programs to be implemented for five years starting in Fiscal Year 2003 at Department of Materials Science in Tokai Research Establishment of JAERI. The Ad Hoc Review Committee consisted of eight specialists from outside of JAERI. The Ad Hoc Review Committee conducted its activities from April 2002 to August 2002. The evaluation was performed on the basis of the materials submitted in advance and of the oral presentations made at the Ad Hoc Review Committee meeting which was held on June 5th, 2002, in line with the items, viewpoints, and criteria for the evaluation specified by the Research Evaluation Committee. The result of the evaluation by the Ad Hoc Review Committee was submitted to the Research Evaluation Committee, and was judged to be appropriate at its meeting held on August 5th, 2002. This report describes the result of the evaluation by the Ad Hoc Review Committee on Materials Science Research. (author)

  6. 76 FR 13436 - National Advisory Committee for Labor Provisions of U.S. Free Trade Agreements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-11

    ... point of contact for the NAALC and the Labor Provisions of U.S. Free Trade Agreements. The committee is... Labor Affairs serves as the U.S. point of contact under the FTAs listed above. The committee shall... Committee. Members of the Committee will not be compensated for their services or reimbursed for travel...

  7. School Lunch Program: Role and Impacts of Private Food Service Companies. United States General Accounting Office Report to Congressional Committees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC. Resources, Community, and Economic Development Div.

    In the Healthy Meals for Healthy Americans Act of 1994, Congress directed the Government Accounting Office (GAO) to examine the use of private food establishments and caterers by schools participating in federal programs for school meals. In conducting its review, the GAO relied primarily on questionnaires returned by food authorities that had…

  8. 78 FR 29145 - President's National Security Telecommunications Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-17

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY [Docket No. DHS-2013-0022] President's National Security Telecommunications Advisory Committee AGENCY: National Protection and Programs Directorate, DHS. ACTION: Committee... notice of a May 22, 2013, meeting of the President's National Security Telecommunications Advisory...

  9. 78 FR 45255 - President's National Security Telecommunications Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-26

    ... Telecommunications Advisory Committee AGENCY: National Protection and Programs Directorate, DHS. [[Page 45256... President's National Security Telecommunications Advisory Committee (NSTAC) will meet on Tuesday, August 20... related to national security and emergency preparedness (NS/EP) telecommunications policy. Agenda: The...

  10. 77 FR 26023 - President's National Security Telecommunications Advisory Committee; Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-02

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY [Docket No. DHS-2012-0016] President's National Security Telecommunications Advisory Committee; Correction AGENCY: National Protection and Programs Directorate, DHS. [[Page... April 25, 2012, concerning the President's National Security Telecommunications Advisory Committee...

  11. 76 FR 28210 - Eastern Arizona Counties Resource Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-16

    ... DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Eastern Arizona Counties Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Eastern Arizona Counties will meet...: Julia Faith Rivera, RAC Program Manager, Eastern Arizona Counties Resource Advisory Committee, Apache...

  12. Child Care: Recent State Policy Changes Affecting the Availability of Assistance for Low-Income Families. Report to the Ranking Minority Member, Subcommittee on Human Resources, Committee on Ways and Means, House of Representatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC.

    At Congressional request, the General Accounting Office examined states choices for providing child care assistance to families and states' proposed changes to child care assistance programs for fiscal year 2004. Information was obtained through a survey of child care administrators of the 50 states and the District of Columbia. Findings revealed…

  13. Inferred referendum: a rule for committee decisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolsky, A; Sanathanan, L

    1979-01-01

    A new method of social choice is presented. The result of the method coincides with that of majority voting when it does not produce an intransitivity among the alternatives under consideration. When majority voting would produce an intransitivity, the method orders the alternatives in the same way as the transitive constituency would whom the committee members are most likely to represent. Analysis of the application of the method to three alternatives shows that the resulting order depends only on the committee members' votes between pairs of alternatives; the resulting order is less sensitive to irrelevant alternatives than the orders provided by other schemes; when majority voting provides an intransitivity, the hypothesis that, in fact, the committee's constituency is as assumed is almost as likely as the hypothesis that it precisely mirrors the committee.

  14. Fusion Policy Advisory Committee (FPAC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-09-01

    This document is the final report of the Fusion Policy Advisory Committee. The report conveys the Committee's views on the matters specified by the Secretary in his charge and subsequent letters to the Committee, and also satisfies the provisions of Section 7 of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Engineering Act of 1980, Public Law 96-386, which require a triennial review of the conduct of the national Magnetic Fusion Energy program. Three sub-Committee's were established to address the large number of topics associated with fusion research and development. One considered magnetic fusion energy, a second considered inertial fusion energy, and the third considered issues common to both. For many reasons, the promise of nuclear fusion as a safe, environmentally benign, and affordable source of energy is bright. At the present state of knowledge, however, it is uncertain that this promise will become reality. Only a vigorous, well planned and well executed program of research and development will yield the needed information. The Committee recommends that the US commit to a plan that will resolve this critically important issue. It also outlines the first steps in a development process that will lead to a fusion Demonstration Power Plant by 2025. The recommended program is aggressive, but we believe the goal is reasonable and attainable. International collaboration at a significant level is an important element in the plan

  15. Using a standards committee to design practical procedure system improvements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grider, D.A.; Plung, D.

    1993-01-01

    In the post-Three Mile Island (TMI) environment, numerous reports have been issued on how to improve the quality of procedures used at government and commercial nuclear facilities. The studies tend to be long on what is wrong with existing procedures and short on practical directions on how to fix those faults. Few of these studies have been conducted by practitioners with full-time procedure-managing or procedure writing experience. None of these studies go into detail on how to improve the procedure system itself. Over the last 10 yr, various nuclear facilities within the US Department of Energy (DOE) have carried out individual programs to develop procedures that meet post-TMI standards. However, ∼2 yr ago, DOE formed a Procedures Standards Committee to advise DOE in developing a set of post-TMI guidelines that could be consistently applied throughout all DOE nuclear facilities. The committee has achieved not only its original mission by producing a series of integrated guidance documents but has also evolved a systems approach to procedures management that sets new standards for procedure quality and efficiency. As members of this committee, the authors want to describe what has made the group's approach so successful. The lessons learned may be translatable to a wide range of government and commercial industry procedure programs

  16. CIRRPC (Committee on Interagency Radiation Research and Policy Coordination) sixteenth quarterly report, April 1-June 30, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, A.L.

    1988-01-01

    The document is a summary of the Committee on Interagency Radiation Research and Policy Coordination activities for the period April 1 through June 30, 1988. During the reporting period, the Executive Committee met with the staff concerned with the radiation matters of the Department of the Interior on May 20 and with the Department of Defense on May 23 to review current CIRRPC activities and issues of particular interest to those agencies. The meetings were a part of CIRRPC's program of visits to member agencies on a two-year cycle

  17. 75 FR 7255 - Army Educational Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-18

    ... Committee: U.S. Army War College Subcommittee of the Army Education Advisory Committee. Date of Meeting: March 11, 2010. Place of Meeting: U.S. Army War College, 122 Forbes Avenue, Carlisle, PA, Command...; table and examine online College issues; assess resident and distance education programs, self- study...

  18. 76 FR 77778 - Amendment to Notice of Establishment of the Advisory Committee on Supply Chain Competitiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-14

    ... Operation The Committee shall consist of a maximum of 40 private sector members appointed by the Secretary... private sector members, the Secretary of Transportation and the Administrator of the Environmental... as appropriate in making appointments of private sector members. The Committee chair and vice chair...

  19. THE INFLUENCE OF AUDIT COMMITTEE CHARACTERISTICS ON REAL EARNINGS MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supriyaningsih Supriyaningsih

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Current study tests the impact of audit committees to the real earnings management.Using the manufacturing public listed companies from Indoensia Stock Exchange from 2012 until 2014, we found that that financial and accounting expertise of audit committee members and audit committee size have positive effect on real earnings management. Furthermore, we also found that the dual positions of the audit committee chairman have a negative effect on earnings management. The Tenure of audit committee chairman however, has no impact on real earnings management.

  20. 21st Century Professional Skill Training Programs for Faculty Members--A Comparative Study between Virginia Tech University, American University & King Saud University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Majed, Asma; Al-Kathiri, Fatima; Al-Ajmi, Sara; Al-Hamlan, Suad

    2017-01-01

    The 21st century faculty member is expected to teach, engage the learner, absorb new discoveries and rely on different knowledge in the execution of duties. This calls for up-to-date skills for instruction, assessment, and identification of opportunities by faculty members to promote learning. This paper investigates the prospects of promoting…

  1. [The Editorial Advisory Committee].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, H

    1996-12-01

    Since 1970, Revista Médica de Chile applies the peer review system as a main step in the selection and improvement of the manuscripts to be published. Over 150 experts participate in this process annually, reviewing up to 5 manuscripts per year. The final decision with regards to to the acceptability of a manuscript remains a responsibility of the Editor. The reviewers are selected by the Editor and his Associates among clinical investigators, prominent subspecialits and basic scientists, according to the nature of the manuscript. Most of them work in Chile. Their names are published and their confidential work is acknowledged in a special chronicle published in the Revista once a year. A small number of these reviewers appears in every issue of the journal identified as Members of its Editorial Advisory Committee. They have been selected by the Editors among those reviewers who deal with a greater number of manuscripts and also those experienced specialists whose opinion is requested when an exceptional conflict of opinions is raised by the authors and their reviewers. After 5 to 10 years of a highly praised collaboration, the previous Committee has been changed and new names were included, starting in this issue of Revista Médica de Chile.

  2. Library Research Instruction for Doctor of Ministry Students: Outcomes of Instruction Provided by a Theological Librarian and by a Program Faculty Member

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles D. Kamilos

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available At some seminaries the question of who is more effective teaching library research is an open question.  There are two camps of thought: (1 that the program faculty member is more effective in providing library research instruction as he or she is intimately engaged in the subject of the course(s, or (2 that the theological librarian is more effective in providing library research instruction as he or she is more familiar with the scope of resources that are available, as well as how to obtain “hard to get” resources.   What began as a librarian’s interest in determining the extent to which Doctor of Ministry (DMin students begin their research using Google, resulted in the development of a survey.  Given the interesting results returned from the first survey in fall of 2008, the survey was conducted again in the fall of 2011.  The results of the comparative data led to the discovery of some useful data that will be used to adjust future instruction sessions for DMin students.  The results of the surveys indicated that the instruction provided by the theological librarian was more effective as students were more prepared to obtain and use resources most likely to provide the best information for course projects. Additionally, following the instruction of library research skills by the librarian (2011 survey, DMin students were more likely to begin the search process for information resources using university provided catalogs and databases than what was reported in the 2008 survey. The responses to the two surveys piqued interest regarding both eBook use during the research process and the reduction of research frustration to be addressed in a follow-up survey to be given in 2014, results of which we hope to report in a future article.

  3. Reducing the psychosocial impact of aphasia on mood and quality of life in people with aphasia and the impact of caregiving in family members through the Aphasia Action Success Knowledge (Aphasia ASK) program: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worrall, Linda; Ryan, Brooke; Hudson, Kyla; Kneebone, Ian; Simmons-Mackie, Nina; Khan, Asaduzzaman; Hoffmann, Tammy; Power, Emma; Togher, Leanne; Rose, Miranda

    2016-03-22

    People with aphasia and their family members are at high risk of experiencing post stroke depression. The impact of early interventions on mood and quality of life for people with aphasia is unknown. This study will determine whether an early intervention for both the person with aphasia after stroke and their family members leads to better mood and quality of life outcomes for people with aphasia, and less caregiver burden and better mental health for their family members. This is a multicenter, cluster-randomized controlled trial. Clusters, which are represented by Health Service Districts, will be randomized to the experimental intervention (Aphasia Action Success Knowledge Program) or an attention control (Secondary Stroke Prevention Information Program). People with aphasia and their family members will be blinded to the study design and treatment allocation (that is, will not know there are two arms to the study). Both arms of the study will receive usual care in addition to either the experimental or the attention control intervention. A total of 344 people with aphasia and their family members will be recruited. Considering a cluster size of 20, the required sample size can be achieved from 18 clusters. However, 20 clusters will be recruited to account for the potential of cluster attrition during the study. Primary outcome measures will be mood and quality of life of people with aphasia at 12 months post stroke. Secondary measures will be family member outcomes assessing the impact of caregiving and mental health, and self-reported stroke risk-related behaviors of people with aphasia. This is the first known program tailored for people with aphasia and their family members that aims to prevent depression in people with aphasia by providing intervention early after the stroke. This trial is registered in the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ANZCTR) as ACTRN12614000979651 . Date registered: 11 September 2014.

  4. 76 FR 16427 - Risk Communication Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-23

    ...] Risk Communication Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS... Communication Advisory Committee. General Function of the Committee: To provide advice and recommendations to... discuss developments in FDA's ongoing communications programs. The discussion will focus on the use of...

  5. 75 FR 2159 - Scientific Earthquake Studies Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-14

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR U.S. Geological Survey Scientific Earthquake Studies Advisory Committee... Scientific Earthquake Studies Advisory Committee (SESAC) will hold its next meeting at the U.S. Geological... participation in the National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program. The Committee will receive updates and...

  6. ITER management advisory committee meeting in NAKA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshikawa, M.

    1999-01-01

    The ITER Management Advisory Committee (MAC) Meeting was held on 17 December 1999 in Naka, Japan. The main topics were the ITER EDA Status, Task Status Summary and Work Program and a schedule of ITER meetings

  7. 41 CFR 102-3.130 - What policies apply to the appointment, and compensation or reimbursement of advisory committee...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... committee staff person who is not a current Federal employee serving under an assignment must be appointed... the appointment, and compensation or reimbursement of advisory committee members, staff, and experts... compensation or reimbursement of advisory committee members, staff, and experts and consultants? In developing...

  8. Resident dashboards: helping your clinical competency committee visualize trainees’ key performance indicators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen A. Friedman

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Under the Next Accreditation System, programs need to find ways to collect and assess meaningful reportable information on its residents to assist the program director regarding resident milestone progression. This paper discusses the process that one large Internal Medicine Residency Program used to provide both quantitative and qualitative data to its clinical competency committee (CCC through the creation of a resident dashboard. Methods: Program leadership at a large university-based program developed four new end of rotation evaluations based on the American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM and Accreditation Council of Graduated Medical Education's (ACGME 22 reportable milestones. A resident dashboard was then created to pull together both milestone- and non-milestone-based quantitative data and qualitative data compiled from faculty, nurses, peers, staff, and patients. Results: Dashboards were distributed to the members of the CCC in preparation for the semiannual CCC meeting. CCC members adjudicated quantitative and qualitative data to present their cohort of residents at the CCC meeting. Based on the committee's response, evaluation scores remained the same or were adjusted. Final milestone scores were then entered into the accreditation data system (ADS on the ACGME website. Conclusions: The process of resident assessment is complex and should comprise both quantitative and qualitative data. The dashboard is a valuable tool for program leadership to use both when evaluating house staff on a semiannual basis at the CCC and to the resident in person.

  9. Resident dashboards: helping your clinical competency committee visualize trainees' key performance indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Karen A; Raimo, John; Spielmann, Kelly; Chaudhry, Saima

    2016-01-01

    Under the Next Accreditation System, programs need to find ways to collect and assess meaningful reportable information on its residents to assist the program director regarding resident milestone progression. This paper discusses the process that one large Internal Medicine Residency Program used to provide both quantitative and qualitative data to its clinical competency committee (CCC) through the creation of a resident dashboard. Program leadership at a large university-based program developed four new end of rotation evaluations based on the American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM) and Accreditation Council of Graduated Medical Education's (ACGME) 22 reportable milestones. A resident dashboard was then created to pull together both milestone- and non-milestone-based quantitative data and qualitative data compiled from faculty, nurses, peers, staff, and patients. Dashboards were distributed to the members of the CCC in preparation for the semiannual CCC meeting. CCC members adjudicated quantitative and qualitative data to present their cohort of residents at the CCC meeting. Based on the committee's response, evaluation scores remained the same or were adjusted. Final milestone scores were then entered into the accreditation data system (ADS) on the ACGME website. The process of resident assessment is complex and should comprise both quantitative and qualitative data. The dashboard is a valuable tool for program leadership to use both when evaluating house staff on a semiannual basis at the CCC and to the resident in person.

  10. Ontario Select Committee on Alternative Fuel Sources : Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galt, D.

    2002-06-01

    On June 28, 2001, the Ontario Legislative Assembly appointed the Select Committee an Alternative Fuel Sources, comprised of representatives of all parties, with a broad mandate to investigate, report and offer recommendations with regard to the various options to support the development and application of environmentally sustainable alternatives to the fossil fuel sources already existing. The members of the Committee elected to conduct extensive public hearings, conduct site visits, attend relevant conferences, do some background research to examine a vast number of alternative fuel and energy sources that could be of relevance to the province of Ontario. A discussion paper (interim report) was issued by the Committee in November 2001, and the present document represents the final report, containing 141 recommendations touching 20 topics. The information contained in the report is expected to assist in the development and outline of policy and programs designed to specifically support alternative fuels and energy sources and applicable technologies. Policy issues were discussed in Part A of the report, along with the appropriate recommendations. The recommendations on specific alternative fuels and energy sources were included in Part B of the report. It is believed that the dependence of Ontario on traditional petroleum-based fuels and energy sources can be reduced through aggressive action on alternative fuels and energy. The benefits of such action would be felt in the area of air quality, with social, and economic benefits as well. 3 tabs

  11. E-survey with researchers, members of ethics committees and sponsors of clinical research in Brazil: an emerging methodology for scientific research Inquérito pela Internet com pesquisadores clínicos, membros de comitês de ética e patrocinadores de pesquisa clínica no Brasil: uma metodologia emergente para pesquisa científica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Mansoldo Dainesi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The growth of Internet users enables epidemiological studies to be conducted electronically, representing a promising methodology for data collection. METHODS: Members of Ethics Committees, Clinical Researchers and Sponsors were interviewed using questionnaires sent over the Internet. Along with the questionnaire, participants received a message explaining the survey and also the informed consent. Returning the questionnaire meant the consent of the participant was given. No incentive was offered; two reminders were sent. RESULTS: The response rate was 21% (124/599, 20% (58/290 and 45% (24/53 respectively for Ethics Committees, Researchers and Sponsors. The percentage of return before the two reminders was about 62%. Reasons for non-response: participant not found, refusal to participate, lack of experience in clinical research or in the therapeutic field. Characteristics of participants: 45% of Ethics Committee participants, 64% of Researchers and 63% of Sponsors were male; mean age (range, respectively: 47 (28-74, 53 (24-72 and 40 (29-65 years. Among Researchers and Sponsors, all respondents had at least a university degree and, in the Ethics Committees group, only two (1.7% did not have one. Most of the questionnaires in all groups came from the Southeast Region of Brazil, probably reflecting the highest number of clinical trials and research professionals in this region. CONCLUSION: Despite the potential limitations of a survey done through the Internet, this study led to a response rate similar to what has been observed with other models, efficiency in obtaining responses (speed and quality, convenience for respondents and low cost.INTRODUÇÃO: O crescimento de usuários da Internet possibilita que estudos epidemiológicos sejam conduzidos eletronicamente, representando uma promissora metodologia para coleta de dados. MÉTODOS: Membros de Comitês de Ética, pesquisadores clínicos e patrocinadores foram entrevistados com

  12. Activities of the research committee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasegawa, A.; Shirai, T.; Nakagawa, M.; Osugi, T.; Ikeda, Y.; Ishida, T.; Shimazaki, J. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2000-01-01

    The department of Nuclear Energy System serves as a secretarial of the following four research committees organized by JAERI; Japanese Nuclear Data Committee, Atomic and Molecular Data Research Committee, Research Committee on Reactor Physics and Research Committee on Marine Reactors. The purpose and the expected task of each committee are summarized here. The detailed activities of each committee are presented in this paper. (author)

  13. 78 FR 63279 - Third Meeting: RTCA Tactical Operations Committee (TOC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-23

    ... Operations Committee (TOC) AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), U.S. Department of Transportation... hereby given for a meeting of the Tactical Operations Committee (TOC). The agenda will include the following: November 19, 2013 Opening of Meeting/Introduction of TOC Members Official Statement of Designated...

  14. 77 FR 43135 - Advisory Committee for Aviation Consumer Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-23

    ... Committee for Aviation Consumer Protection AGENCY: Office of the Secretary (OST), Department of... second meeting of the Advisory Committee for Aviation Consumer Protection. DATES: The second meeting of... Aviation Consumer Protection and announced those persons appointed as members. By notice dated June 13...

  15. 76 FR 20336 - Defense Audit Advisory Committee (DAAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-12

    ... Accounting/Audit Competencies 4:30 DAAC Member Involvement in Service Audit Committees 4:45 Conclusion (c..., work badge, social security card). Special Accommodations: Individuals requiring special accommodation...

  16. 76 FR 64325 - Advisory Committee on Earthquake Hazards Reduction Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-18

    ... 2004 (Pub. L. 108-360). The Committee is composed of 12 members appointed by the Director of NIST, who...-U.S. citizens must also submit their country of citizenship, title, and employer/ sponsor. Mrs...

  17. 75 FR 18787 - Advisory Committee on Earthquake Hazards Reduction Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-13

    ... the NEHRP Reauthorization Act of 2004 (Pub. L. 108-360). The Committee is composed of 15 members....S. citizens must also submit their country of citizenship, title, employer/sponsor, and address with...

  18. 77 FR 64314 - Advisory Committee on Earthquake Hazards Reduction Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-19

    ... Act of 2004 (Pub. L. 108-360). The Committee is composed of 12 members appointed by the Director of... number to Michelle Harman. Non-U.S. citizens must also submit their country of citizenship, title, and...

  19. 9 CFR 147.43 - General Conference Committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... committee members will include, but not be limited to: Advertisements in at least two industry journals... Plan. (2) Advise and make yearly recommendations to the Department with respect to the NPIP budget well...

  20. 76 FR 19970 - Hiawatha East Resource Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-11

    ... and Community Self-Determination Act (Pub. L. 110-343) and in compliance with the Federal Advisory... chairperson by the committee members. (3) Receive materials explaining roles of the RAC and process for...

  1. 77 FR 46375 - Chippewa National Forest Resource Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-03

    ... Schools and Community Self-Determination Act (Pub. L. 110-343) (the Act) and operates in compliance with... review with the Chippewa National Forest Resource Advisory Committee members their roles and...

  2. 76 FR 44574 - Yavapai County Resource Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-26

    ... and Community Self-Determination Act (Pub. L. 110- 343) and in compliance with the Federal Advisory... Act, roles of members, guidelines for Title II, and the Federal Advisory Committee Act. DATES: The...

  3. 75 FR 11104 - Del Norte Resource Advisory Committee (RAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-10

    ... Schools and Community Self-Determination Act (Pub. L. 110-343) and in compliance with the Federal Advisory...; (4) discussion of Committee member and Designated Federal Official roles and (5) review operational...

  4. 75 FR 48306 - San Juan National Forest Resource Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-10

    ... Secure Rural Schools and Community Self-Determination Act (Pub. L. 110-343) and in compliance with the... questions about the roles of members, support of the committee and other pertinent information, elect a...

  5. 75 FR 44757 - Yavapai County Resource Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-29

    ... and Community Self-Determination Act (Pub. L. 110- 343) and in compliance with the Federal Advisory... Act, roles of members, guidelines for Title II, and the Federal Advisory Committee Act. DATES: The... Designated Federal [[Page 44758

  6. 76 FR 12692 - San Juan National Forest Resource Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-08

    ... Secure Rural Schools and Community Self-Determination Act (Pub. L. 110-343) and in compliance with the... questions about the roles of members, support of the committee and other pertinent information, elect a...

  7. 76 FR 13124 - Yavapai County Resource Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-10

    ... and Community Self-Determination Act (Pub. L. 110- 343) and in compliance with the Federal Advisory... Act, roles of members, guidelines for Title II, and the Federal Advisory Committee Act. DATES: The...

  8. User's manual to the ICRP Code: a series of computer programs to perform dosimetric calculations for the ICRP Committee 2 report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, S.B.; Ford, M.R.

    1980-02-01

    A computer code has been developed that implements the recommendations of ICRP Committee 2 for computing limits for occupational exposure of radionuclides. The purpose of this report is to describe the various modules of the computer code and to present a description of the methods and criteria used to compute the tables published in the Committee 2 report. The computer code contains three modules of which: (1) one computes specific effective energy; (2) one calculates cumulated activity; and (3) one computes dose and the series of ICRP tables. The description of the first two modules emphasizes the new ICRP Committee 2 recommendations in computing specific effective energy and cumulated activity. For the third module, the complex criteria are discussed for calculating the tables of committed dose equivalent, weighted committed dose equivalents, annual limit of intake, and derived air concentration

  9. User's manual to the ICRP Code: a series of computer programs to perform dosimetric calculations for the ICRP Committee 2 report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, S.B.; Ford, M.R.

    1980-02-01

    A computer code has been developed that implements the recommendations of ICRP Committee 2 for computing limits for occupational exposure of radionuclides. The purpose of this report is to describe the various modules of the computer code and to present a description of the methods and criteria used to compute the tables published in the Committee 2 report. The computer code contains three modules of which: (1) one computes specific effective energy; (2) one calculates cumulated activity; and (3) one computes dose and the series of ICRP tables. The description of the first two modules emphasizes the new ICRP Committee 2 recommendations in computing specific effective energy and cumulated activity. For the third module, the complex criteria are discussed for calculating the tables of committed dose equivalent, weighted committed dose equivalents, annual limit of intake, and derived air concentration.

  10. Nuclear Safety Research Review Committee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todreas, N.E.

    1990-01-01

    The Nuclear Safety Research Review Committee has had a fundamental difficulty because of the atmosphere that has existed since it was created. It came into existence at a time of decreasing budgets. For any Committee the easiest thing is to tell the Director what additional to do. That does not really help him a lot in this atmosphere of reduced budgets which he reviewed for you on Monday. Concurrently the research arm of Nuclear Regulatory Commission has recognized that the scope of its activity needed to be increased rather than decreased. In the last two-and-a-half-year period, human factors work was reinstated, radiation and health effects investigations were reinvigorated, research in the waste area was given significant acceleration. Further, accident management came into being, and the NRC finally got back into the TMI-2 area. So with all of those activities being added to the program at the same time that the research budget was going down, the situation has become very strained. What that leads to regarding Committee membership is a need for technically competent generalists who will be able to sit as the Division Directors come in, as the contractors come in, and sort the wheat from the chaff. The Committee needs people who are interested in and have a broad perspective on what regulatory needs are and specifically how safety research activities can contribute to them. The author summarizes the history of the Committee, the current status, and plans for the future

  11. Transparency in Canadian public drug advisory committees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg-Yunger, Zahava R S; Bayoumi, Ahmed M

    2014-11-01

    Transparency in health care resource allocation decisions is a criterion of a fair process. We used qualitative methods to explore transparency across 11 Canadian drug advisory committees. We developed seven criteria to assess transparency (disclosure of members' names, disclosure of membership selection criteria, disclosure of conflict of interest guidelines and members' conflicts, public posting of decisions not to fund drugs, public posting of rationales for decisions, stakeholder input, and presence of an appeals mechanism) and two sub-criteria for when rationales were posted (direct website link and readability). We interviewed a purposeful sample of key informants who were conversant in English and a current or past member of either a committee or a stakeholder group. We analyzed data using a thematic approach. Interviewing continued until saturation was reached. We examined documents from 10 committees and conducted 27 interviews. The median number of criteria addressed by committees was 2 (range 0-6). Major interview themes included addressing: (1) accessibility issues, including stakeholders' degree of access to the decision making process and appeal mechanisms; (2) communication issues, including improving internal and external communication and public access to information; and (3) confidentiality issues, including the use of proprietary evidence. Most committees have some mechanisms to address transparency but none had a fully transparent process. The most important ways to improve transparency include creating formal appeal mechanisms, improving communication, and establishing consistent rules about the use of, and public access to, proprietary evidence. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Careerism, Committee Assignments and the Electoral Connection

    OpenAIRE

    Katz, Jonathan N.; Sala, Brian R.

    1996-01-01

    Most scholars agree that members of Congress are strongly motivated by their desire for reelection. This assumption implies that members of Congress adopt institutions, rules, and norms of behavior in part to serve their electoral interests. Direct tests of the electoral connection are rare, however, because significant, exogenous changes in the electoral environment are difficult to identify. We develop and test an electoral rationale for the norm of committee assignment "property rights...

  13. European Committee for Future Accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulvey, John

    1983-01-01

    Nearly 21 years ago, in December 1962, Viktor Weisskopf and Cecil Powell, then respectively CERN's Director General and Chairman of the Scientific Policy Committee, called together a group of European high energy physicists to advise on steps to reach higher energy. The CERN PS had been in operation since 1959, its experimental programme was well established and the time had come to think of the future. The Chairman of the group, which later took the title 'European Committee for Future Accelerators', was Edoardo Amaldi and his influential report, presented to the CERN Council in June 1963, reviewed the whole structure and possible development of the field in the CERN Member States. Its proposals included the construction of the Intersecting Storage Rings (ISR), and of a 300 GeV proton accelerator which was then envisaged as being the major facility of a second CERN Laboratory elsewhere in Europe

  14. The UK Committee on Radioactive Waste Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baverstock, Keith; Ball, David J

    2005-01-01

    The UK Committee on Radioactive Waste Management is charged with recommending to Government, by July 2006, options for the long term management of the UK's radioactive waste legacy. These options should inspire public confidence. Now, more than halfway into the time allotted, we, as two former members of the Committee, express our concerns at the wayward approach that has been adopted. The Committee has placed emphasis on gaining public confidence but this has been done at the expense of recruiting the best scientific expertise in the management of radioactive waste, an act which we believe will actually undermine public confidence. Furthermore, given also the immense importance of this decision to public safety, national security and the national interest, we believe urgent steps should be taken to review the Committee's process, its management and its sponsorship. (opinion)

  15. Statement of Honorable Donald C. Winter Secretary of the Navy Before the House Armed Services Committee

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Winter, Donald C

    2007-01-01

    Mr. Chairman, Mr. Ranking Member, and Members of the Committee, it is an honor to appear before you representing the brave men and women of the United States Navy and the United States Marine Corps active, reserve...

  16. Evaluate the capability and accuracy of response-2000 program in prediction of the shear capacities of reinforced and prestressed concrete members

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim M. Metwally

    2012-08-01

    Member response analysis and sectional analysis were both used in Response-2000 to predict the behavior of the beams. Member response calculates the full member behavior including the deflection and curvature along the member length, as well as predicted failure modes. The analysis was performed by specifying the length subjected to shear and any constant moment region. Response-2000 provided a very good prediction of experimental behavior when compared to a database of 534 beams tested in shear. These include prestressed and reinforced sections, very large footing-like sections, sections made with very high strength concrete and elements with unusual geometry. All are predicted well. The results include that Response-2000 can predict the failure shear with an average experimental over predicted shear ratio of 1.05 with a coefficient of variation of 12%. This compares favorably to the ACI 318-08 [2] Code prediction ratios that have an average of 1.20 and a coefficient of variation of 32%.

  17. 77 FR 76515 - Osage Negotiated Rulemaking Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-28

    ... sign-up sheet at the meeting for those wishing to speak during the public comment period. The meeting... and Introduction; (2) Overview of prior meeting and action tracking; (3) Members' round robin to share... subcommittee activities; (5) Future Committee activities; (6) Public comments which will be scheduled for 45...

  18. 12 CFR 363.5 - Audit committees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... committee shall include the appointment, compensation, and oversight of the independent public accountant... public accountant the basis for the reports issued under this part. (1) Each insured depository... members who are large customers of the subsidiary institution. (c) Independent public accountant...

  19. Report of the Committee on Government Organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenks, R. Stephen; And Others

    This report presents in detail a unicameral government structure with supporting student and faculty caucuses, recommended for the University of New Hampshire by its Committee on Government Organization to (1) provide maximum participation to all members of the university community on a fair and equitable basis, and (2) provide a more efficient…

  20. Members of the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The new Member since the last list of Member States was issued (INFCIRC/2/Rev.63) is Palau which deposited its Instrument of Acceptance of the Statute on 2 March 2007. The Attachment hereto shows the dates on which the present 144 Member States became Members [fr

  1. Members of the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The new Member since the last list of Member States was issued (INFCIRC/2/Rev.63) is Palau which deposited its Instrument of Acceptance of the Statute on 2 March 2007. The Attachment hereto shows the dates on which the present 144 Member States became Members [es

  2. 1997 report of the scientific evaluation committee of DAPNIA (Department of astrophysics, particle physics, nuclear physics and instrumentation)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1998-01-01

    The DAPNIA is a department of CEA, its main characteristic is to manage scientific teams working on astrophysics, nuclear physics, elementary particles and instrumentation. Every 2 years DAPNIA's activities are submitted to an evaluation made by a scientific committee whose members are experts independent from CEA. This committee reviews the work done, gives an opinion about the options chosen for the projects to come and writes out a report. In 1997 the committee had a very positive opinion of the work done by DAPNIA teams. The contributions to various and important national or international programs have been successful, we can quote: Ulysse mission, soho, iso, integral for spatial programs, aleph, delphi, H1 at Hera, atlas, cms, na48, nomad, babar, antares for particle physics and spiral, smc, compass for nuclear physics. The committee advises DAPNIA to favour more contacts between the theoreticians and the experimentalists who work on quantum chromodynamics and hadron physics. The committee shows its concern about improving the balance between the means dedicated to instrumentation designing and those dedicated to the analysis and interpretation of the experimental data collected. (A.C.)

  3. The Audit Committee. AGB Effective Committee Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staisloff, Richard L.

    2011-01-01

    This publication is part of an Association of Governing Boards of Universities and Colleges (AGB) series devoted to strengthening the role of key standing committees of governing boards. While there is no optimum committee system for institutions of higher education, certain principles, practices, and procedures prevail. The best practices…

  4. The Investment Committee. Effective Committees. Board Basics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biggs, John H.

    1997-01-01

    The investment committee of the college or university governing board is charged with determining, overseeing, and assessing the policies and processes by which institutional funds are invested. The committee has fiduciary duty to ensure that the terms of investment of donors' gifts are met and to maximize investment returns within an appropriate…

  5. The audit committee : Management watchdog or personal friend of the CEO?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruynseels, L.M.L.; Cardinaels, E.

    2014-01-01

    To ensure that audit committees provide sufficient oversight over the auditing process and quality of financial reporting, legislators have imposed stricter requirements on the independence of audit committee members. Although many audit committees appear to be “fully” independent, anecdotal

  6. Barriers and challenges in clinical ethics consultations: the experiences of nine clinical ethics committees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Reidar; Akre, Victoria; Førde, Reidun

    2009-10-01

    Clinical ethics committees have recently been established in nearly all Norwegian hospital trusts. One important task for these committees is clinical ethics consultations. This qualitative study explores significant barriers confronting the ethics committees in providing such consultation services. The interviews with the committees indicate that there is a substantial need for clinical ethics support services and, in general, the committee members expressed a great deal of enthusiasm for the committee work. They also reported, however, that tendencies to evade moral disagreement, conflict, and 'outsiders' are common in the hospitals. Sometimes even the committees comply with some of these tendencies. The committees agree that there is a need to improve their routines and procedures, clarify the committees' profile and field of responsibility, to make the committees well-known, to secure adequate operating conditions, and to develop organizational integration and support. Various strategies to meet these challenges on a local, regional or national level are also explored in this paper.

  7. 77 FR 31071 - Research Advisory Committee on Gulf War Veterans' Illnesses, Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-24

    ... DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Research Advisory Committee on Gulf War Veterans' Illnesses, Notice... Advisory Committee Act) that the Research Advisory Committee on Gulf War Veterans' Illnesses will meet on... Asia theater of operations during the Gulf War. The Committee will review VA program activities related...

  8. 75 FR 8789 - Research Advisory Committee on Gulf War Veterans' Illnesses; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-25

    ... DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Research Advisory Committee on Gulf War Veterans' Illnesses; Notice... Advisory Committee Act) that the Research Advisory Committee on Gulf War Veterans' Illnesses will meet on... theater of operations during the Gulf War. The Committee will review VA program activities related to Gulf...

  9. 75 FR 28686 - Research Advisory Committee on Gulf War Veterans' Illnesses; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-21

    ... DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Research Advisory Committee on Gulf War Veterans' Illnesses; Notice... Advisory Committee Act) that the Research Advisory Committee on Gulf War Veterans' Illnesses will meet on... Asia theater of operations during the Gulf War. The Committee will review VA program activities related...

  10. 76 FR 9407 - Research Advisory Committee on Gulf War Veterans' Illnesses; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-17

    ... DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Research Advisory Committee on Gulf War Veterans' Illnesses; Notice... Advisory Committee Act) that the Research Advisory Committee on Gulf War Veterans' Illnesses will meet on... Southwest Asia theater of operations during the Gulf War. The Committee will review VA program activities...

  11. 75 FR 65405 - Research Advisory Committee on Gulf War Veterans' Illnesses; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-22

    ... DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Research Advisory Committee on Gulf War Veterans' Illnesses; Notice... Advisory Committee Act) that the Research Advisory Committee on Gulf War Veterans' Illnesses will meet on... Asia theater of operations during the Gulf War. The Committee will review VA program activities related...

  12. New Sunshine Program for Fiscal 2000. International cooperative project for developing photovoltaic power system practicalization technology (International Energy Agency (IEA)/Cooperative Program on Photovoltaic Power Systems (PVPS) implementing agreement - Executive committee meeting); 2000 nendo New sunshine keikaku. Taiyoko hatsuden system jitsuyoka gijustu kaihatsu kokusai kyoryoku jigyo (IEA taiyoko hatsuden system kenkyu kyoryoku program jisshi kyotei shikko iinkai)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    Cooperative endeavors of research and development, verification, analysis, information exchange, introduction acceleration, etc., were exerted through participation in the above-said PVPS program. At the 15th PVPS executive committee meeting held in this fiscal year, reconsideration was made about the commencement of new tasks, change of OAs (operating agents), change of participating countries, etc., whose current state was not correctly reflected in the existing implementation agreement. At the 16th PVPS executive committee meeting, discussions were made and conclusions were reached that the next executive committee meeting decide whether to change the chairman, that deliberation be made in 2003 to decide whether to hold the 4th IEA/PVPS executive conference in Japan, that the assessment of each of the tasks be carried out in fiscal 2001, and that Task I conduct studies about market implementation for the fruits of the research-centered activities in the past to hit the market, etc. Workshop meetings were held, where Australia, France, Italy, and Japan reported their PVPS research, development, and popularization efforts. (NEDO)

  13. Advisory Committee Handbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black Hawk Coll., Moline, IL.

    An advisory committee is generally comprised of persons outside the education profession who have specialized knowledge in a given area. The committee advises, makes recommendations, and gives service to the college and its students, instructors, and administrators. At Black Hawk College, there are four types of advisory committees: community,…

  14. Reducing Drinking Among Junior Enlisted Air Force Members in Five Communities: Early Findings of the EUDL Program's Influence on Self-Reported Drinking Behaviors*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spera, Christopher; Franklin, Keita; Uekawa, Kazuaki; Kunz, John F.; Szoc, Ronald Z.; Thomas, Randall K.; Cambridge, Milton H.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: In the fall of 2006, the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention awarded discretionary grants to five communities in four states as part of the Enforcing Underage Drinking Laws initiative. These 3-year grants were designed to support implementation of a set of interventions using an environmental strategies approach to reduce drinking and associated alcohol-related misconducts among active-duty Air Force members ages 18–25, with a specific focus on the underage population. The current article presents findings from Year 1 of the evaluation. Method: Data on alcohol use were obtained from a large-scale, anonymous survey that fielded in the spring of 2006 (i.e., pretest) and the spring of 2008 (i.e., posttest) from a stratified random sample of Air Force members at five demonstration and five comparison communities. Results: The percentage of junior enlisted personnel at risk for an alcohol problem dropped 6.6% in the Air Force overall during the last 2 years but dropped as much as 13.6% and 9.8% in two Arizona demonstration communities that implemented the intervention. Conclusions: The first-year results suggest that the Enforcing Underage Drinking Laws intervention may have been one factor that helped to reduce the percentage of junior enlisted Air Force members at risk for an alcohol problem in the demonstration communities. PMID:20409431

  15. Reducing drinking among junior enlisted Air Force members in five communities: early findings of the EUDL program's influence on self-reported drinking behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spera, Christopher; Franklin, Keita; Uekawa, Kazuaki; Kunz, John F; Szoc, Ronald Z; Thomas, Randall K; Cambridge, Milton H

    2010-05-01

    In the fall of 2006, the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention awarded discretionary grants to five communities in four states as part of the Enforcing Underage Drinking Laws initiative. These 3-year grants were designed to support implementation of a set of interventions using an environmental strategies approach to reduce drinking and associated alcohol-related misconducts among active-duty Air Force members ages 18-25, with a specific focus on the underage population. The current article presents findings from Year 1 of the evaluation. Data on alcohol use were obtained from a large-scale, anonymous survey that fielded in the spring of 2006 (i.e., pretest) and the spring of 2008 (i.e., posttest) from a stratified random sample of Air Force members at five demonstration and five comparison communities. The percentage of junior enlisted personnel at risk for an alcohol problem dropped 6.6% in the Air Force overall during the last 2 years but dropped as much as 13.6% and 9.8% in two Arizona demonstration communities that implemented the intervention. The first-year results suggest that the Enforcing Underage Drinking Laws intervention may have been one factor that helped to reduce the percentage of junior enlisted Air Force members at risk for an alcohol problem in the demonstration communities.

  16. Options in Education: Program No. 88. Sex and Sexism in Education, Part II. Transcripts of a Weekly Series Broadcast by Member Stations of National Public Radio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Public Radio, Washington, DC.

    This booklet is a transcription of a program from the radio series, "Options in Education." It is part 2 of a two-part series dealing with sexism in education. It deals with sex discrimination in various aspects of public education, including textbooks, teacher promotion, sports programs and children's literature. There is also a…

  17. Randomized Trial of an eLearning Program for Training Family Members of Children with Autism in the Principles and Procedures of Applied Behavior Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Jina; Dixon, Dennis R.; Tarbox, Jonathan; Granpeesheh, Doreen; Kornack, Julie; de Nocker, Yanicka

    2012-01-01

    Effective training of caregivers is an integral part of top-quality treatment programs for individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). However, traditional caregiver training can be time consuming and costly. The development of Web-based electronic training programs (e.g., "eLearning") may extend training to rural areas, thereby…

  18. Ostomy Home Skills Program

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Profession Member Benefits About Member Benefits About Member Benefits Fellows (US and Canada) International Fellows Associate Fellows Residents Medical Students Affiliate Members ACS Insurance Programs ACS Discount Programs ...

  19. Committees review activities at December meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Education and Human Resources Committee reported having approved participation in the Association for Women Geoscientist's (AWG) national survey. During the summer of 1983 the AWG designed a 75-question survey targeted to women but also applicable to men. The survey consisted of five sections (in addition to such demographics as age, salary, education, job area, and society membership): feelings and attitude toward job, career/family balance, sexual harassment and discrimination, opinions on national energy and conservation policy, and attitude toward AWG. The questionnaire was mailed to AWG members (just over 1000) and to AGU female members (about 1300). Survey participants were asked to give copies to their male colleagues to create a comparison group. About 25% of the 800 responses were from men. The responses were split about 50/50 between AWG and AGU members. The Education and Human Resources Committee will have the results from the survey presented at their next meeting in Cincinnati, May 15.

  20. 75 FR 34972 - Notice of Invitation for Nominations to the Advisory Committee on Agriculture Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-21

    ... Nominations to the Advisory Committee on Agriculture Statistics AGENCY: National Agricultural Statistics... agriculture-related business and marketing experts. Members serve staggered 2-year terms, with terms for half.... Committee members are reimbursed for official travel expenses only. Send questions, comments, and requests...

  1. 75 FR 12814 - Advisory Committee on Minority Veterans, Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-17

    ... 3:30 p.m. to hold discussions with VAMC key staff members on services, benefits, delivery challenges... with VARO key staff members on services, benefits, delivery challenges and successes. The Committee... leadership from all three administrations and work on their report during this period. The Committee will...

  2. The Department of Energy's Atmospheric Chemistry Program: A critical review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    In response to a request from the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER), the Committee on Atmospheric Chemistry has reviewed OHER's Atmospheric Chemistry Program (ACP). This report contains the committee's evaluation and critique arising from that review. The review process included a two-day symposium held at the National Academy of Sciences on September 25 and 26, 1990, that focused on presenting the ACP's current components, recent scientific accomplishments, and scientific plans. Following the symposium, committee members met in a one-day executive session to formulate and outline this report. In undertaking this review, OHER and ACP management requested that the committee attempt to answer several specific questions involving the program's technical capability and productivity, its leadership and organization, and its future direction. These questions are given in the Appendix. This report represents the committee's response to the questions posed in the Appendix. Chapter I explores the committee's view of the role that atmospheric chemistry could and should assume within the DOE and its prospective National Energy Strategy. Chapter 2 assesses the current ACP, Chapter 3 presents recommendations for revising and strengthening it, and Chapter 4 restates the committee's conclusions and recommendations

  3. Effectiveness of the current method of calculating member states' contributions

    CERN Document Server

    2002-01-01

    At its Two-hundred and eighty-sixth Meeting of 19 September 2001, the Finance Committee requested the Management to re-assess the effectiveness of the current method of forecasting Net National Income (NNI) for the purposes of calculating the Member States' contributions by comparing the results of the current weighted average method with a method based on a simple arithmetic average. The Finance Committee is invited to take note of this information.

  4. Formation of a New Entity to Support Effective Use of Technology in Medical Education: The Student Technology Committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenson, Jared Andrew; Adams, Ryan Christopher; Ahmed, S Toufeeq; Spickard, Anderson

    2015-09-17

    As technology in medical education expands from teaching tool to crucial component of curricular programming, new demands arise to innovate and optimize educational technology. While the expectations of today's digital native students are significant, their experience and unique insights breed new opportunities to involve them as stakeholders in tackling educational technology challenges. The objective of this paper is to present our experience with a novel medical student-led and faculty-supported technology committee that was developed at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine to harness students' valuable input in a comprehensive fashion. Key lessons learned through the initial successes and challenges of implementing our model are also discussed. A committee was established with cooperation of school administration, a faculty advisor with experience launching educational technologies, and a group of students passionate about this domain. Committee membership is sustained through annual selective recruitment of interested students. The committee serves 4 key functions: acting as liaisons between students and administration; advising development of institutional educational technologies; developing, piloting, and assessing new student-led educational technologies; and promoting biomedical and educational informatics within the school community. Participating students develop personally and professionally, contribute to program implementation, and extend the field's understanding by pursuing research initiatives. The institution benefits from rapid improvements to educational technologies that meet students' needs and enhance learning opportunities. Students and the institution also gain from fostering a campus culture of awareness and innovation in informatics and medical education. The committee's success hinges on member composition, school leadership buy-in, active involvement in institutional activities, and support for committee initiatives. Students

  5. 76 FR 81009 - Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee-New Task

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-27

    ... Committee--New Task AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of new task... Rulemaking Advisory Committee (ARAC) a new task to develop a comprehensive program of voluntary accreditation... maintenance program (CAMP). This task addresses, in part, the ARAC recommendation developed by the Commercial...

  6. Adventure Program Risk Management Report: 1998 Edition. Narratives and Data from 1991-1997.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leemon, Drew, Ed.; Schimelpfenig, Tod, Ed.; Gray, Sky, Ed.; Tarter, Shana, Ed.; Williamson, Jed, Ed.

    The Wilderness Risk Managers Committee (WRMC), a consortium of outdoor schools and organizations, works toward better understanding and management of risks in the wilderness. Among other activities, the WRMC gathers data on incidents and accidents from member organizations and other wilderness-based programs. This book compiles incident data for…

  7. 77 FR 38768 - Smart Grid Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-29

    ...The Smart Grid Advisory Committee (SGAC or Committee) will hold a meeting via teleconference on Friday, July 27, 2012 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Eastern Time (ET). The primary purposes of this meeting are to review updates on the Smart Grid Interoperability Panel transition plan, review the status of the research subcommittee and the August Smart Grid Workshop in Boulder, Colorado, and plan for a fall meeting. Interested members of the public will be able to participate in the meeting from remote locations by calling into a central phone number.

  8. 78 FR 63232 - President's National Security Telecommunications Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-23

    .... Please note that the meeting may close early if the committee has completed its business. ADDRESSES: The... Commission will brief members on its cybersecurity activities. Finally, the EOP will facilitate a roundtable discussion with members on the National Institute of Standards and Technology's Cybersecurity Framework...

  9. Energy Materials Coordinating Committee (EMaCC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-05-31

    This report summarizes EMaCC activities for fiscal year 1990 and describes the materials research programs of various offices and divisions within the department. The DOE Energy Materials Coordinating Committee (EMaCC) serves primarily to enhance coordination among the Department's materials programs and to further the effective use of materials expertise within the department. (JL)

  10. Report of the Ethics Committee, 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Psychologist, 2009

    2009-01-01

    In accordance with the bylaws of the American Psychological Association (APA), the Ethics Committee reports regularly to the membership regarding the number and types of ethics complaints investigated and the major programs undertaken. In 2008, ethics adjudication, ethics education and consultation, convention programs, ethics publications,…

  11. High committee for transparency and information on nuclear safety: meeting of December 16, 2010; Haut Comite pour la Transparence et l'Information sur la Securite Nucleaire. Reunion du 16 decembre 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-07-01

    The discussion between members dealt with the following topics: the committee' program and implication with respect to the ACN approach (Aarhus Convention and Nuclear), the main orientations of the Transparency and Secret work group, the hearing of actors involved in a Tritium contamination incident in Valduc. These actors belonged to the CEA, to the 2M Process company, to the Nuclear safety authority or ASN, to the Institute for radiation protection and nuclear safety or IRSN, or to the Delegate to radiation protection and nuclear safety for installations of interest for the defence or DSND. Then the committee addressed the issue of old uranium mines and of places of use of uranium mining tailings. The committee members discuss the results of investigations performed around the Tricastin site (studies on cancers, on the presence of uranium in underground water sheets). Other topics are addressed: waste transportation to Germany, the French-British nuclear cooperation, the creation of a web site

  12. Engaging Youth in the Curriculum Development Process with Technology: The Nebraska State 4-H Youth Curriculum Committee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle J. Garwood

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Technology is changing the way youth learn and lead. This paper illustrates a successful case study of a program that actively engaged youth in the decision-making process through the use of an online community and virtual conferencing. Synergy was generated when the youth were mentored (virtually and in-person by members of a parallel adult committee. Utilizing technology resources proved to be the key to building a vibrant, innovative and inclusive program that could overcome the barriers of time and travel constraints.

  13. Ensuring Resident Competence: A Narrative Review of the Literature on Group Decision Making to Inform the Work of Clinical Competency Committees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauer, Karen E; Cate, Olle Ten; Boscardin, Christy K; Iobst, William; Holmboe, Eric S; Chesluk, Benjamin; Baron, Robert B; O'Sullivan, Patricia S

    2016-05-01

    Background The expectation for graduate medical education programs to ensure that trainees are progressing toward competence for unsupervised practice prompted requirements for a committee to make decisions regarding residents' progress, termed a clinical competency committee (CCC). The literature on the composition of these committees and how they share information and render decisions can inform the work of CCCs by highlighting vulnerabilities and best practices. Objective We conducted a narrative review of the literature on group decision making that can help characterize the work of CCCs, including how they are populated and how they use information. Methods English language studies of group decision making in medical education, psychology, and organizational behavior were used. Results The results highlighted 2 major themes. Group member composition showcased the value placed on the complementarity of members' experience and lessons they had learned about performance review through their teaching and committee work. Group processes revealed strengths and limitations in groups' understanding of their work, leader role, and information-sharing procedures. Time pressure was a threat to the quality of group work. Conclusions Implications of the findings include the risks for committees that arise with homogeneous membership, limitations to available resident performance information, and processes that arise through experience rather than deriving from a well-articulated purpose of their work. Recommendations are presented to maximize the effectiveness of CCC processes, including their membership and access to, and interpretation of, information to yield evidence-based, well-reasoned judgments.

  14. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center Workshop, Volume 91, RBRC Scientific Review Committee Meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samios,N.P.

    2008-11-17

    The ninth evaluation of the RIKEN BNL Research Center (RBRC) took place on Nov. 17-18, 2008, at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The members of the Scientific Review Committee (SRC) were Dr. Dr. Wit Busza (Chair), Dr. Miklos Gyulassy, Dr. Akira Masaike, Dr. Richard Milner, Dr. Alfred Mueller, and Dr. Akira Ukawa. We are pleased that Dr. Yasushige Yano, the Director of the Nishina Institute of RIKEN, Japan participated in this meeting both in informing the committee of the activities of the Nishina Institute and the role of RBRC and as an observer of this review. In order to illustrate the breadth and scope of the RBRC program, each member of the Center made a presentation on his/her research efforts. This encompassed three major areas of investigation, theoretical, experimental and computational physics. In addition the committee met privately with the fellows and postdocs to ascertain their opinions and concerns. Although the main purpose of this review is a report to RIKEN Management (Dr. Ryoji Noyori, RIKEN President) on the health, scientific value, management and future prospects of the Center, the RBRC management felt that a compendium of the scientific presentations are of sufficient quality and interest that they warrant a wider distribution. Therefore we have made this compilation and present it to the community for its information and enlightenment.

  15. 78 FR 69991 - Advisory Committee; Veterinary Medicine Advisory Committee; Termination

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-22

    .... FDA-2013-N-1380] Advisory Committee; Veterinary Medicine Advisory Committee; Termination AGENCY: Food... announcing the termination of the Veterinary Medicine Advisory Committee. This document removes the Veterinary Advisory Committee from the Agency's list of standing advisory committees. DATES: This rule is...

  16. An Examination of the Special Education Teacher Training Programs in Turkey and European Union Member Countries in Terms of Language Development and Communication Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akmese, Pelin Pistav; Kayhan, Nilay

    2016-01-01

    The academic terms and the periods of the courses related to the language development and communication differs considerably in the programs of the countries which train teachers for the special education department. The aim of this study is to examine the contents and credits of the communication and the language development courses in Teacher…

  17. 77 FR 61033 - Advisory Committee for Education and Human Resources; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-05

    ... NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION Advisory Committee for Education and Human Resources; Notice of... human resources programming. Agenda November 7, 2012 (Wednesday Morning) Welcoming Remarks Opening... Science Foundation announces the following meeting: Name: Advisory Committee for Education and Human...

  18. 78 FR 21979 - Advisory Committee for Education and Human Resources; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-12

    ... NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION Advisory Committee for Education and Human Resources; Notice of..., technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education and human resources programming. Agenda May 6, 2013... Science Foundation announces the following meeting: Name: Advisory Committee for Education and Human...

  19. [Responsibilities of ethics committees].

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Bergmann, K

    2000-05-01

    Increasing numbers of clinical research projects are submitted to ethical committees (institutional review boards) for approval. New therapeutic developments have to be evaluated by these committees to protect patients/volunteers. Thus, the responsibility of ethical committees is increasing. The "Nürnberger Kodex" and the "Declaration of Helsinki" are the background for these evaluations. According to the German drug law the physician is obligated by law to submit the protocol to such a committee. In addition, local state physician authorities require such a procedure. Important considerations during the review process besides ethical aspects are the informed consent, which should be written in an understandable form, and the obligations of the insurance.

  20. Consensus, contracts, and committees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, J D

    1991-08-01

    Following a brief account of the puzzle that ethics committees present for the Western Philosophical tradition, I will examine the possibility that social contract theory can contribute to a philosophical account of these committees. Passing through classical as well as contemporary theories, particularly Rawls' recent constructivist approach, I will argue that social contract theory places severe constraints on the authority that may legitimately be granted to ethics committees. This, I conclude, speaks more about the suitability of the theory to this level of analysis than about the ethics committee phenomenon itself.

  1. Radiological environmental monitoring program for Angra I: basis and methodology proposed for executing the requirements of the regulatory member and to assure the population safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kircher, E.; Dezordi, W.L.

    1984-01-01

    It is presented, applyed to Angra-1, a methodology for implanting the monitoring program of the vicinity level radiation exposure to the installation. The method considers two kinds of radioactive effluents in the environment: gaseous (in the atmosphere) and liquid (in the marine aquatic environment). It is based on the generation and ordering of the important relation: radiation exposure pathway/radionuclide group. (M.C.K.) [pt

  2. Introduction and Committees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelova, Maia; Zakrzewski, Wojciech; Hussin, Véronique; Piette, Bernard

    2011-03-01

    This volume contains contributions to the XXVIIIth International Colloquium on Group-Theoretical Methods in Physics, the GROUP 28 conference, which took place in Newcastle upon Tyne from 26-30 July 2010. All plenary and contributed papers have undergone an independent review; as a result of this review and the decisions of the Editorial Board most but not all of the contributions were accepted. The volume is organised as follows: it starts with notes in memory of Marcos Moshinsky, followed by contributions related to the Wigner Medal and Hermann Weyl prize. Then the invited talks at the plenary sessions and the public lecture are published followed by contributions in the parallel and poster sessions in alphabetical order. The Editors:Maia Angelova, Wojciech Zakrzewski, Véronique Hussin and Bernard Piette International Advisory Committee Michael BaakeUniversity of Bielefeld, Germany Gerald DunneUniversity of Connecticut, USA J F (Frank) GomesUNESP, Sao Paolo, Brazil Peter HanggiUniversity of Augsburg, Germany Jeffrey C LagariasUniversity of Michigan, USA Michael MackeyMcGill University, Canada Nicholas MantonCambridge University, UK Alexei MorozovITEP, Moscow, Russia Valery RubakovINR, Moscow, Russia Barry SandersUniversity of Calgary, Canada Allan SolomonOpen University, Milton Keynes, UK Christoph SchweigertUniversity of Hamburg, Germany Standing Committee Twareque AliConcordia University, Canada Luis BoyaSalamanca University, Spain Enrico CeleghiniFirenze University, Italy Vladimir DobrevBulgarian Academy of Sciences, Bulgaria Heinz-Dietrich DoebnerHonorary Member, Clausthal University, Germany Jean-Pierre GazeauChairman, Paris Diderot University, France Mo-Lin GeNankai University. China Gerald GoldinRutgers University, USA Francesco IachelloYale University, USA Joris Van der JeugtGhent University, Belgium Richard KernerPierre et Marie Curie University, France Piotr KielanowskiCINVESTAV, Mexico Alan KosteleckyIndiana University, USA Mariano del Olmo

  3. Committees and organizers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    Chairman:Jozef Spałek (Kraków) Program Committee:Stephen Blundell (Oxford), J Michael D Coey (Dublin), Dominique Givord (Grenoble), Dariusz Kaczorowski (Wrocław), Roman Micnas (Poznań), Marek Przybylski (Halle), Ludiwig Schultz (Dresden), Vladimir Sechovsky (Prague), Jozef Spałek (Kraków), Henryk Szymczak (Warszawa), Manuel Vázquez (Madrid) Publication Committee:Dariusz Kaczorowski, Robert Podsiadły, Jozef Spałek, Henryk Szymczak, Andrzej Szytuła Local committee:Maria Bałanda, Anna Majcher, Robert Podsiadły, Michał Rams, Andrzej Ślebarski, Krzysztof Tomala Editors of the Proceedings:Jozef Spałek, Krzysztof Tomala, Danuta Goc-Jagło, Robert Podsiadły, Michał Rams, Anna Majcher Plenary, semi-plenary and tutorial speakers:Ernst Bauer (Wien)Stephen Blundell (Oxford)J Michael D Coey (Dublin)Russell P Cowburn (London)Burkard Hillebrands (Kaiserslautern)Claudine Lacroix (Grenoble)Lluís Mañosa (Barcelona)María del Carmen Muñoz (Madrid)Bernard Raveau (Caen)Pedro Schlottmann (Tallahassee)Frank Steglich (Dresden)Oliver Waldmann (Freiburg) Invited speakers within symposia: R Ahuja (Uppsala)A Kirilyuk (Nijmegen) M Albrecht (Vienna)L Theil Kuhn (Roskilde) K Bärner (Göttingen)J Liu (Dresden) U Bovensiepen (Duisburg)G Lorusso (Modena) V Buchelnikov (Chelyabinsk)M M Maska (Katowice) B Chevalier (Bordeaux)Y Mukovskii (Moscow) O Chubykalo-Fesenko (Madrid)M Pannetier-Lecoeur (Saclay) A V Chumak (Kaiserslautern)G Papavassiliou (Athens) J M D Coey (Dublin)K R Pirota (Campinas) B Dabrowski (DeKalb)P Przyslupski (Warszawa) S Das (Aveiro)M Reiffers (Košice) A del Moral (Zaragoza)K Sandeman (London) V E Demidov (Muenster)D Sander (Halle) B Djafari-Rouhani (Lille)M Sawicki (Sendai/Warsaw) H A Dürr (Menlo Park)J Schaefer (Würzburg) J Fassbender (Dresden)H Schmidt (Wetzikon) J Fontcuberta (Barcelona)J Spałek (Kraków) V Garcia (Orsay)L Straka (Helsinki) J N Gonçalves (Aveiro)A Szewczyk (Warszawa) M E Gruner (Duisburg)Y Taguchi (Wako) G Gubbiotti (Perugia)A Thiaville

  4. The Solar Neighborhood. XXXIX. Parallax Results from the CTIOPI and NOFS Programs: 50 New Members of the 25 parsec White Dwarf Sample

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subasavage, John P.; Harris, Hugh C.; Dahn, Conard C.; Jao, Wei-Chun; Lépine, Sébastien; Henry, Todd J.; Ianna, Philip A.; Bergeron, P.; Dufour, P.; Dunlap, Bart H.; Barlow, Brad N.; Margheim, Steven J.

    2017-01-01

    We present 114 trigonometric parallaxes for 107 nearby white dwarf (WD) systems from both the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory Parallax Investigation (CTIOPI) and the U. S. Naval Observatory Flagstaff Station (NOFS) parallax programs. Of these, 76 parallaxes for 69 systems were measured by the CTIOPI program and 38 parallaxes for as many systems were measured by the NOFS program. A total of 50 systems are confirmed to be within the 25-pc horizon of interest. Coupled with a spectroscopic confirmation of a common proper-motion companion to a Hipparcos star within 25 pc as well as confirmation parallax determinations for two WD systems included in the recently released Tycho Gaia Astrometric Solution catalog, we add 53 new systems to the 25-pc WD sample—a 42% increase. Our sample presented here includes four strong candidate halo systems, a new metal-rich DAZ WD, a confirmation of a recently discovered nearby short-period ( P  = 2.85 hr) double degenerate, a WD with a new astrometric perturbation (long period, unconstrained with our data), and a new triple system where the WD companion main-sequence star has an astrometric perturbation ( P  ∼ 1.6 year).

  5. The Solar Neighborhood. XXXIX. Parallax Results from the CTIOPI and NOFS Programs: 50 New Members of the 25 parsec White Dwarf Sample

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Subasavage, John P.; Harris, Hugh C.; Dahn, Conard C. [U.S. Naval Observatory, 10391 West Naval Observatory Road, Flagstaff, AZ 86005-8521 (United States); Jao, Wei-Chun; Lépine, Sébastien [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA 30302-4106 (United States); Henry, Todd J.; Ianna, Philip A. [RECONS Institute, Chambersburg, PA 17201 (United States); Bergeron, P.; Dufour, P. [Département de Physique, Université de Montréal, C.P. 6128, Succ. Centre-Ville, Montréal, Québec H3C 3J7 (Canada); Dunlap, Bart H. [University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Barlow, Brad N. [Department of Physics, High Point University, One University Parkway, High Point, NC 27268 (United States); Margheim, Steven J., E-mail: jsubasavage@nofs.navy.mil [Gemini Observatory, Southern Operations Center, Casilla 603, La Serena (Chile)

    2017-07-01

    We present 114 trigonometric parallaxes for 107 nearby white dwarf (WD) systems from both the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory Parallax Investigation (CTIOPI) and the U. S. Naval Observatory Flagstaff Station (NOFS) parallax programs. Of these, 76 parallaxes for 69 systems were measured by the CTIOPI program and 38 parallaxes for as many systems were measured by the NOFS program. A total of 50 systems are confirmed to be within the 25-pc horizon of interest. Coupled with a spectroscopic confirmation of a common proper-motion companion to a Hipparcos star within 25 pc as well as confirmation parallax determinations for two WD systems included in the recently released Tycho Gaia Astrometric Solution catalog, we add 53 new systems to the 25-pc WD sample—a 42% increase. Our sample presented here includes four strong candidate halo systems, a new metal-rich DAZ WD, a confirmation of a recently discovered nearby short-period ( P  = 2.85 hr) double degenerate, a WD with a new astrometric perturbation (long period, unconstrained with our data), and a new triple system where the WD companion main-sequence star has an astrometric perturbation ( P  ∼ 1.6 year).

  6. Ostomy Home Skills Program

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Membership Directory 2017 Annual Meeting 2016 Annual Meeting Women's Committee Mentorship Program Outside Activities ACS Archives Contact Us Quality Programs Quality Programs Overview About Quality Programs ACS ...

  7. Ostomy Home Skills Program

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Membership Directory 2017 Annual Meeting 2016 Annual Meeting Women's Committee Mentorship Program Outside Activities ACS Archives Contact Us Quality Programs Quality Programs Overview About Quality Programs ACS Leadership in Quality ACS Leadership in Quality Setting the ...

  8. Guiding Principles for Student Leadership Development in the Doctor of Pharmacy Program to Assist Administrators and Faculty Members in Implementing or Refining Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Cynthia J.; Janke, Kristin K.

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To assist administrators and faculty members in colleges and schools of pharmacy by gathering expert opinion to frame, direct, and support investments in student leadership development. Methods. Twenty-six leadership instructors participated in a 3-round, online, modified Delphi process to define doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) student leadership instruction. Round 1 asked open-ended questions about leadership knowledge, skills, and attitudes to begin the generation of student leadership development guiding principles and competencies. Statements were identified as guiding principles when they were perceived as foundational to the instructional approach. Round 2 grouped responses for agreement rating and comment. Group consensus with a statement as a guiding principle was set prospectively at 80%. Round 3 allowed rating and comment on guidelines, modified from feedback in round 2, that did not meet consensus. The principles were verified by identifying common contemporary leadership development approaches in the literature. Results. Twelve guiding principles, related to concepts of leadership and educational philosophy, were defined and could be linked to contemporary leadership development thought. These guiding principles describe the motivation for teaching leadership, the fundamental precepts of student leadership development, and the core tenets for leadership instruction. Conclusions. Expert opinion gathered using a Delphi process resulted in guiding principles that help to address many of the fundamental questions that arise when implementing or refining leadership curricula. The principles identified are supported by common contemporary leadership development thought. PMID:24371345

  9. Guiding principles for student leadership development in the doctor of pharmacy program to assist administrators and faculty members in implementing or refining curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traynor, Andrew P; Boyle, Cynthia J; Janke, Kristin K

    2013-12-16

    To assist administrators and faculty members in colleges and schools of pharmacy by gathering expert opinion to frame, direct, and support investments in student leadership development. Twenty-six leadership instructors participated in a 3-round, online, modified Delphi process to define doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) student leadership instruction. Round 1 asked open-ended questions about leadership knowledge, skills, and attitudes to begin the generation of student leadership development guiding principles and competencies. Statements were identified as guiding principles when they were perceived as foundational to the instructional approach. Round 2 grouped responses for agreement rating and comment. Group consensus with a statement as a guiding principle was set prospectively at 80%. Round 3 allowed rating and comment on guidelines, modified from feedback in round 2, that did not meet consensus. The principles were verified by identifying common contemporary leadership development approaches in the literature. Twelve guiding principles, related to concepts of leadership and educational philosophy, were defined and could be linked to contemporary leadership development thought. These guiding principles describe the motivation for teaching leadership, the fundamental precepts of student leadership development, and the core tenets for leadership instruction. Expert opinion gathered using a Delphi process resulted in guiding principles that help to address many of the fundamental questions that arise when implementing or refining leadership curricula. The principles identified are supported by common contemporary leadership development thought.

  10. 77 FR 27832 - Shipping Coordinating Committee; Notice of Committee Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-11

    ... organizations --Relations with non-governmental organizations --World Maritime Day --International Maritime... DEPARTMENT OF STATE [Public Notice: 7879] Shipping Coordinating Committee; Notice of Committee...-second Session of the International Maritime Organization (IMO) Technical Co-operation Committee (TCC 62...

  11. Decision Making in Liver Transplant Selection Committees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volk, Michael L; Biggins, Scott W; Huang, Mary Ann; Argo, Curtis K; Fontana, Robert J; Anspach, Renee R

    2011-01-01

    Background In order to receive a liver transplant, patients must first be placed on the waiting list – a decision made in most transplant centers by a multidisciplinary committee. The function of these committees has never been studied. Objectives To describe decision making in liver transplant committees and identify opportunities for process improvement. Design Observational multi-center Setting We observed 63 meetings and interviewed 50 committee members at 4 liver transplant centers. Study Subjects Transplant committee members. Measurements Recorded transcripts and field notes were analyzed using standard qualitative sociological methods. Results While the structure of meetings varied by center, the process was uniform and involved reviewing possible reasons for patient exclusion using primarily inductive reasoning. Stated justifications for excluding patients were a) too well, b) non-hepatic comorbidities or advanced age, c) too sick in the setting of advanced liver disease, d) substance abuse, or e) other psychosocial barriers. Dominant themes identified included members’ angst over deciding who lives and dies, a high correlation between psychosocial barriers to transplant and patients’ socioeconomic status, and the influence of external forces on decision making. Consistently identified barriers to effective group decision making were: 1) unwritten center policies, and 2) confusion regarding advocacy versus stewardship roles. Limitations The use of qualitative methods provides broad understanding but limits specific inferences. These four centers may not be reflective of every transplant center nationwide. Conclusion The difficult decisions made by these committees are reasonably consistent and always well-intentioned, but might be improved by more explicit written policies and clarifying roles. This process may help inform resource allocation in other areas of medicine. Primary funding source The Greenwall Foundation. PMID:22007044

  12. The Evolution of American Hospital Ethics Committees: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtwright, Andrew; Jurchak, Martha

    2016-01-01

    During the 1970s and 1980s, legal precedent, governmental recommendations, and professional society guidelines drove the formation of hospital ethics committees (HECs). The Joint Commission on Accreditation of Health Care Organization's requirements in the early 1990s solidified the role of HECs as the primary mechanism to address ethical issues in patient care. Because external factors drove the rapid growth of HECs on an institution-by-institution basis, however, no initial consensus formed around the structure and function of these committees. There are now almost 40 years of empirical studies on the composition, administration, and activities of HECs in the United States. We conducted a systematic review of the available empirical literature on HECs to describe their evolution. As HECs changed over time, they increased their total number of members and percentage of members from nursing and the community. Although physicians increasingly chaired these committees, their presence as a percentage of overall members declined. The percentage of administrative members remained steady, although committees became increasingly likely to have at least one administrative member. HECs were also increasingly likely to report to an administrative body or to the board of trustees or directors rather than to the medical staff. Finally, consultation volume increased steadily over time. There has not, however, been a national survey of the composition of ethics committees, their administration, or volume of consultation in more than 10 years, despite increasing calls for professional standards and quality improvement assessments among HECs. Copyright 2016 The Journal of Clinical Ethics. All rights reserved.

  13. The medical school curriculum committee revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricson, W D; Payer, A F; Rogers, L P; Markus, J F

    1993-03-01

    Numerous study commissions have contended that departmental territoriality and lack of coordinated planning are stagnating contemporary medical education. As a cure, these commissions have recommended the creation of centralized academic management units empowered to oversee revitalization of the curriculum through a series of reforms, including better definition of graduation competencies, community-based training, interdisciplinary courses, problem-based learning, and modernization of evaluation strategies. To determine the extent to which these recommendations were being adopted, in 1990 the authors sent a questionnaire on curriculum committee functions, current innovation efforts, and future priorities to academic administrators and members of medical school curriculum committees at 143 North American medical schools. Responses were received from administrators (primarily associate deans for academic affairs) at 118 schools and committee members (primarily faculty) at 111 schools. Recommendations for enhancing curriculum committee effectiveness were also elicited. The authors conclude that centralization of curricular management has occurred at very few institutions, and that the commonly mentioned reforms are being adopted at a modest pace. The results are analyzed in light of theories of the institutional change process and strategies for introducing educational innovations into established institutions.

  14. News from the Staff Association Executive Committee

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2018-01-01

    On 17 April, the Staff Council proceeded to the election of the Executive Committee of the Staff Association and the members of the Bureau. First of all, why a new election of the Executive Committee elected in April 2018 after that of December 2017 (Echo No. 281)? Quite simply because a Crisis Executive Committee with a provisional Bureau had been elected for a period from 1st January to 16 April 2018 with defined and restricted objectives (Echo No. 283). Therefore, on 17 April, G. Roy presented for election a list of 12 persons, including five members for the Bureau, who agreed to continue their work within the Executive Committee, based on an intensive programme with the following main axes: Crèche and School and in particular the establishment of a foundation; Concertation: review and relaunch of the concertation process; Finalisation of the 2015 five-yearly review; Preparation and start of the 2020 five-yearly review; Actuarial reviews of the Pension Fund and the CHIS; Internal enquiries and...

  15. Committee on Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    SCIENCE ADVISOR WASHINGTON, DC -- Today, House Science Committee Chairman Sherwood Boehlert (R-NY23) and Advisor nominee Dr. John H. Marburger. The Senate Commerce Committee has scheduled a nomination hearing for this afternoon, and Boehlert and Grucci have been invited to testify. Dr. Marburger was nominated

  16. LOCAL ORGANIZING COMMITTEE

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prof. B. B. P. Gupta

    INDIAN ACADEMY OF SCIENCES. Bengaluru. 83rd ANNUAL MEETING. 3–5 November 2017, NEHU, Shillong. LOCAL ORGANIZING COMMITTEE. Local Organizing Committee. 1. Prof. S. K. Srivastava. Chairman. Vice-Chancellor, NEHU, Shillong. 2. Prof. B. B. P. Gupta. Organising Secretary. Department of Zoology ...

  17. Institutional Ethics Committee Regulations and Current Updates in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahuli, Amit V; Mahuli, Simpy A; Patil, Shankargouda; Bhandi, Shilpa

    2017-08-01

    The aim of the review is to provide current updates on regulations for ethics committees and researchers in India. Ethical dilemmas in research since time immemorial have been a major concern for researchers worldwide. The question "what makes clinical research ethical" is significant and difficult to answer as multiple factors are involved. The research involving human participants in clinical trials should follow the required rules, regulations, and guidelines in one's own country. It is a dynamic process, and updates have to be learned by researcher and committee members. The review highlights the ethical regulation from the Drug Controller General of India, Clinical Trial Registry of India, and Indian Council of Medical Research guidelines. In this article, the updates on Indian scenario of the Ethical Committee and guidelines are compiled. The review comes handy for clinical researchers and ethics committee members in academic institutions to check on the current updates and keep abreast with the knowledge on regulations of ethics in India.

  18. 78 FR 12762 - Joint Meeting of the Medical Imaging Drugs Advisory Committee and the Oncologic Drugs Advisory...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-25

    ...] Joint Meeting of the Medical Imaging Drugs Advisory Committee and the Oncologic Drugs Advisory Committee... be open to the public. Name of Committees: Medical Imaging Drugs Advisory Committee and the Oncologic... Special Medical Programs. [FR Doc. 2013-04141 Filed 2-22-13; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4160-01-P ...

  19. Patient empowerment in a hand hygiene program: differing points of view between patients/family members and health care workers in Asian culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Sung-Ching; Tien, Kuei-Lien; Hung, I-Chen; Lin, Yu-Jiun; Yang, Ya-Ling; Yang, Ming-Chin; Wang, Ming-Jiuh; Chang, Shan-Chwen; Chen, Yee-Chun

    2013-11-01

    "Patient empowerment" is an important component of World Health Organization hand hygiene program, but little is known about the intentions and attitude of patients/families and health care workers (HCWs) regarding this. A cross-sectional survey using questionnaires was conducted in a tertiary teaching hospital in Taiwan to assess hand hygiene knowledge and the attitudes and intentions regarding patient empowerment among patients/families and HCWs. Among patients/families, 95.4% (329/345) had positive attitudes regarding patient empowerment; however, only 67.2% (232/345) had the positive intention to remind HCWs about hand hygiene (P families in the pediatric department (OR, 1.86; 95% CI: 0.93-3.64). Among HCWs, the difference between positive attitude (81.1%; 714/880) and positive intention regarding being reminded about hand hygiene (62.8%; 553/880) was significant (P 25 years (OR, 3.20; 95% CI: 1.51-6.81) and a negative attitude toward patient empowerment (OR, 10.00; 95% CI: 5.88-16.67). There were significant gaps between attitude and intention regarding patient empowerment both among patients/families and HCWs. Special strategies targeting women, the pediatric population, or illiterate people may help improve patient/family participation. Additionally, hand hygiene education should be incorporated into early-stage medical/nursing education to create a facilitating environment. Patients/families and HCWs cooperation is needed to promote the hand hygiene program further. Copyright © 2013 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. ACCU: a committee that addresses Users' needs

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2013-01-01

    This year, the Advisory Committee of CERN Users (ACCU) celebrates its 25th anniversary. Created in its modern form in December 1988 - at a time when the number of users was about 1,500 - the committee still defends the interests of today’s users, now numbering around 11,000.   Actually, the first ACCU was established in 1977. Demanded by the rising number of Users, the need for such a committee arose during the 127th Meeting of Committee of Council (as stated in this official document): “In view of the large number and diversity of CERN Users, it has become apparent for some time that it would be useful to have an organised channel of consultation between the CERN direction and a representative group of CERN Users.” Michael Hauschild, ACCU Secretary since 2010, explains: “At that time, there were fewer ACCU members, and not all the countries were represented. With the birth of the modern form of the committee, in 1988, the decision to have representatives ...

  1. The Incentive Effect of Scores: Randomized Evidence from Credit Committees

    OpenAIRE

    Daniel Paravisini; Antoinette Schoar

    2013-01-01

    We design a randomized controlled trial to evaluate the adoption of credit scoring with a bank that uses soft information in small businesses lending. We find that credit scores improve the productivity of credit committees, reduce managerial involvement in the loan approval process, and increase the profitability of lending. Credit committee members' effort and output also increase when they anticipate the score becoming available, indicating that scores improve incentives to use existing in...

  2. 2015 Executive Committee: the strength of continuity

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2014-01-01

    The year 2015 will see few changes in the composition of the Executive Committee. On the one hand, Oliver Boetcher enters and becomes the representative of the Staff Association in the Management Board of EN Department. On the other hand, Jaap Panman, who will retire in 2015, leaves the Committee at the end of 2014. We would like to thank Joël Lahaye, who was the departmental representative for EN in 2014, and Jaap for their contributions. The other members of the Committee continue to assume their respective duties, thus ensuring that your Staff Association will have a solid, experienced, effective and cohesive team to cope with the challenges of the new year, with, among others, the key issues of pensions and the 2015 five-yearly review. Your staff delegates hope to be able to count on the active support of all of you to defend the interests of the personnel, past, present, and future, and their families. Sandrine BAUDAT FP Member Oliver BOETCHER EN Member Rachel BRAY GS Memb...

  3. Report on the BWR owners group radiation protection/ALARA Committee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aldrich, L.R. [Commonwealth Edison Co., Downers Grove, IL (United States)

    1995-03-01

    Radiation protection programs at U.S. boiling water reactor (BWR) stations have evolved during the 1980s and early 1990s from a regulatory adherence-based endeavor to a proactive, risk-based radiation protection and prevention mission. The objectives are no longer to merely monitor and document exposure to radiation and radioactive materials. The focus of the current programs is the optimization of radiation protection of occupational workers consistent with the purpose of producing cost-effective electric power. The newly revised 10 CFR 20 defines the term ALARA (as low as reasonably achievable) to take into account the state of technology, the economics of improvements in relation to the state of the technology, and the benefits to the public health and safety. The BWR Owners Group (BWROG) initially formed the Radiation Protection/ALARA Committee in January 1990 to evaluate methods of reducing occupational radiation exposure during refueling outages. Currently, twenty U.S. BWR owner/operators (representing 36 of the operational 37 domestic BWR units), as well as three foreign BWR operators (associate members), have broadened the scope to promote information exchange between BWR radiation protection professionals and develop good practices which will affect optimization of their radiation protection programs. In search of excellence and the challenge of becoming {open_quotes}World Class{close_quotes} performers in radiation protection, the BWROG Radiation Protection/ALARA Committee has recently accepted a role in assisting the member utilities in improving radiation protection performance in a cost-effective manner. This paper will summarize the recent activities of this Committee undertaken to execute their role of exchanging information in pursuit of optimizing the improvement of their collective radiation protection performance.

  4. Report on the BWR owners group radiation protection/ALARA Committee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aldrich, L.R.

    1995-01-01

    Radiation protection programs at U.S. boiling water reactor (BWR) stations have evolved during the 1980s and early 1990s from a regulatory adherence-based endeavor to a proactive, risk-based radiation protection and prevention mission. The objectives are no longer to merely monitor and document exposure to radiation and radioactive materials. The focus of the current programs is the optimization of radiation protection of occupational workers consistent with the purpose of producing cost-effective electric power. The newly revised 10 CFR 20 defines the term ALARA (as low as reasonably achievable) to take into account the state of technology, the economics of improvements in relation to the state of the technology, and the benefits to the public health and safety. The BWR Owners Group (BWROG) initially formed the Radiation Protection/ALARA Committee in January 1990 to evaluate methods of reducing occupational radiation exposure during refueling outages. Currently, twenty U.S. BWR owner/operators (representing 36 of the operational 37 domestic BWR units), as well as three foreign BWR operators (associate members), have broadened the scope to promote information exchange between BWR radiation protection professionals and develop good practices which will affect optimization of their radiation protection programs. In search of excellence and the challenge of becoming open-quotes World Classclose quotes performers in radiation protection, the BWROG Radiation Protection/ALARA Committee has recently accepted a role in assisting the member utilities in improving radiation protection performance in a cost-effective manner. This paper will summarize the recent activities of this Committee undertaken to execute their role of exchanging information in pursuit of optimizing the improvement of their collective radiation protection performance

  5. 7 CFR 932.129 - Nomination procedures for producer members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... choose the district in which the producer will vote and notify the Committee of that choice. If the... producer wishes to participate shall be the producer's choice. (4) Any member of a producer's family (husband, wife, son or daughter) may vote on behalf of an owner-operated, landlord-tenant, family...

  6. Drug usage guidelines, Part 3: assessment of acceptance of the program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patry, R A; Huber, S L; Rice, G; Hudson, H D; Godwin, H N

    1985-04-01

    The Drug Usage Guidelines (DUG) program, as perceived by the members of the P & T Committee and by physicians who had prepared and submitted DUGs, was demonstrated to be an effective method for evaluating drugs for formulary inclusion. The majority of P & T members felt that the DUG program had strengthened the drug review process without being too tedious or preventing the addition of valuable drugs to the formulary. Sixty-eight percent of physicians who had submitted a DUG expressed the opinion that it served as a vehicle for providing educational information on rational therapeutics. A majority of respondents stated that they would recommend the DUG program to other hospitals.

  7. 76 FR 49757 - Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-11

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee AGENCY: Office of Science... Services Administration, notice is hereby given that the Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee will be... science, fusion science, and fusion technology related to the Fusion Energy Sciences program. Additionally...

  8. 75 FR 19662 - Advisory Committee on Presidential Libraries Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-15

    ... NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION Advisory Committee on Presidential Libraries Meeting... Records Administration (NARA) announces a meeting of the Advisory Committee on Presidential Libraries. The meeting will be held to discuss the Presidential Library program and topics related to the public-private...

  9. 77 FR 35465 - Advisory Committee for Aviation Consumer Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-13

    ... Committee for Aviation Consumer Protection AGENCY: Office of the Secretary (OST), Department of... first meeting of the Advisory Committee for Aviation Consumer Protection. DATES: The first meeting of... recommendations to the Secretary for improving existing aviation consumer protection programs and for establishing...

  10. Linking data to tobacco control program action among students aged 13-15 in Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) member states, 2000-2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirichotiratana, N; Sovann, S; Aditama, T Y; Krishnan, M; Kyaing, N N; Miguel-Baquilod, M; Hai, P T; Sinha, D N; Warren, C W; Jones, N R

    2008-12-01

    The Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) has made tobacco use prevention a primary health issue. All ASEAN countries except Indonesia have ratified the World Health Organization Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (WHO FCTC), the world's first public health treaty on tobacco control. Global Youth Tobacco Survey (GYTS) data were collected from representative samples of students in school grades associated with ages 13-15 in Cambodia, Indonesia, Laos (Vientiane), Malaysia, Myanmar, Philippines, Singapore, Thailand and Vietnam (Hanoi). Current cigarette smoking ranged from less than 5% (Vietnam and Cambodia) to 20.2% in Malaysia. Current use of tobacco products other than cigarettes was less than 10% in all countries. Boys were significantly more likely than girls to smoke cigarettes or use other tobacco products. Exposure to second-hand smoke in public places was greater than 50%, direct pro-tobacco advertising exposure was greater than 75% and over 10% of students were exposed to indirect advertising. Over 60% of students who currently smoked cigarettes wanted to stop, but 80% who tried to quit in the year prior to the survey failed. Efforts to reduce the current and projected harm caused by tobacco use in the ASEAN countries are urgently needed. ASEAN countries need to expand their national comprehensive tobacco prevention and control programs and enforce those laws already passed. Without this effort little reduction can be expected in the burden of chronic diseases and tobacco-related mortality.

  11. X-ray fluorescence in Member States (Indonesia): Application of ED XRF in supporting national program of air quality improvement in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhayatun, Santoso; Diah Dwiana Lestiani

    2014-01-01

    Since 1997, the National Nuclear Energy Agency, BATAN has been involved in the IAEA’s RAS projects for the application of nuclear analytical techniques to characterize airborne particulate samples. The measurement of the elemental composition of the particulate matters is a key factor in utilization of the data for the determination of possible sources, which the process of identification and apportionment of pollutants to their sources is an important step in air quality management. Nuclear analytical methods such as XRF and PIXE are suitable for characterizations and need to be applied to produce large data sets of elemental compositions of APM. To maintain the sustainability of research in supporting the national program of air quality improvement in Indonesia, in 2011, BATAN has proposed new equipment, Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence (ED-XRF) Epsilon 5. During the last two years, based on MoU between BATAN and the Ministry of Environment, the assessment and monitoring of air quality has been expanded into 15 cities in Indonesia. In this review, we present the research activities related to the application of XRF in APM samples characterization. (author)

  12. Members of the Forum Engelberg visit CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2002-01-01

    The Forum Engelberg is an annual interdisciplinary conference held in Engelberg, Switzerland intended to act as an international platform for debate and exchange of views on key issues affecting scientific research, technology, economics and philosophy. Its President is Hubert Curien - former French Minister of Research and Space Research, and President of the CERN Council from 1994 to 1996. Horst Wenninger (left) in animated discussion with Alexander Höchli, member of the Institutional Committee of Forum Engelberg and former Landammann of the canton of Obwalden.

  13. Colloquium on the Past, Present and Future of the Nuclear Law Committee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Echavarri, Luis; Schwartz, Julia; Dussart-Desart, Roland; Pelzer, Norbert; Leger, Marc

    2007-01-01

    The NEA Nuclear Law Committee (NLC) celebrated its 50. anniversary in February 2007. To mark the occasion, a colloquium was organised on 6 February 2007 in conjunction with the committee's regular meeting in Paris, France. Those attending included nearly all former NLC chairs and former heads of NEA Legal Affairs. This document brings together the available presentations given at this colloquium: 1 - Welcoming Address (Luis Echavarri); 2 - The Nuclear Law Committee - A Historical Perspective (Julia Schwartz); 3 - The NEA Nuclear Law Committee - From the Viewpoint of a Committee Member (Norbert Pelze); 4 - Memorable Moments from Special guests; 5 - The Prospects for Nuclear Law (Marc Leger); 6 - Concluding Remarks (Roland Dussart-Desart)

  14. Panel Discussion : Report of the APS Ad-Hoc Committee on LGBT Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atherton, Tim; Barthelemy, Ramon; Garmon, Savannah; Reeves, Kyle; APS Ad-Hoc Committee on LGBT Issues Team

    Following the presentation of the findings and recommendations of the APS Ad-Hoc Committee on LGBT Issues (C-LGBT) by Committee Chair Michael Falk, a panel discussion will be held featuring several members of the committee. The discussion will focus on how APS can best ensure the recommendations of the committee are carried out in a timely fashion and other ideas on future APS efforts toward LGBT inclusion in physics. Discussion topics will also include the research and other input that shaped the committee's findings and recommendations.

  15. Food Assistance: Efforts To Control Fraud and Abuse in the Child and Adult Care Food Program Should Be Strengthened. United States General Accounting Office Report to Congressional Committees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Robert E.

    The Child and Adult Care Food Program provides over $1.5 billion in benefits annually to children and adults in day care. In order to address the longstanding problems of fraud and abuse present in the program, state agencies have been charged with the responsibility for implementing Food and Nutrition Service's (FNS) regulations to prevent and…

  16. Federal Student Loan Programs: Opportunities Exist to Improve Audit Requirements and Oversight Procedures. Report to Congressional Committees. GAO-10-668

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Kay L.

    2010-01-01

    The Higher Education Opportunity Act of 2008, Pub. L. No. 110-315, mandated GAO (Government Accountability Office) to study the financial and compliance audits and reviews required or conducted for the Federal Family Education Loan (FFEL) program and the Federal Direct Student Loan (DL) program. The Department of Education's (Education) Office of…

  17. Energy and water development appropriations for Fiscal year 1986. Part 2. Hearings before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations, United States Senate, Ninety-Ninth Congress, First Session on H.R. 2959

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1985-01-01

    Part 2 of the hearing record covers testimony on H.R. 2959 by representatives of DOE and selected agencies within the department. The volume opens with an overview of DOE-sponsored water programs and budget justifications by Energy Secretary Herrington and supporting witnesses. Witnesses on subsequent days defended the budgets of the radioactive waste management programs, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the five federal power marketing administrations, the solar and renewable programs, the Office of Energy Research, and the atomic energy defense activities. Witnesses described research and development programs and responded to the questions of committee members concerning the fiscal year 1986 budget for DOE

  18. An overview of the national immunization policy making process: the role of the Korea expert committee on immunization practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    The need for evidence-based decision making in immunization programs has increased due to the presence of multiple health priorities, limited human resources, expensive vaccines, and limited funds. Countries should establish a group of national experts to advise their Ministries of Health. So far, many nations have formed their own National Immunization Technical Advisory Groups (NITAGs). In the Republic of Korea, the Korea Expert Committee on Immunization Practices (KECIP), established by law in the early 1990s, has made many important technical recommendations to contribute to the decline in vaccine preventable diseases and currently functions as a NITAG. It includes 13 core members and 2 non-core members, including a chairperson. Core members usually come from affiliated organizations in internal medicine, pediatrics, obstetrics, microbiology, preventive medicine, nursing and a representative from a consumer group, all of whom serve two year terms. Non-core members comprise two government officials belonging to the Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (KCDC) and the Korea Food and Drug Administration. Meetings are held as needed, but at least twice a year, and sub-committees are formed as a resource for gathering, analyzing, and preparing information for the KECIP meetings. Once the sub-committees or the KCDC review the available data, the KECIP members discuss each issue in depth and develop recommendations, usually by a consensus in the meeting. The KECIP publishes national guidelines and immunization schedules that are updated regularly. KECIP's role is essentially consultative and the implementation of their recommendations may depend on the budget or current laws. PMID:22359523

  19. An overview of the national immunization policy making process: the role of the Korea expert committee on immunization practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hee Yeon Cho

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The need for evidence-based decision making in immunization programs has increased due to the presence of multiple health priorities, limited human resources, expensive vaccines, and limited funds. Countries should establish a group of national experts to advise their Ministries of Health. So far, many nations have formed their own National Immunization Technical Advisory Groups (NITAGs. In the Republic of Korea, the Korea Expert Committee on Immunization Practices (KECIP, established by law in the early 1990s, has made many important technical recommendations to contribute to the decline in vaccine preventable diseases and currently functions as a NITAG. It includes 13 core members and 2 non-core members, including a chairperson. Core members usually come from affiliated organizations in internal medicine, pediatrics, obstetrics, microbiology, preventive medicine, nursing and a representative from a consumer group, all of whom serve two year terms. Non-core members comprise two government officials belonging to the Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (KCDC and the Korea Food and Drug Administration. Meetings are held as needed, but at least twice a year, and sub-committees are formed as a resource for gathering, analyzing, and preparing information for the KECIP meetings. Once the sub-committees or the KCDC review the available data, the KECIP members discuss each issue in depth and develop recommendations, usually by a consensus in the meeting. The KECIP publishes national guidelines and immunization schedules that are updated regularly. KECIP’s role is essentially consultative and the implementation of their recommendations may depend on the budget or current laws.

  20. Caregiver outcomes of partners in dementia care: effect of a care coordination program for veterans with dementia and their family members and friends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bass, David M; Judge, Katherine S; Snow, A Lynn; Wilson, Nancy L; Morgan, Robert; Looman, Wendy J; McCarthy, Catherine A; Maslow, Katie; Moye, Jennifer A; Randazzo, Ronda; Garcia-Maldonado, Maurilio; Elbein, Richard; Odenheimer, Germaine; Kunik, Mark E

    2013-08-01

    The objective is to test the effectiveness of Partners in Dementia Care (PDC), a care-coordination program that integrates and improves access to medical and nonmedical services, while strengthening the informal care network and providing information, coaching, and emotional support. PDC was delivered via a partnership between Veterans Affairs (VA) Medical Centers (VAMCs) and Alzheimer's Association chapters, for caregivers of veterans with dementia living in the community and receiving primary care from the VA. The initial sample was 486 caregivers of 508 veterans with diagnosed dementia. Outcomes were evaluated for 394 and 324 caregivers who completed 6- and 12- month follow-up, respectively. PDC had a standardized protocol that included assessment and reassessment, action planning, and ongoing monitoring. It was delivered by telephone and e-mail for cost efficiency and the ability to handle caseloads of 100 to 125. Care coordinators from VAMCs and Alzheimer's Association chapters worked as a team using a shared computerized record. A variety of caregiver outcomes was measured after 6 and 12 months. Intervention group caregivers had significant improvements in outcomes representing unmet needs, three types of caregiver strains, depression, and two support resources. Most improvements were evident after 6 months, with more-limited improvements from Months 6 to 12. Some outcomes improved for all caregivers, whereas some improved for caregivers experiencing more initial difficulties or caring for veterans with more-severe impairments. PDC is a promising model that improves linkages between healthcare services and community services, which is a goal of several new national initiatives such as the National Plan to Address Alzheimer's Disease and a proposed amendment to the Older Americans Act. © 2013, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2013, The American Geriatrics Society.

  1. Evaluation of the audit committees of government ministries in Namibia: Their compositions, functions and regulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Winnie Kandandu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the underlying study to this paper is to evaluate the audit committees in the government ministries in Namibia; by assessing their composition, the function and regulations that govern committees. The study used a qualitative approach of inquiry. A purposive sampling method was used as the researcher selected ministries with audit committees. Thematic and content analysis was used in this study. Both primary and secondary and data were used. On primary data, interviews were conducted and recorded with a voice recorder. Secondary data was during the review of existing literature on the subject. The study found that from the 4 government ministries with audit committees, only one ministry consisted of independent members as well as an independent chairperson, while 3 ministries are chaired by members within their organisations. There was clear evidence of lack of accounting / financial /auditing competence among the committee members. This trend is contrary to the best practice which requires that the chairperson of the audit committees be independent of the ministry as well as the members of the audit committee. The finding indicates possibility of lack of capacity to carry out the functions of audit committees; weak internal control systems; chances of conflict of interest and complacency due to the lack of independence. There is avenue for further research as more ministries in Namibia are now establishing their audit committees, especially as the Namibian Code of Corporate Governance (the NamCode gains more popularity among the public sector.

  2. [Management committees in health services: an empirical study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecilio, Luiz Carlos de Oliveira

    2010-03-01

    The aim of the article, based on field data collected from a continuing education program for primary health clinic administrators, was to analyze the functioning of a health service management strategy called "management committees". Different meanings and operational modalities emerged in the committees. Various antimonies appeared in the way the committees operate (autonomy versus heteronomy, reproduction of "instituted" versus "instituting" processes, and communicative versus instrumental reasoning), thus reflecting the level of complexity in this management mechanism. Healthcare provision per se by the clinics only appeared occasionally on the committees' agenda, which mainly focused on administrative issues. The article suggests that further research is needed on the coordinator's involvement in the field of forces constituting the management committee, besides developing pedagogical strategies to support the clinic coordinators and health teams in building the committees. The primary data were submitted to an epistemological discussion anchored in the idea of double hermeneutics, multiple validation of research results, and the relationship between theory and practice.

  3. Highway Safety Improvement Program : further efforts needed to address data limitations and better align funding with states' top safety priorities : report to the Ranking Member, Committee on Environment and Public Works, U.S. Senate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-11-01

    About 43,000 people died and another 290,000 were seriously injured on the nation's roads in 2006. To reduce these numbers, the Safe, Accountable, Flexible, Efficient Transportation Equity Act: A Legacy for Users (SAFETEA-LU) nearly doubled funding f...

  4. Recommendations of the Standing Committee on Vaccination (STIKO) at the Robert Koch Institute – 2017/2018

    OpenAIRE

    Robert Koch-Institut

    2017-01-01

    The Standing Committee on Vaccination (STIKO) is an independent expert committee, consisting of 12 to 18 members, as stipulated in the Infection Against Protection Law [Infektionsschutzgesetz (IfSG)]. The members are appointed by the German Federal Ministry of Health in consultation with the federal state health authorities for a period of 3 years. In accordance with the IfSG the committee provides recommendations on vaccinations and other measures for the specific prophylaxis of commun...

  5. Report of the Ethics Committee, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Psychologist, 2011

    2011-01-01

    In accordance with the bylaws of the American Psychological Association (APA), the Ethics Committee reports regularly to the membership regarding the number and types of ethics matters investigated and the major programs undertaken. In 2010, ethics adjudication, ethics education and consultation, and special projects were activities of the Ethics…

  6. Report of the Ethics Committee, 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Psychologist, 2010

    2010-01-01

    In accordance with the bylaws of the American Psychological Association (APA), the Ethics Committee reports regularly to the membership regarding the number and types of ethics complaints investigated and the major programs undertaken. This article is a summary of the talks and workshops of 2009, ethics adjudication, ethics education and…

  7. 76 FR 12087 - Army Educational Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-04

    ...: U.S. Army War College Subcommittee of the Army Education Advisory Committee. Dates of Meeting: March 24, 2011. Place of Meeting: U.S. Army War College, 122 Forbes Avenue, Carlisle, PA, Command... faculty; table and examine online College issues; assess resident and distance education programs, self...

  8. Tribal Grant Program Area Polygons with Project Officer and Tribal Contact Information, US EPA Region 9, 2015, Regional Tribal Operations Committee

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This dataset contains information pertaining to EPA Region 9 project officers and their areas of oversight, EPA Region 9 grant program recipients and grant types,...

  9. Standing Concertation Committee

    CERN Document Server

    HR Department

    2010-01-01

    Main issues examined at the meeting of 2 October 2009 The October 2009 meeting of the Standing Concertation Committee was entirely devoted to preparation of TREF’s meeting on 21-22 October. The Committee took note of, discussed and agreed on clarifications needed to some of the documents and presentations that the Management intended to submit and/or present to TREF on the following subjects: Equal opportunities The Committee took note of a preliminary report on equal opportunities at CERN drawn up by D. Chromek-Burckhart, the Equal Opportunities Officer, and T. Smith, Chairman of the Equal Opportunities Advisory Panel, containing in particular a proposal for a new process for resolving harassment conflicts. Technical analysis of the CERN Health Insurance Scheme - Actuary’s Report The Committee took note of a presentation by P. Charpentier, Chairman of the CERN Health Insurance Supervisory Board (CHIS Board), on the 2009 actuarial report on the CERN Health Insurance Scheme (CHIS). Th...

  10. Standing Concertation Committee

    CERN Document Server

    HR Department

    2008-01-01

    ORDINARY MEETING ON 27 FEBRUARY 2008 The main items discussed at the meetings of the Standing Concertation Committee on 27 February 2008 included: Short-term Saved Leave Scheme The Committee noted that, by the end of February 2008, some 600 staff had enrolled in the short-term saved leave scheme: approx. 58% had signed up for 1 slice, 14% for two slices, 5% for three slices and 23% for four slices. Administrative Circular No. 4 (Rev. 4) - Unemployment Insurance Scheme The Committee agreed to recommend the Director-General to approve Administrative Circular No. 4 (Rev. 4) - Unemployment Insurance Scheme. Administrative Circular No. 30 (Rev. 2) - Financial benefits upon taking up appointment and termination of contract The Committee agreed to recommend the Director-General to approve Administrative Circular No. 30 (Rev. 2) - Financial Benefits upon taking up appointment and termination of contract. Progressive Retirement Programme The Progressive Retirement Programme (PR...

  11. Ostomy Home Skills Program

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Member Fellows International Fellows Associate Fellows Residents Medical Students Affiliate Members Fees and Dues Realize the Potential ... and Canada) International Fellows Associate Fellows Residents Medical Students Affiliate Members ACS Insurance Programs ACS Discount Programs ...

  12. 78 FR 61400 - Advisory Committee for Education and Human Resources; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-03

    ... NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION Advisory Committee for Education and Human Resources; Notice of...) education and human resources programming. Agenda November 6, 2013 Remarks by the Committee Chair and NSF Assistant Director for Education and Human Resources (EHR) Brief updates on EHR and Committee of Visitor...

  13. 76 FR 45221 - Office of Advocacy and Outreach; Advisory Committee on Minority Farmers; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-28

    ... Outreach; Advisory Committee on Minority Farmers; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Office of Advocacy and Outreach... amended, the OAO announces a public meeting of the Advisory Committee on Minority Farmers (Committee) to... minority farmers and ranchers in Department of Agriculture programs; and (3) civil rights activities within...

  14. Report of the CEA visiting committee on R and D for future nuclear energy systems, May 11-13, 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brechet, Y.; Ebbesen, T.; Fujiie, Y.; Richter, B.; Stormer, H.; Zinkle, S.J.

    2005-01-01

    This was the fifth meeting of the Visiting Committee of the CEA since its creation in year 2000. The first meeting gave members of the committee a broad overview of the entire spectrum of CEA research and subsequent meetings have focused on specific topics. These included the nuclear fuel cycle, biology, and micro and nano technologies. This meeting focused on research and development for future nuclear energy systems. The main division of CEA concerned with this topic is the Nuclear Energy Division. Some of the laboratories of the Technological Research and Matter Science Divisions are also involved in areas such as materials and basic nuclear data. The report deals with the fuels and waste, the SFR (Sodium Fast Reactor) and GFR (Gas Fast Reactor) programs, the Very High temperature reactor (VHTR), the actinide separation, the materials, the irradiation tests facilities and the personnel for the future. (A.L.B.)

  15. Report of the CEA visiting committee on R and D for future nuclear energy systems, May 11-13, 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brechet, Y. [Institut National Polytechnique, ENSEEG/LTPCM, 38 - Grenoble (France); Ebbesen, T. [Universite Louis Pasteur, ISIS, 67 - Strasbourg (France); Fujiie, Y. [Nuclear Salon Fuj-ie (Japan); Richter, B. [Director Emeritus, Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (United States); Stormer, H. [Columbia Univ., Dept. of Physics (United States); Zinkle, S.J. [Oac Ridge National Laboratory, Metals and Ceramics Div. (United States)

    2005-07-01

    This was the fifth meeting of the Visiting Committee of the CEA since its creation in year 2000. The first meeting gave members of the committee a broad overview of the entire spectrum of CEA research and subsequent meetings have focused on specific topics. These included the nuclear fuel cycle, biology, and micro and nano technologies. This meeting focused on research and development for future nuclear energy systems. The main division of CEA concerned with this topic is the Nuclear Energy Division. Some of the laboratories of the Technological Research and Matter Science Divisions are also involved in areas such as materials and basic nuclear data. The report deals with the fuels and waste, the SFR (Sodium Fast Reactor) and GFR (Gas Fast Reactor) programs, the Very High temperature reactor (VHTR), the actinide separation, the materials, the irradiation tests facilities and the personnel for the future. (A.L.B.)

  16. Ostomy Home Skills Program

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Membership Directory 2017 Annual Meeting 2016 Annual Meeting Women's Committee Mentorship Program Outside Activities ACS Archives Contact ... Accreditation Program for Breast Centers About NAPBC Accreditation Education NAPBC Standards Cancer Programs News Quality in Geriatric ...

  17. Condition of the Department of Energy's Isotope Program. Hearing before the Environment, Energy, and Natural Resources Subcommittee of the Committee on Government Operations, House of Representatives, One Hundred Second Congress, Second Session, August 12, 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    This is a hearing into the financial and organizational problems of the DOE's Isotope production and distribution program and how the problems affect research, medical care and industry in the US. US congressional members and representatives of the following entities presented statements: American Society for Nondestructive Testing, and the Nondestructive Testing Management Association (2 representatives); National Research Council (4 representatives); Council on Radioisotopes and Radiopharmaceuticals (2 representatives); Society for Nuclear Medicine and the American College of Nuclear Physicians (2 representatives); Energy Issues, GAO (2 representatives); DOE (2 representatives)

  18. Fourteenth meeting of the ITER management advisory committee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshikawa, M.

    1998-01-01

    Following the Director's report on the progress made in the ITER Engineering Design Activities, the ITER Management Advisory Committee reviewed the Task Status Summary, Work Program and Task Agreements for EDA Extension, Joint Fund and a schedule of ITER meetings

  19. 77 FR 35941 - Environmental Technologies Trade Advisory Committee Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-15

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration Environmental Technologies Trade... meeting of the Environmental Technologies Trade Advisory Committee (ETTAC). DATES: The meeting is... promotion programs; and issues related to innovation in the environmental technology sector. Background: The...

  20. 77 FR 6064 - Environmental Technologies Trade Advisory Committee Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-07

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration Environmental Technologies Trade... meeting of the Environmental Technologies Trade Advisory Committee (ETTAC). DATES: The teleconference... administration of programs to expand U.S. exports of environmental technologies, goods, services, and products...

  1. 78 FR 66801 - Motor Carrier Safety Advisory Committee; Charter Renewal

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-06

    ... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration [Docket No. FMCSA-2006-26367] Motor Carrier Safety Advisory Committee; Charter Renewal AGENCY: Federal Motor Carrier Safety... and recommendations on motor carrier safety programs and motor carrier safety regulations through a...

  2. Shuttle Rocket Motor Program: NASA should delay awarding some construction contracts. Report to the Chair, Subcommittee on Government Activities and Transportation, Committee on Government Operations, House of Representatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    Even though the executive branch has proposed terminating the Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM) program, NASA is proceeding with all construction activity planned for FY 1992 to avoid schedule slippage if the program is reinstated by Congress. However, NASA could delay some construction activities for at least a few months without affecting the current launch data schedule. For example, NASA could delay Yellow Creek's motor storage and dock projects, Stennis' dock project, and Kennedy's rotation processing and surge facility and dock projects. Starting all construction activities as originally planned could result in unnecessarily incurring additional costs and termination liability if the funding for FY 1993 is not provided. If Congress decides to continue the program, construction could still be completed in time to avoid schedule slippage.

  3. Ostomy Home Skills Program

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Overview Committee on Health Care Disparities Overview Why Optimal Access Matters NIH-ACS Symposium Symposium Findings Search Relevant Publications Optimal Access Resources Members Contact Us Publications ACS Publications ...

  4. [The role of bioethics committees in the systems protecting scientific biomedical research participants in France and in Poland].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarkowski, Marek; Sieczych, Alicja

    2013-08-01

    Bioethics committees are along with ethic regulations and rules of law one of three main pillars in the system of protection of scientific biomedical research participants. Although principal directives for bioethics committees are established by international guidelines, detailed regulations may differ in particular states. The aim of this article was to compare two bioethic committees systems: French and Polish one. Historical beginnings of the bioethics committees system in France and in Poland are briefly mentioned, Subsequently, the networks of bioethics committees in both countries are compared. Although the number of bioethics committees (Research Ethic Committees) in both countries is comparable, the procedure of their establishment varies. French committees are based on administrative division of the country and divide on regional and interregional committees. In Poland, bioethics committees are established by medical universities, medical research and development units or regional chambers of physicians and dentists. In France there is no equivalent of Appeal Bioethics Committee, however one could appeal from the negative bioethics committee's opinion. The composition of French bioethics committees is more diverse and half of the members are not related to medical professions. Members of French committees are named on indefinite term by headmaster of Regional Health Agency after having been chosen in competition for the post. In Poland members are called on three-year-term but the rotation of members is not overwhelming since there is no limit of terms for one member. French legal solutions seems more secure for scientific bioethics research participants. For this reason, a detailed research on legislation in other countries is necessary before introducing any new regulations in Polish law.

  5. Nuclear committee plays it straight: and draws criticism from all quarters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanouette, W.J.

    1981-01-01

    The Nuclear Safety Oversight Committee appointed after the 1979 accident at Three Mile Island angered everyone, but succeeded in highlighting many of the operating and regulatory problems plaguing nuclear power. The now defunct committee received mixed reviews, some calling it a waste of time and money, and others seeing it as a model for solving policy disputes. A review of the committee members and their two controversial studies describes the areas of disagreement

  6. Design committee makes major headway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1998-01-01

    Work of Ontario's Market Design Committee (MDC), charged with recommending the detailed steps to restructuring the electric power industry in Ontario was described. In its short life of only a few weeks, MDC had to create a series of strenuous internal rules in order to accomplish the enormous task of restructuring the industry in the relatively short time set out in the Government's White Paper in February 1998. Most of this article is devoted to describing the nature and functions of the Independent Market Operator (IMO), more commonly referred to as the Independent System Operator or the dispatch and control centre for the electrical system. The IMO will be governed by a board of 15 members consisting of a CEO, end-users, generation providers, marketers and transmission providers. Five independent members will be appointed by the Government from a list suggested by market participants to represent the broad industry and public interest. The IMO will be created as a not-for-profit, statutory corporation using a special act of the Ontario Legislature. Special needs identified by MDC will be drawn mostly from the Ontario Corporation Act, with operating procedures included as by-laws. The Ontario Energy Board (OEB) and the IMO are envisaged as having a relationship somewhat similar to the Ontario Securities Commission's role in overseeing the Toronto Stock Exchange. The involvement of the Independent Power Producers' Society of Ontario (IPPSO) in the work of the MDC is also described

  7. VA Student Financial Aid. Opportunity To Reduce Overlap in Approving Education and Training Programs. Report to the Committee on Veterans' Affairs, U.S. Senate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC. Health, Education, and Human Services Div.

    The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) contracts with state approving agencies (SAAs) to assess whether schools and training programs offer education of sufficient quality for veterans to receive VA education assistance benefits when attending them. The General Accounting Office examined the gatekeeping activities of the VA and the Department of…

  8. Federal Prisons. Inmate and Staff Views on Education and Work Training Programs. Report to the Chairman, Select Committee on Narcotics Abuse and Control, House of Representatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC. General Government Div.

    The purpose of this study was to determine the uses and usefulness of prison literacy and vocational education programs to the 65,000 inmates of federal prisons. Data were collected in two ways: (1) a survey of prison staff and review of selected inmate case files and other data to determine if the Federal Bureau of Prisons (BOP) had reliable…

  9. Justice and care: decision making by medical school student promotions committees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Emily P; Gruppuso, Philip A

    2017-06-01

    The function of medical school entities that determine student advancement or dismissal has gone largely unexplored. The decision making of 'academic progress' or student promotions committees is examined using a theoretical framework contrasting ethics of justice and care, with roots in the moral development work of theorists Kohlberg and Gilligan. To ascertain promotions committee members' conceptualisation of the role of their committee, ethical orientations used in member decision making, and student characteristics most influential in that decision making. An electronic survey was distributed to voting members of promotions committees at 143 accredited allopathic medical schools in the USA. Descriptive statistics were calculated and data were analysed by gender, role, institution type and class size. Respondents included 241 voting members of promotions committees at 55 medical schools. Respondents endorsed various promotions committee roles, including acting in the best interest of learners' future patients and graduating highly qualified learners. Implementing policy was assigned lower importance. The overall pattern of responses did not indicate a predominant orientation toward an ethic of justice or care. Respondents indicated that committees have discretion to take individual student characteristics into consideration during deliberations, and that they do so in practice. Among the student characteristics with the greatest influence on decision making, professionalism and academic performance were paramount. Eighty-five per cent of participants indicated that they received no training. Promotions committee members do not regard orientations of justice and care as being mutually exclusive and endorse an array of statements regarding the committee's purpose that may conflict with one another. The considerable variance in the influence of student characteristics and the general absence of committee member training indicate a need for clear delineation of the

  10. Evaluation and review of planning for greater-confinement disposal by the Independent Peer Review Committee, July 9-10, 1985. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-07-01

    This evaluation and review was performed under contract by Argonne National Laboratory in support of their role for developing the ''Planning for Greater Confinement Disposal'' Document for the Low-Level Waste Management Program Office for the Department of Energy, Office of Defense Waste and Byproducts Management. The Independent Peer Review Committee was composed of 13 well-qualified and recognized experts in their fields and pertinent disciplines, collectively representing considerable expertise and experience in waste disposal operations, waste management, environmental assessment and impact analysis, and other aspects of radioactive waste disposal. The members of the Peer Review Committee, their organizations, and thier area of expertise are given in Appendix 1. The general consensus of the Independent Review Committee was that the ''Planning for Greater-Confinement Disposal'' document was reasonably comprehensive, covering nearly all topics necessary to provide a good planning guide. There is, however, a definite need to reorganize the document into two volumes with appendices and the relationship of the GCD document to other LLWMP documents needs to be clarified in the introductory volume. Specific recommendations made by the committee on the DCD document are given in Section 3.2. Recommendations by the committee that have a somewhat broader scope than just the GCD document are given in Section 3.3

  11. 76 FR 63666 - Advisory Committee for Education and Human Resources; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-13

    ... Advancement of Women in Academic Science and Engineering Careers Committee discussion of EHR collaborations...'s science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education and human resources programming...

  12. 76 FR 21802 - Advisory Committee on the Readjustment of Veterans Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-18

    ... VA mental health program activities with special attention to mental health services for retuning war... for operations. The Committee will conduct a strategic planning session to formulate recommendations...

  13. Election of the new Executive Committee: Combining continuity and renewal

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2015-01-01

    In agreement with the Staff Association’s Statutes the new Staff Council elected on Tuesday, 8 December, a new President and his Executive Committee for a two-year mandate 2016–2017. Alessandro Raimondo, the only candidate for president, presented a list of delegates for an Executive Committee, which combines continuity and renewal. These are important assets to start working in early 2016 on the implementation of the decisions of the 2015 Five-Yearly Review, especially in the field of the career structure. Alessandro RAIMONDO GS President / Président Céline GROBON PH Vice-president / Vice-président Catherine LAVERRIÈRE DGS Vice-president / Vice-président Juan GARCIA PEREZ TE Treasurer / Trésorier Ghislain ROY BE Secretary / Secrétaire Sandrine BAUDAT FP Member / Membre Oliver BOETTCHER EN Member / Membre Rachel BRAY GS Member / Membre Nicolas DELRUELLE TE Member / Membre Gianni DEROMA GS Mem...

  14. Glued structural members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell C. Moody; Jen Y. Liu

    1999-01-01

    Glued structural members are manufactured in a variety of configurations. Structural composite lumber (SCL) products consist of small pieces of wood glued together into sizes common for solid-sawn lumber. Glued-laminated timber (glulam) is an engineered stress-rated product that consists of two or more layers of lumber in which the grain of all layers is oriented...

  15. CERN welcomes new members

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-01

    Lithuania is on course to become an associate member of CERN, pending final approval by the Lithuanian parliament. Associate membership will allow representatives of the Baltic nation to take part in meetings of the CERN Council, which oversees the Geneva-based physics lab.

  16. 77 FR 65585 - Renewal of the Bureau of Labor Statistics Data Users Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-29

    ... the U.S. economy, including the labor, business, research, academic and government communities, on... reports, and on gaps between or the need for new Bureau statistics. The Committee will function solely as.... All committee members will have extensive research or practical experience using BLS data. The...

  17. 75 FR 28667 - Joint CFTC-SEC Advisory Committee on Emerging Regulatory Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-21

    ... members, (iii) discussion of Committee agenda and organization; (iv) discussion of the Joint CFTC-SEC... make recommendations related to market structure issues that may have contributed to the volatility, as... ``Joint CFTC-SEC Advisory Committee'' to facilitate the organization and distribution of comments between...

  18. 75 FR 59720 - Methodology Committee of the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-28

    ... GOVERNMENT ACCOUNTABILITY OFFICE Methodology Committee of the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research... responsibility for appointing not more than 15 members to a Methodology Committee of the Patient- Centered Outcomes Research Institute. In addition, the Directors of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality...

  19. 77 FR 16866 - Request of Recommendations for Membership for Directorate and Office Advisory Committees

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-22

    ... opportunities in science and engineering; performance assessment; and business and operations. A primary... underrepresented in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. Committee members serve for varying term.... [email protected] ; fax: (703) 292-9042. Advisory Committee for Business and Jeffrey Rich, Office of...

  20. Committee Structure and its Implications for Monetary Policy Decision-making

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M. Berk (Jan Marc); B.K. Bierut

    2003-01-01

    textabstractWe investigate the implications for the setting of interest rates when monetary policy decisions are taken by a committee, in which a subset of members may meet prior to the voting in the committee and therefore has the possibility to reach consensus ex ante to vote unanimously ex post.

  1. 76 FR 15307 - Notice of Staff Attendance at Southwest Power Pool Strategic Planning Committee Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-21

    ... Power Pool Strategic Planning Committee Meeting The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission hereby gives notice that members of its staff may attend the meeting of the Southwest Power Pool, Inc. (SPP) Strategic Planning Committee (SPC), as noted below. Their attendance is part of the Commission's ongoing outreach...

  2. 29 CFR 525.24 - Advisory Committee on Special Minimum Wages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Advisory Committee on Special Minimum Wages. 525.24 Section 525.24 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... Special Minimum Wages. The Advisory Committee on Special Minimum Wages, the members of which are appointed...

  3. 78 FR 54621 - Agenda and Notice of Public Meeting of the Rhode Island Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-05

    ... Island 02905. The purpose of the orientation meeting is to inform the newly appointed Committee members... information may contact the Eastern Regional Office at 202-376-7533. Persons needing accessibility services...

  4. 78 FR 47274 - Agenda and Notice of Public Meeting of the Minnesota Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-05

    ... meeting will also include an orientation to new members of the Committee. This meeting is available to the... Federal Relay Service at 1-800-977-8339 and providing the Service with the conference call number and...

  5. 76 FR 50453 - Agenda and Notice of Public Meeting of the New Hampshire State Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-15

    ... advisory committees. The purpose of the planning meeting is to discuss future activities. Members of the....usccr.gov , or to contact the Eastern Regional Office at the above e-mail or street address. Deaf or...

  6. Technical review of the Sandia Laboratories' Particle Beam Fusion Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    This report considers the technical aspects of Sandia Laboratories' Particle Beam Fusion Program and examines the program's initial goals, the progress made to date towards reaching those goals, and the future plans or methods of reaching those original or modified goals. A summary of Sandia Laboratories' effort, which seeks to demonstrate that high voltage pulsed power generated high-current electron or light ion beams can be used to ignite a deuterium or tritium pellet, is provided. A brief review and assessment of the Sandia Pulse Power Program is given. Several critical issues and summaries of the committee members' opinions are discussed

  7. Department of Energy Office of Energy Research Programs: Fiscal year 1996 authorization testimony presented before the Subcommittee on Energy and Environment Committee on Science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldwin, D.E.

    1995-01-01

    Fusion energy is not as mature as the other energy options. However, in recent years fusion research has focused on its energy mission, and the progress has been impressive. Ten years ago, many observers questioned whether fusion in the laboratory was scientifically feasible. Today, few question fusion's basic feasibility, and the issues have shifted to its economic and environmental aspects. This is a measure of the progress the program has made. For the reasons outlined here, the author requests Congress to support at a minimum the Administration's FY96 budget request of $366 Million for fusion energy. This level permits the program to continue developing the tokamak as its principal fusion concept. The level is, however, insufficient to pursue meaningful development of specialized materials and non-tokamak alternatives which are sure to play important roles in enabling fusion to reach its highest potential attractiveness

  8. Corporate Governance Role of Audit Committees in the Banking Sector: Evidence from Libya

    OpenAIRE

    Abdulaziz Abdulsaleh

    2014-01-01

    This study aims at identifying the practices that should be taken into consideration by audit committees as a tool of corporate governance in Libyan commercial banks by investigating various perceptions on this topic. The study is based on a questionnaire submitted to audit committeesmembers at Libyan commercial banks, directors of internal audit departments as well as members of board of directors at these banks in addition to a number of external auditors and academic staff from Libyan un...

  9. Alliances in Human Biology: The Harvard Committee on Industrial Physiology, 1929-1939.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oakes, Jason

    2015-08-01

    In 1929 the newly-reorganized Rockefeller Foundation funded the work of a cross-disciplinary group at Harvard University called the Committee on Industrial Physiology (CIP). The committee's research and pedagogical work was oriented towards different things for different members of the alliance. The CIP program included a research component in the Harvard Fatigue Laboratory and Elton May's interpretation of the Hawthorne Studies; a pedagogical aspect as part of Wallace Donham's curriculum for Harvard Business School; and Lawrence Henderson's work with the Harvard Pareto Circle, his course Sociology 23, and the Harvard Society of Fellows. The key actors within the CIP alliance shared a concern with training men for elite careers in government service, business leadership, and academic prominence. But the first communications between the CIP and the Rockefeller Foundation did not emphasize training in human biology. Instead, the CIP presented itself as a coordinating body that would be able to organize all the varied work going on at Harvard that did not fit easily into one department, and it was on this basis that the CIP became legible to the President of Harvard, A. Lawrence Lowell, and to Rockefeller's Division of Social Sciences. The members of the CIP alliance used the term human biology for this project of research, training and institutional coordination.

  10. NASA/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program, 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiwari, S.N.

    1991-09-01

    In a series of collaborations between NASA research and development centers and nearby universities, engineering faculty members spent 10 weeks working with professional peers on research. The Summer Faculty Program Committee of the American Society of Engineering Education supervises the programs. The objects were the following: (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate and exchange ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of the participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA center

  11. 75 FR 27614 - Shipping Coordinating Committee; Notice of Committee Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-17

    ... Environment Protection Committee. --Consideration of the report of the Maritime Safety Committee... Session of the International Maritime Organization (IMO) Council to be held at the IMO headquarters in... HNS Convention. --World Maritime University: --IMO International Maritime Law Institute: --Protection...

  12. 77 FR 76164 - Shipping Coordinating Committee; Notice of Committee Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-26

    ... atmospheric pollution --Development of international measures for minimizing the transfer of invasive aquatic... pollution hazards of chemicals and preparation of consequential amendments --Additional guidelines for... DEPARTMENT OF STATE [Public Notice 8133] Shipping Coordinating Committee; Notice of Committee...

  13. A report of the Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee: 1992 review of the Basic Energy Sciences Program of the Department of Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-09-01

    The general quality of BES research at each of the 4 laboratories is high. Diversity of management at the different laboratories is beneficial as long as the primary BES mission and goals are clearly identified and effectively pursued. External sources of personnel should be encouraged. DOE has been designing a new high flux research reactor, the Advanced Neutron Source, to replace DOE's two aging research reactors; BESAC conducted a panel evaluation of neutron sources for the future. The two new light sources, Advanced Light Source and Advanced Photon source will come on line well before all of their beamline instrumentation can be funded, developed, and installed. Appointment of a permanent director and deputy for OBES would enhance OBES effectiveness in budget planning and intra-DOE program coordination. Some DOE and DP laboratories have substantial infrastructure which match well industry development-applications needs; interlaboratory partnerships in this area are encouraged. Funding for basic science research programs should be maintained at FY1993 levels, adjusted for inflation; OBES plans should be updated and monitored to maintain the balance between basic research and facilities construction and operation. The recommendations are discussed in detail in this document

  14. Proposal for a program in particle-beam radiation therapy in the United States. A report from the Committee for Radiation Oncology Studies (CROS) and its particle subcommittee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1978-01-01

    The Program for Particle Therapy proposes utilization of hospital-based particle generators in a nationwide program to evaluate, through meaningful clinical trials, article radiation therapy and the impact its utilization can have in cancer care. The scientific rationale for use of particle therapy compared to conventional radiation in the effort to achieve uncomplicated local control of cancer, to heal, cure and palliate the patient, indicates the advantages of particle therapy consist of either or both (a) enhanced biological effect and (b) physical properties leading to improvement in dose distribution. Any new modality enabling the therapist to increase dose to tumor, while sparing critical normal tissue, can enhance local control and benefit systemic therapy. Limited clinical trials to date warrant further definitive clinical study of particle beams. Physical and biologic considerations of fast-neutron beams have been essentially completed; equipment design, availability, and predicted reliability are good; and the medical community has indicated support of further study. A major clinical investigation can be implemented to provide the scientific basis for judging clinical merit of use of high LET radiations. Concurrently, the first phase of work can be started with protons, negative pions, and heavy ions. It is anticipated that clinical results will accrue much more rapidly with hospital-based facilities in two phases, over a 10-year period

  15. 76 FR 18966 - Listing Standards for Compensation Committees

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-06

    ... director. For this purpose, remuneration includes any payment in exchange for goods or services. Section... the board of directors and to be ``independent,'' as defined in the listing standards of the exchanges... requirements for members of the compensation committee of the board of directors of an issuer. In accordance...

  16. 77 FR 38421 - Listing Standards for Compensation Committees

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-27

    ..., in any capacity other than as a director. For this purpose, remuneration includes any payment in... of a listed issuer's compensation committee to be a member of the board of directors and to be... annual meeting of shareholders (or a special meeting in lieu of the annual meeting) at which directors...

  17. installation of the ITER committee industry. Participants guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    ITER is an international project to design and build an experimental fusion reactor based on the tokamak concept. This guide presents the ITER project and objectives and the associated organizations in France, the recommendations and actions for ITER, the industrial mobilization, the industrial committee and its members, technological sheets for the enterprises and the statistical document of the SESSI. (A.L.B.)

  18. 76 FR 29191 - Lawrence County Resource Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-20

    ... project proposals and will be soliciting for additional projects. The purpose of the meeting is to review submitted projects and vote on project proposals to recommend for funding. DATES: The meeting will be held... be conducted: Review proposed projects. If Committee members have enough information, they may choose...

  19. UK Chemical Nuclear Data Committee request list - 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nichols, A.L.

    1990-03-01

    The 1986 UK request list for chemical nuclear data has been reviewed in detail by members of the UK Chemical Nuclear Data Committee. New requirements for data measurements and evaluations have been identified, and specific requests have been withdrawn. A new UK request list has evolved, and is given in the form of tabulations covering measurements and evaluations. (author)

  20. 78 FR 10595 - Olympic Peninsula Resource Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-14

    ... DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Olympic Peninsula Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Outreach for new RAC Replacement members. SUMMARY: Interested citizens are... information, please contact Donna Nemeth at 360-956-2274 or Bill Shelmerdine at 360-956- 2282. Dated: February...