WorldWideScience

Sample records for program coalescent theory

  1. Coalescent: an open-science framework for importance sampling in coalescent theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tewari, Susanta; Spouge, John L

    2015-01-01

    Background. In coalescent theory, computer programs often use importance sampling to calculate likelihoods and other statistical quantities. An importance sampling scheme can exploit human intuition to improve statistical efficiency of computations, but unfortunately, in the absence of general computer frameworks on importance sampling, researchers often struggle to translate new sampling schemes computationally or benchmark against different schemes, in a manner that is reliable and maintainable. Moreover, most studies use computer programs lacking a convenient user interface or the flexibility to meet the current demands of open science. In particular, current computer frameworks can only evaluate the efficiency of a single importance sampling scheme or compare the efficiencies of different schemes in an ad hoc manner. Results. We have designed a general framework (http://coalescent.sourceforge.net; language: Java; License: GPLv3) for importance sampling that computes likelihoods under the standard neutral coalescent model of a single, well-mixed population of constant size over time following infinite sites model of mutation. The framework models the necessary core concepts, comes integrated with several data sets of varying size, implements the standard competing proposals, and integrates tightly with our previous framework for calculating exact probabilities. For a given dataset, it computes the likelihood and provides the maximum likelihood estimate of the mutation parameter. Well-known benchmarks in the coalescent literature validate the accuracy of the framework. The framework provides an intuitive user interface with minimal clutter. For performance, the framework switches automatically to modern multicore hardware, if available. It runs on three major platforms (Windows, Mac and Linux). Extensive tests and coverage make the framework reliable and maintainable. Conclusions. In coalescent theory, many studies of computational efficiency consider only

  2. HIV classification using the coalescent theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulla, Ingo; Schultz, Anne-Kathrin; Schreiber, Fabian; Zhang, Ming; Leitner, Thomas; Korber, Bette; Morgenstern, Burkhard; Stanke, Mario

    2010-06-01

    Existing coalescent models and phylogenetic tools based on them are not designed for studying the genealogy of sequences like those of HIV, since in HIV recombinants with multiple cross-over points between the parental strains frequently arise. Hence, ambiguous cases in the classification of HIV sequences into subtypes and circulating recombinant forms (CRFs) have been treated with ad hoc methods in lack of tools based on a comprehensive coalescent model accounting for complex recombination patterns. We developed the program ARGUS that scores classifications of sequences into subtypes and recombinant forms. It reconstructs ancestral recombination graphs (ARGs) that reflect the genealogy of the input sequences given a classification hypothesis. An ARG with maximal probability is approximated using a Markov chain Monte Carlo approach. ARGUS was able to distinguish the correct classification with a low error rate from plausible alternative classifications in simulation studies with realistic parameters. We applied our algorithm to decide between two recently debated alternatives in the classification of CRF02 of HIV-1 and find that CRF02 is indeed a recombinant of Subtypes A and G. ARGUS is implemented in C++ and the source code is available at http://gobics.de/software.

  3. Coalescing the theories of two nurse visionaries: Parse and Watson.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, C A

    1996-11-01

    The theories of two nurse visionaries, Rosemarie Rizzo Parse and Jean Watson, are examined for areas of agreement and notable differences. Watson and Parse reject (or hold seriously suspect) traditional, positivistic methods of studying human behaviour and posit their theories as alternatives to the totality paradigm. Since both of these theories, Parse's theory of human becoming and Watson's theory of transpersonal care, borrow heavily from existential phenomenology, major tenets of this philosophic perspective are outlined. Each theory is then described with emphasis on anchoring motifs, concepts, and principles. Next both theories are analysed and critiqued simultaneously. Finally, the theories are applied to a case study with the intent of maximizing their mutual strengths and diminishing their limitations. Coalescence of compatible theories is recommended as a way of enhancing the application of nursing knowledge in practice.

  4. Coalescent: an open-source and scalable framework for exact calculations in coalescent theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tewari Susanta

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Currently, there is no open-source, cross-platform and scalable framework for coalescent analysis in population genetics. There is no scalable GUI based user application either. Such a framework and application would not only drive the creation of more complex and realistic models but also make them truly accessible. Results As a first attempt, we built a framework and user application for the domain of exact calculations in coalescent analysis. The framework provides an API with the concepts of model, data, statistic, phylogeny, gene tree and recursion. Infinite-alleles and infinite-sites models are considered. It defines pluggable computations such as counting and listing all the ancestral configurations and genealogies and computing the exact probability of data. It can visualize a gene tree, trace and visualize the internals of the recursion algorithm for further improvement and attach dynamically a number of output processors. The user application defines jobs in a plug-in like manner so that they can be activated, deactivated, installed or uninstalled on demand. Multiple jobs can be run and their inputs edited. Job inputs are persisted across restarts and running jobs can be cancelled where applicable. Conclusions Coalescent theory plays an increasingly important role in analysing molecular population genetic data. Models involved are mathematically difficult and computationally challenging. An open-source, scalable framework that lets users immediately take advantage of the progress made by others will enable exploration of yet more difficult and realistic models. As models become more complex and mathematically less tractable, the need for an integrated computational approach is obvious. Object oriented designs, though has upfront costs, are practical now and can provide such an integrated approach.

  5. Coalescent: an open-source and scalable framework for exact calculations in coalescent theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tewari, Susanta; Spouge, John L

    2012-10-03

    Currently, there is no open-source, cross-platform and scalable framework for coalescent analysis in population genetics. There is no scalable GUI based user application either. Such a framework and application would not only drive the creation of more complex and realistic models but also make them truly accessible. As a first attempt, we built a framework and user application for the domain of exact calculations in coalescent analysis. The framework provides an API with the concepts of model, data, statistic, phylogeny, gene tree and recursion. Infinite-alleles and infinite-sites models are considered. It defines pluggable computations such as counting and listing all the ancestral configurations and genealogies and computing the exact probability of data. It can visualize a gene tree, trace and visualize the internals of the recursion algorithm for further improvement and attach dynamically a number of output processors. The user application defines jobs in a plug-in like manner so that they can be activated, deactivated, installed or uninstalled on demand. Multiple jobs can be run and their inputs edited. Job inputs are persisted across restarts and running jobs can be cancelled where applicable. Coalescent theory plays an increasingly important role in analysing molecular population genetic data. Models involved are mathematically difficult and computationally challenging. An open-source, scalable framework that lets users immediately take advantage of the progress made by others will enable exploration of yet more difficult and realistic models. As models become more complex and mathematically less tractable, the need for an integrated computational approach is obvious. Object oriented designs, though has upfront costs, are practical now and can provide such an integrated approach.

  6. Theoretical Coalescence: A Method to Develop Qualitative Theory: The Example of Enduring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, Janice M

    2018-01-23

    Qualitative research is frequently context bound, lacks generalizability, and is limited in scope. The purpose of this article was to describe a method, theoretical coalescence, that provides a strategy for analyzing complex, high-level concepts and for developing generalizable theory. Theoretical coalescence is a method of theoretical expansion, inductive inquiry, of theory development, that uses data (rather than themes, categories, and published extracts of data) as the primary source for analysis. Here, using the development of the lay concept of enduring as an example, I explore the scientific development of the concept in multiple settings over many projects and link it within the Praxis Theory of Suffering. As comprehension emerges when conducting theoretical coalescence, it is essential that raw data from various different situations be available for reinterpretation/reanalysis and comparison to identify the essential features of the concept. The concept is then reconstructed, with additional inquiry that builds description, and evidence is conducted and conceptualized to create a more expansive concept and theory. By utilizing apparently diverse data sets from different contexts that are linked by certain characteristics, the essential features of the concept emerge. Such inquiry is divergent and less bound by context yet purposeful, logical, and with significant pragmatic implications for practice in nursing and beyond our discipline. Theoretical coalescence is a means by which qualitative inquiry is broadened to make an impact, to accommodate new theoretical shifts and concepts, and to make qualitative research applied and accessible in new ways.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0 (CCBY-NC-ND), where it is permissible to download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially without permission

  7. Finding the best resolution for the Kingman-Tajima coalescent: theory and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sainudiin, Raazesh; Stadler, Tanja; Véber, Amandine

    2015-05-01

    Many summary statistics currently used in population genetics and in phylogenetics depend only on a rather coarse resolution of the underlying tree (the number of extant lineages, for example). Hence, for computational purposes, working directly on these resolutions appears to be much more efficient. However, this approach seems to have been overlooked in the past. In this paper, we describe six different resolutions of the Kingman-Tajima coalescent together with the corresponding Markov chains, which are essential for inference methods. Two of the resolutions are the well-known n-coalescent and the lineage death process due to Kingman. Two other resolutions were mentioned by Kingman and Tajima, but never explicitly formalized. Another two resolutions are novel, and complete the picture of a multi-resolution coalescent. For all of them, we provide the forward and backward transition probabilities, the probability of visiting a given state as well as the probability of a given realization of the full Markov chain. We also provide a description of the state-space that highlights the computational gain obtained by working with lower-resolution objects. Finally, we give several examples of summary statistics that depend on a coarser resolution of Kingman's coalescent, on which simulations are usually based.

  8. On the limits of Köhler activation theory: how do collision and coalescence affect the activation of aerosols?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Fabian

    2017-07-01

    Activation is necessary to form a cloud droplet from an aerosol, and it is widely accepted that it occurs as soon as a wetted aerosol grows beyond its critical radius. Traditional Köhler theory assumes that this growth is driven by the diffusion of water vapor. However, if the wetted aerosols are large enough, the coalescence of two or more particles is an additional process for accumulating sufficient water for activation. This transition from diffusional to collectional growth marks the limit of traditional Köhler theory and it is studied using a Lagrangian cloud model in which aerosols and cloud droplets are represented by individually simulated particles within large-eddy simulations of shallow cumuli. It is shown that the activation of aerosols larger than 0. 1 µm in dry radius can be affected by collision and coalescence, and its contribution increases with a power-law relation toward larger radii and becomes the only process for the activation of aerosols larger than 0. 4-0. 8 µm depending on aerosol concentration. Due to the natural scarcity of the affected aerosols, the amount of aerosols that are activated by collection is small, with a maximum of 1 in 10 000 activations. The fraction increases as the aerosol concentration increases, but decreases again as the number of aerosols becomes too high and the particles too small to cause collections. Moreover, activation by collection is found to affect primarily aerosols that have been entrained above the cloud base.

  9. Bubble coalescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Orvalho, Sandra; Ruzicka, Marek C.; Olivieri, Giuseppe; Marzocchella, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study is to present new experimental data on the effect of the bubble approach velocity and liquid viscosity on pairwise bubble coalescence. Measurements were performed to investigate the dynamics of bubble coalescence under well-defined laboratory conditions. Air and pure

  10. On the limits of Köhler activation theory: how do collision and coalescence affect the activation of aerosols?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Hoffmann

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Activation is necessary to form a cloud droplet from an aerosol, and it is widely accepted that it occurs as soon as a wetted aerosol grows beyond its critical radius. Traditional Köhler theory assumes that this growth is driven by the diffusion of water vapor. However, if the wetted aerosols are large enough, the coalescence of two or more particles is an additional process for accumulating sufficient water for activation. This transition from diffusional to collectional growth marks the limit of traditional Köhler theory and it is studied using a Lagrangian cloud model in which aerosols and cloud droplets are represented by individually simulated particles within large-eddy simulations of shallow cumuli. It is shown that the activation of aerosols larger than 0. 1 µm in dry radius can be affected by collision and coalescence, and its contribution increases with a power-law relation toward larger radii and becomes the only process for the activation of aerosols larger than 0. 4–0. 8 µm depending on aerosol concentration. Due to the natural scarcity of the affected aerosols, the amount of aerosols that are activated by collection is small, with a maximum of 1 in 10 000 activations. The fraction increases as the aerosol concentration increases, but decreases again as the number of aerosols becomes too high and the particles too small to cause collections. Moreover, activation by collection is found to affect primarily aerosols that have been entrained above the cloud base.

  11. Elementary number theory with programming

    CERN Document Server

    Lewinter, Marty

    2015-01-01

    A successful presentation of the fundamental concepts of number theory and computer programming Bridging an existing gap between mathematics and programming, Elementary Number Theory with Programming provides a unique introduction to elementary number theory with fundamental coverage of computer programming. Written by highly-qualified experts in the fields of computer science and mathematics, the book features accessible coverage for readers with various levels of experience and explores number theory in the context of programming without relying on advanced prerequisite knowledge and con

  12. Electro-Coalescence Fireworks

    OpenAIRE

    Aryafar, H.; Kavehpour, H. P.

    2009-01-01

    Electro-coalescence is the application of an electric field onto coalescing fluid bodies. The following fluid dynamics videos show a droplet coalescing into a fluid bath while embedded into a viscous medium and subject to a very high electric field. The concentration of electric stresses at the apex of the droplet cause it to break apart. The droplet is glycerol and the viscous medium is silicone oil.

  13. Hydrodynamic effects on coalescence.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dimiduk, Thomas G.; Bourdon, Christopher Jay; Grillet, Anne Mary; Baer, Thomas A.; de Boer, Maarten Pieter; Loewenberg, Michael (Yale University, New Haven, CT); Gorby, Allen D.; Brooks, Carlton, F.

    2006-10-01

    The goal of this project was to design, build and test novel diagnostics to probe the effect of hydrodynamic forces on coalescence dynamics. Our investigation focused on how a drop coalesces onto a flat surface which is analogous to two drops coalescing, but more amenable to precise experimental measurements. We designed and built a flow cell to create an axisymmetric compression flow which brings a drop onto a flat surface. A computer-controlled system manipulates the flow to steer the drop and maintain a symmetric flow. Particle image velocimetry was performed to confirm that the control system was delivering a well conditioned flow. To examine the dynamics of the coalescence, we implemented an interferometry capability to measure the drainage of the thin film between the drop and the surface during the coalescence process. A semi-automated analysis routine was developed which converts the dynamic interferogram series into drop shape evolution data.

  14. HIV classification using coalescent theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Ming [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Letiner, Thomas K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Korber, Bette T [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    Algorithms for subtype classification and breakpoint detection of HIV-I sequences are based on a classification system of HIV-l. Hence, their quality highly depend on this system. Due to the history of creation of the current HIV-I nomenclature, the current one contains inconsistencies like: The phylogenetic distance between the subtype B and D is remarkably small compared with other pairs of subtypes. In fact, it is more like the distance of a pair of subsubtypes Robertson et al. (2000); Subtypes E and I do not exist any more since they were discovered to be composed of recombinants Robertson et al. (2000); It is currently discussed whether -- instead of CRF02 being a recombinant of subtype A and G -- subtype G should be designated as a circulating recombination form (CRF) nd CRF02 as a subtype Abecasis et al. (2007); There are 8 complete and over 400 partial HIV genomes in the LANL-database which belong neither to a subtype nor to a CRF (denoted by U). Moreover, the current classification system is somehow arbitrary like all complex classification systems that were created manually. To this end, it is desirable to deduce the classification system of HIV systematically by an algorithm. Of course, this problem is not restricted to HIV, but applies to all fast mutating and recombining viruses. Our work addresses the simpler subproblem to score classifications of given input sequences of some virus species (classification denotes a partition of the input sequences in several subtypes and CRFs). To this end, we reconstruct ancestral recombination graphs (ARG) of the input sequences under restrictions determined by the given classification. These restritions are imposed in order to ensure that the reconstructed ARGs do not contradict the classification under consideration. Then, we find the ARG with maximal probability by means of Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods. The probability of the most probable ARG is interpreted as a score for the classification. To our knowledge, this particular problem was not addressed up to now. The software package Lamarc Kuhner et al. (2000) allows for sampling ARGs, but it assumes that recombination events only involve one breakpoint. However, in HIV recombinants usually have more than one breakpoint. Moreover, Lamarc does not perform an explicit breakpoint detection, but tries to find them by chance. Although this approach is suitable for most situations, it will not lead to satisfying results in case of highly recombining viruses with multiple breakpoints.

  15. Integer programming theory, applications, and computations

    CERN Document Server

    Taha, Hamdy A

    1975-01-01

    Integer Programming: Theory, Applications, and Computations provides information pertinent to the theory, applications, and computations of integer programming. This book presents the computational advantages of the various techniques of integer programming.Organized into eight chapters, this book begins with an overview of the general categorization of integer applications and explains the three fundamental techniques of integer programming. This text then explores the concept of implicit enumeration, which is general in a sense that it is applicable to any well-defined binary program. Other

  16. Separable programming theory and methods

    CERN Document Server

    Stefanov, Stefan M

    2001-01-01

    In this book, the author considers separable programming and, in particular, one of its important cases - convex separable programming Some general results are presented, techniques of approximating the separable problem by linear programming and dynamic programming are considered Convex separable programs subject to inequality equality constraint(s) and bounds on variables are also studied and iterative algorithms of polynomial complexity are proposed As an application, these algorithms are used in the implementation of stochastic quasigradient methods to some separable stochastic programs Numerical approximation with respect to I1 and I4 norms, as a convex separable nonsmooth unconstrained minimization problem, is considered as well Audience Advanced undergraduate and graduate students, mathematical programming operations research specialists

  17. How coalescing droplets jump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enright, Ryan; Miljkovic, Nenad; Sprittles, James; Nolan, Kevin; Mitchell, Robert; Wang, Evelyn N

    2014-10-28

    Surface engineering at the nanoscale is a rapidly developing field that promises to impact a range of applications including energy production, water desalination, self-cleaning and anti-icing surfaces, thermal management of electronics, microfluidic platforms, and environmental pollution control. As the area advances, more detailed insights of dynamic wetting interactions on these surfaces are needed. In particular, the coalescence of two or more droplets on ultra-low adhesion surfaces leads to droplet jumping. Here we show, through detailed measurements of jumping droplets during water condensation coupled with numerical simulations of binary droplet coalescence, that this process is fundamentally inefficient with only a small fraction of the available excess surface energy (≲ 6%) convertible into translational kinetic energy. These findings clarify the role of internal fluid dynamics during the jumping droplet coalescence process and underpin the development of systems that can harness jumping droplets for a wide range of applications.

  18. Fast "coalescent" simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wall Jeff D

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The amount of genome-wide molecular data is increasing rapidly, as is interest in developing methods appropriate for such data. There is a consequent increasing need for methods that are able to efficiently simulate such data. In this paper we implement the sequentially Markovian coalescent algorithm described by McVean and Cardin and present a further modification to that algorithm which slightly improves the closeness of the approximation to the full coalescent model. The algorithm ignores a class of recombination events known to affect the behavior of the genealogy of the sample, but which do not appear to affect the behavior of generated samples to any substantial degree. Results We show that our software is able to simulate large chromosomal regions, such as those appropriate in a consideration of genome-wide data, in a way that is several orders of magnitude faster than existing coalescent algorithms. Conclusion This algorithm provides a useful resource for those needing to simulate large quantities of data for chromosomal-length regions using an approach that is much more efficient than traditional coalescent models.

  19. Linear programming mathematics, theory and algorithms

    CERN Document Server

    1996-01-01

    Linear Programming provides an in-depth look at simplex based as well as the more recent interior point techniques for solving linear programming problems. Starting with a review of the mathematical underpinnings of these approaches, the text provides details of the primal and dual simplex methods with the primal-dual, composite, and steepest edge simplex algorithms. This then is followed by a discussion of interior point techniques, including projective and affine potential reduction, primal and dual affine scaling, and path following algorithms. Also covered is the theory and solution of the linear complementarity problem using both the complementary pivot algorithm and interior point routines. A feature of the book is its early and extensive development and use of duality theory. Audience: The book is written for students in the areas of mathematics, economics, engineering and management science, and professionals who need a sound foundation in the important and dynamic discipline of linear programming.

  20. Stochastic control theory dynamic programming principle

    CERN Document Server

    Nisio, Makiko

    2015-01-01

    This book offers a systematic introduction to the optimal stochastic control theory via the dynamic programming principle, which is a powerful tool to analyze control problems. First we consider completely observable control problems with finite horizons. Using a time discretization we construct a nonlinear semigroup related to the dynamic programming principle (DPP), whose generator provides the Hamilton–Jacobi–Bellman (HJB) equation, and we characterize the value function via the nonlinear semigroup, besides the viscosity solution theory. When we control not only the dynamics of a system but also the terminal time of its evolution, control-stopping problems arise. This problem is treated in the same frameworks, via the nonlinear semigroup. Its results are applicable to the American option price problem. Zero-sum two-player time-homogeneous stochastic differential games and viscosity solutions of the Isaacs equations arising from such games are studied via a nonlinear semigroup related to DPP (the min-ma...

  1. Implementing a Moral Education Program through Attitude Change Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Richard L.; Casper, Daniel

    1979-01-01

    Major theories of attitude change are explained: stimulus-response and reinforcement theory, functional theory, social judgment theory, and consistency theory. These theories are applied to the problems of influencing staff toward implementing a program of moral education. (Author/SJL)

  2. Bubble coalescence in breathing DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novotný, Tomas; Pedersen, Jonas Nyvold; Ambjörnsson, Tobias

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the coalescence of two DNA bubbles initially located at weak segments and separated by a more stable barrier region in a designed construct of double-stranded DNA. The characteristic time for bubble coalescence and the corresponding distribution are derived, as well...

  3. Program Spectra Analysis with Theory of Evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rattikorn Hewett

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an approach to automatically analyzing program spectra, an execution profile of program testing results for fault localization. Using a mathematical theory of evidence for uncertainty reasoning, the proposed approach estimates the likelihood of faulty locations based on evidence from program spectra. Our approach is theoretically grounded and can be computed online. Therefore, we can predict fault locations immediately after each test execution is completed. We evaluate the approach by comparing its performance with the top three performing fault localizers using a benchmark set of real-world programs. The results show that our approach is at least as effective as others with an average effectiveness (the reduction of the amount of code examined to locate a fault of 85.6% over 119 versions of the programs. We also study the quantity and quality impacts of program spectra on our approach where the quality refers to the spectra support in identifying that a certain unit is faulty. The results show that the effectiveness of our approach slightly improves with a larger number of failed runs but not with a larger number of passed runs. Program spectra with support quality increases from 1% to 100% improves the approach's effectiveness by 3.29%.

  4. Chemical dispersant effectiveness testing: influence of droplet coalescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterling, Michael C; Bonner, James S; Ernest, Andrew N S; Page, Cheryl A; Autenrieth, R L

    2004-05-01

    Thermodynamic and kinetic investigations were performed to determine the influence of coalescence of chemically dispersed crude oil droplets in saline waters. For the range of pH (4-10) and salinity (10 per thousand, 30 per thousand, 50 per thousand ) values studied, zeta-potential values ranged from -3 to -10 mV. As the interaction potential values calculated using Derjaguin-Landau-Verway-Overbeek (DLVO) theory were negative, the electrostatic barrier did not produce significant resistance to droplet coalescence. Coalescence kinetics of premixed crude oil and chemical dispersant were determined within a range of mean shear rates (Gm = 5, 10, 15, 20 s(-1)) and salinity (10 per thousand, 30 per thousand ) values. Coalescence reaction rates were modeled using Smoluchowski reaction kinetics. Measured collision efficiency values (alpha = 0.25) suggest insignificant resistance to coalescence in shear systems. Experimentally determined dispersant efficiencies (alpha = 0.35) were 10-50% lower than that predicted using a non-interacting droplet model (alpha = 0.0). Unlike other protocols in which the crude oil and dispersant are not premixed, salinity effects were not significant in this protocol. This approach allowed the effects of dispersant-oil contact efficiency eta(contact) to be separated from those of water column transport efficiency (eta(transport)) and coalescence efficiency (eta(coalescence)).

  5. Purposeful Program Theory: Effective Use of Theories of Change and Logic Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funnell, Sue C.; Rogers, Patricia J.

    2011-01-01

    Between good intentions and great results lies a program theory--not just a list of tasks but a vision of what needs to happen, and how. Now widely used in government and not-for-profit organizations, program theory provides a coherent picture of how change occurs and how to improve performance. "Purposeful Program Theory" shows how to develop,…

  6. Using Concept Mapping as as Tool for Program Theory Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orsi, Rebecca

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this methodological study is to explore how well a process called "concept mapping" (Trochim, 1989) can articulate the theory which underlies a social program. Articulation of a program's theory is a key step in completing a sound theory based evaluation (Weiss, 1997a). In this study, concept mapping is used to…

  7. Coalescence Processes of Droplets and Liquid Marbles

    OpenAIRE

    Jing Jin; Chin Hong Ooi; Dzung Viet Dao; Nam-Trung Nguyen

    2017-01-01

    The coalescence process of droplets and, more recently, of liquid marbles, has become one of the most essential manipulation schemes in digital microfluidics. This process is indispensable for realising microfluidic functions such as mixing and reactions at microscale. This paper reviews previous studies on droplet coalescence, paying particular attention to the coalescence of liquid marbles. Four coalescence systems have been reviewed, namely, the coalescence of two droplets freely suspended...

  8. The Complement of Research and Theory in Practice: Contact Theory at Work in Nonfamilial Intergenerational Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrott, Shannon E.; Smith, Cynthia L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose of the Study: We assessed whether a shared site intergenerational care program informed by contact theory contributed to more desirable social behaviors of elders and children during intergenerational programming than a center with a more traditional programming approach that lacks some or all of the contact theory tenets. Design and…

  9. Partial coalescence of soap bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Daniel M.; Pucci, Giuseppe; Bush, John W. M.

    2015-11-01

    We present the results of an experimental investigation of the merger of a soap bubble with a planar soap film. When gently deposited onto a horizontal film, a bubble may interact with the underlying film in such a way as to decrease in size, leaving behind a smaller daughter bubble with approximately half the radius of its progenitor. The process repeats up to three times, with each partial coalescence event occurring over a time scale comparable to the inertial-capillary time. Our results are compared to the recent numerical simulations of Martin and Blanchette and to the coalescence cascade of droplets on a fluid bath.

  10. Short time dynamics of water coalescence on a flat water pool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Su Jin; Gim, Bopil; Fezzaa, Kamel; Weon, Byung Mook

    2016-12-01

    Coalescence is an important hydrodynamic event that frequently takes place in nature as well as in industry. Here we provide an experimental study on short time dynamics of water coalescence, particularly when a water droplet comes in contact with a flat water surface, by utilizing high-resolution high-penetration ultrafast X-ray microscopy. Our results demonstrate a possibility that an extreme curvature difference between a drop and a flat surface can significantly modify the hydrodynamics of water coalescence, which is unexpected in the existing theory. We suggest a plausible explanation for why coalescence can be modified by an extreme curvature difference.

  11. Stochastic linear programming models, theory, and computation

    CERN Document Server

    Kall, Peter

    2011-01-01

    This new edition of Stochastic Linear Programming: Models, Theory and Computation has been brought completely up to date, either dealing with or at least referring to new material on models and methods, including DEA with stochastic outputs modeled via constraints on special risk functions (generalizing chance constraints, ICC’s and CVaR constraints), material on Sharpe-ratio, and Asset Liability Management models involving CVaR in a multi-stage setup. To facilitate use as a text, exercises are included throughout the book, and web access is provided to a student version of the authors’ SLP-IOR software. Additionally, the authors have updated the Guide to Available Software, and they have included newer algorithms and modeling systems for SLP. The book is thus suitable as a text for advanced courses in stochastic optimization, and as a reference to the field. From Reviews of the First Edition: "The book presents a comprehensive study of stochastic linear optimization problems and their applications. … T...

  12. Coalescence Processes of Droplets and Liquid Marbles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Jin

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The coalescence process of droplets and, more recently, of liquid marbles, has become one of the most essential manipulation schemes in digital microfluidics. This process is indispensable for realising microfluidic functions such as mixing and reactions at microscale. This paper reviews previous studies on droplet coalescence, paying particular attention to the coalescence of liquid marbles. Four coalescence systems have been reviewed, namely, the coalescence of two droplets freely suspended in a fluid; the coalescence of two sessile droplets on a solid substrate; the coalescence of a falling droplet and a sessile droplet on a solid substrate; and liquid marble coalescence. The review is presented according to the dynamic behaviors, physical mechanisms and experimental parameters of the coalescence process. It also provides a systematic overview of how the coalescence process of droplets and liquid marbles could be induced and manipulated using external energy. In addition, the practical applications of liquid marble coalescence as a novel microreactor are highlighted. Finally, future perspectives on the investigation of the coalescence process of liquid marbles are proposed. This review aims to facilitate better understanding of the coalescence of droplets and of liquid marbles as well as to shed new insight on future studies.

  13. Ultrasound-induced microbubble coalescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postema, Michiel; Postema, M.A.B.; Marmottant, P.G.M.; Lancée, Charles T.; Versluis, Andreas Michel; Hilgenfeldt, Sascha; de Jong, N.

    2004-01-01

    We studied the interaction of ultrasound contrast agent bubbles coated with a layer of lipids, driven by 0.5 MHz ultrasound. High-speed photography on the submicrosecond timescale reveals that some bubbles bounce off each other, while others show very fast coalescence during bubble expansion. This

  14. Pacific salmon and the coalescent effective population size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cenik, Can; Wakeley, John

    2010-09-27

    Pacific salmon include several species that are both commercially important and endangered. Understanding the causes of loss in genetic variation is essential for designing better conservation strategies. Here we use a coalescent approach to analyze a model of the complex life history of salmon, and derive the coalescent effective population (CES). With the aid of Kronecker products and a convergence theorem for Markov chains with two time scales, we derive a simple formula for the CES and thereby establish its existence. Our results may be used to address important questions regarding salmon biology, in particular about the loss of genetic variation. To illustrate the utility of our approach, we consider the effects of fluctuations in population size over time. Our analysis enables the application of several tools of coalescent theory to the case of salmon.

  15. Pacific salmon and the coalescent effective population size.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Can Cenik

    Full Text Available Pacific salmon include several species that are both commercially important and endangered. Understanding the causes of loss in genetic variation is essential for designing better conservation strategies. Here we use a coalescent approach to analyze a model of the complex life history of salmon, and derive the coalescent effective population (CES. With the aid of Kronecker products and a convergence theorem for Markov chains with two time scales, we derive a simple formula for the CES and thereby establish its existence. Our results may be used to address important questions regarding salmon biology, in particular about the loss of genetic variation. To illustrate the utility of our approach, we consider the effects of fluctuations in population size over time. Our analysis enables the application of several tools of coalescent theory to the case of salmon.

  16. Shear-induced coalescence of emulsified oil drops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, A; Moran, K; Masliyah, J; Czarnecki, J

    2003-09-15

    Crude oil droplets, when suspended in water, possess negative surface charges which give rise to double-layer repulsive forces between the drops. According to conventional DLVO theory, the magnitude of this repulsion (based on the measured zeta potential) is more than sufficient to prevent coalescence of the droplets. Indeed, when two such droplets were brought together on direct (i.e., "head-on") approach, coalescence was rarely observed. Upon oblique approach, however, the same droplets were seen to coalesce readily. An oblique encounter must necessarily give rise to lateral relative motion-or shearing-between the droplet surfaces. It is speculated that, if the charge distributions at the droplet surfaces were heterogeneous, lateral shearing would facilitate many encounters between surface patches of different zeta potentials across the intervening water film. If the repulsion across any local region were sufficiently weak to allow formation of an oil bridge across the water film, coalescence of the drops would follow inevitably. With the hypothesis of surface heterogeneity, it is not necessary to invoke any additional colloidal interactions (such as "hydrophobic forces") to account for the observed droplet-droplet coalescence. This finding may have important implications for the underlying mechanisms of emulsion stability in general and the commercial extraction of bitumen from oil sands in particular.

  17. Coalescence of liquid drops: Different models versus experiment

    KAUST Repository

    Sprittles, J. E.

    2012-01-01

    The process of coalescence of two identical liquid drops is simulated numerically in the framework of two essentially different mathematical models, and the results are compared with experimental data on the very early stages of the coalescence process reported recently. The first model tested is the "conventional" one, where it is assumed that coalescence as the formation of a single body of fluid occurs by an instant appearance of a liquid bridge smoothly connecting the two drops, and the subsequent process is the evolution of this single body of fluid driven by capillary forces. The second model under investigation considers coalescence as a process where a section of the free surface becomes trapped between the bulk phases as the drops are pressed against each other, and it is the gradual disappearance of this "internal interface" that leads to the formation of a single body of fluid and the conventional model taking over. Using the full numerical solution of the problem in the framework of each of the two models, we show that the recently reported electrical measurements probing the very early stages of the process are better described by the interface formation/disappearance model. New theory-guided experiments are suggested that would help to further elucidate the details of the coalescence phenomenon. As a by-product of our research, the range of validity of different "scaling laws" advanced as approximate solutions to the problem formulated using the conventional model is established. © 2012 American Institute of Physics.

  18. A fluid-mechanical model of elastocapillary coalescence

    KAUST Repository

    Singh, Kiran

    2014-03-25

    © 2014 Cambridge University Press. We present a fluid-mechanical model of the coalescence of a number of elastic objects due to surface tension. We consider an array of spring-block elements separated by thin liquid films, whose dynamics are modelled using lubrication theory. With this simplified model of elastocapillary coalescence, we present the results of numerical simulations for a large number of elements, N = O(104). A linear stability analysis shows that pairwise coalescence is always the most unstable mode of deformation. However, the numerical simulations show that the cluster sizes actually produced by coalescence from a small white-noise perturbation have a distribution that depends on the relative strength of surface tension and elasticity, as measured by an elastocapillary number K. Both the maximum cluster size and the mean cluster size scale like K-1/2 for small K. An analytical solution for the response of the system to a localized perturbation shows that such perturbations generate propagating disturbance fronts, which leave behind \\'frozen-in\\' clusters of a predictable size that also depends on K. A good quantitative comparison between the cluster-size statistics from noisy perturbations and this \\'frozen-in\\' cluster size suggests that propagating fronts may play a crucial role in the dynamics of coalescence.

  19. Coalescence of droplets laden with insoluble surfactant on a preset liquid film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunxi; Lin, Yuxi; Zhang, Ran; Ye, Xuemin

    2018-01-31

    A model for the evolution of two droplets laden with insoluble surfactant coalescing on a preset film is established according to the lubrication theory, and the coalescence processes are simulated. The role of the surfactant and its inherent mechanism are investigated, the effects of the Marangoni number, the preset liquid film thickness and the initial spacing between the two droplets on the coalescence are examined. The results show that the droplets encounter each other, gradually overlap, and finally coalesce into a "new" droplet. The Marangoni effect is beneficial to the convergence of the two inner leading fronts of the droplets in the early stage, but it hinders the accumulation of the droplets and subsequent coalescence. Increasing the Marangoni number promotes not only the aforementioned inhibition, but also the convergence of the two leading fronts towards the center, which speeds up the coalescence of the surfactant. Moreover, the diffusion of the surfactant towards the outsides of the droplets is accelerated; hence, its distribution along the droplet surface is more uniform after the coalescence. The droplets and the surfactant undertake a longer "journey" to achieve coalescence when their initial spacing is increased; increasing the preset film thickness shortens the time of coalescence required.

  20. The user-oriented evaluator's role in formulating a program theory: Using a theory-driven approach

    OpenAIRE

    Christie, CA; Alkin, MC

    2003-01-01

    Program theory plays a prominent role in many evaluations, not only in theory-driven evaluations. This paper presents a case study of the process of developing and refining a program's theory within a user-oriented evaluation. In user-oriented (or utilization-focused) evaluations, primary users can play a role in defining their own program theory. This is different, however, from the typical process by which a program theory is developed when using theory-driven evaluation framework. This cas...

  1. Use of Program Theory in a Nutrition Program for Grandchildren and Grandparents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenings, Mallory; Arscott, Sara

    2013-01-01

    Grandparents University ® (GPU) is a 2-day campus-based nutrition education program for grandparents and grandchildren based on constructs from Social Cognitive Theory and the Theory of Planned Behavior. This article describes how program theory was used to develop a working model, design activities, and select outcome measures of a 2-day…

  2. A Theory Based Introductory Programming Course

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Michael Reichhardt; Kristensen, Jens Thyge; Rischel, Hans

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents an introductory programming course designed to teach programming as an intellectual activity. The course emphasizes understandable concepts which can be useful in designing programs, while the oddities of today's technology are considered of secondary importance. An important...... goal is to fight the trial-and-error approach to programming which is a result of the students battles with horribly designed and documented systems and languages prior to their studies at university. Instead, the authors strive for giving the students a good experience of programming as a systematic...

  3. Formulated linear programming problems from game theory and its ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... using the primal and symmetric dual linear programming problem and its numerical illustration of the super linear programming problem using TORA package. Keywords: Game theory, linear programming, zero sum game, TORA package, computer. International Journal of Natural and Applied Sciences, 6(4): 413 - 422, ...

  4. The Bacterial Sequential Markov Coalescent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Maio, Nicola; Wilson, Daniel J

    2017-05-01

    Bacteria can exchange and acquire new genetic material from other organisms directly and via the environment. This process, known as bacterial recombination, has a strong impact on the evolution of bacteria, for example, leading to the spread of antibiotic resistance across clades and species, and to the avoidance of clonal interference. Recombination hinders phylogenetic and transmission inference because it creates patterns of substitutions (homoplasies) inconsistent with the hypothesis of a single evolutionary tree. Bacterial recombination is typically modeled as statistically akin to gene conversion in eukaryotes, i.e. , using the coalescent with gene conversion (CGC). However, this model can be very computationally demanding as it needs to account for the correlations of evolutionary histories of even distant loci. So, with the increasing popularity of whole genome sequencing, the need has emerged for a faster approach to model and simulate bacterial genome evolution. We present a new model that approximates the coalescent with gene conversion: the bacterial sequential Markov coalescent (BSMC). Our approach is based on a similar idea to the sequential Markov coalescent (SMC)-an approximation of the coalescent with crossover recombination. However, bacterial recombination poses hurdles to a sequential Markov approximation, as it leads to strong correlations and linkage disequilibrium across very distant sites in the genome. Our BSMC overcomes these difficulties, and shows a considerable reduction in computational demand compared to the exact CGC, and very similar patterns in simulated data. We implemented our BSMC model within new simulation software FastSimBac. In addition to the decreased computational demand compared to previous bacterial genome evolution simulators, FastSimBac provides more general options for evolutionary scenarios, allowing population structure with migration, speciation, population size changes, and recombination hotspots. FastSimBac is

  5. Coalescence of repelling colloidal droplets: a route to monodisperse populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roger, Kevin; Botet, Robert; Cabane, Bernard

    2013-05-14

    Populations of droplets or particles dispersed in a liquid may evolve through Brownian collisions, aggregation, and coalescence. We have found a set of conditions under which these populations evolve spontaneously toward a narrow size distribution. The experimental system consists of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) nanodroplets dispersed in a solvent (acetone) + nonsolvent (water) mixture. These droplets carry electrical charges, located on the ionic end groups of the macromolecules. We used time-resolved small angle X-ray scattering to determine their size distribution. We find that the droplets grow through coalescence events: the average radius (R) increases logarithmically with elapsed time while the relative width σR/(R) of the distribution decreases as the inverse square root of (R). We interpret this evolution as resulting from coalescence events that are hindered by ionic repulsions between droplets. We generalize this evolution through a simulation of the Smoluchowski kinetic equation, with a kernel that takes into account the interactions between droplets. In the case of vanishing or attractive interactions, all droplet encounters lead to coalescence. The corresponding kernel leads to the well-known "self-preserving" particle distribution of the coalescence process, where σR/(R) increases to a plateau value. However, for droplets that interact through long-range ionic repulsions, "large + small" droplet encounters are more successful at coalescence than "large + large" encounters. We show that the corresponding kernel leads to a particular scaling of the droplet-size distribution-known as the "second-scaling law" in the theory of critical phenomena, where σR/(R) decreases as 1/√(R) and becomes independent of the initial distribution. We argue that this scaling explains the narrow size distributions of colloidal dispersions that have been synthesized through aggregation processes.

  6. Program evaluation models and related theories: AMEE guide no. 67.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frye, Ann W; Hemmer, Paul A

    2012-01-01

    This Guide reviews theories of science that have influenced the development of common educational evaluation models. Educators can be more confident when choosing an appropriate evaluation model if they first consider the model's theoretical basis against their program's complexity and their own evaluation needs. Reductionism, system theory, and (most recently) complexity theory have inspired the development of models commonly applied in evaluation studies today. This Guide describes experimental and quasi-experimental models, Kirkpatrick's four-level model, the Logic Model, and the CIPP (Context/Input/Process/Product) model in the context of the theories that influenced their development and that limit or support their ability to do what educators need. The goal of this Guide is for educators to become more competent and confident in being able to design educational program evaluations that support intentional program improvement while adequately documenting or describing the changes and outcomes-intended and unintended-associated with their programs.

  7. Game Theory and its Relationship with Linear Programming Models ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Game theory, a branch of operations research, has been successfully applied to solve various categories of problems arising from human decisions making characterized by the complexity of situations and the limits of individual processing abilities. This paper shows that game theory and linear programming problem are ...

  8. Genetic programming theory and practice XII

    CERN Document Server

    Riolo, Rick; Kotanchek, Mark

    2015-01-01

    These contributions, written by the foremost international researchers and practitioners of Genetic Programming (GP), explore the synergy between theoretical and empirical results on real-world problems, producing a comprehensive view of the state of the art in GP. Topics in this volume include: gene expression regulation, novel genetic models for glaucoma, inheritable epigenetics, combinators in genetic programming, sequential symbolic regression, system dynamics, sliding window symbolic regression, large feature problems, alignment in the error space, HUMIE winners, Boolean multiplexer funct

  9. Cavity coalescence in superplastic deformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stowell, M.J.; Livesey, D.W.; Ridley, N.

    1984-01-01

    An analysis of the probability distribution function of particles randomly dispersed in a solid has been applied to cavitation during superplastic deformation and a method of predicting cavity coalescence developed. Cavity size distribution data were obtained from two microduplex nickel-silver alloys deformed superplastically to various extents at elevated temperature, and compared to theoretical predictions. Excellent agreement occurred for small void sizes but the model underestimated the number of voids in the largest size groups. It is argued that the discrepancy results from a combination of effects due to non-random cavity distributions and to enhanced growth rates and incomplete spheroidization of the largest cavities.

  10. Learning Theories Applied to Teaching Technology: Constructivism versus Behavioral Theory for Instructing Multimedia Software Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Cajah S.

    2012-01-01

    This study sought to find evidence for a beneficial learning theory to teach computer software programs. Additionally, software was analyzed for each learning theory's applicability to resolve whether certain software requires a specific method of education. The results are meant to give educators more effective teaching tools, so students…

  11. Explicating Practicum Program Theory: A Case Example in Human Ecology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, Kathryn M. M.; Williamson, Deanna L.

    2013-01-01

    This study explicated the theory underpinning the Human Ecology Practicum Program offered in the Department of Human Ecology at the University of Alberta. The program has operated for 40 years but never been formally evaluated. Using a document analysis, focus group and individual interviews, and a stakeholder working group, we explored…

  12. Coalescent genealogy samplers: windows into population history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhner, Mary K

    2009-02-01

    Coalescent genealogy samplers attempt to estimate past qualities of a population, such as its size, growth rate, patterns of gene flow or time of divergence from another population, based on samples of molecular data. Genealogy samplers are increasingly popular because of their potential to disentangle complex population histories. In the last decade they have been widely applied to systems ranging from humans to viruses. Findings include detection of unexpected reproductive inequality in fish, new estimates of historical whale abundance, exoneration of humans for the prehistoric decline of bison and inference of a selective sweep on the human Y chromosome. This review summarizes available genealogy-sampler software, including data requirements and limitations on the use of each program.

  13. Online Financial Education Programs: Theory, Research, and Recommendations

    OpenAIRE

    Jinhee Kim; Mia B. Russell; Allison Schroeder

    2017-01-01

    Technological advances have created unprecedented opportunities for online financial education that can be used to improve financial literacy and money management practices. While online financial education programs have become popular, relevant research and theoretical frameworks have rarely been considered in the development of such programs. This article synthesizes lessons from literature and theories for the development of an effective online financial education program. Drawing from ...

  14. Genetic programming theory and practice X

    CERN Document Server

    Riolo, Rick; Ritchie, Marylyn D; Moore, Jason H

    2013-01-01

    These contributions, written by the foremost international researchers and practitioners of Genetic Programming (GP), explore the synergy between theoretical and empirical results on real-world problems, producing a comprehensive view of the state of the art in GP. Topics in this volume include: evolutionary constraints, relaxation of selection mechanisms, diversity preservation strategies, flexing fitness evaluation, evolution in dynamic environments, multi-objective and multi-modal selection, foundations of evolvability, evolvable and adaptive evolutionary operators, foundation of  injecting

  15. Anomalous behaviour of droplet coalescence in a two-dimensional complex system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basak, Uttam Kumar; Datta, Alokmay

    2017-11-01

    Coalescence of myristic acid droplets on water surface is found to exhibit anomalous behaviour such as simultaneous increase of mean droplet size and droplet number with time at low surface pressure. The existing theories and models can describe droplet evolution at high surface pressure but fail to explain this anomaly at low surface pressure. We propose a more general model for coalescence that reproduces the anomaly at low surface pressure and agrees with other models at high surface pressure. Our model considers microscopic resolution, nucleation of droplets and desorption of droplets in addition to pure coalescence and can be applied to a wide variety of systems.

  16. SPSS and SAS programs for generalizability theory analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mushquash, Christopher; O'Connor, Brian P

    2006-08-01

    The identification and reduction of measurement errors is a major challenge in psychological testing. Most investigators rely solely on classical test theory for assessing reliability, whereas most experts have long recommended using generalizability theory instead. One reason for the common neglect of generalizability theory is the absence of analytic facilities for this purpose in popular statistical software packages. This article provides a brief introduction to generalizability theory, describes easy to use SPSS, SAS, and MATLAB programs for conducting the recommended analyses, and provides an illustrative example, using data (N = 329) for the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale. Program output includes variance components, relative and absolute errors and generalizability coefficients, coefficients for D studies, and graphs of D study results.

  17. Effect of oil droplet size on activation energy for coalescence of oil droplets in an O/W emulsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyagawa, Yayoi; Katsuki, Kazutaka; Matsuno, Ryuichi; Adachi, Shuji

    2015-01-01

    The activation energy of a reasonable order of magnitude was estimated for the coalescence of oil droplets in an O/W emulsion by formulating the balance of forces acting on a droplet that crosses over the potential barrier to coalesce with another droplet by the DLVO theory and Stokes' law. An emulsion with smaller oil droplets was shown to be more stable.

  18. Mathematical programming and game theory for decision making

    CERN Document Server

    Bapat, R B; Das, A K; Parthasarathy, T

    2008-01-01

    This edited book presents recent developments and state-of-the-art review in various areas of mathematical programming and game theory. It is a peer-reviewed research monograph under the ISI Platinum Jubilee Series on Statistical Science and Interdisciplinary Research. This volume provides a panoramic view of theory and the applications of the methods of mathematical programming to problems in statistics, finance, games and electrical networks. It also provides an important as well as timely overview of research trends and focuses on the exciting areas like support vector machines, bilevel pro

  19. The complement of research and theory in practice: contact theory at work in nonfamilial intergenerational programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrott, Shannon E; Smith, Cynthia L

    2011-02-01

    We assessed whether a shared site intergenerational care program informed by contact theory contributed to more desirable social behaviors of elders and children during intergenerational programming than a center with a more traditional programming approach that lacks some or all of the contact theory tenets. We observed 59 elder and child participants from the two sites during intergenerational activities. Using the Intergenerational Observation Scale, we coded participants' predominant behavior in 15-s intervals through each activity's duration. We then calculated for each individual the percentage of time frames each behavior code was predominant. Participants at the theory-based program demonstrated higher rates of intergenerational interaction, higher rates of solitary behavior, and lower rates of watching than at the traditional program. Contact theory tenets were optimized when coupled with evidence-based practices. Intergenerational programs with stakeholder support that promotes equal group status, cooperation toward a common goal, and mechanisms of friendship among participants can achieve important objectives for elder and child participants in care settings.

  20. The Development of a Program Engagement Theory for Group Offending Behavior Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holdsworth, Emma; Bowen, Erica; Brown, Sarah; Howat, Douglas

    2017-10-01

    Offender engagement in group offending behavior programs is poorly understood and under-theorized. In addition, there is no research on facilitators' engagement. This article presents the first ever theory to address this gap. A Program Engagement Theory (PET) was derived from a constructivist grounded theory analysis that accounts for both facilitators' and offenders' engagement in group offending behavior programs (GOBPs). Interviews and session observations were used to collect data from 23 program facilitators and 28 offenders (group members). The analysis revealed that group members' engagement involved shared identities and moving on as a group. In turn, this was dependent on facilitators personalising treatment frameworks and establishing a hook to help group members move on. The PET emphasizes the importance of considering change during treatment as a process rather than simply a program outcome. Solution-focused (SF) programs were more conducive to engagement and the change process than offence-focused programs.

  1. Molecular Dynamics Simulations on Coalescence and Non-coalescence of Conducting Droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bing-Bing; Wang, Xiao-Dong; Yan, Wei-Mon; Wang, Tian-Hu

    2015-07-14

    When an electric field with various strengths is applied to two adjacent conducting droplets, the droplets may completely coalesce, partially coalesce, or bounce off one another. To reveal an atom-scale mechanism of coalescence or non-coalescence, dynamic behaviors of two conducting nanodroplets at a homogeneous electric field are studied via molecular dynamics simulations in this work. The results show that there is a critical field strength and a critical cone angle above which the two droplets partially coalesce or bounce off. Charge transfer between the two droplets is observed when the droplets are brought into contact. The partial coalescence and the bounce-off of the two droplets at strong field strengths are found to be due to the high charge transfer rate, which leads to the breakup of the coalescing droplet at different locations.

  2. Towards a Theory for Testing Non-terminating Programs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gotlieb, Arnaud; Petit, Matthieu

    2009-01-01

    Non-terminating programs are programs that legally perform unbounded computations. Though they are ubiquitous in real-world applications, testing these programs requires new theoretic developments as usual definitions of test data adequacy criteria ignore infinite paths. This paper develops...... a theory of program-based structural testing based on operational semantics. Reasoning at the program semantics level permits to cope with infinite paths (and non-feasible paths) when defining test data adequacy criteria. As a result, our criteria respect the first Weyuker’s property on finite...... applicability, even for non-terminating programs. We discuss the consequences of this re-interpretation of test data adequacy criteria w.r.t. existing test coverage criteria....

  3. The Behavior Intervention Support Team (BIST) Program: Underlying Theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulden, Walter T.

    2010-01-01

    The Behavior Intervention Support Team (BIST) is a proactive school-wide behavior management plan for all students, emphasizing schools partnering with students and parents through caring relationships and high expectations. The BIST program is well-grounded in behavioral theory and combines strength-based and resiliency principles within the…

  4. Reconstructing Program Theories : Methods Available and Problems to be Solved

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuw, Frans de

    2003-01-01

    This paper discusses methods for reconstructing theories underlying programs and policies. It describes three approaches. One is empirical–analytical in nature and focuses on interviews, documents and argumentational analysis. The second has strategic assessment, group dynamics, and dialogue as its

  5. Coalescent histories for caterpillar-like families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Noah A

    2013-01-01

    A coalescent history is an assignment of branches of a gene tree to branches of a species tree on which coalescences in the gene tree occur. The number of coalescent histories for a pair consisting of a labeled gene tree topology and a labeled species tree topology is important in gene tree probability computations, and more generally, in studying evolutionary possibilities for gene trees on species trees. Defining the Tr-caterpillar-like family as a sequence of n-taxon trees constructed by replacing the r-taxon subtree of n-taxon caterpillars by a specific r-taxon labeled topology Tr, we examine the number of coalescent histories for caterpillar-like families with matching gene tree and species tree labeled topologies. For each Tr with size r≤8, we compute the number of coalescent histories for n-taxon trees in the Tr-caterpillar-like family. Next, as n→∞, we find that the limiting ratio of the numbers of coalescent histories for the Tr family and caterpillars themselves is correlated with the number of labeled histories for Tr. The results support a view that large numbers of coalescent histories occur when a tree has both a relatively balanced subtree and a high tree depth, contributing to deeper understanding of the combinatorics of gene trees and species trees.

  6. Species tree inference by minimizing deep coalescences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cuong Than

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available In a 1997 seminal paper, W. Maddison proposed minimizing deep coalescences, or MDC, as an optimization criterion for inferring the species tree from a set of incongruent gene trees, assuming the incongruence is exclusively due to lineage sorting. In a subsequent paper, Maddison and Knowles provided and implemented a search heuristic for optimizing the MDC criterion, given a set of gene trees. However, the heuristic is not guaranteed to compute optimal solutions, and its hill-climbing search makes it slow in practice. In this paper, we provide two exact solutions to the problem of inferring the species tree from a set of gene trees under the MDC criterion. In other words, our solutions are guaranteed to find the tree that minimizes the total number of deep coalescences from a set of gene trees. One solution is based on a novel integer linear programming (ILP formulation, and another is based on a simple dynamic programming (DP approach. Powerful ILP solvers, such as CPLEX, make the first solution appealing, particularly for very large-scale instances of the problem, whereas the DP-based solution eliminates dependence on proprietary tools, and its simplicity makes it easy to integrate with other genomic events that may cause gene tree incongruence. Using the exact solutions, we analyze a data set of 106 loci from eight yeast species, a data set of 268 loci from eight Apicomplexan species, and several simulated data sets. We show that the MDC criterion provides very accurate estimates of the species tree topologies, and that our solutions are very fast, thus allowing for the accurate analysis of genome-scale data sets. Further, the efficiency of the solutions allow for quick exploration of sub-optimal solutions, which is important for a parsimony-based criterion such as MDC, as we show. We show that searching for the species tree in the compatibility graph of the clusters induced by the gene trees may be sufficient in practice, a finding that helps

  7. NASA's Heliophysics Theory Program - Accomplishments in Life Cycle Ending 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grebowsky, J.

    2011-01-01

    NASA's Heliophysics Theory Program (HTP) is now into a new triennial cycle of funded research, with new research awards beginning in 2011. The theory program was established by the (former) Solar Terrestrial Division in 1980 to redress a weakness of support in the theory area. It has been a successful, evolving scientific program with long-term funding of relatively large "critical mass groups" pursuing theory and modeling on a scale larger than that available within the limits of traditional NASA Supporting Research and Technology (SR&T) awards. The results of the last 3 year funding cycle, just ended, contributed to ever more cutting edge theoretical understanding of all parts of the Sun-Earth Connection chain. Advances ranged from the core of the Sun out into the corona, through the solar wind into the Earth's magnetosphere and down to the ionosphere and lower atmosphere, also contributing to understanding the environments of other solar system bodies. The HTP contributions were not isolated findings but continued to contribute to the planning and implementation of NASA spacecraft missions and to the development of the predictive computer models that have become the workhorses for analyzing satellite and ground-based measurements.

  8. Integrating Program Theory and Systems-Based Procedures in Program Evaluation: A Dynamic Approach to Evaluate Educational Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grammatikopoulos, Vasilis

    2012-01-01

    The current study attempts to integrate parts of program theory and systems-based procedures in educational program evaluation. The educational program that was implemented, called the "Early Steps" project, proposed that physical education can contribute to various educational goals apart from the usual motor skills improvement. Basic…

  9. Coalescence Avalanches in Liquid Aluminum Foams

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Marlen Paeplow; Francisco García-Moreno; Aaron Joseph Meagher; Alexander Rack; John Banhart

    2017-01-01

    Coalescence is the rupture of a film between two adjacent bubbles in any type of liquid foam and has pronounced influence on the development of its macrostructure after solidification, mostly leading...

  10. Analysis of coalescence behavior for compressed droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sung Woong; Lee, Dong Eon; Lee, Woo Il; Kim, Han Sang

    2017-03-01

    Coalescence of droplets is a significant phenomenon, and it has been adapted to many applications such as raindrop formation, emulsion polymerization, ink-jet printing, coating, and multiphase flows. In this study, the morphological characteristics of two compressed adjacent droplets between two parallel plates were investigated to study the phenomenon of coalescence of droplets. By controlling the distance of the dispensed droplets, various results for coalescence of droplets were evaluated, especially, from the view of the minor axis, major axis, and meniscus liquid bridge of the coalesced droplet. Experimental results show that the length of the meniscus liquid bridge rapidly increases and then the rate of increase slows with time. The increase rate of the major and minor axes is largely influenced by the meniscus liquid bridge, which is mainly due to the curvature between the droplets. The numerical modeling of the coalescence of the two compressed droplets between two parallel plates was presented and simulation was conducted to realize the coalescence behavior. Comparison with numerical simulation showed that there was a good agreement with the experimental results.

  11. Modeling the coalescence of sessile droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellier, M.; Trelluyer, E.

    2009-01-01

    This paper proposes a simple scenario to describe the coalescence of sessile droplets. This scenario predicts a power-law growth of the bridge between the droplets. The exponent of this power law depends on the driving mechanism for the spreading of each droplet. To validate this simple idea, the coalescence is simulated numerically and a basic experiment is performed. The fluid dynamics problem is formulated in the lubrication approximation framework and the governing equations are solved in the commercial finite element software COMSOL. Although a direct comparison of the numerical results with experiment is difficult because of the sensitivity of the coalescence to the initial and operating conditions, the key features of the event are qualitatively captured by the simulation and the characteristic time scale of the dynamics recovered. The experiment consists of inducing coalescence by pumping a droplet through a substrate which grows and ultimately coalesces with another droplet resting on the substrate. The coalescence was recorded using high-speed imaging and also confirmed the power-law growth of the neck. PMID:19693347

  12. A theory-informed, process-oriented Resident Scholarship Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thammasitboon, Satid; Darby, John B; Hair, Amy B; Rose, Karen M; Ward, Mark A; Turner, Teri L; Balmer, Dorene F

    2016-01-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education requires residency programs to provide curricula for residents to engage in scholarly activities but does not specify particular guidelines for instruction. We propose a Resident Scholarship Program that is framed by the self-determination theory (SDT) and emphasize the process of scholarly activity versus a scholarly product. The authors report on their longitudinal Resident Scholarship Program, which aimed to support psychological needs central to SDT: autonomy, competence, and relatedness. By addressing those needs in program aims and program components, the program may foster residents' intrinsic motivation to learn and to engage in scholarly activity. To this end, residents' engagement in scholarly processes, and changes in perceived autonomy, competence, and relatedness were assessed. Residents engaged in a range of scholarly projects and expressed positive regard for the program. Compared to before residency, residents felt more confident in the process of scholarly activity, as determined by changes in increased perceived autonomy, competence, and relatedness. Scholarly products were accomplished in return for a focus on scholarly process. Based on our experience, and in line with the SDT, supporting residents' autonomy, competence, and relatedness through a process-oriented scholarship program may foster the curiosity, inquisitiveness, and internal motivation to learn that drives scholarly activity and ultimately the production of scholarly products.

  13. Microeconomic theory of the household and nutrition programs

    OpenAIRE

    Chernichovsky, Dov*Zangwill, Linda

    1988-01-01

    Lack of food is no longer the major cause of malnutrition. Many households and individuals remain malnourished when income and supplies of food are adequate. Nutrition policy and programs must be based on a sound knowledge of household behaviour patterns. The microeconomic theory of the household focuses on the household's decisionmaking about scarce food resources based upon such considerations as: (i) the size of the family; (ii) the purchasing power of the family; (iii) the availability of...

  14. The structure of genealogies in the presence of purifying selection: a fitness-class coalescent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walczak, Aleksandra M; Nicolaisen, Lauren E; Plotkin, Joshua B; Desai, Michael M

    2012-02-01

    Compared to a neutral model, purifying selection distorts the structure of genealogies and hence alters the patterns of sampled genetic variation. Although these distortions may be common in nature, our understanding of how we expect purifying selection to affect patterns of molecular variation remains incomplete. Genealogical approaches such as coalescent theory have proven difficult to generalize to situations involving selection at many linked sites, unless selection pressures are extremely strong. Here, we introduce an effective coalescent theory (a "fitness-class coalescent") to describe the structure of genealogies in the presence of purifying selection at many linked sites. We use this effective theory to calculate several simple statistics describing the expected patterns of variation in sequence data, both at the sites under selection and at linked neutral sites. Our analysis combines a description of the allele frequency spectrum in the presence of purifying selection with the structured coalescent approach of Kaplan et al. (1988), to trace the ancestry of individuals through the distribution of fitnesses within the population. We also derive our results using a more direct extension of the structured coalescent approach of Hudson and Kaplan (1994). We find that purifying selection leads to patterns of genetic variation that are related but not identical to a neutrally evolving population in which population size has varied in a specific way in the past.

  15. Droplet coalescence on water repellant surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Youngsuk; Seo, Donghyun; Lee, Choongyeop; Shin, Seungwon

    2015-01-07

    We report our hydrodynamic and energy analyses of droplet coalescence on water repellent surfaces including hydrophobic, superhydrophobic and oil-infused superhydrophobic surfaces. The receding contact angle has significant effects on the contact line dynamics since the contact line dissipation was more significant during the receding mode than advancing. The contact line dynamics is modeled by the damped harmonic oscillation equation, which shows that the damping ratio and angular frequency of merged droplets decrease as the receding contact angle increases. The fast contact line relaxation and the resulting decrease in base area during coalescence were crucial to enhance the mobility of coalescing sessile droplets by releasing more surface energy with reducing dissipation loss. The superhydrophobic surface converts ∼42% of the released surface energy to the kinetic energy via coalescence before the merged droplet jumps away from the surface, while oil-infused superhydrophobic and hydrophobic surfaces convert ∼30% and ∼22%, respectively, for the corresponding time. This work clarifies the mechanisms of the contact line relaxation and energy conversion during the droplet coalescence on water repellent surfaces, and helps develop water repellent condensers.

  16. A study of oil droplet coalescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyson, T K; Pashley, R M

    2007-12-01

    Oil droplets dispersed in water can be readily studied when they are coated with surfactants, which lower their interfacial tension and enhance their stability. Pure oil droplets are more difficult to study because of their high interfacial tension, which facilitates coalescence and the adsorption of contaminants. In this study, we have characterised the surface charging properties of a water insoluble oil, bromododecane, which has a density close to water. The small density difference allows us to study relatively large drops of this oil and to analyse its coalescence behaviour. The results obtained with this simple, surfactant-free, system suggest that an additional attractive force, such as the long range hydrophobic interaction, might be required to explain oil droplet coalescence behaviour.

  17. NASA's space physics theory program - An opportunity for collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinas, Adolfo F.

    1990-01-01

    The field of theoretical space physics offers a unique opportunity to Latin American scientists for collaborative participation in NASA programs where the greatly increased complexity of both experimental observations and theoretical simulations requires in-depth comparisons between theory and observational data. The key problem areas identified by NASA for aggressive work in the decade of the 1990s are the nature of flows and turbulence, acceleration and transport of particles, the coupling of microphysics and macrophysics, the coupling of local and global dynamics, and nonclassical plasmas.

  18. On Coalescence Analysis Using Genealogy Rooted Trees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ao Yuan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA sequence data are now being used to study the ancestral history of human population. The existing methods for such coalescence inference use recursion formula to compute the data probabilities. These methods are useful in practical applications, but computationally complicated. Here we first investigate the asymptotic behavior of such inference; results indicate that, broadly, the estimated coalescent time will be consistent to a finite limit. Then we study a relatively simple computation method for this analysis and illustrate how to use it.

  19. Applying Program Theory-Driven Approach to Design and Evaluate a Teacher Professional Development Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Su-ching; Wu, Ming-sui

    2016-01-01

    This study was the first year of a two-year project which applied a program theory-driven approach to evaluating the impact of teachers' professional development interventions on students' learning by using a mix of methods, qualitative inquiry, and quasi-experimental design. The current study was to show the results of using the method of…

  20. Interfacing theories of program with theories of evaluation for advancing evaluation practice: Reductionism, systems thinking, and pragmatic synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huey T

    2016-12-01

    Theories of program and theories of evaluation form the foundation of program evaluation theories. Theories of program reflect assumptions on how to conceptualize an intervention program for evaluation purposes, while theories of evaluation reflect assumptions on how to design useful evaluation. These two types of theories are related, but often discussed separately. This paper attempts to use three theoretical perspectives (reductionism, systems thinking, and pragmatic synthesis) to interface them and discuss the implications for evaluation practice. Reductionism proposes that an intervention program can be broken into crucial components for rigorous analyses; systems thinking view an intervention program as dynamic and complex, requiring a holistic examination. In spite of their contributions, reductionism and systems thinking represent the extreme ends of a theoretical spectrum; many real-world programs, however, may fall in the middle. Pragmatic synthesis is being developed to serve these moderate- complexity programs. These three theoretical perspectives have their own strengths and challenges. Knowledge on these three perspectives and their evaluation implications can provide a better guide for designing fruitful evaluations, improving the quality of evaluation practice, informing potential areas for developing cutting-edge evaluation approaches, and contributing to advancing program evaluation toward a mature applied science. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Relativistic calculations of coalescing binary neutron stars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Relativistic calculations of coalescing binary neutron stars. JOSHUA FABER, PHILIPPE GRANDCLÉMENT and FREDERIC RASIO. Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, Evanston,. IL 60208-0834, USA. E-mail: rasio@mac.com. Abstract. We have designed and tested a new relativistic Lagrangian ...

  2. Frequentist estimation of coalescence times from nucleotide sequence data using a tree-based partition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Hua; Siegmund, David O; Shen, Peidong; Oefner, Peter J; Feldman, Marcus W

    2002-05-01

    This article proposes a method of estimating the time to the most recent common ancestor (TMRCA) of a sample of DNA sequences. The method is based on the molecular clock hypothesis, but avoids assumptions about population structure. Simulations show that in a wide range of situations, the point estimate has small bias and the confidence interval has at least the nominal coverage probability. We discuss conditions that can lead to biased estimates. Performance of this estimator is compared with existing methods based on the coalescence theory. The method is applied to sequences of Y chromosomes and mtDNAs to estimate the coalescent times of human male and female populations.

  3. Studying the learning of programming using grounded theory to support activity theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham Alsop

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Teaching programming to first year undergraduates in large numbers is challenging. Currently, online supported learning is becoming more dominant, even on face-to-face courses, and this trend will increase in the future. This paper uses activity theory (AT to analyse the use of tools to support learning. Data collection took place during 2008-2010 at Kingston University and involves over one hundred responses. This has been analysed into activity systems offering a detailed analysis of the use of a number of tools being used (in AT these include physical tools, such as technologies including books, and non-physical tools, such as conversation. When teaching programming to large numbers of students it is difficult to offer one-to-one attention and the reliance on such tools becomes more important. For example, in student responses a good integrated development environment (IDE is shown to make learning easier and more enjoyable, whereas a bad IDE makes the learning experience poor. Teaching materials, and access to these, were often mentioned positively. These included online communication, discussion boards and video lectures. Using AT offers sufficiently rich detail to identify key interventions and aids the redesign of the learning process. For example, the choice of an IDE for a specific language can have a larger impact than is initially apparent. This paper will report on the data collected to show where simple improvements to the use of tools may have a large impact on students' abilities to learn programming.

  4. Partial coalescence from bubbles to drops

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, F. H.

    2015-10-07

    The coalescence of drops is a fundamental process in the coarsening of emulsions. However, counter-intuitively, this coalescence process can produce a satellite, approximately half the size of the original drop, which is detrimental to the overall coarsening. This also occurs during the coalescence of bubbles, while the resulting satellite is much smaller, approximately 10 %. To understand this difference, we have conducted a set of coalescence experiments using xenon bubbles inside a pressure chamber, where we can continuously raise the pressure from 1 up to 85 atm and thereby vary the density ratio between the inner and outer fluid, from 0.005 up to unity. Using high-speed video imaging, we observe a continuous increase in satellite size as the inner density is varied from the bubble to emulsion-droplet conditions, with the most rapid changes occurring as the bubble density grows up to 15 % of that of the surrounding liquid. We propose a model that successfully relates the satellite size to the capillary wave mode responsible for its pinch-off and the overall deformations from the drainage. The wavelength of the primary wave changes during its travel to the apex, with the instantaneous speed adjusting to the local wavelength. By estimating the travel time of this wave mode on the bubble surface, we also show that the model is consistent with the experiments. This wavenumber is determined by both the global drainage as well as the interface shapes during the rapid coalescence in the neck connecting the two drops or bubbles. The rate of drainage is shown to scale with the density of the inner fluid. Empirically, we find that the pinch-off occurs when 60 % of the bubble fluid has drained from it. Numerical simulations using the volume-of-fluid method with dynamic adaptive grid refinement can reproduce these dynamics, as well as show the associated vortical structure and stirring of the coalescing fluid masses. Enhanced stirring is observed for cases with second

  5. Using organization theory to understand the determinants of effective implementation of worksite health promotion programs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Weiner, Bryan J; Lewis, Megan A; Linnan, Laura A

    .... However, no integrated theory of implementation has emerged from this research. This article describes a theory of the organizational determinants of effective implementation of comprehensive worksite health promotion programs...

  6. Coalescence and Collisions of Gold Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Pérez-Tijerina

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the assembling of small gold clusters subject to collisions and close contact coalescence by using molecular dynamics simulations to simulate events that occur typically in the sputtering process of synthesis. Our results support the notion that the kinetics of coalescence processes strongly determine the geometry and structure of the final particle. While impact velocities, relative orientations, and the initial shape of the interacting particles are unlikely to strictly determine the structural details of the newly formed particle, we found that high initial temperatures and/or impact velocities increase the probability of appearance of icosahedral-like structures, Wulff polyhedra are likely to be formed as a product of the interactions between nanospheres, while the appearance of fcc particles of approximately cuboctahedral shape is mainly due to the interaction between icosahedra.

  7. Hadronization via coalescence at RHIC and LHC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minissale V.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available An hadronization model that includes coalescence and fragmentation is used in this work to obtain predictions at both RHIC and LHC energy for light and strange hadrons transverse momentum spectra (π, p, k, Λ and baryon to meson ratios (p/π, Λ/k in a wide range of pT. This is accomplished without changing coalescence parameters. The ratios p/π and Λ/K shows the right behaviour except for some lack of baryon yield in a limited pT range around 6 GeV. This would indicate that the AKK fragmentation functions is too flat at pT < 8 GeV.

  8. Coalescence and Breakup of Oppositely Charged Droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junfeng; Wang, Bin; Qiu, Huihe

    2014-01-01

    The coalescence process of oppositely charged drops for different electrical conductivities of liquids is presented. When the electrical conductivity was relatively low, oppositely charged drops failed to coalesce under sufficiently high electrical fields and capillary ripples were formed on the surfaces of droplets after rebound. For a high electrically conductive liquid, it was found that a crown profile of drop fission always appeared on the top surface of negatively charged drops after the two charged drops contacted and bounced off. Furthermore, we report here, for the first time, the newly found phenomenon and argue that the break up might be caused by Rayleigh instability, a form of Coulomb fission. The different mobility of positive and negative ions is the underlying mechanism that explains why the break up always happened on the negative side of charged drops. PMID:25410022

  9. Scaling laws and dynamics of bubble coalescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony, Christopher R.; Kamat, Pritish M.; Thete, Sumeet S.; Munro, James P.; Lister, John R.; Harris, Michael T.; Basaran, Osman A.

    2017-08-01

    The coalescence of bubbles and drops plays a central role in nature and industry. During coalescence, two bubbles or drops touch and merge into one as the neck connecting them grows from microscopic to macroscopic scales. The hydrodynamic singularity that arises when two bubbles or drops have just touched and the flows that ensue have been studied thoroughly when two drops coalesce in a dynamically passive outer fluid. In this paper, the coalescence of two identical and initially spherical bubbles, which are idealized as voids that are surrounded by an incompressible Newtonian liquid, is analyzed by numerical simulation. This problem has recently been studied (a) experimentally using high-speed imaging and (b) by asymptotic analysis in which the dynamics is analyzed by determining the growth of a hole in the thin liquid sheet separating the two bubbles. In the latter, advantage is taken of the fact that the flow in the thin sheet of nonconstant thickness is governed by a set of one-dimensional, radial extensional flow equations. While these studies agree on the power law scaling of the variation of the minimum neck radius with time, they disagree with respect to the numerical value of the prefactors in the scaling laws. In order to reconcile these differences and also provide insights into the dynamics that are difficult to probe by either of the aforementioned approaches, simulations are used to access both earlier times than has been possible in the experiments and also later times when asymptotic analysis is no longer applicable. Early times and extremely small length scales are attained in the new simulations through the use of a truncated domain approach. Furthermore, it is shown by direct numerical simulations in which the flow within the bubbles is also determined along with the flow exterior to them that idealizing the bubbles as passive voids has virtually no effect on the scaling laws relating minimum neck radius and time.

  10. Analysis of optical trap mediated aerosol coalescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mistry, N. S.; Power, R.; Anand, S.; McGloin, D.; Almohamedi, A.; Downie, M.; Reid, J. P.; Hudson, A. J.

    2012-10-01

    The use of optical tweezers for the analysis of aerosols is valuable for understanding the dynamics of atmospherically relevant particles. However to be able to make accurate measurements that can be directly tied to real-world phenomena it is important that we understand the influence of the optical trap on those processes. One process that is seemingly straightforward to study with these techniques is binary droplet coalescence, either using dual beam traps, or by particle collision with a single trapped droplet. This binary coalescence is also of interest in many other processes that make use of dense aerosol sprays such as spray drying and the use of inhalers for drug delivery in conditions such as asthma or hay fever. In this presentation we discuss the use of high speed (~5000 frames per second) video microscopy to track the dynamics of particles as they approach and interact with a trapped aqueous droplet and develop this analysis further by considering elastic light scattering from droplets as they undergo coalescence. We find that we are able to characterize the re-equilibration time of droplets of the same phase after they interact and that the trajectories taken by airborne particles influenced by an optical trap are often quite complex. We also examine the role of parameters such as the salt concentration of the aqueous solutions used and the influence of laser wavelength.

  11. Arrested coalescence of viscoelastic droplets: polydisperse doublets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahiya, Prerna; Caggioni, Marco; Spicer, Patrick T

    2016-07-28

    Arrested droplet coalescence produces stable anisotropic shapes and is a key mechanism for microstructure development in foods, petroleum and pharmaceutical formulations. Past work has examined the dynamic elastic arrest of coalescing monodisperse droplet doublets and developed a simple model of doublet strain as a function of physical variables. Although the work describes experimental data well, it is limited to describing same-size droplets. A new model incorporating a generalized description of doublet shape is developed to describe polydisperse doublet formation in more realistic emulsion systems. Polydisperse doublets are shown to arrest at lower strains than monodisperse doublets as a result of the smaller contribution of surface area in a given pair. Larger droplet size ratios have lower relative degrees of strain because coalescence is arrested at an earlier stage than in more monodisperse cases. Experimental observations of polydisperse doublet formation indicate that the model under-predicts arrest strains at low solid levels and small droplet sizes. The discrepancy is hypothesized to be the result of nonlinear elastic deformation at high strains.This article is part of the themed issue 'Soft interfacial materials: from fundamentals to formulation'. © 2016 The Author(s).

  12. Selective droplet coalescence using microfluidic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazutis, Linas; Griffiths, Andrew D

    2012-04-24

    We report a microfluidic approach, which allows selective and controlled 1 : 1, 2 : 1 or 3 : 1 droplet fusion. A surfactant-stabilized droplet with an interfacial surfactant coverage, Γ, of >98% will fuse spontaneously with a second droplet when Γ of the latter droplet is droplet is ~66%, the two droplets will not fuse, unless they have previously been brought into contact for critical time τ. Therefore, controlling the number of droplets in contact for time τ allows precise control over the number of fused droplets. We have demonstrated efficient (proportion of droplets coalesced p(c) = 1.0, n > 1000) and selective 1 : 1, 2 : 1 or 3 : 1 droplet fusion (proportion of correctly fused droplets p(s) > 0.99, n > 1000). Coalescence in this regime is induced by hydrodynamic flow causing interface separation and is efficient at different Ca numbers and using different dispersed phases, continuous phases and surfactants. However, when Γ of the second droplet is ~96% coalescence is no longer observed. Droplet-based microfluidic systems, in which each droplet functions as an independent microreactor, are proving a promising tool for a wide range of ultrahigh-throughput applications in biology and chemistry. The addition of new reagents to pre-formed droplets is critical to many of these applications and we believe the system described here is a simple and flexible method to do so, as well as a new tool to study interfacial stability phenomena.

  13. Arrested coalescence of viscoelastic droplets with internal microstructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawar, Amar B; Caggioni, Marco; Hartel, Richard W; Spicer, Patrick T

    2012-01-01

    There are many new approaches to designing complex anisotropic colloids, often using droplets as templates. However, droplets themselves can be designed to form anisotropic shapes without any external templates. One approach is to arrest binary droplet coalescence at an intermediate stage before a spherical shape is formed. Further shape relaxation of such anisotropic, arrested structures is retarded by droplet elasticity, either interfacial or internal. In this article we study coalescence of structured droplets, containing a network of anisotropic colloids, whose internal elasticity provides a resistance to full shape relaxation and interfacial energy minimization during coalescence. Precise tuning of droplet elasticity arrests coalescence at different stages and leads to various anisotropic shapes, ranging from doublets to ellipsoids. A simple model balancing interfacial and elastic energy is used to explain experimentally observed coalescence arrest in viscoelastic droplets. During coalescence of structured droplets the interfacial energy is continuously reduced while the elastic energy is increased by compression of the internal structure and, when the two processes balance one another, coalescence is arrested. Experimentally we observe that if either interfacial energy or elasticity dominates, total coalescence or total stability of droplets results. The stabilization mechanism is directly analogous to that in a Pickering emulsion, though here the resistance to coalescence is provided via an internal volume-based, rather than surface, structure. This study provides guidelines for designing anisotropic droplets by arrested coalescence but also explains some observations of "partial" coalescence observed in commercial foods like ice cream and whipped cream.

  14. Liquid-liquid separation using steady-state bed coalescer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šećerov-Sokolović Radmila M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a literature review on the current understanding of liquid-liquid separation that is immensely widespread in practice, highlighting the steady-state bed coalescer being a good solution in various engineering application. Generally, the fibre bed coalescence has proven to be very effective separation method in the industry. Due to the complexity of bed coalescence phenomenon coalescer design and sizing procedure relies on experimental test. This review provides a research overview of the key phenomena essential for the efficient bed coalescence, such as mechanisms of droplet coalescence and emulsion flow through the fibre bed. In addition to this provides an overview of the current knowledge about coalescer´s design properties and variables such as: fluid velocity, fluid flow orientation/flow mode, fibre bed geometry, and bed length. [[Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 172022

  15. Theory in the Service of Practice: Theories in Action Research Dissertations Written by Students in Education Doctorate Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambo, Debby

    2014-01-01

    Educational leaders are enrolling in second-generation education doctorate (EdD) programs because these are allowing them to remain in the field as they pursue their degree and perform action research within their workplace. As part of degree requirements, students in these programs are challenged to cross the theory-to-practice divide. However,…

  16. Towards program theory validation: Crowdsourcing the qualitative analysis of participant experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harman, Elena; Azzam, Tarek

    2018-02-01

    This exploratory study examines a novel tool for validating program theory through crowdsourced qualitative analysis. It combines a quantitative pattern matching framework traditionally used in theory-driven evaluation with crowdsourcing to analyze qualitative interview data. A sample of crowdsourced participants are asked to read an interview transcript and identify whether program theory components (Activities and Outcomes) are discussed and to highlight the most relevant passage about that component. The findings indicate that using crowdsourcing to analyze qualitative data can differentiate between program theory components that are supported by a participant's experience and those that are not. This approach expands the range of tools available to validate program theory using qualitative data, thus strengthening the theory-driven approach. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Investigation of drop coalescence using tomographic PIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Duenas, Cecilia; Kim, Jungyong; Longmire, Ellen

    2008-11-01

    High-speed tomographic PIV was used to obtain evolving volumetric velocity fields of the coalescence of single drops and two side-by-side drops through liquid/liquid interfaces. Reynolds numbers (Re=ρsUσD/μs) based on surface tension velocity (Uσ=D/tσ) and surrounding ambient fluid were 8-10, and the viscosity ratio between the fluid drop and surrounding fluid was 0.14. The coalescence process investigated is driven by gravity and thus the initial drops are non-spherical and the interface is deformed by the drops. Previously, Mohamed-Kassim & Longmire (2004) showed that under these conditions, the film rupture typically occurs off-axis, and therefore the flow is three-dimensional. For a single drop, volumetric velocity vector fields are used to characterize the asymmetric film rupture occurring for 0coalesce ruptures off-axis on the side closest to the second drop. The volumetric velocity and vorticity fields indicate an asymmetric collapse of the drop for 0.1

  18. Stochastic coalescence in Lagrangian cloud microphysics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Dziekan

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Stochasticity of the collisional growth of cloud droplets is studied using the super-droplet method (SDM of Shima et al.(2009. Statistics are calculated from ensembles of simulations of collision–coalescence in a single well-mixed cell. The SDM is compared with direct numerical simulations and the master equation. It is argued that SDM simulations in which one computational droplet represents one real droplet are at the same level of precision as the master equation. Such simulations are used to study fluctuations in the autoconversion time, the sol–gel transition and the growth rate of lucky droplets, which is compared with a theoretical prediction. The size of the coalescence cell is found to strongly affect system behavior. In small cells, correlations in droplet sizes and droplet depletion slow down rain formation. In large cells, collisions between raindrops are more frequent and this can also slow down rain formation. The increase in the rate of collision between raindrops may be an artifact caused by assuming an overly large well-mixed volume. The highest ratio of rain water to cloud water is found in cells of intermediate sizes. Next, we use these precise simulations to determine the validity of more approximate methods: the Smoluchowski equation and the SDM with multiplicities greater than 1. In the latter, we determine how many computational droplets are necessary to correctly model the expected number and the standard deviation of the autoconversion time. The maximal size of a volume that is turbulently well mixed with respect to coalescence is estimated at Vmix  =  1.5  ×  10−2 cm3. The Smoluchowski equation is not valid in such small volumes. It is argued that larger volumes can be considered approximately well mixed, but such approximation needs to be supported by a comparison with fine-grid simulations that resolve droplet motion.

  19. Le phénomène de coalescence. Etude bibliographique Coalescence Phenomena. A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palermo T.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Nous présentons une revue des différents travaux expérimentaux et théoriques effectués sur le phénomène de coalescence en limitant principalement notre discussion au cas de la coalescence d'une goutte isolée à une interface plane ou déformable. La coalescence se divise en deux phases distinctes : le drainage et la rupture du film interfacial. Ce film est constitué du liquide de la phase continue séparant la goutte de l'interface. La condition de rupture est principalement contrôlée par les forces électrostatiques dues à la double couche et par les forces de Van der Waals. Les résultats expérimentaux mettent en évidence un phénomène de coalescence partielle ainsi que l'existence d'une distribution statistique du temps de coalescence. Ils montrent également l'influence complexe de nombreux paramètres physiques et physico-chimiques sur le temps de coalescence. On rappelle les principaux modèles théoriques décrivant le drainage et la rupture des films liquides. Ces modèles permettent, entre autre, d'aboutir à des expressions mathématiques reliant le temps de coalescence à des paramètres tels que la tension interfaciale, les densités et les viscosités des fluides, la taille des gouttes. The problem linked to the stability of oil-in-water emulsions (e. g. deoiling of water and water-in-oil emulsions (e. g. dehydration of crudes is one of the major problems encountered in the petroleum industry. From the thermodynamic standpoint, an emulsion is always unstable (Fig. I. 1. The kinematic stability characterizing the separation rate of the dispersed phase from the continuous phase can nonetheless be controlled by the coalescence of droplets present in the emulsion (Fig. I. 2. This article reviews various experimental and theoretical works on the phenomenon of coalescence but the discussion is limited mainly to the coalescence of an single drop at a flat or deformable interface. The coalescence of a single drop is governed

  20. Mechanisms of rectangular groove-induced multiple-microdroplet coalescences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Feng; Li, Yi; Wang, Guiren; Liu, Zhaomiao

    2017-06-01

    The mechanism of microdroplet coalescence is a fundamental issue for droplet-based microfluidics. We developed an asymmetric expansion (a rectangular groove) along one side of a microchannel to achieve multiple-microdroplet trapping, collision, and coalescence. Compared with reported symmetric expansions, this asymmetric groove could easily trap microdroplets and control two or three microdroplet coalescences precisely without a requirement for temporal and spatial synchronization. To reveal the mechanisms of multiple-droplet coalescences in a groove, we observed five different coalescence patterns under different flow conditions. Moreover, we characterized the flow behavior quantitatively by simulating the velocity vector fields in both the microdroplets and continuous phase, finding good agreement with experiments. Finally, a map of coalescence forms with different capillary numbers (0.001droplet-based microfluidic devices.

  1. Research program in elementary particle theory, 1980. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sudarshan, E. C.G.; Ne' eman, Y.

    1980-01-01

    Research is reported for these subject areas: particle physics in relativistic astrophysics and cosmology; phenomenology of weak and electromagnetic interactions; strong interaction physics, QCD, and quark-parton physics; quantum field theory, quantum mechanics and fundamental problems; groups, gauges, and grand unified theories; and supergeometry, superalgebra, and unification. (GHT)

  2. Enhancement of coalescence in turbulent clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerstein, Alan; Krueger, Steven

    2017-11-01

    An economical numerical model, called ClusColl, for droplet motions and collisions in turbulent flows has been developed, tested, and applied. In the linear eddy model, 1D turbulent advection of fluid is implemented by rearranging the fluid cells. Each permutation represents an individual turbulent eddy, and is called a ``triplet map.'' The triplet map captures flow processes as small as the smallest turbulent eddy, but the response of cloud droplets to turbulence has important features at scales as small as the droplet radius. ClusColl includes a 3D triplet map for droplets that captures these additional effects. We have also implemented a collision detection algorithm so that ClusColl can simulate collisions and coalescence between finite-inertia particles. For sedimenting droplets with St coalescence calculations made using ClusColl suggest that turbulence can significantly accelerate rain formation by droplet clustering and/or by spectral broadening due to entrainment and mixing. We are using ClusColl to investigate the relative roles that entrainment and mixing, droplet inertial effects, and ultragiant nuclei play in warm rain initiation.

  3. Liquid droplet coalescence and fragmentation at the aqueous-air surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paneru, Govind; Law, Bruce M; Ibi, Koki; Ushijima, Baku; Flanders, Bret N; Aratono, Makoto; Matsubara, Hiroki

    2015-01-13

    For hexadecane oil droplets at an aqueous-air surface, the surface film in coexistence with the droplets exhibits two-dimensional gaseous (G), liquid (L), or solid (S) behavior depending upon the temperature and concentration of the cationic surfactant dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide. In the G (L) phase, oil droplets are observed to coalesce (fragment) as a function of time. In the coalescence region, droplets coalesce on all length scales, and the final state is a single oil droplet at the aqueous-air surface. The fragmentation regime is complex. Large oil droplets spread as oil films; hole nucleation breaks up this film into much smaller fluctuating and fragmenting or metastable droplets. Metastable droplets are small contact angle spherical caps and do not fluctuate in time; however, they are unstable over long time periods and eventually sink into the bulk water phase. Buoyancy forces provide a counterbalancing force where the net result is that small oil droplets (radius r droplets at liquid surfaces indicates that droplet coalesce is primarily driven by surface tension effects. This theory, which only considers spherical cap shaped surface droplets, qualitatively suggests that in the L phase the sinking of metastable surface droplets into the bulk aqueous medium is driven by a negative line tension and a very small spreading coefficient.

  4. Droplet coalescence at microchannel intersection chambers with different shapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhaomiao; Wang, Xiang; Cao, Rentuo; Pang, Yan

    2016-06-29

    The influence of microchannel intersection chamber shape on the droplet coalescence process is investigated in this study. Three kinds of chamber shapes (half-round, triangle and camber) are designed to realize head-on droplet coalescence. The coalescence processes are visualized using a high-speed camera system and the internal flow patterns are resolved using a micro-PIV system. Experimental analyses on the coalescence position and coalescence time of droplets and the critical conditions are discussed. Both direct coalescence and late coalescence can be observed in the camber junction while only the late coalescence is present for the half-round and the triangle junction. The critical capillary number Ca* varies for different working systems or intersection shapes. Ca* in the camber junction is larger than that in the other two junctions for each working system and it decreases with the increase of the viscosity ratio for each intersection shape. Moreover, the characteristics of the velocity fields for different coalescence cases are analyzed for an in-depth understanding of the process.

  5. Mechanism and simulation of droplet coalescence in molten steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Bing; Zhang, Tao; Ni, Hai-qi; Luo, Zhi-guo

    2017-11-01

    Droplet coalescence in liquid steel was carefully investigated through observations of the distribution pattern of inclusions in solidified steel samples. The process of droplet coalescence was slow, and the critical Weber number ( We) was used to evaluate the coalescence or separation of droplets. The relationship between the collision parameter and the critical We indicated whether slow coalescence or bouncing of droplets occurred. The critical We was 5.5, which means that the droplets gradually coalesce when We ≤ 5.5, whereas they bounce when We > 5.5. For the carbonate wire feeding into liquid steel, a mathematical model implementing a combined computational fluid dynamics (CFD)-discrete element method (DEM) approach was developed to simulate the movement and coalescence of variably sized droplets in a bottom-argon-blowing ladle. In the CFD model, the flow field was solved on the premise that the fluid was a continuous medium. Meanwhile, the droplets were dispersed in the DEM model, and the coalescence criterion of the particles was added to simulate the collision- coalescence process of the particles. The numerical simulation results and observations of inclusion coalescence in steel samples are consistent.

  6. Droplets coalescence at microchannel intersection chambers with different shapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhaomiao; Wang, Xiang; Cao, Rentuo; Pang, Yan

    2016-11-01

    The influence of microchannel intersection chamber shape on droplets coalescence process is investigated in this study. Three kinds of chamber shapes (half-round, triangle and camber) are designed to realize head-on droplets coalescence. The coalescence processes are visualized with high-speed camera system and the internal flow patterns are resolved with micro-PIV system. Experimental analyses on droplets coalescence position, coalescence time and the critical conditions are discussed. Both direct coalescence and late coalescence can be observed in the camber junction while only the late coalescence is present for the half-round and the triangle junction. The critical capillary number Ca* varies for different working systems or intersection shapes. Ca* in the camber junction is larger than that in the other two junctions for each working system and it decreases with the increase of the viscosity ratios for each intersection shape. Moreover, the characteristics of the velocity fields for different coalescence cases are analyzed for in-depth understanding of the process. The authors do appreciate the financial support of No.11572013 of National Nature Scicence Funding of China.

  7. Bilevel programming problems theory, algorithms and applications to energy networks

    CERN Document Server

    Dempe, Stephan; Pérez-Valdés, Gerardo A; Kalashnykova, Nataliya; Kalashnikova, Nataliya

    2015-01-01

    This book describes recent theoretical findings relevant to bilevel programming in general, and in mixed-integer bilevel programming in particular. It describes recent applications in energy problems, such as the stochastic bilevel optimization approaches used in the natural gas industry. New algorithms for solving linear and mixed-integer bilevel programming problems are presented and explained.

  8. Antisocial behavior during adolescence: theory, research and prevention programs

    OpenAIRE

    Herrera, Dora; Morales Córdova, Hugo

    2012-01-01

    The existence of several causes of antisocial behavior during adolescence seems to respond, not only to the combination of many risk factors within different levels of human development, but also to cultural and historical processes affecting, in many ways, several generations since their early childhood. This paper revises the main explicative theories about antisocial behavior during adolescence and highlights the theory of the Neuropsychological Taxonomy of the Antisocial Behavior proposed...

  9. Coalescence of psychiatry, neurology, and neuropsychology: from theory to practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Miles G; Goldstein, Martin; Katz, David; O'Neil, Sarah Quimby; Joseph, Anthony; Price, Bruce

    2006-01-01

    In a climate of renewed interest in the synergy between neurology and psychiatry, practitioners are increasingly recognizing the importance of exchange and collaboration between these two disciplines. However, there are few working models of interdisciplinary teams that freely share expertise in real time, while providing clinical and academic training to future physicians who specialize in the central nervous system. Over the past 11 years, the McLean Hospital Neuropsychiatry and Behavioral Neurology service has provided proof-of-principle for such collaboration, demonstrating that a team comprising psychiatrists, neurologists, and neuropsychologists can function effectively as a unit while maintaining the autonomy of these three disciplines and also synthesizing their combined knowledge. In addition to delivering enhanced patient care and promoting medical research, this clinical service has provided enriched cross-specialty training for fellows, residents, and medical students. The practical functioning of the team is described, and case vignettes are presented to illustrate the team's collaborative synergism in practice.

  10. Reducing Violence in Non-Controlling Ways: A Change Program Based on Self Determination Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assor, Avi; Feinberg, Ofra; Kanat-Maymon, Yaniv; Kaplan, Haya

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents and examines the first school change program focusing on violence and caring based on self-determination theory (Deci & Ryan, 2012). The program aimed at promoting teachers' capacity to cope with violence and enhance caring without becoming more controlling. Comparisons of the effects of a 22-month-long program in three…

  11. Learning in Context: Technology Integration in a Teacher Preparation Program Informed by Situated Learning Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Randy L.; Maeng, Jennifer L.; Binns, Ian C.

    2013-01-01

    This investigation explores the effectiveness of a teacher preparation program aligned with situated learning theory on preservice science teachers' use of technology during their student teaching experiences. Participants included 26 preservice science teachers enrolled in a 2-year Master of Teaching program. A specific program goal was to…

  12. Review of the Fusion Theory and Computing Program. Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (FESAC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antonsen, Thomas M. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Berry, Lee A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Brown, Michael R. [Swarthmore College, PA (United States); Dahlburg, Jill P. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Davidson, Ronald C. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Greenwald, Martin [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Hegna, Chris C. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); McCurdy, William [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Newman, David E. [Univ. of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK (United States); Pellegrini, Claudio [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Phillips, Cynthia K. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Post, Douglass E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Rosenbluth, Marshall N. [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States); Sheffield, John [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Simonen, Thomas C. [Munising, MI (United States); Van Dam, James [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

    2001-08-01

    At the November 14-15, 2000, meeting of the Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee, a Panel was set up to address questions about the Theory and Computing program, posed in a charge from the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences (see Appendix A). This area was of theory and computing/simulations had been considered in the FESAC Knoxville meeting of 1999 and in the deliberations of the Integrated Program Planning Activity (IPPA) in 2000. A National Research Council committee provided a detailed review of the scientific quality of the fusion energy sciences program, including theory and computing, in 2000.

  13. Inductive Data Types Based on Fibrations Theory in Programming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Decheng Miao

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Traditional methods including algebra and category theory have some deficiencies in analyzing semantics properties and describing inductive rules of inductive data types, we present a method based on Fibrations theory aiming at those questions above. We systematically analyze some basic logical structures of inductive data types about a fibration such as re-indexing functor, truth functor and comprehension functor, make semantics models of non-indexed fibration, single-sorted indexed fibration and many-sorted indexed fibration respectively. On this basis, we thoroughly discuss semantics properties of fibred, single-sorted indexed and many-sorted indexed inductive data types, and abstractly describe their inductive rules with universality. Furthermore, we briefly introduce applications of the three inductive dana types for analyzing semantics properties and describing inductive rules based on Fibrations theory via some examples. Compared with traditional methods, our works have the following three advantages. Firstly, brief descriptions and flexible expansibility of Fibrations theory can analyze semantics properties of inductive data types accurately, whose semantics are computed automatically. Secondly, superior abstractness of Fibrations theory does not rely on particular computing environments to depict inductive rules of inductive data types with universality. Thirdly, its rigorousness and consistence provide sound basis for testing and maintenance of software development.

  14. Burst Searches for Compact Binary Coalescences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimenko, Sergey

    2014-03-01

    Compact Binary coalescences (CBC) are the most promising sources of gravitational waves (GW) for the first detection with advanced GW detectors. Being the most efficient GW emitters among anticipated GW sources, they are also well understood theoretically in the framework of General Relativity. In the talk I'll discuss different flavors of CBC sources and two types of search methods employed in the GW data analysis: template and excess power. While template methods are the most optimal for CBC sources, I will concentrate on the excess power methods, which are typical for searches of generic GW transients (bursts). How to use burst searches for CBC sources? Why would we do this? What can we learn about CBC sources from a burst search? - these and other questions will be discussed in the talk. Supported by NSF grant PHY-1205512.

  15. Coalescence kinetics in surfactant stabilized emulsions: evolution equations from direct numerical simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skartlien, R; Grimes, B; Meakin, P; Sjöblom, J; Sollum, E

    2012-12-07

    Lattice Boltzmann simulations were used to study the coalescence kinetics in emulsions with amphiphilic surfactant, under neutrally buoyant conditions, and with a significant kinematic viscosity contrast between the phases (emulating water in oil emulsions). The 3D simulation domain was large enough (256(3) ~ 10(7) grid points) to obtain good statistics with droplet numbers ranging from a few thousand at early times to a few hundred near equilibrium. Increased surfactant contents slowed down the coalescence rate between droplets due to the Gibbs-Marangoni effect, and the coalescence was driven by a quasi-turbulent velocity field. The kinetic energy decayed at a relatively slow rate at early times, due to conversion of interfacial energy to kinetic energy in the flow during coalescence. Phenomenological, coupled differential equations for the mean droplet diameter D(t) and the number density n(d)(t) were obtained from the simulation data and from film draining theories. Local (in time) power law exponents for the growth of the mean diameter (and for the concomitant decrease of n(d)) were established in terms of the instantaneous values of the kinetic energy, coalescence probability, Gibbs elasticity, and interfacial area. The model studies indicated that true power laws for the growth of the droplet size and decrease of the number of droplets with time may not be justified, since the exponents derived using the phenomenological model were time dependent. In contrast to earlier simulation results for symmetric blends with surfactant, we found no evidence for stretched logarithmic scaling of the form D ~ [ln (ct)](α) for the morphology length, or exponential scalings associated with arrested growth, on the basis of the phenomenological model.

  16. Translating Theory Into Practice: Implementing a Program of Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauer, Karen E; O'Sullivan, Patricia S; Fitzhenry, Kristen; Boscardin, Christy

    2018-03-01

    A program of assessment addresses challenges in learner assessment using a centrally planned, coordinated approach that emphasizes assessment for learning. This report describes the steps taken to implement a program of assessment framework within a medical school. A literature review on best practices in assessment highlighted six principles that guided implementation of the program of assessment in 2016-2017: (1) a centrally coordinated plan for assessment aligns with and supports a curricular vision; (2) multiple assessment tools used longitudinally generate multiple data points; (3) learners require ready access to information-rich feedback to promote reflection and informed self-assessment; (4) mentoring is essential to facilitate effective data use for reflection and learning planning; (5) the program of assessment fosters self-regulated learning behaviors; and (6) expert groups make summative decisions about grades and readiness for advancement. Implementation incorporated stakeholder engagement, use of multiple assessment tools, design of a coaching program, and creation of a learner performance dashboard. The assessment team monitors adherence to principles defining the program of assessment and gathers and responds to regular feedback from key stakeholders, including faculty, staff, and students. Next steps include systematically collecting evidence for validity of individual assessments and the program overall. Iterative review of student performance data informs curricular improvements. The program of assessment also highlights technology needs that will be addressed with information technology experts. The outcome ultimately will entail showing evidence of validity that the program produces physicians who engage in lifelong learning and provide high-quality patient care.

  17. Chemically induced coalescence in droplet-based microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akartuna, Ilke; Aubrecht, Donald M; Kodger, Thomas E; Weitz, David A

    2015-02-21

    We present a new microfluidic method to coalesce pairs of surfactant-stabilized water-in-fluorocarbon oil droplets. We achieve this through the local addition of a poor solvent for the surfactant, perfluorobutanol, which induces cohesion between droplet interfaces causing them to merge. The efficiency of this technique is comparable to existing techniques providing an alternative method to coalesce pairs of droplets.

  18. Coalescence of protein-stabilised emulsions studied with microfluidics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muijlwijk, Kelly; Colijn, Ivanna; Harsono, Herditya; Krebs, Thomas; Berton-Carabin, Claire; Schroën, Karin

    2017-01-01

    Emulsion droplet formation occurs in milliseconds to seconds when emulsifier adsorption is often not yet completed, therewith allowing coalescence to take place. Because of these short time-scales, it is difficult to quantify adsorption and coalescence during processing. A microfluidic device can

  19. Less Is More : Generic Programming Theory and Practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodrigues Magalhães, J.P.

    2012-01-01

    Abstraction is ubiquitous in computer programming. The work of this thesis focuses on one specific form of abstraction. Computer programs manipulate data, which can either be primitive machine data (such as integer or fractional numbers) or programmer-defined data (such as lists, trees, matrices,

  20. Using Self-Determination Theory in Correctional Education Program Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinney, Dani; Cotronea, Michael A.

    2011-01-01

    As funding has become available through the Second Chance Act of 2007, many correctional facilities have developed new educational programs in an effort to ease the transition from prison to community. Many new programs are developed based on the belief that incarcerated individuals are a special and unique population of student. The present…

  1. Coalescence-Induced Jumping of Nanodroplets on Textured Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Shan; Liao, Quanwen; Liu, Wei; Liu, Zhichun

    2018-01-04

    Conducting experimental studies on nanoscale droplet coalescence using traditional microscopes is a challenging research topic, and views differ as to whether the spontaneous removal can occur in the coalescing nanodroplets. Here, a molecular dynamics simulation is carried out to investigate the coalescence process of two equally sized nanodroplets. On the basis of atomic coordinates, we compute the liquid bridge radii for various cases, which is described by a power law of spreading time, and these nanodroplets undergo coalescence in the inertially limited-viscous regime. Moreover, coalescence-induced jumping is also possible for the nanodroplets, and the attraction force between surface and water molecules plays a crucial role in this process, where the merged nanodroplets prefer to jump away from those surfaces with lower attraction force. When the solid-liquid interaction intensity and surface structure parameters are varied, the attraction force is shown to decrease with decreasing surface wettability intensity and solid fraction.

  2. Satellite Formation during Coalescence of Unequal Size Drops

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, F. H.

    2009-03-12

    The coalescence of a drop with a flat liquid surface pinches off a satellite from its top, in the well-known coalescence cascade, whereas the coalescence of two equally sized drops does not appear to leave such a satellite. Herein we perform experiments to identify the critical diameter ratio of two drops, above which a satellite is produced during their coalescence. We find that the critical parent ratio is as small as 1.55, but grows monotonically with the Ohnesorge number. The daughter size is typically about 50% of the mother drop. However, we have identified novel pinch-off dynamics close to the critical size ratio, where the satellite does not fully separate, but rather goes directly into a second stage of the coalescence cascade, thus generating a much smaller satellite droplet.

  3. Research program in elementary-particle theory, 1983. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sudarshan, E C.G.; Ne& #x27; eman, Y

    1983-08-01

    Progress is reviewed on the following topics: physics of ultra high energies and cosmology; phenomenology of particle physics; quantum field theory, supersymmetry and models of particles; and geometric formulations and algebraic models. Recent DOE reports resulting from the contract are listed. (WHK)

  4. The Uses of Theory in Health Advocacy: Policies and Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howze, Elizabeth Harper; Redman, Linda J.

    1992-01-01

    The Health Promotion and Education Council of Virginia became an effective advocate by incorporating elements of the theory of innovation diffusion, such as working through opinion leaders, creating information exchange relationships, tailoring attributes of the innovation to achieve objectives, and communicating the innovation to legislators. (SK)

  5. Theory-Driven Process Evaluation of the SHINE Trial Using a Program Impact Pathway Approach

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mbuya, Mduduzi N N; Jones, Andrew D; Ntozini, Robert; Humphrey, Jean H; Moulton, Lawrence H; Stoltzfus, Rebecca J; Maluccio, John A

    2015-01-01

    Two reasons for the lack of success of programs or interventions are poor alignment of interventions with the causes of the problem targeted by the intervention, leading to poor efficacy (theory failure...

  6. Views on and Practices of Integrating Theory and Practice in Teacher Education Programs in Atlantic Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falkenberg, Thomas; Goodnough, Karen; MacDonald, Ronald J.

    2014-01-01

    The need for and lack of integration of theory and practice in initial teacher education programs has been discussed as a central issue for teacher education. This article reports on a study that surveyed university-based teacher educators in Atlantic Canada on their perspectives regarding how theory and practice can be integrated, how they and…

  7. Identifying Barriers in Implementing Outcomes-Based Assessment Program Review: A Grounded Theory Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bresciani, Marilee J.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this grounded theory study was to identify the typical barriers encountered by faculty and administrators when implementing outcomes-based assessment program review. An analysis of interviews with faculty and administrators at nine institutions revealed a theory that faculty and administrators' promotion, tenure (if applicable),…

  8. The Course Research for the Software Program Based on the Constructivism Teaching Theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Quanyou; Kou, Qiongjie

    The theory of constructivism teaching emphasizes that: firstly, the center of teaching should be students; secondly, teaching should cultivate the student's character of autonomy and cooperation. The constructivism teaching gets rid of some disadvantage in the traditional teaching. Through using constructivism teaching theories to instruct programming course, it can liven up the lesson mood and cultivate the independent study; improve the team spirit and the ability of programming software for students.

  9. Harnessing International Relations Theory to Security Cooperation Program Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-22

    behavior. One of the most famous Liberal theorists is the philosopher Immanuel Kant , whose theory of “Perpetual Peace” centered on a vision where “free...democratic states would retain their sovereignty while working together to avoid war.”17 Kant ‟s vision has repeatedly been channeled into a desire...Interdependence and Liberal Institutionalist thinkers share roots with Grotius and Kant , and believe that there is a larger civil society where interstate

  10. An integrative theory-driven framework for evaluating travel training programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chul Hyun; Welch, Eric W; Sriraj, P S

    2016-12-01

    Since the 1970s, travel training programs, which provide a short-term training to people with disabilities and older people to teach them independent travel skills required to use fixed-route transportation, have spread across the United States. But the authors note that currently, there is no integrative framework for evaluating the training programs, although it is crucial for improving program implementation and developing knowledge and theories related to travel training. Therefore, this research aims to build an integrative theory-driven evaluation framework of the programs on the basis of prior studies on travel training and the literature on program evaluation and learning and training theories. The framework considers (1) a wide range of key elements related to the delivery systems and outcomes of travel training; (2) diverse stakeholders that engage in designing, operating, and assessing travel training; and (3) the short-term, intermediate, and long-term outcomes of the programs. Based on the framework, the authors develop a flexible logic model for travel training programs to help scholars and practitioners design and conduct actual evaluation studies. Thus, this research is expected to make theoretical and practical contributions to theory-driven program evaluation and travel training programs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Estimating species phylogenies using coalescence times among sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Liang; Yu, Lili; Pearl, Dennis K; Edwards, Scott V

    2009-10-01

    The estimation of species trees (phylogenies) is one of the most important problems in evolutionary biology, and recently, there has been greater appreciation of the need to estimate species trees directly rather than using gene trees as a surrogate. A Bayesian method constructed under the multispecies coalescent model can consistently estimate species trees but involves intensive computation, which can hinder its application to the phylogenetic analysis of large-scale genomic data. Many summary statistics-based approaches, such as shallowest coalescences (SC) and Global LAteSt Split (GLASS), have been developed to infer species phylogenies for multilocus data sets. In this paper, we propose 2 methods, species tree estimation using average ranks of coalescences (STAR) and species tree estimation using average coalescence times (STEAC), based on the summary statistics of coalescence times. It can be shown that the 2 methods are statistically consistent under the multispecies coalescent model. STAR uses the ranks of coalescences and is thus resistant to variable substitution rates along the branches in gene trees. A simulation study suggests that STAR consistently outperforms STEAC, SC, and GLASS when the substitution rates among lineages are highly variable. Two real genomic data sets were analyzed by the 2 methods and produced species trees that are consistent with previous results.

  12. How do you feel, developer? An explanatory theory of the impact of affects on programming performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Graziotin

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Affects—emotions and moods—have an impact on cognitive activities and the working performance of individuals. Development tasks are undertaken through cognitive processes, yet software engineering research lacks theory on affects and their impact on software development activities. In this paper, we report on an interpretive study aimed at broadening our understanding of the psychology of programming in terms of the experience of affects while programming, and the impact of affects on programming performance. We conducted a qualitative interpretive study based on: face-to-face open-ended interviews, in-field observations, and e-mail exchanges. This enabled us to construct a novel explanatory theory of the impact of affects on development performance. The theory is explicated using an established taxonomy framework. The proposed theory builds upon the concepts of events, affects, attractors, focus, goals, and performance. Theoretical and practical implications are given.

  13. ESRO study program for a space experiment on gravitation theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israel, G. M.

    1971-01-01

    ESRO is considering a space experiment which is the definition phase. A more complete utilization of space techniques, leading to highly accurate acceleration measurements in a heliocentric spacecraft, together with an improved laser signal propagation method (using a space-borne atomic clock), could substantially increase the validity of the gravitational time delay test during solar conjunction. Preliminary investigations of the primary required techniques were carried out. These studies included an orbit analysis, investigation of drag-free techniques, and studies of the time measuring instrument. These studies were used to define the framework of a space experiment on gravitation theories. A preliminary feasibility study of the mission is being undertaken.

  14. Multiple utility constrained multi-objective programs using Bayesian theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasian, Pooneh; Mahdavi-Amiri, Nezam; Fazlollahtabar, Hamed

    2017-06-01

    A utility function is an important tool for representing a DM's preference. We adjoin utility functions to multi-objective optimization problems. In current studies, usually one utility function is used for each objective function. Situations may arise for a goal to have multiple utility functions. Here, we consider a constrained multi-objective problem with each objective having multiple utility functions. We induce the probability of the utilities for each objective function using Bayesian theory. Illustrative examples considering dependence and independence of variables are worked through to demonstrate the usefulness of the proposed model.

  15. Intervention mapping protocol for developing a theory-based diabetes self-management education program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Misoon; Choi, Suyoung; Kim, Se-An; Seo, Kyoungsan; Lee, Soo Jin

    2015-01-01

    Development of behavior theory-based health promotion programs is encouraged with the paradigm shift from contents to behavior outcomes. This article describes the development process of the diabetes self-management program for older Koreans (DSME-OK) using intervention mapping (IM) protocol. The IM protocol includes needs assessment, defining goals and objectives, identifying theory and determinants, developing a matrix to form change objectives, selecting strategies and methods, structuring the program, and planning for evaluation and pilot testing. The DSME-OK adopted seven behavior objectives developed by the American Association of Diabetes Educators as behavioral outcomes. The program applied an information-motivation-behavioral skills model, and interventions were targeted to 3 determinants to change health behaviors. Specific methods were selected to achieve each objective guided by IM protocol. As the final step, program evaluation was planned including a pilot test. The DSME-OK was structured as the 3 determinants of the IMB model were intervened to achieve behavior objectives in each session. The program has 12 weekly 90-min sessions tailored for older adults. Using the IM protocol in developing a theory-based self-management program was beneficial in terms of providing a systematic guide to developing theory-based and behavior outcome-focused health education programs.

  16. Leveraging Sociocultural Theory to Create a Mentorship Program for Doctoral Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosslin, Matt; Wakefield, Jenny S.; Bennette, Phyllis; Black, James William, III

    2013-01-01

    This paper details a proposed doctoral student connections program that is based on sociocultural theory. It is designed to assist new students with starting their educational journey. This program is designed to leverage social interactions, peer mentorship, personal reflection, purposeful planning, and existing resources to assist students in…

  17. A Grounded Theory of Connectivity and Persistence in a Limited Residency Doctoral Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrell, Steven R.; Snyder, Martha M.; Dringus, Laurie P.; Maddrey, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Limited-residency and online doctoral programs have an attrition rate significantly higher than traditional programs. This grounded-theory study focused on issues pertaining to communication between students, their peers and faculty and how interpersonal communication may affect persistence. Data were collected from 17 students actively working on…

  18. Simulations of droplet coalescence in simple shear flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shardt, Orest; Derksen, J J; Mitra, Sushanta K

    2013-05-28

    Simulating droplet coalescence is challenging because small-scale (tens of nanometers) phenomena determine the behavior of much larger (micrometer- to millimeter-scale) droplets. In general, liquid droplets colliding in a liquid medium coalesce when the capillary number is less than a critical value. We present simulations of droplet collisions and coalescence in simple shear flow using the free-energy binary-liquid lattice Boltzmann method. In previous simulations of low-speed collisions, droplets coalesced at unrealistically high capillary numbers. Simulations of noncoalescing droplets have not been reported, and therefore, the critical capillary number for simulated collisions was unknown. By simulating droplets with radii up to 100 lattice nodes, we determine the critical capillary number for coalescence and quantify the effects of several numerical and geometric parameters. The simulations were performed with a well-resolved interface, a Reynolds number of one, and capillary numbers from 0.01 to 0.2. The ratio of the droplet radius and interface thickness has the greatest effect on the critical capillary number. As in experiments, the critical capillary number decreases with increasing droplet size. A second numerical parameter, the interface diffusivity (Péclet number) also influences the conditions for coalescence: coalescence occurs at higher capillary numbers with lower Péclet numbers (higher diffusivity). The effects of the vertical offset between the droplets and the confinement of the droplets were also studied. Physically reasonable results were obtained and provide insight into the conditions for coalescence. Simulations that match the conditions of experiments reported in the literature remain computationally impractical. However, the scale of the simulations is now sufficiently large that a comparison with experiments involving smaller droplets (≈10 μm) and lower viscosities (≈10(-6) m(2)/s, the viscosity of water) may be possible

  19. Formulated linear programming problems from game theory and its ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A good theoretical background is needed in interpreting optimal mixed strategies as proportion of time that a given player could utilize each of his/her pure strategies. It is also needed in interpreting how a two-person zero sum game could be reduced to a special linear programming problem, using the primal and symmetric ...

  20. Employee wellness program marketing: an organizational theory perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, D P

    1992-01-01

    An employee wellness program (EWP) marketing system can be analyzed as an adhocracy, an organizational form proposed by Mintzberg and is characterized by sharing of power, mutual adjustment among its members, and ability to innovate. The design parameters of informal behavior, planning and control, liaison, and decentralization appear to be particularly important to the success of EWPs.

  1. Inferring the dynamics of diversification: a coalescent approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélène Morlon

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Recent analyses of the fossil record and molecular phylogenies suggest that there are fundamental limits to biodiversity, possibly arising from constraints in the availability of space, resources, or ecological niches. Under this hypothesis, speciation rates decay over time and biodiversity eventually saturates, with new species emerging only when others are driven to extinction. This view of macro-evolution contradicts an alternative hypothesis that biodiversity is unbounded, with species ever accumulating as they find new niches to occupy. These contrasting theories of biodiversity dynamics yield fundamentally different explanations for the disparity in species richness across taxa and regions. Here, we test whether speciation rates have decayed or remained constant over time, and whether biodiversity is saturated or still expanding. We first derive a general likelihood expression for internode distances in a phylogeny, based on the well-known coalescent process from population genetics. This expression accounts for either time-constant or time-variable rates, time-constant or time-variable diversity, and completely or incompletely sampled phylogenies. We then compare the performance of different diversification scenarios in explaining a set of 289 phylogenies representing amphibians, arthropods, birds, mammals, mollusks, and flowering plants. Our results indicate that speciation rates typically decay over time, but that diversity is still expanding at present. The evidence for expanding-diversity models suggests that an upper limit to biodiversity has not yet been reached, or that no such limit exists.

  2. Inferring the dynamics of diversification: a coalescent approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morlon, Hélène; Potts, Matthew D; Plotkin, Joshua B

    2010-09-28

    Recent analyses of the fossil record and molecular phylogenies suggest that there are fundamental limits to biodiversity, possibly arising from constraints in the availability of space, resources, or ecological niches. Under this hypothesis, speciation rates decay over time and biodiversity eventually saturates, with new species emerging only when others are driven to extinction. This view of macro-evolution contradicts an alternative hypothesis that biodiversity is unbounded, with species ever accumulating as they find new niches to occupy. These contrasting theories of biodiversity dynamics yield fundamentally different explanations for the disparity in species richness across taxa and regions. Here, we test whether speciation rates have decayed or remained constant over time, and whether biodiversity is saturated or still expanding. We first derive a general likelihood expression for internode distances in a phylogeny, based on the well-known coalescent process from population genetics. This expression accounts for either time-constant or time-variable rates, time-constant or time-variable diversity, and completely or incompletely sampled phylogenies. We then compare the performance of different diversification scenarios in explaining a set of 289 phylogenies representing amphibians, arthropods, birds, mammals, mollusks, and flowering plants. Our results indicate that speciation rates typically decay over time, but that diversity is still expanding at present. The evidence for expanding-diversity models suggests that an upper limit to biodiversity has not yet been reached, or that no such limit exists.

  3. The coalescence of heterogeneous liquid metal on nano substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Long; Li, Yifan; Zhou, Xuyan; Li, Tao; Li, Hui

    2017-06-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation has been performed to study the asymmetric coalescence of heterogeneous liquid metal on graphene. Simulation results show that the anomalies in the drop coalescence is mainly caused by the wettability of heterogeneous liquid metal. The silver atoms incline to distribute on the outer layer of the gold and copper droplets, revealing that the structure is determined by the interaction between different metal atoms. The coalescence and fusion of heterogeneous liquid metal drop can be predicted by comparing the wettability and the atomic mass of metallic liquid drops, which has important implications in the industrial application such as ink-jet printing and metallurgy.

  4. Oscillatory coalescence of droplets in an alternating electric field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Suhwan; Saveliev, Alexei V.

    2017-06-01

    Partial coalescence of microdroplets is of interest for a number of microfluidic applications where a controlled fluid transfer from one droplet to another is required for mixing, dispensing, and metering of chemical and biological fluids. We report a phenomenon of oscillatory coalescence of water droplets situated in an alternating electric field. The oscillatory coalescence exists in a range of electric capillary numbers and fluid conductivities and proceeds through a finite number of cycles. Each cycle includes attractive and repulsion stages and results in a partial fluid transfer through a liquid bridge formed between droplets during the repulsion stage. We propose an energy model to describe the phenomenon and define its limit of existence.

  5. A sample theory-based logic model to improve program development, implementation, and sustainability of Farm to School programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratcliffe, Michelle M

    2012-08-01

    Farm to School programs hold promise to address childhood obesity. These programs may increase students’ access to healthier foods, increase students’ knowledge of and desire to eat these foods, and increase their consumption of them. Implementing Farm to School programs requires the involvement of multiple people, including nutrition services, educators, and food producers. Because these groups have not traditionally worked together and each has different goals, it is important to demonstrate how Farm to School programs that are designed to decrease childhood obesity may also address others’ objectives, such as academic achievement and economic development. A logic model is an effective tool to help articulate a shared vision for how Farm to School programs may work to accomplish multiple goals. Furthermore, there is evidence that programs based on theory are more likely to be effective at changing individuals’ behaviors. Logic models based on theory may help to explain how a program works, aid in efficient and sustained implementation, and support the development of a coherent evaluation plan. This article presents a sample theory-based logic model for Farm to School programs. The presented logic model is informed by the polytheoretical model for food and garden-based education in school settings (PMFGBE). The logic model has been applied to multiple settings, including Farm to School program development and evaluation in urban and rural school districts. This article also includes a brief discussion on the development of the PMFGBE, a detailed explanation of how Farm to School programs may enhance the curricular, physical, and social learning environments of schools, and suggestions for the applicability of the logic model for practitioners, researchers, and policy makers.

  6. Connection Between the Theory and Practice in Pre-service Teacher Education Programs in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gülsen ÜNVER

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Research reveals that there are severe problems on connecting theory and practice in pre-service teacher education programs in Turkey. This descriptive study was limited by examining the decisions and applications related to connecting theory and practice in pre-service teacher education since 1998. Results are organized by concerning the factors like durations and semesters of field experiences, efficiencies of the stakeholders of teacher education programs. In conclusion connecting theoy and practice in pre-service teacher education is considered important in Turkey. However the policies on this issue in Turkey can be criticized; and the stakeholders of teacher education programs are not efficiacy on connecting theory and practice. And the study presents recommendations for enhancing connecting theory and practice in pre-service teacher education as follows: University-School Cooperation Protocol should include methods courses, directors of universities and practice schools should promote other stakeholders for connecting theory and practice, faculties should indigenize connecting theory and practice in teacher education and, cooperating teachers should be good models for teacher candidates in terms of connecting theory and practice.

  7. Cluster Dynamics Modeling with Bubble Nucleation, Growth and Coalescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Almeida, Valmor F. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Blondel, Sophie [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Bernholdt, David E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wirth, Brian D. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2017-06-01

    The topic of this communication pertains to defect formation in irradiated solids such as plasma-facing tungsten submitted to helium implantation in fusion reactor com- ponents, and nuclear fuel (metal and oxides) submitted to volatile ssion product generation in nuclear reactors. The purpose of this progress report is to describe ef- forts towards addressing the prediction of long-time evolution of defects via continuum cluster dynamics simulation. The di culties are twofold. First, realistic, long-time dynamics in reactor conditions leads to a non-dilute di usion regime which is not accommodated by the prevailing dilute, stressless cluster dynamics theory. Second, long-time dynamics calls for a large set of species (ideally an in nite set) to capture all possible emerging defects, and this represents a computational bottleneck. Extensions beyond the dilute limit is a signi cant undertaking since no model has been advanced to extend cluster dynamics to non-dilute, deformable conditions. Here our proposed approach to model the non-dilute limit is to monitor the appearance of a spatially localized void volume fraction in the solid matrix with a bell shape pro le and insert an explicit geometrical bubble onto the support of the bell function. The newly cre- ated internal moving boundary provides the means to account for the interfacial ux of mobile species into the bubble, and the growth of bubbles allows for coalescence phenomena which captures highly non-dilute interactions. We present a preliminary interfacial kinematic model with associated interfacial di usion transport to follow the evolution of the bubble in any number of spatial dimensions and any number of bubbles, which can be further extended to include a deformation theory. Finally we comment on a computational front-tracking method to be used in conjunction with conventional cluster dynamics simulations in the non-dilute model proposed.

  8. Local fixed pivot quadratue method of moment for bubble population balance equation including coalescence and breakage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, J. W.; Gu, Z. L.; Jiao, J. Y.; Xu, X. Y.

    2010-03-01

    Population balance equation as an essential tool to describe micro-behaviors and resulting bubble size distribution has received considerable attention in scientific and engineering fields. Numerical solution is the only choice in most cases due to its complexity. However, it is almost impossible for the existing numerical methods to predict both bubble size distribution and its moments exactly. In this work, a new numerical method basing on the idea of short time Fourier transformation, namely local fixed pivot quadrature method of moment, is proposed for bubble coalescence and breakage. A continuous summation of Dirac Delta function as trial functions in the local domain and monomials as the weighted functions to conserve the local moments were adopted. The moments and the bubble size distribution were constructed based on the moments in the local domain. Numerical tests including pure coalescence, pure breakage and coalescence and breakage combined processes showed that both the moments and bubble size distribution were predicted accurately. A special algorithm was used to solve the vandermonde linear system, with which the influence of the ill-conditioned feature of coefficient matrix on the numerical accuracy can be avoided. In theory any number of moments can be tracked with the new method. Moreover, with it one can solely track the bubble size distribution or the moments depending on the concrete application.

  9. Pacific Salmon and the Coalescent Effective Population Size

    OpenAIRE

    Can Cenik; John Wakeley

    2010-01-01

    Pacific salmon include several species that are both commercially important and endangered. Understanding the causes of loss in genetic variation is essential for designing better conservation strategies. Here we use a coalescent approach to analyze a model of the complex life history of salmon, and derive the coalescent effective population (CES). With the aid of Kronecker products and a convergence theorem for Markov chains with two time scales, we derive a simple formula for the CES and th...

  10. Potential function methods for approximately solving linear programming problems theory and practice

    CERN Document Server

    Bienstock, Daniel

    2002-01-01

    Potential Function Methods For Approximately Solving Linear Programming Problems breaks new ground in linear programming theory. The book draws on the research developments in three broad areas: linear and integer programming, numerical analysis, and the computational architectures which enable speedy, high-level algorithm design. During the last ten years, a new body of research within the field of optimization research has emerged, which seeks to develop good approximation algorithms for classes of linear programming problems. This work both has roots in fundamental areas of mathematical programming and is also framed in the context of the modern theory of algorithms. The result of this work, in which Daniel Bienstock has been very much involved, has been a family of algorithms with solid theoretical foundations and with growing experimental success. This book will examine these algorithms, starting with some of the very earliest examples, and through the latest theoretical and computational developments.

  11. Investigation of liquid-liquid drop coalescence using tomographic PIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Dueñas, Cecilia; Kim, Jungyong; Longmire, Ellen K.

    2010-07-01

    High-speed tomographic PIV was used to investigate the coalescence of drops placed on a liquid/liquid interface; the coalescence of a single drop and of a drop in the presence of an adjacent drop (side-by-side drops) was investigated. The viscosity ratio between the drop and surrounding fluids was 0.14, the Ohnesorge number (Oh = μd/(ρdσD)1/2) was 0.011, and Bond numbers (Bo = ( ρ d - ρ s ) gD 2/ σ) were 3.1-7.5. Evolving volumetric velocity fields of the full coalescence process allowed for quantification of the velocity scales occurring over different time scales. For both single and side-by-side drops, the coalescence initiates with an off-axis film rupture and film retraction speeds an order of magnitude larger than the collapse speed of the drop fluid. This is followed by the formation and propagation of an outward surface wave along the coalescing interface with wavelength of approximately 2D. For side-by-side drops, the collapse of the first drop is asymmetric due to the presence of the second drop and associated interface deformation. Overall, tomographic PIV provides insight into the flow physics and inherent three-dimensionalities in the coalescence process that would not be achievable with flow visualization or planar PIV only.

  12. On spatial coalescents with multiple mergers in two dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuer, Benjamin; Sturm, Anja

    2013-08-01

    We consider the genealogy of a sample of individuals taken from a spatially structured population when the variance of the offspring distribution is relatively large. The space is structured into discrete sites of a graph G. If the population size at each site is large, spatial coalescents with multiple mergers, so called spatial Λ-coalescents, for which ancestral lines migrate in space and coalesce according to some Λ-coalescent mechanism, are shown to be appropriate approximations to the genealogy of a sample of individuals. We then consider as the graph G the two dimensional torus with side length 2L+1 and show that as L tends to infinity, and time is rescaled appropriately, the partition structure of spatial Λ-coalescents of individuals sampled far enough apart converges to the partition structure of a non-spatial Kingman coalescent. From a biological point of view this means that in certain circumstances both the spatial structure as well as larger variances of the underlying offspring distribution are harder to detect from the sample. However, supplemental simulations show that for moderately large L the different structure is still evident. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Impact of fertility transmission and other sociodemographic factors on reproductive success and coalescent trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandenburg, Jean-Tristan; Austerlitz, Frédéric; Toupance, Bruno

    2012-06-01

    Summary Fertility transmission (FT) is a phenomenon with a cultural and/or genetic basis, whereby a positive correlation exists between the number of offspring of an individual and that of his/her parents. Theoretical studies using a haploid individual-based model have shown that FT increases the variance and intergenerational correlation in reproductive success and results in an imbalance in the coalescent tree of sampled genes. This phenomenon has been documented in several demographic studies conducted on the correlation in fertility between generations, or through the reconstruction of the genealogical trees of mitochondrial DNA sequences. However, as mtDNA is a single locus, potentially subject to other forces (e.g. natural selection), it is of interest to extend the theory of FT to nuclear loci. We show that because random mating between individuals leads to a mixing of their fertility profiles, FT in these cases will have less influence on the variance and intergenerational correlation of reproductive success. This, in turn, results in less impact on the shape of the coalescent trees. Nevertheless, in the presence of FT, high heterogeneity in reproductive success and homogamy for family size will increase the imbalance in the coalescent tree. Thus, FT should be easier to detect when occurring in conjunction with these other factors. We also show the utility of analysing different kinds of loci (X-linked, Y-linked, mitochondrial and autosomal) to assess whether FT is matrilineal, patrilineal or biparental. Finally, we demonstrate that the shape of the coalescent tree depends upon population size, in contrast to the classical Kingman's model.

  14. Implementation of visual programming methods for numerical techniques used in electromagnetic field theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Metin Varan

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Field theory is one of the two sub-field theories in electrical and electronics engineering that for creates difficulties for undergraduate students. In undergraduate period, field theory has been taught under the theory of electromagnetic fields by which describes using partial differential equations and integral methods. Analytical methods for solution of field problems on the basis of a mathematical model may result the understanding difficulties for undergraduate students due to their mathematical and physical infrastructure. The analytical methods which can be applied in simple model lose their applicability to more complex models. In this case, the numerical methods are used to solve more complex equations. In this study, by preparing some field theory‘s web-based graphical user interface numerical methods of applications it has been aimed to increase learning levels of field theory problems for undergraduate and graduate students while taking in mind their computer programming capabilities.

  15. Educational Program Evaluation Model, From the Perspective of the New Theories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soleiman Ahmady

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This study is focused on common theories that influenced the history of program evaluation and introduce the educational program evaluation proposal format based on the updated theory. Methods: Literature searches were carried out in March-December 2010 with a combination of key words, MeSH terms and other free text terms as suitable for the purpose. A comprehensive search strategy was developed to search Medline by the PubMed interface, ERIC (Education Resources Information Center and the main journal of medical education regarding current evaluation models and theories. We included all study designs in our study. We found 810 articles related to our topic, and finally 63 with the full text article included. We compared documents and used expert consensus for selection the best model. Results: We found that the complexity theory using logic model suggests compatible evaluation proposal formats, especially with new medical education programs. Common components of a logic model are: situation, inputs, outputs, and outcomes that our proposal format is based on. Its contents are: title page, cover letter, situation and background, introduction and rationale, project description, evaluation design, evaluation methodology, reporting, program evaluation management, timeline, evaluation budget based on the best evidences, and supporting documents. Conclusion: We found that the logic model is used for evaluation program planning in many places, but more research is needed to see if it is suitable for our context.

  16. Integrating design science theory and methods to improve the development and evaluation of health communication programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuhauser, Linda; Kreps, Gary L

    2014-12-01

    Traditional communication theory and research methods provide valuable guidance about designing and evaluating health communication programs. However, efforts to use health communication programs to educate, motivate, and support people to adopt healthy behaviors often fail to meet the desired goals. One reason for this failure is that health promotion issues are complex, changeable, and highly related to the specific needs and contexts of the intended audiences. It is a daunting challenge to effectively influence health behaviors, particularly culturally learned and reinforced behaviors concerning lifestyle factors related to diet, exercise, and substance (such as alcohol and tobacco) use. Too often, program development and evaluation are not adequately linked to provide rapid feedback to health communication program developers so that important revisions can be made to design the most relevant and personally motivating health communication programs for specific audiences. Design science theory and methods commonly used in engineering, computer science, and other fields can address such program and evaluation weaknesses. Design science researchers study human-created programs using tightly connected build-and-evaluate loops in which they use intensive participatory methods to understand problems and develop solutions concurrently and throughout the duration of the program. Such thinking and strategies are especially relevant to address complex health communication issues. In this article, the authors explore the history, scientific foundation, methods, and applications of design science and its potential to enhance health communication programs and their evaluation.

  17. Droplet coalescence process under electric fields in an immiscible polymer blend.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aida, Kohei; Na, Yang Ho; Nagaya, Tomoyuki; Orihara, Hiroshi

    2010-09-01

    The droplet coalescence process was investigated in immiscible polymer blends when subjected to a step electric field. We present sequential three-dimensional images captured during the process with a confocal scanning laser microscope. Characteristic lengths parallel and perpendicular to the electric field were obtained from the spatial correlation functions of the images. It was found that the droplet growth rate increased with both the electric field and the volume fraction of droplets. A function describing the droplet growth rate was derived from theory using the "hierarchical model" and was found to be in good agreement with the experimental results.

  18. Effect of confinement on droplet coalescence in shear flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dongju; Cardinaels, Ruth; Moldenaers, Paula

    2009-11-17

    The effect of confinement on the coalescence of Newtonian (polydimethylsiloxane) droplets in a Newtonian (polyisobutylene) matrix is investigated experimentally. A counter rotating parallel plate device, equipped with a microscopy setup, is used to visualize two interacting droplets during shear flow. The ratio of droplet-to-matrix viscosity is kept constant at 1.1. Droplet collisions are studied for a range of droplet sizes, both in bulk conditions and for gap spacings that are comparable to the droplet size. As a result, we present the first quantitative experimental data set for the coalescence of two equal-sized droplets in a pure shear flow with varying degrees of confinement. Compared to bulk conditions, for droplets smaller than roughly 0.2 times the gap spacing, a slight degree of confinement only decreases the orientation angle at which the droplets coalesce whereas the critical conditions for coalescence remain unaltered. For more confined conditions, the critical capillary number up to which coalescence can occur, increases. Therefore, confinement clearly promotes coalescence. In addition, the droplet trajectories, the time-dependent orientation angle of the droplet pair, and the droplet deformation prior to the coalescence event are systematically studied, and a comparison between the confined and the unconfined situation is provided. It is shown that the presence of two parallel walls can induce changes in the flow field around the droplet pair, which cause an increase of the interaction time between the droplets. Moreover, for sufficiently confined droplets, the additional force originating from the presence of the walls becomes comparable to the hydrodynamic force on the droplet pair, thus influencing the drainage of the matrix film between the droplet surfaces.

  19. Coalescence and noncoalescence of sessile drops: impact of surface forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpitschka, Stefan; Hanske, Christoph; Fery, Andreas; Riegler, Hans

    2014-06-17

    Due to capillarity, sessile droplets of identical liquids will instantaneously fuse when they come in contact at their three-phase lines. However, with drops of different, completely miscible liquids, instantaneous coalescence can be suppressed. Instead, the drops remain in a state of noncoalescence for some time, with the two drop bodies connected only by a thin neck. The reason for this noncoalescence is the surface tension difference, Δγ, between the liquids. If Δγ is sufficiently large, then it induces a sufficiently strong Marangoni flow, which keeps the main drop bodies temporarily separated. Studies with spreading drops have revealed that the boundary between instantaneous coalescence and noncoalescence is sharp (Karpitschka, S.; Riegler, H. J. Fluid. Mech. 2014, 743, R1). The boundary is a function of two parameters only: Δγ and Θ(a), the arithmetic mean of the contact angles in the moment of drop-drop contact. It appears plausible that surface forces (the disjoining pressure) could also influence the coalescence behavior. However, in experiments with spreading drops, surface forces always promote coalescence and their influence might be obscured. Therefore, we present here coalescence experiments with partially wetting liquids and compare the results to the spreading case. We adjust different equilibrium contact angles (i.e., different surface forces) with different substrate surface coatings. As for spreading drops, we observe a sharp boundary between regimes of coalescence and noncoalescence. The boundary follows the same power law relation for both partially and completely wetting cases. Therefore, we conclude that surface forces have no significant, explicit influence on the coalescence behavior of sessile drops from different miscible liquids.

  20. A Theory of Secondary Teachers' Adaptations When Implementing a Reading Intervention Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leko, Melinda M.; Roberts, Carly A.; Pek, Yvonne

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the causes and consequences of secondary teachers' adaptations when implementing a research-based reading intervention program. Interview, observation, and artifact data were collected on five middle school intervention teachers, leading to a grounded theory composed of the core component, reconciliation through adaptation, and…

  1. Students' Understanding of Loops and Nested Loops in Computer Programming: An APOS Theory Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cetin, Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore students' understanding of loops and nested loops concepts. Sixty-three mechanical engineering students attending an introductory programming course participated in the study. APOS (Action, Process, Object, Schema) is a constructivist theory developed originally for mathematics education. This study is the…

  2. Mindstorms Robots and the Application of Cognitive Load Theory in Introductory Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Raina; Cooper, Graham

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports on a series of introductory programming workshops, initially targeting female high school students, which utilised Lego Mindstorms robots. Cognitive load theory (CLT) was applied to the instructional design of the workshops, and a controlled experiment was also conducted investigating aspects of the interface. Results indicated…

  3. How Robotics Programs Influence Young Women's Career Choices: A Grounded Theory Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Cecilia Dosh-Bluhm

    2014-01-01

    The fields of engineering, computer science, and physics have a paucity of women despite decades of intervention by universities and organizations. Women's graduation rates in these fields continue to stagnate, posing a critical problem for society. This qualitative grounded theory (GT) study sought to understand how robotics programs influenced…

  4. Connecting Neuroscience, Cognitive, and Educational Theories and Research to Practice: A Review of Mathematics Intervention Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroeger, Lori A.; Brown, Rhonda Douglas; O'Brien, Beth A.

    2012-01-01

    Research Findings: This article describes major theories and research on math cognition across the fields of neuroscience, cognitive psychology, and education and connects these literatures to intervention practices. Commercially available math intervention programs were identified and evaluated using the following questions: (a) Did neuroscience…

  5. Exploring the Disjunctures between Theory and Practice in Community College Visual Arts Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Arnold

    2012-01-01

    This study explored the perceptions of ten community college visual arts faculty in five different community college settings with regard to the theory and practice disjunctures they were experiencing in their roles as instructors teaching foundational level courses within visual arts programs. The study illuminated the responses of community…

  6. Multiple Intelligences Theory and Foreign Language Education: Perspectives of College Students in a German Immersion Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber-Segler, Ellen

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative research study was to explore and comprehend the role of Howard Gardner's theory of multiple intelligences (MI) in foreign language learning by analyzing the perspectives of college students in a German immersion program at a liberal arts college in the Midwest. Data collection included 10 in-depth student…

  7. Coalescence Dynamics of Mobile and Immobile Fluid Interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakarelski, Ivan U; Manica, Rogerio; Li, Er Qiang; Basheva, Elka S; Chan, Derek Y C; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T

    2018-02-06

    Coalescence dynamics between deformable bubbles and droplets can be dramatically affected by the mobility of the interfaces with fully tangentially mobile bubble-liquid or droplet-liquid interfaces expected to accelerate the coalescence by orders of magnitude. However, there is a lack of systematic experimental investigations that quantify this effect. By using high speed camera imaging we examine the free rise and coalescence of small air-bubbles (100 to 1300 μm in diameter) with a liquid interface. A perfluorocarbon liquid, PP11, is used as a model liquid to investigate coalescence dynamics between fully mobile and immobile deformable interfaces. The mobility of the bubble surface was determined by measuring the terminal rise velocity of small bubbles rising at Reynolds numbers, Re, less than 0.1 and the mobility of free PP11 surface by measuring the deceleration kinetics of the small bubble toward the interface. Induction or film drainage times of a bubble at the mobile PP11-air surface were found to be more than 2 orders of magnitude shorter compared to the case of bubble and an immobile PP11-water interface. A theoretical model is used to illustrate the effect of hydrodynamics and interfacial mobility on the induction time or film drainage time. The results of this study are expected to stimulate the development of a comprehensive theoretical model for coalescence dynamics between two fully or partially mobile fluid interfaces.

  8. Coalescence dynamics of mobile and immobile fluid interfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Vakarelski, Ivan Uriev

    2018-01-12

    Coalescence dynamics between deformable bubbles and droplets can be dramatically affected by the mobility of the interfaces with fully tangentially mobile bubble-liquid or droplet-liquid interfaces expected to accelerate the coalescence by orders of magnitudes. However, there is a lack of systematic experimental investigations that quantify this effect. By using high speed camera imaging we examine the free rise and coalescence of small air-bubbles (100 to 1300 μm in diameter) with a liquid interface. A perfluorocarbon liquid, PP11 is used as a model liquid to investigate coalescence dynamics between fully-mobile and immobile deformable interfaces. The mobility of the bubble surface was determined by measuring the terminal rise velocity of small bubbles rising at Reynolds numbers, Re less than 0.1 and the mobility of free PP11 surface by measuring the deceleration kinetics of the small bubble toward the interface. Induction or film drainage times of a bubble at the mobile PP11-air surface were found to be more than two orders of magnitude shorter compared to the case of bubble and an immobile PP11-water interface. A theoretical model is used to illustrate the effect of hydrodynamics and interfacial mobility on the induction time or film drainage time. The results of this study are expected to stimulate the development of a comprehensive theoretical model for coalescence dynamics between two fully or partially mobile fluid interfaces.

  9. Physics of Relativistic Objects in Compact Binaries: From Birth to Coalescence

    CERN Document Server

    Colpi, Monica; Gorini, Vittorio; Moschella, Ugo; Possenti, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive, authoritative and timely review of the astrophysical approach to the investigation of gravity theories. Particular attention is paid to strong-field tests of general relativity and alternative theories of gravity, performed using collapsed objects (neutron stars, black holes and white dwarfs) in relativistic binaries as laboratories. The book starts with an introduction which gives the background linking experimental gravity in cosmic laboratories to astrophysics and fundamental physics. Subsequent chapters cover observational and theoretical aspects of the following topics: from binaries as test-beds of gravity theories to binary pulsars as cosmic laboratories; from binary star evolution to the formation of relativistic binaries; from short gamma-ray bursts to low mass X-ray binaries; from stellar-mass black hole binaries to coalescing super-massive black holes in galaxy mergers. The book will be useful to researchers, PhD and graduate students in Astrophysics, Cosmology, ...

  10. Evaluation of a preschool nutrition education program based on the theory of multiple intelligences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cason, K L

    2001-01-01

    This report describes the evaluation of a preschool nutrition education program based on the theory of multiple intelligences. Forty-six nutrition educators provided a series of 12 lessons to 6102 preschool-age children. The program was evaluated using a pretest/post-test design to assess differences in fruit and vegetable identification, healthy snack choices, willingness to taste foods, and eating behaviors. Subjects showed significant improvement in food identification and recognition, healthy snack identification, willingness to taste foods, and frequency of fruit, vegetable, meat, and dairy consumption. The evaluation indicates that the program was an effective approach for educating preschool children about nutrition.

  11. Molecular simulations of droplet coalescence in oil/water/surfactant systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rekvig, Live; Frenkel, Daan

    2007-10-07

    determines whether there is a critical channel radius at which the channel free energy has a maximum. The latter is in agreement with the hole-nucleation theory of Kabalnov and Wennerstrom [Langmuir 12, 276 (1996)]. Our simulations seriously overestimate the relative stability of surfactant free emulsions. We argue that this is due to the fact that our model does not allow for nanobubble formation and capillary evaporation-processes that are presumably of key importance in the coalescence of surfactant-free emulsions.

  12. The over-step coalescence of carbon atoms on copper surface in the CVD growth of graphene: density functional calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingfeng Li

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The ways in which carbon atoms coalesce over the steps on copper (111 surface are ascertained by density functional theory (DFT calculations in the context of chemical vapor deposition (CVD growth of graphene. Two strategies, (1 by putting carbon atoms on and under the steps separately and (2 by importing additional carbon atoms between the ones separated by the steps, have been attempted to investigate if an over-step coalescence of carbon atoms could take place. Based on analyses about the optimized configurations and adsorption energies of carbon atoms nearby the steps, as well as the energy evolution curve of the system throughout the geometry optimizations process, we determined the main way in which graphene grows over the steps continuously: the carbon atoms, adsorbed additionally on the locations between the already existing ones which are separated by the steps, link them (these carbon atoms separated by the steps together. The direct over-step coalescence of the carbon atoms separated by the steps is very difficult, although the energy barrier preventing their coalescence can be weakened by importing carbon atoms on and under the steps gradually. Our results imply potential applications in directing the fabrication of graphene with particular structure by controlling the surface topography of copper substrate.

  13. Promoting Supportive Relationships in Youth Programs: A Self-Determination Theory Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mat D. Duerden

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Although research suggests that positive contact with non-parental adults is developmentally beneficial for youth; many adolescents do not have access to such relationships. It is important that adults structure existing relationships to optimize positive youth development. Relationships with adults, who support youth’s needs for autonomy, relatedness, and competence, provide youth with scaffolding as they navigate their way through adolescence. Self-Determination Theory offers a straight-forward approach to understanding the elements of contexts that best promote the development of supportive relationships. The purpose of this paper is to review the literature concerning youth-adult relationships, including their associated prevalence and developmental benefits across multiple contexts. These findings are then integrated into a framework of best practices for developing and supporting positive youth relationships with adults within youth program settings. Several theory-based recommendations are offered for youth program administrators and staff who wish to improve youth-adult relationships in their programs.

  14. Academic training: From Evolution Theory to Parallel and Distributed Genetic Programming

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    2006-2007 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME LECTURE SERIES 15, 16 March From 11:00 to 12:00 - Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 From Evolution Theory to Parallel and Distributed Genetic Programming F. FERNANDEZ DE VEGA / Univ. of Extremadura, SP Lecture No. 1: From Evolution Theory to Evolutionary Computation Evolutionary computation is a subfield of artificial intelligence (more particularly computational intelligence) involving combinatorial optimization problems, which are based to some degree on the evolution of biological life in the natural world. In this tutorial we will review the source of inspiration for this metaheuristic and its capability for solving problems. We will show the main flavours within the field, and different problems that have been successfully solved employing this kind of techniques. Lecture No. 2: Parallel and Distributed Genetic Programming The successful application of Genetic Programming (GP, one of the available Evolutionary Algorithms) to optimization problems has encouraged an ...

  15. Viscosity Measurement via Drop Coalescence: A Space Station Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antar, Basil; Ethridge, Edwin C.

    2010-01-01

    The concept of using low gravity experimental data together with CFD simulations for measuring the viscosity of highly viscous liquids was recently validated on onboard the International Space Station (ISS). A series of microgravity tests were conducted for this purpose on the ISS in July, 2004 and in May of 2005. In these experiments two liquid drops were brought manually together until they touched and were allowed to coalesce under the action of the capillary force alone. The coalescence process was recorded photographically from which the contact radius speed of the merging drops was measured. The liquid viscosity was determined by fitting the measured data with accurate numerical simulation of the coalescence process. Several liquids were tested and for each liquid several drop diameters were employed. Experimental and numerical results will be presented in which the viscosity of several highly viscous liquids were determined using this technique.

  16. Brownian dynamics of emulsion film formation and droplet coalescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toro-Mendoza, Jhoan; Petsev, Dimiter N

    2010-05-01

    We analyze the evolution in thickness and radius of the film formed during the collision of two deformable emulsion Brownian droplets. These variables exhibit random fluctuations due to thermal disturbances from the continuous liquid phase. As a result, the system probes a random trajectory in the configurational space until it reaches a critical film thickness, at which point the droplets coalesce. Therefore, the film is modeled as a disk with thicknesses and radi that can fluctuate. Our analysis is based on a Langevin-Brownian dynamics approach, which accounts for the thermodynamic and hydrodynamic interactions in the lubrication approximation. We examine the effect of parameters such as droplet size, interfacial mobility, and electrolyte concentration on the coalescence of small Brownian droplets. The results suggest that the coalescence times depend on a complex interplay between the thermodynamic and hydrodynamic interactions.

  17. Effect of electric field non-uniformity on droplets coalescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Shirui; Schiffbauer, Jarrod; Luo, Tengfei

    2016-11-21

    Electric field assisted coalescence is one of the most efficient methods for water-in-oil emulsion separation. In this paper, we experimentally study water droplet evolution in an oil phase under different electric field configurations. We determine that non-uniform fields can enhance the performance of electrocoalescence compared to uniform fields. The analysis indicates that the enhanced coalescence is due to the combined effects of dipole-dipole interaction between droplets and dielectrophoresis between individual droplets and the applied non-uniform field. The present study shows that a non-uniform electric field and the induced dielectrophoretic effect can accelerate the coalescence and phase separation of micro-emulsions. These results may provide useful guidance in designing an optimum electrode configuration for efficient electrocoalescence.

  18. Critical parameters for the partial coalescence of a droplet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilet, T; Mulleners, K; Lecomte, J P; Vandewalle, N; Dorbolo, S

    2007-03-01

    The partial coalescence of a droplet onto a planar liquid-liquid interface is investigated experimentally by tuning the viscosities of both liquids. The problem mainly depends on four dimensionless parameters: The Bond number (gravity vs surface tension), the Ohnesorge numbers (viscosity in both fluids vs surface tension), and the density relative difference. The ratio between the daughter droplet size and the mother droplet size is investigated as a function of these dimensionless numbers. Global quantities such as the available surface energy of the droplet have been measured during the coalescence. The capillary waves propagation and damping are studied in detail. The relation between these waves and the partial coalescence is discussed. Additional viscous mechanisms are proposed in order to explain the asymmetric role played by both viscosities.

  19. Capillary-inertial colloidal catapults upon drop coalescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavez, Roger L.; Liu, Fangjie; Feng, James J.; Chen, Chuan-Hua

    2016-07-01

    Surface energy released upon drop coalescence is known to power the self-propelled jumping of liquid droplets on superhydrophobic solid surfaces, and the jumping droplets can additionally carry colloidal payloads toward self-cleaning. Here, we show that drop coalescence on a spherical particle leads to self-propelled launching of the particle from virtually any solid surface. The main prerequisite is an intermediate wettability of the particle, such that the momentum from the capillary-inertial drop coalescence process can be transferred to the particle. By momentum conservation, the launching velocity of the particle-drop complex is proportional to the capillary-inertial velocity based on the drop radius and to the fraction of the liquid mass in the total mass. The capillary-inertial catapult is not only an alternative mechanism for removing colloidal contaminants, but also a useful model system for studying ballistospore launching.

  20. A new method for modeling coalescent processes with recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Zhou, Ying; Li, Linfeng; Chen, Xian; Liu, Yuting; Ma, Zhi-Ming; Xu, Shuhua

    2014-08-11

    Recombination plays an important role in the maintenance of genetic diversity in many types of organisms, especially diploid eukaryotes. Recombination can be studied and used to map diseases. However, recombination adds a great deal of complexity to the genetic information. This renders estimation of evolutionary parameters more difficult. After the coalescent process was formulated, models capable of describing recombination using graphs, such as ancestral recombination graphs (ARG) were also developed. There are two typical models based on which to simulate ARG: back-in-time model such as ms and spatial model including Wiuf&Hein's, SMC, SMC', and MaCS. In this study, a new method of modeling coalescence with recombination, Spatial Coalescent simulator (SC), was developed, which considerably improved the algorithm described by Wiuf and Hein. The present algorithm constructs ARG spatially along the sequence, but it does not produce any redundant branches which are inevitable in Wiuf and Hein's algorithm. Interestingly, the distribution of ARG generated by the present new algorithm is identical to that generated by a typical back-in-time model adopted by ms, an algorithm commonly used to model coalescence. It is here demonstrated that the existing approximate methods such as the sequentially Markov coalescent (SMC), a related method called SMC', and Markovian coalescent simulator (MaCS) can be viewed as special cases of the present method. Using simulation analysis, the time to the most common ancestor (TMRCA) in the local trees of ARGs generated by the present algorithm was found to be closer to that produced by ms than time produced by MaCS. Sample-consistent ARGs can be generated using the present method. This may significantly reduce the computational burden. In summary, the present method and algorithm may facilitate the estimation and description of recombination in population genomics and evolutionary biology.

  1. Coalescence-Induced Jumping of Two Unequal-Sized Nanodroplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Fang-Fang; Lu, Gui; Wang, Xiao-Dong; Wang, Bing-Bing

    2018-02-12

    Coalescence-induced self-propelled jumping of droplets on superhydrophobic surfaces has potential applications for condensation heat transfer enhancement, anti-icing, self-cleaning, antidew, and so forth. However, most of the previous studies focused on two identical droplets which are not commonly encountered in the nature. In this work, coalescence-induced jumping phenomena of two unequal-sized droplets on superhydrophobic surfaces were investigated theoretically and numerically. First, by introducing modified inertial-capillary velocity (u ic * ) and Ohnesorge number (Oh*) with consideration of radius ratio (r*) of two coalescing droplets, we proposed a generalized inertial-capillary scaling law for the jumping velocity of coalesced droplets, which is expected to be applicable for both two identical droplets and two unequal-sized droplets coalescing on superhydrophobic surfaces. Subsequently, we employed molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the coalescence-induced jumping process of two unequal-sized nanodroplets. Our simulations showed that the dimensionless jumping velocity (v j /u ic * ) well follows the generalized inertial-capillary scaling law with v j /u ic * ≈ 0.127 in a specific Oh* range; however, it rapidly reduces and finally vanishes when the radius ratio of large droplet to small droplet is larger than a certain threshold value. Our simulations also revealed that nonjumping of two unequal-sized droplets with a very large radius ratio is due to that the larger droplet swallows the small one, so that the liquid bridge has no chance to impact the solid surface, and hence the "liquid bridge impacting substrate" mechanism fails in this circumstance.

  2. Algorithms and theory for the design and programming of industrial control systems materialized with PLC's

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoya Villena, Rafael

    According to its title, the general objective of the Thesis consists in developing a clear, simple and systematic methodology for programming type PLC devices. With this aim in mind, we will use the following elements: Codification of all variables types. This section is very important since it allows us working with little information. The necessary rules are given to codify all type of phrases produced in industrial processes. An algorithm that describes process evolution and that has been called process D.F. This is one of the most important contributions, since it will allow us, together with information codification, representing the process evolution in a graphic way and with any design theory used. Theory selection. Evidently, the use of some kind of design method is necessary to obtain logic equations. For this particular case, we will use binodal theory, an ideal theory for wired technologies, since it can obtain highly reduced schemas for relatively simple automatisms, which means a minimum number of components used. User program outline algorithm (D.F.P.). This is another necessary contribution and perhaps the most important one, since logic equations resulting from binodal theory are compatible with process evolution if wired technology is used, whether it is electric, electronic, pneumatic, etc. On the other hand, PLC devices performance characteristics force the program instructions order to validate or not the automatism, as we have proven in different articles and lectures at congresses both national and international. Therefore, we will codify any information concerning the automating process, graphically represent its temporal evolution and, applying binodal theory and D.F.P (previously adapted), succeed in making logic equations compatible with the process to be automated and the device in which they will be implemented (PLC in our case)

  3. Capillary waves at microdroplet coalescence with a liquid layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorets, A. A.; Marchuk, I. V.; Strizhak, P. A.; Kabov, O. A.

    2015-07-01

    The quickly damped capillary waves generated at coalescence of microdroplets (diameter of up to 100 µm), formed in a gas atmosphere at water vapor condensation, with the horizontal layer of water are studied experimentally. Evaporation takes place at intensive local heating of liquid from the substrate side. To visualize and measure the deformations, the Schlieren technique and high-speed video (up to 54000 f/s) are applied. The measured wave amplitude varies within 1-6 μm, and this is consistent with the magnitude of the surface energy of coalescing microdroplets. The waves are generated by the energy of droplet surface.

  4. A program plan addressing carpal tunnel syndrome: the utility of King's goal attainment theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norgan, G H; Ettipio, A M; Lasome, C E

    1995-08-01

    1. Today's nurse is prepared to address the needs of groups of individuals who share common characteristics or risks (aggregates). Program planning skills and ability to use nursing theory can enhance the nurse's effectiveness in addressing the needs of such aggregates. 2. Carpal tunnel syndrome and other repetitive stress injuries are very costly to industry, both in terms of monetary loss and lost work hours. Such injuries can be reduced in the workplace through careful observation and communication of trends by the nurse. 3. The systems perspective of King's goal attainment theory guided the nurse in problem solving and facilitating the development of a workplace capable of responding to trends as they occur.

  5. Evaluating the role of key learning theories in ECHO: a telehealth educational program for primary care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Socolovsky, Carmela; Masi, Christopher; Hamlish, Tamara; Aduana, Glen; Arora, Sanjeev; Bakris, George; Johnson, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    ECHO (Extension for Community Healthcare Outcomes) is a telehealth educational program that uses videoconference technology to train community-based primary care providers (PCP's) on the management of complex, chronic diseases. The main components of ECHO are didactics, case presentations, and case-based learning. ECHO was developed using the key principles of Social Cognitive Theory, Situated Learning Theory, and Community of Practice Theory. In a prior study, we implemented an ECHO curriculum to improve management of resistant hypertension. The goals of the current study were to determine the extent to which the learning theories served as the foundation of the ECHO curriculum and identify opportunities to more effectively incorporate key principles of these theories into the ECHO program. We conducted semi-structured interviews with the nine clinicians who participated in the pilot curriculum. A community-based PCP assisted with question development, analysis, and manuscript preparation. We analyzed the interview transcripts using Directed Content Analysis. Transcript analysis supported the contention that ECHO is based upon Social Cognitive Theory, Situated Learning Theory, and Community of Practice Theory. Comments from study participants highlighted benefits of each theory's principles. Conversely, they also suggested we could improve our implementation of ECHO by adhering more closely to specific learning theory strategies. Our results indicate that ECHO indeed reflects the key tenants of Social Cognitive Theory, Situated Learning Theory, and Community of Practice Theory. Several aspects of our ECHO curriculum can be improved by more complete application of these learning theories.

  6. The effect of an interventional program based on the Theory of Ethology on infant breastfeeding competence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    aghdas karimi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: according to the ethology theory mother infant separation immediately after birth can interfere with the infants innate behaviors for the initiation of breastfeeding. The aim of this study was to the effect of an interventional program based on the Theory of Ethology on infant breast feeding competence Materials and Methods: 114 primiparous, Iranian, healthy, full term mothers between 18-35 years with normal vaginal delivery who intended to breastfeed their babies. They were put in direct skin to skin contact with their infants immediately after birth for two hours. Then, rates of infant breastfeeding competence were compared with a control group receiving routine hospital cares. Results: Rates of infant breastfeeding competence were higher in the skin to skin contact group compared to routine care group (p=0.0001. Conclusion: mother- infant early skin to skin contact promotes infants natural feeding behaviors leading to higher rates of infant breastfeeding competence. These findings confirm the Theory of Ethology.

  7. The effect of an interventional program based on the Theory of Ethology on infant breastfeeding competence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    aghdas karimi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: according to the ethology theory mother infant separation immediately after birth can interfere with the infants innate behaviors for the initiation of breastfeeding. The aim of this study was to the effect of an interventional program based on the Theory of Ethology on infant breast feeding competence Materials and Methods: 114 primiparous, Iranian, healthy, full term mothers between 18-35 years with normal vaginal delivery who intended to breastfeed their babies. They were put in direct skin to skin contact with their infants immediately after birth for two hours. Then, rates of infant breastfeeding competence were compared with a control group receiving routine hospital cares. Results: Rates of infant breastfeeding competence were higher in the skin to skin contact group compared to routine care group (p=0.0001. Conclusion: mother- infant early skin to skin contact promotes infants natural feeding behaviors leading to higher rates of infant breastfeeding competence. These findings confirm the Theory of Ethology.

  8. Introductory Computer Programming Course Teaching Improvement Using Immersion Language, Extreme Programming, and Education Theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velez-Rubio, Miguel

    2013-01-01

    Teaching computer programming to freshmen students in Computer Sciences and other Information Technology areas has been identified as a complex activity. Different approaches have been studied looking for the best one that could help to improve this teaching process. A proposed approach was implemented which is based in the language immersion…

  9. An Inventory-Theory-Based Inexact Multistage Stochastic Programming Model for Water Resources Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Q. Suo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An inventory-theory-based inexact multistage stochastic programming (IB-IMSP method is developed for planning water resources systems under uncertainty. The IB-IMSP is based on inexact multistage stochastic programming and inventory theory. The IB-IMSP cannot only effectively handle system uncertainties represented as probability density functions and discrete intervals but also efficiently reflect dynamic features of system conditions under different flow levels within a multistage context. Moreover, it can provide reasonable transferring schemes (i.e., the amount and batch of transferring as well as the corresponding transferring period associated with various flow scenarios for solving water shortage problems. The applicability of the proposed IB-IMSP is demonstrated by a case study of planning water resources management. The solutions obtained are helpful for decision makers in not only identifying different transferring schemes when the promised water is not met, but also making decisions of water allocation associated with different economic objectives.

  10. Effect of Collision Angle on Binary Droplet Coalescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jungyong; Longmire, Ellen

    2006-11-01

    Drop pairs of water/glycerin solution were injected into silicone oil of lower density through opposing tubes at varying initial angles with the goal of controlling the eventual collision angles. Simultaneous dual-field PIV measurements were obtained in index-matched fluids to characterize coalescence and rebounding behavior. The larger field captured trajectories, and the smaller field captured the thin film region. Experiments were performed for Weber numbers [We] in the range of 1-50 and collision angles of 15-80 degrees below the horizontal. Above We ˜ 10, drops coalesced, with the rebounding/coalescence boundary shifting to higher We with increasing collision angle. Also, the collision angle affected the eventual location of film rupture. The rupture location moved higher in the thin film region as the collision angle increased. Interactions of vortex rings within drops and strong deformation associated with shallow collision angles and sufficient We encouraged coalescence. Details of these interactions will be discussed in the presentation. Supported by Petroleum Research Fund (42939-AC9) and NSF (CTS-0320327).

  11. Break-up and Coalescence in Liquid/Liquid Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longmire, Ellen K.

    2004-11-01

    Break-up and coalescence transitions in mixtures of oil- and water-based fluids are investigated experimentally with the goal of understanding the underlying dynamics and of eventually developing accurate numerical models for practical applications such as transport, mixing, and separation of petroleum, chemical, and waste streams. Several geometries are examined: natural and periodically forced jets flowing into and breaking up in an ambient, drops impacting and eventually coalescing at a quiescent interface, and coalescing drop pairs. Refractive index matching and laser induced fluorescence are employed to obtain clear images of the interfaces and interior volumes within each flow. Real-time flow sequences of planar fields are acquired using a high-frequency laser and camera system, and the resulting images are analyzed to determine interfacial behavior as well as two- and three-component velocity fields. In the jet flow, the effects of fluid viscosity ratio, Reynolds number, Strouhal number, and Ohnesorge number on the flow dynamics will be discussed. In the coalescing flows, the effects of viscosity ratio, impact Weber number and offset distance will be discussed. Finally, some of the experimental results will be compared with the results of numerical simulations incorporating transition models and adaptive grids.

  12. Influence of droplet geometry on the coalescence of low viscosity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eddi, A.C.A.; Winkels, K.G.; Snoeijer, Jacobus Hendrikus

    2013-01-01

    The coalescence of water drops on a substrate is studied experimentally. We focus on the rapid growth of the bridge connecting the two drops, which very quickly after contact ensues from a balance of surface tension and liquid inertia. For drops with contact angles below 90°, we find that the bridge

  13. Void Coalescence Processes Quantified through Atomistic and Multiscale Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudd, R E; Seppala, E T; Dupuy, L M; Belak, J

    2005-12-31

    Simulation of ductile fracture at the atomic scale reveals many aspects of the fracture process including specific mechanisms associated with void nucleation and growth as a precursor to fracture and the plastic deformation of the material surrounding the voids and cracks. Recently we have studied void coalescence in ductile metals using large-scale atomistic and continuum simulations. Here we review that work and present some related investigations. The atomistic simulations involve three-dimensional strain-controlled multi-million atom molecular dynamics simulations of copper. The correlated growth of two voids during the coalescence process leading to fracture is investigated, both in terms of its onset and the ensuing dynamical interactions. Void interactions are quantified through the rate of reduction of the distance between the voids, through the correlated directional growth of the voids, and through correlated shape evolution of the voids. The critical inter-void ligament distance marking the onset of coalescence is shown to be approximately one void radius based on the quantification measurements used, independent of the initial separation distance between the voids and the strain-rate of the expansion of the system. No pronounced shear flow is found in the coalescence process.

  14. Factors governing partial coalescence in oil-in-water emulsions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fredrick, E.; Walstra, P.; Dewettinck, K.

    2010-01-01

    The consequences of the instability mechanism partial coalescence in oil-in-water food emulsions show a discrepancy. On the one hand, it needs to be avoided in order to achieve an extended shelf life in food products like sauces, creams and several milk products. On the other hand, during the

  15. Development of a program theory for shared decision-making: a realist review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groot, Gary; Waldron, Tamara; Carr, Tracey; McMullen, Linda; Bandura, Lori-Ann; Neufeld, Shelley-May; Duncan, Vicky

    2017-06-17

    The practicality of applying evidence to healthcare systems with the aim of implementing change is an ongoing challenge for practitioners, policy makers, and academics. Shared decision- making (SDM), a method of medical decision-making that allows a balanced relationship between patients, physicians, and other key players in the medical decision process, is purported to improve patient and system outcomes. Despite the oft-mentioned benefits, there are gaps in the current literature between theory and implementation that would benefit from a realist approach given the value of this methodology to analyze complex interventions. In this protocol, we outline a study that will explore: "In which situations, how, why, and for whom does SDM between patients and health care providers contribute to improved decision making?" A seven step iterative process will be described including preliminary theory development, establishment of a search strategy, selection and appraisal of literature, data extraction, analysis and synthesis of extracted results from literature, and formation of a revised program theory with the input of patients, physicians, nurse navigators, and policy makers from a stakeholder session. The goal of the realist review will be to identify and refine a program theory for SDM through the identification of mechanisms which shape the characteristics of when, how, and why SDM will, and will not, work. PROSPERO CRD42017062609.

  16. Open pre-schools at integrated health services - A program theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agneta Abrahamsson

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Family centres in Sweden are integrated services that reach all prospective parents and parents with children up to their sixth year, because of the co-location of the health service with the social service and the open pre-school. The personnel on the multi-professional site work together to meet the needs of the target group. The article explores a program theory focused on the open pre-schools at family centres.Method: A multi-case design is used and the sample consists of open pre-schools at six family centres. The hypothesis is based on previous research and evaluation data. It guides the data collection which is collected and analysed stepwise. Both parents and personnel are interviewed individually and in groups at each centre.Findings: The hypothesis was expanded to a program theory. The compliance of the professionals was the most significant element that explained why the open access service facilitated positive parenting. The professionals act in a compliant manner to meet the needs of the children and parents as well as in creating good conditions for social networking and learning amongst the parents. Conclusion: The compliance of the professionals in this program theory of open pre-schools at family centres can be a standard in integrated and open access services, whereas the organisation form can vary. The best way of increasing the number of integrative services is to support and encourage professionals that prefer to work in a compliant manner.

  17. Open pre-schools at integrated health services - A program theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agneta Abrahamsson

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Family centres in Sweden are integrated services that reach all prospective parents and parents with children up to their sixth year, because of the co-location of the health service with the social service and the open pre-school. The personnel on the multi-professional site work together to meet the needs of the target group. The article explores a program theory focused on the open pre-schools at family centres. Method: A multi-case design is used and the sample consists of open pre-schools at six family centres. The hypothesis is based on previous research and evaluation data. It guides the data collection which is collected and analysed stepwise. Both parents and personnel are interviewed individually and in groups at each centre. Findings: The hypothesis was expanded to a program theory. The compliance of the professionals was the most significant element that explained why the open access service facilitated positive parenting. The professionals act in a compliant manner to meet the needs of the children and parents as well as in creating good conditions for social networking and learning amongst the parents. Conclusion: The compliance of the professionals in this program theory of open pre-schools at family centres can be a standard in integrated and open access services, whereas the organisation form can vary. The best way of increasing the number of integrative services is to support and encourage professionals that prefer to work in a compliant manner.

  18. Lean and leadership practices: development of an initial realist program theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodridge, Donna; Westhorp, Gill; Rotter, Thomas; Dobson, Roy; Bath, Brenna

    2015-09-07

    Lean as a management system has been increasingly adopted in health care settings in an effort to enhance quality, capacity and safety, while simultaneously containing or reducing costs. The Ministry of Health in the province of Saskatchewan, Canada has made a multi-million dollar investment in Lean initiatives to create "better health, better value, better care, and better teams", affording a unique opportunity to advance our understanding of the way in which Lean philosophy, principles and tools work in health care. In order to address the questions, "What changes in leadership practices are associated with the implementation of Lean?" and "When leadership practices change, how do the changed practices contribute to subsequent outcomes?", we used a qualitative, multi-stage approach to work towards developing an initial realist program theory. We describe the implications of realist assumptions for evaluation of this Lean initiative. Formal theories including Normalization Process Theory, Theories of Double Loop and Organization Leaning and the Theory of Cognitive Dissonance help understand this initial rough program theory. Data collection included: key informant consultation; a stakeholder workshop; documentary review; 26 audiotaped and transcribed interviews with health region personnel; and team discussions. A set of seven initial hypotheses regarding the manner in which Lean changes leadership practices were developed from our data. We hypothesized that Lean, as implemented in this particular setting, changes leadership practices in the following ways. Lean: a) aligns the aims and objectives of health regions; b) authorizes attention and resources to quality improvement and change management c) provides an integrated set of tools for particular tasks; d) changes leaders' attitudes or beliefs about appropriate leadership and management styles and behaviors; e) demands increased levels of expertise, accountability and commitment from leaders; f) measures and

  19. Investigation of drop coalescence via transient shape evolution: A sequential event based approach

    CERN Document Server

    Haldar, Krishnayan; Behera, Manas Ranjan; Chakraborty, Sudipto

    2015-01-01

    While a drop of liquid is placed on another liquid surface, two possible coalescence outcomes are observed. The parent drop bounces several times, floats and then disappears within the liquid pool without producing daughter droplets. This is called complete coalescence. Another outcome is the generation of secondary droplets from the primary drop itself. This is called partial coalescence. Repetitions of such phenomenon as a successive self-similar event is also known as coalescence cascade. In a nutshell, complete coalescence is governed strongly by swallowing mechanism whereas partial coalescence is attributed to slippage mechanism and solutal Marangoni flow. Here we use high speed camera and witness that water drop coalesces completely after impacting on pool of liquid whereas drop of non-ionic surfactant (TWEEN 20) coalesces partially. We also observe that number of daughter droplet generation is a strong function of surfactant concentration. Here we utilise the images to elaborately explain both the phen...

  20. Using diffusion of innovations theory to guide diabetes management program development: an illustrative example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Civita, Mirella; Dasgupta, Kaberi

    2007-09-01

    Optimal management of type 2 diabetes requires achievement of optimal glucose, blood pressure and lipid targets through promotion of prudent diet, regular physical activity and adherence to necessary medication. This may require the development of new programs for the coordination of required multidisciplinary services. Diffusion of innovations theory offers a conceptual framework that may facilitate the implementation of such programs. To illustrate this, we have re-examined the implementation experiences previously reported by the developers of an actual diabetes management pilot program in Montreal, with an eye toward identifying potentially important process factors that could effectively increase adoption and sustainability. Physician participation in the program appeared to be influenced by perceived advantages of participation, compatibility of the program with own perspective and perceived barriers to participation. Organizational features that may have influenced participation included the extent of the program's integration within the existing health care system. A thorough consideration of process factors that impact system and team integration must equally include a focus on ensuring ongoing partnerships among the producers of the model, governments, nongovernmental organizations, private industry, user professionals and patients. This can only be achieved when a knowledge transfer action plan is developed to guide program development, implementation and sustainability.

  1. ASTRAL-II: coalescent-based species tree estimation with many hundreds of taxa and thousands of genes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mirarab, Siavash; Warnow, Tandy

    2015-01-01

    .... We recently developed a coalescent-based method, ASTRAL, which is statistically consistent under the multi-species coalescent model and which is more accurate than other coalescent-based methods...

  2. Dissemination of a theory-based online bone health program: Two intervention approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahm, Eun-Shim; Resnick, Barbara; Bellantoni, Michele; Zhu, Shijun; Brown, Clayton; Brennan, Patricia F; Charters, Kathleen; Brown, Jeanine; Rietschel, Matthew; Pinna, Joanne; An, Minjeong; Park, Bu Kyung; Plummer, Lisa

    2015-06-01

    With the increasing nationwide emphasis on eHealth, there has been a rapid growth in the use of the Internet to deliver health promotion interventions. Although there has been a great deal of research in this field, little information is available regarding the methodologies to develop and implement effective online interventions. This article describes two social cognitive theory-based online health behavior interventions used in a large-scale dissemination study (N = 866), their implementation processes, and the lessons learned during the implementation processes. The two interventions were a short-term (8-week) intensive online Bone Power program and a longer term (12-month) Bone Power Plus program, including the Bone Power program followed by a 10-month online booster intervention (biweekly eHealth newsletters). This study used a small-group approach (32 intervention groups), and to effectively manage those groups, an eLearning management program was used as an upper layer of the Web intervention. Both interventions were implemented successfully with high retention rates (80.7% at 18 months). The theory-based approaches and the online infrastructure used in this study showed a promising potential as an effective platform for online behavior studies. Further replication studies with different samples and settings are needed to validate the utility of this intervention structure. © The Author(s) 2013.

  3. Strengthening prevention program theories and evaluations: contributions from social network analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gest, Scott D; Osgood, D Wayne; Feinberg, Mark E; Bierman, Karen L; Moody, James

    2011-12-01

    A majority of school-based prevention programs target the modification of setting-level social dynamics, either explicitly (e.g., by changing schools' organizational, cultural or instructional systems that influence children's relationships), or implicitly (e.g., by altering behavioral norms designed to influence children's social affiliations and interactions). Yet, in outcome analyses of these programs, the rich and complicated set of peer network dynamics is often reduced to an aggregation of individual characteristics or assessed with methods that do not account for the interdependencies of network data. In this paper, we present concepts and analytic methods from the field of social network analysis and illustrate their great value to prevention science--both as a source of tools for refining program theories and as methods that enable more sophisticated and focused tests of intervention effects. An additional goal is to inform discussions of the broader implications of social network analysis for public health efforts.

  4. Mindstorms robots and the application of cognitive load theory in introductory programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Raina; Cooper, Graham

    2013-12-01

    This paper reports on a series of introductory programming workshops, initially targeting female high school students, which utilised Lego Mindstorms robots. Cognitive load theory (CLT) was applied to the instructional design of the workshops, and a controlled experiment was also conducted investigating aspects of the interface. Results indicated that a truncated interface led to better learning by novice programmers as measured by test performance by participants, as well as enhanced shifts in self-efficacy and lowered perception of difficulty. There was also a transfer effect to another programming environment (Alice). It is argued that the results indicate that for novice programmers, the mere presence on-screen of additional (redundant) entities acts as a form of tacit distraction, thus impeding learning. The utility of CLT to analyse, design and deliver aspects of computer programming environments and instructional materials is discussed.

  5. Relative position control and coalescence of independent microparticles using ultrasonic waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Shuang; Jia, Kun; Chen, Jian; Mei, Deqing; Yang, Keji

    2017-05-01

    Controlling the relative positions and coalescence of independent cells or microparticles is of particular importance for studying many physical phenomena, biological research, pharmaceutical tests, and chemical material processing. In this work, contactless maneuvering of two independent microparticles initially lying on a rigid surface was performed at a stable levitation height within a water-filled ultrasonic chamber. Three lead zirconate titanate transducers with 2 MHz thickness resonance frequency were obliquely mounted in a homemade device to form a sound field in a half space. By modulating the excitation voltage of a single transducer and the subsequent combination of amplitude and phase modulation, two separate 80 μm diameter silica beads were picked up from the chamber bottom, approached, and then coalesced to form a cluster in different ways. Both particles simultaneously migrated towards each other in the former process, while more dexterous movement with single-particle migration was realized for the other process. There is good agreement between the measured trajectories and theoretical predictions based on the theory of the first-order acoustic radiation force. The method introduced here also has the ability to form a cluster at any desired location in the chamber, which is promising for macromolecule processing ranging from the life sciences to biochemistry and clinical practice.

  6. Reduction in syllable onsets in the acquisition of Polish: deletion, coalescence, metathesis and gemination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    łukaszewicz, Beata

    2007-02-01

    This paper focuses on four strategies of onset reduction employed by a single child (4;0-4;4) acquiring Polish: deletion, coalescence, metathesis, and gemination. Deletion and coalescence occur in word-initial onsets while metathesis and gemination are restricted to word-medial position. The data, which constitute an intriguing 'conspiracy' case (Kisseberth, 1970), are analysed within OPTIMALITY THEORY (henceforth, OT; Prince & Smolensky, 1993/2004; McCarthy & Prince, 1995) in which all surface-true 'processes' are motivated through the interaction of ranked and violable constraints. The OT account makes it possible to envisage the four strategies as different surface responses to the undominated *COMPLEXOnset which militates against onset clusters. The choice of a particular strategy as well as its restriction to a particular word position is not random but follows from the interplay between *COMPLEXOnset, sonority-based syllable structure constraints (Margin Hierarchy, CONTACT LAW), context-sensitive markedness constraints (CODA CONDITION, *Nasal-Fricative) and faithfulness constraints. The present study confirms previous sonority-based findings, supplies further evidence for universal sonority mechanisms from word-medial clusters, and points to the coexistence of child-specific and abstract adult-based phonological strategies in the child's system.

  7. Coalescent inference for infectious disease: meta-analysis of hepatitis C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dearlove, Bethany; Wilson, Daniel J.

    2013-01-01

    Genetic analysis of pathogen genomes is a powerful approach to investigating the population dynamics and epidemic history of infectious diseases. However, the theoretical underpinnings of the most widely used, coalescent methods have been questioned, casting doubt on their interpretation. The aim of this study is to develop robust population genetic inference for compartmental models in epidemiology. Using a general approach based on the theory of metapopulations, we derive coalescent models under susceptible–infectious (SI), susceptible–infectious–susceptible (SIS) and susceptible–infectious–recovered (SIR) dynamics. We show that exponential and logistic growth models are equivalent to SI and SIS models, respectively, when co-infection is negligible. Implementing SI, SIS and SIR models in BEAST, we conduct a meta-analysis of hepatitis C epidemics, and show that we can directly estimate the basic reproductive number (R0) and prevalence under SIR dynamics. We find that differences in genetic diversity between epidemics can be explained by differences in underlying epidemiology (age of the epidemic and local population density) and viral subtype. Model comparison reveals SIR dynamics in three globally restricted epidemics, but most are better fit by the simpler SI dynamics. In summary, metapopulation models provide a general and practical framework for integrating epidemiology and population genetics for the purposes of joint inference. PMID:23382432

  8. Applying Monte Carlo Concept and Linear Programming in Modern Portfolio Theory to Obtain Best Weighting Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tumpal Sihombing

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The world is entering the era of recession when the trend is bearish and market is not so favorable. The capital markets in every major country were experiencing great amount of loss and people suffered in their investment. The Jakarta Composite Index (JCI has shown a great downturn for the past one year but the trend bearish year of the JCI. Therefore, rational investors should consider restructuring their portfolio to set bigger proportion in bonds and cash instead of stocks. Investors can apply modern portfolio theory by Harry Markowitz to find the optimum asset allocation for their portfolio. Higher return is always associated with higher risk. This study shows investors how to find out the lowest risk of a portfolio investment by providing them with several structures of portfolio weighting. By this way, investor can compare and make the decision based on risk-return consideration and opportunity cost as well. Keywords: Modern portfolio theory, Monte Carlo, linear programming

  9. A QUALITATIVE METHODOLOGY FOR THEORY ELUCIDATION, EXPLICATION, AND DEVELOPMENT APPLIED WITHIN AN INTENSIVE GROUP PSYCHOTHERAPY PROGRAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Williams

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Mental health day treatment (MHDT programs provide intensive group psychotherapy for patients with psychiatric pathology complicated by personality disorder. Recently, researchers have begun to examine specific components of these programs. Of importance is the theoretical rationale, which may be challenging to understand given the complexity of the treatment. The purpose of this project was to investigate the theory of one MHDT program. Community-based participatory research was chosen and accordingly, all stages of the project were collaborative with the MHDT clinical team. We engaged in a six-month, iterative process of weekly action-reflection cycles wherein material was discussed, analyzed for themes, and the findings presented back to the team to further the conversation. Results summarize this program’s Theories of Dysfunction and Therapeutic Change, which were primarily psychodynamic, but also integrative through assimilation of elements from other paradigms. Usefulness of the research process is discussed and recommendations are provided for others wishing to undergo a similar process.

  10. Development of a Food Safety and Nutrition Education Program for Adolescents by Applying Social Cognitive Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jounghee; Jeong, Soyeon; Ko, Gyeongah; Park, Hyunshin; Ko, Youngsook

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop an educational model regarding food safety and nutrition. In particular, we aimed to develop educational materials, such as middle- and high-school textbooks, a teacher's guidebook, and school posters, by applying social cognitive theory. To develop a food safety and nutrition education program, we took into account diverse factors influencing an individual's behavior, such as personal, behavioral, and environmental factors, based on social cognitive theory. We also conducted a pilot study of the educational materials targeting middle-school students (n = 26), high-school students (n = 24), and dietitians (n = 13) regarding comprehension level, content, design, and quality by employing the 5-point Likert scale in May 2016. The food safety and nutrition education program covered six themes: (1) caffeine; (2) food additives; (3) foodborne illness; (4) nutrition and meal planning; (5) obesity and eating disorders; and (6) nutrition labeling. Each class activity was created to improve self-efficacy by setting one's own goal and to increase self-control by monitoring one's dietary intake. We also considered environmental factors by creating school posters and leaflets to educate teachers and parents. The overall evaluation score for the textbook was 4.0 points among middle- and high-school students, and 4.5 points among dietitians. This study provides a useful program model that could serve as a guide to develop educational materials for nutrition-related subjects in the curriculum. This program model was created to increase awareness of nutrition problems and self-efficacy. This program also helped to improve nutrition management skills and to promote a healthy eating environment in middle- and high-school students.

  11. Designing and Implementing an Ambulatory Oncology Nursing Peer Preceptorship Program: Using Grounded Theory Research to Guide Program Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda C. Watson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Having enough staff to provide high-quality care to cancer patients will become a growing issue across Canada over the next decades. Statistical predictions indicate that both the number of new diagnoses and the prevalence of cancer will increase dramatically in the next two decades. When combining these trends with the simultaneous trend toward health human resource shortage in Canada, the urgency of assuring we have adequate staff to deliver cancer care becomes clear. This research study focuses directly on oncology nurses. Guided by the grounded theory methodology, this research study aims to formulate a strategic, proactive peer preceptorship program through a four-phased research process. The goal of this research is to develop a program that will support experienced staff members to fully implement their role as a preceptor to new staff, to facilitate effective knowledge transfer between experienced staff to the new staff members, and to assure new staff members are carefully transitioned and integrated into the complex ambulatory cancer care workplaces. In this article, the data from the first phase of the research project will be explored specifically as it relates to establishing the foundation for the development of a provincial ambulatory oncology nursing peer preceptorship program.

  12. Designing and implementing an ambulatory oncology nursing peer preceptorship program: using grounded theory research to guide program development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Linda C; Raffin-Bouchal, Shelley; Melnick, Amy; Whyte, Darlene

    2012-01-01

    Having enough staff to provide high-quality care to cancer patients will become a growing issue across Canada over the next decades. Statistical predictions indicate that both the number of new diagnoses and the prevalence of cancer will increase dramatically in the next two decades. When combining these trends with the simultaneous trend toward health human resource shortage in Canada, the urgency of assuring we have adequate staff to deliver cancer care becomes clear. This research study focuses directly on oncology nurses. Guided by the grounded theory methodology, this research study aims to formulate a strategic, proactive peer preceptorship program through a four-phased research process. The goal of this research is to develop a program that will support experienced staff members to fully implement their role as a preceptor to new staff, to facilitate effective knowledge transfer between experienced staff to the new staff members, and to assure new staff members are carefully transitioned and integrated into the complex ambulatory cancer care workplaces. In this article, the data from the first phase of the research project will be explored specifically as it relates to establishing the foundation for the development of a provincial ambulatory oncology nursing peer preceptorship program.

  13. Numerical Investigation of Grain Coarsening and Coalescence Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muradova, Aliki D.; Hristopulos, Dionisios T.

    2015-01-01

    A kinetic nonlinear model of mass transfer, grain coarsening and coalescence with potential applications in sintering processes is studied. The model involves nonlinear differential equations that determine the transport of mass between grains. The rate of mass transfer is controlled by the activation energy (an Arrhenius factor) leading to a nonlinear model of mass transfer and grain coarsening. The resulting dynamical system of coupled nonlinear differential equations with random initial conditions (i.e., initial grain mass configuration) is solved by means of the Runge-Kutta method. An analysis of the fixed points of the two-grain system is carried out, and the solution of the multi-grain system is studied. We incorporate coalescence of smaller grains with larger neighbors using a cellular automaton step in the evolution of the system.

  14. A variational void coalescence model for ductile metals

    KAUST Repository

    Siddiq, Amir

    2011-08-17

    We present a variational void coalescence model that includes all the essential ingredients of failure in ductile porous metals. The model is an extension of the variational void growth model by Weinberg et al. (Comput Mech 37:142-152, 2006). The extended model contains all the deformation phases in ductile porous materials, i.e. elastic deformation, plastic deformation including deviatoric and volumetric (void growth) plasticity followed by damage initiation and evolution due to void coalescence. Parametric studies have been performed to assess the model\\'s dependence on the different input parameters. The model is then validated against uniaxial loading experiments for different materials. We finally show the model\\'s ability to predict the damage mechanisms and fracture surface profile of a notched round bar under tension as observed in experiments. © Springer-Verlag 2011.

  15. Direct numerical simulation of coalescing droplets in turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li Sing How, Melanie; Collins, Lance

    2017-11-01

    There is a rich body of numerical, experimental and theoretical work looking at the role of turbulence in particle collisions, with a particular emphasis on how it might accelerate the evolution of clouds in the atmosphere. This study is a continuation of that lineage. We perform direct numerical simulations of isotropic turbulence with embedded droplets that, upon collision, coalesce to produce a daughter droplet that conserves the mass and momentum of the parent droplets. As a consequence of coalescence, the droplet size distribution evolves over time from its monodisperse initial condition. The work is an extension of Reade and Collins (J. Fluid Mech. 415:45-64, 2000), which considered the same problem at a much lower Reynolds number. We observe important effects of intermittency at Reynolds numbers that are several-fold higher. The collisions do not yet take into account the effect of the lubricating gas layer, which will be the topic of future work. NSF Award CBET-1605195.

  16. Bubble Coalescence and Breakup Modeling for Computing Mass Transfer Coefficient

    OpenAIRE

    Mawson, Ryan A.

    2012-01-01

    There exist several different numerical models for predicting bubble coalescence and breakup using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Various combinations of these models will be employed to model a bioreactor process in a stirred reactor tank. A mass transfer coefficient, Kla, has been calculated and compared to those found experimentally by Thermo-Fisher Scientific, to validate the accuracy of currently available mathematical models for population balance equations. These include various c...

  17. Critical parameters for the partial coalescence of a droplet

    OpenAIRE

    Gilet, T.; Mulleners, K.; Lecomte, J. P.; Vandewalle, N.; Dorbolo, S.

    2006-01-01

    The partial coalescence of a droplet onto a planar liquid/liquid interface is investigated experimentally by tuning the viscosities of both liquids. The problem mainly depends on four dimensionless parameters: the Bond number (gravity vs. surface tension), the Ohnesorge numbers (viscosity in both fluids vs. surface tension), and the density relative difference. The ratio between the daughter droplet size and the mother droplet size is investigated as a function of these dimensionless numbers....

  18. Bubble coalescence dynamics and supersaturation in electrolytic gas evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stover, R.L. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering]|[Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Energy and Environment Div.

    1996-08-01

    The apparatus and procedures developed in this research permit the observation of electrolytic bubble coalescence, which heretofore has not been possible. The influence of bubble size, electrolyte viscosity, surface tension, gas type, and pH on bubble coalescence was examined. The Navier-Stokes equations with free surface boundary conditions were solved numerically for the full range of experimental variables that were examined. Based on this study, the following mechanism for bubble coalescence emerges: when two gas bubbles coalesce, the surface energy decreases as the curvature and surface area of the resultant bubble decrease, and the energy is imparted into the surrounding liquid. The initial motion is driven by the surface tension and slowed by the inertia and viscosity of the surrounding fluid. The initial velocity of the interface is approximately proportional to the square root of the surface tension and inversely proportional to the square root of the bubble radius. Fluid inertia sustains the oblate/prolate oscillations of the resultant bubble. The period of the oscillations varies with the bubble radius raised to the 3/2 power and inversely with the square root of the surface tension. Viscous resistance dampens the oscillations at a rate proportional to the viscosity and inversely proportional to the square of the bubble radius. The numerical simulations were consistent with most of the experimental results. The differences between the computed and measured saddle point decelerations and periods suggest that the surface tension in the experiments may have changed during each run. By adjusting the surface tension in the simulation, a good fit was obtained for the 150-{micro}m diameter bubbles. The simulations fit the experiments on larger bubbles with very little adjustment of surface tension. A more focused analysis should be done to elucidate the phenomena that occur in the receding liquid film immediately following rupture.

  19. Reducing cyberbullying: A theory of reasoned action-based video prevention program for college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doane, Ashley N; Kelley, Michelle L; Pearson, Matthew R

    2016-01-01

    Few studies have evaluated the effectiveness of cyberbullying prevention/intervention programs. The goals of the present study were to develop a Theory of Reasoned Action (TRA)-based video program to increase cyberbullying knowledge (1) and empathy toward cyberbullying victims (2), reduce favorable attitudes toward cyberbullying (3), decrease positive injunctive (4) and descriptive norms about cyberbullying (5), and reduce cyberbullying intentions (6) and cyberbullying behavior (7). One hundred sixty-seven college students were randomly assigned to an online video cyberbullying prevention program or an assessment-only control group. Immediately following the program, attitudes and injunctive norms for all four types of cyberbullying behavior (i.e., unwanted contact, malice, deception, and public humiliation), descriptive norms for malice and public humiliation, empathy toward victims of malice and deception, and cyberbullying knowledge significantly improved in the experimental group. At one-month follow-up, malice and public humiliation behavior, favorable attitudes toward unwanted contact, deception, and public humiliation, and injunctive norms for public humiliation were significantly lower in the experimental than the control group. Cyberbullying knowledge was significantly higher in the experimental than the control group. These findings demonstrate a brief cyberbullying video is capable of improving, at one-month follow-up, cyberbullying knowledge, cyberbullying perpetration behavior, and TRA constructs known to predict cyberbullying perpetration. Considering the low cost and ease with which a video-based prevention/intervention program can be delivered, this type of approach should be considered to reduce cyberbullying. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. GENOVA: a generalized perturbation theory program for various applications to CANDU core physics analysis (I)-theory and application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Do Heon; Choi, Hang Bok

    2001-01-01

    A generalized perturbation theory (GPT) program, GENOVA, has been developed for the purpose of various applications to Canadian deuterium uranium (CANDU) reactor physics analyses. GENOVA was written under the framework of CANDU physics design and analysis code, RFSP. A sensitivity method based on the GPT was implemented in GENOVA to estimate various sensitivity coefficients related to the movement of zone controller units (ZCUs) existing in the CANDU reactor. The numerical algorithm for the sensitivity method was verified by a simple 2 x 2 node problem. The capability of predicting ZCU levels upon a refueling perturbation was validated for a CANDU-6 reactor problem. The applicability of GENOVA to the CANDU-6 core physics analysis has been demonstrated with the optimum refueling simulation and the uncertainty analysis problems. For the optimum refueling simulation, an optimum channel selection strategy has been proposed, using the ZCU level predicted by GENOVA. The refueling simulation of a CANDU-6 natural uranium core has shown that the ZCU levels are successfully controlled within the operating range while the channel and bundle powers are satisfying the license limits. An uncertainty analysis has been performed for the fuel composition heterogeneity of a CANDU DUPIC core, using the sensitivity coefficients generated by GENOVA. The results have shown that the uncertainty of the core performance parameter can be reduced appreciably when the contents of the major fissile isotopes are tightly controlled. GENOVA code has been successfully explored to supplement the weak points of the current design and analysis code, such as the incapacity of performing an optimum refueling simulation and uncertainty analysis. The sample calculations have shown that GENOVA has strong potential to be used for CANDU core analysis combined with the current design and analysis code, RFSP, especially for the development of advanced CANDU fuels.

  1. New Routes to Phylogeography: A Bayesian Structured Coalescent Approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Maio, Nicola; Wu, Chieh-Hsi; O’Reilly, Kathleen M; Wilson, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Phylogeographic methods aim to infer migration trends and the history of sampled lineages from genetic data. Applications of phylogeography are broad, and in the context of pathogens include the reconstruction of transmission histories and the origin and emergence of outbreaks. Phylogeographic inference based on bottom-up population genetics models is computationally expensive, and as a result faster alternatives based on the evolution of discrete traits have become popular. In this paper, we show that inference of migration rates and root locations based on discrete trait models is extremely unreliable and sensitive to biased sampling. To address this problem, we introduce BASTA (BAyesian STructured coalescent Approximation), a new approach implemented in BEAST2 that combines the accuracy of methods based on the structured coalescent with the computational efficiency required to handle more than just few populations. We illustrate the potentially severe implications of poor model choice for phylogeographic analyses by investigating the zoonotic transmission of Ebola virus. Whereas the structured coalescent analysis correctly infers that successive human Ebola outbreaks have been seeded by a large unsampled non-human reservoir population, the discrete trait analysis implausibly concludes that undetected human-to-human transmission has allowed the virus to persist over the past four decades. As genomics takes on an increasingly prominent role informing the control and prevention of infectious diseases, it will be vital that phylogeographic inference provides robust insights into transmission history. PMID:26267488

  2. Effect of Tracer Particles on Binary Droplet Coalescence in Liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jungyong; Longmire, Ellen

    2007-11-01

    Pairs of water/glycerin drops were injected into silicone oil and traveled on downward trajectories before colliding. Simultaneous dual-field PIV measurements were obtained to characterize coalescence and rebounding behavior for Weber numbers [We] of 1-50 for a range of collision angles θ below the horizontal. First, both fluids were seeded with TiO2 for PIV measurement. Then, additional experiments were performed with no tracer particles in the silicone oil to determine whether particles affect the coalescence. When both fluids were seeded, the drops rebounded for We 10. Based on the current data, this boundary applies for 22 < θ < 35 , but shifts to higher We with increasing collision angle. For the experiments with unseeded ambient fluid, the drops rebounded for We < 10. However, both coalescence and rebounding occurred for 10 < We < 17. For cases with seeded ambient fluid, the rupture location was always in the lower portion of the thin film between the drops. However, for cases with unseeded ambient fluid, the rupture location was more variable. Details of these behaviors will be discussed in the presentation. Supported by Petroleum Research Fund (42939-AC9) and NSF (CTS-0320327).

  3. Nickel, copper and cobalt coalescence in copper cliff converter slag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolf A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this investigation is to assess the effect of various additives on coalescence of nickel, copper and cobalt from slags generated during nickel extraction. The analyzed fluxes were silica and lime while examined reductants were pig iron, ferrosilicon and copper-silicon compound. Slag was settled at the different holding temperatures for various times in conditions that simulated the industrial environment. The newly formed matte and slag were characterized by their chemical composition and morphology. Silica flux generated higher partition coefficients for nickel and copper than the addition of lime. Additives used as reducing agents had higher valuable metal recovery rates and corresponding partition coefficients than fluxes. Microstructural studies showed that slag formed after adding reductants consisted of primarily fayalite, with some minute traces of magnetite as the secondary phase. Addition of 5 wt% of pig iron, ferrosilicon and copper-silicon alloys favored the formation of a metallized matte which increased Cu, Ni and Co recoveries. Addition of copper-silicon alloys with low silicon content was efficient in copper recovery but coalescence of the other metals was low. Slag treated with the ferrosilicon facilitated the highest cobalt recovery while copper-silicon alloys with silicon content above 10 wt% resulted in high coalescence of nickel and copper, 87 % and 72 % respectively.

  4. Influence of droplet deformability on the coalescence rate of emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toro-Mendoza, Jhoan; Lozsan, Aileen; Garcia-Sucre, Maximo; Castellanos S, Aly J; Urbina-Villalba, German

    2010-01-01

    In this article the influence of deformation on the coalescence rates of oil-in-water (O/W) emulsions is analyzed. Calculations for doublets and many-particles systems were performed based on a Brownian dynamics algorithm. Extensional and bending energies were included in order to quantify the effect of the changes in the surface geometry on the coalescence rates. Also, the hydrodynamic resistance due to the flat film was included through a correction to the diffusion coefficient in the lubrication limit. Results of two particles calculations were compared with previous analytical evaluations of the coalescence time in absence of highly repulsive barriers [Danov, Langmuir 9, 1731 (1993)]. Lifetime of doublets was calculated as a function of the particle radius from 100 nm to 100 microm. It was found that the doublets lifetime strongly depends on the interplay between the potential of interaction between the droplets and the hydrodynamic resistance. Depending on the repulsive barrier either a monotonous increase of the lifetime with the droplet size or a maximum value is observed. Finally, the evolution of O/W emulsions with a volume fraction of phi=0.10 was studied. For these many-particle systems, the results show a sensitive dependence of the aggregation behavior on the interfacial tension. The procedure reported here allows us to include Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) and non-DLVO forces and the film drainage velocity of many different systems.

  5. A PIV Study of Drop-interface Coalescence with Surfactants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weheliye, Weheliye Hashi; Dong, Teng; Angeli, Panagiota

    2017-11-01

    In this work, the coalescence of a drop with an aqueous-organic interface was studied by Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). The effect of surfactants on the drop surface evolution, the vorticity field and the kinetic energy distribution in the drop during coalescence were investigated. The coalescence took place in an acrylic rectangular box with 79% glycerol solution at the bottom and Exxsol D80 oil above. The glycerol solution drop was generated through a nozzle fixed at 2cm above the aqueous/oil interface and was seeded with Rhodamine particles. The whole process was captured by a high-speed camera. Different mass ratios of non-ionic surfactant Span80 to oil were studied. The increase of surfactant concentration promoted deformation of the interface before the rupture of the trapped oil film. At the early stages after film rupture, two counter-rotating vortices appeared at the bottom of the drop which then travelled to the upper part. The propagation rates, as well as the intensities of the vortices decreased at high surfactant concentrations. At early stages, the kinetic energy was mainly distributed near the bottom part of the droplet, while at later stages it was distributed near the upper part of the droplet. Programme Grant MEMPHIS, Chinese Scholarship Council (CSC).

  6. Phylogenomics and coalescent analyses resolve extant seed plant relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Zhenxiang; Rest, Joshua S; Davis, Charles C

    2013-01-01

    The extant seed plants include more than 260,000 species that belong to five main lineages: angiosperms, conifers, cycads, Ginkgo, and gnetophytes. Despite tremendous effort using molecular data, phylogenetic relationships among these five lineages remain uncertain. Here, we provide the first broad coalescent-based species tree estimation of seed plants using genome-scale nuclear and plastid data By incorporating 305 nuclear genes and 47 plastid genes from 14 species, we identify that i) extant gymnosperms (i.e., conifers, cycads, Ginkgo, and gnetophytes) are monophyletic, ii) gnetophytes exhibit discordant placements within conifers between their nuclear and plastid genomes, and iii) cycads plus Ginkgo form a clade that is sister to all remaining extant gymnosperms. We additionally observe that the placement of Ginkgo inferred from coalescent analyses is congruent across different nucleotide rate partitions. In contrast, the standard concatenation method produces strongly supported, but incongruent placements of Ginkgo between slow- and fast-evolving sites. Specifically, fast-evolving sites yield relationships in conflict with coalescent analyses. We hypothesize that this incongruence may be related to the way in which concatenation methods treat sites with elevated nucleotide substitution rates. More empirical and simulation investigations are needed to understand this potential weakness of concatenation methods.

  7. Capillary-Inertial Colloidal Catapult upon Drop Coalescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavez, Roger; Liu, Fangjie; Feng, James; Chen, Chuan-Hua

    2014-11-01

    To discharge micron-sized particles such as colloidal contaminants and biological spores, an enormous power density is needed to compete against the strong adhesive forces between the small particles and the supporting surface as well as the significant air friction exerted on the particles. Here, we demonstrate a colloidal catapult that achieves such a high power density by extracting surface energy released upon drop coalescence within an extremely short time period, which is governed by the capillary-inertial process converting the released surface energy into the bulk inertia of the merged drop. When two drops coalesce on top of a spherical particle, the resulting capillary-inertial oscillation is perturbed by the solid particle, giving rise to a net momentum eventually propelling the particle to launch from the supporting surface. The measured launching velocity follows a scaling law that accounts for the redistribution of the momentum of the merged drop onto the particle-drop complex, and is therefore proportional to the capillary-inertial velocity characterizing the coalescing drops. The interfacial flow process associated with the colloidal catapult is elucidated with both high-speed imaging and phase-field simulations.

  8. The case for including reach as a key element of program theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montague, Steve; Porteous, Nancy L

    2013-02-01

    This paper suggests that there is a need to build reach in the logic models and results frameworks of public health initiatives. A lack of explicit thinking about reach in logic models can lead to problems such as narrow/constricted understanding of impacts chain, favoring of 'narrow and efficient' initiatives over 'wide and engaging' initiatives and biased thinking against equity considerations. An alternative approach described in this paper that explicitly considers reach demonstrates that an explicit description of reach in program theory and results logic depictions can improve equity in health and social systems. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Coalescence-Induced Jumping of Multiple Condensate Droplets on Hierarchical Superhydrophobic Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xuemei; Patel, Ravi S; Weibel, Justin A; Garimella, Suresh V

    2016-01-04

    Coalescence-induced jumping of condensate droplets from a superhydrophobic surface with hierarchical micro/nanoscale roughness is quantitatively characterized. Experimental observations show that the condensate droplet jumping is induced by coalescence of multiple droplets of different sizes, and that the coalesced droplet trajectories typically deviate from the surface normal. A depth-from-defocus image processing technique is developed to track the out-of-plane displacement of the jumping droplets, so as to accurately measure the droplet size and velocity. The results demonstrate that the highest jumping velocity is achieved when two droplets coalesce. The jumping velocity decreases gradually with an increase in the number of coalescing droplets, despite the greater potential surface energy released upon coalescence. A general theoretical model that accounts for viscous dissipation, surface adhesion, line tension, the initial droplet wetting states, and the number and sizes of the coalescing droplets is developed to explain the trends of droplet jumping velocity observed in the experiments.

  10. An experimental study on the coalescence process of binary droplets in oil under ultrasonic standing waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xiaoming; Cao, Juhang; He, Limin; Wang, Hongping; Yan, Haipeng; Qin, Yahua

    2017-01-01

    The coalescence process of binary droplets in oil under ultrasonic standing waves was investigated with high-speed photography. Three motion models of binary droplets in coalescence process were illustrated: (1) slight translational oscillation; (2) sinusoidal translational oscillation; (3) migration along with acoustic streaming. To reveal the droplets coalescence mechanisms, the influence of main factors (such as acoustic intensity, droplet size, viscosity and interfacial tension, etc) on the motion and coalescence of binary droplets was studied under ultrasonic standing waves. Results indicate that the shortest coalescence time is achieved when binary droplets show sinusoidal translational oscillation. The corresponding acoustic intensity in this case is the optimum acoustic intensity. Under the optimum acoustic intensity, drop size decrease will bring about coalescence time decrease by enhancing the binary droplets oscillation. Moreover, there is an optimum interfacial tension to achieve the shortest coalescence time. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Topological inversions in coalescing granular media control fluid-flow regimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadsworth, Fabian B; Vasseur, Jérémie; Llewellin, Edward W; Dobson, Katherine J; Colombier, Mathieu; von Aulock, Felix W; Fife, Julie L; Wiesmaier, Sebastian; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Scheu, Bettina; Lavallée, Yan; Dingwell, Donald B

    2017-09-01

    Sintering-or coalescence-of viscous droplets is an essential process in many natural and industrial scenarios. Current physical models of the dynamics of sintering are limited by the lack of an explicit account of the evolution of microstructural geometry. Here, we use high-speed time-resolved x-ray tomography to image the evolving geometry of a sintering system of viscous droplets, and use lattice Boltzmann simulations of creeping fluid flow through the reconstructed pore space to determine its permeability. We identify and characterize a topological inversion, from spherical droplets in a continuous interstitial gas, to isolated bubbles in a continuous liquid. We find that the topological inversion is associated with a transition in permeability-porosity behavior, from Stokes permeability at high porosity, to percolation theory at low porosity. We use these findings to construct a unified physical description that reconciles previously incompatible models for the evolution of porosity and permeability during sintering.

  12. An Arbitrary First Order Theory Can Be Represented by a Program: A Theorem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosheleva, Olga

    1997-01-01

    How can we represent knowledge inside a computer? For formalized knowledge, classical logic seems to be the most adequate tool. Classical logic is behind all formalisms of classical mathematics, and behind many formalisms used in Artificial Intelligence. There is only one serious problem with classical logic: due to the famous Godel's theorem, classical logic is algorithmically undecidable; as a result, when the knowledge is represented in the form of logical statements, it is very difficult to check whether, based on this statement, a given query is true or not. To make knowledge representations more algorithmic, a special field of logic programming was invented. An important portion of logic programming is algorithmically decidable. To cover knowledge that cannot be represented in this portion, several extensions of the decidable fragments have been proposed. In the spirit of logic programming, these extensions are usually introduced in such a way that even if a general algorithm is not available, good heuristic methods exist. It is important to check whether the already proposed extensions are sufficient, or further extensions is necessary. In the present paper, we show that one particular extension, namely, logic programming with classical negation, introduced by M. Gelfond and V. Lifschitz, can represent (in some reasonable sense) an arbitrary first order logical theory.

  13. The dock-and-coalesce mechanism for the association of a WASP disordered region with the Cdc42 GTPase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Li; Matthews, Megan; Pang, Xiaodong; Zhou, Huan-Xiang

    2017-10-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) play key roles in signaling and regulation. Many IDPs undergo folding upon binding to their targets. We have proposed that coupled folding and binding of IDPs generally follow a dock-and-coalesce mechanism, whereby a segment of the IDP, through diffusion, docks to its cognate subsite and, subsequently, the remaining segments coalesce around their subsites. Here, by a combination of experiment and computation, we determined the precise form of dock-and-coalesce operating in the association between the intrinsically disordered GTPase-binding domain (GBD) of the Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome protein and the Cdc42 GTPase. The association rate constants (ka ) were measured by stopped-flow fluorescence under various solvent conditions. ka reached 10(7) m(-1) ·s(-1) at physiological ionic strength and had a strong salt dependence, suggesting that an electrostatically enhanced, diffusion-controlled docking step may be rate limiting. Our computation, based on the transient-complex theory, identified the N-terminal basic region of the GBD as the docking segment. However, several other changes in solvent conditions provided strong evidence that the coalescing step also contributed to determining the magnitude of ka . Addition of glucose and trifluoroethanol and an increase in temperature all produced experimental ka values much higher than expected from the effects on the docking rate alone. Conversely, addition of urea led to ka values much lower than expected if only the docking rate was affected. These results all pointed to ka being approximately two-thirds of the docking rate constant under physiological solvent conditions. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  14. An algorithm for emulsion stability simulations: account of flocculation, coalescence, surfactant adsorption and the process of Ostwald ripening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbina-Villalba, German

    2009-03-01

    The first algorithm for Emulsion Stability Simulations (ESS) was presented at the V Conferencia Iberoamericana sobre Equilibrio de Fases y Diseño de Procesos [Luis, J.; García-Sucre, M.; Urbina-Villalba, G. Brownian Dynamics Simulation of Emulsion Stability In: Equifase 99. Libro de Actas, 1(st) Ed., Tojo J., Arce, A., Eds.; Solucion's: Vigo, Spain, 1999; Volume 2, pp. 364-369]. The former version of the program consisted on a minor modification of the Brownian Dynamics algorithm to account for the coalescence of drops. The present version of the program contains elaborate routines for time-dependent surfactant adsorption, average diffusion constants, and Ostwald ripening.

  15. A multimedia adult literacy program: Combining NASA technology, instructional design theory, and authentic literacy concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Jerry W.

    1993-01-01

    be the most effective or most desirable way to use computer technology in literacy programs. This project is developing a series of instructional packages that are based on a different instructional model - authentic instruction. The instructional development model used to create these packages is also different. Instead of using the traditional five stage linear, sequential model based on behavioral learning theory, the project uses the recursive, reflective design and development model (R2D2) that is based on cognitive learning theory, particularly the social constructivism of Vygotsky, and an epistemology based on critical theory. Using alternative instructional and instructional development theories, the result of the summer faculty fellowship is LiteraCity, a multimedia adult literacy instructional package that is a simulation of finding and applying for a job. The program, which is about 120 megabytes, is distributed on CD-ROM.

  16. Altruism in terminal cancer patients and rapid tissue donation program: does the theory apply?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Gwendolyn P; Murphy, Devin; Pratt, Christie; Muñoz-Antonia, Teresita; Guerra, Lucy; Schabath, Matthew B; Leon, Marino E; Haura, Eric

    2013-11-01

    Rapid tissue donation (RTD) is an advancing oncology research procedure for collecting tumors, metastases, and unaffected tissue 2-6 h after death. Researchers can better determine rates of progression, response to treatment, and polymorphic differences among patients. Cancer patients may inquire about posthumous body donation for research to offer a personal contribution to research; however, there are barriers to recruiting for an RTD program. Physicians must reassure the patient that their treatment options and quality of care will not be compromised due to participating in RTD. In this commentary we discuss how theories of altruism may explain cancer patients' desire to participate in an RTD program, the ethical concerns of health care professionals and patients and the use of altruism as a recruitment strategy. We offer recommendations for examining the cultural and ethical climate of the institution prior to initiating such a program such as examining the relationship of healthcare professionals and patients, identifying ethical concerns, and examining ways to promote acceptance and buy-in across professionals, patients, and families.

  17. Efficient Bayesian Species Tree Inference under the Multispecies Coalescent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rannala, Bruce; Yang, Ziheng

    2017-09-01

    We develop a Bayesian method for inferring the species phylogeny under the multispecies coalescent (MSC) model. To improve the mixing properties of the Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithm that traverses the space of species trees, we implement two efficient MCMC proposals: the first is based on the Subtree Pruning and Regrafting (SPR) algorithm and the second is based on a node-slider algorithm. Like the Nearest-Neighbor Interchange (NNI) algorithm we implemented previously, both new algorithms propose changes to the species tree, while simultaneously altering the gene trees at multiple genetic loci to automatically avoid conflicts with the newly proposed species tree. The method integrates over gene trees, naturally taking account of the uncertainty of gene tree topology and branch lengths given the sequence data. A simulation study was performed to examine the statistical properties of the new method. The method was found to show excellent statistical performance, inferring the correct species tree with near certainty when 10 loci were included in the dataset. The prior on species trees has some impact, particularly for small numbers of loci. We analyzed several previously published datasets (both real and simulated) for rattlesnakes and Philippine shrews, in comparison with alternative methods. The results suggest that the Bayesian coalescent-based method is statistically more efficient than heuristic methods based on summary statistics, and that our implementation is computationally more efficient than alternative full-likelihood methods under the MSC. Parameter estimates for the rattlesnake data suggest drastically different evolutionary dynamics between the nuclear and mitochondrial loci, even though they support largely consistent species trees. We discuss the different challenges facing the marginal likelihood calculation and transmodel MCMC as alternative strategies for estimating posterior probabilities for species trees. [Bayes factor; Bayesian

  18. Growth of Gallium Nitride Nanorods and Their Coalescence Overgrowth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-07

    radiation angle dependence [13]. Sixth, GaN NR growth and coalescence overgrowth can result in a GaN thin film of significantly improved crystal quality...their work, by depositing the quantum structures on the GaN NRs of truncated pyramidal tops, InGaN layers of unclear quantum structures and crystal ...W. M. Chang, C. H. Liao, C. H. Lin, K. C. Shen, C. C. Yang, M. C. Hsu, J. H. Yeh, and T. C. Hsu, “Threading dislocation evolution in patterned GaN

  19. Void growth and coalescence in metals deformed at elevated temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klöcker, H.; Tvergaard, Viggo

    2000-01-01

    For metals deformed at elevated temperatures the growth of voids to coalescence is studied numerically. The voids are assumed to be present from the beginning of deformation, and the rate of deformation considered is so high that void growth is dominated by power law creep of the material, without...... voids. The focus of the study is on various relatively high stress triaxialties. In order to represent the results in terms of a porous ductile material model a set of constitutive relations are used, which have been proposed for void growth in a material undergoing power law creep....

  20. Parton coalescence and the antiproton/pion anomaly at RHIC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, V; Ko, C M; Lévai, P

    2003-05-23

    Coalescence of minijet partons with partons from the quark-gluon plasma formed in relativistic heavy ion collisions is suggested as the mechanism for production of hadrons with intermediate transverse momentum. The resulting enhanced antiproton and pion yields at intermediate transverse momenta give a plausible explanation for the observed large antiproton to pion ratio. With further increasing momentum, the ratio is predicted to decrease and approach the small value given by independent fragmentations of minijet partons after their energy loss in the quark-gluon plasma.

  1. Coalescence in the 1D Cahn-Hilliard model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villain-Guillot, Simon [Centre de Physique Moleculaire Optique et Hertzienne, Universite Bordeaux I, 33406 Talence Cedex (France)

    2004-07-09

    We present an approximate analytical solution of the Cahn-Hilliard equation describing the coalescence during a first-order phase transition. We have identified all the intermediate profiles, stationary solutions of the noiseless Cahn-Hilliard equation. Using properties of the soliton lattices, periodic solutions of the Ginzburg-Landau equation, we have constructed a family of ansaetze describing continuously the process of destabilization and period doubling predicted in Langer's self-similar scenario (Langer 1971 Ann. Phys., NY 65 53)

  2. Fractional Calculus of Coalescence Hidden-Variable Fractal Interpolation Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Srijanani Anurag

    Riemann-Liouville fractional calculus of Coalescence Hidden-variable Fractal Interpolation Function (CHFIF) is studied in this paper. It is shown in this paper that fractional integral of order ν of a CHFIF defined on any interval [a,b] is also a CHFIF albeit passing through different interpolation points. Further, conditions for fractional derivative of order ν of a CHFIF is derived in this paper. It is shown that under these conditions on free parameters, fractional derivative of order ν of a CHFIF defined on any interval [a,b] is also a CHFIF.

  3. Partial coalescence of sessile drops with different liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borcia, Rodica; Bestehorn, Michael

    2014-11-01

    We examine numerically the interaction between two deformable drops consisting of two perfectly miscible liquids sitting on a solid substrate under a given contact angle. Driven by solutal Marangoni forces, several distinct coalescence regimes are achieved after the droplets collision. Phase diagrams for different control parameters are emphasized, which give predictions about drop behavior along the solid substrates, control of various interfacial effects, manipulations of tiny droplets in micro- and nano-fluidic devices without power supply, design of droplets or cleaning surfaces. This work was partially supported by Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) under the project ``Dynamics of interfaces between drops with miscible liquids''.

  4. Research program in elementary particle theory. Progress report, 1975--1976. [Summaries of research activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sudarshan, E.C.G.; Ne' eman, Y.

    1976-01-01

    Research on particle theory is summarized including field theory models, phenomenological applications of field theory, strong interactions, the algebraic approach to weak and electromagnetic interactions, and superdense matter. A list of reports is also included. (JFP)

  5. Quantum field theory and the linguistic Minimalist Program: a remarkable isomorphism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piattelli-Palmarini, M.; Vitiello, G.

    2017-08-01

    By resorting to recent results, we show that an isomorphism exist between linguistic features of the Minimalist Program and the quantum field theory formalism of condensed matter physics. Specific linguistic features which admit a representation in terms of the many-body algebraic formalism are the unconstrained nature of recursive Merge, the operation of the Labeling Algorithm, the difference between pronounced and un-pronounced copies of elements in a sentence and the build-up of the Fibonacci sequence in the syntactic derivation of sentence structures. The collective dynamical nature of the formation process of Logical Forms leading to the individuation of the manifold of concepts and the computational self-consistency of languages are also discussed.

  6. Review of the Dynamics of Coalescence and Demulsification by High-Voltage Pulsed Electric Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye Peng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The coalescence of droplets in oil can be implemented rapidly by high-voltage pulse electric field, which is an effective demulsification dehydration technological method. At present, it is widely believed that the main reason of pulse electric field promoting droplets coalescence is the dipole coalescence and oscillation coalescence in pulse electric field, and the optimal coalescence pulse electric field parameters exist. Around the above content, the dynamics of high-voltage pulse electric field promoting the coalescence of emulsified droplets is studied by researchers domestically and abroad. By review, the progress of high-voltage pulse electric field demulsification technology can get a better understanding, which has an effect of throwing a sprat to catch a whale on promoting the industrial application.

  7. Investigation of droplet coalescence in nanoparticle suspensions by a microfluidic collision experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qianqian; Sun, Yue; Yi, Shiting; Wang, Kai; Luo, Guangsheng

    2016-02-14

    Understanding the phenomenon of droplet coalescence in nanoparticle suspensions is extremely important for the preparation of Pickering emulsions. A microfluidic platform, which can provide compulsive droplet collisions, was developed to imitate the droplet coalescence process in the early stages of emulsification. Microscope videos showed the variations in the droplet coalescence percentage, droplet contact time, and liquid film drainage time in different working systems containing 158-306 nm polystyrene (PS) particles in the continuous oil phase. The intersections of the half and total droplet contact times as well as the liquid film drainage time indicated the transitions of coalescence percentage. The additional hydrodynamic resistance in the liquid film between the approaching interfaces caused by the embedded hydrophobic nanoparticles was understood to be the main reason for reduced droplet coalescence, whereas hydrophilic particles were found to promote coalescence. As a novel method, the microfluidic collision experiment provided accurate and quantitative data for analyzing the formation of Pickering emulsions.

  8. Exact coalescent simulation of new haplotype data from existing reference haplotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Chul Joo; Marjoram, Paul

    2012-03-15

    We introduce a coalescent-based method (RECOAL) for the simulation of new haplotype data from a reference population of haplotypes. A coalescent genealogy for the reference haplotype data is sampled from the appropriate posterior probability distribution, then a coalescent genealogy is simulated which extends the sampled genealogy to include new haplotype data. The new haplotype data will, therefore, contain both some of the existing polymorphic sites and new polymorphisms added based on the structure of the simulated coalescent genealogy. This allows exact coalescent simulation of new haplotype data, compared with other methods which are more approximate in nature. We demonstrate the performance of our method using a variety of data simulated under a coalescent model, before applying it to data from the 1000 Genomes project.

  9. Unified description of structure and reactions: implementing the nuclear field theory program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broglia, R. A.; Bortignon, P. F.; Barranco, F.; Vigezzi, E.; Idini, A.; Potel, G.

    2016-06-01

    The modern theory of the atomic nucleus results from the merging of the liquid drop model of Niels Bohr and Fritz Kalckar, and of the shell model of Marie Goeppert Meyer and Hans Jensen. The first model contributed the concepts of collective excitations. The second, those of independent-particle motion. The unification of these apparently contradictory views in terms of the particle-vibration and particle-rotation couplings carried out by Aage Bohr and Ben Mottelson has allowed for an ever more complete, accurate and detailed description of nuclear structure. Nuclear field theory (NFT), developed by the Copenhagen-Buenos Aires collaboration, provided a powerful quantal embodiment of this unification. Reactions are not only at the basis of quantum mechanics (statistical interpretation, Max Born), but also the specific tools to probe the atomic nucleus. It is then natural that NFT is being extended to deal with processes which involve the continuum in an intrinsic fashion, so as to be able to treat them on an equal footing with those associated with bound states (structure). As a result, spectroscopic studies of transfer to continuum states could eventually make use of the NFT rules, properly extended to take care of recoil effects. In the present contribution we review the implementation of the NFT program of structure and reactions, setting special emphasis on open problems and outstanding predictions.

  10. Coalescence and Rebounding of Colliding Drops in Liquid Ambients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salber, Shirin; Longmire, Ellen

    2003-11-01

    Flow visualization is performed on two water/glycerin droplets colliding in an immiscible liquid ambient. The drops, of equal size and velocity, are ejected from identical tubes opposite each other through means of a solenoid valve mechanism. Drop diameters are of order 1 cm. The Weber number is varied between 1 and 300 by adjusting the mass flow rate and solenoid valve open time. By using surrounding fluids of different viscosities, as well as by adjusting the mass flow rate and solenoid valve open time, the Reynolds number is varied between 1 and 500. Precise offset adjustments of the tubes are made to study a range of collisions varying from head-on to glancing. Flow behavior is observed as the two droplets directly approach, impact, and then bounce, coalesce, or separate. These outcomes are mapped into regions as functions of the Reynolds number, Weber number, and the normalized offset (i.e. impact parameter). Preliminary PIV experiments have been performed on index matched fluids to understand these events. The resulting velocity fields and the effect of seed particles on coalescence time will also be discussed. *supported by DOE (DE-FG02-98ER14869).

  11. Mapping coalescence of micron-sized drops and bubbles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Joseph D; Dagastine, Raymond R

    2017-02-01

    Emulsion formulation, solvent extraction and multiphase microfluidics are all examples of processes that require precise control of drop or bubble collision stability. We use a previously validated numerical model to map the exact conditions under which micron-sized drops or bubbles undergo coalescence in the presence of colloidal forces and hydrodynamic effects relevant to Brownian motion and low Reynolds number flows. We demonstrate that detailed understanding of how the equilibrium surface forces vary with film thickness can be applied to make accurate predictions of the outcome of a drop or bubble collision when hydrodynamic effects are negligible. In addition, we illuminate the parameter space (i.e. interaction velocity, drop deformation, interfacial tension, etc.) at which hydrodynamic effects can stabilise collisions that are unstable at equilibrium. Further, we determine conditions for which drop or bubble collisions become unstable upon separation, caused by negative hydrodynamic pressure in the film. Lastly, we show that scaling analyses are not applicable for constant force collisions where the approach timescale is comparable to the coalescence timescale, and demonstrate that initial conditions under these circumstances cannot be ignored. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Arrested coalescence of viscoelastic droplets: triplet shape and restructuring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahiya, Prerna; DeBenedictis, Andrew; Atherton, Timothy J.; Caggioni, Marco; Prescott, Stuart W.; Hartel, Richard W.; Spicer, Patrick T.

    The stability of shapes formed by three viscoelastic droplets during their arrested coalescence has been investigated using micromanipulation experiments. Addition of a third droplet to arrested droplet doublets is shown to be controlled by the balance between interfacial pressures driving coalescence and internal elasticity that resists total consolidation. The free fluid available within the droplets controls the transmission of stress during droplet combination and allows connections to occur via formation of a neck between the droplets. The anisotropy of three-droplet systems adds complexity to the symmetric case of two-droplet aggregates because of the multiplicity of orientations possible for the third droplet. When elasticity dominates, the initial orientation of the third droplet is preserved in the triplet's final shape. When elasticity is dominated by the interfacial driving force, the final shape can deviate strongly from the initial positioning of droplets. Movement of the third droplet to a more compact packing occurs, driven by liquid meniscus expansion that minimizes the surface energy of the triplet. A range of compositions and orientations are examined and the resulting domains of restructuring and stability are mapped based on the final triplet structure. A geometric and a physical model are used to explain the mechanism driving meniscus-induced restructuring and are related to the impact of these phenomena on multiple droplet emulsions.

  13. Morphology and dynamics of droplet coalescence on a surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapur, Nikil; Gaskell, Philip H

    2007-05-01

    The coalescence of a pair of droplets on a surface is investigated experimentally with images from detailed flow visualisations revealing the morphology of the process. It is found that they merge and evolve to a final state with a footprint that is peanut like in shape, with bulges along the longer sides resulting from the effects of inertia during spreading. The associated dynamics involve a subtle interplay between (i) the motion of the wetting process due to relaxation of the contact angle and (ii) a rapid rise in free-surface height above the point where coalescence began due to negative pressure generated by curvature. During the early stages of the motion, a traveling wave propagates from the point of initial contact up the side of each droplet as liquid is drawn into the neck region, and only when it reaches the apex of each do their heights start to decrease. A further feature of the rapid rise in height of the neck region is that the free surface there overshoots significantly its final equilibrium position; it reaches a height greater than that of the starting droplets, producing a self-excited oscillation that persists long after the system reaches its final morphological state in relation to its footprint.

  14. Electro-coalescence of particle-coated droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shum, Anderson Ho Cheung

    Droplets in air or in an immiscible liquid phase are used widely in applications ranging from personal hygiene products to drug delivery. The stability of the droplets are highly linked to their utility, and thus have been systematically studied. To enhance the stability of the droplets, particles are often added to the droplets. In this talk, I will discuss how the particle layer at droplet interfaces responds to electrical charging of the droplets. The electrical forces can distort the droplet shape, which is opposed by the layer of particles adsorbed. A balance of the electrical and interfacial effects provides a quantitative indicator of the droplet instability. The coalescence of droplets in both air and liquid induced by electrically charging, which we call ``electro-coalescence'', will be introduced, with its potential application in devising a digital millifluidic platform. We thank the Research Grants Council of Hong Kong (No. HKU 719813E, 17304514 and 17306315 and C6004-14G) from the and National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 21476189/B060201 and 91434202).

  15. Collective effects of temperature gradients and gravity on droplet coalescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoguang; Wang, Hua; Davis, Robert H.

    1993-01-01

    The interaction and coalescence of small spherical drops in dilute, homogeneous dispersions are considered theoretically under conditions, where drop motion results from gravity settling and thermocapillary migration acting simultaneously. A trajectory analysis is used to predict pairwise collision rates, and population dynamics equations are solved to predict the time evolution of the droplet size distribution. The rate of droplet collisions and growth may be reduced dramatically by antiparallel alignment of the gravitational and thermocapillary velocities. For such antiparallel alignment with the gravitational relative velocity exceeding the thermocapillary relative velocity for two widely separated drops, there is a 'collision-forbidden region' in parameter space. This occurs because the gravitational relative velocity decays more rapidly with decreasing separation distance between the drops than does the thermocapillary relative velocity, and so the resultant relative velocity along the line-of-centers from these two sources combined becomes zero at a finite separation and the drops are unable to collide. As a result, small drops which initially collide and coalesce due to thermocapillary motion will only grow until they reach a critical size for which the oppositely directed gravitational motion balances the thermocapillary motion.

  16. Coalescence, evaporation and particle deposition of consecutively printed colloidal drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhasatia, Viral; Yang, Xin; Shah, Jaymeen; Sun, Ying

    2012-11-01

    In applications such as inkjet printing and spray deposition, colloid drops are often used as building blocks for line and pattern printing where their interactions play important roles in determining the deposition morphology and properties. In this study, the particle deposition dynamics of two consecutively printed evaporating colloidal drops is examined using a fluorescence microscope and a synchronized side-view camera. The results show that the relaxation time of the water-air interface of the merged drop is shorter than that of a single drop impacting on a dry surface. It is also found that both morphology and particle distribution uniformity of the deposit change significantly with varying jetting delay and spatial spacing between two drops. As the drop spacing increases while keeping jetting delay constant, the circularity of the coalesced drop reduces. For the regime where the time scale for drop evaporation is comparable with the relaxation time scale for two drops to completely coalesce, the capillary flow induced by the local curvature variation of the air-water interface redistributes particles inside a merged drop, causing suppression of the coffee-ring effect for the case of a high jetting frequency while resulting in a region of particle accumulation in the middle of the merged drop at a low jetting frequency. By tuning the interplay of wetting, evaporation, capillary relaxation, and particle assembly, the deposition morphology of consecutively printed colloidal drops can be controlled.

  17. Coalescence of silver clusters by immersion in diluted HF solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milazzo, R. G.; Mio, A. M.; D'Arrigo, G.; Grimaldi, M. G.; Spinella, C.; Rimini, E.

    2015-07-01

    The galvanic displacement deposition of silver on H-terminated Si (100) in the time scale of seconds is instantaneous and characterized by a cluster density of 1011-1012 cm-2. The amount of deposited Ag follows a t1/2 dependence in agreement with a Cottrell diffusion limited mechanism. At the same time, during the deposition, the cluster density reduces by a factor 5. This behavior is in contrast with the assumption of immobile clusters. We show in the present work that coalescence and aggregation occur also in the samples immersed in the diluted hydrofluoric acid (HF) solution without the presence of Ag+. Clusters agglomerate according to a process of dynamic coalescence, typical of colloids, followed by atomic redistribution at the contact regions with the generation of multiple internal twins and stacking-faults. The normalized size distributions in terms of r/rmean follow also the prediction of the Smoluchowski ripening mechanism. No variation of the cluster density occurs for samples immersed in pure H2O solution. The different behavior might be associated to the strong attraction of clusters to oxide-terminated Si surface in presence of water. The silver clusters are instead weakly bound to hydrophobic H-terminated Si in presence of HF. HF causes then the detachment of clusters and a random movement on the silicon surface with mobility of about 10-13 cm2/s. Attractive interaction (probably van der Waals) among particles promotes coarsening.

  18. Asphaltene-laden interfaces form soft glassy layers in contraction experiments: a mechanism for coalescence blocking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauchard, Vincent; Rane, Jayant P; Banerjee, Sanjoy

    2014-11-04

    In previous studies, the adsorption kinetics of asphaltenes at the water-oil interface were interpreted utilizing a Langmuir equation of state (EOS) based on droplet expansion experiments.1-3 Long-term adsorption kinetics followed random sequential adsorption (RSA) theory predictions, asymptotically reaching ∼85% limiting surface coverage, which is similar to limiting random 2D close packing of disks. To extend this work beyond this slow adsorption process, we performed rapid contractions and contraction-expansions of asphaltene-laden interfaces using the pendant drop experiment to emulate a Langmuir trough. This simulates the rapid increase in interfacial asphaltene concentration that occurs during coalescence events. For the contraction of droplets aged in asphaltene solutions, deviation from the EOS consistently occurs at a surface pressure value ∼21 mN/m corresponding to a surface coverage ∼80%. At this point droplets lose the shape required for validity of the Laplace-Young equation, indicating solidlike surface behavior. On further contraction wrinkles appear, which disappear when the droplet is held at constant volume. Surface pressure also decreases down to an equilibrium value near that measured for slow adsorption experiments. This behavior appears to be due to a transition to a glassy interface on contraction past the packing limit, followed by relaxation toward equilibrium by desorption at constant volume. This hypothesis is supported by cycling experiments around the close-packed limit where the transition to and from a solidlike state appears to be both fast and reversible, with little hysteresis. Also, the soft glass rheology model of Sollich is shown to capture previously reported shear behavior during adsorption. The results suggest that the mechanism by which asphaltenes stabilize water-in-oil emulsions is by blocking coalescence due to rapid formation of a glassy interface, in turn caused by interfacial asphaltenes rapidly increasing in

  19. Discrete modelling of ductile crack growth by void growth to coalescence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvergaard, Viggo

    2007-01-01

    Ductile crack growth is analyzed by discrete representation of the voids growing near a blunting crack-tip. Coalescence of the nearest void with the crack-tip is modeled, followed by the subsequent coalescence of other discretely represented voids with the newly formed crack-tip. Necking of the l......Ductile crack growth is analyzed by discrete representation of the voids growing near a blunting crack-tip. Coalescence of the nearest void with the crack-tip is modeled, followed by the subsequent coalescence of other discretely represented voids with the newly formed crack-tip. Necking...

  20. Germany-US Nuclear Theory Exchange Program for QCD Studies of Hadrons & Nuclei 'GAUSTEQ'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dudek, Jozef [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States); Melnitchouk, Wally [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2016-03-07

    GAUSTEQ was a Germany-U.S. exchange program in nuclear theory whose purpose was to focus research efforts on QCD studies of hadrons and nuclei, centered around the current and future research programs of Jefferson Lab and the Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI) in Germany. GAUSTEQ provided travel support for theoretical physicists at US institutions conducting collaborative research with physicists in Germany. GSI (with its Darmstadt and Helmholtz Institute Mainz braches) served as the German “hub” for visits of U.S. physicists, while Jefferson Lab served as the corresponding “hub” for visits of German physicists visiting U.S. institutions through the reciprocal GUSTEHP (German-US Theory Exchange in Hadron Physics) program. GAUSTEQ was funded by the Office of Nuclear Physics of the U.S. Department of Energy, under Contract No.DE-SC0006758 and officially managed through Old Dominion University in Norfolk, Virginia. The program ran between 2011 and 2015.

  1. Numerical Simulation of Coalescence-Induced Jumping of Multidroplets on Superhydrophobic Surfaces: Initial Droplet Arrangement Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kai; Liang, Qianqing; Jiang, Rui; Zheng, Yi; Lan, Zhong; Ma, Xuehu

    2017-06-27

    The coalescence-induced droplet jumping on superhydrophobic surfaces (SHSs) has attracted considerable attention over the past several years. Most of the studies on droplet jumping mainly focus on two-droplet coalescence events whereas the coalescence of three or more droplets is actually more frequent and still remains poorly understood. In this work, a 3D lattice Boltzmann simulation is carried out to investigate the effect of initial droplet arrangements on the coalescence-induced jumping of three equally sized droplets. Depending on the initial position of droplets on the surface, the droplet coalescence behaviors can be generally classified into two types: one is that all droplets coalesce together instantaneously (concentrated configuration), and the other is that the initial coalesced droplet sweeps up the third droplet in its moving path (spaced configuration). The critical Ohnesorge number, Oh, for the transition of inertial-capillary-dominated coalescence to inertially limited-viscous coalescence is found to be 0.10 for droplet coalescence on SHSs with a contact angle of 160°. The jumping droplet velocity for concentrated multidroplet coalescence at Oh ⩽ 0.10 still follows the inertial-capillary scaling with an increased prefactor, which indicates a viable jumping droplet velocity enhancement scheme. However, the droplet jumping velocity is drastically reduced for the spaced configuration compared to that for the aforementioned concentrated configuration. Because Oh exceeds 0.10, the effects of initial droplet arrangements on multidroplet jumping become weaker as viscosity plays a key role in the merging process. This work will provide effective guidelines for the design of functional SHSs with enhanced droplet jumping for a wide range of industrial applications.

  2. Reliability of a viva assessment of clinical reasoning in an Australian pre-professional osteopathy program assessed using generalizability theory

    OpenAIRE

    Brett Vaughan; Paul Orrock; Sandra Grace; Sun Huh

    2017-01-01

    Clinical reasoning is situation-dependent and case-specific; therefore, assessments incorporating different patient presentations are warranted. The present study aimed to determine the reliability of a multi-station case-based viva assessment of clinical reasoning in an Australian pre-registration osteopathy program using generalizability theory. Students (from years 4 and 5) and examiners were recruited from the osteopathy program at Southern Cross University, Lismore, Australia. The study ...

  3. Self-management programs based on the social cognitive theory for Koreans with chronic disease: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Yeonsoo; Yoo, Hyera

    2012-02-01

    Self-management programs based on social cognitive theory are useful to improve health care outcomes for patients with chronic diseases in Western culture. The purpose of this review is to identify and synthesize published research on the theory to enhance self-efficacy in disease management and examine its applicability to Korean culture regarding the learning strategies used. Ultimately, it was to identify the optimal use of these learning strategies to improve the self-efficacy of Korean patients in self-management of their hypertension and diabetic mellitus. The authors searched the Korean and international research databases from January 2000 to September 2009. Twenty studies were selected and reviewed. The most frequently used learning strategies of social cognitive theory was skill mastery by practice and feedback (N = 13), followed by social or verbal persuasion by group members (N = 7) and, however, observation learning and reinterpretation of symptoms by debriefing or discussion were not used any of the studies. Eight studies used only one strategy to enhance self-efficacy and six used two. A lack of consistency regarding the content and clinical efficacy of the self-efficacy theory-based self-management programs is found among the reviewed studies on enhancing self-efficacy in Koreans with hypertension and diabetes mellitus. Further research on the effectiveness of these theory-based self-management programs for patients with chronic diseases in Korea and other countries is recommended.

  4. On-Chip generation of polymer microcapsules through droplet coalescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eqbal, Md Danish; Gundabala, Venkat; Gundabala lab Team

    Alginate microbeads and microcapsules have numerous applications in drug delivery, tissue engineering and other biomedical areas due to their unique properties. Microcapsules with liquid core are of particular interest in the area of cell encapsulation. Various methods such as coacervation, emulsification, micro-nozzle, etc. exist for the generation of microbeads and microcapsules. However, these methods have several drawbacks like coagulation, non-uniformity, and polydispersity. In this work we present a method for complete on chip generation of alginate microcapsules (single core as well as double core) through the use of droplet merging technique. For this purpose, a combined Coflow and T-junction configuration is implemented in a hybrid glass-PDMS (Polydimethylsiloxane) microfluidic device. Efficient generation is achieved through precise matching of the generation rates of the coalescing drops. Through this approach, microcapsules with intact single and double (liquid) cores surrounded by alginate shell have been successfully generated and characterized.

  5. Coalescence of Black Hole-Neutron Star Binaries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaru Shibata

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available We review the current status of general relativistic studies for the coalescence of black hole-neutron star (BH-NS binaries. First, procedures for a solution of BH-NS binaries in quasi-equilibrium circular orbits and the numerical results, such as quasi-equilibrium sequence and mass-shedding limit, of the high-precision computation, are summarized. Then, the current status of numerical-relativity simulations for the merger of BH-NS binaries is described. We summarize our understanding for the merger and/or tidal disruption processes, the criterion for tidal disruption, the properties of the remnant formed after the tidal disruption, gravitational waveform, and gravitational-wave spectrum.

  6. On the coalescence-dispersion modeling of turbulent molecular mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Givi, Peyman; Kosaly, George

    1987-01-01

    The general coalescence-dispersion (C/D) closure provides phenomenological modeling of turbulent molecular mixing. The models of Curl and Dopazo and O'Brien appear as two limiting C/D models that bracket the range of results one can obtain by various models. This finding is used to investigate the sensitivtiy of the results to the choice of the model. Inert scalar mixing is found to be less model-sensitive than mixing accompanied by chemical reaction. Infinitely fast chemistry approximation is used to relate the C/D approach to Toor's earlier results. Pure mixing and infinite rate chemistry calculations are compared to study further a recent result of Hsieh and O'Brien who found that higher concentration moments are not sensitive to chemistry.

  7. Coalescence of Black Hole-Neutron Star Binaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Masaru; Taniguchi, Keisuke

    2011-01-01

    We review the current status of general relativistic studies for the coalescence of black hole-neutron star (BH-NS) binaries. First, procedures for a solution of BH-NS binaries in quasi-equilibrium circular orbits and the numerical results, such as quasi-equilibrium sequence and mass-shedding limit, of the high-precision computation, are summarized. Then, the current status of numerical-relativity simulations for the merger of BH-NS binaries is described. We summarize our understanding for the merger and/or tidal disruption processes, the criterion for tidal disruption, the properties of the remnant formed after the tidal disruption, gravitational waveform, and gravitational-wave spectrum.

  8. Caustics-induced coalescence of small droplets near a vortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deepu, P.; Ravichandran, S.; Govindarajan, Rama

    2017-02-01

    How droplets grow rapidly from 10 to 50 μ m is an outstanding question in cloud physics. We show theoretically and numerically that caustics, locations of multivalued droplet velocity, of small droplets near a single planar steady vortex offer one route through this bottleneck. Such a vortex serves as a simple model for the more complicated turbulence field existing in clouds. Within a special radial distance rc from the vortex center, droplets closer to the vortex can centrifugally overtake those farther out and coalesce. Small polydispersity increases rc dramatically, enabling repeated collisions at short time intervals and formation of large droplets. Our results show that caustics brought about in a polydisperse suspension could offer a mechanistic explanation of accelerated rain initiation.

  9. Coalescence Sampling and Analysis of Aerosols using Aerosol Optical Tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddrell, Allen E; Miles, Rachael E H; Bzdek, Bryan R; Reid, Jonathan P; Hopkins, Rebecca J; Walker, Jim S

    2017-02-21

    We present a first exploratory study to assess the use of aerosol optical tweezers as an instrument for sampling and detecting accumulation- and coarse-mode aerosol. A subpicoliter aqueous aerosol droplet is captured in the optical trap and used as a sampling volume, accreting mass from a free-flowing aerosol generated by a medical nebulizer or atomizer. Real-time measurements of the initial stability in size, refractive index, and composition of the sampling droplet inferred from Raman spectroscopy confirm that these quantities can be measured with high accuracy and low noise. Typical standard deviations in size and refractive index of the sampling droplet over a period of 200 s are droplet as discrete coalescence events. With accumulation-mode aerosol, we show that fluxes as low as 0.068 pg s -1 can be detected over a 50 s period, equivalent to ∼3 pg of sampled material.

  10. A Formative Evaluation of Healthy Heroes: A Photo Comic Book-Social Cognitive Theory Based Obesity Prevention Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branscum, Paul; Housley, Alexandra; Bhochhibhoya, Amir; Hayes, Logan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Low consumption of fruits and vegetables is often associated with poor diet quality, and childhood obesity. The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility, and conduct a formative evaluation, of Healthy Heroes, an innovative, social cognitive theory-based program that uses child created photo-comic books to promote fruit and…

  11. Analysis of a Moodle-Based Training Program about the Pedagogical Content Knowledge of Evolution Theory and Natural Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stasinakis, Panagiotis K.; Kalogiannnakis, Michail

    2017-01-01

    In this study we aim to find out whether a training program for secondary school science teachers which was organized based on the model of Pedagogical Content Knowledge (PCK), could improve their individual PCK for a specific scientific issue. The Evolution Theory (ET) and the Natural Selection (NS) were chosen as the scientific issues of…

  12. Integrating Life Skills Into a Theory-Based Drug-Use Prevention Program: Effectiveness among Junior High Students in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chiu-Mieh; Chien, Li-Yin; Cheng, Chin-Feng; Guo, Jong-Long

    2012-01-01

    Background: Drug use has been noted among students in Taiwan during the past decade and schools have a role in preventing or delaying students' drug use. We developed and evaluated a school-based, drug-use prevention program integrating the theory of planned behavior (TPB) and life skills for junior high school students. Methods: We recruited 441…

  13. Cope and Grow: A Grounded Theory Approach to Early College Entrants' Lived Experiences and Changes in a STEM Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, David Yun; Steenbergen-Hu, Saiying; Zhou, Yehan

    2015-01-01

    In this grounded theory qualitative study, we interviewed 34 graduates from one cohort of 51 students from a prestigious early college entrance program in China. Based on the interview data, we identified distinct convergent and divergent patterns of lived experiences and changes. We found several dominant themes, including peers' mutual…

  14. A Program Based on the Pragmatic Theory to Develop Grammatical Structure Comprehension Skills for Foreign Learners of Arabic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsamman, Marwan

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed at designing a program based on the Pragmatic theory to develop grammatical structure comprehension skills for foreign learners of Arabic and examining its effectiveness. Hence, the problem of the study has been summarized in the weakness of grammatical structure comprehension skills for foreign learners of Arabic and in the need…

  15. Coalescence of silver clusters by immersion in diluted HF solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milazzo, R. G.; Mio, A. M.; D’Arrigo, G.; Spinella, C. [CNR-IMM Institute for Microelectronics and Microsystems, I-95121 Catania (Italy); Grimaldi, M. G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Università di Catania, I-95123 Catania (Italy); MATIS IMM-CNR, I-95123 Catania (Italy); Rimini, E. [CNR-IMM Institute for Microelectronics and Microsystems, I-95121 Catania (Italy); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Università di Catania, I-95123 Catania (Italy)

    2015-07-14

    The galvanic displacement deposition of silver on H-terminated Si (100) in the time scale of seconds is instantaneous and characterized by a cluster density of 10{sup 11}-10{sup 12} cm{sup −2}. The amount of deposited Ag follows a t{sup 1/2} dependence in agreement with a Cottrell diffusion limited mechanism. At the same time, during the deposition, the cluster density reduces by a factor 5. This behavior is in contrast with the assumption of immobile clusters. We show in the present work that coalescence and aggregation occur also in the samples immersed in the diluted hydrofluoric acid (HF) solution without the presence of Ag{sup +}. Clusters agglomerate according to a process of dynamic coalescence, typical of colloids, followed by atomic redistribution at the contact regions with the generation of multiple internal twins and stacking-faults. The normalized size distributions in terms of r/r{sub mean} follow also the prediction of the Smoluchowski ripening mechanism. No variation of the cluster density occurs for samples immersed in pure H{sub 2}O solution. The different behavior might be associated to the strong attraction of clusters to oxide-terminated Si surface in presence of water. The silver clusters are instead weakly bound to hydrophobic H-terminated Si in presence of HF. HF causes then the detachment of clusters and a random movement on the silicon surface with mobility of about 10{sup −13} cm{sup 2}/s. Attractive interaction (probably van der Waals) among particles promotes coarsening.

  16. Effect of neighboring perturbations on drop coalescence at an interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordoloi, Ankur Deep; Longmire, Ellen K.

    2012-06-01

    Coalescence at a quiescent silicone oil/water glycerine interface was investigated for water/glycerine drops with Bond number ˜7 and Ohnesorge number = 0.01 using high-speed imaging and time-resolved tomographic particle image velocimetry. In addition to a single drop case, three perturbation cases were considered corresponding with a second drop, a solid particle wetted in oil, and a solid particle wetted in water/glycerine placed adjacent to the coalescing drop. Each perturbing object caused an initial tilting of the drop, influencing its rupture location and eventual collapse behavior. Once tilted, drops typically ruptured near their lowest vertical position which was located either toward or away from the perturbing object depending on the case. The initial retraction speed of the ruptured film was higher for drops initially tilted at significant angles, and the local variations in retraction speed correlated well with the expected variations in local film thickness. The drop fluid always collapsed away from the drop axis in the direction of the rupture location in all unperturbed or perturbed cases. In the case of a drop next to a particle wetted in water/glycerine, the collapsing fluid travelled away from the particle, and the downward propagating vortex ring which developed was similar to that resulting from an unperturbed drop rupture. By contrast, the drop fluid collapsed toward either a second drop or a particle wetted in oil. The resulting vortex rings were more asymmetric, and viscous interaction between the particle and collapsing fluid hindered the downward motion of the associated ring.

  17. Integrating coalescent and ecological niche modeling in comparative phylogeography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carstens, Bryan C; Richards, Corinne L

    2007-06-01

    Understanding the factors that contribute to the formation of population genetic structure is a central goal of phylogeographic research, but achieving this goal can be complicated by the stochastic variance inherent to genetic processes. Statistical approaches to testing phylogeographic hypotheses accommodate this stochasticity by evaluating competing models of putative historical population structure, often by simulating null distributions of the expected variance. The effectiveness of these tests depends on the biological realism of the models. Information from the fossil record can aid in reconstructing the historical distributions of some taxa. However, for the majority of taxa, which lack sufficient fossils, paleodistributional modeling can provide valuable spatial-geographic data concerning ancestral distributions. Paleodistributional models are generated by projecting ecological niche models, which predict the current distribution of each species, onto a model of past climatic conditions. Here, we generate paleodistributional models describing the suitable habitat during the last glacial maximum for lineages from the mesic forests of the Pacific Northwest of North America, and use these models to generate alternative phylogeographic hypotheses. Coalescent simulations are then used to test these hypotheses to improve our understanding of the historical events that promoted the formation of population genetic structure in this ecosystem. Results from Pacific Northwest mesic forest organisms demonstrate the utility of these combined approaches. Paleodistribution models and population genetic structure are congruent across three amphibian lineages, suggesting that they have responded in a concerted manner to environmental change. Two other species, a willow and a water vole, despite being currently codistributed and having similar population genetic structure, were predicted by the paleodistributional model to have had markedly different distributions during

  18. An algorithm for computing the gene tree probability under the multispecies coalescent and its application in the inference of population tree.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yufeng

    2016-06-15

    Gene tree represents the evolutionary history of gene lineages that originate from multiple related populations. Under the multispecies coalescent model, lineages may coalesce outside the species (population) boundary. Given a species tree (with branch lengths), the gene tree probability is the probability of observing a specific gene tree topology under the multispecies coalescent model. There are two existing algorithms for computing the exact gene tree probability. The first algorithm is due to Degnan and Salter, where they enumerate all the so-called coalescent histories for the given species tree and the gene tree topology. Their algorithm runs in exponential time in the number of gene lineages in general. The second algorithm is the STELLS algorithm (2012), which is usually faster but also runs in exponential time in almost all the cases. In this article, we present a new algorithm, called CompactCH, for computing the exact gene tree probability. This new algorithm is based on the notion of compact coalescent histories: multiple coalescent histories are represented by a single compact coalescent history. The key advantage of our new algorithm is that it runs in polynomial time in the number of gene lineages if the number of populations is fixed to be a constant. The new algorithm is more efficient than the STELLS algorithm both in theory and in practice when the number of populations is small and there are multiple gene lineages from each population. As an application, we show that CompactCH can be applied in the inference of population tree (i.e. the population divergence history) from population haplotypes. Simulation results show that the CompactCH algorithm enables efficient and accurate inference of population trees with much more haplotypes than a previous approach. The CompactCH algorithm is implemented in the STELLS software package, which is available for download at http://www.engr.uconn.edu/ywu/STELLS.html ywu@engr.uconn.edu Supplementary data are

  19. OPTIMUM COALESCENCE PLATE ARC LENGTH FOR REMOVAL OF OIL DROPLETS FROM WASTEWATERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. S. ALMAROUF

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Aspects on the arc length of coalescence plates of a oil-water separator as determinant factors for removal of oil droplets from wastewaters were investigated. The primary component of the separator consists of a series of concave and convex shaped coalescence plates to form multiple angles plate arrangement for enhancement of oil droplet coalescence onto the plates. Experimental results were obtained using different overflow rates and different arc lengths of coalescence plates, and were statistically evaluated. As a result, a series of mathematical equations pertaining to oil removal efficiencies from wastewaters were formulated. The predicted and observed data were compared, and optimal coalescence plate arc lengths for maximum oil droplets removal from wastewater at different flow rates were determined. It was also found that coalescence plate arc length had a more significant effect on oil removal efficiency at high overflow rate than at low overflow rate, i.e. oil removal efficiency dropped with reducing coalescence plate arc length. It was also concluded that removal efficiency of emulsified oil droplets from wastewater was strongly correlated to the system’s overflow rate and horizontal projection of arc coalescence plate area.

  20. Nanoparticles of varying hydrophobicity at the emulsion droplet-water interface: adsorption and coalescence stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simovic, Spomenka; Prestidge, Clive A

    2004-09-14

    The coalescence stability of poly(dimethylsiloxane) emulsion droplets in the presence of silica nanoparticles ( approximately 50 nm) of varying contact angles has been investigated. Nanoparticle adsorption isotherms were determined by depletion from solution. The coalescence kinetics (determined under coagulation conditions at high salt concentration) and the physical structure of coalesced droplets were determined from optical microscopy. Fully hydrated silica nanoparticles adsorb with low affinity, reaching a maximum surface coverage that corresponds to a close packed monolayer, based on the effective particle radius and controlled by the salt concentration. Adsorbed layers of hydrophilic nanoparticles introduce a barrier to coalescence of approximately 1 kT, only slightly reduce the coalescence kinetics, and form kinetically unstable networks at high salt concentrations. Chemically hydrophobized silica nanoparticles, over a wide range of contact angles (25 to >90 degrees ), adsorb at the droplet interface with high affinity and to coverages equivalent to close-packed multilayers. Adsorption isotherms are independent of the contact angle, suggesting that hydrophobic attraction overcomes electrostatic repulsion in all cases. The highly structured and rigid adsorbed layers significantly reduce coalescence kinetics: at or above monolayer surface coverage, stable flocculated networks of droplets form and, regardless of their wettability, particles are not detached from the interface during coalescence. At sub-monolayer nanoparticle coverages, limited coalescence is observed and interfacial saturation restricts the droplet size increase. When the nanoparticle interfacial coverage is >0.7 and droplets, whereas mixtures of hydrophobized and hydrophilic nanoparticles do not effectively stabilize emulsion droplets.

  1. Coalescence kinetics of oil-in-water emulsions studied with microfluidics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krebs, T.; Schroen, C.G.P.H.; Boom, R.M.

    2013-01-01

    We report the results of experiments on the coalescence dynamics in flowing oil-in-water emulsions using an integrated microfluidic device. The microfluidic circuit permits direct observation of shear-induced collisions and coalescence events between emulsion droplets. Three mineral oils with a

  2. The occurrence of in-mouth coalescence of emulsion droplets in relation to perception of fat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dresselhuis, D.M.; Hoog, de E.H.A.; Cohen Stuart, M.A.; Vingerhoeds, M.H.; Aken, van G.A.

    2008-01-01

    We studied the relation between sensitivity of emulsions for in-mouth coalescence and perception of fat-related attributes, such as creaminess as well as the relation with in vivo perceived and ex vivo measured friction. Emulsions with varying expected sensitivity towards in-mouth coalescence were

  3. Coalescence as a hiatus resolution strategy in chiKaranga – a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Coalescence is the preferred strategy across a Prosodic Word boundary, precisely across a host-clitic boundary (Postlexical Level), and it involves the elision of V1 with the preservation of the feature [open] that is passed onto the following vowel. In chiKaranga, coalescence occurs when the clitic is minimally a CV syllable.

  4. Challenges of implementating a doctoral program in an international exchange in Cuba through the lens of Kanter's empowerment theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scanlan, Judith M; Abdul Hernandéz, C

    2014-08-01

    The literature in international education focuses primarily on the experiences of western students in developing countries, international students in western universities, the development of an educational program in a developing country, or internationalization of curricula in western universities. There is little in the literature that addresses the challenges students and participating faculty face when implementing a graduate program in a developing country. The purpose of this paper is to describe and analyze the challenges of implementing a doctoral program in an international exchange through the lens of Kanter's theory of empowerment. Recommendations to address these challenges will be made. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Merging contemporary learning theory with mental health promotion to produce an effective schools-based program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAllister, Margaret; Knight, Bruce Allen; Withyman, Cathie

    2017-07-01

    Approximately three quarters of all major mental disorders begin in adolescence. Finding ways to buffer against stress, access social support and connection and flexibly draw upon a range of coping mechanisms are vital strategies that young people can use to promote mental health and wellbeing and to navigate this turbulent life transition successfully. Within Australia, like other parts of the world such as the UK and the USA, it is a sad reality that when young people do become distressed they are not self-caring or supporting others effectively, and not seeking or receiving appropriate help. In order to respond proactively to this issue, a nurse-initiated mental health promotion program was developed. It is termed, iCARE, which stands for Creating Awareness, Resilience and Enhanced Mental Health. The aim of this paper is to discuss the underpinning educational theory that assists in developing in young people a sense of belonging, empathy, self-care and resilience, and why the strategies chosen to engage young people are likely to be effective. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Expansion of Parents' Undetermined Experience in Socioeducational Programs: Extending the Dialogical Self Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulanger, Dany

    2017-12-01

    The Dialogic Self Theory (DST-Hermans et al. Integrative Psychology and Behavioral Sciences, 51(4), 1-31, 2017) is extended here in its dynamic aspects through focusing on the notions of indeterminacy, emptiness and movement. Linking with Husserl, I propose moving the dialogical self (DS) from a clear position in the "repertory of the Self" to an undetermined horizon. This makes it possible to introduce "holes" (emptiness) into the schematic representation of the "repertory of the Self". Yet Husserl's concept of horizon seems to focus too much on making the indeterminable determinate. To overcome this limit, I incorporate Bergson's concept of empty form into the DST. This enables conceptualising the extension and emergence of horizon. Extending Bergson's concept of organisation, it is possible to see how the expansion of the horizon in a movement of globalisation does not necessarily entail the disorganisation of the DS but rather to its further organisation. Extending the system of DS by Hermans et al. Integrative Psychology and Behavioral Sciences, 51(4), 1-31, (2017), I open by suggesting that movements are both horizontal (between people) and vertical (between the person, the institutions and the norms) connectors. My conceptual propositions are illustrated by parents' and educators' discourses in two Canadian socio-educational programs.

  7. Self-determination theory and weight loss in a Diabetes Prevention Program translation trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trief, Paula M; Cibula, Donald; Delahanty, Linda M; Weinstock, Ruth S

    2017-06-01

    We examined self-determination theory (SDT) and weight loss, and hypothesized that the Diabetes Prevention Program's (DPP) intervention would result in an increase in autonomous regulation of motivation (AR) in participants. Further, that those with higher AR, and those who perceived educators as supporting SDT-defined needs, would lose more weight. Support, Health Information, Nutrition and Exercise (SHINE) Study data (N = 257) were analyzed. SHINE was a randomized, controlled DPP translation trial (2-years, telephonic, primary care staff). Autonomous motivation in males increased significantly, while females showed no change. Males with high AR, but not females, lost more weight. However, the significance of these relationships varied over time. Participants who perceived educators as more supportive of psychological needs lost more weight (especially males). However, effect of support on weight loss was not mediated by AR change. Autonomous motivation and educator support are relevant to male weight loss. Future research might develop interventions to enhance autonomous motivation and educator support, and understand change pathways.

  8. SAFSIM theory manual: A computer program for the engineering simulation of flow systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobranich, D.

    1993-12-01

    SAFSIM (System Analysis Flow SIMulator) is a FORTRAN computer program for simulating the integrated performance of complex flow systems. SAFSIM provides sufficient versatility to allow the engineering simulation of almost any system, from a backyard sprinkler system to a clustered nuclear reactor propulsion system. In addition to versatility, speed and robustness are primary SAFSIM development goals. SAFSIM contains three basic physics modules: (1) a fluid mechanics module with flow network capability; (2) a structure heat transfer module with multiple convection and radiation exchange surface capability; and (3) a point reactor dynamics module with reactivity feedback and decay heat capability. Any or all of the physics modules can be implemented, as the problem dictates. SAFSIM can be used for compressible and incompressible, single-phase, multicomponent flow systems. Both the fluid mechanics and structure heat transfer modules employ a one-dimensional finite element modeling approach. This document contains a description of the theory incorporated in SAFSIM, including the governing equations, the numerical methods, and the overall system solution strategies.

  9. Application of parametric equations of motion to study the resonance coalescence in H2(+).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalita, Dhruba J; Gupta, Ashish K

    2012-12-07

    Recently, occurrence of coalescence point was reported in H(2)(+) undergoing multiphoton dissociation in strong laser field. We have applied parametric equations of motion and smooth exterior scaling method to study the coalescence phenomenon of H(2)(+). The advantage of this method is that one can easily trace the different states that are changing as the field parameters change. It was reported earlier that in the parameter space, only two bound states coalesce [R. Lefebvre, O. Atabek, M. Sindelka, and N. Moiseyev, Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 123003 (2009)]. However, it is found that increasing the accuracy of the calculation leads to the coalescence between resonance states originating from the bound and the continuum states. We have also reported many other coalescence points.

  10. Development and validation of a social cognitive theory-based survey for elementary nutrition education program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Elisha; Chai, Weiwen; Koszewski, Wanda; Albrecht, Julie

    2015-04-09

    The Social Cognitive Theory (SCT) is a widely used model for developing elementary nutrition education programs; however, few instruments are available to assess the impact of such programs on the main constructs of the SCT. The purposes of this study were: 1) to develop and validate a SCT-based survey instrument that focuses on knowledge, behavior, and self-efficacy for fifth grade students; 2) to assess the relationships between knowledge, behavior, and self-efficacy; and 3) to assess knowledge, behavior, and self-efficacy for healthy eating among the fifth grade students. A 40-item instrument was developed and validated using content validity and tested among 98 fifth grade students for internal consistency reliability. Relationships between knowledge, behavior, and self-efficacy were assessed using Pearson Correlation Coefficients. Differences in behavior and knowledge scores between children with high and low self-efficacy were examined using t-test. Cronbach's alphas for self-efficacy (0.70) and behavior (0.71) subscales of the survey were acceptable, although lower for knowledge (0.56). Summary scores for self-efficacy and behaviors were positively correlated (r = 0.40, P = 0.0001); however, summary knowledge scores were not associated with self-efficacy (r = 0.02, P = 0.88) or behavior scores (r = 0.14, P = 0.23). Participants with high self-efficacy also had significantly higher scores on consuming fruits (P = 0.0009) and dairy products (P = 0.009), eating breakfast (P = 0.008), helping plan family meals (P = 0.0006) and total behaviors for healthy-eating (P = 0.001) compared to those with low self-efficacy. In addition, approximately two thirds of the fifth grade students reported that they did not eat any fruits or vegetables or ate them only once on a typical day. The developed instrument is a reliable and useful tool to assess SCT-based elementary nutrition education programs, particularly for self

  11. Critical Void Volume Fraction fc at Void Coalescence for S235JR Steel at Low Initial Stress Triaxiality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzegorz Kossakowski, Paweł; Wciślik, Wiktor

    2017-10-01

    The paper is concerned with the nucleation, growth and coalescence of microdefects in the form of voids in S235JR steel. The material is known to be one of the basic steel grades commonly used in the construction industry. The theory and methods of damage mechanics were applied to determine and describe the failure mechanisms that occur when the material undergoes deformation. Until now, engineers have generally employed the Gurson-Tvergaard- Needleman model. This material model based on damage mechanics is well suited to define and analyze failure processes taking place in the microstructure of S235JR steel. It is particularly important to determine the critical void volume fraction fc , which is one of the basic parameters of the Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman material model. As the critical void volume fraction fc refers to the failure stage, it is determined from the data collected for the void coalescence phase. A case of multi-axial stresses is considered taking into account the effects of spatial stress state. In this study, the parameter of stress triaxiality η was used to describe the failure phenomena. Cylindrical tensile specimens with a circumferential notch were analysed to obtain low values of initial stress triaxiality (η = 0.556 of the range) in order to determine the critical void volume fraction fc . It is essential to emphasize how unique the method applied is and how different it is from the other more common methods involving parameter calibration, i.e. curve-fitting methods. The critical void volume fraction fc at void coalescence was established through digital image analysis of surfaces of S235JR steel, which involved studying real, physical results obtained directly from the material tested.

  12. A theory-based newsletter nutrition education program reduces nutritional risk and improves dietary intake for congregate meal participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Sarah L; MacNab, Lindsay; Shelley, Mack

    2014-01-01

    At-risk older adults need community-based nutrition programs that improve nutritional status and practices. This 6-month study assessed the impact of the traditional Chef Charles (CC) program (Control) compared to a theory-based CC program (Treatment) on nutritional risk (NR), dietary intakes, self-efficacy (SE), food security (FS), and program satisfaction for congregate meal participants. Participants were mostly educated, single, "food secure" White females. NR change for the treatment group was significantly higher (P = 0.042) than the control group. No differences were noted for SE or FS change and program satisfaction between groups. The overall distribution classification levels of FS changed significantly (P < .001) from pre to post. Over half (n = 46, 76.7%) reported making dietary changes and the majority (n = 52, 86.7%) rated CC as good to excellent. Results suggest the theory-based CC program (treatment) is more effective in reducing NR and dietary practices than the traditional CC program (control).

  13. Asymptotic distributions of coalescence times and ancestral lineage numbers for populations with temporally varying size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hua; Chen, Kun

    2013-07-01

    The distributions of coalescence times and ancestral lineage numbers play an essential role in coalescent modeling and ancestral inference. Both exact distributions of coalescence times and ancestral lineage numbers are expressed as the sum of alternating series, and the terms in the series become numerically intractable for large samples. More computationally attractive are their asymptotic distributions, which were derived in Griffiths (1984) for populations with constant size. In this article, we derive the asymptotic distributions of coalescence times and ancestral lineage numbers for populations with temporally varying size. For a sample of size n, denote by Tm the mth coalescent time, when m + 1 lineages coalesce into m lineages, and An(t) the number of ancestral lineages at time t back from the current generation. Similar to the results in Griffiths (1984), the number of ancestral lineages, An(t), and the coalescence times, Tm, are asymptotically normal, with the mean and variance of these distributions depending on the population size function, N(t). At the very early stage of the coalescent, when t → 0, the number of coalesced lineages n - An(t) follows a Poisson distribution, and as m → n, $$n\\left(n-1\\right){T}_{m}/2N\\left(0\\right)$$ follows a gamma distribution. We demonstrate the accuracy of the asymptotic approximations by comparing to both exact distributions and coalescent simulations. Several applications of the theoretical results are also shown: deriving statistics related to the properties of gene genealogies, such as the time to the most recent common ancestor (TMRCA) and the total branch length (TBL) of the genealogy, and deriving the allele frequency spectrum for large genealogies. With the advent of genomic-level sequencing data for large samples, the asymptotic distributions are expected to have wide applications in theoretical and methodological development for population genetic inference.

  14. Effect of care management program structure on implementation: a normalization process theory analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtrop, Jodi Summers; Potworowski, Georges; Fitzpatrick, Laurie; Kowalk, Amy; Green, Lee A

    2016-08-15

    Care management in primary care can be effective in helping patients with chronic disease improve their health status, however, primary care practices are often challenged with implementation. Further, there are different ways to structure care management that may make implementation more or less successful. Normalization process theory (NPT) provides a means of understanding how a new complex intervention can become routine (normalized) in practice. In this study, we used NPT to understand how care management structure affected how well care management became routine in practice. Data collection involved semi-structured interviews and observations conducted at 25 practices in five physician organizations in Michigan, USA. Practices were selected to reflect variation in physician organizations, type of care management program, and degree of normalization. Data were transcribed, qualitatively coded and analyzed, initially using an editing approach and then a template approach with NPT as a guiding framework. Seventy interviews and 25 observations were completed. Two key structures for care management organization emerged: practice-based care management where the care managers were embedded in the practice as part of the practice team; and centralized care management where the care managers worked independently of the practice work flow and was located outside the practice. There were differences in normalization of care management across practices. Practice-based care management was generally better normalized as compared to centralized care management. Differences in normalization were well explained by the NPT, and in particular the collective action construct. When care managers had multiple and flexible opportunities for communication (interactional workability), had the requisite knowledge, skills, and personal characteristics (skill set workability), and the organizational support and resources (contextual integration), a trusting professional relationship

  15. An experimental evaluation of theory-based mother and mother-child programs for children of divorce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolchik, S A; West, S G; Sandler, I N; Tein, J Y; Coatsworth, D; Lengua, L; Weiss, L; Anderson, E R; Greene, S M; Griffin, W A

    2000-10-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy of 2 theory-based preventive interventions for divorced families: a program for mothers and a dual component mother-child program. The mother program targeted mother-child relationship quality, discipline, interparental conflict, and the father-child relationship. The child program targeted active coping, avoidant coping, appraisals of divorce stressors, and mother-child relationship quality. Families with a 9- to 12-year-old child (N = 240) were randomly assigned to the mother, dual-component, or self-study program. Postintervention comparisons showed significant positive program effects of the mother program versus self-study condition on relationship quality, discipline, attitude toward father-child contact, and adjustment problems. For several outcomes, more positive effects occurred in families with poorer initial functioning. Program effects on externalizing problems were maintained at 6-month follow-up. A few additive effects of the dual-component program occurred for the putative mediators; none occurred for adjustment problems.

  16. A zero-gravity demonstration of the collision and coalescence of water droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, R. J.; Vaughan, O. H.; Smith, R. E.

    1974-01-01

    The mechanics of the collision and coalescence of liquid droplets is one of the main research areas in the fields of nuclear physics, astrophysics, meteorology and fluid mechanics. The crew members on the Skylab 3 and 4 missions were requested to perform demonstrations of the collision and coalescence of water droplets under the low gravity environment at orbital altitude. In Skylab 4 two water droplets with equal volumes, 30 cu cm each, were used. A dark colored droplet (contaminated with grape drink) moving with a velocity of 3.14 cm/sec collided with a stationary pink colored droplet (contaminated with strawberry drink) and coalescence occurred. Theoretical models are proposed to study the various stages of the collision-coalescence processes. Special considerations are concentrated in the investigation of the bounce-coalescence and coalescence-instability processes. The surface tension of the coalesced droplets was calculated to be 52 dynes/cm in perfect agreement with laboratory measurements made after the flight using a reproduction of the liquids.

  17. Chloroplast evolution in the Pinus montezumae complex: a coalescent approach to hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matos, J A; Schaal, B A

    2000-08-01

    This study addresses the evolutionary history of the chloroplast genomes of two closely related pine species, Pinus hartwegii Lindl. and P. montezumae Lamb (subsect. Ponderosae) using coalescent theory and some of the statistical tools that have been developed from it during the past two decades. Pinus hartwegii and P. montezumae are closely related species in the P. montezumae complex (subsect. Ponderosae) of Mexico and Central America. Pinus hartwegii is a high elevation species, whereas P. montezumae occurs at lower elevations. The two species occur on many of the same mountains throughout Mexico. A total of 350 individuals of P. hartwegii and P. montezumae were collected from Nevado de Colima (Jalisco), Cerro Potosí (Nuevo León), Iztaccihuatl/Popocatepetl (México), and Nevado de Toluca (México). The chloroplast genome of P. hartwegii and P. montezumae was mapped using eight restriction enzymes. Fifty-one different haplotypes were characterized; 38 of 160 restriction sites were polymorphic. Clades of most parsimoniously related chloroplast haplotypes are geographically localized and do not overlap in distribution, and the geographically localized clades of haplotypes include both P. hartwegii and P. montezumae. Some haplotypes in the clades occur in only one of the two species, whereas other haplotypes occur in both species. These data strongly suggest ancient and/or ongoing hybridization between P. hartwegii and P. montezumae and a shared chloroplast genome history within geographic regions of Mexico.

  18. Mechanism design: theory and application to welfare-to-work programs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Onderstal, S.

    2008-01-01

    In October 2007, Leonid Hurwicz , Eric Maskin, and Roger Myerson won the Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences "for having laid the foundations of mechanism design theory". My aim is to give you a flavor of what mechanism design theory is and how we can apply it in practice. More in particular, I will

  19. [Research programs on elementary particle and field theories and superconductivity]. [Rockefeller Univ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khuri, N.N.

    1992-01-01

    Research of staff members in theoretical physics is presented in the following areas: super string theory, a new approach to path integrals, new ideas on the renormalization group, nonperturbative chiral gauge theories, the standard model, K meson decays, and the CP problem. Work on high-[Tc] superconductivity and protein folding is also related.

  20. Drop coalescence and liquid flow in a single Plateau border

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Alexandre; Fraysse, Nathalie; Raufaste, Christophe

    2015-05-01

    We report a comprehensive study of the flow of liquid triggered by injecting a droplet into a liquid foam microchannel, also called a Plateau border. This drop-injected experiment reveals an intricate dynamics for the liquid redistribution, with two contrasting regimes observed, ruled either by inertia or viscosity. We devoted a previous study [A. Cohen et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 218303 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.112.218303] to the inertial imbibition regime, unexpected at such small length scales. Here we report other features of interest of the drop-injected experiment, related to the coalescence of the droplet with the liquid microchannel, to both the inertial and viscous regimes, and to the occurrence of liquid flow through the soap films as well as effects of the interfacial rheology. The transition between the two regimes is investigated and qualitatively accounted for. The relevance of our results to liquid foam drainage is tackled by considering the flow of liquid at the nodes of the network of interconnected microchannels. Extensions of our study to liquid foams are discussed.

  1. Effect of neighboring particles on drop coalescence at an interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordoloi, Ankur; Adhikari, Deepak; Longmire, Ellen

    2010-11-01

    The coalescence of a liquid drop in the presence of an adjacent solid particle or liquid drop is studied using high-speed visualization and Tomographic PIV. A drop of water/glycerin (W/G), surrounded by silicone oil of matched refractive index, is released onto an underlying W/G interface. A nylon sphere, neutrally buoyant with respect to the drop liquid, is placed adjacent to the drop. Three initial conditions are considered: the particle is wetted in W/G so that the interface maintains an angle of contact with the particle, the particle is wetted in oil so that it rests above the interface, and the particle is placed so that it maintains an angle of contact with the drop already resting above the interface. These cases are compared with that of two neighboring W/G drops. Off-axis rupture near the solid particle was found to be dominant in cases where the particle was wetted with W/G. However, when the particle was wetted with oil, the point of rupture occurred closer to the drop-axis. The film rupture in the drop is followed by retraction of the film and finally collapse of the drop. Both visualization and PIV results show that the trajectory of the collapsing drop depends on the initial contact condition as well as the rupture location.

  2. Coalescence induced self-propulsion of droplets on superomniphobic surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahabi, Hamed; Wang, Wei; Davies, Seth; Mabry, Joseph M.; Kota, Arun K.

    2017-11-01

    We utilized superomniphobic surfaces to systematically investigate the different regimes of coalescence-induced self-propulsion of liquid droplets with a wide range of droplet radii, viscosities and surface tensions. Our results indicate that for all the liquids studied, the transition from the inertial-capillary regime to the visco-capillary regime occurs over a narrow range of Ohnesorge number Oh 0.02 to 0.05. The non-dimensional jumping velocity Vj* is nearly constant (Vj* 0.2) in the inertial-capillary regime and decreases in the visco-capillary regime as the Ohnesorge number Oh increases, in agreement with prior work. Within the visco-capillary regime, decreasing the droplet radius R0 results in a more rapid decrease in the non-dimensional jumping velocity Vj* compared to increasing the viscosity μ. This is because decreasing the droplet radius R0 increases the inertial-capillary velocity Vic in addition to increasing the Ohnesorge number Oh.

  3. [Effectiveness of the Self-determination Theory based a Motivational Interviewing YOU-TURN Program for Smoking Cessation among Adolescents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Young Sun; Choi, Yeon Hee

    2015-06-01

    In this study, the effectiveness of a motivational interviewing smoking cessation YOU-TURN program for adolescents was examined. The program was based on the self-determination theory. The study was carried out with a nonequivalent control group pretest-posttest design. Participants in the present study were 136 high school students living in D city. The students were assigned to the experimental group (n=52) who participated in the motivational interviewing smoking cessation YOU-TURN program based on self-determination theory, or to the control group (n=84) who participated in a general smoking cessation program. Data were collected from September 1, 2013 through April 30, 2014. Collected data were analyzed using SPSS PC+ 21.0 with Chi-square test, Fisher's exact test, t-test, Mann-Whitney U test, Repeated Measures ANOVA, and MANOVA-Wilk's Lambda. The experimental group had a significant increase in basic psychological needs, and duration of quitting-smoking in comparison with the control group. The experimental group had a significant decrease in cigarettes smoked per day and cotinine in urine in comparison with the control group. The motivational interviewing YOU-TURN program, when delivered to adolescents who smoked, was effective in discouraging smoking, and can be utilized as an effective nursing intervention for adolescents who smoke.

  4. Development And Evaluation of A Sleep Education Program in Middle School Pupils Based on Self-Determination Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Vollmer, Christian; Hammer, Judith; Keller, Christian; Maxand, Anna Karina; DíazMorales, Juan Francisco; Randler, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    Education on sleep hygiene improves sleep knowledge. However, the literature shows that improvements in adolescents’ sleep hygiene behaviour are less convincing. We developed an educational intervention for 6th graders based on self-determination theory and evaluated this program in a pre-post-design with a control group. Pre-test was one week before the intervention, POST1 was directly afterwards, POST2 with a delay of one week, and POST3 after six weeks. Morningness was positively correlate...

  5. The CIFF proof procedure for abductive logic programming with constraints: Theory, implementation and experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mancarella, P.; Terreni, G.; Sadri, F.; Toni, F.; Endriss, U.

    2009-01-01

    We present the CIFF proof procedure for abductive logic programming with constraints, and we prove its correctness. CIFF is an extension of the IFF proof procedure for abductive logic programming, relaxing the original restrictions over variable quantification (allowedness conditions) and

  6. Pedagogical perspectives and implicit theories of teaching: First year science teachers emerging from a constructivist science education program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Michael James

    Traditional, teacher-centered pedagogies dominate current teaching practice in science education despite numerous research-based assertions that promote more progressive, student-centered teaching methods. Best-practice research emerging from science education reform efforts promotes experiential, collaborative learning environments in line with the constructivist referent. Thus there is a need to identify specific teacher education program designs that will promote the utilization of constructivist theory among new teachers. This study explored the learning-to-teach process of four first-year high school teachers, all graduates of a constructivist-based science education program known as Teacher Education Environments in Mathematics and Science (TEEMS). Pedagogical perspectives and implicit theories were explored to identify common themes and their relation to the pre-service program and the teaching context. Qualitative methods were employed to gather and analyze the data. In depth, semi-structured interviews (Seidman, 1998) formed the primary data for probing the context and details of the teachers' experience as well as the personal meaning derived from first year practice. Teacher journals and teaching artifacts were utilized to validate and challenge the primary data. Through an open-coding technique (Strauss & Corbin, 1990) codes, and themes were generated from which assertions were made. The pedagogical perspectives apparent among the participants in this study emerged as six patterns in teaching method: (1) utilization of grouping strategies, (2) utilization of techniques that allow the students to help teach, (3) similar format of daily instructional strategy, (4) utilization of techniques intended to promote engagement, (5) utilization of review strategies, (6) assessment by daily monitoring and traditional tests, (7) restructuring content knowledge. Assertions from implicit theory data include: (1) Time constraints and lack of teaching experience made

  7. The SEEK Mentoring Program: An Application of the Goal-Setting Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorrentino, Diane M.

    2007-01-01

    This article describes a pilot academic mentoring program carried out over 1 semester in the SEEK Program at the College of Staten Island, CUNY. The program was utilized to provide a resource for students whose overall grade point average was below 2.5, placing them at risk for academic dismissal. A goal-setting approach was used to aid the…

  8. Theoretical and experimental investigation of the coalescence efficiency of droplets in simple shear flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mousa, H.A.H.; Koutsoukos, P.G.; Agterof, W.G.M.; Mellema, J.

    2001-01-01

    The coalescence efficiency of two Newtonian droplets submerged in a Newtonian fluid subjected to a simple shear flow was investigated experimentally and theoretically. The experimental investigation was based on observing collisions between two droplets under a microscope. The theoretical

  9. An Algorithm for Emulsion Stability Simulations: Account of Flocculation, Coalescence, Surfactant Adsorption and the Process of Ostwald Ripening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The first algorithm for Emulsion Stability Simulations (ESS was presented at the V Conferencia Iberoamericana sobre Equilibrio de Fases y Diseño de Procesos [Luis, J.; García-Sucre, M.; Urbina-Villalba, G. Brownian Dynamics Simulation of Emulsion Stability In: Equifase 99. Libro de Actas, 1st Ed., Tojo J., Arce, A., Eds.; Solucion’s: Vigo, Spain, 1999; Volume 2, pp. 364-369]. The former version of the program consisted on a minor modification of the Brownian Dynamics algorithm to account for the coalescence of drops. The present version of the program contains elaborate routines for time-dependent surfactant adsorption, average diffusion constants, and Ostwald ripening.

  10. Effect of Educational Program on Milk Consumption based on the Theory of Planned Behavior among Girl Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afsaneh Gholipour-Baboli

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background An adequate level of calcium intake during growth years can extensively help to stabilize calcium level and increase bone density. However, calcium intake in female school-age students is low. This study aimed to determine effect of educational programs on milk consumption based on the theory of planned behavior among 7th grade girl students in Kashan city, Iran. Materials and Methods: This studywas interventional quasi‑experimentalresearch. 220 girl students (110 for interventional group and 110 for control group, were selected by simple random sampling from schools in Kashan city, Iran. The researcher-made questionnaire based on theory of planned behavior used for data collection. Interventional programs were performed using lectures, poster, and pamphlet. The questionnaire was completed by the students twice, before and two months after the implementation of educational program. Data were analyzed by SPSS version 20.0 using descriptive statistics and independent t-test. Results: After the implementation of the educational programs, the rate of milk consumption at home significantly increased among the interventional group (P

  11. Drop coalescence through a liquid/liquid interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed-Kassim, Zulfaa; Longmire, Ellen K.

    2004-07-01

    Particle image velocimetry (PIV) experiments were conducted to study the coalescence of single drops through planar liquid/liquid interfaces. Sequences of velocity vector fields were obtained with a high-speed video camera and subsequent PIV analysis. Two ambient liquids with different viscosity but similar density were examined resulting in Reynolds numbers based on a surface tension velocity of 10 and 26. Prior to rupture, the drops rested on a thin film of ambient liquid above an underlying interface. After rupture, which was typically off-axis, the free edge of the thin film receded rapidly allowing the drop fluid to sink into the bulk liquid below. Vorticity generated in the collapsing fluid developed into a vortex ring straddling the upper drop surface. The ring core traveled radially inward with a ring-shaped capillary wave effectively pinching the upper drop surface and increasing the drop collapse speed. The inertia of the collapse deflected the interface downward before it rebounded upward. During this time, the vortex core split so that part of its initial vorticity moved inside the drop fluid while part remained in the ambient fluid above it. A second ring-shaped capillary wave formed along the interface outside of the drop and propagated radially outward during the collapse. Changing the ambient fluid viscosity resulted in several effects. First, the velocity of the receding free edge was smaller for higher ambient viscosity. Second, the pinching of the upper drop surface caused by the shrinking capillary ring wave was stronger when the ambient viscosity was lower, and this resulted in a higher maximum collapse speed and higher vorticity values in the dominant vortex ring.

  12. The effect of surface-active solutes on bubble coalescence in the presence of ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Judy; Kentish, Sandra E; Ashokkumar, Muthupandian

    2005-03-24

    The sonication of an aqueous solution generates cavitation bubbles, which may coalesce and produce larger bubbles. This paper examines the effect of surface-active solutes on such bubble coalescence in an ultrasonic field. A novel capillary system has been designed to measure the change in the total volume resulting from the sonication of aqueous solutions with 515 kHz ultrasound pulses. This volume change reflects the total volume of larger gas bubbles generated by the coalescence of cavitation bubbles during the sonication process. The total volume of bubbles generated is reduced when surface-active solutes are present. We have proposed that this decrease in the total bubble volume results from the inhibition of bubble coalescence brought about by the surface-active solutes. The observed results revealed similarities with bubble coalescence data reported in the literature in the absence of ultrasound. It was found that for uncharged and zwitterionic surface-active solutes, the extent of bubble coalescence is affected by the surface activity of the solutes. The addition of 0.1 M NaCl to such solutes had no effect on the extent of bubble coalescence. Conversely, for charged surface-active solutes, the extent of bubble coalescence appears to be dominated by electrostatic effects. The addition of 0.1 M NaCl to charged surfactant solutions was observed to increase the total bubble volume close to that of the zwitterionic surfactant. This suggests the involvement of electrostatic interactions between cavitation bubbles in the presence of charged surfactants in the solution.

  13. Comparison of nonwoven fiberglass and stainless steel microfiber media in aerosol coalescence filtration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzo, Gabriel

    Coalescing filters are used to remove small liquid droplets from air streams. They have numerous industrial applications including dehumidification, cabin air filtration, compressed air filtration, metal working, CCV, and agriculture. In compressed air systems, oils used for lubrication of compressor parts can aerosolize into the main air stream causing potential contamination concerns for downstream applications. In many systems, humid air can present problems to sensitive equipment and sensors. As the humid air cools, small water drops condense and can disrupt components that need to be kept dry. Fibrous nonwoven filter media are commonly used to coalesce small drops into larger drops for easier removal. The coalescing performance of a medium is dependent upon several parameters including permeability, porosity, and wettability. In many coalescing filters, glass fibers are used. In this work, the properties of steel fiber media are measured to see how these properties compare to glass fiber media. Steel fiber media has different permeability, porosity and wettability to oil and water than fiber glass media. These differences can impact coalescence performance. The impact of these differences in properties on coalescence filtration performance was evaluated in a coalescence test apparatus. The overall coalescence performance of the steel and glass nonwoven fiber media are compared using a filtration efficiency and filtration index. In many cases, the stainless steel media performed comparably to fiber glass media with efficiencies near 90%. Since stainless steel media had lower pressure drops than fiber glass media, its filtration index values were significantly higher. Broader impact of this work is the use of stainless steel fiber media as an alternative to fiber glass media in applications where aerosol filtration is needed to protect the environment or sensitive equipment and sensors.

  14. Inference of epidemiological dynamics based on simulated phylogenies using birth-death and coalescent models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronika Boskova

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Quantifying epidemiological dynamics is crucial for understanding and forecasting the spread of an epidemic. The coalescent and the birth-death model are used interchangeably to infer epidemiological parameters from the genealogical relationships of the pathogen population under study, which in turn are inferred from the pathogen genetic sequencing data. To compare the performance of these widely applied models, we performed a simulation study. We simulated phylogenetic trees under the constant rate birth-death model and the coalescent model with a deterministic exponentially growing infected population. For each tree, we re-estimated the epidemiological parameters using both a birth-death and a coalescent based method, implemented as an MCMC procedure in BEAST v2.0. In our analyses that estimate the growth rate of an epidemic based on simulated birth-death trees, the point estimates such as the maximum a posteriori/maximum likelihood estimates are not very different. However, the estimates of uncertainty are very different. The birth-death model had a higher coverage than the coalescent model, i.e. contained the true value in the highest posterior density (HPD interval more often (2-13% vs. 31-75% error. The coverage of the coalescent decreases with decreasing basic reproductive ratio and increasing sampling probability of infecteds. We hypothesize that the biases in the coalescent are due to the assumption of deterministic rather than stochastic population size changes. Both methods performed reasonably well when analyzing trees simulated under the coalescent. The methods can also identify other key epidemiological parameters as long as one of the parameters is fixed to its true value. In summary, when using genetic data to estimate epidemic dynamics, our results suggest that the birth-death method will be less sensitive to population fluctuations of early outbreaks than the coalescent method that assumes a deterministic exponentially growing

  15. Gravitational Waves from Coalescing Binary Black Holes: Theoretical and Experimental Challenges

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2010-01-01

    (LIGO/VIRGO/GEO/...) is currently taking data near its planned sensitivity. Coalescing black hole binaries are among the most promising, and most exciting, gravitational wave sources for these detectors. The talk will review the theoretical and experimental challenges that must be met in order to successfully detect gravitational waves from coalescing black hole binaries, and to be able to reliably measure the physical parameters of the source (masses, spins, ...).

  16. Characterization of solids deposited on the modular caustic-side solvent extraction unit (MCU) coalescer media removed in October 2014

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fondeur, F. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-03-01

    In February 2015, Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) received a Strip Effluent (SE) coalescer (FLT-304) from MCU. That coalescer was first installed at MCU in July 2014 and removed in October 2014. While processing approximately 31,400 gallons of strip solution, the pressure drop steadily increased from 1 psi to beyond the administrative limit of 20 psi. The physical and chemical analysis was conducted on this coalescer to determine the mechanism that led to the plugging of this coalescer. Characterization of this coalescer revealed the adsorption of organic containing amines as well as MCU modifier. The amines are probably from the decomposition of the suppressor (TiDG) as well as from bacteria. This adsorption may have changed the surface energetics (characteristics) of the coalescer fibers and therefore, their wetting behavior. A very small amount of inorganic solids were found to have deposited on this coalescer (possibly an artifact of cleaning the coalescer with Boric acid. However, we believe that inorganic precipitation, as has been seen in the past, did not play a role in the high pressure drop rise of this coalescer. With regards to the current practice of reducing the radioactive content of the SE coalescer, it is recommended that future SE coalescer should be flushed with 10 mM boric acid which is currently used at MCU. Plugging of the SE coalescer was most likely due to the formation and accumulation of a water-in-oil emulsion that reduced the overall porosity of the coalescer. There is also evidence that a bimodal oil particle distribution may have entered and deposited in the coalescer and caused the initial increase in pressure drop.

  17. Testing general relativity with compact coalescing binaries: comparing exact and predictive methods to compute the Bayes factor

    CERN Document Server

    Del Pozzo, Walter; Mandel, Ilya; Vecchio, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    The second generation of gravitational-wave detectors is scheduled to start operations in 2015. Gravitational-wave signatures of compact binary coalescences could be used to accurately test the strong-field dynamical predictions of general relativity. Computationally expensive data analysis pipelines, including TIGER, have been developed to carry out such tests. As a means to cheaply assess whether a particular deviation from general relativity can be detected, Cornish et al. and Vallisneri recently proposed an approximate scheme to compute the Bayes factor between a general-relativity gravitational-wave model and a model representing a class of alternative theories of gravity parametrised by one additional parameter. This approximate scheme is based on only two easy-to-compute quantities: the signal-to-noise ratio of the signal and the fitting factor between the signal and the manifold of possible waveforms within general relativity. In this work, we compare the prediction from the approximate formula agains...

  18. Safeguarding Self-Governance: A Grounded Theory of Older Patients’ Pattern of Behavior in Relation to their Relatives in Fast-track Programs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berthelsen, Connie B.; Frederiksen, Kirsten; Lindhardt Damsgaard, Tove

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to generate a grounded theory of older patients’ pattern of behavior in relation to their relatives’ involvement in fast-track programs during total joint replacement. Sixteen patients were recruited in orthopedic wards. Data collection included 11 interviews......-governance emerged in the analysis as the core category of our theory and pattern of behavior of the older patients in relation to their relatives. The older patients’ main concern was to complete the fast-track program while maintaining autonomy, which they resolved through four strategies of actions: embracing......, shielding, distancing, and masking. Keywords: Fast-track program, grounded theory, older patients, relatives, total joint replacement....

  19. Assessment of partial coalescence in whippable oil-in-water food emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrut, Raul Flaviu; Danthine, Sabine; Blecker, Christophe

    2016-03-01

    Partial coalescence influences to a great extent the properties of final food products such as ice cream and whipped toppings. In return, the partial coalescence occurrence and development are conditioned, in such systems, by the emulsion's intrinsic properties (e.g. solid fat content, fat crystal shape and size), formulation (e.g. protein content, surfactants presence) and extrinsic factors (e.g. cooling rate, shearing). A set of methods is available for partial coalescence investigation and quantification. These methods are critically reviewed in this paper, balancing the weaknesses of the methods in terms of structure alteration (for turbidity, dye dilution, etc.) and assumptions made for mathematical models (for particle size determination) with their advantages (good repeatability, high sensitivity, etc.). With the methods proposed in literature, the partial coalescence investigations can be conducted quantitatively and/or qualitatively. Good correlation were observed between some of the quantitative methods such as dye dilution, calorimetry, fat particle size; while a poor correlation was found in the case of solvent extraction method with other quantitative methods. The most suitable way for partial coalescence quantification was implied to be the fat particle size method, which would give results with a high degree of confidence if used in combination with a microscopic technique for the confirmation of partial coalescence as the main destabilization mechanism. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. The effect of surfactant crystallization on partial coalescence in O/W emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goibier, Lucie; Lecomte, Sophie; Leal-Calderon, Fernando; Faure, Chrystel

    2017-08-15

    Partial coalescence is a ubiquitous instability in emulsions whose dispersed phase is partially crystallized. When emulsions are stabilized with proteins, interfacial stiffness and long-range repulsive surface forces hinder this type of instability. The addition of low molecular weight surfactants modifies the interfacial properties and surface forces, generally promoting partial coalescence. In the present work, various surfactants (Tween® 80, palmitic acid and monoglycerides) differing in their crystallization temperature were probed for their ability to induce partial coalescence in model O/W emulsions stabilized by sodium caseinate. The initially fluid emulsions were submitted to a tempering cycle leading to the gelation of the system. The extent of partial coalescence was evaluated by measuring the bulk storage modulus. DSC was used to determine the melting range of the oil phase and surfactants, while polarized microscopy, Raman imaging, and surface rheology measurements were performed to characterize the oil/water interface. The experimental conditions in terms of droplet size, surfactant-to-protein molar ratio and tempering history favoring partial coalescence were first explored in presence of Tween® 80. We show that partial coalescence is rather marginal when crystallizable surfactants are added, and pronounced with liquid surfactants. The phenomena underlying this result, especially interfacial crystallization of surfactants, are evidenced and discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Dynamic measurements and simulations of airborne picolitre-droplet coalescence in holographic optical tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bzdek, Bryan R; Collard, Liam; Sprittles, James E; Hudson, Andrew J; Reid, Jonathan P

    2016-08-07

    We report studies of the coalescence of pairs of picolitre aerosol droplets manipulated with holographic optical tweezers, probing the shape relaxation dynamics following coalescence by simultaneously monitoring the intensity of elastic backscattered light (EBL) from the trapping laser beam (time resolution on the order of 100 ns) while recording high frame rate camera images (time resolution droplet coalescence in holographic optical traps; assign the origin of key features in the time-dependent EBL intensity; and validate the use of the EBL alone to precisely determine droplet surface tension and viscosity. For low viscosity droplets, two sequential processes are evident: binary coalescence first results from the overlap of the optical traps on the time scale of microseconds followed by the recapture of the composite droplet in an optical trap on the time scale of milliseconds. As droplet viscosity increases, the relaxation in droplet shape eventually occurs on the same time scale as recapture, resulting in a convoluted evolution of the EBL intensity that inhibits quantitative determination of the relaxation time scale. Droplet coalescence was simulated using a computational framework to validate both experimental approaches. The results indicate that time-dependent monitoring of droplet shape from the EBL intensity allows for robust determination of properties such as surface tension and viscosity. Finally, the potential of high frame rate imaging to examine the coalescence of dissimilar viscosity droplets is discussed.

  2. The effect of geometrical confinement on coalescence efficiency of droplet pairs in shear flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Bruyn, Pieter; Cardinaels, Ruth; Moldenaers, Paula

    2013-11-01

    Droplet coalescence is determined by the combined effect of the collision frequency and the coalescence efficiency of colliding droplets. In the present work, the effect of geometrical confinement on coalescence efficiency in shear flow is experimentally investigated by means of a counter rotating parallel plate device, equipped with a microscope. The model system consisted of Newtonian droplets in a Newtonian matrix. The ratio of droplet diameter to plate spacing (2R/H) is varied between 0.06 and 0.42, thus covering bulk as well as confined conditions. Droplet interactions are investigated for the complete range of offsets between the droplet centers in the velocity gradient direction. It is observed that due to confinement, coalescence is possible up to higher initial offsets. On the other hand, confinement also induces a lower boundary for the initial offset, below which the droplets reverse during their interaction, thus rendering coalescence impossible. Numerical simulations in 2D show that the latter phenomenon is caused by recirculation flows at the front and rear of confined droplet pairs. The lower boundary is independent of Ca, but increases with increasing confinement ratio 2R/H and droplet size. The overall coalescence efficiency is significantly larger in confined conditions as compared to bulk conditions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Med Wise: A theory-based program to improve older adults' communication with pharmacists about their medicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, B A; Chewning, B A; Margolis, A R; Wilson, D A; Renken, J

    2016-01-01

    The health and economic toll of medication errors by older adults is well documented. Poor communication and medication coordination problems increase the likelihood of adverse drug events (ADEs). Older adults have difficulty communicating with health care professionals, including pharmacists. As such, the theory-based Med Wise program was designed. Building on the Self-efficacy Framework and the Chronic Care Model, this program was tested with community-dwelling older adults. This study and its resultant paper: (1) describe the theory-based design of the Med Wise program; (2) describe the collaboration of multiple community partners to develop a sustainable model for implementing Med Wise; and (3) present findings from the Med Wise course evaluation. Med Wise was designed to be a sustainable, skill-based educational and behavior change program consisting of two, 2-h interactive classes to enhance participants' medication communication skills and self-efficacy. To explore the potential to disseminate Med Wise throughout the state, a partnership was formed between the pharmacy team and the statewide Aging & Disability Resource Centers (ADRCs), as well as the Community-Academic Aging Research Network (CAARN). Over 30 lay volunteer leaders in 8 Wisconsin (U.S. State) counties were trained, and they delivered Med Wise through ADRC community centers. The CAARN staff evaluated the fidelity of the course delivery by leaders. To evaluate Med Wise, a quasi-experimental design using pre/post surveys assessed knowledge, worry and self-efficacy. A telephone follow-up three months later assessed self-efficacy and translation of medication management skills and behaviors. Med Wise programs were presented to 198 community-dwelling older adults while maintaining program fidelity. This evaluation found significant increases in older adults' knowledge about pharmacists' roles and responsibilities, likelihood of talking with a pharmacist about medication concerns, and self

  4. Geometrical and topological foundations of theoretical physics: from gauge theories to string program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Boi

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available We study the role of geometrical and topological concepts in the recent developments of theoretical physics, notably in non-Abelian gauge theories and superstring theory, and further we show the great significance of these concepts for a deeper understanding of the dynamical laws of physics. This work aims to demonstrate that the global topological properties of the manifold's model of spacetime play a major role in quantum field theory and that, therefore, several physical quantum effects arise from the nonlocal metrical and topological structure of this manifold. We mathematically argue the need for building new structures of space with different topology. This means, in particular, that the “hidden” symmetries of fundamental physics can be related to the phenomenon of topological change of certain classes of (presumably nonsmooth manifolds.

  5. Thermomechanical theory of materials undergoing large elastic and viscoplastic deformation (AWBA development program)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, S.E.; Newman, J.B.

    1980-11-01

    A thermomechanical theory of large deformation elastic-inelastic material behavior is developed which is based on a multiplicative decomposition of the strain. Very general assumptions are made for the elastic and inelastic constitutive relations and effects such as thermally-activated creep, fast-neutron-flux-induced creep and growth, annealing, and strain recovery are compatible with the theory. Reduced forms of the constitutive equations are derived by use of the second law of thermodynamics in the form of the Clausius-Duhem inequality. Observer invariant equations are derived by use of an invariance principle which is a generalization of the principle of material frame indifference.

  6. The Historical Method of Inquiry in a Teacher Training Program: Theory and Metatheory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimmons, Ron

    A historical method of inquiry can be applied to an experimental teacher training program, specifically, the Ford Training and Preparation Program (FTPP). The historical method requires gathering a lot of loose ideas and events that have been part of the project and hanging them together in an integrated way. To achieve this, two organizing…

  7. Posture Management Program Based on Theory of Planned Behavior for Adolescents with Mild Idiopathic Scoliosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jihea Choi, PhD, RN, CPNP

    2013-09-01

    Conclusion: The results indicate that the posture management program is effective in maintaining posture management behavior in adolescents with mild idiopathic scoliosis for both cognitive and physical outcomes. The posture management program should be helpful in expanding the role of school nurses in improving the health status of adolescents with mild idiopathic scoliosis.

  8. Exploring Teaching Programming Online through Web Conferencing System: The Lens of Activity Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çakiroglu, Ünal; Kokoç, Mehmet; Kol, Elvan; Turan, Ebru

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to understand activities and behaviors of learners and instructor in an online programming course. Adobe Connect web conferencing system was used as a delivery platform. A total of fifty-six sophomore students attending a computer education and instructional technology program (online) participated in this…

  9. Evaluation of Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Education: Application of Behavioral Theory and Survey Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyker, Brett A.; Jordan, Patricia; Quigley, Danielle L.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Application of the Transtheoretical Model (TTM) to Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Education (SNAP-Ed) evaluation and development and validation of an evaluation tool used to measure TTM constructs is described. Methods: Surveys were collected from parents of children receiving food at Summer Food Service Program sites prior…

  10. Design considerations for a theory-driven exergame-based rehabilitation program to improve walking of persons with stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wüest, Seline; van de Langenberg, Rolf; de Bruin, Eling D

    2014-01-01

    Virtual rehabilitation approaches for promoting motor recovery has attracted considerable attention in recent years. It appears to be a useful tool to provide beneficial and motivational rehabilitation conditions. Following a stroke, hemiparesis is one of the most disabling impairments and, therefore, many affected people often show substantial deficits in walking abilities. Hence, one of the major goals of stroke rehabilitation is to improve patients' gait characteristics and hence to regain their highest possible level of walking ability. Because previous studies indicate a relationship between walking and balance ability, this article proposes a stroke rehabilitation program that targets balance impairments to improve walking in stroke survivors. Most currently, available stroke rehabilitation programs lack a theory-driven, feasible template consistent with widely accepted motor learning principles and theories in rehabilitation. To address this hiatus, we explore the potential of a set of virtual reality games specifically developed for stroke rehabilitation and ordered according to an established two-dimensional motor skill classification taxonomy. We argue that the ensuing "exergame"-based rehabilitation program warrants individually tailored balance progression in a learning environment that allows variable practice and hence optimizes the recovery of walking ability.

  11. [Effects of Group Counseling Program Based on Goal Attainment Theory for Middle School Students with Emotional and Behavioral Problems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, In Ju; Kim, Soo Jin

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a group counseling program based on goal attainment theory on self-esteem, interpersonal relationships, and school adjustment of middle school students with emotional and behavioral problems. Forty-four middle school students with emotional and behavioral problems (22 in the experimental group and 22 in the control group) from G city participated in this study. Data were collected from July 30 to September 24, 2015. The experimental group received the 8-session program, scheduled once a week, with each session lasting 45 minutes. Outcome variables included self-esteem, interpersonal relationship, and school adjustment. There were significant increases for self-esteem (t=3.69, p=.001), interpersonal relationship (t=8.88, ptheory is very effective in increasing self-esteem, interpersonal relationship, and school adjustment for middle school students with emotional and behavioral problems. Therefore, it is recommended that the group counseling program based on goal attainment theory be used as an effective psychiatric nursing intervention for mental health promotion and the prevention of mental illness in adolescents.

  12. Bourbaki's structure theory in the problem of complex systems simulation models synthesis and model-oriented programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodsky, Yu. I.

    2015-01-01

    The work is devoted to the application of Bourbaki's structure theory to substantiate the synthesis of simulation models of complex multicomponent systems, where every component may be a complex system itself. An application of the Bourbaki's structure theory offers a new approach to the design and computer implementation of simulation models of complex multicomponent systems—model synthesis and model-oriented programming. It differs from the traditional object-oriented approach. The central concept of this new approach and at the same time, the basic building block for the construction of more complex structures is the concept of models-components. A model-component endowed with a more complicated structure than, for example, the object in the object-oriented analysis. This structure provides to the model-component an independent behavior-the ability of standard responds to standard requests of its internal and external environment. At the same time, the computer implementation of model-component's behavior is invariant under the integration of models-components into complexes. This fact allows one firstly to construct fractal models of any complexity, and secondly to implement a computational process of such constructions uniformly-by a single universal program. In addition, the proposed paradigm allows one to exclude imperative programming and to generate computer code with a high degree of parallelism.

  13. The application of rhetorical structure theory to interactive news program generation from digital archives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.A. Lindley; J.R. Davis; F.-M. Nack (Frank); L. Rutledge (Lloyd)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractRhetorical structure theory (RST) provides a model of textual function based upon rhetoric. Initially developed as a model of text coherence, RST has been used extensively in text generation research, and has more recently been proposed as a basis for multimedia presentation

  14. Not Our Regularly Scheduled Programming: Integrating Feminist Theory, Popular Culture, and Writing Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    When Alexandra Gold described her composition course: one that situates feminist and queer theory as a lens through which to view, analyze, and discuss contemporary television, a male acquaintance responded by saying he would not pay for that class. Another female acquaintance assured Gold that although she had loved a similar class at her Ivy…

  15. Giftedness in Arabic Environments: Concepts, Implicit Theories, and the Contributed Factors in the Enrichment Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aljughaiman, Abdullah M.; Ayoub, Alaa Eldin A.

    2017-01-01

    The study aimed at identifying specific giftedness patterns that teachers discriminate against, and for, when nominating gifted students and focused on the identification of implicit theories adopted by teachers on the topics of intelligence, giftedness, and creativity in light of their specialization and experience. The study examined the…

  16. Avoiding the A.B.D. Abyss: A Grounded Theory Study of a Dissertation-Focused Course for Doctoral Students in an Educational Leadership Program

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Leslie Ann Locke; Melanie Boyle

    2016-01-01

    ...) phase of the process. This grounded theory study focused on the perceptions and experiences of doctoral students in an educational leadership program, who were ABD, regarding their participation in a dissertation-focused...

  17. Short- and Long-Term Theory-Based Predictors of Physical Activity in Women Who Participated in a Weight-Management Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasserkampf, A.; Silva, M. N.; Santos, I. C.; Carraça, E. V.; Meis, J. J. M.; Kremers, S. P. J.; Teixeira, P. J.

    2014-01-01

    This study analyzed psychosocial predictors of the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) and Self-Determination Theory (SDT) and evaluated their associations with short- and long-term moderate plus vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and lifestyle physical activity (PA) outcomes in women who underwent a weight-management program. 221 participants (age…

  18. Understanding groundwater - students' pre-conceptions and conceptual change by means of a theory-guided multimedia learning program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unterbruner, Ulrike; Hilberg, Sylke; Schiffl, Iris

    2016-06-01

    Education on the subject of groundwater is crucial for sustainability. Nevertheless, international studies with students across different age groups have shown that the basic hydrogeological concept of groundwater defined as water within porous and permeable rocks is not an established everyday notion. Drawing from international research, a multimedia learning program Zwischen Regenwolke und Wasserhahn (between the rain cloud and the tap) was developed, which incorporates specific insights from the fields of conceptual change research, multimedia research, and the model of educational reconstruction. The effectiveness of the learning program was ascertained by means of two studies with Austrian seventh grade pupils as well as teacher-training students from the fields of biology and geography in order to ascertain the effectiveness of the learning program. Using a quasi-experimental research design, the participants' conceptions and knowledge of groundwater were determined in a pre- and post-test. The pupils and students greatly benefitted from working through the learning software independently. Their knowledge of groundwater increased significantly compared to the control group and there was a highly significant increase in the number of scientifically correct notions of groundwater. The acceptance of the program was also generally very high. The results indicate that theory-guided multimedia learning programs can play an important role in the transfer of research results to classroom settings, especially in science education.

  19. Coalescence Dynamics of PEDOT:PSS Droplets Impacting at Offset on Substrates for Inkjet Printing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarojini Kg, Kalpana; Dhar, Purbarun; Varughese, Susy; Das, Sarit K

    2016-06-14

    The dynamics of coalescence and consequent spreading of conducting polymer droplets on a solid substrate impacting at an offset are crucial in understanding the stability of inkjet printed patterns, which find application in organic flexible electronic devices. Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) ( PSS) dispersion in water is a widely used commercial conducting polymer for the fabrication of electron devices. The effects of droplet spacing, impact velocity, substrate hydrophilicity, polymer concentration, and charges on the coalescence of two sessile droplets have been experimentally investigated, and the characteristics of dynamic spreading during the coalescence process are determined through image processing. The equilibrium spreading length of the coalesced droplets decreases with concentration and spacing of the droplets, revealing the necessity of optimum fluid properties (viscosity and surface tension) for the stability of the desired pattern. The droplet's impact energy governs the maximum extent of spreading and receding dynamics, as the velocity gradients developed in polymer droplets during coalescence are a function of the inertia of the fluid elements. Hydrophilicity affects the maximum spreading extent but it has no influence on the equilibrium droplet diameter. The spreading length dynamics of charge-neutralized PSS is found similar to the charged droplets, which show that the charged nature of the polymer does not affect the coalescence behavior. Furthermore, different spreading regimes are identified and the governing forces in each regime are described using a semianalytical formulation derived for the coalescence of two droplets. The model has been found to accurately provide insight into the various mechanisms that play a role during the complex spreading event.

  20. Understanding Unix/Linux programming a guide to theory and practice

    CERN Document Server

    Molay, Bruce

    2003-01-01

    This book explains in a clear and coherent manner how Unix works, how to understand existing Unix programs, and how to design and create new Unix programs. The book is organized by subsystem, each presented in visual terms and explained using vivid metaphors. It breaks the information into manageable parts that can be presented, explained, and mastered. By using case studies and an extremely reader-friendly manner to illustrate complex ideas and concepts, the book covers the basics of systems programming, users, files and manuals, how to read a directory, using 1S, writing PWD, studying STTY, writing a video game, studying SH, environment and shell variables, I/O redirection and pipes, servers and sockets, writing a web server, license servers, and concurrent functions. For Unix system administrators and programmers, network programmers, and others who have used other operating systems and need to learn Unix programming to expand their skill sets.

  1. An introduction to fuzzy linear programming problems theory, methods and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Kaur, Jagdeep

    2016-01-01

    The book presents a snapshot of the state of the art in the field of fully fuzzy linear programming. The main focus is on showing current methods for finding the fuzzy optimal solution of fully fuzzy linear programming problems in which all the parameters and decision variables are represented by non-negative fuzzy numbers. It presents new methods developed by the authors, as well as existing methods developed by others, and their application to real-world problems, including fuzzy transportation problems. Moreover, it compares the outcomes of the different methods and discusses their advantages/disadvantages. As the first work to collect at one place the most important methods for solving fuzzy linear programming problems, the book represents a useful reference guide for students and researchers, providing them with the necessary theoretical and practical knowledge to deal with linear programming problems under uncertainty.

  2. Improving health equity through theory-informed evaluations: a look at housing first strategies, cross-sectoral health programs, and prostitution policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, James R; van der Meulen, Emily; O'Campo, Patricia; Muntaner, Carles

    2013-02-01

    The emergent realist perspective on evaluation is instructive in the quest to use theory-informed evaluations to reduce health inequities. This perspective suggests that in addition to knowing whether a program works, it is imperative to know 'what works for whom in what circumstances and in what respects, and how?' (Pawson & Tilley, 1997). This addresses the important issue of heterogeneity of effect, in other words, that programs have different effects for different people, potentially even exacerbating inequities and worsening the situation of marginalized groups. But in addition, the realist perspective implies that a program may not only have a greater or lesser effect, but even for the same effect, it may work by way of a different mechanism, about which we must theorize, for different groups. For this reason, theory, and theory-based evaluations are critical to health equity. We present here three examples of evaluations with a focus on program theories and their links to inequalities. All three examples illustrate the importance of theory-based evaluations in reducing health inequities. We offer these examples from a wide variety of settings to illustrate that the problem of which we write is not an exception to usual practice. The 'Housing First' model of supportive housing for people with severe mental illness is based on a theory of the role of housing in living with mental illness that has a number of elements that directly contradict the theory underlying the dominant model. Multisectoral action theories form the basis for the second example on Venezuela's revolutionary national Barrio Adentro health improvement program. Finally, decriminalization of prostitution and related health and safety policies in New Zealand illustrate how evaluations can play an important role in both refining the theory and contributing to improved policy interventions to address inequalities. The theoretically driven and transformative nature of these interventions create

  3. A Test of Basic Psychological Needs Theory in a Physical-Activity-Based Program for Underserved Youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDavid, Lindley; McDonough, Meghan H; Blankenship, Bonnie T; LeBreton, James M

    2017-02-01

    This study used a randomized controlled design to test the pathways in basic psychological needs theory, where social relationships characterized by autonomy support, involvement, and structure foster psychological need satisfaction and well-being. Participants were recruited from a physical-activity-based youth program. A new staff training was implemented to manipulate the use of each interpersonal characteristic by program staff (N = 24 observed) and perceptions of each interpersonal characteristic, psychological needs, hope, and self-worth in youth (N = 379 surveyed pre- and postprogram). Staff in the intervention condition used greater overall observed autonomy support, involvement, and structure. Condition assignment did not lead to differences in youth perceptions, but observed staff behaviors positively predicted youth perceptions of staff and perceptions of staff positively predicted change in well-being. Findings indicate that the training manipulated how staff engaged youth, and autonomy support, involvement, and structure are useful strategies to foster well-being in youth.

  4. Effect of self-care educational program based on Orem’s Theory on hope in patients with Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dahmardeh H

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Multiple sclerosis (MS as one of the major causes of disability in the world, can create a sense of hopelessness in patient. Thus the application of self-care methods is very important for these patients. The current study was conducted to determine the effect of self-care educational program based on Orem’s Theory on hope in patients with Multiple sclerosis. Materials and Method: In this clinical trial study, 88 patients with multiple sclerosis who were registered in MS Association of Zahedan, were selected through convenience sampling and then randomly allocated into two intervention and control groups of 44 people in 2014-2015. Then, nine educational sessions were designed and conducted according to patients’ needs based on Orem’s Theory. The rate of implementing the program by patients was measured through a self-report checklist. The hope of patients was measured by Snyder Hope Scale before and 3 months after the intervention. Data were analyzed by SPSS 16 using independent T-test, paired t-test and Chi-square. Results: The mean of total hope score, aspects of pathway thinking and agency thinking didn’t show significant difference between two groups before and after the intervention, but the mean of change score of total hope and aspects of pathway thinking and agency thinking in intervention group was increased significantly after the educational program in compare with control group (p<0.001. Conclusion: According to the results, implementation of Orem’s self-care program can increase the hope in patients with MS. Given the limitations of the present study, further studies is recommended.

  5. Theory-based Osteoporosis Prevention Education and Counseling Program for Women: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalkım, Aslı; Dağhan, Şafak

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this research was to investigate the effect of an osteoporosis prevention program based on the Health Belief Model for women between the ages of 30 years and 45 years at risk of osteoporosis. This study was conducted with randomized control group pretest, post-test and follow-up trial. Intervention group (n = 37) and control group (n = 36) participated in the research. Data were collected using a sociodemographic data questionnaire, the Osteoporosis Knowledge Test, the Osteoporosis Health Belief Scale, the Osteoporosis Self-efficacy Scale, a monitoring form for estimated dairy calcium intake, and a monitoring form for estimated weekly exercise. Intervention program was composed of a 4-week education program and a 24-week counseling program. Data were collected pretest, post-test 15 days after the end of the education program, follow-up 1 after 3 months, and follow-up 2 after 6 months. Mann Whitney U test, chi-square test, Friedman test, Bonferroni test, two means test and Wilcoxon signed-rank test were used for statistical analysis. After the education and counseling program, a significant increase was seen in comparison with the control group in the mean scores of the intervention group on the Osteoporosis Knowledge Test and its subscales (p Belief Scale and its subscales (p Belief Model-based osteoporosis prevention education and counseling program conducted by nurses. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Incorporating shared savings programs into primary care: from theory to practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayen, Arthur P; van den Berg, Michael J; Meijboom, Bert R; Struijs, Jeroen N; Westert, Gert P

    2015-12-30

    In several countries, health care policies gear toward strengthening the position of primary care physicians. Primary care physicians are increasingly expected to take accountability for overall spending and quality. Yet traditional models of paying physicians do not provide adequate incentives for taking on this new role. Under a so-called shared savings program physicians are instead incentivized to take accountability for spending and quality, as the program lets them share in cost savings when quality targets are met. We provide a structured approach to designing a shared savings program for primary care, and apply this approach to the design of a shared savings program for a Dutch chain of primary care providers, which is currently being piloted. Based on the literature, we defined five building blocks of shared savings models that encompass the definition of the scope of the program, the calculation of health care expenditures, the construction of a savings benchmark, the assessment of savings and the rules and conditions under which savings are shared. We apply insights from a variety of literatures to assess the relative merits of alternative design choices within these building blocks. The shared savings program uses an econometric model of provider expenditures as an input to calculating a casemix-corrected benchmark. The minimization of risk and uncertainty for both payer and provider is pertinent to the design of a shared savings program. In that respect, the primary care setting provides a number of unique opportunities for achieving cost and quality targets. Accountability can more readily be assumed due to the relatively long-lasting relationships between primary care physicians and patients. A stable population furthermore improves the confidence with which savings can be attributed to changes in population management. Challenges arise from the institutional context. The Dutch health care system has a fragmented structure and providers are typically

  7. Coalescence map for bubbles in surfactant-free aqueous electrolyte solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Roger G; Del Castillo, Lorena A; Ohnishi, Satomi

    2011-10-14

    Factors influencing bubble coalescence in surfactant-free aqueous electrolyte solutions are considered in this compilation of literature results. These factors include viscous and inertial thin film drainage, surface deformation, surface elasticity, mobility or otherwise of the air-water interface, and disjoining pressure. Several models from the literature are discussed, with particular attention paid to predictions of transitions between regions where behaviour is qualitatively different. The transitions are collated onto a single chart with salt concentration and bubble approach speed as the axes. This creates a map of the regions in which different mechanisms operate, giving an overall picture of bubble coalescence behaviour over a wide range of concentration and speed. Only mm-size bubbles in water and NaCl solutions are discussed in this initial effort at creating such a map. Data on bubble coalescence or non-coalescence are collected from the literature and plotted on the same map, generally aligning well with the predicted transitions and thus providing support for the theoretical reasoning that went into creating the coalescence map. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. The effect of contact angle hysteresis on droplet coalescence and mixing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Michael A; Rothstein, Jonathan P

    2011-11-15

    In this work, droplet coalescence and the subsequent mixing in superhydrophobic surfaces is studied over a range of impact velocities and impact angles. Sanded Teflon surfaces are used as a novel two-dimensional microfluidics platform. These superhydrophobic surfaces exhibit a constant advancing contact angle of θ(A)=150° over a broad range of contact angle hysteresis. As a result, the effect of contact angle hysteresis on droplet coalescence and mixing can be studied. Based on the observed characteristics of coalescence, three different regimes of coalescence are identified as a function of both Weber number and impact angle. These regimes include oscillation dominated, rotation dominated, and mixed dynamics. It is shown that within Weber number ranges achievable in this experiment, hysteresis greatly reduces the deformation of the droplet coalescence process and the subsequent mixing. In head-on collisions, higher hysteresis is found to decrease the frequency at which the resulting dr oscillates. In the case of glancing collisions, where the resulting droplet is found to rotate, higher hysteresis increases the rate of rotation although the overall angular momentum is found to be independent of contact angle hysteresis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. An experimental study on the drop/interface partial coalescence with surfactants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Teng; Weheliye, Weheliye Hashi; Chausset, Pierre; Angeli, Panagiota

    2017-10-01

    This paper presents investigations on the partial coalescence of an aqueous drop with an organic-aqueous interface with and without surfactants. The organic phase was different silicone oils and the aqueous phase was a glycerol-water solution at different concentrations. It is found that when the surfactant Span 80 is introduced into the organic phase, the partial coalescence region is reduced in the Oh-Bo coalescence map. The range of the inertio-capillary regime reduces when surfactants are present, while the drop size ratio decreases with increasing surfactant concentration. The velocity fields inside the aqueous drop were studied with high speed particle image velocimetry for the first time. In the surfactant-free system, it was found that the inward motion of the fluids at the upper part of the drop favours the generation of a liquid cylinder at the early stages of coalescence. The pressure gradient created by the downward stream at the bottom of the liquid cylinder drives the pinch-off of the secondary drop. When surfactants are present, the rupture of the film between the drop and the interface occurs at an off-axis location. The liquid cylinder formed in this case is not symmetric and does not lead to pinch-off. It is also found that the vortices inside the droplet have little impact on the partial coalescence.

  10. Suppression of Coalescence-Induced Droplet-Jumping on Superhydrophobic Surfaces by Microstructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Yota; Zhang, Peng; Lv, Fengyong; Askounis, Alexandros; Sheng, Biao; Takata, Yasuyuki; Orejon, Daniel

    2017-11-01

    Superhydrophobic surfaces are receiving increasing attention due to their enhanced condensation performance, which is owed to the ability to shed-off the condensate either by gravity or by coalescence-induced droplet-jumping. In this work we study the effect of microstructures on coalescence-induced droplet-jumping phenomenon. The frequency of the droplet-jumping events is found to decrease when increasing the density and the size of the microstructures. In addition, important differences in the droplet size distribution and in the number of coalescing droplets involved in the jumping events are reported. In the presence of microstructures, bigger and greater number of droplets are required to coalesce for the jump to ensue. Furthermore, we report the suppression of the droplet-jumping performance of droplets in size similar to that of the microstructures. We propose that microstructures introduce a droplet an angular deviation from the main surface normal so, upon coalescence, droplets sitting on the side of the microstructures will not fully contribute to the jump in the out-of-plane direction. As consequence the heat transfer performance due to small jumping droplets is reduced in the presence of microstructures. The authors acknowledge the support of WPI-I2CNER and KAKENHI JSPS.

  11. Melanoma cells undergo aggressive coalescence in a 3D Matrigel model that is repressed by anti-CD44

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, Edward; Kuhl, Spencer; Buchele, Emma C.; Klemme, Michael R.; Russell, Kanoe B.; Ambrose, Joseph; Soll, Benjamin A.; Bossler, Aaron; Milhem, Mohammed; Goldman, Charles

    2017-01-01

    Using unique computer-assisted 3D reconstruction software, it was previously demonstrated that tumorigenic cell lines derived from breast tumors, when seeded in a 3D Matrigel model, grew as clonal aggregates which, after approximately 100 hours, underwent coalescence mediated by specialized cells, eventually forming a highly structured large spheroid. Non-tumorigenic cells did not undergo coalescence. Because histological sections of melanomas forming in patients suggest that melanoma cells migrate and coalesce to form tumors, we tested whether they also underwent coalescence in a 3D Matrigel model. Melanoma cells exiting fragments of three independent melanomas or from secondary cultures derived from them, and cells from the melanoma line HTB-66, all underwent coalescence mediated by specialized cells in the 3D model. Normal melanocytes did not. However, coalescence of melanoma cells differed from that of breast-derived tumorigenic cell lines in that they 1) coalesced immediately, 2) underwent coalescence as individual cells as well as aggregates, 3) underwent coalescence far faster and 4) ultimately formed long, flat, fenestrated aggregates that were extremely dynamic. A screen of 51 purified monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) targeting cell surface-associated molecules revealed that two mAbs, anti-beta 1 integrin/(CD29) and anti-CD44, blocked melanoma cell coalescence. They also blocked coalescence of tumorigenic cells derived from a breast tumor. These results add weight to the commonality of coalescence as a characteristic of tumorigenic cells, as well as the usefulness of the 3D Matrigel model and software for both investigating the mechanisms regulating tumorigenesis and screening for potential anti-tumorigenesis mAbs. PMID:28264026

  12. Molecular symmetry and group theory a programmed introduction to chemical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Vincent, Alan

    2013-01-01

    This substantially revised and expanded new edition of the bestselling textbook, addresses the difficulties that can arise with the mathematics that underpins the study of symmetry, and acknowledges that group theory can be a complex concept for students to grasp.Written in a clear, concise manner, the author introduces a series of programmes that help students learn at their own pace and enable to them understand the subject fully. Readers are taken through a series of carefully constructed exercises, designed to simplify the mathematics and give them a full understanding of how this

  13. The Evaluation of Two Death Education Programs for EMTs Using the Theory of Planned Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith-Cumberland, Tracy

    2006-01-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of two death education programs by comparing pretest and posttest scores of behavioral intentions and (reported) behavior of EMTs when at the scene of a death. After the interventions, the majority of EMTs intended to change their behavior at the scene of a death when compared to the control…

  14. Programmed Instruction versus Meaningful Learning Theory in Teaching Basic Structured Query Language (SQL) in Computer Lesson

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efendioglu, Akin; Yelken, Tugba Yanpar

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of two different methods on primary school teacher candidates' academic achievements and attitudes toward computer-based education, and to define their views on these methods. Both the first experimental group, programmed instruction (PI), and the second experimental group, meaningful…

  15. Effects of a Theory-Based Education Program to Prevent Overweightness in Primary School Children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kocken, P.L.; Scholten, A.M.; Westhoff, P.; Kok, B.P. De; Taal, E.M.; Goldbohm, R.A.

    2016-01-01

    The effectiveness of the "Extra Fit!" (EF!) education program in promoting healthy diet and physical activity to prevent and reduce overweightness among primary school children aged 9 to 11 was evaluated. A randomized controlled design was carried out in 45 primary schools (n = 1112) in the

  16. Effects of a Theory-Based Education Program to Prevent Overweightness in Primary School Children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kocken, P.L.; Scholten, A.M.; Westhoff,E.; Kok, B.P.H.; Taal, E.M.; Goldbohm, R.A.

    2016-01-01

    The effectiveness of the “Extra Fit!” (EF!) education program in promoting healthy diet and physical activity to prevent and reduce overweightness among primary school children aged 9 to 11 was evaluated. A randomized controlled design was carried out in 45 primary schools (n = 1112) in the

  17. Towards harnessing theories through tool support for hard real-time Java programming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøgholm, Thomas; Frost, Christian; Hansen, Rene Rydhof

    2013-01-01

    We present a rationale for a selection of tools that assist developers of hard real-time applications to verify that programs conform to a Java real-time profile and that platform-specific resource constraints are satisfied. These tools are specialised instances of more generic static analysis an...

  18. Towards harnessing theories through tool support for hard real-time Java programming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Hans; Bøgholm, Thomas; Frost, Christian

    2012-01-01

    We present a rationale for a selection of tools that assist developers of hard real-time applications to verify that programs conform to a Java real-time profile and that platform-specific resource constraints are satisfied. These tools are specialised instances of more generic static analysis an...

  19. The Development of a Collegiate Recovery Program: Applying Social Cognitive Theory within a Social Ecological Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beeson, Eric T.; Whitney, Jennifer M.; Peterson, Holly M.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Collegiate recovery programs (CRPs) are emerging as a strategy to provide after-care support to students in recovery from substance use disorders (SUDs) at institutions of higher education. CRPs are an innovative strategy for Health Educators to support the personal, academic, and professional goals of students in recovery. Purpose:…

  20. Theory to Practice: Developmental Mathematics Program--A Model for Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasquez Mireles, Selina

    2010-01-01

    The Developmental Mathematics Program (DMP) at Texas State University-San Marcos in central Texas has undergone systemic, significant changes over the past ten years. These changes primarily resulted from the alignment to the American Mathematical Association of Two-Year Colleges' (AMATYC) Crossroads in Mathematics: Standards for Introductory…

  1. Applying Theories of Adult Learning in Developing Online Programs in Gerontology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Christy S.; Solberg, Lauren B.; Solberg, Laurence M.

    2017-01-01

    The Department of Aging and Geriatric Research at the University of Florida College of Medicine has established online education programs to provide healthcare professionals with advanced training in the field of gerontology to establish proficiency in providing quality care to older individuals. A major barrier to creating our online education…

  2. A Dynamical Systems Theory Examination of Social Connections in Outdoor Recreation Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jostad, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    Adolescence is a developmental time period in which social connections are an important aspect to fostering positive growth and identity. Outdoor Adventure Education (OAE) programs are strategically positioned to help in this developmental process because of the novel social environment, however, little is known about how these types of social…

  3. Decision-Making Theory Applied to Architectural Programming: Some Research Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Meg

    The implications of delineating and determining the sequence of programming decisions are shown in the selection of building committee membership. The role relationships of client and architect are discussed in terms of decision-making function. Decision tables are described as aids in problem analysis. Other topics include information and…

  4. Research Findings on Neurolinguistic Programming: Nonsupportive Data or an Untestable Theory?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharpley, Christopher F.

    1987-01-01

    Examines the experimental literature on neurolinguistic programming (NLP). Sharpley (l984) and Einspruch and Forman (l985) concluded that the effectiveness of this therapy was yet to be demonstrated. Presents data from seven recent studies that further question the basic tenets of NLP and their application in counseling situations. (Author/KS)

  5. Implementing a simulated client program: bridging the gap between theory and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Cindy L; Ladner, Lynda D

    2004-01-01

    This paper outlines the design and implementation of an innovative communication skills training program at the Ontario Veterinary College (OVC). Based upon the body of research in human medical education reporting effective results through the use of standardized patients (SPs) for this type of training, an experiential learning laboratory using simulated clients (SCs) and patients was introduced to first-year veterinary students. One hundred and four first-year students were assigned to 12 groups of eight or nine students plus a facilitator. Each student interacted with a simulated client and a patient while being observed by peers and a facilitator. The Calgary-Cambridge Observation Guide (CCOG) was used to guide students and facilitators with performance standards and feedback. Assessment strategies were utilized. Implementation of this program required extensive resources, including funding, expertise, facilitator training, time allotment in an already overburdened curriculum, and administrative and faculty support. Preliminary assessment revealed high student and facilitator satisfaction. The potential of this program for student education and assessment was recognized, and it will be expanded in years 2 and 3 of the DVM (Doctor of Veterinary Medicine) curriculum. Medical educators have created resources, including skills checklists and experiential learning modalities, that are highly applicable to veterinary medical education. Ongoing evaluation of the program is essential to determine whether we are meeting expectations for communication competency in veterinary medicine.

  6. Basic Constructs of a Theory for Personal Professional Development and Program Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kersting, Joseph S.

    The opinion is set forth that intense competition for individual promotion in higher education institutions is counter-productive to the achievement of educational excellence. It is proposed that individual development as well as the development of successful college programs are better served by mutual support, cooperation, and intelligent…

  7. A DEEP CUT ELLIPSOID ALGORITHM FOR CONVEX-PROGRAMMING - THEORY AND APPLICATIONS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    FRENK, JBG; GROMICHO, J; ZHANG, S

    1994-01-01

    This paper proposes a deep cut version of the ellipsoid algorithm for solving a general class of continuous convex programming problems. In each step the algorithm does not require more computational effort to construct these deep cuts than its corresponding central cut version. Rules that prevent

  8. Investigation of binary drop rebound and coalescence in liquids using dual-field PIV technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jungyong; Longmire, Ellen K.

    2009-08-01

    Experiments on binary drop collisions within an index-matched liquid were conducted for Weber numbers ( We) in the range of 1-50. Drop pairs of water/glycerin mixture were injected horizontally into silicone oil and, due to gravitational effects, travelled on downward trajectories before colliding. A dual-field high-speed PIV measurement system was employed to quantify drop trajectories and overall collision conditions while simultaneously examining detailed velocity fields at the collision interface. Sequences of velocity and vorticity fields were computed for both larger and smaller fields of view. In the We range examined, both rebounding and coalescing behavior occurred. Coalescence was found to result from a combination of vortical flow within drops and strong drop deformation characteristic of higher We. Flow through the centers of opposing ring vortices, strengthened by drop deformation, enhanced drainage of the thin film in the impact region, leading to film rupture and coalescence.

  9. Importance sampling for Lambda-coalescents in the infinitely many sites model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkner, Matthias; Blath, Jochen; Steinrücken, Matthias

    2011-06-01

    We present and discuss new importance sampling schemes for the approximate computation of the sample probability of observed genetic types in the infinitely many sites model from population genetics. More specifically, we extend the 'classical framework', where genealogies are assumed to be governed by Kingman's coalescent, to the more general class of Lambda-coalescents and develop further Hobolth et al.'s (2008) idea of deriving importance sampling schemes based on 'compressed genetrees'. The resulting schemes extend earlier work by Griffiths and Tavaré (1994), Stephens and Donnelly (2000), Birkner and Blath (2008) and Hobolth et al. (2008). We conclude with a performance comparison of classical and new schemes for Beta- and Kingman coalescents. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Coalescence collision of liquid drops II: Off-center collisions of unequal-size drops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Acevedo-Malavé

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available We applied the Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics method to simulate for first time in the three-dimensional space the hydrodynamic off-center collisions of unequal-size liquid drops in a vacuum environment. The Weber number for several conditions of the droplets dynamics is determined. Also the velocity vector fields inside the drops are shown in the collision process. The evolution of the kinetic and internal energy is shown for the permanent coalescence case. The resulting drops tend to deform, and depending of the Weber number two possible outcomes for the collision of droplets arise: either permanent coalescence or flocculation. In the permanent coalescence of the drops a fragmentation case is modeled, yielding the formation of little satellite droplets.

  11. Coalescence and fragmentation in the late Pleistocene archaeology of southernmost Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackay, Alex; Stewart, Brian A; Chase, Brian M

    2014-07-01

    The later Pleistocene archaeological record of southernmost Africa encompasses several Middle Stone Age industries and the transition to the Later Stone Age. Through this period various signs of complex human behaviour appear episodically, including elaborate lithic technologies, osseous technologies, ornaments, motifs and abstract designs. Here we explore the regional archaeological record using different components of lithic technological systems to track the transmission of cultural information and the extent of population interaction within and between different climatic regions. The data suggest a complex set of coalescent and fragmented relationships between populations in different climate regions through the late Pleistocene, with maximum interaction (coalescence) during MIS 4 and MIS 2, and fragmentation during MIS 5 and MIS 3. Coalescent phases correlate with increases in the frequency of ornaments and other forms of symbolic expression, leading us to suggest that population interaction was a significant driver in their appearance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Role of surfactants in the number of secondary droplet generation during drop coalescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haldar, Krishnayan; Chakraborty, Sudipto

    The current study focuses on the variation in secondary droplet generation number with surfactant types and concentrations while surfactant laden drop impinges on a water pool. Cationic, anionic and non-ionic surfactant solutions of different concentrations are used as liquid drop. We observe from high speed imaging technique that secondary droplet generation number increases with increasing concentration for cationic and nonionic whereas it decreases for anionic surfactants. The variation of dimensionless viscosity to surface tension ratio of each surfactant determines the droplet generation number. Also the empirical relations between dimensionless coalescence time and Reynolds, Ohnesorge Number for the impinging drops reveal the dominance of viscous force over inertial and surface forces during the cascade. High viscous force, low inertial force and low surface force reduces the coalescence time. Hence, partial coalescence is faster for drops which high viscosity, low surface tension and low impact velocity and consequently the number of secondary droplet generation in the cascade will also increase.

  13. Influence of droplet geometry on the coalescence of low viscosity drops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddi, A; Winkels, K G; Snoeijer, J H

    2013-10-04

    The coalescence of water drops on a substrate is studied experimentally. We focus on the rapid growth of the bridge connecting the two drops, which very quickly after contact ensues from a balance of surface tension and liquid inertia. For drops with contact angles below 90°, we find that the bridge grows with a self-similar dynamics that is characterized by a height h~t(2/3). By contrast, the geometry of coalescence changes dramatically for contact angles at 90°, for which we observe h~t(1/2), just as for freely suspended spherical drops in the inertial regime. We present a geometric model that quantitatively captures the transition from 2/3 to 1/2 exponent, and unifies the inertial coalescence of sessile drops and freely suspended drops.

  14. A novel surgery-like strategy for droplet coalescence in microchannels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Nan-Nan; Sun, Shao-Xing; Wang, Wei; Ju, Xiao-Jie; Xie, Rui; Chu, Liang-Yin

    2013-09-21

    We report an innovative and efficient surgery-like strategy for achieving the coalescence of surfactant-stabilized droplets in microchannels. As pairs of preformed droplets flow across a micro-lancet, with a suitable surface wettability, in a converging microchannel simultaneously, their surfaces are scratched by the micro-lancet, which causes temporarily local scattering of surfactants, and thus induces their coalescence by joining up their scratched wounds. Our approach shows highly controllable flexibility and stability. We demonstrate this by controlling the coalescence of emulsion droplets with different numbers and complex structures. This surgery-like strategy is totally passive and has great potential in myriad applications including micro-reaction, high-throughput injection, and multiple emulsion formation, etc.

  15. Influence of viscosity coefficients during spreading and coalescence of droplets in liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubaud, Thomas; Jose, Bibin M.

    2017-11-01

    We experimentally characterize the role of absolute viscosities on the dynamics of droplet spreading on solids and droplet-droplet coalescence in liquid/liquid systems for a broad range of fluid parameters. In particular, we show the existence of a viscous function based on both inner and outer fluid viscosities that allows for the determination of the critical wetting velocity and the evolution of the contact diameter during immersed spreading and coalescence of droplets. Our approach demonstrates the reduced influence of fluid viscosity from initial wetting to spreading and coalescence of droplets and provides insights into the influence of wetting contact lines on spontaneous capillary phenomena. This work is supported by NSF (CBET-1150389 and CBET-1605809).

  16. Role of viscosity coefficients during spreading and coalescence of droplets in liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose, Bibin M.; Cubaud, Thomas

    2017-11-01

    The role of absolute viscosities on the dynamics of droplet spreading on solids and droplet-droplet coalescence in liquid-liquid systems is experimentally characterized for a broad range of fluid parameters. We show in particular the existence of a viscous function based on both inner and outer fluid viscosities that allows for the determination of the critical wetting velocity and the evolution of contact diameters during immersed spreading and coalescence of droplets. This work quantifies the cooperative effects of fluid viscosities on droplet dynamics as well as their overall reduced influence from initial wetting to spreading and coalescence, which provides insights into the role of wetting contact lines on spontaneous capillary phenomena.

  17. Knitmesh And Duplex-Nylon Type Coalescence Aids Use In Phase Disengagement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamit Topuz

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This study shows how dispersions consisted of droplet sizes ranging from 100 microns and above of immiscible liquids in agitated vessels coalesced and settled back to their phases by employing commercially known as knit-mesh made from stainless steel and nylon. These components known as higher surface energy and lower surface energy contained coalesce aids respectively. In addition to compare coalesce aid made purely from commercially known as duplex-nylon also used. The experimental set up was 13 scale of a single stage mixer-settler unit of the already existing unit which was in use at BNFL Springfield Works. The liquid liquid system made from 20 tri-butyl-phosphate TBP technical grade of odorless kerosene forming the light organic phase or solvent phase and 5 M nitric acid forming the heavy aqueous phase. The solvent phase contained 70 gram of uranium per liter. Uranium contained phase was supplied by above mentioned company.

  18. The dynamics of the impact and coalescence of droplets on a solid surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castrejón-Pita, J. R.; Betton, E. S.; Kubiak, K. J.; Wilson, M. C. T.; Hutchings, I. M.

    2011-01-01

    A simple experimental setup to study the impact and coalescence of deposited droplets is described. Droplet impact and coalescence have been investigated by high-speed particle image velocimetry. Velocity fields near the liquid-substrate interface have been observed for the impact and coalescence of 2.4 mm diameter droplets of glycerol∕water striking a flat transparent substrate in air. The experimental arrangement images the internal flow in the droplets from below the substrate with a high-speed camera and continuous laser illumination. Experimental results are in the form of digital images that are processed by particle image velocimetry and image processing algorithms to obtain velocity fields, droplet geometries, and contact line positions. Experimental results are compared with numerical simulations by the lattice Boltzmann method. PMID:21523250

  19. Oil slicks on water surface: Breakup, coalescence, and droplet formation under breaking waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissanka, Indrajith D; Yapa, Poojitha D

    2017-01-15

    The ability to calculate the oil droplet size distribution (DSD) and its dynamic behavior in the water column is important in oil spill modeling. Breaking waves disperse oil from a surface slick into the water column as droplets of varying sizes. Oil droplets undergo further breakup and coalescence in the water column due to the turbulence. Available models simulate oil DSD based on empirical/equilibrium equations. However, the oil DSD evolution due to subsequent droplet breakup and coalescence in the water column can be best represented by a dynamic population model. This paper develops a phenomenological model to calculate the oil DSD in wave breaking conditions and ocean turbulence and is based on droplet breakup and coalescence. Its results are compared with data from laboratory experiments that include different oil types, different weathering times, and different breaking wave heights. The model comparisons showed a good agreement with experimental data. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. CoaSim: A Flexible Environment for Simulating Genetic Data under Coalescent Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mailund; Schierup, Mikkel Heide; Pedersen, Christian Nørgaard Storm

    2005-01-01

    Background Coalescent simulations are playing a large role in interpreting large scale intra- polymorphism surveys and for planning and evaluating association studies. Coalescent of data sets under different models can be compared to the actual data to test different evolutionary factors and thus...... get insight into these. Results We have created the CoaSim application as a flexible environment for Monte various types of genetic data under equilibrium and non-equilibrium coalescent variety of applications. Interaction with the tool is through the Guile version scripting language. Scheme scripts...... for many standard and advanced applications these can easily be modified by the user for a much wider range of applications. interface with less functionality and flexibility is also included. It is primarily exploratory and educational tool. Conclusions CoaSim is a powerful tool because of its flexibility...

  1. A quantitative review of the transition salt concentration for inhibiting bubble coalescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firouzi, Mahshid; Howes, Tony; Nguyen, Anh V

    2015-08-01

    Some salts have been proven to inhibit bubble coalescence above a certain concentration called the transition concentration. The transition concentration of salts has been investigated and determined by using different techniques. Different mechanisms have also been proposed to explain the stabilizing effect of salts on bubble coalescence. However, as yet there is no consensus on a mechanism which can explain the stabilizing effect of all inhibiting salts. This paper critically reviews the experimental techniques and mechanisms for the coalescence of bubbles in saline solutions. The transition concentrations of NaCl, as the most popularly used salt, determined by using different techniques such as bubble swarm, bubble pairs, and thin liquid film micro-interferometry were analyzed and compared. For a consistent comparison, the concept of TC95 was defined as a salt concentration at which the "percentage coalescence" of bubbles reduces by 95% relative to the highest (100% in pure water) and lowest (in high-salt concentration) levels. The results show a linear relationship between the TC95 of NaCl and the reciprocal of the square root of the bubble radius. This relationship holds despite different experimental techniques, salt purities and bubble approach speeds, and highlights the importance of the bubble size in bubble coalescence. The available theoretical models for inhibiting effect of salts have also been reviewed. The failure of these models in predicting the salt transition concentration commands further theoretical development for a better understanding of bubble coalescence in salt solutions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Multimode multidrop serial coalescence effects during condensation on hierarchical superhydrophobic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rykaczewski, Konrad; Paxson, Adam T; Anand, Sushant; Chen, Xuemei; Wang, Zuankai; Varanasi, Kripa K

    2013-01-22

    The prospect of enhancing the condensation rate by decreasing the maximum drop departure diameter significantly below the capillary length through spontaneous drop motion has generated significant interest in condensation on superhydrophobic surfaces (SHS). The mobile coalescence leading to spontaneous drop motion was initially reported to occur only on hierarchical SHS, consisting of both nanoscale and microscale topological features. However, subsequent studies have shown that mobile coalescence also occurs on solely nanostructured SHS. Thus, recent focus has been on understanding the condensation process on nanostructured surfaces rather than on hierarchical SHS. In this work, we investigate the impact of microscale topography of hierarchical SHS on the droplet coalescence dynamics and wetting states during the condensation process. We show that isolated mobile and immobile coalescence between two drops, almost exclusively focused on in previous studies, are rare. We identify several new droplet shedding modes, which are aided by tangential propulsion of mobile drops. These droplet shedding modes comprise of multiple droplets merging during serial coalescence events, which culminate in formation of a drop that either departs or remains anchored to the surface. We directly relate postmerging drop adhesion to formation of drops in nanoscale as well as microscale Wenzel and Cassie-Baxter wetting states. We identify the optimal microscale feature spacing of the hierarchical SHS, which promotes departure of the highest number of microdroplets. This optimal surface architecture consists of microscale features spaced close enough to enable transition of larger droplets into micro-Cassie state yet, at the same time, provides sufficient spacing in-between the features for occurrence of mobile coalescence.

  3. Fermentation broth components influence droplet coalescence and hinder advanced biofuel recovery during fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heeres, Arjan S; Schroën, Karin; Heijnen, Joseph J; van der Wielen, Luuk A M; Cuellar, Maria C

    2015-08-01

    Developments in synthetic biology enabled the microbial production of long chain hydrocarbons, which can be used as advanced biofuels in aviation or transportation. Currently, these fuels are not economically competitive due to their production costs. The current process offers room for improvement: by utilizing lignocellulosic feedstock, increasing microbial yields, and using cheaper process technology. Gravity separation is an example of the latter, for which droplet growth by coalescence is crucial. The aim of this study was to study the effect of fermentation broth components on droplet coalescence. Droplet coalescence was measured using two setups: a microfluidic chip and regular laboratory scale stirred vessel (2 L). Some fermentation broth components had a large impact on droplet coalescence. Especially components present in hydrolysed cellulosic biomass and mannoproteins from the yeast cell wall retard coalescence. To achieve a technically feasible gravity separation that can be integrated with the fermentation, the negative effects of these components on coalescence should be minimized. This could be achieved by redesign of the fermentation medium or adjusting the fermentation conditions, aiming to minimize the release of surface active components by the microorganisms. This way, another step can be made towards economically feasible advanced biofuel production. © 2015 The Authors. Biotechnology Journal published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-NoDerivs Licence, which permits use and distribution in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, the use is non-commercial and no modifications or adaptations are made.

  4. Bayesian species identification under the multispecies coalescent provides significant improvements to DNA barcoding analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ziheng; Rannala, Bruce

    2017-06-01

    DNA barcoding methods use a single locus (usually the mitochondrial COI gene) to assign unidentified specimens to known species in a library based on a genetic distance threshold that distinguishes between-species divergence from within-species diversity. Recently developed species delimitation methods based on the multispecies coalescent (MSC) model offer an alternative approach to individual assignment using either single-locus or multiloci sequence data. Here, we use simulations to demonstrate three features of an MSC method implemented in the program bpp. First, we show that with one locus, MSC can accurately assign individuals to species without the need for arbitrarily determined distance thresholds (as required for barcoding methods). We provide an example in which no single threshold or barcoding gap exists that can be used to assign all specimens without incurring high error rates. Second, we show that bpp can identify cryptic species that may be misidentified as a single species within the library, potentially improving the accuracy of barcoding libraries. Third, we show that taxon rarity does not present any particular problems for species assignments using bpp and that accurate assignments can be achieved even when only one or a few loci are available. Thus, concerns that have been raised that MSC methods may have problems analysing rare taxa (singletons) are unfounded. Currently, barcoding methods enjoy a huge computational advantage over MSC methods and may be the only approach feasible for massively large data sets, but MSC methods may offer a more stringent test for species that are tentatively assigned by barcoding. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Thermal models of buildings. Determination of temperatures, heating and cooling loads. Theories, models and computer programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaellblad, K.

    1998-05-01

    The need to estimate indoor temperatures, heating or cooling load and energy requirements for buildings arises in many stages of a buildings life cycle, e.g. at the early layout stage, during the design of a building and for energy retrofitting planning. Other purposes are to meet the authorities requirements given in building codes. All these situations require good calculation methods. The main purpose of this report is to present the authors work with problems related to thermal models and calculation methods for determination of temperatures and heating or cooling loads in buildings. Thus the major part of the report deals with treatment of solar radiation in glazing systems, shading of solar and sky radiation and the computer program JULOTTA used to simulate the thermal behavior of rooms and buildings. Other parts of thermal models of buildings are more briefly discussed and included in order to give an overview of existing problems and available solutions. A brief presentation of how thermal models can be built up is also given and it is a hope that the report can be useful as an introduction to this part of building physics as well as during development of calculation methods and computer programs. The report may also serve as a help for the users of energy related programs. Independent of which method or program a user choose to work with it is his or her own responsibility to understand the limits of the tool, else wrong conclusions may be drawn from the results 52 refs, 22 figs, 4 tabs

  6. The Impact of Duty to Warn (And Other Legal Theories) on Countering Violent Extremism Intervention Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    client.26 The requirement, which has been adopted and applied by most states, requires that psychotherapists with information that a client they...confidentiality  The multidisciplinary approach 1. U.S. CVE Program The 2011 federal government report titled, Empowering Local Partners to Prevent Violent...different fields have relied on multidisciplinary efforts to find the best approach to shared goals. MDTs are typically composed of a group of

  7. Rheological properties, shape oscillations, and coalescence of liquid drops with surfactants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apfel, R. E.; Holt, R. G.

    1990-01-01

    A method was developed to deduce dynamic interfacial properties of liquid drops. The method involves measuring the frequency and damping of free quadrupole oscillations of an acoustically levitated drop. Experimental results from pure liquid-liquid systems agree well with theoretical predictions. Additionally, the effects of surfactants is considered. Extension of these results to a proposed microgravity experiment on the drop physics module (DPM) in USML-1 are discussed. Efforts are also underway to model the time history of the thickness of the fluid layer between two pre-coalescence drops, and to measure the film thickness experimentally. Preliminary results will be reported, along with plans for coalescence experiments proposed for USML-1.

  8. Controlling the partial coalescence of a droplet on a vertically vibrated bath.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilet, T; Vandewalle, N; Dorbolo, S

    2007-09-01

    A method is proposed to stop the cascade of partial coalescences of a droplet laid on a liquid bath. The strategy consists of vibrating the bath in the vertical direction in order to keep small droplets bouncing. Since large droplets are not able to bounce, they partially coalesce until they reach a critical size. The system behaves as a low pass filter: droplets smaller than the critical size are selected. This size has been investigated as a function of the acceleration and the frequency of the bath vibration. Results suggest that the limit size for bouncing is related to the first mode of the droplet deformation.

  9. Critical Coalescence Concetration (CCC as a parameter for evaluation of selected quaternary ammonium compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danuta Szyszka

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper was to determine the Critical Coalescence Concentration (CCC of surfactants such as N(dodecyloxycarboxymethyl N,N,N-(trimethylammonium bromide (DMGM- 12, N-[2-(dodecyoxycarboxyethyl] N,N,N-(trimethylammonium bromide (DMALM-12 and N-[3- (dodecanoyloxycarboxyprophyl] N,N,N-(trimethylammonium bromide (DMPM-11. The surfactants used represent quaternary ammonium compounds containing a hydrophobic moiety with an ester group (commonly known as “esterquats”. The CCC value was determined by analysis of the relationship between concentration of surfactant and average air bubble diameter. The values of the critical coalescence concentration (CCC were estimated using a graphical method.

  10. Prostate Cancer Ambassadors: Enhancing a Theory-Informed Training Program for Informed Decision-Making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vines, Anissa I; Hunter, Jaimie C; Carlisle, Veronica A; Richmond, Alan N

    2017-09-01

    Despite the high burden of prostate cancer in African American communities, there is a paucity of knowledge about prostate health. This paper describes the enhancement of a curriculum for training lay health advisors, called prostate cancer ambassadors, on informed decision-making for prostate cancer screening. Adult learning theory informed the structuring of the training sessions to be interactive, self-directed, and engaging. Trainings were developed in a manner that made the material relevant to the learners and encouraged co-learning. The research team developed strategies, such as using discussions and interactive activities, to help community members weigh the pros and cons of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening and to make an informed decision about screening. Furthermore, activities were developed to bolster four social cognitive theory constructs: observational learning, self-efficacy for presenting information to the community and for making an informed decision themselves, collective efficacy for presenting information to the community, and outcome expectations from those presentations. Games, discussions, and debates were included to make learning fun and encourage discovery. Practice sessions and team-building activities were designed to build self-efficacy for sharing information about informed decision-making. Topics added to the original curriculum included updates on prostate cancer screening, informed decision-making for screening, skills for being a lay health advisor, and ethics. This dynamic model and approach to lay health advisor (ambassador) training is flexible: while it was tailored for use with prostate cancer education, it can be adjusted for use with other types of cancer and even other diseases.

  11. [Development and effectiveness of a drug dosage calculation training program using cognitive loading theory based on smartphone application].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myoung Soo; Park, Jung Ha; Park, Kyung Yeon

    2012-10-01

    This study was done to develop and evaluate a drug dosage calculation training program using cognitive loading theory based on a smartphone application. Calculation ability, dosage calculation related self-efficacy and anxiety were measured. A nonequivalent control group design was used. Smartphone application and a handout for self-study were developed and administered to the experimental group and only a handout was provided for control group. Intervention period was 4 weeks. Data were analyzed using descriptive analysis, χ²-test, t-test, and ANCOVA with the SPSS 18.0. The experimental group showed more 'self-efficacy for drug dosage calculation' than the control group (t=3.82, panxiety for drug dosage calculation'. Mean satisfaction score for the program was 86.1. These results indicate that this drug dosage calculation training program using smartphone application is effective in improving dosage calculation related self-efficacy and calculation ability. Further study should be done to develop additional interventions for reducing anxiety.

  12. Autonomy support and need satisfaction in prevocational programs on care farms: The self-determination theory perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellingsen-Dalskau, Lina H; Morken, Margrete; Berget, Bente; Pedersen, Ingeborg

    2015-01-01

    Mental health problems are leading causes for early and prolonged withdrawal from the workforce. Green work on care farms represents a prevocational training program intended to stimulate return to work for people with mental health problems. Research suggests that care farms may improve mental health, but there is still little knowledge of the subjective perspective of clients in green work programs. To gain a deeper and broader understanding of the individual experiences of people with mental health problems participating in green work on care farms in Norway. A hermeneutic phenomenological research design was applied. Ten semi-structured interviews were conducted. The self-determination theory (SDT) was adapted to gain a deeper understanding of the themes that emerged in the analysis process of the interviews. Five main themes materialize describing participants' experiences within the green work program. The main themes consist of (1) structure and flexibility, (2) understanding and acknowledgement, (3) guidance and positive feedback, (4) nature and animals, and (5) reflections on personal functioning and the future. The main themes identified indicate a high degree of autonomy support and need satisfaction within the care farm context, which according to SDT can facilitate good human functioning, and well-being.

  13. Development and Pilot Test of the Workplace Readiness Questionnaire, a Theory-Based Instrument to Measure Small Workplaces' Readiness to Implement Wellness Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannon, Peggy A; Helfrich, Christian D; Chan, K Gary; Allen, Claire L; Hammerback, Kristen; Kohn, Marlana J; Parrish, Amanda T; Weiner, Bryan J; Harris, Jeffrey R

    2017-01-01

    To develop a theory-based questionnaire to assess readiness for change in small workplaces adopting wellness programs. In developing our scale, we first tested items via "think-aloud" interviews. We tested the revised items in a cross-sectional quantitative telephone survey. The study setting comprised small workplaces (20-250 employees) in low-wage industries. Decision-makers representing small workplaces in King County, Washington (think-aloud interviews, n = 9), and the United States (telephone survey, n = 201) served as study subjects. We generated items for each construct in Weiner's theory of organizational readiness for change. We also measured workplace characteristics and current implementation of workplace wellness programs. We assessed reliability by coefficient alpha for each of the readiness questionnaire subscales. We tested the association of all subscales with employers' current implementation of wellness policies, programs, and communications, and conducted a path analysis to test the associations in the theory of organizational readiness to change. Each of the readiness subscales exhibited acceptable internal reliability (coefficient alpha range, .75-.88) and was positively associated with wellness program implementation ( p theory of organizational readiness to change, except change efficacy did not predict change-related effort. We developed a new questionnaire to assess small workplaces' readiness to adopt and implement evidence-based wellness programs. Our findings also provide empirical validation of Weiner's theory of readiness for change.

  14. Risk Aversion and Support for Merit Pay: Theory and Evidence from Minnesota's Q Comp Program

    OpenAIRE

    Carl Nadler; Matthew Wiswall

    2011-01-01

    Recent research attributes the lack of merit pay in teaching to the resistance of teachers. This article examines whether the structure of merit pay affects the types of teachers who support it. We develop a model of the relative utility teachers receive from merit pay versus the current fixed schedule of raises. We show that if teachers are risk averse, teachers with higher base salaries would be more likely to support a merit pay program that allows them to keep their current base salary an...

  15. Theory-based Osteoporosis Prevention Education and Counseling Program for Women: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Aslı Kalkım, RN, PhD; Şafak Dağhan, RN, PhD

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this research was to investigate the effect of an osteoporosis prevention program based on the Health Belief Model for women between the ages of 30 years and 45 years at risk of osteoporosis. Methods: This study was conducted with randomized control group pretest, post-test and follow-up trial. Intervention group (n = 37) and control group (n = 36) participated in the research. Data were collected using a sociodemographic data questionnaire, the Osteoporosis Knowled...

  16. Computer Programs for Calculating Partially Cavitating Blunt Trailing Edged Cascade Flows in Nonlinear Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    thickness of the foil which was used for the plano -convex foil case in the previous project [1] is now a dummy input in these programs. 8 3.1 INPUT DATA...the plano -convex foil (dummy variable). XXDD End of the normalized foil =1. YYDD Y coordinate of upper end of the normalized foil. 16 R Specifies the...6)’CAVLEN’( 1.-UU22).C1.-CAVLEN) 00 25 LG:1,LPM CI~NO CPC?.SIP) NEXT* FOR THE FIRST wETTE3 ARC PORTION Sl-- CP IS BASED ON Ul AND Pie 140 LP:1 IS

  17. Theory Support for the Excited Baryon Analysis Program at the JLAB 12 GeV Upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burkert, Volker; Lee, Tsung-Shung; Mokeev, Viktor; Aznauryan, Inna; Braun, Vladimir; Capstick, Simon; Cloet, Ian; Edwards, Robert; Gianinni, M.; Lin, Huey-Wen; Roberts, C.D.; Stoler, Paul; Zhao, Qiang; Zou, Bing-Song

    2009-01-01

    This document summarizes the contributions of the Electromagnetic $\\gamma_vNN^*$ Transition Form Factors workshop participants that provide theoretical support of the excited baryon program at the 12 GeV energy upgrade at JLab. The main objectives of the workshop were (a) review the status of the $\\gamma_vNN^*$ transition form factors extracted from the meson electroproduction data, (b) call for the theoretical interpretations of the extracted $N$-$N^*$ transition form factors, that enable access to the mechanisms responsible for the N* formation and to their emergence from QCD.

  18. Effects of a nutritional intervention program based on the self-determination theory and promoting the Mediterranean diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leblanc, Vicky; Bégin, Catherine; Hudon, Anne-Marie; Royer, Marie-Michelle; Corneau, Louise; Dodin, Sylvie; Lemieux, Simone

    2016-01-01

    Our objective was to determine gender differences in the impact of a nutritional intervention based on the self-determination theory and promoting the Mediterranean diet on changes in eating-related self-determined motivation and adherence to the Mediterranean diet. Changes in eating-related self-determined motivation were larger in men than in women in response to the intervention and at follow-up, but the magnitude of change decreased with time in both genders. Changes in eating-related self-determined motivation were positively associated with changes in the Mediterranean diet adherence in response to the intervention and at follow-up in men only, suggesting that the nutritional program seems to fit better men than women.

  19. Effects of a nutritional intervention program based on the self-determination theory and promoting the Mediterranean diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leblanc, Vicky; Bégin, Catherine; Hudon, Anne-Marie; Royer, Marie-Michelle; Corneau, Louise; Dodin, Sylvie; Lemieux, Simone

    2016-01-01

    Our objective was to determine gender differences in the impact of a nutritional intervention based on the self-determination theory and promoting the Mediterranean diet on changes in eating-related self-determined motivation and adherence to the Mediterranean diet. Changes in eating-related self-determined motivation were larger in men than in women in response to the intervention and at follow-up, but the magnitude of change decreased with time in both genders. Changes in eating-related self-determined motivation were positively associated with changes in the Mediterranean diet adherence in response to the intervention and at follow-up in men only, suggesting that the nutritional program seems to fit better men than women. PMID:28070382

  20. A Test of Social Cognitive Theory to Explain Men's Physical Activity During a Gender-Tailored Weight Loss Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Myles D; Plotnikoff, Ronald C; Collins, Clare E; Callister, Robin; Morgan, Philip J

    2016-11-01

    Physical inactivity is a leading contributor to the burden of disease in men. Social-cognitive theories may improve physical activity (PA) interventions by identifying which variables to target to maximize intervention impact. This study tested the utility of Bandura's social cognitive theory (SCT) to explain men's PA during a 3-month weight loss program. Participants were 204 overweight/obese men (M [SD] age = 46.6 [11.3] years; body mass index = 33.1 [3.5] kg/m2). A longitudinal, latent variable structural equation model tested the associations between SCT constructs (i.e., self-efficacy, outcome expectations, intention, and social support) and self-reported moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA) and examined the total PA variance explained by SCT. After controlling for Time 1 cognitions and behavior, the model fit the data well (χ2 = 73.9, degrees of freedom = 39, p weight loss interventions for men may benefit by targeting self-efficacy and intention, but the utility of targeting social support and outcome expectations requires further examination. © The Author(s) 2015.

  1. Educational Program Status of Premarital Counseling Centers in Hamadan Province Based on Theory of Reasoned Action (TRA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Mahdi Hazavehei

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objective: Divorce, unwanted pregnancies, and unsuccessful marriages create mental, emotional, physical, and financial problems for individuals, families, and ultimately the community. Premarital education and counseling is one of the most effective ways for the prevention of such problems. The purpose of this study was to describe and evaluate the effectiveness of a premarital educational program by using the TRA (Theory of Reasoned Action. Materials and Methods: Four hundred couples who attended premarital education and counseling classes voluntarily participated in this descriptive and analytical study. Variables such as attitude, subjective norms, and intention, were collected by using a validated questionnaire based on the TRA components. The questionnaire was filled out before and after the educational classes. Results: The mean age of the couples was 23.16 ± 5.64 years old. Statistically significant differences were found in knowledge, attitude, and subjective norms before and after participation in the classes (p value 0.05. Conclusion: Although the mean knowledge and attitude of the couples under study increased after the classes, the increase was not high and only 20% of the couples gained acceptable knowledge. The effectiveness of such classes in the current manner is very low. Application of appropriate educational methods and media-based models and theories is highly recommended.

  2. Temperature-induced Coalescence of Droplets Manipulated by Optical Trapping in an Oil-in-Water Emulsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsunobu, Manami; Kobayashi, Sakurako; Takeyasu, Nobuyuki; Kaneta, Takashi

    2017-01-01

    Coalescence of oil droplets in an oil-in-water (O/W) emulsion was achieved with heating and optical trapping. Three types of O/W emulsions were prepared by adding a mixture of butanol and n-decane to an aqueous solution containing a cationic surfactant (cetyltrimethylammonium bromide, CTAB), an anionic surfactant (sodium dodecyl sulfate, SDS), or a neutral hydrophilic polymer (polyethylene glycol, PEG) as an emulsifier. Two oil droplets in the emulsions were randomly trapped in a square capillary tube by two laser beams in order to induce coalescence. Coalescence of the droplets could not be achieved at room temperature (25°C) regardless of the type of emulsifier. Conversely, the droplets prepared with PEG coalesced at a temperature higher than 30°C, although the droplets with ionic surfactants CTAB and SDS did not coalesce even at the elevated temperature due to their electrostatic repulsion. The size of the resultant coalesced droplet was consistent with that calculated from the size of the two droplets of oil, which indicated successful coalescence of the two droplets. We also found that the time required for the coalescence could be correlated with the temperature using an Arrhenius plot.

  3. Evaluation of a social skills program based on social learning theory, implemented in a school setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheridan, Beth A; MacDonald, Douglas A; Donlon, Mark; Kuhn, Beth; McGovern, Katie; Friedman, Harris

    2011-04-01

    Using a sample of 647 Canadian children in kindergarten to Grade 3 (325 boys, 322 girls), the present study evaluated the perceived effectiveness of Skillstreaming (McGinnis & Goldstein, 2003), a widely known social skills program implemented to target the development of four skill sets, i.e., listening, following directions, problem-solving, and knowing when to tell. Results indicated significant postprogram improvements in all skills as well as in ratings of overall prosociality obtained from both classroom teachers and mental health staff, with medium to large effect sizes obtained from teachers' and mental health professionals' ratings, respectively. Additional analyses yielded significant but weak moderator effects of grade and preprogram prosocial functioning for teacher ratings but no consistent moderator effects for children's sex or school location (i.e., urban versus rural) regardless of rater.

  4. Coalescence of magnetic islands in the low-resistivity, Hall-MHD regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoll, D A; Chacón, L

    2006-04-07

    The coalescence of magnetic islands in the low-resistivity eta, Hall-MHD regime is studied. The interaction between the ion inertial length d(i) and the dynamically evolving current sheet scale length deltaJ is established. Initially, d(i) MHD model.

  5. Neural Correlates of Visual Aesthetics - Beauty as the Coalescence of Stimulus and Internal State

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, Richard H. A. H.; Renken, Remco; Cornelissen, Frans W.

    2012-01-01

    How do external stimuli and our internal state coalesce to create the distinctive aesthetic pleasures that give vibrance to human experience? Neuroaesthetics has so far focused on the neural correlates of observing beautiful stimuli compared to neutral or ugly stimuli, or on neural correlates of

  6. GW151226: Observation of Gravitational Waves from a 22-Solar-Mass Binary Black Hole Coalescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Phythian-Adams, A.T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V. B.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.T.; Aguiar, O. D.; Aiello, L.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Altin, P. A.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C. C.; Areeda, J. S.; Arnaud, N.; Arun, K. G.; Ascenzi, S.; Ashton, G.; Ast, M.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Bacon, P.; Bader, M. K. M.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barclay, S. E.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, R.D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barta, D.; Bartlett, J.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Baune, C.; Bavigadda, V.; Bazzan, M.; Bejger, M.; Bell, A. S.; Berger, B. K.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, M.J.; Birney, R.; Birnholtz, O.; Biscans, S.; Bisht, A.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D. G.; Blair, R. M.; Bloemen, A.L.S.; Bock, O.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, J.G.; Bogan, C.; Bohe, A.; Bond, T.C; Bondu, F.; Bonnand, R.; Boom, B. A.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bouffanais, Y.; Bozzi, A.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brockill, P.; Broida, J. E.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, A.D.; Brown, D.; Brown, N. M.; Brunett, S.; Buchanan, C. C.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cabero, M.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Cahillane, C.; Bustillo, J. Calderon; Callister, T. A.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Capocasa, E.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Diaz, J. Casanueva; Casentini, C.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglia, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C. B.; Baiardi, L. Cerboni; Cerretani, G.; Cesarini, E.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chan, M.; Chao, D. S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Cheeseboro, B. D.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, Y; Cheng, C.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Qian; Chua, S. E.; Chung, E.S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P. -F.; Colla, A.; Collette, C. G.; Cominsky, L.; Constancio, M., Jr.; Conte, A.; Conti, L.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Cortese, S.; Costa, A.C.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coughlin, S. B.; Coulon, J. -P.; Countryman, S. T.; Couvares, P.; Cowan, E. E.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, A.L.; Cuoco, E.; Dal Canton, T.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Darman, N. S.; Dasgupta, A.; Costa, C. F. Da Silva; Dattilo, V.; Dave, I.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; De, S.; Debra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; De laurentis, M.; Deleglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dergachev, V.A.; Rosa, R.; DeRosa, R. T.; DeSalvo, R.; Devine, R. C.; Dhurandhar, S.; Diaz, M. C.; Di Fiore, L.; Giovanni, M.G.; Di Girolamo, T.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Pace, S.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Dolique, V.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Ducrot, M.; Dwyer, S. E.; Edo, T. B.; Edwards, M. C.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H. -B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Engels, W.; Essick, R. C.; Etzel, T.; Evans, T. M.; Evans, T. M.; Everett, R.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fair, H.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.M.; Fang, Q.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Fenyvesi, E.; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Fiori, I.; Fiorucci, D.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Fletcher, M; Fong, H.; Fournier, J. -D.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Frey, V.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gabbard, H. A. G.; Gair, J. R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Gaonkar, S. G.; Garufi, F.; Gaur, G.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Geng, P.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; George, J.; Gergely, L.; Germain, V.; Ghosh, Abhirup; Ghosh, Archisman; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, K.P.; Glaefke, A.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; Gonzalez, Idelmis G.; Castro, J. M. Gonzalez; Gopakumar, A.; Gordon, N. A.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S. E.; Lee-Gosselin, M.; Gouaty, R.; Grado, A.; Graef, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.M.; Greco, G.; Green, A. C.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guo, X.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, M. K.; Gushwa, K. E.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hacker, J. J.; Buffoni-Hall, R.; Hall, E. D.; Hamilton-Ayers, M.; Hammond, G.L.; Haney, M.; Hanke, M. M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hannam, M. D.; Hanson, P.J.; Hardwick, T.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M. J.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C. -J.; Haughian, K.; Healy, J.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M. C.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Hennig, J.; Henry, J.A.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hofman, D.; Holt, K.; Holz, D. E.; Hopkins, P.; Hough, J.; Houston, E. A.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y. M.; Huang, S.; Huerta, E. A.; Huet, D.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Indik, N.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isa, H. N.; Isac, J. -M.; Isi, M.; Isogai, T.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacqmin, T.; Jang, D.H.; Jani, K.; Jaranowski, P.; Jawahar, S.; Jian, L.; Jimenez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W.; Johnson-McDaniel, N. K.; Jones, I.D.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; Haris, K.; Kalaghatgi, C. V.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.H.; Kanner, J. B.; Kapadia, S. J.; Karki, S.; Karvinen, K. S.; Kasprzack, M.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, S.; Kaur, T.; Kawabe, K.; Kefelian, F.; Kehl, M. S.; Keitel, D.; Kelley, D. B.; Kells, W.; Kennedy, R.E.; Key, J. S.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khan, I.; Khan., S.; Khan, Z.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kijbunchoo, N.; Kim, Chi-Woong; Kim, Chunglee; Kim, J.; Kim, K.; Kim, Namjun; Kim, W.; Kim, Y.M.; Kimbrell, S. J.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kissel, J. S.; Klein, B.; Kleybolte, L.; Klimenko, S.; Koehlenbeck, S. M.; Koley, S.; Kondrashov, V.; Kontos, A.; Korobko, M.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D. B.; Kringel, V.; Krishnan, B.; Krolak, A.; Krueger, C.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, P.; Kumar, R.; Kuo, L.; Kutynia, A.; Lackey, B. D.; Landry, M.; Lange, J.; Lantz, B.; Lasky, P. D.; Laxen, M.; Lazzarini, A.; Lazzaro, C.; Leaci, P.; Leavey, S.; Lebigot, E. O.; Lee, C.H.; Lee, K.H.; Lee, M.H.; Lee, K.; Lenon, A.; Leonardi, M.; Leong, J. R.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Levin, Y.; Lewis, J. B.; Li, T. G. F.; Libson, A.; Littenberg, T. B.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Lombardi, A. L.; London, L. T.; Lord, J. E.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J. D.; Lousto, C. O.; Lueck, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; Lynch, R.; Ma, Y.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Magana-Sandoval, F.; Zertuche, L. Magana; Magee, R. M.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Malvezzi, V.; Man, N.; Mandel, I.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mansell, G. L.; Manske, M.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Marka, S.; Marka, Z.; Markosyan, A. S.; Maros, E.; Martelli, F.; Martellini, L.; Martin, I. W.; Martynov, D. V.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Massinger, T. J.; Masso-Reid, M.; Mastrogiovanni, S.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazumder, N.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McCormick, S.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McManus, D. J.; McRae, T.; McWilliams, S. T.; Meacher, D.; Meadors, G. D.; Meidam, J.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mercer, R. A.; Merilh, E. L.; Merzougui, M.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Messick, C.; Metzdorff, R.; Meyers, P. M.; Mezzani, F.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Middleton, H.; Mikhailov, E. E.; Milano, L.; Miller, A. L.; Miller, A. L.; Miller, B.; Miller, J.; Millhouse, M.; Minenkov, Y.; Ming, J.; Mirshekari, S.; Mishra, C.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moggi, A.; Mohan, M.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Montani, M.; Moore, B.C.; Moore, J.C.; Moraru, D.; Gutierrez Moreno, M.; Morriss, S. R.; Mossavi, K.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, G.; Muir, A. W.; Mukherjee, Arunava; Mukherjee, S.D.; Mukherjee, S.; Mukund, N.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Murphy, D. J.; Murray, P.G.; Mytidis, A.; Nardecchia, I.; Naticchioni, L.; Nayak, R. K.; Nedkova, K.; Nelemans, G.; Nelson, T. J. N.; Gutierrez-Neri, M.; Neunzert, A.; Newton-Howes, G.; Nguyen, T. T.; Nielsen, A. B.; Nissanke, S.; Nitz, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E. N.; Nuttall, L. K.; Oberling, J.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohme, F.; Oliver, M. B.; Oppermann, P.; Oram, Richard J.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Ottaway, D. J.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Pai, A.; Pai, S. A.; Palamos, J. R.; Palashov, O.; Palomba, C.; Pal-Singh, A.; Pan, H.; Pankow, C.; Pannarale, F.; Pant, B. C.; Paoletti, F.; Paoli, A.; Papa, M. A.; Paris, H. R.; Parker, W.S; Pascucci, D.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Patricelli, B.; Patrick, Z.; Pearlstone, B. L.; Pedraza, M.; Pedurand, R.; Pekowsky, L.; Pele, A.; Penn, S.; Perreca, A.; Perri, L. M.; Pfeiffer, H. P.; Phelps, M.; Piccinni, O. J.; Pichot, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pillant, G.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Poe, M.; Poggiani, R.; Popolizio, P.; Post, A.; Powell, J.; Prasad, J.; Predoi, V.; Prestegard, T.; Price, L. R.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prix, R.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L. G.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Puerrer, M.; Qi, H.; Qin, J.; Qiu, S.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E. A.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rajan, C.; Rakhmanov, M.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Razzano, M.; Re, V.; Read, J.; Reed, C. M.; Regimbau, T.; Rei, L.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Rew, H.; Reyes, S. D.; Ricci, F.; Riles, K.; Rizzo, D.M.; Robertson, N. A.; Robie, R.; Robinet, F.; Rocchi, A.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Roma, V. J.; Romano, J. D.; Romano, R.; Romanov, G.; Romie, J. H.; Rosinska, D.; Rowan, S.; Ruediger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Ryan, K.A.; Sachdev, P.S.; Sadecki, T.; Sadeghian, L.; Sakellariadou, M.; Salconi, L.; Saleem, M.; Salemi, F.; Samajdar, A.; Sammut, L.; Sanchez, E. J.; Sandberg, V.; Sandeen, B.; Sanders, J. R.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Saulson, P. R.; Sauter, O. E. S.; Savage, R. L.; Sawadsky, A.; Schale, P.; Schilling, R.; Schmidt, J; Schmidt, P.; Schnabel, R.B.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schoenbeck, A.; Schreiber, K.E.C.; Schuette, D.; Schutz, B. F.; Scott, J.; Scott, M.S.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sentenac, D.; Sequino, V.; Sergeev, A.; Setyawati, Y.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shaffer, T. J.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shaltev, M.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Sheperd, A.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Shoemaker, D. M.; Siellez, K.; Siemens, X.; Sieniawska, M.; Sigg, D.; Silva, António Dias da; Singer, A; Singer, L. P.; Singh, A.; Singh, R.; Singhal, A.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Smith, R. J. E.; Smith, N.D.; Smith, R. J. E.; Son, E. J.; Sorazu, B.; Sorrentino, F.; Souradeep, T.; Srivastava, A. K.; Staley, A.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steinmeyer, D.; Stephens, B. C.; Stevenson-Moore, P.; Stone, J.R.; Strain, K. A.; Straniero, N.; Stratta, G.; Strauss, N. A.; Strigin, S. E.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sun, L.; Sunil, S.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B. L.; Szczepanczyk, M. J.; Tacca, M.D.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tapai, M.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taracchini, A.; Taylor, W.R.; Theeg, T.; Thirugnanasambandam, M. P.; Thomas, E. G.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thrane, E.; Tiwari, S.; Tiwari, V.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Toland, K.; Tomlinson, C.; Tonelli, M.; Tornasi, Z.; Torres, C. V.; Torrie, C. I.; Toyra, D.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Trifiro, D.; Tringali, M. C.; Trozzo, L.; Tse, M.; Turconi, M.; Tuyenbayev, D.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Urban, A. L.; Usman, S. A.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; Vallisneri, M.; van Bakel, N.; Van Beuzekom, Martin; van den Brand, J. F. J.; Van Den Broeck, C.F.F.; Vander-Hyde, D. C.; van der Schaaf, L.; van Heijningen, J. V.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vardaro, M.; Vass, S.; Vasuth, M.; Vaulin, R.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P.J.; Venkateswara, K.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Vicere, A.; Vinciguerra, S.; Vine, D. J.; Vinet, J. -Y.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Voss, D. V.; Vousden, W. D.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A. R.; Wade, L. E.; Wade, MT; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, M.; Wang, X.; Wang, Y.; Ward, R. L.; Warner, J.; Was, M.; Weaver, B.; Wei, L. -W.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Wen, L.M.; Wessels, P.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whiting, B. F.; Williams, D.R.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M. H.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Woehler, J.; Worden, J.; Wright, J.L.; Wu, D.S.; Wu, G.; Yablon, J.; Yam, W.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yu, H.; Yvert, M.; Zadrozny, A.; Zangrando, L.; Zanolin, M.; Zendri, J. -P.; Zevin, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, X. J.; Zucker, M. E.; Zuraw, S. E.; Zweizig, J.; Boyle, M.; Hemberger, D.; Kidder, L. E.; Lovelace, G.; Ossokine, S.; Scheel, M.; Szilagyi, B.; Teukolsky, S.

    2016-01-01

    We report the observation of a gravitational-wave signal produced by the coalescence of two stellar-mass black holes. The signal, GW151226, was observed by the twin detectors of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) on December 26, 2015 at 03:38:53 UTC. The signal was

  7. Directly comparing GW150914 with numerical solutions of Einstein's equations for binary black hole coalescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Phythian-Adams, A.T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V. B.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.T.; Aguiar, O. D.; Aiello, L.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Altin, P. A.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C. C.; Areeda, J. S.; Arnaud, N.; Arun, K. G.; Ascenzi, S.; Ashton, G.; Ast, M.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Bacon, P.; Bader, M. K. M.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barclay, S. E.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, R.D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barta, D.; Bartlett, J.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Baune, C.; Bavigadda, V.; Bazzan, M.; Bejger, M.; Bell, A. S.; Berger, B. K.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, M.J.; Birney, R.; Biscans, S.; Bisht, A.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D. G.; Blair, R. M.; Bloemen, A.L.S.; Bock, O.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, J.G.; Bogan, C.; Bohe, A.; Bond, T.C; Bondu, F.; Bonnand, R.; Boom, B. A.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bouffanais, Y.; Bozzi, A.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brockill, P.; Broida, J. E.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, A.D.; Brown, D.; Brown, N. M.; Brunett, S.; Buchanan, C. C.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cabero, M.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Cahillane, C.; Bustillo, J. Calderon; Callister, T. A.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Capocasa, E.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Diaz, J. Casanueva; Casentini, C.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglia, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C. B.; Baiardi, L. Cerboni; Cerretani, G.; Cesarini, E.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chan, M.; Chao, D. S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Cheeseboro, B. D.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, Y; Cheng, C.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Qian; Chua, S. E.; Chung, E.S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P. -F.; Colla, A.; Collette, C. G.; Cominsky, L.; Constancio, M., Jr.; Conte, A.; Conti, L.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Cortese, S.; Costa, A.C.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coughlin, S. B.; Coulon, J. -P.; Countryman, S. T.; Couvares, P.; Cowan, E. E.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, A.L.; Cuoco, E.; Dal Canton, T.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Darman, N. S.; Dasgupta, A.; Costa, C. F. Da Silva; Dattilo, V.; Dave, I.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; De, S.; Debra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; De laurentis, M.; Deleglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dergachev, V.A.; Rosa, R.; DeRosa, R. T.; DeSalvo, R.; Devine, R. C.; Dhurandhar, S.; Diaz, M. C.; Di Fiore, L.; Giovanni, M.G.; Di Girolamo, T.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Pace, S.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Dolique, V.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Ducrot, M.; Dwyer, S. E.; Edo, T. B.; Edwards, M. C.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H. -B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Engels, W.; Essick, R. C.; Etzel, T.; Evans, T. M.; Evans, T. M.; Everett, R.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fair, H.; Fan, X.M.; Fang, Q.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Fenyvesi, E.; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Fiori, I.; Fiorucci, D.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Fletcher, M; Fournier, J. -D.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Frey, V.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gabbard, H. A. G.; Gair, J. R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Gaonkar, S. G.; Garufi, F.; Gaur, G.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Geng, P.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; George, J.; Gergely, L.; Germain, V.; Ghosh, Abhirup; Ghosh, Archisman; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, K.P.; Glaefke, A.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; Gonzalez, Idelmis G.; Castro, J. M. Gonzalez; Gopakumar, A.; Gordon, N. A.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S. E.; Lee-Gosselin, M.; Gouaty, R.; Grado, A.; Graef, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.M.; Greco, G.; Green, A. C.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guo, X.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, M. K.; Gushwa, K. E.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hacker, J. J.; Buffoni-Hall, R.; Hall, E. D.; Hammond, G.L.; Haney, M.; Hanke, M. M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hanson, P.J.; Hardwick, T.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M. J.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C. -J.; Haughian, K.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M. C.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Hennig, J.; Henry, J.A.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hofman, D.; Holt, K.; Holz, D. E.; Hopkins, P.; Hough, J.; Houston, E. A.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y. M.; Huang, S.; Huerta, E. A.; Huet, D.; Hughey, B.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Indik, N.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isa, H. N.; Isac, J. -M.; Isi, M.; Isogai, T.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacqmin, T.; Jang, D.H.; Jani, K.; Jaranowski, P.; Jawahar, S.; Jian, L.; Jimenez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W.; Jones, I.D.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; Haris, K.; Kalaghatgi, C. V.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.H.; Kanner, J. B.; Kapadia, S. J.; Karki, S.; Karvinen, K. S.; Kasprzack, M.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, S.; Kaur, T.; Kawabe, K.; Kefelian, F.; Kehl, M. S.; Keitel, D.; Kelley, D. B.; Kells, W.; Kennedy, R.E.; Key, J. S.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khan, I.; Khan, Z.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kijbunchoo, N.; Kim, Chi-Woong; Kim, Chunglee; Kim, J.; Kim, K.; Kim, Namjun; Kim, W.; Kim, Y.M.; Kimbrell, S. J.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kissel, J. S.; Klein, B.; Kleybolte, L.; Klimenko, S.; Koehlenbeck, S. M.; Koley, S.; Kondrashov, V.; Kontos, A.; Korobko, M.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D. B.; Kringel, V.; Krolak, A.; Krueger, C.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, P.; Kumar, R.; Kuo, L.; Kutynia, A.; Lackey, B. D.; Landry, M.; Lange, J.; Lantz, B.; Lasky, P. D.; Laxen, M.; Lazzarini, A.; Lazzaro, C.; Leaci, P.; Leavey, S.; Lebigot, E. O.; Lee, C.H.; Lee, K.H.; Lee, M.H.; Lee, K.; Lenon, A.; Leonardi, M.; Leong, J. R.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Levin, Y.; Lewis, J. B.; Li, T. G. F.; Libson, A.; Littenberg, T. B.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Lombardi, A. L.; Lord, J. E.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J. D.; Lueck, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; Lynch, R.; Ma, Y.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Magana-Sandoval, F.; Zertuche, L. Magana; Magee, R. M.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Malvezzi, V.; Man, N.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mansell, G. L.; Manske, M.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Marka, S.; Marka, Z.; Markosyan, A. S.; Maros, E.; Martelli, F.; Martellini, L.; Martin, I. W.; Martynov, D. V.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Massinger, T. J.; Masso-Reid, M.; Mastrogiovanni, S.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazumder, N.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McCormick, S.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McManus, D. J.; McRae, T.; McWilliams, S. T.; Meacher, D.; Meadors, G. D.; Meidam, J.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mercer, R. A.; Merilh, E. L.; Merzougui, M.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Messick, C.; Metzdorff, R.; Meyers, P. M.; Mezzani, F.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Middleton, H.; Mikhailov, E. E.; Milano, L.; Miller, A. L.; Miller, A. L.; Miller, B.; Miller, J.; Millhouse, M.; Minenkov, Y.; Ming, J.; Mirshekari, S.; Mishra, C.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moggi, A.; Mohan, M.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Montani, M.; Moore, B.C.; Moore, J.C.; Moraru, D.; Gutierrez Moreno, M.; Morriss, S. R.; Mossavi, K.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, G.; Muir, A. W.; Mukherjee, Arunava; Mukherjee, S.D.; Mukherjee, S.; Mukund, N.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Murphy, D. J.; Murray, P.G.; Mytidis, A.; Nardecchia, I.; Naticchioni, L.; Nayak, R. K.; Nedkova, K.; Nelemans, G.; Nelson, T. J. N.; Gutierrez-Neri, M.; Neunzert, A.; Newton-Howes, G.; Nguyen, T. T.; Nielsen, A. B.; Nissanke, S.; Nitz, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E. N.; Nuttall, L. K.; Oberling, J.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohme, F.; Oliver, M. B.; Oppermann, P.; Oram, Richard J.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Ottaway, D. J.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Pai, A.; Pai, S. A.; Palamos, J. R.; Palashov, O.; Palomba, C.; Pal-Singh, A.; Pan, H.; Pankow, C.; Pant, B. C.; Paoletti, F.; Paoli, A.; Papa, M. A.; Paris, H. R.; Parker, W.S; Pascucci, D.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Patricelli, B.; Patrick, Z.; Pearlstone, B. L.; Pedraza, M.; Pedurand, R.; Pekowsky, L.; Pele, A.; Penn, S.; Perreca, A.; Perri, L. M.; Phelps, M.; Piccinni, O. J.; Pichot, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pillant, G.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Poe, M.; Poggiani, R.; Popolizio, P.; Post, A.; Powell, J.; Prasad, J.; Predoi, V.; Prestegard, T.; Price, L. R.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L. G.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Puerrer, M.; Qi, H.; Qin, J.; Qiu, S.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E. A.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rajan, C.; Rakhmanov, M.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Razzano, M.; Re, V.; Read, J.; Reed, C. M.; Regimbau, T.; Rei, L.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Rew, H.; Reyes, S. D.; Ricci, F.; Riles, K.; Rizzo, D.M.; Robertson, N. A.; Robie, R.; Robinet, F.; Rocchi, A.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Roma, V. J.; Romano, J. D.; Romano, R.; Romanov, G.; Romie, J. H.; Rosinska, D.; Rowan, S.; Ruediger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Ryan, K.A.; Sachdev, P.S.; Sadecki, T.; Sadeghian, L.; Sakellariadou, M.; Salconi, L.; Saleem, M.; Salemi, F.; Samajdar, A.; Sammut, L.; Sanchez, E. J.; Sandberg, V.; Sandeen, B.; Sanders, J. R.; Sassolas, B.; Saulson, P. R.; Sauter, O. E. S.; Savage, R. L.; Sawadsky, A.; Schale, P.; Schilling, R.; Schmidt, J; Schmidt, P.; Schnabel, R.B.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schoenbeck, A.; Schreiber, K.E.C.; Schuette, D.; Schutz, B. F.; Scott, J.; Scott, M.S.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sentenac, D.; Sequino, V.; Sergeev, A.; Setyawati, Y.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shaffer, T. J.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shaltev, M.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Sheperd, A.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Siellez, K.; Siemens, X.; Sieniawska, M.; Sigg, D.; Silva, António Dias da; Singer, A; Singer, L. P.; Singh, A.; Singh, R.; Singhal, A.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Smith, R. J. E.; Smith, N.D.; Smith, R. J. E.; Son, E. J.; Sorazu, B.; Sorrentino, F.; Souradeep, T.; Srivastava, A. K.; Staley, A.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steinmeyer, D.; Stephens, B. C.; Stone, J.R.; Strain, K. A.; Straniero, N.; Stratta, G.; Strauss, N. A.; Strigin, S. E.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sun, L.; Sunil, S.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B. L.; Szczepanczyk, M. J.; Tacca, M.D.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tapai, M.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taracchini, A.; Taylor, W.R.; Theeg, T.; Thirugnanasambandam, M. P.; Thomas, E. G.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thrane, E.; Tiwari, S.; Tiwari, V.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Toland, K.; Tomlinson, C.; Tonelli, M.; Tornasi, Z.; Torres, C. V.; Torrie, C. I.; Toyra, D.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Trifiro, D.; Tringali, M. C.; Trozzo, L.; Tse, M.; Turconi, M.; Tuyenbayev, D.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Urban, A. L.; Usman, S. A.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; van Bakel, N.; Van Beuzekom, Martin; van den Brand, J. F. J.; Van Den Broeck, C.F.F.; Vander-Hyde, D. C.; van der Schaaf, L.; van Heijningen, J. V.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vardaro, M.; Vass, S.; Vasuth, M.; Vaulin, R.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P.J.; Venkateswara, K.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Vicere, A.; Vinciguerra, S.; Vine, D. J.; Vinet, J. -Y.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Voss, D. V.; Vousden, W. D.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A. R.; Wade, L. E.; Wade, MT; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, M.; Wang, X.; Wang, Y.; Ward, R. L.; Warner, J.; Was, M.; Weaver, B.; Wei, L. -W.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Wen, L.M.; Wessels, P.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whiting, B. F.; Williams, D.R.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M. H.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Woehler, J.; Worden, J.; Wright, J.L.; Wu, D.S.; Wu, G.; Yablon, J.; Yam, W.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yu, H.; Yvert, M.; Zadrozny, A.; Zangrando, L.; Zanolin, M.; Zendri, J. -P.; Zevin, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, X. J.; Zucker, M. E.; Zuraw, S. E.; Zweizig, J.; Boyle, M.; Campanelli, M.; Chu, I.W.T.; Clark, M.; Fauchon-Jones, E. J.; Fong, H.; Healy, J.; Hemberger, D.; Hinder, I.; Husa, S.; Kalaghati, C.; Khan., S.; Kidder, L. E.; Kinsey, M.; Laguna, P.; London, L. T.; Lousto, C. O.; Lovelace, G.; Ossokine, S.; Pannarale, F.; Pfeiffer, H. P.; Scheel, M.; Shoemaker, D. M.; Szilagyi, B.; Teukolsky, S.; Vinuales, A. Vano; Zlochower, Y.

    2016-01-01

    We compare GW150914 directly to simulations of coalescing binary black holes in full general relativity, including several performed specifically to reproduce this event. Our calculations go beyond existing semianalytic models, because for all simulations—including sources with two independent,

  8. Insights into the Impact of Surface Hydrophobicity on Droplet Coalescence and Jumping Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongxia; Yang, Weilin; Aili, Abulimiti; Zhang, TieJun

    2017-08-29

    Droplet coalescence jumping on superhydrophobic surfaces attracts much research attention owing to its capability in enhancing condensation for energy and water applications. In this work, we reveal the impact of the finite surface adhesion to explain velocity discrepancies observed in recent droplet jumping studies, particularly when droplet sizes are a few micrometers (1-10 μm). Surface adhesion, which is usually neglected, can significantly affect both droplet coalescence and departure dynamics. It causes oscillations on velocity and contact area in the droplet coalescence process, as observed numerically and experimentally. Comparing the increasing rate of jumping velocity with contact angle for three different droplet sizes, we show that smaller droplets exhibit higher sensitivity to the change of surface hydrophobicity. We also specify the range of surface superhydrophobicity where the jumping velocity monotonically decreases (θ ≳ 170°), increases (θ ≲ 160°), or changes non-monotonically in transition (160° ≲ θ ≲170°) with droplet size. As a result, there exists a broad jumping velocity range for micrometer-sized droplets on a superhydrophobic surface with a slight contact angle variation. This work offers an extended understanding of the droplet coalescence and jumping dynamics to resolve the discrepancies in recent experimental observations.

  9. Droplet coalescence: drainage, film rupture and neck growth in ultralow interfacial tension systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aarts, D.G.A.L.; Lekkerkerker, H.N.W.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/159054885

    2008-01-01

    We study the coalescence of a drop with its bulk phase in fluid–fluid demixing colloid–polymer mixtures. Such mixtures show behaviour analogous to molecular fluid–fluid systems, but the interfacial tension is between 105 to 107 times smaller than in the molecular case. Such an ultralow interfacial

  10. Critical size ratio for coalescence-induced droplet jumping on superhydrophobic surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kai; Li, Ruixin; Liang, Qianqing; Jiang, Rui; Zheng, Yi; Lan, Zhong; Ma, Xuehu

    2017-08-01

    The mechanism of coalescence-induced droplet jumping on superhydrophobic surfaces has been relatively well-established over the years. Most of the related studies are only considering the coalescence process of equal-sized water droplets. However, the coalescence of droplets with different sizes is actually more frequently encountered and the effect of the size ratio on droplet jumping is very crucial to the hydrodynamics of this process. In this work, the effect of the initial droplet size ratio on coalescence-induced jumping of two water droplets is investigated experimentally and numerically. For the previously reported jumping droplet sizes (˜1-100 μm), it is found that the critical droplet size ratio below which the jumping does not occur is about 0.56. The results agree well with the experimental data as the size ratios of observed jumping events collapse into the predicted jumping regime. These findings will gain insights into droplet jumping which has great potential in a number of industrial processes.

  11. Organic nanocomposite structure tailored by controlling droplet coalescence during inkjet printing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihnen, Andrew C; Petrock, Anne M; Chou, Tsengming; Fuchs, Brian E; Lee, Woo Y

    2012-09-26

    Inkjet printing offers a low-cost, high-throughput avenue for producing functional organic materials through rapid translation of desktop discoveries to industrial roll-to-roll processes. Here, we report a simple, but effective strategy to control droplet coalescence during inkjet printing, as a major variable, to tailor the nanoscale morphology of organic composite materials produced upon evaporation of all-liquid inks. During deposition, the spacing between ink droplets was controlled to systematically vary the extent of droplet coalescence. Our results show that decreasing coalescence increased the solvent evaporation rate, supersaturation of the solutes, and nucleation density of the precipitating organic crystals. This phenomenon was utilized to tailor the average size of pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) crystals dispersed in an adhesive binder matrix from ~0.2 to upwards of 100 μm. The results suggest that controlling the extent of droplet coalescence can be used as an effective means to tailor the composite morphology of printed organic materials at the nanoscale.

  12. Collision and Coalescence of Single Attoliter Oil Droplets on a Pipet Nanopore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunderson, Christopher G; Peng, Zhuoyu; Zhang, Bo

    2018-02-12

    We describe the use of a quartz pipet nanopore to study the collision and coalescence of individual emulsion oil droplets and their subsequent nanopore translocation. Collision and coalescence of single toluene droplets at a nanopore orifice are driven primarily by electroosmosis and electrophoresis and lead to the fast growth of a trapped oil droplet. This results in a stepwise current response due to the coalesced oil droplet increasing its volume and its ability to partially block the nanopore's ionic current, allowing us to use the resistive-pulse method to resolve single droplet collisions. Further growth of the trapped oil droplet leads to a complete blockage of the nanopore and a nearly 100% current decay. The trapped oil droplet shows enormous mechanical stability at lower voltages and stays in its trapped status for hundreds of seconds. An increased voltage can be used to drive the trapped droplet into the pipet pore within several milliseconds. Simultaneous fluorescence imaging and amperometry were performed to examine droplet collision, coalescence, and translocation, further confirming the proposed mechanism of droplet-nanopore interaction. Moreover, we demonstrate the unique ability to perform fast voltammetric measurements on a nanopore-supported attoliter oil droplet and study its voltage-driven ion transfer processes.

  13. Enhanced mixing of droplets during coalescence on a surface with a wettability gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Yu-Hsuan; Hsu, Miao-Hsing; Yang, Jing-Tang

    2010-11-21

    We investigated the dynamics of head-on collisions between a moving droplet and a stationary droplet on a surface with a wettability gradient. The mixing of fluids is achieved passively through convective mass transfer caused by the release of surface energy during coalescence, and also through diffusive mass transfer. The coalescence dynamics were visualized with a high-speed camera; the internal flow patterns were resolved with measurement of micro-PIV (particle image velocimetry). The results show that the released surface energy creates a pair recirculation flow inside the merged droplet when the stationary droplet is placed near the gradient, whereas most released surface energy is converted into oscillation when the stationary droplet is far from the gradient. This distinction is attributed to the motion of the contact line during coalescence. The mixing of fluorescently labeled oligonucleotides in these two modes is revealed with confocal micro-laser induced fluorescence technique. The results of 3D scans demonstrate that the motion of the contact line during coalescence distributes the fluids in a complicated manner, thus beneficial for mixing. This mechanism of enhanced mixing is applicable also for platforms other than a surface with a wettability gradient; prospective applications include improving the mixing of biochemical fluids.

  14. Influence of Bubble Approach Velocity on Coalescence in α-Terpineol and n-Octanol Solutions.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Orvalho, Sandra; Štiková, Lucie; Stanovský, Petr; Zedníková, Mária; Vejražka, Jiří; Růžička, Marek

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 54, č. 1 (2018), s. 73-80 ISSN 1643-1049 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-15467S Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : bubble * coalescence * frother Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 0.901, year: 2016

  15. Effect of Contact Conditions on Void Coalescence at Low Stress Triaxiality Shearing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Jonas; Nielsen, Kim Lau; Tvergaard, Viggo

    2012-01-01

    to zero stress triaxiality. Furthermore, it is shown that accounting for friction at the void surface strongly postpones the onset of coalescence, hence, increasing the overall material ductility. The changes in overall material behavior are here presented for a wide range of initial material and loading...

  16. Influence of Energy and Temperature in Cluster Coalescence Induced by Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. C. Jiménez-Sáez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Coalescence induced by deposition of different Cu clusters on an epitaxial Co cluster supported on a Cu(001 substrate is studied by constant-temperature molecular dynamics simulations. The degree of epitaxy of the final system increases with increasing separation between the centres of mass of the projectile and target clusters during the collision. Structure, roughness, and epitaxial order of the supported cluster also influence the degree of epitaxy. The effect of energy and temperature is determinant on the epitaxial condition of the coalesced cluster, especially both factors modify the generation, growth and interaction among grains. A higher temperature favours the epitaxial growth for low impact parameters. A higher energy contributes to the epitaxial coalescence for any initial separation between the projectile and target clusters. The influence of projectile energy is notably greater than the influence of temperature since higher energies allow greater and instantaneous atomic reorganizations, so that the number of arisen grains just after the collision becomes smaller. The appearance of grain boundary dislocations is, therefore, a decisive factor in the epitaxial growth of the coalesced cluster.

  17. Critical frequency for coalescence of emulsions in an AC electric field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhou; Ali, Faizi Hammad; Shum, Ho Cheung

    2017-11-01

    Applying an electric field to trigger the coalescence of emulsions has been applied in various applications which include crude oil recovery, emulsion stability characterization as well as pico-injection and droplet-based chemical reaction in microfluidics. In this work, we systematically investigated the responses of surfactant-stabilized emulsions to a controlled AC electric field using a customer-built chip. At a given amplitude of the AC voltage, we found a critical frequency beyond which the emulsions remain stable. When the frequency is decreased to below the critical value, emulsions coalesce immediately. Such critical frequency is found to be dependent of amplitude of the AC voltage, viscosity of the fluids, concentration and type of the surfactant as well as the electric conductivity of the droplet phase. Using a model based on the drainage of thin film, we have explored the mechanism behind and interpret this phenomenon systematically. Our work extends the understanding of the electro-coalescence of emulsions and can be beneficial for any applications involve the coalescence of droplets in an AC electric field.

  18. Along the way to developing a theory of the program: a re-examination of the conceptual framework as an organizing strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helitzer, Deborah L; Sussman, Andrew L; Hoffman, Richard M; Getrich, Christina M; Warner, Teddy D; Rhyne, Robert L

    2014-08-01

    Conceptual frameworks (CF) have historically been used to develop program theory. We re-examine the literature about the role of CF in this context, specifically how they can be used to create descriptive and prescriptive theories, as building blocks for a program theory. Using a case example of colorectal cancer screening intervention development, we describe the process of developing our initial CF, the methods used to explore the constructs in the framework and revise the framework for intervention development. We present seven steps that guided the development of our CF: (1) assemble the "right" research team, (2) incorporate existing literature into the emerging CF, (3) construct the conceptual framework, (4) diagram the framework, (5) operationalize the framework: develop the research design and measures, (6) conduct the research, and (7) revise the framework. A revised conceptual framework depicted more complicated inter-relationships of the different predisposing, enabling, reinforcing, and system-based factors. The updated framework led us to generate program theory and serves as the basis for designing future intervention studies and outcome evaluations. A CF can build a foundation for program theory. We provide a set of concrete steps and lessons learned to assist practitioners in developing a CF. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Reliability of a viva assessment of clinical reasoning in an Australian pre-professional osteopathy program assessed using generalizability theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, Brett; Orrock, Paul; Grace, Sandra

    2017-01-01

    Clinical reasoning is situation-dependent and case-specific; therefore, assessments incorporating different patient presentations are warranted. The present study aimed to determine the reliability of a multi-station case-based viva assessment of clinical reasoning in an Australian pre-registration osteopathy program using generalizability theory. Students (from years 4 and 5) and examiners were recruited from the osteopathy program at Southern Cross University, Lismore, Australia. The study took place on a single day in the student teaching clinic. Examiners were trained before the examination. Students were allocated to 1 of 3 rounds consisting of 5 10-minute stations in an objective structured clinical examination-style. Generalizability analysis was used to explore the reliability of the examination. Fifteen students and 5 faculty members participated in the study. The examination produced a generalizability coefficient of 0.53, with 18 stations required to achieve a generalizability coefficient of 0.80. The reliability estimations were acceptable and the psychometric findings related to the marking rubric and overall scores were acceptable; however, further work is required in examiner training and ensuring consistent case difficulty to improve the reliability of the examination.

  20. Reliability of a viva assessment of clinical reasoning in an Australian pre-professional osteopathy program assessed using generalizability theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brett Vaughan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinical reasoning is situation-dependent and case-specific; therefore, assessments incorporating different patient presentations are warranted. The present study aimed to determine the reliability of a multi-station case-based viva assessment of clinical reasoning in an Australian pre-registration osteopathy program using generalizability theory. Students (from years 4 and 5 and examiners were recruited from the osteopathy program at Southern Cross University, Lismore, Australia. The study took place on a single day in the student teaching clinic. Examiners were trained before the examination. Students were allocated to 1 of 3 rounds consisting of 5 10-minute stations in an objective structured clinical examination-style. Generalizability analysis was used to explore the reliability of the examination. Fifteen students and 5 faculty members participated in the study. The examination produced a generalizability coefficient of 0.53, with 18 stations required to achieve a generalizability coefficient of 0.80. The reliability estimations were acceptable and the psychometric findings related to the marking rubric and overall scores were acceptable; however, further work is required in examiner training and ensuring consistent case difficulty to improve the reliability of the examination.

  1. Measuring the Transition Rates of Coalescence Events during Double Phase Separation in Microgravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Oprisan

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Phase transition is a ubiquitous phenomenon in nature, science and technology. In general, the phase separation from a homogeneous phase depends on the depth of the temperature quench into the two-phase region. Earth’s gravity masks the details of phase separation phenomena, which is why experiments were performed under weightlessness. Under such conditions, the pure fluid sulphur hexafluoride (SF 6 near its critical point also benefits from the universality of phase separation behavior and critical slowing down of dynamics. Initially, the fluid was slightly below its critical temperature with the liquid matrix separated from the vapor phase. A 0.2 mK temperature quench further cooled down the fluid and produced a double phase separation with liquid droplets inside the vapor phase and vapor bubbles inside the liquid matrix, respectively. The liquid droplets and the vapor bubbles respective distributions were well fitted by a lognormal function. The evolution of discrete bins of different radii allowed the derivation of the transition rates for coalescence processes. Based on the largest transition rates, two main coalescence mechanisms were identified: (1 asymmetric coalescences between one small droplet of about 20 μ m and a wide range of larger droplets; and (2 symmetric coalescences between droplets of large and similar radii. Both mechanisms lead to a continuous decline of the fraction of small radii droplets and an increase in the fraction of the large radii droplets. Similar coalescence mechanisms were observed for vapor bubbles. However, the mean radii of liquid droplets exhibits a t 1 / 3 evolution, whereas the mean radii of the vapor bubbles exhibit a t 1 / 2 evolution.

  2. Measuring the Transition Rates of Coalescence Events during Double Phase Separation in Microgravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oprisan, Ana; Garrabos, Yves; Lecoutre, Carole; Beysens, Daniel

    2017-07-06

    Phase transition is a ubiquitous phenomenon in nature, science and technology. In general, the phase separation from a homogeneous phase depends on the depth of the temperature quench into the two-phase region. Earth's gravity masks the details of phase separation phenomena, which is why experiments were performed under weightlessness. Under such conditions, the pure fluid sulphur hexafluoride (SF 6 ) near its critical point also benefits from the universality of phase separation behavior and critical slowing down of dynamics. Initially, the fluid was slightly below its critical temperature with the liquid matrix separated from the vapor phase. A 0.2 mK temperature quench further cooled down the fluid and produced a double phase separation with liquid droplets inside the vapor phase and vapor bubbles inside the liquid matrix, respectively. The liquid droplets and the vapor bubbles respective distributions were well fitted by a lognormal function. The evolution of discrete bins of different radii allowed the derivation of the transition rates for coalescence processes. Based on the largest transition rates, two main coalescence mechanisms were identified: (1) asymmetric coalescences between one small droplet of about 20 μ m and a wide range of larger droplets; and (2) symmetric coalescences between droplets of large and similar radii. Both mechanisms lead to a continuous decline of the fraction of small radii droplets and an increase in the fraction of the large radii droplets. Similar coalescence mechanisms were observed for vapor bubbles. However, the mean radii of liquid droplets exhibits a t 1 / 3 evolution, whereas the mean radii of the vapor bubbles exhibit a t 1 / 2 evolution.

  3. Use of Theory in Behavior Change Interventions: An Analysis of Programs to Increase Physical Activity in Posttreatment Breast Cancer Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bluethmann, Shirley M.; Bartholomew, L. Kay; Murphy, Caitlin C.; Vernon, Sally W.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Theory use may enhance effectiveness of behavioral interventions, yet critics question whether theory-based interventions have been sufficiently scrutinized. This study applied a framework to evaluate theory use in physical activity interventions for breast cancer survivors. The aims were to (1) evaluate theory application intensity and…

  4. Determination of the Orthokinetic Coalescence Efficiency of Droplets in Simple Shear Flow Using Mobile, Partially Mobile and Immobile Drainage Models and Trajectory Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mousa, H.A.H.; Agterof, W.G.M.; Mellema, J.

    2002-01-01

    The orthokinetic coalescence efficiency, of two Newtonian droplets submerged in a Newtonian fluid in simple shear flow, was theoretically investigated. The investigation considered three drainage models: immobile, partially mobile and mobile interfaces. The coalescence efficiency was also determined

  5. Increasing sun protection in winter outdoor recreation a theory-based health communication program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walkosz, Barbara J; Buller, David B; Andersen, Peter A; Scott, Michael D; Dignan, Mark B; Cutter, Gary R; Maloy, Julie A

    2008-06-01

    Unprotected and excessive exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UVR) is the primary risk factor for skin cancer. A pair-matched, group-randomized, pre-test/post-test, quasi-experimental design, with ski resorts as the unit of randomization, tested the effectiveness of Go Sun Smart, a multi-channel skin cancer prevention program. Independent samples of guests were taken at baseline (2001) and follow-up (2002); data were analyzed in 2006. A total of 6516 adult guests at 26 ski areas in the western U.S. and Canada were recruited, consented, and interviewed on chairlifts. This study was nested within an occupational intervention for ski area workers. Ski areas were pair-matched and randomized to receive Go Sun Smart, which consisted of print, electronic, visual, and interpersonal skin cancer prevention messages. Sun-protection behaviors, sunburning, recall of sun-protection messages, and the association of message exposure to sun protection. The difference in recall of all sun-protection messages, messages on signs and posters, and the Go Sun Smart logo was significant between the intervention and control resorts. Reported use of sun-protection practices was higher by guests at intervention ski areas using more (a higher dose of) Go Sun Smart materials. Intervention-group guests who recalled a sun-safety message were more likely to practice sun safety than intervention-group guests who did not recall a message and control-group guests. While the mere implementation of Go Sun Smart did not produce sun-safety improvements, Go Sun Smart appeared to be effective for guests who encountered and remembered it. Many factors can work against message exposure. Signage seemed to produce the greatest increase in exposure to sun-safety messages.

  6. Putting Children’s Sleep Problems to Bed: Using Behavior Change Theory to Increase the Success of Children’s Sleep Education Programs and Contribute to Healthy Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Blunden

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Sleep is critical for the healthy development of children, yet most children simply don’t get enough. Whilst school based sleep education programs have been developed for parents and their children, they have had mixed success. We consider how existing school-based sleep education programs can be improved by applying a broader model to behaviour change theory. We find that the mixed success of school-based sleep education programs may be due to a plausible but misleading assumption that simply increasing information about the importance of sleep and the risks of insufficient and/or inefficient sleep, will necessarily result in improved sleep behaviours. We identify the potential benefits of using a more inclusive behavior change theory in the development of sleep education programs with a particular need for theories that incorporate the multiple biological, environmental and social impacts on children’s sleep. Bronfenbrenner’s Bioecological model is presented to illustrate how one such inclusive behavior change theory could significantly improve the success of sleep education programs and ultimately support the healthy development of children.

  7. Theory and practice as cultural forms and the research design on The open school program in the Danish school reform

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Lars Emmerik Damgaard; Haastrup, Lisbeth

    2015-01-01

    Title Theory and practice in the workshop – towards a theory and practice didactics The knowledge forms of theory and practice has been historically viewed as means and measures for knowing and doing with a primary focus on how to bridge the gap between them. On the basis of qualitative fieldwork...... Carr (1986) I wish to present an understanding of theory and practice as cultural forms (Knudsen 2012). In this perspective theory and practice are viewed as knowledge forms in cultural forms. We found that this perspective supports how theory and practice can relate in multiple ways...

  8. Arrested coalescence behaviour of giant Pickering droplets and colloidosomes stabilised by poly(tert-butylaminoethyl methacrylate) latexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, Andrew J; Tan, Sin-Ying; Giakoumatos, Emma C; Webber, Grant B; Armes, Steven P; Ata, Seher; Wanless, Erica J

    2014-08-21

    The coalescence of two oil droplets grown at pH 10 in the presence of lightly cross-linked 260 nm diameter charge-stabilised poly(tert-butylamino)ethyl methacrylate (PTBAEMA) latexes was monitored using a high-speed video camera. Three model oils (n-dodecane, isopropyl myristate and sunflower oil) were investigated, each in the absence and presence of an oil-soluble cross-linker [tolylene 2,4-diisocyanate-terminated poly(propylene glycol), PPG-TDI]. In the absence of PPG-TDI, rapid coalescence was observed for giant PTBAEMA-stabilised Pickering oil droplets, which exhibited faster coalescence times compared to bare oil droplets. However, an increase in the damping coefficients for coalescing Pickering droplets (compared to those of bare oil droplets) indicated PTBAEMA latex particle adsorption. Addition of PPG-TDI cross-linker to oil droplets in the absence of latex particles led to a reduction in the interfacial tension confirming its surface-active nature. The oil-soluble PPG-TDI reacts with the secondary amine groups on the PTBAEMA latex, producing giant colloidosomes that remain stable to coalescence when brought into contact. This stability to coalescence was not observed for bare oil droplets in the presence of PPG-TDI, confirming that the cross-linked latex particles at the interface provide the additional stability. Finally, interactions between asymmetric n-dodecane droplets were examined. Adding oil-soluble cross-linker to only one droplet resulted in "arrested coalescence" behaviour in the presence of PTBAEMA latex particles. In this context, the droplet ageing time was found to be critical and is attributed to the relatively slow particle adsorption kinetics. Ageing times of less than 60 s led to catastrophic droplet coalescence, whereas ageing times longer than 60 s indicated cross-linker diffusion from one droplet to the other, which produced inter-cross-linked colloidosomes. Arrested coalescence was only observed for ageing times of approximately 60

  9. Comparison of Effects of Teaching English to Thai Undergraduate Teacher-Students through Cross-Curricular Thematic Instruction Program Based on Multiple Intelligence Theory and Conventional Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattanavich, Saowalak

    2013-01-01

    This study is aimed at comparing the effects of teaching English to Thai undergraduate teacher-students through cross-curricular thematic instruction program based on multiple intelligence theory and through conventional instruction. Two experimental groups, which utilized Randomized True Control Group-Pretest-posttest Time Series Design and…

  10. High energy physics program: Task A, Experiment and theory; Task B, Numerical simulation. Progress report, July 1, 1988--June 30, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-08-01

    This report discusses research in High Energy Physics at Florida State University. Contained in this paper are: highlights of activities during the past few years; five year summary; fixed target experiments; collider experiments; SSC preparation, detector development and detector construction; computing, networking and VAX upgrade to ALPHA; and particle theory programs.

  11. The theory of planned behavior and physical activity change: Outcomes of the Aging Well and Healthily Intervention Program for Older Adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stolte, E.; Hopman-Rock, M.; Aartsen, M.J.; van Tilburg, T.G.; Chorus, A.

    2017-01-01

    The predictive value of the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) on intention and physical activity (PA) over time was examined. Data from the Aging Well and Healthily intervention program (targeting perceived behavioral control and attitude, not subjective norm) were analyzed, including pretest (T0),

  12. The theory of planned behavior and physical activity change: Outcomes of the aging well and healthily intervention program for older adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stolte, E.; Hopman-Rock, M.; Aartsen, M.J.; Tilburg, T.G. van; Chorus, A.

    2017-01-01

    The predictive value of the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) on intention and physical activity (PA) over time was examined. Data from the Aging Well and Healthily intervention program (targeting perceived behavioral control and attitude, not subjective norm) were analyzed, including pretest (T0),

  13. Inferring Species Trees Directly from Biallelic Genetic Markers: Bypassing Gene Trees in a Full Coalescent Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, David; Bouckaert, Remco; Felsenstein, Joseph; Rosenberg, Noah A.; RoyChoudhury, Arindam

    2012-01-01

    The multispecies coalescent provides an elegant theoretical framework for estimating species trees and species demographics from genetic markers. However, practical applications of the multispecies coalescent model are limited by the need to integrate or sample over all gene trees possible for each genetic marker. Here we describe a polynomial-time algorithm that computes the likelihood of a species tree directly from the markers under a finite-sites model of mutation effectively integrating over all possible gene trees. The method applies to independent (unlinked) biallelic markers such as well-spaced single nucleotide polymorphisms, and we have implemented it in SNAPP, a Markov chain Monte Carlo sampler for inferring species trees, divergence dates, and population sizes. We report results from simulation experiments and from an analysis of 1997 amplified fragment length polymorphism loci in 69 individuals sampled from six species of Ourisia (New Zealand native foxglove). PMID:22422763

  14. Coalescence-avoiding joint probabilistic data association based on bias removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Peiliang; Xu, Shiyou; Li, Xian; Chen, Zengping

    2015-12-01

    In order to deal with the track coalescence problem of the joint probabilistic data association (JPDA) algorithm, a novel approach from a state bias removal point of view is developed in this paper. The factors that JPDA causes the state bias are analyzed, and the direct computation equation of the bias in the ideal case is given. Then based on the definitions of target detection hypothesis and target-to-target association hypothesis, the bias estimation is extended to the general and practical case. Finally, the estimated bias is removed from the state updated by JPDA to generate the unbiased state. The results of Monte Carlo simulations show that the proposed method can handle track coalescence and presents better performance when compared with the traditional methods.

  15. In situ imaging of nano-droplet condensation and coalescence on thin water films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkay, Zahava

    2014-04-01

    Two related aspects of nano-droplet condensation and droplets coalescence are studied for droplets on self-supported thin water films. The experiments are conducted in the environmental scanning electron microscope using wet scanning transmission electron microscopy. Favorable condensation sites are examined and in-situ position-controlled condensation experiments are conducted. The interaction among condensed multi-droplets as well as between a single droplet and the underneath nano-thick water film are dynamically examined with 10nm lateral resolution. The droplet round shape is reshaped to flat-like facets in-between droplets of 30-230 nm separation. Dynamic imaging of a few minutes duration shows a delayed coalescence effect, being explained by increased droplet-droplet electrostatic interaction relative to van der Waals interaction.

  16. Simulation of droplet formation and coalescence using lattice Boltzmann-based single-phase model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Xiu Qing; Butler, David Lee; Ng, Sum Huan; Wang, Zhenfeng; Danyluk, Steven; Yang, Chun

    2007-07-15

    A lattice Boltzmann method-based single-phase free surface model is developed to study the interfacial dynamics of coalescence, droplet formation and detachment phenomena related to surface tension and wetting effects. Compared with the conventional multiphase models, the lattice Boltzmann-based single-phase model has a higher computational efficiency since it is not necessary to simulate the motion of the gas phase. A perturbation, which is given in the same fashion as the perturbation step in Gunstensen's color model, is added to the distribution functions of the interface cells for incorporating the surface tension into the single-phase model. The assignment of different mass gradients along the fluid-wall interface is used to model the wetting properties of the solid surface. Implementations of the model are demonstrated for simulating the processes of the droplet coalescence, the droplet formation and detachment from ceiling and from nozzles with different shapes and different wall wetting properties.

  17. Coalescence collision of liquid drops I: Off-center collisions of equal-size drops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Acevedo-Malavé

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics method (SPH is used here to model off-center collisions of equal-size liquid drops in a three-dimensional space. In this study the Weber number is calculated for several conditions of the droplets dynamics and the velocity vector fields formed inside the drops during the collision process are shown. For the permanent coalescence the evolution of the kinetic and internal energy is shown and also the approaching to equilibrium of the resulting drop. Depending of the Weber number three possible outcomes for the collision of droplets is obtained: permanent coalescence, flocculation and fragmentation. The fragmentation phenomena are modeled and the formation of small satellite drops can be seen. The ligament that is formed follows the “end pinching” mechanism and it is transformed into a flat structure.

  18. Growth Mechanism of Lipid-Based Nanodiscs -- a Model Membrane for Studying Kinetics of Particle Coalescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieh, Mu-Ping; Dizon, Anthony; Li, Ming; Hu, Andrew; Fan, Tai-Hsi

    2012-02-01

    Lipid-based nanodiscs composed of long- and short- chain lipids [namely, dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine (DMPC), dimyristoyl phosphatidylglycerol (DMPG) and dihexanoyl phosphatidylcholine (DHPC)] constantly form at high lipid concentrations and at low temperatures (i.e., below the melting transition temperature of DMPC, TM). The initial size of these nanodiscs (at high total lipid concentration, CL> 20 wt.%) is relatively uniform and of similar dimension (according to dynamic light scattering and small angle neutron scattering experiments), seemingly independent of thermal history. Upon dilution, the nanodiscs slowly coalesce and grow in size with time irreversibly. Our preliminary result shows that the growth rate strongly depends on several parameters such as charge density, CL and temperature. We have also found that the nanodisc coalescence is a reaction limit instead of diffusion limit process through a time-resolved study.

  19. Non-coalescence of oppositely charged droplets in pH-sensitive emulsions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tingting; Seiffert, Sebastian; Thiele, Julian; Abate, Adam R.; Weitz, David A.; Richtering, Walter

    2012-01-01

    Like charges stabilize emulsions, whereas opposite charges break emulsions. This is the fundamental principle for many industrial and practical processes. Using micrometer-sized pH-sensitive polymeric hydrogel particles as emulsion stabilizers, we prepare emulsions that consist of oppositely charged droplets, which do not coalesce. We observe noncoalescence of oppositely charged droplets in bulk emulsification as well as in microfluidic devices, where oppositely charged droplets are forced to collide within channel junctions. The results demonstrate that electrostatic interactions between droplets do not determine their stability and reveal the unique pH-dependent properties of emulsions stabilized by soft microgel particles. The noncoalescence can be switched to coalescence by neutralizing the microgels, and the emulsion can be broken on demand. This unusual feature of the microgel-stabilized emulsions offers fascinating opportunities for future applications of these systems. PMID:22203968

  20. Impact of 50% Synthesized Iso-Paraffins (SIP) on F-76 Fuel Coalescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-16

    petroleum JP-5 and Synthesized Iso-Paraffins (SIP). SIP fuels are made from direct fermentation of sugar into olefinic hydrocarbons. The olefinic...5 and Synthesized Iso-Paraffins (SIP). SIP fuels are made from direct fermentation of sugar into olefinic hydrocarbons. The olefinic hydrocarbons...coalescer and separator filtration system. 3.0 APPROACH 3.1 Test Overview Testing was conducted in accordance with (IAW) NCT Standard Work Package

  1. Exploring tidal effects of coalescing binary neutron stars in numerical relativity II: Longterm simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Hotokezaka, Kenta; Kyutoku, Koutarou; Okawa, Hirotada; Shibata, Masaru

    2015-01-01

    We perform new longterm (15-16 orbits) simulations of coalescing binary neutron stars in numerical relativity using an updated Einstein's equation solver, employing low-eccentricity initial data, and modeling the neutron stars by a piecewise polytropic equation of state. A convergence study shows that our new results converge more rapidly than the third order and using the determined convergence order, we construct an extrapolated waveform for which the estimated total phase error should be l...

  2. A coherent synchrotron X-ray microradiology investigation of bubble and droplet coalescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weon, B M; Je, J H; Hwu, Y; Margaritondo, G

    2008-11-01

    A quantitative application of microradiology with coherent X-rays to the real-time study of microbubble and microdroplet coalescence phenomena, with specific emphasis on the size relations in three-body events, is presented. The results illustrate the remarkable effectiveness of coherent X-ray imaging in delineating interfaces in multiphase systems, in accurately measuring their geometric properties and in monitoring their dynamics.

  3. Impact of diblock copolymers on droplet coalescence, emulsification, and aggregation in immiscible homopolymer blends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Jeremy N; Saito, Tonomori; Gao, Renlong; Fried, Eric S; Long, Timothy E; Green, David L

    2012-02-07

    Using rheo-optical techniques, we investigated the impact of interfacial wetting of symmetric diblock copolymers (BCPs) on the coalescence and aggregation of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) droplets in immiscible polyethylene-propylene (PEP) homopolymers. Anionic polymerization was used to synthesize well-defined matrix homopolymers and symmetric 16 kg/mol-to-16 kg/mol PDMS-b-PEP diblock copolymers with low polydispersity (PDI ≈ 1.02) as characterized with size exclusion chromatography and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Blends were formulated to match the viscosities between the droplets and the matrix. Moreover, molecular weights of these components were varied to ensure that the inner block of the copolymer inside the droplet was collapsed and dry, whereas the outer block of the copolymer outside of the droplet was stretched and wet. Droplet breakup and coalescence as well as interfacial tensions were measured using rheo-optical experiments with Linkam shearing stage and an optical microscope. Subsequent to droplet breakup at high shear rates, we found that the BCPs mitigated shear-induced coalescence at lower shear rates. Based on surface tension measurements, the stretching of the BCP increased in lower molecular weight matrices, causing the droplet surface to saturate at lower coverage in line with theoretical predictions. Droplet aggregation was detected with further reductions in shear rate, which was attributed to the dewetting or the expulsion of the matrix from a saturated brush. Ultimately, the regions of droplet coalescence and aggregation were scaled by balancing the forces of shear with those due to the attraction between BCP-coated droplets.

  4. Enhanced Coalescence-Induced Droplet-Jumping on Nanostructured Superhydrophobic Surfaces in the Absence of Microstructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng; Maeda, Yota; Lv, Fengyong; Takata, Yasuyuki; Orejon, Daniel

    2017-10-11

    Superhydrophobic surfaces are receiving increasing attention due to the enhanced condensation heat transfer, self-cleaning, and anti-icing properties by easing droplet self-removal. Despite the extensive research carried out on this topic, the presence or absence of microstructures on droplet adhesion during condensation has not been fully addressed yet. In this work we, therefore, study the condensation behavior on engineered superhydrophobic copper oxide surfaces with different structural finishes. More specifically, we investigate the coalescence-induced droplet-jumping performance on superhydrophobic surfaces with structures varying from the micro- to the nanoscale. The different structural roughness is possible due to the specific etching parameters adopted during the facile low-cost dual-scale fabrication process. A custom-built optical microscopy setup inside a temperature and relative humidity controlled environmental chamber was used for the experimental observations. By varying the structural roughness, from the micro- to the nanoscale, important differences on the number of droplets involved in the jumps, on the frequency of the jumps, and on the size distribution of the jumping droplets were found. In the absence of microstructures, we report an enhancement of the droplet-jumping performance of small droplets with sizes in the same order of magnitude as the microstructures. Microstructures induce further droplet adhesion, act as a structural barrier for the coalescence between droplets growing on the same microstructure, and cause the droplet angular deviation from the main surface normal. As a consequence, upon coalescence, there is a decrease in the net momentum in the out-of-plane direction, and the jump does not ensue. We demonstrate that the absence of microstructures has therefore a positive impact on the coalescence-induced droplet-jumping of micrometer droplets for antifogging, anti-icing, and condensation heat transfer applications.

  5. Application of persuasion and health behavior theories for behavior change counseling: design of the ADAPT (Avoiding Diabetes Thru Action Plan Targeting) program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jenny J; Mann, Devin M

    2012-09-01

    Diabetes incidence is increasing worldwide and providers often do not feel they can effectively counsel about preventive lifestyle changes. The goal of this paper is to describe the development and initial feasibility testing of the Avoiding Diabetes Thru Action Plan Targeting (ADAPT) program to enhance counseling about behavior change for patients with pre-diabetes. Primary care providers and patients were interviewed about their perspectives on lifestyle changes to prevent diabetes. A multidisciplinary design team incorporated this data to translate elements from behavior change theories to create the ADAPT program. The ADAPT program was pilot tested to evaluate feasibility. Leveraging elements from health behavior theories and persuasion literature, the ADAPT program comprises a shared goal-setting module, implementation intentions exercise, and tailored reminders to encourage behavior change. Feasibility data demonstrate that patients were able to use the program to achieve their behavior change goals. Initial findings show that the ADAPT program is feasible for helping improve primary care providers' counseling for behavior change in patients with pre-diabetes. If successful, the ADAPT program may represent an adaptable and scalable behavior change tool for providers to encourage lifestyle changes to prevent diabetes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. [Dissection of prostate coalesce in treatment of benign prostate hypertrophy with relatively small volume].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Ming-xing; Wang, Dong; Wu, Hui-min; Xiong, Guo-bing; Chen, Zhao-xiang

    2007-07-10

    To evaluate the curative effect of dissection for coalesce of prostate in treatment of bladder outlet obstruction (BOO) caused by benign prostate hypertrophy (BPH) with relatively small volume (less than 30 g). Thirty-six patients of BOO caused by BPH with relatively small volume underwent dissection of prostate coalesce. Follow-up was conducted for 32 months (9 - 52 months). The values of international prostate symptom score (IPSS), maximum flow rate (Qmax), and postvoid residual volume (PRV) before and after treatment were measured and compared. The post-operative IPSS was 5.03 +/- 2.66, significantly lower than that before operation (14.19 +/- 5.35), the post-operative Qmax was (17.71 +/- 4.1) ml/s, significantly higher than that before operation [(6.19 +/- 2.14) ml/s], and the post-operative PRV was (8.53 +/- 4.78) ml, significantly lower than that before operation [(50.58 +/- 14.84) ml] (all P prostate coalesce is an ideal method in treatment of BOO caused by BPH with relatively small volume (less than 30 g).

  7. Formation and coalescence of nanobubbles under controlled gas concentration and species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chenliang; Zhang, A.-Man; Wang, Shiping; Cui, Pu

    2018-01-01

    Using molecular dynamics simulations, the effects of gas concentration and species on the coalescence and growth of nanobubbles were systematically investigated. With increasing gas concentration, not only surface nanobubbles but also bulk nanobubbles are formed. The bulk nanobubble in water is less explored so far. Here, its coalescence, stability, movement trajectory and velocity are discussed. A comparison of the motion and coalescence of the bulk nanobubble to the surface nanobubble, directly demonstrates that the three-phase contact line plays a crucial role for surface nanobubble stability. Compared with the bubble size, the distance between surface nanobubbles is a more important factor to decide the merging order among three nanobubbles. The study also shows that three factors including the oversaturated gas concentration, the distance between surface nanobubbles, and the stronger solid-gas interactions influence the formation of the gas-enrichment layer at the solid-liquid interface. The result has an important significance to enhancing the boundary slip due to the presence of nanobubbles.

  8. Ancestral population genomics using coalescence hidden Markov models and heuristic optimisation algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jade Yu; Mailund, Thomas

    2015-08-01

    With full genome data from several closely related species now readily available, we have the ultimate data for demographic inference. Exploiting these full genomes, however, requires models that can explicitly model recombination along alignments of full chromosomal length. Over the last decade a class of models, based on the sequential Markov coalescence model combined with hidden Markov models, has been developed and used to make inference in simple demographic scenarios. To move forward to more complex demographic modelling we need better and more automated ways of specifying these models and efficient optimisation algorithms for inferring the parameters in complex and often high-dimensional models. In this paper we present a framework for building such coalescence hidden Markov models for pairwise alignments and present results for using heuristic optimisation algorithms for parameter estimation. We show that we can build more complex demographic models than our previous frameworks and that we obtain more accurate parameter estimates using heuristic optimisation algorithms than when using our previous gradient based approaches. Our new framework provides a flexible way of constructing coalescence hidden Markov models almost automatically. While estimating parameters in more complex models is still challenging we show that using heuristic optimisation algorithms we still get a fairly good accuracy. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. Droplet-based electro-coalescence for probing threshold disjoining pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhou; Chan, San To; Faizi, Hammad Ali; Roberts, Robert C; Shum, Ho Cheung

    2015-05-07

    In this work, we investigate the coalescence of emulsion droplets in a controlled electric field. Two contacting droplets stabilized by surfactants can be forced to coalesce into a combined one when the applied voltage is above a critical value. The critical voltages change with the types, concentrations of surfactants and temperature. By exploring the drainage of a thin oil film trapped between emulsions, we interpret that the coalescence occurs as the electric compression overcomes the disjoining pressure barrier and squeezes the film to a critical thickness. Based on this, we have devised an approach to probe the threshold disjoining pressure which can help predict the emulsion stability and surfactant efficacy quantitatively. We have confirmed the validity of our approach for measuring the threshold disjoining pressure by comparing the result with other proven tests that involve centrifugation and thermal heating. Our approach is simple, reliable and robust in predicting emulsion stability and will facilitate the design of emulsion-based formulations by accelerating the testing of emulsion stability.

  10. Coalescence-induced droplet jumping on superhydrophobic surfaces: Effects of droplet mismatch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasserfall, Joram; Figueiredo, Patric; Kneer, Reinhold; Rohlfs, Wilko; Pischke, Philipp

    2017-12-01

    On low-adhesion surfaces, coalescing droplets can spontaneously jump off, known as coalescence-induced droplet jumping. It is observed on a variety of synthetic and natural superhydrophobic surfaces, and gives rise to a range of applications, such as self-cleaning condensers, anti-icing coatings, and thermal diodes. Through three-dimensional simulations, this paper demonstrates the fluid dynamics of droplet jumping upon binary unequal-sized-droplet coalescence. Parametric studies show the influence of droplet mismatch, viscosity, and contact angle on jumping velocities, where liftoff regimes are defined on the basis of Ohnesorge number and droplet size ratio. Because of the strong asymmetric flow behavior, the well-known small conversion efficiency for equal-sized-droplet jumping, where around 6 % of the released surface energy is convertible into translational kinetic energy, is further reduced for unequal-sized-droplet jumping. The findings offer insights into their fluid dynamics and give a starting point for further modeling of dropwise condensation on superhydrophobic surfaces.

  11. Continuously Electrotriggered Core Coalescence of Double-Emulsion Drops for Microreactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Likai; Ren, Yukun; Jia, Yankai; Deng, Xiaokang; Liu, Weiyu; Feng, Xiangsong; Jiang, Hongyuan

    2017-04-12

    Microfluidically generated double emulsions are promising templates for microreactions, which protect the reaction from external disturbance and enable in vitro analyses with large-scale samples. Controlled combination of their inner droplets in a continuous manner is an essential requirement toward truly applications. Here, we first generate dual-cored double-emulsion drops with different inner encapsulants using a capillary microfluidic device; next, we transfer the emulsion drops into another electrode-integrated polydimethylsiloxane microfluidic device and utilize external AC electric field to continuously trigger the coalescence of inner cores inside these emulsion drops in continuous flow. Hundreds of thousands of monodisperse microreactions with nanoliter-scale reagents can be conducted using this approach. The performance of core coalescence is investigated as a function of flow rate, applied electrical signal, and core conductivity. The coalescence efficiency can reach up to 95%. We demonstrate the utility of this technology for accommodating microreactions by analyzing an enzyme catalyzed reaction and by fabricating cell-laden hydrogel particles. The presented method can be readily used for the controlled triggering of microreactions with high flexibility for a wide range of applications, especially for continuous chemical or cell assays.

  12. Wettability and Coalescence of Cu Droplets Subjected to Two-Wall Confinement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiongying; Ren, Hongru; Wu, Weikang; Li, Hui; Wang, Long; He, Yezeng; Wang, Junjun; Zhou, Yi

    2015-10-13

    Controlling droplet dynamics via wettability or movement at the nanoscale is a significant goal of nanotechnology. By performing molecular dynamics simulations, we study the wettability and spontaneous coalescence of Cu droplets confined in two carbon walls. We first focus on one drop in the two-wall confinement to reveal confinement effects on wettability and detaching behavior of metallic droplets. Results show that Cu droplets finally display three states: non-detachment, semi-detachment and full detachment, depending on the height of confined space. The contact angle ranges from 125° to 177°, and the contact area radius ranges from 12 to ~80 Å. The moving time of the detached droplet in the full detachment state shows a linear relationship with the height of confined space. Further investigations into two drops subjected to confinement show that the droplets, initially distant from each other, spontaneously coalesce into a larger droplet by detachment. The coalescing time and final position of the merged droplet are precisely controlled by tailoring surface structures of the carbon walls, the height of the confined space or a combination of these approaches. These findings could provide an effective method to control the droplet dynamics by confinement.

  13. Droplet Coalescence and Spontaneous Emulsification in the Presence of Asphaltene Adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochner de Araujo, Simone; Merola, Maria; Vlassopoulos, Dimitris; Fuller, Gerald G

    2017-10-10

    In a refinery, undesired high levels of salt concentration in crude oils are reduced by the contact of water with crude oils, where an emulsion is formed. Later, the separation of the water from the desalted oil is essential for the quality of both wastewater discharge and refined oil. However, complex components of crude oils such as asphaltenes may stabilize these emulsions, causing difficulties in efficient separation. Here, we show the coalescence inhibition caused by asphaltene adsorption for both water-in-oil and oil-in-water emulsions, where the oil phase consists of a simple model of asphaltenes dissolved in toluene. We find that oil-in-water emulsions are less stable than water-in-oil emulsions by using a newly developed instrument where controlled experiments can be performed to measure the coalescence time of a single droplet against an oil/water interface as a function of asphaltene aging (associated with the adsorption process of asphaltene molecules onto the interfaces) and asphaltene concentration. Furthermore, we find that the coalescence time for water droplets exhibits a maximum because of a spontaneous emulsification at the oil/water interface that produces droplets consisting of asphaltene-laden water droplets.

  14. Droplet transport and coalescence kinetics in emulsions subjected to acoustic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pangu, Gautam D; Feke, Donald L

    2007-11-01

    A method to aid the separation of the oil phase from aqueous emulsions using a low-intensity, resonant ultrasonic field has recently been developed. The density and compressibility difference between the dispersed and continuous phases within the emulsion results in a net force on the oil drops that pushes them toward the pressure antinodes of the standing-wave field, where coalescence subsequently occurs. A trajectory model is developed to predict the relative motion of drops subjected to the acoustic field. Such trajectories are sensitive to the physical properties and relative size of interacting drops, the initial configuration of the drops, and acoustic field parameters. Model predictions are validated by comparing experimentally observed trajectories with those predicted by the model. The modeling approach is then extended to determine the temporal evolution of the size of the region surrounding a target drop cleared by coalescence as a function of physical and acoustic field parameters. These results form the basis of a population balance model that attempts to track the size-evolution of a drop population coalescing under the influence of an acoustic field.

  15. Graph theory

    CERN Document Server

    Gould, Ronald

    2012-01-01

    This introduction to graph theory focuses on well-established topics, covering primary techniques and including both algorithmic and theoretical problems. The algorithms are presented with a minimum of advanced data structures and programming details. This thoroughly corrected 1988 edition provides insights to computer scientists as well as advanced undergraduates and graduate students of topology, algebra, and matrix theory. Fundamental concepts and notation and elementary properties and operations are the first subjects, followed by examinations of paths and searching, trees, and networks. S

  16. The effect of educational programs based on the theory of planned behavior on parental supervision in students' television watching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moshki, Mahdi; Delshad Noghabi, Ali; Darabi, Fatemeh; Safari Palangi, Hossein; Bahri, Narjes

    2016-01-01

    Excessive and uncontrolled television watching by children predisposes them to some risks such as developmental, social and psychological disorders. Parents play an important role in nurturing their children and controlling the factors affecting their health. The aim of this study was to determine the impact of health education programs on parents' supervision skills to control their children's television watching habits based on the theory of planned behavior. One hundred twenty parents of the students at the first and fifth grades of primary school were randomly divided into an intervention and a control group. Data were collected by a self-report questionnaire at the beginning of and one month after intervention. An educational intervention was implemented for the case group parents, who were divided into four 15-member groups, in the form of three 45-60 minute sessions with focus group discussions. Moreover, the parents were provided with children and television booklet. Data were entered into SPSS-16 and were analyzed using Chi-square, paired t test, Mann-Whitney and Wilcoxon tests. After the intervention, significant changes were detected in the intervention group with respect to the mean hours of watching television (from 6.74±2.02 to 4.28±2.40; p= 0.039), knowledge scores (from 5.8±2.1 to 7.7±1.9; p= 0.001), attitude towards less television watching (from 35.5±11.5 to 48.4±8.9; p=0.003), subjective norms (from 11.8±8.1 to 24.5±8.6; p>0.001) and behavioral intention (from 18.6±7.4 to 31.8±5.1; p=0.001). The results revealed that educational interventions based on the theory of planned behavior are capable of changing knowledge, attitude, subjective norm and intention of parents towards controlling and monitoring their children's television watching and can improve the performance of parental control and reduce the hours of TV watching by children. Therefore, this pattern is suggested for reforming the nurturing skills of parents about other

  17. Uncertainty theory

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Baoding

    2015-01-01

    When no samples are available to estimate a probability distribution, we have to invite some domain experts to evaluate the belief degree that each event will happen. Perhaps some people think that the belief degree should be modeled by subjective probability or fuzzy set theory. However, it is usually inappropriate because both of them may lead to counterintuitive results in this case. In order to rationally deal with belief degrees, uncertainty theory was founded in 2007 and subsequently studied by many researchers. Nowadays, uncertainty theory has become a branch of axiomatic mathematics for modeling belief degrees. This is an introductory textbook on uncertainty theory, uncertain programming, uncertain statistics, uncertain risk analysis, uncertain reliability analysis, uncertain set, uncertain logic, uncertain inference, uncertain process, uncertain calculus, and uncertain differential equation. This textbook also shows applications of uncertainty theory to scheduling, logistics, networks, data mining, c...

  18. Potential Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Lukeš, Jaroslav; Netuka, Ivan; Veselý, Jiří

    1988-01-01

    Within the tradition of meetings devoted to potential theory, a conference on potential theory took place in Prague on 19-24, July 1987. The Conference was organized by the Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University, with the collaboration of the Institute of Mathematics, Czechoslovak Academy of Sciences, the Department of Mathematics, Czech University of Technology, the Union of Czechoslovak Mathematicians and Physicists, the Czechoslovak Scientific and Technical Society, and supported by IMU. During the Conference, 69 scientific communications from different branches of potential theory were presented; the majority of them are in­ cluded in the present volume. (Papers based on survey lectures delivered at the Conference, its program as well as a collection of problems from potential theory will appear in a special volume of the Lecture Notes Series published by Springer-Verlag). Topics of these communications truly reflect the vast scope of contemporary potential theory. Some contributions deal...

  19. Precise quantitative addition of multiple reagents into droplets in sequence using glass fiber-induced droplet coalescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunyu; Xu, Jian; Ma, Bo

    2015-02-07

    Precise quantitative addition of multiple reagents into droplets in sequence is still a bottleneck in droplet-based analysis. To address this issue, we presented a simple and robust glass fiber-induced droplet coalescence method. The hydrophilic glass fiber embedded in the microchannels can induce the deformation of droplets and trigger the coalescence. Serial addition of reagents with controlled volumes was performed by this method without the requirement for an external power source.

  20. Distribution of Corrosion Fatigue Crack Lengths in Carbon Steel : 2nd Report, The Distributed Cracks which Interact and Coalesce

    OpenAIRE

    Ishihara, Sotomi; Shiozawa, Kazuaki; Miyao, Kazyu

    1985-01-01

    It has been known that very small distributed cracks can be observed on the surface of smooth specimen subjected to corrosion fatigue, and the fatigue crack growth rate is accelerated by the interaction and coalescence of them. In this report, following the previous report of the authors, the interaction and coalescence behaviour of the distributed cracks on the specimen surface were observed in detail. Based on the experimental results, distribution of corrosion fatigue crack lengths after a...

  1. Report from the Committee of Visitors on its Review of the Processes and Procedures used to Manage the Theory and Computations Program, Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2004-03-01

    A Committee of Visitors (COV) was formed to review the procedures used by the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences to manage its Theory and Computations program. The COV was pleased to conclude that the research portfolio supported by the OFES Theory and Computations Program was of very high quality. The Program supports research programs at universities, research industries, and national laboratories that are well regarded internationally and address questions of high relevance to the DOE. A major change in the management of the Theory and Computations program over the past few years has been the introduction of a system of comparative peer review to guide the OFES Theory Team in selecting proposals for funding. The COV was impressed with the success of OFES in its implementation of comparative peer review and with the quality of the reviewers chosen by the OFES Theory Team. The COV concluded that the competitive peer review process has improved steadily over the three years that it has been in effect and that it has improved both the fairness and accountability of the proposal review process. While the COV commends OFES in its implementation of comparative review, the COV offers the following recommendations in the hope that they will further improve the comparative peer review process: The OFES should improve the consistency of peer reviews. We recommend adoption of a “results-oriented” scoring system in their guidelines to referees (see Appendix II), a greater use of review panels, and a standard format for proposals; The OFES should further improve the procedures and documentation for proposal handling. We recommend that the “folders” documenting funding decisions contain all the input from all of the reviewers, that OFES document their rationale for funding decisions which are at variance with the recommendation of the peer reviewers, and that OFES provide a Summary Sheet within each folder; The OFES should better communicate the procedures used to

  2. [An oral function improvement program utilizing health behavior theories ameliorates oral functions and oral hygienic conditions of pre-frail elderly persons].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaguchi, Hideo

    2014-06-01

    Oral function improvement programs utilizing health behavior theories are considered to be effective in preventing the need for long-term social care. In the present study, an oral function improvement program based upon health behavior theories was designed, and its utility was assessed in 102 pre-frail elderly persons (33 males, 69 females, mean age: 76.9 +/- 5.7) considered to be in potential need of long-term social care and attending a long-term care prevention class in Sayama City, Saitama Prefecture, Japan. The degree of improvement in oral functions (7 items) and oral hygienic conditions (3 items) was assessed by comparing oral health before and after participation in the program. The results showed statistically significant improvements in the following oral functions: (1) lip functions (oral diadochokinesis, measured by the regularity of the repetition of the syllable "Pa"), (2) tongue functions, (3) tongue root motor skills (oral diadochokinesis, measured by the regularity of the repetition of the syllables "Ta" and "Ka"), (4) tongue extension/retraction, (5) side-to-side tongue movement functions, (6) cheek motor skills, and (7) repetitive saliva swallowing test (RSST). The following measures of oral hygiene also showed a statistically significant improvement: (1) debris on dentures or teeth, (2) coated tongue, and (3) frequency of oral cleaning. These findings demonstrated that an improvement program informed by health behavior theories is useful in improving oral functions and oral hygiene conditions.

  3. Asymptotic Properties of the Number of Matching Coalescent Histories for Caterpillar-Like Families of Species Trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disanto, Filippo; Rosenberg, Noah A

    2016-01-01

    Coalescent histories provide lists of species tree branches on which gene tree coalescences can take place, and their enumerative properties assist in understanding the computational complexity of calculations central in the study of gene trees and species trees. Here, we solve an enumerative problem left open by Rosenberg (IEEE/ACM Transactions on Computational Biology and Bioinformatics 10: 1253-1262, 2013) concerning the number of coalescent histories for gene trees and species trees with a matching labeled topology that belongs to a generic caterpillar-like family. By bringing a generating function approach to the study of coalescent histories, we prove that for any caterpillar-like family with seed tree t , the sequence (h n ) n ≥ 0 describing the number of matching coalescent histories of the n th tree of the family grows asymptotically as a constant multiple of the Catalan numbers. Thus, h n  ∼ β t c n , where the asymptotic constant β t > 0 depends on the shape of the seed tree t. The result extends a claim demonstrated only for seed trees with at most eight taxa to arbitrary seed trees, expanding the set of cases for which detailed enumerative properties of coalescent histories can be determined. We introduce a procedure that computes from t the constant β t as well as the algebraic expression for the generating function of the sequence (h n ) n ≥ 0 .

  4. Nucleotide variation and balancing selection at the Ckma gene in Atlantic cod: analysis with multiple merger coalescent models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Árnason, Einar; Halldórsdóttir, Katrín

    2015-01-01

    High-fecundity organisms, such as Atlantic cod, can withstand substantial natural selection and the entailing genetic load of replacing alleles at a number of loci due to their excess reproductive capacity. High-fecundity organisms may reproduce by sweepstakes leading to highly skewed heavy-tailed offspring distribution. Under such reproduction the Kingman coalescent of binary mergers breaks down and models of multiple merger coalescent are more appropriate. Here we study nucleotide variation at the Ckma (Creatine Kinase Muscle type A) gene in Atlantic cod. The gene shows extreme differentiation between the North (Canada, Greenland, Iceland, Norway, Barents Sea) and the South (Faroe Islands, North-, Baltic-, Celtic-, and Irish Seas) with FST > 0.8 between regions whereas neutral loci show no differentiation. This is evidence of natural selection. The protein sequence is conserved by purifying selection whereas silent and non-coding sites show extreme differentiation. The unfolded site-frequency spectrum has three modes, a mode at singleton sites and two high frequency modes at opposite frequencies representing divergent branches of the gene genealogy that is evidence for balancing selection. Analysis with multiple-merger coalescent models can account for the high frequency of singleton sites and indicate reproductive sweepstakes. Coalescent time scales vary with population size and with the inverse of variance in offspring number. Parameter estimates using multiple-merger coalescent models show that times scales are faster than under the Kingman coalescent.

  5. Repository Integration Program: RIP performance assessment and strategy evaluation model theory manual and user`s guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-11-01

    This report describes the theory and capabilities of RIP (Repository Integration Program). RIP is a powerful and flexible computational tool for carrying out probabilistic integrated total system performance assessments for geologic repositories. The primary purpose of RIP is to provide a management tool for guiding system design and site characterization. In addition, the performance assessment model (and the process of eliciting model input) can act as a mechanism for integrating the large amount of available information into a meaningful whole (in a sense, allowing one to keep the ``big picture`` and the ultimate aims of the project clearly in focus). Such an integration is useful both for project managers and project scientists. RIP is based on a `` top down`` approach to performance assessment that concentrates on the integration of the entire system, and utilizes relatively high-level descriptive models and parameters. The key point in the application of such a ``top down`` approach is that the simplified models and associated high-level parameters must incorporate an accurate representation of their uncertainty. RIP is designed in a very flexible manner such that details can be readily added to various components of the model without modifying the computer code. Uncertainty is also handled in a very flexible manner, and both parameter and model (process) uncertainty can be explicitly considered. Uncertainty is propagated through the integrated PA model using an enhanced Monte Carlo method. RIP must rely heavily on subjective assessment (expert opinion) for much of its input. The process of eliciting the high-level input parameters required for RIP is critical to its successful application. As a result, in order for any project to successfully apply a tool such as RIP, an enormous amount of communication and cooperation must exist between the data collectors, the process modelers, and the performance. assessment modelers.

  6. Generating information-rich high-throughput experimental materials genomes using functional clustering via multitree genetic programming and information theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suram, Santosh K; Haber, Joel A; Jin, Jian; Gregoire, John M

    2015-04-13

    High-throughput experimental methodologies are capable of synthesizing, screening and characterizing vast arrays of combinatorial material libraries at a very rapid rate. These methodologies strategically employ tiered screening wherein the number of compositions screened decreases as the complexity, and very often the scientific information obtained from a screening experiment, increases. The algorithm used for down-selection of samples from higher throughput screening experiment to a lower throughput screening experiment is vital in achieving information-rich experimental materials genomes. The fundamental science of material discovery lies in the establishment of composition-structure-property relationships, motivating the development of advanced down-selection algorithms which consider the information value of the selected compositions, as opposed to simply selecting the best performing compositions from a high throughput experiment. Identification of property fields (composition regions with distinct composition-property relationships) in high throughput data enables down-selection algorithms to employ advanced selection strategies, such as the selection of representative compositions from each field or selection of compositions that span the composition space of the highest performing field. Such strategies would greatly enhance the generation of data-driven discoveries. We introduce an informatics-based clustering of composition-property functional relationships using a combination of information theory and multitree genetic programming concepts for identification of property fields in a composition library. We demonstrate our approach using a complex synthetic composition-property map for a 5 at. % step ternary library consisting of four distinct property fields and finally explore the application of this methodology for capturing relationships between composition and catalytic activity for the oxygen evolution reaction for 5429 catalyst compositions in a

  7. Educational Program Status of Premarital Counseling Centers in Hamadan Province Based on Theory of Reasoned Action (TRA)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mohamad Mahdi Hazavehei; Samane Shirahmadi2; Ghodratollah Roshanaei; Mohamad kazem- zade; Mohamad Mahdi majzubi

    2013-01-01

    ... (Theory of Reasoned Action). Materials and Methods: Four hundred couples who attended premarital education and counseling classes voluntarily participated in this descriptive and analytical study...

  8. Geno-Diver: A combined coalescence and forward-in-time simulator for populations undergoing selection for complex traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, J T; Tiezzi, F; Pryce, J E; Maltecca, C

    2017-12-01

    Geno-Diver is a combined coalescence and forward-in-time simulator designed to simulate complex traits with a quantitative and/or fitness component and implement multiple selection and mating strategies utilizing pedigree or genomic information. The simulation is carried out in two steps. The first step generates whole-genome sequence data for founder individuals. A variety of trait architectures can be generated for quantitative and fitness traits along with their covariance. The second step generates new individuals forward-in-time based on a variety of selection and mating scenarios. Genetic values are predicted for individuals utilizing pedigree or genomic information. Relationship matrices and their associated inverses are generated using computationally efficient routines. We benchmarked Geno-Diver with a previous simulation program and described how to simulate a traditional quantitative trait along with a quantitative and fitness trait. A user manual with examples, source code in C++11 and executable versions of Geno-Diver for Linux are freely available at https://github.com/jeremyhoward/Geno-Diver. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  9. [Research programs on elementary particle and field theories and superconductivity]. Technical progress report, June 1, 1991--October 1, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khuri, N.N.

    1992-11-01

    Research of staff members in theoretical physics is presented in the following areas: super string theory, a new approach to path integrals, new ideas on the renormalization group, nonperturbative chiral gauge theories, the standard model, K meson decays, and the CP problem. Work on high-{Tc} superconductivity and protein folding is also related.

  10. Progress report on research program in elementary particle theory, 1979-1980. [Univ. of Texas at Austin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sudarshan, E.C.G.; Ne' eman, Y.

    1980-01-01

    A qualitative description is given of research in the following areas: particle physics in relativistic astrophysics and cosmology; phenomenology of weak and electromagnetic interactions; strong interaction physics and quark-parton physics; quantum mechanics, quantum field theory, and fundamental problems; and groups, gauges, and grand unified theories. Reports on this work have already been published, or will be, when it is completed. (RWR)

  11. Effect of Educational Program to Encourage Safe Sexual Behaviors Among Addicted Men Refered to Substance Abuse Treatment Centers in Hamadan, Western Iran: Applying the Theory of Planned Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babak Moeini

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Unsafe sexual behaviors as important risky behaviors can expose individuals and society to dangerous infectious disease such as AIDS and viral hepatitis. Considering the high prevalence of unsafe sexual behaviors, this study aimed to determine the effect of educational programs to encourage safe sexual behaviors among substance abusers referred to substance abuse treatment centers in Hamadan, Western Iran by applying the theory of planned behavior. Materials & Methods: This quasi-experimental study was performed on 104 men substance abusers (52 participants in each of the control and intervention groups referred to substance abuse treatment centers in Hamadan. Data collection tool was a questionnaire containing demographic information and the theory of planned behavior constructs. Before the educational program, questionnaires were completed by both groups. After the pretest in both groups, participants in the intervention group participated in four educational sessions designed based on the theory of planned behavior. Two months after the end of program, posttest was performed. Data was analyzed using independent T-test, chi-square, fisher exact test, McNemar’s test and multiple linear regressions using SPSS-16. Results: After educational intervention, the mean scores of the theory constructs (attitude toward behavior, subjective norms, behavioral control, behavioral intention and behaviors, in the intervention group increased significantly (P<0.05, despite the fact, changes were not significant in the control group. Conclusion: Implementation of educational courses to encourage safe sexual behaviors based on the theory of planned behavior can be beneficial for substance abusers referred to substance abuse treatment centers.

  12. Organizational and training factors that promote team science: A qualitative analysis and application of theory to the National Institutes of Health's BIRCWH career development program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guise, Jeanne-Marie; Winter, Susan; Fiore, Stephen M; Regensteiner, Judith G; Nagel, Joan

    2017-04-01

    Research organizations face challenges in creating infrastructures that cultivates and sustains interdisciplinary team science. The objective of this paper is to identify structural elements of organizations and training that promote team science. We qualitatively analyzed the National Institutes of Health's Building Interdisciplinary Research Careers in Women's Health, K12 using organizational psychology and team science theories to identify organizational design factors for successful team science and training. Seven key design elements support team science: (1) semiformal meta-organizational structure, (2) shared context and goals, (3) formal evaluation processes, (4) meetings to promote communication, (5) role clarity in mentoring, (6) building interpersonal competencies among faculty and trainees, and (7) designing promotion and tenure and other organizational processes to support interdisciplinary team science. This application of theory to a long-standing and successful program provides important foundational elements for programs and institutions to consider in promoting team science.

  13. RETRACTED: The effect of an educational program based on health belief model and social cognitive theory in prevention of osteoporosis in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khani Jeihooni, Ali; Hidarnia, Alireza; Kaveh, Mohammad Hossein; Hajizadeh, Ebrahim; Askari, Alireza

    2017-04-01

    At the request of the Journal Editor and the Publisher, the following article has been retracted: Khani Jeihooni A, Hidarnia A, Hossein Kaveh M, Hajizadeh E and Askari A (2015) The effect of an education program based on health belief model and social cognitive theory in prevention of osteoporosis in women. Journal of Health Psychology. Epub ahead of print 8 September. DOI: 10.1177/1359105315603696.

  14. Matching theory

    CERN Document Server

    Plummer, MD

    1986-01-01

    This study of matching theory deals with bipartite matching, network flows, and presents fundamental results for the non-bipartite case. It goes on to study elementary bipartite graphs and elementary graphs in general. Further discussed are 2-matchings, general matching problems as linear programs, the Edmonds Matching Algorithm (and other algorithmic approaches), f-factors and vertex packing.

  15. Global solutions of restricted open-shell Hartree-Fock theory from semidefinite programming with applications to strongly correlated quantum systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veeraraghavan, Srikant; Mazziotti, David A

    2014-03-28

    We present a density matrix approach for computing global solutions of restricted open-shell Hartree-Fock theory, based on semidefinite programming (SDP), that gives upper and lower bounds on the Hartree-Fock energy of quantum systems. While wave function approaches to Hartree-Fock theory yield an upper bound to the Hartree-Fock energy, we derive a semidefinite relaxation of Hartree-Fock theory that yields a rigorous lower bound on the Hartree-Fock energy. We also develop an upper-bound algorithm in which Hartree-Fock theory is cast as a SDP with a nonconvex constraint on the rank of the matrix variable. Equality of the upper- and lower-bound energies guarantees that the computed solution is the globally optimal solution of Hartree-Fock theory. The work extends a previously presented method for closed-shell systems [S. Veeraraghavan and D. A. Mazziotti, Phys. Rev. A 89, 010502-R (2014)]. For strongly correlated systems the SDP approach provides an alternative to the locally optimized Hartree-Fock energies and densities with a certificate of global optimality. Applications are made to the potential energy curves of C2, CN, Cr2, and NO2.

  16. Using the theory of planned behavior to examine pharmacists' intention to utilize a prescription drug monitoring program database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Marc L; Barner, Jamie C; Brown, Carolyn M; Shepherd, Marvin D; Strassels, Scott; Novak, Suzanne

    2014-01-01

    Prescription drug monitoring programs (PDMPs) are state-operated electronic databases that contain patients' controlled drug histories. Most states provide these data to pharmacists via online web portals to combat prescription drug abuse and diversion. The objectives of this study were to: 1) explore the theory of planned behavior's (TPB) utility in predicting Texas pharmacists' intention to utilize an online accessible PDMP; 2) to determine the contribution of each construct, attitude (A), subjective norm (SN) and perceived behavioral control (PBC) in predicting pharmacists' intention; and 3) test whether the addition of perceived obligation (PO) is significantly related to pharmacists' intention. A cross-sectional, 36-item questionnaire was developed from focus groups and literature of pharmacists' views regarding prescription drug abuse. A total of 998 practicing Texas community pharmacists were surveyed to collect data on their intention to utilize a PDMP database. Descriptive statistics, multivariate and hierarchical logistic regression analyses were used to address the study objectives. The response rate was 26.2% (261/998). TPB constructs were significant predictors of pharmacists' high intention to utilize the PDMP. Pharmacists with positive attitudes were almost twice as likely to have high intention (odds ratio [OR] = 1.8, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.2-2.8). SN was the strongest predictor of pharmacists' high intention (OR = 2.2, 95% CI = 1.4-3.3). Pharmacists with high PBC were also twice as likely to have high intention (OR = 1.9, 95% CI = 1.2-3.0). Additionally, pharmacists' PO contributed to the prediction of high intention (OR = 1.8, 95% CI = 1.0-3.1) above that explained by the TPB model constructs (X(2) = 4.14, P high intention to utilize a PDMP database. Interventions that address pharmacists' A, SN, PBC, and PO may be valuable to increase pharmacists' high intention. Pharmacists' utilization of PDMPs may lead to a decrease in the morbidity

  17. Coalescent-based genome analyses resolve the early branches of the euarchontoglires.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikas Kumar

    Full Text Available Despite numerous large-scale phylogenomic studies, certain parts of the mammalian tree are extraordinarily difficult to resolve. We used the coding regions from 19 completely sequenced genomes to study the relationships within the super-clade Euarchontoglires (Primates, Rodentia, Lagomorpha, Dermoptera and Scandentia because the placement of Scandentia within this clade is controversial. The difficulty in resolving this issue is due to the short time spans between the early divergences of Euarchontoglires, which may cause incongruent gene trees. The conflict in the data can be depicted by network analyses and the contentious relationships are best reconstructed by coalescent-based analyses. This method is expected to be superior to analyses of concatenated data in reconstructing a species tree from numerous gene trees. The total concatenated dataset used to study the relationships in this group comprises 5,875 protein-coding genes (9,799,170 nucleotides from all orders except Dermoptera (flying lemurs. Reconstruction of the species tree from 1,006 gene trees using coalescent models placed Scandentia as sister group to the primates, which is in agreement with maximum likelihood analyses of concatenated nucleotide sequence data. Additionally, both analytical approaches favoured the Tarsier to be sister taxon to Anthropoidea, thus belonging to the Haplorrhine clade. When divergence times are short such as in radiations over periods of a few million years, even genome scale analyses struggle to resolve phylogenetic relationships. On these short branches processes such as incomplete lineage sorting and possibly hybridization occur and make it preferable to base phylogenomic analyses on coalescent methods.

  18. An efficient Bayesian inference framework for coalescent-based nonparametric phylodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Shiwei; Palacios, Julia A; Karcher, Michael; Minin, Vladimir N; Shahbaba, Babak

    2015-10-15

    The field of phylodynamics focuses on the problem of reconstructing population size dynamics over time using current genetic samples taken from the population of interest. This technique has been extensively used in many areas of biology but is particularly useful for studying the spread of quickly evolving infectious diseases agents, e.g. influenza virus. Phylodynamic inference uses a coalescent model that defines a probability density for the genealogy of randomly sampled individuals from the population. When we assume that such a genealogy is known, the coalescent model, equipped with a Gaussian process prior on population size trajectory, allows for nonparametric Bayesian estimation of population size dynamics. Although this approach is quite powerful, large datasets collected during infectious disease surveillance challenge the state-of-the-art of Bayesian phylodynamics and demand inferential methods with relatively low computational cost. To satisfy this demand, we provide a computationally efficient Bayesian inference framework based on Hamiltonian Monte Carlo for coalescent process models. Moreover, we show that by splitting the Hamiltonian function, we can further improve the efficiency of this approach. Using several simulated and real datasets, we show that our method provides accurate estimates of population size dynamics and is substantially faster than alternative methods based on elliptical slice sampler and Metropolis-adjusted Langevin algorithm. The R code for all simulation studies and real data analysis conducted in this article are publicly available at http://www.ics.uci.edu/∼slan/lanzi/CODES.html and in the R package phylodyn available at https://github.com/mdkarcher/phylodyn. S.Lan@warwick.ac.uk or babaks@uci.edu Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Phase Structure and Properties of a Biodegradable Block Copolymer Coalesced from It's Crystalline Inclusion Compound Formed with alpha-Cyclodextrin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuai, Xintao; Wei, Min; Probeni, Francis; Bullions, Todd A.; Shin, I. Daniel; Tonelli, Alan E.

    2002-03-01

    A well-defined biodegradable block copolymer of poly(epsilon caprolactone) (PCL) and poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) was synthesized and characterized and then included as a guest in an inclusion compound (IC) formed with the host alpha-cyclodextrin (CD). The PCL-b-PLLA block copolymer was subsequently coalesced from it's CD-IC crystals by either treatment with hot water (50 C) or an aqueous amylase solution at 25 C. The coalesced PCL-b-PLLA was examined by FTIR, DSC, TGA, and WAXD and was found to be much more homogeneosly organized, with much less segregation and crystallinity of the PCL and PLLA microphases. The morpholgy, crystallization kinetics, thermal behavior, and biodegradability of the coalesced PCL-b-PLLA block copolymer was studied by comparison to similar observations made on as-synthesized PCL-b-PLLA, PCL and PLLA homopolymers, and their solution-cast blend. The PCL and PLLA blocks are found to be more intimately mixed, with less phase segregation, in the coalesced diblock copolymer, and this leads to homogeneous bulk crystallization, which is not observed for the as-synthesized diblock copolymer. The coalesced PCL-b-PLLA was also found to be more quickly biodegraded (lipase from Rhizopus arrhizus)than the as-synthesized PCL-b-PLLA or the physical blend of PCL and PLLA homopolymers. Overall, the coalescence of the inherently phase segregated diblock copolymer PCL-b-PLLA results in a small amount of compact, chain-extended PCL and PLLA crystals embedded in an amorphous phase, largely consisting of well-mixed PCL and PLLA blocks. Thus, we have demonstrated that it is possible to control the morpholgy of a biodegradable diblock copolymer, thereby significantly modifying it's properties, by coalescence from it's CD-IC crystals.

  20. Eulerian multi-fluid models for the simulation of dynamics and coalescence of particles in solid propellant combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doisneau, F.; Laurent, F.; Murrone, A.; Dupays, J.; Massot, M.

    2013-02-01

    The accurate simulation of polydisperse sprays undergoing coalescence in unsteady gaseous flows is a crucial issue. In solid rocket motors, the internal flow depends strongly on the alumina droplet size distribution, which spreads up with coalescence. Yet solving for unsteady two-phase flows with high accuracy on the droplet sizes is a challenge for both modeling and scientific computing. As an alternative to Lagrangian approaches, a wide range of Eulerian models have been recently developed to describe the disperse liquid phase at a lower cost, with an easier coupling to the gaseous phase and with massively parallel codes. Among these models, the multi-fluid model allows the detailed description of polydispersity and size/velocity correlations by separately solving fluids of size-sorted droplets, the so-called sections. The existing one size moment method, which describes the size distribution with one size moment per section, provides simple and fast resolution for coalescence. On the other hand, a two size moment method has been suggested to reduce the number of sections but it lacks an efficient coalescence resolution method. After introducing a new strategy for two size moment coalescence, the two methods are compared on various configurations in a research code and an industrial-oriented code, in order to conclude on computational accuracy and cost. Then the paper aims at describing the most efficient approach for multi-dimensional unsteady and eventually coalescing rocket chamber simulations. Its objective is threefold: first, to validate the two size moment method by comparing simulations to reference solutions and dedicated experimental measurements conducted at ONERA, second to study the efficiency and robustness of both methods, third, to draw some firm conclusions about the necessity to use the one size moment or two size moment method to simulate solid propellant alumina sprays. We finally perform the first simulations of coalescence in realistic 2D

  1. Coalescence dynamics of size-selected gold clusters studied by time-resolved transmission electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J.; Foster, D.; Li, Z. Y.; Wilkinson, N.; Yuan, J.

    2017-09-01

    Coalescence dynamics of size-selected gold (Au) clusters (each with nominal 923 atoms), on amorphous Si3N4 substrate at room temperature, has been studied via time-resolved transmission electron microscopy (TEM). We found that the clusters approached each other in two stages. In the first stage, the drift velocity was independent of the particle separation and could be attributed to beam-induced random motion. In the second stage, the clusters were found to jump into contact with a much higher final averaged speed. This is independent of beam dose rates and is attributed to the van der Waal attraction.

  2. Self-assembled crystalline silicon carbide Y junctions by coalescence of nucleated iron catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhenyu; Srot, V.; Yang, Judith C.

    2010-06-01

    Self-assembled crystalline SiC Y junctions with either parallel or inclined branches have been created via the iron catalyzed vapor-liquid-solid mechanism. These formations are attributed to coalescence of two catalyst droplets that have already each formed a SiC nanowire branch, where the merged catalyst remains catalytically active and catalyzes the stem growth of the Y junction. The SiC Y junction formed by two parallel branches follows the original growth direction and creates a single crystal stem. While the SiC Y junction formed by two inclined branches, the merged catalyst creates a bicrystal stem with a planar grain boundary along the center.

  3. Solid colloidal particles inducing coalescence in bitumen-in-water emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legrand, J; Chamerois, M; Placin, F; Poirier, J E; Bibette, J; Leal-Calderon, F

    2005-01-04

    Silica particles are dispersed in the continuous phase of bitumen-in-water emulsions. The mixture remains dispersed in quiescent storage conditions. However, rapid destabilization occurs once a shear is applied. Observations under the microscope reveal that the bitumen droplets form a colloidal gel and coalesce upon application of a shear. We follow the kinetic evolution of the emulsions viscosity, eta, at constant shear rate: eta remains initially constant and exhibits a dramatic increase after a finite time, tau. We study the influence of various parameters on the evolution of tau: bitumen droplet size and volume fraction, silica diameter and concentration, shear rate, etc.

  4. Martensitic transformation during coalescence of Fe-Ni nanoparticles. Atomistic simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karkina, L. E.; Karkin, I. N.; Kuznetsov, A. R.

    2017-09-01

    Martensitic transformation during coalescence of two Fe-20 at.% Ni nanoparticles of size d ∼3-7 nm has been studied using molecular dynamics. Orientation relationship analysis showed that Kurdyumov-Sachs orientation relationship was observed between the initial γ-phase and the final α phase (at T = 0 K) for all of the studied cases of misorientation. A significant change in the type of contact boundaries between the two nanoparticles was obtained after the completion of the martensitic transformation, which was caused by a change in the indices of the misorientation axis of the particles and in the number of symmetry elements for it.

  5. Problematic stabilizing films in petroleum emulsions: shear rheological response of viscoelastic asphaltene films and the effect on drop coalescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harbottle, David; Chen, Qian; Moorthy, Krishna; Wang, Louxiang; Xu, Shengming; Liu, Qingxia; Sjoblom, Johan; Xu, Zhenghe

    2014-06-17

    Adsorption of asphaltenes at the water-oil interface contributes to the stability of petroleum emulsions by forming a networked film that can hinder drop-drop coalescence. The interfacial microstructure can either be liquid-like or solid-like, depending on (i) initial bulk concentration of asphaltenes, (ii) interfacial aging time, and (iii) solvent aromaticity. Two techniques--interfacial shear rheology and integrated thin film drainage apparatus--provided equivalent interface aging conditions, enabling direct correlation of the interfacial rheology and droplet stability. The shear rheological properties of the asphaltene film were found to be critical to the stability of contacting drops. With a viscous dominant interfacial microstructure, the coalescence time for two drops in intimate contact was rapid, on the order of seconds. However, as the elastic contribution develops and the film microstructure begins to be dominated by elasticity, the two drops in contact do not coalescence. Such step-change transition in coalescence is thought to be related to the high shear yield stress (~10(4) Pa), which is a function of the film shear yield point and the film thickness (as measured by quartz crystal microbalance), and the increased elastic stiffness of the film that prevents mobility and rupture of the asphaltene film, which when in a solid-like state provides an energy barrier against drop coalescence.

  6. A dual-core double emulsion platform for osmolarity-controlled microreactor triggered by coalescence of encapsulated droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Xuewei; Hou, Likai; Ren, Yukun; Deng, Xiaokang; Lang, Qi; Jia, Yankai; Hu, Qingming; Tao, Ye; Liu, Jiangwei; Jiang, Hongyuan

    2016-05-01

    Droplet-based microfluidics has provided a means to generate multi-core double emulsions, which are versatile platforms for microreactors in materials science, synthetic biology, and chemical engineering. To provide new opportunities for double emulsion platforms, here, we report a glass capillary microfluidic approach to first fabricate osmolarity-responsive Water-in-Oil-in-Water (W/O/W) double emulsion containing two different inner droplets/cores and to then trigger the coalescence between the encapsulated droplets precisely. To achieve this, we independently control the swelling speed and size of each droplet in the dual-core double emulsion by controlling the osmotic pressure between the inner droplets and the collection solutions. When the inner two droplets in one W/O/W double emulsion swell to the same size and reach the instability of the oil film interface between the inner droplets, core-coalescence happens and this coalescence process can be controlled precisely. This microfluidic methodology enables the generation of highly monodisperse dual-core double emulsions and the osmolarity-controlled swelling behavior provides new stimuli to trigger the coalescence between the encapsulated droplets. Such swelling-caused core-coalescence behavior in dual-core double emulsion establishes a novel microreactor for nanoliter-scale reactions, which can protect reaction materials and products from being contaminated or released.

  7. Improving the power of an efficacy study of a social and emotional learning program: application of generalizability theory to the measurement of classroom-level outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashburn, Andrew J; Downer, Jason T; Rivers, Susan E; Brackett, Marc A; Martinez, Andres

    2014-04-01

    Social and emotional learning programs are designed to improve the quality of social interactions in schools and classrooms in order to positively affect students' social, emotional, and academic development. The statistical power of group randomized trials to detect effects of social and emotional learning programs and other preventive interventions on setting-level outcomes is influenced by the reliability of the outcome measure. In this paper, we apply generalizability theory to an observational measure of the quality of classroom interactions that is an outcome in a study of the efficacy of a social and emotional learning program called The Recognizing, Understanding, Labeling, Expressing, and Regulating emotions Approach. We estimate multiple sources of error variance in the setting-level outcome and identify observation procedures to use in the efficacy study that most efficiently reduce these sources of error. We then discuss the implications of using different observation procedures on both the statistical power and the monetary costs of conducting the efficacy study.

  8. Education, outreach, and inclusive engagement: Towards integrated indicators of successful program outcomes in participatory science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haywood, Benjamin K; Besley, John C

    2014-01-01

    The use and utility of science in society is often influenced by the structure, legitimacy, and efficacy of the scientific research process. Public participation in scientific research (PPSR) is a growing field of practice aimed at enhancing both public knowledge and understanding of science (education outreach) and the efficacy and responsiveness of scientific research, practice, and policy (participatory engagement). However, PPSR objectives focused on "education outreach" and "participatory engagement" have each emerged from diverse theoretical traditions that maintain distinct indicators of success used for program development and evaluation. Although areas of intersection and overlap among these two traditions exist in theory and practice, a set of comprehensive standards has yet to coalesce that supports the key principles of both traditions in an assimilated fashion. To fill this void, a comprehensive indicators framework is proposed with the goal of promoting a more integrative and synergistic PPSR program development and assessment process.

  9. Interaction and coalescence of multiple simultaneous and non-simultaneous blast waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, S.; Eliasson, V.

    2016-05-01

    Interaction of multiple blast waves can be used to direct energy toward a target while simultaneously reducing collateral damage away from the target area. In this paper, simulations of multiple point source explosives were performed and the resulting shock interaction and coalescence behavior were explored. Three to ten munitions were placed concentrically around the target, and conditions at the target area were monitored and compared to those obtained using a single munition. For each simulation, the energy summed over all munitions was kept constant, while the radial distances between target and munitions and the munition initiation times were varied. Each munition was modeled as a point source explosion. The resulting blast wave propagation and shock front coalescence were solved using the inviscid Euler equations of gas dynamics on overlapping grids employing a finite difference scheme. Results show that multiple munitions can be beneficial for creating extreme conditions at the intended target area; over 20 times higher peak pressure is obtained for ten simultaneous munitions compared to a single munition. Moreover, peak pressure at a point away from the target area is reduced by more than a factor of three.

  10. The formation and coalescence sites of the first gravitational wave events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Raffaella; Graziani, Luca; Marassi, Stefania; Spera, Mario; Mapelli, Michela; Alparone, Matteo; de Bennassuti, Matteo

    2017-10-01

    We present a novel theoretical model to characterize the formation and coalescence sites of compact binaries in a cosmological context. This is based on the coupling between the binary population synthesis code SeBa with a simulation following the formation of a Milky Way-like halo in a well resolved cosmic volume of 4 cMpc, performed with the GAMESH pipeline. We have applied this technique to investigate when and where systems with properties similar to the recently observed LIGO/VIRGO events are more likely to form and where they are more likely to reside when they coalesce. We find that more than 70% of GW151226 and LVT151012-like systems form in galaxies with stellar mass M* > 10^8 Msun in the redshift range [0.06 - 3] and [0.14 - 11.3], respectively. All GW150914-like systems form in low-metallicity dwarfs with M* 10^{10} Msun. Due to tidal stripping and radiative feedback, a non negligible fraction of GW150914-like candidates end-up in galaxies with properties similar to dwarf spheroidals and ultra-faint satellites.

  11. Stochastic coalescence in finite systems: an algorithm for the numerical solution of the multivariate master equation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfonso, Lester; Zamora, Jose; Cruz, Pedro

    2015-04-01

    The stochastic approach to coagulation considers the coalescence process going in a system of a finite number of particles enclosed in a finite volume. Within this approach, the full description of the system can be obtained from the solution of the multivariate master equation, which models the evolution of the probability distribution of the state vector for the number of particles of a given mass. Unfortunately, due to its complexity, only limited results were obtained for certain type of kernels and monodisperse initial conditions. In this work, a novel numerical algorithm for the solution of the multivariate master equation for stochastic coalescence that works for any type of kernels and initial conditions is introduced. The performance of the method was checked by comparing the numerically calculated particle mass spectrum with analytical solutions obtained for the constant and sum kernels, with an excellent correspondence between the analytical and numerical solutions. In order to increase the speedup of the algorithm, software parallelization techniques with OpenMP standard were used, along with an implementation in order to take advantage of new accelerator technologies. Simulations results show an important speedup of the parallelized algorithms. This study was funded by a grant from Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnologia de Mexico SEP-CONACYT CB-131879. The authors also thanks LUFAC® Computacion SA de CV for CPU time and all the support provided.

  12. GW151226: Observation of Gravitational Waves from a 22-Solar-Mass Binary Black Hole Coalescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Camp, Jordan B.; hide

    2016-01-01

    We report the observation of a gravitational-wave signal produced by the coalescence of two stellar-mass black holes. The signal, GW151226, was observed by the twin detectors of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) on December 26, 2015 at 03:38:53 UTC. The signal was initially identified within 70 s by an online matched-filter search targeting binary coalescences. Subsequent off-line analyses recovered GW151226 with a network signal-to-noise ratio of 13 and a significance greater than 5(sigma). The signal persisted in the LIGO frequency band for approximately 1 s, increasing in frequency and amplitude over about 55 cycles from 35 to 450 Hz, and reached a peak gravitational strain of 3.4(+0.7/-0.9) x 10(exp -22). The inferred source-frame initial black hole masses are 14.2(+8.3/-3.7 Stellar Mass and 7.5(+2.3/-2.3) Stellar Mass, and the final black hole mass is 20.8(+6.1/-1.7) Stellar Mass. We find that at least one of the component black holes has spin greater than 0.2. This source is located at a luminosity distance of 440(+180/-190) Mpc corresponding to a redshift of 0.090(+.030/-0.04). All uncertainties define a 90% credible interval. This second gravitational-wave observation provides improved constraints on stellar populations and on deviations from general relativity.

  13. Separation of oil from oily wastewater by sorption and coalescence technique using ethanol grafted polyacrylonitrile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Fei; Li, Chaolin; Dong, Xiaoqing; Li, Yang; Wang, Dandan

    2009-05-30

    Polyacrylonitrile fiber (PANF) was modified by alcoholysis reaction and the efficiencies of the PANF and the modified polyacrylonitrile fiber (MPANF) for oil removal were investigated. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy revealed that new organophilic functional groups were grafted on the fiber surface. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed that the alcoholysis process made the surface of the MPANF rougher than that of the PANF. Oil sorption tests of the PANF and the MPANF for motor oil SAE 30, motor oil SAE 50, and multigrade engine oil (MEO) were carried out in batch tank (in water and in oil without water), and the MPANF showed higher oil sorption capacity compared to the PANF. Dynamic sorption of diesel oil-in-water emulsion (initial oil concentration of 630 mg/dm(3)) was investigated in coalescing bed. The experiments in the coalescing bed indicated that the MPANF could resist higher interstitial velocity, as compared to the PANF. More than 97% of oil content in the influent stream could be removed by the MPANF bed under the optimum condition. The results indicated that reuse of the PANF as oil sorbent was quite feasible.

  14. Separation of oil from oily wastewater by sorption and coalescence technique using ethanol grafted polyacrylonitrile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, Fei [Environmental Science and Engineering Research Center, Shenzhen Graduate School, Harbin Institute of Technology, Shenzhen 518055 (China); Li, Chaolin, E-mail: lichaolin@hitsz.edu.cn [Environmental Science and Engineering Research Center, Shenzhen Graduate School, Harbin Institute of Technology, Shenzhen 518055 (China); Dong, Xiaoqing; Li, Yang; Wang, Dandan [Environmental Science and Engineering Research Center, Shenzhen Graduate School, Harbin Institute of Technology, Shenzhen 518055 (China)

    2009-05-30

    Polyacrylonitrile fiber (PANF) was modified by alcoholysis reaction and the efficiencies of the PANF and the modified polyacrylonitrile fiber (MPANF) for oil removal were investigated. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy revealed that new organophilic functional groups were grafted on the fiber surface. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed that the alcoholysis process made the surface of the MPANF rougher than that of the PANF. Oil sorption tests of the PANF and the MPANF for motor oil SAE 30, motor oil SAE 50, and multigrade engine oil (MEO) were carried out in batch tank (in water and in oil without water), and the MPANF showed higher oil sorption capacity compared to the PANF. Dynamic sorption of diesel oil-in-water emulsion (initial oil concentration of 630 mg/dm{sup 3}) was investigated in coalescing bed. The experiments in the coalescing bed indicated that the MPANF could resist higher interstitial velocity, as compared to the PANF. More than 97% of oil content in the influent stream could be removed by the MPANF bed under the optimum condition. The results indicated that reuse of the PANF as oil sorbent was quite feasible.

  15. Multilocus coalescent species delimitation to evaluate traditionally defined morphotypes in Hydrangea sect. Asperae (Hydrangeaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Smet, Yannick; De Clerck, Olivier; Uemachi, Tatsuya; Granados Mendoza, Carolina; Wanke, Stefan; Goetghebeur, Paul; Samain, Marie-Stéphanie

    2017-09-01

    The number of species recognized in section Asperae of the flowering plant genus Hydrangea differs widely between subsequent revisions. This variation is largely centered around the H. aspera species complex, with numbers of recognized species varying from one to nearly a dozen. Despite indications of molecular variation in this complex, no sequence-based species delimitation methods have been employed to evaluate the primarily morphology-based species boundaries. In the present study, a multi-locus coalescent-based approach to species delimitation is employed in order to identify separate evolutionary lines within H. sect. Asperae, using four chloroplast and four nuclear molecular markers. Eight lineages were recovered within the focal group, of which five correspond with named morphotypes. The other three lineages illustrate types of conflict between molecular species delimitation and traditional morphology-based taxonomy. One molecular lineage comprises two named morphotypes, which possibly diverged recently enough to not have developed sufficient molecular divergence. A second conflict is found in H. strigosa. This morphotype is recovered as a separate lineage when occurring in geographic isolation, but when occurring in sympatry with two other morphotypes (H. aspera and H. robusta), the coalescent species delimitation lumps these taxa into a single putative species. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Dynamic Behavior of the Liquid Flow Coalescing with a Droplet in Hydrophobic Microchannels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, Chen; Shuzhe, Li; Hong, Wang; Qiang, Liao; Xun, Zhu; Qinlin, Fan; Xuefeng, He; Zhibin, Wang

    2015-04-01

    In this study, the dynamic behavior of the moving liquid column coalescing with a sessile droplet in a hydrophobic microchannel under pressure driven flow conditions is numerically investigated using coupled Volume of Fluid with Level Set (CLSVOF) interface tracking method implemented in ANSYS-Fluent 14.5 in conjunction with the continuum surface force (CSF) model. Numerical result reveals that the coalescence between the moving liquid column and droplet can accelerate the original liquid column movement. Effects of the wettability, head pressure, and droplet size and position are also investigated. It is found that the velocity increment ratio increases with increasing the contact angle and decreasing the head pressure. Larger droplet and smaller distance between the droplet and inlet can result in a larger velocity increment ratio as a result of higher surface energy and lower viscous dissipation energy. The maximum velocity increment ratio of 0.17 is obtained with a 10000-µm3 droplet that is positioned at 200 µm in a microchannel with 100 µm in width and 300 µm in length and contact angle of 120°.

  17. Collisions and coalescence in droplet streams for the production of freeze-dried powders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Süverkrüp, Richard; Eggerstedt, Sören; Wanning, Stefan; Kuschel, Matthias; Sommerfeld, Martin; Lamprecht, Alf

    2016-05-01

    Streams of mono-disperse micro-droplets with diameters ranging from about 20 μm to 100 μm were produced from diluted aqueous solutions containing carbohydrates and proteins using a pinhole type piezoelectric generator with either a 20 μm or a 50 μm single-orifice diaphragm. Image sequences indicating droplet size, velocity, inter-droplet spacing at various distances from the nozzles as well as collision events and coalescence were recorded using a high-speed camera and analysed quantitatively. The size-dependent gradual deceleration of the droplets is superimposed by small scale random movements, which equally affect both large and small droplets and lead to early contacts and coalescence. The loss of mono-dispersity can be reduced by quick cooling since both the nucleation rate and the freezing rate of micro-droplets are extremely dependent upon the temperature of their gaseous environment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Mixing efficiency inside micro-droplets coalesced by two components in cross-structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yanlin; Liu, Zhaomiao; Pang, Yan

    2017-11-01

    The mixing of micro-droplets is used in analytical chemistry, medicine production and material synthesis owing to its advantages including the encapsulation and narrow time residence distribution. In this work, droplets are coalesced by two dispersed phase with different flow rates, generated in cross-structure and mixed in planar serpentine structure. The mixing efficiency of micro-droplets under control characters including the width of entrance and the flow rate of dispersed phases have been investigated by experiments and numerical simulations. The UDS (user-defined scalar) as dimensionless concentration of the solution is adopted in simulation, and is used to calculate the concentration and the mixing effect. By changing the flow rates and the entrances` width, the changing rules of the mixing characters have been obtained. The asymmetry distributions of components make rapid mixing process in half part of each droplet when travel through a straight channel. Increasing of the ratio of entrance width result into larger droplet and weaken the chaotic mixing effect. Meanwhile, the coalesced mechanism can be performed by ranging the ratio of flow rates, the ranges are also determined by the widths of entrances. The authors gratefully acknowledge the support of National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11572013).

  19. Reagent delivery by partial coalescence and noncoalescence of aqueous microdroplets in oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minardi, Carina S; Taghioskoui, Mazdak; Jang, Seong J; Jorabchi, Kaveh

    2013-07-02

    Reagent delivery constitutes a key step for reaction initiation in droplet-in-oil microfluidic platforms. Currently, this function is performed by complete fusion of a reagent droplet with the reactor droplet. The full coalescence, however, constrains the lower limit of volume delivery because reproducible droplet generation becomes exceedingly difficult as the reagent droplet volume is decreased. Here, we demonstrate fractional volume delivery based on partially coalescent and noncoalescent droplet collisions as a new reagent delivery mechanism. A charged reagent droplet is generated by pulsing a flow carrying needle to high voltage. The charged droplet is directed toward a grounded reactor droplet. Upon collision, the reagent droplet inverts its charge and is pulled away from the reactor droplet prior to full fusion, injecting only a fraction of its volume. The undelivered portion of the reagent drop is then merged with a collector droplet. We demonstrate that a wide range of fractional injections (0.003%-56%) can be reproducibly achieved, providing a means for minute volume delivery without small drop generation.

  20. Modeling of collision and coalescence of droplets during microgravity processing of Zn-Bi immiscible alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, R. H.; Rogers, J. R.

    1990-01-01

    A population balance model is presented for the coarsening of the dispersed phase of liquid-liquid two-phase mixtures in microgravity due to gravity sedimentation and Marangoni migration, which lead to the collision and coalescence of droplets. The model is used to predict the evolution of the size distribution of the dispersed phase in a liquid-phase miscibility gap system, Zn-Bi, which has been used in a number of experimental microgravity processing studies in which significant phase segregation has been observed. The analysis shows that increasing the temperature gradient, gravity level, volume fraction of the dispersed phase, initial average drop radius, initial standard deviation of droplet radii, or the temperature coefficient of the interfacial tension leads to an increase in the rate of droplet growth due to collision and coalescence. Comparison of the distribution evolutions for unimodal and bimodal initial distributions shows that the latter yield significantly more rapid droplet growth. Finally, it is shown that droplet growth can be dramatically reduced with antiparallel orientation of the gravity vector and the temperature gradient, provided that the relative magnitude of these two vectors is properly chosen.