WorldWideScience

Sample records for program cnp centers

  1. Circulatory CNP Rescues Craniofacial Hypoplasia in Achondroplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanaka, S; Nakao, Kazumasa; Koyama, N; Isobe, Y; Ueda, Y; Kanai, Y; Kondo, E; Fujii, T; Miura, M; Yasoda, A; Nakao, Kazuwa; Bessho, K

    2017-12-01

    Achondroplasia is the most common genetic form of human dwarfism, characterized by midfacial hypoplasia resulting in occlusal abnormality and foramen magnum stenosis, leading to serious neurologic complications and hydrocephalus. Currently, surgery is the only way to manage jaw deformity, neurologic complications, and hydrocephalus in patients with achondroplasia. We previously showed that C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) is a potent stimulator of endochondral bone growth of long bones and vertebrae and is also a potent stimulator in the craniofacial region, which is crucial for midfacial skeletogenesis. In this study, we analyzed craniofacial morphology in a mouse model of achondroplasia, in which fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) is specifically activated in cartilage ( Fgfr3ach mice), and investigated the mechanisms of jaw deformities caused by this mutation. Furthermore, we analyzed the effect of CNP on the maxillofacial area in these animals. Fgfr3ach mice exhibited midfacial hypoplasia, especially in the sagittal direction, caused by impaired endochondral ossification in craniofacial cartilage and by premature closure of the spheno-occipital synchondrosis, an important growth center in craniomaxillofacial skeletogenesis. We crossed Fgfr3ach mice with transgenic mice in which CNP is expressed in the liver under the control of the human serum amyloid-P component promoter, resulting in elevated levels of circulatory CNP ( Fgfr3ach/SAP-Nppc-Tg mice). In the progeny, midfacial hypoplasia in the sagittal direction observed in Fgfr3ach mice was improved significantly by restoring the thickness of synchondrosis and promoting proliferation of chondrocytes in the craniofacial cartilage. In addition, the foramen magnum stenosis observed in Fgfr3ach mice was significantly ameliorated in Fgfr3ach/SAP-Nppc-Tg mice due to enhanced endochondral bone growth of the anterior intraoccipital synchondrosis. These results clearly demonstrate the therapeutic potential of

  2. A Tale of Two Community Networks Program Centers: Operationalizing and Assessing CBPR Principles and Evaluating Partnership Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arroyo-Johnson, Cassandra; Allen, Michele L.; Colditz, Graham A.; Hurtado, G. Ali; Davey, Cynthia S.; Sanders Thompson, Vetta L.; Drake, Bettina F.; Svetaz, Maria Veronica; Rosas-Lee, Maira; Goodman, Melody S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Community Networks Program (CNP) centers are required to use a community-based participatory research (CBPR) approach within their specific priority communities. Not all communities are the same and unique contextual factors and collaborators’ priorities shape each CBPR partnership. There are also established CBPR and community engagement (CE) principles shown to lead to quality CBPR in any community. However, operationalizing and assessing CBPR principles and partnership outcomes to understand the conditions and processes in CBPR that lead to achieving program and project level goals is relatively new in the science of CBPR. Objectives We sought to describe the development of surveys on adherence to and implementation of CBPR/CE principles at two CNP centers and examine commonalities and differences in program- versus project-level CBPR evaluation. Methods A case study about the development and application of CBPR/CE principles for the Missouri CNP, Program for the Elimination of Cancer Disparities, and Minnesota CNP, Padres Informados/Jovenes Preparados, surveys was conducted to compare project versus program operationalization of principles. Survey participant demographics were provided by CNP. Specific domains found in CBPR/CE principles were identified and organized under an existing framework to establish a common ground. Operational definitions and the number of survey items were provided for each domain by CNP. Conclusion There are distinct differences in operational definitions of CBPR/CE principles at the program and project levels of evaluation. However, commonalities support further research to develop standards for CBPR evaluation across partnerships and at the program and project levels. PMID:26213405

  3. ProCNP and CNP are expressed primarily in male genital organs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, S.J.; Gotze, J.P.; Jensen, H.L.

    2008-01-01

    -form. Immunocytochemistry confirmed the pattern of peptide expression measured by RIA. In conclusion most proCNP-derived peptides are synthesized in epithelial cells in the epididymis, the prostate gland and in the seminal vesicles. The expression in male genital organs suggests a role of CNP in reproduction Udgivelsesdato...

  4. Structural and Functional Insight into Canarypox Virus CNP058 Mediated Regulation of Apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Ishtiaq Anasir

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Programmed cell death or apoptosis is an important component of host defense systems against viral infection. The B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2 proteins family is the main arbiter of mitochondrially mediated apoptosis, and viruses have evolved sequence and structural mimics of Bcl-2 to subvert premature host cell apoptosis in response to viral infection. The sequencing of the canarypox virus genome identified a putative pro-survival Bcl-2 protein, CNP058. However, a role in apoptosis inhibition for CNP058 has not been identified to date. Here, we report that CNP058 is able to bind several host cell pro-death Bcl-2 proteins, including Bak and Bax, as well as several BH3 only-proteins including Bim, Bid, Bmf, Noxa, Puma, and Hrk with high to moderate affinities. We then defined the structural basis for CNP058 binding to pro-death Bcl-2 proteins by determining the crystal structure of CNP058 bound to Bim BH3. CNP058 adopts the conserved Bcl-2 like fold observed in cellular pro-survival Bcl-2 proteins, and utilizes the canonical ligand binding groove to bind Bim BH3. We then demonstrate that CNP058 is a potent inhibitor of ultraviolet (UV induced apoptosis in a cell culture model. Our findings suggest that CNP058 is a potent inhibitor of apoptosis that is able to bind to BH3 domain peptides from a broad range of pro-death Bcl-2 proteins, and may play a key role in countering premature host apoptosis.

  5. Center Innovation Fund Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — To stimulate and encourage creativity and innovation within the NASA Centers. The activities are envisioned to fall within the scope of NASA Space Technology or...

  6. Industrial Assessment Center Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolarik, William J.

    2007-02-26

    Over the five-year period (2002-2006) the Oklahoma State University Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) performed energy assessments for 106 different clients, writing 835 recommendations, for a total of $23,937,099 in potential estimated annual savings. IAC clients served consisted of small and medium-sized manufacturers ranging from food manufactures to foundries. The OSU IAC served clients in Oklahoma, Kansas, Missouri, Arkansas, and Texas. In addition to client service, student training and instruction was a major accomplishment. The OSU IAC employed (and trained) 12 baccalaureate-level students, 17 masters-level graduate students, and 7 doctoral-level graduate students. Most are practicing in the energy management area. Training was focused on both energy assessment and safety. Safety training was both center-based training as well as on-site training. Energy management related training was focused on classroom (for academic credit) work at both the undergraduate and graduate level. IEM 4923 (Energy and Water Management) was developed to serve both the IAC as well as non-IAC students. It was delivered once per year, with enrollments of typically 10 to 20 students. This course was required for IAC student employees, both undergraduate and graduate. This course was patterned after the AEE CEM (five-day) course for practicing professionals. IEM 4923 required each student to attend at least one on-site assessment and write at least one recommendation for their client’s report. Hence, a hands-on approach was practiced. Advance level courses were used to train graduate students. Two courses played major roles here: IEM 5923 (Advanced Energy and Water Management) and IEM 5943 (Hazardous Material and Waste). Graduate student participation in these courses helped the IAC to gain additional perspectives in on-site assessment and resulting recommendations. Numerous hands-on demonstration/training was conducted by directors and graduate students in order to gain

  7. Diversified cardiovascular actions of six homologous natriuretic peptides (ANP, BNP, VNP, CNP1, CNP3, and CNP4) in conscious eels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobata, Shigenori; Ventura, Albert; Kaiya, Hiroyuki; Takei, Yoshio

    2010-06-01

    The natriuretic peptide (NP) family consists of seven paralogs [atrial NP (ANP), brain NP (BNP), ventricular NP (VNP), and C-type NP 1-4 (CNP1-4)] in teleosts, but relative biological activity of the seven NPs has not been comprehensively examined using homologous peptides. In this study, we newly identified CNP3 and CNP4 in eels to use homologous peptides, but the CNP2 gene may have been silenced in this species. The CNP4 gene was expressed exclusively in the brain as CNP1, but the CNP3 gene, from which cardiac ANP, BNP, and VNP were generated by tandem duplication, was most abundantly expressed in the pituitary, suggesting its local action. All NPs induced hypotension dose dependently after intra-arterial injection with a potency order of ANP > VNP > BNP > CNP4 > CNP1 = CNP3. The degree of hypotension was similar at the ventral and dorsal aorta, indicating similar actions on the branchial and systemic circulation. The hypotension induced by cardiac NPs was longer lasting than CNPs, probably because of the difference in preferential receptors. Among cardiac NPs, the hypotensive effect of VNP lasted much longer than those of ANP and BNP, even though VNP disappeared from the blood more quickly than ANP. To analyze the unique effect of VNP, we examined possible involvement of the autonomic nervous system using ANP, VNP, and CNP3. Beta-adrenergic blockade diminished hypotensive effects of all three NPs, but alpha-adrenergic and cholinergic blockade enhanced only the effect of VNP, suggesting a specific mechanism for the VNP action. The NP-induced tachycardia was diminished by all blockers examined. Furthermore, the cardiovascular action of VNP was not impaired by a blocker of NP receptor, HS-142-1. Taken together, the homologous NPs exhibit diverse cardiovascular actions in eels partially through the autonomic nervous system, and the unique VNP action may be mediated by a novel receptor that has not been identified in teleosts.

  8. 75 FR 53701 - Health Center Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    ... Administration Health Center Program AGENCY: Health Resources and Services Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of... and Services Administration (HRSA) will transfer Health Center Program (Section 330(h) of the Public... Health Center Program Section 330(h) funds to SPHC in order to implement and carry out grant activities...

  9. 75 FR 32797 - Health Center Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-09

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Health Center Program AGENCY: Health... transferring Health Center Program (section 330 of the Public Health Service Act) Community Health Center (CHC), Increased Demand for Services (IDS), and Capital Improvement Program (CIP) funds originally awarded to...

  10. 75 FR 21001 - Health Center Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-22

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Health Center Program AGENCY: Health... Health Center Program (section 330 of the Public Health Service Act) New Access Point (NAP), Increased Demand for Service (IDS), and Capital Improvement Program (CIP) funds originally awarded to Community...

  11. 78 FR 25457 - Health Center Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Health Center Program AGENCY: Health... Program (section 330 of the Public ] Health Service Act.) that will be awarded to West End Medical Center...

  12. 75 FR 2549 - Health Center Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-15

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Health Center Program AGENCY: Health Resources and Services Administration, HHS ACTION: Notice of Noncompetitive Replacement Award to Regional Health Care Affiliates. SUMMARY: The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) will be...

  13. The Goddard Space Flight Center ergonomics program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batson, Eileen; Unite, Theodore

    1993-01-01

    Since the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Cardiovascular Screening Program started in 1984, we have made many changes to accommodate the growing number of participants. As a result of these changes, screening of KSC employees has become more efficient and productive. Various aspects of the program are covered.

  14. Academic Cancer Center Phase I Program Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankel, Arthur E; Flaherty, Keith T; Weiner, George J; Chen, Robert; Azad, Nilofer S; Pishvaian, Michael J; Thompson, John A; Taylor, Matthew H; Mahadevan, Daruka; Lockhart, A Craig; Vaishampayan, Ulka N; Berlin, Jordan D; Smith, David C; Sarantopoulos, John; Riese, Matthew; Saleh, Mansoor N; Ahn, Chul; Frenkel, Eugene P

    2017-04-01

    Multiple factors critical to the effectiveness of academic phase I cancer programs were assessed among 16 academic centers in the U.S. Successful cancer centers were defined as having broad phase I and I/II clinical trial portfolios, multiple investigator-initiated studies, and correlative science. The most significant elements were institutional philanthropic support, experienced clinical research managers, robust institutional basic research, institutional administrative efforts to reduce bureaucratic regulatory delays, phase I navigators to inform patients and physicians of new studies, and a large cancer center patient base. New programs may benefit from a separate stand-alone operation, but mature phase I programs work well when many of the activities are transferred to disease-oriented teams. The metrics may be useful as a rubric for new and established academic phase I programs. The Oncologist 2017;22:369-374. © The Authors. The Oncologist published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of AlphaMed Press 2017.

  15. Industrial Assessment Center Program Impact Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, M.A.

    2000-01-26

    This report presents the results of an evaluation of the U.S. Department of Energy's Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) Program. The purpose of this program is to conduct energy, waste, and productivity assessments for small to medium-sized industrial firms. Assessments are conducted by 30 university-based industrial assessment centers. The purpose of this project was to evaluate energy and cost savings attributable to the assessments, the trained alumni, and the Websites sponsored by this program. How IAC assessments, alumni, and Web-based information may influence industrial energy efficiency decision making was also studied. It is concluded that appreciable energy and cost savings may be attributed to the IAC Program and that the IAC Program has resulted in more active and improved energy-efficiency decision making by industrial firms.

  16. Academic Cancer Center Phase I Program Development

    OpenAIRE

    Frankel, Arthur E; Flaherty, Keith T; Weiner, George J.; Chen, Robert; Azad, Nilofer S.; Pishvaian, Michael J.; Thompson, John A.; Taylor, Matthew H.; Mahadevan, Daruka; Lockhart, A. Craig; Vaishampayan, Ulka N.; Berlin, Jordan D.; Smith, David C.; Sarantopoulos, John; Riese, Matthew

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Multiple factors critical to the effectiveness of academic phase I cancer programs were assessed among 16 academic centers in the U.S. Successful cancer centers were defined as having broad phase I and I/II clinical trial portfolios, multiple investigator?initiated studies, and correlative science. The most significant elements were institutional philanthropic support, experienced clinical research managers, robust institutional basic research, institutional administrative efforts to...

  17. Dryden Flight Research Center Chemical Pharmacy Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Bette

    1997-01-01

    The Dryden Flight Research Center (DFRC) Chemical Pharmacy "Crib" is a chemical sharing system which loans chemicals to users, rather than issuing them or having each individual organization or group purchasing the chemicals. This cooperative system of sharing chemicals eliminates multiple ownership of the same chemicals and also eliminates stockpiles. Chemical management duties are eliminated for each of the participating organizations. The chemical storage issues, hazards and responsibilities are eliminated. The system also ensures safe storage of chemicals and proper disposal practices. The purpose of this program is to reduce the total releases and transfers of toxic chemicals. The initial cost of the program to DFRC was $585,000. A savings of $69,000 per year has been estimated for the Center. This savings includes the reduced costs in purchasing, disposal and chemical inventory/storage responsibilities. DFRC has chemicals stored in 47 buildings and at 289 locations. When the program is fully implemented throughout the Center, there will be three chemical locations at this facility. The benefits of this program are the elimination of chemical management duties; elimination of the hazard associated with chemical storage; elimination of stockpiles; assurance of safe storage; assurance of proper disposal practices; assurance of a safer workplace; and more accurate emissions reports.

  18. The Arecibo Remote Command Center Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Fronefield; Jenet, Fredrick; Siemens, Xavier; Dolch, Timothy; Stovall, Kevin

    2016-07-01

    The Arecibo Remote Command Center (ARCC) is a multi-institution research and education program that introduces undergraduates to the field of pulsar research. Specifically, the program trains students to work in small teams to operate several of the world's largest radio telescopes (both Arecibo and the Green Bank Telescope). Students conduct survey observations for the PALFA Galactic plane pulsar survey and conduct timing observations of millisecond pulsars (MSPs) for the NANOGrav search for gravitational waves using these telescopes. In addition, ARCC students search pulsar candidates generated from processed survey data in order to find both new radio MSPs and non-recycled pulsars. The ARCC program currently operates at four U.S. institutions and involves more than 50 undergraduate students each year. To date, ARCC students have discovered 64 new pulsars in this program.

  19. NASA Glenn Research Center's Hypersonic Propulsion Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palac, Donald T.

    1999-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC), as NASA's lead center for aeropropulsion, is responding to the challenge of reducing the cost of space transportation through the integration of air-breathing propulsion into launch vehicles. Air- breathing launch vehicle (ABLV) propulsion requires a marked departure from traditional propulsion applications. and stretches the technology of both rocket and air-breathing propulsion. In addition, the demands of the space launch mission require an unprecedented level of integration of propulsion and vehicle systems. GRC is responding with a program with rocket-based combined cycle (RBCC) propulsion technology as its main focus. RBCC offers the potential for simplicity, robustness, and performance that may enable low-cost single-stage-to-orbit (SSTO) transportation. Other technologies, notably turbine-based combined cycle (TBCC) propulsion, offer benefits such as increased robustness and greater mission flexibility, and are being advanced, at a slower pace, as part of GRC's program in hypersonics.

  20. Marshall Space Flight Center Faculty Fellowship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Six, N. F. (Compiler)

    2015-01-01

    The Faculty Fellowship program was revived in the summer of 2015 at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, following a period of diminished faculty research activity here since 2006 when budget cuts in the Headquarters' Education Office required realignment. Several senior Marshall managers recognized the need to involve the Nation's academic research talent in NASA's missions and projects to the benefit of both entities. These managers invested their funds required to establish the renewed Faculty Fellowship program in 2015, a 10-week residential research involvement of 16 faculty in the laboratories and offices at Marshall. These faculty engineers and scientists worked with NASA collaborators on NASA projects, bringing new perspectives and solutions to bear. This Technical Memorandum is a compilation of the research reports of the 2015 Marshall Faculty Fellowship program, along with the Program Announcement (appendix A) and the Program Description (appendix B). The research touched on seven areas-propulsion, materials, instrumentation, fluid dynamics, human factors, control systems, and astrophysics. The propulsion studies included green propellants, gas bubble dynamics, and simulations of fluid and thermal transients. The materials investigations involved sandwich structures in composites, plug and friction stir welding, and additive manufacturing, including both strength characterization and thermosets curing in space. The instrumentation projects involved spectral interfero- metry, emissivity, and strain sensing in structures. The fluid dynamics project studied the water hammer effect. The human factors project investigated the requirements for close proximity operations in confined spaces. Another team proposed a controls system for small launch vehicles, while in astrophysics, one faculty researcher estimated the practicality of weather modification by blocking the Sun's insolation, and another found evidence in satellite data of the detection of a warm

  1. 77 FR 33563 - Applications for New Awards; Comprehensive Centers Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-06

    ... support effective special education teachers; and developing and implementing human capital management... June 6, 2012 Part II Department of Education Applications for New Awards; Comprehensive Centers Program... OF EDUCATION Applications for New Awards; Comprehensive Centers Program AGENCY: Office of Elementary...

  2. CNP signal peptide (CNPsp in patients with cardiovascular disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqui eLee

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We have previously reported that signal peptide fragments of C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP are present in the human circulation. Here, we provide the first preliminary assessment of the potential utility of CNP signal peptide (CNPsp measurement in acute cardiovascular disease. Utilising our specific and sensitive immunoassay, we assessed the potential of CNPsp measurement to assist in the identification of acute coronary syndromes in 494 patients presenting consecutively with chest pain. The diagnostic and prognostic potential of CNPsp was assessed in conjunction with a contemporary clinical troponin I assay, an investigational highly sensitive troponin T assay and NT-proBNP measurement. Utility was assessed via receiver operator curve characteristic analysis.CNPsp did not identify patients with myocardial infarction (MI or those with unstable angina, nor did it assist the diagnostic ability of clinical or investigational troponin measurement. CNPsp levels were significantly elevated in patients presenting with atrial fibrillation (P<0.05 and were significantly lower in those with a history of previous MI (P<0.05. CNPsp could identify those at risk of mortality within 1 year (P<0.05 and also could identify those at risk of death or re-infarction within 1 year (P<0.01. This is the first exploratory report describing the potential of CNPsp measurement in acute cardiovascular disease. Whilst CNPsp does not have utility in acute diagnosis, it may have potential in assisting risk prognosis with respect to mortality and re-infarction.

  3. Center Innovation Fund: KSC CIF Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Each individual NASA Center has full discretion on the use of the funds and the Center Chief Technologists coordinates a competitive process at their Center for the...

  4. Center Innovation Fund: JPL CIF Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Funds are distributed to each NASA Center to support emerging technologies and creative initiatives that leverage Center talent and capabilities. NASA scientists and...

  5. Center Innovation Fund: AFRC CIF Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Armstrong Flight Research Center is NASA’s primary center for atmospheric flight research and operations, with a vision “to fly what others only...

  6. The alteration of NTproCNP plasma levels following anaerobic exercise in physically active young men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akseki Temür, Hilal; Vardar, Selma Arzu; Demir, Muzaffer; Palabıyık, Orkide; Karaca, Aziz; Guksu, Zuhal; Ortanca, Arif; Süt, Necdet

    2015-02-01

    Amino-terminal propeptide of C-type natriuretic peptide (NTproCNP) is a synthesis product of C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP). In this study, plasma levels of NTproCNP were compared before and after exercise in healthy young subjects who are physically active (PA) or not physically active (NPA). The study was carried on PA group (n=10) who defined the exercise duration more than 2.5 hours per week for at least one year and NPA group (n = 10) whose exercise duration was lower than 1.5 hours per week. The level of maximal oxygen consumption was determined. Wingate exercise test was applied on the following day. Plasma NTproCNP levels were measured before the exercise and at the 1st, 5th and 30th minute after the exercise. Exercise duration of physically active group was reported as 11.3 ± 5.0 hours per week. Basal NTproCNP levels of the groups were found to be comparable. NTproCNP levels in the 5th minute (0.93 ± 0.23 pmol/L; pexercise were higher than the levels before exercise (0.64 ± 0.29 pmol/L) in PA group. Additionally, the plasma levels of NTproCNP after 5th minute of exercise were higher in PA group (0.93 ± 0.23 pmol/L) than NPA group (0.74 ± 0.16 pmol/L, pexercise.

  7. Higher level of NT-proCNP in cerebrospinal fluid of patients with meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasiuk, Ryszard; Lipowski, Dariusz; Szlufik, Stanislaw; Peplinska, Krystyna; Mikaszewska-Sokolewicz, Malgorzata

    2016-02-12

    Aminoterminal pro-C type natriuretic peptide (NT-proCNP) as an active form of CNP, has been recently proven to be a potential marker of sepsis and to be linked to inflammatory diseases. So far, there are no studies describing the level of NT-proCNP in meningitis. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic value of NT-proCNP in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in patients with meningitis and to compare it with the serum level of CRP and procalcitonin (PCT) in this group of patients. The results were compared to serum levels of CRP, PCT and CSF levels of cytosis, protein and lactate. NT-proCNP levels were statistically significant between the control group and the meningitis groups (p=0.02; R=0.3). We also noted a correlation between the level of NT-proCNP in the CSF of all of the study groups (controls and meningitis patients) and the CSF levels of cytosis (p0.05; R=0.11). These results suggest that NT-proCNP could be a potential marker of meningitis, but it cannot be used to distinguish between the types of meningitis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Effects of three global change drivers on terrestrial C:N:P stoichiometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yue, Kai; Fornara, Dario A; Yang, Wanqin

    2017-01-01

    more common than synergistic or antagonistic interactions, (4) C:N:P stoichiometry of soil and soil microbial biomass shows high homeostasis under global change manipulations, and (5) C:N:P responses to global change are strongly affected by ecosystem type, local climate and experimental conditions......, and elevated CO2 ) on primary productivity and on the biogeochemistry of carbon (C), N and phosphorus (P) across different terrestrial ecosystems. Here we capitalize on this large amount of information by performing a comprehensive meta-analysis (>2000 case studies worldwide) to address how C:N:P stoichiometry...

  9. Animal Resource Program | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    CCR Animal Resource Program The CCR Animal Resource Program plans, develops, and coordinates laboratory animal resources for CCR’s research programs. We also provide training, imaging, and technology development in support of moving basic discoveries to the clinic. The ARP Manager:

  10. Annual health examination program, Ames Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, L.; Ladou, J.

    1975-01-01

    A cost analysis of a low-volume multiphasic health testing program is presented. The results indicate that unit costs are similar to those of high-volume automated programs. The comparability in unit cost appears to result from the savings in personnel and space requirements of the smaller program as compared with the larger ones.

  11. Center Independent Research & Developments: JSC IRAD Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — JSC provides and applies its preeminent capabilities in science and technology to develop, operate, and integrate human exploration missions.  The center...

  12. Argonne Code Center: compilation of program abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butler, M.K.; DeBruler, M.; Edwards, H.S.; Harrison, C. Jr.; Hughes, C.E.; Jorgensen, R.; Legan, M.; Menozzi, T.; Ranzini, L.; Strecok, A.J.

    1977-08-01

    This publication is the eleventh supplement to, and revision of, ANL-7411. It contains additional abstracts and revisions to some earlier abstracts and other pages. Sections of the complete document ANL-7411 are as follows: preface, history and acknowledgements, abstract format, recommended program package contents, program classification guide and thesaurus, and the abstract collection. (RWR)

  13. Microcomputer Programming in the Information Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fosdick, Howard

    1983-01-01

    Microcomputer programing languages BASIC, Pascal, and PL/1 are characterized and contrasted in terms of suitability for library and textual processing needs. Issues pertaining to choice of programing languages for library microcomputing are discussed. Fifty-one references and tables rating languages on basis of number of string functions and…

  14. Argonne Code Center: compilation of program abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butler, M.K.; DeBruler, M.; Edwards, H.S.

    1976-08-01

    This publication is the tenth supplement to, and revision of, ANL-7411. It contains additional abstracts and revisions to some earlier abstracts and other pages. Sections of the document are as follows: preface; history and acknowledgements; abstract format; recommended program package contents; program classification guide and thesaurus; and abstract collection. (RWR)

  15. Marshall Space Flight Center Faculty Fellowship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Six, N. F.; Karr, G.

    2017-01-01

    The research projects conducted by the 2016 Faculty Fellows at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center included propulsion studies on propellant issues, and materials investigations involving plasma effects and friction stir welding. Spacecraft Systems research was conducted on wireless systems and 3D printing of avionics. Vehicle Systems studies were performed on controllers and spacecraft instruments. The Science and Technology group investigated additive construction applied to Mars and Lunar regolith, medical uses of 3D printing, and unique instrumentation, while the Test Laboratory measured pressure vessel leakage and crack growth rates.

  16. The Puente Learning Center: A Building and a Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Kelly R.

    1998-01-01

    Describes the People United To Enrich the Neighborhood through Education (Puente) Learning Center, a nonprofit center in Los Angeles (California) providing programs in literacy, English-as-a-Second-Language, study skills, job training, and computer skills for people who traditionally have had limited access to education and technology. (SLD)

  17. CENTER FOR ADVANCED SEPARATION TECHNOLOGY (CAST) PROGRAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Roe-Hoan; Hull, Christopher

    2014-09-30

    The U.S. is the largest producer of mining products in the world. In 2011, U.S. mining operations contributed a total of $232 billion to the nation’s GDP plus $138 billion in labor income. Of this the coal mining industry contributed a total of $97.5 billion to GDP plus $53 billion in labor income. Despite these contributions, the industry has not been well supported with research and development funds as compared to mining industries in other countries. To overcome this problem, the Center for Advanced Separation Technologies (CAST) was established to develop technologies that can be used by the U.S. mining industry to create new products, reduce production costs, and meet environmental regulations.

  18. Center for Advanced Energy Studies Program Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kevin Kostelnik

    2005-09-01

    The world is facing critical energy-related challenges regarding world and national energy demands, advanced science and energy technology delivery, nuclear engineering educational shortfalls, and adequately trained technical staff. Resolution of these issues is important for the United States to ensure a secure and affordable energy supply, which is essential for maintaining U.S. national security, continued economic prosperity, and future sustainable development. One way that the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is addressing these challenges is by tasking the Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC (BEA) with developing the Center for Advanced Energy Studies (CAES) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). By 2015, CAES will be a self-sustaining, world-class, academic and research institution where the INL; DOE; Idaho, regional, and other national universities; and the international community will cooperate to conduct critical energy-related research, classroom instruction, technical training, policy conceptualization, public dialogue, and other events.

  19. A Community - Centered Astronomy Research Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyce, Pat; Boyce, Grady

    2017-06-01

    The Boyce Research Initiatives and Education Foundation (BRIEF) is providing semester-long, hands-on, astronomy research experiences for students of all ages that results in their publishing peer-reviewed papers. The course in astronomy and double star research has evolved from a face-to-face learning experience with two instructors to an online - hybrid course that simultaneously supports classroom instruction at a variety of schools in the San Diego area. Currently, there are over 65 students enrolled in three community colleges, seven high schools, and one university as well as individual adult learners. Instructional experience, courseware, and supporting systems were developed and refined through experience gained in classroom settings from 2014 through 2016. Topics of instruction include Kepler's Laws, basic astrometry, properties of light, CCD imaging, use of filters for varying stellar spectral types, and how to perform research, scientific writing, and proposal preparation. Volunteer instructors were trained by taking the course and producing their own research papers. An expanded program was launched in the fall semester of 2016. Twelve papers from seven schools were produced; eight have been accepted for publication by the Journal of Double Observations (JDSO) and the remainder are in peer review. Three additional papers have been accepted by the JDSO and two more are in process papers. Three college professors and five advanced amateur astronomers are now qualified volunteer instructors. Supporting tools are provided by a BRIEF server and other online services. The server-based tools range from Microsoft Office and planetarium software to top-notch imaging programs and computational software for data reduction for each student team. Observations are performed by robotic telescopes worldwide supported by BRIEF. With this success, student demand has increased significantly. Many of the graduates of the first semester course wanted to expand their

  20. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Plasma Fusion Center, Technical Research Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davidson, Ronald C.

    1980-08-01

    A review is given of the technical programs carried out by the Plasma Fusion Center. The major divisions of work areas are applied plasma research, confinement experiments, fusion technology and engineering, and fusion systems. Some objectives and results of each program are described. (MOW)

  1. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Supply Chain Management Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Michael P.

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the working of the Supplier Assessment Program at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. The program supports many GSFC projects to ensure suppliers are aware of and are following the contractual requirements, to provide an independent assessment of the suppliers' processes, and provide suppliers' safety and mission assurance organizations information to make the changes within their organization.

  2. 45 CFR 1306.32 - Center-based program option.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... grantees operating migrant programs are required to plan for a minimum of two parent-teacher conferences... Center-based program option. (a) Class size. (1) Head Start classes must be staffed by a teacher and an aide or two teachers and, whenever possible, a volunteer. (2) Grantees must determine their class size...

  3. Shear stress induction of C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) in endothelial cells is independent of NO autocrine signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z; Xiao, Z; Diamond, S L

    1999-01-01

    C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) is secreted by endothelial cells and has vasodilatory and antiproliferative activity against smooth muscle cells. Using defined laminar shear stress exposures of cultured bovine aortic endothelial cells, we investigated the regulation of CNP gene by PhosphorImaging the ratio of CNP mRNA to glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) mRNA. A 6 h exposure to arterial shear stress of 25 dyn/cm2 caused a marked elevation (10.5 +/- 6.2-fold: n=10, pshear stress was 2.6 times more potent than a venous level of shear stress of 4 dyn/cm2 in elevating the CNP/GAPDH mRNA ratio. After 6 h, CNP secretion by shear stressed BAEC was elevated over stationary controls by 3.1-fold (n=5, pBAEC. Shear stress elevated CNP mRNA in the presence of L-NAME (400 microM) indicating that autocrine signaling through shear-induced NO production or guanylate cyclase activation was not involved. Similarly, the tyrosine kinase inhibitor genistein (10 microM), which can also block shear-induced NO production, had no effect on CNP mRNA induction by shear stress in BAEC. The intracellular calcium chelator BAPTA/AM (5 microM) attenuated the shear stress-induced CNP mRNA expression by 71%. Interestingly, dexamethasone (1 microM) potentiated by 2-fold the shear stress enhancement of CNP mRNA. Shear stress was a more potent inducer of CNP than either phorbol myristrate acetate or lipopolysaccharide. Hemodynamic shear stress may be an important physiological regulator of CNP expression with consequent effects on vasodilation and regulation of intimal hyperplasia.

  4. Effects of three global change drivers on terrestrial C:N:P stoichiometry: a global synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Kai; Fornara, Dario A; Yang, Wanqin; Peng, Yan; Li, Zhijie; Wu, Fuzhong; Peng, Changhui

    2017-06-01

    Over the last few decades, there has been an increasing number of controlled-manipulative experiments to investigate how plants and soils might respond to global change. These experiments typically examined the effects of each of three global change drivers [i.e., nitrogen (N) deposition, warming, and elevated CO 2 ] on primary productivity and on the biogeochemistry of carbon (C), N, and phosphorus (P) across different terrestrial ecosystems. Here, we capitalize on this large amount of information by performing a comprehensive meta-analysis (>2000 case studies worldwide) to address how C:N:P stoichiometry of plants, soils, and soil microbial biomass might respond to individual vs. combined effects of the three global change drivers. Our results show that (i) individual effects of N addition and elevated CO 2 on C:N:P stoichiometry are stronger than warming, (ii) combined effects of pairs of global change drivers (e.g., N addition + elevated CO 2 , warming + elevated CO 2 ) on C:N:P stoichiometry were generally weaker than the individual effects of each of these drivers, (iii) additive interactions (i.e., when combined effects are equal to or not significantly different from the sum of individual effects) were more common than synergistic or antagonistic interactions, (iv) C:N:P stoichiometry of soil and soil microbial biomass shows high homeostasis under global change manipulations, and (v) C:N:P responses to global change are strongly affected by ecosystem type, local climate, and experimental conditions. Our study is one of the first to compare individual vs. combined effects of the three global change drivers on terrestrial C:N:P ratios using a large set of data. To further improve our understanding of how ecosystems might respond to future global change, long-term ecosystem-scale studies testing multifactor effects on plants and soils are urgently required across different world regions. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Making program evaluation activities family-centered: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, Katherine A; Cousins, J Bradley

    2014-01-01

    This study explored ways in which program evaluation activities in pediatric rehabilitation settings can become congruent with family-centered service (FCS) philosophy. Two Canadian pediatric rehabilitation centers participated in this study, which included focus groups with staff members and interviews with parents. Participants identified seven ways in which program evaluation practices could be made congruent with FCS. Suggestions included: (a) the inclusion of a diverse group of program recipients, (b) the use of processes that facilitate family involvement, (c) the recruitment of family champions, (d) the involvement of families in program development, (e) the establishment of evaluations that are relevant to families (f) the development of center-wide statements about family involvement in evaluation and (g) the compensation of families for their active participation in evaluation. For program evaluation practices to be useful and relevant, they should be improved and made consistent with FCS philosophy. Those evaluating pediatric rehabilitation programs need to use approaches and activities that respect the needs, characteristics, cultures and diversity of the program recipients. Such actions will help to improve the quality of care provided, the nature of program evaluation activities, as well as the overall level of FCS in pediatric rehabilitation settings.

  6. Increased renal production of C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) in patients with cirrhosis and functional renal failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gülberg, V; Møller, S; Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl

    2000-01-01

    homeostasis. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the possible role of CNP in renal function disturbances in patients with cirrhosis of the liver. METHODS: Peripheral venous and urinary concentrations of CNP were determined in samples from 11 healthy controls, 20 cirrhotic patients...... with normal renal function (creatinine clearance 117 (8) ml/min), and 20 cirrhotic patients with impaired renal function (creatinine clearance 35 (4) ml/min). In a second protocol, arterial and renal venous plasma concentrations of CNP were determined in 37 patients with cirrhosis of the liver to estimate...... renal extraction ratios of CNP. A sensitive and specific radioimmunoassay was applied after solid phase extraction of samples. RESULTS: Plasma CNP was lower in cirrhotic patients with normal and impaired renal function than in controls (3.0 (0.4) and 2.7 (0.2) v. 4.2 (0.4) pg/ml, respectively; p

  7. Trauma Center Based Youth Violence Prevention Programs: An Integrative Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhail, Judy Nanette; Nemeth, Lynne Sheri

    2016-12-01

    Youth violence recidivism remains a significant public health crisis in the United States. Violence prevention is a requirement of all trauma centers, yet little is known about the effectiveness of these programs. Therefore, this systematic review summarizes the effectiveness of trauma center-based youth violence prevention programs. A systematic review of articles from MEDLINE, CINAHL, and PsychINFO databases was performed to identify eligible control trials or observational studies. Included studies were from 1970 to 2013, describing and evaluating an intervention, were trauma center based, and targeted youth injured by violence (tertiary prevention). The social ecological model provided the guiding framework, and findings are summarized qualitatively. Ten studies met eligibility requirements. Case management and brief intervention were the primary strategies, and 90% of the studies showed some improvement in one or more outcome measures. These results held across both social ecological level and setting: both emergency department and inpatient unit settings. Brief intervention and case management are frequent and potentially effective trauma center-based violence prevention interventions. Case management initiated as an inpatient and continued beyond discharge was the most frequently used intervention and was associated with reduced rearrest or reinjury rates. Further research is needed, specifically longitudinal studies using experimental designs with high program fidelity incorporating uniform direct outcome measures. However, this review provides initial evidence that trauma centers can intervene with the highest of risk patients and break the youth violence recidivism cycle. © The Author(s) 2015.

  8. Supporting Multiple Programs and Projects at NASA's Kennedy Space Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Camiren L.

    2014-01-01

    With the conclusion of the shuttle program in 2011, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) had found itself at a crossroads for finding transportation of United States astronauts and experiments to space. The agency would eventually hand off the taxiing of American astronauts to the International Space Station (ISS) that orbits in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) about 210 miles above the earth under the requirements of the Commercial Crew Program (CCP). By privatizing the round trip journey from Earth to the ISS, the space agency has been given the additional time to focus funding and resources to projects that operate beyond LEO; however, adding even more stress to the agency, the premature cancellation of the program that would succeed the Shuttle Program - The Constellation Program (CxP) -it would inevitably delay the goal to travel beyond LEO for a number of years. Enter the Space Launch System (SLS) and the Orion Multipurpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV). Currently, the SLS is under development at NASA's Marshall Spaceflight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, while the Orion Capsule, built by government contractor Lockheed Martin Corporation, has been assembled and is currently under testing at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in Florida. In its current vision, SLS will take Orion and its crew to an asteroid that had been captured in an earlier mission in lunar orbit. Additionally, this vehicle and its configuration is NASA's transportation to Mars. Engineers at the Kennedy Space Center are currently working to test the ground systems that will facilitate the launch of Orion and the SLS within its Ground Services Development and Operations (GSDO) Program. Firing Room 1 in the Launch Control Center (LCC) has been refurbished and outfitted to support the SLS Program. In addition, the Spaceport Command and Control System (SCCS) is the underlying control system for monitoring and launching manned launch vehicles. As NASA finds itself at a junction, so does all of its

  9. 77 FR 59931 - Single Source Program Expansion Supplement Award to Area Health Education Centers (AHEC) Program...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    ... University of Guam School of Nursing, an Area Health Education Center (AHEC) Program grantee, to coordinate... baccalaureate nursing education program in the Pacific. Its focus is on health careers training and development... only nationally accredited baccalaureate nursing education program in the Pacific. The Guam/Micronesia...

  10. History of the Animal Care Program at Johnson Space Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan-Mayberry, Noreen; Bassett, Stephanie

    2010-01-01

    NASA has a rich history of scientific research that has been conducted throughout our numerous manned spaceflight programs. This scientific research has included animal test subjects participating in various spaceflight missions, including most recently, Space Shuttle mission STS-131. The Animal Care Program at Johnson Space Center (JSC) in Houston, Texas is multi-faceted and unique in scope compared to other centers within the agency. The animal care program at JSC has evolved from strictly research to include a Longhorn facility and the Houston Zoo's Attwater Prairie Chicken refuge, which is used to help repopulate this endangered species. JSC is home to more than 300 species of animals including home of hundreds of white-tailed deer that roam freely throughout the center which pose unique issues in regards to population control and safety of NASA workers, visitors and tourists. We will give a broad overview of our day to day operations, animal research, community outreach and protection of animals at NASA Johnson Space Center.

  11. Serum NT-proCNP levels increased after initiation of GH treatment in patients with achondroplasia/hypochondroplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, Takuo; Wang, Wei; Miura, Kohji; Nakayama, Hirofumi; Yamamoto, Keiko; Fujiwara, Makoto; Ohata, Yasuhisa; Tachibana, Makiko; Kitaoka, Taichi; Takakuwa, Satoshi; Miyoshi, Yoko; Namba, Noriyuki; Ozono, Keiichi

    2016-06-01

    Serum amino-terminal propeptide of C-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proCNP) levels have been proposed as a biomarker of linear growth in healthy children. The usefulness of NT-proCNP in patients with achondroplasia (ACH)/hypochondroplasia (HCH) remains to be elucidated. The objective was to study whether serum NT-proCNP level is a good biomarker for growth in ACH/HCH and other patients of short stature. This was a longitudinal cohort study. Sixteen children with ACH (aged 0·4-4·3 years), six children with HCH (2·7-6·3 years), 23 children with idiopathic short stature (ISS) (2·2-9·0 years), eight short children with GH deficiency (GHD) (2·9-6·8 years) and five short children born small for gestational age (SGA) (2·0-6·6 years). Patients with ACH/HCH received GH treatment for 1 year. Serum NT-proCNP levels and height were measured. NT-proCNP levels positively correlated with height velocity in these short children (P < 0·05, r = 0·27). NT-proCNP levels inversely correlated with age in children with ISS alone (P < 0·01, r = -0·55). Serum NT-proCNP levels in patients with ACH/HCH were increased 3 months following the initiation of GH treatment (P < 0·05). Height SDS gain during GH treatment for 1 year was positively correlated with the changes in NT-proCNP levels after the initiation of GH (P < 0·01, r = 0·72). Serum NT-proCNP levels may be a good biomarker to indicate the effect of GH treatment on growth in patients with ACH/HCH at least in the first year and height velocity in short stature patients. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Center for Programming Models for Scalable Parallel Computing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Mellor-Crummey

    2008-02-29

    Rice University's achievements as part of the Center for Programming Models for Scalable Parallel Computing include: (1) design and implemention of cafc, the first multi-platform CAF compiler for distributed and shared-memory machines, (2) performance studies of the efficiency of programs written using the CAF and UPC programming models, (3) a novel technique to analyze explicitly-parallel SPMD programs that facilitates optimization, (4) design, implementation, and evaluation of new language features for CAF, including communication topologies, multi-version variables, and distributed multithreading to simplify development of high-performance codes in CAF, and (5) a synchronization strength reduction transformation for automatically replacing barrier-based synchronization with more efficient point-to-point synchronization. The prototype Co-array Fortran compiler cafc developed in this project is available as open source software from http://www.hipersoft.rice.edu/caf.

  13. Implementing a Reliability Centered Maintenance Program at NASA's Kennedy Space Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuttle, Raymond E.; Pete, Robert R.

    1998-01-01

    Maintenance practices have long focused on time based "preventive maintenance" techniques. Components were changed out and parts replaced based on how long they had been in place instead of what condition they were in. A reliability centered maintenance (RCM) program seeks to offer equal or greater reliability at decreased cost by insuring only applicable, effective maintenance is performed and by in large part replacing time based maintenance with condition based maintenance. A significant portion of this program involved introducing non-intrusive technologies, such as vibration analysis, oil analysis and I/R cameras, to an existing labor force and management team.

  14. Policy Evaluation of District Mobile Internet Service Center Program (MPLIK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mulyono Yalia

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The research was motivated by a problem that is interesting to study the Provision of Facilities Policy Evaluation Program Universal Service Obligation (USO Internet Service Center District Mobile Program (MPLIK In Kuningan regency of West Java. The problem is how the Department of Communication and Information Policy in the Kuningan District MPLIK program in Kuningan District,? The aim is (1 want to know the Department of Communication and Information Policy in the Kuningan district MPLIK program in Kuningan district, (2 What factors are a supporter and obstacles in the implementation of policies in support of the Office of Communications and Informatics Program at Kabupaten MPLIK Brass, (3 Efforts effort whether carried out in the implementation of policies in support of the program Diskominfo MPLIK in Kuningan regency. The theory used as an approach to the problem of this research is the Evaluation of Policies Bardach. The research method used is a qualitative method of data collection techniques through participant observation and in-depth interviews. The results showed that in the Provision of Facilities Policy Evaluation Program USO MPLIK In Kuningan West Java through policy evaluation approach found another dimension, namely the importance of control, supervision, and coordination in addition to the four main dimensions of the policy evaluation is used as the approach in this study.

  15. Responses of cardiac natriuretic peptides after paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia: ANP surges faster than BNP and CNP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Jen-Yuan; Wang, An-Mei; Chang, Sheng-Hsiung; Hung, Chung-Lieh; Chen, Chun-Yen; Shih, Bing-Fu; Yeh, Hung-I

    2016-03-15

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) secretion increases after 30 min of paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia (PSVT). Whether this phenomenon also applies to brain or C-type natriuretic peptides (BNP or CNP) remains unknown. Blood samples of 18 patients (41 ± 11 yr old; 4 men) with symptomatic PSVT and normal left ventricular systolic function (ejection fraction 65 ± 6%) were collected from the coronary sinus (CS) and the femoral artery (FA) before and 30 min after the induction, and 30 min after the termination of PSVT. The results showed that the ANP levels rose steeply after the PSVT and then reduced at 30 min after the termination (baseline vs. post-PSVT vs. posttermination: CS: 34.0 ± 29.6 vs. 74.1 ± 42.3 vs. 46.1 ± 32.9; FA: 5.9 ± 3.24 vs. 28.2 ± 20.7 vs. 10.0 ± 4.6 pg/ml; all P ANP, the increases of BNP and CNP in CS after the PSVT were less sharp, but continued to rise after the termination of tachycardia (BNP, 10.2 ± 6.4 vs. 11.3 ± 7.1 vs. 11.8 ± 7.9; CNP, 4.5 ± 1.2 vs. 4.9 ± 1.4 vs. 5.0 ± 1.4 pg/ml; all P ANP increased greater after a 30-min induced PSVT, but dropped faster after termination of PSVT, compared with BNP and CNP. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  16. Copy number variation in CNP267 region may be associated with hip bone size.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan-Lin Liu

    Full Text Available Osteoporotic hip fracture (HF is a serious global public health problem associated with high morbidity and mortality. Hip bone size (BS has been identified as one of key measurable risk factors for HF, independent of bone mineral density (BMD. Hip BS is highly genetically determined, but genetic factors underlying BS variation are still poorly defined. Here, we performed an initial genome-wide copy number variation (CNV association analysis for hip BS in 1,627 Chinese Han subjects using Affymetrix GeneChip Human Mapping SNP 6.0 Array and a follow-up replicate study in 2,286 unrelated US Caucasians sample. We found that a copy number polymorphism (CNP267 located at chromosome 2q12.2 was significantly associated with hip BS in both initial Chinese and replicate Caucasian samples with p values of 4.73E-03 and 5.66E-03, respectively. An important candidate gene, four and a half LIM domains 2 (FHL2, was detected at the downstream of CNP267, which plays important roles in bone metabolism by binding to several bone formation regulator, such as insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 5 (IGFBP-5 and androgen receptor (AR. Our findings suggest that CNP267 region may be associated with hip BS which might influence the FHL2 gene downstream.

  17. Inventors Center of Michigan Technical Assessment Program. Final progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-12-31

    The Technical Assessment Program at the Inventors Center of Michigan is designed to provide independent inventors with a reliable assessment of the technical merits of their proposed inventions. Using faculty from within Ferris State University`s College of Technology an assessment process examines the inventor`s assumptions, documentation, and prototypes, as well as, reviewing patent search results and technical literature to provide the inventor with a written report on the technical aspects of the proposed invention. The forms for applying for a technical assessment of an invention are included.

  18. Honoring 15 Years of the 21st Century Community Learning Centers Program: A Polity-Centered Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Sarah Fierberg

    2010-01-01

    Emphasizing the intersection of policy and politics, this paper uses Theda Skocpol's polity-centered approach (1992) to analyze two key moments in the history of the 21st Century Community Learning Centers (CCLC) program: (1) 1998, when the program's budget grew from $40 million to $200 million; and (2) 2003, when President Bush attempted to cut…

  19. Final Report: Center for Programming Models for Scalable Parallel Computing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mellor-Crummey, John [William Marsh Rice University

    2011-09-13

    As part of the Center for Programming Models for Scalable Parallel Computing, Rice University collaborated with project partners in the design, development and deployment of language, compiler, and runtime support for parallel programming models to support application development for the “leadership-class” computer systems at DOE national laboratories. Work over the course of this project has focused on the design, implementation, and evaluation of a second-generation version of Coarray Fortran. Research and development efforts of the project have focused on the CAF 2.0 language, compiler, runtime system, and supporting infrastructure. This has involved working with the teams that provide infrastructure for CAF that we rely on, implementing new language and runtime features, producing an open source compiler that enabled us to evaluate our ideas, and evaluating our design and implementation through the use of benchmarks. The report details the research, development, findings, and conclusions from this work.

  20. US DOE Regional Test Centers Program - 2016 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stein, Joshua [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-05-01

    The US Department of Energy’s Regional Test Center (RTC) program provides outdoor validation and bankability data for innovative solar technologies at five sites across the US representing a range of climate conditions. Data helps get new technologies to market faster and improves US industry competitiveness. Managed by Sandia National Laboratories and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), the RTC program partners with US manufacturers of photovoltaic (PV) technologies, including modules, inverters, and balance-of-system equipment. The study is collaborative, with manufacturers (also known as RTC industry partners) and the national labs working together on a system design and validation strategy that meets a clearly defined set of performance and reliability objectives.

  1. Control Systems Security Test Center - FY 2004 Program Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert E. Polk; Alen M. Snyder

    2005-04-01

    In May 2004, the US-CERT Control Systems Security Center (CSSC) was established at Idaho National Laboratory to execute assessment activities to reduce the vulnerability of the nation’s critical infrastructure control systems to terrorist attack. The CSSC implements a program to accomplish the five goals presented in the US-CERT National Strategy for Control Systems Security. This report summarizes the first year funding of startup activities and program achievements that took place in FY 2004 and early FY 2005. This document was prepared for the US-CERT Control Systems Security Center of the National Cyber Security Division of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS). DHS has been tasked under the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to coordinate the overall national effort to enhance the protection of the national critical infrastructure. Homeland Security Presidential Directive HSPD-7 directs federal departments to identify and prioritize the critical infrastructure and protect it from terrorist attack. The US-CERT National Strategy for Control Systems Security was prepared by the National Cyber Security Division to address the control system security component addressed in the National Strategy to Secure Cyberspace and the National Strategy for the Physical Protection of Critical Infrastructures and Key Assets. The US-CERT National Strategy for Control Systems Security identified five high-level strategic goals for improving cyber security of control systems.

  2. 77 FR 33729 - Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program-National Data and Statistical...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-07

    ... Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program--National Data and Statistical Center for... and Centers Program--Disability Rehabilitation Research Project (DRRP)-- National Data and Statistical... with burn injury. To meet this priority, the National BMS Data Center's research and technical...

  3. 78 FR 40152 - World Trade Center Health Program Scientific/Technical Advisory Committee; Nominations of Candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-03

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention World Trade Center Health Program Scientific... Nominations of Candidates to Serve on the World Trade Center Health Program Scientific/Technical Advisory... Health and Human Services. The CDC is soliciting nominations for membership on the World Trade Center...

  4. 78 FR 38983 - World Trade Center Health Program Scientific/Technical Advisory Committee (WTCHP-STAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-28

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention World Trade Center Health Program Scientific... Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, (BSC, NCIPC) and the name of the Committee should read World Trade Center Health Program Scientific/Technical Advisory...

  5. Center for Network Planning Status Report 2004-2005

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Ole Brun; Pedersen, Jens Myrup; Jensen, Michael

    CNP, Center for Network Planning, was founded January 29th in 2004 based on an agree-ment between the Institutes of Business Studies, Electronic Systems, Mathematics and Planning at Aalborg University and hosted by the department of Control Engineering at the Institute of Electronic Systems. CNP ...... an almost complete state of the art technical framework for its activities as well as an international contact network. The CNP status report 2004 – 2005 summarises the main activities conducted, results achieved and outlines the visions and plans for the period to follow....... was established in order to strengthen the base for research, special studies, educa-tion, training and dissemination of results within the field of Network Planning and with special focus on the development of the next generation ICT Infrastructure. CNP is a member of CTIF, Centre for TeleInFrastruktur, ensuring...

  6. The Research Program of the Yale Child Study Center School Development Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comer, James P.; Emmons, Christine

    2006-01-01

    The Yale Child Study Center School Development Program (SDP) practices an action research approach to look into obstacles to good teaching and learning in schools, and to reduce or eliminate them. A discussion on the SDP explains how the pilot, field-test and dissemination aspects of the work evolved, the intervention methods used and their…

  7. National Energy Software Center: compilation of program abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, J.M.; Butler, M.K.; De Bruler, M.M.

    1979-05-01

    This is the third complete revision of program abstracts undertaken by the Center. Programs of the IBM 7040, 7090, and CDC 3600 vintage have been removed. Historical data and information on abstract format, program package contents, and subject classification are given. The following subject areas are included in the library: cross section and resonance integral calculations; spectrum calculations, generation of group constants, lattice and cell problems; static design studies; depletion, fuel management, cost analysis, and power plant economics; space-independent kinetics; space--time kinetics, coupled neutronics--hydrodynamics--thermodynamics and excursion simulations; radiological safety, hazard and accident analysis; heat transfer and fluid flow; deformation and stress distribution computations, structural analysis and engineering design studies; gamma heating and shield design; reactor systems analysis; data preparation; data management; subsidiary calculations; experimental data processing; general mathematical and computing system routines; materials; environmental and earth sciences; electronics, engineering equipment, and energy systems studies; chemistry; particle accelerators and high-voltage machines; physics; magnetic fusion research; data. (RWR)

  8. Federally qualified health center dental program finances: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beazoglou, Tryfon; Bailit, Howard; Maule, Margaret Drozdowski

    2010-01-01

    We analyzed the operation of one Connecticut federally qualified health center (FOHC) dental program with seven delivery sites. We assessed the financial operation of the different delivery sites and contrasted the overall performance of the FOHC with private practices. We obtained data from a pretested financial survey instrument, electronic patient visit records, and site visits. To assess clinic productivity, we used two output measures: patient visits and market value of services. For the latter, we estimated the implicit fee of each service provided in patient visits. On average, these clinics were running a modest deficit, mainly due to startup costs of two new clinics. The primary factor that impacted net revenues was low reimbursement rates, including privately insured patients. When FOHC dental revenues were adjusted to market rates, revenues were close to expenses. FOHC dental clinics are major components of the dental safety net system. This case study suggests that the established clinics use resources as effectively as private practices.

  9. Evaluation of the therapeutic potential of a CNP analog in a Fgfr3 mouse model recapitulating achondroplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorget, Florence; Kaci, Nabil; Peng, Jeff; Benoist-Lasselin, Catherine; Mugniery, Emilie; Oppeneer, Todd; Wendt, Dan J; Bell, Sean M; Bullens, Sherry; Bunting, Stuart; Tsuruda, Laurie S; O'Neill, Charles A; Di Rocco, Federico; Munnich, Arnold; Legeai-Mallet, Laurence

    2012-12-07

    Achondroplasia (ACH), the most common form of dwarfism, is an inherited autosomal-dominant chondrodysplasia caused by a gain-of-function mutation in fibroblast-growth-factor-receptor 3 (FGFR3). C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) antagonizes FGFR3 downstream signaling by inhibiting the pathway of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). Here, we report the pharmacological activity of a 39 amino acid CNP analog (BMN 111) with an extended plasma half-life due to its resistance to neutral-endopeptidase (NEP) digestion. In ACH human growth-plate chondrocytes, we demonstrated a decrease in the phosphorylation of extracellular-signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2, confirming that this CNP analog inhibits fibroblast-growth-factor-mediated MAPK activation. Concomitantly, we analyzed the phenotype of Fgfr3(Y367C/+) mice and showed the presence of ACH-related clinical features in this mouse model. We found that in Fgfr3(Y367C/+) mice, treatment with this CNP analog led to a significant recovery of bone growth. We observed an increase in the axial and appendicular skeleton lengths, and improvements in dwarfism-related clinical features included flattening of the skull, reduced crossbite, straightening of the tibias and femurs, and correction of the growth-plate defect. Thus, our results provide the proof of concept that BMN 111, a NEP-resistant CNP analog, might benefit individuals with ACH and hypochondroplasia. Copyright © 2012 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Evaluation of the Therapeutic Potential of a CNP Analog in a Fgfr3 Mouse Model Recapitulating Achondroplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorget, Florence; Kaci, Nabil; Peng, Jeff; Benoist-Lasselin, Catherine; Mugniery, Emilie; Oppeneer, Todd; Wendt, Dan J.; Bell, Sean M.; Bullens, Sherry; Bunting, Stuart; Tsuruda, Laurie S.; O'Neill, Charles A.; Di Rocco, Federico; Munnich, Arnold; Legeai-Mallet, Laurence

    2012-01-01

    Achondroplasia (ACH), the most common form of dwarfism, is an inherited autosomal-dominant chondrodysplasia caused by a gain-of-function mutation in fibroblast-growth-factor-receptor 3 (FGFR3). C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) antagonizes FGFR3 downstream signaling by inhibiting the pathway of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). Here, we report the pharmacological activity of a 39 amino acid CNP analog (BMN 111) with an extended plasma half-life due to its resistance to neutral-endopeptidase (NEP) digestion. In ACH human growth-plate chondrocytes, we demonstrated a decrease in the phosphorylation of extracellular-signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2, confirming that this CNP analog inhibits fibroblast-growth-factor-mediated MAPK activation. Concomitantly, we analyzed the phenotype of Fgfr3Y367C/+ mice and showed the presence of ACH-related clinical features in this mouse model. We found that in Fgfr3Y367C/+ mice, treatment with this CNP analog led to a significant recovery of bone growth. We observed an increase in the axial and appendicular skeleton lengths, and improvements in dwarfism-related clinical features included flattening of the skull, reduced crossbite, straightening of the tibias and femurs, and correction of the growth-plate defect. Thus, our results provide the proof of concept that BMN 111, a NEP-resistant CNP analog, might benefit individuals with ACH and hypochondroplasia. PMID:23200862

  11. Effect of the C:N:P ratio on the denitrifying dephosphatation in a sequencing batch biofilm reactor (SBBR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mielcarek, Artur; Rodziewicz, Joanna; Janczukowicz, Wojciech; Thornton, Arthur J; Jóźwiak, Tomasz; Szymczyk, Paula

    2015-12-01

    A series of investigations were conducted using sequencing batch biofilm reactor (SBBR) to explore the influence of C:N:P ratio on biological dephosphatation including the denitrifying dephosphatation and the denitrification process. Biomass in the reactor occurred mainly in the form of a biofilm attached to completely submerged disks. Acetic acid was used as the source of organic carbon. C:N:P ratios have had a significant effect on the profiles of phosphate release and phosphate uptake and nitrogen removal. The highest rates of phosphate release and phosphate uptake were recorded at the C:N:P ratio of 140:70:7. The C:N ratio of 2.5:1 ensured complete denitrification. The highest rate of denitrification was achieved at the C:N:P ratio of 140:35:7. The increase of nitrogen load caused an increase in phosphates removal until a ratio C:N:P of 140:140:7. Bacteria of the biofilm exposed to alternate conditions of mixing and aeration exhibited enhanced intracellular accumulation of polyphosphates. Also, the structure of the biofilm encouraged anaerobic-aerobic as well as anoxic-anaerobic and absolutely anaerobic conditions in a SBBR. These heterogeneous conditions in the presence of nitrates may be a significant factor determining the promotion of denitrifying polyphosphate accumulating organism (DNPAO) development. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. The Computational Physics Program of the national MFE Computer Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirin, A.A.

    1989-01-01

    Since June 1974, the MFE Computer Center has been engaged in a significant computational physics effort. The principal objective of the Computational Physics Group is to develop advanced numerical models for the investigation of plasma phenomena and the simulation of present and future magnetic confinement devices. Another major objective of the group is to develop efficient algorithms and programming techniques for current and future generations of supercomputers. The Computational Physics Group has been involved in several areas of fusion research. One main area is the application of Fokker-Planck/quasilinear codes to tokamaks. Another major area is the investigation of resistive magnetohydrodynamics in three dimensions, with applications to tokamaks and compact toroids. A third area is the investigation of kinetic instabilities using a 3-D particle code; this work is often coupled with the task of numerically generating equilibria which model experimental devices. Ways to apply statistical closure approximations to study tokamak-edge plasma turbulence have been under examination, with the hope of being able to explain anomalous transport. Also, we are collaborating in an international effort to evaluate fully three-dimensional linear stability of toroidal devices. In addition to these computational physics studies, the group has developed a number of linear systems solvers for general classes of physics problems and has been making a major effort at ascertaining how to efficiently utilize multiprocessor computers. A summary of these programs are included in this paper. 6 tabs.

  13. Combined nano-imprint and photolithography (CNP) of integrated polymer optics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Mads Brøkner; Schøler, Mikkel; Kristensen, Anders

    2007-01-01

    and substrate are separated, and the un-exposed resist is dissolved. Polymer waveguides are added to the system by an additional UV lithography step in a film of un-doped SU-8, which is spincoated on top of the lasers and substrate. When optically pumped at 532 nm, lasing is obtained in the wavelength range 559...... nm - 600 nm, determined by the grating period. Our results, where 20 laser devices are defined across a 10 cm diameter wafer substrate, demonstrate the feasibility of CNP for wafer-scale fabrication of advanced nano-structured active and passive polymer optical components....

  14. 78 FR 45231 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Initial Approval of Center for Improvement in Healthcare Quality...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Initial Approval of Center for Improvement in Healthcare Quality's (CIHQ's) Hospital Accreditation Program AGENCY... announces our decision to approve the Center for Improvement in Healthcare Quality (CIHQ) as a national...

  15. 78 FR 12325 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Application From the Center for Improvement in Healthcare Quality...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-22

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Application From the Center for Improvement in Healthcare Quality (CIHQ) for CMS-Approval of Its Hospital Accreditation Program AGENCY: Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, HHS. ACTION: Proposed notice. SUMMARY: This...

  16. 76 FR 27648 - World Trade Center (WTC) Health Program Scientific/Technical Advisory Committee; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-12

    ... establishment of the World Trade Center (WTC) Health Program Scientific/Technical Advisory Committee. The WTC... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention World Trade Center (WTC) Health Program Scientific/Technical Advisory Committee; Notice of Establishment Pursuant to Public Law 111-347 (The James...

  17. Global biodiversity, stoichiometry and ecosystem function responses to human-induced C-N-P imbalances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnicer, Jofre; Sardans, Jordi; Stefanescu, Constantí; Ubach, Andreu; Bartrons, Mireia; Asensio, Dolores; Peñuelas, Josep

    2015-01-01

    Global change analyses usually consider biodiversity as a global asset that needs to be preserved. Biodiversity is frequently analysed mainly as a response variable affected by diverse environmental drivers. However, recent studies highlight that gradients of biodiversity are associated with gradual changes in the distribution of key dominant functional groups characterized by distinctive traits and stoichiometry, which in turn often define the rates of ecosystem processes and nutrient cycling. Moreover, pervasive links have been reported between biodiversity, food web structure, ecosystem function and species stoichiometry. Here we review current global stoichiometric gradients and how future distributional shifts in key functional groups may in turn influence basic ecosystem functions (production, nutrient cycling, decomposition) and therefore could exert a feedback effect on stoichiometric gradients. The C-N-P stoichiometry of most primary producers (phytoplankton, algae, plants) has been linked to functional trait continua (i.e. to major axes of phenotypic variation observed in inter-specific analyses of multiple traits). In contrast, the C-N-P stoichiometry of higher-level consumers remains less precisely quantified in many taxonomic groups. We show that significant links are observed between trait continua across trophic levels. In spite of recent advances, the future reciprocal feedbacks between key functional groups, biodiversity and ecosystem functions remain largely uncertain. The reported evidence, however, highlights the key role of stoichiometric traits and suggests the need of a progressive shift towards an ecosystemic and stoichiometric perspective in global biodiversity analyses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  18. A Program of Research and Education in Astronautics at the NASA Langley Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolson, Robert H.

    2000-01-01

    The objectives of the Program were to conduct research at the NASA Langley Research Center in the area of astronautics and to provide a comprehensive education program at the Center leading to advanced degrees in Astronautics. We believe that the program has successfully met the objectives and has been of significant benefit to NASA LaRC, the GWU and the nation.

  19. Kennedy Space Center Coronary Heart Disease Risk Screening Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tipton, David A.; Scarpa, Philip J.

    1999-01-01

    interested in implementing a similar program at their NASA Center. Questions were asked pertaining to standardization for age, the validity of using the idealized male values also for the female population, and indications of the screening test's sensitivity and specificity.

  20. Center forTelehealth and Cybermedicine Research, University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center: a model of a telehealth program within an academic medical center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alverson, Dale C; Dion, Denise; Migliorati, Margaret; Rodriguez, Adrian; Byun, Hannah W; Effertz, Glen; Duffy, Veronica; Monge, Benjamin

    2013-05-01

    An overview of the Center for Telehealth and Cybermedicine Research at the University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center was presented along with several other national and international programs as part of the of a symposium-workshop on telehealth, "Sustaining and Realizing the Promise of Telemedicine," held at the University of Michigan Health System in Ann Arbor, MI, May 18-19, 2012 and hosted by the University of Michigan Telemedicine Resource Center and its Director, Rashid Bashshur. This article describes our Center, its business plan, and a view to the future.

  1. National Center for Advanced Information Components Manufacturing. Program summary report, Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-10-01

    The National Center for Advanced Information Components Manufacturing focused on manufacturing research and development for flat panel displays, advanced lithography, microelectronics, and optoelectronics. This report provides an overview of the program, summaries of the technical projects, and key program accomplishments.

  2. 77 FR 22321 - National Toxicology Program (NTP) Interagency Center for the Evaluation of Alternative...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Toxicology Program (NTP) Interagency Center for the Evaluation of Alternative... AGENCY: Division of the National Toxicology Program (DNTP), National Institute of Environmental Health... products, food additives, human and veterinary drugs, manufacturing intermediates, and pesticides. These 10...

  3. Biomass allocation and C-N-P stoichiometry in C3 and C4 crops under abiotic stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biomass allocation to structural, metabolic and reproductive organs as well as their carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus (C-N-P) profiles and ratios (C:N, C:P, and N:P) were estimated in C3 and C4 crop plants subjected to multiple abiotic stresses (i.e., combination of temperature and water stress level...

  4. Increasing aridity, temperature and soil pH induce soil C-N-P imbalance in grasslands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Feng; Shi, Xin-Rong; Han, Feng-Peng; Yuan, Zhi-You

    2016-01-01

    Due to the different degrees of controls exerted by biological and geochemical processes, climate changes are suggested to uncouple biogeochemical C, N and P cycles, influencing biomass accumulation, decomposition and storage in terrestrial ecosystems. However, the possible extent of such disruption in grassland ecosystems remains unclear, especially in China’s steppes which have undergone rapid climate changes with increasing drought and warming predicted moving forward in these dryland ecosystems. Here, we assess how soil C-N-P stoichiometry is affected by climatic change along a 3500-km temperate climate transect in Inner Mongolia, China. Our results reveal that the soil from more arid and warmer sites are associated with lower soil organic C, total N and P. The ratios of both soil C:P and N:P decrease, but soil C:N increases with increasing aridity and temperature, indicating the predicted decreases in precipitation and warming for most of the temperate grassland region could lead to a soil C-N-P decoupling that may reduce plant growth and production in arid ecosystems. Soil pH, mainly reflecting long-term climate change in our sites, also contributes to the changing soil C-N-P stoichiometry, indicating the collective influences of climate and soil type on the shape of soil C-N-P balance.

  5. Program Analysis and Design Requirements for tne National Science Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-02-01

    center. At Indianapolis, visitors are offered rental strollers for small children. Rental lockers were available at the Ontario center. Museum Store... issues and physics which are "invisibie" they are very difticult to engage from an on hand point of view. Therefore, they are not very successful, nor

  6. Transportation Education Demonstration Pilot Program UVM Transportation Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-30

    The Transportation Education Development Pilot Program (TEDPP) develops innovative workforce development programs to attract and retain skilled workers in the transportation sector of Vermont, New Hampshire and Maine and encourages statewide economic...

  7. Genome-wide association study identified CNP12587 region underlying height variation in Chinese females.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin-Ping Zhang

    Full Text Available Human height is a highly heritable trait considered as an important factor for health. There has been limited success in identifying the genetic factors underlying height variation. We aim to identify sequence variants associated with adult height by a genome-wide association study of copy number variants (CNVs in Chinese.Genome-wide CNV association analyses were conducted in 1,625 unrelated Chinese adults and sex specific subgroup for height variation, respectively. Height was measured with a stadiometer. Affymetrix SNP6.0 genotyping platform was used to identify copy number polymorphisms (CNPs. We constructed a genomic map containing 1,009 CNPs in Chinese individuals and performed a genome-wide association study of CNPs with height.We detected 10 significant association signals for height (p<0.05 in the whole population, 9 and 11 association signals for Chinese female and male population, respectively. A copy number polymorphism (CNP12587, chr18:54081842-54086942, p = 2.41 × 10(-4 was found to be significantly associated with height variation in Chinese females even after strict Bonferroni correction (p = 0.048. Confirmatory real time PCR experiments lent further support for CNV validation. Compared to female subjects with two copies of the CNP, carriers of three copies had an average of 8.1% decrease in height. An important candidate gene, ubiquitin-protein ligase NEDD4-like (NEDD4L, was detected at this region, which plays important roles in bone metabolism by binding to bone formation regulators.Our findings suggest the important genetic variants underlying height variation in Chinese.

  8. Physical Activity and Beverages in Home- and Center-Based Child Care Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tandon, Pooja S.; Garrison, Michelle M.; Christakis, Dimitri A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To describe and compare obesity prevention practices related to physical activity and beverages in home- and center-based child care programs. Methods: A telephone survey of licensed home- and center-based child care programs in Florida, Massachusetts, Michigan, and Washington between October and December 2008. Results: Most programs…

  9. Center Innovation Fund: JSC CIF (also includes JSC IRAD) Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — JSC provides and applies its preeminent capabilities in science and technology to develop, operate, and integrate human exploration missions.  The Center...

  10. The NASA radar entomology program at Wallops Flight Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughn, C. R.

    1979-01-01

    NASA contribution to radar entomology is presented. Wallops Flight Center is described in terms of its radar systems. Radar tracking of birds and insects was recorded from helicopters for airspeed and vertical speed.

  11. 77 FR 4820 - World Trade Center Health Program Scientific/Technical Advisory Committee (WTCHP STAC or Advisory...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-31

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention World Trade Center Health Program Scientific... scientific and medical evidence and to make recommendations to the World Trade Center (WTC) Program... within the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), the World Trade Center (WTC) Health Program, to...

  12. User-Centered Design of GPU-Based Shader Programs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kraus, Martin

    2012-01-01

    In the context of game engines with graphical user interfaces, shader programs for GPUs (graphics processing units) are an asset for game development that is often used by artists and game developers without knowledge of shader programming. Thus, it is important that non-programmers are enabled...

  13. National Center for Advanced Information Components Manufacturing. Program summary report, Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-10-01

    The National Center for Advanced Information Components Manufacturing focused on manufacturing research and development for flat panel displays, advanced lithography, microelectronics, and optoelectronics. This report provides an overview of the program, program history, summaries of the technical projects, and key program accomplishments.

  14. Training Future Leaders of Academic Medicine: Internal Programs at Three Academic Health Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morahan, Page S.; Kasperbauer, Dwight; McDade, Sharon A.; Aschenbrener, Carol A.; Triolo, Pamela K.; Monteleone, Patricia L.; Counte, Michael; Meyer, Michael J.

    1998-01-01

    Reviews need for internal leadership training programs at academic health centers and describes three programs. Elements common to the programs include small classes, participants from many areas of academic medicine and health care, building on prior experience and training, training conducted away from the institution, short sessions, faculty…

  15. 75 FR 35460 - Funding Opportunity; Basic Center Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-22

    ... support, guidance, and opportunities during adolescence, a time of rapid growth and change. With this... of government. (45 CFR 1351.1) Maternity Group Home (MGH)--The program provides long-term residential...

  16. Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma Program | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma Program Multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) types 2A and 2B are rare genetic diseases, which lead to the development of medullary thyroid cancer, usually in childhood. Surgery is the only standard treatment.

  17. The Ismail Center Hypertension Program: Application of Medical Nutrition Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Darbishire, Lily

    2016-01-01

    Lily Darbishire is a registered dietitian nutritionist and graduate student at Missouri State University completing a master’s degree in public health. During her senior year in the dietetics program at Purdue University, Darbishire was involved in a service-learning–based hypertension clinic focusing on medical nutrition therapy. This article outlines her experiences and what she learned as a result of completing the program.

  18. Summer Research Program - 1997 Summer Faculty Research Program Volume 6 Arnold Engineering Development Center United States Air Force Academy Air Logistics Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-12-01

    Fracture Analysis of the F-5, 15%-Spar Bolt DR Devendra Kumar SAALC/LD 6- 16 CUNY-City College, New York, NY A Simple, Multiversion Concurrency Control...Program, University of Dayton, Dayton, OH. [3]AFGROW, Air Force Crack Propagation Analysis Program, Version 3.82 (1997) 15-8 A SIMPLE, MULTIVERSION ...Office of Scientific Research Boiling Air Force Base, DC and San Antonio Air Logistic Center August 1997 16-1 A SIMPLE, MULTIVERSION CONCURRENCY

  19. Effect of Discontinuous Ultrasonic Treatment on Mechanical Properties and Microstructure of Cast Al413-SiCnp Nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.R. Dehnavi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Effects of discontinuous ultrasonic treatment on the microstructure, nanoparticle distribution, and mechanical properties of cast Al413-SiCnp nanocomposites were studied. The results showed that discontinuous ultrasonic treatment was more effective in improving the mechanical properties of the cast nanocomposites than the equally timed continuous treatment. The yield and ultimate tensile strengths of Al413-2%SiCnp nanocomposites discontinuously treated for two 20 minute periods increased by about 126% and 100% compared to those of the monolithic sample, respectively. These improvements were about 107% and 94% for the nanocomposites continuously treated for a single 40 minute period. The improvement in the mechanical properties was associated with severe refinement of the microstructure, removal of the remaining gas layers on the particles surfaces, more effective fragmentation of the remaining agglomerates as well as improved wettability and distribution of the reinforcing particles during the first stage of solidification.

  20. Cyclic di-AMP-mediated interaction between Mycobacterium tuberculosis ΔcnpB and macrophages implicates a novel strategy for improving BCG vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yang; Yang, Jun; Bai, Guangchun

    2018-01-31

    Cyclic di-AMP (c-di-AMP) has been shown to play an important role in bacterial physiology and pathogen-host interactions. We previously reported that deletion of the sole c-di-AMP phosphodiesterase-encoding gene (cnpB) in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) led to significant virulence attenuation. In this study, we found that ΔcnpB of M. bovis BCG (BCG) was unable to secrete c-di-AMP, which differs from Mtb ΔcnpB. We infected bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs) with c-di-AMP-associated mutants generated from both Mtb and BCG. Our results showed that upon infection with Mtb ΔcnpB, BMDMs of WT mice secreted a large amount of interferon-β (IFN-β) post-infection similarly as we reported previously. In contrast, the response was less pronounced with BMDMs isolated from cGAS-/- mice and was nearly abolished with BMDMs prepared from STING-/- mice. Deletion of the region of difference 1 (RD1) locus in Mtb ΔcnpB did not alter the c-di-AMP secretion of ΔcnpB but eliminated the IFN-β production in the infected cells. In contrast, neither BCG ΔcnpB nor a recombinant BCG ΔcnpB with a pRD1 cosmid induced a type I interferon response. Interestingly, multiple studies have demonstrated that type I IFN enhances BCG's immunity. Thus, amending BCG based on our findings might improve BCG vaccination. © FEMS 2018. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. A Description of the Hawthorn Center Early Intervention Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glovinsky, Ira; Keller, Jackie

    An early intervention project for preschool handicapped children is described. Specific program goals (including improved functioning in social, emotional, communication, and preacademic areas) are listed, and roles of the interdisciplinary staff members are considered. Among evaluation approaches discussed are psychological measures, family…

  2. 75 FR 10219 - Solicitation of Applications for the FY 2010 University Center Economic Development Program...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-05

    ... Competition in EDA's Austin and Denver Regional Offices AGENCY: Economic Development Administration (EDA... goal of enhancing regional economic development by promoting a favorable business environment to... Center Program Competition, Economic Development Administration, Austin Regional Office, 504 Lavaca...

  3. CNP-pGC-cGMP-PDE3-cAMP Signal Pathway Upregulated in Gastric Smooth Muscle of Diabetic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Lan Cai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Our previous studies have shown that CNP-NPR-B/pGC-cGMP is upregulated in the diabetic rats. The present study was designed to determine whether the upregulation of CNP-NPR-B/pGC-cGMP signal pathway affects cGMP-PDE3-cAMP signal pathway in diabetic gastric smooth muscle. The gastric smooth muscle motility was observed by using isometric measurement. PDEs expressions in diabetic gastric smooth muscle tissue were observed by using immunohistochemistry, Western blotting, and RT-PCR methods. The results demonstrated that the inhibitory effect of CNP on the spontaneous contraction of gastric antral circular smooth muscle was potentiated in STZ-induced diabetic rat. CNP-induced increase of cGMP and cAMP was much higher in diabetic gastric smooth muscle tissue than in controls. The expression of PDE3 is downregulated while the levels of gene expression of PDE1, PDE2, PDE4, and PDE5 were not altered in the diabetic gastric smooth muscle tissue. The results suggest that the sensitivity of gastric smooth muscle to CNP is potentiated via activation of CNP-pGC-cGMP-PDE3-cAMP signal pathway in STZ-induced diabetic rats, which may be associated with diabetes-induced gastric motility disorder.

  4. Energy Efficient Industrialized Housing Research Program, Center for Housing Innovation, University of Oregon and the Florida Solar Energy Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, G.Z.

    1990-01-01

    This research program addresses the need to increase the energy efficiency of industrialized housing. Two research centers have responsibility for the program: the Center for Housing Innovation at the University of Oregon and the Florida Solar Energy Center, a research institute of the University of Central Florida. The two organizations provide complementary architectural, systems engineering, and industrial engineering capabilities. In 1989 we worked on these tasks: (1) the formation of a steering committee, (2) the development of a multiyear research plan, (3) analysis of the US industrialized housing industry, (4) assessment of foreign technology, (5) assessment of industrial applications, (6) analysis of computerized design and evaluation tools, and (7) assessment of energy performance of baseline and advanced industrialized housing concepts. The current research program, under the guidance of a steering committee composed of industry and government representatives, focuses on three interdependent concerns -- (1) energy, (2) industrial process, and (3) housing design. Building homes in a factory offers the opportunity to increase energy efficiency through the use of new materials and processes, and to increase the value of these homes by improving the quality of their construction. Housing design strives to ensure that these technically advanced homes are marketable and will meet the needs of the people who will live in them.

  5. A VA medical center's PTSD residential recovery program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devaney, Donald E

    2010-01-01

    With the influx of military veterans with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) increasingly affecting all healthcare facilities, including acute care and long term, learning from the experience of VA hospitals in treating those with PTSD may prove valuable. In this article, Tripler/VA Provost Marshal Donald E. Delaney describes a program that has been in operation since 1994. He may be contacted for further in formation at (808) 433-4465 or Donald.devaney@amedd.army .mil

  6. 34 CFR 366.1 - What is the Centers for Independent Living (CIL) program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What is the Centers for Independent Living (CIL) program? 366.1 Section 366.1 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education... independent living (centers) that comply with the standards and assurances in section 725(b) and (c) of the...

  7. Summaries of Center for Fire Research grants and in-house programs, 1985

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, S. M.

    1985-11-01

    This conference report was prepared for distribution at the First International Symposium on Fire Safety Science, October 7 to 11, 1985 in Gaithersburg, Md. It contains extended abstracts of grants for fire research sponsored by the Center for Fire Research, National Bureau of Standards, as well as descriptions of the internal programs of the Center for Fire Research.

  8. Creating a Child Care Center in a Nursing Home and Implementing an Intergenerational Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Karen B.

    The success of the Champaign County Nursing Home Child Care Center (CCNHCCC) in Illinois provides a model for the establishment of child care centers in nursing homes. Needs assessment, financial support, licensing, staff hiring and training are all important factors that need to addressed in the start up and running of such a program. The…

  9. Addressing data center efficiency. Lessons learned from process evaluations of utility energy efficiency programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howard, A.J.; Holmes, J. [Energy Market Innovations, Inc, 83 Columbia St., Suite 303, Seattle, WA 98104 (United States)

    2012-01-15

    This paper summarizes the unique challenges related to addressing energy efficiency in the data center industry and lessons learned from original research and two process evaluations of energy efficiency programs with components that specifically target data centers. The lessons learned include: creating program opportunities specifically focused on data centers; clearly identifying target data centers able to implement energy efficiency programs; understanding decision making in these facilities; and effectively communicating the program opportunities to the target market. The growing energy use of data centers has drawn international attention from policy makers, regulators, industry consortiums, and electric utilities. Any program effective at improving the energy performance of data centers must include specific strategies and processes aimed at confronting a number of challenges specific to this industry, including: the concentrated and rapidly growing energy use of these facilities; the rapid pace of innovation; the extremely high reliability requirements; and the significant split incentives due to the typical data center management structure. The process evaluations covered in this paper are the Pacific Gas and Electric (PG and E) High-Tech program and the Silicon Valley Power (SVP) Public Benefits Program. While the PG and E evaluation was a more complete process evaluation, the SVP evaluation focused specifically on participation from co-location facilities. These process evaluations together included interviews with program participants, nonparticipants and utility staff and also included outreach to a large variety of industry stakeholders. In addition, the PG and E evaluation included detailed process-mapping used to identify the necessity and importance of all program processes. The insights gathered from these evaluations are not only applicable to US electrical utilities but can also be applied to any international organization looking to create

  10. An academic medical center model for community colorectal cancer screening: the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention demonstration program experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Dorothy S; Cavanagh, Mary F; Messina, Catherine R; Anderson, Joseph C

    2010-08-01

    During 2005-2009, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention funded five colorectal cancer (CRC) screening demonstration projects around the United States; only one was based in an academic medical center (AMC) rather than a health department. The Suffolk County Preventive Endoscopy Project (Project SCOPE) was a collaborative effort between Stony Brook University Medical Center (SBUMC) and the Suffolk County Department of Health Services. Project SCOPE's objective was to increase CRC screening among Suffolk County residents at least 50 years old who had inadequate or no insurance coverage for CRC screening. The demonstration application drew on the screening, diagnostic, and treatment resources of the AMC and the indigent populations using its outpatient clinics. Patients at 10 county health centers were a primary target for (previously inaccessible) colonoscopy screening. The project's organizational center was SBUMC's preventive medicine department, which was linked to SBUMC's large gastroenterology practice. The specific staffing, financial, and training issues faced by this project provide insights for others who are similarly interested in community engagement. During 40 months of screening, 800 indigent, culturally diverse patients were recruited, and they underwent colonoscopy. Challenges encountered included unreachable referred patients (425 patients; 28% of referrals) and medical ineligibility (e.g., symptomatic comorbid conditions). Pending legislation providing federal funding for a national program offers other AMCs the opportunity to adopt a model such as that proven feasible during Project SCOPE. The lessons learned may have broader application for fostering collaborative AMC partnerships and for enhancing recruitment and retention of participants through outreach.

  11. Academic affiliated training centers in humanitarian health, Part I: program characteristics and professionalization preferences of centers in North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkle, Frederick M; Walls, Alexa E; Heck, Joan P; Sorensen, Brian S; Cranmer, Hilarie H; Johnson, Kirsten; Levine, Adam C; Kayden, Stephanie; Cahill, Brendan; VanRooyen, Michael J

    2013-04-01

    The collaborative London based non-governmental organization network ELRHA (Enhancing Learning and Research for Humanitarian Assistance) supports partnerships between higher education institutions and humanitarian organizations worldwide with the objective to enhance the professionalization of the humanitarian sector. While coordination and control of the humanitarian sector has plagued the response to every major crisis, concerns highlighted by the 2010 Haitian earthquake response further catalyzed and accelerated the need to ensure competency-based professionalization of the humanitarian health care work force. The Harvard Humanitarian Initiative sponsored an independent survey of established academically affiliated training centers in North America that train humanitarian health care workers to determine their individual training center characteristics and preferences in the potential professionalization process. The survey revealed that a common thread of profession-specific skills and core humanitarian competencies were being offered in both residential and online programs with additional programs offering opportunities for field simulation experiences and more advanced degree programs. This study supports the potential for the development of like-minded academic affiliated and competency-based humanitarian health programs to organize themselves under ELRHA's regional "consultation hubs" worldwide that can assist and advocate for improved education and training opportunities in less served developing countries.

  12. 34 CFR 415.1 - What is the Demonstration Centers for the Training of Dislocated Workers Program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Dislocated Workers Program? 415.1 Section 415.1 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of... CENTERS FOR THE TRAINING OF DISLOCATED WORKERS PROGRAM General § 415.1 What is the Demonstration Centers for the Training of Dislocated Workers Program? The Demonstration Centers for the Training of...

  13. 76 FR 81947 - World Trade Center Health Program Scientific/Technical Advisory Committee (WTCHP STAC or Advisory...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-29

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention World Trade Center Health Program Scientific.... Purpose: The purpose of the Advisory Committee is to review scientific and medical evidence and to make recommendations to the World Trade Center (WTC) Program Administrator regarding additional WTC Health Program...

  14. A Community-Centered Astronomy Research Program (Abstract)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyce, P.; Boyce, G.

    2017-12-01

    (Abstract only) The Boyce Research Initiatives and Education Foundation (BRIEF) is providing semester-long, hands-on, astronomy research experiences for students of all ages that results in their publishing peer-reviewed papers. The course in astronomy and double star research has evolved from a face-to-face learning experience with two instructors to an online hybrid course that simultaneously supports classroom instruction at a variety of schools in the San Diego area. Currently, there are over 65 students enrolled in three community colleges, seven high schools, and one university as well as individual adult learners. Instructional experience, courseware, and supporting systems were developed and refined through experience gained in classroom settings from 2014 through 2016. Topics of instruction include Keplerís Laws, basic astrometry, properties of light, CCD imaging, use of filters for varying stellar spectral types, and how to perform research, scientific writing, and proposal preparation. Volunteer instructors were trained by taking the course and producing their own research papers. An expanded program was launched in the fall semester of 2016. Twelve papers from seven schools were produced; eight have been accepted for publication by the Journal of Double Star Observations (JDSO) and the remainder are in peer review. Three additional papers have been accepted by the JDSO and two more are in process papers. Three college professors and five advanced amateur astronomers are now qualified volunteer instructors. Supporting tools are provided by a BRIEF server and other online services. The server-based tools range from Microsoft Office and planetarium software to top-notch imaging programs and computational software for data reduction for each student team. Observations are performed by robotic telescopes worldwide supported by BRIEF. With this success, student demand has increased significantly. Many of the graduates of the first semester course wanted to

  15. The Larry Jarret House Program at the Helen Beebe Speech and Hearing Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Donald M.; Talbot, Pamela J.

    1993-01-01

    The Larry Jarret House is a one-week in-residence program of the Helen Beebe Speech and Hearing Center in Easton, Pennsylvania, for parents of children with hearing impairments. The program is designed to help parents maximize their child's use of residual hearing in daily life situations to develop spoken language. (JDD)

  16. NASA Lewis Research Center low-gravity fluid management technology program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydelott, J. C.; Carney, M. J.; Hochstein, J. I.

    1985-01-01

    A history of the Lewis Research Center in space fluid management technology program is presented. Current programs which include numerical modeling of fluid systems, heat exchanger/radiator concept studies, and the design of the Cryogenic Fluid Management Facility are discussed. Recent analytical and experimental activities performed to support the Shuttle/Centaur development activity are highlighted.

  17. Description and Evaluation of 1972 Summer Training Program for Paraprofessionals in Occupational Resource Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leland, Arthur L.; And Others

    A three-week intensive training program is described for preparing paraprofessionals to organize, develop, and establish Occupational Resource Centers (ORC) in elementary and secondary schools and related community agencies. The training program is based on a specific task analysis of the position of developing and operating an ORC. A behavior…

  18. The computational physics program of the National MFE Computer Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirin, A.A.

    1988-01-01

    The principal objective of the Computational Physics Group is to develop advanced numerical models for the investigation of plasma phenomena and the simulation of present and future magnetic confinement devices. Another major objective of the group is to develop efficient algorithms and programming techniques for current and future generation of supercomputers. The computational physics group is involved in several areas of fusion research. One main area is the application of Fokker-Planck/quasilinear codes to tokamaks. Another major area is the investigation of resistive magnetohydrodynamics in three dimensions, with applications to compact toroids. Another major area is the investigation of kinetic instabilities using a 3-D particle code. This work is often coupled with the task of numerically generating equilibria which model experimental devices. Ways to apply statistical closure approximations to study tokamak-edge plasma turbulence are being examined. In addition to these computational physics studies, the group has developed a number of linear systems solvers for general classes of physics problems and has been making a major effort at ascertaining how to efficiently utilize multiprocessor computers.

  19. Evolution of the Systems Engineering Education Development (SEED) Program at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagg, Thomas C., III; Brumfield, Mark D.; Jamison, Donald E.; Granata, Raymond L.; Casey, Carolyn A.; Heller, Stuart

    2003-01-01

    The Systems Engineering Education Development (SEED) Program at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center develops systems engineers from existing discipline engineers. The program has evolved significantly since the report to INCOSE in 2003. This paper describes the SEED Program as it is now, outlines the changes over the last year, discusses current status and results, and shows the value of human systems and leadership skills for practicing systems engineers.

  20. Processes and Procedures of the Higher Education Programs at Marshall Space Flight Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heard, Pamala D.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of my research was to investigate the policies, processes, procedures and timelines for the higher education programs at Marshall Space Flight Center. The three higher education programs that comprised this research included: the Graduate Student Researchers Program (GSRP), the National Research Council/Resident Research Associateships Program (NRC/RRA) and the Summer Faculty Fellowship Program (SFFP). The GSRP award fellowships each year to promising U.S. graduate students whose research interest coincides with NASA's mission. Fellowships are awarded for one year and are renewable for up to three years to competitively selected students. Each year, the award provides students the opportunity to spend a period in residence at a NASA center using that installation's unique facilities. This program is renewable for three years, students must reapply. The National Research Council conducts the Resident Research Associateships Program (NRC/RRA), a national competition to identify outstanding recent postdoctoral scientists and engineers and experience senior scientists and engineers, for tenure as guest researchers at NASA centers. The Resident Research Associateship Program provides an opportunity for recipients of doctoral degrees to concentrate their research in association with NASA personnel, often as a culmination to formal career preparation. The program also affords established scientists and engineers an opportunity for research without any interruptions and distracting assignments generated from permanent career positions. All opportunities for research at NASA Centers are open to citizens of the U.S. and to legal permanent residents. The Summer Faculty Fellowship Program (SFFP) is conducted each summer. NASA awards research fellowships to university faculty through the NASA/American Society for Engineering Education. The program is designed to promote an exchange of ideas between university faculties, NASA scientists and engineers. Selected

  1. Innovative Partnerships Program Accomplishments: 2009-2010 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makufka, David

    2010-01-01

    This document reports on the accomplishments of the Innovative Partnerships Program during the two years of 2009 and 2010. The mission of the Innovative Partnerships Program is to provide leveraged technology alternatives for mission directorates, programs, and projects through joint partnerships with industry, academia, government agencies, and national laboratories. As outlined in this accomplishments summary, the IPP at NASA's Kennedy Space Center achieves this mission via two interdependent goals: (1) Infusion: Bringing external technologies and expertise into Kennedy to benefit NASA missions, programs, and projects (2) Technology Transfer: Spinning out space program technologies to increase the benefits for the nation's economy and humanity

  2. The Tripler Army Medical Center LEAN Program: a healthy lifestyle model for the treatment of obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, L C; Folen, R A; Garland, F N; Edwards, C; Noce, M; Gohdes, D; Williams, D; Bowles, S; Kellar, M A; Supplee, E

    1997-05-01

    This paper provides an overview of the Tripler Army Medical Center LEAN Program for the treatment of obesity, hypercholesterolemia, and essential hypertension. The LEAN Program, a multi-disciplinary prevention program, emphasizes healthy Lifestyles, Exercise and Emotions, Attitudes, and Nutrition for active duty service members. The treatment model offers a medically healthy, emotionally safe, and reasonable, low-intensity exercise program to facilitate weight loss. We will discuss the philosophy behind the LEAN Program and the major components. Thereafter, we will briefly discuss the preliminary results.

  3. Effects of proprioceptive training program on core stability and center of gravity control in sprinters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Franco, Natalia; Martínez-López, Emilio; Lomas-Vega, Rafael; Hita-Contreras, Fidel; Martínez-Amat, Antonio

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determinate the effect of a 6-week specific-sprinter proprioceptive training program on core stability and gravity center control in sprinters. Thirty-three athletes (age = 21.82 ± 4.84 years, height = 1.76 ± 0.07 m, weight = 67.82 ± 08.04 kg, body mass index = 21.89 ± 2.37 kg · m(-2)) from sprint disciplines were divided into a control (n = 17) and experimental (n = 16) groups. A 30-minute proprioceptive training program was included in the experimental group training sessions, and it was performed for 6 weeks, 3 times each week. This program included 5 exercises with the BOSU and Swiss ball as unstable training tools that were designed to reproduce different moments of the technique of a sprint race. Stability with eyes open (EO) and eyes closed, postural stability, and gravity center control were assessed before and after the training program. Analyses of covariance (α = 0.05) revealed significant differences in stability in the medial-lateral plane with EO, gravity center control in the right direction and gravity center control in the back direction after the exercise intervention in the experimental athletes. Nevertheless, no other significant differences were demonstrated. A sprinter-specific proprioceptive training program provided postural stability with EO and gravity center control measures improvements, although it is not clear if the effect of training would transfer to the general population.

  4. Northwest Hazardous Waste Research, Development, and Demonstration Center: Program Plan. [Contains glossary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-02-01

    The Northwest Hazardous Waste Research, Development, and Demonstration Center was created as part of an ongoing federal effort to provide technologies and methods that protect human health and welfare and environment from hazardous wastes. The Center was established by the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) to develop and adapt innovative technologies and methods for assessing the impacts of and remediating inactive hazardous and radioactive mixed-waste sites. The Superfund legislation authorized $10 million for Pacific Northwest Laboratory to establish and operate the Center over a 5-year period. Under this legislation, Congress authorized $10 million each to support research, development, and demonstration (RD and D) on hazardous and radioactive mixed-waste problems in Idaho, Montana, Oregon, and Washington, including the Hanford Site. In 1987, the Center initiated its RD and D activities and prepared this Program Plan that presents the framework within which the Center will carry out its mission. Section 1.0 describes the Center, its mission, objectives, organization, and relationship to other programs. Section 2.0 describes the Center's RD and D strategy and contains the RD and D objectives, priorities, and process to be used to select specific projects. Section 3.0 contains the Center's FY 1988 operating plan and describes the specific RD and D projects to be carried out and their budgets and schedules. 9 refs., 18 figs., 5 tabs.

  5. The Ruby Red Slipper Program: an interdisciplinary fall management program in a community academic medical center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wexler, Sharon Stahl; D'Amico, Catherine O'Neill; Foster, Norma; Cataldo, Karen A; Brody, Patricia; Huang, Zheng-Bo

    2011-01-01

    Falls are a common, yet serious complication for hospitalized patients. The Ruby Red Slipper Program is an interdisciplinary fall management program that includes development and education of unit-based fall management teams. Initial outcomes demonstrated significant reductions in falls.

  6. Combating Obesity at Community Health Centers (COACH): a quality improvement collaborative for weight management programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkes, Abigail E; John, Priya M; Vable, Anusha M; Campbell, Amanda; Heuer, Loretta; Schaefer, Cynthia; Vinci, Lisa; Drum, Melinda L; Chin, Marshall H; Quinn, Michael T; Burnet, Deborah L

    2013-01-01

    Community health centers (CHCs) seek effective strategies to address obesity. MidWest Clinicians' Network partnered with [an academic medical center] to test feasibility of a weight management quality improvement (QI) collaborative. MidWest Clinicians' Network members expressed interest in an obesity QI program. This pilot study aimed to determine whether the QI model can be feasibly implemented with limited resources at CHCs to improve weight management programs. Five health centers with weight management programs enrolled with CHC staff as primary study participants; this study did not attempt to measure patient outcomes. Participants attended learning sessions and monthly conference calls to build QI skills and share best practices. Tailored coaching addressed local needs. Topics rated most valuable were patient recruitment/retention strategies, QI techniques, evidence-based weight management, motivational interviewing. Challenges included garnering provider support, high staff turnover, and difficulty tracking patient-level data. This paper reports practical lessons about implementing a weight management QI collaborative in CHCs.

  7. A human-centered framework for innovation in conservation incentive programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorice, Michael G; Donlan, C Josh

    2015-12-01

    The promise of environmental conservation incentive programs that provide direct payments in exchange for conservation outcomes is that they enhance the value of engaging in stewardship behaviors. An insidious but important concern is that a narrow focus on optimizing payment levels can ultimately suppress program participation and subvert participants' internal motivation to engage in long-term conservation behaviors. Increasing participation and engendering stewardship can be achieved by recognizing that participation is not simply a function of the payment; it is a function of the overall structure and administration of the program. Key to creating innovative and more sustainable programs is fitting them within the existing needs and values of target participants. By focusing on empathy for participants, co-designing program approaches, and learning from the rapid prototyping of program concepts, a human-centered approach to conservation incentive program design enhances the propensity for discovery of novel and innovative solutions to pressing conservation issues.

  8. 77 FR 14017 - World Trade Center Health Program Scientific/Technical Advisory Committee (WTCHP STAC or Advisory...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-08

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention World Trade Center Health Program Scientific... at 42 U.S.C. 300mm-300mm-61. Purpose: The purpose of the Advisory Committee is to review scientific and medical evidence and to make recommendations to the World Trade Center (WTC) Program Administrator...

  9. Genetic and Biochemical Characterization of 2-Chloro-5-Nitrophenol Degradation in a Newly Isolated Bacterium,Cupriavidussp. Strain CNP-8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Jun; Chen, Weiwei; Wang, Jinpei; Hu, Xiaoke

    2017-01-01

    Compound 2-chloro-5-nitrophenol (2C5NP) is a typical chlorinated nitroaromatic pollutant. To date, the bacteria with the ability to degrade 2C5NP are rare, and the molecular mechanism of 2C5NP degradation remains unknown. In this study, Cupriavidus sp. strain CNP-8 utilizing 2-chloro-5-nitrophenol (2C5NP) and meta -nitrophenol (MNP) via partial reductive pathways was isolated from pesticide-contaminated soil. Biodegradation kinetic analysis indicated that 2C5NP degradation by this strain was concentration dependent, with a maximum specific degradation rate of 21.2 ± 2.3 μM h -1 . Transcriptional analysis showed that the mnp genes are up-regulated in both 2C5NP- and MNP-induced strain CNP-8. Two Mnp proteins were purified to homogeneity by Ni-NTA affinity chromatography. In addition to catalyzing the reduction of MNP, MnpA, a NADPH-dependent nitroreductase, also catalyzes the partial reduction of 2C5NP to 2-chloro-5-hydroxylaminophenol via 2-chloro-5-nitrosophenol, which was firstly identified as an intermediate of 2C5NP catabolism. MnpC, an aminohydroquinone dioxygenase, is likely responsible for the ring-cleavage reaction of 2C5NP degradation. Gene knockout and complementation indicated that mnpA is necessary for both 2C5NP and MNP catabolism. To our knowledge, strain CNP-8 is the second 2C5NP-utilizing bacterium, and this is the first report of the molecular mechanism of microbial 2C5NP degradation.

  10. Temporal changes in soil C-N-P stoichiometry over the past 60 years across subtropical China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zaipeng; Wang, Minhuang; Huang, Zhiqun; Lin, Teng-Chiu; Vadeboncoeur, Matthew A; Searle, Eric B; Chen, Han Y H

    2018-03-01

    Controlled experiments have shown that global changes decouple the biogeochemical cycles of carbon (C), nitrogen (N), and phosphorus (P), resulting in shifting stoichiometry that lies at the core of ecosystem functioning. However, the response of soil stoichiometry to global changes in natural ecosystems with different soil depths, vegetation types, and climate gradients remains poorly understood. Based on 2,736 observations along soil profiles of 0-150 cm depth from 1955 to 2016, we evaluated the temporal changes in soil C-N-P stoichiometry across subtropical China, where soils are P-impoverished, with diverse vegetation, soil, and parent material types and a wide range of climate gradients. We found a significant overall increase in soil total C concentration and a decrease in soil total P concentration, resulting in increasing soil C:P and N:P ratios during the past 60 years across all soil depths. Although average soil N concentration did not change, soil C:N increased in topsoil while decreasing in deeper soil. The temporal trends in soil C-N-P stoichiometry differed among vegetation, soil, parent material types, and spatial climate variations, with significantly increased C:P and N:P ratios for evergreen broadleaf forest and highly weathered Ultisols, and more pronounced temporal changes in soil C:N, N:P, and C:P ratios at low elevations. Our sensitivity analysis suggests that the temporal changes in soil stoichiometry resulted from elevated N deposition, rising atmospheric CO 2 concentration and regional warming. Our findings revealed that the responses of soil C-N-P and stoichiometry to long-term global changes have occurred across the whole soil depth in subtropical China and the magnitudes of the changes in soil stoichiometry are dependent on vegetation types, soil types, and spatial climate variations. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Genetic and Biochemical Characterization of 2-Chloro-5-Nitrophenol Degradation in a Newly Isolated Bacterium, Cupriavidus sp. Strain CNP-8

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Min

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Compound 2-chloro-5-nitrophenol (2C5NP is a typical chlorinated nitroaromatic pollutant. To date, the bacteria with the ability to degrade 2C5NP are rare, and the molecular mechanism of 2C5NP degradation remains unknown. In this study, Cupriavidus sp. strain CNP-8 utilizing 2-chloro-5-nitrophenol (2C5NP and meta-nitrophenol (MNP via partial reductive pathways was isolated from pesticide-contaminated soil. Biodegradation kinetic analysis indicated that 2C5NP degradation by this strain was concentration dependent, with a maximum specific degradation rate of 21.2 ± 2.3 μM h−1. Transcriptional analysis showed that the mnp genes are up-regulated in both 2C5NP- and MNP-induced strain CNP-8. Two Mnp proteins were purified to homogeneity by Ni-NTA affinity chromatography. In addition to catalyzing the reduction of MNP, MnpA, a NADPH-dependent nitroreductase, also catalyzes the partial reduction of 2C5NP to 2-chloro-5-hydroxylaminophenol via 2-chloro-5-nitrosophenol, which was firstly identified as an intermediate of 2C5NP catabolism. MnpC, an aminohydroquinone dioxygenase, is likely responsible for the ring-cleavage reaction of 2C5NP degradation. Gene knockout and complementation indicated that mnpA is necessary for both 2C5NP and MNP catabolism. To our knowledge, strain CNP-8 is the second 2C5NP-utilizing bacterium, and this is the first report of the molecular mechanism of microbial 2C5NP degradation.

  12. Introduction to the special section from recent Association of Psychologists in Academic Health Centers (APAHC) programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klepac, Robert K; Dixon, Kim E

    2010-12-01

    The Association of Psychologists in Academic Health Centers (APAHC) offers programming at the annual American Psychological Association (APA) conventions as well as periodic APAHC conferences. Participants from academic health centers across the country convened in St. Louis, Missouri, October 15-17, 2009, for the 4th National Conference of the Association of Psychologists in Academic Health Centers (APAHC). The title of the conference was ''Psychologists in Academic Health Centers: Facing Tomorrow's Challenges to AHC Programs and Careers.'' Efforts were made to include topics relevant to academic health center (AHC) practice including the unique challenges of working in AHCs and issues pertinent to the different stages of AHC careers. To facilitate networking, opportunities for discussion among conferees and presenters with shared interests and concerns were provided throughout the conference. This paper introduces the special section of JCPMS dedicated to the conference and provides a brief overview of its development and organization. Articles selected for inclusion represent a sampling of the four conference themes: (1) challenges to AHC programs, (2) staying current in critical clinical areas, (3) professional issues and challenges, and (4) challenges to developing careers. Post-conference evaluation data are presented as evidence of the need for further conferences with similar foci. The programming offered by APAHC at the APA convention in San Diego in 2010 built on the themes offered at the 2009 APAHC conference.

  13. Characteristics of postgraduate year 1 pharmacy residency programs at academic medical centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Holly; Jasiak, Karalea D; Lindberg, Lance S; Ryzner, Kristi L

    2011-08-01

    The training components and other characteristics of postgraduate year 1 (PGY1) pharmacy residency programs at a sample of academic medical centers were evaluated. A questionnaire was sent via e-mail to the directors of 98 PGY1 residency programs at academic medical centers in the University HealthSystem Consortium (UHC) to elicit benchmarking data on issues such as recruitment, learning experiences, resident staffing requirements, resident research projects and professional presentations, opportunities for resident participation in teaching activities, and requirements for faculty service as preceptors; 72 program directors responded to the survey. The residency programs represented in the survey reported an average of approximately 14 applicants for each available position in 2010 and an average of about five candidate interviews per available position. The survey results indicated wide variation in the learning experiences offered by PGY1 programs (the most commonly reported rotations were in administration, critical care, internal medicine, ambulatory care, and drug information), with a high degree of individualization of elective rotations. Almost all programs had a mandatory staffing component, typically requiring 4-10 hours of service weekly. Results of this survey indicate that there is a large amount of variation in the components of PGY1 pharmacy residency programs among UHC academic medical centers. The majority of respondents reported no change in the number of residency positions offered within the past two years, but they reported an increase in the number of applications from 2009 to 2010.

  14. The Loyalty of older people in fitness centers: Managing customers for physical activity programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerónimo García Fernández

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The fitness centers are now places where partners perform «controlled» physical activity, which improves their physical and mental state, and where they socialize with other partners of all ages. These centers have been typically managed by people without training in this subject and with the only interest of obtaining partners without taking into account the long-term impact. This problem, together with management problems of the center and personal problems of the members, have meant that there are high desertion rates in this type of indoor facilities, with the consequent increase in expenditure on marketing and a non-sustainable profitability. We propose a program of physical activity that could improve the rate of loyalty, being the central point of management of sports centers today, the satisfaction and loyalty to the fitness centers.

  15. National Center for Analysis of Energy Systems: program summaries for 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-12-01

    This Center, founded in January 1976, is one of four areas comprising the Department of Energy and Environment at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The major ongoing activities of the Center concern integrated, quantitative analyses of technological, economic, and environmental aspects of energy at the regional, national, and international levels. The objectives, activities, and sources of support of each of the programs are described and the major accomplishments during the year are outlined. Some of the planned future activities of the Center are indicated, and recent publications are listed.

  16. The Benefits of Physician Training Programs for Rural Communities: Lessons Learned from the Teaching Health Center Graduate Medical Education Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Marshala; Newton, Helen; Smith, Tracey; Crawford, Malena; Kepley, Hayden; Regenstein, Marsha; Chen, Candice

    2016-01-01

    Rural communities disproportionately face preventable chronic diseases and death from treatable conditions. Health workforce shortages contribute to limited health care access and health disparities. Efforts to address workforce shortages have included establishing graduate medical education programs with the goal of recruiting and retaining physicians in the communities in which they train. However, rural communities face a number of challenges in developing and maintaining successful residency programs, including concerns over financial sustainability and the integration of resident trainees into existing clinical practices. Despite these challenges, rural communities are increasingly interested in investing in residency programs; those that are successful see additional benefits in workforce recruitment, access, and quality of care that have immediate and direct impact on the health of rural communities. This commentary examines the challenges and benefits of rural residency programs, drawing from lessons learned from the Health Resources and Services Administration's Teaching Health Center Graduate Medical Education program.

  17. Patient-Centered Cancer Care Programs in Italy: Benchmarking Global Patient Education Initiatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truccolo, Ivana; Cipolat Mis, Chiara; Cervo, Silvia; Dal Maso, Luigino; Bongiovanni, Marilena; Bearz, Alessandra; Sartor, Ivana; Baldo, Paolo; Ferrarin, Emanuela; Fratino, Lucia; Mascarin, Maurizio; Roncadin, Mario; Annunziata, Maria Antonietta; Muzzatti, Barbara; De Paoli, Paolo

    2016-06-01

    In Italy, educational programs for cancer patients are currently provided by the national government, scientific societies, and patient advocate organizations. Several gaps limit their effectiveness, including the lack of coordinated efforts, poor involvement of patient feedback in the planning of programs, as well as a lack of resources on innovative cancer-related topics. This process is parallel to a strong shift in the attitude of patients towards health in general and taking charge of their own health conditions in particular. The National Cancer Institute in the USA and the Organization of European Cancer Institutes encourage comprehensive cancer centers in providing educational programs conceived to overcome these gaps. The goal of this paper is to identify and describe the key elements necessary to develop a global patient education program and provide recommendations for strategies with practical examples for implementation in the daily activities of cancer institutes. A multidisciplinary committee was established for patient education, including patient representatives as equal partners, to define, implement, verify, and evaluate the fundamental steps for establishing a comprehensive education program. Six essential topics were identified for the program: appropriate communication of cancer epidemiology, clinical trial information, new therapeutic technologies, support in the use of medicines, psycho-oncological interventions, age-personalized approaches, and training programs for healthcare providers. Integration of these topics along with patient feedback is the key to a successful model for educational programs. An integrated educational program can transform a comprehensive cancer center to an institution that provides research and care for and with patients.

  18. 76 FR 64088 - World Trade Center Health Program Scientific/Technical Advisory Committee (WTCHP STAC or Advisory...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention World Trade Center Health Program Scientific... Committee is to review scientific and medical evidence and to make recommendations to the World Trade Center... Act established within the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), the World Trade Center (WTC...

  19. Kennedy Space Center: Constellation Program Electrical Ground Support Equipment Research and Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, Keegan

    2010-01-01

    The Kennedy Space Center (KSC) is NASA's spaceport, launching rockets into space and leading important human spaceflight research. This spring semester, I worked at KSC on Constellation Program electrical ground support equipment through NASA's Undergraduate Student Research Program (USRP). This report includes a discussion of NASA, KSC, and my individual research project. An analysis of Penn State's preparation of me for an internship and my overall impressions of the Penn State and NASA internship experience conclude the report.

  20. An Electronic Commerce Program for the Defence Finance and Accounting Service-Columbus Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-05-01

    AD-A237 636 JU0 0 u5 11111 IN III III1 m11i AN ELECTRONIC COMMERCE PROGRAM FOR THE DEFENSE FINANCE AND ACCOUNTING SERVICE - COLUMBUS CENTER Report...MANAGEMENT INSTITUTE 6400 Goldsboro Road Bethesda, Maryland 20817-5886 91-04373 LMI Executive Summary AN ELECTRONIC COMMERCE PROGRAM FOR THE DEFENSE...some Electronic Commerce techniques, such as electronic data interchange and electronic funds transfer. We believe additional applications of those

  1. 34 CFR 272.1 - What is the Desegregation Assistance Center Program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... assistance (including training) at the request of school boards and other responsible governmental agencies... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What is the Desegregation Assistance Center Program? 272.1 Section 272.1 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education OFFICE OF...

  2. 50 CFR 23.79 - How may I participate in the Plant Rescue Center Program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., EXPORTATION, AND IMPORTATION OF WILDLIFE AND PLANTS (CONTINUED) CONVENTION ON INTERNATIONAL TRADE IN... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false How may I participate in the Plant Rescue Center Program? 23.79 Section 23.79 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE...

  3. 75 FR 76995 - National Toxicology Program (NTP); Center for the Evaluation of Risks to Human Reproduction...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-10

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Toxicology Program (NTP); Center for the Evaluation of Risks to Human... biological targets for assays for the Toxicology Testing in the 21st Century (``Tox21'') high throughput...://cerhr.niehs.nih.gov . Dated: December 2, 2010. John R. Bucher, Associate Director, National Toxicology...

  4. 75 FR 32942 - National Toxicology Program (NTP); NTP Interagency Center for the Evaluation of Alternative...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Toxicology Program (NTP); NTP Interagency Center for the Evaluation of...://iccvam.niehs.nih.gov . Dated: June 3, 2010. John R. Bucher, Associate Director, National Toxicology...

  5. Telemedicine spirometry training and quality assurance program in primary care centers of a public health system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marina Malanda, Nuria; López de Santa María, Elena; Gutiérrez, Asunción; Bayón, Juan Carlos; Garcia, Larraitz; Gáldiz, Juan B

    2014-04-01

    Forced spirometry is essential for diagnosing respiratory diseases and is widely used across levels of care. However, several studies have shown that spirometry quality in primary care is not ideal, with risks of misdiagnosis. Our objective was to assess the feasibility and performance of a telemedicine-based training and quality assurance program for forced spirometry in primary care. The two phases included (1) a 9-month pilot study involving 15 centers, in which spirometry tests were assessed by the Basque Office for Health Technology Assessment, and (2) the introduction of the program to all centers in the Public Basque Health Service. Technicians first received 4 h of training, and, subsequently, they sent all tests to the reference laboratory using the program. Quality assessment was performed in accordance with clinical guidelines (A and B, good; C-F, poor). In the first phase, 1,894 spirometry tests were assessed, showing an improvement in quality: acceptable quality tests increased from 57% at the beginning to 78% after 6 months and 83% after 9 months (pspirometry tests were assessed after the inclusion of 36 additional centers, maintaining the positive trend (61%, 87%, and 84% at the same time points; pspirometry tests improved in all centers. (2) The program provides a tool for transferring data that allows monitoring of its quality and training of technicians who perform the tests. (3) This approach is useful for improving spirometry quality in the routine practice of a public health system.

  6. Creating a Center of Choice: A Program Evaluation of Higher Quality Child Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenbrey, Taryn Caye

    2013-01-01

    This program evaluation focused on one year of Bridges to Tomorrow, a multi-year initiative designed by Metro United Way to better prepare at-risk children for academic success upon entering kindergarten. Bridges to Tomorrow provided three child care centers operating in at-risk neighborhoods with interventions that included a structured…

  7. College Smoking Policies and Smoking Cessation Programs: Results of a Survey of College Health Center Directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wechsler, Henry; Kelley, Kathleen; Seibring, Mark; Kuo, Meichun; Rigotti, Nancy A.

    2001-01-01

    Surveyed college health center directors about policies addressing smoking and availability of smoking cessation programs. Though 85 percent considered students' smoking a problem, only 81 percent of colleges prohibited smoking in all public areas, and only 27 percent banned smoking in all indoor areas. Though over half of the schools offered…

  8. Age 26 Cost-Benefit Analysis of the Child-Parent Center Early Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Arthur J.; Temple, Judy A.; White, Barry A. B.; Ou, Suh-Ruu; Robertson, Dylan L.

    2011-01-01

    Using data collected up to age 26 in the Chicago Longitudinal Study, this cost-benefit analysis of the Child-Parent Centers (CPC) is the first for a sustained publicly funded early intervention. The program provides services for low-income families beginning at age 3 in 20 school sites. Kindergarten and school-age services are provided up to age 9…

  9. Florida Public Health Training Center: Evidence-Based Online Mentor Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frahm, Kathryn A.; Alsac-Seitz, Biray; Mescia, Nadine; Brown, Lisa M.; Hyer, Kathy; Liburd, Desiree; Rogoff, David P.; Troutman, Adewale

    2013-01-01

    This article describes an Online Mentor Program (OMP) designed to support and facilitate mentorships among and between Florida Department of Health (FDOH) employees and USF College of Public Health students using a Web-based portal. The Florida Public Health Training Center (FPHTC) at the University of South Florida (USF) College of Public Health…

  10. Using concept mapping to develop a logic model for the Prevention Research Centers Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Lynda A; Gwaltney, Margaret K; Sundra, Demia L; Brownson, Ross C; Kane, Mary; Cross, Alan W; Mack, Richard; Schwartz, Randy; Sims, Tom; Carol, White R

    2006-01-01

    Concept mapping is a structured conceptualization process that provides a visual representation of relationships among ideas. Concept mapping was used to develop a logic model for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Prevention Research Centers Program, which has a large and diverse group of stakeholders throughout the United States. No published studies have used concept mapping to develop a logic model for a national program. Two logic models were constructed using the data from the concept mapping process and program documents: one for the national level and one for the local level. Concept mapping involved three phases: 1) developing questions to generate ideas about the program's purpose and function, 2) gathering input from 145 national stakeholders and 135 local stakeholders and sorting ideas into themes, and 3) using multivariate statistical analyses to generate concept maps. Logic models were refined using feedback received from stakeholders at regional meetings and conferences and from a structured feedback tool. The national concept map consisted of 9 clusters with 88 statements; the local concept map consisted of 11 clusters with 75 statements. Clusters were categorized into three logic model components: inputs, activities, and outcomes. Based on feedback, two draft logic models were combined and finalized into one for the Prevention Research Centers Program. Concept mapping provides a valuable data source, establishes a common view of a program, and identifies inputs, activities, and outcomes in a logic model. Our concept mapping process resulted in a logic model that is meaningful for stakeholders, incorporates input from the program's partners, and establishes important program expectations. Our methods may be beneficial for other programs that are developing logic models for evaluation planning.

  11. Programs and services for older people in fitness centers in Seville

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerónimo García Fernández

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The practice of physical activity by older people is increasingly becoming very usual within this population. Therefore, the sports facilities, are offering specific programs and activities to improve the quality of life for this population. One of the places where these activities are offered, are the private fitness centers (PFC, where nowadays is getting more frequent to find seniors doing exercises in the latest generation apparatus and dealing with modern equipment.Our study reflects the reality of 45 PFC of a Spanish city, Seville, in relation to specific fees and activities offered for seniors at these centers. Similarly, it shows the status of this offer in relation to the census districts of Seville. The research found out that most of the centers analyzed did not have a specific program with activities for seniors.

  12. Integral measurement of the $^{12}$C(n,p)$^{12}$B reaction up to 10 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Žugec, P; Bosnar, D; Ventura, A; Mengoni, A; Altstadt, S; Andrzejewski, J; Audouin, L; Barbagallo, M; Bécares, V; Bečvář, F; Belloni, F; Berthoumieux, E; Billowes, J; Boccone, V; Brugger, M; Calviani, M; Calviño, F; Cano-Ott, D; Carrapiço, C; Cerutti, F; Chiaveri, E; Chin, M; Cortés, G; Cortés-Giraldo, M.A; Cosentino, L; Diakaki, M; Domingo-Pardo, C; Dressler, R; Duran, I; Eleftheriadis, C; Ferrari, A; Finocchiaro, P; Fraval, K; Ganesan, S; García, A R; Giubrone, G; Gómez-Hornillos, M B; Gonçalves, I F; González-Romero, E; Griesmayer, E; Guerrero, C; Gunsing, F; Gurusamy, P; Heinitz, S; Jenkins, D G; Jericha, E; Käppeler, F; Karadimos, D; Kivel, N; Kokkoris, M; Krtička, M; Kroll, J; Langer, C; Lederer, C; Leeb, H; Leong, L S; Meo, S Lo; Losito, R; Manousos, A; Marganiec, J; Martínez, T; Massimi, C; Mastinu, P; Mastromarco, M; Mendoza, E; Milazzo, P M; Mingrone, F; Mirea, M; Mondalaers, W; Musumarra, A; Paradela, C; Pavlik, A; Perkowski, J; Plompen, A; Praena, J; Quesada, J; Rauscher, T; Reifarth, R; Riego, A; Roman, F; Rubbia, C; Sarmento, R; Saxena, A; Schillebeeckx, P; Schmidt, S; Schumann, D; Tagliente, G; Tain, J L; Tarrío, D; Tassan-Got, L; Tsinganis, A; Valenta, S; Vannini, G; Variale, V; Vaz, P; Versaci, R; Vermeulen, M J; Vlachoudis, V; Vlastou, R; Wallner, A; Ware, T; Weigand, M; Weiß, C; Wright, T

    2016-01-01

    The integral measurement of the $^{12}$C(n,p)$^{12}$B reaction was performed at the neutron time of flight facility n_TOF at CERN. The total number of $^{12}$B nuclei produced per neutron pulse of the n_TOF beam was determined using the activation technique in combination with a time of flight technique. The cross section is integrated over the n_TOF neutron energy spectrum from reaction threshold at 13.6 MeV to 10 GeV. Having been measured up to 1 GeV on basis of the $^{235}$U(n,f) reaction, the neutron energy spectrum above 200 MeV has been reevaluated due to the recent extension of the cross section reference for this particular reaction, which is otherwise considered a standard up to 200 MeV. The results from the dedicated GEANT4 simulations have been used to evaluate the neutron flux from 1 GeV up to 10 GeV. The experimental results related to the $^{12}$C(n,p)$^{12}$B reaction are compared with the evaluated cross sections from major libraries and with the predictions of different GEANT4 models, which m...

  13. Effects of soil C:N:P stoichiometry on biomass allocation in the alpine and arid steppe systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaodan; Ma, Xingxing; Yan, Yan

    2017-03-01

    Soil nutrients strongly influence biomass allocation. However, few studies have examined patterns induced by soil C:N:P stoichiometry in alpine and arid ecosystems. Samples were collected from 44 sites with similar elevation along the 220-km transect at spatial intervals of 5 km along the northern Tibetan Plateau. Aboveground biomass (AGB) levels were measured by cutting a sward in each plot. Belowground biomass (BGB) levels were collected from soil pits in a block of 1 m × 1 m in actual root depth. We observed significant decreases in AGB and BGB levels but increases in the BGB:AGB ratio with increases in latitude. Although soil is characterized by structural complexity and spatial heterogeneity, we observed remarkably consistent C:N:P ratios within the cryic aridisols. We observed significant nonlinear relationships between the soil N:P and BGB:AGB ratios. The critical N:P ratio in soils was measured at approximately 2.0, above which the probability of BGB:AGB response to nutrient availability is small. These findings serve as interesting contributions to the global data pool on arid plant stoichiometry, given the previously limited knowledge regarding high-altitude regions.

  14. Global health: the Fogarty International Center, National Institutes of Health: vision and mission, programs, and accomplishments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breman, Joel G; Bridbord, Kenneth; Kupfer, Linda E; Glass, Roger I

    2011-09-01

    The Fogarty International Center (FIC) of the US National Institutes of Health has supported long-term training and research for more than 3600 future leaders in science and public health from low-income and middle-income countries; tens of thousands more persons have received short-term training. More than 23 extramural training and research programs plus an intramural program are now operating. Newer FIC training programs are addressing chronic, noncommunicable diseases and strengthening the quality of medical schools and health care provider training. Most FIC trainees return to their countries of origin, where they mentor and train thousands of individuals in their home countries. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. TIME ANALYSIS ACCORDING TO PART PROGRAMS ON A CNC VERTICAL MACHINING CENTER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Murat PİNAR

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a program examining the CNC programs in the control unit of Dyna Myte 2900 Vertical Machining Center and calculating the machining time and rapid movement time of the cutting tools has been developed. The workpiece program to be examined is transferred to CNC code editor by the user manually, by a computer file with a diskette, or through hard disk or the machine tool. By examining all the movements of the cutting tools, detailed machining time, rapid movement time or total time is served to the user. So that, an important part of workpiece cost analysis information is provided.

  16. General aviation internal combustion engine research programs at NASA-Lewis Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, E. A.

    1978-01-01

    An update is presented of non-turbine general aviation engine programs underway at the NASA-Lewis Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio. The program encompasses conventional, lightweight diesel and rotary engines. Its three major thrusts are: (a) reduced SFC's; (b) improved fuels tolerance; and (c) reducing emissions. Current and planned future programs in such areas as lean operation, improved fuel management, advanced cooling techniques and advanced engine concepts, are described. These are expected to lay the technology base, by the mid to late 1980's, for engines whose life cycle fuel costs are 30 to 50% lower than today's conventional engines.

  17. Summer Research Program - 1996 High School Apprenticeship Program. Volume 16, Arnold Engineering Development Center

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moore, Gary

    1996-01-01

    The United States Air Force Summer Research Program (USAF-SRP) is designed to introduce university, college, and technical institute faculty members, graduate students, and high school students to Air Force research...

  18. Summer Research Program - 1997 High School Appenticeship Program Volume 16 Arnold Engineering Development Center

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moore, Gary

    1997-01-01

    The United States Air Force Summer Research Program (USAF-SRP) is designed to introduce university, college, and technical institute faculty members, graduate students, and high school students to Air Force research...

  19. A Youth-Leader Program in Baltimore City Recreation Centers: Lessons Learned and Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trude, Angela C B; Anderson Steeves, Elizabeth; Shipley, Cara; Surkan, Pamela J; Sato, Priscila de Morais; Estep, Tracey; Clanton, Stella; Lachenmayr, Lisa; Gittelsohn, Joel

    2018-01-01

    Peer-led interventions may be an effective means of addressing the childhood obesity epidemic; however, few studies have looked at the long-term sustainability of such programs. As part of a multilevel obesity prevention intervention, B'More Healthy Communities for Kids, 16 Baltimore college students were trained as youth-leaders (YLs) to deliver a skill-based nutrition curriculum to low-income African American children (10-14 years old). In April 2015, formative research was used to inform sustainability of the YL program in recreation centers. In-depth interviews were conducted with recreation center directors ( n = 4) and the YLs ( n = 16). Two focus groups were conducted with YLs ( n = 7) and community youth-advocates ( n = 10). Barriers to this program included difficulties with transportation, time constraints, and recruiting youth. Lessons learned indicated that improving trainings and incentives to youth were identified as essential strategies to foster continuity of the youth-led program and capacity building. High school students living close to the centers were identified as potential candidates to lead the program. Based on our findings, the initial intervention will be expanded into a sustainable model for implementation, using a train-the-trainer approach to empower community youth to be change agents of the food environment and role models.

  20. Integrating comparative effectiveness research programs into predictive health: a unique role for academic health centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rask, Kimberly J; Brigham, Kenneth L; Johns, Michael M E

    2011-06-01

    The growing burden of chronic disease, an aging population, and rising health care costs threaten the sustainability of our current model for health care delivery. At the same time, innovations in predictive health offer a pathway to reduce disease burden by preventing and mitigating the development of disease. Academic health centers are uniquely positioned to evaluate the comparative effectiveness of predictive and personalized health interventions, given institutional core competencies in innovative knowledge development. The authors describe Emory University's commitment to integrating comparative effectiveness research (CER) into predictive health programs through the creation and concurrent evaluation of its Center for Health Discovery and Well Being (hereafter, "the Center"). Established in 2008, the Center is a clinical laboratory for testing the validity and utility of a health-focused rather than disease-focused care setting. The Center provides preventive health services based on the current evidence base, evaluates the effectiveness of its care delivery model, involves trainees in both the delivery and evaluation of its services, and collects structured physical, social, and emotional health data on all participants over time. Concurrent evaluation allows the prospective exploration of the complex interactions among health determinants as well as the comparative effectiveness of novel biomarkers in predicting health. Central to the Center is a cohort study of randomly selected university employees. The authors describe how the Center has fostered a foundation for CER through the structured recruitment of study cohorts, standardized interventions, and scheduled data collection strategies that support pilot studies by faculty and trainees.

  1. NASA Lunar Sample Education Disk Program - Space Rocks for Classrooms, Museums, Science Centers and Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, J. S.

    2009-12-01

    NASA is eager for students and the public to experience lunar Apollo rocks and regolith soils first hand. Lunar samples embedded in plastic are available for educators to use in their classrooms, museums, science centers, and public libraries for education activities and display. The sample education disks are valuable tools for engaging students in the exploration of the Solar System. Scientific research conducted on the Apollo rocks has revealed the early history of our Earth-Moon system. The rocks help educators make the connections to this ancient history of our planet as well as connections to the basic lunar surface processes - impact and volcanism. With these samples educators in museums, science centers, libraries, and classrooms can help students and the public understand the key questions pursued by missions to Moon. The Office of the Curator at Johnson Space Center is in the process of reorganizing and renewing the Lunar and Meteorite Sample Education Disk Program to increase reach, security and accountability. The new program expands the reach of these exciting extraterrestrial rocks through increased access to training and educator borrowing. One of the expanded opportunities is that trained certified educators from science centers, museums, and libraries may now borrow the extraterrestrial rock samples. Previously the loan program was only open to classroom educators so the expansion will increase the public access to the samples and allow educators to make the critical connections of the rocks to the exciting exploration missions taking place in our solar system. Each Lunar Disk contains three lunar rocks and three regolith soils embedded in Lucite. The anorthosite sample is a part of the magma ocean formed on the surface of Moon in the early melting period, the basalt is part of the extensive lunar mare lava flows, and the breccias sample is an important example of the violent impact history of the Moon. The disks also include two regolith soils and

  2. Program evaluation of remote heart failure monitoring: healthcare utilization analysis in a rural regional medical center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, William T; Keberlein, Pamela; Sorenson, Gigi; Mohler, Sailor; Tye, Blake; Ramirez, A Susana; Carroll, Mark

    2015-03-01

    Remote monitoring for heart failure (HF) has had mixed and heterogeneous effects across studies, necessitating further evaluation of remote monitoring systems within specific healthcare systems and their patient populations. "Care Beyond Walls and Wires," a wireless remote monitoring program to facilitate patient and care team co-management of HF patients, served by a rural regional medical center, provided the opportunity to evaluate the effects of this program on healthcare utilization. Fifty HF patients admitted to Flagstaff Medical Center (Flagstaff, AZ) participated in the project. Many of these patients lived in underserved and rural communities, including Native American reservations. Enrolled patients received mobile, broadband-enabled remote monitoring devices. A matched cohort was identified for comparison. HF patients enrolled in this program showed substantial and statistically significant reductions in healthcare utilization during the 6 months following enrollment, and these reductions were significantly greater compared with those who declined to participate but not when compared with a matched cohort. The findings from this project indicate that a remote HF monitoring program can be successfully implemented in a rural, underserved area. Reductions in healthcare utilization were observed among program participants, but reductions were also observed among a matched cohort, illustrating the need for rigorous assessment of the effects of HF remote monitoring programs in healthcare systems.

  3. Incorporation of poison center services in a state-wide overdose education and naloxone distribution program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyon, Suzanne; Benton, Carleigh; Anderson, Bruce A; Baier, Michael; Haas, Erin; Hadley, Lisa; Maehr, Jennifer; Rebbert-Franklin, Kathleen; Olsen, Yngvild; Welsh, Christopher

    2016-06-01

    To help curb the opioid overdose epidemic, many states are implementing overdose education and naloxone distribution (OEND) programs. Few evaluations of these programs exist. Maryland's OEND program incorporated the services of the poison center. It asked bystanders to call the poison center within 2 hours of administration of naloxone. Bystanders included law enforcement (LE). Description of the initial experience with this unique OEND program component. Retrospective case series of all cases of bystander-administered naloxone reported to the Maryland Poison Center over 16 months. Cases were followed to final outcome, for example, hospital discharge or death. Indications for naloxone included suspected opioid exposure and unresponsiveness, respiratory depression, or cyanosis. Naloxone response was defined as person's ability to breathe, talk, or walk within minutes of administration. Seventy-eight cases of bystander-administered naloxone were reported. Positive response to naloxone was observed in 75.6% of overall cases. Response rates were 86.1% and 70.9% for suspected exposures to heroin and prescription opioids, respectively. Two individuals failed to respond to naloxone and died. Naloxone response rates were higher and admission to the intensive care unit rates were lower in heroin overdoses than prescription opioid overdoses. This retrospective case series of 78 cases of bystander-administered naloxone reports a 75.6% overall rate of reversal. The findings of this study may be more generalizable. Incorporation of poison center services facilitated the capture of more timely data not usually available to OEND programs. (Am J Addict 2016;25:301-306). © 2016 American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry.

  4. The Managers’ Experiential Learning of Program Planning in Active Ageing Learning Centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Ting Yeh

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Planning older adult learning programs is really a complex work. Program planners go through different learning stages and accumulate experiences to be able to undertake the task alone. This study aimed to explore the experiential learning process of older adult learning program planners who work in the Active Ageing Learning Centers (AALCs. Semi-structure interviews were conducted with seven program planners. The findings of this study were identified as follows. 1 Before being a program planner, the participants’ knowledge results from grasping and transforming experience gained from their family, their daily lives and past learning experiences; 2 after being a program planner, the participants’ experiential learning focused on leadership, training in the institute, professional development, as well as involvement in organizations for elderly people; and 3 the participants’ experiential learning outcomes in the older adult learning program planning include: their ability to reflect on the appropriateness and fulfillment of program planning, to apply theoretical knowledge and professional background in the field, and to make plans for future learning and business strategies.

  5. 78 FR 35036 - Request for Nominations of Candidates To Serve on the World Trade Center Health Program...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-11

    ... Serve on the World Trade Center Health Program Scientific/Technical Advisory Committee (the STAC or the... soliciting nominations for membership on the World Trade Center (WTC) Health Program Scientific/Technical... Scientific/Technical Advisory Committee (STAC). The STAC is governed by the provisions of the Federal...

  6. Surgical leadership and standardization of multidisciplinary breast cancer care: the evolution of the National Accreditation Program for Breast Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bensenhaver, Jessica; Winchester, David P

    2014-07-01

    Evidence has shown that multidisciplinary specialist team evaluation and management for cancer results in better patient outcomes. For breast cancer, breast centers are where this evaluation and management occurs. The National Accreditation Program for Breast Centers has helped standardize multidisciplinary breast cancer care by defining services and standards required of accredited breast centers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Pilot project for a commercial buildings Energy Analysis and Diagnostic Center (EADC) program. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capehart, B.L.

    1996-02-01

    Commercial energy use costs businesses around $70 billion annually. Many of these businesses are small and medium sized organizations that do not have the resources to help themselves, or to pay for professional engineering services to help reduce their energy costs and improve their economic competitiveness. Energy cost reduction actions with payback times of around two years could save the commercial sector 15--20%, or $10--$15 billion per year. This project was initially intended to evaluate the feasibility of performing commercial energy audits as an adjunct to the industrial audit program run by the US Department of Energy Industrial Office. This program is housed in 30 universities throughout the United States. Formerly known as Energy Analysis and Diagnostic Centers (EADC`s), the university programs are now called Industrial Assessment Centers (IAC`s) to reflect their expansion from energy use analyses to include waste and productivity analyses. The success of the EADC/IAC program in helping the manufacturing sector provides an excellent model for a similar program in the commercial buildings sector. This project has investigated using the EADC/IAC approach to performing energy audits for the commercial sector, and has determined that such an approach is feasible and cost effective.

  8. A Case Study: Using Delmia at Kennedy Space Center to Support NASA's Constellation Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kickbusch, Tracey; Humeniuk, Bob

    2010-01-01

    The presentation examines the use of Delmia (Digital Enterprise Lean Manufacturing Interactive Application) for digital simulation in NASA's Constellation Program. Topics include an overview of the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Design Visualization Group tasks, NASA's Constellation Program, Ares 1 ground processing preliminary design review, and challenges and how Delmia is used at KSC, Challenges include dealing with large data sets, creating and maintaining KSC's infrastructure, gathering customer requirements and meeting objectives, creating life-like simulations, and providing quick turn-around on varied products,

  9. Spaceflight Radiation Health program at the Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, A. Steve; Badhwar, Gautam D.; Golightly, Michael J.; Hardy, Alva C.; Konradi, Andrei; Yang, Tracy Chui-Hsu

    1993-01-01

    The Johnson Space Center leads the research and development activities that address the health effects of space radiation exposure to astronaut crews. Increased knowledge of the composition of the environment and of the biological effects of space radiation is required to assess health risks to astronaut crews. The activities at the Johnson Space Center range from quantification of astronaut exposures to fundamental research into the biological effects resulting from exposure to high energy particle radiation. The Spaceflight Radiation Health Program seeks to balance the requirements for operational flexibility with the requirement to minimize crew radiation exposures. The components of the space radiation environment are characterized. Current and future radiation monitoring instrumentation is described. Radiation health risk activities are described for current Shuttle operations and for research development program activities to shape future analysis of health risk.

  10. A knowledge continuity management program for the energy, infrastructure and knowledge systems center, Sandia National Laboratories.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menicucci, David F.

    2006-07-01

    A growing recognition exists in companies worldwide that, when employees leave, they take with them valuable knowledge that is difficult and expensive to recreate. The concern is now particularly acute as the large ''baby boomer'' generation is reaching retirement age. A new field of science, Knowledge Continuity Management (KCM), is designed to capture and catalog the acquired knowledge and wisdom from experience of these employees before they leave. The KCM concept is in the final stages of being adopted by the Energy, Infrastructure, and Knowledge Systems Center and a program is being applied that should produce significant annual cost savings. This report discusses how the Center can use KCM to mitigate knowledge loss from employee departures, including a concise description of a proposed plan tailored to the Center's specific needs and resources.

  11. Analysis of the Aircraft Flying Hour Program at the Pacific Missile Test Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-12-01

    David R. Whipple, hai artment of Adinst<t’e c2e ABSTRACT "Yhis thesis is an analysis of the flight hour cost program at the Pacific Missile Test Center...LEVEL 2 TRAIN COSTS TO BE COSTS COSTS COSTS COSTS NOIA LIZED A-3 A-6 CIVILIANS 87 306,000 A-7 CONTRCTOR F-4 STSI 81 620,325 F-14 SAC 33 568,750 F-18 HIC 5

  12. Technology requirements to be addressed by the NASA Lewis Research Center Cryogenic Fluid Management Facility program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydelott, J. C.; Rudland, R. S.

    1985-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center is responsible for the planning and execution of a scientific program which will provide advance in space cryogenic fluid management technology. A number of future space missions were identified that require or could benefit from this technology. These fluid management technology needs were prioritized and a shuttle attached reuseable test bed, the cryogenic fluid management facility (CFMF), is being designed to provide the experimental data necessary for the technology development effort.

  13. Coral Research Data from NOAA's Undersea Research Center, Caribbean Marine Research Center, NOAA's Undersea Research Program (NURP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA's National Undersea Research Center for the Caribbean Marine Research Center, Perry Institure for Marine Science, for the Caribbean region explores and studies...

  14. Dialysis vascular access management by interventional nephrology programs at University Medical Centers in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vachharajani, Tushar J; Moossavi, Shahriar; Salman, Loay; Wu, Steven; Dwyer, Amy C; Ross, Jamie; Dukkipati, Ramanath; Maya, Ivan D; Yevzlin, Alexander S; Agarwal, Anil; Abreo, Kenneth D; Work, Jack; Asif, Arif

    2011-01-01

    The development of interventional nephrology has undoubtedly led to an improvement in patient care at many facilities across the United States. However, these services have traditionally been offered by interventional nephrologists in the private practice arena. While interventional nephrology was born in the private practice setting, several academic medical centers across the United States have now developed interventional nephrology programs. University Medical Centers (UMCs) that offer interventional nephrology face challenges, such as smaller dialysis populations, limited financial resources, and real or perceived political "turf" issues." Despite these hurdles, several UMCs have successfully established interventional nephrology as an intricate part of a larger nephrology program. This has largely been accomplished by consolidating available resources and collaborating with other specialties irrespective of the size of the dialysis population. The collaboration with other specialties also offers an opportunity to perform advanced procedures, such as application of excimer laser and endovascular ultrasound. As more UMCs establish interventional nephrology programs, opportunities for developing standardized training centers will improve, resulting in better quality and availability of nephrology-related procedures, and providing an impetus for research activities. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. An Assessment of Energy-Related Career Paths of Senior Industrial Assessment Center Program Alumni

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, M.A.

    2003-10-20

    The purpose of this study was to assess the career paths of alumni from the U.S. Department of Energy's Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) program. IAC was originally named the Energy Analysis and Diagnostic Center (EADC) program when it began in association with four schools in 1976. The current IAC program provides funding to 26 engineering colleges, located in centers across the United States, to conduct energy, waste, and productivity assessments for small- to medium-sized manufacturing establishments within their respective regions. Through part-time employment with the university, students receive training and in turn conduct assessments for local manufacturers, under the direct supervision of engineering faculty. Annually, IAC participants conduct over 700 assessments, and each assessment generates recommendations for energy savings, energy cost savings, and waste and productivity cost savings customized for individual clients. An earlier study determined that energy savings could be attributed to alumni of the IAC program who take their IAC experiences with them to the professional workplace. During their careers, the alumni conduct additional energy assessments as well as influence energy efficiency through design, teaching and training, and other activities. Indeed, a significant level of program benefits can be attributed to the alumni. This project addressed such specific questions as: How many years after graduation are IAC alumni involved in energy-efficiency activities? What different methods do they use to influence energy-efficiency decisions? To answer these questions, the University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UT) surveyed IAC senior alumni, defined as those who graduated in 1995 or earlier. Section 2 describes the survey used in this research. The actual survey can be found in Appendix A. Section 3 describes our approach to data collection. Section 4 presents descriptive statistics about the senior alumni who responded to the survey. Section 5

  16. Guanine α-carboxy nucleoside phosphonate (G-α-CNP) shows a different inhibitory kinetic profile against the DNA polymerases of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and herpes viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balzarini, Jan; Menni, Michael; Das, Kalyan; van Berckelaer, Lizette; Ford, Alan; Maguire, Nuala M; Liekens, Sandra; Boehmer, Paul E; Arnold, Eddy; Götte, Matthias; Maguire, Anita R

    2017-07-15

    α-Carboxy nucleoside phosphonates (α-CNPs) are modified nucleotides that represent a novel class of nucleotide-competing reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors (NcRTIs). They were designed to act directly against HIV-1 RT without the need for prior activation (phosphorylation). In this respect, they differ from the nucleoside or nucleotide RTIs [N(t)RTIs] that require conversion to their triphosphate forms before being inhibitory to HIV-1 RT. The guanine derivative (G-α-CNP) has now been synthesized and investigated for the first time. The (L)-(+)-enantiomer of G-α-CNP directly and competitively inhibits HIV-1 RT by interacting with the substrate active site of the enzyme. The (D)-(-)-enantiomer proved inactive against HIV-1 RT. In contrast, the (+)- and (-)-enantiomers of G-α-CNP inhibited herpes (i.e. HSV-1, HCMV) DNA polymerases in a non- or uncompetitive manner, strongly indicating interaction of the (L)-(+)- and the (D)-(-)-G-α-CNPs at a location different from the polymerase substrate active site of the herpes enzymes. Such entirely different inhibition profile of viral polymerases is unprecedented for a single antiviral drug molecule. Moreover, within the class of α-CNPs, subtle differences in their sensitivity to mutant HIV-1 RT enzymes were observed depending on the nature of the nucleobase in the α-CNP molecules. The unique properties of the α-CNPs make this class of compounds, including G-α-CNP, direct acting inhibitors of multiple viral DNA polymerases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Developing a Comprehensive Cardio-Oncology Program at a Cancer Institute: The Moffitt Cancer Center Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fradley, Michael G.; Brown, Allen C.; Shields, Bernadette; Viganego, Federico; Damrongwatanasuk, Rongras; Patel, Aarti A.; Hartlage, Gregory; Roper, Natalee; Jaunese, Julie; Roy, Larry; Ismail-Khan, Roohi

    2017-01-01

    Cardio-oncology is a multidisciplinary field focusing on the management and prevention of cardiovascular complications in cancer patients and survivors. While the initial focus of this specialty was on heart failure associated with anthracycline use, novel anticancer agents are increasingly utilized and are associated with many other cardiotoxicities including hypertension, arrhythmias and vascular disease. Since its inception, the field has developed at a rapid pace with the establishment of programs at many major academic institutions and community practices. Given the complexities of this patient population, it is important for providers to possess knowledge of not only cardiovascular disease but also cancer subtypes and their specific therapeutics. Developing a cardio-oncology program at a stand-alone cancer center can present unique opportunities and challenges when compared to those affiliated with other institutions including resource allocation, cardiovascular testing availability and provider education. In this review, we present our experiences establishing the cardio-oncology program at Moffitt Cancer Center and provide guidance to those individuals interested in developing a program at a similar independent cancer institution. PMID:28781723

  18. Developing a Comprehensive Cardio-Oncology Program at a Cancer Institute: The Moffitt Cancer Center Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fradley, Michael G; Brown, Allen C; Shields, Bernadette; Viganego, Federico; Damrongwatanasuk, Rongras; Patel, Aarti A; Hartlage, Gregory; Roper, Natalee; Jaunese, Julie; Roy, Larry; Ismail-Khan, Roohi

    2017-06-14

    Cardio-oncology is a multidisciplinary field focusing on the management and prevention of cardiovascular complications in cancer patients and survivors. While the initial focus of this specialty was on heart failure associated with anthracycline use, novel anticancer agents are increasingly utilized and are associated with many other cardiotoxicities including hypertension, arrhythmias and vascular disease. Since its inception, the field has developed at a rapid pace with the establishment of programs at many major academic institutions and community practices. Given the complexities of this patient population, it is important for providers to possess knowledge of not only cardiovascular disease but also cancer subtypes and their specific therapeutics. Developing a cardio-oncology program at a stand-alone cancer center can present unique opportunities and challenges when compared to those affiliated with other institutions including resource allocation, cardiovascular testing availability and provider education. In this review, we present our experiences establishing the cardio-oncology program at Moffitt Cancer Center and provide guidance to those individuals interested in developing a program at a similar independent cancer institution.

  19. Building the foundation for health system transformation: Oregon's Patient-Centered Primary Care Home program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rissi, Jill Jamison; Gelmon, Sherril; Saulino, Evan; Merrithew, Nicole; Baker, Robin; Hatcher, Paige

    2015-01-01

    Health system reform is largely dependent upon the transformation of primary care in addition to the alignment of incentives that mediate the allocation of resources. The Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH) is a model of enhanced primary care that encourages coordination, patient-centered care, integration of public health services, and innovative methods for improving population health-all critical elements of health system reform. Because it changes the way primary care is organized and delivered, the PCMH model has been adopted as a foundational component of Oregon's health system transformation. This article presents insights drawn from an evaluation of the implementation of Oregon's Patient-Centered Primary Care Home (PCPCH) program and the adoption of the model by primary care providers. We used a mixed-methods approach consisting of 2 surveys of recognized PCPCH practices, qualitative document analysis, and key informant interviews. Evaluation research findings were triangulated with findings from PCPCH clinic site visits conducted as part of a regulatory verification process. Survey results describe a broad range of strategies and practices adopted by recognized PCPCH clinics within 6 defined core attributes: (1) access to care; (2) accountability; (3) comprehensive whole-person care; (4) continuity; (5) coordination and integration; and (6) person- and family-centered care. We also identify 4 key factors that influenced the conceptualization, development, and implementation of the PCPCH program: (1) support and motivations; (2) administrative barriers and resource constraints; (3) alignment of short- and long-term financial incentives; and (4) leadership and interpersonal relationships. This evaluation provides insights into the factors that influence implementation of a primary care home program as public policy; the strategies and challenges associated with implementation of the model; and the implications of both for other states that are engaged in

  20. Leadership Development Programs at Academic Health Centers: Results of a National Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Raymond; Goldman, Ellen F; Scott, Andrea R; Dandar, Valerie

    2018-02-01

    To identify the prevalence and characteristics of faculty leadership development programs (LDPs) offered by North American academic health centers (AHCs) and to uncover gaps in leadership training. Faculty development/affairs deans of the 161 Association of American Medical Colleges member schools were surveyed in 2015 on their approach to faculty leadership training. For AHCs delivering their own training, the survey included questions about LDP participants, objectives, curriculum, delivery, resources, and evaluation. The literature on leadership and leadership development was used to develop a taxonomy of leadership competencies, which formed the basis of the survey questions related to program content. Survey results were analyzed with descriptive statistics and chi-square analysis for categorical data. Of the 94 respondents (response rate 58%), 93 provided some form of leadership training and 61 provided a formal internal faculty LDP. Content was variable and rarely based on a specific leadership competency model. Although programs described innovative approaches to learning, lectures and case discussions were the predominant approaches. Evaluation beyond participant satisfaction was uncommon. Faculty LDPs were common, with some programs describing elements informed by the leadership literature. However, nationally programs can improve by basing content on a leadership competency model, incorporating multiple approaches to teaching, and implementing more rigorous program evaluation.

  1. The impact of leadership training programs on physicians in academic medical centers: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straus, Sharon E; Soobiah, Charlene; Levinson, Wendy

    2013-05-01

    To identify the impact of leadership training programs at academic medical centers (AMCs) on physicians' knowledge, skills, attitudes, behaviors, and outcomes. In 2011, the authors conducted a systematic review of the literature, identifying relevant studies by searching electronic databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane Central Register), scanning reference lists, and consulting experts. They deemed eligible any qualitative or quantitative study reporting on the implementation and evaluation of a leadership program for physicians in AMCs. Two independent reviewers conducted the review, screening studies, abstracting data, and assessing quality. The authors initially identified 2,310 citations. After the screening process, they had 11 articles describing 10 studies. Three were controlled before-and-after studies, four were before-and-after case series, and three were cross-sectional surveys. The authors did not conduct a meta-analysis because of the methodological heterogeneity across studies. Although all studies were at substantial risk of bias, the highest-quality ones showed that leadership training programs affected participants' advancement in academic rank (48% versus 21%, P=.005) and hospital leadership position (30% versus 9%, P=.008) and that participants were more successful in publishing papers (3.5 per year versus 2.1 per year, Pleadership programs have modest effects on outcomes important to AMCs. Given AMCs' substantial investment in these programs, rigorous evaluation of their impact is essential. High-quality studies, including qualitative research, will allow the community to identify which programs are most effective.

  2. Establishing an Integrative Medicine Program Within an Academic Health Center: Essential Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenberg, David M; Kaptchuk, Ted J; Post, Diana E; Hrbek, Andrea L; O'Connor, Bonnie B; Osypiuk, Kamila; Wayne, Peter M; Buring, Julie E; Levy, Donald B

    2016-09-01

    Integrative medicine (IM) refers to the combination of conventional and "complementary" medical services (e.g., chiropractic, acupuncture, massage, mindfulness training). More than half of all medical schools in the United States and Canada have programs in IM, and more than 30 academic health centers currently deliver multidisciplinary IM care. What remains unclear, however, is the ideal delivery model (or models) whereby individuals can responsibly access IM care safely, effectively, and reproducibly in a coordinated and cost-effective way.Current models of IM across existing clinical centers vary tremendously in their organizational settings, principal clinical focus, and services provided; practitioner team composition and training; incorporation of research activities and educational programs; and administrative organization (e.g., reporting structure, use of medical records, scope of clinical practice) and financial strategies (i.e., specific business plans and models for sustainability).In this article, the authors address these important strategic issues by sharing lessons learned from the design and implementation of an IM facility within an academic teaching hospital, the Brigham and Women's Hospital at Harvard Medical School; and review alternative options based on information about IM centers across the United States.The authors conclude that there is currently no consensus as to how integrative care models should be optimally organized, implemented, replicated, assessed, and funded. The time may be right for prospective research in "best practices" across emerging models of IM care nationally in an effort to standardize, refine, and replicate them in preparation for rigorous cost-effectiveness evaluations.

  3. Development and evaluation of a learner-centered educational summer camp program on soft skills for baccalaureate nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Ying; Wang, Wenru

    2014-01-01

    The objectives were to develop a learner-centered educational camp program for nursing students and to evaluate 4 areas of soft skills, communication ability, clinical interaction, interpersonal relationships, and social problem solving, before and after the program. The results showed that the summer camp program was effective in improving nursing students' soft skills.

  4. Special Education and Related Services for Handicapped Young Children (18-36 months): The Project WISP Center-Based Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stile, Ann; Stile, Steve

    The paper summarized the rationale for early intervention programs and describes the major components of the Project WISP (Wyoming Infant Stimulation Program) center-based program for handicapped young children (18-36 months). Early intervention for handicapped children is justified from five points-of-view: prevention of failure during subsequent…

  5. Overview of the fatigue/fracture/life working group program at the Lewis Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcgaw, Michael A.

    1989-01-01

    Constitutive and life prediction models are developed and verified for materials typically used in hot gas path components of reusable space propulsion systems over the range of relevant operating environments. The efforts were centered on the development of crack initiation life prediction methods, while the efforts of a counterpart group were centered on the development of cyclic crack propagation life prediction methods. The complexion of the active tasks are presented. A significant new task started this year will incorporate the various material constitutive and life prediction models developed in this program into a comprehensive creep-fatigue damage analysis and life assessment computer code. The program will function as a postprocessor to general structural analysis programs (such as finite element or boundary element codes) using the output of such analyses (stress, strain, and temperature fields as functions of time) as the input to the damage analysis and life assessment code. The code will be designed to execute on engineering/scientific workstations and will feature a windowing, mouse-driven user interface. Current plans call for the code to be finished and made available for use in mid 1991.

  6. Ecological Impacts of the Space Shuttle Program at John F. Kennedy Space Center, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Carlton R.; Schmalzer, Paul A.; Breininger, David R.; Duncan, Brean W.; Drese, John H.; Scheidt, Doug A.; Lowers, Russ H.; Reyier, Eric A.; Holloway-Adkins, Karen G.; Oddy, Donna M.; hide

    2014-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Program was one of NASAs first major undertakings to fall under the environmental impact analysis and documentation requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). Space Shuttle Program activities at John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and the associated Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge (MINWR) contributed directly and indirectly to both negative and positive ecological trends in the region through the long-term, stable expenditure of resources over the 40 year program life cycle. These expenditures provided support to regional growth and development in conjunction with other sources that altered land use patterns, eliminated and modified habitats, and contributed to cultural eutrophication of the Indian River Lagoon. At KSC, most Space Shuttle Program related actions were conducted in previously developed facilities and industrial areas with the exception of the construction of the shuttle landing facility (SLF) and the space station processing facility (SSPF). Launch and operations impacts were minimal as a result of the low annual launch rate. The majority of concerns identified during the NEPA process such as potential weather modification, acid rain off site, and local climate change did not occur. Launch impacts from deposition of HCl and particulates were assimilated as a result of the high buffering capacity of the system and low launch and loading rates. Metals deposition from exhaust deposition did not display acute impacts. Sub-lethal effects are being investigated as part of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulatory process. Major positive Space Shuttle Program effects were derived from the adequate resources available at the Center to implement the numerous environmental laws and regulations designed to enhance the quality of the environment and minimize impacts from human activities. This included reduced discharges of domestic and industrial wastewater, creation of stormwater management

  7. Optoelectronics research for communication programs at the Goddard Space Flight Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krainak, Michael A.

    1991-01-01

    Current optoelectronics research and development of high-power, high-bandwidth laser transmitters, high-bandwidth, high-sensitivity optical receivers, pointing, acquisition and tracking components, and experimental and theoretical system modeling at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center is reviewed. Program hardware and space flight milestones are presented. It is believed that these experiments will pave the way for intersatellite optical communications links for both the NASA Advanced Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System and commercial users in the 21st century.

  8. K12 Education Program Lessons Learned at the Center for Earthquake Research and Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, G. L.; Dry, M.

    2003-12-01

    The Center for Earthquake Research and Information at the University of Memphis has been committed to increasing awareness for Seismic Hazard, Earthquake Engineering, and Earth Science among Mid-America's policy-makers, engineers, emergency managers, the general public, and K-12 teachers and students for nearly three decades. During that time we have learned many lessons related to providing effective education and outreach programs, especially for K-12 students. The lessons learned from these activities may be particularly appropriate for other regions where large earthquakes occur infrequently but have disproportionately high consequence areas due to low attenuation of seismic waves. Effective education programs in these settings must provide a consistent message across many states to a wide variety of socio-economic groups and professional communities through the leveraged resources of various groups and agencies. It is also beneficial to hire and train staff with K-12 teaching experience to work directly K-12 education organizations, and science curriculum coordinators.

  9. SimZones: An Organizational Innovation for Simulation Programs and Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roussin, Christopher J; Weinstock, Peter

    2017-08-01

    The complexity and volume of simulation-based learning programs have increased dramatically over the last decade, presenting several major challenges for those who lead and manage simulation programs and centers. The authors present five major issues affecting the organization of simulation programs: (1) supporting both single- and double-loop learning experiences; (2) managing the training of simulation teaching faculty; (3) optimizing the participant mix, including individuals, professional groups, teams, and other role-players, to ensure learning; (4) balancing in situ, node-based, and center-based simulation delivery; and (5) organizing simulation research and measuring value. They then introduce the SimZones innovation, a system of organization for simulation-based learning, and explain how it can alleviate the problems associated with these five issues.Simulations are divided into four zones (Zones 0-3). Zone 0 simulations include autofeedback exercises typically practiced by solitary learners, often using virtual simulation technology. Zone 1 simulations include hands-on instruction of foundational clinical skills. Zone 2 simulations include acute situational instruction, such as clinical mock codes. Zone 3 simulations involve authentic, native teams of participants and facilitate team and system development.The authors also discuss the translation of debriefing methods from Zone 3 simulations to real patient care settings (Zone 4), and they illustrate how the SimZones approach can enable the development of longitudinal learning systems in both teaching and nonteaching hospitals. The SimZones approach was initially developed in the context of the Boston Children's Hospital Simulator Program, which the authors use to illustrate this innovation in action.

  10. Lunar and Meteorite Sample Education Disk Program - Space Rocks for Classrooms, Museums, Science Centers, and Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Jaclyn; Luckey, M.; McInturff, B.; Huynh, P.; Tobola, K.; Loftin, L.

    2010-01-01

    NASA is eager for students and the public to experience lunar Apollo samples and meteorites first hand. Lunar rocks and soil, embedded in Lucite disks, are available for educators to use in their classrooms, museums, science centers, and public libraries for education activities and display. The sample education disks are valuable tools for engaging students in the exploration of the Solar System. Scientific research conducted on the Apollo rocks reveals the early history of our Earth-Moon system and meteorites reveal much of the history of the early solar system. The rocks help educators make the connections to this ancient history of our planet and solar system and the basic processes accretion, differentiation, impact and volcanism. With these samples, educators in museums, science centers, libraries, and classrooms can help students and the public understand the key questions pursued by many NASA planetary missions. The Office of the Curator at Johnson Space Center is in the process of reorganizing and renewing the Lunar and Meteorite Sample Education Disk Program to increase reach, security and accountability. The new program expands the reach of these exciting extraterrestrial rocks through increased access to training and educator borrowing. One of the expanded opportunities is that trained certified educators from science centers, museums, and libraries may now borrow the extraterrestrial rock samples. Previously the loan program was only open to classroom educators so the expansion will increase the public access to the samples and allow educators to make the critical connections to the exciting exploration missions taking place in our solar system. Each Lunar Disk contains three lunar rocks and three regolith soils embedded in Lucite. The anorthosite sample is a part of the magma ocean formed on the surface of Moon in the early melting period, the basalt is part of the extensive lunar mare lava flows, and the breccias sample is an important example of the

  11. Lunar and Meteorite Sample Education Disk Program — Space Rocks for Classrooms, Museums, Science Centers, and Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, J.; Luckey, M.; McInturff, B.; Huynh, P.; Tobola, K.; Loftin, L.

    2010-03-01

    NASA’s Lunar and Meteorite Sample Education Disk Program has Lucite disks containing Apollo lunar samples and meteorite samples that are available for trained educators to borrow for use in classrooms, museums, science center, and libraries.

  12. Contexts for Sustainable Implementation of a Colorectal Cancer Screening Program at a Community Health Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yip, Mei-Po; Chun, Alan; Edelson, Jane; Feng, Xuaohua; Tu, Shin-Ping

    2016-01-01

    "Context" is a mediating construct that significantly influences the initiation and maintenance of program implementation, but it has seldom been studied in process evaluation. This case study describes the contextual factors that encourage or impede the implementation processes of a research-tested program at a Federally Qualified Community Health Center. We conducted 14 key informant interviews with providers, nurses, medical assistants, and clinic staff in leadership and management positions during the 24 months of active implementation. Interview data were analyzed using Atlas.ti software. A written log documenting exposure, adherence, and coverage of the implementation was used to describe implementation fidelity. Findings indicated that program implementation needs to align with the organization's mission and values. Sensemaking caused individuals to understand the importance of the new process and increased their motivation to follow assigned procedures. Revisions of the implementation process allowed the program to fit better with the clinic's existing workflow. However, permitting flexibility in the delivery of an intervention may result in inconsistent implementation fidelity. In this study, threats to implementation included unanticipated changes in the clinic environment, such as budget cuts to resources and staff turnover as a consequence of the current economic downturn. Momentum leading to sustainable implementation requires a continuous team effort and a stable environment; consequently, a successful implementation requires a structure that supports problem solving, communication, and evaluation. © 2015 Society for Public Health Education.

  13. Building diversity in REU programs through MIMSUP at the Shannon Point Marine Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingham, B. L.; Sulkin, S.

    2011-12-01

    The road to a career in the ocean sciences can be long and challenging, particularly for students from racial/ethnic groups underrepresented in the field. For the past 21 years, faculty and staff at the Shannon Point Marine Center, Western Washington University have annually administered the NSF-funded Multicultural Initiative in the Marine Sciences: Undergraduate Participation (MIMSUP) program. The goal of MIMSUP is to increase diversity in the ocean sciences by moving students though their undergraduate programs into advanced education and leadership positions in the field. Helping students find positions in REU and other focused research programs is an important step along this path. Primary obstacles for the students include 1) a lack of knowledge about opportunities available to them, 2) a lack of experience preparing quality applications and 3) a lack of confidence in their ability to compete for positions. Focused mentoring, with an emphasis on skills development is important in helping outstanding, though inexperienced, students find and excel in REU programs.

  14. TABADO: "Evaluation of a smoking cessation program among Adolescents in Vocational Training Centers": Study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martinet Yves

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most of the efforts to reduce teenagers' tobacco addiction have focused on smoking prevention and little on smoking cessation. A smoking cessation program (TABADO study, associating pharmacologic and cognitive-behavioural strategy, on a particularly vulnerable population (vocational trainees, was developed. This study aims to evaluate the efficacy of the program which was offered to all smokers in a population aged 15 to 20 years in Vocational Training Centers (VTC. This paper presents the TABADO study protocol. Methods The study is quasi-experimental, prospective, evaluative and comparative and takes place during the 2 years of vocational training. The final population will be composed of 2000 trainees entering a VTC in Lorraine, France, during the 2008-2009 period. The intervention group (1000 trainees benefited from the TABADO program while no specific intervention took place in the "control" group (1000 trainees other than the treatment and education services usually available. Our primary outcome will be the tobacco abstinence rate at 12 months. Discussion If the program proves effective, it will be a new tool in the action against smoking in populations that have been seldom targeted until now. In addition, the approach could be expanded to other young subjects from socially disadvantaged backgrounds in the context of a public health policy against smoking among adolescents. Trial registration Clinical trial identification number is NTC00973570.

  15. Development of multidisciplinary nanotechnology undergraduate education program at the University of Rochester Integrated Nanosystems Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukishova, Svetlana G.; Bigelow, Nicholas P.; D'Alessandris, Paul D.

    2017-08-01

    Supported by the U.S. National Science Foundation educational grant, a coherent educational program at the University of Rochester (UR) in nanoscience and nanoengineering, based on the Institute of Optics and Intergrated Nanosystems Center resources was created. The main achievements of this program are (1) developing curriculum and offering the Certificate for Nanoscience and Nanoengineering program (15 students were awarded the Certificate and approximately 10 other students are working in this direction), (2) creating a reproducible model of collaboration in nanotechnology between a university with state-of-the-art, expensive experimental facilities, and a nearby, two-year community college (CC) with participation of a local Monroe Community College (MCC). 52 MCC students carried out two labs at the UR on the atomic force microscopy and a photolithography at a clean room; (3) developing reproducible hand-on experiments on nanophotonics ("mini-labs"), learning materials and pedagogical methods to educate students with diverse backgrounds, including freshmen and non-STEM-major CC students. These minilabs on nanophotonics were also introduced in some Institute of Optics classes. For the Certificate program UR students must take three courses: Nanometrology Laboratory (a new course) and two other selective courses from the list of several. Students also should carry out a one-semester research or a design project in the field of nanoscience and nanoengineering.

  16. Development and Implementation of an AIDS Prevention Program for African-American Women at a Child Care Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moten-Tolson, Paula

    This program was designed to provide Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) prevention education for African-American women of child bearing age at a child care center which serves low income high risk families. The primary goal was to reduce the risk of African-American women at the child care center for contracting the Human Immunodeficiency…

  17. The Partners in Prevention Program: The Evaluation and Evolution of the Task-Centered Case Management Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colvin, Julanne; Lee, Mingun; Magnano, Julienne; Smith, Valerie

    2008-01-01

    This article reports on the further development of the task-centered model for difficulties in school performance. We used Bailey-Dempsey and Reid's (1996) application of Rothman and Thomas's (1994) design and development framework and annual evaluations of the Partners in Prevention (PIP) Program to refine the task-centered case management model.…

  18. 77 FR 47440 - Office of the Assistant Secretary for Office of Disability Employment Program National Center on...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-08

    ... Program National Center on Leadership for Employment and Advancement of People With Disabilities AGENCY... Leadership for the Employment and Advancement of People with Disabilities (LEAD). The Center will seek to..., grantees, subcontracting entities and external partners on evidence-based strategies and best practices...

  19. 77 FR 8877 - World Trade Center Health Program Scientific/Technical Advisory Committee (WTCHP STAC or Advisory...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention World Trade Center Health Program Scientific/Technical Advisory Committee (WTCHP STAC or Advisory Committee), National Institute for Occupational Safety...

  20. 77 FR 5258 - World Trade Center Health Program Scientific/Technical Advisory Committee (WTCHP STAC or Advisory...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention World Trade Center Health Program Scientific/Technical Advisory Committee (WTCHP STAC or Advisory Committee), National Institute for Occupational Safety...

  1. 78 FR 22794 - World Trade Center Health Program; Certification of Breast Cancer in WTC Responders and Survivors...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-17

    ... disruption, as a 9/11 exposure, could be associated with breast cancer.\\3\\ For that reason, the Administrator... HUMAN SERVICES 42 CFR Part 88 World Trade Center Health Program; Certification of Breast Cancer in WTC... Federal Register adding certain types of cancer to the List of World Trade Center (WTC)-Related Health...

  2. A qualitative evaluation of the 2005-2011 National Academic Centers of Excellence in Youth Violence Prevention Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Kristin M; Vivolo-Kantor, Alana M; Dela Cruz, Jason; Massetti, Greta M; Mahendra, Reshma

    2015-12-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Division of Violence Prevention (DVP) funded eight National Academic Centers of Excellence (ACEs) in Youth Violence Prevention from 2005 to 2010 and two Urban Partnership Academic Centers of Excellence (UPACEs) in Youth Violence Prevention from 2006 to 2011. The ACEs and UPACEs constitute DVP's 2005-2011 ACE Program. ACE Program goals include partnering with communities to promote youth violence (YV) prevention and fostering connections between research and community practice. This article describes a qualitative evaluation of the 2005-2011 ACE Program using an innovative approach for collecting and analyzing data from multiple large research centers via a web-based Information System (ACE-IS). The ACE-IS was established as an efficient mechanism to collect and document ACE research and programmatic activities. Performance indicators for the ACE Program were established in an ACE Program logic model. Data on performance indicators were collected through the ACE-IS biannually. Data assessed Centers' ability to develop, implement, and evaluate YV prevention activities. Performance indicator data demonstrate substantial progress on Centers' research in YV risk and protective factors, community partnerships, and other accomplishments. Findings provide important lessons learned, illustrate progress made by the Centers, and point to new directions for YV prevention research and programmatic efforts. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Hospital-centered violence intervention programs: a cost-effectiveness analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Vincent E; Smith, Randi; Garcia, Arturo; Lee, Wayne S; Ashley, Linnea; Marks, Anne; Liu, Terrence H; Victorino, Gregory P

    2015-04-01

    Hospital-centered violence intervention programs (HVIPs) reduce violent injury recidivism. However, dedicated cost analyses of such programs have not yet been published. We hypothesized that the HVIP at our urban trauma center is a cost-effective means for reducing violent injury recidivism. We conducted a cost-utility analysis using a state-transition (Markov) decision model, comparing participation in our HVIP with standard risk reduction for patients injured because of firearm violence. Model inputs were derived from our trauma registry and published literature. The 1-year recidivism rate for participants in our HVIP was 2.5%, compared with 4% for those receiving standard risk reduction resources. Total per-person costs of each violence prevention arm were similar: $3,574 for our HVIP and $3,515 for standard referrals. The incremental cost effectiveness ratio for our HVIP was $2,941. Our HVIP is a cost-effective means of preventing recurrent episodes of violent injury in patients hurt by firearms. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. A workshop on asthma management programs and centers in Brazil: reviewing and explaining concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stelmach, Rafael; Cerci Neto, Alcindo; Fonseca, Ana Cristina de Carvalho Fernandez; Ponte, Eduardo Vieira; Alves, Gerardo; Araujo-Costa, Ildely Niedia; Lasmar, Laura Maria de Lima Belizário Facury; Castro, Luci Keiko Kuromoto de; Lenz, Maria Lucia Medeiros; Silva, Paulo; Cukier, Alberto; Alves, Alexssandra Maia; Lima-Matos, Aline Silva; Cardoso, Amanda da Rocha Oliveira; Fernandes, Ana Luisa Godoy; São-José, Bruno Piassi de; Riedi, Carlos Antônio; Schor, Deborah; Peixoto, Décio Medeiros; Brandenburg, Diego Djones; Camillo, Elineide Gomes Dos Santos; Serpa, Faradiba Sarquis; Brandão, Heli Vieira; Lima, João Antonio Bonfadini; Pio, Jorge Eduardo; Fiterman, Jussara; Anderson, Maria de Fátima; Cardoso, Maria do Socorro de Lucena; Rodrigues, Marcelo Tadday; Pereira, Marilyn Nilda Esther Urrutia; Antila, Marti; Martins, Sonia Maria; Guimarães, Vanessa Gonzaga Tavares; Mello, Yara Arruda Marques; Andrade, Wenderson Clay Correia de; Salibe-Filho, William; Caldeira, Zelina Maria da Rocha; Cruz-Filho, Álvaro Augusto Souza da; Camargos, Paulo

    2015-01-01

    To report the results of a workshop regarding asthma management programs and centers (AMPCs) in Brazil, so that they can be used as a tool for the improvement and advancement of current and future AMPCs. The workshop consisted of five presentations and the corresponding group discussions. The working groups discussed the following themes: implementation of asthma management strategies; human resources needed for AMPCs; financial resources needed for AMPCs; and operational maintenance of AMPCs. The workshop involved 39 participants, from all regions of the country, representing associations of asthma patients (n = 3), universities (n = 7), and AMPCs (n = 29). We found a direct relationship between a lack of planning and the failure of AMPCs. Based on the experiences reported during the workshop, the common assumptions about AMPCs in Brazil were the importance of raising awareness of managers; greater community participation; interdependence between primary care and specialized care; awareness of regionalization; and use of medications available in the public health system. Brazil already has a core of experience in the area of asthma management programs. The implementation of strategies for the management of chronic respiratory disease and their incorporation into health care system protocols would seem to be a natural progression. However, there is minimal experience in this area. Joint efforts by individuals with expertise in AMPCs could promote the implementation of asthma management strategies, thus speeding the creation of treatment networks, which might have a multiplier effect, precluding the need for isolated centers to start from zero.

  5. A workshop on asthma management programs and centers in Brazil: reviewing and explaining concepts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Stelmach

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To report the results of a workshop regarding asthma management programs and centers (AMPCs in Brazil, so that they can be used as a tool for the improvement and advancement of current and future AMPCs. Methods: The workshop consisted of five presentations and the corresponding group discussions. The working groups discussed the following themes: implementation of asthma management strategies; human resources needed for AMPCs; financial resources needed for AMPCs; and operational maintenance of AMPCs. Results: The workshop involved 39 participants, from all regions of the country, representing associations of asthma patients (n = 3, universities (n = 7, and AMPCs (n = 29. We found a direct relationship between a lack of planning and the failure of AMPCs. Based on the experiences reported during the workshop, the common assumptions about AMPCs in Brazil were the importance of raising awareness of managers; greater community participation; interdependence between primary care and specialized care; awareness of regionalization; and use of medications available in the public health system. Conclusions: Brazil already has a core of experience in the area of asthma management programs. The implementation of strategies for the management of chronic respiratory disease and their incorporation into health care system protocols would seem to be a natural progression. However, there is minimal experience in this area. Joint efforts by individuals with expertise in AMPCs could promote the implementation of asthma management strategies, thus speeding the creation of treatment networks, which might have a multiplier effect, precluding the need for isolated centers to start from zero.

  6. Teacher perceptions of the Centers for Ocean Sciences Education Excellence: Central Gulf of Mexico program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sempier, Tracie Tingle

    The 12 Centers for Ocean Sciences Education Excellence (COSEE) are funded by the National Science Foundation and are designed to promote creative ways of disseminating marine science research and its importance to the public. The focus of this study is the COSEE Central Gulf of Mexico program which encourages active partnerships between research scientists and teachers. In these collaborative partnerships, teachers and scientists work together to create educational products and disseminate best practices in ocean sciences education. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the lesson plans and curricula created through the Centers for Ocean Sciences Education Excellence: Central Gulf of Mexico program (COSEE:CGOM), which are the products of this collaboration, were being used effectively in the classroom. The study addressed issues such as teacher perceptions of collaboration with scientists, effectiveness of COSEE:CGOM curriculum implementation in producing more ocean literate students, and teachers' varying views concerning how to successfully implement new COSEE:CGOM knowledge and concepts into their classrooms in order to improve student scientific understanding. In addition, the study examined frequency of use of COSEE:CGOM lesson plans and identified predictor variables that can produce a model for understanding factors hindering or enhancing lesson plan use. Further, participant perceptions of using peer-teaching as a method for disseminating COSEE:CGOM information in their districts were addressed.

  7. Obesity Prevention Program in Childcare Centers: Two-Year Follow-Up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natale, Ruby A; Messiah, Sarah E; Asfour, Lila S; Uhlhorn, Susan B; Englebert, Nicole E; Arheart, Kristopher L

    2017-11-01

    To assess the impact of an early childhood obesity prevention intervention "Healthy Caregivers-Healthy Children" (HC2) on dietary patterns and body mass index percentile (PBMI) over 2 school years. Randomized controlled trial. Childcare centers. Low-income families. Intervention centers (N = 12) received HC2 which consisted of (1) menu modifications, (2) a healthy eating and physical activity curriculum for children, and (3) a parent curriculum for healthy meal preparation, reinforced through a role-modeling curriculum. Control centers (N = 16) received an injury prevention/safety intervention. Child PBMI and parent report of child's consumption of fruits/vegetables and unhealthy food. Confirmatory factor analysis verified the psychometric properties of factor scores for children's consumption of fruits/vegetables and unhealthy food. Growth curve analysis assessed the impact of HC2 on change in consumption of fruits/vegetables and unhealthy food and PBMI over 2 school years. Children in the intervention group (n = 754) had a negative slope (β = -1.95, standard error [SE] = 0.97, P = .04), indicating less increase in PBMI versus control children (n = 457). Stratified analyses showed that obese children in the intervention arm had a significantly higher increase in fruit/vegetable consumption versus control group obese children (β = 0.24, SE = 0.08, P = .003). The HC2 intervention resulted in the maintenance of healthy PBMI over 2 preschool years among low-income multiethnic children. These findings support efforts to implement healthy weight programs in the childcare setting.

  8. 76 FR 15964 - Funding Priorities: Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-22

    ... Centers (Proposed Priority 1), the ADA National Network Knowledge Translation Center (Proposed Priority 2... Regional Centers, Knowledge Translation Center, and Collaborative'' in the subject line of your electronic... through 350.19: Research, training, demonstration, development, dissemination, utilization, and technical...

  9. Seasonal variation in marine C:N:P stoichiometry: can the composition of seston explain stable Redfield ratios?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Frigstad

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Seston is suspended particulate organic matter, comprising a mixture of autotrophic, heterotrophic and detrital material. Despite variable proportions of these components, marine seston often exhibits relatively small deviations from the Redfield ratio (C:N:P = 106:16:1. Two time-series from the Norwegian shelf in Skagerrak are used to identify drivers of the seasonal variation in seston elemental ratios. An ordination identified water mass characteristics and bloom dynamics as the most important drivers for determining C:N, while changes in nutrient concentrations and biomass were most important for the C:P and N:P relationships. There is no standardized method for determining the functional composition of seston and the fractions of POC, PON and PP associated with phytoplankton, therefore any such information has to be obtained by indirect means. In this study, a generalized linear model was used to differentiate between the live autotrophic and non-autotrophic sestonic fractions, and for both stations the non-autotrophic fractions dominated with respective annual means of 76 and 55%. This regression model approach builds on assumptions (e.g. constant POC:Chl-a ratio and the robustness of the estimates were explored with a bootstrap analysis. In addition the autotrophic percentage calculated from the statistical model was compared with estimated phytoplankton carbon, and the two independent estimates of autotrophic percentage were comparable with similar seasonal cycles. The estimated C:nutrient ratios of live autotrophs were, in general, lower than Redfield, while the non-autotrophic C:nutrient ratios were higher than the live autotrophic ratios and above, or close to, the Redfield ratio. This is due to preferential remineralization of nutrients, and the P content mainly governed the difference between the sestonic fractions. Despite the seasonal variability in seston composition and the generally low contribution of autotrophic

  10. Comparison of patient outcomes in academic medical centers with and without value analysis programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murray AS

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Adrienne S Murray, Michael Griswold, Imran Sunesara, Ed SmithUniversity of Mississippi Health Care, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS, USABackground: Value analysis is the science of balancing the mandate to deliver high-quality clinical outcomes with the necessity to drive down costs in order to thrive in the challenging economics of health care. This study compared average length of stay, direct cost, morbidity, and mortality across the cardiology, cardiovascular, neuroscience, and orthopedic service lines, in academic medical centers with and without value analysis programs (VAPs. The basic question was, “Do academic medical centers with VAPs have lower average length of stay, better morbidity and mortality rates, and lower overall supply costs?”Methods and results: The clinical data base/resource manager (CDB/RM of the University HealthSystem Consortium was utilized as secondary data for this study. Reports from the CDB/RM were generated from 2006 to 2011. Continuous variable differences across VAP status were examined using Wilcoxon two-sample tests. Primary analyses used multilevel linear mixed model methods to estimate the effects of VAPs on primary outcomes (average length of stay, cost, morbidity, mortality. Association components of the linear mixed models incorporated random effects at the hospital level and robust, Huber-White, standard errors were calculated. There was no significant difference for average length of stay, direct cost, morbidity, and mortality between academic medical centers with and without VAPs. However, outcomes were not noted to be substantially worse.Conclusion: Numerous case studies reveal that aggressively active VAPs do decrease hospital cost. Also, this study did not find a negative impact on patient care. Further studies are needed to explore the benefits of value analysis and its effect on patient outcomes.Keywords: value analysis, average length of stay, morbidity, mortality

  11. Taylor-Leaver FSC (Family Service Center): A Prototype for Program Evaluation of Navy Family Service Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-08-01

    Premarital counseling Anti-drinking campaign Single-parent programs -" Legal services * •Housing assistance Recreation programs Welcome package...Latin American -USE NO 2 PENCIL ONLY 3. Sex 0o Asia n/F ilipino/Pac. Islande- 0Male 0White/Caucasian 0 DO NOT USE INK OR BALLPOINT PENS.0Mae1 Wit/ucin

  12. Effects of P addition on plant C:N:P stoichiometry in an N-limited temperate wetland of Northeast China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Rong; Chen, Hui-Min; Zhang, Xin-Hou; Shi, Fu-Xi; Song, Chang-Chun

    2016-07-15

    Phosphorus (P) enrichment induced by anthropogenic activities results in modified plant nutrient status, which potentially alters the stoichiometry of carbon (C), nitrogen (N), and P in plants. However, how increased P availability changes plant C:N:P stoichiometry at different hierarchical scales is unclear in N-limited ecosystems. In this study, we conducted a four-level P addition experiment (0, 1.2, 4.8, and 9.6gPm(-)(2)year(-1)) to elucidate the effect of P enrichment on plant C:N:P stoichiometric ratios at both the species and community levels in a freshwater wetland in the Sanjiang Plain, Northeast China. We found that species- and community-level plant C:N:P stoichiometry responded consistently to six years of P addition, although there was a shift in species dominance. Phosphorus addition increased plant N and P concentrations and thus decreased C:N, C:P, and N:P ratios irrespective of the P addition levels. These similar change trends at different scales resulted from the identical responses of plant N and P concentrations in different species to P addition. Moreover, plant N concentration exhibited an increasing trend with increasing P addition levels, whereas plant C:N ratio showed a declining trend. At the community level, P addition at the rates of 1.2, 4.8, and 9.6gPm(-2)year(-1) decreased the C:N ratio by 24%, 27%, and 34%; decreased the C:P ratio by 33%, 35%, and 38%; and decreased the N:P ratio by 12%, 10%, and 6%, respectively. Our results indicate that the stoichiometric responses to P addition are scale-independent, and suggest that altered plant C:N:P stoichiometry induced by P enrichment would stimulate organic matter decomposition and accelerate nutrient cycles in N-limited temperate freshwater wetlands. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. The role of C:N:P stoichiometry in affecting denitrification in sediments from agricultural surface and tile-water wetlands

    OpenAIRE

    Grebliunas, Brian D.; Perry, William L.

    2016-01-01

    Nutrient stoichiometry within a wetland is affected by the surrounding land use, and may play a significant role in the removal of nitrate (NO3?N). Tile-drained, agricultural watersheds experience high seasonal inputs of NO3?N, but low phosphorus (PO4?P) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) loads relative to surface water dominated systems. This difference may present stoichiometric conditions that limit denitrification within receiving waterways. We investigated how C:N:P ratios affected denit...

  14. Performance of a career development and compensation program at an academic health science center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brodovich, Hugh; Beyene, Joseph; Tallett, Susan; MacGregor, Daune; Rosenblum, Norman D

    2007-04-01

    The academic physicians of our department developed a novel Career Development and Compensation Program to outline job expectations, enhance career development, and provide a peer-review process to assess performance. The Career Development and Compensation Program was founded on the principle that sustained achievement in education, clinical care, or research should be valued, supported, and rewarded in an equivalent manner and that reward for clinical work should not be limited by the focus of the university on research and education. The objective of this study was to determine whether the principles of the Career Development and Compensation Program were sustained during the initial 7 years of its implementation. The outcome of the 7 triennial reviews that occurred from 1999 to 2005 was evaluated. For the purposes of some analyses, physicians were classified as predominately clinical (clinician-specialists and clinician-teachers), predominately education (clinician-educators), or predominately research (clinician-investigators and clinician-scientists). Each of the job profiles had a similar probability to increase a level within the Career Development and Compensation Program at the time of triennial review. Similarly, all 5 job profiles had a similar rate of increase in their level in relation to the total number of years of experience at an academic health science center. Neither the university academic rank nor gender of the physician affected the probability of increasing a level at the time of the triennial review. The peer-reviewed Career Development and Compensation Program recognizes sustained achievement in each area of education, clinical care, and research in an equivalent manner with no detectable effect of academic rank or gender.

  15. Age-26 Cost-Benefit Analysis of the Child-Parent Center Early Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Arthur J.; Temple, Judy A.; White, Barry A.; Ou, Suh-Ruu; Robertson, Dylan L.

    2013-01-01

    We conducted a cost-benefit analysis of the Child-Parent Center (CPC) early childhood intervention. Using data collected up to age 26 on health and well-being, the study is the first adult economic analysis of a sustained large-scale and publicly-funded intervention. As part of the Chicago Longitudinal Study, a complete cohort of 900 low-income children who enrolled in 20 CPCs beginning at age 3 were compared to 500 well-matched low-income children who participated in the usual educational interventions for the economically disadvantaged in Chicago schools. School-age services were provided up to age 9 (third grade). Findings indicated that the three components of CPC had economic benefits in 2007 dollars that exceeded costs. The preschool program provided a total return to society of $10.83 per dollar invested (net benefits per participant of $83,708). Benefits to the public (other than program participants and families) were $7.20 per dollar invested. The primary sources of benefits were increased earnings and tax revenues, averted criminal justice system and victim costs, and savings for child welfare, special education, and grade retention. The school-age program had a societal return of $3.97 per dollar invested and a $2.11 public return. The extended intervention program (4 to 6 years of participation) had a societal return of $8.24 and public return of $5.21. Estimates were robust across a wide range of discount rates and alternative assumptions, and were consistent with the results of Monte Carlo simulations. Males, 1-year preschool participants, and children from higher risk families had greater economic benefits. Findings provide strong evidence that sustained early childhood programs can contribute to well-being for individuals and society. PMID:21291448

  16. Analysis of 10-Year Training Results of Medical Students Using the Microvascular Research Center Training Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onoda, Satoshi; Kimata, Yoshihiro; Sugiyama, Narushi; Tokuyama, Eijiro; Matsumoto, Kumiko; Ota, Tomoyuki; Thuzar, Moe

    2016-06-01

    Background In this article, we reviewed the training results of medical students using the Microvascular Research Center Training Program (MRCP), and proposed an ideal microsurgical training program for all individuals by analyzing the training results of medical students who did not have any surgical experience. Methods As of 2015, a total of 29 medical students completed the MRCP. In the most recent 12 medical students, the number of trials performed for each training stage and the number of rats needed to complete the training were recorded. Additionally, we measured the operating time upon finishing stage 5 for the recent six medical students after it became a current program. Results The average operating time upon finishing stage 5 for the recent six medical students was 120 minutes ± 11 minutes (standard deviation [SD]). The average vascular anastomosis time (for the artery and vein) was 52 minutes ± 2 minutes (SD). For the most recent 12 medical students, there was a negative correlation between the number of trials performed in the non-rat stages (stages 1-3) and the number of rats used in the rat stages (stages 4-5). Conclusion Analysis of the training results of medical students suggests that performing microsurgery first on silicon tubes and chicken wings saves animals' lives later during the training program. We believe that any person can learn the technique of microsurgery by performing 7 to 8 hours of training per day over a period of 15 days within this program setting. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  17. The impact of Fogarty International Center research training programs on public health policy and program development in Kenya and Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Sara; Paina, Ligia; Ssengooba, Freddie; Waswa, Douglas; M'Imunya, James M

    2013-08-21

    The Fogarty International Center (FIC) has supported research capacity development for over twenty years. While the mission of FIC is supporting and facilitating global health research conducted by U.S. and international investigators, building partnerships between health research institutions in the U.S. and abroad, and training the next generation of scientists to address global health needs, research capacity may impact health policies and programs and therefore have positive impacts on public health. We conducted an exploratory analysis of how FIC research training investments affected public health policy and program development in Kenya and Uganda. We explored the long term impacts of all FIC supported research training programs using case studies, in Kenya and Uganda. Semi-structured in-depth interviews were conducted with 53 respondents and 29 focus group discussion participants across the two countries. Qualitative methods were supplemented by structured surveys of trainees and document review, including a review of evidence cited in policy documents. In the primary focal areas of FIC grants, notably HIV/AIDS, there were numerous examples of work conducted by former FIC trainees that influenced national and global policies. Facilitators for this influence included the strong technical skills and scientific reputations of the trainees, and professional networks spanning research and policy communities. Barriers included the fact that trainees typically had not received training in research communication, relatively few policy makers had received scientific training, and institutional constraints that undermined alignment of research with policy needs. While FIC has not focused its programs on the goal of policy and program influence, its investments have affected global and national public health policies and practice. These influences have occurred primarily through strengthening research skills of scientists and developing strong in-country networks

  18. Effects of taxonomy, sediment, and water column on C:N:P stoichiometry of submerged macrophytes in Yangtze floodplain shallow lakes, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Haojie; Wu, Yao; Xie, Ping; Chen, Jun; Cao, Te; Xia, Wulai

    2016-11-01

    Carbon (C), nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) are the three most important essential elements limiting growth of primary producers. Submerged macrophytes generally absorb nutrients from sediments by root uptake. However, the C:N:P stoichiometric signatures of plant tissue are affected by many additional factors such as taxonomy, nutrient availability, and light availability. We first revealed the relative importance of taxonomy, sediment, and water column on plant C:N:P stoichiometry using variance partitioning based on partial redundancy analyses. Results showed that taxonomy was the most important factor in determining C:N:P stoichiometry, then the water column and finally the sediment. In this study, a significant positive relationship was found between community C concentration and macrophyte community biomass, indicating that the local low C availability in macrophytes probably was the main reason why submerged macrophytes declined in Yangtze floodplain shallow lakes. Based on our study, it is suggested that submerged macrophytes in Yangtze floodplain shallow lakes are primarily limited by low light levels rather than nutrient availability.

  19. Teaching Scientific Computing: A Model-Centered Approach to Pipeline and Parallel Programming with C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimiras Dolgopolovas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to present an approach to the introduction into pipeline and parallel computing, using a model of the multiphase queueing system. Pipeline computing, including software pipelines, is among the key concepts in modern computing and electronics engineering. The modern computer science and engineering education requires a comprehensive curriculum, so the introduction to pipeline and parallel computing is the essential topic to be included in the curriculum. At the same time, the topic is among the most motivating tasks due to the comprehensive multidisciplinary and technical requirements. To enhance the educational process, the paper proposes a novel model-centered framework and develops the relevant learning objects. It allows implementing an educational platform of constructivist learning process, thus enabling learners’ experimentation with the provided programming models, obtaining learners’ competences of the modern scientific research and computational thinking, and capturing the relevant technical knowledge. It also provides an integral platform that allows a simultaneous and comparative introduction to pipelining and parallel computing. The programming language C for developing programming models and message passing interface (MPI and OpenMP parallelization tools have been chosen for implementation.

  20. Failure mode and effects analysis based risk profile assessment for stereotactic radiosurgery programs at three cancer centers in Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teixeira, Flavia C., E-mail: flavitiz@gmail.com [CNEN—Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear, Rio de Janeiro, RJ 22290-901, Brazil and LCR/UERJ—Laboratorio de Ciencias Radiologicas/Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, RJ 20550-013 (Brazil); Almeida, Carlos E. de [LCR/UERJ—Laboratorio de Ciencias Radiologicas/Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, RJ 20550-013 (Brazil); Saiful Huq, M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute and UPMC Cancer Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15232 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Purpose: The goal of this study was to evaluate the safety and quality management program for stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) treatment processes at three radiotherapy centers in Brazil by using three industrial engineering tools (1) process mapping, (2) failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA), and (3) fault tree analysis. Methods: The recommendations of Task Group 100 of American Association of Physicists in Medicine were followed to apply the three tools described above to create a process tree for SRS procedure for each radiotherapy center and then FMEA was performed. Failure modes were identified for all process steps and values of risk priority number (RPN) were calculated from O, S, and D (RPN = O × S × D) values assigned by a professional team responsible for patient care. Results: The subprocess treatment planning was presented with the highest number of failure modes for all centers. The total number of failure modes were 135, 104, and 131 for centers I, II, and III, respectively. The highest RPN value for each center is as follows: center I (204), center II (372), and center III (370). Failure modes with RPN ≥ 100: center I (22), center II (115), and center III (110). Failure modes characterized by S ≥ 7, represented 68% of the failure modes for center III, 62% for center II, and 45% for center I. Failure modes with RPNs values ≥100 and S ≥ 7, D ≥ 5, and O ≥ 5 were considered as high priority in this study. Conclusions: The results of the present study show that the safety risk profiles for the same stereotactic radiotherapy process are different at three radiotherapy centers in Brazil. Although this is the same treatment process, this present study showed that the risk priority is different and it will lead to implementation of different safety interventions among the centers. Therefore, the current practice of applying universal device-centric QA is not adequate to address all possible failures in clinical processes at different

  1. Differences Between the Family-Centered "COPCA" Program and Traditional Infant Physical Therapy Based on Neurodevelopmental Treatment Principles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dirks, Tineke; Blauw-Hospers, Cornill H.; Hulshof, Lily J.; Hadders-Algra, Mijna

    Background. Evidence for effectiveness of pediatric physical therapy in infants at high risk for developmental motor disorders is limited. Therefore, "Coping With and Caring for Infants With Special Needs" (COPCA), a family-centered, early intervention program, was developed. The COPCA program is

  2. The Source of Child Care Center Preschool Learning and Program Standards: Implications for Potential Early Learning Challenge Fund Grantees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, Debra J.; Sansanelli, Rachel A.

    2010-01-01

    The proposed federal Early Learning Challenge Fund (ELCF) aims to improve the quality of early care and education programs by promoting the integration of more stringent program and early learning standards than are typically found in child care centers. ELCF grantees also must outline their plans for professional development and technical…

  3. An Analysis of Bilingual Education Programs and Directors in Texas Education Service Center Region Two School Districts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davila, Michelle Arevalo

    2013-01-01

    In this mixed methods research study, the researcher investigated the difference between additive and subtractive bilingual education programs and student achievement. The researcher examined types of bilingual education and special language programs currently utilized in school districts located within the Education Service Center Region Two…

  4. Effects of Health Education Programs for the Elders in Community Care Centers – Evaluated by Health Promotion Behaviors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuo-Song Chang

    2017-06-01

    Conclusion: The health education programs specifically for elders and middle age adults in community care centers were effective in raising the awareness of health promotion behaviors. The success could provide a reference for future studies developing health promotion and education programs and holistic care for community elders and middle age adults in Taiwan.

  5. C:N:P Stoichiometry and Leaf Traits of Halophytes in an Arid Saline Environment, Northwest China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lilong; Zhao, Guanxiang; Li, Meng; Zhang, Mingting; Zhang, Lifang; Zhang, Xinfang; An, Lizhe; Xu, Shijian

    2015-01-01

    Salinization is an important and increasingly prevalent issue which has broad and profound effects on plant survival and distribution pattern. To understand the patterns and potential drivers of leaf traits in saline environments, we determined the soil properties, leaf morphological traits (specific leaf area, SLA, and leaf dry matter content, LDMC), leaf chemical traits (leaf carbon, C, nitrogen, N, and phosphorus, P, stoichiometry) based on 142 observations collected from 23 sites in an arid saline environment, which is a vulnerable ecosystem in northwest China. We also explored the relationships among leaf traits, the responses of leaf traits, and plant functional groups (herb, woody, and succulent woody) to various saline environments. The arid desert halophytes were characterized by lower leaf C and SLA levels, higher N, but stable P and N:P. The leaf morphological traits were correlated significantly with the C, N, and P contents across all observations, but they differed within each functional group. Succulent woody plants had the lowest leaf C and highest leaf N levels among the three functional groups. The growth of halophytes might be more limited by N rather than P in the study area. GLM analysis demonstrated that the soil available nutrients and plant functional groups, but not salinity, were potential drivers of leaf C:N:P stoichiometry in halophytes, whereas species differences accounted for the largest contributions to leaf morphological variations. Our study provides baseline information to facilitate the management and restoration of arid saline desert ecosystem. PMID:25798853

  6. Rehabilitation program for traumatic chronic cervical pain associated with unsteadiness: a single case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Descarreaux Martin

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neck problems are often recurring or chronic. After pain, unsteadiness and balance problems are among the most frequent symptoms reported by chronic neck pain (CNP patients. Altered sensorimotor control of the cervical spine and sensorimotor integration problems affecting postural control have been observed in CNP patients. Very few data are available regarding the post-intervention effects of rehabilitation programs on postural control in CNP. Case presentation This is a case study of a traumatic CNP patient (a 45-year old female with postural unsteadiness who participated in an 8-week rehabilitation program combining therapeutic exercises with spinal manipulative therapy. Pre-intervention data revealed that the postural control system was challenged when postural control sensory inputs were altered, particularly during the head-extended-backward condition. Post-intervention centre of pressure measurements indicated a drastic reduction in postural sway during trials with changes in neck orientation. Conclusion This case report indicates that an 8-week rehabilitation program combining therapeutic exercises with spinal manipulative therapy may have had an effect on improvement of postural control in a trauma CNP patient with unsteadiness. These results warrant further studies to investigate the relationships between pain amelioration, sensorimotor control of the cervical spine, muscle fitness and postural steadiness.

  7. Seeing the World Through Our Children's Eyes: Exploring Parent Practices, Routines, and Culture in A Non Center Based Care Program

    OpenAIRE

    Cortes, Alma Ester

    2012-01-01

    There are a limited number of programs as well as a limited structural capacity for children under four. Research indicates that 22% of four-year old children are enrolled in preschool (College Board, 2008). Currently, The United States lacks a unified system for families with children under the age of three, with opportunities to attend center-based care or specific programming (Magnuson & Waldfogel, 2005). Not all families have access to high quality care. Intervention programs that focus ...

  8. OPTIMASI KONSENTRASI INOKULUM, RASIO C:N:P DAN pH PADA PROSES BIOREMEDIASI LIMBAH PENGILANGAN MINYAK BUMI MENGGUNAKAN KULTUR CAMPURAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syukria Ikhsan Zam

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The purposes of this research were to obtain the best inoculum concentration, C:N:P ratio, and pH, and also to identify the ability of mixed culture of hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria in oil waste degradation. The isolats were used are Acinetobacter baumanni, Alcaligenes eutrophus, Bacillus sp1., Methylococcus capsulatus, Bacillus sp2., Morococcus sp., Pseudomonas diminuta, Xanthomonas albilineans, Bacillus cereus and Flavobacterium branchiophiia. Variation of inoculum concentrations were 10%, 15%, and 20% (v/v, C:N:P ratios were 100:10:1, 100:10:0,5, 100:5:1, and 100:5:0,5, and pH were 6,5, 7,0, 7,5. Observed parameters in optimization were Total Plate Count (TPC the culture every 24 hours, Total Petroleum Hydrocarbon (TPH and Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD examined at the end of the bioremediation period. Best optimization result then analyzed with GC/MS. Optimization result indicated the best inoculum concentration was 10% with TPH degradation 61,79% and COD slope 61,75%. It is assumed that the low value of TPH degradation and COD slope at 15% and 20% inoculum concentration were caused by competition inside the bacterial population at that high inoculum concentration. The competition result in low growth and degradation. C:N:P ratio was 100:5:1 with TPH degradation 66,55% and COD slope 85,18%. It is assumed that the C:N:P ratio is equal, so it can enhance the bioremediation procces. The best pH was 7,5 with TPH degradation 73,24% and COD slope 86,28%. The process at the optimum conditions using inoculum as a mixed culture enhanced the bioremediation process with the result as follows, TPH degradation 93,06%, COD 90,73% for treatment. The chromatogram indicated that total hydrocarbon compound from nC9 – nC32 have been degraded by 43,413% – 63,117%. A good result of bioremediation was obtained from mixed culture inoculum at 10% concentration, C:N:P ratio of 100:5:1, and pH 7,5.

  9. Rocket ranch the nuts and bolts of the Apollo Moon program at Kennedy Space Center

    CERN Document Server

    Ward, Jonathan H

    2015-01-01

    Jonathan Ward takes the reader deep into the facilities at Kennedy Space Center to describe NASA’s first computer systems used for spacecraft and rocket checkout and explain how tests and launches proceeded. Descriptions of early operations include a harrowing account of the heroic efforts of pad workers during the Apollo 1 fire. A companion to the author’s book Countdown to a Moon Launch: Preparing Apollo for Its Historic Journey, this explores every facet of the facilities that served as the base for the Apollo/Saturn missions. Hundreds of illustrations complement the firsthand accounts of more than 70 Apollo program managers and engineers. The era of the Apollo/Saturn missions was perhaps the most exciting period in American space exploration history. Cape Canaveral and Kennedy Space Center were buzzing with activity. Thousands of workers came to town to build the facilities and launch the missions needed to put an American on the Moon before the end of the decade. Work at KSC involved much more than j...

  10. Status of the Morgantown Energy Technology Center`s Particulate Cleanup Program -- enabling technology for advanced coal-based power systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dennis, R.A.

    1994-10-01

    Advanced coal-based power systems, such as integrated gasification and pressurized fluidized-bed combustion, require particulate removal at high temperatures and high pressure under adverse chemical conditions. To facilitate the development of advanced coal-based power systems, then Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) has assembled a Particulate Cleanup Program, which conducts technology demonstration projects and applied research to address the adverse filtration conditions and filter system issues, as well as the future performance demands of these systems.

  11. Navigating to health: Evaluation of a community health center patient navigation program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Monica L.; Gallivan, Leah; Lemon, Stephenie C.; Borg, Amy; Ramirez, Jose; Figueroa, Brenda; McGuire, Antonia; Rosal, Milagros C.

    2015-01-01

    Patient Navigators are trained, lay health care workers who guide patients in overcoming barriers to health care access and utilization. Little evidence exists regarding reach and impact of Patient Navigators for chronic disease management. This study evaluated a Patient Navigator program aimed at optimizing health care utilization among ethnically diverse patients with diabetes and/or hypertension at a community health center (CHC). Trained Patient Navigators contacted eligible patients who had not seen a primary care provider (PCP) for ≥ 6 months. Outcomes included number of patients reached by Patient Navigators and seen by PCPs after Patient Navigator contact. Distributions and frequencies of outcomes pre- and post-call were compared. A total of 215 patients had ≥ 1 call attempt from Patient Navigators. Of these, 74 were additionally contacted via mailed letters or at the time of a CHC visit. Among the 45 patients reached, 77.8% scheduled an appointment through the Patient Navigator. These patients had higher rates of PCP visits 6 months post-call (90%) than those not reached (42.2%) (p < 0.0001). Findings emphasize the value of direct telephone contact in patient health care re-engagement and may inform the development of future Patient Navigator programs to improve reach and effectiveness. PMID:26844134

  12. Multiorgan transplant program in a nonacademic center: organizational structure and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbour, Nicolas; Singhal, Ashish; Ghuloom, Adel E; Monlux, Roy D; Bag, Remzi; Dugan, Rebecca; Sigle, Gary

    2010-09-01

    Given the complexity of solid organ transplantation, it is reasonable to believe that numerous factors are at play in achieving the enviable outcomes reported. The aim of this study is to examine the role of an organizational structure in maintaining the outcomes of a multiorgan transplant program at a nonacademic center. A retrospective analysis of 2378 solid organ transplants at Nazih Zuhdi Transplant Institute between March 1985 and December 2008 was performed. The 1-year and 3-year patient and graft survival rates, rate of retransplantation, and median length of hospital stay were compared with US national data released by the Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients in January 2009. The 1-year patient survival rates were 87.5% for heart, 95.1% for kidney, 75.8% for lung, 89.6% for liver, and 100.0% for pancreas. The 3-year patient survival rates were 73.5% for heart, 89.7% for kidney, 57.8% for lung, 87.7% for liver, and 100.0% for pancreas. A well-structured transplant program along with competent medical, administrative, and ancillary support can achieve comparable patient and graft survival rates independent of volume.

  13. SPA AND CLIMATIC RESORTS (CENTERS AS RESOURCES OF PROGRAM OF SPORT RECREATION IMPLEMENTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivica Nikolić

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The aspiration of the civilized man is the improvement of work which aim is to achieve as big as possible effect of productivity and as small as possible participation of labour. The result of this process, which cannot be avoided, is some kind of fatigue that has hypocinaesiological characteristics in regard to demands of modern work process. The most effective way to fight against fatigue is to have an active holiday that is meaningfully programmed, led and carried out through movement of tourists, with the addition of natural factors, among which climate and healing waters are particularly important. These very resources characterize the tourist potential of Serbia and Montenegro with lots of available facilities at 1000 m height above the sea level and spa centers with springs and a complete offer physio-prophylactic procedures and following facilities for sport recreation. The implementation of programmed active holidays in to the corpus of tourist offer of Serbia and Montenegro represents prospective of development of tourism and tourist economy with effects of multiple importance as for participants, so for the level of tourist consumption. That will definitely influence the lengthening of tourist season as the primary goal of every catering establishment. Surveys show that the affection and viewpoints of potential tourists are especially directed towards engaging sport games and activities on and in the water, as part of the elementary tourist offer in spas and climatic resorts and their available facilities. Recommendationsand postulates of program of sport recreation, which are presented through four charts, are the basis of marketing strategy of appearance on tourist market with permanent education of management personnel and further research of potential market expanding. The publication and distribution of advertising materials are especially important, both at the market in our country and at the foreign market, where the abundance

  14. C:N:P Molar Ratios, Sources and 14C Dating of Surficial Sediments from the NW Slope of Cuba.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guadalupe de la Lanza Espino

    Full Text Available The surficial sediments recovered from 12 sites located near the channel axis of the Florida Straits and the lower slope off NW Cuba were analyzed for total organic carbon (TOC, nitrogen (TN, phosphorus (TP, elemental C:N:P ratios, C and N isotopic values, and 14C dating. The depth profiles of TOC, TN, and TP (0-18 cm displayed a downcore trend and a significant variation. The TOC values were low (0.15 to 0.62%; 66 to 516 µmol g(-1. Sites near the island's lower slope had lower TOC average concentrations (158-333 µmol g(-1 than those closer to the channel axis (averaging 341-516 µmol g(-1; p <0.05. The TN concentrations near the lower slope attained 0.11% (80 µmol g(-1, whereas, towards the channel axis, they decreased to 0.07% (55 µmol g(-1; p<0.05. The C:N ratios ranged from 1.9 to 10.2. The mean molar C:N ratio (5.4 indicated a marine hemipelagic deposition. The TP was lower at sites near the lower slope (38.4 to 50.0 µmol gv; 0.12% to 0.16% than those near the channel axis (50.0 to 66 µmol g(-1; 0.15 to 0.21%. C:P fluctuated from 7.7 to 14.1 in the surficial sediment layer. The bulk organic δ13Corg and δ15N values confirmed pelagic organic sources, and the 14C dating revealed that the sediments were deposited during the Holocene (1000-5000 yr BP. We suggest that the hydrodynamic conditions in the Straits influence vertical and advective fluxes of particulate organic material trapped in the mixed-layer, which reduces the particulate matter flux to the seabed.

  15. The Solar Heating and Cooling Commercial Demonstration Program at Marshall Space Flight Center - Some problems and conclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, R. L.

    1978-01-01

    The origin and evolution of the Solar Heating and Cooling Commercial Demonstration Program by the Department of Energy and the Marshall Space Flight Center activities supporting this program from its conception are defined and discussed. Problems are summarized in the design and financial areas. It is concluded that the program has significantly assisted the creation of a viable solar testing and cooling industry. The cost effective procedures evolving from the program are expected to make a major contribution to reducing the effective life cycle cost of solar installation.

  16. Development of a human pancreatic islet-transplant program through a collaborative relationship with a remote islet-isolation center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goss, John A; Goodpastor, Sarah E; Brunicardi, F Charles; Barth, Merle H; Soltes, George D; Garber, Alan J; Hamilton, Dale J; Alejandro, Rodolfo; Ricordi, Camillo

    2004-02-15

    With the development of the Edmonton Protocol, pancreatic islet transplantation (PIT) now offers insulin-dependent diabetic patients metabolic stability. The PIT Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulations, pancreatic islet isolation (PII) techniques, and clinical PIT protocols are challenging and make PIT program development daunting. Review of the establishment of a PIT program through a collaborative relationship with a remote PIT/PII center. Four key elements are required: (1) development of a collaborative relationship with an established PIT/PII center, (2) achievement of institutional review board and FDA approval at both centers, (3) generation of standard operating procedures, and (4) development of a multidisciplinary PIT team. Securing a collaborative relationship with an experienced PIT/PII center permitted our program to develop in less than 18 months. Twenty-two PITs were completed in the first clinical year. Collaboration with an experienced PIT/PII center allows developing programs to focus on patient safety and care, prudent use of pancreata, and consolidates PII expertise and experience.

  17. User-centered Design of the eyeGuide: A Tailored Glaucoma Behavior Change Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killeen, Olivia J; MacKenzie, Chamisa; Heisler, Michele; Resnicow, Ken; Lee, Paul P; Newman-Casey, Paula Anne

    2016-10-01

    We employed user-centered design to refine a prototype of the eyeGuide, a novel, tailored behavior change program intended to improve medication adherence among glaucoma patients. Glaucoma patients age 40 years and above prescribed ≥1 glaucoma medication were included. The eyeGuide consists of tailored educational content and tailored testimonials in which patients share how they were able to overcome barriers to improve their medication adherence. A hybrid of semistructured diagnostic and pretesting interviews were used to refine the content of the eyeGuide. Purposeful sampling was used to recruit a study population representative of the glaucoma patient population. Interviews were conducted until thematic saturation was reached. Interviews were audiorecorded and transcribed verbatim. Three researchers analyzed the transcripts, generated a codebook, and identified key themes using NVivo 10.0 to further refine the eyeGuide. Twenty-one glaucoma patients were interviewed; mean age 72±12.4 years, 5 (24%) African Americans, 9 (43%) with poor self-reported adherence, 10 (47.6%) age 75 years and above, 10 (47.6%) with poor vision, and 9 (42.9%) women. Qualitative analysis identified 5 important themes for improving glaucoma self-management: social support, patient-provider relationship, medication routine, patients' beliefs about disease and treatment, and eye drop instillation. All participants expressed satisfaction with in-person delivery of the eyeGuide and preferred this to a Web-based module. Participant feedback resulted in revised content. User-centered design generated improvements in the eyeGuide that would not have been possible without patient input. Participants expressed satisfaction with the tailored content.

  18. Center for Theoretical Underground Physics and Related Areas – CETUP*2016 Summer Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szczerbinska, Barbara [Texas A& M University Corpus Christi, Madison, SD (United States)

    2017-02-15

    For last six years Center for Theoretical Underground Physics and Related Areas (CETUP*) successfully provided a stimulating environment for creative thinking and open communication between researches of varying ages and nationalities in dynamic atmosphere of intense scientific interactions. Ongoing and proposed Neutrino and Dark Matter experiments are expected to unveil the answers to fundamental questions about the Universe. CETUP*2016 was focused exactly on these subjects bringing together experts in dark matter, neutrino physics, particle and nuclear physics, astrophysics and cosmology from around the world. Scientists invited to participate in the program not only provided theoretical support to the underground science, but they also examined core questions including: What is the nature of dark matter?, What is the origin of the neutrino masses?, How well do we know the neutrino parameters?, How have neutrinos shaped the evolution of the universe?, , What are the fundamental underlying symmetries of the Universe? Is there a Grand Unified Theory of the Universe? and many others. The 2016 CETUP* summer program consisted of three sessions (June 6 – July 16, 2016) covering various aspects of theoretical and experimental neutrino physics, unification and dark matter. The two week long session on Physics and Instrumentation of the Near Detector for the Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiments (June 6 – June 16) was followed by the two week long Neutrino Physics/Unification session: “From Grand Unification to String Theory and Back” (June 20 – July 2). The program ended with two week long session on Dark Matter Physics (July 4 – July 16). This six-week long program allowed for thorough discussions and an effective and comprehensive analysis of topics related to Dark Matter, Dark Energy, Neutrino Physics including astrophysical neutrinos, near and far detector physics, neutrino interactions, Higgs Boson, Inflation, Leptogenesis and many others that will advance

  19. Introducing an enhanced recovery after surgery program in colorectal surgery: A single center experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bona, Stefano; Molteni, Mattia; Rosati, Riccardo; Elmore, Ugo; Bagnoli, Pietro; Monzani, Roberta; Caravaca, Monica; Montorsi, Marco

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To study the implementation of an enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) program at a large University Hospital from “pilot study” to “standard of care”. METHODS: The study was designed as a prospective single centre cohort study. A prospective evaluation of compliance to a protocol based on full application of all ERAS principles, through the progressive steps of its implementation, was performed. Results achieved in the initial pilot study conducted by a dedicated team (n = 47) were compared to those achieved in the shared protocol phase (n = 143) three years later. Outcomes were length of postoperative hospital stay, readmission rate, compliance to the protocol and morbidity. Primary endpoint was the description of the results and the identification of critical issues of large scale implementation of an ERAS program in colorectal surgery emerged in the experience of a single center. Secondary endpoint was the identification of interventions that have been proven to be effective for facilitating the transition from traditional care pathways to a multimodal management protocol according to ERAS principles in colorectal surgery at a single center. RESULTS: During the initial pilot study (March 2009 to December 2010; 47 patients) conducted by a dedicated multidisciplinary team, compliance to the items of ERAS protocol was 93%, with a median length of hospital stay (LOS) of 3 d. Early anastomotic fistulas were observed in 2 cases (4.2%), which required reoperation (Clavien-Dindo grade IIIb). None of the patients had been discharged before the onset of the complication, which could therefore receive prompt treatment. There were also four (8.5%) minor complications (Clavien-Dindo grade II). Thirty days readmission rate was 4%. Perioperative mortality was nil. After implementation of the protocol throughout the Hospital in unselected patients (May 2012 to December 2012; 147 patients) compliance was 74%, with a median LOS of 6 d. Early anastomotic fistulas

  20. Transition Marshall Space Flight Center Wind Profiler Splicing Algorithm to Launch Services Program Upper Winds Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauman, William H., III

    2014-01-01

    NASAs LSP customers and the future SLS program rely on observations of upper-level winds for steering, loads, and trajectory calculations for the launch vehicles flight. On the day of launch, the 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) Launch Weather Officers (LWOs) monitor the upper-level winds and provide forecasts to the launch team via the AMU-developed LSP Upper Winds tool for launches at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. This tool displays wind speed and direction profiles from rawinsondes released during launch operations, the 45th Space Wing 915-MHz Doppler Radar Wind Profilers (DRWPs) and KSC 50-MHz DRWP, and output from numerical weather prediction models.The goal of this task was to splice the wind speed and direction profiles from the 45th Space Wing (45 SW) 915-MHz Doppler radar Wind Profilers (DRWPs) and KSC 50-MHz DRWP at altitudes where the wind profiles overlap to create a smooth profile. In the first version of the LSP Upper Winds tool, the top of the 915-MHz DRWP wind profile and the bottom of the 50-MHz DRWP were not spliced, sometimes creating a discontinuity in the profile. The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Natural Environments Branch (NE) created algorithms to splice the wind profiles from the two sensors to generate an archive of vertically complete wind profiles for the SLS program. The AMU worked with MSFC NE personnel to implement these algorithms in the LSP Upper Winds tool to provide a continuous spliced wind profile.The AMU transitioned the MSFC NE algorithms to interpolate and fill data gaps in the data, implement a Gaussian weighting function to produce 50-m altitude intervals in each sensor, and splice the data together from both DRWPs. They did so by porting the MSFC NE code written with MATLAB software into Microsoft Excel Visual Basic for Applications (VBA). After testing the new algorithms in stand-alone VBA modules, the AMU replaced the existing VBA code in the LSP Upper Winds tool with the new

  1. Evaluation of the Microvascular Research Center Training Program for Assessing Microsurgical Skills in Trainee Surgeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Kiyoshi; Yamashita, Shuji; Sugiyama, Narushi; Tokuyama, Eijiro; Matsumoto, Kumiko; Takara, Ayumi; Kimata, Yoshihiro

    2013-01-01

    Background We established the Microvascular Research Center Training Program (MRCP) to help trainee surgeons acquire and develop microsurgical skills. Medical students were recruited to undergo the MRCP to assess the effectiveness of the MRCP for trainee surgeons. Methods Twenty-two medical students with no prior microsurgical experience, who completed the course from 2005 to 2012, were included. The MRCP comprises 5 stages of training, each with specific passing requirements. Stages 1 and 2 involve anastomosing silicone tubes and blood vessels of chicken carcasses, respectively, within 20 minutes. Stage 3 involves anastomosing the femoral artery and vein of live rats with a 1-day patency rate of >80%. Stage 4 requires replantation of free superficial inferior epigastric artery flaps in rats with a 7-day success rate of >80%. Stage 5 involves successful completion of one case of rat replantation/transplantation. We calculated the passing rate for each stage and recorded the number of anastomoses required to pass stages 3 and 4. Results The passing rates were 100% (22/22) for stages 1 and 2, 86.4% (19/22) for stage 3, 59.1% (13/22) for stage 4, and 55.0% (11/20) for stage 5. The number of anastomoses performed was 17.2±12.2 in stage 3 and 11.3±8.1 in stage 4. Conclusions Majority of the medical students who undertook the MRCP acquired basic microsurgical skills. Thus, we conclude that the MRCP is an effective microsurgery training program for trainee surgeons. PMID:23730596

  2. Evaluation of the Microvascular Research Center Training Program for Assessing Microsurgical Skills in Trainee Surgeons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seiji Komatsu

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundWe established the Microvascular Research Center Training Program (MRCP to help trainee surgeons acquire and develop microsurgical skills. Medical students were recruited to undergo the MRCP to assess the effectiveness of the MRCP for trainee surgeons.MethodsTwenty-two medical students with no prior microsurgical experience, who completed the course from 2005 to 2012, were included. The MRCP comprises 5 stages of training, each with specific passing requirements. Stages 1 and 2 involve anastomosing silicone tubes and blood vessels of chicken carcasses, respectively, within 20 minutes. Stage 3 involves anastomosing the femoral artery and vein of live rats with a 1-day patency rate of >80%. Stage 4 requires replantation of free superficial inferior epigastric artery flaps in rats with a 7-day success rate of >80%. Stage 5 involves successful completion of one case of rat replantation/transplantation. We calculated the passing rate for each stage and recorded the number of anastomoses required to pass stages 3 and 4.ResultsThe passing rates were 100% (22/22 for stages 1 and 2, 86.4% (19/22 for stage 3, 59.1% (13/22 for stage 4, and 55.0% (11/20 for stage 5. The number of anastomoses performed was 17.2±12.2 in stage 3 and 11.3±8.1 in stage 4.ConclusionsMajority of the medical students who undertook the MRCP acquired basic microsurgical skills. Thus, we conclude that the MRCP is an effective microsurgery training program for trainee surgeons.

  3. Assessing the Development of Multidisciplinary Care: Experience of the National Cancer Institute Community Cancer Centers Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Eliot L; Chawla, Neetu; Morris, Paul T; Castro, Kathleen M; Carrigan, Angela C; Das, Irene Prabhu; Clauser, Steven B

    2015-01-01

    The National Cancer Institute Community Cancer Centers Program (NCCCP) began in 2007 with a goal of expanding cancer research and delivering quality care in communities. The NCCCP Quality of Care (QoC) Subcommittee was charged with developing and improving the quality of multidisciplinary care. An assessment tool with nine key elements relevant to MDC structure and operations was developed. Fourteen NCCCP sites reported multidisciplinary care assessments for lung, breast, and colorectal cancer in June 2010, June 2011, and June 2012 using an online reporting tool. Each site evaluated their level of maturity (level 1 = no multidisciplinary care, level 5 = highly integrated multidisciplinary care) in nine elements integral to multidisciplinary care. Thematic analysis of open-ended qualitative responses was also conducted. The proportion of sites that reported level 3 or greater on the assessment tool was tabulated at each time point. For all tumor types, sites that reached this level increased in six elements: case planning, clinical trials, integration of care coordination, physician engagement, quality improvement, and treatment team integration. Factors that enabled improvement included increasing organizational support, ensuring appropriate physician participation, increasing patient navigation, increasing participation in national quality initiatives, targeting genetics referrals, engaging primary care providers, and integrating clinical trial staff. Maturation of multidisciplinary care reflected focused work of the NCCCP QoC Subcommittee. Working group efforts in patient navigation, genetics, and physician conditions of participation were evident in improved multidisciplinary care performance for three common malignancies. This work provides a blueprint for health systems that wish to incorporate prospective multidisciplinary care into their cancer programs. Copyright © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  4. Saint Louis Center for Sustainment of Trauma and Readiness Skills: A Collaborative Air Force-Civilian Trauma Skills Training Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-19

    Journal Article 3. DATES COVERED (From – To) June 2014 – December 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Saint Louis Center for Sustainment of Trauma and...Readiness Skills: A Collaborative Air Force-Civilian Trauma Skills Training Program 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT...in support of these campaigns have had to maintain a high degree of clinical skill to effectively render care to wounded combatants, a necessity

  5. Johnson Space Center's Free Range Bicycle Program.- Fall 2015 Intern Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee-Stockton, Willem

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Johnson Space Center is a big place, encompassing 1,620 acres and more than a hundred buildings. Furthermore, there are reportedly 15 thousand employees, all of which have somewhere to be. To facilitate the movement of all these people JSC has historically relied on human power. Pedaling their way towards deep space, bicycles have been the go to method. Currently there are about 200 Free Range Bicycles at JSC. Free Range Bicycles belong to nobody, except NASA, and are available for anybody to use. They are not to be locked or hidden (although frequently are) and the intention is that there will always be a bike to hop on to get where you're going (although it may not be the bike you rode in on). Although not without its own shortcomings, the Free Range Bicycle Program has continued to provide low cost, simple transportation for NASA's JSC. In addition to the approximately 200 Free Range Bicycles, various larger divisions (like engineering) will often buy a few dozen bikes for their team members to use or individuals will bring their own personal bike to either commute or use on site. When these bicycles fall into disrepair or are abandoned (from retirees etc) they become a problem at JSC. They are an eye sore, create a safety hazard and make it harder to find a working bike in a time of need. The Free Range Program hopes to address this first problem by "tagging out" abandoned or out of service bicycles. A bright orange "DO NOT OPERATE" tag is placed on the bike and given a serial number for tracking purposes. See picture to the right. If the bike has an active owner with intentions to repair the bike the bottom of the tag has instructions for how to claim the abandoned bicycle. After being tagged the owner of the bicycle has 30 days to claim the bicycle and either haul it off site or get it repaired (and labeled) in accordance with Johnson's Bicycle Policy. If the abandoned bicycle is not claimed within 30 days it becomes the property of the Government. The

  6. Using the Patient Centered Observation Form: Evaluation of an online training program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keen, Misbah; Cawse-Lucas, Jeanne; Carline, Jan; Mauksch, Larry

    2015-06-01

    The Patient Centered Observation Form (PCOF) helps trainees identify and describe specific communication skills and enhance self-awareness about skill use. We studied the effectiveness and ease of use of the Improving Communication Assessment Program (ICAP), an online module that prepares trainees to use the PCOF. Students, residents and medical educators viewed two videos (common and better skill use) of the same interaction and rated each video using the PCOF. Video sequence was randomized. We assessed agreement with experts, ease of use, concepts learned, and areas of confusion. Trainees (211) achieved strong agreement (.83) with experts and were highly satisfied (mean 4.18 out of 5). Viewing the common video first produced higher agreement (.87 vs .79; ES=.4) with experts and greater satisfaction (4.36 vs 4.02, ES .4) than viewing the better video first. Trainees reported diverse areas of learning and minimal confusion. ICAP training to use the PCOF may facilitate teaching and assessment of communication skills and enrich training through peer observation and feedback. We offer several educational strategies. Learning to use the PCOF via the ICAP module may accelerate communication training for medical students, residents, medical educators and practicing clinicians. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Test Program for Stirling Radioisotope Generator Hardware at NASA Glenn Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewandowski, Edward J.; Bolotin, Gary S.; Oriti, Salvatore M.

    2015-01-01

    Stirling-based energy conversion technology has demonstrated the potential of high efficiency and low mass power systems for future space missions. This capability is beneficial, if not essential, to making certain deep space missions possible. Significant progress was made developing the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG), a 140-W radioisotope power system. A variety of flight-like hardware, including Stirling convertors, controllers, and housings, was designed and built under the ASRG flight development project. To support future Stirling-based power system development NASA has proposals that, if funded, will allow this hardware to go on test at the NASA Glenn Research Center. While future flight hardware may not be identical to the hardware developed under the ASRG flight development project, many components will likely be similar, and system architectures may have heritage to ASRG. Thus, the importance of testing the ASRG hardware to the development of future Stirling-based power systems cannot be understated. This proposed testing will include performance testing, extended operation to establish an extensive reliability database, and characterization testing to quantify subsystem and system performance and better understand system interfaces. This paper details this proposed test program for Stirling radioisotope generator hardware at NASA Glenn. It explains the rationale behind the proposed tests and how these tests will meet the stated objectives.

  8. Evaluation of the Microvascular Research Center Training Program for Assessing Microsurgical Skills in Trainee Surgeons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seiji Komatsu

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Background  We established the Microvascular Research Center Training Program (MRCPto help trainee surgeons acquire and develop microsurgical skills. Medical students wererecruited to undergo theMRCP to assessthe effectiveness oftheMRCP fortrainee surgeons.Methods  Twenty-two medical students with no prior microsurgical experience, who completed the course from2005 to 2012,were included. TheMRCP comprises 5 stages oftraining,each with specific passing requirements. Stages 1 and 2 involve anastomosing silicone tubesand blood vessels of chicken carcasses,respectively,within 20minutes. Stage 3 involves anastomosing the femoral artery and vein oflive ratswith a 1-day patency rate of > 80%. Stage4 requires replantation of free superficial inferior epigastric artery flaps in rats with a 7-daysuccessrate of > 80%. Stage 5 involvessuccessful completion of one case ofratreplantation/transplantation. We calculated the passing rate for each stage and recorded the number ofanastomosesrequired to passstages 3 and 4.Results  The passing rates were 100% (22/22 for stages 1 and 2, 86.4% (19/22 for stage3, 59.1% (13/22 for stage 4, and 55.0% (11/20 for stage 5. The number of anastomosesperformedwas 17.2± 12.2 in stage 3 and 11.3± 8.1 in stage 4.Conclusions  Majority ofthemedicalstudentswho undertook theMRCP acquired basicmicrosurgicalskills. Thus,we conclude thatthe MRCP is an effective microsurgery training programfortrainee surgeons.

  9. Chest Pain Centers: A Comparison of Accreditation Programs in Germany and the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breuckmann, Frank; Burt, David R; Melching, Kay; Erbel, Raimund; Heusch, Gerd; Senges, Jochen; Garvey, J Lee

    2015-06-01

    The implementation of chest pain centers (CPC)/units (CPU) has been shown to improve emergency care in patients with suspected cardiac ischemia. In an effort to provide a systematic and specific standard of care for patients with acute chest pain, the Society of Cardiovascular Patient Care (SCPC) as well as the German Cardiac Society (GCS) introduced criteria for the accreditation of specialized units. To date, 825 CPCs in the United States and 194 CPUs in Germany have been successfully certified by the SCPC or GCS, respectively. Even though there are differences in the accreditation processes, the goals are quite similar, focusing on enhanced operational efficiencies in the care of the acute coronary syndrome patients, reduced time delays, improved diagnostic and therapeutic strategies using adapted standard operating procedures, and increased medical as well as community awareness by the implementation of nationwide standardized concepts. In addition to national efforts, both societies have launched international initiatives, accrediting CPCs/CPU in the Middle East and China (SCPC) and Switzerland (GCS). Enhanced collaboration among international bodies interested in promoting high quality care might extend the opportunity for accreditation of facilities that treat cardiovascular patients, with national programs designed to meet local needs and local healthcare system requirements.

  10. An integer programming for airplane rounting in the U.S. Center-TRACON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srisawat Supsomboon

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Air travel has been a major transportation for commerce and tour in many countries. As the demand of air traffic has been increasing, air traffic management has confronted with poverty of handling the increase of the demand of runway facilities where congestion often takes place. In order to cope with such problems, runway efficiency enhancement or capacity increasing are taken into account. In air traffic management, the effective air space utilization and air control workload management can be improved by the use of many up-to-date technologies in forms of decision support tools. This study developed a computer-aided decision support model in the form of integer programming. The purpose of the model was to allocate airplanes arrival at U.S. Center-TRACON airspace to enter feeder gates and to design optimal routes along the track to runway. Results of optimal path of the airplanes throughout the TRACON air space system which yield a minimum delay were presented.

  11. Male veterans with complicated urinary tract infections: Influence of a patient-centered antimicrobial stewardship program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbo, James F; Ruh, Christine A; Kurtzhalts, Kari E; Ott, Michael C; Sellick, John A; Mergenhagen, Kari A

    2016-12-01

    The influence of antimicrobial stewardship programs (ASPs) on outcomes in male veterans treated for complicated urinary tract infection has not been determined. This was a retrospective cohort study encompassing the study period January 1, 2005-October 31, 2014, which was conducted at a 150-bed Veterans Affairs Healthcare System facility in Buffalo, NY. Male veterans admitted for treatment of complicated urinary tract infection were identified using ICD-9-CM codes. Outcomes before and after implementation of a patient-centered ASP, including duration of antibiotic therapy, length of hospitalization, readmission within 30 days, and Clostridium difficile infection were compared. Interventions resulting from the ASP were categorized. Of the 1,268 patients screened, 241 met criteria for inclusion in the study (n = 118 and n = 123 in the pre-ASP and ASP group, respectively). Duration of antibiotic therapy was significantly shorter in the ASP group (10.32 days vs 11.96 days; P complicated urinary tract infection. Implementation of an ASP was associated with significant decreases in duration of antibiotic therapy and length of hospitalization, without adversely affecting 30-day readmission rates. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. NASA Glenn Research Center Program in High Power Density Motors for Aeropropulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Gerald V.; Kascak, Albert F.; Ebihara, Ben; Johnson, Dexter; Choi, Benjamin; Siebert, Mark; Buccieri, Carl

    2005-01-01

    Electric drive of transport-sized aircraft propulsors, with electric power generated by fuel cells or turbo-generators, will require electric motors with much higher power density than conventional room-temperature machines. Cryogenic cooling of the motor windings by the liquid hydrogen fuel offers a possible solution, enabling motors with higher power density than turbine engines. Some context on weights of various systems, which is required to assess the problem, is presented. This context includes a survey of turbine engine weights over a considerable size range, a correlation of gear box weights and some examples of conventional and advanced electric motor weights. The NASA Glenn Research Center program for high power density motors is outlined and some technical results to date are presented. These results include current densities of 5,000 A per square centimeter current density achieved in cryogenic coils, finite element predictions compared to measurements of torque production in a switched reluctance motor, and initial tests of a cryogenic switched reluctance motor.

  13. 76 FR 32971 - Proposed Priority for the Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-07

    ... and Rehabilitation Research Project (DRRP)--Center on Knowledge Translation for Disability and... notice proposes a priority for a center on knowledge translation for disability and rehabilitation..., demonstration projects, training, and related activities, including international activities, to develop methods...

  14. [Effects of acupuncture on ANP and CNP in adrenal gland and CORT in plasma in rats with chronic emotional stress anxiety].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Hong; Wei, Daneng; Cai, Dingjun; Yu, Shuguang; Zhang, Chengshun; Wei, Jingjin; Xiao, Xia; Zhou, Qizhi

    2016-02-01

    To analyze the effects of acupuncture on the level of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) in adrenal gland and the content of corticosterone (CORT) in plasma in rats withchronic emotional stress anxiety, and to explore the partial action mechanism of acupuncture on anxiety disorder. Thirty-two healthy Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats, after 7 days of feeding and domestication, were randomly divided into a blank group (10 rats), a model group (11 rats) and an acupuncture group (11 rats). The rats inthe model group and acupuncture group were treated with unpredictable chronic emotional stress (CES) method toestablish the model of anxiety. Rats in the acupuncture group were treated with acupuncture at "Neiguan" (PC 6)and "Shenmen" (HT 7), once every other day, 30 minutes each time. The model establishment and treatment lasted 15 days. Rats in the blank group were treated with identical immobilization but no treatment was given. Theelevated plus maze was used to test the behavioral changes of rats with anxiety; the level of CORT in plasma wasdetected by ELISA, and the expression level of CNP and ANP in adrenal cortex and medulla was detected by immunohistochemical method. (1) The percentage of open-arms time in total time (OT%) in elevated plus maze in the model group was significantly lower than that in the blank group (PANP in adrenal medulla and cortex in the model group was lower than that in the blank group (PANP and CNP in adrenal medulla, affecting the release of CORT and inhibition on the activity !f hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA axis).

  15. Conversations on Collaboration: Graduate Students as Writing Program Administrators in the Writing Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewerdine, Jennifer M.

    2017-01-01

    This research sought to ascertain through a phenomenological approach whether and how collaboration occurs in writing center administration. The reflections and perceptions of former writing center gWPAs provided insight into a variety of institutional contexts and experiences present in writing center collaboration. The participants perceived…

  16. Measurement of the 12C(n,p)12B cross section at n_TOF at CERN by in-beam activation analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Žugec, P.; Colonna, N.; Bosnar, D.; Mengoni, A.; Altstadt, S.; Andrzejewski, J.; Audouin, L.; Barbagallo, M.; Bécares, V.; Bečvář, F.; Belloni, F.; Berthoumieux, E.; Billowes, J.; Boccone, V.; Brugger, M.; Calviani, M.; Calviño, F.; Cano-Ott, D.; Carrapiço, C.; Cerutti, F.; Chiaveri, E.; Chin, M.; Cortés, G.; Cortés-Giraldo, M. A.; Cosentino, L.; Diakaki, M.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Dressler, R.; Duran, I.; Eleftheriadis, C.; Ferrari, A.; Finocchiaro, P.; Fraval, K.; Ganesan, S.; García, A. R.; Giubrone, G.; Gómez-Hornillos, M. B.; Gonçalves, I. F.; González-Romero, E.; Griesmayer, E.; Guerrero, C.; Gunsing, F.; Gurusamy, P.; Heinitz, S.; Jenkins, D. G.; Jericha, E.; Käppeler, F.; Karadimos, D.; Kivel, N.; Kokkoris, M.; Krtička, M.; Kroll, J.; Langer, C.; Lederer, C.; Leeb, H.; Leong, L. S.; Lo Meo, S.; Losito, R.; Manousos, A.; Marganiec, J.; Martínez, T.; Massimi, C.; Mastinu, P.; Mastromarco, M.; Mendoza, E.; Milazzo, P. M.; Mingrone, F.; Mirea, M.; Mondalaers, W.; Musumarra, A.; Paradela, C.; Pavlik, A.; Perkowski, J.; Plompen, A.; Praena, J.; Quesada, J.; Rauscher, T.; Reifarth, R.; Riego, A.; Roman, F.; Rubbia, C.; Sarmento, R.; Saxena, A.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Schmidt, S.; Schumann, D.; Tagliente, G.; Tain, J. L.; Tarrío, D.; Tassan-Got, L.; Tsinganis, A.; Valenta, S.; Vannini, G.; Variale, V.; Vaz, P.; Ventura, A.; Versaci, R.; Vermeulen, M. J.; Vlachoudis, V.; Vlastou, R.; Wallner, A.; Ware, T.; Weigand, M.; Weiß, C.; Wright, T.; n TOF Collaboration

    2014-08-01

    The integral cross section of the 12C(n,p)12B reaction has been determined for the first time in the neutron energy range from threshold to several GeV at the n_TOF facility at CERN. The measurement relies on the activation technique with the β decay of 12B measured over a period of four half-lives within the same neutron bunch in which the reaction occurs. The results indicate that model predictions, used in a variety of applications, are mostly inadequate. The value of the integral cross section reported here can be used as a benchmark for verifying or tuning model calculations.

  17. Measurement of the $^{12}$C($n,p$)$^{12}$B cross section at n_TOF (CERN) by in-beam activation analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Žugec, P.; Bosnar, D.; Mengoni, A.; Altstadt, S.; Andrzejewski, J.; Audouin, L.; Barbagallo, M.; Bécares, V.; Bečvář, F.; Belloni, F.; Berthoumieux, E.; Billowes, J.; Boccone, V.; Brugger, M.; Calviani, M.; Calviño, F.; Cano-Ott, D.; Carrapiço, C.; Cerutti, F.; Chiaveri, E.; Chin, M.; Cortés, G.; Cortés-Giraldo, M.A.; Cosentino, L.; Diakaki, M.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Dressler, R.; Duran, I.; Eleftheriadis, C.; Ferrari, A.; Finocchiaro, P.; Fraval, K.; Ganesan, S.; García, A.R.; Giubrone, G.; Gómez-Hornillos, M.B.; Gonçalves, I.F.; González-Romero, E.; Griesmayer, E.; Guerrero, C.; Gunsing, F.; Gurusamy, P.; Heinitz, S.; Jenkins, D.G.; Jericha, E.; Käppeler, F.; Karadimos, D.; Kivel, N.; Kokkoris, M.; Krtička, M.; Kroll, J.; Langer, C.; Lederer, C.; Leeb, H.; Leong, L.S.; Lo Meo, S.; Losito, R.; Manousos, A.; Marganiec, J.; Martínez, T.; Massimi, C.; Mastinu, P.; Mastromarco, M.; Mendoza, E.; Milazzo, P.M.; Mingrone, F.; Mirea, M.; Mondalaers, W.; Musumarra, A.; Paradela, C.; Pavlik, A.; Perkowski, J.; Plompen, A.; Praena, J.; Quesada, J.; Rauscher, T.; Reifarth, R.; Riego, A.; Roman, F.; Rubbia, C.; Sarmento, R.; Saxena, A.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Schmidt, S.; Schumann, D.; Tagliente, G.; Tain, J.L.; Tarrío, D.; Tassan-Got, L.; Tsinganis, A.; Valenta, S.; Vannini, G.; Variale, V.; Vaz, P.; Ventura, A.; Versaci, R.; Vermeulen, M.J.; Vlachoudis, V.; Vlastou, R.; Wallner, A.; Ware, T.; Weigand, M.; Weiß, C.; Wright, T.

    2014-01-01

    The integral cross section of the $^{12}$C($n,p$)$^{12}$B reaction has been determined for the first time in the neutron energy range from threshold to several GeV at the n_TOF facility at CERN. The measurement relies on the activation technique, with the $\\beta$-decay of $^{12}$B measured over a period of four half-lives within the same neutron bunch in which the reaction occurs. The results indicate that model predictions, used in a variety of applications, are mostly inadequate. The value of the integral cross section reported here can be used as a benchmark for verifying or tuning model calculations.

  18. Implementation of a Community-Based Family-Centered Program in Portugal: A Multiple Case Study Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira de Melo, Ana; Alarcao, Madalena

    2012-01-01

    Family-centered, community-based programs are particularly suited to support families with at-risk children or maltreated children and achieve family preservation or reunification. In these child protection and child welfare cases, assessment is of great importance to inform decision making. But the implementation of services to support the…

  19. Design of a Model Management Information System (MIS) for California's Regional Occupational Centers and Programs. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, James C.; And Others

    The management information system (MIS) development project for California's Regional Occupational Centers and Programs (ROC/Ps) was conducted in 3 phases over a 12-month period. Phase I involved a literature review and field study to match MIS design features and development strategy with existing conditions in ROC/Ps. A decision support system…

  20. Developing a Blueprint for Successful Private Partnership Programs in Small Fusion Centers: Key Program Components and Smart Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    provide comprehensive training on the subjects mentioned above, and also host “train-the-trainer” programs to teach FLO program participants and...actually teach . The program is mobile and is presented in schools and other civic venues, and it focuses on terrorism prevention, resiliency, and home...validated the often-quoted idiom , “The devil is in the details.” Law enforcement executives attempting to establish a private sector outreach program

  1. The Tripler Army Medical Center's LE3AN program: a six-month retrospective analysis of program effectiveness for African-American and European-American females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Mark; Earles, Jay; Folen, Raymond; Trammel, Rick; James, Larry

    2004-10-01

    This is a retrospective study that examines the effectiveness of the Tripler Army Medical Center (TAMC) LE3AN Program for weight management among African-American and European American women. African-American and European-American active-duty females who enrolled in the TAMC LE3AN Program between July 1998 and December 2001, and completed six months of follow-up were included in the analysis. The results indicate that the program is associated with significant weight loss for participants, and that it is equally effective for African-American and European-American women. Weekly follow-up visits were correlated with greater weight loss.

  2. The China Studies Programs of U.B.C.'s Center for Continuing Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodsworth, K. C.

    1970-01-01

    Program will cover Contemporary Chinese History, Society, and Politics; Chinese Language; Doing Business with China; A China Educational Travel Program. The program combines professional and general public areas. (NL)

  3. Design and methods for evaluating an early childhood obesity prevention program in the childcare center setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natale Ruby

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many unhealthy dietary and physical activity habits that foster the development of obesity are established by the age of five. Presently, approximately 70 percent of children in the United States are currently enrolled in early childcare facilities, making this an ideal setting to implement and evaluate childhood obesity prevention efforts. We describe here the methods for conducting an obesity prevention randomized trial in the child care setting. Methods/design A randomized, controlled obesity prevention trial is currently being conducted over a three year period (2010-present. The sample consists of 28 low-income, ethnically diverse child care centers with 1105 children (sample is 60% Hispanic, 15% Haitian, 12% Black, 2% non-Hispanic White and 71% of caregivers were born outside of the US. The purpose is to test the efficacy of a parent and teacher role-modeling intervention on children’s nutrition and physical activity behaviors. . The Healthy Caregivers-Healthy Children (HC2 intervention arm schools received a combination of (1 implementing a daily curricula for teachers/parents (the nutritional gatekeepers; (2 implementing a daily curricula for children; (3 technical assistance with meal and snack menu modifications such as including more fresh and less canned produce; and (4 creation of a center policy for dietary requirements for meals and snacks, physical activity and screen time. Control arm schools received an attention control safety curriculum. Major outcome measures include pre-post changes in child body mass index percentile and z score, fruit and vegetable and other nutritious food intake, amount of physical activity, and parental nutrition and physical activity knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs, defined by intentions and behaviors. All measures were administered at the beginning and end of the school year for year one and year two of the study for a total of 4 longitudinal time points for assessment

  4. Design and methods for evaluating an early childhood obesity prevention program in the childcare center setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natale, Ruby; Scott, Stephanie Hapeman; Messiah, Sarah E; Schrack, Maria Mesa; Uhlhorn, Susan B; Delamater, Alan

    2013-01-28

    Many unhealthy dietary and physical activity habits that foster the development of obesity are established by the age of five. Presently, approximately 70 percent of children in the United States are currently enrolled in early childcare facilities, making this an ideal setting to implement and evaluate childhood obesity prevention efforts. We describe here the methods for conducting an obesity prevention randomized trial in the child care setting. A randomized, controlled obesity prevention trial is currently being conducted over a three year period (2010-present). The sample consists of 28 low-income, ethnically diverse child care centers with 1105 children (sample is 60% Hispanic, 15% Haitian, 12% Black, 2% non-Hispanic White and 71% of caregivers were born outside of the US). The purpose is to test the efficacy of a parent and teacher role-modeling intervention on children's nutrition and physical activity behaviors. . The Healthy Caregivers-Healthy Children (HC2) intervention arm schools received a combination of (1) implementing a daily curricula for teachers/parents (the nutritional gatekeepers); (2) implementing a daily curricula for children; (3) technical assistance with meal and snack menu modifications such as including more fresh and less canned produce; and (4) creation of a center policy for dietary requirements for meals and snacks, physical activity and screen time. Control arm schools received an attention control safety curriculum. Major outcome measures include pre-post changes in child body mass index percentile and z score, fruit and vegetable and other nutritious food intake, amount of physical activity, and parental nutrition and physical activity knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs, defined by intentions and behaviors. All measures were administered at the beginning and end of the school year for year one and year two of the study for a total of 4 longitudinal time points for assessment. Although few attempts have been made to prevent obesity

  5. Reducing Health Disparities Through a Culturally Centered Mentorship Program for Minority Faculty: The Southwest Addictions Research Group (SARG) Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viets, Vanessa Lopez; Baca, Catherine; Verney, Steven P.; Venner, Kamilla; Parker, Tassy; Wallerstein, Nina

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Ethnic minority faculty members are vastly underrepresented in academia. Yet, the presence of these individuals in academic institutions is crucial, particularly because their professional endeavors often target issues of health disparities. One promising way to attract and retain ethnic minority faculty is to provide them with formal mentorship. This report describes a culturally centered mentorship program, the Southwest Addictions Research Group (SARG, 2003–2007), at the University of New Mexico (UNM) that trained a cadre of minority researchers dedicated to reducing health disparities associated with substance abuse. Method The SARG was based at UNM’s School of Medicine’s Institute for Public Health, in partnership with the UNM’s Center on Alcoholism, Substance Abuse, and Addictions. The program consisted of regular research meetings, collaboration with the Community Advisory Board, monthly symposia with renowned professionals, pilot projects, and conference support. The authors collected data on mentee research productivity as outcomes and conducted separate mentee and mentor focus-group interviews to assess the strengths and weaknesses of the SARG program. Results The SARG yielded positive outcomes as evidenced by mentee increase in grant submissions, publications, and professional presentations. Focus-group qualitative data highlighted program and institutional barriers as well as successes that surfaced during the program. Based on this evaluation, a Culturally Centered Mentorship Model (CCMM) emerged. Conclusions The CCMM can help counter institutional challenges by valuing culture, community service, and community-based participatory research to support the recruitment and advancement of ethnic minority faculty members in academia. PMID:19638783

  6. A model for training medical student innovators: the Harvard Medical School Center for Primary Care Abundance Agents of Change program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duong, David B; Sullivan, Erin E; Minter-Jordan, Myechia; Giesen, Lindsay; Ellner, Andrew L

    2016-01-01

    In 2013, the Harvard Medical School Center for Primary Care established the Abundance Agents of Change (AoC) program to promote interprofessional learning and innovation, increase partnership between 15 academic and community health centers (CHCs) in Boston's most under-served communities, and increase medical student interest in primary care careers. The AoC is modeled in the form of a 'grants challenge', offering $20,000 to interprofessional student teams to develop an innovative solution that addresses a healthcare delivery need identified by CHCs. The program's initial two years were characterized by a four-stage process which included working with CHCs and crafting a request for proposals, forming interprofessional 20 student teams comprising students from across and outside of Harvard University, training students using a systems-based innovation curriculum, and performing program evaluation. Our evaluation data from cohorts 1 and 2 of the AoC program demonstrate that we succeeded in training students as innovators and members of interprofessional teams. We also learned valuable lessons regarding creating better alignment with CHC priorities, extending the program cycle from 12 to 18 months, and changing the way funding is disbursed to 25 students, which will be incorporated in later versions of the program. Based on our experience and evaluation data, we believe that this program is a replicable way to train students as innovators and members of interprofessional teams to address the current complex healthcare environment.

  7. The role of a clinical engineer within a mechanical circulatory support device program: a single center's experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Princer, Kathleen

    2010-06-01

    With the rapidly growing world of mechanical circulatory support device programs, a variety of multidisciplinary team models have been successful. Most include nurses, nurse practitioners, perfusionists, and/or clinical engineers, with patient care and education primarily directed by nurses. At Aurora St Luke's Medical Center, the team includes transplant surgeons, transplant cardiologists, nurse practitioners, clinical engineers, perfusionists, and nurses who serve as transplant coordinators and research coordinators, but the team is unique in having clinical engineers at the center of patient care. The clinical engineers and the transplant coordinators split many of the duties of a typical ventricular assist device coordinator. The role of the clinical engineer within the program is elucidated by discussing the history of the program, the structure of the clinical engineering team, the duties related to mechanical circulatory support devices and the additional responsibilities of the clinical engineers.

  8. Weight gain prevention among black women in the rural community health center setting: The Shape Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foley Perry

    2012-06-01

    for depression. Discussion The Shape Program utilizes an innovative intervention approach to lower the risk of obesity and obesity-associated chronic disease among black women in the primary care setting. The intervention was informed by behavior change theory and aims to prevent weight gain using inexpensive mobile technologies and existing health center resources. Baseline characteristics reflect a socioeconomically disadvantaged, high-risk population sample in need of evidence-based treatment strategies. Trial registration The trial is registered with clinicaltrials.gov NCT00938535.

  9. A web-based program for informal caregivers of persons with Alzheimer's disease: an iterative user-centered design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristancho-Lacroix, Victoria; Moulin, Florence; Wrobel, Jérémy; Batrancourt, Bénédicte; Plichart, Matthieu; De Rotrou, Jocelyne; Cantegreil-Kallen, Inge; Rigaud, Anne-Sophie

    2014-09-15

    Web-based programs have been developed for informal caregivers of people with Alzheimer's disease (PWAD). However, these programs can prove difficult to adopt, especially for older people, who are less familiar with the Internet than other populations. Despite the fundamental role of usability testing in promoting caregivers' correct use and adoption of these programs, to our knowledge, this is the first study describing this process before evaluating a program for caregivers of PWAD in a randomized clinical trial. The objective of the study was to describe the development process of a fully automated Web-based program for caregivers of PWAD, aiming to reduce caregivers' stress, and based on the user-centered design approach. There were 49 participants (12 health care professionals, 6 caregivers, and 31 healthy older adults) that were involved in a double iterative design allowing for the adaptation of program content and for the enhancement of website usability. This process included three component parts: (1) project team workshops, (2) a proof of concept, and (3) two usability tests. The usability tests were based on a mixed methodology using behavioral analysis, semistructured interviews, and a usability questionnaire. The user-centered design approach provided valuable guidelines to adapt the content and design of the program, and to improve website usability. The professionals, caregivers (mainly spouses), and older adults considered that our project met the needs of isolated caregivers. Participants underlined that contact between caregivers would be desirable. During usability observations, the mistakes of users were also due to ergonomics issues from Internet browsers and computer interfaces. Moreover, negative self-stereotyping was evidenced, when comparing interviews and results of behavioral analysis. Face-to-face psycho-educational programs may be used as a basis for Web-based programs. Nevertheless, a user-centered design approach involving targeted

  10. Final technical report DOE award DE-SC0007206 Improving CESM Efficiency to Study Variable C:N:P Stoichiometry in the Oceans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Primeau, Francois William [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States)

    2016-02-11

    This report lists the accomplishments of the project, which includes: (1) analysis of inorganic nutrient concentration data as well as suspended particulate organic matter data in the ocean to demonstrate that the carbon to nitrogen to phosphorus ratios (C:N:P) of biological uptake and export vary on large spatial scales, (2) the development of a new computationally efficient method for simulating biogeochemical tracers in earth system models, (3) the application of the method to help calibrate an improved representation of dissolved organic matter in the ocean that includes variable C:N:P stoichiometry. This research is important because biological uptake of carbon and nutrients in the upper ocean and export by sinking particles and downward mixing of dissolved organic matter helps maintain a vertical gradient in the carbon dioxide concentration in the ocean. This gradient is key to understanding the partitioning of CO2 between the ocean and the atmosphere. The final report lists seven peer reviewed scientific publications, one Ph.D. thesis, one technical report and two papers in preparation.

  11. El Consejo Nacional de la Publicidad (CNP. La “voz” empresarial mexicana en tiempos no democráticos (1959-2000

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Georgina Sosa Hernández

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available El Consejo Nacional de la Publicidad (cnp, antecedente del Consejo de la Comunicación (cc, es un organismo del sector empresarial que se fundó en 1959 y que aglutinaba a los empresarios dedicados a la publicidad. Entre ese año y el 2000, generó y difundió 49 campañas publicitarias que reflejaban su visión del país e indicaban, de una manera medianamente clara, su relación con el gobierno en turno. En este artículo me propongo estudiar la acción del cnp a través de estas campañas, teniendo en cuenta que se gestaron en un contexto anterior a la democracia (primero autoritario, después en transición a la democracia. Hago una revisión de algunos de los mensajes más importantes que transmitió el Consejo a partir de su vínculo con el contexto a fin de establecer cuál era su lectura que los empresarios hacían de la coyuntura específica por la que atravesaban.

  12. The role of C:N:P stoichiometry in affecting denitrification in sediments from agricultural surface and tile-water wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grebliunas, Brian D; Perry, William L

    2016-01-01

    Nutrient stoichiometry within a wetland is affected by the surrounding land use, and may play a significant role in the removal of nitrate (NO3-N). Tile-drained, agricultural watersheds experience high seasonal inputs of NO3-N, but low phosphorus (PO4-P) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) loads relative to surface water dominated systems. This difference may present stoichiometric conditions that limit denitrification within receiving waterways. We investigated how C:N:P ratios affected denitrification rates of sediments from tile-drained mitigation wetlands incubated for: 0, 5, 10, and 20 days. We then tested whether denitrification rates of sediments from surface-water and tile-drained wetlands responded differently to C:N ratios of 2:1 versus 4:1. Ratios of C:N:P (P wetland sediments. Carbon limitation of denitrification became evident at elevated NO3-N concentrations (20 mg L(-1)). Denitrification measured from tile water and surface water wetland sediments increased significantly (P wetland sediments provide a limiting pool of labile DOC to maintain prolonged NO3-N removal. Also, DOC limitation became more evident at elevated NO3-N concentrations (20 mg L(-1)). Irrespective of NO3-N concentrations, P did not limit denitrification rates. In addition to wetting period, residence time, and maintenance of anaerobic conditions, the availability of labile DOC is playing an important limiting role in sediment denitrification within mitigation wetlands.

  13. Knowledge translation: a Nurse Practitioner Clinical Ladder Advancement Program in a university-affiliated, integrated medical center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paplanus, Lisa M; Bartley-Daniele, Patricia; Mitra, Kathryn S

    2014-08-01

    A Nurse Practitioner Clinical Ladder (NPCL) Advancement Program was designed to recognize and reward advanced nursing practice and promote nurse practitioner (NP) retention at New York University Hospitals Center (NYUHC). Search of published and gray literature was conducted. Electronic databases included CINAHL, Medline, PubMed, Cochrane Library of Systematic Reviews, and the Joanna Briggs Institute. The NYUHC NPCL Advancement Program incorporated its current Staff Nurse Clinical Ladder, previous NP promotional program literature, and NP role competencies to support the Advanced Practice Nursing Clinical Ladder Program. The NPCL is supportive of professional development, performance evaluation, clinical practice excellence, job satisfaction, and NP retention. Program outgrowths include a progressive model of NP clinical practice, a formal NP mentoring program, NP leadership, and research opportunities. Organizational commitment to a structured NPCL Advancement Program is critical for NP professional development, evolving role responsibilities, and job satisfaction. The NPCL Advancement Program provides requisite structures and processes supportive of clinical excellence. The development of the NPCL has highlighted the need for structured NP orientation and mentorship, knowledge translation, and leadership programs to meet the professional needs of NPs in diverse clinical settings. ©2013 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  14. Center for Theoretical Underground Physics and Related Areas - CETUP*2013 Summer Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szczerbinska, Barbara [Dakota State Univ., Madison, SD (United States)

    2014-06-01

    In response to an increasing interest in experiments conducted at deep underground facilities around the world, in 2010 the theory community has proposed a new initiative - a Center for Theoretical Underground Physics and Related Areas (CETUP*). The main goal of CETUP* is to bring together people with different talents and skills to address the most exciting questions in particle and nuclear physics, astrophysics, geosciences, and geomicrobiology. Scientists invited to participate in the program do not only provide theoretical support to the underground science, they also examine underlying universal questions of the 21st century including: What is dark matter?, What are the masses of neutrinos?, How have neutrinos shaped the evolution of the universe?, How were the elements from iron to uranium made?, What is the origin and thermal history of the Earth? The mission of the CETUP* is to promote an organized research in physics, astrophysics, geoscience, geomicrobiology and other fields related to the underground science via individual and collaborative research in dynamic atmosphere of intense scientific interactions. Our main goal is to bring together scientists scattered around the world, promote the deep underground science and provide a stimulating environment for creative thinking and open communication between researches of varying ages and nationalities. CETUP*2014 included 5 week long program (June 24 – July 26, 2013) covering various theoretical and experimental aspects of Dark Matter, Neutrino Physics and Astrophysics. Two week long session focused on Dark Matter (June 24-July 6) was followed by two week long program on Neutrino Physics and Astrophysics (July 15-26). The VIIth International Conference on Interconnections between Particle Physics and Cosmology (PPC) was sandwiched between these sessions (July 8-13) covering the subjects of dark matter, neutrino physics, gravitational waves, collider physics and other from both

  15. Tackling NCD in LMIC: Achievements and Lessons Learned From the NHLBI-UnitedHealth Global Health Centers of Excellence Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelgau, Michael M; Sampson, Uchechukwu K; Rabadan-Diehl, Cristina; Smith, Richard; Miranda, Jaime; Bloomfield, Gerald S; Belis, Deshiree; Narayan, K M Venkat

    2016-03-01

    Effectively tackling the growing noncommunicable disease (NCD) burden in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC) is a major challenge. To address research needs in this setting for NCDs, in 2009, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) and UnitedHealth Group (UHG) engaged in a public-private partnership that supported a network of 11 LMIC-based research centers and created the NHLBI-UnitedHealth Global Health Centers of Excellence (COE) Program. The Program's overall goal was to contribute to reducing the cardiovascular and lung disease burdens by catalyzing in-country research institutions to develop a global network of biomedical research centers. Key elements of the Program included team science and collaborative approaches, developing research and training platforms for future investigators, and creating a data commons. This Program embraced a strategic approach for tackling NCDs in LMICs and will provide capacity for locally driven research efforts that can identify and address priority health issues in specific countries' settings. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. The Successful High School Writing Center: Building the Best Program with Your Students. Language & Literacy Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fels, Dawn, Ed.; Wells, Jennifer, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    This book highlights the work of talented writing center teachers who share practices and lessons learned from today's most important high school writing centers. The authors offer innovative methods for secondary educators who deal with adolescent literacy, English language learners, new literacies, embedded professional development, and…

  17. 77 FR 33725 - Applications for New Awards; Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-07

    ... and Statistical Center for the Burn Model Systems AGENCY: Office of Special Education and... for the Burn Model Systems (National BMS Data Center); Notice inviting applications for new awards for... most severe disabilities. DRRPs carry out one or more of the following types of activities, as...

  18. 76 FR 38134 - Final Priorities; Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program-Disability...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-29

    ... Disability Business Technical Assistance Centers (DBTACs), the ADA National Network Knowledge Translation... (Priority 1), (2) a priority for the ADA National Network Knowledge Translation Center (Priority 2), and (3... through 350.19: Research, training, demonstration, development, dissemination, utilization, and technical...

  19. Model Programs: Reading. Yuba County Reading-Learning Center, Marysville, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Institutes for Research in the Behavioral Sciences, Palo Alto, CA.

    Almost 900 children in grades 1 through 8, with reading difficulties, are given special individualized instruction at the Yuba County Reading-Learning Center each year. Operating on a twelve-months basis, the Center seeks to improve the children's reading and verbal skills and bring about more positive attitudes toward school and education. The…

  20. Integrating a Writing-Across-Curriculum Program into a Self-Access Learning Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Jeng-yih

    2007-01-01

    In recent years, several writing centers have been set up in colleges and universities of Taiwan. Almost at the same time, many self-access learning centers are being designed and built on campuses all over the island. Whether these two institutes function jointly or independently, dissatisfaction arises. In order to run the self-access learning…

  1. Consumer preference programs for individuals who are homeless and have psychiatric disabilities: a drop-in center and a supported housing program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsemberis, Sam J; Moran, Linda; Shinn, Marybeth; Asmussen, Sara M; Shern, David L

    2003-12-01

    We illustrate Fairweather's approach to Experimental Social Innovation and Dissemination with two experimental studies of programs to reduce homelessness for 168 and 225 people with mental illness and often substance abuse. Literally homeless participants were randomly assigned to programs that emphasized consumer choice or to the usual continuum of care, in which housing and services are contingent on sobriety and progress in treatment. A drop-in center that eliminated barriers to access to services was more successful than control programs in reducing homelessness, but after 24 months only 38% of participants had moved to community housing. A subsequent apartment program, in which individuals in the experimental condition moved to subsidized apartments directly from the street, with services under their control, had 79% in stable housing (compared to 27% in the control group) at the end of 6 months. Groups in this study did not differ on substance abuse or psychosocial outcomes.

  2. Evaluation of a Community Health Service Center-Based Intervention Program for Managing Chronic Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Moli; Ma, Yanlan; Zhou, Ti; Xia, Yunfeng

    2016-01-01

    Although the role of primary care for the management of patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) has been highly recommended, structural involvement of primary care in heart failure (HF) management programs is extremely limited. To examine the feasibility and applicability of two most recommended forms of care delivery mode, home visit and telephone support, for CHF management in the setting of community health service center (CHSC). Prospective study. This study was conducted in two CHSCs in Beijing, China. Care delivery was led by trained general practitioners or community nurses via home visits in one CHSC and telephone support in the other. Data regarding the change in mortality and hospitalization rate during 12 months and self-care level at 6 months were prospectively collected and compared across the intervention groups. A total of 329 patients were included, with 142 in the home visit group and 187 in the telephone support group. Patients in both groups had frequent visits to CHSC (8.1±5.9 in the home visit and 7.7±4.1 in the telephone support group, p=0.45) during the follow-up period. Compared to the telephone support group, patients in the home visit group showed a reduction in all-cause mortality (14.1% versus 20.3%, p=0.14), one or more hospitalizations due to any cause (33.8% versus 44.2%, p=0.12) and one or more hospitalizations due to cardiac cause (17.6% versus 24.6%, p=0.13) in the home visit group. The absolute differences were 6.2% (95% CI: 1.9%, 14.3%), 8.4% (95% CI: 2.1%, 18.9%) and 7.3% (95% CI: 1.5%, 16.1%), respectively, although the results were not statistically significant. After 6 months of intervention, patients in both groups achieved marked improvement in self-care with reference to their own baseline values. Although no statistical difference was observed between the two care delivery approaches regarding the clinical outcomes of interest, given the high participation rates, the acceptable rate of adverse events, frequent CHSC

  3. Medicare Program: Hospital Outpatient Prospective Payment and Ambulatory Surgical Center Payment Systems and Quality Reporting Programs. Final rule with comment period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-14

    This final rule with comment period revises the Medicare hospital outpatient prospective payment system (OPPS) and the Medicare ambulatory surgical center (ASC) payment system for CY 2018 to implement changes arising from our continuing experience with these systems. In this final rule with comment period, we describe the changes to the amounts and factors used to determine the payment rates for Medicare services paid under the OPPS and those paid under the ASC payment system. In addition, this final rule with comment period updates and refines the requirements for the Hospital Outpatient Quality Reporting (OQR) Program and the ASC Quality Reporting (ASCQR) Program.

  4. Pioneering Quality Assessment in European Cancer Centers: A Data Analysis of the Organization for European Cancer Institutes Accreditation and Designation Program

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saghatchian, Mahasti; Thonon, Frederique; Boomsma, Femke; Hummel, Henk; Koot, Bert; Harrison, Chris; Rajan, Abinaya; de Valeriola, Dominique; Otter, Renee; Pontes, Jose Laranja; Lombardo, Claudio; McGrath, Eoin; Ringborg, Ulrik; Tursz, Thomas; van Harten, Willem H.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: In order to improve the quality of care in Cancer Centers (CC) and designate Comprehensive Cancer Centers (CCCs), the Organization for European Cancer Institutes (OECI) launched an Accreditation and Designation (A&D) program. The program facilitates the collection of defined data and the

  5. [Community center for human development: program for African-Colombian families based on the participatory action research approach].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreto-Zorza, Yenny M; Velasquez-Gutierrez, Vilma F

    2016-01-01

    To describe the process of construction of a program of Primary Health Care (PHC) for African-Colombian families in Guapi, Cauca. Participatory action research (PAR). The PHC program is a collective construction between the IAP Group and the Commission for Support and Follow-up (CAS), carried out in four phases: 1. Field preparation; 2. Approximation to the universe of the African-Colombian families of Guapi; 3. Building the program "Center for Human Development: with strength, joy and love we go 'pa'lante' families"; and 4. Evaluation and socialization of results. The collective construction of the program was conducted from the perspective of PHC, PAR and the cultural context, where the experts are the community, health professionals and institutions who have the ability to examine, reflect and participate in the transformation of reality based on their everyday life and view of the world. The starting point involves planning, developing and evaluating actions in healthy environments, relating not only to the physical space, but also to the work with families and community, taking into account needs, perceptions, beliefs, and actions towards health. The "Human Development Center Community" program allows a process of community participation towards achieving healthy environments to improve the health of the African-Colombian population, through the active participation of families, community, institutions and health professionals who, based on reality and knowledge exchange, generate actions directed to health of the large families of Guapi.

  6. Higher blood pressure control rate in a real life management program provided by the community health service center in China

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Xiao-Jing; Gao, Xi-Lian; You, Gui-Ying; Jiang, Jing; Sun, Xiao-Lin; Li, Xiao; Chen, Yu-Cheng; Liang, Yu-Jia; Zhang, Qing; Zeng, Zhi

    2014-01-01

    Background Community health service center (CHSC) in China is always regarded as a good facility of primary care, which plays an important role in chronic non-communicable disease management. This study aimed to investigate the blood pressure (BP) control rate in a real life CHSC-based management program and its determinants. Methods The study enrolled 3191 patients (mean age of 70 ± 10 years, 43% males) in a hypertension management program provided by the Yulin CHSC (Chengdu, China), which h...

  7. 77 FR 43578 - Applications for New Awards; American Overseas Research Centers Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-25

    ... higher education (IHEs) to establish or operate an AORC that promotes postgraduate research, exchanges... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION... Education, Department of Education. ACTION: Notice. Overview Information American Overseas Research Centers...

  8. An Analysis of the Nurse Internship Program at Naval Medical Center San Diego

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gillard, Elizabeth

    2003-01-01

    ...) at Naval Medical Center San Diego. The NIP provides nurses with no or little nursing experience an opportunity to participate in professional development as United States Navy Nurse Corps officers...

  9. 76 FR 50224 - Medicare Program; Accountable Care Organization Accelerated Development Learning Sessions; Center...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-12

    ... Accelerated Development Learning Sessions; Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation, September 15th and... second Accelerated Development Learning Session (ADLS) hosted by CMS to help Accountable Care... while improving the quality of care for our beneficiaries. Through Accelerated Development Learning...

  10. An Analysis of the Child and Adult Care Food Programs in Child Care Centers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kapur, Kanika

    1999-01-01

    ...) that provides healthy meals and snacks in child and adult day care facilities. This report uses the Cost, Quality and Child Outcomes study to analyze the characteristics of three types of child care centers: (1...

  11. 75 FR 51815 - National Toxicology Program (NTP); Center for the Evaluation of Risks to Human Reproduction...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-23

    ... (NTP); Center for the Evaluation of Risks to Human Reproduction (CERHR); Evaluation of the Health... reproduction and/or development and provide opinion on whether these substances are hazardous for humans...

  12. Development of a Standardized Job Description for Healthcare Managers of Metabolic Syndrome Management Programs in Korean Community Health Centers

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Youngjin; Choo, Jina; Cho, Jeonghyun; Kim, So-Nam; Lee, Hye-Eun; Yoon, Seok-Jun; Seomun, GyeongAe

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This study aimed to develop a job description for healthcare managers of metabolic syndrome management programs using task analysis. Methods: Exploratory research was performed by using the Developing a Curriculum method, the Intervention Wheel model, and focus group discussions. Subsequently, we conducted a survey of 215 healthcare workers from 25 community health centers to verify that the job description we created was accurate. Results: We defined the role of healthcare man...

  13. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center Saves Water With High-Efficiency Toilet and Urinal Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2011-02-22

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s (NASA) Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has a longstanding, successful sustainability program that focuses on energy and water efficiency as well as environmental protection. Because MSFC was built in the 1960s, most of the buildings house outdated, inefficient restroom fixtures. The facility engineering team at MSFC developed an innovative efficiency model for replacing these older toilets and urinals.

  14. Implementation of a community-based family-centered program in Portugal: a multiple case study evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Melo, Ana Teixeira de; Alarcão, Madalena

    2012-01-01

    Family-centered, community-based programs are particularly suited to support families with at-risk children or maltreated children and achieve family preservation or reunification. In these child protection and child welfare cases, assessment is of great importance to inform decision making. But the implementation of services to support the families change and its evaluation in real settings is not without challenges. The Integrated Family Assessment and Intervention Model (IFAIM) was designe...

  15. Development and evaluation of a patient centered cardiovascular health education program for insured patients in rural Nigeria (QUICK - II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osibogun Akin

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Sub Saharan Africa, the incidence of hypertension and other modifiable cardiovascular risk factors is growing rapidly. Poor adherence to prescribed prevention and treatment regimens by patients can compromise treatment outcomes. Patient-centered cardiovascular health education is likely to improve shortcomings in adherence. This paper describes a study that aims to develop a cardiovascular health education program for patients participating in a subsidized insurance plan in Nigeria and to evaluate the applicability and effectiveness in patients at increased risk for cardiovascular disease. Methods/Design Design: The study has two parts. Part 1 will develop a cardiovascular health education program, using qualitative interviews with stakeholders. Part 2 will evaluate the effectiveness of the program in patients, using a prospective (pre-post observational design. Setting: A rural primary health center in Kwara State, Nigeria. Population: For part 1: 40 patients, 10 healthcare professionals, and 5 insurance managers. For part 2: 150 patients with uncontrolled hypertension or other cardiovascular risk factors after one year of treatment. Intervention: Part 2: patient-centered cardiovascular health education program. Measurements: Part 1: Semi-structured interviews to identify stakeholder perspectives. Part 2: Pre- and post-intervention assessments including patients' demographic and socioeconomic data, blood pressure, body mass index and self-reporting measures on medication adherence and perception of care. Feasibility of the intervention will be measured using process data. Outcomes: For program development (part 1: overview of healthcare professionals' perceptions on barriers and facilitators to care, protocol for patient education, and protocol implementation plan. For program evaluation (part 2: changes in patients' scores on adherence to medication and life style changes, blood pressure, and other physiological and self

  16. Differences between the family-centered "COPCA" program and traditional infant physical therapy based on neurodevelopmental treatment principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirks, Tineke; Blauw-Hospers, Cornill H; Hulshof, Lily J; Hadders-Algra, Mijna

    2011-09-01

    Evidence for effectiveness of pediatric physical therapy in infants at high risk for developmental motor disorders is limited. Therefore, "Coping With and Caring for Infants With Special Needs" (COPCA), a family-centered, early intervention program, was developed. The COPCA program is based on 2 components: (1) family involvement and educational parenting and (2) the neuromotor principles of the neuronal group selection theory. The COPCA coach uses principles of coaching to encourage the family's own capacities for solving problems of daily care and incorporating variation, along with trial and error in daily activities. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether the content of sessions of the home-based, early intervention COPCA program differs from that of traditional infant physical therapy (TIP) sessions, which in the Netherlands are largely based on neurodevelopmental treatment. The study was conducted at the University Medical Center Groningen in the Netherlands. A quantitative video analysis of therapy sessions was conducted with infants participating in a 2-arm randomized trial. Forty-six infants at high risk for developmental motor disorders were randomly assigned to receive COPCA (n=21) or TIP (n=25) between 3 and 6 months corrected age. Intervention sessions were videotaped at 4 and 6 months corrected age and analyzed with a standardized observation protocol for the classification of physical therapy actions. Outcome parameters were relative amounts of time spent on specific physical therapy actions. The content of COPCA and TIP differed substantially. For instance, in TIP sessions, more time was spent on facilitation techniques, including handling, than in COPCA sessions (29% versus 3%, respectively). During COPCA, more time was spent on family coaching and education than during TIP (16% versus 4%, respectively). The major limitation of the study was its restriction to the Netherlands, implying that findings cannot be generalized automatically to

  17. John F. Kennedy Space Center, Safety, Reliability, Maintainability and Quality Assurance, Survey and Audit Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    This document is the product of the KSC Survey and Audit Working Group composed of civil service and contractor Safety, Reliability, and Quality Assurance (SR&QA) personnel. The program described herein provides standardized terminology, uniformity of survey and audit operations, and emphasizes process assessments rather than a program based solely on compliance. The program establishes minimum training requirements, adopts an auditor certification methodology, and includes survey and audit metrics for the audited organizations as well as the auditing organization.

  18. 78 FR 26684 - Notice of Funding Availability for the Small Business Transportation Resource Center Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-07

    ... Program (BEP) information, SBTRC brochures and literature, Procurement Forecasts; Contracting with DOT... authorities for the SBTRC's headquarters state must have representation on the planning committee. This...

  19. 78 FR 70617 - Notice of Funding Availability for the Small Business Transportation Resource Center Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-26

    ... (STLP) Information, Bonding Education Program (BEP) information, SBTRC brochures and literature... representation on the planning committee. This committee shall be established no later than 60 days after the...

  20. 78 FR 13143 - Notice of Funding Availability for the Small Business Transportation Resource Center Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-26

    ... Education Program (BEP) information, SBTRC brochures and literature, Procurement Forecasts; Contracting with... for the SBTRC's headquarters state must have representation on the planning committee. This committee...

  1. 75 FR 34249 - Centers for Independent Living Program-Training and Technical Assistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-16

    ... program is to maximize independence, productivity, empowerment, and leadership of individuals with... alternatives to institutionalization; assisting transition-age youths to succeed after secondary school; and...

  2. NCI Start-Up Program 2.0: An Evaluation Option License Program | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI's Start-Up Evaluation Option License minimizes barriers to entry faced by start-up companies that seek to license NIH technologies. The license encourages and supports the commercial development of early-stage technologies developed in the NIH Intramural Research Program. While the NIH has been quite flexible in structuring licenses for the benefit of start-up companies, one of the goals of the NIH Start-up License program is to further reduce the time and capital to negotiate and finalize an exclusive license agreement. | [google6f4cd5334ac394ab.html

  3. The United States' national accreditation program for breast centers: a model for excellence in breast disease evaluation and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winchester, David P

    2016-06-01

    The evaluation and management of patients with breast disease have historically been disorganized and fragmented, leading to inefficiencies in patient flow and increased anxiety. The NAPBC was founded to address this deficiency and optimize the system. Evidence-based breast center standards were developed by a multinational, multidisciplinary Board and revised after pilot surveys. The Board defined 17 essential components in the continuum of care, available on site or referred. Physician surveyors were trained to conduct triennial site visits to assure compliance with standards. Correction of deficiencies is required within 12 months. Since the first accreditation award in late 2008, the NAPBC has grown rapidly. By the end of 2015, there will be 650 breast centers accredited by the NAPBC, with an additional 50 programs being scheduled for survey. Re-survey for continued accreditation occurs every 3 years. There has been minimal attrition. Survey results from our accredited centers indicate a high level of patient and facility satisfaction. Although only one foreign breast center has been NAPBC-accredited, and two scheduled for survey, the interest level is high. Thirty-two breast centers from 17 countries have requested information. The NAPBC provides an ideal model for facilities to render state of the art evaluation and treatment throughout the continuum of care for patients with breast disease. Accredited centers are afforded internal and external assessment of their performance based on recognized standards that demonstrate a commitment to quality care. The centers attain national recognition and public promotion. Patients, facilities and their providers are the ultimate beneficiaries.

  4. Carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus accumulation and partitioning, and C:N:P stoichiometry in late-season rice under different water and nitrogen managements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yushi Ye

    Full Text Available Water and nitrogen availability plays an important role in the biogeochemical cycles of essential elements, such as carbon (C, nitrogen (N and phosphorus (P, in agricultural ecosystems. In this study, we investigated the seasonal changes of C, N and P concentrations, accumulation, partitioning, and C:N:P stoichiometric ratios in different plant tissues (root, stem-leaf, and panicle of late-season rice under two irrigation regimes (continuous flooding, CF; alternate wetting and drying, AWD and four N managements (control, N0; conventional urea at 240 kg N ha(-1, UREA; controlled-release bulk blending fertilizer at 240 kg N ha(-1, BBF; polymer-coated urea at 240 kg N ha(-1, PCU. We found that water and N treatments had remarkable effects on the measured parameters in different plant tissues after transplanting, but the water and N interactions had insignificant effects. Tissue C:N, N:P and C:P ratios ranged from 14.6 to 52.1, 3.1 to 7.8, and 76.9 to 254.3 over the rice growing seasons, respectively. The root and stem-leaf C:N:P and panicle C:N ratios showed overall uptrends with a peak at harvest whereas the panicle N:P and C:P ratios decreased from filling to harvest. The AWD treatment did not affect the concentrations and accumulation of tissue C and N, but greatly decreased those of P, resulting in enhanced N:P and C:P ratios. N fertilization significantly increased tissue N concentration, slightly enhanced tissue P concentration, but did not affect tissue C concentration, leading to a significant increase in tissue N:P ratio but a decrease in C:N and C:P ratios. Our results suggested that the growth of rice in the Taihu Lake region was co-limited by N and P. These findings broadened our understanding of the responses of plant C:N:P stoichiometry to simultaneous water and N managements in subtropical high-yielding rice systems.

  5. An Evaluation of the Mississippi Recipes for Success Program from the Perspective of Child Nutrition Directors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Chelsea; Lambert, Laurel; Chang, Yunhee; Carithers, Teresa

    2017-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The Mississippi Recipes for Success (MRS), a customizable selective menu system resource, was developed for child nutrition program (CNP) directors to comply with USDA nutrition regulations. The resource is available in printed and online formats and includes recipes, menu matrixes, food safety, and training materials for meal…

  6. Yoga for Stress Management Program as a Complementary Alternative Counseling Resource in a University Counseling Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milligan, Colleen K.

    2006-01-01

    A Yoga for Stress Management Program (YSMP) that served as a complementary alternative therapy resource was successfully implemented at a midsize, predominantly undergraduate university. It was offered in addition to traditional treatments for student mental health. Counselors, Residence Life staff, and faculty found that the program was useful…

  7. Center for development technology and program in technology and human affairs. [emphasizing technology-based networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, M. D.

    1974-01-01

    The role of technology in nontraditional higher education with particular emphasis on technology-based networks is analyzed nontraditional programs, institutions, and consortia are briefly reviewed. Nontraditional programs which utilize technology are studied. Technology-based networks are surveyed and analyzed with regard to kinds of students, learning locations, technology utilization, interinstitutional relationships, cost aspects, problems, and future outlook.

  8. Assignment Management Policies of the Air Force Manpower and Personnel Center Palace Scope Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-05-01

    Background II. THE PALACE SCOPE PROGRAM .......... Concept Goals Policies and Guidance for the Program Palace Scope Office Organization III. ASSIGNMENT...above. Palace Scope Office Organization The Palace Scope personnel organization consists of four officers (one major, two captains, one first lieutenant

  9. Network model and short circuit program for the Kennedy Space Center electric power distribution system

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-01-01

    Assumptions made and techniques used in modeling the power network to the 480 volt level are discussed. Basic computational techniques used in the short circuit program are described along with a flow diagram of the program and operational procedures. Procedures for incorporating network changes are included in this user's manual.

  10. 77 FR 6805 - Eligibility Criteria for the Centers of Excellence Program in Health Professions Education for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-09

    ... Excellence Program in Health Professions Education for Under-Represented Minority Individuals AGENCY: Health...) program in health professions education for under-represented minority (URM) individuals is authorized by... Interdisciplinary Education, Bureau of Health Professions, Health Resources and Services Administration. Dr. Weiss...

  11. 75 FR 13521 - Centers for Independent Living Program-Training and Technical Assistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-22

    ... of Program: The purpose of the CIL program is to maximize independence, productivity, empowerment... transition from school to living independently, and two provide general, comprehensive training and technical... from school to postsecondary education, employment, and IL; and to better serve individuals with...

  12. Should Your College Start a Center for the Delivery of Contract Training Programs? ERIC Digest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deegan, William L.

    Community colleges have been at the forefront in providing contract training programs for clients such as businesses, health care organizations, and government agencies. Many state governments are beginning to provide resources for these programs as an incentive to attract or retain business and industry. One of the consequences of the demand for…

  13. Innovation in Innovation Management: The Experience of Petrobras Centers and Networks of Excellence Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria de Britto Pires

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Since 1996, Petrobras – Petróleo Brasileiro S.A., the biggest company in Latin America, has supported the development of a method to structure networks of partnerships called Centers and Networks of Excellence Practice (PCREX. It aims to support the establishment of centers and networks of excellence in areas in which innovation depends heavily on the articulation of various players from outside the company and different internal areas. This article presents the results of the analysis of the PCREX method, including its characterization and field research carried out in eight Centers and Networks of Excellence developed by Petrobras. The field research and subsequent analysis helped identify (i the alignment between the PCREX method and the best innovation management practices and (ii the difficulties faced by new management models based on resource and knowledge sharing, which highlights that organizational innovations need to be able to count on strong institutional support to succeed.

  14. Groundwater monitoring program plan and conceptual site model for the Al-Tuwaitha Nuclear Research Center in Iraq.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Copland, John Robin; Cochran, John Russell

    2013-07-01

    The Radiation Protection Center of the Iraqi Ministry of Environment is developing a groundwater monitoring program (GMP) for the Al-Tuwaitha Nuclear Research Center located near Baghdad, Iraq. The Al-Tuwaitha Nuclear Research Center was established in about 1960 and is currently being cleaned-up and decommissioned by Iraqs Ministry of Science and Technology. This Groundwater Monitoring Program Plan (GMPP) and Conceptual Site Model (CSM) support the Radiation Protection Center by providing: A CSM describing the hydrogeologic regime and contaminant issues, recommendations for future groundwater characterization activities, and descriptions of the organizational elements of a groundwater monitoring program. The Conceptual Site Model identifies a number of potential sources of groundwater contamination at Al-Tuwaitha. The model also identifies two water-bearing zones (a shallow groundwater zone and a regional aquifer). The depth to the shallow groundwater zone varies from approximately 7 to 10 meters (m) across the facility. The shallow groundwater zone is composed of a layer of silty sand and fine sand that does not extend laterally across the entire facility. An approximately 4-m thick layer of clay underlies the shallow groundwater zone. The depth to the regional aquifer varies from approximately 14 to 17 m across the facility. The regional aquifer is composed of interfingering layers of silty sand, fine-grained sand, and medium-grained sand. Based on the limited analyses described in this report, there is no severe contamination of the groundwater at Al-Tuwaitha with radioactive constituents. However, significant data gaps exist and this plan recommends the installation of additional groundwater monitoring wells and conducting additional types of radiological and chemical analyses.

  15. Implementing Electronic Portfolios for Performance Assessment: A Pilot Program Involving a College Writing Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Click, Ben A.; Magruder, Sarah C.

    2004-01-01

    In December 2001, as part of a Preparing Tomorrow's Teachers to Use Technology grant, the St. Mary's College writing center dedicated space, software, and trained personnel to assist students and teachers in the writing and development of electronic portfolios. They created a unified space for faculty and student development across disciplines.…

  16. Program review of the USDA Center for Medical, Agricultural and Veterinary Entomology

    Science.gov (United States)

    The USDA-ARS Center for Medical, Agricultural and Veterinary Entomology (CMAVE) has a history that starts in 1932 in Orlando to develop methods to control mosquitoes, including malaria vectors under conditions simulating those of the south Pacific jungles, and other insects affecting man and animals...

  17. Douglass Developmental Disabilities Center: An ABA Program for Children and Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handleman, Jan S.; Harris, Sandra L.

    2005-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) is an effective, and often superior, method to teach children with Autism Spectrum Disorders ASD), than other methods. The Douglass Developmental Disabilities Center of Rutgers University (DDDC) has been using ABA for more than thirty years to teach toddlers, young children,…

  18. Atlantic salmon and eastern oyster breeding programs at the National Cold Water Marine Aquaculture Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    The USDA-ARS National Cold Water Marine Aquaculture Center (NCWMAC) focuses on the coldwater marine aquaculture industry’s highest priority research needs including development of improved genetic stocks. Coldwater aquaculture production has potential for expansion, and both Atlantic salmon and Eas...

  19. 76 FR 66931 - Medicare Program; Accountable Care Organization Accelerated Development Learning Sessions; Center...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-28

    ... Accelerated Development Learning Sessions; Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation November 17 and 18... third and final Accelerated Development Learning Session (ADLS) hosted by CMS to help Accountable Care... while improving the quality of care for beneficiaries. Through Accelerated Development Learning Sessions...

  20. 75 FR 55588 - Family-to-Family Health Information Center Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Family-to-Family Health Information Center... Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) will be transferring the Florida Family-to-Family Health... parent-to-parent support for families with children and youth with special health care needs (CYSHCN) in...

  1. 75 FR 55587 - Family-to-Family Health Information Center Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Family-to-Family Health Information Center... Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) will be transferring the Vermont Family-to-Family Health... support for families with children and youth with special health care needs (CYSHCN) in the state of...

  2. General aviation internal-combustion engine research programs at NASA-Lewis Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, E. A.

    1978-01-01

    An update is presented of non-turbine general aviation engine programs. The program encompasses conventional, lightweight diesel and rotary engines. It's three major thrusts are: (1) reduced SFC's; (2) improved fuels tolerance; and (3) reduced emissions. Current and planned future programs in such areas as lean operation, improved fuel management, advanced cooling techniques and advanced engine concepts, are described. These are expected to lay the technology base, by the mid to latter 1980's, for engines whose life cycle fuel costs are 30 to 50% lower than today's conventional engines.

  3. Psychological health of military children: Longitudinal evaluation of a family-centered prevention program to enhance family resilience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, Patricia; Stein, Judith A.; Saltzman, William; Woodward, Kirsten; MacDermid, Shelley W.; Milburn, Norweeta; Mogil, Catherine; Beardslee, William

    2014-01-01

    Family-centered preventive interventions have been proposed as relevant to mitigating psychological health risk and promoting resilience in military families facing wartime deployment and reintegration. This study evaluates the impact of a family-centered prevention program, Families OverComing Under Stress Family Resilience Training (FOCUS), on the psychological adjustment of military children. Two primary goals include: 1) Understanding the relationships of distress among family members using a longitudinal path model to assess relations at the child and family level, and 2) Determining pathways of program impact on child adjustment. Multilevel data analysis using structural equation modeling was conducted with de-identified service delivery data from 280 families (505 children ages 3-17) in two follow-up assessments. Standardized measures included Service Member and Civilian parental distress (Brief Symptom Inventory, PTSD Checklist – Military), child adjustment (Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire), and family functioning (McMaster Family Assessment Device). Distress was significantly related among the service member parent, civilian parent and children. FOCUS improved family functioning, which in turn significantly reduced child distress at follow-up. Salient components of improved family functioning in reducing child distress mirrored resilience processes targeted by FOCUS. These findings underscore the public health potential of family-centered prevention for military families, and suggest areas for future research. PMID:23929043

  4. Academic-Community Partnership to Develop a Patient-Centered Breast Cancer Risk Reduction Program for Latina Primary Care Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castañeda, Sheila F; Giacinto, Rebeca E; Medeiros, Elizabeth A; Brongiel, Ilana; Cardona, Olga; Perez, Patricia; Talavera, Gregory A

    2016-06-01

    This collaborative study sought to address Latina breast cancer (BC) disparities by increasing health literacy (HL) in a community health center situated on the US-Mexico border region of San Diego County. An academic-community partnership conducted formative research to develop a culturally tailored promotora-based intervention with 109 individuals. The Spanish language program, entitled Nuestra Cocina: Mesa Buena, Vida Sana (Our Kitchen: Good Table, Healthy Life), included six sessions targeting HL, women's health, BC risk reduction, and patient-provider communication; sessions include cooking demonstrations of recipes with cancer-risk-reducing ingredients. A pilot study with 47 community health center Latina patients was conducted to examine the program's acceptability, feasibility, and ability to impact knowledge and skills. Pre- and post-analyses demonstrated that participants improved their self-reported cancer screening, BC knowledge, daily fruit and vegetable intake, and ability to read a nutrition label (p < 0.05). Results of the pilot study demonstrate the importance of utilizing patient-centered culturally appropriate noninvasive means to educate and empower Latina patients.

  5. Impact of a worksite wellness program on the nutrition and physical activity environment of child care centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosliner, Wendi A; James, Paula; Yancey, Antronette K; Ritchie, Lorrene; Studer, Natalie; Crawford, Patricia B

    2010-01-01

    To test whether implementing a staff wellness program affects the nutrition and physical activity environment at child care centers. Quasi-experimental controlled trial. Child care centers in low income neighborhoods in California. Eighty-two staff members at 13 centers completed the study. Intervention and control groups received training and education about nutrition and physical activity. The intervention group also participated in a worksite wellness program. Staff members' personal health habits, self-efficacy in working with families on nutrition and physical activity, and changes in children's food and physical activity environments were assessed. Statistical software was used to analyze change scores for pre-post measures and to test differences for end point-only measures. Although significant differences in staff members' personal health behaviors were not observed, staff from intervention sites exhibited more positive changes in their comfort level in talking to parents about nutrition and physical activity. Intervention sites reported providing more fresh fruits (p = .004) and vegetables (p = .03) to children as part of regular meals and snacks and serving more fresh fruits (p = .05) at children's celebrations. Control sites reported greater increases in sweetened foods (p = .02) and sweetened beverages (p = .05) at children's celebrations. The wellness intervention shows promise in improving the children's food environment in a child care setting.

  6. Psychological health of military children: longitudinal evaluation of a family-centered prevention program to enhance family resilience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, Patricia; Stein, Judith A; Saltzman, William; Woodward, Kirsten; MacDermid, Shelley W; Milburn, Norweeta; Mogil, Catherine; Beardslee, William

    2013-08-01

    Family-centered preventive interventions have been proposed as relevant to mitigating psychological health risk and promoting resilience in military families facing wartime deployment and reintegration. This study evaluates the impact of a family-centered prevention program, Families OverComing Under Stress Family Resilience Training (FOCUS), on the psychological adjustment of military children. Two primary goals include (1) understanding the relationships of distress among family members using a longitudinal path model to assess relations at the child and family level and (2) determining pathways of program impact on child adjustment. Multilevel data analysis using structural equation modeling was conducted with deidentified service delivery data from 280 families (505 children aged 3-17) in two follow-up assessments. Standardized measures included service member and civilian parental distress (Brief Symptom Inventory, PTSD Checklist-Military), child adjustment (Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire), and family functioning (McMaster Family Assessment Device). Distress was significantly related among the service member parent, civilian parent, and children. FOCUS improved family functioning, which in turn significantly reduced child distress at follow-up. Salient components of improved family functioning in reducing child distress mirrored resilience processes targeted by FOCUS. These findings underscore the public health potential of family-centered prevention for military families and suggest areas for future research. Reprint & Copyright © 2013 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  7. 78 FR 41817 - Notice of Funding Availability for the Small Business Transportation Resource Center Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-11

    ... Education Program (BEP) information, SBTRC brochures and literature, Procurement Forecasts; Contracting with... representation on the planning committee. This committee shall be established no later than 60 days after the...

  8. 77 FR 36034 - Notice of Funding Availability for the Small Business Transportation Resource Center Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-15

    ... (STLP) Information, Bonding Education Program (BEP) information, SBTRC brochures and literature, Procurement Forecasts; Contracting with DOT booklets, Women and Girls Entrepreneurial Training and Technical... authorities for the SBTRC's headquarters state must have representation on the planning committee. This...

  9. 77 FR 42790 - Notice of Funding Availability for the Small Business Transportation Resource Center Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-20

    ... (STLP) Information, Bonding Education Program (BEP) information, SBTRC brochures and literature, Procurement Forecasts; Contracting with DOT booklets, Women and Girls Entrepreneurial Training and Technical... must have representation on the planning committee. This committee shall be established no later than...

  10. 78 FR 4973 - Notice of Funding Availability for the Small Business Transportation Resource Center Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-23

    ... Program (BEP) information, SBTRC brochures and literature, Procurement Forecasts; Contracting with DOT booklets, Women and Girls in Transportation Initiative (WITI) information, and any other materials or... for the SBTRC's headquarters state must have representation on the planning committee. This committee...

  11. 75 FR 3517 - Notice of Funding Availability for the Small Business Transportation Resource Center Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-21

    ... assistance, business training programs, such as, business assessment, management training, counseling..., rehabilitation, restructuring, improvement, or revitalization of any of the nation's modes of transportation...; develop support mechanisms, including management and technical services, that will enable small...

  12. Supply Inventory Management: Industrial Prime Vendor Program at the Air Force Air Logistics Centers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2002-01-01

    ... in maintenance, repair, and overhaul facilities. The IPV Program is a customer-oriented, supply-chain management initiative that transfers complete responsibility for bench-stock material to a third-party vendor...

  13. Saint Louis Science Center Community STEM Outreach Program: A Local Model for National Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-26

    of youth. This particular set of needs (Collins, 1998) has been adopted by numerous youth programs. They include:  Mastery and Achievement...will be teaching. The overall design of the YES Program also addresses the 7 Developmental Needs of Youth. The need for Mastery and Achievement...thorough understanding of STEM concepts that can be transferred to school and applied in their lives  Improved communications skills, including vocabulary

  14. Users Guide for NASA Lewis Research Center DC-9 Reduced-Gravity Aircraft Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaniec, John S.

    1995-01-01

    The document provides guidelines and information for users of the DC-9 Reduced-Gravity Aircraft Program. It describes the facilities, requirements for test personnel, equipment design and installation, mission preparation, and in-flight procedures. Those who have used the KC-135 reduced-gravity aircraft will recognize that many of the procedures and guidelines are the same, to ensure a commonality between the DC-9 and KC-135 programs.

  15. [Nasopharyngeal Hib Carriage Among Healthy Children Attending Daycare Centers in Yokohama After One Year of a Publicly Funded Vaccine Program].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Ayako; Sumita, Hiroko; Minohara, Yutaka; Fujita, Shinji; Yazaki, Shigeyoshi; Kitamura, Miyoshi; Kawai, Shigehiko; Kamata, Kazumi; Oota, Yoshimi; Yamada, Mikiko; Matsumoto, Yuko; Takeyasu, Nobuaki

    2015-01-01

    Yokohama city started a regular, free vaccine program for Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) from February of 2011. This study was completed to verify the effectiveness of the vaccine on the nasopharyngeal Hib carriage among healthy children attending daycare centers in the Isogo area. The research was conducted during the late spring (Jun--Jul) and fall (Oct-Nov) of 2012. There was a significant decrease in the Hib carriage rate (spring 8.8%, fall 1.6%). During this period there was no increase in the Hib vaccine coverage. The Hib carriage rate of each daycare center was 0-18.4% in spring and 0-4.9% in fall. There was no significant relationship between the rate of non immunized children and that of Hib carriage. This improvement in nasopharyngeal Hib carriage shows the impact of community immunity.

  16. Longitudinal spirometry among patients in a treatment program for community members with World Trade Center (WTC)-related illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mengling; Qian, Meng; Cheng, Qinyi; Berger, Kenneth I.; Shao, Yongzhao; Turetz, Meredith; Kazeros, Angeliki; Parsia, Sam; Goldring, Roberta M.; Fernandez-Beros, Maria Elena; Marmor, Michael; Reibman, Joan

    2013-01-01

    Objective The course of lung function in community members exposed to World Trade Center (WTC) dust and fumes remains undefined. We studied longitudinal spirometry among patients in the WTC Environmental Health Center (WTCEHC) treatment program. Methods Observational study of 946 WTCEHC patients with repeated spirometry measures analyzed on the population as a whole and stratified by smoking status, initial spirometry pattern and WTC-related exposure category. Results Improvement in forced expiratory volume (FVC; 54.4 ml/year; 95% CI: 45.0-63.8) and forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1; 36.8 ml/year; 95% CI: 29.3-44.3) was noted for the population as a whole. Heavy smokers did not improve. Spirometry changes differed depending on initial spirometry pattern and exposure category. Conclusions These data demonstrate spirometry improvement in select populations suggesting reversibility in airway injury and reinforcing the importance of continued treatment. PMID:22995806

  17. Institution of a Rubella Screening and Immunization Program at Tripler Army Medical Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-06-01

    to accomplish the same goal of protecting the best interest of mother , child and Tripler Army Medical Center. 59 HST-CPOH (26 Oct 78) SUBJECT: TAC...person who is infected doughs , sneezes or speaks. Symptoms of the disease are characterized by a mild upper respiratory illness with a low fever and a...children being born with congenital birth defects to mothers inadvertently exposed to rubella virus during pregnancy. 3. The health records of

  18. Perceived Impacts of a Public Health Training Center Field Placement Program among Trainees: Findings from a Small Group Externship Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Patrik; Grimm, Brandon; Abdel-Monem, Tarik; Hoffman, Stacey J; DeKraai, Mark; McMillan, Analisa

    2014-01-01

    There is heightened interest in identifying the impact of the federally funded Public Health Training Center (PHTC) program. Although evaluation studies have been conducted of public health training in general, evaluations of PHTC programs are rare. Field placement components are congressionally mandated requirements of PHTCs. Field placements are typically intensive, supervised externships for students to gain public health experience with local health departments or non-profit organizations. We have found no published evaluations of PHTC field placement components. This may be because of their small size and unique nature. We designed and evaluated a 200-h field placement program at an established PHTC. The evaluation included pre/post surveys measuring public health core competencies, and post-experience interviews. We found significant increases in three competency domains among trainees: policy development and program planning, communication skills, and community dimensions of practice. These outcomes contribute to evidence based on the efficacy of PHTC field placement programs, and underscore their role in public health training.

  19. National Aeronautics and Space Administration Marshall Space Flight Center Space Transportation Directorate Risk Management Implementation Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Luis Alberto; Kross, Denny (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The US civil aerospace program has been a great contributor to the creation and implementation of techniques and methods to identify, analyze, and confront risk. NASA has accomplished mission success in many instances, but also has had many failures. Anomalies have kept the Agency from achieving success on other occasions, as well. While NASA has mastered ways to prevent risks, and to quickly and effectively react and recover from anomalies or failures, it was not until few years ago that a comprehensive Risk Management process started being implemented in some of its programs and projects. A Continuous Risk Management (CRM) cycle process was developed and has been promoted and used successfully in programs and projects across the Agency.

  20. A Broadly-Based Training Program in Volcano Hazards Monitoring at the Center for the Study of Active Volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, D. M.; Bevens, D.

    2015-12-01

    The Center for the Study of Active Volcanoes, in cooperation with the USGS Volcano Hazards Program at HVO and CVO, offers a broadly based volcano hazards training program targeted toward scientists and technicians from developing nations. The program has been offered for 25 years and provides a hands-on introduction to a broad suite of volcano monitoring techniques, rather than detailed training with just one. The course content has evolved over the life of the program as the needs of the trainees have changed: initially emphasizing very basic monitoring techniques (e.g. precise leveling, interpretation of seismic drum records, etc.) but, as the level of sophistication of the trainees has increased, training in more advanced technologies has been added. Currently, topics of primary emphasis have included volcano seismology and seismic networks; acquisition and modeling of geodetic data; methods of analysis and monitoring of gas geochemistry; interpretation of volcanic deposits and landforms; training in LAHARZ, GIS mapping of lahar risks; and response to and management of volcanic crises. The course also provides training on public outreach, based on CSAV's Hawaii-specific hazards outreach programs, and volcano preparedness and interactions with the media during volcanic crises. It is an intensive eight week course with instruction and field activities underway 6 days per week; it is now offered in two locations, Hawaii Island, for six weeks, and the Cascades volcanoes of the Pacific Northwest, for two weeks, to enable trainees to experience field conditions in both basaltic and continental volcanic environments. The survival of the program for more than two decades demonstrates that a need for such training exists and there has been interaction and contribution to the program by the research community, however broader engagement with the latter continues to present challenges. Some of the reasons for this will be discussed.

  1. [Changing health, activity and mood Department of day care clients comprehensive social service center: training program, methods, results].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolgova, V I

    2016-01-01

    The comparative analysis of changes in the self-assessment of health, activity and mood of older clients (men and women) separating the daycare center of the complex of social services. Used psychodiagnostic method of self-assessment of the functional state of the differential «Test SAN» (V.A.Doskin, N.A. Lavrentiev, V.B.Sphere, M.P.Miroshnikov). The study of these states conducted before and after the implementation of targeted training programs, simulation and which goal setting made from the standpoint of the system and subject-activity approach.

  2. Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program FY-99 Status Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. K. Herbst; J. A. McCray; R. J. Kirkham; J. Pao; S. H. Hinckley

    1999-09-30

    The Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) anticipates that large volumes of low-level/low-activity wastes will need to be grouted prior to near-surface disposal. During fiscal year 1999, grout formulations were studied for transuranic waste derived from INTEC liquid sodium-bearing waste and for projected newly generated low-level liquid waste. Additional studies were completed on radionuclide leaching, microbial degradation, waste neutralization, and a small mockup for grouting the INTEC underground storage tank residual heels.

  3. Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program FY-99 Status Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herbst, Alan Keith; Mc Cray, John Alan; Kirkham, Robert John; Pao, Jenn Hai; Hinckley, Steve Harold

    1999-10-01

    The Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) anticipates that large volumes of low-level/low-activity wastes will need to be grouted prior to near-surface disposal. During fiscal year 1999, grout formulations were studied for transuranic waste derived from INTEC liquid sodium-bearing waste and for projected newly generated low-level liquid waste. Additional studies were completed on radionuclide leaching, microbial degradation, waste neutralization, and a small mockup for grouting the INTEC underground storage tank residual heels.

  4. Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program, FY-98 Status Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herbst, A.K.; Rogers, A.Z.; McCray, J.A.; Simmons, R.F.; Palethorpe, S.J.

    1999-03-01

    The Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) anticipates that large volumes of low-level/low-activity wastes will need to be grouted prior to near-surface disposal. During fiscal year 1998, three grout formulations were studied for low-activity wastes derived from INTEC liquid sodium-bearing waste. Compressive strength and leach results are presented for phosphate bonding cement, acidic grout, and alkaline grout formulations. In an additional study, grout formulations are recommended for stabilization of the INTEC underground storage tank residual heels.

  5. An In-Barracks Medical Screening Program at the Recruit Training Command, Naval Training Center, Orlando, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-04-25

    ACCESSION NO. 1.T[AN IlBRAK MDIA CEIN PROGRAM AT THE 1SCRUIT TRAINING COMMAND, NAVAL TRAINING CENTER, ORLANDO, FLORIDA 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) LT John R...the pro- ductive utilization of resources, leadership, social de- terminates of group expectations, the measurement of group standards to those of...3 Tu 14. Alcohol Sponges 3 Bx 15. Q-Tips 3 Pg 16. Triangular Bandages 6 Ea 17. Bandage Scissors 1 Ea 18. Telfa Pads 2 Bx 19. Scrotal Supports, medimum

  6. Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program FY-98 Status Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herbst, Alan Keith; Mc Cray, John Alan; Rogers, Adam Zachary; Simmons, R. F.; Palethorpe, S. J.

    1999-03-01

    The Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) anticipates that large volumes of low-level/low-activity wastes will need to be grouted prior to near-surface disposal. During fiscal year 1998, three grout formulations were studied for low-activity wastes derived from INTEC liquid sodium-bearing waste. Compressive strength and leach results are presented for phosphate bonding cement, acidic grout, and alkaline grout formulations. In an additional study, grout formulations are recommended for stabilization of the INTEC underground storage tank residual heels.

  7. School Subsidies for the Poor: Evaluating the Mexican Progresa Poverty Program. Center Discussion Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, T. Paul

    In rural Mexico, the Progresa program provided educational grants to poor mothers of children enrolled in grades 3-9 and attending 85 percent of the school days. Payments were increased at the higher grades, a premium was paid for girls enrolled in grades 7-9, and every 6 months the grants were adjusted upward to compensate for inflation. The…

  8. Centering the Voices of International Students in Family Studies and Family Therapy Graduate Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDowell, Teresa; Fang, Shi-Ruei; Kosutic, Iva; Griggs, Julie

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we report the results of a survey that accessed the perceptions of family studies and family therapy international master's and doctoral students across the United States. Our goals included giving collective voice to the experience of international students and gathering their suggestions for improving programs. Themes that…

  9. 76 FR 19063 - Applications for New Awards; Educational Opportunity Centers (EOC) Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-06

    ...; and to improve the financial and economic literacy of participants. Priorities: This notice includes..., audiotape, or computer diskette) by contacting the program contact person listed in this section. 2. Content... package in an accessible format (e.g., braille, large print, audiotape, or computer diskette) on request...

  10. Model Programs: Compensatory Education. The Juan Morel Campos Bilingual Center, Chicago, Illinois.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Center for Educational Communication (DHEW/OE), Washington, DC.

    The bilingual program described in this booklet offers intermediate-grade English and Spanish instruction to Spanish-speaking children from an economically disadvantaged neighborhood in one of Chicago's largest school districts. The descriptive information presented here concerns context and objectives, necessary personnel, educational…

  11. 76 FR 30990 - Notice of Funding Availability for the Small Business Transportation Resource Center Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-27

    ..., SBTRC brochures and literature, Procurement Forecasts; Contracting with DOT booklets, and any other... representation on the planning committee. This committee shall be established no later than 60 days after the..., facilities and equipment to perform the services described in this announcement. (H) Women & Girls Program 1...

  12. 78 FR 13148 - Notice of Funding Availability for the Small Business Transportation Resource Center Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-26

    ... Program (BEP) information, SBTRC ] brochures and literature, Procurement Forecasts; Contracting with DOT booklets, Women and Girls in Transportation Initiative (WITI) information, and any other materials or... headquarters state must have representation on the planning committee. This committee shall be established no...

  13. 75 FR 29366 - ``Homeless Veterans' Reintegration Program (HVRP) National Technical Assistance Center...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-25

    ... of the Assistant Secretary for Veterans' Employment and Training ``Homeless Veterans' Reintegration... the Homeless Veterans' Reintegration Program (HVRP) to include the Homeless Female Veterans and... to expedite the reintegration of homeless Veterans into the labor force. In order to assist the USDOL...

  14. Technology to support integrated Antimicrobial Stewardship Programs : a user centered and stakeholder driven development approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beerlage-de Jong, Nienke; van Gemert-Pijnen, Julia E.W.C.; Wentzel, M.J.; Hendrix, Ron; Tjin-Kam-Jet-Siemons, Liseth

    2017-01-01

    The rise of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is a severe global health problem. Tackling this problem requires the prudent prescribing of antimicrobials. This is promoted through Antimicrobial Stewardship Programs (ASPs). In this position paper we describe i) how a socio-technical multidisciplinary

  15. Disseminating end-of-life education to cancer centers: overview of program and of evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Marcia; Hanson, Jo; Mullan, Patricia; Spolum, Maren; Ferrell, Betty

    2007-01-01

    Systematic provision of compassionate end-of-life (EOL) care requires strategic training of health professionals. Disseminating EOL Education to Cancer Centers (DELEtCC) targeted education of interdisciplinary institutional teams. Competitively-selected two-person teams participated in a national three-day EOL conference. Nationally recognized faculty created and presented the curriculum. Project faculty supported teams over 18 months as they implemented EOL goals. Conference evaluations were very positive. Independent participant and administrative evaluations reported successful implementation of goals aimed an improving EOL care. DELEtCC disseminated education representing best EOL practices, and participants used this knowledge to create and implement goals aimed at improving EOL care.

  16. USBI Booster Production Company's Hazardous Waste Management Program at the Kennedy Space Center, FL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venuto, Charles

    1987-01-01

    In response to the hazardous-waste generating processes associated with the launch of the Space Shuttle, a hazardous waste management plan has been developed. It includes waste recycling, product substitution, waste treatment, and waste minimization at the source. Waste material resulting from the preparation of the nonmotor segments of the solid rocket boosters include waste paints (primer, topcoats), waste solvents (methylene chloride, freon, acetone, toluene), waste inorganic compounds (aluminum anodizing compound, fixer), and others. Ways in which these materials are contended with at the Kennedy Space Center are discussed.

  17. Global biology - An interdisciplinary scientific research program at NASA, Ames Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawless, J. G.; Colin, L.

    1983-01-01

    NASA has initiated new effort in Global Biology, the primary focus of which is to understand biogeochemical cycles. As part of this effort, an interdisciplinary team of scientists has formed at Ames Research Center to investigate the cycling of sulfur in the marine coastal zone and to study the cycling of nitrogen in terrestrial ecosystems. Both studies will use remotely sensed data, coupled with ground-based research, to identify and measure the transfer of major and minor biologically produced gases between these ecosystems and global reservoirs.

  18. Global Biology: An Interdisciplinary Scientific Research Program at NASA Ames Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawless, James G.; Colin, Lawrence

    1984-01-01

    NASA has initiated new effort in Global Biology, the primary focus of which is to understand biogeochemical cycles. As part of this effort, an interdisciplinary team of scientists has formed at Ames Research Center to investigate the cycling of sulfur in the marine coastal zone and to study the cycling of nitrogen in terrestrial ecosystems. Both studies will use remotely sensed data, coupled with ground-based research, to identify and measure the transfer of major and minor biologically produced gases between these ecosystems and global reservoirs.

  19. Improving clinical research and cancer care delivery in community settings: evaluating the NCI community cancer centers program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fennell Mary L

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In this article, we describe the National Cancer Institute (NCI Community Cancer Centers Program (NCCCP pilot and the evaluation designed to assess its role, function, and relevance to the NCI's research mission. In doing so, we describe the evolution of and rationale for the NCCCP concept, participating sites' characteristics, its multi-faceted aims to enhance clinical research and quality of care in community settings, and the role of strategic partnerships, both within and outside of the NCCCP network, in achieving program objectives. Discussion The evaluation of the NCCCP is conceptualized as a mixed method multi-layered assessment of organizational innovation and performance which includes mapping the evolution of site development as a means of understanding the inter- and intra-organizational change in the pilot, and the application of specific evaluation metrics for assessing the implementation, operations, and performance of the NCCCP pilot. The assessment of the cost of the pilot as an additional means of informing the longer-term feasibility and sustainability of the program is also discussed. Summary The NCCCP is a major systems-level set of organizational innovations to enhance clinical research and care delivery in diverse communities across the United States. Assessment of the extent to which the program achieves its aims will depend on a full understanding of how individual, organizational, and environmental factors align (or fail to align to achieve these improvements, and at what cost.

  20. Adaptation of Lean Six Sigma Methodologies for the Evaluation of Veterans Choice Program at 3 Urban Veterans Affairs Medical Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Sherry L; Stevenson, Lauren D; Ladebue, Amy C; McCreight, Marina S; Lawrence, Emily C; Oestreich, Taryn; Lambert-Kerzner, Anne C

    2017-07-01

    The Veterans Health Administration (VHA) is adapting to meet the changing needs of our Veterans. VHA leaders are promoting quality improvement strategies including Lean Six Sigma (LSS). This study used LSS tools to evaluate the Veterans Choice Program (VCP), a program that aims to improve access to health care services for eligible Veterans by expanding health care options to non-VHA providers. LSS was utilized to assess the current process and efficiency patterns of the VCP at 3 VHA Medical Centers. LSS techniques were used to assess data obtained through semistructured interviews with Veterans, staff, and providers to describe and evaluate the VCP process by identifying wastes and defects. The LSS methodology facilitated the process of targeting priorities for improvement and constructing suggestions to close identified gaps and inefficiencies. Identified key process wastes included inefficient exchange of clinical information between stakeholders in and outside of the VHA; poor dissemination of VCP programmatic information; shortages of VCP-participating providers; duplication of appointments; declines in care coordination; and lack of program adaptability to local processes. Recommendations for improvement were formulated using LSS. This evaluation illustrates how LSS can be utilized to assess a nationally mandated health care program. By focusing on stakeholder, staff, and Veteran perspectives, process defects in the VCP were identified and improvement recommendations were made. However, the current LSS language used is not intuitive in health care and similar applications of LSS may consider using new language and goals adapted specifically for health care.

  1. The service-education linkage: implications for family practice residency programs and community and migrant health centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, P R; Hale, F

    1993-05-01

    Access to quality primary health care for our country's underserved populations is a challenge for both the government and physicians. The Division of Medicine, through funding priorities and other initiatives, is encouraging family practice educators to train residents and students for work in community and migrant health centers (C/MHCs) in underserved areas. The objective of this research was to study linkages between family practice residency programs and C/MHCs and determine the reasons for affiliation, disadvantages and advantages, predictors of successful linkages, and common errors in the linkage agreement. We conducted in-depth telephone interviews with the directors of 13 of the 19 family practice residency programs identified as having linkages with C/MHCs. All interviewees at residency programs indicated that their programs had a mission to serve underserved patients. The most commonly cited constraining factor cited by both residency programs and C/MHCs was financial support for residents, on-site faculty, and support staff. Many programs reported that residents training at the C/MHC were able to gain a community health perspective and practice community-oriented primary care. Finally, financing the relationship involved many different approaches, ranging from the residency paying all of the salaries, to a sharing of salaries by the residency, state, and/or hospital, to C/MHC paying the salaries either through its own funds or through grant support. These data provide an assessment of the current issues that family practice residencies must address to implement service-education linkages. They provide an empirical basis to outline the steps involved in forming a linkage between a residency and a C/MHC.

  2. Expanding Antimicrobial Stewardship to Urgent Care Centers Through a Pharmacist-Led Culture Follow-up Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumkow, Lisa E; Beuschel, Thomas S; Brandt, Kasey L

    2017-09-01

    Urgent care centers represent a high-volume outpatient setting where antibiotics are prescribed frequently but resources for antimicrobial stewardship may be scarce. In 2015, our pharmacist-led Emergency Department (ED) culture follow-up program was expanded to include two urgent care (UC) sites within the same health system. The UC program is conducted by ED and infectious diseases clinical pharmacists as well as PGY1 pharmacy residents using a collaborative practice agreement (CPA). The purpose of this study was to describe the pharmacist-led UC culture follow-up program and its impact on pharmacist workload. This retrospective, descriptive study included all patients discharged to home from UC with a positive culture from any site resulting between 1 January and 31 December 2016. Data collected included the culture type, presence of intervention, and proportion of interventions made under the CPA. Additionally, pharmacist workload was reported as the number of call attempts made, new prescriptions written, and median time to complete follow-up per patient. Data were reported using descriptive statistics. A total of 1461 positive cultures were reviewed for antibiotic appropriateness as part of the UC culture follow-up program, with 320 (22%) requiring follow-up intervention. Culture types most commonly requiring intervention were urine cultures (25%) and sexually transmitted diseases (25%). A median of 15 min was spent per intervention, with a median of one call (range 1-6 calls) needed to reach each patient. Less than half of patients required a new antimicrobial prescription at follow-up. A pharmacist-led culture follow-up program conducted using a CPA was able to be expanded to UC sites within the same health system using existing clinical pharmacy staff along with PGY1 pharmacy residents. Service expansion resulted in minimal increase in pharmacist workload. Adding UC culture follow-up services to an existing ED program can allow health systems to expand

  3. Outcome Evaluation of a Policy-Mandated Lifestyle and Environmental Modification Program in a National Job Training Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez, Elizabeth Yakes; Harris, Amanda; Luna, Donald; Velasquez, Daniel; Slovik, Jonathan; Kong, Alberta

    2017-06-01

    Excess weight gain is common when adolescents become young adults, but there are no obesity prevention or weight management interventions that have been tested for emerging adults who follow non-traditional post-secondary paths, such as enrolling in job training programs. We evaluated Healthy Eating & Active Lifestyles (HEALs), a policy-mandated lifestyle education/environmental modification program, at a job training center for low-income 16-24 year olds. We examined average change in body mass index (BMI) z-score from baseline to 6 months for emerging adults (aged 16-24 years) in pre-HEALs implementation (n = 125) and post-HEALs implementation (n = 126) cohorts living at the job training center, by baseline weight status. In both cohorts, average BMI z-score significantly increased from baseline to 6 months for students with BMI < 25. Average BMI z-score significantly decreased for the overweight (BMI 25 to <30; -0.11, p = .03) and obese (BMI ≥ 30; -0.11, p = .001) students only within the post-HEALs cohort; changes within the pre-HEALs cohort and between cohorts were not significant. HEALs may promote positive weight-related trends for overweight/obese students, but prevention efforts for non-overweight/obese students need to be improved.

  4. Shipshape: sanitation inspections on cruise ships, 1990-2005, Vessel Sanitation Program, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, Elaine H; Blanton, Curtis J; Otto, Charles

    2008-03-01

    In the course of a successful collaboration between the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the cruise ship industry on reducing common-source outbreaks, CDC's Vessel Sanitation Program (VSP) has expanded its training, education, and cruise ship inspection programs. The study reported here evaluated 15 years of ship sanitation inspection data from the National Center for Environmental Health and assessed performance in specific sanitation categories from 1996 to 2005. During the period 1990-2005, scores from cruise ship environmental sanitation inspections steadily improved. The percentage of inspections with violations decreased among five of nine categories. Those five categories were Washing Facilities, Contact Surfaces, Facility Maintenance, Food Handling, and Communicable Disease Practices. Inspection violations increased proportionally in the categories of Swimming Pools and Water System Protection/Chart Recording. Overall continued good performance in most sanitation categories is likely attributable to on-site training during inspections, improvements in ship construction, and a switch from hot-holding temperatures to time limits as a public health control for foods on display.

  5. Getting on the same page: an interprofessional common reading program as foundation for patient-centered care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, Regina F; Knab, Mary; Cahn, Peter S

    2018-02-20

    A primary goal of interprofessional education is to produce clinicians who practice collaboratively to provide patient-centered care. This exploratory study evaluated whether students' attitudes about a literary account of an illness experience endured after a year of professional and clinical education and if students applied lessons learned from a common reading to the delivery of patient centered care. Six focus groups were completed with health professions students and five main themes emerged from the focus group data. Themes include: Seeing family members as stakeholders; Establishing common ground with peers and the larger reason for graduate school; Applying lessons to clinical practice that see the patient as a person; Experiencing an emotional connection with a story and its characters; and Taking alternative perspectives/stepping into the shoes of the patient. Study results are discussed in relation to the interprofessional education literature, with implications for educators and interprofessional curricula also presented. We conclude that a common reading program may provide an effective means for developing health professions students' knowledge and attitudes in the tenets of patient-centered collaborative care. It has the potential to build community through shared intellectual experience, facilitating meaningful reflection and perspective-taking in interprofessional learners.

  6. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center Workshop: Brookhaven Summer Program on Nucleon Spin Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aschenauer, A.; Qiu, Jianwei; Vogelsang, W.; Yuan, F.

    2011-08-02

    Understanding the structure of the nucleon is of fundamental importance in sub-atomic physics. Already the experimental studies on the electro-magnetic form factors in the 1950s showed that the nucleon has a nontrivial internal structure, and the deep inelastic scattering experiments in the 1970s revealed the partonic substructure of the nucleon. Modern research focuses in particular on the spin and the gluonic structure of the nucleon. Experiments using deep inelastic scattering or polarized p-p collisions are carried out in the US at the CEBAF and RHIC facilities, respectively, and there are other experimental facilities around the world. More than twenty years ago, the European Muon Collaboration published their first experimental results on the proton spin structure as revealed in polarized deep inelastic lepton-nucleon scattering, and concluded that quarks contribute very little to the proton's spin. With additional experimental and theoretical investigations and progress in the following years, it is now established that, contrary to naive quark model expectations, quarks and anti-quarks carry only about 30% of the total spin of the proton. Twenty years later, the discovery from the polarized hadron collider at RHIC was equally surprising. For the phase space probed by existing RHIC experiments, gluons do not seem to contribute any to the proton's spin. To find out what carries the remaining part of proton's spin is a key focus in current hadronic physics and also a major driving force for the new generation of spin experiments at RHIC and Jefferson Lab and at a future Electron Ion Collider. It is therefore very important and timely to organize a series of annual spin physics meetings to summarize the status of proton spin physics, to focus the effort, and to layout the future perspectives. This summer program on 'Nucleon Spin Physics' held at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) on July 14-27, 2010 [http://www.bnl.gov/spnsp/] is the

  7. Showcasing the InTeGrate STEP Center principles and implementation programs through interactive webinars and websites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, C. H.; McFadden, R.; Manduca, C. A.; Newman, A.

    2016-12-01

    Teaching sustainability curriculum provides an opportunity for building connections between academic learning and examples, experiences, and issues from beyond academia. Done well, this can increase students interest in a topic that feels relevant to their lives and help them transfer this learning to real life situations in their professional and personal lives. To support this approach to teaching, the NSF STEP Center InTeGrate developed a set of five core principles to guide development of teaching materials and programs that draw content from grand challenges to society and work to improve students' ability to understand the nature of science and think like a scientist. These principles include both effective pedagogical approaches and an interdisciplinary framework and are reflected in example curriculum modules, and implementation programs supported by InTeGrate. In order to promote adoption of teaching aligned with the InTeGrate philosophy and to use the InTeGrate-developed materials as tools, we organized a public webinar series led by materials developers and program leaders in the InTeGrate community. The webinars highlight programs that have addressed bigger-scale challenges such as increasing diversity of our majors and creating pathways to the workforce, as well as the materials used by these programs. They provide detailed examples designed to help other groups implement similar programs including showcase teaching activities and examples of their use in a wide range of settings. The webinars are interactive, with built-in activities and reflections that promote discussion among participants and speakers. Topics include natural hazards and risks, water resources and sustainability, energy and atmosphere, integrating sustainability into your course, and tracing environmental contaminants. These have clear components of geoscience, but promote an interdisciplinary perspective, that provides a deeper and more thorough discussion. Each webinar is archived

  8. The Digital Library for Earth System Education: A Progress Report from the DLESE Program Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlino, M. R.; Sumner, T. R.; Kelly, K. K.; Wright, M.

    2002-12-01

    DLESE is a community-owned and governed digital library offering easy access to high quality electronic resources about the Earth system at all educational levels. Currently in its third year of development and operation, DLESE resources are designed to support systemic educational reform, and include web-based teaching resources, tools, and services for the inclusion of data in classroom activities, as well as a "virtual community center" that supports community goals and growth. "Community-owned" and "community-governed" embody the singularity of DLESE through its unique participatory approach to both library building and governance. DLESE is guided by policy development vested in the DLESE Steering Committee, and informed by Standing Committees centered on Collections, Services, Technology, and Users, and community working groups covering a wide variety of interest areas. This presentation highlights both current and projected status of the library and opportunities for community engagement. It is specifically structured to engage community members in the design of the next version of the library release. The current Version 1.0 of the library consists of a web-accessible graphical user interface connected to a database of catalogued educational resources (approximately 3000); a metadata framework enabling resource characterization; a cataloging tool allowing community cataloging and indexing of materials; a search and discovery system allowing browsing based on topic, grade level, and resource type, and permitting keyword and controlled vocabulary-based searches; and a portal website supporting library use, community action, and DLESE partnerships. Future stages of library development will focus on enhanced community collaborative support; development of controlled vocabularies; collections building and community review systems; resource discovery integrating the National Science Education Standards and geography standards; Earth system science vocabulary

  9. Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center (JSC) proposed dual-use technology investment program in intelligent robotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Jon D.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the proposed Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center (JSC) precompetitive, dual-use technology investment project in robotics. New robotic technology in advanced robots, which can recognize and respond to their environments and to spoken human supervision so as to perform a variety of combined mobility and manipulation tasks in various sectors, is an objective of this work. In the U.S. economy, such robots offer the benefits of improved global competitiveness in a critical industrial sector; improved productivity by the end users of these robots; a growing robotics industry that produces jobs and profits; lower cost health care delivery with quality improvements; and, as these 'intelligent' robots become acceptable throughout society, an increase in the standard of living for everyone. In space, such robots will provide improved safety, reliability, and productivity as Space Station evolves, and will enable human space exploration (by human/robot teams). The proposed effort consists of partnerships between manufacturers, universities, and JSC to develop working production prototypes of these robots by leveraging current development by both sides. Currently targeted applications are in the manufacturing, health care, services, and construction sectors of the U.S. economy and in the inspection, servicing, maintenance, and repair aspects of space exploration. But the focus is on the generic software architecture and standardized interfaces for custom modules tailored for the various applications allowing end users to customize a robot as PC users customize PC's. Production prototypes would be completed in 5 years under this proposal.

  10. Alternative Ultrasound Gel for a Sustainable Ultrasound Program: Application of Human Centered Design.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret Salmon

    Full Text Available This paper describes design of a low cost, ultrasound gel from local products applying aspects of Human Centered Design methodology. A multidisciplinary team worked with clinicians who use ultrasound where commercial gel is cost prohibitive and scarce. The team followed the format outlined in the Ideo Took Kit. Research began by defining the challenge "how to create locally available alternative ultrasound gel for a low-resourced environment? The "End-Users," were identified as clinicians who use ultrasound in Democratic Republic of the Congo and Ethiopia. An expert group was identified and queried for possible alternatives to commercial gel. Responses included shampoo, oils, water and cornstarch. Cornstarch, while a reasonable solution, was either not available or too expensive. We then sought deeper knowledge of locally sources materials from local experts, market vendors, to develop a similar product. Suggested solutions gleaned from these interviews were collected and used to create ultrasound gel accounting for cost, image quality, manufacturing capability. Initial prototypes used cassava root flour from Great Lakes Region (DRC, Rwanda, Uganda, Tanzania and West Africa, and bula from Ethiopia. Prototypes were tested in the field and resulting images evaluated by our user group. A final prototype was then selected. Cassava and bula at a 32 part water, 8 part flour and 4 part salt, heated, mixed then cooled was the product design of choice.

  11. Alternative Ultrasound Gel for a Sustainable Ultrasound Program: Application of Human Centered Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmon, Margaret; Salmon, Christian; Bissinger, Alexa; Muller, Mundenga Mutendi; Gebreyesus, Alegnta; Geremew, Haimanot; Wendel, Sarah K; Wendell, Sarah; Azaza, Aklilu; Salumu, Maurice; Benfield, Nerys

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes design of a low cost, ultrasound gel from local products applying aspects of Human Centered Design methodology. A multidisciplinary team worked with clinicians who use ultrasound where commercial gel is cost prohibitive and scarce. The team followed the format outlined in the Ideo Took Kit. Research began by defining the challenge "how to create locally available alternative ultrasound gel for a low-resourced environment? The "End-Users," were identified as clinicians who use ultrasound in Democratic Republic of the Congo and Ethiopia. An expert group was identified and queried for possible alternatives to commercial gel. Responses included shampoo, oils, water and cornstarch. Cornstarch, while a reasonable solution, was either not available or too expensive. We then sought deeper knowledge of locally sources materials from local experts, market vendors, to develop a similar product. Suggested solutions gleaned from these interviews were collected and used to create ultrasound gel accounting for cost, image quality, manufacturing capability. Initial prototypes used cassava root flour from Great Lakes Region (DRC, Rwanda, Uganda, Tanzania) and West Africa, and bula from Ethiopia. Prototypes were tested in the field and resulting images evaluated by our user group. A final prototype was then selected. Cassava and bula at a 32 part water, 8 part flour and 4 part salt, heated, mixed then cooled was the product design of choice.

  12. An Overview of My Internship with the Ecological Program at John F. Kennedy Space Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Samantha

    2010-01-01

    During my internship with Innovative Health Applications, I participated in numerous longterm research projects involving the study of various plant and animal life at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC). I observed the monitoring of nesting sea turtles. I learned about the transfer of egg clutches from the northern Gulf Coast in an effort to help the hatchlings avoid the oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. I gained knowledge of tracking the movements of important sport fish and sharks in this area using a hydro-acoustic tag and receiver system. This effort included routinely taking water quality data at multiple sites around KSC. Alligator population and nesting assessments was another part of my internship. I observed the biologists take morphometric measurements, blood, urine and tissue samples from alligators found in KSC waterways. I assisted in taking photosynthesis and reflectance measurements on various scrub oaks and palmettos. I participated in Florida Scrub-Jay surveys in an effort to monitor their population trends and was involved in Southeastern beach mouse trapping and identification. I also assisted in seagrass surveys monitoring the health of the seagrass beds.

  13. Evaluation of two prevention programs 'Early Steps' and 'Faustlos' in daycare centers with children at risk: the study protocol of a cluster randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laezer, Katrin Luise; Leuzinger-Bohleber, Marianne; Rüger, Bernhard; Fischmann, Tamara

    2013-08-22

    While early programs to prevent aggression and violence are widely used, only a few controlled trials of effectiveness of psychoanalytically based prevention programs for preschoolers have been evaluated. This study compares 'Faustlos' (a violence prevention program) and 'Early Steps' (a psychoanalytically based, whole daycare center intervention to prevent violence) in daycare centers in socioeconomically deprived neighborhoods. Preschoolers in 14 daycare centers in Frankfurt, Germany, participate in a cluster randomized controlled trial (CRCT). The daycare centers were randomly chosen from a representative baseline survey of all Frankfurt's daycare centers carried out in 2003 (n = 5,300) with the following stratifying factors: children's aggressiveness, hyperactivity, anxiety and socioeconomic status. Additionally, the geographic identification of socioeconomically deprived neighborhoods regarding low-income children was taken from the Frankfurt Municipality Statistics. Children's attachment classification and children's aggressiveness, hyperactivity, anxiety and social competence are measured as outcome criteria before and after 2 years of intervention. The programs in the study aim to reach a high-risk population. Therefore, the combination of a random sampling of daycare centers out of a representative baseline survey in all daycare centers in Frankfurt and the application of official data on the local distribution of low-income children are unique features offered by the EVA study design. Data on preschooler's attachment representations are collected in socioeconomically deprived neighborhoods for the first time. DRKS00003500.

  14. Development of a standardized job description for healthcare managers of metabolic syndrome management programs in Korean community health centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Youngjin; Choo, Jina; Cho, Jeonghyun; Kim, So-Nam; Lee, Hye-Eun; Yoon, Seok-Jun; Seomun, GyeongAe

    2014-03-01

    This study aimed to develop a job description for healthcare managers of metabolic syndrome management programs using task analysis. Exploratory research was performed by using the Developing a Curriculum method, the Intervention Wheel model, and focus group discussions. Subsequently, we conducted a survey of 215 healthcare workers from 25 community health centers to verify that the job description we created was accurate. We defined the role of healthcare managers. Next, we elucidated the tasks of healthcare managers and performed needs analysis to examine the frequency, importance, and difficulty of each of their duties. Finally, we verified that our job description was accurate. Based on the 8 duties, 30 tasks, and 44 task elements assigned to healthcare managers, we found that the healthcare managers functioned both as team coordinators responsible for providing multidisciplinary health services and nurse specialists providing health promotion services. In terms of importance and difficulty of tasks performed by the healthcare managers, which were measured using a determinant coefficient, the highest-ranked task was planning social marketing (15.4), while the lowest-ranked task was managing human resources (9.9). A job description for healthcare managers may provide basic data essential for the development of a job training program for healthcare managers working in community health promotion programs. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Academic Health Center-Community Justice Program Partnerships: Linking Men in the Justice System to Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Bruce J; Kalmuss, Debra; Cushman, Linda F; Bjarnadottir, Ragnhildur I; Holstrom, Amelia; Peters, Zachary J; Valera, Pamela; Cohall, Alwyn T

    2016-01-01

    Linkage to community health and social services after incarceration is often inadequate. This is troubling, because risk taking and poor health are common immediately after release, and access to health providers and insurance helps individuals to transition home. This article describes how faculty and clinicians at a large academic health center in New York City, established partnerships with justice programs to jointly develop services that aimed to increase health care access for men in the justice system. We describe how faculty and students from Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health (MSPH), clinicians from New York-Presbyterian Hospital's (NYPH) Young Men's Clinic (YMC) and project STAY, and staff from justice programs collaborated to increase access to care. We highlight the characteristics of successful partnerships drawn from the literature on community-based participatory research. We conclude with a discussion of some challenges we encountered and lessons we learned about establishing and sustaining partnerships with court, probation, parole, reentry, and diversion programs while educating the next generation of public health leaders.

  16. Effect of Self–Care Educational Program to Improving Quality of Life among Elderly Referred to Health Centers in Zanjan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Salimi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Since elderlies are susceptible to various impairments due to different physical and mental problems, they need more attention and abiding and efficient self-care program for their health promotion. The present study investigated the effect of self-care training program on quality of life of elderlies. Materials and Methods: This pre- and post-quasi-experimental study was carried out on 160 elderly clients selected from eight health care centers in Zanjan, Iran. The elderlies were selected by randomized sampling and assigned to two groups of experimental (n = 80 and control (n = 80 groups. The experimental group participated in the self-care training program for six sessions of one hour. The study instruments were questionnaires regarding demographic information and short-form health survey (SF-36. Data analysis was performed using SPSS-22 software by independent t-test, Mann-Whitney and chi-squared. Results: The finding showed a significant difference in mean scores of quality of life between the experimental and control groups after the intervention (P < 0.001. Conclusions: Self-care education to elderlies about the practices of proper nutrition, exercise, rest and medication can prevent several problems and help them to improve their quality of lives.

  17. A review of recent programs and future plans for rotorcraft in-flight simulation at Ames Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshow, Michelle M.; Aiken, Edwin W.; Hindson, William S.; Lebacqz, J. V.; Denery, Dallas G.

    1991-01-01

    A new flight research vehicle, the Rotorcraft-Aircrew Systems Concepts Airborne Laboratory (RASCAL), is being developed by the U.S. Army and NASA at Ames Research Center. The requirements for this new facility stem from a perception of rotorcraft system technology requirements for the next decade together with operational experience with the CH-47B research helicopter that was operated as an in-flight simulator at Ames during the past 10 years. Accordingly, both the principal design features of the CH-47B variable-stability system and the flight-control and cockpit-display programs that were conducted using this aircraft at Ames are reviewed. Another U.S. Army helicopter, a UH-60A Black Hawk, has been selected as the baseline vehicle for the RASCAL. The research programs that influence the design of the RASCAL are summarized, and the resultant requirements for the RASCAL research system are described. These research programs include investigations of advanced, integrated control concepts for achieving high levels of agility and maneuverability, and guidance technologies, employing computer/sensor-aiding, designed to assist the pilot during low-altitude flight in conditions of limited visibility. The approach to the development of the new facility is presented and selected plans for the preliminary design of the RASCAL are described.

  18. Creation of a healing enhancement program at an academic medical center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutshall, Susanne M; Fenske, Laura L; Kelly, Ryan F; Phillips, Brent R; Sundt, Thoralf M; Bauer, Brent A

    2007-11-01

    There has been a growing emphasis on evaluating and improving the experience of the hospitalized patient. In 2004, the Cardiovascular Surgery team at Mayo Clinic Rochester, though achieving a high level of technical expertise and clinical outcomes, recognized that patients were not rating their overall hospital experience as highly as was expected. After a systematic evaluation of the hospital experience, tension, stress, pain, and anxiety were identified as key challenges for patients. A multidisciplinary team was created to evaluate pain management practices and explore methods for reducing pain, anxiety, and tension. An extensive review of the literature and site visits to other institutions provided the foundation for the program. The term "Healing Enhancement" was coined to identify the goals of this emerging paradigm that focused on all aspects of the patient's experience-mind, body, and spirit. Integrated therapies such as music, massage, guided imagery, and relaxation training were explored to measure their role in patient care.

  19. Summary of the Script and Program Review of Sesame Street by the Chicano Study Center, University of California in Los Angeles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Children's Television Workshop, New York, NY.

    The Sesame Street research staff summarizes comments on the fourth season of the program by the Chicano Study Center of the University of California at Los Angeles. Included are reviews of Sesame Street scripts and programs containing Spanish content; sex role observations; examples of modeling behavior; and comments on segments which challenge…

  20. Preliminary assessment report for Camp Carroll Training Center, Installation 02045, Anchorage, Alaska. Installation Restoration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krokosz, M.; Sefano, J.

    1993-08-01

    This report presents the results of the preliminary assessment (PA) conducted by Argonne National Laboratory at the Alaska Army National Guard property known as Camp Carroll Training Center, located on the Fort Richardson Army facility near Anchorage, Alaska. Preliminary assessments of federal facilities are being conducted to compile the information necessary for the completion of preremedial activities and to provide a basis for establishing, corrective actions in response to releases of hazardous substances. The principal objective of the PA is to characterize the site accurately and determine the need for further action by examining site activities, types and quantities of hazardous substances used, the nature and amounts of wastes generated or stored at the facility, and potential pathways by which contamination could affect public health and the environment. The primary environmentally significant operations (ESOs) associated with the property are (1) the Alaska Air National Guard storage area behind Building S57112 (Organizational Maintenance Shop [OMS] 6); (2) the state of Alaska maintenance facility and the soil/tar-type spill north of the state of Alaska maintenance facility; (3) the waste storage area adjacent to OMS 6; (4) the contaminated area from leaking underground storage tanks (USTs) and the oil-water separator; and (5) soil staining in the parking area at the Camp Carroll Headquarters Building. Camp Carroll appears to be in excellent condition from an environmental standpoint, and current practices are satisfactory. Argonne recommends that the Alaska Department of Military Affairs consider remediation of soil contamination associated with all storage areas, as well as reviewing the practices of other residents of the facility. Argonne also recommends that the current methods of storing waste material behind Building S57112 (OMS 6) be reviewed for alternatives.

  1. Energy Assurance Technical Training and Awareness Program/Energy Infrastructure Training and Analysis Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbara McCabe

    2005-11-15

    This report covers the work completed during Year One (Year One has a 16 month project period) of a five- year Cooperative Agreement (DE-FC26-03NT41895) between the International Union of Operating Engineers (IUOE) National Hazmat Program (OENHP) and the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). This final technical report is being submitted, as required by the Cooperative Agreement, within 90 (calendar) days after the project period ends (December 31, 2004). The resources allocated to Year One of the Cooperative Agreement were adequate for the completion of the required deliverables. All deliverables have been completed and sent to AAD Document Control as directed in the cooperative agreement. The allocation for Year One required 20-25 trainers to be trained in each of five Train-the-Trainer courses and a total of 6,000 workers trained throughout the country. Through cost savings employed for the scheduling and conduct of Train-the-Trainer, instructor refreshers, and direct training classes, 3171 workers have been trained to date. This total incorporates 159 trainers and members from management, local, county, state and federal organizations identified in the Strategic Plan. The largest percentage of personnel trained is heavy equipment operators, and building engineers, which is the largest targeted population identified under this cooperative agreement. The OENHP, using existing curriculum as appropriate, has modified and developed new training modules that have been used to establish four different levels of training courses. The four courses are: (1) EA 500 Energy Assurance Train-the-Trainer, (2) EA 400 Energy Assurance Instructor Refresher, (3) EA 300 Energy Assurance, and (4) EA 100 Energy Assurance Awareness. Training modules cover topics, such as, but not limited to, facility vulnerability and vulnerability assessment, physical security- heating, ventilation, air conditioning, terrorism awareness, weapons of mass

  2. The piloting of a culturally centered American Indian family prevention program: a CBPR partnership between Mescalero Apache and the University of New Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    Belone, Lorenda; Orosco, Ardena; Damon, Eloise; Smith-McNeal, Willymae; Rae, Rebecca; Sherpa, Mingma L.; Myers, Orrin B.; Omeh, Anslem O.; Wallerstein, Nina

    2017-01-01

    The Mescalero Apache Family Listening Program (MAFLP) is a culturally centered family prevention program with third, fourth, and fifth graders; a parent/caregiver; and a family elder. The program follows a positive youth development model to develop stronger communication and shared cultural practices between elders, parents, and youth in the tribe to reduce substance initiation of use among the youth. The MAFLP was created using a community-based participatory research (CBPR) approach in par...

  3. Elimination of waste: creation of a successful Lean colonoscopy program at an academic medical center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damle, Aneel; Andrew, Nathan; Kaur, Shubjeet; Orquiola, Alan; Alavi, Karim; Steele, Scott R; Maykel, Justin

    2016-07-01

    Lean processes involve streamlining methods and maximizing efficiency. Well established in the manufacturing industry, they are increasingly being applied to health care. The objective of this study was to determine feasibility and effectiveness of applying Lean principles to an academic medical center colonoscopy unit. Lean process improvement involved training endoscopy personnel, observing patients, mapping the value stream, analyzing patient flow, designing and implementing new processes, and finally re-observing the process. Our primary endpoint was total colonoscopy time (minutes from check-in to discharge) with secondary endpoints of individual segment times and unit colonoscopy capacity. A total of 217 patients were included (November 2013-May 2014), with 107 pre-Lean and 110 post-Lean intervention. Pre-Lean total colonoscopy time was 134 min. After implementation of the Lean process, mean colonoscopy time decreased by 10 % to 121 min (p = 0.01). The three steps of the process affected by the Lean intervention (time to achieve adequate sedation, time to recovery, and time to discharge) decreased from 3.7 to 2.4 min (p < 0.01), 4.0 to 3.4 min (p = 0.09), and 41.2 to 35.4 min (p = 0.05), respectively. Overall, unit capacity of colonoscopies increased from 39.6 per day to 43.6. Post-Lean patient satisfaction surveys demonstrated an average score of 4.5/5.0 (n = 73) regarding waiting time, 4.9/5.0 (n = 60) regarding how favorably this experienced compared to prior colonoscopy experiences, and 4.9/5.0 (n = 74) regarding professionalism of staff. One hundred percentage of respondents (n = 69) stated they would recommend our institution to a friend for colonoscopy. With no additional utilization of resources, a single Lean process improvement cycle increased productivity and capacity of our colonoscopy unit. We expect this to result in increased patient access and revenue while maintaining patient satisfaction. We believe these results are

  4. Hype, harmony and human factors: applying user-centered design to achieve sustainable telehealth program adoption and growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossos, P G; St-Cyr, O; Purdy, B; Toenjes, C; Masino, C; Chmelnitsky, D

    2015-01-01

    Despite decades of international experience with the use of information and communication technologies in healthcare delivery, widespread telehealth adoption remains limited and progress slow. Escalating health system challenges related to access, cost and quality currently coincide with rapid advancement of affordable and reliable internet based communication technologies creating unprecedented opportunities and incentives for telehealth. In this paper, we will describe how Human Factors Engineering (HFE) and user-centric elements have been incorporated into the establishment of telehealth within a large academic medical center to increase acceptance and sustainability. Through examples and lessons learned we wish to increase awareness of HFE and its importance in the successful implementation, innovation and growth of telehealth programs.

  5. The effect of an educational program for vascular access care on nurses’ knowledge at dialysis centers in Khartoum State, Sudan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalthoum Ibrahim Yousif

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available End-stage renal disease is a worldwide problem that requires highly skilled nursing care. Hemodialysis (HD is a corner-stone procedure in the management of most patients who require renal replacement therapy. Adequate vascular access is essential for the successful use of HD. Appropriate knowledge in taking care of vascular access is essential for minimizing complications and accurately recognizing vascular access-related problems. This study was to evaluate the effect of an educational program for vascular access care on nurses’ knowledge at nine dialysis centers in Khartoum State. This was a Quasi experimental study (pre-and post-test for the same group. Sixty-one nurses working in these HD centers were chosen by simple random sampling method. A structured face-to-face interview questionnaire based on the Kidney Dialysis Outcome Quality Initiative (K/DOQI clinical practice guidelines for vascular access care was used. Instrument validity was determined through content validity by a panel of experts. Reliability of the instrument was tested by a pilot study to test the knowledge scores for 15 nurses. The Pearson correlation coefficient obtained was (r = 0.82. Data collection was taken before and after the educational intervention. A follow-up test was performed three month later, using the same data collection tools. Twenty-two individual variables assessing the knowledge levels in aspects related to the six K/DOQI guidelines showed improvement in all scores of the nurses’ knowledge after the educational intervention; and the differences from the preeducational scores were statistically significant (P < 0.001. The study showed that a structured educational program based on the K/DOQI clinical practice guidelines had a significant impact on the dialysis nurses knowledge in caring for vascular access in HD patients. The knowledge level attained was maintained for at least three months after the educational intervention.

  6. The effect of an educational program for vascular access care on nurses' knowledge at dialysis centers in Khartoum State, Sudan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousif, Kalthoum Ibrahim; Abu-Aisha, Hasan; Abboud, Omar Ibrahim

    2017-01-01

    End-stage renal disease is a worldwide problem that requires highly skilled nursing care. Hemodialysis (HD) is a corner-stone procedure in the management of most patients who require renal replacement therapy. Adequate vascular access is essential for the successful use of HD. Appropriate knowledge in taking care of vascular access is essential for minimizing complications and accurately recognizing vascular access-related problems. This study was to evaluate the effect of an educational program for vascular access care on nurses' knowledge at nine dialysis centers in Khartoum State. This was a Quasi experimental study (pre-and post-test for the same group). Sixty-one nurses working in these HD centers were chosen by simple random sampling method. A structured face-to-face interview questionnaire based on the Kidney Dialysis Outcome Quality Initiative (K/DOQI) clinical practice guidelines for vascular access care was used. Instrument validity was determined through content validity by a panel of experts. Reliability of the instrument was tested by a pilot study to test the knowledge scores for 15 nurses. The Pearson correlation coefficient obtained was (r = 0.82). Data collection was taken before and after the educational intervention. A follow-up test was performed three month later, using the same data collection tools. Twenty-two individual variables assessing the knowledge levels in aspects related to the six K/DOQI guidelines showed improvement in all scores of the nurses' knowledge after the educational intervention; and the differences from the preeducational scores were statistically significant (P < 0.001). The study showed that a structured educational program based on the K/DOQI clinical practice guidelines had a significant impact on the dialysis nurses knowledge in caring for vascular access in HD patients. The knowledge level attained was maintained for at least three months after the educational intervention.

  7. Needs Assessment for Creating a Patient-Centered, Community-Engaged Health Program for Homeless Pregnant Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tegan Ake

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Women who experience homelessness during pregnancy have poorer birth outcomes than the general population. This exploratory research describes the needs assessment of homeless women currently living at a shelter in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, to identify unmet needs related to maternal and infant perinatal health as the first step in designing a mutually beneficial patient-centered service-learning program for medical students to address these needs. Methods: Two 1-hour focus groups were held at a shelter for women who are homeless and/or victims of domestic violence. A total of 13 women participated in each session; four medical students and a physician served as facilitators and scribes at each session. The facilitators alternated asking predetermined open- and close-ended questions, followed by discussion among participants. Questions elicited experiences during pregnancy, what went well, what women living in the shelter struggled with, and what support they wished for but did not have. Scribes captured the conversation through hand-written notes and used content analysis in order of frequency. Results: Thirteen themes were identified. The 5 most frequently identified themes were a need for pregnancy education, access/transportation, baby care, advocacy, and material necessities. Participating shelter residents and the medical students expressed interest in working with one another and forming a long-term partnership with the shelter. Conclusions: Results of this needs assessment will inform the creation of a new shelter-based medical education program that will meet homeless women’s needs while preparing medical students for patient-centered, community-responsive care.

  8. Quality site seasonal report, Tucson Job Corps Center, SFBP (Solar in Federal Buildings Program) 1751, November 1984 through July 1985

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Logee, T.L.

    1987-10-15

    The active solar Domestic Hot Water (DHW) system at the Tucson Job Corps Center was designed and constructed as part of the Solar in Federal Buildings Program (SFBP). This retrofitted system is one of eight of the systems in the SFBP selected for quality monitoring. The purpose of this monitoring effort is to document the performance of quality state-of-the-art solar systems in large Federal buildings. The systems are unique prototypes. Design errors and system faults discovered during the monitoring period could not always be corrected. Therefore, the aggregated overall performance is often considerably below what might be expected had similar systems been constructed consecutively with each repetition incorporating corrections and improvements. The solar collector system is installed on a two story dormitory at the Job Corps Center. The solar system preheats hot water for about two hundred students. The solar system provided about 50% of the energy needed for water heating in the winter and nearly 100% of the water heating needs in the summer. There are about 70,000 gallons of water used per month. There are seventy-nine L.O.F. panels or 1659 square feet of collectors (1764 square feet before freeze damage occurred) mounted in two rows on the south facing roof. Collected solar energy is stored in the 2200-gallon storage tank. The control system is by Johnson Controls. City water is piped directly to the storage tank and is circulated in the collectors. Freeze protection is provided by recirculation of storage water. There is an auxiliary gas fired boiler and 750 gallon DHW storage tank to provide backup for the solar system. Highlights of the performance monitoring from the solar collection system at the Tucson Job Corps Center during the November 1984 through July 1985 monitoring period are presented in this report.

  9. Short-term impact of an educational program promoting live donor kidney transplantation in dialysis centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradel, Françoise G; Suwannaprom, Puckwipa; Mullins, C Daniel; Sadler, John; Bartlett, Stephen T

    2008-12-01

    Given the shortage of kidneys available for transplantation, a community-based intervention trial was implemented to assess the impact of an educational program on patients' access to live donor kidney transplantation (LDKT). To compare the short-term impact of a basic intervention and an enhanced intervention on patients' readiness to pursue LDKT. DEGISN: Baseline data and data from 1 week after interventions were analyzed. 214 transplant-eligible hemodialysis patients attending 14 dialysis facilities in Maryland, Virginia, and Pennsylvania. In the basic intervention, 107 patients watched a 10-minute videotape on the experience of recipients and live donors of a kidney. In the enhanced intervention, 107 patients watched the same videotape and had a discussion with a health educator on the risks and benefits of LDKT, who could be a donor, and how to address the barriers they were encountering when seeking a live kidney donor. Patient reported whether they were considering LDKT, had talked with family or friends about LDKT, and had asked someone for a kidney. Over half of transplant-eligible patients were not pursuing LDKT at baseline (64% in the basic intervention group, 61% in the enhanced intervention group). One week after the intervention, the odds of considering LDKT were higher among African Americans (odds ratio [OR], 2.28; confidence interval [CI], 1.22-4.25), younger patients (OR, 0.94; CI, 0.91-0.97), and patients who spent less time on dialysis (OR, 0.90; CI, 0.83-0.97). The odds of asking for a kidney were higher among African Americans (OR, 4.94; CI, 2.54-9.60) and patients who perceived they were in poor to fair health (OR, 3.30; CI, 1.12-9.67). Although both interventions helped patients consider LDKT and ask for a kidney, more time and expanded educational content might be needed to facilitate patients' discussion about LDKT with their loved ones.

  10. The effects of educational program on health volunteers’ knowledge regarding their approach to earthquake in health centers in Tehran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZAHRA JOUHARI

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The people’s mental, intellectual and physical nonreadiness to confront earthquake may result in disastrous outcomes. This research aimed to study of effects of a training intervention on health connector’s knowledge regarding their approach to earthquake in health-training centers in East of Tehran. Methods: This research which is a semi-experimental study was designed and executed in 2011, using a questionnaire with items based on the information of Crisis Management Org. After a pilot study and making the questionnaire valid and reliable, we determined the sample size. Then, the questionnaires were completed before and after the training program by 82 health connectors at health-treatment centers in the East of Tehran. Finally, the collected data were analyzed by SPSS 14, using paired sample t–test and Pearson’s correlation coefficient. Results: Health connectors were women with the mean age of 43.43±8.51 years. In this research, the mean score of connectors’ knowledge before and after the training was 35.15±4.3 and 43.73±2.91 out of 48, respectively. The difference was statistically significant (p=0.001. The classes were the most important source of information for the health connectors. Conclusion: The people’s knowledge to confront earthquake can be increased by holding training courses and workshops. Such training courses and workshops have an important role in data transfer and readiness of health connectors.

  11. Redfield Ratios in Inland Waters: Higher Biological Control of C:N:P Ratios in Tropical Semi-arid High Water Residence Time Lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    They, Ng H; Amado, André M; Cotner, James B

    2017-01-01

    The canonical Redfield C:N:P ratio for algal biomass is often not achieved in inland waters due to higher C and N content and more variability when compared to the oceans. This has been attributed to much lower residence times and higher contributions of the watershed to the total organic matter pool of continental ecosystems. In this study we examined the effect of water residence times in low latitude lakes (in a gradient from humid to a semi-arid region) on seston elemental ratios in different size fractions. We used lake water specific conductivity as a proxy for residence time in a region of Eastern Brazil where there is a strong precipitation gradient. The C:P ratios decreased in the seston and bacterial size-fractions and increased in the dissolved fraction with increasing water retention time, suggesting uptake of N and P from the dissolved pool. Bacterial abundance, production and respiration increased in response to increased residence time and intracellular nutrient availability in agreement with the growth rate hypothesis. Our results reinforce the role of microorganisms in shaping the chemical environment in aquatic systems particularly at long water residence times and highlights the importance of this factor in influencing ecological stoichiometry in all aquatic ecosystems.

  12. CNP stoichiometry of a lipid-synthesising zooplankton, Calanus finmarchicus, from winter to spring bloom in a sub-Arctic sound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubert, A. B.; Svensen, C.; Hessen, D. O.; Tamelander, T.

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the seasonal stoichiometry of the high-latitude lipid-synthesising copepod Calanus finmarchicus and assess how this would affect dietary demands with season, ontogeny and lipid storage. C:N:P ratios in different stages (adults, copepodite V and IV), in eggs and faecal pellets as well as in bulk food (seston) was analysed in a sub-Arctic Norwegian sound (69° 47'N, 19° 19'E) from late February to mid-May 2009. The period covered the phytoplankton bloom and was divided into four sequences of the bloom based on chl a and seston C:chl a ratio variations. The calculation of the somatic elemental C:N and C:P body ratios (without the lipid storage) indicates that nearly homeostatic control in C. finmarchicus is maintained in somatic tissues within stages, while not if the lipid storage pool is included. Nutrient limitation was assessed calculating threshold elemental ratios based on the somatic body ratios and for different sets of assimilation efficiencies, and indicated a predominant C limitation that may reflect demands for lipid storage. The results suggest that stoichiometric composition and demands in such high-latitude, lipid-storing species strongly depend on stage and season, and the large contribution of storage lipids highlights the need for a two-compartment approach for lipid-synthesising species, with different dietary requirements for somatic growth and for lipid storage.

  13. Redfield Ratios in Inland Waters: Higher Biological Control of C:N:P Ratios in Tropical Semi-arid High Water Residence Time Lakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ng H. They

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The canonical Redfield C:N:P ratio for algal biomass is often not achieved in inland waters due to higher C and N content and more variability when compared to the oceans. This has been attributed to much lower residence times and higher contributions of the watershed to the total organic matter pool of continental ecosystems. In this study we examined the effect of water residence times in low latitude lakes (in a gradient from humid to a semi-arid region on seston elemental ratios in different size fractions. We used lake water specific conductivity as a proxy for residence time in a region of Eastern Brazil where there is a strong precipitation gradient. The C:P ratios decreased in the seston and bacterial size-fractions and increased in the dissolved fraction with increasing water retention time, suggesting uptake of N and P from the dissolved pool. Bacterial abundance, production and respiration increased in response to increased residence time and intracellular nutrient availability in agreement with the growth rate hypothesis. Our results reinforce the role of microorganisms in shaping the chemical environment in aquatic systems particularly at long water residence times and highlights the importance of this factor in influencing ecological stoichiometry in all aquatic ecosystems.

  14. A multi-objective possibilistic programming approach for locating distribution centers and allocating customers demands in supply chains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Ahmad Yazdian

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present a multi-objective possibilistic programming model to locate distribution centers (DCs and allocate customers' demands in a supply chain network design (SCND problem. The SCND problem deals with determining locations of facilities (DCs and/or plants, and also shipment quantities between each two consecutive tier of the supply chain. The primary objective of this study is to consider different risk factors which are involved in both locating DCs and shipping products as an objective function. The risk consists of various components: the risks related to each potential DC location, the risk associated with each arc connecting a plant to a DC and the risk of shipment from a DC to a customer. The proposed method of this paper considers the risk phenomenon in fuzzy forms to handle the uncertainties inherent in these factors. A possibilistic programming approach is proposed to solve the resulted multi-objective problem and a numerical example for three levels of possibility is conducted to analyze the model.

  15. Perceptions of the 2011 ACGME duty hour requirements among residents in all core programs at a large academic medical center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandefur, Benjamin J; Shewmaker, Diana M; Lohse, Christine M; Rose, Steven H; Colletti, James E

    2017-11-10

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) implemented revisions to resident duty hour requirements (DHRs) in 2011 to improve patient safety and resident well-being. Perceptions of DHRs have been reported to vary by training stage and specialty among internal medicine and general surgery residents. The authors explored perceptions of DHRs among all residents at a large academic medical center. The authors administered an anonymous cross-sectional survey about DHRs to residents enrolled in all ACGME-accredited core residency programs at their institution. Residents were categorized as medical and pediatric, surgery, or other. In total, 736 residents representing 24 core specialty residency programs were surveyed. The authors received responses from 495 residents (67%). A majority reported satisfaction (78%) with DHRs and believed DHRs positively affect their training (73%). Residents in surgical specialties and in advanced stages of training were significantly less likely to view DHRs favorably. Most respondents believed fatigue contributes to errors (89%) and DHRs reduce both fatigue (80%) and performance of clinical duties while fatigued (74%). A minority of respondents (37%) believed that DHRs decrease medical errors. This finding may reflect beliefs that handovers contribute more to errors than fatigue (41%). Negative perceived effects included diminished patient familiarity and continuity of care (62%) and diminished clinical educational experiences for residents (41%). A majority of residents reported satisfaction with the 2011 DHRs, although satisfaction was significantly less among residents in surgical specialties and those in advanced stages of training.

  16. Center for Programming Models for Scalable Parallel Computing - Towards Enhancing OpenMP for Manycore and Heterogeneous Nodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbara Chapman

    2012-02-01

    OpenMP was not well recognized at the beginning of the project, around year 2003, because of its limited use in DoE production applications and the inmature hardware support for an efficient implementation. Yet in the recent years, it has been graduately adopted both in HPC applications, mostly in the form of MPI+OpenMP hybrid code, and in mid-scale desktop applications for scientific and experimental studies. We have observed this trend and worked deligiently to improve our OpenMP compiler and runtimes, as well as to work with the OpenMP standard organization to make sure OpenMP are evolved in the direction close to DoE missions. In the Center for Programming Models for Scalable Parallel Computing project, the HPCTools team at the University of Houston (UH), directed by Dr. Barbara Chapman, has been working with project partners, external collaborators and hardware vendors to increase the scalability and applicability of OpenMP for multi-core (and future manycore) platforms and for distributed memory systems by exploring different programming models, language extensions, compiler optimizations, as well as runtime library support.

  17. Impact of a pharmacy technician-centered medication reconciliation program on medication discrepancies and implementation of recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kraus SK

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To evaluate the impact of a pharmacy-technician centered medication reconciliation (PTMR program by identifying and quantifying medication discrepancies and outcomes of pharmacist medication reconciliation recommendations. Methods: A retrospective chart review was performed on two-hundred patients admitted to the internal medicine teaching services at Cooper University Hospital in Camden, NJ. Patients were selected using a stratified systematic sample approach and were included if they received a pharmacy technician medication history and a pharmacist medication reconciliation at any point during their hospital admission. Pharmacist identified medication discrepancies were analyzed using descriptive statistics, bivariate analyses. Potential risk factors were identified using multivariate analyses, such as logistic regression and CART. The priority level of significance was set at 0.05. Results: Three-hundred and sixty-five medication discrepancies were identified out of the 200 included patients. The four most common discrepancies were omission (64.7%, non-formulary omission (16.2%, dose discrepancy (10.1%, and frequency discrepancy (4.1%. Twenty-two percent of pharmacist recommendations were implemented by the prescriber within 72 hours. Conclusion: A PTMR program with dedicated pharmacy technicians and pharmacists identifies many medication discrepancies at admission and provides opportunities for pharmacist reconciliation recommendations.

  18. Childcare service centers' preferences and intentions to use a web-based program to implement healthy eating and physical activity policies and practices: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoong, Sze Lin; Williams, Christopher Michael; Finch, Meghan; Wyse, Rebecca; Jones, Jannah; Freund, Megan; Wiggers, John Henry; Nathan, Nicole; Dodds, Pennie; Wolfenden, Luke

    2015-04-30

    Overweight and obesity is a significant public health problem that impacts a large number of children globally. Supporting childcare centers to deliver healthy eating and physical activity-promoting policies and practices is a recommended strategy for obesity prevention, given that such services provide access to a substantial proportion of children during a key developmental period. Electronic Web-based interventions represent a novel way to support childcare service providers to implement such policies and practices. This study aimed to assess: (1) childcare centers' current use of technology, (2) factors associated with intention to use electronic Web-based interventions, and (3) Web-based features that managers rated as useful to support staff with implementing healthy eating and physical activity-promoting policies and practices. A computer-assisted telephone interview (CATI) was conducted with service managers from long day care centers and preschools. The CATI assessed the following: (1) childcare center characteristics, (2) childcare centers' use of electronic devices, (3) intention to use a hypothetical electronic Web-based program-assessed using the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) with ratings between 1 (strongly disagree) and 7 (strongly agree), and (4) features rated as useful to include in a Web-based program. Overall, 214 service centers out of 277 (77.3%) consented to participate. All service centers except 2 reported using computers (212/214, 99.1%), whereas 40.2% (86/214) used portable tablets. A total of 71.9% (151/210) of childcare service managers reported a score of 6 or more for intention to use a hypothetical electronic Web-based program. In a multivariable logistic regression analysis, intention to use the program was significantly associated with perceived ease of use (P=.002, odds ratio [OR] 3.9, 95% CI 1.6-9.2) and perceived usefulness (Pservice managers as useful or very useful for a Web-based program included decision-support tools to

  19. Constructing ?Packages? of Evidence-Based Programs to Prevent Youth Violence: Processes and Illustrative Examples From the CDC?s Youth Violence Prevention Centers

    OpenAIRE

    Kingston, Beverly; Bacallao, Martica; Smokowski, Paul; Sullivan, Terri; Sutherland, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the strategic efforts of six National Centers of Excellence in Youth Violence Prevention (YVPC), funded by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, to work in partnership with local communities to create comprehensive evidence-based program packages to prevent youth violence. Key components of a comprehensive evidence-based approach are defined and examples are provided from a variety of community settings (rural and urban) across the nation that illustrate at...

  20. Developing a Pipeline for the Community-Based Primary Care Workforce and Its Leadership: The Kraft Center for Community Health Leadership's Fellowship and Practitioner Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shtasel, Derri; Hobbs-Knutson, Katherine; Tolpin, Harriet; Weinstein, Debra; Gottlieb, Gary L

    2015-09-01

    Community health centers (CHCs) face challenges recruiting and retaining primary care clinicians. Providing advanced training that enhances clinical skills within a public health framework, teaches leadership, protects time for scholarly activities, and focuses on the social mission may be a successful career development strategy. In July 2012, the Kraft Center for Community Health Leadership developed and implemented two 2-year programs to develop physician and nursing leaders with blended academic-community career paths and identities. The fellowship program for physicians and the practitioner program for early-career physicians and advanced practice nurses include mentored practice in a CHC; monthly learning days; completion of a community-based research project; and, for fellows, matriculation in an MPH program and engagement in a bimonthly leadership seminar. The first classes of 5 fellows and 14 practitioners graduated in June 2014. All 5 fellowship graduates were offered full-time positions at the CHCs where they practiced, and 2 have accepted leadership positions at their CHCs. All 14 practitioner graduates remain in community health, 5 have accepted leadership positions, and 2 have obtained grants to support ongoing projects. The authors are tracking graduates' career paths and the programs' impact on CHCs while modifying the programs on the basis of feedback; identifying elements of the programs that may be amenable to more cost-effective delivery; and exploring the potential for federal funding to support expansion of the practitioner program, and for the practitioner program to increase the return on investment provided by the National Health Service Corps.

  1. Effective recruitment strategies and community-based participatory research: community networks program centers' recruitment in cancer prevention studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greiner, K Allen; Friedman, Daniela B; Adams, Swann Arp; Gwede, Clement K; Cupertino, Paula; Engelman, Kimberly K; Meade, Cathy D; Hébert, James R

    2014-03-01

    Community-based participatory research (CBPR) approaches that involve community and academic partners in activities ranging from protocol design through dissemination of study findings can increase recruitment of medically underserved and underrepresented racial/ethnic minority populations into biomedical research. Five cancer screening and prevention trials in three National Cancer Institute (Bethesda, MD)-funded Community Networks Program Centers (CNPC), in Florida, Kansas, and South Carolina, were conducted across diverse populations. Data were collected on total time period of recruitment, ratios of participants enrolled over potential participants approached, selected CBPR strategies, capacity-building development, and systematic procedures for community stakeholder involvement. Community-engaged approaches used included establishing colearning opportunities, participatory procedures for community-academic involvement, and community and clinical capacity building. A relatively large proportion of individuals identified for recruitment was actually approached (between 50% and 100%). The proportion of subjects who were eligible among all those approached ranged from 25% to more than 70% (in the community setting). Recruitment rates were very high (78%-100% of eligible individuals approached) and the proportion who refused or who were not interested among those approached was very low (5%-11%). Recruitment strategies used by the CNPCs were associated with low refusal and high enrollment ratios of potential subjects. Adherence to CBPR principles in the spectrum of research activities, from strategic planning to project implementation, has significant potential to increase involvement in biomedical research and improve our ability to make appropriate recommendations for cancer prevention and control programming in underrepresented diverse populations. CBPR strategies should be more widely implemented to enhance study recruitment. ©2014 AACR.

  2. Sleeve Gastrectomy vs Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass. Data from IFSO-European Chapter Center of Excellence Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melissas, John; Stavroulakis, Konstantinos; Tzikoulis, Vassilis; Peristeri, Angeliki; Papadakis, John A; Pazouki, Abdolreza; Khalaj, Alireza; Kabir, Ali

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare sleeve gastrectomy (SG) and Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGBP) performed in Institutions participating in IFSO-European Chapter, Center of Excellence (COE) program. Since the initiation of the program in January 2010, 6413 SGs and 10,622 RYGBPs performed as primary procedures by December 31, 2014, with at least 12-month follow-up, were retrospectively compared. There were steadily increasing numbers of patients underwent SG from 2010 to 2015. Early (<30 days) postoperative complication rate of 3.02 % for RYGBP was significantly higher than 2.12 % seen after SG (p = 0.0006). Only two patients, one in each group, died in the first 30 postoperative days (0.016 % mortality for SG vs 0.009 % for RYGBP-NS). From SG group, 103 patients, 1.61 %, and 206 patients, 1.94 %, from RYGBP group required readmission following hospital discharge in the first 30 days following bariatric surgery-NS. From the readmitted patients in the SG group, 75.72 % were reoperated vs 50.50 % in the RYGBP group (p < 0.0001). SG patients were heavier (BMI 44.93 vs 43.96 kg/m 2 , p < 0.0001). However, significantly better % excess weight loss were seen following RYGBP in all postoperative years (60.36 vs 67.72 %, p = 0.002 at fifth year). Better remission rates were seen for diabetes, arterial hypertension, dyslipidemia, and sleep apnea syndrome after RYGBP in the first postoperative year. Both procedures were performed with very low complications, mortality, readmissions, and reoperations rate. Better weight loss was observed following RYGBP, the first five postoperative years.

  3. Paths of Effects from Preschool to Adult Well-Being: A Confirmatory Analysis of the Child-Parent Center Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Arthur J.; Ou, Suh-Ruu

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the contribution of five hypotheses to the estimated effects of preschool in the Child-Parent Centers on occupational prestige, felony arrest, and depressive symptoms in adulthood in the Chicago Longitudinal Study. An alternative-intervention, quasi-experimental design included over 1,400 low-income participants (93% of whom were black) who attended preschool for 1–2 years or the usual early educational intervention and were traced to age 24. LISREL analysis of five hypotheses (cognitive advantage, family support, school support, motivational advantage, and social adjustment) indicated that while each individually accounted for part of the estimated direct effect of preschool on adult well-being, the best-fitting model across outcomes included indicators of all five hypotheses. The full model completely accounted for the direct effect of preschool on occupational prestige and official felony arrest, and 79% on depression symptoms. Key mediators included cognitive skills at school entry, school quality in the elementary grades, juvenile arrest, and school completion. The identified processes may help establish, strengthen, and sustain effects in other programs and settings. PMID:21410923

  4. Impact of the application of neurolinguistic programming to mothers of children enrolled in a day care center of a shantytown.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Miranda, C T; de Paula, C S; Palma, D; da Silva, E M; Martin, D; de Nóbrega, F J

    1999-03-04

    Of the members of a family, the mother is without doubt the most important one, which provides justification for including an evaluation of her mental health as one of the variables to be considered as determining factors in each child's level of development. To assess the impact of the application of Neurolinguistic Programming (NLP) on child development, home environment and maternal mental health. Randomised controlled trial. The study included children enrolled in the municipal day care center of a shantytown in the City of São Paulo. 45 pairs of mothers and respective children between 18 and 36 months of age. Children's development (Bayley scales); home environment variation (HOME); and maternal mental health (SRQ). Comparison between before and after the intervention was made in terms of children's psychomotor development, home environment and maternal mental health. Application of the NLP technique to the experimental group and comparison with a control group. 1--Experimental (EG), consisting of 23 children submitted to intervention by NLP; and 2--Control (CG), with 22 children with no intervention. Length of intervention: 15 sessions of NLP. 37 children remained in the study (EG = 10, CG = 27). Variations in mental development (OR 1.21, IC 95% 0.0 to 23.08) in their home environment (Wilcoxon): p = 0.96 (before) and p = 0.09 (after); in maternal mental health: p = 0.26, 2 df. There was a trend that indicated positive effects on the home environment from the intervention.

  5. The Effect of Empathy Training Programs on Aggression and Compatibility Students of Elementary Schools in Yazd, Center of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bi Bi Halimeh Sohravardi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Empathy is believed to play an important role in fostering prosocial behavior and social competence. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of empathy teaching on aggression and compatibility in female students of elementary sixth grade in yazd, center of Iran. Materials and Methods The samples were 62 girl students of grade 6 in elementary schools that were selected by available (targeted sampling among girl students of grade 6 on Yazd. They were put in two groups of control group and experiment group randomly and equally. Data were collected by using empathy questions of Isenberg, Febs, Oscolar, Carlo & Miller, Rater questionnaire about children behavioral disorder and Bus & Perry questionnaire and were analyzed with Mankoo & Ankova methods. Results The mean age of students was 13 ± 0.359 year-old. The Results showed that after controlling scores of pretests, there was a meaningful relationship between two groups in their empathy, social compatibility and aggression and its aspects (like physical aggression, verbal aggression, hostility and anger scores (P< 0.05. Conclusion The development of empathy with training programs, can have a positive effect on reduce of aggression and increasing of compatibility in students at elementary schools.

  6. Coral Research Data from NOAA's Undersea Research Center, North Atlantic and Great Lakes Region, NOAA's Undersea Research Program (NURP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA's Undersea Research Center for the NOAA's Undersea Research Center for the North Atlantic and Great Lakes region (NAGL) explores and studies the waters off the...

  7. 77 FR 35573 - World Trade Center Health Program; Addition of Certain Types of Cancer to the List of WTC-Related...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-13

    ... of WTC-Related Health Conditions; 2. Information or published studies about the type of welding that... June 13, 2012 Part IV Department of Health and Human Services 42 CFR Part 88 World Trade Center Health Program; Addition of Certain Types of Cancer to the List of WTC-Related Health Conditions; Proposed Rule...

  8. Changes in Social Capital and Networks: A Study of Community-Based Environmental Management through a School-Centered Research Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, Teresa; Leahy, Jessica

    2012-01-01

    Social network analysis (SNA) is a social science research tool that has not been applied to educational programs. This analysis is critical to documenting the changes in social capital and networks that result from community based K-12 educational collaborations. We review SNA and show an application of this technique in a school-centered,…

  9. Zero to Three: Bulletin of the National Center for Clinical Infant Programs. Volume IX, Nos. 1-5, September, 1988-June, 1989.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zero to Three, 1989

    1989-01-01

    Five bulletins of the National Center for Clinical Infant Programs provide articles with the following titles and authors: "Motor Control as a Resource for Adaptive Coping" (G. Gordon Williamson et al.); "Fostering Emotional and Social Development in Infants with Disabilities" (Stanley Greenspan); "Dramatic Responses in a…

  10. School Health Connection Goes Electronic: Developing a Health Information Management System for New Orleans' School-Based Health Centers. Program Results Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastorfer, Darl

    2011-01-01

    From February 2008 through April 2011, School Health Connection, a program of the Louisiana Public Health Institute, developed an electronic health information management system for newly established school-based health centers in Greater New Orleans. School Health Connection was established as part of a broader effort to restore community health…

  11. Presentation of the program of quality for health physics measurement-instrumentation at the Rossendorf research center; Vorstellung des Qualitaetssicherungsprogramms Strahlenschutzmesstechnik am Forschungsstandort Rossendorf

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roellig, D. [VKTA, Dresden (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    In the facilities of the research center Rossendorf ionizing radiation and radioactive materials are used in many ways. Radiation protection devices ensure their safe handling. The quality of these devices has to be monitored to protect personnel and environment from unacceptably high radiation levels at all times. For that a quality control program was developed whose details are explained in the poster.

  12. Designing a Staff Development Program and Subsequent Handbook for Use at Woburn Nursing Center: A Long-Term Care Facility of Salter Healthcare Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinnon, Cole; Capone, Martha

    Woburn Nursing Center (WNC), a private nursing home owned and operated by Salter Healthcare Services (SHS), developed an integrated, comprehensive staff development program and handbook. A literature review focused on staff needs, responsible agent, and handbook development. The following activities were undertaken: a review of ERIC documents,…

  13. Center Staff and Research Fellows> Towards Preparing Future Faculty: A Case Study of the PFF Program in the Graduate School of Letters, Kyoto University

    OpenAIRE

    田口, 真奈; 出口, 康夫; 赤嶺, 宏介; 半澤, 礼之; 松下, 佳代

    2010-01-01

    The PPF program of the Graduate School of Letters, Kyoto University, is one of pioneering attempts of PPF in Japanese universities. This paper aims to describe the program against its international and national backgrounds, to evaluate it on the basis of, among others, interviews of its participants, and to outline its future prospects. The program started in 2009, and now it is in its second year. It was planned and run by a project team that consisted of staff of the Center for the Promotio...

  14. Changes in Social Capital and Networks: A Study of Community-Based Environmental Management Through a School-Centered Research Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, Teresa; Leahy, Jessica

    2012-02-01

    Social network analysis (SNA) is a social science research tool that has not been applied to educational programs. This analysis is critical to documenting the changes in social capital and networks that result from community based K-12 educational collaborations. We review SNA and show an application of this technique in a school-centered, community based environmental monitoring research (CBEMR) program. This CBEMR employs K-12 students, state and local government employees, environmental organization representatives, local businesses, colleges, and community volunteers. As citizen scientists and researchers, collaborators create a database of local groundwater quality to use as a baseline for long-term environmental health management and public education. Past studies have evaluated the reliability of data generated by students acting as scientists, but there have been few studies relating to power dynamics, social capital, and resilience in school-centered CBEMR programs. We use qualitative and quantitative data gathered from a science education program conducted in five states in the northeastern United States. SPSS and NVivo data were derived from semi-structured interviews with thirty-nine participants before and after their participation in the CBEMR. Pajek software was used to determine participant centralities and power brokers within networks. Results indicate that there were statistically significant increases in social capital and resilience in social networks after participation in the school-centered CBEMR program leading to an increased community involvement in environmental health management. Limiting factors to the CBMER were based on the educator/administration relationship.

  15. Medicare and Medicaid programs: Hospital Outpatient Prospective Payment and Ambulatory Surgical Center Payment Systems and Quality Reporting Programs; electronic reporting pilot; Inpatient Rehabilitation Facilities Quality Reporting Program; revision to Quality Improvement Organization regulations. Final rule with comment period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-15

    This final rule with comment period revises the Medicare hospital outpatient prospective payment system (OPPS) and the Medicare ambulatory surgical center (ASC) payment system for CY 2013 to implement applicable statutory requirements and changes arising from our continuing experience with these systems. In this final rule with comment period, we describe the changes to the amounts and factors used to determine the payment rates for Medicare services paid under the OPPS and those paid under the ASC payment system. In addition, this final rule with comment period updates and refines the requirements for the Hospital Outpatient Quality Reporting (OQR) Program, the ASC Quality Reporting (ASCQR) Program, and the Inpatient Rehabilitation Facility (IRF) Quality Reporting Program. We are continuing the electronic reporting pilot for the Electronic Health Record (EHR) Incentive Program, and revising the various regulations governing Quality Improvement Organizations (QIOs), including the secure transmittal of electronic medical information, beneficiary complaint resolution and notification processes, and technical changes. The technical changes to the QIO regulations reflect CMS' commitment to the general principles of the President's Executive Order on Regulatory Reform, Executive Order 13563 (January 18, 2011).

  16. Impact of the application of neurolinguistic programming to mothers of children enrolled in a day care center of a shantytown

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudio Torres de Miranda

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Of the members of a family, the mother is without doubt the most important one, which provides justification for including an evaluation of her mental health as one of the variables to be considered as determining factors in each child’s level of development. OBJECTIVE: To assess the impact of the application of Neurolinguistic Programming (NLP on child development, home environment and maternal mental health. DESIGN: Randomised controlled trial. SETTING: The study included children enrolled in the municipal day care center of a shantytown in the City of São Paulo. PARTICIPANTS: 45 pairs of mothers and respective children between 18 and 36 months of age. MAIN MEASUREMENTS: Children’s development (Bayley scales; home environment variation (HOME; and maternal mental health (SRQ. Comparison between before and after the intervention was made in terms of children’s psychomotor development, home environment and maternal mental health. INTERVENTION: Application of the NLP technique to the experimental group and comparison with a control group. 1 - Experimental (EG, consisting of 23 children submitted to intervention by NLP; and 2 - Control (CG, with 22 children with no intervention. Length of intervention: 15 sessions of NLP. RESULTS: 37 children remained in the study (EG = 10, CG = 27. Variations in mental development (OR 1.21, IC 95% 0.0 to 23.08 in their home environment (Wilcoxon: p = 0.96 (before and p = 0.09 (after; in maternal mental health: p = 0.26, 2 df. CONCLUSIONS: There was a trend that indicated positive effects on the home environment from the intervention.

  17. Massive transfusion policies at trauma centers participating in the American College of Surgeons Trauma Quality Improvement Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camazine, Maraya N; Hemmila, Mark R; Leonard, Julie C; Jacobs, Rachel A; Horst, Jennifer A; Kozar, Rosemary A; Bochicchio, Grant V; Nathens, Avery B; Cryer, Henry M; Spinella, Philip C

    2015-06-01

    Massive transfusion protocols (MTPs) have been developed to implement damage control resuscitation (DCR) principles. A survey of MTP policies from American College of Surgeons Trauma Quality Improvement Program (ACS-TQIP) participants was performed to establish which MTP activation, hemostatic resuscitation, and monitoring aspects of DCR are included in the MTP guidelines. On October 10, 2013, ACS-TQIP administration administered a cross-sectional electronic survey to 187 ACS-TQIP participants. Seventy-one percent (132 of 187) of responses were analyzed, with 62% designated as Level I and 38% designated as Level II ACS-TQIP trauma centers. Sixty-nine percent of sites indicated that they have plasma immediately available for MTP activation. By policy, in the first group of blood products administered, 88% of sites target high (≥1:2) plasma-to-red blood cell (RBC) ratios and 10% target low ratios. Likewise, 79% of sites target high platelet-to-RBC ratios and 16% target low ratios. Eighteen percent of sites reported incorporating point-of-care thromboelastogram into MTP policies. The most common intravenous hemostatic adjunct incorporated into MTPs was tranexamic acid (49%). Thirty-four percent of sites reported that some or all of their emergency medical service agencies have the ability to administer blood products or hemostatic agents during prehospital transport. There were minimal differences in MTP policies or capabilities between Level I and II sites. The majority of ACS-TQIP participants reported having MTPs that support the use of DCR principles including high plasma-to-RBC and platelet-to-RBC ratios. Immediate availability of plasma and product use by emergency medical services are becoming increasingly common, whereas the incorporation of point-of-care thromboelastogram into MTP policies remains low.

  18. Person centered prediction of survival in population based screening program by an intelligent clinical decision support system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safdari, Reza; Maserat, Elham; Asadzadeh Aghdaei, Hamid; Javan Amoli, Amir Hossein; Mohaghegh Shalmani, Hamid

    2017-01-01

    To survey person centered survival rate in population based screening program by an intelligent clinical decision support system. Colorectal cancer is the most common malignancy and major cause of morbidity and mortality throughout the world. Colorectal cancer is the sixth leading cause of cancer death in Iran. In this survey, we used cosine similarity as data mining technique and intelligent system for estimating survival of at risk groups in the screening plan. In the first step, we determined minimum data set (MDS). MDS was approved by experts and reviewing literatures. In the second step, MDS were coded by python language and matched with cosine similarity formula. Finally, survival rate by percent was illustrated in the user interface of national intelligent system. The national intelligent system was designed in PyCharm environment. Main data elements of intelligent system consist demographic information, age, referral type, risk group, recommendation and survival rate. Minimum data set related to survival comprise of clinical status, past medical history and socio-demographic information. Information of the covered population as a comprehensive database was connected to intelligent system and survival rate estimated for each patient. Mean range of survival of HNPCC patients and FAP patients were respectively 77.7% and 75.1%. Also, the mean range of the survival rate and other calculations have changed with the entry of new patients in the CRC registry by real-time. National intelligent system monitors the entire of risk group and reports survival rates by electronic guidelines and data mining technique and also operates according to the clinical process. This web base software has a critical role in the estimation survival rate in order to health care planning.

  19. Tool for evaluating the evolution Space Weather Regional Warning Centers under the innovation point of view: the Case Study of the Embrace Space Weather Program Early Stages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denardini, Clezio Marcos

    2016-07-01

    We have developed a tool for measuring the evolutional stage of the space weather regional warning centers using the approach of the innovative evolution starting from the perspective presented by Figueiredo (2009, Innovation Management: Concepts, metrics and experiences of companies in Brazil. Publisher LTC, Rio de Janeiro - RJ). It is based on measuring the stock of technological skills needed to perform a certain task that is (or should) be part of the scope of a space weather center. It also addresses the technological capacity for innovation considering the accumulation of technological and learning capabilities, instead of the usual international indices like number of registered patents. Based on this definition, we have developed a model for measuring the capabilities of the Brazilian Study and Monitoring Program Space Weather (Embrace), a program of the National Institute for Space Research (INPE), which has gone through three national stages of development and an international validation step. This program was created in 2007 encompassing competence from five divisions of INPE in order to carry out the data collection and maintenance of the observing system in space weather; to model processes of the Sun-Earth system; to provide real-time information and to forecast space weather; and provide diagnostic their effects on different technological systems. In the present work, we considered the issues related to the innovation of micro-processes inherent to the nature of the Embrace program, not the macro-economic processes, despite recognizing the importance of these. During the development phase, the model was submitted to five scientists/managers from five different countries member of the International Space Environment Service (ISES) who presented their evaluations, concerns and suggestions. It was applied to the Embrace program through an interview form developed to be answered by professional members of regional warning centers. Based on the returning

  20. Supply Inventory Management: Evaluation of the Defense Supply Center Columbus Qualified Products List and Qualified Manufacturers List Program

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2002-01-01

    ... was transitioned from the Military Departments. The Defense Supply Center Columbus currently has management responsibility for over 300 Qualified Products Lists and 4 Qualified Manufacturers Lists...

  1. Effect of a child care center-based obesity prevention program on body mass index and nutrition practices among preschool-aged children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natale, Ruby A; Lopez-Mitnik, Gabriela; Uhlhorn, Susan B; Asfour, Lila; Messiah, Sarah E

    2014-09-01

    This study examined the effect of an early childhood obesity prevention program on changes in Body Mass Index (BMI) z-score and nutrition practices. Eight child care centers were randomly assigned to an intervention or attention control arm. Participants were a multiethnic sample of children aged 2 to 5 years old (N = 307). Intervention centers received healthy menu changes and family-based education focused on increased physical activity and fresh produce intake, decreased intake of simple carbohydrate snacks, and decreased screen time. Control centers received an attention control program. Height, weight, and nutrition data were collected at baseline and at 3, 6, and 12 months. Analysis examined height, weight, and BMI z-score change by intervention condition (at baseline and at 3, 6, and 12 months). Pearson correlation analysis examined relationships among BMI z-scores and home activities and nutrition patterns in the intervention group. Child BMI z-score was significantly negatively correlated with the number of home activities completed at 6-month post intervention among intervention participants. Similarly, intervention children consumed less junk food, ate more fresh fruits and vegetables, drank less juice, and drank more 1% milk compared to children at control sites at 6 months post baseline. Ninety-seven percent of those children who were normal weight at baseline were still normal weight 12 months later. Findings support child care centers as a promising setting to implement childhood obesity prevention programs in this age group. © 2014 Society for Public Health Education.

  2. A Web-Based Program for Informal Caregivers of Persons With Alzheimer’s Disease: An Iterative User-Centered Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulin, Florence; Wrobel, Jérémy; Batrancourt, Bénédicte; Plichart, Matthieu; Rigaud, Anne-Sophie

    2014-01-01

    Background Web-based programs have been developed for informal caregivers of people with Alzheimer’s disease (PWAD). However, these programs can prove difficult to adopt, especially for older people, who are less familiar with the Internet than other populations. Despite the fundamental role of usability testing in promoting caregivers’ correct use and adoption of these programs, to our knowledge, this is the first study describing this process before evaluating a program for caregivers of PWAD in a randomized clinical trial. Objective The objective of the study was to describe the development process of a fully automated Web-based program for caregivers of PWAD, aiming to reduce caregivers’ stress, and based on the user-centered design approach. Methods There were 49 participants (12 health care professionals, 6 caregivers, and 31 healthy older adults) that were involved in a double iterative design allowing for the adaptation of program content and for the enhancement of website usability. This process included three component parts: (1) project team workshops, (2) a proof of concept, and (3) two usability tests. The usability tests were based on a mixed methodology using behavioral analysis, semistructured interviews, and a usability questionnaire. Results The user-centered design approach provided valuable guidelines to adapt the content and design of the program, and to improve website usability. The professionals, caregivers (mainly spouses), and older adults considered that our project met the needs of isolated caregivers. Participants underlined that contact between caregivers would be desirable. During usability observations, the mistakes of users were also due to ergonomics issues from Internet browsers and computer interfaces. Moreover, negative self-stereotyping was evidenced, when comparing interviews and results of behavioral analysis. Conclusions Face-to-face psycho-educational programs may be used as a basis for Web-based programs

  3. The piloting of a culturally centered American Indian family prevention program: a CBPR partnership between Mescalero Apache and the University of New Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belone, Lorenda; Orosco, Ardena; Damon, Eloise; Smith-McNeal, Willymae; Rae, Rebecca; Sherpa, Mingma L; Myers, Orrin B; Omeh, Anslem O; Wallerstein, Nina

    2017-01-01

    The Mescalero Apache Family Listening Program (MAFLP) is a culturally centered family prevention program with third, fourth, and fifth graders; a parent/caregiver; and a family elder. The program follows a positive youth development model to develop stronger communication and shared cultural practices between elders, parents, and youth in the tribe to reduce substance initiation of use among the youth. The MAFLP was created using a community-based participatory research (CBPR) approach in partnership with the University of New Mexico. The research focus of MAFLP is centered on the adaptation of a family curriculum from a Navajo and Pueblo version of the Family Listening Program to an Apache version, the establishment of a (Apache) Tribal Research Team, and the piloting of the curriculum with Apache families. MAFLP was piloted twice, and evaluation measures were collected focused on formative and impact evaluation. This article provides a background on Mescalero Apache then introduces the Navajo and Pueblo version of a Family Listening and Family Circle Program, respectively, next, the CBPR research partnership between Mescalero Apache and the University of New Mexico and the creation of a Mescalero Apache Tribal Research Team followed by the development and adaptation of a Mescalero Apache Family Listening Program including implementation and evaluation, and concluding with preliminary findings.

  4. Predominant Non-additive Effects of Multiple Stressors on Autotroph C:N:P Ratios Propagate in Freshwater and Marine Food Webs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Villar-Argaiz

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A continuing challenge for scientists is to understand how multiple interactive stressor factors affect biological interactions, and subsequently, ecosystems–in ways not easily predicted by single factor studies. In this review, we have compiled and analyzed available research on how multiple stressor pairs composed of temperature (T, light (L, ultraviolet radiation (UVR, nutrients (Nut, carbon dioxide (CO2, dissolved organic carbon (DOC, and salinity (S impact the stoichiometry of autotrophs which in turn shapes the nature of their ecological interactions within lower trophic levels in streams, lakes and oceans. Our analysis from 66 studies with 320 observations of 11 stressor pairs, demonstrated that non-additive responses predominate across aquatic ecosystems and their net interactive effect depends on the stressor pair at play. Across systems, there was a prevalence of antagonism in freshwater (60–67% vs. 47% in marine systems compared to marine systems where synergism was more common (49% vs. 33–40% in freshwaters. While the lack of data impeded comparisons among all of the paired stressors, we found pronounced system differences for the L × Nut interactions. For this interaction, our data for C:P and N:P is consistent with the initial hypothesis that the interaction was primarily synergistic in the oceans, but not for C:N. Our study found a wide range of variability in the net effects of the interactions in freshwater systems, with some observations supporting antagonism, and others synergism. Our results suggest that the nature of the stressor pairs interactions on C:N:P ratios regulates the “continuum” commensalistic-competitive-predatory relationship between algae and bacteria and the food chain efficiency at the algae-herbivore interface. Overall, the scarce number of studies with even more fewer replications in each study that are available for freshwater systems have prevented a more detailed, insightful analysis. Our

  5. Predominant Non-additive Effects of Multiple Stressors on Autotroph C:N:P Ratios Propagate in Freshwater and Marine Food Webs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villar-Argaiz, Manuel; Medina-Sánchez, Juan M.; Biddanda, Bopaiah A.; Carrillo, Presentación

    2018-01-01

    A continuing challenge for scientists is to understand how multiple interactive stressor factors affect biological interactions, and subsequently, ecosystems–in ways not easily predicted by single factor studies. In this review, we have compiled and analyzed available research on how multiple stressor pairs composed of temperature (T), light (L), ultraviolet radiation (UVR), nutrients (Nut), carbon dioxide (CO2), dissolved organic carbon (DOC), and salinity (S) impact the stoichiometry of autotrophs which in turn shapes the nature of their ecological interactions within lower trophic levels in streams, lakes and oceans. Our analysis from 66 studies with 320 observations of 11 stressor pairs, demonstrated that non-additive responses predominate across aquatic ecosystems and their net interactive effect depends on the stressor pair at play. Across systems, there was a prevalence of antagonism in freshwater (60–67% vs. 47% in marine systems) compared to marine systems where synergism was more common (49% vs. 33–40% in freshwaters). While the lack of data impeded comparisons among all of the paired stressors, we found pronounced system differences for the L × Nut interactions. For this interaction, our data for C:P and N:P is consistent with the initial hypothesis that the interaction was primarily synergistic in the oceans, but not for C:N. Our study found a wide range of variability in the net effects of the interactions in freshwater systems, with some observations supporting antagonism, and others synergism. Our results suggest that the nature of the stressor pairs interactions on C:N:P ratios regulates the “continuum” commensalistic-competitive-predatory relationship between algae and bacteria and the food chain efficiency at the algae-herbivore interface. Overall, the scarce number of studies with even more fewer replications in each study that are available for freshwater systems have prevented a more detailed, insightful analysis. Our findings

  6. Revisiting the concept of Redfield ratios applied to plankton stoichiometry - Addressing model uncertainties with respect to the choice of C:N:P ratios for phytoplankton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreus, Markus; Paetsch, Johannes; Grosse, Fabian; Lenhart, Hermann; Peck, Myron; Pohlmann, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    Ongoing Ocean Acidification (OA) and climate change related trends impact on physical (temperature), chemical (CO2 buffer capacity) and biological (stoichiometric) properties of the marine environment. These threats affect the global ocean but they appear particularly pronounced in marginal and shelf seas. Marine biogeochemical models are often used to investigate the impacts of climate change and changes in OA on the marine system as well as its exchange with the atmosphere. Different studies showed that both the structural composition of the models and the elemental ratios of particulate organic matter in the surface ocean affect the key processes controlling the ocean's efficiency storing atmospheric excess carbon. Recent studies focus on the variability of the elemental ratios of phytoplankton and found that the high plasticity of C:N:P ratios enables the storage of large amounts of carbon by incorporation into carbohydrates and lipids. Our analysis focuses on the North Sea, a temperate European shelf sea, for the period 2000-2014. We performed an ensemble of model runs differing only in phytoplankton stoichiometry, representing combinations of C:P = [132.5, 106, 79.5] and N:P=[20, 16, 12] (i.e., Redfield ratio +/- 25%). We examine systematically the variations in annual averages of net primary production (NPP), net ecosystem production in the upper 30 m (NEP30), export production below 30 m depth (EXP30), and the air-sea flux of CO2 (ASF). Ensemble average fluxes (and standard deviations) resulted in NPP = 15.4 (2.8) mol C m-2 a-1, NEP30 = 5.4 (1.1) mol C m-2 a-1, EXP30 = 8.1 (1.1) mol C m-2 a-1 and ASF = 1.1 (0.5) mol C m-2 a-1. All key parameters exhibit only minor variations along the axis of constant C:N, but correlate positively with increasing C:P and decreasing N:P ratios. Concerning regional differences, lowest variations in local fluxes due to different stoichiometric ratios can be found in the shallow southern and coastal North Sea. Highest

  7. Clinical Informatics Fellowship Programs: In Search of a Viable Financial Model: An open letter to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, C U; Longhurst, C A; Hersh, W; Mohan, V; Levy, B P; Embi, P J; Finnell, J T; Turner, A M; Martin, R; Williamson, J; Munger, B

    2015-01-01

    In the US, the new subspecialty of Clinical Informatics focuses on systems-level improvements in care delivery through the use of health information technology (HIT), data analytics, clinical decision support, data visualization and related tools. Clinical informatics is one of the first subspecialties in medicine open to physicians trained in any primary specialty. Clinical Informatics benefits patients and payers such as Medicare and Medicaid through its potential to reduce errors, increase safety, reduce costs, and improve care coordination and efficiency. Even though Clinical Informatics benefits patients and payers, because GME funding from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) has not grown at the same rate as training programs, the majority of the cost of training new Clinical Informaticians is currently paid by academic health science centers, which is unsustainable. To maintain the value of HIT investments by the government and health care organizations, we must train sufficient leaders in Clinical Informatics. In the best interest of patients, payers, and the US society, it is therefore critical to find viable financial models for Clinical Informatics fellowship programs. To support the development of adequate training programs in Clinical Informatics, we request that the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) issue clarifying guidance that would allow accredited ACGME institutions to bill for clinical services delivered by fellows at the fellowship program site within their primary specialty.

  8. Development of a Standardized Job Description for Healthcare Managers of Metabolic Syndrome Management Programs in Korean Community Health Centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youngjin Lee, RN, PhD

    2014-03-01

    Conclusion: A job description for healthcare managers may provide basic data essential for the development of a job training program for healthcare managers working in community health promotion programs.

  9. Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s (ORNL) ecological and physical science study center: A hands-on science program for K-12 students

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradshaw, S.P. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1994-12-31

    In our tenth year of educational service and outreach, Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s Ecological and Physical Science Study Center (EPSSC) provides hands-on, inquiry-based science activities for area students and teachers. Established in 1984, the EPSSC now hosts over 20,000 student visits. Designed to foster a positive attitude towards science, each unit includes activities which reinforce the science concept being explored. Outdoor science units provide field experience at the Department of Energy`s Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park and outreach programs are offered on-site in area schools. Other programs are offered as extensions of the EPSSC core programs, including on-site student science camps, all-girl programs, outreach science camps, student competitions, teacher in-service presentations and teacher workshops.

  10. Feasibility of Using a Community-Supported Agriculture Program to Increase Access to and Intake of Vegetables among Federally Qualified Health Center Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumi, Betty T; Higgins, Cesar E; Baron, Andrea; Ness, Sylvia J; Allan, Bryan; Barth, Elizabeth T; Smith, Teresa M; Pranian, Katy; Frank, Brian

    2017-11-21

    This study explored the feasibility of using a 23-week subsidized community-supported agriculture program to increase access to and intake of vegetables among Federally Qualified Health Center patients. Outcomes were measured using pre-post intervention surveys (n = 9). Process data were collected in post-intervention surveys and focus groups (n = 15). Most participants (77%) indicated that the program improved their health and all (100%) reported that they were eating a greater variety of vegetables because of their participation in the program. Three themes emerged from the focus groups: increased access to fresh and/or organic vegetables, improved diet quality, and the importance of social support during the program. Linking subsided community-supported agriculture programs with Federally Qualified Health Centers has the potential to increase access to and intake of vegetables among low-income patients. However, further research is needed with a larger sample size and a more robust study design. Copyright © 2017 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Implementation of an enhanced safety-engineered sharp device oversight and bloodborne pathogen protection program at a large academic medical center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbot, Thomas R; Wang, Deede; Swift, Melanie; St Jacques, Paul; Johnson, Susan; Brinsko, Vicki; Thayer, Valerie; Dail, Teresa; Feistritzer, Nancye; Polancich, Shea

    2014-11-01

    Exposure of healthcare personnel to bloodborne pathogens (BBPs) can be prevented in part by using safety-engineered sharp devices (SESDs) and other safe practices, such as double gloving. In some instances, however, safer devices and practices cannot be utilized because of procedural factors or the lack of a manufactured safety device for the specific clinical use. In these situations, a standardized system to examine requests for waiver from expected practices is necessary. Before-after program analysis. Large academic medical center. Vanderbilt University Medical Center developed a formalized system for an improved waiver process, including an online submission and tracking site, and standards surrounding implementation of core safe practices. The program's impact on sharp device injuries and utilization of double gloving and blunt sutures was examined. Following implementation of the enhanced program, there was an increase in the amount of undergloves and blunt sutures purchased for surgical procedures, suggesting larger utilization of these practices. The rate of sharp device injuries of all at-risk employees decreased from 2.32% to 2.12%, but this decline was not statistically significant (P = .14). The proportion of reported injuries that were deemed preventable significantly decreased from 72.7% (386/531) before implementation to 63.9% (334/523; P = .002) after implementation of the enhanced program. An enhanced BBP protection program was successful at providing guidance to increase safe practices and at improving the management of SESD waiver requests and was associated with a reduction in preventable sharp device injuries.

  12. Constructing "Packages" of Evidence-Based Programs to Prevent Youth Violence: Processes and Illustrative Examples From the CDC's Youth Violence Prevention Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingston, Beverly; Bacallao, Martica; Smokowski, Paul; Sullivan, Terri; Sutherland, Kevin

    2016-04-01

    This paper describes the strategic efforts of six National Centers of Excellence in Youth Violence Prevention (YVPC), funded by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, to work in partnership with local communities to create comprehensive evidence-based program packages to prevent youth violence. Key components of a comprehensive evidence-based approach are defined and examples are provided from a variety of community settings (rural and urban) across the nation that illustrate attempts to respond to the unique needs of the communities while maintaining a focus on evidence-based programming and practices. At each YVPC site, the process of selecting prevention and intervention programs addressed the following factors: (1) community capacity, (2) researcher and community roles in selecting programs, (3) use of data in decision-making related to program selection, and (4) reach, resources, and dosage. We describe systemic barriers to these efforts, lessons learned, and opportunities for policy and practice. Although adopting an evidence-based comprehensive approach requires significant upfront resources and investment, it offers great potential for preventing youth violence and promoting the successful development of children, families and communities.

  13. Creating a “culture of research” in a community hospital: Strategies and tools from the National Cancer Institute Community Cancer Centers Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    St. Germain, Diane; Nacpil, Lianne M; Zaren, Howard A; Swanson, Sandra M; Minnick, Christopher; Carrigan, Angela; Denicoff, Andrea M; Igo, Kathleen E; Acoba, Jared D; Gonzalez, Maria M; McCaskill-Stevens, Worta

    2015-01-01

    Background The value of community-based cancer research has long been recognized. In addition to the National Cancer Institute’s Community Clinical and Minority-Based Oncology Programs established in 1983, and 1991 respectively, the National Cancer Institute established the National Cancer Institute Community Cancer Centers Program in 2007 with an aim of enhancing access to high-quality cancer care and clinical research in the community setting where most cancer patients receive their treatment. This article discusses strategies utilized by the National Cancer Institute Community Cancer Centers Program to build research capacity and create a more entrenched culture of research at the community hospitals participating in the program over a 7-year period. Methods To facilitate development of a research culture at the community hospitals, the National Cancer Institute Community Cancer Centers Program required leadership or chief executive officer engagement; utilized a collaborative learning structure where best practices, successes, and challenges could be shared; promoted site-to-site mentoring to foster faster learning within and between sites; required research program assessments that spanned clinical trial portfolio, accrual barriers, and outreach; increased identification and use of metrics; and, finally, encouraged research team engagement across hospital departments (navigation, multidisciplinary care, pathology, and disparities) to replace the traditionally siloed approach to clinical trials. Limitations The health-care environment is rapidly changing while complexity in research increases. Successful research efforts are impacted by numerous factors (e.g. institutional review board reviews, physician interest, and trial availability). The National Cancer Institute Community Cancer Centers Program sites, as program participants, had access to the required resources and support to develop and implement the strategies described. Metrics are an important

  14. Effect of a governmentally-led physical activity program on motor skills in young children attending child care centers: a cluster randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Objective To assess the effect of a governmentally-led center based child care physical activity program (Youp’là Bouge) on child motor skills. Patients and methods We conducted a single blinded cluster randomized controlled trial in 58 Swiss child care centers. Centers were randomly selected and 1:1 assigned to a control or intervention group. The intervention lasted from September 2009 to June 2010 and included training of the educators, adaptation of the child care built environment, parental involvement and daily physical activity. Motor skill was the primary outcome and body mass index (BMI), physical activity and quality of life secondary outcomes. The intervention implementation was also assessed. Results At baseline, 648 children present on the motor test day were included (age 3.3 ± 0.6, BMI 16.3 ± 1.3 kg/m2, 13.2% overweight, 49% girls) and 313 received the intervention. Relative to children in the control group (n = 201), children in the intervention group (n = 187) showed no significant increase in motor skills (delta of mean change (95% confidence interval: -0.2 (−0.8 to 0.3), p = 0.43) or in any of the secondary outcomes. Not all child care centers implemented all the intervention components. Within the intervention group, several predictors were positively associated with trial outcomes: 1) free-access to a movement space and parental information session for motor skills 2) highly motivated and trained educators for BMI 3) free-access to a movement space and purchase of mobile equipment for physical activity (all p life” physical activity program in child care centers confirms the complexity of implementing an intervention outside a study setting and identified potentially relevant predictors that could improve future programs. Trial registration Clinical trials.gov NCT00967460 PMID:23835207

  15. Effect of a governmentally-led physical activity program on motor skills in young children attending child care centers: a cluster randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonvin, Antoine; Barral, Jérôme; Kakebeeke, Tanja H; Kriemler, Susi; Longchamp, Anouk; Schindler, Christian; Marques-Vidal, Pedro; Puder, Jardena J

    2013-07-08

    To assess the effect of a governmentally-led center based child care physical activity program (Youp'là Bouge) on child motor skills. We conducted a single blinded cluster randomized controlled trial in 58 Swiss child care centers. Centers were randomly selected and 1:1 assigned to a control or intervention group. The intervention lasted from September 2009 to June 2010 and included training of the educators, adaptation of the child care built environment, parental involvement and daily physical activity. Motor skill was the primary outcome and body mass index (BMI), physical activity and quality of life secondary outcomes. The intervention implementation was also assessed. At baseline, 648 children present on the motor test day were included (age 3.3 ± 0.6, BMI 16.3 ± 1.3 kg/m2, 13.2% overweight, 49% girls) and 313 received the intervention. Relative to children in the control group (n = 201), children in the intervention group (n = 187) showed no significant increase in motor skills (delta of mean change (95% confidence interval: -0.2 (-0.8 to 0.3), p = 0.43) or in any of the secondary outcomes. Not all child care centers implemented all the intervention components. Within the intervention group, several predictors were positively associated with trial outcomes: (1) free-access to a movement space and parental information session for motor skills (2) highly motivated and trained educators for BMI (3) free-access to a movement space and purchase of mobile equipment for physical activity (all p life" physical activity program in child care centers confirms the complexity of implementing an intervention outside a study setting and identified potentially relevant predictors that could improve future programs. Clinical trials.gov NCT00967460.

  16. Development and evaluation of a patient centered cardiovascular health education program for insured patients in rural Nigeria (QUICK - II)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Odusola, Aina Olufemi; Hendriks, Marleen; Schultsz, Constance; Stronks, Karien; Lange, Joep; Osibogun, Akin; Akande, Tanimola; Alli, Shade; Adenusi, Peju; Agbede, Kayode; Haafkens, Joke

    2011-01-01

    In Sub Saharan Africa, the incidence of hypertension and other modifiable cardiovascular risk factors is growing rapidly. Poor adherence to prescribed prevention and treatment regimens by patients can compromise treatment outcomes. Patient-centered cardiovascular health education is likely to

  17. Development and evaluation of a patient centered cardiovascular health education program for insured patients in rural Nigeria (QUICK-II)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Odusola, A.O.; Hendriks, M.; Schultsz, C.; Stronks, K.; Lange, J.; Osibogun, A.; Akande, T.; Alli, S.; Adenusi, P.; Agbede, K.; Haafkens, J.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In Sub Saharan Africa, the incidence of hypertension and other modifiable cardiovascular risk factors is growing rapidly. Poor adherence to prescribed prevention and treatment regimens by patients can compromise treatment outcomes. Patient-centered cardiovascular health education is

  18. Coral Research Data from NOAA's Undersea Research Center, West Coast and Polar Region, NOAA's Undersea Research Program (NURP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA's Undersea Research Center for the West Coast and Polar regions operates in the waters offshore of California, Oregon, Washington, and Alaska, and the Artic and...

  19. Coral Research Data from NOAA's Undersea Research Center, Hawaii Undersea Research Laboratory, NOAA's Undersea Research Program (NURP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA's Undersea Research Center, the Hawaii Undersea Research Laboratory, explores and studies the waters around the Main Hawaiian Islands, Northwest Hawaiian...

  20. The Effectiveness of Education Based on BASNEF Model Program in Promotion of Preventive Behavior of Leishmaniasis among Health Workers and Families under Health Centers Coverage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Khani Jeihooni

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objective: Intervention of educational training in order to prevent the leishmaniasis in endemic areas seems necessary. This study was implemented with the aim of assessing the effectiveness of education based on BASNEF Model program in promotion of preventive behavior of leishmaniasis among Health workers and families under the coverage of Health centers. Materials & Methods: An intervention study was carried out in rural health centers during 2009. Questionnaires were completed by 20 health- workers of two rural health centers. Also 20 families under the coverage of this health centers were randomly selected to complete the questionnaire. Then four training sessions for health workers and 2 training sessions for the influential individuals were conducted to increase the enabling factors and solving their problems, weekly meetings was held with health workers representatives. After three months of health workers training the data were collected again and analyzed via Chi- Square, T Independent, T pair, Regression and Mann- Whitney statistics. Results: The mean score for to knowledge, attitude, behavior intension, enabling factors and health workers behaviors significantly increased after educational intervention in experimental group and influential individuals. The mean scores for knowledge, attitude, behavior intension, enabling factors and the behavior of attendant families under coverage also increased significantly. Conclusion: Educational program of BASNEF Model, leads to behavior change of health workers and eventually their training behavior leads to preventive actions in families under coverage.

  1. Helping Hand: The Salin Kaalaman Tungo sa Kaunlaran Extension Program of Polytechnic University of the Philippines Among the Beneficiaries of the Pilot Centers in Sta. Mesa, Manila, Philippines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junnette B. Hasco

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available One of the four-fold functions of State Universities and Colleges in accordance by their mandates was to provide assistance to communities; this was achieved thru conducting different skills and development trainings in partnership with Local Government Units (LGU’s. This study was conducted to assess the current Extension program of the Polytechnic University of the Philippines (PUP. Some 74 beneficiaries from the 23 centers of Sta. Mesa, Manila were identified through the use of purposive sampling. The data gathering made use of aided surveys. Weighted Mean and Pearson Product Moment of Correlation was used to treat and process statistical data. Findings revealed that the Extension Services conducted by the PUP Salin Kaalaman Tungo sa Kaunlaran Extension Program (SALIN were highly effective regarding Information Dissemination, Staff and Officials, Trainings and Programs, Trainers and Speakers, Programs, Accommodation and Venue and the personal impact of the Extension Program to the Beneficiaries. Satisfaction rating on the extension program was also high. Further, this study found out that as respondents are satisfied with the implementation of SALIN, the greater the chance of positive assessment on the effectiveness of the project. The study also disclosed problems and recommendations identified by the respondents. In addressing the research gaps, this study further identified recommendations to enhance capabilities of program implementers such as better execution in the delivery of extension services, fund sourcing and forging linkages or networking.

  2. The Development of Program for Enhancing Learning Management Competency of Teachers in Non-Formal and Informal Education Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jutasong, Chanokpon; Sirisuthi, Chaiyut; Phusri-on, Songsak

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of this research are: 1) to study factors and indicators, 2) to study current situations, desirable situations and techniques, 3) to develop the Program, and 4) to study the effect of Program. It comprised 4 phases: (1) studying the factors and indicators; (2) studying the current situations, desirable situations and techniques; (3)…

  3. Physician Engagement Strategies in Care Coordination: Findings from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services' Health Care Innovation Awards Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skillman, Megan; Cross-Barnet, Caitlin; Singer, Rachel Friedman; Ruiz, Sarah; Rotondo, Christina; Ahn, Roy; Snyder, Lynne Page; Colligan, Erin M; Giuriceo, Katherine; Moiduddin, Adil

    2017-02-01

    To identify roles physicians assumed as part of new health care delivery models and related strategies that facilitated physician engagement across 21 Health Care Innovation Award (HCIA) programs. Site-level in-depth interviews, conducted from 2014 to 2015 (N = 672) with program staff, leadership, and partners (including 95 physicians) and direct observations. NORC conducted a mixed-method evaluation, including two rounds of qualitative data collected via site visits and telephone interviews. We used qualitative thematic coding for data from 21 programs actively engaging physicians as part of HCIA interventions. Establishing physician champions and ensuring an innovation-values fit between physicians and programs, including the strategies programs employed, facilitated engagement. Among engagement practices identified in this study, tailoring team working styles to meet physician preferences and conducting physician outreach and education were the most common successful approaches. We describe engagement strategies derived from a diverse range of programs. Successful programs considered physicians' values and engagement as components of process and policy, rather than viewing them as exogenous factors affecting innovation adoption. These types of approaches enabled programs to accelerate acceptance of innovations within organizations. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  4. Intergenerational Relationships at the Center: Finding Shared Meaning from Programs in the U.S. and Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larkin, Elizabeth; Kaplan, Matthew S.

    2010-01-01

    Newcomers to intergenerational programs in early childhood settings tend to recognize immediately the value of bringing younger and older age groups together. However, they then ask, "But what do they do together?" The goal of intergenerational programs is to promote bonds between younger and older generations--relationships that will…

  5. Self-reported use of Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program benefits to purchase soda in a public health center population: Los Angeles County, California, 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barragan, Noel; Gase, Lauren; Butler, Rebecca; Smith, Lisa; Simon, Paul; Kuo, Tony

    2015-01-01

    To better inform local program planning for the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health used self-reported data from a public health center population to examine the prevalence of benefits used to purchase soda. We performed statistical analyses, including multivariable regression modeling, using data from a local health and nutrition examination survey. The survey response rate was 69% (n=1,503). More than one-third of survey participants reported receiving, or living in a household where someone receives, nutrition assistance benefits. When asked, 33% (n=170) reported using these benefits to purchase soda "sometimes" and 18% (n=91) reported "often" or "always," suggesting that the use of program benefits to purchase soda was not uncommon in this subpopulation. These findings have meaningful policy and planning implications, as they contribute to ongoing dialogue about strategies for optimizing nutrition among SNAP recipients.

  6. Results of Occupational Monitoring Program in Technologic Navy Center in Sao Paulo; Resultados do programa de monitoracao ocupacional do Centro Tecnologico da Marinha em Sao Paulo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez, Clarice F.A.; Bitelli, Ricardo D.; Oliveira, Rodemir, E-mail: clarice.acosta@ctmsp.mar.mil.br, E-mail: bitelli@ctmsp.mar.mil.br, E-mail: rodemir@ctmsp.mar.mil.br [Centro Tecnologico da Marinha em Sao Paulo (CTMSP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-10-01

    The CTMSP, Centro Tecnologico da Marinha em Sao Paulo, is a nuclear research Center located in the State of Sao Paulo. CTMSP headquarters is placed at the Campus of the University of Sao Paulo. Most of CTMSP nuclear facilities are at the Centro Experimental Aramar (CEA), located 120 km northwest from the Capital city of Sao Paulo. CTMSP has two major nuclear programs. One is the development of a PWR reactor for naval propulsion, and the other is associated with the front end fuel cycle technology comprising enrichment, conversion and reconversion. These activities require an extensive area monitoring program. This paper presents the results of this program covering the years of 2003 to 2011. The results include surface monitoring, dose rates and uranium concentrations in the air. (author)

  7. Carefree in child care ?: child wellbeing, caregiving quality, and intervention programs in center-based child care

    OpenAIRE

    Werner, Claudia Denise

    2014-01-01

    The use of center child care in Western countries has increased over the last three decades and is nowadays the most frequently used type of non-parental care for children aged zero to four (OECD, 2013). The aim of the current dissertation is to shed more light on indicators of child care quality in center child care and to answer the question whether narrow-focused caregiver interventions are effective in improving child care quality. The reported meta-analysis shows that narrow-focus interv...

  8. THE IMPLEMENTATION OF THE PREVENTION AND IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM OF MALNUTRITION IN CHILDREN UNDER FIVE YEARS AT SIAK HULU III PUBLIC HEALTH CENTER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    winda septiani

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Prevention and tackling malnutrition is an effort to anticipate potential problem of malnutrition before incident malnutrition and combat cases of malnutrition has happebed. Puskesmas Siak Hulu III has happened malnutrished cases for three years successive. The aim of this research is aware of the problem of malnutrition program of prevention and tacking Puskesmas Siak Hulu III the program implementation so far, and wich has operated community health center. The reseach a qualitative method being used. This research executed in june until july 2015. An analysis of the data done is analysis before in the feald, during analysis in the field, and analysis of after in a fieldwork constisting of an analysis of the domain, taxonomic analysis, componencial analysis and the theme of it’s cultural analysis. Informants in this research is 8 of a person taken based in the principle of sufficiency (Adequasy. The research result obtained important themes of human resources, financing system, as well as advice remains a big problem in achieving the program. Most being considerate in the research is not stead a source of the national budget in the form of vehicle operational cost calculation in the program implementation. While the implementation of the program against the technical level is still experiencing a sumber of problems that could actualy be solved well namely coordination between health workers (midwives cadres parents with toddkers and of health worker was recommended to all community health center head, the program nutrition and holders the village midwives priority heath to be more effort to promote compared with the effort to curative is cases of malnutrition.

  9. [Study on job support programs for drug addicts in japan: results of a nationwide survey on drug addiction rehabilitation centers (DARC)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahara, Keiko; Morita, Nobuaki; Ogai, Yasukazu; Umeno, Mitsuru; Koda, Minoru; Ikeda, Tomohiro; Yabe, Yohko; Abe, Yukie; Kondo, Tsuneo

    2014-04-01

    In Japan, many drug addiction rehabilitation centers (DARC) provide various types of recovery programs for drug addiction. The purpose of this study was to clarify the attitudes of DARC staff and users regarding job support programs. A nationwide questionnaire survey was conducted in 2009. The staff of 46 facilities and 606 users returned questionnaires. The results indicated that many (92.1%) users had work experience before entering the recovery programs provided by DARC and about half (49.3%) of the users reported being motivated to work. Although many DARC have established various job support programs, the users faced various levels of anxieties to get employed and 60.4% of the users expected to learn more detailed and concrete methods for finding a job. Through the DARC programs, the users gradually realize the significance of basic daily living skills such as maintaining their rhythm of life or neat and presentable appearance. And the more they get recovered the more they understand the significance of "self-care" and "interpersonal relationship skills". These findings indicate that job support programs for drug addicts should also focus on these recovery processes. More extensive job supports dealing with more practical issues and covering a wide variety of anxieties would be imperative.

  10. Carefree in child care ? : child wellbeing, caregiving quality, and intervention programs in center-based child care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Werner, Claudia Denise

    2014-01-01

    The use of center child care in Western countries has increased over the last three decades and is nowadays the most frequently used type of non-parental care for children aged zero to four (OECD, 2013). The aim of the current dissertation is to shed more light on indicators of child care quality in

  11. 78 FR 20928 - Center for Devices and Radiological Health: Health of Women Program; Public Workshop; Request for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-08

    ...-representation of women in clinical trials Baseline differences in anatomy, physiology, risk factors, disease... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Center for Devices and Radiological Health: Health of Women...

  12. Horizon's patient-centered medical home program shows practices need much more than payment changes to transform

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Patel, Urvashi B; Rathjen, Carl; Rubin, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    ...' accountability for care coordination and outcomes. Horizon Healthcare Services, Inc., New Jersey's oldest and largest health insurance company, developed medical home programs that include financial incentives with essential support tools...

  13. The Office Guidelines Applied to Practice program improves secondary prevention of heart disease in Federally Qualified Healthcare Centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adesuwa Olomu

    2016-12-01

    Office-GAP resulted in increased use of guideline-based medications for secondary CVD prevention in underserved populations. The Office-GAP program could serve as a model for implementing guideline-based care for other chronic diseases.

  14. Effects of Structured Physical Activity Program on Chinese Young Children’s Executive Functions and Perceived Physical Competence in a Day Care Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanying Xiong

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To examine the effects of a structured physical activity program on executive functions and perceived physical competence as compared to a traditional recess among preschool children. Methods. Participants were 40 preschool children aged 4-5 from an urban child care center in a southern Chinese metropolitan area. Prior to the intervention, baseline assessments of children’s executive functions and perceived physical competence were conducted. Children were then assigned to (1 intervention condition: a structured physical activity intervention group; (2 control condition: free-activity recess. The structured physical activity or recess programs were provided to the intervention and control groups 30 minutes daily for 3 months, respectively, followed by the identical postintervention measures. Results. Thirty-nine children (19 girls; mean age = 4.67 years old, BMI = 15.54±1.21 were included in the analysis. In general, children’s executive functions and perceived physical competence increased over time. Repeated measures analysis of variance revealed the intervention group had significant greater increases in executive functions compared to the control children (F(1, 37 = 4.20, p=0.04, η2=.10, yet there were no greater increases in perceived physical competence (F(1, 37 = 2.35, p=0.13, η2=.06. Conclusion. The intervention exerted significant greater increases in executive functions in preschool children. It is meaningful to offer structured physical activity programs in day care centers.

  15. Temporal Variation in Ankle Fractures and Orthopedic Resident Program Planning in an Urban Level 1 Trauma Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynkoop, Aaron; Ndubaku, Osy; Walter, Norman; Atkinson, Theresa

    Previous studies have described the mechanism of ankle fractures, their seasonal variation, and fracture patterns but never in conjunction. In addition, the cohorts previously studied were either not from trauma centers or were often dominated by low-energy mechanisms. The present study aimed to describe the epidemiology of ankle fractures presenting to an urban level 1 trauma center. The records from an urban level 1 trauma center located in the Midwestern United States were retrospectively reviewed, and the injury mechanism and energy, time of injury, day of week, month, and patient characteristics (age, gender, comorbidities, smoking status) were collected. The fractures were classified using the AO (Arbeitsgemeinschaft für Osteosynthesefragen), Lauge-Hansen, and Danis-Weber systems. Of these systems, the Lauge-Hansen classification system resulted in the greatest number of "unclassifiable" cases. Most ankle fractures were due to high-energy mechanisms, with motor vehicle collisions the most common high-energy mechanism. The review found that most ankle fractures were malleolar fractures, regardless of the mechanism of injury. The ankle fracture patients had greater rates of obesity, diabetes, and smoking than present in the region where the hospital is located. The fractures were most likely to occur in the afternoon, with more fractures presenting on the weekend than earlier in the week and more fractures in the fall and winter than in the spring and summer. The temporal variation of these fractures should be considered for health services planning, in particular, in regard to resident physician staffing at urban level 1 trauma centers. Copyright © 2017 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Effect of Educational Program to Encourage Safe Sexual Behaviors Among Addicted Men Refered to Substance Abuse Treatment Centers in Hamadan, Western Iran: Applying the Theory of Planned Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babak Moeini

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Unsafe sexual behaviors as important risky behaviors can expose individuals and society to dangerous infectious disease such as AIDS and viral hepatitis. Considering the high prevalence of unsafe sexual behaviors, this study aimed to determine the effect of educational programs to encourage safe sexual behaviors among substance abusers referred to substance abuse treatment centers in Hamadan, Western Iran by applying the theory of planned behavior. Materials & Methods: This quasi-experimental study was performed on 104 men substance abusers (52 participants in each of the control and intervention groups referred to substance abuse treatment centers in Hamadan. Data collection tool was a questionnaire containing demographic information and the theory of planned behavior constructs. Before the educational program, questionnaires were completed by both groups. After the pretest in both groups, participants in the intervention group participated in four educational sessions designed based on the theory of planned behavior. Two months after the end of program, posttest was performed. Data was analyzed using independent T-test, chi-square, fisher exact test, McNemar’s test and multiple linear regressions using SPSS-16. Results: After educational intervention, the mean scores of the theory constructs (attitude toward behavior, subjective norms, behavioral control, behavioral intention and behaviors, in the intervention group increased significantly (P<0.05, despite the fact, changes were not significant in the control group. Conclusion: Implementation of educational courses to encourage safe sexual behaviors based on the theory of planned behavior can be beneficial for substance abusers referred to substance abuse treatment centers.

  17. Participation in a farmers' market fruit and vegetable prescription program at a federally qualified health center improves hemoglobin A1C in low income uncontrolled diabetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryce, Richard; Guajardo, Claudia; Ilarraza, Deliana; Milgrom, Nicki; Pike, Denise; Savoie, Kathryn; Valbuena, Felix; Miller-Matero, Lisa R

    2017-09-01

    Fruit and vegetable prescription programs have been shown to increase consumption of fresh produce, but whether they have an impact on medical outcomes is unknown. The purpose of this study was to examine the role of participation in a farmers' market and fruit and vegetable prescription program on changes in hemoglobin A1C (HbA1C), blood pressure (BP) and weight in patients with uncontrolled type 2 diabetes at a federally qualified health center (FQHC) in Detroit, MI. The 13-week Fresh Prescription program (June 2015-October 2015) was designed to improve access and consumption of produce among low-income patients with uncontrolled type 2 diabetes. The program allotted up to $40 ($10 per week for up to four weeks) for purchase of produce from a FQHC located farmers' market. Adult, non-pregnant patients with a history of type 2 diabetes that had an elevated HbA1C > 6.5 within three months before Fresh Prescription program were eligible to participate. HgA1c, BP and weight were collected within three months of program start and within three months of completion. There were 65 eligible participants with complete biometric data. A statistically significant (p = 0.001) decrease in HbA1C was found (9.54% to 8.83%). However, weight (208.3 lbs. to 209.0 lbs.) and BP (135.1/79.3 mm Hg to 135.8/77.6 mm Hg) did not change from pre- to post-study (p > 0.05). Access to a fruit and vegetable prescription program over a 13-week period led to decreased HbA1C concentrations in uncontrolled type 2 diabetic patients living in an urban area of predominately-lower socioeconomic status.

  18. The Current State of Early Childhood Education Programs: How Early Childhood Center Directors Manage Their Human Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arend, Lauren E.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Research in the field of early childhood education (ECE) demonstrated the association between skilled directors and high quality programs. Still, most state licensing requirements do not delineate the requisite knowledge or experience necessary to be an effective director. Many ECE directors advance to their position directly from the…

  19. A Competency-Based and Field-Centered Teacher Education Program in French: Teacher Competencies and Evidence of Achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papalia, Anthony

    The foreign language teacher training program described here is competency-based and therefore assumes the use of stated assessment criteria. Foreign language teacher competencies are listed in three categories: (1) content area, (2) learning-teaching process, and (3) teacher-school-community and profession. The team leader responsible for…

  20. 78 FR 57505 - World Trade Center Health Program; Addition of Prostate Cancer to the List of WTC-Related Health...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-19

    ... program for the Windows Computing Environment. American Journal of Industrial Medicine 54:915-924. \\31... of Children From Environmental Health Risks and Safety Risks) I. Executive Order 13211 (Actions... published in the scientific journal Environmental Health Perspectives.\\6\\ Petition 002 asserted that the...

  1. Hunt for forgotten warplanes: a unique application for the Goddard Space Flight Center Search and Rescue Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR2) program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagen, Gerald; Jackson, Christopher R.

    1998-09-01

    The principal purpose of the Beaconless Search and Rescue program at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) is to utilize synthetic aperture radar (SAR) for the efficient and rapid location of recent small aircraft crashes. An additional side benefit might prove to be the detection and discovery of long lost or forgotten historic aircraft that have now become of immense value for museum display or among wealthy collectors. As the GSFC SAR2 program matures and its achievements in SAR target detection become more widely available, they will be of use to amateur and professional airplane hunters. We recommend that such ancillary benefits be kept in mind during the continued development and testing of such equipment, which would be of benefit to all future generations concerning the history of aviation. We welcome and encourage all participants to notify organizations such as ours of the discovery of any historic aircraft wreckage or intact abandoned old aircraft throughout the world.

  2. Archive of Geosample Data and Information from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Coastal and Marine Geology Program (CMGP) Woods Hole Coastal and Marine Science Center (WHCMSC) Samples Repository

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The U.S. Geological Survey Coastal and Marine Geology Program (CMGP) Woods Hole Coastal and Marine Science Center (WHCMSC) Samples Repository is a partner in the...

  3. Archive of Geosample Data and Information from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Coastal and Marine Geology Program (CMGP) Pacific Coastal and Marine Science Center (PCMSC) Samples Repository

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The U.S. Geological Survey Coastal and Marine Geology Program (CMGP) Pacific Coastal and Marine Science Center (PCMSC) Samples Repository is a partner in the Index...

  4. Archive of Geosample Data and Information from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Coastal and Marine Geology Program (CMGP) St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center (SPCMSC) Samples Repository

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The U.S. Geological Survey Coastal and Marine Geology Program (CMGP) St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center (SPCMSC) Samples Repository is a partner in the...

  5. [A Recreation Room for adolescents who are hospitalized at a tertiary-care Center: Care Program for Hospitalized Adolescents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mato, Roberto; Rodríguez, M Susana

    2015-06-01

    Hospital admission is a high-impact event in children. Adolescence is a critical and complex period of human development that may be adversely affected by hospitalization. At the Garrahan Hospital, where adolescents account for more than 30% of inpatients, a program for comprehensive care of adolescents was set up in 2008 with a special focus on their specific needs. As a part of this program, the aim of the Recreation Room for Hospitalized Adolescents is to provide a friendly environment to reduce stress and anxiety and to facilitate the learning of healthy behaviors, under the permanent care of nurses and medical doctors. Interventions in health, leisure time, education, and emotional care are effective in diminishing the negative impact of hospitalization and prevent risk behaviors. Our objective was to report our experience in the Recreation Room for Hospitalized Adolescents.

  6. Air Force Personalized Medicine Program Panel: Representative Research at the 59th Medical Wing San Antonio Military Medical Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-18

    Graduate Health Sciences Education (GHSE) (SGS O&M); SGS R&D; Tri-Service Nursing Research Program (TSNRP); Defense Medical Research & Development...the utilization of genetics , genomics, pharmacogenomics, proteomics, and bioinformatics tools to optimize prevention, diagnosis, early intervention...prevention strategies tailored to the individual genetic characteristics of each patient On July 8. 2015 the White House released for public comment a

  7. A Study to Develop and Test the Effectiveness of a Program of Supervisory Development at Fitzsimons Army Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-05-01

    Head Nurses, F.A. Davis Company, Phila- delphis, 1971. Hersey , Paul , Blanchard, Kenneth H. Management of Organizational Behavior : Utilizing Human...which have required adaptive responses by managers . He states: vt nagerial attitudes and values are changing, and we are creating an organizational ...Development Program focused at the level of first-line and middle management is an appropriate component of a more comprehensive organizational management

  8. Using intervention mapping to develop and adapt a secondary stroke prevention program in Veterans Health Administration medical centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andersen Jane

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Secondary stroke prevention is championed by the stroke guidelines; however, it is rarely systematically delivered. We sought to develop a locally tailored, evidence-based secondary stroke prevention program. The purpose of this paper was to apply intervention mapping (IM to develop our locally tailored stroke prevention program and implementation plan. We completed a needs assessment and the five Steps of IM. The needs assessment included semi-structured interviews of 45 providers; 26 in Indianapolis and 19 in Houston. We queried frontline clinical providers of stroke care using structured interviews on the following topics: current provider practices in secondary stroke risk factor management; barriers and needs to support risk factor management; and suggestions on how to enhance secondary stroke risk factor management throughout the continuum of care. We then describe how we incorporated each of the five Steps of IM to develop locally tailored programs at two sites that will be evaluated through surveys for patient outcomes, and medical records chart abstraction for processes of care.

  9. Using intervention mapping to develop and adapt a secondary stroke prevention program in Veterans Health Administration medical centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Arlene A; Andersen, Jane; Kent, Thomas; Williams, Linda S; Damush, Teresa M

    2010-12-15

    Secondary stroke prevention is championed by the stroke guidelines; however, it is rarely systematically delivered. We sought to develop a locally tailored, evidence-based secondary stroke prevention program. The purpose of this paper was to apply intervention mapping (IM) to develop our locally tailored stroke prevention program and implementation plan. We completed a needs assessment and the five Steps of IM. The needs assessment included semi-structured interviews of 45 providers; 26 in Indianapolis and 19 in Houston. We queried frontline clinical providers of stroke care using structured interviews on the following topics: current provider practices in secondary stroke risk factor management; barriers and needs to support risk factor management; and suggestions on how to enhance secondary stroke risk factor management throughout the continuum of care. We then describe how we incorporated each of the five Steps of IM to develop locally tailored programs at two sites that will be evaluated through surveys for patient outcomes, and medical records chart abstraction for processes of care.

  10. Gynecologic evaluation of the first female soldiers enrolled in the Gulf War Comprehensive Clinical Evaluation Program at Tripler Army Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittich, A C

    1996-11-01

    Tripler Army Medical Center initiated the Department of Defense's Persian Gulf Illness Comprehensive Clinical Evaluation Program (CCEP) on June 15, 1994. In the first 5 months, 100 patients enrolled in this program. Sixteen (16%) were women who served in the Persian Gulf during Desert Shield/ Desert Storm, and 1 (1%) was the dependent wife of a Gulf War veteran who is experiencing illness that may be related to the Persian Gulf War. All 17 women enrolled in the CCEP were evaluated in the Tripler Army Medical Center Obstetrics and Gynecology Clinic between June 17 and November 10, 1994. Each patient underwent gynecologic history, pelvic exam, Pap smear, and screen for fecal occult blood. Ten patients underwent baseline mammograms and 13 patients underwent urogenital and cervical cultures for aerobic bacteria, chlamydia and herpes simplex. The 1 patient with an abnormal Pap smear underwent cervical and endocervical biopsies and colposcopy (histology demonstrated no dysplasia or neoplasia). Half of the 16 Gulf War veterans experienced gynecologic problems while serving in the Gulf and 43% admitted gynecologic problems since returning in 1991. Of 6 patients who became pregnant after returning, 5 had normal pregnancies and 1 suffered four miscarriages.

  11. Analysis of interaction of triple helix in a federal public program: A study of the centers of support for innovation management (NAGIS [doi: 10.21529/RECADM.2016015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurora Carneiro Zen

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to analyze interactions among government, universities and enterprises, components of Triple helix model, considering the implementation process of governmental program to foster innovation in Brazil. To do so, we conducted a qualitative exploratory research within five Centers of Support for Innovation Management (Núcleos de Apoio à Gestão de Inovação – Nagis, which are projects financed through support from federal government, in order to encourage innovation in enterprises of the country. We analized trajectory of these Nagis, their methodology and their difficulties during implantation of each center. The source of data was documents and interviews with Nagis’s managers, using a script about the operationalization of project (structure, methodology of innovation management and the experiency with this methodology. Then, we analized the role of the relationship of the component in the Triple Helix model and the development of Nagis. As a main conclusion, we identified that synergy between government, university and industry spheres is limited, which does not allow more relevant advances of this program. The evidences indicate a need to restructure the role of each "helix" aiming at changes in bilateral relations. Companies need to be sensitized more emphatically about the importance of innovation and to adopt a more proactive strategy. We recommend to academy adopts a more entrepreneurial stance and the government should take a position not only as a financier, but coordinatior and facilitator of innovative activities.   Keywords Nagi; Innovation management; Triple Helix.

  12. Level of acceptance of a clinical solid organ xenotransplantation program among personnel in organ transplant-related services in Spanish, Mexican, and Cuban hospital centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ríos, A; Martínez-Alarcón, L; Ayala-García, M A; Sebastián, M J; Abdo-Cuza, A; López-Navas, A; López-López, A; Ramírez, E J; Muñoz, G; Camacho, A; Suárez-López, J; Castellanos, R; Rodríguez, J S; Martínez, M A; Nieto, A; Ramis, G; Ramírez, P; Parrilla, P

    2010-01-01

    Xenotransplantation is far from becoming a clinical reality. However, in vital organs it could be used as a bridge until a human organ becomes available, in an emergency situation. We analyzed the attitude toward xenotransplantation among personnel in transplant-related services in several hospitals in Spain and Latin America. A random sample stratified by type of service and job category (n = 738), in transplant-related services (procurement units, transplant units, and transplant patient follow-up units) was examined in eight hospital centers from three different countries: Spain (n = 349), Mexico (n = 269), and Cuba (n = 120). A self-administered validated questionnaire was completed anonymously. Based on the assumption that all the results of xenotransplantation were similar to those achieved with human donors, most respondents [66% (n = 484)] would be in favor. The employees from Cuban centers had the most favorable attitudes (72% in favor), followed by the Spanish (64%) and the Mexicans (61%; P = .013). However, the differences were mainly determined by job category: Physicians showed the most favorable attitudes and auxiliary staff the least (67% vs 40%; P = .010). Attitudes were significantly related to beliefs about different types of human donation [deceased (P donating the organs of a deceased family member (P = .004). Currently, a third of health care employees working in transplant-related services are not in favor of xenotransplantation. More information should be provided about the subject, especially in centers with preclinical xenotransplantation programs.

  13. Development and pilot testing of HIV screening program integration within public/primary health centers providing antenatal care services in Maharashtra, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bindoria, Suchitra V; Devkar, Ramesh; Gupta, Indrani; Ranebennur, Virupax; Saggurti, Niranjan; Ramesh, Sowmya; Deshmukh, Dilip; Gaikwad, Sanjeevsingh

    2014-03-26

    The objectives of this paper are: (1) to study the feasibility and relative benefits of integrating the prevention of parent-to-child transmission (PPTCT) component of the National AIDS Control Program with the maternal and child health component of the National Rural Health Mission (NRHM) by offering HIV screening at the primary healthcare level; and (2) to estimate the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio to understand whether the costs are commensurate with the benefits. The intervention included advocacy with political, administrative/health heads, and capacity building of health staff in Satara district, Maharashtra, India. The intervention also conducted biannual outreach activities at primary health centers (PHCs)/sub-centers (SCs); initiated facility-based integrated counseling and testing centers (FICTCs) at all round-the-clock PHCs; made the existing FICTCs functional and trained PHC nurses in HIV screening. All "functional" FICTCs were equipped to screen for HIV and trained staff provided counseling and conducted HIV testing as per the national protocol. Data were collected pre- and post- integration on the number of pregnant women screened for HIV, the number of functional FICTCs and intervention costs. Trend analyses on various outcome measures were conducted. Further, the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio per pregnant woman screened was calculated. An additional 27% of HIV-infected women were detected during the intervention period as the annual HIV screening increased from pre- to post-intervention (55% to 79%, p < 0.001) among antenatal care (ANC) attendees under the NRHM. A greater increase in HIV screening was observed in PHCs/SCs. The proportions of functional FICTCs increased from 47% to 97% (p < 0.001). Additionally, 93% of HIV-infected pregnant women were linked to anti-retroviral therapy centers; 92% of mother-baby pairs received Nevirapine; and 89% of exposed babies were enrolled for early infant diagnosis. The incremental cost

  14. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center Workshop: Brookhaven Summer Program on Quarkonium Production in Elementary and Heavy Ion Collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dumitru, A.; Lourenco, C.; Petreczky, P.; Qiu, J., Ruan, L.

    2011-08-03

    Understanding the structure of the hadron is of fundamental importance in subatomic physics. Production of heavy quarkonia is arguably one of the most fascinating subjects in strong interaction physics. It offers unique perspectives into the formation of QCD bound states. Heavy quarkonia are among the most studied particles both theoretically and experimentally. They have been, and continue to be, the focus of measurements in all high energy colliders around the world. Because of their distinct multiple mass scales, heavy quarkonia were suggested as a probe of the hot quark-gluon matter produced in heavy-ion collisions; and their production has been one of the main subjects of the experimental heavy-ion programs at the SPS and RHIC. However, since the discovery of J/psi at Brookhaven National Laboratory and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory over 36 years ago, theorists still have not been able to fully understand the production mechanism of heavy quarkonia, although major progresses have been made in recent years. With this in mind, a two-week program on quarkonium production was organized at BNL on June 6-17, 2011. Many new experimental data from LHC and from RHIC were presented during the program, including results from the LHC heavy ion run. To analyze and correctly interpret these measurements, and in order to quantify properties of the hot matter produced in heavy-ion collisions, it is necessary to improve our theoretical understanding of quarkonium production. Therefore, a wide range of theoretical aspects on the production mechanism in the vacuum as well as in cold nuclear and hot quark-gluon medium were discussed during the program from the controlled calculations in QCD and its effective theories such as NRQCD to various models, and to the first principle lattice calculation. The scientific program was divided into three major scientific parts: basic production mechanism for heavy quarkonium in vacuum or in high energy elementary collisions; the

  15. Needs assessment of science teachers in secondary schools in Kumasi, Ghana: A basis for in-service education training programs at the Science Resource Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyamfi, Alexander

    The purpose of this study was twofold. First, it identified the priority needs common to all science teachers in secondary schools in Kumasi, Ghana. Second, it investigated the relationship existing between the identified priority needs and the teacher demographic variables (type of school, teacher qualification, teaching experience, subject discipline, and sex of teacher) to be used as a basis for implementing in-service education training programs at the Science Resource Centers in Kumasi Ghana. An adapted version of the Moore Assessment Profile (MAP) survey instrument and a set of open-ended questions were used to collect data from the science teachers. The researcher handed out one hundred and fifty questionnaire packets, and all one hundred and fifty (100%) were collected within a period of six weeks. The data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, content analysis, and inferential statistics. The descriptive statistics reported the frequency of responses, and it was used to calculate the Need Index (N) of the identified needs of teachers. Sixteen top-priority needs were identified, and the needs were arranged in a hierarchical order according to the magnitude of the Need Index (0.000 ≤ N ≤ 1.000). Content analysis was used to analyze the responses to the open-ended questions. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to test the null hypotheses of the study on each of the sixteen identified top-priority needs and the teacher demographic variables. The findings of this study were as follows: (1) The science teachers identified needs related to "more effective use of instructional materials" as a crucial area for in-service training. (2) Host and Satellite schools exhibited significant difference on procuring supplementary science books for students. Subject discipline of teachers exhibited significant differences on utilizing the library and its facilities by students, obtaining information on where to get help on effective science teaching

  16. Preliminary Data from the Caring for Older Adults and Caregivers at Home (COACH) Program: A Care Coordination Program for Home-Based Dementia Care and Caregiver Support in a Veterans Affairs Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Souza, Maria F; Davagnino, Judith; Hastings, S Nicole; Sloane, Richard; Kamholz, Barbara; Twersky, Jack

    2015-06-01

    Caring for Older Adults and Caregivers at Home (COACH) is an innovative care coordination program of the Durham Veteran's Affairs Medical Center in Durham, North Carolina, that provides home-based dementia care and caregiver support for individuals with dementia and their family caregivers, including attention to behavioral symptoms, functional impairment, and home safety, on a consultation basis. The objectives of this study were to describe the COACH program in its first 2 years of operation, assess alignment of program components with quality measures, report characteristics of program participants, and compare rates of placement outside the home with those of a nontreatment comparison group using a retrospective cohort design. Participants were community-dwelling individuals with dementia aged 65 and older who received primary care in the medical center's outpatient clinics and their family caregivers, who were enrolled as dyads (n = 133), and a control group of dyads who were referred to the program and met clinical eligibility criteria but did not enroll (n = 29). Measures included alignment with Dementia Management Quality Measures and time to placement outside the home during 12 months of follow-up after referral to COACH. Results of the evaluation demonstrated that COACH aligns with nine of 10 clinical process measures identified using quality measures and that COACH delivers several other valuable services to enhance care. Mean time to placement outside the home was 29.6 ± 14.3 weeks for both groups (P = .99). The present study demonstrates the successful implementation of a home-based care coordination intervention for persons with dementia and their family caregivers that is strongly aligned with quality measures. © 2015, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2015, The American Geriatrics Society.

  17. The Effect of Family-Centered Empowerment Program on Self-Efficacy of Adolescents with Thalassemia Major: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leili Borimnejad

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic nature of thalassemia causes changes in different aspects of life in patients, including their self-efficacy. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of family-centered empowerment program on the self-efficacy of adolescents with Thalassemia major. Methods: A quasi-experimental study was performed on adolescents with thalassemia major in 2013 in Bandar Abbas, Iran. The participants were divided into intervention and control groups, respectively. Research instruments included demographic data questionnaire, need assessment self-made questionnaire, general self-efficacy scale, and sickle cell self-efficacy scale. After collecting the data from the pre-intervention step, family-centered empowerment program was implemented for the intervention group and secondary test was conducted six weeks after the intervention and the results were analyzed by statistical SPSS-21 software, using independent t-test, paired t-test, Chi-square and Fisher’s exact test, and descriptive statistics. A significance level of P<0.05 was considered as significant. Results: The mean and standard deviation of the adolescents’ age were 16±1.9 in the intervention group and 15.2±2 in the control group. Independent t-test showed a significant difference between the two groups after the intervention for both self-efficacies (P<0.01 and P=0.02. In the control group, the results of general self-efficacy scores after six weeks’ time were reduced compared to the previous one while disease-related self-efficacy scores in the same group after six weeks’ time increased and paired t-test indicated a significant difference in the mean scores for both self-efficacies in both groups. Conclusion: Implementation of family-centered empowerment program for patients with thalassemia major is practically feasible and it can increase self-efficacy in these patients. It is suggested that the program should be used in comprehensive care protocols of children

  18. Implementing a fax referral program for quitline smoking cessation services in urban health centers: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cantrell Jennifer

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fax referral services that connect smokers to state quitlines have been implemented in 49 U.S. states and territories and promoted as a simple solution to improving smoker assistance in medical practice. This study is an in-depth examination of the systems-level changes needed to implement and sustain a fax referral program in primary care. Methods The study involved implementation of a fax referral system paired with a chart stamp prompting providers to identify smoking patients, provide advice to quit and refer interested smokers to a state-based fax quitline. Three focus groups (n = 26 and eight key informant interviews were conducted with staff and physicians at two clinics after the intervention. We used the Chronic Care Model as a framework to analyze the data, examining how well the systems changes were implemented and the impact of these changes on care processes, and to develop recommendations for improvement. Results Physicians and staff described numerous benefits of the fax referral program for providers and patients but pointed out significant barriers to full implementation, including the time-consuming process of referring patients to the Quitline, substantial patient resistance, and limitations in information and care delivery systems for referring and tracking smokers. Respondents identified several strategies for improving integration, including simplification of the referral form, enhanced teamwork, formal assignment of responsibility for referrals, ongoing staff training and patient education. Improvements in Quitline feedback were needed to compensate for clinics' limited internal information systems for tracking smokers. Conclusions Establishing sustainable linkages to quitline services in clinical sites requires knowledge of existing patterns of care and tailored organizational changes to ensure new systems are prioritized, easily integrated into current office routines, formally assigned to specific

  19. Epidemiologic research on man-made disasters: strategies and implications of cohort definition for World Trade Center worker and volunteer surveillance program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savitz, David A; Oxman, Rachael T; Metzger, Kristina B; Wallenstein, Sylvan; Stein, Diane; Moline, Jacqueline M; Herbert, Robin

    2008-01-01

    Studies of long-term health consequences of disasters face unique methodologic challenges. The authors focused on studies of the health of cleanup and recovery workers, who are often poorly enumerated at the outset and difficult to follow over time. Comparison of the experience at the World Trade Center disaster with 4 past incidents of chemical and radiation releases at Seveso, Italy; Bhopal, India; Chernobyl, Ukraine; and Three Mile Island, USA, provided useful contrasts. Each event had methodologic advantages and disadvantages that depended on the nature of the disaster and the availability of records on area residents, and the emergency-response and cleanup protocol. The World Trade Center Worker Monitoring Program has well-defined eligibility criteria but lacks information on the universe of eligible workers to characterize response proportions or the potential for distortion of reported health effects. Nonparticipation may result from lack of interest, lack of awareness of the program, availability of another source of medical care, medical conditions precluding participation, inability to take time off from work, moving out of the area, death, or shift from initially ineligible to eligible status. Some of these considerations suggest selective participation by the sickest individuals, whereas others favor participation by the healthiest. The greatest concern with the validity of inferences regarding elevated health risks relative to external populations is the potential for selective enrollment among those who are affected. If there were a large pool of nonparticipating workers and those who suffered ill health were most motivated to enroll, the rates of disease among participants would be substantially higher than among all those eligible for the program. Future disaster follow-up studies would benefit substantially by having access to accurate estimates of the number of workers and information on the individuals who contributed to the cleanup and recovery

  20. Developing and Sustaining a Science and Technology Center Education Program: "Inquiry" as a Means for Organizational Change and Institutional Legitimacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, T.; Hunter, L.

    2010-12-01

    Formal organizations have become ubiquitous in contemporary society and since so many of us spend so much of our daily lives working, learning, and socializing in them it is important to understand not only how they govern our interactions but also how we can incite (and sustain) organizational change. This is especially true for STEM education; learning about science, technology, engineering or mathematics rarely occurs outside of formal settings and educators need to be aware of how learning goals, priorities and practices are permeable to the institutional processes that structure sponsoring organizations. Adopting a historical perspective, this paper reports on organizational changes at the Center for Adaptive Optics in relation to an emerging emphasis on inquiry learning. The results of our analysis show how the inquiry model functioned as a boundary object and was instrumental in transforming members' expectations and assumptions about educational practice in STEM while securing the institutional legitimacy of the CfAO as a whole. Our findings can inform the advancement of educational initiatives within the STEM research community and are particularly useful in relation to concerns around accommodating and integrating individuals from non-dominant backgrounds.

  1. Successfully accelerating translational research at an academic medical center: the University of Michigan-Coulter translational research partnership program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pienta, Kenneth J

    2010-12-01

    Translational research encompasses the effective movement of new knowledge and discoveries into new approaches for prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of disease. There are many roadblocks to successful bench to bedside research, but few have received as much recent attention as the "valley of death". The valley of death refers to the lack of funding and support for research that moves basic science discoveries into diagnostics, devices, and treatments in humans, and is ascribed to be the result of companies unwilling to fund research development that may not result in a drug or device that will be utilized in the clinic and conversely, the fact that researchers have no access to the funding needed to carry out preclinical and early clinical development to demonstrate potential efficacy in humans. The valley of death also exists because bridging the translational gap is dependent on successfully managing an additional four risks: scientific, intellectual property, market, and regulatory. The University of Michigan (UM) has partnered with the Wallace H. Coulter Foundation (CF) to create a model providing an infrastructure to overcome these risks. This model is easily adoptable to other academic medical centers (AMCs). © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Nationwide Quality of Hospice Care: Findings From the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Hospice Quality Reporting Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Nan Tracy; Li, Qinghua; Hanson, Laura C; Wessell, Kathryn L; Chong, Natalie; Sherif, Noha; Broyles, Ila H; Frank, Jennifer; Kirk, M Alexis; Schwartz, Carol R; Levitt, Alan F; Rokoske, Franziska

    2018-02-01

    With increasing use of the Medicare hospice benefit, policymakers recognize the need for quality measurement to assure that terminally ill patients receive high-quality care and have the information they need when selecting a hospice. Toward these goals, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services has been collecting standardized patient-level quality data via the Hospice Item Set (HIS) since July 1, 2014. This article presents a first look at the national hospice HIS quality data. We calculated seven quality measures using the HIS data. These measures are endorsed by the National Quality Forum and focus on important care processes hospice providers are required to perform at admission, including discussion of patient preferences regarding life-sustaining treatments, care for spiritual and existential concerns, and symptom management (pain, opioid-induced constipation, and dyspnea). Our sample included 1,218,786 hospice patients discharged from 3922 hospices from October 1, 2014 to September 30, 2015. More than 90% of patients received screenings and assessments captured by six of the seven quality measures. The only exception was pain assessment, for which the national mean score was 78.2%. A small number of hospices (156, 4.0%) had perfect scores for all seven quality measures. Most hospices conduct critical assessments and discuss treatment preferences with patients at admission, although few hospices have perfect scores. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Evaluation of two prevention programs ‘Early Steps’ and ‘Faustlos’ in daycare centers with children at risk: the study protocol of a cluster randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background While early programs to prevent aggression and violence are widely used, only a few controlled trials of effectiveness of psychoanalytically based prevention programs for preschoolers have been evaluated. This study compares ‘Faustlos’ (a violence prevention program) and ‘Early Steps’ (a psychoanalytically based, whole daycare center intervention to prevent violence) in daycare centers in socioeconomically deprived neighborhoods. Methods/Design Preschoolers in 14 daycare centers in Frankfurt, Germany, participate in a cluster randomized controlled trial (CRCT). The daycare centers were randomly chosen from a representative baseline survey of all Frankfurt’s daycare centers carried out in 2003 (n = 5,300) with the following stratifying factors: children’s aggressiveness, hyperactivity, anxiety and socioeconomic status. Additionally, the geographic identification of socioeconomically deprived neighborhoods regarding low-income children was taken from the Frankfurt Municipality Statistics. Children’s attachment classification and children’s aggressiveness, hyperactivity, anxiety and social competence are measured as outcome criteria before and after 2 years of intervention. The programs in the study aim to reach a high-risk population. Therefore, the combination of a random sampling of daycare centers out of a representative baseline survey in all daycare centers in Frankfurt and the application of official data on the local distribution of low-income children are unique features offered by the EVA study design. Data on preschooler’s attachment representations are collected in socioeconomically deprived neighborhoods for the first time. Trial registration DRKS-ID: DRKS00003500 PMID:23968458

  4. Effect of a Comprehensive Health Care Program by Korean Medicine Doctors on Medical Care Utilization for Common Infectious Diseases in Child-Care Centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minjung Park

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available As the role of traditional medicine in community health improvement increases, a comprehensive health care program for infectious diseases management in child-care centers by Korean medicine doctors was developed. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effects of the program intervention on infection-related medical care utilization among children. The study used a quasi-experimental design with nonequivalent control group, comparing pre- and post-intervention data of the same children. The program implemented interventions in terms of management, education, and medical examination for the teachers, parents, and children in 12-week period. The frequency of utilization, cost, and prescription days of drugs and antibiotics due to infectious diseases prior to the intervention were compared with those during the 3-month intervention, using health insurance claim data. A panel analysis was also conducted to support the findings. A significant reduction (12% in infection-related visit days of hospitals was observed with the intervention (incident rate ratio = 0.88, P=0.01. And medical cost, drug prescription days, and antibiotics prescription days were decreased, although not statistically significant. A further cost-effectiveness analysis in terms of social perspectives, considering the opportunity costs for guardians to take children to medical institutions, would be needed.

  5. The Center for HIV/AIDS Vaccine Immunology (CHAVI) Multi-site Quality Assurance Program for Cryopreserved Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarzotti-Kelsoe, Marcella; Needham, Leila K.; Rountree, Wes; Bainbridge, John; Gray, Clive M.; Fiscus, Susan A.; Ferrari, Guido; Stevens, Wendy S.; Stager, Susan L.; Binz, Whitney; Louzao, Raul; Long, Kristy O.; Mokgotho, Pauline; Moodley, Niranjini; Mackay, Melanie; Kerkau, Melissa; McMillion, Takesha; Kirchherr, Jennifer; Soderberg, Kelly A.; Haynes, Barton F.; Denny, Thomas N.

    2014-01-01

    The Center for HIV/AIDS Vaccine Immunology (CHAVI) consortium was established to determine the host and virus factors associated with HIV transmission, infection and containment of virus replication, with the goal of advancing the development of an HIV protective vaccine. Studies to meet this goal required the use of cryopreserved Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cell (PBMC) specimens, and therefore it was imperative that a quality assurance (QA) oversight program be developed to monitor PBMC samples obtained from study participants at multiple international sites. Nine site-affiliated laboratories in Africa and the USA collected and processed PBMCs, and cryopreserved PBMC were shipped to CHAVI repositories in Africa and the USA for long-term storage. A three-stage program was designed, based on Good Clinical Laboratory Practices (GCLP), to monitor PBMC integrity at each step of this process. The first stage evaluated the integrity of fresh PBMCs for initial viability, overall yield, and processing time at the site-affiliated laboratories (Stage 1); for the second stage, the repositories determined post-thaw viability and cell recovery of cryopreserved PBMC, received from the site-affiliated laboratories (Stage 2); the third stage assessed the long-term specimen storage at each repository (Stage 3). Overall, the CHAVI PBMC QA oversight program results highlight the relative importance of each of these stages to the ultimate goal of preserving specimen integrity from peripheral blood collection to long-term repository storage. PMID:24910414

  6. Behavioral Health and Performance Operations at the NASA Johnson Space Center: A Comprehensive Program that Addresses Flight and Spaceflight Duty Adaptability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beven, G. E.

    2017-01-01

    NASA astronauts on active status require medical certification for aircraft flying duties as well as readiness for long duration spaceflight training, launch to the International Space Station (ISS), and mission continuation during spaceflight operations. Behavioral fitness and adaptability is an inherent component of medical certification at NASA and requires a unique approach that spans the professional life-span of all active astronauts. TOPIC: This presentation will address the Behavioral Health and Performance (BHP) operations program at the Johnson Space Center. Components of BHP operations include astronaut selection, as well as annual, elective, preflight, inflight, and postflight BHP assessments. Each aspect of the BHP operations program will be discussed, with a focus on behavioral fitness determination and resultant outcomes. Specifically, astronaut selection generates a rating of suitability for long duration spaceflight as well as psychiatric qualification; annual, preflight and postflight BHP assessments provoke a decision regarding the presence of any aeromedical concerns; and inflight assessment requires a conclusion pertaining to mission impact. The combination of these elements provide for a unique, comprehensive approach to flight and spaceflight adaptability. APPLICATIONS: Attendees will understand the differing facets of NASA's comprehensive BHP operations program that occurs over the course of an astronaut's career and be able to compare and contrast this to the Adaptability Rating for Military Aviation (ARMA) and proposed models presented by others on this panel.

  7. The attitude toward living liver donation among the hospital personnel in a northeast China center with a liver transplant program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, B; Liu, S; Cui, D; Dai, X

    2010-06-01

    China has the largest population of end-stage liver disease patients, but the acceptance of liver donation is really poor. Our objective was to analyze the attitudes toward living liver donation among hospital workers in a hospital with an authorized living donor liver transplant program in northeast China. A random sample stratified by department of service and job category (n = 800) evaluated attitudes using a modified psychosocial questionnaire, which was self-administered and completed anonymously. The factors were divided into subcategories of psychosocial variables, family variables, and attitudes toward other types of organ donation and willingness to accept an organ if needed. The results showed favorable attitudes toward living liver donation among hospital personnel. Family factors were closely related to this attitude as were altruistic activities and feelings of reciprocity.

  8. Impact of Starting an Emergency Medicine Residency Program on Overall Mortality Rate in a Regional Trauma Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Thomas; Blow, Osbert; Herrick, John; Richman, Peter

    2016-02-01

    CHRISTUS Spohn Hospital Corpus Christi - Memorial began an Emergency Medicine Residency Program in March 2007. During each of the three years of their residency, residents are required to complete a trauma surgery rotation. These emergency medicine residents are the only residents participating on this rotation as there is no surgical residency. The Department of Acute Care Surgery, Trauma and Surgical Critical Care analyzed the impact of the residents on trauma patient care outcomes with the hypothesis that there were no differences. Data including length of stay in the hospital, length of stay in the intensive care unit, time spent in the emergency department (ED), morbidities and mortalities were compiled from the trauma registry for patients from the year before the residents began (March 1, 2006 to February 28, 2007) and compared with patients from the first year the residents began their trauma rotations (March 1, 2007 to February 29, 2008). T-tests and Mann-Whitney U tests were used to compare continuous variables and a Chi-square test was used to analyze the categorical variable (mortality). Linear and logistic regression analyses were also performed in order to adjust for potential confounding factors. Trauma patient admission rates were 1,316 before and 1,391 after the residents began. No statistically significant differences were found among all of the outcome variables during the two time periods except for time spent in the ED (P = 0.00), which increased during the year the residents began (236.83 ± 4.53 minutes in 2006 compared to 297.40 ± 5.55 minutes in 2007). Linear and logistic regression analyses confirmed these results with the exception of a statistically significant decrease in mortality with the residents on the trauma service (2.8% in 2006 and 2.1% in 2007, P = 0.00) after adjustment for multiple confounding factors. The addition of emergency medicine residents to the trauma care service did increase ED length of stay, but did not increase

  9. Assessing the Importance of Domestic Vaccine Manufacturing Centers: An Overview of Immunization Programs, Vaccine Manufacture, and Distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Rey-Jurado

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Vaccines have significantly reduced the detrimental effects of numerous human infectious diseases worldwide, helped to reduce drastically child mortality rates and even achieved eradication of major pathogens, such as smallpox. These achievements have been possible due to a dedicated effort for vaccine research and development, as well as an effective transfer of these vaccines to public health care systems globally. Either public or private institutions have committed to developing and manufacturing vaccines for local or international population supply. However, current vaccine manufacturers worldwide might not be able to guarantee sufficient vaccine supplies for all nations when epidemics or pandemics events could take place. Currently, different countries produce their own vaccine supplies under Good Manufacturing Practices, which include the USA, Canada, China, India, some nations in Europe and South America, such as Germany, the Netherlands, Italy, France, Argentina, and Brazil, respectively. Here, we discuss some of the vaccine programs and manufacturing capacities, comparing the current models of vaccine management between industrialized and developing countries. Because local vaccine production undoubtedly provides significant benefits for the respective population, the manufacture capacity of these prophylactic products should be included in every country as a matter of national safety.

  10. Deceased Donor Kidney Transplantation in the Eurotransplant Senior Program (ESP): A Single-Center Experience from 2008 to 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobi, Johannes; Beckmann, Sophie; Heller, Katharina; Hilgers, Karl F; Apel, Hendrik; Spriewald, Bernd; Eckardt, Kai-Uwe; Amann, Kerstin U

    2016-02-11

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the outcome after transplantation of deceased allografts in donor/recipient pairs aged ≥65 years enrolled in the Eurotransplant Senior Program (ESP). In this retrospective cohort study we evaluated data from 89 patients transplanted under the ESP protocol from 2008 to 2013. Outcome parameters included graft and patient survival, rate of biopsy-proven acute rejections (BPAR), peri- and post-operative complications, tumor development, development of donor-specific antibodies (DSA), and the prognostic role of preimplantation biopsies. One-year patient and allograft survival rates were 92.1% and 84.3%, respectively. During follow-up, 23 (26%) patients died; the major cause of death was sepsis, followed by cardiovascular events and malignancies. BPAR episodes were frequent within the first year (~33%) and overall were less common in patients treated with tacrolimus. Post-transplant malignancies were seen in 15 (17%) patients. During follow-up, 16 (18%) patients developed DSA; patients with delayed graft function (DGF) were more likely to develop DSA (p=0.029). A higher preimplantation biopsy score was associated with DGF but did not predict later graft outcome. The results highlight increased risks in ESP transplant candidates and the importance of careful surveillance of this patient group.

  11. Assessing the Importance of Domestic Vaccine Manufacturing Centers: An Overview of Immunization Programs, Vaccine Manufacture, and Distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey-Jurado, Emma; Tapia, Felipe; Muñoz-Durango, Natalia; Lay, Margarita K; Carreño, Leandro J; Riedel, Claudia A; Bueno, Susan M; Genzel, Yvonne; Kalergis, Alexis M

    2018-01-01

    Vaccines have significantly reduced the detrimental effects of numerous human infectious diseases worldwide, helped to reduce drastically child mortality rates and even achieved eradication of major pathogens, such as smallpox. These achievements have been possible due to a dedicated effort for vaccine research and development, as well as an effective transfer of these vaccines to public health care systems globally. Either public or private institutions have committed to developing and manufacturing vaccines for local or international population supply. However, current vaccine manufacturers worldwide might not be able to guarantee sufficient vaccine supplies for all nations when epidemics or pandemics events could take place. Currently, different countries produce their own vaccine supplies under Good Manufacturing Practices, which include the USA, Canada, China, India, some nations in Europe and South America, such as Germany, the Netherlands, Italy, France, Argentina, and Brazil, respectively. Here, we discuss some of the vaccine programs and manufacturing capacities, comparing the current models of vaccine management between industrialized and developing countries. Because local vaccine production undoubtedly provides significant benefits for the respective population, the manufacture capacity of these prophylactic products should be included in every country as a matter of national safety.

  12. Educational Program Status of Premarital Counseling Centers in Hamadan Province Based on Theory of Reasoned Action (TRA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Mahdi Hazavehei

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objective: Divorce, unwanted pregnancies, and unsuccessful marriages create mental, emotional, physical, and financial problems for individuals, families, and ultimately the community. Premarital education and counseling is one of the most effective ways for the prevention of such problems. The purpose of this study was to describe and evaluate the effectiveness of a premarital educational program by using the TRA (Theory of Reasoned Action. Materials and Methods: Four hundred couples who attended premarital education and counseling classes voluntarily participated in this descriptive and analytical study. Variables such as attitude, subjective norms, and intention, were collected by using a validated questionnaire based on the TRA components. The questionnaire was filled out before and after the educational classes. Results: The mean age of the couples was 23.16 ± 5.64 years old. Statistically significant differences were found in knowledge, attitude, and subjective norms before and after participation in the classes (p value 0.05. Conclusion: Although the mean knowledge and attitude of the couples under study increased after the classes, the increase was not high and only 20% of the couples gained acceptable knowledge. The effectiveness of such classes in the current manner is very low. Application of appropriate educational methods and media-based models and theories is highly recommended.

  13. Structural Integrity Program for the 300,000-Gallon Radioactive Liquid Waste Storage Tanks at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryant, Jeffrey W.

    2010-08-12

    This report provides a record of the Structural Integrity Program for the 300,000-gal liquid waste storage tanks and associated equipment at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, as required by U.S. Department of Energy M 435.1-1, “Radioactive Waste Management Manual.” This equipment is known collectively as the Tank Farm Facility. This report is an update, and replaces the previous report by the same title issued April 2003. The conclusion of this report is that the Tank Farm Facility tanks, vaults, and transfer systems that remain in service for storage are structurally adequate, and are expected to remain structurally adequate over the remainder of their planned service life through 2012. Recommendations are provided for continued monitoring of the Tank Farm Facility.

  14. Preliminary assessment report for Grubbs/Kyle Training Center, Smyrna/Rutherford County Regional Airport, Installation 47340, Smyrna, Tennessee. Installation Restoration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dennis, C.; Stefano, J.

    1993-07-01

    This report presents the results of the preliminary assessment (PA) conducted by Argonne National Laboratory at the Tennessee Army National Guard (TNARNG) property near Smyrna, Tennessee. Preliminary assessments of federal facilities are being conducted to compile the information necessary for completing preremedial activities and to provide a basis for establishing corrective actions in response to releases of hazardous substances. The principal objective of the PA is to characterize the site accurately and determine the need for further action by examining site activities, quantities of hazardous substances present, and potential pathways by which contamination could affect public health and the environment. This PA satisfies, for the Grubbs/Kyle Training Center property, the requirement of the Department of Defense Installation Restoration Program.

  15. Congestive heart failure disease management program: 1-Year population experience from a tertiary center heart failure registry in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Khal; Fallata, Dania; ElSebaie, Maha; Montasser, Ahmad; ElGedamy, Khaled; ElKhateeb, Osama

    2017-04-01

    We aimed to evaluate congestive heart failure (CHF) multidisciplinary disease management program (DMProg) impact on mortality, readmission rates, length of stay (LOS), and gender health characteristics. This was a quasi-observational, pre- and post-trial with a parallel nonequivalent group. We enrolled 174 inpatients having CHF with reduced ejection fraction and New York Heart Association (NYHA) Class II-IV, and a total of 197 hospital admissions. A comparative follow-up was performed from 15 December 2014 to 15 December 2015. Among 197 consecutive hospital admissions, 76 (39%) were included in the preintervention or usual care group and 121 (61%) were assigned to the postintervention group. After 1 year, in comparison with the preintervention group, the postintervention group had shorter average LOS in days (7.6 days vs. 11.1 days, p < 0.002), lower 1-year readmission rate (36% vs. 57%, p < 0.003), and lower in-house mortality (1.6% vs. 7.8%, p = 0.03), but similar baseline mortality scores (38.2 vs. 38.6, p = 0.7), 30-day and 90-day readmission rates (15% vs. 18.3%, p = 0.62 and 27.6% vs. 30%, p = 0.65), and 30-day readmission risk score (24.9% vs. 26.2%, p = 0.09). By regression analysis, the DMProg intervention was an independent factor for 1-year readmission reduction (p = 0.001). Kaplan-Meier survival analysis favored the postintervention group (log-rank, p < 0.001). DMProg significantly decreased 1-year readmission rates, LOS, and in-house mortality.

  16. Factors associated with failure of enhanced recovery programs after laparoscopic colon cancer surgery: a single-center retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Heung-Kwon; Ihn, Myong Hun; Son, Il Tae; Park, Jin Taek; Lee, Jaebong; Kim, Duck-Woo; Kang, Sung-Bum

    2016-03-01

    Although enhanced recovery programs (ERPs) have been proven to be beneficial after laparoscopic colon surgery, they may result in adverse clinical outcomes following failure. This study analyzed risk factors associated with ERP failure after laparoscopic colon cancer surgery. We analyzed the outcomes of 208 patients who underwent ERPs following laparoscopic colon cancer surgery between June 2007 and April 2013. The ERP included early oral feeding, early ambulation, and regular laxative administration. ERP failure was defined as postoperative hospital stay of more than 5 days related to postoperative complications, unplanned readmission within 30 days of surgery, or death. Surgical procedures included anterior resection (n = 101), right hemicolectomy (n = 90), and left hemicolectomy (n = 17). The mean postoperative hospital stay was 6.5 ± 2.3 days (range 3-24 days). ERP failure occurred in 36 patients (17.3%), with no mortality; reasons included ileus (n = 14), wound infection (n = 4), chylous drainage (n = 3), anastomotic bleeding (n = 3), pneumonia (n = 1), or readmission (n = 11) owing to delayed complications. Univariable analysis showed that ERP failure was associated with proximal colon cancer, side-to-side anastomosis, longer operation time, increased blood loss, and longer resected specimen length. Multivariable analysis showed that side-to-side anastomosis [odds ratio (OR) 4.534; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.902-10.811; P = 0.001] and increased blood loss (OR 1.004; 95% CI 1.001-1.008; P = 0.041) were independent risk factors for ERP failure. We showed that increased blood loss and side-to-side anastomosis in comparison with end-to-end anastomosis were independent risk factors associated with ERP failure after laparoscopic colon cancer surgery. This suggests that intraoperative elements may be important determinants to obtain successful postoperative recovery in the era of ERP.

  17. Solving multi-objective facility location problem using the fuzzy analytical hierarchy process and goal programming: a case study on infectious waste disposal centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narong Wichapa

    Full Text Available The selection of a suitable location for infectious waste disposal is one of the major problems in waste management. Determining the location of infectious waste disposal centers is a difficult and complex process because it requires combining social and environmental factors that are hard to interpret, and cost factors that require the allocation of resources. Additionally, it depends on several regulations. Based on the actual conditions of a case study, forty hospitals and three candidate municipalities in the sub-Northeast region of Thailand, we considered multiple factors such as infrastructure, geological and social & environmental factors, calculating global priority weights using the fuzzy analytical hierarchy process (FAHP. After that, a new multi-objective facility location problem model which combines FAHP and goal programming (GP, namely the FAHP-GP model, was tested. The proposed model can lead to selecting new suitable locations for infectious waste disposal by considering both total cost and final priority weight objectives. The novelty of the proposed model is the simultaneous combination of relevant factors that are difficult to interpret and cost factors, which require the allocation of resources. Keywords: Multi-objective facility location problem, Fuzzy analytic hierarchy process, Infectious waste disposal centers

  18. Ostomy Home Skills Program

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Program Commission on Cancer National Accreditation Program for Breast Centers National Cancer Database National Accreditation Program for Rectal Cancer Oncology Medical Home Accreditation Program Stereotactic Breast Biopsy Accreditation Program Cancer Programs Staff Information Children's ...

  19. Federal Agency and Federal Library Reports. Library of Congress; Center for the Book; Federal Library and Information Center Committee; National Commission on Libraries and Information Science; National Agricultural Library; National Library of Medicine;United States Government Printing Office; National Technical Information Service; National Archives and Records Administration; National Center for Education Statistics Library Statistics Program; National Library of Education; Educational Resources Information Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Audrey; Cole, John Y.; Tarr, Susan M.; Vlach, Rosalie B.; Carey, Len; Mehnert, Robert; Sherman, Andrew M.; Davis, Linda; Vecchiarelli, Marion H.; Chute, Adrienne; Dunn, Christina

    2002-01-01

    Includes reports from Library of Congress, Center for the Book, Federal Library and Information Center Committee, National Commission on Libraries and Information Science, National Agricultural Library, National Library of Medicine, Government Printing Office, National Technical Information Service, National Archives and Records Administration,…

  20. Medicare and Medicaid programs: hospital outpatient prospective payment; ambulatory surgical center payment; hospital value-based purchasing program; physician self-referral; and patient notification requirements in provider agreements. Final rule with comment period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-30

    This final rule with comment period revises the Medicare hospital outpatient prospective payment system (OPPS) for CY 2012 to implement applicable statutory requirements and changes arising from our continuing experience with this system. In this final rule with comment period, we describe the changes to the amounts and factors used to determine the payment rates for Medicare hospital outpatient services paid under the OPPS. In addition, this final rule with comment period updates the revised Medicare ambulatory surgical center (ASC) payment system to implement applicable statutory requirements and changes arising from our continuing experience with this system. In this final rule with comment period, we set forth the relative payment weights and payment amounts for services furnished in ASCs, specific HCPCS codes to which these changes apply, and other ratesetting information for the CY 2012 ASC payment system. We are revising the requirements for the Hospital Outpatient Quality Reporting (OQR) Program, adding new requirements for ASC Quality Reporting System, and making additional changes to provisions of the Hospital Inpatient Value-Based Purchasing (VBP) Program. We also are allowing eligible hospitals and CAHs participating in the Medicare Electronic Health Record (EHR) Incentive Program to meet the clinical quality measure reporting requirement of the EHR Incentive Program for payment year 2012 by participating in the 2012 Medicare EHR Incentive Program Electronic Reporting Pilot. Finally, we are making changes to the rules governing the whole hospital and rural provider exceptions to the physician self-referral prohibition for expansion of facility capacity and changes to provider agreement regulations on patient notification requirements.