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Sample records for program chcbp coverage

  1. 32 CFR 199.20 - Continued Health Care Benefit Program (CHCBP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Privilege Card”; (iii) A front and back copy of a DD Form 1173, “Uniformed Services Identification and... under 10 U.S.C. 1145(a)) ends. (e) CHCBP benefits—(1) In general. Except as provided in paragraph (e)(2... continuation health care benefit for the Department of Defense and the other Uniformed Services (e.g., NOAA...

  2. Coverage of Nutrition Interventions Intended for Infants and Young Children Varies Greatly across Programs: Results from Coverage Surveys in 5 Countries123

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaron, Grant J; Poonawala, Alia; van Liere, Marti J; Schofield, Dominic; Myatt, Mark

    2017-01-01

    Background: The efficacy of a number of interventions that include fortified complementary foods (FCFs) or other products to improve infant and young child feeding (IYCF) is well established. Programs that provide such products free or at a subsidized price are implemented in many countries around the world. Demonstrating the impact at scale of these programs has been challenging, and rigorous information on coverage and utilization is lacking. Objective: The objective of this article is to review key findings from 11 coverage surveys of IYCF programs distributing or selling FCFs or micronutrient powders in 5 countries. Methods: Programs were implemented in Ghana, Cote d’Ivoire, India, Bangladesh, and Vietnam. Surveys were implemented at different stages of program implementation between 2013 and 2015. The Fortification Assessment Coverage Toolkit (FACT) was developed to assess 3 levels of coverage (message: awareness of the product; contact: use of the product ≥1 time; and effective: regular use aligned with program-specific goals), as well as barriers and factors that facilitate coverage. Analyses included the coverage estimates, as well as an assessment of equity of coverage between the poor and nonpoor, and between those with poor and adequate child feeding practices. Results: Coverage varied greatly between countries and program models. Message coverage ranged from 29.0% to 99.7%, contact coverage from 22.6% to 94.4%, and effective coverage from 0.8% to 88.3%. Beyond creating awareness, programs that achieved high coverage were those with effective mechanisms in place to overcome barriers for both supply and demand. Conclusions: Variability in coverage was likely due to the program design, delivery model, quality of implementation, and product type. Measuring program coverage and understanding its determinants is essential for program improvement and to estimate the potential for impact of programs at scale. Use of the FACT can help overcome this evidence

  3. Poverty reduction and coverage extension of social programs in Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Soto Iguarán

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In Colombia today, poverty affects one individual out of three. Employment does not seem to guarantee that households’ income is above the poverty line. In this context and considering the current framework of the social protection system, where assistance and promotion are increasingly important, strategies for extending social protection programs play an important role. The analysis considers the characteristics of social protection regime and the factors that block the universalization of social insurance, in particular, the mechanisms targeted at workers who are difficult to cover, such as domestic workers, and those aimed at improving savings of informal workers are analyzed. The effects of these strategies are too marginal to reach universal social protection and significant reduction of poverty.

  4. Focus and coverage of Bolsa Família Program in the Pelotas 2004 birth cohort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelen H Schmidt

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To describe the focalization and coverage of Bolsa Família Program among the families of children who are part of the 2004 Pelotas birth cohort (2004 cohort. METHODS The data used derives from the integration of information from the 2004 cohort and the Cadastro Único para Programas Sociais do Governo Federal (CadÚnico – Register for Social Programs of the Federal Government, in the 2004-2010 period. We estimated the program coverage (percentage of eligible people who receive the benefit and its focus (proportion of eligible people among the beneficiaries. We used two criteria to define eligibility: the per capita household income reported in the cohort follow-ups and belonging to the 20% poorest families according to the National Economic Indicator (IEN, an asset index. RESULTS Between 2004 and 2010, the proportion of families in the cohort that received the benefit increased from 11% to 34%. We observed an increase in all wealth quintiles. In 2010, by income and wealth quintiles (IEN, 62%-72% of the families were beneficiaries among the 20% poorest people, 2%-5% among the 20% richest people, and about 30% of families of the intermediate quintile. According to household income (minus the benefit 29% of families were eligible in 2004 and 16% in 2010. By the same criteria, the coverage of the program increased from 43% in 2004 to 71% in 2010. In the same period, by the wealth criterion (IEN, coverage increased from 29% to 63%. The focalization of the program decreased from 78% in 2004 to 32% in 2010 according to income, and remained constant (37% according to the IEN. CONCLUSIONS Among the families of the 2004 cohort, there was a significant increase in the program coverage, from its inception until 2010, when it was near 70%. The focus of the program was below 40% in 2010, indicating that more than half of the beneficiaries did not belong to the target population.

  5. 7 CFR 400.55 - Qualification for actual production history coverage program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Qualification for actual production history coverage program. 400.55 Section 400.55 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FEDERAL CROP INSURANCE CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE REGULATIONS Actual...

  6. Trends in Health Insurance Coverage of Title X Family Planning Program Clients, 2005-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Emily J; Ahrens, Katherine A; Fowler, Christina I; Carter, Marion; Gavin, Loretta; Moskosky, Susan

    2017-12-13

    The federal Title X Family Planning Program supports the delivery of family planning services and related preventive care to 4 million individuals annually in the United States. The implementation of the 2010 Affordable Care Act's (ACA's) Medicaid expansion and provisions expanding access to health insurance, which took effect in January 2014, resulted in higher rates of health insurance coverage in the U.S. population; the ACA's impact on individuals served by the Title X program has not yet been evaluated. Using administrative data we examined changes in health insurance coverage among Title X clinic patients during 2005-2015. We found that the percentage of clients without health insurance decreased from 60% in 2005 to 48% in 2015, with the greatest annual decrease occurring between 2013 and 2014 (63% to 54%). Meanwhile, between 2005 and 2015, the percentage of clients with Medicaid or other public health insurance increased from 20% to 35% and the percentage of clients with private health insurance increased from 8% to 15%. Although clients attending Title X clinics remained uninsured at substantially higher rates compared with the national average, the increase in clients with health insurance coverage aligns with the implementation of ACA-related provisions to expand access to affordable health insurance.

  7. Strategies to improve treatment coverage in community-based public health programs: A systematic review of the literature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrina V Deardorff

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Community-based public health campaigns, such as those used in mass deworming, vitamin A supplementation and child immunization programs, provide key healthcare interventions to targeted populations at scale. However, these programs often fall short of established coverage targets. The purpose of this systematic review was to evaluate the impact of strategies used to increase treatment coverage in community-based public health campaigns.We systematically searched CAB Direct, Embase, and PubMed archives for studies utilizing specific interventions to increase coverage of community-based distribution of drugs, vaccines, or other public health services. We identified 5,637 articles, from which 79 full texts were evaluated according to pre-defined inclusion and exclusion criteria. Twenty-eight articles met inclusion criteria and data were abstracted regarding strategy-specific changes in coverage from these sources. Strategies used to increase coverage included community-directed treatment (n = 6, pooled percent change in coverage: +26.2%, distributor incentives (n = 2, +25.3%, distribution along kinship networks (n = 1, +24.5%, intensified information, education, and communication activities (n = 8, +21.6%, fixed-point delivery (n = 1, +21.4%, door-to-door delivery (n = 1, +14.0%, integrated service distribution (n = 9, +12.7%, conversion from school- to community-based delivery (n = 3, +11.9%, and management by a non-governmental organization (n = 1, +5.8%.Strategies that target improving community member ownership of distribution appear to have a large impact on increasing treatment coverage. However, all strategies used to increase coverage successfully did so. These results may be useful to National Ministries, programs, and implementing partners in optimizing treatment coverage in community-based public health programs.

  8. Functional coverages

    OpenAIRE

    Donchyts, G.; Baart, F.; Jagers, H.R.A.; Van Dam, A

    2011-01-01

    A new Application Programming Interface (API) is presented which simplifies working with geospatial coverages as well as many other data structures of a multi-dimensional nature. The main idea extends the Common Data Model (CDM) developed at the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR). The proposed function object model uses the mathematical definition of a vector-valued function. A geospatial coverage will be expressed as a vector-valued function whose dependent variables (the...

  9. Mental health education in occupational therapy professional preparation programs: Alignment between clinician priorities and coverage in university curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scanlan, Justin Newton; Meredith, Pamela J; Haracz, Kirsti; Ennals, Priscilla; Pépin, Geneviève; Webster, Jayne S; Arblaster, Karen; Wright, Shelley

    2017-06-29

    Occupational therapy programs must prepare graduates for work in mental health. However, this area of practice is complex and rapidly changing. This study explored the alignment between educational priorities identified by occupational therapists practising in mental health and level of coverage of these topics in occupational therapy programs in Australia and New Zealand. Surveys were distributed to heads of all occupational therapy programs across Australia and New Zealand. The survey included educational priorities identified by occupational therapists in mental health from a previous study. Respondents were requested to identify the level of coverage given to each of these priorities within their curriculum. These data were analysed to determine a ranking of educational topics in terms of level of coverage in university programs. Responses were received for 19 programs from 16 universities. Thirty-four topics were given 'High-level coverage' in university programs, and these were compared against the 29 topics classified as 'Essential priorities' by clinicians. Twenty topics were included in both the 'Essential priorities' and 'High-level coverage' categories. Topics considered to be 'Essential priorities' by clinicians which were not given 'High-level coverage' in university programs included the following: mental health fieldwork experiences; risk assessment and management; professional self-care resilience and sensory approaches. While there appears to be overall good alignment between mental health curricula and priorities identified by practising occupational therapists, there are some discrepancies. These discrepancies are described and establish a strong foundation for further discussion between clinicians, academics and university administration to support curriculum review and revision. © 2017 Occupational Therapy Australia.

  10. Comparative assessment of immunization coverage of migrant children between national immunization program vaccines and non-national immunization program vaccines in East China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yu; Luo, Shuying; Tang, Xuewen; Lou, Linqiao; Chen, Yaping; Guo, Jing

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to describe the disparities in immunization coverage between National Immunization Program (NIP) vaccines and non-NIP vaccines in Yiwu and to identify potential determinants. A face-to-face interview-based questionnaire survey among 423 migrant children born from 1 June 2010 to 31 May 2013 was conducted. Immunization coverage was estimated according to the vaccines scheduled at different age, the birth cohorts, and socio- demographic characteristics. Single-level logistic regression analysis was applied to identify the determinants of coverage of non-NIP vaccines. We found that NIP vaccines recorded higher immunization coverage compared with non-NIP vaccines (87.9100%- vs 0%-74.8%). Among the non-NIP vaccines, varicella vaccine (VarV) recorded the highest coverage of 85.4%, which was introduced in 1998; while 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine(PCV7) recorded the lowest coverage of 0% for primary series, which was introduced recently. Lower coverage rate of non-NIP vaccines was significantly associated with more siblings in household, shorter duration of living in the surveyed areas, lower family income, mother with a job, mother with poor awareness of vaccination, and mother with lower education level. We found the immunization coverage rate of non-NIP vaccines was significant lower than that of NIP vaccines. Expansion of NIP to include non-NIP vaccines can provide better protection against the vaccine preventable diseases through increased immunization coverage.

  11. 75 FR 29555 - Medicare Program; Medicare Coverage Gap Discount Program Model Manufacturer Agreement and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-26

    ... secondary payers (for example, State Pharmaceutical Assistance Programs) are responsible for paying 100... Beneficiary Advocate Panel 2:30-3:30 Part D Plan Sponsor/PBM Panel 3:30-3:45 Break 3:45-5:15 Pharmaceutical... related to Manufacturer's labeler codes, expiration date of NDCs, utilization and pricing information...

  12. Evaluation of an educational program on deciphering heterogeneity for medical coverage decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warholak, Terri L; Hilgaertner, Jianhua W; Dean, Joni L; Taylor, Ann M; Hines, Lisa E; Hurwitz, Jason; Brown, Mary; Malone, Daniel C

    2014-06-01

    It is increasingly important for decision makers, such as medical and pharmacy managers (or pharmacy therapeutics committee members and staff), to understand the variation and diversity in treatment response as decisions shift from an individual patient perspective to optimizing care for populations of patients. To assess the effectiveness of an instructional program on heterogeneity designed for medical and pharmacy managers. A live educational program was offered to members of the Academy of Managed Care Pharmacy at the fall 2012 educational meeting and also to medical directors and managers attending a national payer roundtable meeting in October 2012. Participants completed a retrospective pretest-posttest assessment of their knowledge, attitudes, and self-efficacy immediately following the program. Participants were offered the opportunity to participate in a follow-up assessment 6 months later. Willing participants for the follow-up assessment were contacted via e-mail and telephone. Rasch rating scale models were used to compare pre- and postscores measuring participants' knowledge about and attitude towards heterogeneity. A total of 49 individuals completed the retrospective pretest-posttest assessment and agreed to be a part of the program evaluation. Fifty percent (n = 25) of participants had heard of the phrase "heterogeneity of treatment effect," and 36 (72%) were familiar with the phrase "individualized treatment effect" prior to the live program. Participants reported a significant improvement in knowledge of heterogeneity (P  less than  0.01) and attitudes about heterogeneity (P  less than  0.01) immediately after attending the program. At the time of the educational program, participants had either never considered heterogeneity (26%) or reported not knowing (28%) whether their organizations considered it when determining basic coverage. Participants were more likely to report "sometimes" considering heterogeneity for determining

  13. Assessing Program Coverage of Two Approaches to Distributing a Complementary Feeding Supplement to Infants and Young Children in Ghana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grant J Aaron

    Full Text Available The work reported here assesses the coverage achieved by two sales-based approaches to distributing a complementary food supplement (KOKO Plus™ to infants and young children in Ghana. Delivery Model 1 was conducted in the Northern Region of Ghana and used a mixture of health extension workers (delivering behavior change communications and demand creation activities at primary healthcare centers and in the community and petty traders recruited from among beneficiaries of a local microfinance initiative (responsible for the sale of the complementary food supplement at market stalls and house to house. Delivery Model 2 was conducted in the Eastern Region of Ghana and used a market-based approach, with the product being sold through micro-retail routes (i.e., small shops and roadside stalls in three districts supported by behavior change communications and demand creation activities led by a local social marketing company. Both delivery models were implemented sub-nationally as 1-year pilot programs, with the aim of informing the design of a scaled-up program. A series of cross-sectional coverage surveys was implemented in each program area. Results from these surveys show that Delivery Model 1 was successful in achieving and sustaining high (i.e., 86% effective coverage (i.e., the child had been given the product at least once in the previous 7 days during implementation. Effective coverage fell to 62% within 3 months of the behavior change communications and demand creation activities stopping. Delivery Model 2 was successful in raising awareness of the product (i.e., 90% message coverage, but effective coverage was low (i.e., 9.4%. Future programming efforts should use the health extension / microfinance / petty trader approach in rural settings and consider adapting this approach for use in urban and peri-urban settings. Ongoing behavior change communications and demand creation activities is likely to be essential to the continued success of

  14. Extent of Drug Coverage across Generic Drug Discount Programs offered by Community Pharmacies: A look at five Chronic Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harshali K. Patel, MS

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic conditions are expensive to treat because of the ongoing prescription cost burden. Generic drug discount programs (GDDPs that offer generics at discounted price may prove beneficial to reduce pharmacy costs for the same.Objective: The objective of this study was to assess the extent to which GDDPs provide drug coverage for five common chronic conditions.Methods: A content analyses of preexisting information was conducted. Extent of coverage based on top 200 generic drugs prescribed during 2008 for the treatment of chronic conditions such as hypertension, mental disorders, arthritis, pulmonary/respiratory conditions, and diabetes were identified. Commonly prescribed medications for these diseases were identified using published peer reviewed clinical guidelines. List of drugs covered under a GDDP for stores, Wal-Mart, Walgreens, CVS, Kroger, HEB, Target, and Randalls were obtained and compared to assess drug coverage by retail dollar sales and sales volume. Descriptive statistics and frequency/percentage of coverage were reported using SAS 9.2.Results: GDDPs covered the highest number of drugs for hypertension (21-27 across different GDDPs and the least (3-5 across different GDDPs for pulmonary/respiratory conditions. Arthritis (5-11, mental disorders (6-11 and diabetes (5-7 had similar coverage. When compared to the top 200 drugs by retail dollars spent during 2008, hypertension (68%-87% and diabetes (63%-88% had the highest coverage followed by respiratory conditions (30%-50%, arthritis (22%-48%, and mental disorders (21%-38%. Similar result was obtained when GDDP coverage was compared with the top 200 generic drugs by sales volume, where diabetes (63-88% and hypertension (57%-74% had the highest coverage and mental disorders remained the lowest (23%-37%.Conclusion/Implications: Drug coverage in GDDPs varied by pharmacies across the five common chronic conditions evaluated which may limit accessibility of these programs for

  15. Vaccination coverage against pertussis in pregnant women of Catalonia in the first year of implementation of the immunisation program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Cano, María Isabel; Espada-Trespalacios, Xavier; Reyes-Lacalle, Azahara; Manresa Domínguez, Josep Maria; Armadans-Gil, Lluís; Campins-Martí, Magda; Falguera-Puig, Gemma; Toran Monserrat, Pere

    2017-11-01

    The re-emergence of pertussis and the severity of its complications in infants younger than 3 months, were determining factors for starting a vaccination program for pregnant women in the third trimester of gestation in Catalonia in February 2014. This was the first autonomous community to introduce it in Spain. The aim of the study was to estimate the coverage of the program in its first year of implementation. A retrospective analysis was performed on the data from the Primary Care Centre computerised medical records of pregnant women attending Sexual and Reproductive Health Care centres of the Metropolitan Nord area of the province of Barcelona, part of the Catalan Institute of Health. The overall coverage was estimated, as well as the sociodemographic variables of Tdap vaccination of women who had registered a delivery of a live birth between August 2014 and August 2015. A total of 6,697 deliveries of live births were recorded, and 1,713 pregnant women were vaccinated, which represented an overall coverage of 25.6% (95% CI; 24.1-26.1). Vaccination coverage was higher in pregnant women under 18 years and Spanish women (P=.018 and P=.036, respectively). The estimation of vaccine coverage against pertussis in pregnant women in the third trimester of pregnancy, after the first year of implementation of the program in a health area of Catalonia was lower than the objective set. Strategies need to be designed in order to improve program coverage. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  16. Functional coverages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donchyts, G.; Baart, F.; Jagers, H.R.A.; Van Dam, A.

    2011-01-01

    A new Application Programming Interface (API) is presented which simplifies working with geospatial coverages as well as many other data structures of a multi-dimensional nature. The main idea extends the Common Data Model (CDM) developed at the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research

  17. Small group employer participation in New Mexico's State Coverage Insurance program: lessons for federal reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommers, Anna S; Abraham, Jean Marie; Spicer, Laura; Mikow, Asher; Spaulding-Bynon, Mari

    2011-02-01

    To identify factors associated with small group employer participation in New Mexico's State Coverage Insurance (SCI) program. Telephone surveys of employers participating in SCI (N=269) and small employers who inquired about SCI (N=148) were fielded September 2008-January 2009. Descriptive and multivariate analyses investigated differences between employer samples, including employer characteristics, concerns that applied to the business when deciding whether to participate in SCI, prior offerings of insurance to workers, and perceived affordability of the program. Unweighted employer samples yielded 88 and 75 percent response rates for the participating and inquiring employers, respectively. The administrative issue most commonly selected by inquiring employers as applying to their business was difficulty understanding how eligibility requirements applied to their business and its employees (53.5 percent). Inquiring businesses were significantly more likely to report concern about affording to pay the premiums in the first month (35.6 versus 18.7 percent) and the cost to the business over the long run (46.5 versus 26.6 percent) relative to participating employers. From the model results, businesses with the fewest full-time employees (zero to two) were 19 percentage points less likely to participate relative to businesses with six or more full-time employees. Administrative and cost barriers to participation in SCI reported by employers suggest that the tax credit offered to small businesses under new federal provisions, which merely offsets the employer portion of premium, could be more effective if accompanied by additional supports to businesses. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  18. The Children's Health Insurance Program Reauthorization Act Evaluation Findings on Children's Health Insurance Coverage in an Evolving Health Care Landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Mary E

    2015-01-01

    The Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP) Reauthorization Act (CHIPRA) reauthorized CHIP through federal fiscal year 2019 and, together with provisions in the Affordable Care Act, federal funding for the program was extended through federal fiscal year 2015. Congressional action is required or federal funding for the program will end in September 2015. This supplement to Academic Pediatrics is intended to inform discussions about CHIP's future. Most of the new research presented comes from a large evaluation of CHIP mandated by Congress in the CHIPRA. Since CHIP started in 1997, millions of lower-income children have secured health insurance coverage and needed care, reducing the financial burdens and stress on their families. States made substantial progress in simplifying enrollment and retention. When implemented optimally, Express Lane Eligibility has the potential to help cover more of the millions of eligible children who remain uninsured. Children move frequently between Medicaid and CHIP, and many experienced a gap in coverage with this transition. CHIP enrollees had good access to care. For nearly every health care access, use, care, and cost measure examined, CHIP enrollees fared better than uninsured children. Access in CHIP was similar to private coverage for most measures, but financial burdens were substantially lower and access to weekend and nighttime care was not as good. The Affordable Care Act coverage options have the potential to reduce uninsured rates among children, but complex transition issues must first be resolved to ensure families have access to affordable coverage, leading many stakeholders to recommend funding for CHIP be continued. Copyright © 2015 Academic Pediatric Association. All rights reserved.

  19. LGBT Coverage in U.S. Dental Schools and Dental Hygiene Programs: Results of a National Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillenburg, Kenneth L; Murdoch-Kinch, Carol A; Kinney, Janet S; Temple, Henry; Inglehart, Marita R

    2016-12-01

    The aims of this study were to assess curricular coverage of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) content in U.S. and Canadian dental schools and U.S. dental hygiene programs, including hours of LGBT content, pedagogy used, and assessment methods, and to determine whether respondents perceived their institution's coverage as adequate. Data were collected from academic deans at 32 U.S. and two Canadian dental schools and from program directors at 71 U.S. dental hygiene programs (response rates 49%, 20%, 23%, respectively). The results showed that 29% of responding dental schools and 48% of responding dental hygiene programs did not cover LGBT content. Among the respondents, dental schools dedicated on average 3.68 hours and dental hygiene programs 1.25 hours in required settings to LGBT content. Lectures (dental schools 68%, dental hygiene programs 45%) and small group instruction (43%, 25%) were reported as the most common methodology used in teaching this content. Most of the responding dental schools and dental hygiene programs covered HIV (85%, 53%), oral disease risk (63%, 54%), and barriers to accessing health care for LGBT people (58%, 38%). Up to a third reported no need for coverage of topics such as sexual orientation (21%, 32%), coming out (29%, 37%), transitioning (29%, 38%), and sex reassignment surgery (32%, 35%). Assessment was through written examinations (41%, 30%) and faculty-observed patient interactions (21%, 23%); some respondents (20%, 33%) reported no assessment of learning outcomes. The most frequently endorsed strategies for increasing LGBT content were receiving curricular material focusing on LGBT-related health issues and health disparities and having trained faculty to teach LGBT content.

  20. Estimation of Pap-test coverage in an area with an organised screening program: challenges for survey methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raggi Patrizio

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The cytological screening programme of Viterbo has completed the second round of invitations to the entire target population (age 25–64. From a public health perspective, it is important to know the Pap-test coverage rate and the use of opportunistic screening. The most commonly used study design is the survey, but the validity of self-reports and the assumptions made about non respondents are often questioned. Methods From the target population, 940 women were sampled, and responded to a telephone interview about Pap-test utilisation. The answers were compared with the screening program registry; comparing the dates of Pap-tests reported by both sources. Sensitivity analyses were performed for coverage over a 36-month period, according to various assumptions regarding non respondents. Results The response rate was 68%. The coverage over 36 months was 86.4% if we assume that non respondents had the same coverage as respondents, 66% if we assume they were not covered at all, and 74.6% if we adjust for screening compliance in the non respondents. The sensitivity and specificity of the question, "have you ever had a Pap test with the screening programme" were 84.5% and 82.2% respectively. The test dates reported in the interview tended to be more recent than those reported in the registry, but 68% were within 12 months of each other. Conclusion Surveys are useful tools to understand the effectiveness of a screening programme and women's self-report was sufficiently reliable in our setting, but the coverage estimates were strongly influenced by the assumptions we made regarding non respondents.

  1. Medicaid: A Primer - Key Information on the Nation's Health Coverage Program for Low-Income People

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the program has been an important locus of innovation and improvement in health care delivery and payment. ... enabled the program to evolve and facilitated state innovation. What is Medicaid? Medicaid is the nation’s publicly ...

  2. FY11_EOM_Oct_Face Amount of Life Insurance Coverage by Program by State

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — Face value of insurance for each administered life insurance program listed by state. Data is current as of 10-31-11. All programs are closed to new issues except...

  3. FY11_EOM_August_Face Amount of Life Insurance Coverage by Program by State

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — Face value of insurance for each administered life insurance program listed by state. Data is current as of 8-31-11. All programs are closed to new issues except for...

  4. EOM July FY2011 - Face Amount of Life Insurance Coverage by Program by State

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — Face value of insurance for each administered life insurance program listed by state. Data is current as of 7-31-11. All programs are closed to new issues except for...

  5. Java vs. Python Coverage of Introductory Programming Concepts: A Textbook Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMaster, Kirby; Sambasivam, Samuel; Rague, Brian; Wolthuis, Stuart

    2017-01-01

    In this research, we compare two languages, Java and Python, by performing a content analysis of words in textbooks that describe important programming concepts. Our goal is to determine which language has better textbook support for teaching introductory programming courses. We used the TextSTAT program to count how often our list of concept…

  6. Evidence-Based Medicine and State Health Care Coverage: The Washington Health Technology Assessment Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothman, David J; Blackwood, Kristy L; Adair, Whitney; Rothman, Sheila M

    2017-12-03

    To evaluate the Washington State Health Technology Assessment Program (WHTAP). Washington State Health Technology Assessment Program proceedings in Seattle, Washington. We assessed the program through observation of its proceedings over a 5-year period, 2009-2014. We conducted detailed analyses of the documents it produced and reviewed relevant literature. Washington State Health Technology Assessment Program is unique compared to other state and federal programs. It has successfully applied evidence-based medicine to health care decision making, limited by the strength of available data. It claims cost savings, but they are not substantiated. Washington State Health Technology Assessment Program is a useful model for other states considering implementation of technology assessment programs. We provide key lessons for improving WHTAP's process. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  7. Cervical cancer screening program in Thimphu, Bhutan: population coverage and characteristics associated with screening attendance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baussano, Iacopo; Tshomo, Ugyen; Clifford, Gary M; Tenet, Vanessa; Tshokey, Tshokey; Franceschi, Silvia

    2014-11-30

    Bhutan has been engaged in good-quality cytology-based cervical screening since 2000 and has vaccinated >90% girls against human papillomavirus (HPV) since 2010. We explored the characteristics associated with lack of previous screening and screening coverage in women age ≥25 years. Women were invited at home or during their attendance at 2 outpatient clinics, in the capital, Thimphu, and nearby Lungthenphu. Age-adjusted odds ratios for lack of previous screening by selected characteristics were computed among 1,620 participating women. In Thimphu an invitation registry allowed to estimate screening history not only among participating women but also among additional 500 women who did not accept to join our study. Among women who had a Pap smear, lack of previous screening was associated with age Bhutan, even in the capital. Better ways to target never-screened women are needed.

  8. Coverage Metrics for Model Checking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penix, John; Visser, Willem; Norvig, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    When using model checking to verify programs in practice, it is not usually possible to achieve complete coverage of the system. In this position paper we describe ongoing research within the Automated Software Engineering group at NASA Ames on the use of test coverage metrics to measure partial coverage and provide heuristic guidance for program model checking. We are specifically interested in applying and developing coverage metrics for concurrent programs that might be used to support certification of next generation avionics software.

  9. Client-Level Coverage of Needle and Syringe Program and High-Risk Injection Behaviors: A Case Study of People Who Inject Drugs in Kermanshah, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noroozi, Mehdi; Mirzazadeh, Ali; Noroozi, Alireza; Mehrabi, Yadoallah; Hajebi, Ahmad; Zamani, Saman; Sharifi, Hamid; Higgs, Peter; Soori, Hamid

    2015-01-01

    Needle-syringe programs (NSP) have been running in Iran since 2002. However, the coverage of such program among the NSP clients at the individual level was not studies yet. This study aimed to determine the client coverage of NSP and its correlation with high injection-related risk behaviors. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in Kermanshah province, Iran, in 2014. 230 people who inject drugs (PWID) recruited from two drop-in centers (DICs) from April to September 2014, participated in a face-to-face interview to provide information related individual coverage of NSP, demographic characteristics, and injecting behaviors 30 days prior to the interview. Overall, the average of syringe coverage was 158% [95% confidence interval (CI) = 65.7-205.5], while 56% (95% CI = 40-97) have individual converge less than 100%. Needle/syringe sharing was significantly higher among individual with low NSP coverage [adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 2.6, 95% CI = 1.3-6.2]. About 85% participants with coverage of less than 100% reported reuse of syringe within the last 30 days (AOR = 3.2, 95% CI = 1.4-7.7). PWID are different regarding their NSP individual-level converges. There are certain clusters of PWID, who do not receive sufficient number of syringes. Given that insufficient individual syringe coverage level is highly associated with injection risk behaviors, reasons for such low converge need to be assessed and addressed carefully.

  10. The decriminalisation of prostitution is associated with better coverage of health promotion programs for sex workers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Harcourt, Christine; O'Connor, Jody; Egger, Sandra; Fairley, Christopher K; Wand, Handan; Chen, Marcus Y; Marshall, Lewis; Kaldor, John M; Donovan, Basil

    2010-01-01

    Objective: In order to assess whether the law has an impact on the delivery of health promotion services to sex workers, we compared health promotion programs in three Australian cities with different prostitution laws...

  11. The decriminalization of prostitution is associated with better coverage of health promotion programs for sex workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harcourt, Christine; O'Connor, Jody; Egger, Sandra; Fairley, Christopher K; Wand, Handan; Chen, Marcus Y; Marshall, Lewis; Kaldor, John M; Donovan, Basil

    2010-10-01

    In order to assess whether the law has an impact on the delivery of health promotion services to sex workers, we compared health promotion programs in three Australian cities with different prostitution laws. The cities were Melbourne (brothels legalized if licensed, unlicensed brothels criminalized), Perth (criminalization of all forms of sex work) and Sydney (sex work largely decriminalized, without licensing). We interviewed key informants and gave questionnaires to representative samples of female sex workers in urban brothels. Despite the different laws, each city had a thriving and diverse sex industry and a government-funded sex worker health promotion program with shopfront, phone, online and outreach facilities. The Sydney program was the only one run by a community-based organisation and the only program employing multi-lingual staff with evening outreach to all brothels. The Melbourne program did not service the unlicensed sector, while the Perth program accessed the minority of brothels by invitation only. More Sydney workers reported a sexual health centre as a source of safer sex training and information (Sydney 52% v Melbourne 33% and Perth 35%; pSex workers in Melbourne's licensed brothels were the most likely to have access to free condoms (Melbourne 88%, Sydney 39%, Perth 12%; psex industry. Brothel licensing and police-controlled illegal brothels can result in the unlicensed sector being isolated from peer-education and support. © 2010 The Authors. Journal Compilation © 2010 Public Health Association of Australia.

  12. [The coverage of science in television news programs in Brazil and Colombia: a comparative study of media constructs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramalho, Marina; Arboleda, Tania; Hermelin, Daniel; Reznik, Gabriela; Massarani, Luisa

    2017-01-01

    This study analyzes and compares the science and technology coverage in Brazil's main television news program (Jornal Nacional) and its Colombian counterpart (Noticias Caracol). Using content analysis, we investigated a corpus of news stories broadcast from April 2009 to March 2010. We found that Jornal Nacional presented over twice as many reports on science and technology as Noticias Caracol, and that its levels of reporting remained fairly stable throughout the year. The Brazilian reports were also longer, were featured more prominently, and used more visual resources. Even so, some similarities were found: news about health and medicine was most frequent; the reports focused primarily on announcing new research; scientists were the main sources cited; and national research was prioritized.

  13. 77 FR 67743 - Federal Employees Health Benefits Program Coverage for Certain Intermittent Employees

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-14

    ... Program (FEHBP) regulations to make certain employees who work on intermittent schedules eligible to be... intermittent employees engaged in emergency response functions. DATES: This rule is effective November 9, 2012... Assistance Act (42 U.S.C. 5149(b)(1)) (``Stafford Act'') to respond to major disasters and emergencies...

  14. 42 CFR 410.47 - Pulmonary rehabilitation program: Conditions for coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... smoking cessation counseling. (iii) Any education or training prescribed must assist in achievement of... supervises the PR program. Outcomes assessment means a written evaluation of the patient's progress as it..., based on patient-centered outcomes, which are conducted by the physician at the start and end of the...

  15. Waterway wide area tactical coverage and homing (WaterWATCH) program overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driggers, Gerald; Cleveland, Tammy; Araujo, Lisa; Spohr, Robert; Umansky, Mark

    2008-04-01

    The Congressional and Army sponsored WaterWATCH TM Program has developed and demonstrated a fully integrated shallow water port and facility monitoring system. It provides fully automated monitoring of domains above and below the surface of the water using primarily off-the-shelf sensors and software. The system is modular, open architecture and IP based, and elements can be mixed and matched to adapt to specific applications. The sensors integrated into the WaterWATCH TM system include cameras, radar, passive and active sonar, and various motion detectors. The sensors were chosen based on extensive requirements analyses and tradeoffs. Descriptions of the system and individual sensors are provided, along with data from modular and system level testing. Camera test results address capabilities and limitations associated with using "smart" image analysis software with stressing environmental issues such as bugs, darkness, rain and snow. Radar issues addressed include achieving range and resolution requirements. The passive sonar capability to provide near 100% true positives with zero false positives is demonstrated. Testing results are also presented to show that inexpensive active sonar can be effective against divers with or without SCUBA gear and that false alarms due to fish can be minimized. A simple operator interface has also been demonstrated.

  16. Computer programs for plotting spot-beam coverages from an earth synchronous satellite and earth-station antenna elevation angle contours

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stagl, T. W.; Singh, J. P.

    1972-01-01

    A description and listings of computer programs for plotting geographical and political features of the world or a specified portion of it, for plotting spot-beam coverages from an earth-synchronous satellite over the computer generated mass, and for plotting polar perspective views of the earth and earth-station antenna elevation contours for a given satellite location are presented. The programs have been prepared in connection with a project on Application of Communication Satellites to Educational Development.

  17. The Effectiveness of Education Based on BASNEF Model Program in Promotion of Preventive Behavior of Leishmaniasis among Health Workers and Families under Health Centers Coverage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Khani Jeihooni

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objective: Intervention of educational training in order to prevent the leishmaniasis in endemic areas seems necessary. This study was implemented with the aim of assessing the effectiveness of education based on BASNEF Model program in promotion of preventive behavior of leishmaniasis among Health workers and families under the coverage of Health centers. Materials & Methods: An intervention study was carried out in rural health centers during 2009. Questionnaires were completed by 20 health- workers of two rural health centers. Also 20 families under the coverage of this health centers were randomly selected to complete the questionnaire. Then four training sessions for health workers and 2 training sessions for the influential individuals were conducted to increase the enabling factors and solving their problems, weekly meetings was held with health workers representatives. After three months of health workers training the data were collected again and analyzed via Chi- Square, T Independent, T pair, Regression and Mann- Whitney statistics. Results: The mean score for to knowledge, attitude, behavior intension, enabling factors and health workers behaviors significantly increased after educational intervention in experimental group and influential individuals. The mean scores for knowledge, attitude, behavior intension, enabling factors and the behavior of attendant families under coverage also increased significantly. Conclusion: Educational program of BASNEF Model, leads to behavior change of health workers and eventually their training behavior leads to preventive actions in families under coverage.

  18. Immunization Coverage

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... country, and global coverage was estimated at 25%. Rubella is a viral disease which is usually mild in children, but infection during early pregnancy may cause fetal death or congenital rubella syndrome, ...

  19. Improved HIV testing coverage after scale-up of antiretroviral therapy programs in urban Zambia: Evidence from serial hospital surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kancheya, Nzali G; Jordan, Atia K; Zulu, Isaac S; Chanda, Duncan; Vermund, Sten H

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We evaluated changing HIV testing coverage and prevalence rates before and after expanding city-wide antiretroviral therapy (ART) programs in Lusaka, Zambia. METHODS: We conducted serial cross-sectional surveys on the University Teaching Hospital medical ward to assess HIV prevalence among inpatients of unknown status in 2003 and 2006. Willing participants received counseling and dual HIV rapid tests. We compared the proportion of inpatients receiving their test results in 2003 (off-the-ward testing) to 2006 (on-the-ward). RESULTS: In 2003, none of 103 inpatients knew their HIV status or took ART; 99.0% (102/103) agreed to testing. In 2006, 49.3% (99 of 201) patients knew they were HIV-infected and were on ART; of those with unknown status, 98.0% (100/102) agreed to testing. In 2003, only 54.9% (56/102) received post-test counseling and 98.2% (55/56) learned their status. In 2006, 99.0% (99/100) received post-test counseling and 99.1% (98 of 99) learned their status. In 2003, 62.8% (64 of 102) of status-unknown inpatients who agreed to testing were seropositive by dual rapid test, compared to 48.0% (48 of 100) of status-unknown inpatients in 2006. When including inpatients who already knew their seropositive status plus those unknowns who tested seropositive, the proportion of inpatients that was seropositive in 2006 was 73.1% (147 of 201), higher than in 2003. CONCLUSIONS: After ART program expansion, inpatients in 2006 were far more likely than their 2003 counterparts to know their HIV status and to be taking ART. In both years, 63-73% of medical inpatients were HIV-infected and 98.5% of inpatients agreed to testing. On-the-ward testing in 2006 avoided the 2003 problem of patient discharge before learning of their test results. Hospital-based HIV testing is an essential clinical service in high prevalence settings and can serve further as a surveillance system to help track the community impact of outpatient AIDS services in Africa.

  20. To expand coverage, or increase frequency: Quantifying the tradeoffs between equity and efficiency facing cervical cancer screening programs in low-resource settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Nicole G; Tsu, Vivien; Jeronimo, Jose; Mvundura, Mercy; Lee, Kyueun; Kim, Jane J

    2017-03-15

    Cervical cancer is a leading cause of cancer death worldwide, with 85% of the disease burden residing in less developed regions. To inform evidence-based decision-making as cervical cancer screening programs are planned, implemented, and scaled in low- and middle-income countries, we used cost and test performance data from the START-UP demonstration project in Uganda and a microsimulation model of HPV infection and cervical carcinogenesis to quantify the health benefits, distributional equity, cost-effectiveness, and financial impact of either (1) improving access to cervical cancer screening or (2) increasing the number of lifetime screening opportunities for women who already have access. We found that when baseline screening coverage was low (i.e., 30%), expanding coverage of screening once in a lifetime to 50% can yield comparable reductions in cancer risk to screening two or three times in a lifetime at 30% coverage, lead to greater reductions in health disparities, and cost 150 international dollars (I$) per year of life saved (YLS). At higher baseline screening coverage levels (i.e., 70%), screening three times in a lifetime yielded greater health benefits than expanding screening once in a lifetime to 90% coverage, and would have a cost-effectiveness ratio (I$590 per YLS) below Uganda's per capita GDP. Given very low baseline coverage at present, we conclude that a policy focus on increasing access for previously unscreened women appears to be more compatible with improving both equity and efficiency than a focus on increasing frequency for a small subset of women. © 2016 UICC.

  1. Report on: "The 1st Workshop on National Immunization Programs and Vaccine Coverage in ASEAN Countries, April 30, 2015, Pattaya, Thailand".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattasingh, Weerawan; Pengsaa, Krisana; Thisyakorn, Usa

    2016-03-04

    The 1st Workshop on National Immunization Programs and Vaccine Coverage in Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) Countries Group (WNIPVC-ASEAN) held a meeting on April 30, 2015, Pattaya, Thailand under the auspices of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society and the World Health Organization (WHO). Reports on the current status and initiatives of the national immunization program (NIP) in each ASEAN countries that attended were presented. These reports along with survey data collected from ministries of health in ASEAN countries NIPs demonstrate that good progress has been made toward the goal of the Global Vaccine Action Plan (GVAP). However, some ASEAN countries have fragile health care systems that still have insufficient vaccine coverage of some basic EPI antigens. Most ASEAN countries still do not have national coverage of some new and underused vaccines, and raising funds for the expansion of NIPs is challenging. Also, there is insufficient research into disease burden of vaccine preventable diseases and surveillance. Health care workers must advocate NIPs to government policy makers and other stakeholders as well as improve research and surveillance to achieve the goals of the GVAP. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  2. Evaluating the McDonald's business model for HIV prevention among truckers to improve program coverage and service utilization in India, 2004–2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tirumalasetti Rao V

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Vasudha Tirumalasetti Rao,1 Bidhubhusan Mahapatra,2 Sachin Juneja,1 Indra R Singh11Transport Corporation of India Foundation, Gurgaon, Haryana, India 2Population Council, New Delhi, IndiaBackground: This study describes the experiences and results of a large-scale human immunodeficiency virus (HIV prevention intervention for long-distance truck drivers operating on the national highways of India.Methods: The intervention for long-distance truckers started in 2004 across 34 trans-shipment locations. However, due to poor coverage and utilization of services by truckers in the initial 18-month period, the intervention was redesigned to focus on only 17 trans-shipment locations. The redesigned intervention model was based on the McDonald's business franchise model where the focus is on optimal placement of services, supported with branding and standardization of services offered, and a surround sound communication approach. Program output indicators were assessed using program monitoring data over 7 years (2004–2010 and two rounds of cross-sectional behavioral surveys conducted in January 2008 (n = 1402 and July 2009 (n = 1407.Results: The number of truckers contacted per month per site increased from 374 in 2004 to 4327 in 2010. Analysis of survey data showed a seven-fold increase in clinic visits in the past 12 months from 2008 to 2009 (21% versus 63%, P < 0.001. A significant increase was also observed in the percentage of truckers who watched street plays (10% to 56%, P < 0.001, and participated in health exhibitions (6% to 35%, P < 0.001. Furthermore, an increase from round 1 to round 2 was observed in the percentage who received condoms (13% to 22%, P < 0.001, and attended one-one counseling (15% to 21%, P < 0.01. Treatment-seeking from program clinics for symptoms related to sexually transmitted infections increased six-fold during this period (16% versus 50%, P < 0.001.Conclusion: Adoption of a business model for HIV prevention helped to

  3. Immunisation coverage, 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, Brynley P; Dey, Aditi; Menzies, Rob I; Brotherton, Julia M; McIntyre, Peter B

    2014-09-30

    This, the 6th annual immunisation coverage report, documents trends during 2012 for a range of standard measures derived from Australian Childhood Immunisation Register (ACIR) data, and National Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccination Program Register data. These include coverage at standard age milestones and for individual vaccines included on the National Immunisation Program (NIP) and coverage in adolescents and adults. The proportion of Australian children 'fully vaccinated' at 12, 24 and 60 months of age was 91.7%, 92.5% and 91.2%, respectively. For vaccines available on the NIP but not assessed during 2012 for 'fully vaccinated' status or for eligibility for incentive payments (rotavirus and pneumococcal at 12 months and meningococcal C and varicella at 24 months) coverage varied. Although pneumococcal vaccine had similar coverage at 12 months to other vaccines, coverage was lower for rotavirus at 12 months (83.6%) and varicella at 24 months (84.4%). Although 'fully vaccinated' coverage at 12 months of age was lower among Indigenous children than non-Indigenous children in all jurisdictions, the extent of the difference varied, reaching a 15 percentage point differential in South Australia but only a 0.4 percentage point differential in the Northern Territory. Overall, Indigenous coverage at 24 months of age exceeded that at 12 months of age nationally and for all jurisdictions, but as receipt of varicella vaccine at 18 months is excluded from calculations, this represents delayed immunisation, with some contribution from immunisation incentives. The 'fully vaccinated' coverage estimates for vaccinations due by 60 months of age for Indigenous children exceeded 90% at 91% in 2012. Unlike in 2011, at 60 months of age, there was no dramatic variation in coverage between Indigenous and non-Indigenous children for individual jurisdictions. As previously documented, vaccines recommended for Indigenous children only, hepatitis A and pneumococcal vaccine, had

  4. Immunisation coverage annual report, 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, Brynley; Dey, Aditi; Mahajan, Deepika; Menzies, Rob; McIntyre, Peter B

    2011-06-01

    This, the third annual immunisation coverage report, documents trends during 2009 for a range of standard measures derived from Australian Childhood Immunisation Register data, including overall coverage at standard age milestones and for individual vaccines included on the National Immunisation Program (NIP). Coverage by Indigenous status and mapping by smaller geographic areas as well as trends in timeliness is also summarised according to standard templates. With respect to overall coverage, the Immunise Australia Program targets have been reached for children at 12 and 24 months of age but not for children at 5 years of age. Coverage at 24 months of age exceeds that at 12 months of age, but as receipt of varicella vaccine at 18 months is excluded from calculations of 'fully immunised' this probably represents delayed immunisation, with some contribution from immunisation incentives. Similarly, the decrease in coverage estimates for immunisations due at 4 years of age from March 2008 is primarily due to changing the assessment age from 6 years to 5 years of age from December 2007. With respect to individual vaccines, a number of those available on the NIP are not currently assessed for 'fully immunised' status or for eligibility for incentive payments. These include pneumococcal conjugate and meningococcal C conjugate vaccines, for which coverage is comparable with vaccines that are assessed for 'fully immunised' status, and rotavirus and varicella vaccines for which coverage is lower. Coverage is also suboptimal for vaccines recommended for Indigenous children only (i.e. hepatitis A and pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine) as previously reported for other vaccines for both children and adults. Delayed receipt of vaccines is an important issue for vaccines recommended for Indigenous children and has not improved among non-Indigenous children despite improvements in coverage at the 24-month milestone. Although Indigenous children in Australia have coverage levels

  5. Benefits of an educational program for journalists on media coverage of HIV/AIDS in developing countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martinez-Cajas Jorge L

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective a To assess the suitability of the curriculum content and didactical quality of information delivered to educate journalists in the J2J program in HIV/AIDS (process evaluation and b to explore the effects of such programs on journalists' reporting of HIV/AIDS related information (outcome evaluation. Design Descriptive study. Methods For the process evaluation, each J2J program curriculum was evaluated for accuracy and pertinence by individuals with high familiarity with HIV/AIDS research. For the outcome evaluation, a survey of J2J attendees and evaluations of the program lectures by attendees were performed in chronological order to determine their perception on usefulness of the program. Results Overall, the J2J curriculum is successful in providing journalists with a clear understanding of the current HIV/AIDS medical research objectives and issues with most journalists reporting an increased ability to better investigate and disseminate accurate information on this subject. Furthermore, the journalists surveyed reported positive community responses directly as a result of the J2J training. Conclusion The J2J program helps to increase global awareness of pertinent HIV/AIDS concepts. Through this professional development strategy, journalists from around the world may help to amplify efforts to prevent new HIV infections and quench the dissemination of inaccurate information and folklore.

  6. Modeling Dr. Dynasaur 2.0 Coverage and Finance Proposals: Effects of the Expansion of Vermont's Dr. Dynasaur Program to All Individuals Through Age 25.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, Andrew W; Price, Carter C; Woods, Dulani; Freund, Deborah Anne; McNamara, Martin; Schramm, Steven P; Berkman, Elrycc; Dehner, Tom

    2017-01-01

    The authors assessed an expansion of Vermont's Dr. Dynasaur program that would cover all residents age 25 and younger. The current Dr. Dynasaur program combines Vermont's Medicaid program and Child Health Insurance Program for children ages 0 through 18 to provide a seamless insurance program for those with family incomes below 317 percent of the federal poverty level. The authors used RAND's COMPARE-VT microsimulation model with Vermont-specific demographic, economic, and actuarial data to estimate the effects on health insurance coverage, costs, and premiums. They also identified the new revenues required to fund the program expansion and explored three alternative financing strategies to raise those funds: (1) an increase in the Vermont income tax, (2) a Vermont payroll tax, and (3) a Vermont business enterprise tax. The authors found that enrollment would increase by more than 260 percent under the 100-percent enrollment scenario and by nearly 200 percent under the 70-percent enrollment scenario by 2019. Not surprisingly, the children and young adults who move off employer-sponsored insurance (ESI) and into Dr. Dynasaur 2.0 have considerably lower expected health care costs than those who remain on ESI, increasing the per-person premiums by nearly $1,000 for those remaining enrolled in ESI. Annual health care expenditures per person for children and young adults in 2019 are estimated at $4,325 with Medicare prices. The combination of increased reimbursement rates, large increases in enrollment, and relatively low Dr. Dynasaur premiums (no more than $720 per year) will require significant new tax revenues to meet program obligations.

  7. Evaluation of the universal immunization program and challenges in coverage of migrant children in Haridwar, Uttarakhand, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Latika Nath

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Studies show that immunization among migrant children is poor. India has a dropout rate of 17.7% between Bacillus Calmette-Guιrin (BCG and measles (District Level Household Survey (DLHS-3. Haridwar district had the highest dropout rate of 27.4% from BCG to diphtheria, pertussis, and tetanus (DPT 3 (DLHS-3 in Uttarakhand. We evaluated the Universal Immunization Programme (UIP among migrants in Haridwar in two blocks. Materials and Methods: We developed input, process, and output indicators on infrastructure, human resources, and service delivery. A facility, session site and cross-sectional survey of 180 children were done and proportions for various indicators were estimated. We determined factors associated with not taking vaccination using multivariate analysis. Results: We surveyed 11 cold chain centers, 25 subcenters, 14 sessions, and interviewed 180 mothers. Dropouts were supposed to be tracked using vaccination card counterfoils and tracking registers. The dropout rate from BCG to DPT3 was 30%. Lack of knowledge (adjusted odds ratio (AOR 6.6,95% confidence interval (CI 2.6-16.7, mother not being decision maker (AOR 4.0,95%CI 1.7-9.2, lack of contact by Accredited Social Health Activist (ASHA; AOR 3.0,95%CI 1.1-7.7, not being given four post-vaccination messages (AOR 7.7, 95% CI 2.9-20.2, and longer duration of stay in Haridwar (AOR 3.0 95% 1.9-7.6 were risk factors for nonimmunization. The reasons stated by mothers included lack of awareness of session site location (67% and belief that child should only be vaccinated in their resident district (43%. Conclusions: There was low immunization coverage among migrants within adequate supervision, poor cold chain maintenance, and improper tracking of dropouts. Mobile immunization teams, prelisting of migrant children, and change in incentives of ASHAs for child tracking were needed. A monitoring plan for sessions and cold chain needed enforcement.

  8. Do Master Early Childhood Teacher Education Programs Provide Adequate Coverage of Infants and Toddlers?: A Review of Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvis, Susanne; Manning, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    In Australia, growth in the demand of early childhood services for young children aged birth to three years has placed increased pressure on the early childhood education sector as new policy stipulates the need for qualified teachers. The new policy has resulted in a growth in Master of Early Childhood Education programs in Australian…

  9. Optimal Partitioning of a Surveillance Space for Persistent Coverage Using Multiple Autonomous Unmanned Aerial Vehicles: An Integer Programming Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-27

    Partitions via Integer Programming”. Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Instituto de Computação, Campinas/SP, Brazil, 1998. [33] Nigam, Nikhil... Mexico . September 25–28, 2007. [39] Rader, David. Deterministic Operations Research. Wiley, New Jersey, 2010. [40] Stone, Andrea. “Drone Program Aims To

  10. Annual immunisation coverage report, 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, Brynley; Dey, Aditi; Menzies, Rob; McIntyre, Peter

    2013-03-31

    This, the fourth annual immunisation coverage report, documents trends during 2010 for a range of standard measures derived from Australian Childhood Immunisation Register (ACIR) data. These include coverage at standard age milestones and for individual vaccines included on the National Immunisation Program (NIP). For the first time, coverage from other sources for adolescents and the elderly are included. The proportion of children 'fully vaccinated' at 12, 24 and 60 months of age was 91.6%, 92.1% and 89.1% respectively. For vaccines available on the NIP but not currently assessed for 'fully immunised' status or for eligibility for incentive payments (rotavirus and pneumococcal at 12 months and meningococcal C and varicella at 24 months) coverage varied. Although pneumococcal vaccine had similar coverage at 12 months to other vaccines, coverage was lower for rotavirus at 12 months (84.7%) and varicella at 24 months (83.0%). Overall coverage at 24 months of age exceeded that at 12 months of age nationally and for most jurisdictions, but as receipt of varicella vaccine at 18 months is excluded from calculations, this represents delayed immunisation, with some contribution from immunisation incentives. The 'fully immunised' coverage estimates for immunisations due by 60 months increased substantially in 2009, reaching almost 90% in 2010, probably related to completed immunisation by 60 months of age being introduced in 2009 as a requirement for GP incentive payments. As previously documented, vaccines recommended for Indigenous children only (hepatitis A and pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine) had suboptimal coverage at around 57%. Delayed receipt of vaccines by Indigenous children at the 60-month milestone age improved from 56% to 62% but the disparity in on-time vaccination between Indigenous and non-Indigenous children at earlier age milestones did not improve. Coverage data for human papillomavirus (HPV)from the national HPV register are consistent with high

  11. Medicare Coverage Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Medicare Coverage Database (MCD) contains all National Coverage Determinations (NCDs) and Local Coverage Determinations (LCDs), local articles, and proposed NCD...

  12. Rarity-weighted richness: a simple and reliable alternative to integer programming and heuristic algorithms for minimum set and maximum coverage problems in conservation planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albuquerque, Fabio; Beier, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Here we report that prioritizing sites in order of rarity-weighted richness (RWR) is a simple, reliable way to identify sites that represent all species in the fewest number of sites (minimum set problem) or to identify sites that represent the largest number of species within a given number of sites (maximum coverage problem). We compared the number of species represented in sites prioritized by RWR to numbers of species represented in sites prioritized by the Zonation software package for 11 datasets in which the size of individual planning units (sites) ranged from <1 ha to 2,500 km2. On average, RWR solutions were more efficient than Zonation solutions. Integer programming remains the only guaranteed way find an optimal solution, and heuristic algorithms remain superior for conservation prioritizations that consider compactness and multiple near-optimal solutions in addition to species representation. But because RWR can be implemented easily and quickly in R or a spreadsheet, it is an attractive alternative to integer programming or heuristic algorithms in some conservation prioritization contexts.

  13. 5 CFR 875.412 - When will my coverage terminate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false When will my coverage terminate? 875.412... REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL LONG TERM CARE INSURANCE PROGRAM Coverage § 875.412 When will my coverage terminate? Your coverage will terminate on the earliest of the following dates: (a) The date you specify to...

  14. 42 CFR 440.330 - Benchmark health benefits coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Benchmark health benefits coverage. 440.330 Section... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS SERVICES: GENERAL PROVISIONS Benchmark Benefit and Benchmark-Equivalent Coverage § 440.330 Benchmark health benefits coverage. Benchmark coverage is health...

  15. Immunisation coverage annual report, 2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, Brynley P; Mahajan, Deepika; Dey, Aditi; Menzies, Rob I; McIntyre, Peter B

    2010-09-01

    This, the 2nd annual immunisation coverage report, documents trends during 2008 for a range of standard measures derived from Australian Childhood Immunisation Register data, including overall coverage at standard age milestones and for individual vaccines included on the National Immunisation Program (NIP). Coverage by indigenous status and mapping by smaller geographic areas as well as trends in timeliness are also summarised according to standard templates. With respect to overall coverage, Immunise Australia Program targets have been reached for children at 12 and 24 months of age but not for children at 5 years of age. Coverage at 24 months of age exceeds that at 12 months of age, but as receipt of varicella vaccine at 18 months is excluded from calculations of 'fully immunised' this probably represents delayed immunisation, with some contribution from immunisation incentives. Similarly, the decrease in coverage estimates for immunisations due at 4 years of age from March 2008, is primarily due to changing the assessment age from 6 years to 5 years of age from December 2007. A number of individual vaccines on the NIP are not currently assessed for 'fully immunised' status or for eligibility for incentive payments. These include pneumococcal conjugate and meningococcal C conjugate vaccines for which coverage is comparable to vaccines which are assessed for 'fully immunised' status, and rotavirus and varicella vaccines for which coverage is lower. Coverage is also suboptimal for vaccines recommended for Indigenous children only (i.e. hepatitis A and pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine) as previously reported for other vaccines for both children and adults. Delayed receipt of vaccines is an important issue for vaccines recommended for Indigenous children and has not improved among non-Indigenous children despite improvements in coverage at the 24-month milestone. Although Indigenous children in Australia have coverage levels that are similar to non

  16. 24 CFR 200.17 - Mortgage coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Mortgage coverage. 200.17 Section... Generally Applicable to Multifamily and Health Care Facility Mortgage Insurance Programs; and Continuing Eligibility Requirements for Existing Projects Eligible Mortgage § 200.17 Mortgage coverage. The mortgage...

  17. Women's Health Insurance Coverage

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Women's Health Policy Women’s Health Insurance Coverage Women’s Health Insurance Coverage Published: Oct 31, 2017 Facebook Twitter LinkedIn ... that many women continue to face. Sources of Health Insurance Coverage Employer-Sponsored Insurance: Approximately 57.9 million ...

  18. NSW annual immunisation coverage report, 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, Brynley; Dey, Aditi; Campbell-Lloyd, Sue; Menzies, Robert I; McIntyre, Peter B

    2012-12-01

    This annual report, the third in the series, documents trends in immunisation coverage in NSW for children, adolescents and the elderly, to the end of 2011. Data from the Australian Childhood Immunisation Register, the NSW School Immunisation Program and the NSW Population Health Survey were used to calculate various measures of population coverage. During 2011, greater than 90% coverage was maintained for children at 12 and 24 months of age. For children at 5 years of age the improvement seen in 2010 was sustained, with coverage at or near 90%. For adolescents, there was improved coverage for all doses of human papillomavirus vaccine, both doses of hepatitis B vaccine, varicella vaccine and the dose of diphtheria, tetanus and acellular pertussis given to school attendees in Years 7 and 10. Pneumococcal vaccination coverage in the elderly has been steadily rising, although it has remained lower than the influenza coverage estimates. This report provides trends in immunisation coverage in NSW across the age spectrum. The inclusion of coverage estimates for the pneumococcal conjugate, varicella and meningococcal C vaccines in the official coverage assessments for 'fully immunised' in 2013 is a welcome initiative.

  19. 32 CFR 199.8 - Double coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... from the operation of a motor vehicle. (4) Exceptions. Double coverage plans do not include: (i) Plans... (for example, the Indian Health Service); or (v) State Victims of Crime Compensation Programs. (c...

  20. Length and coverage of inhibitory decision rules

    KAUST Repository

    Alsolami, Fawaz

    2012-01-01

    Authors present algorithms for optimization of inhibitory rules relative to the length and coverage. Inhibitory rules have a relation "attribute ≠ value" on the right-hand side. The considered algorithms are based on extensions of dynamic programming. Paper contains also comparison of length and coverage of inhibitory rules constructed by a greedy algorithm and by the dynamic programming algorithm. © 2012 Springer-Verlag.

  1. Immunisation coverage annual report, 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, Brynley P; Hendry, Alexandra J; Dey, Aditi; Beard, Frank H; Brotherton, Julia M; McIntyre, Peter B

    2017-03-31

    This 8th annual immunisation coverage report shows data for 2014 derived from the Australian Childhood Immunisation Register and the National Human Papillomavirus Vaccination Program Register. This report includes coverage data for 'fully immunised' and by individual vaccines at standard age milestones and timeliness of receipt at earlier ages according to Indigenous status. Overall, 'fully immunised' coverage has been mostly stable at the 12- and 24-month age milestones since late 2003, but at 60 months of age, it has increased by more than 10 percentage points since 2009. As in previous years, coverage for 'fully immunised' at 12 months of age among Indigenous children was 3.7% lower than for non-Indigenous children overall, varying from 6.9 percentage points in Western Australia to 0.3 of a percentage point in the Australian Capital Territory. In 2014, 73.4% of Australian females aged 15 years had 3 documented doses of human papillomavirus vaccine (jurisdictional range 67.7% to 77.4%), and 82.7% had at least 1 dose, compared with 71.4% and 81.5%, respectively, in 2013. The disparity in on-time vaccination between Indigenous and non-Indigenous children in 2014 diminished progressively from 20.2% for vaccines due by 12 months to 11.5% for those due by 24 months and 3.0% at 60 months of age.

  2. 5 CFR 792.103 - Coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Coverage. 792.103 Section 792.103 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL EMPLOYEES' HEALTH AND COUNSELING PROGRAMS Regulatory Requirements for Alcoholism and Drug Abuse Programs and...

  3. Computer Programs for Plotting Spot-Beam Coverages from an Earth-Synchronous Satellite and Earth-Station Antenna Elevation Angle Contours. Memorandum Number 72/4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stagl, Thomas W.; Singh, Jai P.

    Computer programs prepared in connection with a project on Application of Communication Satellites to Educational Development (see EM 010 449) are described and listed in this memorandum. First, the data tape containing a digitized map of the world which was used for the programs is described. Then the first program, WORLDMAP, which plots the tape…

  4. 5 CFR 534.202 - Coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS PAY UNDER OTHER SYSTEMS Student-Employees in Government Hospitals § 534.202 Coverage. In addition to the student-employees specified in 5 U.S.C. 5351(2)(A), the following student-employees are covered under this program, provided they are...

  5. A GPS coverage model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skidmore, Trent A.

    1994-01-01

    The results of several case studies using the Global Positioning System coverage model developed at Ohio University are summarized. Presented are results pertaining to outage area, outage dynamics, and availability. Input parameters to the model include the satellite orbit data, service area of interest, geometry requirements, and horizon and antenna mask angles. It is shown for precision-landing Category 1 requirements that the planned GPS 21 Primary Satellite Constellation produces significant outage area and unavailability. It is also shown that a decrease in the user equivalent range error dramatically decreases outage area and improves the service availability.

  6. Relationships between length and coverage of decision rules

    KAUST Repository

    Amin, Talha

    2014-02-14

    The paper describes a new tool for study relationships between length and coverage of exact decision rules. This tool is based on dynamic programming approach. We also present results of experiments with decision tables from UCI Machine Learning Repository.

  7. Dental Care Coverage and Use: Modeling Limitations and Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeller, John F.; Chen, Haiyan

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We examined why older US adults without dental care coverage and use would have lower use rates if offered coverage than do those who currently have coverage. Methods. We used data from the 2008 Health and Retirement Study to estimate a multinomial logistic model to analyze the influence of personal characteristics in the grouping of older US adults into those with and those without dental care coverage and dental care use. Results. Compared with persons with no coverage and no dental care use, users of dental care with coverage were more likely to be younger, female, wealthier, college graduates, married, in excellent or very good health, and not missing all their permanent teeth. Conclusions. Providing dental care coverage to uninsured older US adults without use will not necessarily result in use rates similar to those with prior coverage and use. We have offered a model using modifiable factors that may help policy planners facilitate programs to increase dental care coverage uptake and use. PMID:24328635

  8. Access to Private Coverage for Children Enrolled in CHIP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMorrow, Stacey; Kenney, Genevieve M; Waidmann, Timothy; Anderson, Nathaniel

    2015-01-01

    To provide updated information on the potential substitution of public for private coverage among low-income children by examining the type of coverage held by children before they enrolled in Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP) and exploring the extent to which children covered by CHIP had access to private coverage while they were enrolled. We conducted a major household telephone survey in 2012 of enrollees and disenrollees in CHIP in 10 states. We used the survey responses and Medicaid/CHIP administrative data to estimate the coverage distribution of all new enrollees in the 12 months before CHIP enrollment and to identify children who may have had access to employer coverage through one of their parents while enrolled in CHIP. About 13% of new enrollees had any private coverage in the 12 months before enrolling in CHIP, and most were found to have lost that coverage as a result of parental job loss. About 40% of CHIP enrollees had a parent with an employer-sponsored insurance (ESI) policy, but only half reported that the policy could cover the child. Approximately 30% of new enrollees had public coverage during the year before but were uninsured just before enrolling. Access to private coverage among CHIP enrollees is relatively limited. Furthermore, even when there is potential access to ESI, affordability is a serious concern for parents, making it possible that many children with access to ESI would remain uninsured in the absence of CHIP. Copyright © 2015 Academic Pediatric Association. All rights reserved.

  9. 42 CFR 457.430 - Benchmark-equivalent health benefits coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STATE CHILDREN'S HEALTH INSURANCE PROGRAMS (SCHIPs) ALLOTMENTS AND GRANTS TO... coverage. (a) Aggregate actuarial value. Benchmark-equivalent coverage is health benefits coverage that has an aggregate actuarial value determined in accordance with § 457.431 that is at least actuarially...

  10. 42 CFR 440.340 - Actuarial report for benchmark-equivalent coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Actuarial report for benchmark-equivalent coverage... AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS SERVICES: GENERAL PROVISIONS Benchmark Benefit and Benchmark-Equivalent Coverage § 440.340 Actuarial report for benchmark-equivalent coverage. (a...

  11. 42 CFR 440.335 - Benchmark-equivalent health benefits coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Benchmark-equivalent health benefits coverage. 440... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS SERVICES: GENERAL PROVISIONS Benchmark Benefit and Benchmark-Equivalent Coverage § 440.335 Benchmark-equivalent health benefits coverage. (a...

  12. Coverage with Evidence Development: applications and issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trueman, Paul; Grainger, David L; Downs, Kristen E

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the current issues surrounding Coverage with Evidence Development (CED). CED is characterized by restricted coverage for a new technology in parallel with targeted research when the stated goal of the research or data collection is to provide definitive evidence for the clinical or cost-effectiveness impact of the new technology. Presented here is information summarized and interpreted from presentations and discussions at the 2008 Health Technology Assessment International (HTAi) meeting and additional information from the medical literature. This study describes the differences between CED and other conditional coverage agreements, provides a brief history of CED, describes real-world examples of CED, describes the areas of consensus between the stakeholders, discusses the areas for future negotiation between stakeholders, and proposes criteria to assist stakeholders in determining when CED could be appropriate. Payers could interpret the evidence obtained from a CED program either positively or negatively, and a range of possible changes to the reimbursement status of the new technology may result. Striking an appropriate balance between the demands for prompt access to new technology and acknowledging that some degree of uncertainty will always exist is a critical challenge to the uptake of this innovative form of conditional coverage. When used selectively for innovative procedures, pharmaceuticals, or devices in the appropriate disease areas, CED may provide patients access to promising medicines or technologies while data to minimize uncertainty are collected.

  13. 42 CFR 457.440 - Existing comprehensive State-based coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STATE CHILDREN'S HEALTH INSURANCE PROGRAMS (SCHIPs) ALLOTMENTS AND GRANTS TO... not reduce the actuarial value of the coverage under the program below the lower of either— (i) The actuarial value of the coverage under the program as of August 5, 1997; or (ii) The actuarial value of a...

  14. Mediating Trust in Terrorism Coverage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Kirsten

    crisis. While the framework is presented in the context of television coverage of a terror-related crisis situation, it can equally be used in connection with all other forms of mediated trust. Key words: National crisis, risk communication, crisis management, television coverage, mediated trust....

  15. Effective coverage: a metric for monitoring Universal Health Coverage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Ng

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A major challenge in monitoring universal health coverage (UHC is identifying an indicator that can adequately capture the multiple components underlying the UHC initiative. Effective coverage, which unites individual and intervention characteristics into a single metric, offers a direct and flexible means to measure health system performance at different levels. We view effective coverage as a relevant and actionable metric for tracking progress towards achieving UHC. In this paper, we review the concept of effective coverage and delineate the three components of the metric - need, use, and quality - using several examples. Further, we explain how the metric can be used for monitoring interventions at both local and global levels. We also discuss the ways that current health information systems can support generating estimates of effective coverage. We conclude by recognizing some of the challenges associated with producing estimates of effective coverage. Despite these challenges, effective coverage is a powerful metric that can provide a more nuanced understanding of whether, and how well, a health system is delivering services to its populations.

  16. Determinants of vaccination coverage and adherence to the Greek national immunization program among infants aged 2-24 months at the beginning of the economic crisis (2009-2011).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassiliki, Papaevangelou; Ioanna, Koutsoumbari; Artemis, Vintila; Eleni, Klinaki; Aglaia, Zellos; Attilakos, Achilleas; Maria, Tsolia; Dimitris, Kafetzis

    2014-11-20

    Childhood immunization has significantly reduced the incidence of vaccine preventable diseases. Parental mistrust over vaccine safety has been associated with vaccine refusal creating barriers on vaccine coverage. Recently, economic crisis has imposed additional impediment. Study aim was to evaluate vaccine coverage among infants 2-24 months old in the Athens metropolitan area at the beginning of the economic crisis (2009-2011). Overall, 1,667 infants were enrolled (mean age 13 months). Less than 5% of parents admitted omitting or postponing vaccination secondary to their beliefs. Although vaccination coverage was acceptable for most vaccines, lower rates of immunization were found for some newer vaccines such as hepatitis A and rotavirus. Multiple regression analysis indicated that parental age, occupational, educational statuses and family size were independently associated with immunization coverage at 6 and 12 months. Interestingly, lack of insurance was not associated with missed vaccine doses. Incomplete vaccination coverage was associated with socioeconomic factors. It becomes apparent, that reassessing vaccination priorities under the current economic situation may be needed.

  17. Assuring Access to Affordable Coverage

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Under the Affordable Care Act, millions of uninsured Americans will gain access to affordable coverage through Affordable Insurance Exchanges and improvements in...

  18. Maintaining Differentiated Coverage in Heterogeneous Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Du Xiaojiang

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Most existing research considers homogeneous sensor networks, which suffer from performance bottleneck and poor scalability. In this paper, we adopt a heterogeneous sensor network model to overcome these problems. Sensing coverage is a fundamental problem in sensor networks and has been well studied over the past years. However, most coverage algorithms only consider the uniform coverage problem, that is, all the areas have the same coverage degree requirement. In many scenarios, some key areas need high coverage degree while other areas only need low coverage degree. We propose a differentiated coverage algorithm which can provide different coverage degrees for different areas. The algorithm is energy efficient since it only keeps minimum number of sensors to work. The performance of the differentiated coverage algorithm is evaluated through extensive simulation experiments. Our results show that the algorithm performs much better than any other differentiated coverage algorithm.

  19. Impact of pharmacists as immunizers on influenza vaccination coverage in Nova Scotia, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isenor, Jennifer E; Alia, Tania A; Killen, Jessica L; Billard, Beverly A; Halperin, Beth A; Slayter, Kathryn L; McNeil, Shelly A; MacDougall, Donna; Bowles, Susan K

    2016-05-03

    Immunization coverage in Canada has continued to fall below national goals. The addition of pharmacists as immunizers may increase immunization coverage. This study aimed to compare estimated influenza vaccine coverage before and after pharmacists began administering publicly funded influenza immunizations in Nova Scotia, Canada. Vaccination coverage rates and recipient demographics for the influenza vaccination seasons 2010-2011 to 2012-2013 were compared with the 2013-2014 season, the first year pharmacists provided immunizations. In 2013-2014, the vaccination coverage rate for those ≥5 years of age increased 6%, from 36% in 2012-2013 to 42% (pNova Scotia increased in 2013-2014 compared to previous years with a universal influenza program. Various factors may have contributed to the increased coverage, including the addition of pharmacists as immunizers and media coverage of influenza related fatalities. Future research will be necessary to fully determine the impact of pharmacists as immunizers.

  20. Crime News Coverage in Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graber, Doris A.

    According to one sociological model, news is a product of socially determined notions of who and what is important and the organizational structures that result for routinizing news collection; events that deviate from these notions are ignored. This report describes a study of crime news coverage in the media that used this model to examine the…

  1. Is Crime News Coverage Excessive?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graber, Doris A.

    1979-01-01

    Reports on the frequency and manner in which various crime and noncrime news topics were presented in selected newspapers and television newscasts in 1976. Examines news flow data to determine whether news output was inflexible, and whether crime news coverage distorted the amount of real-life crime. (PD)

  2. Ostomy Home Skills Program

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Meeting Women's Committee Mentorship Program Outside Activities ACS Archives Contact Us Quality Programs Quality Programs Overview About ... The Hartford Consensus News Coverage Stop the Bleed Archives and History Archives and History Archives and History ...

  3. Assessment of Vaccination Coverage of Sheep and Goat using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A retrospective study using data of the record of the veterinary clinic of Alamata Woreda with the objective of assessment vaccine coverage in the area was conducted from May to June 2014. The data indicated that there was vaccination program for ovine pasteurellosis, sheep and goat pox, pestides petites ruminits and ...

  4. Prevalence, Characteristics, and Perception of Nursery Antibiotic Stewardship Coverage in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantey, Joseph B; Vora, Niraj; Sunkara, Mridula

    2017-09-01

    Prolonged or unnecessary antibiotic use is associated with adverse outcomes in infants. Antibiotic stewardship programs (ASPs) aim to prevent these adverse outcomes and optimize antibiotic prescribing. However, data evaluating ASP coverage of nurseries are limited. The objectives of this study were to describe the characteristics of nurseries with and without ASP coverage and to determine perceptions of and barriers to nursery ASP coverage. The 2014 American Hospital Association annual survey was used to randomly select a level III neonatal intensive care unit from all 50 states. A level I and level II nursery from the same city as the level III nursery were then randomly selected. Hospital, nursery, and ASP characteristics were collected. Nursery and ASP providers (pharmacists or infectious disease providers) were interviewed using a semistructured template. Transcribed interviews were analyzed for themes. One hundred forty-six centers responded; 104 (71%) provided nursery ASP coverage. In multivariate analysis, level of nursery, university affiliation, and number of full-time equivalent ASP staff were the main predictors of nursery ASP coverage. Several themes were identified from interviews: unwanted coverage, unnecessary coverage, jurisdiction issues, need for communication, and a focus on outcomes. Most providers had a favorable view of nursery ASP coverage. Larger, higher-acuity nurseries in university-affiliated hospitals are more likely to have ASP coverage. Low ASP staffing and a perceived lack of importance were frequently cited as barriers to nursery coverage. Most nursery ASP coverage is viewed favorably by providers, but nursery providers regard it as less important than ASP providers.

  5. -Net Approach to Sensor -Coverage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fusco Giordano

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Wireless sensors rely on battery power, and in many applications it is difficult or prohibitive to replace them. Hence, in order to prolongate the system's lifetime, some sensors can be kept inactive while others perform all the tasks. In this paper, we study the -coverage problem of activating the minimum number of sensors to ensure that every point in the area is covered by at least sensors. This ensures higher fault tolerance, robustness, and improves many operations, among which position detection and intrusion detection. The -coverage problem is trivially NP-complete, and hence we can only provide approximation algorithms. In this paper, we present an algorithm based on an extension of the classical -net technique. This method gives an -approximation, where is the number of sensors in an optimal solution. We do not make any particular assumption on the shape of the areas covered by each sensor, besides that they must be closed, connected, and without holes.

  6. Medical coverage of cycling events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, John M

    2006-05-01

    Medical coverage of recreational and competitive cycling events requires significant planning and cooperation among the race and medical directors, race officials, and local emergency medical services. The medical team should be proficient in treating minor and self-limiting injuries such as abrasions and minor trauma. The medical team should also have contingency plans for medical emergencies, such as cardiac events and major trauma, that ensure rapid stabilization and transport of the athlete to the appropriate medical facility. Stationary and mobile medical teams may be necessary for proper coverage of the event. Event day communication systems between individual medical staff as well as race officials and local emergency medical services is important to the success of the event.

  7. Media coverage of women victimization

    OpenAIRE

    Konstantinović-Vilić, Slobodanka; Žunić, Natalija

    2012-01-01

    Mass media seem to be playing the central role in our everyday life and the media impact is so overpowering nowadays that we live in a mediasaturated culture. Not only are mass media an inseparable part of our contemporary life but they also significantly define and shape our daily existence. In order to explain the cultural impact that the media coverage of crime and victimization has in our society, it is necessary to understand the relationship between crime, victimization and mass media. ...

  8. Increasing Coverage of Appropriate Vaccinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Verughese; Chattopadhyay, Sajal K.; Hopkins, David P.; Morgan, Jennifer Murphy; Pitan, Adesola A.; Clymer, John

    2016-01-01

    Context Population-level coverage for immunization against many vaccine-preventable diseases remains below optimal rates in the U.S. The Community Preventive Services Task Force recently recommended several interventions to increase vaccination coverage based on systematic reviews of the evaluation literature. The present study provides the economic results from those reviews. Evidence acquisition A systematic review was conducted (search period, January 1980 through February 2012) to identify economic evaluations of 12 interventions recommended by the Task Force. Evidence was drawn from included studies; estimates were constructed for the population reach of each strategy, cost of implementation, and cost per additional vaccinated person because of the intervention. Analyses were conducted in 2014. Evidence synthesis Reminder systems, whether for clients or providers, were among the lowest-cost strategies to implement and the most cost effective in terms of additional people vaccinated. Strategies involving home visits and combination strategies in community settings were both costly and less cost effective. Strategies based in settings such as schools and managed care organizations that reached the target population achieved additional vaccinations in the middle range of cost effectiveness. Conclusions The interventions recommended by the Task Force differed in reach, cost, and cost effectiveness. This systematic review presents the economic information for 12 effective strategies to increase vaccination coverage that can guide implementers in their choice of interventions to fit their local needs, available resources, and budget. PMID:26847663

  9. Health Insurance Stability and Health Status: Do Family-Level Coverage Patterns Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Robert B.; Garasky, Steven

    2008-01-01

    Being uninsured affects one's ability to access medical services and maintain health. Using longitudinal data from the Survey of Income and Program Participation, the authors investigated how individual and family insurance coverage affects adult health. They found that health insurance coverage often varies across family members and changes…

  10. 42 CFR 405.860 - Review of a national coverage determination (NCD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Review of a national coverage determination (NCD... the Medicare Part B Program § 405.860 Review of a national coverage determination (NCD). (a) General rule. (1) An NCD is a determination by the Secretary for whether or not a particular item or service is...

  11. Assessing Measurement Error in Medicare Coverage

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Assessing Measurement Error in Medicare Coverage From the National Health Interview Survey Using linked administrative data, to validate Medicare coverage estimates...

  12. 15 CFR 14.31 - Insurance coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Insurance coverage. 14.31 Section 14... COMMERCIAL ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Property Standards § 14.31 Insurance coverage. Recipients shall, at a minimum, provide the equivalent insurance coverage for real property and equipment acquired...

  13. 40 CFR 30.31 - Insurance coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Insurance coverage. 30.31 Section 30.31... NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Property Standards § 30.31 Insurance coverage. Recipients shall, at a minimum, provide the equivalent insurance coverage for real property and equipment...

  14. 45 CFR 74.31 - Insurance coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Insurance coverage. 74.31 Section 74.31 Public..., AND COMMERCIAL ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Property Standards § 74.31 Insurance coverage. Recipients shall, at a minimum, provide the equivalent insurance coverage for real property and equipment...

  15. 28 CFR 70.31 - Insurance coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Insurance coverage. 70.31 Section 70.31...-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Property Standards § 70.31 Insurance coverage. Recipients must, at a minimum, provide the equivalent insurance coverage for real property and equipment acquired...

  16. 32 CFR 32.31 - Insurance coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Insurance coverage. 32.31 Section 32.31 National... NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Property Standards § 32.31 Insurance coverage. Recipients shall, at a minimum, provide the equivalent insurance coverage for real property and equipment...

  17. 38 CFR 49.31 - Insurance coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Insurance coverage. 49.31... NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Property Standards § 49.31 Insurance coverage. Recipients shall, at a minimum, provide the equivalent insurance coverage for real property and equipment...

  18. 24 CFR 84.31 - Insurance coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Insurance coverage. 84.31 Section 84.31 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban... Insurance coverage. Recipients shall, at a minimum, provide the equivalent insurance coverage for real...

  19. 49 CFR 19.31 - Insurance coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Insurance coverage. 19.31 Section 19.31... Requirements Property Standards § 19.31 Insurance coverage. Recipients shall, at a minimum, provide the equivalent insurance coverage for real property and equipment acquired with Federal funds as provided to...

  20. Mexican and U.S. News Coverage of the IPDC at Acapulco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roach, Colleen

    1982-01-01

    Focuses on the news coverage of the International Program for the Development of Communications (IPDC) Conference held in Mexico, January 1982. However, the IPDC is also analyzed in relation to the evolution of the international communication debate. (PD)

  1. Country-level predictors of vaccination coverage and inequalities in Gavi-supported countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsenault, Catherine; Johri, Mira; Nandi, Arijit; Mendoza Rodríguez, José M; Hansen, Peter M; Harper, Sam

    2017-04-25

    Important inequalities in childhood vaccination coverage persist between countries and population groups. Understanding why some countries achieve higher and more equitable levels of coverage is crucial to redress these inequalities. In this study, we explored the country-level determinants of (1) coverage of the third dose of diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis- (DTP3) containing vaccine and (2) within-country inequalities in DTP3 coverage in 45 countries supported by Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance. We used data from the most recent Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS) conducted between 2005 and 2014. We measured national DTP3 coverage and the slope index of inequality in DTP3 coverage with respect to household wealth, maternal education, and multidimensional poverty. We collated data on country health systems, health financing, governance and geographic and sociocultural contexts from published sources. We used meta-regressions to assess the relationship between these country-level factors and variations in DTP3 coverage and inequalities. To validate our findings, we repeated these analyses for coverage with measles-containing vaccine (MCV). We found considerable heterogeneity in DTP3 coverage and in the magnitude of inequalities across countries. Results for MCV were consistent with those from DTP3. Political stability, gender equality and smaller land surface were important predictors of higher and more equitable levels of DTP3 coverage. Inequalities in DTP3 coverage were also lower in countries receiving more external resources for health, with lower rates of out-of-pocket spending and with higher national coverage. Greater government spending on heath and lower linguistic fractionalization were also consistent with better vaccination outcomes. Improving vaccination coverage and reducing inequalities requires that policies and programs address critical social determinants of health including geographic and social exclusion, gender inequality and the availability of

  2. Whole brain CT perfusion in acute anterior circulation ischemia: coverage size matters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emmer, B.J. [Erasmus Medical Centre, Department of Radiology, Postbus 2040, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Rijkee, M.; Walderveen, M.A.A. van [Leiden University Medical Centre, Department of Radiology, Leiden (Netherlands); Niesten, J.M.; Velthuis, B.K. [University Medical Centre Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Wermer, M.J.H. [Leiden University Medical Centre, Department of Neurology, Leiden (Netherlands)

    2014-12-15

    Our aim was to compare infarct core volume on whole brain CT perfusion (CTP) with several limited coverage sizes (i.e., 3, 4, 6, and 8 cm), as currently used in routine clinical practice. In total, 40 acute ischemic stroke patients with non-contrast CT (NCCT) and CTP imaging of anterior circulation ischemia were included. Imaging was performed using a 320-multislice CT. Average volumes of infarct core of all simulated partial coverage sizes were calculated. Infarct core volume of each partial brain coverage was compared with infarct core volume of whole brain coverage and expressed using a percentage. To determine the optimal starting position for each simulated CTP coverage, the percentage of infarct coverage was calculated for every possible starting position of the simulated partial coverage in relation to Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score in Acute Stroke Triage (ASPECTS 1) level. Whole brain CTP coverage further increased the percentage of infarct core volume depicted by 10 % as compared to the 8-cm coverage when the bottom slice was positioned at the ASPECTS 1 level. Optimization of the position of the region of interest (ROI) in 3 cm, 4 cm, and 8 cm improved the percentage of infarct depicted by 4 % for the 8-cm, 7 % for the 4-cm, and 13 % for the 3-cm coverage size. This study shows that whole brain CTP is the optimal coverage for CTP with a substantial improvement in accuracy in quantifying infarct core size. In addition, our results suggest that the optimal position of the ROI in limited coverage depends on the size of the coverage. (orig.)

  3. Sri Lanka : Achieving Pro-Poor Universal Health Coverage without Health Financing Reforms

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Owen

    2018-01-01

    Sri Lanka’s health system has a long track record of strong performance. This case study describes the main features and achievements of Sri Lanka’s high-performing health system, to distill lessons for the rest of the world. UNICO case studies focus on a particular health coverage program. In Sri Lanka, the selected health coverage program is the government’s national health service (NHS)...

  4. Coverage of Large-Scale Food Fortification of Edible Oil, Wheat Flour, and Maize Flour Varies Greatly by Vehicle and Country but Is Consistently Lower among the Most Vulnerable: Results from Coverage Surveys in 8 Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaron, Grant J; Friesen, Valerie M; Jungjohann, Svenja; Garrett, Greg S; Neufeld, Lynnette M; Myatt, Mark

    2017-05-01

    Background: Large-scale food fortification (LSFF) of commonly consumed food vehicles is widely implemented in low- and middle-income countries. Many programs have monitoring information gaps and most countries fail to assess program coverage. Objective: The aim of this work was to present LSFF coverage survey findings (overall and in vulnerable populations) from 18 programs (7 wheat flour, 4 maize flour, and 7 edible oil programs) conducted in 8 countries between 2013 and 2015. Methods: A Fortification Assessment Coverage Toolkit (FACT) was developed to standardize the assessments. Three indicators were used to assess the relations between coverage and vulnerability: 1 ) poverty, 2 ) poor dietary diversity, and 3 ) rural residence. Three measures of coverage were assessed: 1 ) consumption of the vehicle, 2 ) consumption of a fortifiable vehicle, and 3 ) consumption of a fortified vehicle. Individual program performance was assessed based on the following: 1 ) achieving overall coverage ≥50%, 2) achieving coverage of ≥75% in ≥1 vulnerable group, and 3 ) achieving equity in coverage for ≥1 vulnerable group. Results: Coverage varied widely by food vehicle and country. Only 2 of the 18 LSFF programs assessed met all 3 program performance criteria. The 2 main program bottlenecks were a poor choice of vehicle and failure to fortify a fortifiable vehicle (i.e., absence of fortification). Conclusions: The results highlight the importance of sound program design and routine monitoring and evaluation. There is strong evidence of the impact and cost-effectiveness of LSFF; however, impact can only be achieved when the necessary activities and processes during program design and implementation are followed. The FACT approach fills an important gap in the availability of standardized tools. The LSFF programs assessed here need to be re-evaluated to determine whether to further invest in the programs, whether other vehicles are appropriate, and whether other approaches

  5. Measuring coverage in MNCH: challenges and opportunities in the selection of coverage indicators for global monitoring.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Harris Requejo

    Full Text Available Global monitoring of intervention coverage is a cornerstone of international efforts to improve reproductive, maternal, newborn, and child health. In this review, we examine the process and implications of selecting a core set of coverage indicators for global monitoring, using as examples the processes used by the Countdown to 2015 for Maternal, Newborn and Child Survival and the Commission on Accountability for Women's and Children's Health. We describe how the generation of data for global monitoring involves five iterative steps: development of standard indicator definitions and measurement approaches to ensure comparability across countries; collection of high-quality data at the country level; compilation of country data at the global level; organization of global databases; and rounds of data quality checking. Regular and rigorous technical review processes that involve high-level decision makers and experts familiar with indicator measurement are needed to maximize uptake and to ensure that indicators used for global monitoring are selected on the basis of available evidence of intervention effectiveness, feasibility of measurement, and data availability as well as programmatic relevance. Experience from recent initiatives illustrates the challenges of striking this balance as well as strategies for reducing the tensions inherent in the indicator selection process. We conclude that more attention and continued investment need to be directed to global monitoring, to support both the process of global database development and the selection of sets of coverage indicators to promote accountability. The stakes are high, because these indicators can drive policy and program development at the country and global level, and ultimately impact the health of women and children and the communities where they live.

  6. Advocacy and coverage of needle exchange programs: results of a comparative study of harm reduction programs in Brazil, Bangladesh, Belarus, Ukraine, Russian Federation, and China Advocacy e cobertura de projetos de troca de agulhas: resultados de um estudo comparativo sobre programas de redução de danos no Brasil, Bangladesh, Belarus, Ucrânia, Federação Russa e China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dave Burrows

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available To prevent or mitigate an AIDS epidemic among injecting drug users (IDUs, effective activities need to be implemented on a large enough scale to reach and assist sufficient numbers of drug users and thereby change their risk behaviors related to drug use and sex. Recent work by UNAIDS on "high coverage sites", adopting the above strategies, has shown that one of the key elements in achieving high coverage is ongoing and sophisticated advocacy. High coverage harm reduction sites were studied through literature search and site visits, including key informant interviews, review of service statistics, and data analysis, in order to document the steps that led to scaling up, the way coverage was defined in these sites, and the lessons learned from their efforts. Syringe-exchange programs can achieve high coverage of IDUs. Monitoring to determine regular reach (those who are in regular contact with harm reduction services should be added to uniform data collection carried out by harm reduction programs. Advocacy is crucial to achieving high coverage.Para prevenir ou mitigar uma epidemia de AIDS entre usuários de drogas injetáveis (UDI, atividades eficazes devem ser implementadas numa escala suficiente para atingir e ajudar um número suficiente de usuários e, portanto, modificar seus comportamentos de risco em relação ao uso de drogas e práticas sexuais. Um estudo recente do UNAIDS sobre "locais de cobertura alta", ao adotar as estratégias propostas acima, demonstrou que um dos elementos centrais para atingir uma cobertura alta é a advocacy permanente e bem-elaborada. Locais de redução de danos que apresentavam altas taxas de cobertura foram estudados através de uma revisão bibliográfica e visitas aos locais de maior cobertura, incluindo entrevistas com informantes principais, revisão de dados estatísticos dos serviços e análise de dados para poder documentar os passos que levaram à ampliação do alcance dos projetos, à defini

  7. Cribado de retinopatía diabética mediante retinografía midriática en atención primaria Coverage and results of a screening program for diabetic retinopathy using mydriatic retinography in primary health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Vargas-Sánchez

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Conocer la cobertura de un programa de cribado de retinopatía diabética en atención primaria y la concordancia entre médicos de familia (MF y oftalmólogos. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: Estudio observacional transversal. Revisión de retinografías midriáticas de pacientes con diabetes mellitus tipo 2 (2007-2008 solicitadas por MF de tres centros de salud urbanos en Jaén,España. RESULTADOS: En total 296 retinografías (2007 y 380 (2008 (cobertura=26%±2.4.Retinografías patológicas: 181 MF (27%±1.3 y 59 (9%±0.3 oftalmólogos. Concordancia global moderada (kappa=0.408±0.039, que mejora del primer al segundo año (0.34 y 0.45; pOBJECTIVE: To identify the coverage of a diabetic retinopathy screening program in primary health care and to assess agreement between ophthalmologists and family physicians (FP regarding retinography evaluations of diabetic patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Cross-sectional observational study,with a review of diabetic patients' mydriatic retinographies (2007-2008 from three urban primary health centers (PHC(Jaén-Spain. RESULTS: A total of 296 retinographies in 2007 and 380 in 2008 (coverage=26%±2,4 were reviewed. Pathological retinographies were identified by 181 FPs (27%±1,3 and 59 (9%±0,3 ophthalmologists.Total agreement was moderate (kappa=0,408±0,039.Agreement was better in the latter year (0,45 vs 0,34; p<0,001 test χ2. FP evaluations showed 97% sensitivity,80% specificity,33% positive predictive value, 100% negative predictive value, 4, 88 positive likelihood ratio and 0,04 negative likelihood ratio. We find variability in coverage and agreement between PHC. CONCLUSIONS: Mydriatic retinographies performed and evaluated by FPs are useful to retinopathy screening of diabetic patients. Coverage, predictive values and likelihood ratio were better in the latter year, although the interpretation should be homogenized.

  8. Evolución de la necesidad y cobertura de los programas de intercambio de jeringuillas en las prisiones españolas, 1992-2009: Una estimación corregida Evolution of the need and coverage of syringe exchange programs in Spanish prisons, 1992-2009: A revised estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. de la Fuente

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: El objetivo del presente artículo es subsanar el sesgo incluido en nuestro anterior original presentando una estimación corregida de la necesidad y cobertura de jeringuillas en las prisiones españolas en el período 1992-2009. Material y Métodos: La provisión de jeringuillas procede de publicaciones oficiales. La necesidad se estimó aplicando métodos multiplicativos a datos secundarios de varias fuentes. La cobertura se estimó mediante el cociente entre provisión y necesidad, y la diferencia entre dichas magnitudes. Se corrigió el sesgo de estimación de necesidad detectado en el estudio original. Resultados: Los programas de intercambio de jeringuillas en prisión comenzaron en 1997. Su máxima cobertura se alcanzó en 2005, con un 36%, valor muy superior al estimado inicialmente, aunque disminuyó a la mitad en los cuatro años siguientes, con un 17.4% en 2009. Conclusiones: Debe valorarse la notable cobertura que se alcanzó con estos programas en España, pero su evolución más reciente nos lleva a enfatizar la necesidad de ser imaginativos para que las nuevas condiciones epidemiológicas y económicas no lleven a la desaparición de los mismos.Introduction: The objective of this paper is to amend the bias included in our previous work, presenting a corrected estimation of the need and coverage of syringes/needles in Spanish prisons between 1992 and 2009. Methods: Data on the provision of the needles exchange programs (NEPs in prison is taken from official publications. The need was calculated by applying multiplicative methods to secondary data from several sources. Coverage was estimated as the quotient between provision and need and the difference between these magnitudes. The detected need estimate bias has been corrected. Results: NEP's in prisons started in 1997. Their maximum coverage reached 36% in 2005, which is much higher than the initially estimated value. However, it decreased by half in the next four

  9. Optimization of inhibitory decision rules relative to length and coverage

    KAUST Repository

    Alsolami, Fawaz

    2012-01-01

    The paper is devoted to the study of algorithms for optimization of inhibitory rules relative to the length and coverage. In contrast with usual rules that have on the right-hand side a relation "attribute ≠ value", inhibitory rules have a relation "attribute = value" on the right-hand side. The considered algorithms are based on extensions of dynamic programming. © 2012 Springer-Verlag.

  10. Immunization Coverage in WHO Regions: A Review Article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahim Vakili

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available   In 1974, the World Health Organization (WHO established the Expanded Program on Immunization (EPI to ensure that all children have access to routinely recommended vaccines. Since then, global coverage with the four core vaccines (Bacille calmette guérin vaccine [for protection against tuberculosis], Diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis vaccine [DTP], Polio vaccine, and Measles vaccine has increased from

  11. Asymmetric k-Center with Minimum Coverage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gørtz, Inge Li

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we give approximation algorithms and inapproximability results for various asymmetric k-center with minimum coverage problems. In the k-center with minimum coverage problem, each center is required to serve a minimum number of clients. These problems have been studied by Lim et al. [A....... Lim, B. Rodrigues, F. Wang, Z. Xu, k-center problems with minimum coverage, Theoret. Comput. Sci. 332 (1–3) (2005) 1–17] in the symmetric setting....

  12. Surveillance of Vaccination Coverage among Adult Populations - United States, 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Walter W; Lu, Peng-Jun; O'Halloran, Alissa; Kim, David K; Grohskopf, Lisa A; Pilishvili, Tamara; Skoff, Tami H; Nelson, Noele P; Harpaz, Rafael; Markowitz, Lauri E; Rodriguez-Lainz, Alfonso; Fiebelkorn, Amy Parker

    2017-05-05

    conditions]). Coverage for all vaccines for adults remained low but modest gains occurred in vaccination coverage for influenza (adults aged ≥19 years), pneumococcal (adults aged 19-64 years with increased risk), Tdap (adults aged ≥19 years and adults aged 19-64 years), herpes zoster (adults aged ≥60 years and ≥65 years), and hepatitis B (HCP aged ≥19 years); coverage for other vaccines and groups with vaccination indications did not improve. The 30% Healthy People 2020 target for herpes zoster vaccination was met. Racial/ethnic disparities persisted for routinely recommended adult vaccines. Missed opportunities to vaccinate remained. Although having health insurance coverage and a usual place for health care were associated with higher vaccination coverage, these factors alone were not associated with optimal adult vaccination coverage. HPV vaccination coverage for males and females has increased since CDC recommended vaccination to prevent cancers caused by HPV, but many adolescents and young adults remained unvaccinated. Assessing factors associated with low coverage rates and disparities in vaccination is important for implementing strategies to improve vaccination coverage. Evidence-based practices that have been demonstrated to improve vaccination coverage should be used. These practices include assessment of patients' vaccination indications by health care providers and routine recommendation and offer of needed vaccines to adults, implementation of reminder-recall systems, use of standing-order programs for vaccination, and assessment of practice-level vaccination rates with feedback to staff members. For vaccination coverage to be improved among those who reported lower coverage rates of recommended adult vaccines, efforts also are needed to identify adults who do not have a regular provider or insurance and who report fewer health care visits.

  13. Post Auction Coverage Baseline 2.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Communications Commission — FINAL TELEVISION CHANNEL ASSIGNMENT INFORMATION RELATED TO INCENTIVE AUCTION REPACKING. NOTE: This file provides new baseline coverage and population data for all...

  14. Disparities in Private Health Insurance Coverage of Skilled Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stacey A. Tovino

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This article compares and contrasts public and private health insurance coverage of skilled medical rehabilitation, including cognitive rehabilitation, physical therapy, occupational therapy, speech-language pathology, and skilled nursing services (collectively, skilled care. As background, prior scholars writing in this area have focused on Medicare coverage of skilled care and have challenged coverage determinations limiting Medicare coverage to beneficiaries who are able to demonstrate improvement in their conditions within a specific period of time (the Improvement Standard. By and large, these scholars have applauded the settlement agreement approved on 24 January 2013, by the U.S. District Court for the District of Vermont in Jimmo v. Sebelius (Jimmo, as well as related motions, rulings, orders, government fact sheets, and Medicare program manual statements clarifying that Medicare covers skilled care that is necessary to prevent or slow a beneficiary’s deterioration or to maintain a beneficiary at his or her maximum practicable level of function even though no further improvement in the beneficiary’s condition is expected. Scholars who have focused on beneficiaries who have suffered severe brain injuries, in particular, have framed public insurance coverage of skilled brain rehabilitation as an important civil, disability, and educational right. Given that approximately two-thirds of Americans with health insurance are covered by private health insurance and that many private health plans continue to require their insureds to demonstrate improvement within a short period of time to obtain coverage of skilled care, scholarship assessing private health insurance coverage of skilled care is important but noticeably absent from the literature. This article responds to this gap by highlighting state benchmark plans’ and other private health plans’ continued use of the Improvement Standard in skilled care coverage decisions and

  15. Prediction of Low Community Sanitation Coverage Using Environmental and Sociodemographic Factors in Amhara Region, Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oswald, William E.; Stewart, Aisha E. P.; Flanders, W. Dana; Kramer, Michael R.; Endeshaw, Tekola; Zerihun, Mulat; Melaku, Birhanu; Sata, Eshetu; Gessesse, Demelash; Teferi, Tesfaye; Tadesse, Zerihun; Guadie, Birhan; King, Jonathan D.; Emerson, Paul M.; Callahan, Elizabeth K.; Moe, Christine L.; Clasen, Thomas F.

    2016-01-01

    This study developed and validated a model for predicting the probability that communities in Amhara Region, Ethiopia, have low sanitation coverage, based on environmental and sociodemographic conditions. Community sanitation coverage was measured between 2011 and 2014 through trachoma control program evaluation surveys. Information on environmental and sociodemographic conditions was obtained from available data sources and linked with community data using a geographic information system. Logistic regression was used to identify predictors of low community sanitation coverage (sanitation coverage were mapped. Among 1,502 communities, 344 (22.90%) had coverage below 20%. The selected model included measures for high topsoil gravel content, an indicator for low-lying land, population density, altitude, and rainfall and had reasonable predictive discrimination (area under the curve = 0.75, 95% confidence interval = 0.72, 0.78). Measures of soil stability were strongly associated with low community sanitation coverage, controlling for community wealth, and other factors. A model using available environmental and sociodemographic data predicted low community sanitation coverage for areas across Amhara Region with fair discrimination. This approach could assist sanitation programs and trachoma control programs, scaling up or in hyperendemic areas, to target vulnerable areas with additional activities or alternate technologies. PMID:27430547

  16. Prediction of Low Community Sanitation Coverage Using Environmental and Sociodemographic Factors in Amhara Region, Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oswald, William E; Stewart, Aisha E P; Flanders, W Dana; Kramer, Michael R; Endeshaw, Tekola; Zerihun, Mulat; Melaku, Birhanu; Sata, Eshetu; Gessesse, Demelash; Teferi, Tesfaye; Tadesse, Zerihun; Guadie, Birhan; King, Jonathan D; Emerson, Paul M; Callahan, Elizabeth K; Moe, Christine L; Clasen, Thomas F

    2016-09-07

    This study developed and validated a model for predicting the probability that communities in Amhara Region, Ethiopia, have low sanitation coverage, based on environmental and sociodemographic conditions. Community sanitation coverage was measured between 2011 and 2014 through trachoma control program evaluation surveys. Information on environmental and sociodemographic conditions was obtained from available data sources and linked with community data using a geographic information system. Logistic regression was used to identify predictors of low community sanitation coverage (sanitation coverage were mapped. Among 1,502 communities, 344 (22.90%) had coverage below 20%. The selected model included measures for high topsoil gravel content, an indicator for low-lying land, population density, altitude, and rainfall and had reasonable predictive discrimination (area under the curve = 0.75, 95% confidence interval = 0.72, 0.78). Measures of soil stability were strongly associated with low community sanitation coverage, controlling for community wealth, and other factors. A model using available environmental and sociodemographic data predicted low community sanitation coverage for areas across Amhara Region with fair discrimination. This approach could assist sanitation programs and trachoma control programs, scaling up or in hyperendemic areas, to target vulnerable areas with additional activities or alternate technologies. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  17. Coverage-based constraints for IMRT optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mescher, H; Ulrich, S; Bangert, M

    2017-09-05

    Radiation therapy treatment planning requires an incorporation of uncertainties in order to guarantee an adequate irradiation of the tumor volumes. In current clinical practice, uncertainties are accounted for implicitly with an expansion of the target volume according to generic margin recipes. Alternatively, it is possible to account for uncertainties by explicit minimization of objectives that describe worst-case treatment scenarios, the expectation value of the treatment or the coverage probability of the target volumes during treatment planning. In this note we show that approaches relying on objectives to induce a specific coverage of the clinical target volumes are inevitably sensitive to variation of the relative weighting of the objectives. To address this issue, we introduce coverage-based constraints for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment planning. Our implementation follows the concept of coverage-optimized planning that considers explicit error scenarios to calculate and optimize patient-specific probabilities [Formula: see text] of covering a specific target volume fraction [Formula: see text] with a certain dose [Formula: see text]. Using a constraint-based reformulation of coverage-based objectives we eliminate the trade-off between coverage and competing objectives during treatment planning. In-depth convergence tests including 324 treatment plan optimizations demonstrate the reliability of coverage-based constraints for varying levels of probability, dose and volume. General clinical applicability of coverage-based constraints is demonstrated for two cases. A sensitivity analysis regarding penalty variations within this planing study based on IMRT treatment planning using (1) coverage-based constraints, (2) coverage-based objectives, (3) probabilistic optimization, (4) robust optimization and (5) conventional margins illustrates the potential benefit of coverage-based constraints that do not require tedious adjustment of target

  18. The art of multiprocessor programming

    CERN Document Server

    Herlihy, Maurice

    2012-01-01

    Revised and updated with improvements conceived in parallel programming courses, The Art of Multiprocessor Programming is an authoritative guide to multicore programming. It introduces a higher level set of software development skills than that needed for efficient single-core programming. This book provides comprehensive coverage of the new principles, algorithms, and tools necessary for effective multiprocessor programming. Students and professionals alike will benefit from thorough coverage of key multiprocessor programming issues. This revised edition incorporates much-demanded updates t

  19. Moving toward universal coverage of health insurance in Vietnam: barriers, facilitating factors, and lessons from Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Ngan; Oh, Juhwan; Lee, Jin-Seok

    2014-07-01

    Vietnam has pursued universal health insurance coverage for two decades but has yet to fully achieve this goal. This paper investigates the barriers to achieve universal coverage and examines the validity of facilitating factors to shorten the transitional period in Vietnam. A comparative study of facilitating factors toward universal coverage of Vietnam and Korea reveals significant internal forces for Vietnam to further develop the National Health Insurance Program. Korea in 1977 and Vietnam in 2009 have common characteristics to be favorable of achieving universal coverage with similarities of level of income, highly qualified administrative ability, tradition of solidarity, and strong political leadership although there are differences in distribution of population and structure of the economy. From a comparative perspective, Vietnam can consider the experience of Korea in implementing the mandatory enrollment approach, household unit of eligibility, design of contribution and benefit scheme, and resource allocation to health insurance for sustainable government subsidy to achieve and sustain the universal coverage of health insurance.

  20. Increasing US health plan coverage for exercise programming in community mental health settings for people with serious mental illness: a position statement from the Society of Behavior Medicine and the American College of Sports Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, Sarah I; Jerome, Gerald J; Schneider, Kristin L; Craft, Lynette L; Buman, Matthew P; Stoutenberg, Mark; Daumit, Gail L; Bartels, Stephen J; Goodrich, David E

    2016-09-01

    Adults with serious mental illness die more than 10 years earlier than the average American. Premature mortality is due to the high prevalence of preventable diseases including cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Poor lifestyle behaviors including lack of exercise and physical inactivity contribute to the epidemic levels of obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease observed among adults with serious mental illness. Not surprisingly, people with serious mental illness are among the most costly consumers of health services due to increased visits for poorly managed mental and physical health. Recent studies have demonstrated that exercise interventions based on community mental health settings can significantly improve physical and mental health in people with serious mental illness. However, current funding regulations limit the ability of community mental health settings to offer exercise programming services to people with serious mental illness. Policy efforts are needed to improve the dissemination and sustainability of exercise programs for people with serious mental illness.

  1. Proteome coverage prediction with infinite Markov models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claassen, Manfred; Aebersold, Ruedi; Buhmann, Joachim M.

    2009-01-01

    Motivation: Liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) is the predominant method to comprehensively characterize complex protein mixtures such as samples from prefractionated or complete proteomes. In order to maximize proteome coverage for the studied sample, i.e. identify as many traceable proteins as possible, LC-MS/MS experiments are typically repeated extensively and the results combined. Proteome coverage prediction is the task of estimating the number of peptide discoveries of future LC-MS/MS experiments. Proteome coverage prediction is important to enhance the design of efficient proteomics studies. To date, there does not exist any method to reliably estimate the increase of proteome coverage at an early stage. Results: We propose an extended infinite Markov model DiriSim to extrapolate the progression of proteome coverage based on a small number of already performed LC-MS/MS experiments. The method explicitly accounts for the uncertainty of peptide identifications. We tested DiriSim on a set of 37 LC-MS/MS experiments of a complete proteome sample and demonstrated that DiriSim correctly predicts the coverage progression already from a small subset of experiments. The predicted progression enabled us to specify maximal coverage for the test sample. We demonstrated that quality requirements on the final proteome map impose an upper bound on the number of useful experiment repetitions and limit the achievable proteome coverage. Contact: manfredc@inf.ethz.ch; jbuhmann@inf.ethz.ch PMID:19477982

  2. CDMA coverage under mobile heterogeneous network load

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saban, D.; van den Berg, Hans Leo; Boucherie, Richardus J.; Endrayanto, A.I.

    2002-01-01

    We analytically investigate coverage (determined by the uplink) under non-homogeneous and moving traffic load of third generation UMTS mobile networks. In particular, for different call assignment policies, we investigate cell breathing and the movement of the coverage gap occurring between cells

  3. On optimal coverage with unreliable sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frasca, Paolo; Garin, Federica

    This paper regards the problem of placing unreliable sensors in a given one-dimensional environment, in such a way to optimize a given coverage cost. We specifically consider the disk-coverage cost, whose optimal solution for reliable sensors is simply an equally-spaced configuration of the sensors.

  4. 76 FR 7767 - Student Health Insurance Coverage

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-11

    ... HUMAN SERVICES 45 CFR Parts 144 and 147 RIN 0950-AA20 Student Health Insurance Coverage AGENCY: Centers... proposed regulation that would establish rules for student health insurance coverage under the Public Health Service Act and the Affordable Care Act. The proposed rule would define ``student health insurance...

  5. A Semantic Framework for Test Coverage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brandan Briones, L.; Brinksma, Hendrik; Stoelinga, Mariëlle Ida Antoinette; Graf, Susanne; Zhang, Wenhui

    2006-01-01

    Since testing is inherently incomplete, test selection has vital importance. Coverage measures evaluate the quality of a test suite and help the tester select test cases with maximal impact at minimum cost. Existing coverage criteria for test suites are usually defined in terms of syntactic

  6. Earthquake Coverage by the Western Press.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaddy, Gary D.; Tanjong, Enoh

    1986-01-01

    Describes a study to determine the type and quantity of Western news coverage of Third World earthquakes. Finds little evidence of geographical bias in coverage studied, and suggests that care must be taken to examine the underlying news events before bias is alleged. (MS)

  7. Impact of invitation schemes on screening coverage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Katja Kemp; von Euler Chelpin, My; Vejborg, Ilse

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The porpuse of mammography screening is to decrease breast cancer mortality. To achieve this a high coverage by examination is needed. Within an organized screening programme, we examined the impact of changes in the invitation schedule on the interplay between coverage...... and participation. METHOD: We studied nine cohorts aged 50-51 when first targeted by mammography screening in Copenhagen, Denmark. Population data were retrieved from the Danish Civil Registration System; invitation and attendance data from the screening programme database. Data were linked using unique personal...... identification numbers. Coverage by invitation was defined as (number of invited women/number of targeted women), coverage by examination as (number of screened women/number of targeted women), and participation rate as (number of screened women/number of invited women). RESULTS: Coverage by invitation was close...

  8. Chinese newspaper coverage of genetically modified organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Debates persist around the world over the development and use of genetically modified organisms (GMO). News media has been shown to both reflect and influence public perceptions of health and science related debates, as well as policy development. To better understand the news coverage of GMOs in China, we analyzed the content of articles in two Chinese newspapers that relate to the development and promotion of genetically modified technologies and GMOs. Methods Searching in the Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure Core Newspaper Database (CNKI-CND), we collected 77 articles, including news reports, comments and notes, published between January 2002 and August 2011 in two of the major Chinese newspapers: People’s Daily and Guangming Daily. We examined articles for perspectives that were discussed and/or mentioned regarding GMOs, the risks and benefits of GMOs, and the tone of news articles. Results The newspaper articles reported on 29 different kinds of GMOs. Compared with the possible risks, the benefits of GMOs were much more frequently discussed in the articles. 48.1% of articles were largely supportive of the GM technology research and development programs and the adoption of GM cottons, while 51.9% of articles were neutral on the subject of GMOs. Risks associated with GMOs were mentioned in the newspaper articles, but none of the articles expressed negative tones in regards to GMOs. Conclusion This study demonstrates that the Chinese print media is largely supportive of GMOs. It also indicates that the print media describes the Chinese government as actively pursuing national GMO research and development programs and the promotion of GM cotton usage. So far, discussion of the risks associated with GMOs is minimal in the news reports. The media, scientists, and the government should work together to ensure that science communication is accurate and balanced. PMID:22551150

  9. Chinese newspaper coverage of genetically modified organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Li; Rachul, Christen

    2012-06-08

    Debates persist around the world over the development and use of genetically modified organisms (GMO). News media has been shown to both reflect and influence public perceptions of health and science related debates, as well as policy development. To better understand the news coverage of GMOs in China, we analyzed the content of articles in two Chinese newspapers that relate to the development and promotion of genetically modified technologies and GMOs. Searching in the Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure Core Newspaper Database (CNKI-CND), we collected 77 articles, including news reports, comments and notes, published between January 2002 and August 2011 in two of the major Chinese newspapers: People's Daily and Guangming Daily. We examined articles for perspectives that were discussed and/or mentioned regarding GMOs, the risks and benefits of GMOs, and the tone of news articles. The newspaper articles reported on 29 different kinds of GMOs. Compared with the possible risks, the benefits of GMOs were much more frequently discussed in the articles. 48.1% of articles were largely supportive of the GM technology research and development programs and the adoption of GM cottons, while 51.9% of articles were neutral on the subject of GMOs. Risks associated with GMOs were mentioned in the newspaper articles, but none of the articles expressed negative tones in regards to GMOs. This study demonstrates that the Chinese print media is largely supportive of GMOs. It also indicates that the print media describes the Chinese government as actively pursuing national GMO research and development programs and the promotion of GM cotton usage. So far, discussion of the risks associated with GMOs is minimal in the news reports. The media, scientists, and the government should work together to ensure that science communication is accurate and balanced.

  10. Chinese newspaper coverage of genetically modified organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Du Li

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Debates persist around the world over the development and use of genetically modified organisms (GMO. News media has been shown to both reflect and influence public perceptions of health and science related debates, as well as policy development. To better understand the news coverage of GMOs in China, we analyzed the content of articles in two Chinese newspapers that relate to the development and promotion of genetically modified technologies and GMOs. Methods Searching in the Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure Core Newspaper Database (CNKI-CND, we collected 77 articles, including news reports, comments and notes, published between January 2002 and August 2011 in two of the major Chinese newspapers: People’s Daily and Guangming Daily. We examined articles for perspectives that were discussed and/or mentioned regarding GMOs, the risks and benefits of GMOs, and the tone of news articles. Results The newspaper articles reported on 29 different kinds of GMOs. Compared with the possible risks, the benefits of GMOs were much more frequently discussed in the articles. 48.1% of articles were largely supportive of the GM technology research and development programs and the adoption of GM cottons, while 51.9% of articles were neutral on the subject of GMOs. Risks associated with GMOs were mentioned in the newspaper articles, but none of the articles expressed negative tones in regards to GMOs. Conclusion This study demonstrates that the Chinese print media is largely supportive of GMOs. It also indicates that the print media describes the Chinese government as actively pursuing national GMO research and development programs and the promotion of GM cotton usage. So far, discussion of the risks associated with GMOs is minimal in the news reports. The media, scientists, and the government should work together to ensure that science communication is accurate and balanced.

  11. Universal health coverage in Turkey: enhancement of equity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atun, Rifat; Aydın, Sabahattin; Chakraborty, Sarbani; Sümer, Safir; Aran, Meltem; Gürol, Ipek; Nazlıoğlu, Serpil; Ozgülcü, Senay; Aydoğan, Ulger; Ayar, Banu; Dilmen, Uğur; Akdağ, Recep

    2013-07-06

    Turkey has successfully introduced health system changes and provided its citizens with the right to health to achieve universal health coverage, which helped to address inequities in financing, health service access, and health outcomes. We trace the trajectory of health system reforms in Turkey, with a particular emphasis on 2003-13, which coincides with the Health Transformation Program (HTP). The HTP rapidly expanded health insurance coverage and access to health-care services for all citizens, especially the poorest population groups, to achieve universal health coverage. We analyse the contextual drivers that shaped the transformations in the health system, explore the design and implementation of the HTP, identify the factors that enabled its success, and investigate its effects. Our findings suggest that the HTP was instrumental in achieving universal health coverage to enhance equity substantially, and led to quantifiable and beneficial effects on all health system goals, with an improved level and distribution of health, greater fairness in financing with better financial protection, and notably increased user satisfaction. After the HTP, five health insurance schemes were consolidated to create a unified General Health Insurance scheme with harmonised and expanded benefits. Insurance coverage for the poorest population groups in Turkey increased from 2·4 million people in 2003, to 10·2 million in 2011. Health service access increased across the country-in particular, access and use of key maternal and child health services improved to help to greatly reduce the maternal mortality ratio, and under-5, infant, and neonatal mortality, especially in socioeconomically disadvantaged groups. Several factors helped to achieve universal health coverage and improve outcomes. These factors include economic growth, political stability, a comprehensive transformation strategy led by a transformation team, rapid policy translation, flexible implementation with

  12. Human papillomavirus vaccine coverage among female Australian adolescents: success of the school-based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brotherton, Julia M L; Murray, Sharron L; Hall, Madeline A; Andrewartha, Lynne K; Banks, Carolyn A; Meijer, Dennis; Pitcher, Helen C; Scully, Megan M; Molchanoff, Luda

    2013-11-04

    To describe quadrivalent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination coverage achieved in the HPV vaccination catch-up program for girls aged 12-17 years. Analysis of data from the Australian National HPV Vaccination Program Register. Girls aged 12-17 years as at 30 June 2007. HPV vaccine coverage by dose (1, 2 and 3), age and state of residence, using Australian Bureau of Statistics estimates of resident populations as the denominator. Notified vaccination coverage for girls aged 12-17 years nationally was 83% for dose 1, 78% for dose 2 and 70% for dose 3. The Australian Capital Territory and Victoria recorded the highest three-dose coverage for the 12-17-year-old cohort overall at 75%. The highest national three-dose coverage rate by age was achieved in 12-year-olds (74%). In Queensland, coverage among Indigenous girls compared with non-Indigenous girls was lower with each dose (lower by 4% for dose 1, 10% for dose 2 and 15% for dose 3). This pattern was not seen in the NT, where initial coverage was 17% lower among Indigenous girls, but the course completion rate among those who started vaccination was identical (84%). The catch-up HPV vaccination program delivered over 1.9 million doses of HPV vaccine to girls aged 12-17 years, resulting in 70% of girls in this age group being fully vaccinated. The range in coverage achieved and the lower uptake documented among Indigenous girls suggest that HPV vaccination programs can be further improved.

  13. Insurance Coverage Policies for Personalized Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Hresko

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Adoption of personalized medicine in practice has been slow, in part due to the lack of evidence of clinical benefit provided by these technologies. Coverage by insurers is a critical step in achieving widespread adoption of personalized medicine. Insurers consider a variety of factors when formulating medical coverage policies for personalized medicine, including the overall strength of evidence for a test, availability of clinical guidelines and health technology assessments by independent organizations. In this study, we reviewed coverage policies of the largest U.S. insurers for genomic (disease-related and pharmacogenetic (PGx tests to determine the extent that these tests were covered and the evidence basis for the coverage decisions. We identified 41 coverage policies for 49 unique testing: 22 tests for disease diagnosis, prognosis and risk and 27 PGx tests. Fifty percent (or less of the tests reviewed were covered by insurers. Lack of evidence of clinical utility appears to be a major factor in decisions of non-coverage. The inclusion of PGx information in drug package inserts appears to be a common theme of PGx tests that are covered. This analysis highlights the variability of coverage determinations and factors considered, suggesting that the adoption of personal medicine will affected by numerous factors, but will continue to be slowed due to lack of demonstrated clinical benefit.

  14. Assessing vaccination coverage in the European Union: is it still a challenge?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haverkate, Manon; D'Ancona, Fortunato; Johansen, Kari; van der Velden, Koos; Giesecke, Johan; Lopalco, Pier Luigi

    2011-08-01

    Assessing vaccination coverage is of paramount importance for improving quality and effectiveness of vaccination programs. In this article, some of the different systems that are used for assessing vaccination coverage within and outside the EU are reviewed in order to explore the need for improving vaccination coverage data quality. All countries in the EU have implemented vaccination programs for children, which include vaccinations to protect against between nine and 14 infectious diseases. Collecting and assessing vaccination coverage regularly is part of such programs, but the methods used vary widely. Some quality issues are evident when data reported through administrative methods are compared with seroprevalence studies or other surveys. More thorough assessment of vaccination coverage and more effective information sharing are needed in the EU. A homogeneous system for assessing vaccination coverage would facilitate comparability across countries and might increase the level of the quality of both the national and local systems. Cooperative and coordinated responses to vaccine-preventable disease threats might be improved by better information sharing.

  15. 42 CFR 457.80 - Current State child health insurance coverage and coordination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Current State child health insurance coverage and... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STATE CHILDREN'S HEALTH INSURANCE PROGRAMS (SCHIPs) ALLOTMENTS AND GRANTS TO STATES Introduction; State Plans for Child Health Insurance Programs and Outreach Strategies...

  16. Elementary number theory with programming

    CERN Document Server

    Lewinter, Marty

    2015-01-01

    A successful presentation of the fundamental concepts of number theory and computer programming Bridging an existing gap between mathematics and programming, Elementary Number Theory with Programming provides a unique introduction to elementary number theory with fundamental coverage of computer programming. Written by highly-qualified experts in the fields of computer science and mathematics, the book features accessible coverage for readers with various levels of experience and explores number theory in the context of programming without relying on advanced prerequisite knowledge and con

  17. Broadcast Network Coverage with Multicell Cooperation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongxiang Li

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Multicell cooperation has been identified as one of the underlying principles for future wireless communication systems. This paper studies the benefits of multicell cooperation in broadcast TV network from an information theoretical perspective. We define outage capacity as the figure of merit and derive the broadcast coverage area to evaluate such system. Specifically, we calculate the broadcast coverage area with given common information rate and outage probabilities when multiple base stations collaboratively transmit the broadcast signals. For the general MIMO case where receivers have multiple antennas, we provide simulation results to illustrate the expanded coverage area. In all cases, our results show that the coverage of a TV broadcast network can be significantly improved by multicell cooperation.

  18. Continuous Eligibility for Medicaid and CHIP Coverage

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — States have the option to provide children with 12 months of continuous coverage through Medicaid and CHIP, even if the family experiences a change in income during...

  19. Media Coverage of Nuclear Energy after Fukushima

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oltra, C.; Roman, P.; Prades, A.

    2013-07-01

    This report presents the main findings of a content analysis of printed media coverage of nuclear energy in Spain before and after the Fukushima accident. Our main objective is to understand the changes in the presentation of nuclear fission and nuclear fusion as a result of the accident in Japan. We specifically analyze the volume of coverage and thematic content in the media coverage for nuclear fusion from a sample of Spanish print articles in more than 20 newspapers from 2008 to 2012. We also analyze the media coverage of nuclear energy (fission) in three main Spanish newspapers one year before and one year after the accident. The results illustrate how the media contributed to the presentation of nuclear power in the months before and after the accident. This could have implications for the public understanding of nuclear power. (Author)

  20. Insurance Coverage Policies for Personalized Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Andrew Hresko; Haga, Susanne B.

    2012-01-01

    Adoption of personalized medicine in practice has been slow, in part due to the lack of evidence of clinical benefit provided by these technologies. Coverage by insurers is a critical step in achieving widespread adoption of personalized medicine. Insurers consider a variety of factors when formulating medical coverage policies for personalized medicine, including the overall strength of evidence for a test, availability of clinical guidelines and health technology assessments by independent ...

  1. Limited Deposit Insurance Coverage and Bank Competition

    OpenAIRE

    SHY, Oz; Stenbacka, Rune; Yankov, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    Deposit insurance schemes in many countries place a limit on the coverage of deposits in each bank. However, no limits are placed on the number of accounts held with different banks. Therefore, under limited deposit insurance, some consumers open accounts with different banks to achieve higher or full deposit insurance coverage. We compare three regimes of deposit insurance: No deposit insurance, unlimited deposit insurance, and limited deposit insurance. We show that limited deposit insuranc...

  2. St. Lukes' Survey on vaccination coverage

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To conf"1rID this very low coverage, a survey was done in the 5 km catchment area around the hospital. ... immunised; 13 (2.1%) had lost their card; 3 (0.5%) had partial immunisation and 2 (0.3%) had not received any ... St. Lukes hospital it was found that the already low estimated vaccine coverage of 57% for 1989, had.

  3. Dermal Coverage of Traumatic War Wounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    healing/non-healing of wound and donor site • Graft loss • Heterotrophic ossification • Infection • Scar contracture • Durability (i.e. abrasions/ injuries ...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-2-0004 TITLE: "Dermal Coverage of Traumatic War Wounds ” PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr. Leon Nesti CONTRACTING...REPORT DATE January 2017 2. REPORT TYPE Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 31 Oct 2012- 30 Oct 2016 " Dermal Coverage of Traumatic War Wounds ” 5a

  4. Cooperative Cloud Service Aware Mobile Internet Coverage Connectivity Guarantee Protocol Based on Sensor Opportunistic Coverage Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Qin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve the Internet coverage ratio and provide connectivity guarantee, based on sensor opportunistic coverage mechanism and cooperative cloud service, we proposed the coverage connectivity guarantee protocol for mobile Internet. In this scheme, based on the opportunistic covering rules, the network coverage algorithm of high reliability and real-time security was achieved by using the opportunity of sensor nodes and the Internet mobile node. Then, the cloud service business support platform is created based on the Internet application service management capabilities and wireless sensor network communication service capabilities, which is the architecture of the cloud support layer. The cooperative cloud service aware model was proposed. Finally, we proposed the mobile Internet coverage connectivity guarantee protocol. The results of experiments demonstrate that the proposed algorithm has excellent performance, in terms of the security of the Internet and the stability, as well as coverage connectivity ability.

  5. Towards Semantic Web Services on Large, Multi-Dimensional Coverages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, P.

    2009-04-01

    Observed and simulated data in the Earth Sciences often come as coverages, the general term for space-time varying phenomena as set forth by standardization bodies like the Open GeoSpatial Consortium (OGC) and ISO. Among such data are 1-d time series, 2-D surface data, 3-D surface data time series as well as x/y/z geophysical and oceanographic data, and 4-D metocean simulation results. With increasing dimensionality the data sizes grow exponentially, up to Petabyte object sizes. Open standards for exploiting coverage archives over the Web are available to a varying extent. The OGC Web Coverage Service (WCS) standard defines basic extraction operations: spatio-temporal and band subsetting, scaling, reprojection, and data format encoding of the result - a simple interoperable interface for coverage access. More processing functionality is available with products like Matlab, Grid-type interfaces, and the OGC Web Processing Service (WPS). However, these often lack properties known as advantageous from databases: declarativeness (describe results rather than the algorithms), safe in evaluation (no request can keep a server busy infinitely), and optimizable (enable the server to rearrange the request so as to produce the same result faster). WPS defines a geo-enabled SOAP interface for remote procedure calls. This allows to webify any program, but does not allow for semantic interoperability: a function is identified only by its function name and parameters while the semantics is encoded in the (only human readable) title and abstract. Hence, another desirable property is missing, namely an explicit semantics which allows for machine-machine communication and reasoning a la Semantic Web. The OGC Web Coverage Processing Service (WCPS) language, which has been adopted as an international standard by OGC in December 2008, defines a flexible interface for the navigation, extraction, and ad-hoc analysis of large, multi-dimensional raster coverages. It is abstract in that it

  6. Knowledge of Healthcare Coverage for Refugee Claimants: Results from a Survey of Health Service Providers in Montreal: e0146798

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mónica Ruiz-Casares; Janet Cleveland; Youssef Oulhote; Catherine Dunkley-Hickin; Cécile Rousseau

    2016-01-01

      Following changes to the Interim Federal Health (IFH) program in Canada in 2012, this study investigates health service providers' knowledge of the healthcare coverage for refugee claimants living in Quebec...

  7. Knowledge of Healthcare Coverage for Refugee Claimants: Results from a Survey of Health Service Providers in Montreal

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ruiz-Casares, Mónica; Cleveland, Janet; Oulhote, Youssef; Dunkley-Hickin, Catherine; Rousseau, Cécile

    2016-01-01

    Following changes to the Interim Federal Health (IFH) program in Canada in 2012, this study investigates health service providers' knowledge of the healthcare coverage for refugee claimants living in Quebec...

  8. A political history of medicare and prescription drug coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Thomas R; Lee, Philip R; Lipton, Helene L

    2004-01-01

    This article examines the history of efforts to add prescription drug coverage to the Medicare program. It identifies several important patterns in policymaking over four decades. First, prescription drug coverage has usually been tied to the fate of broader proposals for Medicare reform. Second, action has been hampered by divided government, federal budget deficits, and ideological conflict between those seeking to expand the traditional Medicare program and those preferring a greater role for private health care companies. Third, the provisions of the Medicare Prescription Drug, Improvement, and Modernization Act of 2003 reflect earlier missed opportunities. Policymakers concluded from past episodes that participation in the new program should be voluntary, with Medicare beneficiaries and taxpayers sharing the costs. They ignored lessons from past episodes, however, about the need to match expanded benefits with adequate mechanisms for cost containment. Based on several new circumstances in 2003, the article demonstrates why there was a historic opportunity to add a Medicare prescription drug benefit and identify challenges to implementing an effective policy.

  9. Increasing influenza vaccination coverage in recommended population groups in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blank, Patricia R; Szucs, Thomas D

    2009-04-01

    The clinical and economic burden of seasonal influenza is frequently underestimated. The cornerstone of controlling and preventing influenza is vaccination. National and international guidelines aim to implement immunization programs and targeted vaccination-coverage rates, which should help to enhance the vaccine uptake, especially in the at-risk population. This review purposes to highlight the vaccination guidelines and the actual vaccination situation in four target groups (the elderly, people with underlying chronic conditions, healthcare workers and children) from a European point of view.

  10. Sports and performing arts medicine: 4. Events coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finnoff, Jonathan T; Willick, Stuart; Akau, Cedric K; Harrast, Mark A; Storm, Seneca A

    2009-03-01

    This self-directed learning module highlights medical coverage of sports events and artistic performances. It is part of the study guide on sports and performing arts medicine in the Self-Directed Physiatric Education Program for practitioners and trainees in physical medicine and rehabilitation. Using a case vignette format, this article specifically focuses on performance anxiety, exercise-associated collapse, exercise-induced asthma, transient quadriparesis, stingers/burners and anterior glenohumeral joint dislocations. The goal of this article is to improve the learner's ability to formulate and implement an appropriate evaluation and treatment algorithm for certain conditions associated with sports and performing arts events.

  11. [Pneumococcal vaccination coverage in at-risk children in Catalonia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Roser; Armadans, Lluís; Martínez, Xavier; Moraga, Fernando; Campins, Magda

    2015-11-01

    The public health system in Catalonia only funds pneumococcal vaccination in paediatrics for children at-risk. The aim of this study was to determine pneumococcal vaccination coverage and its association with age, sociodemographic factors and other variables. Descriptive cross-sectional study of children aged between 2 months and 15 years old assigned to primary care centres in Catalonia and with diseases that are included for pneumococcal vaccine in the official vaccination program. The information on vaccination status and study variables were obtained from data registered in the electronic medical records in the primary care centres. An analysis was made of the association between pneumococcal vaccination and demographic and medical variables using bivariate analysis and a multiple logistic regression model. The adjusted odds ratio (aOR), with a confidence interval of 95%, was used to measure the relationships. Pneumococcal vaccination coverage was 47.7%. Variables which predicted pneumococcal vaccination were: age (aOR: 9.2 [7.9-10.7] in children 2 months-2 years old; aOR 8.1 [7.0-9.3] in children 3-5 years; aOR: 4.6 [4.0-5.2] in children 6-10 years), Spanish nationality (aOR: 3.9 [3.5-4.3]), correct immunisation according to systematic immunisation schedule (aOR: 2.5 [2.1-3.0]), and number of risk conditions (aOR: 3.2 [2.5-4.1] in children with 2 or more conditions). Pneumococcal vaccination coverage in children with risk conditions is low in Catalonia. Strategies need to be implemented to increase coverage. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  12. Near visual impairment and spectacle coverage in Telangana, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmamula, Srinivas; Khanna, Rohit C; Kunuku, Eswararao; Rao, Gullapalli N

    2017-08-01

    The study highlights the burden of near visual impairment (NVI) in India. NVI is a common condition that can be addressed through provision of spectacles. The study aims to assess the prevalence of NVI and spectacle coverage among those aged ≥40 years in south Indian state of Telangana. Population-based cross-sectional study using a rapid assessment methodology. Five thousand one hundred forty participants enumerated from 123 clusters in two districts and have presenting distance visual acuity of ≥6/18 in the better eye. Presenting near vision was assessed binocularly at a fixed distance of 40 cm using a log MAR chart with tumbling E optotypes in ambient lighting conditions. If the presenting near vision was worse than 6/12 (log MAR 0.3), then it was re-assessed with addition lens appropriate to the age. NVI was defined as binocular presenting near vision worse than 6/12. Prevalence of NVI and spectacle coverage. The mean age of the participants was 51.1 years (standard deviation: 9.3 years), and 46.5% (n = 2392) were women. About 80% (n = 4142) of them had no education, and 21.9% (n = 1126) were using spectacles for near vision. Nearly half of the participants were from Adilabad district (n = 2665). The prevalence of NVI was 58.3% (95% confidence interval: 56.9-59.6). NVI was associated with older age groups, male gender and no education. The spectacle coverage was 26.5%. NVI is common in rural Telangana with low spectacle coverage. Service delivery programs should use a multi-pronged approach to address the burden of NVI. © 2017 Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Ophthalmologists.

  13. Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Health Insurance Coverage: Dynamics of Gaining and Losing Coverage over the Life-Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Heeju

    2017-04-01

    Health insurance coverage varies substantially between racial and ethnic groups in the United States. Compared to non-Hispanic whites, African Americans and people of Hispanic origin had persistently lower insurance coverage rates at all ages. This article describes age- and group-specific dynamics of insurance gain and loss that contribute to inequalities found in traditional cross-sectional studies. It uses the longitudinal 2008 Panel of the Survey of Income and Program Participation (N=114,345) to describe age-specific patterns of disparity prior to the Affordable Care Act (ACA). A formal decomposition on increment-decrement life-tables of insurance gain and loss shows that coverage disparities are predominately driven by minority groups' greater propensity to lose the insurance that they already have. Uninsured African Americans were faster to gain insurance than non-Hispanic whites but their high rates of insurance loss more than negated this advantage. Disparities from greater rates of loss among minority groups emerge rapidly at the end of childhood and persist throughout adulthood. This is especially true for African Americans and Hispanics and their relative disadvantages again heighten in their 40s and 50s.

  14. Vaccination Coverage Among Children in Kindergarten - United States, 2014-15 School Year.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seither, Ranee; Calhoun, Kayla; Knighton, Cynthia L; Mellerson, Jenelle; Meador, Seth; Tippins, Ashley; Greby, Stacie M; Dietz, Vance

    2015-08-28

    State and local jurisdictions require children to be vaccinated before starting school to maintain high vaccination coverage and protect schoolchildren from vaccine-preventable diseases. State vaccination requirements, which include school vaccination and exemption laws and health department regulations, permit medical exemptions for students with a medical contraindication to receiving a vaccine or vaccine component and may allow nonmedical exemptions for religious reasons or philosophic beliefs. To monitor state and national vaccination coverage and exemption levels among children attending kindergarten, CDC analyzes school vaccination data collected by federally funded state, local, and territorial immunization programs. This report describes vaccination coverage estimates in 49 states and the District of Columbia (DC) and vaccination exemption estimates in 46 states and DC that reported the number of children with at least one exemption among kindergartners during the 2014-15 school year. Median vaccination coverage* was 94.0% for 2 doses of measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccine; 94.2% for the local requirements for diphtheria, tetanus, and acellular pertussis vaccine (DTaP); and 93.6% for 2 doses of varicella vaccine among the 39 states and DC with a 2-dose requirement. The median percentage of any exemptions† was 1.7%. Although statewide vaccination coverage among kindergartners was high during the 2014-15 school year, geographic pockets of low vaccination coverage and high exemption levels can place children at risk for vaccine-preventable diseases. Appropriate school vaccination coverage assessments can help immunization programs identify clusters of low coverage and develop partnerships with schools and communities to ensure that children are protected from vaccine-preventable diseases.

  15. Cervical cancer screening coverage in a high-incidence region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cibelli Navarro

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE To analyze the coverage of a cervical cancer screening program in a city with a high incidence of the disease in addition to the factors associated with non-adherence to the current preventive program. METHODS A cross-sectional study based on household surveys was conducted. The sample was composed of women between 25 and 59 years of age of the city of Boa Vista, RR, Northern Brazil who were covered by the cervical cancer screening program. The cluster sampling method was used. The dependent variable was participation in a women’s health program, defined as undergoing at least one Pap smear in the 36 months prior to the interview; the explanatory variables were extracted from individual data. A generalized linear model was used. RESULTS 603 women were analyzed, with an mean age of 38.2 years (SD = 10.2. Five hundred and seventeen women underwent the screening test, and the prevalence of adherence in the last three years was up to 85.7% (95%CI 82.5;88.5. A high per capita household income and recent medical consultation were associated with the lower rate of not being tested in multivariate analysis. Disease ignorance, causes, and prevention methods were correlated with chances of non-adherence to the screening system; 20.0% of the women were reported to have undergone opportunistic and non-routine screening. CONCLUSIONS The informed level of coverage is high, exceeding the level recommended for the control of cervical cancer. The preventive program appears to be opportunistic in nature, particularly for the most vulnerable women (with low income and little information on the disease. Studies on the diagnostic quality of cervicovaginal cytology and therapeutic schedules for positive cases are necessary for understanding the barriers to the control of cervical cancer.

  16. Conceptualising the lack of health insurance coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, J B

    2000-01-01

    This paper examines the lack of health insurance coverage in the US as a public policy issue. It first compares the problem of health insurance coverage to the problem of unemployment to show that in terms of the numbers of individuals affected lack of health insurance is a problem comparable in importance to the problem of unemployment. Secondly, the paper discusses the methodology involved in measuring health insurance coverage, and argues that the current method of estimation of the uninsured underestimates the extent that individuals go without health insurance. Third, the paper briefly introduces Amartya Sen's functioning and capabilities framework to suggest a way of representing the extent to which individuals are uninsured. Fourth, the paper sketches a means of operationalizing the Sen representation of the uninsured in terms of the disability-adjusted life year (DALY) measure.

  17. Resolution, coverage, and geometry beyond traditional limits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronen, Shuki; Ferber, Ralf

    1998-12-31

    The presentation relates to the optimization of the image of seismic data and improved resolution and coverage of acquired data. Non traditional processing methods such as inversion to zero offset (IZO) are used. To realize the potential of saving acquisition cost by reducing in-fill and to plan resolution improvement by processing, geometry QC methods such as DMO Dip Coverage Spectrum (DDCS) and Bull`s Eyes Analysis are used. The DDCS is a 2-D spectrum whose entries consist of the DMO (Dip Move Out) coverage for a particular reflector specified by it`s true time dip and reflector normal strike. The Bull`s Eyes Analysis relies on real time processing of synthetic data generated with the real geometry. 4 refs., 6 figs.

  18. Coverage and Compliance of Mass Drug Administration in Lymphatic Filariasis: A Comparative Analysis in a District of West Bengal, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanmay Kanti Panja

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Despite several rounds of Mass Drug Administration (MDA as an elimination strategy of Lymphatic Filariasis (LF from India, still the coverage is far behind the required level of 85%.Objectives: The present study was carried out with the objectives to assess the coverage and compliance of MDA and their possible determinants. Methods: A cross-sectional community based study was conducted in Paschim Midnapur district of West Bengal, India for consecutive two years following MDA. Study participants were chosen by 30-cluster sampling technique. Data was collected by using pre-tested semi-structured proforma to assess the coverage and compliance of MDA along with possible determinants for non-attaining the expected coverage. Results: In the year 2009, coverage, compliance, coverage compliance gap (CCG and effective coverage was seen to be 84.1%, 70.5%, 29.5% and 59.3% respectively. In 2010, the results further deteriorated to 78.5%, 66.9%, 33.3% and 57% respectively. The poor coverage and compliance were attributed to improper training of service providers and lack of community awareness regarding MDA.Conclusion: The study emphasized supervised consumption, retraining of service providers before MDA activities, strengthening behaviour change communication strategy for community awareness. Advocacy by the program managers and policy makers towards prioritization of MDA program will make the story of filaria elimination a success.

  19. Coverage statistics for sequence census methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evans Steven N

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We study the statistical properties of fragment coverage in genome sequencing experiments. In an extension of the classic Lander-Waterman model, we consider the effect of the length distribution of fragments. We also introduce a coding of the shape of the coverage depth function as a tree and explain how this can be used to detect regions with anomalous coverage. This modeling perspective is especially germane to current high-throughput sequencing experiments, where both sample preparation protocols and sequencing technology particulars can affect fragment length distributions. Results Under the mild assumptions that fragment start sites are Poisson distributed and successive fragment lengths are independent and identically distributed, we observe that, regardless of fragment length distribution, the fragments produced in a sequencing experiment can be viewed as resulting from a two-dimensional spatial Poisson process. We then study the successive jumps of the coverage function, and show that they can be encoded as a random tree that is approximately a Galton-Watson tree with generation-dependent geometric offspring distributions whose parameters can be computed. Conclusions We extend standard analyses of shotgun sequencing that focus on coverage statistics at individual sites, and provide a null model for detecting deviations from random coverage in high-throughput sequence census based experiments. Our approach leads to explicit determinations of the null distributions of certain test statistics, while for others it greatly simplifies the approximation of their null distributions by simulation. Our focus on fragments also leads to a new approach to visualizing sequencing data that is of independent interest.

  20. The nature of newspaper coverage of homicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, C A; Sorenson, S B

    2002-06-01

    Previous research has shown that some homicides are more likely than others to receive newspaper coverage (for example, homicides by strangers). The present investigation examined whether, once the decision has been made to report on a homicide, the nature of the coverage (that is, how much visibility is given to a story, what information is included, and how a story is written) differs according to two key variables, victim ethnicity, and victim-suspect relationship. Los Angeles, California (USA). Homicide articles from the 1990-94 issues of the Los Angeles Times were stratified according to the predictors of interest (victim ethnicity and victim-suspect relationship) and a sample was drawn. Data that characterized two primary aspects of newspaper coverage, prominence and story framing (including background information, story focus, use of opinions, story tone, and "hook" or leading introductory lines) were abstracted from the articles. Descriptive statistics and cross tabulations were generated. Multivariate analyses were conducted to examine the predictive value of victim ethnicity and victim-suspect relationship on the nature of the newspaper coverage. Newspaper coverage of homicide was generally factual, episodic, and unemotional in tone. Victim-suspect relationship, but not victim ethnicity, was related to how a story was covered, particularly the story frame. Homicides by intimates were covered consistently differently from other types of homicides; these stories were less likely to be opinion dominated, be emotional, and begin with a "hook". Victim-suspect relationship was related to the nature of coverage of homicides in a large, metropolitan newspaper. Given the agenda setting and issue framing functions of the news media, these findings have implications for the manner in which the public and policy makers perceive homicides and, consequently, for the support afforded to various types of solutions for addressing and preventing violence.

  1. Massachusetts 2005 Lidar Coverage, USACE National Coastal Mapping Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — The Joint Airborne Lidar Bathymetry Technical Center of Expertise (JALBTCX) has performed a coastal survey along the Atlantic coast in the summer of 2005. The data...

  2. Ohio 2006 Lidar Coverage, USACE National Coastal Mapping Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — The Joint Airborne Lidar Bathymetry Technical Center of Expertise (JALBTCX) has performed a coastal survey along the Lake Erie coast of OH in 2006. The data types...

  3. Validation of the Voice of America Coverage Analysis Program (VOACAP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    34 ======================================================================= ================== Points of contact: Wayne Patterson 619-553-1423 wayne.patterson@navy.mil (Areps, Enviro ) 29 Amalia Barrios 619

  4. California 2010 Lidar Coverage, USACE National Coastal Mapping Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — The Joint Airborne Lidar Bathymetry Technical Center of Expertise (JALBTCX) has performed a coastal survey along the Pacific coast in 2010. The data types collected...

  5. Alabama 2011 Lidar Coverage, USACE National Coastal Mapping Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — The Joint Airborne Lidar Bathymetry Technical Center of Expertise (JALBTCX) has performed a coastal survey along the Gulf of Mexico in 2011. The data types collected...

  6. Louisiana 2011 Lidar Coverage, USACE National Coastal Mapping Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — The Joint Airborne Lidar Bathymetry Technical Center of Expertise (JALBTCX) has performed a coastal survey along the Gulf of Mexico in 2011. The data types collected...

  7. Pennsylvania 2007 Lidar Coverage, USACE National Coastal Mapping Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — The Joint Airborne Lidar Bathymetry Technical Center of Expertise (JALBTCX) has performed a coastal survey along the Lake Erie coast of PA in 2007. The data types...

  8. Virginia 2005 Lidar Coverage, USACE National Coastal Mapping Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — The Joint Airborne Lidar Bathymetry Technical Center of Expertise (JALBTCX) has performed a coastal survey along the Atlantic coast of VA in 2005. The data types...

  9. Alabama 2004 Lidar Coverage, USACE National Coastal Mapping Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — The Joint Airborne Lidar Bathymetry Technical Center of Expertise (JALBTCX) has performed a coastal survey along the Gulf of Mexico in the summer of 2004. The data...

  10. South Carolina 2010 Lidar Coverage, USACE National Coastal Mapping Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — The Joint Airborne Lidar Bathymetry Technical Center of Expertise (JALBTCX) has performed a coastal survey along the Atlantic coast of SC in 2010. The data types...

  11. Massachusetts 2007 Lidar Coverage, USACE National Coastal Mapping Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — The Joint Airborne Lidar Bathymetry Technical Center of Expertise (JALBTCX) has performed a coastal survey along the Atlantic coast of MA in the summer of 2007. The...

  12. Connecticut 2007 Lidar Coverage, USACE National Coastal Mapping Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — The Joint Airborne Lidar Bathymetry Technical Center of Expertise (JALBTCX) has performed a coastal survey along the Atlantic Coastline, in the summer of 2007. The...

  13. Massachusetts 2010 Lidar Coverage, USACE National Coastal Mapping Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — The Joint Airborne Lidar Bathymetry Technical Center of Expertise (JALBTCX) has performed a coastal survey along the Atlantic Coast of MA in 2010. The data types...

  14. Virginia 2009 Lidar Coverage, USACE National Coastal Mapping Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — The Joint Airborne Lidar Bathymetry Technical Center of Expertise (JALBTCX) has performed a coastal survey along the Atlantic coast of VA in 2009. The data types...

  15. Louisiana 2010 Lidar Coverage, USACE National Coastal Mapping Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — The Joint Airborne Lidar Bathymetry Technical Center of Expertise (JALBTCX) has performed a coastal survey along the Gulf of Mexico in 2010. The data types collected...

  16. Minnesota 2009 Lidar Coverage, USACE National Coastal Mapping Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — The Joint Airborne Lidar Bathymetry Technical Center of Expertise (JALBTCX) has performed a coastal survey along the Lake Superior coast of MN in 2009. The data...

  17. Indiana 2008 Lidar Coverage, USACE National Coastal Mapping Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — The Joint Airborne Lidar Bathymetry Technical Center of Expertise (JALBTCX) has performed a coastal survey along Lake Michigan in the summer of 2008. The data types...

  18. New Hampshire 2010 Lidar Coverage, USACE National Coastal Mapping Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — The Joint Airborne Lidar Bathymetry Technical Center of Expertise (JALBTCX) has performed a coastal survey along the Atlantic coast of NH in 2010. The data types...

  19. Nevada 2008 Lidar Coverage, USACE National Coastal Mapping Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — The Joint Airborne Lidar Bathymetry Technical Center of Expertise (JALBTCX) has performed a coastal survey along Truckee River in NV in 2008. The data types...

  20. Wisconsin 2007 Lidar Coverage, USACE National Coastal Mapping Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — The Joint Airborne Lidar Bathymetry Technical Center of Expertise (JALBTCX) has performed a coastal survey along the Lake Superior coast of WI in 2007. The data...

  1. Washington 2010 Lidar Coverage, USACE National Coastal Mapping Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — The Joint Airborne Lidar Bathymetry Technical Center of Expertise (JALBTCX) has performed a coastal survey along the Pacific coast of WA in 2010. The data types...

  2. Wisconsin 2008 Lidar Coverage, USACE National Coastal Mapping Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — The Joint Airborne Lidar Bathymetry Technical Center of Expertise (JALBTCX) has performed a coastal survey along the Lake Michigan coast of WI in 2008. The data...

  3. Oregon 2011 Lidar Coverage, USACE National Coastal Mapping Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — The Joint Airborne Lidar Bathymetry Technical Center of Expertise (JALBTCX) has performed a coastal survey along the Pacific coast of OR in 2011. The data types...

  4. New Hampshire 2011 Lidar Coverage, USACE National Coastal Mapping Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — The Joint Airborne Lidar Bathymetry Technical Center of Expertise (JALBTCX) has performed a coastal survey along the Atlantic coast of NH in 2011. The data types...

  5. North Carolina 2008 Lidar Coverage, USACE National Coastal Mapping Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — The Joint Airborne Lidar Bathymetry Technical Center of Expertise (JALBTCX) has performed a coastal survey along the Atlantic coast of NC in 2008. The data types...

  6. Rhode Island 2007 Lidar Coverage, USACE National Coastal Mapping Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — The Joint Airborne Lidar Bathymetry Technical Center of Expertise (JALBTCX) has performed a coastal survey along the Atlantic coast of RI in 2007. The data types...

  7. Florida 2009 Lidar Coverage, USACE National Coastal Mapping Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — The Joint Airborne Lidar Bathymetry Technical Center of Expertise (JALBTCX) has performed a coastal survey along the Gulf of Mexico in 2009. The data types collected...

  8. Hawaii 2007 Lidar Coverage, USACE National Coastal Mapping Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — The Joint Airborne Lidar Bathymetry Technical Center of Expertise (JALBTCX) has performed a coastal survey along the Pacific Coast, in the summer of 2007. The data...

  9. Texas 2010 Lidar Coverage, USACE National Coastal Mapping Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — The Joint Airborne Lidar Bathymetry Technical Center of Expertise (JALBTCX) has performed a coastal survey along the Gulf coast of TX in 2010. The data types...

  10. Mississippi 2010 Lidar Coverage, USACE National Coastal Mapping Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — The Joint Airborne Lidar Bathymetry Technical Center of Expertise (JALBTCX) has performed a coastal survey along the Gulf of Mexico coastline of MS in 2010. The data...

  11. Mississippi 2011 Lidar Coverage, USACE National Coastal Mapping Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — The Joint Airborne Lidar Bathymetry Technical Center of Expertise (JALBTCX) has performed a coastal survey along the Gulf of Mexico coastline of MS in 2011. The data...

  12. Mississippi 2007 Lidar Coverage, USACE National Coastal Mapping Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — The Joint Airborne Lidar Bathymetry Technical Center of Expertise (JALBTCX) has performed a coastal survey along the Gulf of Mexico coastline of MS in 2007. The data...

  13. Michigan 2007 Lidar Coverage, USACE National Coastal Mapping Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — The Joint Airborne Lidar Bathymetry Technical Center of Expertise (JALBTCX) has performed a coastal survey along the MI coasts of Lake Superior, Lake St. Clair and...

  14. Virginia 2010 Lidar Coverage, USACE National Coastal Mapping Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — The Joint Airborne Lidar Bathymetry Technical Center of Expertise (JALBTCX) has performed a coastal survey along the Atlantic coast of VA in 2010. The data types...

  15. New York 2007 Lidar Coverage, USACE National Coastal Mapping Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — The Joint Airborne Lidar Bathymetry Technical Center of Expertise (JALBTCX) has performed a coastal survey along the Niagara River and Lake Erie and Lake Ontario...

  16. North Carolina 2010 Lidar Coverage, USACE National Coastal Mapping Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — The Joint Airborne Lidar Bathymetry Technical Center of Expertise (JALBTCX) has performed a coastal survey along the Atlantic coast of NC in 2010. The data types...

  17. Maine 2010 Lidar Coverage, USACE National Coastal Mapping Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — The Joint Airborne Lidar Bathymetry Technical Center of Expertise (JALBTCX) has performed a coastal survey along the Atlantic Coast of ME in 2010. The data types...

  18. Alabama 2010 Lidar Coverage, USACE National Coastal Mapping Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — The Joint Airborne Lidar Bathymetry Technical Center of Expertise (JALBTCX) has performed a coastal survey along the Gulf of Mexico in 2010. The data types collected...

  19. Rhode Island 2010 Lidar Coverage, USACE National Coastal Mapping Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — The Joint Airborne Lidar Bathymetry Technical Center of Expertise (JALBTCX) has performed a coastal survey along the Atlantic coast of RI in 2010. The data types...

  20. Maryland 2010 Lidar Coverage, USACE National Coastal Mapping Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — The Joint Airborne Lidar Bathymetry Technical Center of Expertise (JALBTCX) has performed a coastal survey along the Atlantic coast in the summer of 2010. The data...

  1. Louisiana 2007 Lidar Coverage, USACE National Coastal Mapping Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — The Joint Airborne Lidar Bathymetry Technical Center of Expertise (JALBTCX) has performed a coastal survey along the Gulf of Mexico, in the summer of 2007. The data...

  2. Louisiana 2006 Lidar Coverage, USACE National Coastal Mapping Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — The Joint Airborne Lidar Bathymetry Technical Center of Expertise (JALBTCX) has performed a coastal survey along the Gulf of Mexico in the summer of 2006. The data...

  3. Maryland 2005 Lidar Coverage, USACE National Coastal Mapping Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — The Joint Airborne Lidar Bathymetry Technical Center of Expertise (JALBTCX) has performed a coastal survey along the Atlantic coast in the summer of 2005. The data...

  4. Maine 2005 Lidar Coverage, USACE National Coastal Mapping Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — The Joint Airborne Lidar Bathymetry Technical Center of Expertise (JALBTCX) has performed a coastal survey along the Atlantic coast in the summer of 2005. The data...

  5. Florida 2003 Lidar Coverage, USACE National Coastal Mapping Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — The Joint Airborne Lidar Bathymetry Technical Center of Expertise (JALBTCX) has performed a coastal survey along the Gulf of Mexico in the summer of 2003. The data...

  6. Indiana 2006 Lidar Coverage, USACE National Coastal Mapping Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — The Joint Airborne Lidar Bathymetry Technical Center of Expertise (JALBTCX) has performed a coastal survey along the Lake Michigan coastline in the summer of 2006....

  7. New York 2005 Lidar Coverage, USACE National Coastal Mapping Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — The Joint Airborne Lidar Bathymetry Technical Center of Expertise (JALBTCX) has performed a coastal survey along the Atlantic coast of NY in 2005. The data types...

  8. Georgia 2006 Lidar Coverage, USACE National Coastal Mapping Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — The Joint Airborne Lidar Bathymetry Technical Center of Expertise (JALBTCX) has performed a coastal survey along the Atlantic coast in the summer of 2006. The data...

  9. New Jersey 2005 Lidar Coverage, USACE National Coastal Mapping Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — The Joint Airborne Lidar Bathymetry Technical Center of Expertise (JALBTCX) has performed a coastal survey along the Atlantic coast of NJ in 2005. The data types...

  10. California 2009 Lidar Coverage, USACE National Coastal Mapping Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — The Joint Airborne Lidar Bathymetry Technical Center of Expertise (JALBTCX) has performed a coastal survey along the Pacific coast in 2009. The data types collected...

  11. Mississippi 2004 Lidar Coverage, USACE National Coastal Mapping Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — The Joint Airborne Lidar Bathymetry Technical Center of Expertise (JALBTCX) has performed a coastal survey along the Gulf of Mexico coastline of MS in 2004. The data...

  12. Washington 2011 Lidar Coverage, USACE National Coastal Mapping Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — The Joint Airborne Lidar Bathymetry Technical Center of Expertise (JALBTCX) has performed a coastal survey along the Pacific coast of WA in 2011. The data types...

  13. Michigan 2009 Lidar Coverage, USACE National Coastal Mapping Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — The Joint Airborne Lidar Bathymetry Technical Center of Expertise (JALBTCX) has performed a coastal survey along the MI coast of Lake Superior in 2009. The data...

  14. New York 2010 Lidar Coverage, USACE National Coastal Mapping Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — The Joint Airborne Lidar Bathymetry Technical Center of Expertise (JALBTCX) has performed a coastal survey along the Atlantic coast of NY in 2010. The data types...

  15. Delaware 2005 Lidar Coverage, USACE National Coastal Mapping Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — The Joint Airborne Lidar Bathymetry Technical Center of Expertise (JALBTCX) has performed a coastal survey along the Atlantic coast in the summer of 2005. The data...

  16. Florida 2006 Lidar Coverage, USACE National Coastal Mapping Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — The Joint Airborne Lidar Bathymetry Technical Center of Expertise (JALBTCX) has performed a coastal survey along the Atlantic, Gulf of Mexico in the summer of 2006....

  17. New Jersey 2010 Lidar Coverage, USACE National Coastal Mapping Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — The Joint Airborne Lidar Bathymetry Technical Center of Expertise (JALBTCX) has performed a coastal survey along the Atlantic coast of NJ in 2010. The data types...

  18. North Carolina 2005 Lidar Coverage, USACE National Coastal Mapping Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — The Joint Airborne Lidar Bathymetry Technical Center of Expertise (JALBTCX) has performed a coastal survey along the Atlantic coast of NC in 2005. The data types...

  19. Pennsylvania 2006 Lidar Coverage, USACE National Coastal Mapping Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — The Joint Airborne Lidar Bathymetry Technical Center of Expertise (JALBTCX) has performed a coastal survey along the Lake Erie coast of PA in 2006. The data types...

  20. South Carolina 2006 Lidar Coverage, USACE National Coastal Mapping Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — The Joint Airborne Lidar Bathymetry Technical Center of Expertise (JALBTCX) has performed a coastal survey along the Atlantic coast of SC in 2006. The data types...

  1. Illinois 2008 Lidar Coverage, USACE National Coastal Mapping Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — The Joint Airborne Lidar Bathymetry Technical Center of Expertise (JALBTCX) has performed a coastal survey along Lake Michigan in the summer of 2008. The data types...

  2. Oregon 2010 Lidar Coverage, USACE National Coastal Mapping Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — The Joint Airborne Lidar Bathymetry Technical Center of Expertise (JALBTCX) has performed a coastal survey along the Pacific coast of OR in 2010. The data types...

  3. Wisconsin 2009 Lidar Coverage, USACE National Coastal Mapping Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — The Joint Airborne Lidar Bathymetry Technical Center of Expertise (JALBTCX) has performed a coastal survey along the Lake Superior coast of WI in 2009. The data...

  4. Georgia 2010 Lidar Coverage, USACE National Coastal Mapping Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — The Joint Airborne Lidar Bathymetry Technical Center of Expertise (JALBTCX) has performed a coastal survey along the Atlantic Coast in 2010. The data types collected...

  5. Massachusetts 2011 Lidar Coverage, USACE National Coastal Mapping Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — The Joint Airborne Lidar Bathymetry Technical Center of Expertise (JALBTCX) has performed a coastal survey along the Atlantic coast of MA in 2011. The data types...

  6. Michigan 2008 Lidar Coverage, USACE National Coastal Mapping Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — The Joint Airborne Lidar Bathymetry Technical Center of Expertise (JALBTCX) has performed a coastal survey along the MI coasts of Lake Superior, Lake Michigan and...

  7. Delaware 2010 Lidar Coverage, USACE National Coastal Mapping Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — The Joint Airborne Lidar Bathymetry Technical Center of Expertise (JALBTCX) has performed a coastal survey along the Atlantic coast in the summer of 2010. The data...

  8. Florida 2010 Lidar Coverage, USACE National Coastal Mapping Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — The Joint Airborne Lidar Bathymetry Technical Center of Expertise (JALBTCX) has performed a coastal survey along the Atlantic Coast and Gulf of Mexico in 2010. The...

  9. Florida 2004 Lidar Coverage, USACE National Coastal Mapping Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — The Joint Airborne Lidar Bathymetry Technical Center of Expertise (JALBTCX) has performed a coastal survey along the Gulf of Mexico in the summer of 2004. The data...

  10. North Carolina 2009 Lidar Coverage, USACE National Coastal Mapping Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — The Joint Airborne Lidar Bathymetry Technical Center of Expertise (JALBTCX) has performed a coastal survey along the Atlantic coast of NC in 2009. The data types...

  11. Michigan 2011 Lidar Coverage, USACE National Coastal Mapping Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — The Joint Airborne Lidar Bathymetry Technical Center of Expertise (JALBTCX) has performed a coastal survey along the MI coast of Lake Superior in 2011. The data...

  12. Alabama 2007 Lidar Coverage, USACE National Coastal Mapping Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — The Joint Airborne Lidar Bathymetry Technical Center of Expertise (JALBTCX) has performed a coastal survey along the Gulf of Mexico, in the summer of 2007. The data...

  13. North Carolina 2004 Lidar Coverage, USACE National Coastal Mapping Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — The Joint Airborne Lidar Bathymetry Technical Center of Expertise (JALBTCX) has performed a coastal survey along the Atlantic coast of NC in 2004. The data types...

  14. Rhode Island 2005 Lidar Coverage, USACE National Coastal Mapping Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — The Joint Airborne Lidar Bathymetry Technical Center of Expertise (JALBTCX) has performed a coastal survey along the Atlantic coast of RI in 2005. The data types...

  15. New Hampshire 2005 Lidar Coverage, USACE National Coastal Mapping Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — The Joint Airborne Lidar Bathymetry Technical Center of Expertise (JALBTCX) has performed a coastal survey along the Atlantic coast of NH in 2005. The data types...

  16. Michigan 2006 Lidar Coverage, USACE National Coastal Mapping Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — The Joint Airborne Lidar Bathymetry Technical Center of Expertise (JALBTCX) has performed a coastal survey along the MI coasts of Lake Huron, Lake Erie and the St....

  17. 7 CFR 1737.31 - Area Coverage Survey (ACS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Area Coverage Survey (ACS). 1737.31 Section 1737.31... Studies-Area Coverage Survey and Loan Design § 1737.31 Area Coverage Survey (ACS). (a) The Area Coverage Survey (ACS) is a market forecast of service requirements of subscribers in a proposed service area. (b...

  18. Coverage of space by random sets

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Consider the non-negative integer line. For each integer point we toss a coin. If the toss at location i is a. Heads we place an interval (of random length) there and move to location i + 1,. Tails we move to location i + 1. Coverage of space by random sets – p. 2/29 ...

  19. Using readability, comprehensibility and lexical coverage to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Finally, Nations' Vocabulary Size Test (Nation and Beglar 2007: 9, 11) was used to determine whether the vocabulary size of the selection of students provides adequate lexical coverage of the lexis used in the textbook to enable comprehension of the text. The findings were somewhat conflicting. The readability indices ...

  20. Tetanus Toxoid Vaccination Coverage And Differential Between ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Government commitment and support from a range of partnerships have led to a massive increase in tetanus toxoid immunization coverage among women of childbearing age, ensuring that both mothers and babies are protected against tetanus infection in. Bangladesh. In order to control and eliminate the ...

  1. The Sad State of Education Coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batory, Joseph P.

    1999-01-01

    A 1997 report by Public Agenda, a nonpartisan public-opinion research firm, confirmed that educators deplore the quality of press coverage of public education. While questioning journalistic effectiveness and credibility, the study offers objective insights about citizens' expectations. Superintendents must communicate concerns to editors and…

  2. Binning metagenomic contigs by coverage and composition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alneberg, J.; Bjarnason, B.S.; Bruijn, de I.; Schirmer, M.; Quick, J.; Ijaz, U.Z.; Lahti, L.M.; Loman, N.J.; Andersson, A.F.; Quince, C.

    2014-01-01

    Shotgun sequencing enables the reconstruction of genomes from complex microbial communities, but because assembly does not reconstruct entire genomes, it is necessary to bin genome fragments. Here we present CONCOCT, a new algorithm that combines sequence composition and coverage across multiple

  3. Suicide reporting within British newspapers' arts coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitman, Alexandra; Stevenson, Fiona

    2015-01-01

    Many suicide prevention strategies promote media guidelines on suicide reporting, given evidence that irresponsible reporting of suicide can influence imitative suicidal behavior. Due to limited resources, monitoring of guideline adherence has tended to focus on news outputs, with a risk of neglecting other journalistic content. To determine whether British newspapers' arts coverage adheres to media guidelines on suicide reporting. Purposive sampling was used to capture current national practice on suicide reporting within newspapers' arts coverage of exhibitions. Recent major UK exhibitions by artists who had died by suicide were identified: Kirchner, Rothko, Gorky, and Van Gogh. Content analysis of all UK national newspaper coverage of these exhibitions was performed to measure the articles' adherence to widely accepted media guidelines. In all, 68 newspaper reviews satisfied inclusion criteria, with 100% failing to show full adherence to media guidelines: 21% used inappropriate language; 38% provided explicit descriptions of the suicide; 7% employed simplistic explanations for suicide triggers; 27% romanticized the suicide; and 100% omitted information on sources of support. British newspapers' arts coverage of exhibitions deviates considerably from media guidelines on the reporting of suicide. The findings suggest scope to improve journalists' awareness of the importance of this component of suicide prevention strategies.

  4. The hunt for 100% sky coverage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meimon, Serge; Fusco, Thierry; Clenet, Yann; Conan, Jean-Marc; Assémat, François; Michau, Vincent

    2010-07-01

    Tomographic AO (or Wide Field AO) systems use LGS to build a 3D model of turbulence, but rely on NGS for low order sensing. .To preserve reasonable sky coverage, each photon coming from the NGS to sense Tip Tilt has to be optimally exploited. That means a smart control law, a low detection noise, a concentration of the photons onto a small patch and a wave front sensor concept with favorable noise propagation. In this paper, we describe the system choices that were made during the E-ELT laser tomographic system ATLAS phase A study, in order to get a sky coverage as close as possible to 100%. A correct estimation of the sky coverage is therefore a key issue. We have developped a sky coverage estimation strategy based on a Besaņcon model starfield generation, a star(s) selection tool, and a careful estimation of the residual anisoplanatism (after reconstruction process between the NGSs), noise and temporal contributors. We describe the details of the procedure, and derive the ATLAS expected performance.

  5. Actual Test Coverage for Embedded Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmer, Mark

    2008-01-01

    Testing embedded systems is inherently incomplete; no test suite will ever be able to test all possible usage scenarios. Therefore, in the past decades many coverage measures have been developed. These measures denote the portion of a system that is tested, that way providing a quality criterion for

  6. Immunization coverage: role of sociodemographic variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Bhuwan; Mahajan, Hemant; Velhal, G D

    2013-01-01

    Children are considered fully immunized if they receive one dose of BCG, three doses of DPT and polio vaccine each, and one measles vaccine. In India, only 44% of children aged 12-23 months are fully vaccinated and about 5% have not received any vaccination at all. Even if national immunization coverage levels are sufficiently high to block disease transmission, pockets of susceptibility may act as potential reservoirs of infection. This study was done to assess the immunization coverage in an urban slum area and determine various sociodemographic variables affecting the same. A total of 210 children were selected from study population using WHO's 30 cluster sampling method. Coverage of BCG was found to be the highest (97.1%) while that of measles was the lowest. The main reason for noncompliance was given as child's illness at the time of scheduled vaccination followed by lack of knowledge regarding importance of immunization. Low education status of mother, high birth order, and place of delivery were found to be positively associated with low vaccination coverage. Regular IEC activities (group talks, role plays, posters, pamphlets, and competitions) should be conducted in the community to ensure that immunization will become a "felt need" of the mothers in the community.

  7. 29 CFR 1603.101 - Coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT EMPLOYEE COMPLAINTS OF EMPLOYMENT DISCRIMINATION UNDER SECTION 304 OF THE GOVERNMENT EMPLOYEE RIGHTS ACT OF 1991 Administrative Process § 1603.101 Coverage. Section 304 of the Government Employee Rights Act of 1991 applies to employment, which includes application for employment, of...

  8. 5 CFR 430.202 - Coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT Performance Appraisal for General Schedule, Prevailing Rate, and Certain Other Employees § 430.202 Coverage. (a) Employees and agencies covered by statute. (1) Section 4301(1) of title 5, United States Code...

  9. EDITORIAL COVERAGE OF SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH BY THE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hi-tech

    The New England Journal of Medicine published an article on coverage by the news media of the benefits and risks of medications by Moynihan et al(l). These authors studied 207 news media stories reporting on benefits and risks of pravastatin (a cholesterol lowering drug), alendronate (a biophosphonate for treatment ...

  10. Danish Media coverage of 22/7

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hervik, Peter; Boisen, Sophie

    2013-01-01

    ’s Danish connections through an analysis of the first 100 days of Danish media coverage. We scrutinised 188 articles in the largest daily newspapers to find out how Danish actors related to ABB’s ideas. The key argument is that the discourses and opinions reflect pre-existing opinions and entrenched...

  11. 5 CFR 9701.505 - Coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Coverage. 9701.505 Section 9701.505 Administrative Personnel DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY-OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT) DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES...

  12. 5 CFR 9701.402 - Coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Coverage. 9701.402 Section 9701.402 Administrative Personnel DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY-OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT) DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES...

  13. 5 CFR 9701.302 - Coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Coverage. 9701.302 Section 9701.302 Administrative Personnel DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY-OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT) DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES...

  14. 5 CFR 9701.202 - Coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Coverage. 9701.202 Section 9701.202 Administrative Personnel DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY-OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT) DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES...

  15. Factors influencing immunisation coverage among children under ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results. The correct vaccination coverage rate for children was found to be high. Children in urban and rural areas differed substantially in their correct vaccination rates and their receipt of each vaccine separately. Walking or travelling time to the place of vaccination was found to be longer in rural areas when compared ...

  16. True Public Access Defibrillator Coverage is Overestimated

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sun, Christopher L.F.; Demirtas, Derya; Brooks, Steven C.; Morrison, Laurie J.; Chan, Timothy C.Y.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCAs) occur at all times of the day and night. Immediate access to an AED increases survival. However, most public-location AEDs are placed in buildings without 24 hour access. Objective: To measure fixed-location public AED coverage of OHCAs by time of

  17. Medicare prescription drug plan coverage of pharmacotherapies for opioid and alcohol dependence in WA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Jae; Dipzinski, Aaron; Roll, John; Coyne, Joseph; Blodgett, Elizabeth

    2011-04-01

    Pharmacotherapeutic treatments for drug addiction offer new options, but only if they are affordable for patients. The objective of this study is to assess the current availability and cost of five common antiaddiction medications in the largest federal medication insurance program in the US, Medicare Part D. In early 2010, we collected coverage and cost data from 41 Medicare Part D prescription drug plans (PDPs) and 45 Medicare Advantage Plans (MAPs) in Washington State. The great majority of Medicare plans (82-100%) covered common pharmacotherapeutic treatments for drug addiction. These Medicare plans typically placed patent protected medications on their highest formulary tiers, leading to relatively high patient co-payments during the initial Part D coverage period. For example, median monthly co-payments for buprenorphine (Suboxone®) were about $46 for PDPs, and about $56 for MAPs. While Medicare prescription plans usually cover pharmacotherapeutic treatments for drug addiction, high co-payments can limit access. For example, beneficiaries without supplemental coverage who use Vivitrol® would exceed their initial coverage cap in 7-8 months, reaching the "doughnut hole" in their Part D coverage and becoming responsible for the full cost of the medication (over $900 per month). The 2010 Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act will gradually eliminate this coverage gap, and loss of patent protection for other antiaddiction medications (Suboxone® and Campral®) should also drive down patient costs, improving access and compliance. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Determinants of vaccination coverage in rural Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meurice Francois P

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Childhood immunization is a cost effective public health strategy. Expanded Programme on Immunisation (EPI services have been provided in a rural Nigerian community (Sabongidda-Ora, Edo State at no cost to the community since 1998 through a privately financed vaccination project (private public partnership. The objective of this survey was to assess vaccination coverage and its determinants in this rural community in Nigeria Methods A cross-sectional survey was conducted in September 2006, which included the use of interviewer-administered questionnaire to assess knowledge of mothers of children aged 12–23 months and vaccination coverage. Survey participants were selected following the World Health Organization's (WHO immunization coverage cluster survey design. Vaccination coverage was assessed by vaccination card and maternal history. A child was said to be fully immunized if he or she had received all of the following vaccines: a dose of Bacille Calmette Guerin (BCG, three doses of oral polio (OPV, three doses of diphtheria, pertussis and tetanus (DPT, three doses of hepatitis B (HB and one dose of measles by the time he or she was enrolled in the survey, i.e. between the ages of 12–23 months. Knowledge of the mothers was graded as satisfactory if mothers had at least a score of 3 out of a maximum of 5 points. Logistic regression was performed to identify determinants of full immunization status. Results Three hundred and thirty-nine mothers and 339 children (each mother had one eligible child were included in the survey. Most of the mothers (99.1% had very positive attitudes to immunization and > 55% were generally knowledgeable about symptoms of vaccine preventable diseases except for difficulty in breathing (as symptom of diphtheria. Two hundred and ninety-five mothers (87.0% had a satisfactory level of knowledge. Vaccination coverage against all the seven childhood vaccine preventable diseases was 61.9% although it

  19. Medicare Program; End-Stage Renal Disease Prospective Payment System, Coverage and Payment for Renal Dialysis Services Furnished to Individuals With Acute Kidney Injury, End-Stage Renal Disease Quality Incentive Program, Durable Medical Equipment, Prosthetics, Orthotics and Supplies Competitive Bidding Program Bid Surety Bonds, State Licensure and Appeals Process for Breach of Contract Actions, Durable Medical Equipment, Prosthetics, Orthotics and Supplies Competitive Bidding Program and Fee Schedule Adjustments, Access to Care Issues for Durable Medical Equipment; and the Comprehensive End-Stage Renal Disease Care Model. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-04

    This rule updates and makes revisions to the End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Prospective Payment System (PPS) for calendar year 2017. It also finalizes policies for coverage and payment for renal dialysis services furnished by an ESRD facility to individuals with acute kidney injury. This rule also sets forth requirements for the ESRD Quality Incentive Program, including the inclusion of new quality measures beginning with payment year (PY) 2020 and provides updates to programmatic policies for the PY 2018 and PY 2019 ESRD QIP. This rule also implements statutory requirements for bid surety bonds and state licensure for the Durable Medical Equipment, Prosthetics, Orthotics, and Supplies (DMEPOS) Competitive Bidding Program (CBP). This rule also expands suppliers' appeal rights in the event of a breach of contract action taken by CMS, by revising the appeals regulation to extend the appeals process to all types of actions taken by CMS for a supplier's breach of contract, rather than limit an appeal for the termination of a competitive bidding contract. The rule also finalizes changes to the methodologies for adjusting fee schedule amounts for DMEPOS using information from CBPs and for submitting bids and establishing single payment amounts under the CBPs for certain groupings of similar items with different features to address price inversions. Final changes also are made to the method for establishing bid limits for items under the DMEPOS CBPs. In addition, this rule summarizes comments on the impacts of coordinating Medicare and Medicaid Durable Medical Equipment for dually eligible beneficiaries. Finally, this rule also summarizes comments received in response to a request for information related to the Comprehensive ESRD Care Model and future payment models affecting renal care.

  20. Staff Acceptance of Tele-ICU Coverage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Paul S.; Cram, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Background: Remote coverage of ICUs is increasing, but staff acceptance of this new technology is incompletely characterized. We conducted a systematic review to summarize existing research on acceptance of tele-ICU coverage among ICU staff. Methods: We searched for published articles pertaining to critical care telemedicine systems (aka, tele-ICU) between January 1950 and March 2010 using PubMed, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Global Health, Web of Science, and the Cochrane Library and abstracts and presentations delivered at national conferences. Studies were included if they provided original qualitative or quantitative data on staff perceptions of tele-ICU coverage. Studies were imported into content analysis software and coded by tele-ICU configuration, methodology, participants, and findings (eg, positive and negative staff evaluations). Results: Review of 3,086 citations yielded 23 eligible studies. Findings were grouped into four categories of staff evaluation: overall acceptance level of tele-ICU coverage (measured in 70% of studies), impact on patient care (measured in 96%), impact on staff (measured in 100%), and organizational impact (measured in 48%). Overall acceptance was high, despite initial ambivalence. Favorable impact on patient care was perceived by > 82% of participants. Staff impact referenced enhanced collaboration, autonomy, and training, although scrutiny, malfunctions, and contradictory advice were cited as potential barriers. Staff perceived the organizational impact to vary. An important limitation of available studies was a lack of rigorous methodology and validated survey instruments in many studies. Conclusions: Initial reports suggest high levels of staff acceptance of tele-ICU coverage, but more rigorous methodologic study is required. PMID:21051386

  1. Cost-effectiveness of full coverage of aromatase inhibitors for Medicare beneficiaries with early breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Kouta; Elkin, Elena; Blinder, Victoria; Keating, Nancy; Choudhry, Niteesh

    2013-07-01

    Rates of nonadherence to aromatase inhibitors (AIs) among Medicare beneficiaries with hormone receptor-positive early breast cancer are high. Out-of-pocket drug costs appear to be an important contributor to this and may be addressed by eliminating copayments and other forms of patient cost sharing. The authors estimated the incremental cost-effectiveness of providing Medicare beneficiaries with full prescription coverage for AIs compared with usual prescription coverage under the Medicare Part D program. A Markov state-transition model was developed to simulate AI use and disease progression in a hypothetical cohort of postmenopausal Medicare beneficiaries with hormone receptor-positive early breast cancer. The analysis was conducted from the societal perspective and considered a lifetime horizon. The main outcome was an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio, which was measured as the cost per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) gained. For patients receiving usual prescription coverage, average quality-adjusted survival was 11.35 QALYs, and lifetime costs were $83,002. For patients receiving full prescription coverage, average quality-adjusted survival was 11.38 QALYs, and lifetime costs were $82,728. Compared with usual prescription coverage, full prescription coverage would result in greater quality-adjusted survival (0.03 QALYs) and less resource use ($275) per beneficiary. From the perspective of Medicare, full prescription coverage was cost-effective (incremental cost-effectiveness ratio, $15,128 per QALY gained) but not cost saving. Providing full prescription coverage for AIs to Medicare beneficiaries with hormone receptor-positive early breast cancer would both improve health outcomes and save money from the societal perspective. Copyright © 2013 American Cancer Society.

  2. 42 CFR 457.431 - Actuarial report for benchmark-equivalent coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STATE CHILDREN'S HEALTH INSURANCE PROGRAMS (SCHIPs) ALLOTMENTS AND... of privately insured children of the age of those expected to be covered under the State plan; (5) Applying the same principles and factors in comparing the value of different coverage (or categories of...

  3. 42 CFR 416.46 - Condition for coverage-Nursing services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM AMBULATORY SURGICAL SERVICES Specific Conditions for Coverage § 416.... Patient care responsibilities must be delineated for all nursing service personnel. Nursing services must be provided in accordance with recognized standards of practice. There must be a registered nurse...

  4. Sequential optimization of approximate inhibitory rules relative to the length, coverage and number of misclassifications

    KAUST Repository

    Alsolami, Fawaz

    2013-01-01

    This paper is devoted to the study of algorithms for sequential optimization of approximate inhibitory rules relative to the length, coverage and number of misclassifications. Theses algorithms are based on extensions of dynamic programming approach. The results of experiments for decision tables from UCI Machine Learning Repository are discussed. © 2013 Springer-Verlag.

  5. 45 CFR 400.103 - Coverage of refugees who spend down to State financial eligibility standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Coverage of refugees who spend down to State... Welfare OFFICE OF REFUGEE RESETTLEMENT, ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN AND FAMILIES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES REFUGEE RESETTLEMENT PROGRAM Refugee Medical Assistance Conditions of Eligibility for...

  6. ACO-Based Sweep Coverage Scheme in Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Huang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Coverage problem is one of the major issues in wireless sensor networks (WSN. In order to optimize the network coverage, different coverage formulations have been proposed. Recently, a newly emerging coverage scheme in wireless sensor networks, sweep coverage, which uses mobile sensors to monitor certain points of interest (POIs, is proposed. However, the data delivery to sink, an important problem in WSN, is not considered in original sweep coverage and many of the existing works did not consider it yet. In this work, a novel algorithm named ACOSC (ACO-based sweep coverage to solve the sweep coverage problem considering periodical coverage of POIs and delivery of data simultaneously is proposed. The evaluation results show that our algorithm has better performance than existing schemes.

  7. Interpregnancy intervals: impact of postpartum contraceptive effectiveness and coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiel de Bocanegra, Heike; Chang, Richard; Howell, Mike; Darney, Philip

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the use of contraceptive methods, which was defined by effectiveness, length of coverage, and their association with short interpregnancy intervals, when controlling for provider type and client demographics. We identified a cohort of 117,644 women from the 2008 California Birth Statistical Master file with second or higher order birth and at least 1 Medicaid (Family Planning, Access, Care, and Treatment [Family PACT] program or Medi-Cal) claim within 18 months after index birth. We explored the effect of contraceptive method provision on the odds of having an optimal interpregnancy interval and controlled for covariates. The average length of contraceptive coverage was 3.81 months (SD = 4.84). Most women received user-dependent hormonal contraceptives as their most effective contraceptive method (55%; n = 65,103 women) and one-third (33%; n = 39,090 women) had no contraceptive claim. Women who used long-acting reversible contraceptive methods had 3.89 times the odds and women who used user-dependent hormonal methods had 1.89 times the odds of achieving an optimal birth interval compared with women who used barrier methods only; women with no method had 0.66 times the odds. When user-dependent methods are considered, the odds of having an optimal birth interval increased for each additional month of contraceptive coverage by 8% (odds ratio, 1.08; 95% confidence interval, 1.08-1.09). Women who were seen by Family PACT or by both Family PACT and Medi-Cal providers had significantly higher odds of optimal birth intervals compared with women who were served by Medi-Cal only. To achieve optimal birth spacing and ultimately to improve birth outcomes, attention should be given to contraceptive counseling and access to contraceptive methods in the postpartum period. Copyright © 2014 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. A Survey of Coverage Problems in Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junbin LIANG

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Coverage problem is an important issue in wireless sensor networks, which has a great impact on the performance of wireless sensor networks. Given a sensor network, the coverage problem is to determine how well the sensing field is monitored or tracked by sensors. In this paper, we classify the coverage problem into three categories: area coverage, target coverage, and barrier coverage, give detailed description of different algorithms belong to these three categories. Moreover, we specify the advantages and disadvantages of the existing classic algorithms, which can give a useful direction in this area.

  9. A study of the geographic coverage properties of a satellite borne Doppler lidar wind velocity measuring system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pate, T. H.

    1982-01-01

    Geographic coverage frequency and geographic shot density for a satellite borne Doppler lidar wind velocity measuring system are measured. The equations of motion of the light path on the ground were derived and a computer program devised to compute shot density and coverage frequency by latitude-longitude sections. The equations for the coverage boundaries were derived and a computer program developed to plot these boundaries, thus making it possible, after an application of a map coloring algorithm, to actually see the areas of multiple coverage. A theoretical cross-swath shot density function that gives close approximations in certain cases was also derived. This information should aid in the design of an efficient data-processing system for the Doppler lidar.

  10. Endorsement of universal health coverage financial principles in Burkina Faso.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agier, Isabelle; Ly, Antarou; Kadio, Kadidiatou; Kouanda, Seni; Ridde, Valéry

    2016-02-01

    In West Africa, health system funding rarely involves cross-subsidization among population segments. In some countries, a few community-based or professional health insurance programs are present, but coverage is very low. The financial principles underlying universal health coverage (UHC) sustainability and solidarity are threefold: 1) anticipation of potential health risks; 2) risk sharing and; 3) socio-economic status solidarity. In Burkina Faso, where decision-makers are favorable to national health insurance, we measured endorsement of these principles and discerned which management configurations would achieve the greatest adherence. We used a sequential exploratory design. In a qualitative step (9 interviews, 12 focus groups), we adapted an instrument proposed by Goudge et al. (2012) to the local context and addressed desirability bias. Then, in a quantitative step (1255 respondents from the general population), we measured endorsement. Thematic analysis (qualitative) and logistic regressions (quantitative) were used. High levels of endorsement were found for each principle. Actual practices showed that anticipation and risk sharing were not only intentions. Preferences were given to solidarity between socio-economic status (SES) levels and progressivity. Although respondents seemed to prefer the national level for implementation, their current solidarity practices were mainly focused on close family. Thus, contribution levels should be set so that the entire family benefits from healthcare. Some critical conditions must be met to make UHC financial principles a reality through health insurance in Burkina Faso: trust, fair and mandatory contributions, and education. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. An expected coverage model with a cutoff priority queue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Soovin; Albert, Laura A

    2017-07-19

    Emergency medical services provide immediate care to patients with various types of needs. When the system is congested, the response to urgent emergency calls can be delayed. To address this issue, we propose a spatial Hypercube approximation model with a cutoff priority queue that estimates performance measures for a system where some servers are reserved exclusively for high priority calls when the system is congested. In the cutoff priority queue, low priority calls are not immediately served-they are either lost or entered into a queue-whenever the number of busy ambulances is equal to or greater than the cutoff. The spatial Hypercube approximation model can be used to evaluate the design of public safety systems that employ a cutoff priority queue. A mixed integer linear programming model uses the Hypercube model to identify deployment and dispatch decisions in a cutoff priority queue paradigm. Our computational study suggests that the improvement in the expected coverage is significant when the cutoff is imposed, and it elucidates the tradeoff between the coverage improvement and the cost to low-priority calls that are "lost" when using a cutoff. Finally, we present a method for selecting the cutoff value for a system based on the relative importance of low-priority calls to high-priority calls.

  12. Medical coverage of youth basketball events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ching, Brian K; Khalili-Borna, Dennis

    2013-01-01

    Basketball is among the most popular team sports for boys and girls in the United States and is continuing to grow in popularity worldwide. Increased popularity translates to an increased number of events and, unfortunately, the injuries that occur as a result. In this article, we discuss ways to be prepared in the coverage of youth basketball events, with an emphasis on the evaluation and treatment of some of the most commonly encountered injuries within the sport of basketball. We also give special consideration to injuries that are specific to the skeletally immature athlete. By having a greater knowledge and understanding of these injuries, a provider of medical coverage for basketball events hopefully will gain a higher sense of confidence in handling associated problems as they arise.

  13. Coverage threshold for laser-induced lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Weliton S.; Oriá, Marcos; Passerat de Silans, Thierry; Chevrollier, Martine

    2017-05-01

    Recent experimental observations of laser-induced adsorption at the interface between an alkali vapor and a dielectric surface have demonstrated the possibility of growing metallic films of nanometric thickness on dielectric surfaces, with arbitrary shapes determined by the intensity profile of the light. The mechanisms directly responsible for the accumulation of atoms at the irradiated surface have been shown to involve photo-ionization of atoms very close to the surface. However, the existence of a vapor-pressure threshold for initiating the film growth still raises questions on the processes occurring at the surface. In this letter, we report on the observation that the vapor-pressure threshold corresponds to a minimum adatom coverage necessary for the surface to effectively neutralize the incoming ions and make possible the growth of a multilayer film. We discuss the hypothesis that the coverage threshold is a surface conductivity threshold.

  14. Chemically grafted carbon nanotube surface coverage gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearer, Cameron J; Ellis, Amanda V; Shapter, Joseph G; Voelcker, Nicolas H

    2010-12-07

    Two approaches to producing gradients of vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) on silicon surfaces by chemical grafting are presented here. The first approach involves the use of a porous silicon (pSi) substrate featuring a pore size gradient, which is functionalized with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES). Carboxylated SWCNTs are then immobilized on the topography gradient via carbodiimide coupling. Our results show that as the pSi pore size and porosity increase across the substrate the SWCNT coverage decreases concurrently. In contrast, the second gradient is an amine-functionality gradient produced by means of vapor-phase diffusion of APTES from a reservoir onto a silicon wafer where APTES attachment changes as a function of distance from the APTES reservoir. Carboxylated SWCNTs are then immobilized via carbodiimide coupling to the amine-terminated silicon gradient. Our observations confirm that with decreasing APTES density on the surface the coverage of the attached SWCNTs also decreases. These gradient platforms pave the way for the time-efficient optimization of SWCNT coverage for applications ranging from field emission to water filtration to drug delivery.

  15. Coverage, continuity, and visual cortical architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keil, Wolfgang; Wolf, Fred

    2011-12-29

    The primary visual cortex of many mammals contains a continuous representation of visual space, with a roughly repetitive aperiodic map of orientation preferences superimposed. It was recently found that orientation preference maps (OPMs) obey statistical laws which are apparently invariant among species widely separated in eutherian evolution. Here, we examine whether one of the most prominent models for the optimization of cortical maps, the elastic net (EN) model, can reproduce this common design. The EN model generates representations which optimally trade of stimulus space coverage and map continuity. While this model has been used in numerous studies, no analytical results about the precise layout of the predicted OPMs have been obtained so far. We present a mathematical approach to analytically calculate the cortical representations predicted by the EN model for the joint mapping of stimulus position and orientation. We find that in all the previously studied regimes, predicted OPM layouts are perfectly periodic. An unbiased search through the EN parameter space identifies a novel regime of aperiodic OPMs with pinwheel densities lower than found in experiments. In an extreme limit, aperiodic OPMs quantitatively resembling experimental observations emerge. Stabilization of these layouts results from strong nonlocal interactions rather than from a coverage-continuity-compromise. Our results demonstrate that optimization models for stimulus representations dominated by nonlocal suppressive interactions are in principle capable of correctly predicting the common OPM design. They question that visual cortical feature representations can be explained by a coverage-continuity-compromise.

  16. Health Care Reform for Children with Public Coverage: How Can Policymakers Maximize Gains and Prevent Harm? Timely Analysis of Immediate Health Policy Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenney, Genevieve M.; Dorn, Stan

    2009-01-01

    Moving toward universal coverage has the potential to increase access to care and improve the health and well-being of uninsured children and adults. The effects of health care reform on the more than 25 million children who currently have coverage under Medicaid or the Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP) are less clear. Increased parental…

  17. 1990 point population coverage for the Conterminous United States

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This is a point coverage of the 1990 Census of Population and Housing for the conterminous United States. (Alaska and Hawaii are available separately). The coverage...

  18. 5 CFR 847.204 - Elections of FERS coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...) from an FERS-covered position to an NAFI may elect to continue FERS coverage. (b) An employee who elects FERS coverage under this section will be covered by FERS during all periods of future service not...

  19. Vaccination coverage and out-of-sequence vaccinations in rural Guinea-Bissau

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hornshøj, Linda; Benn, Christine Stabell; Fernandes, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    this study was conducted. The WHO assesses coverage by 12 months of age. The sequence of vaccines may have an effect on child mortality, but is not considered in official statistics or assessments of programme performance. We assessed vaccination coverage and frequency of out-of-sequence vaccinations by 12......OBJECTIVE: The WHO aims for 90% coverage of the Expanded Program on Immunization (EPI), which in Guinea-Bissau included BCG vaccine at birth, three doses of diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis vaccine (DTP) and oral polio vaccine (OPV) at 6, 10 and 14 weeks and measles vaccine (MV) at 9 months when...... and 24 months of age. DESIGN: Observational cohort study. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: The Bandim Health Project's (BHP) rural Health and Demographic Surveillance site covers 258 randomly selected villages in all regions of Guinea-Bissau. Villages are visited biannually and vaccination cards inspected...

  20. [Extension of health coverage and community based health insurance schemes in Africa: Myths and realities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boidin, B

    2015-02-01

    This article tackles the perspectives and limits of the extension of health coverage based on community based health insurance schemes in Africa. Despite their strong potential contribution to the extension of health coverage, their weaknesses challenge their ability to play an important role in this extension. Three limits are distinguished: financial fragility; insufficient adaptation to characteristics and needs of poor people; organizational and institutional failures. Therefore lessons can be learnt from the limits of the institutionalization of community based health insurance schemes. At first, community based health insurance schemes are to be considered as a transitional but insufficient solution. There is also a stronger role to be played by public actors in improving financial support, strengthening health services and coordinating coverage programs.

  1. 42 CFR 436.128 - Coverage for certain qualified aliens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Coverage for certain qualified aliens. 436.128... Mandatory Coverage of the Categorically Needy § 436.128 Coverage for certain qualified aliens. The agency... § 440.255(c) of this chapter to those aliens described in § 436.406(c) of this subpart. ...

  2. 42 CFR 435.350 - Coverage for certain aliens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Coverage for certain aliens. 435.350 Section 435... ISLANDS, AND AMERICAN SAMOA Optional Coverage of the Medically Needy § 435.350 Coverage for certain aliens... treatment of an emergency medical condition, as defined in § 440.255(c) of this chapter, to those aliens...

  3. 26 CFR 54.4980B-5 - COBRA continuation coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 17 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false COBRA continuation coverage. 54.4980B-5 Section...) MISCELLANEOUS EXCISE TAXES (CONTINUED) PENSION EXCISE TAXES § 54.4980B-5 COBRA continuation coverage. The following questions-and-answers address the requirements for coverage to constitute COBRA continuation...

  4. 42 CFR 457.420 - Benchmark health benefits coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Benchmark health benefits coverage. 457.420 Section 457.420 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... State Plan Requirements: Coverage and Benefits § 457.420 Benchmark health benefits coverage. Benchmark...

  5. Pap smear coverage among rural workers | London | South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Data describing Papanicolaou smear coverage and factors related to .coverage are presented from 9 surveys ofrural women workers in the food canning and processing industry in the Cape. Adequacy of Pap smear coverage was assessed according to whether the l'espondent had ever previously had a Pap smear, or had ...

  6. 48 CFR 9903.201-2 - Types of CAS coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... coverage. Full coverage requires that the business unit comply with all of the CAS specified in part 9904... later award of a CAS-covered contract. Full coverage applies to contractor business units that— (1... covered contract of less than $50 million awarded to a business unit that received less than $50 million...

  7. [Coverage of cervical cancer screening in Catalonia, Spain (2008-2011)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Salés, Vanesa; Roura, Esther; Ibáñez, Raquel; Peris, Mercè; Bosch, F Xavier; Coma E, Ermengol; Silvia de Sanjosé

    2014-01-01

    To estimate cervical cytology coverage for the period 2008-2011 by age groups and health regions from data recorded in the medical records of women attending centers within the Catalan national health system. The data used to estimate coverage were obtained from the primary care information system. This information was anonymous and included age, center, date, and the results of cytological smears for a total of 2,292,564 women aged 15 years or more. A total of 758,690 smears were performed in 595,868 women. Among women aged 25-65 years, the estimated coverage was 32.4% of the assigned population and was 40.8% in the population attended. Geographical variation was observed, with higher coverage among health regions closer to Barcelona. Abnormal Pap smears increased slightly from 2008 to 2011 (from 3% to 3.5%, respectively, p <0.001). In women with a negative first smear, the mean interval until the second smear was 2.4 years, but only 50% of women with a negative first smear in 2008 attended a second round during the study period. Cervical screening coverage in the National Health Service of Catalonia includes one in three women. Second round participation was poor. Existing computer systems in primary care centers can ensure monitoring of population-based screening programs for cervical cancer. These systems could be used to plan an organized screening program to ensure wider coverage and better follow-up. Copyright © 2013 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  8. How does complementary private prescription drug insurance coverage affect seniors' use of publicly funded medications?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allin, Sara; Law, Michael R; Laporte, Audrey

    2013-05-01

    Like in many other high-income jurisdictions, the public drug program in Ontario, Canada provides comprehensive coverage of prescription drugs to the 65 years and older population with some cost sharing. The objective of this study was to examine the marginal impact of holding private drug coverage on the use of publicly funded medicines among the senior population in Ontario. We drew on linked survey and administrative data sources to examine the impact of private drug coverage first on total spending and utilization of medications, and second, on clinically recommended medications for individuals with a diagnosis of diabetes. Approximately 27% of Ontario seniors reported having private prescription drug insurance from a current or prior employer. The population-level analysis of all seniors found that individuals with private insurance coverage, on average, took about a quarter of an additional drug and incurred 16% more in costs to the public program in a year compared to those without additional coverage. The disease-specific analysis of seniors with a diagnosis of diabetes found that private coverage was associated with two-fold higher odds of taking an anti-hypertensive drug, but it had no association with the use of statins or anti-diabetic medications. The results of this study provide some evidence that seniors in Ontario are sensitive to the price of drugs. These findings raise equity concerns relating to the cost sharing arrangements in the public system and our policy of allowing private plans to "top-up" the public plan. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Vaccination coverage of children with rare genetic diseases and attitudes of their parents toward vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Susanna; Cerutti, Marta; Milani, Donatella; Menni, Francesca; Principi, Nicola

    2016-03-03

    Despite the fact that the achievement of appropriate immunization coverage for routine vaccines is a priority for health authorities worldwide, vaccination delays or missed opportunities for immunization are common in children with chronic diseases. The main aim of this cross-sectional study was to evaluate immunization coverage and the timeliness of vaccination in children suffering from 3 different rare genetic diseases: Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome (RSTS), Sotos syndrome (SS), and Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS). A total of 57 children with genetic diseases (15 with RSTS, 14 children with SS, and 28 with BWS) and 57 healthy controls with similar characteristics were enrolled. The coverage of all the recommended vaccines in children with genetic syndromes was significantly lower than that observed in healthy controls (p vaccinated, all of the patients, independent of the genetic syndrome from which they suffer, were administered the primary series and the booster doses at a similar time to healthy controls. In comparison with parents of healthy controls, parents of children with genetic diseases were found to more frequently have negative attitudes toward vaccination (p vaccination coverage is poor in pediatric patients with RSTS, BWS, and SS and significantly lower than that observed in healthy children. These results highlight the need for educational programs specifically aimed at both parents and pediatricians to increase immunization coverage in children with these rare genetic diseases.

  10. Impact of coverage-dependent marginal costs on optimal HPV vaccination strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc D. Ryser

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The effectiveness of vaccinating males against the human papillomavirus (HPV remains a controversial subject. Many existing studies conclude that increasing female coverage is more effective than diverting resources into male vaccination. Recently, several empirical studies on HPV immunization have been published, providing evidence of the fact that marginal vaccination costs increase with coverage. In this study, we use a stochastic agent-based modeling framework to revisit the male vaccination debate in light of these new findings. Within this framework, we assess the impact of coverage-dependent marginal costs of vaccine distribution on optimal immunization strategies against HPV. Focusing on the two scenarios of ongoing and new vaccination programs, we analyze different resource allocation policies and their effects on overall disease burden. Our results suggest that if the costs associated with vaccinating males are relatively close to those associated with vaccinating females, then coverage-dependent, increasing marginal costs may favor vaccination strategies that entail immunization of both genders. In particular, this study emphasizes the necessity for further empirical research on the nature of coverage-dependent vaccination costs.

  11. Complete immunization coverage and its determinants among children in Malaysia: findings from the National Health and Morbidity Survey (NHMS) 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, K K; Chan, Y Y; Noor Ani, A; Rohani, J; Siti Norfadhilah, Z A; Santhi, M R

    2017-12-01

    The success of the Expanded Program on Immunization among children will greatly reduce the burden of illness and disability from vaccine preventable diseases. The aim of the study was to evaluate the complete immunization coverage and its determinants among children aged 12-23 months in Malaysia. Cross-sectional study. Data on immunization were extracted from the 2016 National Health and Morbidity Survey. Complete immunization coverage was classified as received all recommended primary vaccine doses by the age of 12 months and verified by vaccination cards, and incompletely immunized if they received partially recommended vaccine dose or not received any recommended vaccine dose or had no vaccination card. The multiple logistic regression analyses were conducted to determine the sociodemographic factors associated with complete immunization coverage. The overall complete immunization coverage among children (verified by cards) was 86.4% (n = 8920, 95% confidence interval: 85.4-87.4). Multivariable logistic regression analyses model revealed that factors significantly associated with complete immunization coverage were ethnicity, occupation of the mother, head of household's education level, and head of household's occupation. While sex, citizenship, household income, mother's age, and marital status were not significantly associated with complete immunization coverage. According to the World Health Organization criteria, the present study demonstrated that the immunization coverage of 86.4% is still unsatisfactory. Thus, the current intervention program should be enhanced in order to achieve the 95% coverage for all antigens in the national vaccination program. Copyright © 2017 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. An equity dashboard to monitor vaccination coverage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Sam; Nandi, Arijit; Rodríguez, José M Mendoza; Hansen, Peter M; Johri, Mira

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Equity monitoring is a priority for Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance, and for those implementing The 2030 agenda for sustainable development. For its new phase of operations, Gavi reassessed its approach to monitoring equity in vaccination coverage. To help inform this effort, we made a systematic analysis of inequalities in vaccination coverage across 45 Gavi-supported countries and compared results from different measurement approaches. Based on our findings, we formulated recommendations for Gavi’s equity monitoring approach. The approach involved defining the vulnerable populations, choosing appropriate measures to quantify inequalities, and defining equity benchmarks that reflect the ambitions of the sustainable development agenda. In this article, we explain the rationale for the recommendations and for the development of an improved equity monitoring tool. Gavi’s previous approach to measuring equity was the difference in vaccination coverage between a country’s richest and poorest wealth quintiles. In addition to the wealth index, we recommend monitoring other dimensions of vulnerability (maternal education, place of residence, child sex and the multidimensional poverty index). For dimensions with multiple subgroups, measures of inequality that consider information on all subgroups should be used. We also recommend that both absolute and relative measures of inequality be tracked over time. Finally, we propose that equity benchmarks target complete elimination of inequalities. To facilitate equity monitoring, we recommend the use of a data display tool – the equity dashboard – to support decision-making in the sustainable development period. We highlight its key advantages using data from Côte d’Ivoire and Haiti. PMID:28250513

  13. Validity of vaccination cards and parental recall to estimate vaccination coverage: a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Melody; Ryman, Tove K; Dietz, Vance; Zell, Elizabeth; Luman, Elizabeth T

    2013-03-15

    Immunization programs frequently rely on household vaccination cards, parental recall, or both to calculate vaccination coverage. This information is used at both the global and national level for planning and allocating performance-based funds. However, the validity of household-derived coverage sources has not yet been widely assessed or discussed. To advance knowledge on the validity of different sources of immunization coverage, we undertook a global review of literature. We assessed concordance, sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value, and coverage percentage point difference when subtracting household vaccination source from a medical provider source. Median coverage difference per paper ranged from -61 to +1 percentage points between card versus provider sources and -58 to +45 percentage points between recall versus provider source. When card and recall sources were combined, median coverage difference ranged from -40 to +56 percentage points. Overall, concordance, sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value showed poor agreement, providing evidence that household vaccination information may not be reliable, and should be interpreted with care. While only 5 papers (11%) included in this review were from low-middle income countries, low-middle income countries often rely more heavily on household vaccination information for decision making. Recommended actions include strengthening quality of child-level data and increasing investments to improve vaccination card availability and card marking. There is also an urgent need for additional validation studies of vaccine coverage in low and middle income countries. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Armenian media coverage of science topics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mkhitaryan, Marie

    2016-12-01

    The article discusses features and issues of Armenian media coverage on scientific topics and provides recommendations on how to promote scientific topics in media. The media is more interested in social or public reaction rather than in scientific information itself. Medical science has a large share of the global media coverage. It is followed by articles about environment, space, technology, physics and other areas. Armenian media mainly tends to focus on a scientific topic if at first sight it contains something revolutionary. Media primarily reviews whether that scientific study can affect the Armenian economy and only then decides to refer to it. Unfortunately, nowadays the perception of science is a little distorted in media. We can often see headlines of news where is mentioned that the scientist has made "an invention". Nowadays it is hard to see the border between a scientist and an inventor. In fact, the technological term "invention" attracts the media by making illusionary sensation and ensuring large audience. The report also addresses the "Gitamard" ("A science-man") special project started in 2016 in Mediamax that tells about scientists and their motivations.

  15. 7 CFR 275.8 - Review coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FOOD AND NUTRITION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FOOD STAMP AND FOOD DISTRIBUTION PROGRAM PERFORMANCE REPORTING SYSTEM Management Evaluation (ME... target areas of program operation specified by FNS. FNS will notify State agencies of the minimum program...

  16. The Immunization Coverage of Afghan Children at the Health Centers Supported by the United Nation Higher Commission in Kerman, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azizallah Dehghan

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Immunization is one of the most important health programs in first level prevention and is also one of the most cost-effective prevention programs in the entire world. This study evaluates the situation of immunization in fewer than one year old Afghan refugee children in Kerman, Iran. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional study. Data was extracted from the records of the health centers supported by the higher commission of refuges in Kerman. The BCG, polio 0, DTP 3, polio 3, Hepatitis B 3 and MMR 1 was calculated and compared with the vaccine coverage in Iran and Afghanistan. Stata 11 and Excel 2007 and the chi-square statistics were used for the analysis. Results: The coverage of all BCG, Polio 0, DTP 3, Polio 3, Hepatitis B 3 and MMR 1 vaccines in the Afghan immigrants residing in Kerman between 2010 and 2012 was more than 95%. This coverage was not significantly different from the vaccine coverage of Iranian children, but was significantly higher than the vaccine coverage of children residing in Afghanistan. Conclusion: The vaccine coverage of Afghan children residing in Kerman is similar to Iranian children and is high and satisfactory. These results show part of The Islamic Republic of Iran’s commitment for providing health requirements for Afghan refugees residing in Iran.

  17. Vaccination Coverage Among Children Aged 19-35 Months - United States, 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Holly A; Elam-Evans, Laurie D; Yankey, David; Singleton, James A; Kang, Yoonjae

    2017-11-03

    Vaccination is the most effective intervention to reduce morbidity and mortality from vaccine-preventable diseases in young children (1). Data from the 2016 National Immunization Survey-Child (NIS-Child) were used to assess coverage with recommended vaccines (2) among children aged 19-35 months in the United States. Coverage remained ≥90% for ≥3 doses of poliovirus vaccine (91.9%), ≥1 dose of measles, mumps, and rubella vaccine (MMR) (91.1%), ≥1 dose of varicella vaccine (90.6%), and ≥3 doses of hepatitis B vaccine (HepB) (90.5%). Coverage in 2016 was approximately 1-2 percentage points lower than in 2015 for ≥3 doses of diphtheria and tetanus toxoids and acellular pertussis vaccine (DTaP), ≥3 doses of poliovirus vaccine, the primary Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) series, ≥3 HepB doses, and ≥3 and ≥4 doses of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV), with no changes for other vaccines. More direct evaluation of trends by month and year of birth (3) found no change in coverage by age 2 years among children included in combined data from the 2015 and 2016 NIS-Child (born January 2012 through January 2015). The observed decreases in annual estimates might result from random differences in vaccination coverage by age 19 months between children sampled in 2016 and those sampled in 2015, among those birth cohorts eligible to be sampled in both survey years. For most vaccines, 2016 coverage was lower among non-Hispanic black* (black) children than among non-Hispanic white (white) children, and for children living below the federal poverty level† compared with those living at or above the poverty level. Vaccination coverage was generally lower among children insured by Medicaid (2.5-12.0 percentage points), and was much lower among uninsured children (12.4-24.9 percentage points), than among children with private insurance. The Vaccines for Children§ (VFC) program was designed to increase access to vaccines among children who might not otherwise be

  18. Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination coverage in young Australian women is higher than previously estimated: independent estimates from a nationally representative mobile phone survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brotherton, Julia M L; Liu, Bette; Donovan, Basil; Kaldor, John M; Saville, Marion

    2014-01-23

    Accurate estimates of coverage are essential for estimating the population effectiveness of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination. Australia has a purpose built National HPV Vaccination Program Register for monitoring coverage, however notification of doses administered to young women in the community during the national catch-up program (2007-2009) was not compulsory. In 2011, we undertook a population-based mobile phone survey of young women to independently estimate HPV vaccination coverage. Randomly generated mobile phone numbers were dialed to recruit women aged 22-30 (age eligible for HPV vaccination) to complete a computer assisted telephone interview. Consent was sought to validate self reported HPV vaccination status against the national register. Coverage rates were calculated based on self report and weighted to the age and state of residence structure of the Australian female population. These were compared with coverage estimates from the register using Australian Bureau of Statistics estimated resident populations as the denominator. Among the 1379 participants, the national estimate for self reported HPV vaccination coverage for doses 1/2/3, respectively, weighted for age and state of residence, was 64/59/53%. This compares with coverage of 55/45/32% and 49/40/28% based on register records, using 2007 and 2011 population data as the denominators respectively. Some significant differences in coverage between the states were identified. 20% (223) of women returned a consent form allowing validation of doses against the register and provider records: among these women 85.6% (538) of self reported doses were confirmed. We confirmed that coverage rates for young women vaccinated in the community (at age 18-26 years) are underestimated by the national register and that under-notification is greater for second and third doses. Using 2011 population estimates, rather than estimates contemporaneous with the program rollout, reduces register-based coverage

  19. One-fifth of nonelderly Californians do not have access to job-based health insurance coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavarreda, Shana Alex; Cabezas, Livier

    2010-11-01

    Lack of job-based health insurance does not affect just workers, but entire families who depend on job-based coverage for their health care. This policy brief shows that in 2007 one-fifth of all Californians ages 0-64 who lived in households where at least one family member was employed did not have access to job-based coverage. Among adults with no access to job-based coverage through their own or a spouse's job, nearly two-thirds remained uninsured. In contrast, the majority of children with no access to health insurance through a parent obtained public health insurance, highlighting the importance of such programs. Low-income, Latino and small business employees were more likely to have no access to job-based insurance. Provisions enacted under national health care reform (the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010) will aid some of these populations in accessing health insurance coverage.

  20. Agricultural Media Coverage of Farm Safety: Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Jim; Heiberger, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Agricultural media merit increased attention in addressing dynamic changes in safety aspects of one of the nation's most hazardous industries. Changes in farming, such as larger-scale, new "niche" enterprises and new technologies, bring new forms of risk to the safety of those who live and work on farms and ranches. At the same time, traditional agricultural media--commercial firms that publish farm periodicals and commercial radio/television stations and networks that provide farm programming--are changing dramatically. In the face of media convergence, these enterprises provide an increasing menu of agricultural information services delivered by print, radio, and television, plus a host of new electronic media. This review of literature addressed the role and importance of commercial agricultural media in the United States, the scope and pattern of their safety coverage, and the opportunities they represent. The review involved searches of 14 bibliographic databases, as well as reference lists of relevant studies and contacts with farm safety experts. Analysis of 122 documents suggested that limited focus has been directed to the role of commercial agricultural media in safety decisions on US farms. Findings revealed that they continue to serve an efficient, early-stage role in creating awareness and interest, providing information, forming attitudes, and stirring consideration of farm safety. Potentials are seen as expanding through the interactive features of social media and other new services offered by these media firms. Findings also identified research needs, 100 farm safety topics for reporting, and opportunities for strengthening safety coverage by commercial agricultural media.

  1. Accuracy of Coverage Survey Recall following an Integrated Mass Drug Administration for Lymphatic Filariasis, Schistosomiasis, and Soil-Transmitted Helminthiasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip J Budge

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Achieving target coverage levels for mass drug administration (MDA is essential to elimination and control efforts for several neglected tropical diseases (NTD. To ensure program goals are met, coverage reported by drug distributors may be validated through household coverage surveys that rely on respondent recall. This is the first study to assess accuracy in such surveys.Recall accuracy was tested in a series of coverage surveys conducted at 1, 6, and 12 months after an integrated MDA in Togo during which three drugs (albendazole, ivermectin, and praziquantel were distributed. Drug distribution was observed during the MDA to ensure accurate recording of persons treated during the MDA. Information was obtained for 506, 1131, and 947 persons surveyed at 1, 6, and 12 months, respectively. Coverage (defined as the percentage of persons taking at least one of the MDA medications within these groups was respectively 88.3%, 87.4%, and 80.0%, according to the treatment registers; it was 87.9%, 91.4% and 89.4%, according to survey responses. Concordance between respondents and registers on swallowing at least one pill was >95% at 1 month and >86% at 12 months; the lower concordance at 12 months was more likely due to difficulty matching survey respondents with the year-old treatment register rather than inaccurate responses. Respondents generally distinguished between pills similar in appearance; concordance for recall of which pills were taken was over 80% in each survey.In this population, coverage surveys provided remarkably consistent coverage estimates for up to one year following an integrated MDA. It is not clear if similar consistency will be seen in other settings, however, these data suggest that in some settings coverage surveys might be conducted as much as one year following an MDA without compromising results. This might enable integration of post-MDA coverage measurement into large, multipurpose, periodic surveys, thereby conserving

  2. Barrier Coverage for 3D Camera Sensor Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Pengju; Wu, Chengdong; Zhang, Yunzhou; Jia, Zixi; Ji, Peng; Chu, Hao

    2017-08-03

    Barrier coverage, an important research area with respect to camera sensor networks, consists of a number of camera sensors to detect intruders that pass through the barrier area. Existing works on barrier coverage such as local face-view barrier coverage and full-view barrier coverage typically assume that each intruder is considered as a point. However, the crucial feature (e.g., size) of the intruder should be taken into account in the real-world applications. In this paper, we propose a realistic resolution criterion based on a three-dimensional (3D) sensing model of a camera sensor for capturing the intruder's face. Based on the new resolution criterion, we study the barrier coverage of a feasible deployment strategy in camera sensor networks. Performance results demonstrate that our barrier coverage with more practical considerations is capable of providing a desirable surveillance level. Moreover, compared with local face-view barrier coverage and full-view barrier coverage, our barrier coverage is more reasonable and closer to reality. To the best of our knowledge, our work is the first to propose barrier coverage for 3D camera sensor networks.

  3. Barrier Coverage for 3D Camera Sensor Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chengdong; Zhang, Yunzhou; Jia, Zixi; Ji, Peng; Chu, Hao

    2017-01-01

    Barrier coverage, an important research area with respect to camera sensor networks, consists of a number of camera sensors to detect intruders that pass through the barrier area. Existing works on barrier coverage such as local face-view barrier coverage and full-view barrier coverage typically assume that each intruder is considered as a point. However, the crucial feature (e.g., size) of the intruder should be taken into account in the real-world applications. In this paper, we propose a realistic resolution criterion based on a three-dimensional (3D) sensing model of a camera sensor for capturing the intruder’s face. Based on the new resolution criterion, we study the barrier coverage of a feasible deployment strategy in camera sensor networks. Performance results demonstrate that our barrier coverage with more practical considerations is capable of providing a desirable surveillance level. Moreover, compared with local face-view barrier coverage and full-view barrier coverage, our barrier coverage is more reasonable and closer to reality. To the best of our knowledge, our work is the first to propose barrier coverage for 3D camera sensor networks. PMID:28771167

  4. The free vaccination policy of influenza in Beijing, China: The vaccine coverage and its associated factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Min; Fang, Renfei; Wu, Jiang; Pang, Xinghuo; Deng, Ying; Lei, Trudy; Xie, Zheng

    2016-04-19

    In order to improve influenza vaccination coverage, the coverage rate and reasons for non-vaccination need to be determined. In 2007, the Beijing Government published a policy providing free influenza vaccinations to elderly people living in Beijing who are older than 60. This study examines the vaccination coverage after the policy was carried out and factors influencing vaccination among the elderly in Beijing. A cross-sectional survey was conducted through the use of questionnaires in 2013. A total of 1673 eligible participants were selected by multistage stratified random sampling in Beijing using anonymous questionnaires in-person. They were surveyed to determine vaccination status and social demographic information. The influenza vaccination coverage was 38.7% among elderly people in Beijing in 2012. The most common reason for not being vaccinated was people thinking they did not need to have a flu shot. After controlling for age, gender, income, self-reported health status, and the acceptance of health promotion, the rate in rural areas was 2.566 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.801-3.655, Pvaccination uptake. Those whom received information through television, community boards, or doctors were more likely to get vaccinated compared to those who did not (Odds Ratio [OR]=1.403, Pvaccine coverage in Beijing is much lower than that of developed countries with similar policies. The rural-urban disparity in coverage rate (64.1% versus 33.5%), may be explained by differing health provision systems and personal attitudes toward free services due to socioeconomic factors. Methods for increasing vaccination levels include increasing the focus on primary care and health education programs, particularly recommendations from doctors, to the distinct target populations, especially with a focus on expanding these efforts in urban areas. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. (Quickly) Testing the Tester via Path Coverage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groce, Alex

    2009-01-01

    The configuration complexity and code size of an automated testing framework may grow to a point that the tester itself becomes a significant software artifact, prone to poor configuration and implementation errors. Unfortunately, testing the tester by using old versions of the software under test (SUT) may be impractical or impossible: test framework changes may have been motivated by interface changes in the tested system, or fault detection may become too expensive in terms of computing time to justify running until errors are detected on older versions of the software. We propose the use of path coverage measures as a "quick and dirty" method for detecting many faults in complex test frameworks. We also note the possibility of using techniques developed to diversify state-space searches in model checking to diversify test focus, and an associated classification of tester changes into focus-changing and non-focus-changing modifications.

  6. Endoscopic coverage of fetal myelomeningocele in utero.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruner, J P; Richards, W O; Tulipan, N B; Arney, T L

    1999-01-01

    Our goal was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of minimally invasive surgery for the coverage of myelomeningocele in utero. Women in the mid-second trimester of a pregnancy complicated by fetal myelomeningocele were offered an experimental procedure designed to prevent ongoing exposure of the spinal cord to the intrauterine environment. The procedure consisted of maternal laparotomy while the patient was under both general and epidural anesthesia, with exposure of the gravid uterus. Endoscopic ports were placed for camera and operating instruments. Amniotic fluid was removed and replaced with carbon dioxide. The fetus was then positioned and a maternal split-thickness skin graft was placed over the exposed spinal cord or neural elements. The skin graft and a covering of Surgicel Absorbable Hemostat were attached with fibrin glue prepared from autologous cryoprecipitate. Four fetuses with open myelomeningocele underwent endoscopic coverage of the spinal lesion between 22 weeks 3 days and 24 weeks 3 days of gestation. One infant, delivered by planned cesarean section at 35 weeks' gestation after demonstration of fetal lung maturity, is almost 3 years old. A second infant was delivered by cesarean section at 28 weeks after preterm labor and is now almost 6 months old. Both survivors manifest only mild motor and somatosensory deficits. One fetus who was delivered 1 week after operation after development of amnionitis died in the delivery room of extreme prematurity. The final fetus died intraoperatively from abruptio placentae. Minimally invasive fetal surgery appears to constitute a feasible approach to nonlethal fetal malformations that result in progressive and disabling organ damage.

  7. Influenza vaccination coverage among medical residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costantino, Claudio; Mazzucco, Walter; Azzolini, Elena; Baldini, Cesare; Bergomi, Margherita; Biafiore, Alessio Daniele; Bianco, Manuela; Borsari, Lucia; Cacciari, Paolo; Cadeddu, Chiara; Camia, Paola; Carluccio, Eugenia; Conti, Andrea; De Waure, Chiara; Di Gregori, Valentina; Fabiani, Leila; Fallico, Roberto; Filisetti, Barbara; Flacco, Maria E; Franco, Elisabetta; Furnari, Roberto; Galis, Veronica; Gallea, Maria R; Gallone, Maria F; Gallone, Serena; Gelatti, Umberto; Gilardi, Francesco; Giuliani, Anna R; Grillo, Orazio C; Lanati, Niccolò; Mascaretti, Silvia; Mattei, Antonella; Micò, Rocco; Morciano, Laura; Nante, Nicola; Napoli, Giuseppe; Nobile, Carmelo; Palladino, Raffaele; Parisi, Salvatore; Passaro, Maria; Pelissero, Gabriele; Quarto, Michele; Ricciardi, Walter; Romano, Gabriele; Rustico, Ennio; Saponari, Anita; Schioppa, Francesco S; Signorelli, Carlo; Siliquini, Roberta; Trabacchi, Valeria; Triassi, Maria; Varetta, Alessia; Ziglio, Andrea; Zoccali, Angela; Vitale, Francesco; Amodio, Emanuele

    2014-01-01

    Although influenza vaccination is recognized to be safe and effective, recent studies have confirmed that immunization coverage among health care workers remain generally low, especially among medical residents (MRs). Aim of the present multicenter study was to investigate attitudes and determinants associated with acceptance of influenza vaccination among Italian MRs. A survey was performed in 2012 on MRs attending post-graduate schools of 18 Italian Universities. Each participant was interviewed via an anonymous, self-administered, web-based questionnaire including questions on attitudes regarding influenza vaccination. A total of 2506 MRs were recruited in the survey and 299 (11.9%) of these stated they had accepted influenza vaccination in 2011–2012 season. Vaccinated MRs were older (P = 0.006), working in clinical settings (P = 0.048), and vaccinated in the 2 previous seasons (P < 0.001 in both seasons). Moreover, MRs who had recommended influenza vaccination to their patients were significantly more compliant with influenza vaccination uptake in 2011–2012 season (P < 0.001). “To avoid spreading influenza among patients” was recognized as the main reason for accepting vaccination by less than 15% of vaccinated MRs. Italian MRs seem to have a very low compliance with influenza vaccination and they seem to accept influenza vaccination as a habit that is unrelated to professional and ethical responsibility. Otherwise, residents who refuse vaccination in the previous seasons usually maintain their behaviors. Promoting correct attitudes and good practice in order to improve the influenza immunization rates of MRs could represent a decisive goal for increasing immunization coverage among health care workers of the future. PMID:24603089

  8. Individual and socioeconomic factors associated with childhood immunization coverage in Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oleribe, Obinna; Kumar, Vibha; Awosika-Olumo, Adebowale; Taylor-Robinson, Simon David

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Immunization is the world’s most successful and cost-effective public health intervention as it prevents over 2 million deaths annually. However, over 2 million deaths still occur yearly from Vaccine preventable diseases, the majority of which occur in sub-Saharan Africa. Nigeria is a major contributor of global childhood deaths from VPDs. Till date, Nigeria still has wild polio virus in circulation. The objective of this study was to identify the individual and socioeconomic factors associated with immunization coverage in Nigeria through a secondary dataset analysis of Nigeria Demographic and Health Survey (NDHS), 2013. Methods A quantitative analysis of the 2013 NDHS dataset was performed. Ethical approvals were obtained from Walden University IRB and the National Health Research Ethics Committee of Nigeria. The dataset was downloaded, validated for completeness and analyzed using univariate, bivariate and multivariate statistics. Results Of 27,571 children aged 0 to 59 months, 22.1% had full vaccination, and 29% never received any vaccination. Immunization coverage was significantly associated with childbirth order, delivery place, child number, and presence or absence of a child health card. Maternal age, geographical location, education, religion, literacy, wealth index, marital status, and occupation were significantly associated with immunization coverage. Paternal education, occupation, and age were also significantly associated with coverage. Respondent's age, educational attainment and wealth index remained significantly related to immunization coverage at 95% confidence interval in multivariate analysis. Conclusion The study highlights child, parental and socioeconomic barriers to successful immunization programs in Nigeria. These findings need urgent attention, given the re-emergence of wild poliovirus in Nigeria. An effective, efficient, sustainable, accessible, and acceptable immunization program for children should be designed

  9. Determinants of antiretroviral therapy coverage in Sub-Saharan Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumitaka Furuoka

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Among 35 million people living with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV in 2013, only 37% had access to antiretroviral therapy (ART. Despite global concerted efforts to provide the universal access to the ART treatment, the ART coverage varies among countries and regions. At present, there is a lack of systematic empirical analyses on factors that determine the ART coverage. Therefore, the current study aimed to identify the determinants of the ART coverage in 41 countries in Sub-Saharan Africa. It employed statistical analyses for this purpose. Four elements, namely, the HIV prevalence, the level of national income, the level of medical expenditure and the number of nurses, were hypothesised to determine the ART coverage. The findings revealed that among the four proposed determinants only the HIV prevalence had a statistically significant impact on the ART coverage. In other words, the HIV prevalence was the sole determinant of the ART coverage in Sub-Saharan Africa.

  10. Leaves coverage of spray liquid and influence on herbicide efficacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Prokop

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of spray liquid leaves coverage on efficacy of herbicides was investigated. Five nozzles sizes were used to reach different percentage coverage. The effect of leaves coverage on Elytrigia repens (L. Desv. was evaluated using systemic herbicide (clethodim 240 g / l + surfactant and the effect of leaves coverage on Chenopodium album L. and Galium aparine L. was evaluated using contact herbicides (bentazone 600 g / l and the mixture of bentazone 480 g / l + activator 150 g / l. No significant differences of the efficacy were observed between different percentages of leaves coverage in case of systemic herbicides. Vice versa the efficacy significantly increased with higher percentage of leaves coverage in case of contact herbicides.

  11. Target Coverage in Wireless Sensor Networks with Probabilistic Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Anxing; Xu, Xianghua; Cheng, Zongmao

    2016-01-01

    Sensing coverage is a fundamental problem in wireless sensor networks (WSNs), which has attracted considerable attention. Conventional research on this topic focuses on the 0/1 coverage model, which is only a coarse approximation to the practical sensing model. In this paper, we study the target coverage problem, where the objective is to find the least number of sensor nodes in randomly-deployed WSNs based on the probabilistic sensing model. We analyze the joint detection probability of target with multiple sensors. Based on the theoretical analysis of the detection probability, we formulate the minimum ϵ-detection coverage problem. We prove that the minimum ϵ-detection coverage problem is NP-hard and present an approximation algorithm called the Probabilistic Sensor Coverage Algorithm (PSCA) with provable approximation ratios. To evaluate our design, we analyze the performance of PSCA theoretically and also perform extensive simulations to demonstrate the effectiveness of our proposed algorithm. PMID:27618902

  12. Effective Universal Coverage of Diabetes Mellitus Type 2 in Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero-Núñez, Sara; Valenzuela-Suazo, Sandra; Cid-Henríquez, Patricia

    2017-04-06

    determine the prevalence of Effective Universal Coverage of Diabetes Mellitus Type 2 in Chile and its relation with the variables: Health Care Coverage of Diabetes Mellitus Type 2; Average of diabetics with metabolic control in 2011-2013; Mortality Rate for Diabetes Mellitus; and Percentage of nurses participating in the Cardiovascular Health Program. cross-sectional descriptive study with ecological components that uses documentary sources of the Ministry of Health. It was established that there is correlation between the Universal Effective Coverage of Diabetes Mellitus Type 2 and the independent variables; it was applied the Pearson Coefficient, being significant at the 0.05 level. in Chile Universal Health Care Coverage of Diabetes Mellitus Type 2 (HbA1cDiabetes Mellitus and Percentage of nurses participating in the Cardiovascular Health Program, being significant at the 0.01 level. effective prevalence of Universal Health Coverage of Diabetes Mellitus Type 2 is low, even though some regions stand out in this research and in the metabolic control of patients who participate in health control program; its relation with percentage of nurses participating in the Cardiovascular Health Program represents a challenge and an opportunity for the health system. determinar a prevalência de Cobertura Universal Efetiva da Diabetes Mellitus tipo 2 em Chile e sua relação com as variáveis; Cobertura da Diabetes Mellitus tipo 2, Média de diabéticos com controle metabólico em 2011-2013, Taxa de Mortalidade por Diabetes Mellitus e Percentagem de participação de enfermeiras no Programa de Saúde Cardiovascular. estudo descritivo transversal com componentes ecológicos, utilizando fontes documentais do Ministério da Saúde. Foi estabelecida correlação entre Cobertura Universal Efetiva da Diabetes Mellitus tipo 2 e as variáveis independentes, aplicando o Coeficiente de Pearson, sendo significante ao 0,05. no Chile a Cobertura Universal Efetiva da Diabetes Mellitus tipo

  13. Employee Costs and the Decline in Health Insurance Coverage

    OpenAIRE

    David M. Cutler

    2002-01-01

    This paper examines why health insurance coverage fell despite the lengthy economic boom of the 1990s. I show that insurance coverage declined primarily because fewer workers took up coverage when offered it, not because fewer workers were offered insurance or were eligible for it. The reduction in take-up is associated with the increase in employee costs for health insurance. Estimates suggest that increased costs to employees can explain the entire decline in take-up rates in the 1990s.

  14. 42 CFR 436.330 - Coverage for certain aliens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Coverage for certain aliens. 436.330 Section 436... Coverage of the Medically Needy § 436.330 Coverage for certain aliens. If an agency provides Medicaid to... condition, as defined in § 440.255(c) of this chapter to those aliens described in § 436.406(c) of this...

  15. Improved Differential Evolution Algorithm for Wireless Sensor Network Coverage Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing Xu

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In order to serve for the ecological monitoring efficiency of Poyang Lake, an improved hybrid algorithm, mixed with differential evolution and particle swarm optimization, is proposed and applied to optimize the coverage problem of wireless sensor network. And then, the affect of the population size and the number of iterations on the coverage performance are both discussed and analyzed. The four kinds of statistical results about the coverage rate are obtained through lots of simulation experiments.

  16. Periosteal Pedicle Flap Harvested during Vestibular Extension for Root Coverage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shubham Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Root exposure along with inadequate vestibular depth is a common clinical finding. Treatment option includes many techniques to treat such defects for obtaining predictable root coverage. Normally, the vestibular depth is increased first followed by a second surgery for root coverage. The present case report describes a single-stage technique for vestibular extension and root coverage in a single tooth by using the Periosteal Pedicle Flap (PPF. This technique involves no donor site morbidity and allows for reflection of sufficient amount of periosteal flap tissue with its own blood supply at the surgical site, thus increasing the chances of success of root coverage with simultaneous increase in vestibular depth.

  17. Coverage regions - How they're computed and used

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Charles K.

    1992-08-01

    Coverage regions are important considerations in the design and use of many space systems. Applications include ground-to-space and space-to-space communications, sensor coverage, and weapon reach. The 'coverage region' umbrella includes 'constraint regions', e.g., shadow regions for satellite visibility issues. The fundamental building blocks are circular regions on a sphere. These are combined to form more complex regions. Algorithms are developed to compute the boundaries of coverage regions in both geographic and satellite orbit coordinates. Emphasis is placed on circular satellite orbits, but extensions to elliptical orbits are addressed. Various applications are illustrated.

  18. Is Colombia reaching the goals on infant immunization coverage? A quantitative survey from 80 municipalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narváez, Javier; Osorio, May Bibiana; Castañeda-Orjuela, Carlos; Alvis Zakzuk, Nelson; Cediel, Natalia; Chocontá-Piraquive, Luz Ángela; de La Hoz-Restrepo, Fernando

    2017-03-13

    This study aimed to evaluate the coverage of the Colombian Expanded Program on Immunization among children less than 6years old, to evaluate the timeliness of immunization, to assess the coverage of newly introduced vaccines, and to identify factors associated with lack of immunization. We conducted a cross-sectional survey in 80 municipalities of Colombia, using a two-stage cluster random sampling. We attempted to contact all children less than 6years old living in the sampled blocks, and asked their caregivers to provide immunization record cards. We also collected basic sociodemographic information. We reached 81% of the attempted household contacts, identifying 18,232 children; of them, 14,805 (83%) had an immunization record card. Coverage for traditional vaccines was above 90%: BCG (tuberculosis) 95.7% (95%CI: 95.1-96.4), pentavalent vaccine 93.3% (92.4-94.3), MMR (measles, mumps, rubella) initial dose 94.5% (93.5-95.6); but it was lower for recently introduced vaccines: rotavirus 80% (77.8-82.1), influenza 48.4% (45.9-50.8). Results for timely vaccination were not equally successful: pentavalent vaccine 44.2% (41.4-47.1), MMR initial dose 71.2% (68.9-73.4). Mother's education was significantly associated with higher immunization odds. Older age, a greater number of siblings, low socioeconomic status, and not having health insurance were significantly associated with lower immunization odds. There was significant heterogeneity in immunization rates by municipality across the country. Although absolute immunization coverage for traditional vaccines met the goal of 90% for the 80 municipalities combined, disparities in coverage across municipalities, delayed immunization, and decline of coverage with age, are common problems in Colombia that may result in reduced protection. Newly introduced vaccines require additional efforts to reach the goal. These results highlight the association of health inequities with low immunization coverage and delayed immunization

  19. Contraception coverage and methods used among women in South Africa: A national household survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M F Chersich

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background. Globally, family planning services are being strengthened and the range of contraceptive choices expanded. Data on contraceptive coverage and service gaps could help to shape these initiatives. Objective. To assess contraception coverage in South Africa (SA and identify underserved populations and aspects of programming that require strengthening. Methods. Data from a 2012 SA household survey assessed contraception coverage among 6 296 women aged 15 - 49 years and identified underserved populations. Results. Two-thirds had an unintended pregnancy in the past 5 years, a quarter of which were contraceptive failures. Most knew of injectable (92.0% and oral contraception (89.9%, but fewer of intrauterine devices (56.1% and emergency contraception (47.3%. Contraceptive prevalence was 49.1%, and 41.8% women used modern non-barrier methods. About half had ever used injectable contraception. Contraception was lower in black Africans and younger women, who used a limited range of methods. Conclusion. Contraception coverage is higher than many previous estimates. Rates of unintended pregnancy, contraceptive failure and knowledge gaps, however, demonstrate high levels of unmet need, especially among black Africans and young women.

  20. SCHIP's impact on dependent coverage in the small-group health insurance market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiber, Eric E; Florence, Curtis S

    2010-02-01

    To estimate the impact of State Children's Health Insurance Program (SCHIP) expansions on public and private coverage of dependents at small firms compared with large firms. 1996-2007 Annual Demographic Survey of the Current Population Survey (CPS). This study estimates a two-stage least squares (2SLS) model for four insurance outcomes that instruments for SCHIP and Medicaid eligibility. Separate models are estimated for small group markets (firms with fewer than 25 employees), small businesses (firms under 500 employees), and large firms (firms 500 employees and above). We extracted data from the 1996-2007 CPS for children in households with at least one worker. The SCHIP expansions decreased the percentage of uninsured dependents in the small group market by 7.6 percentage points with negligible crowd-out in the small group and no significant effect on private coverage across the 11-year-period. The SCHIP expansions have increased coverage for households in the small group market with no significant crowd-out of private coverage. In contrast, the estimates for large firms are consistent with the substantial crowd-out observed in the literature.

  1. Media Coverage of Recent Crises in Middle East: Daily Jordanian Press Coverage of Events in Syria 2011-2013

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Nasr-Allah Farej Farej; Ahmad Rasmi AlBattat; Abdul Azeem Noor Eldeen Alhasan

    2014-01-01

    The current paper investigates the media coverage of recent crisis affecting Syria. It focused on an essential research topic that deals with an important issue which covers the Jordanian Newspaper study sample of the current events in Syria, as well it identified the mechanism, methods and coverage language that newspapers used in their coverage of events in Syria and identified the most press forms used by newspapers to cover events. Thus, the background of the study has a scientific profes...

  2. Programming Pig

    CERN Document Server

    Gates, Alan

    2011-01-01

    This guide is an ideal learning tool and reference for Apache Pig, the open source engine for executing parallel data flows on Hadoop. With Pig, you can batch-process data without having to create a full-fledged application-making it easy for you to experiment with new datasets. Programming Pig introduces new users to Pig, and provides experienced users with comprehensive coverage on key features such as the Pig Latin scripting language, the Grunt shell, and User Defined Functions (UDFs) for extending Pig. If you need to analyze terabytes of data, this book shows you how to do it efficiently

  3. US health policy and prescription drug coverage of FDA-approved medications for the treatment of obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, G; Stanford, F C

    2017-11-20

    Obesity is now the most prevalent chronic disease in the United States, which amounts to an estimated $147 billion in health care spending annually. The Affordable Care Act (ACA) enacted in 2010 included provisions for private and public health insurance plans that expanded coverage for lifestyle/behavior modification and bariatric surgery for the treatment of obesity. Pharmacotherapy, however, has not been included despite their evidence-based efficacy. We set out to investigate the coverage of Food and Drug Administration-approved medications for obesity within Medicare, Medicaid and ACA-established marketplace health insurance plans. We examined coverage for phentermine, diethylpropion, phendimetrazine, Benzphentamine, Lorcaserin, Phentermine/Topiramate (Qysmia), Liraglutide (Saxenda) and Buproprion/Naltrexone (Contrave) among Medicare, Medicaid and marketplace insurance plans in 34 states. Among 136 marketplace health insurance plans, 11% had some coverage for the specified drugs in only nine states. Medicare policy strictly excludes drug therapy for obesity. Only seven state Medicaid programs have drug coverage. Obesity requires an integrated approach to combat its public health threat. Broader coverage of pharmacotherapy can make a significant contribution to fighting this complex and chronic disease.International Journal of Obesity advance online publication, 9 January 2018; doi:10.1038/ijo.2017.287.

  4. Plenary III–04: Responses to Drug Costs: Year Three of the Medicare Part D Program

    OpenAIRE

    Fung, Vicki; Reed, Mary; Hsu, John

    2010-01-01

    Background/Aims: Many Medicare Part D beneficiaries face substantial prescription drug cost-sharing. In the first year of the program, many beneficiaries reported substantial drug use changes in response to the coverage gap. In response, an increasing number of plans offer generic drug coverage during the gap. We compared responses to Part D costs among beneficiaries with generic-only gap coverage and full gap coverage in 2008, the third year of the Part D program.

  5. Inequity between male and female coverage in state infertility laws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupree, James M; Dickey, Ryan M; Lipshultz, Larry I

    2016-06-01

    To analyze state insurance laws mandating coverage for male factor infertility and identify possible inequities between male and female coverage in state insurance laws. We identified states with laws or codes related to infertility insurance coverage using the National Conference of States Legislatures' and the National Infertility Association's websites. We performed a primary, systematic analysis of the laws or codes to specifically identify coverage for male factor infertility services. Not applicable. Not applicable. Not applicable. The presence or absence of language in state insurance laws mandating coverage for male factor infertility care. There are 15 states with laws mandating insurance coverage for female factor infertility. Only eight of those states (California, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Montana, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, and West Virginia) have mandates for male factor infertility evaluation or treatment. Insurance coverage for male factor infertility is most specific in Massachusetts, New Jersey, and New York, yet significant differences exist in the male factor policies in all eight states. Three states (Massachusetts, New Jersey, and New York) exempt coverage for vasectomy reversal. Despite national recommendations that male and female partners begin infertility evaluations together, only 8 of 15 states with laws mandating infertility coverage include coverage for the male partner. Excluding men from infertility coverage places an undue burden on female partners and risks missing opportunities to diagnose serious male health conditions, correct reversible causes of infertility, and provide cost-effective treatments that can downgrade the intensity of intervention required to achieve a pregnancy. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Medicare Prescription Drug Coverage - General Information

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The MMA legislation provides seniors and people with disabilities with the first comprehensive prescription drug benefit ever offered under the Medicare program, the...

  7. Presumptive Eligibility for Medicaid and CHIP Coverage

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Health care providers and Head Start programs can play a major role in finding and enrolling uninsured children through presumptive eligibility. States can authorize...

  8. Evaluating Software Complexity Based on Decision Coverage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa AL-HAJJAJI

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available It is becoming increasingly difficult to ignore the complexity of software products. Software metrics are proposed to help show indications for quality, size, complexity, etc. of software products. In this paper, software metrics related to complexity are developed and evaluated. A dataset of many open source projects is built to assess the value of the developed metrics. Comparisons and correlations are conducted among the different tested projects. A classifica-tion is proposed to classify software code into different levels of complexity. The results showed that measuring the complexity of software products based on decision coverage gives a significant indicator of degree of complexity of those software products. However, such in-dicator is not exclusive as there are many other complexity indicators that can be measured in software products. In addition, we conducted a comparison among several available metric tools that can collect software complexity metrics. Results among those different tools were not consistent. Such comparison shows the need to have a unified standard for measuring and collecting complexity attributes.

  9. Salvia officinalis L. coverage on plants development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.T.A. CRUZ-SILVA

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Medicinal plants with essential oils in their composition havetypicallybeen shown to be promising in plant control. Sage (Salvia officinalis L. is cited for its allelopathic effects. This study evaluated the allelopathic potential of dried sage leaves in vegetation, soil and the development of Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. (tomato, Panicum maximum Jacq. (guinea grass and Salvia hispanica L. (chia plants. Three seedlings were transplanted seven days after germination in 1 kg plastic containers with soil, in a greenhouse. The grinded dry mass of sage was placed at rates of 3.75; 7.5 15 t ha-1, and a control (no mass. After 30 days, the chlorophyll index of tomato and guinea grass plants were inhibited with 7.5 and 15 t ha-1 sage cover crops. Tomato shoot length was inhibited in all tested rates, and guinea grass plants showed some reduction in growth when using the highest rate of sage mass (15 t ha-1. The dry mass of tomato and guinea grass plants was reduced when using the15 t ha-1, and 7.5 and 15 t ha-1 of sage cover crops, respectively. It can be concluded that there was some effect of sage coverage on the soil in tomato and guinea grass, but no effect was observed on chia plants.

  10. 48 CFR 927.404 - Rights in technical data in subcontracts. (DOE coverage-paragraphs (g), (k), (l), and (m))

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... copyright in any computer software first produced in the performance of the contract. This requirement reflects DOE's established software distribution program, recognized at FAR 27.404(g)(2), and the... COPYRIGHTS Technical Data and Copyrights 927.404 Rights in technical data in subcontracts. (DOE coverage...

  11. 20 CFR 10.730 - What are the conditions of coverage for Peace Corps volunteers and volunteer leaders injured...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What are the conditions of coverage for Peace Corps volunteers and volunteer leaders injured while serving outside the United States? 10.730 Section 10.730 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION PROGRAMS, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR FEDERAL EMPLOYEES' COMPENSATION ACT CLAIMS FOR...

  12. Counting and Comparing School Performance: An Analysis of Media Coverage of PISA in Australia, 2000-2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baroutsis, Aspa; Lingard, Bob

    2017-01-01

    This paper empirically documents media portrayals of Australia's performance on the Program for the International Student Assessment (PISA), 2000-2014. We analyse newspaper articles from two national and eight metropolitan newspapers. This analysis demonstrates increased media coverage of PISA over the period in question. Our research data were…

  13. Public insurance is increasingly crucial to American families even as employer-sponsored health insurance coverage ends its steady decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Elise

    2014-01-01

    Americans under age 65 rely on a healthy labor market for almost all facets of economic security. While 2012 marked the first year in more than a decade that the employer-sponsored health insurance (ESI) coverage rate for the under-65 population did not decline, employer-sponsored health insurance continues to fail American families. If the coverage rate had not fallen 10.8 percentage points as it did from 2000 to 2012, as many as 29 million more people under age 65 would have had ESI in 2012. Even with the end of its longstanding decline, ESI coverage rates among men and women, white and non-white, high and low income, white and blue collar, young and old remain far lower than they were in 2000. Over this period, the increase in uninsured Americans was not as steep as the fall in ESI because of increases in public coverage, including Medicaid, the Children's Health Insurance Program, and Medicare. These programs were particularly effective in reducing the share of children uninsured over the 2000s. Additionally, key components in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act shielded young adults from further coverage losses.

  14. Coverage and quality: A comparison of Web of Science and Scopus databases for reporting faculty nursing publication metrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Kimberly R; Peterson, Shenita R

    Web of Science and Scopus are the leading databases of scholarly impact. Recent studies outside the field of nursing report differences in journal coverage and quality. A comparative analysis of nursing publications reported impact. Journal coverage by each database for the field of nursing was compared. Additionally, publications by 2014 nursing faculty were collected in both databases and compared for overall coverage and reported quality, as modeled by Scimajo Journal Rank, peer review status, and MEDLINE inclusion. Individual author impact, modeled by the h-index, was calculated by each database for comparison. Scopus offered significantly higher journal coverage. For 2014 faculty publications, 100% of journals were found in Scopus, Web of Science offered 82%. No significant difference was found in the quality of reported journals. Author h-index was found to be higher in Scopus. When reporting faculty publications and scholarly impact, academic nursing programs may be better represented by Scopus, without compromising journal quality. Programs with strong interdisciplinary work should examine all areas of strength to ensure appropriate coverage. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. How much does it cost to achieve coverage targets for primary healthcare services? A costing model from Aceh, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Asnawi; Hort, Krishna; Abidin, Azwar Zaenal; Amin, Fadilah M

    2012-01-01

    Despite significant investment in improving service infrastructure and training of staff, public primary healthcare services in low-income and middle-income countries tend to perform poorly in reaching coverage targets. One of the factors identified in Aceh, Indonesia was the lack of operational funds for service provision. The objective of this study was to develop a simple and transparent costing tool that enables health planners to calculate the unit costs of providing basic health services to estimate additional budgets required to deliver services in accordance with national targets. The tool was developed using a standard economic approach that linked the input activities to achieving six national priority programs at primary healthcare level: health promotion, sanitation and environment health, maternal and child health and family planning, nutrition, immunization and communicable diseases control, and treatment of common illness. Costing was focused on costs of delivery of the programs that need to be funded by local government budgets. The costing tool consisting of 16 linked Microsoft Excel worksheets was developed and tested in several districts enabled the calculation of the unit costs of delivering of the six national priority programs per coverage target of each program (such as unit costs of delivering of maternal and child health program per pregnant mother). This costing tool can be used by health planners to estimate additional money required to achieve a certain level of coverage of programs, and it can be adjusted for different costs and program delivery parameters in different settings. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. original article assessment of effective coverage of voluntary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abrham

    CONCLUSION: This study demonstrated that effective coverage of Voluntary Counseling and Testing service was very low based on the providers ... questionnaire was developed and used in this study. Training topics included: discussion on ... measurement of HIV/AIDS intervention would be by use of coverage indicators ...

  17. Medical Coverage of High School Football in New York State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, James B.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    A survey of New York secondary schools showed that nearly 25 percent do not employ a physician to oversee medical coverage of football games. The authors suggest several ways to improve this much-needed coverage--not only to protect athletes but also to shield the administration from litigation. (JD)

  18. Increasing the coverage of vaccination against influenza by general practitioners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perenboom, R.J.M.; Davidse, W.

    1996-01-01

    Background. To increase the coverage of influenza vaccination in groups of patients at risk, an experiment was conducted in 1993, aimed at logistic support of general practitioners (GPs). Methods. Support was given to 56 GPs with 133 000 patients to select and invite patients at risk. The coverage

  19. Textbook Coverage of the Destruction of the Armenians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindquist, David H.

    2012-01-01

    Despite its importance as the event establishing that the 20th century would be known as "the age of genocide," the destruction of the Armenians that occurred between the mid-1890s and 1923 is given marginal coverage in contemporary U. S. high school history textbooks. This article critiques that coverage and identifies the overall flow…

  20. Newspaper Coverage of Nigeria Police Activities: A Content Analysis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study is a content analysis of newspaper coverage of police activities in Nigeria from January to March, 2012. Three national dailies (the Nation, the Punch and Daily Sun) were studied. Among the specific objectives were to determine the volume of coverage of the activities of Nigeria Police by selected newspapers, ...

  1. Evolution Reporting in 1925: How the Audience Determined Coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Carrie

    General interest, scientific, and religious periodicals responded to the theory of evolution in 1925 with the same opinions but slanted their coverage to appeal to different readerships. "Scientific American" and "Current History" differed only stylistically in their coverage of the "Australopithecus africanus"…

  2. 42 CFR 435.139 - Coverage for certain aliens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Coverage for certain aliens. 435.139 Section 435... Aliens § 435.139 Coverage for certain aliens. The agency must provide services necessary for the treatment of an emergency medical condition, as defined in § 440.255(c) of this chapter, to those aliens...

  3. A Fair Path Toward Universal Coverage: National Case Study for ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    A Fair Path Toward Universal Coverage: National Case Study for Ethiopia, Uganda, and Zambia. As national health systems in developing countries make progress toward achieving universal health service coverage, many face ethical challenges. In its 2010 World Health Report, the World Health Assembly called on the ...

  4. Assessment of Effective Coverage of HIV Prevention of Pregnant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: Coverage assessment of prevention of Pregnant Mother to Child Transmission (PMTCT) of HIV service is useful to measure the health system effort or performance of health service delivery function and to influence decisions. The objective of this study was to assess effective coverage level for prevention ...

  5. National EPI coverage survey report in Ethiopia, 2006

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine regional coverage of child and TT immunization and assess reasons for not utilizing immunization services. - - ' i i. Methods: The revised 2005 WHO-EPI regional coverage cluster survey method was used to determine the sample size for the study. Regional immunization status of 12-23 months of ...

  6. Variability of surface ozone with cloud coverage over Kolkata, India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Critical analysis of experimental surface ozone data and cloud coverage is reported over Kolkata during the period January 2011 to December 2011. Significant relationship between these two parameters is observed. Analysis shows that the trend of surface ozone concentration and cloud coverage follow opposite ...

  7. 45 CFR 147.130 - Coverage of preventive health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Coverage of preventive health services. 147.130... § 147.130 Coverage of preventive health services. (a) Services—(1) In general. Beginning at the time... rating of A or B in the current recommendations of the United States Preventive Services Task Force with...

  8. A trust-based probabilistic coverage algorithm for wireless sensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taghikhaki, Zahra; Meratnia, Nirvana; Havinga, Paul J.M.

    2013-01-01

    Sensing coverage is a fundamental issue for many applications in wireless sensor networks. Due to sensors resource limitations, inherent uncertainties associated with their measurements, and the harsh and dynamic environment in which they are deployed, having a QoS-aware coverage scheme is a must.

  9. New Civil Rights Act Coverages - Progress or Racism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Galen

    1975-01-01

    The growing list of added coverages in state and local civil rights laws is diluting the fight against racial discrimination by weakening enforcement through loading civil rights agencies with many new areas of coverage which are diverting them from their original purpose of ending discrimination against racial and religious minorities. (EH)

  10. A Semantic Framework for Test Coverage (Extended Version)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brinksma, Hendrik; Stoelinga, Mariëlle Ida Antoinette; Brandan Briones, L.

    2006-01-01

    Since testing is inherently incomplete, test selection is of vital importance. Coverage measures evaluate the quality of a test suite and help the tester select test cases with maximal impact at minimum cost. Existing coverage criteria for test suites are usually defined in terms of syntactic

  11. An Appraisal of Immunisation in Nigeria: Towards Improving Coverage

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Even though the Nigeria's universal child immunization coverage is said to have improved in the last two years much is still needed to bring the coverage target to at least 75% throughout the nation for effective control of all Vaccine Preventable Diseases. Targeted “mop-up” campaigns should be intensified for the wild polio ...

  12. US Media Coverage of Tobacco Industry Corporate Social Responsibility Initiatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDaniel, Patricia A; Lown, E Anne; Malone, Ruth E

    2018-02-01

    Media coverage of tobacco industry corporate social responsibility (CSR) initiatives represents a competitive field where tobacco control advocates and the tobacco industry vie to shape public and policymaker understandings about tobacco control and the industry. Through a content analysis of 649 US news items, we examined US media coverage of tobacco industry CSR and identified characteristics of media items associated with positive coverage. Most coverage appeared in local newspapers, and CSR initiatives unrelated to tobacco, with non-controversial beneficiaries, were most commonly mentioned. Coverage was largely positive. Tobacco control advocates were infrequently cited as sources and rarely authored opinion pieces; however, when their voices were included, coverage was less likely to have a positive slant. Media items published in the South, home to several tobacco company headquarters, were more likely than those published in the West to have a positive slant. The absence of tobacco control advocates from media coverage represents a missed opportunity to influence opinion regarding the negative public health implications of tobacco industry CSR. Countering the media narrative of virtuous companies doing good deeds could be particularly beneficial in the South, where the burdens of tobacco-caused disease are greatest, and coverage of tobacco companies more positive.

  13. Anterior Palatal Island Advancement Flap for Bone Graft Coverage ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Anterior Palatal Island Advancement Flap for Bone Graft. Coverage: Technical Note. Amin Rahpeyma, Saeedeh Khajehahmadi1. INTRODUCTION. The most important step in bone graft augmentation of alveolar process is soft tissue coverage. Dehiscence of the wound leads to graft exposure and subsequent problems.

  14. Coverage of the Stanford Prison Experiment in Introductory Psychology Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartels, Jared M.; Milovich, Marilyn M.; Moussier, Sabrina

    2016-01-01

    The present study examined the coverage of Stanford prison experiment (SPE), including criticisms of the study, in introductory psychology courses through an online survey of introductory psychology instructors (N = 117). Results largely paralleled those of the recently published textbook analyses with ethical issues garnering the most coverage,…

  15. St. Lukes' Survey on vaccination coverage | Quartero | Malawi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    St. Lukes hospital, a PRAM unit in Zomba district, had an estimated vaccination coverage of 44% in 1990. To conf"1rID this very low coverage, a survey was done in the 5 km catchment area around the hospital. 611 children, being 104% of the estimated number, bom between 1st June 1989 and 31st May 1990 were ...

  16. Anterior palatal island advancement flap for bone graft coverage ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... Palatal Island Advancement Flap was effective in bone graft coverage in premaxillary edentulous area. Conclusion: It can be used as an aid for bone graft coverage of premaxillary edentulous ridge, where the need for mucosa is small in width but long in length. Keywords: Anterior maxilla, bone graft, dental implant, ...

  17. Higher Education Students' Perceptions of Environmental Issues and Media Coverage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keinonen, Tuula; Palmberg, Irmeli; Kukkonen, Jari; Yli-Panula, Eija; Persson, Christel; Vilkonis, Rytis

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to find higher education students' perceptions about environmental issues and how the perceptions are related to perceptions of media coverage. This study investigates higher education students' perceptions of the seriousness of environmental issues and their relation to perceptions of media coverage. Higher education students…

  18. Financial incentives and coverage of child health interventions: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassani, Diego G; Arora, Paul; Wazny, Kerri; Gaffey, Michelle F; Lenters, Lindsey; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A

    2013-01-01

    Financial incentives are widely used strategies to alleviate poverty, foster development, and improve health. Cash transfer programs, microcredit, user fee removal policies and voucher schemes that provide direct or indirect monetary incentives to households have been used for decades in Latin America, Sub-Saharan Africa, and more recently in Southeast Asia. Until now, no systematic review of the impact of financial incentives on coverage and uptake of health interventions targeting children under 5 years of age has been conducted. The objective of this review is to provide estimates on the effect of six types of financial incentive programs: (i) Unconditional cash transfers (CT), (ii) Conditional cash transfers (CCT), (iii) Microcredit (MC), (iv) Conditional Microcredit (CMC), (v) Voucher schemes (VS) and (vi) User fee removal (UFR) on the uptake and coverage of health interventions targeting children under the age of five years. We conducted systematic searches of a series of databases until September 1st, 2012, to identify relevant studies reporting on the impact of financial incentives on coverage of health interventions and behaviors targeting children under 5 years of age. The quality of the studies was assessed using the CHERG criteria. Meta-analyses were undertaken to estimate the effect when multiple studies meeting our inclusion criteria were available. Our searches resulted in 1671 titles identified 25 studies reporting on the impact of financial incentive programs on 5 groups of coverage indicators: breastfeeding practices (breastfeeding incidence, proportion of children receiving colostrum and early initiation of breastfeeding, exclusive breastfeeding for six months and duration of breastfeeding); vaccination (coverage of full immunization, partial immunization and specific antigens); health care use (seeking healthcare when child was ill, visits to health facilities for preventive reasons, visits to health facilities for any reason, visits for health

  19. Hybrid Wireless Sensor Network Coverage Holes Restoring Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Zhouzhou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aiming at the perception hole caused by the necessary movement or failure of nodes in the wireless sensor actuator network, this paper proposed a kind of coverage restoring scheme based on hybrid particle swarm optimization algorithm. The scheme first introduced network coverage based on grids, transformed the coverage restoring problem into unconstrained optimization problem taking the network coverage as the optimization target, and then solved the optimization problem in the use of the hybrid particle swarm optimization algorithm with the idea of simulated annealing. Simulation results show that the probabilistic jumping property of simulated annealing algorithm could make up for the defect that particle swarm optimization algorithm is easy to fall into premature convergence, and the hybrid algorithm can effectively solve the coverage restoring problem.

  20. Distributed Multitarget Probabilistic Coverage Control Algorithm for Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Tian

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is concerned with the problem of multitarget coverage based on probabilistic detection model. Coverage configuration is an effective method to alleviate the energy-limitation problem of sensors. Firstly, considering the attenuation of node’s sensing ability, the target probabilistic coverage problem is defined and formalized, which is based on Neyman-Peason probabilistic detection model. Secondly, in order to turn off redundant sensors, a simplified judging rule is derived, which makes the probabilistic coverage judgment execute on each node locally. Thirdly, a distributed node schedule scheme is proposed for implementing the distributed algorithm. Simulation results show that this algorithm is robust to the change of network size, and when compared with the physical coverage algorithm, it can effectively minimize the number of active sensors, which guarantees all the targets γ-covered.

  1. Universal Health Coverage: A Political Struggle and Governance Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méndez, Claudio A.

    2015-01-01

    Universal health coverage has become a rallying cry in health policy, but it is often presented as a consensual, technical project. It is not. A review of the broader international literature on the origins of universal coverage shows that it is intrinsically political and cannot be achieved without recognition of its dependence on, and consequences for, both governance and politics. On one hand, a variety of comparative research has shown that health coverage is associated with democratic political accountability. Democratization, and in particular left-wing parties, gives governments particular cause to expand health coverage. On the other hand, governance, the ways states make and implement decisions, shapes any decision to strive for universal health coverage and the shape of its implementation. PMID:26180991

  2. Controlling coverage of solution cast materials with unfavourable surface interactions

    KAUST Repository

    Burlakov, V. M.

    2014-03-03

    Creating uniform coatings of a solution-cast material is of central importance to a broad range of applications. Here, a robust and generic theoretical framework for calculating surface coverage by a solid film of material de-wetting a substrate is presented. Using experimental data from semiconductor thin films as an example, we calculate surface coverage for a wide range of annealing temperatures and film thicknesses. The model generally predicts that for each value of the annealing temperature there is a range of film thicknesses leading to poor surface coverage. The model accurately reproduces solution-cast thin film coverage for organometal halide perovskites, key modern photovoltaic materials, and identifies processing windows for both high and low levels of surface coverage. © 2014 AIP Publishing LLC.

  3. Vaccination coverage and timeliness in three South African areas: a prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanders David

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Timely vaccination is important to induce adequate protective immunity. We measured vaccination timeliness and vaccination coverage in three geographical areas in South Africa. Methods This study used vaccination information from a community-based cluster-randomized trial promoting exclusive breastfeeding in three South African sites (Paarl in the Western Cape Province, and Umlazi and Rietvlei in KwaZulu-Natal between 2006 and 2008. Five interview visits were carried out between birth and up to 2 years of age (median follow-up time 18 months, and 1137 children were included in the analysis. We used Kaplan-Meier time-to-event analysis to describe vaccination coverage and timeliness in line with the Expanded Program on Immunization for the first eight vaccines. This included Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG, four oral polio vaccines and 3 doses of the pentavalent vaccine which protects against diphtheria, pertussis, tetanus, hepatitis B and Haemophilus influenzae type B. Results The proportion receiving all these eight recommended vaccines were 94% in Paarl (95% confidence interval [CI] 91-96, 62% in Rietvlei (95%CI 54-68 and 88% in Umlazi (95%CI 84-91. Slightly fewer children received all vaccines within the recommended time periods. The situation was worst for the last pentavalent- and oral polio vaccines. The hazard ratio for incomplete vaccination was 7.2 (95%CI 4.7-11 for Rietvlei compared to Paarl. Conclusions There were large differences between the different South African sites in terms of vaccination coverage and timeliness, with the poorer areas of Rietvlei performing worse than the better-off areas in Paarl. The vaccination coverage was lower for the vaccines given at an older age. There is a need for continued efforts to improve vaccination coverage and timeliness, in particular in rural areas. Trial registration number ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00397150

  4. [Coverage for birth care in Mexico and its interpretation within the context of maternal mortality].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Schiavon, Raffaela; Uribe-Zúñiga, Patricia; Walker, Dilys; Suárez-López, Leticia; Luna-Gordillo, Rufino; Ulloa-Aguirre, Alfredo

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate health coverage for birth care in Mexico within the frame of maternal mortality reduction. Two information sources were used: 1) The comparison between the results yield by the Mexican National Health and Nutrition Surveys 2006 and 2012 (ENSANUT 2006 and 2012), and 2) the databases monitoring maternal deaths during 2012 (up to December 26), and live births (LB) in Mexico as estimated by the Mexican National Population Council (Conapo). The national coverage for birth care by medical units is nearly 94.4% at the national level, but in some federal entities such as Chiapas (60.5%), Nayarit (87.8%), Guerrero (91.2%), Durango (92.5%), Oaxaca (92.6%), and Puebla (93.4%), coverage remains below the national average. In women belonging to any social security system (eg. IMSS, IMSS Oportunidades, ISSSTE), coverage is almost 99%, whereas in those affiliated to the Mexican Popular Health Insurance (which depends directly from the Federal Ministry of Health), coverage reached 92.9%. In terms of Maternal Mortality Ratio (MMR), there are still large disparities among federal states in Mexico, with a national average of 47.0 per 100 000 LB (preliminary data for 2012, up to December 26). The MMR estimation has been updated using the most recent population projections. There is no correlation between the level of institutional birth care and the MMR in Mexico. It is thus necessary not only to guarantee universal birth care by health professionals, but also to provide obstetric care by qualified personnel in functional health services networks, to strengthen the quality of obstetric care, family planning programs, and to promote the implementation of new and innovative health policies that include intersectoral actions and human rights-based approaches targeted to reduce the enormous social inequity still prevailing in Mexico.

  5. Progress in timely vaccination coverage among children living in low-income households.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Philip J; Jain, Nidhi; Stevenson, John; Männikkö, Nancy; Molinari, Noelle-Angelique

    2009-05-01

    To evaluate progress in timely vaccination coverage associated with low-income households. The US National Immunization Survey. Children aged 19 to 35 months living in low-income households who were sampled between 1995 and 2007 (N = 232 318). Low-income households had an annual income that was 133% or less of the federal poverty level, and high-income households had an annual income of 400% or more of the federal poverty level. Administration of 4 or more doses of diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis (DTaP-DTP) vaccine; 3 or more doses of polio; 1 or more doses of measles, mumps, rubella (MMR); 3 or more doses of Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib); 3 or more doses of hepatitis B; and 1 or more doses of varicella vaccines by age 19 months as reported by the children's vaccination providers. Progress in timely coverage was evaluated by tracking changes between consecutive annual birth cohorts born between 1994 and 2004. Among low-income children, timely vaccination coverage increased significantly between consecutive birth cohorts by an estimated 0.5% for DTaP-DTP, 0.3% for polio, 0.6% for MMR, 1.2% for hepatitis B, and 5.3% for varicella vaccines but did not change significantly for the Hib vaccine. Disparities in timely coverage for low- vs high-income children declined significantly between consecutive birth cohorts by an estimated -0.3% for MMR, -0.3% for hepatitis B, and -0.5% for varicella vaccines, did not change significantly for the polio vaccine, and increased significantly by 0.4% for the DTaP-DTP vaccine. Disparities in vaccination coverage associated with low household income persist. Further progress in timely vaccination may be achieved by improving health care providers' reminder/recall systems, implementing educational interventions that address barriers to vaccination, and increasing parents' awareness of the Vaccines for Children Program.

  6. Three-Dimensional Analysis of Deep Space Network Antenna Coverage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kegege, Obadiah; Fuentes, Michael; Meyer, Nicholas; Sil, Amy

    2012-01-01

    There is a need to understand NASA s Deep Space Network (DSN) coverage gaps and any limitations to provide redundant communication coverage for future deep space missions, especially for manned missions to Moon and Mars. The DSN antennas are required to provide continuous communication coverage for deep space flights, interplanetary missions, and deep space scientific observations. The DSN consists of ground antennas located at three sites: Goldstone in USA, Canberra in Australia, and Madrid in Spain. These locations are not separated by the exactly 120 degrees and some DSN antennas are located in the bowl-shaped mountainous terrain to shield against radiofrequency interference resulting in a coverage gap in the southern hemisphere for the current DSN architecture. To analyze the extent of this gap and other coverage limitations, simulations of the DSN architecture were performed. In addition to the physical properties of the DSN assets, the simulation incorporated communication forward link calculations and azimuth/elevation masks that constrain the effects of terrain for each DSN antenna. Analysis of the simulation data was performed to create coverage profiles with the receiver settings at a deep space altitudes ranging from 2 million to 10 million km and a spherical grid resolution of 0.25 degrees with respect to longitude and latitude. With the results of these simulations, two- and three-dimensional representations of the area without communication coverage and area with coverage were developed, showing the size and shape of the communication coverage gap projected in space. Also, the significance of this communication coverage gap is analyzed from the simulation data.

  7. Assuring health coverage for all in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Vikram; Parikh, Rachana; Nandraj, Sunil; Balasubramaniam, Priya; Narayan, Kavita; Paul, Vinod K; Kumar, A K Shiva; Chatterjee, Mirai; Reddy, K Srinath

    2015-12-12

    Successive Governments of India have promised to transform India's unsatisfactory health-care system, culminating in the present government's promise to expand health assurance for all. Despite substantial improvements in some health indicators in the past decade, India contributes disproportionately to the global burden of disease, with health indicators that compare unfavourably with other middle-income countries and India's regional neighbours. Large health disparities between states, between rural and urban populations, and across social classes persist. A large proportion of the population is impoverished because of high out-of-pocket health-care expenditures and suffers the adverse consequences of poor quality of care. Here we make the case not only for more resources but for a radically new architecture for India's health-care system. India needs to adopt an integrated national health-care system built around a strong public primary care system with a clearly articulated supportive role for the private and indigenous sectors. This system must address acute as well as chronic health-care needs, offer choice of care that is rational, accessible, and of good quality, support cashless service at point of delivery, and ensure accountability through governance by a robust regulatory framework. In the process, several major challenges will need to be confronted, most notably the very low levels of public expenditure; the poor regulation, rapid commercialisation of and corruption in health care; and the fragmentation of governance of health care. Most importantly, assuring universal health coverage will require the explicit acknowledgment, by government and civil society, of health care as a public good on par with education. Only a radical restructuring of the health-care system that promotes health equity and eliminates impoverishment due to out-of-pocket expenditures will assure health for all Indians by 2022--a fitting way to mark the 75th year of India

  8. Coverage and inequalities in maternal and child health interventions in Afghanistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akseer, Nadia; Bhatti, Zaid; Rizvi, Arjumand; Salehi, Ahmad S; Mashal, Taufiq; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A

    2016-09-12

    of the country, while they were lowest in the South and Southeast. About 7700 newborns and 26,000 post-neonates could be saved by scaling up coverage of community outreach interventions to 90 %, with the most gains in the poorest quintiles. Afghanistan is a pervasively poor and conflict-prone nation that has only recently experienced a decade of relative stability. Though donor investments during this period have been plentiful and have contributed to rebuilding of health infrastructure in the country, glaring inequities remain. A resolution to scaling up health coverage in insecure and isolated regions, and improving accessibility for the poorest and marginalised populations, should be at the forefront of national policy and programming efforts.

  9. Coverage and inequalities in maternal and child health interventions in Afghanistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Akseer

    2016-09-01

    more urbanised East, West and Central regions of the country, while they were lowest in the South and Southeast. About 7700 newborns and 26,000 post-neonates could be saved by scaling up coverage of community outreach interventions to 90 %, with the most gains in the poorest quintiles. Conclusions Afghanistan is a pervasively poor and conflict-prone nation that has only recently experienced a decade of relative stability. Though donor investments during this period have been plentiful and have contributed to rebuilding of health infrastructure in the country, glaring inequities remain. A resolution to scaling up health coverage in insecure and isolated regions, and improving accessibility for the poorest and marginalised populations, should be at the forefront of national policy and programming efforts.

  10. Another health insurance gap: gaining and losing coverage among natives and immigrants at older ages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Adriana M; Hardy, Melissa

    2014-01-01

    As the immigrant population grows older and larger, limitations on access to health insurance may create a new subgroup of people who remain outside or on the margin of coverage. Using the Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP) data from the 2004 and 2008 panels, we address the health insurance gap between foreign-born and native-born adults among those aged 50-64 and the 65 and older, two sub-populations that have received relatively little attention in past research. We argue that current practices leave a significant minority of older foreign-born residents inconsistently covered or without any insurance. We find that health insurance coverage for older immigrants is both less likely and more episodic even when compositional differences in SES and assimilation are controlled. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. 42 CFR 410.49 - Cardiac rehabilitation program and intensive cardiac rehabilitation program: Conditions of coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... or more of the following: (i) An acute myocardial infarction within the preceding 12 months; (ii) A.... Individualized treatment plan means a written plan tailored to each individual patient that includes all of the... rehabilitation treatment, and psychosocial evaluation of the individual's response to and rate of progress under...

  12. Improved-Coverage Preserving Clustering Protocol in Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manju

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Coverage maintenance for longer period is crucial problem in wireless sensor network (WSNs due to limited inbuilt battery in sensors. Coverage maintenance can be prolonged by using the network energy efficiently, which can be done by keeping sufficient number of sensors in sensor covers. There has been discussed a Coverage-Preserving Clustering Protocol (CPCP to increase the network lifetime in clustered WSNs. It selects sensors for various roles such as cluster heads and sensor cover members by considering various coverage aware cost metrics. In this paper, we propose a new heuristic called Improved-Coverage-Preserving Clustering Protocol (I-CPCP to maximize the total network lifetime. In our proposed method, minimal numbers of sensor are selected to construct a sensor covers based on various coverage aware cost metrics. These cost metrics are evaluated by using residual energy of a sensor and their coverage. The simulation results show that our method has longer network lifetime as compared to generic CPCP.

  13. Contraception and abortion coverage: What do primary care physicians think?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Cynthia H; Martenis, Melissa E; Parisi, Sara M; Delano, Rachel E; Sobota, Mindy; Nothnagle, Melissa; Schwarz, Eleanor Bimla

    2012-08-01

    Insurance coverage for family planning services has been a highly controversial element of the US health care reform debate. Whether primary care providers (PCPs) support public and private health insurance coverage for family planning services is unknown. PCPs in three states were surveyed regarding their opinions on health plan coverage and tax dollar use for contraception and abortion services. Almost all PCPs supported health plan coverage for contraception (96%) and use of tax dollars to cover contraception for low-income women (94%). A smaller majority supported health plan coverage for abortions (61%) and use of tax dollars to cover abortions for low-income women (63%). In adjusted models, support of health plan coverage for abortions was associated with female gender and internal medicine specialty, and support of using tax dollars for abortions for low-income women was associated with older age and internal medicine specialty. The majority of PCPs support health insurance coverage of contraception and abortion, as well as tax dollar subsidization of contraception and abortion services for low-income women. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Vocabulary Demands of Television Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Stuart; Rodgers, Michael P. H.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated vocabulary coverage and the number of encounters of low-frequency vocabulary in television programs. Eighty-eight television programs consisting of 264,384 running words were categorized according to genre. Television shows were classified as either British or American and then put into the following genres: news, drama,…

  15. Progress toward universal health coverage in ASEAN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Minh, Hoang; Pocock, Nicola Suyin; Chaiyakunapruk, Nathorn; Chhorvann, Chhea; Duc, Ha Anh; Hanvoravongchai, Piya; Lim, Jeremy; Lucero-Prisno, Don Eliseo; Ng, Nawi; Phaholyothin, Natalie; Phonvisay, Alay; Soe, Kyaw Min; Sychareun, Vanphanom

    2014-12-01

    Background The Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) is characterized by much diversity in terms of geography, society, economic development, and health outcomes. The health systems as well as healthcare structure and provisions vary considerably. Consequently, the progress toward Universal Health Coverage (UHC) in these countries also varies. This paper aims to describe the progress toward UHC in the ASEAN countries and discuss how regional integration could influence UHC. Design Data reported in this paper were obtained from published literature, reports, and gray literature available in the ASEAN countries. We used both online and manual search methods to gather the information and 'snowball' further data. Results We found that, in general, ASEAN countries have made good progress toward UHC, partly due to relatively sustained political commitments to endorse UHC in these countries. However, all the countries in ASEAN are facing several common barriers to achieving UHC, namely 1) financial constraints, including low levels of overall and government spending on health; 2) supply side constraints, including inadequate numbers and densities of health workers; and 3) the ongoing epidemiological transition at different stages characterized by increasing burdens of non-communicable diseases, persisting infectious diseases, and reemergence of potentially pandemic infectious diseases. The ASEAN Economic Community's (AEC) goal of regional economic integration and a single market by 2015 presents both opportunities and challenges for UHC. Healthcare services have become more available but health and healthcare inequities will likely worsen as better-off citizens of member states might receive more benefits from the liberalization of trade policy in health, either via regional outmigration of health workers or intra-country health worker movement toward private hospitals, which tend to be located in urban areas. For ASEAN countries, UHC should be explicitly

  16. Progress toward universal health coverage in ASEAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoang Van Minh

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN is characterized by much diversity in terms of geography, society, economic development, and health outcomes. The health systems as well as healthcare structure and provisions vary considerably. Consequently, the progress toward Universal Health Coverage (UHC in these countries also varies. This paper aims to describe the progress toward UHC in the ASEAN countries and discuss how regional integration could influence UHC. Design: Data reported in this paper were obtained from published literature, reports, and gray literature available in the ASEAN countries. We used both online and manual search methods to gather the information and ‘snowball’ further data. Results: We found that, in general, ASEAN countries have made good progress toward UHC, partly due to relatively sustained political commitments to endorse UHC in these countries. However, all the countries in ASEAN are facing several common barriers to achieving UHC, namely 1 financial constraints, including low levels of overall and government spending on health; 2 supply side constraints, including inadequate numbers and densities of health workers; and 3 the ongoing epidemiological transition at different stages characterized by increasing burdens of non-communicable diseases, persisting infectious diseases, and reemergence of potentially pandemic infectious diseases. The ASEAN Economic Community's (AEC goal of regional economic integration and a single market by 2015 presents both opportunities and challenges for UHC. Healthcare services have become more available but health and healthcare inequities will likely worsen as better-off citizens of member states might receive more benefits from the liberalization of trade policy in health, either via regional outmigration of health workers or intra-country health worker movement toward private hospitals, which tend to be located in urban areas. For ASEAN countries, UHC should

  17. Automatic magnetometer calibration with small space coverage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahdan, Ahmed

    The use of a standalone Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) has proved to be insufficient when navigating indoors or in urban canyons due to multipath or obstruction. Recent technological advances in low cost micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) -- based sensors (like accelerometers, gyroscopes and magnetometers) enabled the development of sensor-based navigation systems. Although MEMS sensors are low-cost, lightweight, small size, and have low-power consumption, they have complex error characteristics. Accurate computation of the heading angle (azimuth) is one of the most important aspects of any navigation system. It can be computed either by gyroscopes or magnetometers. Gyroscopes are inertial sensors that can provide the angular rate from which the heading can be calculated, however, their outputs drift with time. Moreover, the accumulated errors due to mathematical integration, performed to obtain the heading angle, lead to large heading errors. On the other hand, magnetometers do not suffer from drift and the calculation of heading does not suffer from error accumulation. They can provide an absolute heading from the magnetic north by sensing the earth's magnetic field. However, magnetometer readings are usually affected by magnetic fields, other than the earth magnetic field, and by other error sources; therefore magnetometer calibration is required to use magnetometer as a reliable source of heading in navigation applications. In this thesis, a framework for fast magnetometer calibration is proposed. This framework requires little space coverage with no user involvement in the calibration process, and does not need specific movements to be performed. The proposed techniques are capable of performing both 2-dimensional (2D) and 3-dimensional (3D) calibration for magnetometers. They are developed to consider different scenarios suitable for different applications, and can benefit from natural device movements. Some applications involve tethering the

  18. Expanded managed care liability: what impact on employer coverage?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studdert, D M; Sage, W M; Gresenz, C R; Hensler, D R

    1999-01-01

    Policymakers are considering legislative changes that would increase managed care organizations' exposure to civil liability for withholding coverage or failing to deliver needed care. Using a combination of empirical information and theoretical analysis, we assess the likely responses of health plans and Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA) plan sponsors to an expansion of liability, and we evaluate the policy impact of those moves. We conclude that the direct costs of liability are uncertain but that the prospect of litigation may have other important effects on coverage decision making, information exchange, risk contracting, and the extent of employers' involvement in health coverage.

  19. Education, leadership and partnerships: nursing potential for Universal Health Coverage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Amélia Costa Mendes

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to discuss possibilities of nursing contribution for universal health coverage. Method: a qualitative study, performed by means of document analysis of the World Health Organization publications highlighting Nursing and Midwifery within universal health coverage. Results: documents published by nursing and midwifery leaders point to the need for coordinated and integrated actions in education, leadership and partnership development. Final Considerations: this article represents a call for nurses, in order to foster reflection and understanding of the relevance of their work on the consolidation of the principles of universal health coverage.

  20. 24/7 pediatric radiology attending coverage: times are changing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donaldson, James S. [Feinberg School of Medicine at Northwestern University, Department of Medical Imaging, Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, IL (United States); Thakrar, Kiran H. [University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine, Body Imaging, NorthShore University HealthSystem, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2017-06-15

    The job of the pediatric radiologist long ago ceased to be an 8-to-5 role. Many practices have adopted evening shifts of in-house attending radiologists to cover the busy evening activity. With the ever-increasing role of imaging in clinical decisions and patient management, there is a need - if not a demand - to further extend attending pediatric radiology coverage. In this article, we discuss the needs and justification for extending pediatric radiology coverage at a tertiary-care children's hospital. We also describe the approach we took toward implementing 24/7 attending in-house coverage of pediatric radiology. (orig.)

  1. National, state, and urban area vaccination coverage levels among children aged 19-35 months--United States, 1998.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, G A; Smith, P; Daniels, D; Klevens, R M; Coronado, V; McCauley, M; Stokley, S; Maes, E F; Ezzati-Rice, T M; Wright, R A; Cordero, J F

    2000-09-22

    High vaccination levels in the population are necessary to decrease disease transmission and prevent disease; therefore, an important component of the U.S. vaccination program is the assessment of vaccination coverage. Current goals are for > or = 90% coverage with recommended vaccines during the first 2 years of life. January-December 1998. The National Immunization Survey (NIS) is an ongoing, random-digit-dialed telephone survey that gathers vaccination coverage data for children aged 19-35 months in all 50 states and 28 urban areas. Vaccination coverage rates derived from NIS data are adjusted statistically for households with multiple telephone lines, household nonresponse, the proportion of households without telephones, and vaccination provider nonresponse. The results were also adjusted to match the known total population of children in each survey area. On the basis of NIS data, national coverage was > or = 90% for three doses of poliovirus vaccine (Polio), three doses of Haemophilus influenzae type b vaccine (Hib), and one dose of measles-containing vaccine (MCV). Coverage was the highest ever reported for four doses of any diphtheria and tetanus toxoids and pertussis vaccine (DTP) (i.e., diphtheria and tetanus toxoids and pertussis vaccine, diphtheria and tetanus toxoids [DT], or diphtheria and tetanus toxoids and acellular pertussis vaccine [DTaP]) (83.9%), three doses of hepatitis B vaccine (Hep B, 87.0%), and one dose of varicella vaccine (43.2%). The number of states achieving the > or = 90% goal was 47 for three doses of Hib, 40 for three doses of Polio, 40 for one dose of MCV, nine for three doses of Hep B, and seven for four doses of DTP. Proportionally fewer urban areas achieved the > or = 90% goal: 23 of 28 for three doses of Hib, 13 for three doses of Polio, 16 for one dose of MCV, five for three doses of Hep B, and one for four doses of DTP. No state or urban area has yet achieved the > or = 90% goal for varicella. Findings from the 1998 NIS

  2. Federal Old-Age, Survivors, and Disability Insurance; coverage of employees of private nonprofit organizations--SSA. Proposed rules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-04-06

    These proposed rules implement sections 102, 321, 322 and 323 of Pub. L. 98-21 (the Social Security Amendments of 1983). Generally, these provisions: (1) Mandatorily cover for Social Security purposes employees of private nonprofit organizations; (2) Provide additional Social Security coverage for certain work performed outside the United States (U.S.); (3) Provide coverage under the Social Security program for certain foreign earned income; (4) Provide special Social Security insured status requirements for certain nonprofit organization employees covered as a result of these amendments; and (5) Provide Social Security coverage for employment and self-employment that is identified as "covered" for purposes of title II of the Social Security Act (the Act) by the provisions of a totalization agreement between the U.S. and another country.

  3. Effective coverage for antiretroviral therapy in a Ugandan district with a decentralized model of care.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian J B Scheibe

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: While increasing access to antiretroviral therapy (ART is reported from many African countries, data on effective coverage particular from settings without external support or research remains scarce. We examined and report effective coverage data from a public ART program in rural Uganda. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective cohort study at all ART-providing governmental health facilities in Iganga District, Eastern Uganda. Based on all HIV patients registered between April 2004 and September 2009 (n = 4775, we assessed indicators of program performance and determined rates of retention and Cox proportional hazards for attrition. Effective ART coverage was calculated using projections (SPECTRUM software adapted to the district demographic structure and number of people receiving ART. RESULTS: By September 2009, district public sector effective ART coverage was 10.3% for adults and 1.9% for children. After a median follow-up of 26.9 months, overall ART retention was 54.7%. The probability of retention was 0.72 (95% confidence interval (CI 0.69-0.75 at 12 and 0.58 (CI 0.54-0.62 at 36 months after ART initiation. Individual health facilities differed considerably regarding performance indicators and retention. Overall, 198 (16.9% individual files of 1171 registered ART patients were lost. Young adult age (15-24 years had a higher risk of attrition (HR 2.1, CI 1.4-3.2 as well as WHO stage I (HR 4.8, CI 1.9-11.8 and WHO stage IV (HR 2.5, CI 1.3-4.7. An interval ≥6 weeks between HIV testing and ART initiation was associated with a reduced risk (HR 0.6, CI 0.47-0.78. CONCLUSION: Compared to reported national data effective ART coverage in Iganga District was low. Intensified efforts to improve access, retention in care, and quality of documentation are urgently needed. Children and young adults require special attention in the program.

  4. A cross-sectional vaccination coverage study in preschool children attending nurseries-kindergartens: Implications on economic crisis effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgakopoulou, Theano; Menegas, Damianos; Katsioulis, Antonis; Theodoridou, Maria; Kremastinou, Jenny; Hadjichristodoulou, Christos

    2017-01-02

    Vaccination coverage studies are important in determining a population's vaccination status and strategically adjusting national immunization programs. This study assessed full and timely vaccination coverage of preschool children aged 2-3 y attending nurseries-kindergartens (N-K) nationwide at the socioeconomic crisis onset. Geographically stratified cluster sampling was implemented considering prefectures as strata and N-K as clusters. The N-K were selected by simple random sampling from the sampling frame while their number was proportional to the stratum size. In total, 185 N-K (response rate 93.9%) and 2539 children (response rate 81.5%) participated. Coverage with traditional vaccines for diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis, polio and measles-mumps-rubella was very high (>95%), followed by Haemophilus influenzae type b and varicella vaccines. Despite very high final coverage, delayed vaccination was observed for hepatitis B (48.3% completed by 12 months). Significant delay was observed for the booster dose of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCV) and meningococcal C conjugate vaccines (MCC). Of the total population studied, 82.3% received 3 PCV doses by 12 months, while 62.3% received the fourth dose by 24 months and 76.2% by 30 months. However, 89.6% received at least one MCC dose over 12 months. Timely vaccinated for hepatitis A with 2 doses by 24 months were 6.1%. Coverage was significantly low for Rotavirus (vaccination coverage is maintained for most vaccines at the beginning of the crisis in Greece. Coverage and timeliness show an increasing trend compared to previous studies. Sustained efforts are needed to support the preventive medicine system as socioeconomic instability continues.

  5. Programming Language Pragmatics

    CERN Document Server

    Scott, Michael L

    2009-01-01

    Programming Language Pragmatics is the most comprehensive programming language textbook available today. Taking the perspective that language design and language implementation are tightly interconnected, and that neither can be fully understood in isolation, this critically acclaimed and bestselling book has been thoroughly updated to cover the most recent developments in programming language design. With a new chapter on run-time program management and expanded coverage of concurrency, this new edition provides both students and professionals alike with a solid understanding of the most impo

  6. The value of coverage in the medicare advantage insurance market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Abe

    2010-12-01

    This paper examines the impact of coverage on demand for health insurance in the Medicare Advantage (MA) insurance market. Estimating the effects of coverage on demand poses a challenge for researchers who must consider both the hundreds of benefits that affect out-of-pocket costs (OOPC) to consumers, but also the endogeneity of coverage. These problems are addressed in a discrete choice demand model by employing a unique measure of OOPC that considers a consumer's expected payments for a fixed bundle of health services and applying instrumental variable techniques to address potential endogeneity bias. The results of the demand model show that OOPC have a significant effect on consumer surplus and that not instrumenting for OOPC results in a significant underestimate of the value of coverage. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Web based geoprocessing tool for coverage data handling

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    K Kumar; S Saran

    2014-01-01

    .... The application of OGC WCS (Web Coverage Service) and WFS (Web Feature Service) standards for geospatial raster and vector data has resulted in an opulent pool of interoperable geodata resources waiting to be used for analytical or modelling purposes...

  8. 45 CFR 146.113 - Rules relating to creditable coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... for distribution of pediatric vaccines). (v) Title 10 U.S.C. Chapter 55 (medical and dental care for... history of a medical condition— (1) Are unable to acquire medical care coverage for such condition through...

  9. Insurance Coverage and Whither Thou Goest for Health Info

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Authors of Insurance Coverage and Whither Thou Goest for Health Information in 2012, recently published in Volume 4, Issue 4 of the Medicare and Medicaid Research...

  10. Graphene transfer process and optimization of graphene coverage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norfaezah Sabki, Syarifah; Hafly Shamsuri, Shafiq; Fazlina Fauzi, Siti; Lim Chon-Ki, Meghashama; Othman, Noraini

    2017-11-01

    Graphene grown on transition metal is known to be high in quality due to its controlled amount of defects and potentially used for many electronic applications. The transfer process of graphene grown on transition metal to a new substrate requires optimization in order to ensure that high graphene coverage can be obtained. In this work, an improvement in the graphene transfer process is performed from graphene grown on copper foil. It has been observed that the graphene coverage is affected by the pressure given to the top of PDMS to eliminate water and air between graphene and SiO2 (new substrate). This work experimented with different approaches to optimize the graphene coverage, and stamping method has proven to be the best technique in obtaining the largest graphene coverage. This work also highlights the elimination of impurities from graphene after the transfer process, known to be PMMA residues, which involved immersion of graphene in acetone. This method has improved the graphene conductivity.

  11. Financing universal coverage in Malaysia: a case study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chua, Hong Teck; Cheah, Julius Chee Ho

    2012-01-01

    .... Using Malaysia as a case study, this paper seeks to evaluate the progress and capacity of a middle income country in terms of health financing for universal coverage, and also to highlight some...

  12. Effect of Incumbency on Coverage Patterns in 1972 Presidential Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graber, Doris A.

    1976-01-01

    This replication of a 1968 study confirms that there are uniform patterns of campaign coverage practiced by daily newspapers, regardless of partisan orientation or other differences among the papers or their audiences. (Author/RB)

  13. Medicaid Coverage Of Cessation Treatments And Barriers To Treatments

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — 2008-2017. American Lung Association. Cessation Coverage. Medicaid data compiled by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Office on Smoking and Health...

  14. Newspaper Coverage of Intimate Partner Violence: Skewing Representations of Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlyle, Kellie E; Slater, Michael D; Chakroff, Jennifer L

    2008-03-01

    How media portray intimate partner violence (IPV) has implications for public perceptions and social policy. Therefore, to better understand these portrayals, this study content analyzes a nationally representative sample of newspaper coverage of IPV over a two-year-period and compares this coverage to epidemiological data in order to examine the implications of the discrepancies between coverage and social reality. Stratified media outlets across the country were used to obtain a representative sample of daily newspapers based on their designated market areas, resulting in 395 IPV-related articles. Results show that newspaper framing of IPV tends to be heavily skewed toward episodic framing. In addition, there are significant differences between our data and epidemiological estimates, particularly in the coverage of homicide and use of alcohol and illegal drugs, which may skew public perceptions of risk. Implications for public perceptions and social policy are discussed.

  15. Coverage Probability of Wald Interval for Binomial Parameters

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Xinjia

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we develop an exact method for computing the minimum coverage probability of Wald interval for estimation of binomial parameters. Similar approach can be used for other type of confidence intervals.

  16. Optimal Explicit Binomial Confidence Interval with Guaranteed Coverage Probability

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Xinjia

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we develop an approach for optimizing the explicit binomial confidence interval recently derived by Chen et al. The optimization reduces conservativeness while guaranteeing prescribed coverage probability.

  17. Coverage of Unification Issue in North and South Korean Papers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Won H.

    1981-01-01

    Concludes that while the North Korean press gives more space to stories concerning the unification of the two Koreas than does the South, it is also more hostile and less varied in its coverage of the issue. (FL)

  18. Medicaid Coverage Of Cessation Treatments And Barriers To Treatments

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — 2008-2016. American Lung Association. Cessation Coverage. Medicaid data compiled by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Office on Smoking and Health...

  19. The Politics of Universal Health Coverage in Low- and Middle-Income Countries: A Framework for Evaluation and Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Ashley M; Reich, Michael R

    2015-10-01

    Universal health coverage has recently become a top item on the global health agenda pressed by multilateral and donor organizations, as disenchantment grows with vertical, disease-specific health programs. This increasing focus on universal health coverage has brought renewed attention to the role of domestic politics and the interaction between domestic and international relations in the health reform process. This article proposes a theory-based framework for analyzing the politics of health reform for universal health coverage, according to four stages in the policy cycle (agenda setting, design, adoption, and implementation) and four variables that affect reform (interests, institutions, ideas, and ideology). This framework can assist global health policy researchers, multilateral organization officials, and national policy makers in navigating the complex political waters of health reforms aimed at achieving universal health coverage. To derive the framework, we critically review the theoretical and applied literature on health policy reform in developing countries and illustrate the framework with examples of health reforms moving toward universal coverage in low- and middle-income countries. We offer a series of lessons stemming from these experiences to date. Copyright © 2015 by Duke University Press.

  20. Optimal control of a social epidemic model with media coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Hai-Feng; Huang, Shui-Rong; Wang, Xun-Yang; Xiang, Hong

    2017-12-01

    A new social epidemic model to depict alcoholism with media coverage is proposed in this paper. Some fundamental properties of the model including existence and positivity as well as boundedness of equilibria are investigated. Stability of all equilibria are studied. The existence of the optimal control pair and mathematical expressions of optimal control are obtained by Pontryagin's maximum principle. Numerical simulations are also performed to illustrate our results. Our results show that media coverage is an effective measure to quit drinking.

  1. Influenza vaccination coverage among adult survivors of pediatric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojha, Rohit P; Offutt-Powell, Tabatha N; Gurney, James G

    2014-06-01

    A large proportion of long-term survivors of childhood cancer have treatment-related adverse cardiac and pulmonary late-effects, with related mortality. Consequently, this population of approximately 379,000 individuals in the U.S. is at high risk of complications from influenza infections. To estimate influenza vaccination coverage overall and among subgroups of adult survivors of pediatric cancer aged 18-64 years and to compare coverage with the general adult U.S. population. Data from the 2009 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System were analyzed in 2013 using binomial regression to estimate influenza vaccination coverage differences (CDs) and corresponding 95% confidence limits (CLs) between adult survivors of pediatric cancer and the general U.S. population. Analyses were stratified by demographic characteristics and adjusted for design effects, non-coverage, and non-response. Influenza vaccination coverage was 37% for adult pediatric cancer survivors overall and 31% for the general adult U.S. population (CD=6.3%, 95% CL=0.04%, 13%). Dramatically lower coverage was observed for non-Hispanic black survivors (6%) than for non-Hispanic blacks in the general U.S. population (26%; CD=-18%, 95% CL=-25%, -11%). Although influenza vaccination coverage was modestly higher among adult survivors of pediatric cancer than the general U.S. population, coverage was less than desirable for a population with a high prevalence of cardiopulmonary conditions and early mortality, and far lower than the Healthy People 2010 goal of 60% or Healthy People 2020 goal of 80% for the general population. Copyright © 2014 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Coverage and Connectivity Issue in Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachit Trivedi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Wireless sensor networks (WSNs are an emerging area of interest in research and development. It finds use in military surveillance, health care, environmental monitoring, forest fire detection and smart environments. An important research issue in WSNs is the coverage since cost, area and lifetime are directly validated to it.In this paper we present an overview of WSNs and try to refine the coverage and connectivity issues in wireless sensor networks.

  3. Strategies for expanding health insurance coverage in vulnerable populations

    OpenAIRE

    Jia, Liying; Yuan, Beibei; Huang, Fei; Lu, Ying; Garner, Paul; Meng, Qingyue

    2014-01-01

    Background Health insurance has the potential to improve access to health care and protect people from the financial risks of diseases. However, health insurance coverage is often low, particularly for people most in need of protection, including children and other vulnerable populations. Objectives To assess the effectiveness of strategies for expanding health insurance coverage in vulnerable populations. Search methods We searched Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), pa...

  4. VaxView: Vaccination Coverage [data] in the U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are protected from vaccine-preventable diseases. What is Vaccination Coverage and Why is it Important? Vaccination coverage ... and other data sets. How does CDC track vaccination coverage? CDC keeps track of the vaccination rates ...

  5. Deconstructing media coverage of trastuzumab (Herceptin): an analysis of national newspaper coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Paul M; Booth, Alison M; Eastwood, Alison; Watt, Ian S

    2008-03-01

    To explore and critically describe the content and main narratives of UK national daily newspaper coverage of trastuzumab (Herceptin). We used the NewsBank database to search eight national daily newspapers, and their Sunday equivalents, retrospectively from 19 February 2006 back to the earliest mention of trastuzumab or Herceptin (19 May 1998). Setting UK national newspapers. To be eligible for inclusion, articles had to contain at least three sentences about trastuzumab. Articles that focused on the financial performance of companies associated with the drug were excluded from the analysis. For each included article, we extracted bibliographic details and data, and independently rated the reporting slant towards trastuzumab and, where relevant, the reporting slant towards access to treatment. We identified 361 articles that met the study inclusion criteria. The proprietary name of Herceptin was always used, with only eight articles mentioning the generic alternative. 294/361 included articles (81.5%) were rated as being positive towards trastuzumab, the remainder rated as neutral. Access to trastuzumab treatment was the main narrative running across included articles and reports of individual patients seeking treatment featured prominently throughout. In 208/361 of included articles (57%) the reporting slant towards access to trastuzumab treatment was rated as negative. 178/361 of included articles (49.3%) mentioned licensing, but rarely mentioned that licensing processes can only occur when the manufacturer applies for a licence. Only a minority of articles mentioned that the drug had to be licensed before it could be subject to the NICE approval process. Newspaper coverage of trastuzumab has been characterized by uncritical reporting. Journalists (and consumers) should be more questioning when confronted with information about new drugs and of the motives of those who seek to set the news agenda.

  6. Fault Tolerant Coverage and Connectivity in Presence of Channel Randomness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil Kumar Sagar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Some applications of wireless sensor network require K-coverage and K-connectivity to ensure the system to be fault tolerance and to make it more reliable. Therefore, it makes coverage and connectivity an important issue in wireless sensor networks. In this paper, we proposed K-coverage and K-connectivity models for wireless sensor networks. In both models, nodes are distributed according to Poisson distribution in the sensor field. To make the proposed model more realistic we used log-normal shadowing path loss model to capture the radio irregularities and studied its impact on K-coverage and K-connectivity. The value of K can be different for different types of applications. Further, we also analyzed the problem of node failure for K-coverage model. In the simulation section, results clearly show that coverage and connectivity of wireless sensor network depend on the node density, shadowing parameters like the path loss exponent, and standard deviation.

  7. Socioeconomic and regional inequalities of pap smear coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manica, Silvia Troyahn; Drachler, Maria de Lourdes; Teixeira, Luciana Barcellos; Ferla, Alcindo Antônio; Gouveia, Helga Geremias; Anschau, Fernando; Oliveira, Dora Lúcia Leidens Correa de

    2016-03-01

    Objectives To identify socioeconomic and regional inequalities of pap smear coverage in the state of Rio Grande do Sul. Methods An ecological study based on data of the 2011-2012 national health information system to estimate the annual coverage of pap smears for the overall female population of the state and for women without private health insurance. We estimated annual pap smear coverage according to the Municipal Social Vulnerability Index and health macro-regions and regions of the state. Results The percentage of women without private health insurance ranged from 38.1% to 94.2% in the health regions. Pap smear coverage was 17.3% for the overall female population and 23.8% for women without private health insurance. Pap smear coverage was higher in more socially vulnerable municipalities and regions with a higher percentage of women with private health insurance. Conclusions The prevalence of private health insurance should be considered in studies that address the coverage of the Brazilian Unified Health System (SUS).

  8. Effectiveness of interventions that apply new media to improve vaccine uptake and vaccine coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odone, Anna; Ferrari, Antonio; Spagnoli, Francesca; Visciarelli, Sara; Shefer, Abigail; Pasquarella, Cesira; Signorelli, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    %), and email communication (n.1, 5%). There is some evidence that text messaging, accessing immunization campaign websites, using patient-held web-based portals and computerized reminders increase immunization coverage rates. Insufficient evidence is available on the use of social networks, email communication and smartphone applications. Although there is great potential for improving vaccine uptake and vaccine coverage by implementing programs and interventions that apply new media, scant data are available and further rigorous research - including cost-effectiveness assessments - is needed.

  9. How did welfare reform affect the health insurance coverage of women and children?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cawley, John; Schroeder, Mathis; Simon, Kosali I

    2006-04-01

    To measure the change in U.S. women and children's health insurance coverage as a result of welfare reform (i.e. the creation of Temporary Assistance for Needy Families or TANF) in 1996. 1992-1999 longitudinal data from the Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP) merged with data on the timing of state implementation of welfare reform after 1996. Two key advantages of the SIPP data are that they permit matching type of insurance coverage to the welfare policy environment in each state in each month, and permit controlling for individual-level fixed effects. We measure how much insurance coverage changed after welfare reform using a difference in differences method that eliminates the influence of time-invariant unobserved individual heterogeneity and of statewide trends in insurance coverage. Models also control for individual, state, and year fixed effects, individual-level characteristics such as education, age, and number of children, plus state-level variables such as real per capita income, real minimum wage, and Medicaid eligibility. We limit our analysis to the SIPP data specific to the month just completed prior to the interview; as a result, we have up to twelve observations for each individual in the SIPP. This paper uses pooled data from the 1992-1996 panels of the SIPP covering the period 1992-1999. Publicly available state identifiers permit the merger of state policies and macroeconomic variables with the SIPP. TANF implementation is associated with an 8.1 percent increase in the probability that a welfare-eligible woman was uninsured. Welfare reform had less of an impact on the health insurance coverage of children. For example, TANF implementation was associated with a 3.0 percent increase in the probability that a welfare-eligible child lacked health insurance. An unintended consequence of welfare reform was to adversely impact the health insurance coverage of economically vulnerable women and children, and that this impact was several

  10. Is cannabis an illicit drug or a medicine? A quantitative framing analysis of Israeli newspaper coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sznitman, Sharon R; Lewis, Nehama

    2015-05-01

    Various countries and states, including Israel, have recently legalized cannabis for therapeutic purposes (CTP). These changes have received mass media coverage and prompted national and international dialogue about the status of cannabis and whether or not it can be defined as a (legitimate) medicine, illicit and harmful drug, or both. News media framing may influence, and be influenced by, public opinion regarding CTP and support for CTP license provisions for patients. This study examines the framing of CTP in Israeli media coverage and the association between media coverage and trends in the provision of CTP licenses in Israel over time. All published news articles relevant to CTP and the framing of cannabis (N=214) from the three highest circulation newspapers in Israel were content analyzed. Articles were published between January 2007 and June 2013, a period in which CTP licenses granted by the Ministry of Health increased substantially. In the majority of CTP news articles (69%), cannabis was framed as a medicine, although in almost one third of articles (31%) cannabis was framed as an illicit drug. The relative proportion of news items in which cannabis was framed as an illicit drug fluctuated during the study period, but was unrelated to linear or curvilinear trends in CTP licensing. The relatively large proportion of news items framing cannabis as a medicine is consistent with growing support for the expansion of the Israel's CTP program. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. On Connected Target Coverage for Wireless Heterogeneous Sensor Networks with Multiple Sensing Units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hung-Chang Chen

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers the connected target coverage (CTC problem in wireless heterogeneous sensor networks (WHSNs with multiple sensing units, termed MU-CTC problem. MU-CTC problem can be reduced to a connected set cover problem and further formulated as an integer linear programming (ILP problem. However, the ILP problem is an NP-complete problem. Therefore, two distributed heuristic schemes, REFS (remaining energy first scheme and EEFS (energy efficiency first scheme, are proposed. In REFS, each sensor considers its remaining energy and its neighbors’ decisions to enable its sensing units and communication unit such that all targets can be covered for the required attributes and the sensed data can be delivered to the sink. The advantages of REFS are its simplicity and reduced communication overhead. However, to utilize sensors’ energy efficiently, EEFS is proposed. A sensor in EEFS considers its contribution to the coverage and the connectivity to make a better decision. To our best knowledge, this paper is the first to consider target coverage and connectivity jointly for WHSNs with multiple sensing units. Simulation results show that REFS and EEFS can both prolong the network lifetime effectively. EEFS outperforms REFS in network lifetime, but REFS is simpler.

  12. Health insurance eroding for working families: employer-provided coverage declines for fifth consecutive year.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Elise

    2007-01-01

    In 2005, the percentage of Americans with employer-provided health insurance fell for the fifth year in a row. Workers and their families have been falling into the ranks of the uninsured at alarming rates. The downward trend in employer-provided coverage for children also continued into 2005. In the previous four years, children were less likely to become uninsured as public sector health coverage expanded, but in 2005 the rate of uninsured children increased. While Medicaid and SCHIP still work for many, the government has not picked up coverage for everybody who lost insurance. The weakening of this system-notably for children-is particularly difficult for workers and their families in a time of stagnating incomes. Furthermore, these programs are not designed to prevent low-income adults or middle- or high-income families from becoming uninsured. Government at the federal and state levels has responded to medical inflation with policy changes that reduce public insurance eligibility or with proposals to reduce government costs. Federal policy proposals to lessen the tax advantage of workplace insurance or to encourage a private purchase system could further destabilize the employer-provided system. Now is a critical time to consider health insurance reform. Several promising solutions could increase access to affordable health care. The key is to create large, varied, and stable risk pools.

  13. Balancing investments in Federally Qualified Health Centers and Medicaid for improved access and coverage in Pennsylvania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Paul M; Lee, Hyunji; Scherrer, Christina; Swann, Julie L

    2014-12-01

    Two common health disparities in the US include a lack of access to care and a lack of insurance coverage. To help address these disparities, healthcare reform will provide $11B to expand Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHCs) over the next 5 years. In 2014, Medicaid rules will be modified so that more people will become eligible. There are, however, important tradeoffs in the investment in these two programs. We find a balanced investment between FQHC expansion and relaxing Medicaid eligibility to improve both access (by increasing the number of FQHCs) and coverage (by FQHC and Medicaid expansion) for the state of Pennsylvania. The comparison is achieved by integrating multi-objective mathematical models with several public data sets that allow for specific estimations of healthcare need. Demand is estimated based on current access and coverage status in order to target groups to be considered preferentially. Results show that for Pennsylvania, FQHCs are more cost effective than Medicaid if we invest all of the resources in just one policy. However, we find a better investment point balancing those two policies. This point is approximately where the additional expenses incurred from relaxing Medicaid eligibility equals the investment in FQHC expansion.

  14. Using Newspaper Coverage Analysis to Evaluate Public Perception of Management in River-Floodplain Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, Brack W.

    2010-05-01

    Traditional natural resource management approaches often focus on a specific natural resource and ignore social components other than economic value. In contrast, new approaches to resource management, such as those employing ecosystem management strategies, recognize and strive to incorporate other social components of the managed system. This study uses a content analysis of regional newspaper coverage of two relatively new reserves in river-floodplain systems, the Lower Wisconsin State Riverway and the Middle Elbe Biosphere Reserve, to analyze each reserve’s success in managing the social components of its resources during each reserve’s first ten years. The results suggest that positive coverage of both reserves has increased, as has the perceived authority of the reserve staff, as measured by trends in the quantity of direct quotes. The Middle Elbe Biosphere Reserve received approximately three times more coverage than its Wisconsin counterpart, suggesting that the more extensive public outreach program of the former is an important tool in dealing with social issues within a conservation reserve.

  15. On connected target coverage for wireless heterogeneous sensor networks with multiple sensing units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Kuei-Ping; Deng, Der-Jiunn; Chang, Ruay-Shiung; Chen, Hung-Chang

    2009-01-01

    The paper considers the connected target coverage (CTC) problem in wireless heterogeneous sensor networks (WHSNs) with multiple sensing units, termed MU-CTC problem. MU-CTC problem can be reduced to a connected set cover problem and further formulated as an integer linear programming (ILP) problem. However, the ILP problem is an NP-complete problem. Therefore, two distributed heuristic schemes, REFS (remaining energy first scheme) and EEFS (energy efficiency first scheme), are proposed. In REFS, each sensor considers its remaining energy and its neighbors' decisions to enable its sensing units and communication unit such that all targets can be covered for the required attributes and the sensed data can be delivered to the sink. The advantages of REFS are its simplicity and reduced communication overhead. However, to utilize sensors' energy efficiently, EEFS is proposed. A sensor in EEFS considers its contribution to the coverage and the connectivity to make a better decision. To our best knowledge, this paper is the first to consider target coverage and connectivity jointly for WHSNs with multiple sensing units. Simulation results show that REFS and EEFS can both prolong the network lifetime effectively. EEFS outperforms REFS in network lifetime, but REFS is simpler.

  16. Remote Sensing of Aquatic Vegetation Coverage in the Kafue River, Zambia and Comparison to Climatic Variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mischler, J. A.; Abdalati, W.; Hussein, K.; Townsend, A. R.

    2013-12-01

    The Kafue River is the longest river in Zambia and is a major tributary of the Zambezi River. It is a vital source of fish, transportation, drinking water, and hydropower for much of Zambia's population, over half of whom live in the Kafue River basin. Like many important water bodies in developing countries the Kafue and its ecosystems face pollution from industrial, mining, agricultural, and domestic/sewage discharge. The Kafue River forms a wide and shallow wetland (the Kafue Flats) during the rainy season (Nov. - Apr.) which serves as habitat for diverse groups of birds and mammals. In recent years the unprecedented emergence of invasive aquatic vegetation such as the water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes) and Salvinia molesta have choked the river, degrading its ability to provide adequate habitat to promote biodiversity, ecosystem services, and hydropower. In addition, these plants provide additional habitat for mosquitoes (vectors for malaria) and aquatic snails (vectors of schistosomiasis). Nutrient-rich effluents are widely believed to contribute to the proliferation and explosive growth of this floating aquatic vegetation. The general methods for managing these aquatic weeds have included mechanical and physical removal, herbicides, and bio-control agents which have had very little impact. However, as in neighboring Lake Victoria, total weed coverage has fluctuated dramatically from year to year making evaluation of the efficacy of management programs difficult. The objectives of this study were to (1) generate the first record of aquatic plant coverage for a section of the Kafue River which is immediately downstream of a sugar plantation (a major source of nitrogen and phosphorus to the river) and (2) determine if plant coverage is correlated with any major climatic (ENSO, temperature, rainfall) or management (introduction of bio-control agents) indices. We utilized remote sensing techniques in conjunction with Landsat 4-5 TM and Landsat 7 ETM imagery for

  17. [Urban vegetation coverage change inside the Third-Ring Road of Shenyang City, China: a study with linear spectral unmixing technique].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jian-Bo; Chen, Wei; Li, Xiao-Yu; He, Xing-Yuan

    2009-05-01

    Based on the Landsat TM images of 2001 and 2006, and by using linear spectral unmixing (LSU) technique, the information of urban vegetation coverage inside the Third-Ring Road of Shenyang City was extracted, and the dynamic change of the vegetation coverage in 2001-2006 was analyzed, in combining with a land use map derived from the visual interpretation of a QuickBird image of 2006. The results showed that in 2001-2006, the urban vegetation coverage in study area changed drastically. Urban greening and the cropland encroachment caused by urban sprawl coexisted, and the vegetation gain from urban greening was larger than the vegetation loss from cropland encroachment. The vegetation coverage of road, residence, public facilities, and park and square increased with varying degrees (5%-9%), while industrial land changed little. The spatial distribution of urban greening was relatively reasonable. Though the polarization of vegetation coverage between central city and suburban still existed, this polarization had been mitigated to some extent. With the increase of the distance from city center, the vegetation coverage increased in sequence of park and square (0.8% x km(-1)) < residence (1.5% x km(-1)) < industrial land (1.7% x km(-1)) < public facilities (2.4% x km(-1)) < road (2.9% x km(-1)). The polarization of vegetation coverage in public facilities and road were still serious, suggesting that more greening programs and strict conservation efforts were needed.

  18. 76 FR 61245 - Provision of Aviation Insurance Coverage for Commercial Air Carrier Service in Domestic and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-03

    ... Coverage for Commercial Air Carrier Service in Domestic and International Operations #0; #0; #0... Aviation Insurance Coverage for Commercial Air Carrier Service in Domestic and International Operations...

  19. Implications of employer coverage of contraception: Cost-effectiveness analysis of contraception coverage under an employer mandate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canestaro, W; Vodicka, E; Downing, D; Trussell, J

    2017-01-01

    Mandatory employer-based insurance coverage of contraception in the US has been a controversial component of the Affordable Care Act (ACA). Prior research has examined the cost-effectiveness of contraception in general; however, no studies have developed a formal decision model in the context of the new ACA provisions. As such, this study aims to estimate the relative cost-effectiveness of insurance coverage of contraception under employer-sponsored insurance coverage taking into consideration newer regulations allowing for religious exemptions. A decision model was developed from the employer perspective to simulate pregnancy costs and outcomes associated with insurance coverage. Method-specific estimates of contraception failure rates, outcomes and costs were derived from the literature. Uptake by marital status and age was drawn from a nationally representative database. Providing no contraception coverage resulted in 33 more unintended pregnancies per 1000 women (95% confidence range: 22.4; 44.0). This subsequently significantly increased the number of unintended births and terminations. Total costs were higher among uninsured women owing to higher costs of pregnancy outcomes. The effect of no insurance was greatest on unmarried women 20-29 years old. Denying female employees' full coverage of contraceptives increases total costs from the employer perspective, as well as the total number of terminations. Insurance coverage was found to be significantly associated with women's choice of contraceptive method in a large nationally representative sample. Using a decision model to extrapolate to pregnancy outcomes, we found a large and statistically significant difference in unintended pregnancy and terminations. Denying women contraception coverage may have significant consequences for pregnancy outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Insurance Coverage and Health Outcomes in Young Adults With Mental Illness Following the Affordable Care Act Dependent Coverage Expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozloff, Nicole; Sommers, Benjamin D

    2017-07-01

    As a provision of the Affordable Care Act, young adults were able to remain on their parents' health insurance plans until age 26. We examined the impact of the 2010 dependent coverage expansion on insurance coverage and health outcomes among young adults with mental illness. Data are from the 2008-2013 National Survey on Drug Use and Health, an annual population-based survey of noninstitutionalized US individuals aged 12 and older. We used a difference-in-differences approach to compare young adults with mental illness subject to the provision (aged 19-25 years, n = 19,051) with an older comparison group (aged 26-34 years, n = 7,958) before (2008-2009) and after (2011-2013) the dependent coverage expansion in their insurance coverage, use of health services, and self-reported health. In adjusted analyses, following the dependent coverage expansion, private insurance coverage increased by 11.7 percentage points (95% CI, 8.4-15.1, P mental illness, relative to 26- to 34-year-olds. The provision was associated with a modest increase in young adults with mental illness who received outpatient mental health treatment at least monthly on average (+2.0% [95% CI, 0.1% to 4.0%, P = .04]) and a modest decrease in those reporting their overall health as fair or poor (-2.3% [95% CI, -4.6% to -0.0%, P = .05]). Unmet mental health needs due to cost decreased significantly among those with moderate-to-serious mental illness (-12.3% [95% CI, -22.7% to -2.0%, P = .02]), but did not change among those with mild illness. The 2010 dependent coverage expansion was associated with an increase in insurance coverage, several indicators of mental health treatment, and improved self-reported health among young adults with mental illness.

  1. High and equitable mass vitamin A supplementation coverage in Sierra Leone: a post-event coverage survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, Mary H; Sesay, Fatmata F; Kamara, Habib I; Turay, Mohamed; Koroma, Aminata S; Blankenship, Jessica L; Katcher, Heather I

    2013-08-01

    In Sierra Leone, children ages 6-59 months receive twice-yearly vitamin A supplementation (VAS) through Maternal and Child Health Week (MCHW) events. VAS coverage in 2011 was calculated using government tally sheets of vitamin A capsule distribution and outdated population projections from the 2004 census. We conducted a national post-event coverage (PEC) survey to validate coverage and inform strategies to reach universal coverage of VAS in Sierra Leone. Immediately following the November 2011 MCHW event, we conducted a national PEC survey by interviewing caregivers with children ages 6-59 months using a randomized 30X30 cluster design (N = 900). We also interviewed one health worker and one community health worker in each cluster to determine their knowledge about VAS (N = 60). VAS coverage was 91.8% among children ages 6-59 months, which was lower than the 105.1% reported through tally sheets. Coverage was high and equitable among all districts and between age groups (98.5% for infants ages 6-11 months and 90.5% for children ages 12-59 months). Major reasons for not receiving VAS were that the child was out of the area (42.4%), the household was not visited by community health workers (28.0%), and the caretaker was not aware of the event (11.9%). Twice-yearly delivery of VAS through MCHW events achieved consistently high and equitable coverage in Sierra Leone. Universal coverage may be achieved through continued focus on communication and targeted outreach to hard-to-reach areas during the MCHWs.

  2. Effect of mass media on influenza vaccine coverage in the season 2014/2015: a regional survey in Lazio, Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capanna, A; Gervasi, G; Ciabattini, M; Volpe, E; Spadea, A; Sgricia, S; Zaratti, L; Franco, E

    2015-08-05

    Adherence to vaccination program for Influenza virus is an important issue of Public Health in presence of many no-vaccine tendencies. The media event about some deaths, occurring after MF59 adjuvanted vaccine administration, has characterized the season 2014/15 vaccination program in Italy. Aim of the study is vaccination adherence assessment of the current season with regards to local health units (LHU) coordinators's perceptions in Lazio Region (IT). LHU coordinators's perceptions were collected from a questionnaire that was send via email to the all 12 LHU coordinators. The questionnaire was built with 4 questions concerning the impression about the vaccination adherence of elderly people in the current season. Data from questionnaire was compared with the official coverage rate obtained by the Regional Authority. Severe adverse events were collected by 1 LHU. All the 12 LHU coordinators answered to our questionnaire: 7/12 (50%) predicted a coverage rate of at least 50%; 3/12 (25%) referred a coverage rate around 40-45%; 2/12 (17%) predicted a reduction of 5-10% less than the previous season. Indeed, a mean 49.1% vaccination coverage in the elderly has been reported by the Regional Authority highlighting a reduction of 10% less than the 2013/14 season coverage. No severe adverse events were observed. In our survey an important effect of media event on anti-flu vaccination program adherence has been evidenced, with a failure in communication and joint management of Public Health Institutions in Italy about efficacy and safety information of flu vaccine. © Copyright by Pacini Editore SpA, Pisa, Italy.

  3. State of inequality in malaria intervention coverage in sub-Saharan African countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galactionova, Katya; Smith, Thomas A; de Savigny, Don; Penny, Melissa A

    2017-10-18

    Scale-up of malaria interventions over the last decade have yielded a significant reduction in malaria transmission and disease burden in sub-Saharan Africa. We estimated economic gradients in the distribution of these efforts and of their impacts within and across endemic countries. Using Demographic and Health Surveys we computed equity metrics to characterize the distribution of malaria interventions in 30 endemic countries proxying economic position with an asset-wealth index. Gradients were summarized in a concentration index, tabulated against level of coverage, and compared among interventions, across countries, and against respective trends over the period 2005-2015. There remain broad differences in coverage of malaria interventions and their distribution by wealth within and across countries. In most, economic gradients are lacking or favor the poorest for vector control; malaria services delivered through the formal healthcare sector are much less equitable. Scale-up of interventions in many countries improved access across the wealth continuum; in some, these efforts consistently prioritized the poorest. Expansions in control programs generally narrowed coverage gaps between economic strata; gradients persist in countries where growth was slower in the poorest quintile or where baseline inequality was large. Despite progress, malaria is consistently concentrated in the poorest, with the degree of inequality in burden far surpassing that expected given gradients in the distribution of interventions. Economic gradients in the distribution of interventions persist over time, limiting progress toward equity in malaria control. We found that, in countries with large baseline inequality in the distribution of interventions, even a small bias in expansion favoring the least poor yielded large gradients in intervention coverage while pro-poor growth failed to close the gap between the poorest and least poor. We demonstrated that dimensions of disadvantage

  4. Genetic Architecture of Phenomic-Enabled Canopy Coverage in Glycine max.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xavier, Alencar; Hall, Benjamin; Hearst, Anthony A; Cherkauer, Keith A; Rainey, Katy M

    2017-06-01

    Digital imagery can help to quantify seasonal changes in desirable crop phenotypes that can be treated as quantitative traits. Because limitations in precise and functional phenotyping restrain genetic improvement in the postgenomic era, imagery-based phenomics could become the next breakthrough to accelerate genetic gains in field crops. Whereas many phenomic studies focus on exploratory analysis of spectral data without obvious interpretative value, we used field images to directly measure soybean canopy development from phenological stage V2 to R5. Over 3 years, we collected imagery using ground and aerial platforms of a large and diverse nested association panel comprising 5555 lines. Genome-wide association analysis of canopy coverage across sampling dates detected a large quantitative trait locus (QTL) on soybean (Glycine max, L. Merr.) chromosome 19. This QTL provided an increase in yield of 47.3 kg ha(-1) Variance component analysis indicated that a parameter, described as average canopy coverage, is a highly heritable trait (h(2) = 0.77) with a promising genetic correlation with grain yield (0.87), enabling indirect selection of yield via canopy development parameters. Our findings indicate that fast canopy coverage is an early season trait that is inexpensive to measure and has great potential for application in breeding programs focused on yield improvement. We recommend using the average canopy coverage in multiple trait schemes, especially for the early stages of the breeding pipeline (including progeny rows and preliminary yield trials), in which the large number of field plots makes collection of grain yield data challenging. Copyright © 2017 by the Genetics Society of America.

  5. 3 CFR - State Children's Health Insurance Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 3 The President 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false State Children's Health Insurance Program... Insurance Program Memorandum for the Secretary of Health and Human Services The State Children's Health Insurance Program (SCHIP) encourages States to provide health coverage for uninsured children in families...

  6. Building high-coverage monolayers of covalently bound magnetic nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Mackenzie G.; Teplyakov, Andrew V., E-mail: andrewt@udel.edu

    2016-12-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • A method for forming a layer of covalently bound nanoparticles is offered. • A nearly perfect monolayer of covalently bound magnetic nanoparticles was formed on gold. • Spectroscopic techniques confirmed covalent binding by the “click” reaction. • The influence of the functionalization scheme on surface coverage was investigated. - Abstract: This work presents an approach for producing a high-coverage single monolayer of magnetic nanoparticles using “click chemistry” between complementarily functionalized nanoparticles and a flat substrate. This method highlights essential aspects of the functionalization scheme for substrate surface and nanoparticles to produce exceptionally high surface coverage without sacrificing selectivity or control over the layer produced. The deposition of one single layer of magnetic particles without agglomeration, over a large area, with a nearly 100% coverage is confirmed by electron microscopy. Spectroscopic techniques, supplemented by computational predictions, are used to interrogate the chemistry of the attachment and to confirm covalent binding, rather than attachment through self-assembly or weak van der Waals bonding. Density functional theory calculations for the surface intermediate of this copper-catalyzed process provide mechanistic insight into the effects of the functionalization scheme on surface coverage. Based on this analysis, it appears that steric limitations of the intermediate structure affect nanoparticle coverage on a flat solid substrate; however, this can be overcome by designing a functionalization scheme in such a way that the copper-based intermediate is formed on the spherical nanoparticles instead. This observation can be carried over to other approaches for creating highly controlled single- or multilayered nanostructures of a wide range of materials to result in high coverage and possibly, conformal filling.

  7. The current situation of voluntary vaccination and the factors influencing its coverage among children in Takatsuki, Japan: focus on Hib and pneumococcal vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuda, Yuko; Watanabe, Misuzu; Tanimoto, Yoshimi; Hayashida, Itsushi; Kusabiraki, Toshiyuki; Komiyama, Maki; Kono, Koichi

    2015-03-01

    This study aimed to understand the current scenario of voluntary vaccination and the factors influencing its coverage among 18-month-old children of Takatsuki City, Japan. Based on 1167 parents responses, we found that voluntary vaccination coverage rates were low when compared with routine vaccination rates. The children who were not the first born of the family and who had young and poorly educated parents were less likely to receive voluntary vaccination. Japanese government-supported vaccines, such as Haemophilus influenzae type b and pneumococcal vaccine, had a higher coverage than the vaccines for which parents had to bear the entire vaccination cost. Furthermore, it was found that mass communication media and family pediatricians were effective means to disseminate voluntary vaccination-related information. We envisage that an active participation of medical professionals, easy access to vaccinations, and mass awareness programs will increase voluntary vaccination coverage in Takatsuki. © 2013 APJPH.

  8. Comparative Estimates of Crude and Effective Coverage of Measles Immunization in Low-Resource Settings: Findings from Salud Mesoamérica 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colson, K Ellicott; Zúñiga-Brenes, Paola; Ríos-Zertuche, Diego; Conde-Glez, Carlos J; Gagnier, Marielle C; Palmisano, Erin; Ranganathan, Dharani; Usmanova, Gulnoza; Salvatierra, Benito; Nazar, Austreberta; Tristao, Ignez; Sanchez Monin, Emmanuelle; Anderson, Brent W; Haakenstad, Annie; Murphy, Tasha; Lim, Stephen; Hernandez, Bernardo; Lozano, Rafael; Iriarte, Emma; Mokdad, Ali H

    2015-01-01

    Timely and accurate measurement of population protection against measles is critical for decision-making and prevention of outbreaks. However, little is known about how survey-based estimates of immunization (crude coverage) compare to the seroprevalence of antibodies (effective coverage), particularly in low-resource settings. In poor areas of Mexico and Nicaragua, we used household surveys to gather information on measles immunization from child health cards and caregiver recall. We also collected dried blood spots (DBS) from children aged 12 to 23 months to compare crude and effective coverage of measles immunization. We used survey-weighted logistic regression to identify individual, maternal, household, community, and health facility characteristics that predict gaps between crude coverage and effective coverage. We found that crude coverage was significantly higher than effective coverage (83% versus 68% in Mexico; 85% versus 50% in Nicaragua). A large proportion of children (19% in Mexico; 43% in Nicaragua) had health card documentation of measles immunization but lacked antibodies. These discrepancies varied from 0% to 100% across municipalities in each country. In multivariate analyses, card-positive children in Mexico were more likely to lack antibodies if they resided in urban areas or the jurisdiction of De Los Llanos. In contrast, card-positive children in Nicaragua were more likely to lack antibodies if they resided in rural areas or the North Atlantic region, had low weight-for-age, or attended health facilities with a greater number of refrigerators. Findings highlight that reliance on child health cards to measure population protection against measles is unwise. We call for the evaluation of immunization programs using serological methods, especially in poor areas where the cold chain is likely to be compromised. Identification of within-country variation in effective coverage of measles immunization will allow researchers and public health

  9. Is there an association between local health department organizational and administrative factors and childhood immunization coverage rates?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ransom, James; Schaff, Katherine; Kan, Lilly

    2012-01-01

    Vaccines are valuable, cost-effective tools for preventing disease and improving community health. Despite the importance and ubiquity of vaccinations, childhood immunization coverage rates vary widely by geography, race, and ethnicity. These differences have been documented for nearly two decades, but their sources are poorly understood. Between 2005 and 2008, immunization staff of the National Association of County & City Health Officials (NACCHO) visited 17 local health department (LHD) immunization programs in 10 states to assess their immunization service delivery (ISD) practices and their impact on community childhood immunization coverage rates. To qualitatively characterize LHD immunization programs and specific organizational factors underlying ISD performance challenges and successes related to community childhood immunization coverage rates. Case studies were conducted in a convenience sample of 17 geographically and demographically diverse LHDs, predicated on each LHD's childhood immunization coverage rates per data from the National Immunization Survey and/or Kindergarten Retrospective Survey. NACCHO staff selected LHDs with high (> or = 80% up to date [UTD]), moderate (> or = 75% UTD but management related to aligning ISD with other child-focused services within the LHD; 2) resources: organizational efforts focused on aligning federal and state ISD financing with local ISD needs; 3) politics: political advocacy and partnering with local community stakeholders, including local political entities and boards of health to better organize ISD; 4) community engagement/coalitions and partnerships: partnerships, coalitions, and community engagement to support local immunization-related decision-making and prioritization; 5) credibility: agency credibility and its ability to influence community attitudes and perspectives on the health department's value in terms of child health; and 6) cultural competency of LHD staff: LHD staff members' perceptions and

  10. Scalable Coverage Maintenance for Dense Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Lu

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Owing to numerous potential applications, wireless sensor networks have been attracting significant research effort recently. The critical challenge that wireless sensor networks often face is to sustain long-term operation on limited battery energy. Coverage maintenance schemes can effectively prolong network lifetime by selecting and employing a subset of sensors in the network to provide sufficient sensing coverage over a target region. We envision future wireless sensor networks composed of a vast number of miniaturized sensors in exceedingly high density. Therefore, the key issue of coverage maintenance for future sensor networks is the scalability to sensor deployment density. In this paper, we propose a novel coverage maintenance scheme, scalable coverage maintenance (SCOM, which is scalable to sensor deployment density in terms of communication overhead (i.e., number of transmitted and received beacons and computational complexity (i.e., time and space complexity. In addition, SCOM achieves high energy efficiency and load balancing over different sensors. We have validated our claims through both analysis and simulations.

  11. The German press coverage on France after World War II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Jaeger

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available How is the continuing reconciliation process between the former "hereditary enemies" Germany and France reflected in German daily newspapers between 1946 and 1970? Using quantitative content analysis, a representative sample of coverage of France and French-related topics published during this period was examined with an emphasis on a the choice of news topics and possible deviations from the predictions of Galtung’s news-factors model and on b how protagonists and events were portrayed in these articles. A further qualitative analysis was made of some promising journalistic attempts to achieve "constructive" coverage during the same period. This was intended a to determine whether and how several theoretical deductions from Kempf’s conflict model of de-escalation processes are manifest in post-conflict coverage and b to identify the stylistic "tools" journalists used – even unintentionally – to further a better understanding of the former enemy and – in the long run – to build peace and reconciliation between Germany and France. The overarching questions addressed by this study are: (What can we learn from coverage during a successful reconciliation process, and how can these lessons be transferred to contemporary coverage of post-war processes? Major findings of the two studies will be presented.

  12. An analytic approach to understanding and predicting healthcare coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delen, Dursun; Fuller, Christie

    2013-01-01

    The inequality in the level of healthcare coverage among the people in the US is a pressing issue. Unfortunately, many people do not have healthcare coverage and much research is needed to identify the factors leading to this phenomenon. Hence, the goal of this study is to examine the healthcare coverage of individuals by applying popular analytic techniques on a wide-variety of predictive factors. A large and feature-rich dataset is used in conjunction with four popular data mining techniques-artificial neural networks, decision trees, support vector machines and logistic regression-to develop prediction models. Applying sensitivity analysis to the developed prediction models, the ranked importance of variables is determined. The experimental results indicated that the most accurate classifier for this phenomenon was the support vector machines that had an overall classification accuracy of 82.23% on the 10-fold holdout/test sample. The most important predictive factors came out as income, employment status, education, and marital status. The ability to identify and explain the reasoning of those likely to be without healthcare coverage through the application of accurate classification models can potentially be used in reducing the disparity in health care coverage.

  13. Media coverage and public reaction to a celebrity cancer diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalfe, D; Price, C; Powell, J

    2011-03-01

    Celebrity diagnoses can have important effects on public behaviour. UK television celebrity Jade Goody died from cervical cancer in 2009. We investigated the impact of her illness on media coverage of cervical cancer prevention, health information seeking behaviour and cervical screening coverage. National UK newspaper articles containing the words 'Jade Goody' and 'cancer' were examined for public health messages. Google Insights for Search was used to quantify Internet searches as a measure of public health information seeking. Cervical screening coverage data were examined for temporal associations with this story. Of 1203 articles, 116 (9.6%) included a clear public health message. The majority highlighted screening (8.2%). Fewer articles provided advice about vaccination (3.0%), number of sexual partners (1.4%), smoking (0.6%) and condom use (0.4%). Key events were associated with increased Internet searches for 'cervical cancer' and 'smear test', although only weakly with searches for 'HPV'. Cervical screening coverage increased during this period. Increased public interest in disease prevention can follow a celebrity diagnosis. Although media coverage sometimes included public health information, articles typically focused on secondary instead of primary prevention. There is further potential to maximize the public health benefit of future celebrity diagnoses.

  14. Market Liquidity, Analysts Coverage, and Ownership Concentration: Evidence From ASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majd Iskandrani

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This research investigates the association between analyst coverage, ownership concentration and market liquidity in Amman Stock Exchange (ASE. Using a unique dataset about information asymmetry, several proxies related to the information asymmetry are used to clarify certain aspects of market liquidity. In a sample of 131 companies with comprehensive data collected from company guides and Datastream, information asymmetry measured by analysts’ coverage is found to be an important determinant of market liquidity. In particular, market liquidity is lower where firms have larger analysts coverage and where firms are denoted with high degree of ownership concentration. The effect of analysts coverage is, however, found to be more marked in firms with high levels of ownership concentration. The study provides theoretical and empirical improvement of market liquidity literature towards an understanding of the information asymmetry proxies in ASE. Policymakers, after the 2007-2009 scandal have formed governance codes that highlight the importance of disclosure requirements as key responsibility of financial analysts. The link between analysts coverage and market liquidity established in this research provides evidence for insider investors on the roles and potential effectiveness of analysts in carrying this responsibility.

  15. Insurance coverage for male infertility care in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James M Dupree

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Infertility is a common condition experienced by many men and women, and treatments are expensive. The World Health Organization and American Society of Reproductive Medicine define infertility as a disease, yet private companies infrequently offer insurance coverage for infertility treatments. This is despite the clear role that healthcare insurance plays in ensuring access to care and minimizing the financial burden of expensive services. In this review, we assess the current knowledge of how male infertility care is covered by insurance in the United States. We begin with an appraisal of the costs of male infertility care, then examine the state insurance laws relevant to male infertility, and close with a discussion of why insurance coverage for male infertility is important to both men and women. Importantly, we found that despite infertility being classified as a disease and males contributing to almost half of all infertility cases, coverage for male infertility is often excluded from health insurance laws. Excluding coverage for male infertility places an undue burden on their female partners. In addition, excluding care for male infertility risks missing opportunities to diagnose important health conditions and identify reversible or irreversible causes of male infertility. Policymakers should consider providing equal coverage for male and female infertility care in future health insurance laws.

  16. Insurance coverage for male infertility care in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupree, James M

    2016-01-01

    Infertility is a common condition experienced by many men and women, and treatments are expensive. The World Health Organization and American Society of Reproductive Medicine define infertility as a disease, yet private companies infrequently offer insurance coverage for infertility treatments. This is despite the clear role that healthcare insurance plays in ensuring access to care and minimizing the financial burden of expensive services. In this review, we assess the current knowledge of how male infertility care is covered by insurance in the United States. We begin with an appraisal of the costs of male infertility care, then examine the state insurance laws relevant to male infertility, and close with a discussion of why insurance coverage for male infertility is important to both men and women. Importantly, we found that despite infertility being classified as a disease and males contributing to almost half of all infertility cases, coverage for male infertility is often excluded from health insurance laws. Excluding coverage for male infertility places an undue burden on their female partners. In addition, excluding care for male infertility risks missing opportunities to diagnose important health conditions and identify reversible or irreversible causes of male infertility. Policymakers should consider providing equal coverage for male and female infertility care in future health insurance laws. PMID:27030084

  17. Characterizing the Path Coverage of Random Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moslem Noori

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Wireless sensor networks are widely used in security monitoring applications to sense and report specific activities in a field. In path coverage, for example, the network is in charge of monitoring a path and discovering any intruder trying to cross it. In this paper, we investigate the path coverage properties of a randomly deployed wireless sensor network when the number of sensors and also the length of the path are finite. As a consequence, Boolean model, which has been widely used previously, is not applicable. Using results from geometric probability, we determine the probability of full path coverage, distribution of the number of uncovered gaps over the path, and the probability of having no uncovered gaps larger than a specific size. We also find the cumulative distribution function (cdf of the covered part of the path. Based on our results on the probability of full path coverage, we derive a tight upper bound for the number of nodes guaranteeing the full path coverage with a desired reliability. Through computer simulations, it is verified that for networks with nonasymptotic size, our analysis is accurate where the Boolean model can be inaccurate.

  18. Measles seroprevalence, outbreaks, and vaccine coverage in Rwanda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seruyange, Eric; Gahutu, Jean-Bosco; Mambo Muvunyi, Claude; Uwimana, Zena G; Gatera, Maurice; Twagirumugabe, Theogene; Katare, Swaibu; Karenzi, Ben; Bergström, Tomas

    2016-01-01

    Measles outbreaks are reported after insufficient vaccine coverage, especially in countries recovering from natural disaster or conflict. We compared seroprevalence to measles in blood donors in Rwanda and Sweden and explored distribution of active cases of measles and vaccine coverage in Rwanda. 516 Rwandan and 215 Swedish blood donors were assayed for measles-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Data on vaccine coverage and acute cases in Rwanda from 1980 to 2014 were collected, and IgM on serum samples and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) on nasopharyngeal (NPH) swabs from suspected measles cases during 2010-2011 were analysed. The seroprevalence of measles IgG was significantly higher in Swedish blood donors (92.6%; 95% CI: 89.1-96.1%) compared to Rwandan subjects (71.5%; 95% CI: 67.6-75.4%) and more pronounced Rwandan blood donors as compared to Swedish subjects (p genocide. 76/544 serum samples were IgM positive and 21/31 NPH swabs were PCR positive for measles, determined by sequencing to be of genotype B3. Measles seroprevalence was lower in Rwandan blood donors compared to Swedish subjects. Despite this, the number of reported measles cases in Rwanda rapidly decreased during the study period, concomitant with increased vaccine coverage. Taken together, the circulation of measles was limited in Rwanda and vaccine coverage was favourable, but seroprevalence and IgG levels were low especially in younger age groups.

  19. Beginning Swift programming

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Wei-Meng

    2014-01-01

    Enter the Swift future of iOS and OS X programming Beginning Swift Programming is your ideal starting point for creating Mac, iPhone, and iPad apps using Apple's new Swift programming language. Written by an experienced Apple developer and trainer, this comprehensive guide explains everything you need to know to jumpstart the creation of your app idea. Coverage includes data types, strings and characters, operators and functions, arrays and dictionaries, control flow, and looping, with expert guidance on classes, objects, class inheritance, closures, protocols, and generics. This succinct - ye

  20. [Coverage by health insurance or discount cards: a household survey in the coverage area of the Family Health Strategy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontenelle, Leonardo Ferreira; Camargo, Maria Beatriz Junqueira de; Bertoldi, Andréa Dâmaso; Gonçalves, Helen; Maciel, Ethel Leonor Noia; Barros, Aluísio J D

    2017-10-26

    This study was designed to assess the reasons for health insurance coverage in a population covered by the Family Health Strategy in Brazil. We describe overall health insurance coverage and according to types, and analyze its association with health-related and socio-demographic characteristics. Among the 31.3% of persons (95%CI: 23.8-39.9) who reported "health insurance" coverage, 57.0% (95%CI: 45.2-68.0) were covered only by discount cards, which do not offer any kind of coverage for medical care, but only discounts in pharmacies, clinics, and hospitals. Both for health insurance and discount cards, the most frequently cited reasons for such coverage were "to be on the safe side" and "to receive better care". Both types of coverage were associated statistically with age (+65 vs. 15-24 years: adjusted odds ratios, aOR = 2.98, 95%CI: 1.28-6.90; and aOR = 3.67; 95%CI: 2.22-6.07, respectively) and socioeconomic status (additional standard deviation: aOR = 2.25, 95%CI: 1.62-3.14; and aOR = 1.96, 95%CI: 1.34-2.97). In addition, health insurance coverage was associated with schooling (aOR = 7.59, 95%CI: 4.44-13.00) for complete University Education and aOR = 3.74 (95%CI: 1.61-8.68) for complete Secondary Education, compared to less than complete Primary Education. Meanwhile, neither health insurance nor discount card was associated with health status or number of diagnosed diseases. In conclusion, studies that aim to assess private health insurance should be planned to distinguish between discount cards and formal health insurance.

  1. Health care coverage among long-distance truckers in India: an evaluation based on the Tanahashi model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma V

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Varun Sharma,1 Niranjan Saggurti,2 Shalini Bharat11School of Health Systems Studies, Tata Institute of Social Sciences, Mumbai, India; 2HIV AIDS Program, Population Council, New Delhi, IndiaAbstract: Long-distance truckers (LDTDs are vulnerable to human immunodeficiency virus infection and other sexually transmitted infections due to the nature of their work, working environment, and frequent mobility. This paper examines and comments on the health care coverage provisioned under “Kavach” Project. Data from the Integrated Behavioural and Biological Survey, National Highway gathered from 2,066 LDTDs in Round 1 and 2,085 LDTDs in Round 2, who traveled in four extreme road corridors travelled by LDTDs in India, were used for analysis. Analysis reveals that service capacity in terms of socially marketed condoms per thousand LDTDs has increased from Round 1 to Round 2 (4,430 to 6,876, respectively. Accessibility coverage in terms of knowledge about the Khushi clinic has significantly decreased between Rounds 1 and 2 (60.9% to 54.6%; P<0.001. Acceptability coverage has increased between the two rounds (13.8% to 50.6%; P<0.001. Contact coverage has also increased between the rounds (12.7% to 22.3%; P<0.001. Effectiveness coverage for preventive and curative care has also increased significantly. This paper comments on the gaps in accessibility and acceptability of health care coverage and emphasizes the need for further studies to assess the contextual factors that influence the effectiveness and efficiency of interventions designed to address access barriers and to identify what combination of interventions may generate the best possible outcome.Keywords: HIV, long-distance truck drivers, mobility, national highways, Tanahashi framework, India

  2. Human papillomavirus vaccine coverage among females aged 11 to 17 in Texas counties: an application of multilevel, small area estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberth, Jan M; Hossain, Md Monir; Tiro, Jasmin A; Zhang, Xingyou; Holt, James B; Vernon, Sally W

    2013-01-01

    Local data are often used to plan and evaluate public health interventions and policy. With increasingly fewer public resources to collect sufficient data to support direct estimation of local outcomes, methods for deriving small area estimates are vital. The purpose of this study is to describe the county-level geographic distribution of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine coverage among adolescent females in Texas using multilevel small area estimation. Multilevel (individual, county, public health region) random-intercept logit models were fit to HPV vaccination data (≥1 dose Gardasil) from the 2008 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. Using the parameter estimates from the final model, we simulated 10,000 data sets for each regression coefficient from the normal distribution and applied them to the logit model to estimate HPV vaccine coverage in each county. County-level coverage estimates ranged from 7% to 29%, compared with the state average of 18% (95% confidence interval [CI], 13.59-21.88). Many Southwestern border and metropolitan counties exhibited high coverage estimates. Low coverage estimates were noted in the Panhandle, Southeastern border region, and Northeast. Significant correlations were observed between HPV vaccination and Hispanic ethnicity, county poverty, and public health region poverty. Harnessing the flexibility of multilevel small area models to estimate HPV vaccine coverage at the county level, we have provided data that may inform the development of health education programs/policies, the provision of health services, and the planning of new research studies. Additionally, we have provided a framework for modeling other health outcomes at the county level using national survey data. Copyright © 2013 Jacobs Institute of Women's Health. All rights reserved.

  3. Holding back the tide: policies to preserve and reconstruct health insurance coverage in Maryland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Thomas R

    2004-04-01

    Over the past decade, state officials have pursued a variety of strategies to protect and expand health insurance coverage for their residents. This article examines the course of action in Maryland, where new initiatives were shaped around the state's unique hospital payment system and its reimbursement of uncompensated care, an evolving Medicaid and children's health program, and regulation of the small group health insurance market. Several important patterns emerge from the Maryland experience. First, even the most incremental initiatives--programs intended to aid a few thousand beneficiaries--bring into play the very issues that hamper comprehensive reforms: who is deserving of mutual aid and what is the proper role of government versus private entities in administering that aid. In Maryland, these issues generate conflict not only between Democrats and Republicans but also urban and rural interests. Second, all of the important reforms of the past decade were undertaken primarily in reaction to federal policy initiatives. Contrary to rhetoric lauding states as the "laboratories of democracy," the political impetus for reform and basic policy options emerge from interaction between federal and state debates. Third, even with budget surpluses and Democrats in control of the governorship and legislature, Maryland did not move aggressively toward universal health insurance. Now, with a much weaker economy and a new, Republican governor, the primary challenge will be to prevent further erosion of insurance coverage. The Maryland experience reiterates that each step toward greater health security, no matter how small, is a major technical and political challenge and that it will be difficult if not impossible to rely on states to secure coverage for all Americans in the foreseeable future.

  4. Insurance coverage of pediatric burns: Switzerland versus USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deghayli, Lina; Moufarrij, Sara; Norberg, Michael; Sheridan, Robert; Raffoul, Wassim; de Buys Roessingh, Anthony; Hirt-Burri, Nathalie; Applegate, Lee Ann

    2014-08-01

    Burn care and research have significantly improved over the past years. However, insurance coverage of such treatments does not reflect the improvements in this multi-disciplinary field. Government insurance policies in first world countries renown for burn care treatment, such as Switzerland and the United States, have not adapted to the complexity and longitudinal nature of burn care. Using case studies from both countries, we have analyzed both the institutional and policy approach to pediatric burn treatment coverage. Subsequently, by presenting the Shriners burn care model, we offer a policy recommendation to both the Swiss and the American governments to better their present legislation and infrastructure on pediatric burn coverage. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  5. Newspaper coverage of youth and tobacco: implications for public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Katherine Clegg; Wakefield, Melanie

    2006-01-01

    The presentation of smoking as a "youth" issue is a powerful component of current tobacco-control efforts. Agenda setting theory demonstrates that the media serve as a potent forum in which the consideration and presentation of perspectives of social problems take place. This analysis of 643 U.S. youth-focused newspaper articles examines the messages being conveyed to the public and policymakers through coverage of tobacco issues focused on youth. Data illustrate that the issue of youth tobacco use is newsworthy but also suggest that youth-focused issues garner little commentary coverage. Rather, straightforward reports of "feel good" stories dominate the coverage, and youth-focused articles tend to conceptualize the problem of tobacco as being one of a need for greater individual-level education rather than structural or policy changes.

  6. The Rise of Web Supremacy in Newspaper Coverage of Science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergård, Gunver Lystbæk

    Quantitative study of science news in Danish national Newspapers 1999 and 2012. This paper demonstrates how the Internet media has altered newspaper coverage of science in terms of quantity, origin and distribution. Although an overall rise in science coverage is observed, content analysis...... of science news material has also shifted the balance in distribution. Coverage in broadsheet print newspapers is decreasing whereas online and tabloid newspapers are steadily embracing science news. This transfer causes new target groups who have not been previously reachable to be included in science...... communication. The paper includes 693 articles from Danish national newspapers between 1999 and 2012 collected from random weeks. As Danish Internet newspapers only gained popularity after 2000 they were only included in the 2012 sample. All journalistic processed articles with a main focus on any field...

  7. Root coverage using epithelial embossed connective tissue graft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Ramakrishnan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In periodontal practice, root coverage after marginal soft tissue recession requires daily clinical decisions. Numerous longitudinal human studies have been presented to support the efficacy and predictability of different mucogingival surgical techniques for root coverage. Over the years, root coverage procedure using the subepithelial connective tissue graft with variations has emerged as the favorite surgical technique. In the case presented in this report, subepithelial connective tissue graft with embossed epithelium was used to cover Miller′s class II gingival recession in the upper right canine. The design is such that embossed epithelium exactly fits the recession site and the connective tissue portion is tucked below the gingival margin of the recipient site. In this technique, coronal advancement of flap is not needed. Wider zone of attached gingiva at the recipient site was achieved by this technique.

  8. Multiattribute Utility Copulas for Multi-objective Coverage Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valicka Christopher G.

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents theoretical and experimental results related to the control and coordination of multirobot systems interested in dynamically covering a compact domain while remaining proximal, so as to promote robust inter-robot communications, and while remaining collision free with respect to each other and static obstacles. A design for a novel, gradient-based controller using nonnegative definite objective functions and an overapproximation to the maximum function is presented. By using a multiattribute utility copula to scalarize the multiobjective control problem, a control law is presented that allows for flexible tuning of the tradeofs between objectives. This procedure mitigates the controller’s dependence on objective function parameters and allows for the straightforward integration of a novel global coverage objective. Simulation and experiments demonstrate the controller’s efectiveness in promoting scenarios with collision free trajectories, robust communications, and satisfactory coverage of the entire coverage domain concurrently for a group of differential drive robots.

  9. Camera Coverage Estimation Based on Multistage Grid Subdivision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meizhen Wang

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Visual coverage is one of the most important quality indexes for depicting the usability of an individual camera or camera network. It is the basis for camera network deployment, placement, coverage-enhancement, planning, etc. Precision and efficiency are critical influences on applications, especially those involving several cameras. This paper proposes a new method to efficiently estimate superior camera coverage. First, the geographic area that is covered by the camera and its minimum bounding rectangle (MBR without considering obstacles is computed using the camera parameters. Second, the MBR is divided into grids using the initial grid size. The status of the four corners of each grid is estimated by a line of sight (LOS algorithm. If the camera, considering obstacles, covers a corner, the status is represented by 1, otherwise by 0. Consequently, the status of a grid can be represented by a code that is a combination of 0s or 1s. If the code is not homogeneous (not four 0s or four 1s, the grid will be divided into four sub-grids until the sub-grids are divided into a specific maximum level or their codes are homogeneous. Finally, after performing the process above, total camera coverage is estimated according to the size and status of all grids. Experimental results illustrate that the proposed method’s accuracy is determined by the method that divided the coverage area into the smallest grids at the maximum level, while its efficacy is closer to the method that divided the coverage area into the initial grids. It considers both efficiency and accuracy. The initial grid size and maximum level are two critical influences on the proposed method, which can be determined by weighing efficiency and accuracy.

  10. 5 CFR 846.711 - Eligibility to elect FERS coverage during the 1998 open enrollment period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Eligibility to elect FERS coverage during... COVERAGE 1998 Open Enrollment Elections Who May Elect § 846.711 Eligibility to elect FERS coverage during... this chapter or § 846.722) may elect FERS coverage during the 1998 open enrollment period. ...

  11. Successful Control of Winter Pyrexias Caused by Equine Herpesvirus Type 1 in Japanese Training Centers by Achieving High Vaccination Coverage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mae, Naomi; Ode, Hirotaka; Nemoto, Manabu; Tsujimura, Koji; Yamanaka, Takashi; Kondo, Takashi; Matsumura, Tomio

    2014-01-01

    Equine herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1) is a major cause of winter pyrexia in racehorses in two training centers (Ritto and Miho) in Japan. Until the epizootic period of 2008-2009, a vaccination program using a killed EHV-1 vaccine targeted only susceptible 3-year-old horses with low antibody levels to EHV-1 antigens. However, because the protective effect was not satisfactory, in 2009-2010 the vaccination program was altered to target all 3-year-old horses. To evaluate the vaccine's efficacy, we investigated the number of horses with pyrexia due to EHV-1 or equine herpesvirus type 4 (EHV-4) infection or both and examined the vaccination coverage in the 3-year-old population and in the whole population before and after changes in the program. The mean (± standard deviation [SD]) estimated numbers of horses infected with EHV-1 or EHV-4 or both, among pyretic horses from 1999-2000 to 2008-2009 were 105 ± 47 at Ritto and 66 ± 44 at Miho. Although the estimated number of infected horses did not change greatly in the first period of the current program, it decreased from the second period, with means (±SD) of 21 ± 12 at Ritto and 14 ± 15 at Miho from 2010-2011 to 2012-2013. Vaccination coverage in the 3-year-old population was 99.4% at Ritto and 99.8% at Miho in the first period, and similar values were maintained thereafter. Coverage in the whole population increased more gradually than that in the 3-year-old population. The results suggest that EHV-1 epizootics can be suppressed by maintaining high vaccination coverage, not only in the 3-year-old population but also in the whole population. PMID:24872513

  12. Medicaid and CHIP Provide Coverage to More than Half of All Children in D.C. Policy Snapshot

    Science.gov (United States)

    DC Action for Children, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Medicaid and CHIP are crucial parts of the social safety net, providing health insurance coverage to more than half of all children ages 0-21 in D.C. and a third of children nationally. Without these two programs, more than 97,000 children in the District would have been uninsured in 2010. New research indicates that compared with the uninsured,…

  13. Geo-spatial reporting for monitoring of household immunization coverage through mobile phones: Findings from a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazi, A M; Ali, M; K, Ayub; Kalimuddin, H; Zubair, K; Kazi, A N; A, Artani; Ali, S A

    2017-11-01

    The addition of Global Positioning System (GPS) to a mobile phone makes it a very powerful tool for surveillance and monitoring coverage of health programs. This technology enables transfer of data directly into computer applications and cross-references to Geographic Information Systems (GIS) maps, which enhances assessment of coverage and trends. Utilization of these systems in low and middle income countries is currently limited, particularly for immunization coverage assessments and polio vaccination campaigns. We piloted the use of this system and discussed its potential to improve the efficiency of field-based health providers and health managers for monitoring of the immunization program. Using "30×7" WHO sampling technique, a survey of children less than five years of age was conducted in random clusters of Karachi, Pakistan in three high risk towns where a polio case was detected in 2011. Center point of the cluster was calculated by the application on the mobile. Data and location coordinates were collected through a mobile phone. This data was linked with an automated mHealth based monitoring system for monitoring of Supplementary Immunization Activities (SIAs) in Karachi. After each SIA, a visual report was generated according to the coordinates collected from the survey. A total of 3535 participants consented to answer to a baseline survey. We found that the mobile phones incorporated with GIS maps can improve efficiency of health providers through real-time reporting and replacing paper based questionnaire for collection of data at household level. Visual maps generated from the data and geospatial analysis can also give a better assessment of the immunization coverage and polio vaccination campaigns. The study supports a model system in resource constrained settings that allows routine capture of individual level data through GPS enabled mobile phone providing actionable information and geospatial maps to local public health managers, policy makers

  14. Dorsal hand coverage with free serratus fascia flap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fotopoulos, Peter; Holmer, Per; Leicht, Pernille

    2003-01-01

    In reconstructing a defect on the dorsum of the hand, with the extensor tendons exposed or even missing, functional, as well as cosmetic, goals are of major importance. The authors present three cases of extensor tendon reconstruction, combined with soft-tissue reconstruction, with the free...... in the flap, leaving the long thoracic nerve intact on the serratus muscle. Coverage of the flap with split-thickness skin graft is done immediately. The free serratus fascia flap is an ideal flap for dorsal hand coverage when the extensor tendons are exposed, especially because of low donor-site morbidity....

  15. Communication-Free Distributed Coverage for Networked Systems

    KAUST Repository

    Yazicioglu, A. Yasin

    2016-01-15

    In this paper, we present a communication-free algorithm for distributed coverage of an arbitrary network by a group of mobile agents with local sensing capabilities. The network is represented as a graph, and the agents are arbitrarily deployed on some nodes of the graph. Any node of the graph is covered if it is within the sensing range of at least one agent. The agents are mobile devices that aim to explore the graph and to optimize their locations in a decentralized fashion by relying only on their sensory inputs. We formulate this problem in a game theoretic setting and propose a communication-free learning algorithm for maximizing the coverage.

  16. Change of mobile network coverage in France from 29 August

    CERN Multimedia

    IT Department

    2016-01-01

    The change of mobile network coverage on the French part of the CERN site will take effect on 29 August and not on 11 July as previously announced.    From 29 August, the Swisscom transmitters in France will be deactivated and Orange France will thenceforth provide coverage on the French part of the CERN site.  This switch will result in changes to billing. You should also ensure that you can still be contacted by your colleagues when you are on the French part of the CERN site. Please consult the information and instructions in this official communication.

  17. Synthesis of volumetric ring antenna array for terrestrial coverage pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyna, Alberto; Panduro, Marco A; Del Rio Bocio, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a synthesis of a volumetric ring antenna array for a terrestrial coverage pattern. This synthesis regards the spacing among the rings on the planes X-Y, the positions of the rings on the plane X-Z, and uniform and concentric excitations. The optimization is carried out by implementing the particle swarm optimization. The synthesis is compared with previous designs by resulting with proper performance of this geometry to provide an accurate coverage to be applied in satellite applications with a maximum reduction of the antenna hardware as well as the side lobe level reduction.

  18. Synthesis of Volumetric Ring Antenna Array for Terrestrial Coverage Pattern

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Reyna

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a synthesis of a volumetric ring antenna array for a terrestrial coverage pattern. This synthesis regards the spacing among the rings on the planes X-Y, the positions of the rings on the plane X-Z, and uniform and concentric excitations. The optimization is carried out by implementing the particle swarm optimization. The synthesis is compared with previous designs by resulting with proper performance of this geometry to provide an accurate coverage to be applied in satellite applications with a maximum reduction of the antenna hardware as well as the side lobe level reduction.

  19. [The registration of deaths in Venezuela: an evaluation of coverage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidegain, G; Lopez, D

    1987-08-01

    "This paper presents six indirect techniques for estimating the degree of death coverage as applied to vital statistics information in Venezuela between 1960 and 1982, collected by two public institutions, namely, the 'Oficina Central de Estadistica e Informatica' (OCEI) and the Ministry of Health and Social Assistance (MSAS).... The results show remarkable improvements in the death registry coverage for both institutions, that amount to 97 or 98 per cent at the beginning of the 80's. Nevertheless, great differences can be observed between them regarding both structure and volume of deaths by sex and age." Among the problems discussed are the impact of immigration and errors in age reporting. (SUMMARY IN ENG) excerpt

  20. Socio-economic inequality in oral healthcare coverage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hosseinpoor, A R; Itani, L; Petersen, P E

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess socio-economic inequality in oral healthcare coverage among adults with expressed need living in 52 countries. Data on 60,332 adults aged 18 years or older were analyzed from 52 countries participating in the 2002-2004 World Health Survey. Oral healthcare...... wealth quintiles in each country, a wealth-based relative index of inequality was used to measure socio-economic inequality. The index was adjusted for sex, age, marital status, education, employment, overall health status, and urban/rural residence. Pro-rich inequality in oral healthcare coverage...

  1. Television coverage of mental illness in Canada: 2013-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitley, Rob; Wang, JiaWei

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study is to assess television news coverage of mental illness in Canadian media, including change over time. Data consist of news clips mentioning terms including 'mental illness' (N = 579). These were systematically collected and coded over 3 years (2013-2015) using a media retrieval software. Trend analysis indicated a significant linear increase for positively oriented coverage. In 2013, less than 10% of clips had a positive overall tone, whereas in 2015, this figure reached over 40%. Articles linking mental illness to violence significantly decreased, though these remain over 50%. Improvement may be due to educational initiatives targeted at journalists.

  2. Quad-Tree Visual-Calculus Analysis of Satellite Coverage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Martin W.; Hockney, George; Kwan, Bruce

    2003-01-01

    An improved method of analysis of coverage of areas of the Earth by a constellation of radio-communication or scientific-observation satellites has been developed. This method is intended to supplant an older method in which the global-coverage-analysis problem is solved from a ground-to-satellite perspective. The present method provides for rapid and efficient analysis. This method is derived from a satellite-to-ground perspective and involves a unique combination of two techniques for multiresolution representation of map features on the surface of a sphere.

  3. Impact of pharmacists as immunizers on influenza vaccination coverage in the community-setting in Nova Scotia, Canada: 2013-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isenor, Jennifer E; Killen, Jessica L; Billard, Beverly A; McNeil, Shelly A; MacDougall, Donna; Halperin, Beth A; Slayter, Kathryn L; Bowles, Susan K

    2016-01-01

    Annual immunization is the most effective way to prevent influenza and its associated complications. However, optimal immunization rates are not being met in Nova Scotia, Canada. Additional providers, such as pharmacists, may improve access and convenience to receive vaccines. Pharmacists began immunizing patients 5 years of age and older within the publicly funded universal influenza vaccination program during the 2013-2014 influenza season. The objective of this study was to evaluate influenza immunization coverage rates before and after pharmacists in Nova Scotia gained authority to immunize as part of the publicly funded universal influenza vaccination program. Influenza immunization data was obtained from the Department of Health and Wellness from 2010 to 2015. Data included billing data from physicians and pharmacists, and local public health data. Vaccination coverage was calculated as proportion of vaccinations received in comparison to the total population. Prior to pharmacists immunizing, overall vaccination coverage for Nova Scotia residents 6 months of age and older was 35.8 % in 2012-2013, increasing to 41.8 % coverage in 2013-2014 the year pharmacists began immunizing. A decrease of 1.9 to 39.9 % was observed in 2014-2015. In patients 65 years of age and older living in the community, coverage has increased from 61.8 % in 2012-2013 to 71.6 % in 2013-2014, and again to 73.3 % in 2014-2015 with the addition of pharmacists immunizing. Prior to pharmacists immunizing the highest coverage noted for this portion of the population was 61.8 %. The addition of pharmacists as immunizers within a publicly funded universal influenza vaccination program was found to increase overall vaccination coverage in the first year and to maintain higher coverage rates in the second year than those observed before pharmacists began immunizing. Increases in coverage in both years were observed in the elderly. Future research will be required to determine the ongoing

  4. Israeli college students challenge media coverage of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mira Feuerstein

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This study is based on a critical media literacy education (CMLE program in a “peace education through media” (Pet-Med project conducted simultaneously in three Israeli academic colleges amongst Arab and Jewish students. It sought to assess general short-term trends of changes in the students’ perceptions of the media coverage of the conflict and the role a critical approach towards the media can play in promoting tolerance, and recognizing mutual-victim roles. The pre-post quantitative questionnaires evinced a general trend towards a more moderate position than the students took in response to the conflict. In the wake of the program, more of them acknowledged the importance of knowing the “Other” and the media effect upon constructions of extreme reality and their own perceptions.

  5. United States societal experiments via the Communications Technology Satellite. [antenna coverage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donoughe, P. L.

    1976-01-01

    The Communications Technology Satellite (CTS) is a cooperative experimental program of the United States and Canadian governments. The CTS uses a high-power transponder at the frequencies of 14/12 GHz for two-way television and voice communication. The United States and Canada have agreed to share equally in the use of CTS. The U.S. program includes a variety of societal experiments. The ground stations for these experiments are located from the Atlantic to the Pacific. The satellite communications capabilities and the antenna coverage for the U.S. are summarized. Emphasis is placed on the U.S. societal experiments in the areas of education, health care, and community and special services; nine separate experiments are discussed.

  6. Influenza vaccination coverage of Vaccine for Children (VFC)-entitled versus privately insured children, United States, 2011–2013☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastav, Anup; Zhai, Yusheng; Santibanez, Tammy A.; Kahn, Katherine E.; Smith, Philip J.; Singleton, James A.

    2016-01-01

    Background The Vaccines for Children (VFC) program provides vaccines at no cost to children who are Medicaid-eligible, uninsured, American Indian or Alaska Native (AI/AN), or underinsured and vaccinated at Federally Qualified Health Centers or Rural Health Clinics. The objective of this study was to compare influenza vaccination coverage of VFC-entitled to privately insured children in the United States, nationally, by state, and by selected socio-demographic variables. Methods Data from the National Immunization Survey-Flu (NIS-Flu) surveys were analyzed for the 2011–2012 and 2012–2013 influenza seasons for households with children 6 months–17 years. VFC-entitlement and private insurance status were defined based upon questions asked of the parent during the telephone interview. Influenza vaccination coverage estimates of children VFC-entitled versus privately insured were compared by t-tests, both nationally and within state, and within selected socio-demographic variables. Results For both seasons studied, influenza coverage for VFC-entitled children did not significantly differ from coverage for privately insured children (2011–2012: 52.0% ± 1.9% versus 50.7% ± 1.2%; 2012–2013: 56.0% ± 1.6% versus 57.2% ± 1.2%). Among VFC-entitled children, uninsured children had lower coverage (2011–2012: 38.9% ± 4.7%; 2012–2013: 44.8% ± 3.5%) than Medicaid-eligible (2011–2012: 55.2% ± 2.1%; 2012–2013: 58.6% ± 1.9%) and AI/AN children (2011–2012: 54.4% ± 11.3%; 2012–2013: 54.6% ± 7.0%). Significant differences in vaccination coverage among VFC-entitled and privately insured children were observed within some subgroups of race/ethnicity, income, age, region, and living in a metropolitan statistical area principle city. Conclusions Although finding few differences in influenza vaccination coverage among VFC-entitled versus privately insured children was encouraging, nearly half of all children were not vaccinated for influenza and coverage was

  7. Influenza vaccination coverage of Vaccine for Children (VFC)-entitled versus privately insured children, United States, 2011-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastav, Anup; Zhai, Yusheng; Santibanez, Tammy A; Kahn, Katherine E; Smith, Philip J; Singleton, James A

    2015-06-17

    The Vaccines for Children (VFC) program provides vaccines at no cost to children who are Medicaid-eligible, uninsured, American Indian or Alaska Native (AI/AN), or underinsured and vaccinated at Federally Qualified Health Centers or Rural Health Clinics. The objective of this study was to compare influenza vaccination coverage of VFC-entitled to privately insured children in the United States, nationally, by state, and by selected socio-demographic variables. Data from the National Immunization Survey-Flu (NIS-Flu) surveys were analyzed for the 2011-2012 and 2012-2013 influenza seasons for households with children 6 months-17 years. VFC-entitlement and private insurance status were defined based upon questions asked of the parent during the telephone interview. Influenza vaccination coverage estimates of children VFC-entitled versus privately insured were compared by t-tests, both nationally and within state, and within selected socio-demographic variables. For both seasons studied, influenza coverage for VFC-entitled children did not significantly differ from coverage for privately insured children (2011-2012: 52.0%±1.9% versus 50.7%±1.2%; 2012-2013: 56.0%±1.6% versus 57.2%±1.2%). Among VFC-entitled children, uninsured children had lower coverage (2011-2012: 38.9%±4.7%; 2012-2013: 44.8%±3.5%) than Medicaid-eligible (2011-2012: 55.2%±2.1%; 2012-2013: 58.6%±1.9%) and AI/AN children (2011-2012: 54.4%±11.3%; 2012-2013: 54.6%±7.0%). Significant differences in vaccination coverage among VFC-entitled and privately insured children were observed within some subgroups of race/ethnicity, income, age, region, and living in a metropolitan statistical area principle city. Although finding few differences in influenza vaccination coverage among VFC-entitled versus privately insured children was encouraging, nearly half of all children were not vaccinated for influenza and coverage was particularly low among uninsured children. Additional public health interventions

  8. The demand for health insurance coverage by low-income workers: can reduced premiums achieve full coverage?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernew, M; Frick, K; McLaughlin, C G

    1997-10-01

    To assess the degree to which premium reductions will increase the participation in employer-sponsored health plans by low-income workers who are employed in small businesses. Sample of workers in small business (25 or fewer employees) in seven metropolitan areas. The data were gathered as part of the Small Business Benefits Survey, a telephone survey of small business conducted between October 1992 and February 1993. Probit regressions were used to estimate the demand for health insurance coverage by low-income workers. Predictions based on these findings were made to assess the extent to which premium reductions might increase coverage rates. Workers included in the sample were selected, at random, from a randomly generated set of firms drawn from Dun and Bradstreet's DMI (Dun's Market Inclusion). The response rate was 81 percent. Participation in employer-sponsored plans is high when coverage is offered. However, even when coverage is offered to employees who have no other source of insurance, participation is not universal. Although premium reductions will increase participation in employer-sponsored plans, even large subsidies will not induce all workers to participate in employer-sponsored plans. For workers eligible to participate, subsidies as high as 75 percent of premiums are estimated to increase participation rates from 89.0 percent to 92.6 percent. For workers in firms that do not sponsor plans, similar subsidies are projected to achieve only modest increases in coverage above that which would be observed if the workers had access to plans at unsubsidized, group market rates. Policies that rely on voluntary purchase of coverage to reduce the number of uninsured will have only modest success.

  9. Assessing HPV vaccine coverage in Australia by geography and socioeconomic status: are we protecting those most at risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbaro, Bianca; Brotherton, Julia M L

    2014-10-01

    To determine whether HPV vaccine coverage in 12-13-year-olds varies by geographical area, remoteness and ecological level indicators of socioeconomic status (SES). Data from the National HPV Vaccination Program Register (NHVPR) were analysed at Statistical Local Area (SLA) level, by the Index of Relative Disadvantage (IRSD) and the Australian Standard Geographical Classification Remoteness Structure. Nationally, 73% of females aged 12-13 years in 2007 were fully vaccinated against HPV. Coverage in low SES areas (71.5%) was 4.1 percentage points lower than coverage in high SES areas (75.6%). Uptake of the first two doses was higher in the very remote parts of Australia (dose 1 - 88.5%, dose 2 - 81.8%) than in major cities (dose 1 - 83.4%, dose 2 - 80.2%), but not for dose 3 where coverage in major cities was 3% higher (73.6% versus 71.4%). Notifications of HPV vaccine doses delivered to females aged 12-13 through schools suggest a high and relatively equal uptake across socioeconomic groups. Females in remote regions have the highest uptake of dose 1 but are least likely to complete the course. This may be due to particular challenges in vaccine delivery to residents of remote areas. © 2014 Public Health Association of Australia.

  10. Vaccination Coverage among Kindergarten Children in Phoenix, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frimpong, Jemima A.; Rivers, Patrick A.; Bae, Sejong

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate school immunization records and document the immunization coverage and compliance level of children enrolled in kindergarten in Phoenix during the 2001-2002 school year. The purpose was to obtain information on: 1) immunization status by age two; 2) under-immunization in kindergarten; 3) administration error; and 4)…

  11. An Analysis of the Policy Coverage and Examination of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    impact topics in subjects such as Life Sciences, Physical Sciences, Life Orientation, Agricultural Sciences, ... The present paper shows that Life Sciences has the widest coverage and that Geography examination papers .... consider how to encourage and enable the teaching of critical thinking, as well as connections.

  12. determinants of immunisation coverage among children in mathare

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2001-11-02

    Nov 2, 2001 ... smallpox in 1977 which prompted WHO to step up its effort in increasing immunisation coverage from 10% in. 1974 to 80% in 1990 but has declined .... Immunisation information for 112 (21%) of the children could not be established as their parents had left health cards up—country. misplaced or lost them.

  13. Chiropractic Use by Urban and Rural Residents with Insurance Coverage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lind, Bonnie K.; Diehr, Paula K.; Grembowski, David E.; Lafferty, William E.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To describe the use of chiropractic care by urban and rural residents in Washington state with musculoskeletal diagnoses, all of whom have insurance coverage for this care. The analyses investigate whether restricting the analyses to insured individuals attenuates previously reported differences in the prevalence of chiropractic use…

  14. Nuclear Bashing in Chernobyl Coverage: Fact or Fiction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Sharon M.; And Others

    Critics of coverage of nuclear power have charged that the media overemphasize the importance of nuclear accidents, encourage public fear, and omit information vital to public understanding of nuclear power and risk. Some also feel there is an anti-nuclear bias among reporters and editors. A study was conducted to determine if such charges were…

  15. Trichiasis surgical coverage in three local government areas of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Website: www.annalsafrmed.org. PMID: ***. DOI: 10.4103/1596-3519.93529. Trichiasis surgical coverage in three local government areas of Sokoto state, Nigeria. Nasiru Muhammad. Department of Surgery, Ophthalmology Unit, Usmanu Danfodiyo University, Sokoto, Nigeria. Correspondence to: Dr. Nasiru Muhammad, ...

  16. Coverage of Milgram's Obedience Experiments in Social Psychology Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griggs, Richard A.; Whitehead, George I., III

    2015-01-01

    Past studies of the treatment of Milgram's obedience experiments in social psychology textbooks from the 1960s to the 1990s discovered an evolving "Milgram-friendly" coverage style (dealing with criticisms of his experiments either summarily, in a pro-Milgram manner, or not at all). We examined 10 current social textbooks to determine…

  17. Network Television Evening News Coverage of Infectious Disease Events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Michael; Wartenberg, Daniel

    1990-01-01

    Examines coverage of several infectious diseases and teenage suicide to see whether television news favors covering illness where it clusters or when it occurs near major news centers where it is easier to cover. Finds that television news did go to where the illness broke out but tended to favor reporting urban over rural suicides. (RS)

  18. With Coverage from Multiple Perspectives, Newspaper Represents Multiple Factions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochran, Stacy

    1999-01-01

    Describes the coverage of the shootings at Columbine High School by the staff of "The Express," the student newspaper of Maize High School, Maize, Kansas. Notes that the school had its own so-called Trench Coat Mafia and that the feelings of this group of students were featured in one of the articles. (RS)

  19. Pericyte coverage of abnormal blood vessels in myelofibrotic bone marrows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zetterberg, Eva; Vannucchi, Alessandro M; Migliaccio, Anna Rita

    2007-01-01

    patients with myelofibrosis differed from that in samples from controls. DESIGN AND METHODS: We assessed the microvascular density (MVD), vessel morphology and pericyte coverage in bone marrows from 19 myelofibrosis patients and nine controls. We also studied the same parameters in two mouse models...

  20. Camera Network Coverage Improving by Particle Swarm Optimization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xu, Y.C.; Lei, B.; Hendriks, E.A.

    2011-01-01

    This paper studies how to improve the field of view (FOV) coverage of a camera network. We focus on a special but practical scenario where the cameras are randomly scattered in a wide area and each camera may adjust its orientation but cannot move in any direction. We propose a particle swarm

  1. Capacity and coverage of power controlled CDMA cellular systems ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Coverage and capacity are among the ambitious challenges to be met by the third generation (3G) systems for successful deployment of its services to both residential and commercial subscribers. This paper reports on the performance study of CDMA systems in relation to an optimum step-regulated SNR-based ...

  2. The Danish National Lymphoma Registry: Coverage and Data Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arboe, Bente; El-Galaly, Tarec Christoffer; Clausen, Michael Roost; Munksgaard, Peter Svenssen; Stoltenberg, Danny; Nygaard, Mette Kathrine; Klausen, Tobias Wirenfeldt; Christensen, Jacob Haaber; Gørløv, Jette Sønderskov; Brown, Peter de Nully

    2016-01-01

    The Danish National Lymphoma Register (LYFO) prospectively includes information on all lymphoma patients newly diagnosed at hematology departments in Denmark. The validity of the clinical information in the LYFO has never been systematically assessed. To test the coverage and data quality of the LYFO. The coverage was tested by merging data of the LYFO with the Danish Cancer Register and the Danish National Patient Register, respectively. The validity of the LYFO was assessed by crosschecking with information from medical records in subgroups of patients. A random sample of 3% (N = 364) was made from all patients in the LYFO. In addition, four subtypes of lymphomas were validated: CNS lymphomas, diffuse large B-cell lymphomas, peripheral T-cell lymphomas, and Hodgkin lymphomas. A total of 1,706 patients from the period 2000-2012 were included. The positive predictive values (PPVs) and completeness of selected variables were calculated for each subgroup and for the entire cohort of patients. The comparison of data from the LYFO with the Danish Cancer Register and the Danish National Patient Register revealed a high coverage. In addition, the data quality was good with high PPVs (87% to 100%), and high completeness (92% to 100%). The LYFO is a unique, nationwide clinical database characterized by high validity, good coverage and prospective data entry. It represents a valuable resource for future lymphoma research.

  3. Rapid assessment of cataract surgical coverage in rural Zululand ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. Cataract surgical coverage (CSC) is a useful indicator of the degree of success of a cataract intervention programme. However, because previously described methods are time-consuming and labour-intensive, they are rarely performed. This study describes a simple and inexpensive assessment of CSC based ...

  4. Measles vaccination coverage in high-incidence areas of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A community survey was conducted in the Western Cape to assess measles vaccination coverage attained by routine and campaign services, in children ... were consecutively visited and requested to participate in the survey. Within each ... analysis, in order to provide a pre- and post-campaign profile. Children without an ...

  5. CT following US for possible appendicitis: anatomic coverage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Malley, Martin E. [University of Toronto, Princess Margaret Hospital, 3-920, Joint Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Alharbi, Fawaz [University of Toronto, Toronto General Hospital, NCSB 1C572, Joint Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Qassim University, Department of Medical Imaging, Buraydah, Qassim (Saudi Arabia); Chawla, Tanya P. [University of Toronto, Mount Sinai Hospital, Room 567, Joint Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Moshonov, Hadas [University of Toronto, Joint Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2016-02-15

    To determine superior-inferior anatomic borders for CT following inconclusive/nondiagnostic US for possible appendicitis. Ninety-nine patients with possible appendicitis and inconclusive/nondiagnostic US followed by CT were included in this retrospective study. Two radiologists reviewed CT images and determined superior-inferior anatomic borders required to diagnose or exclude appendicitis and diagnose alternative causes. This ''targeted'' coverage was used to estimate potential reduction in anatomic coverage compared to standard abdominal/pelvic CT. The study group included 83 women and 16 men; mean age 32 (median, 29; range 18-73) years. Final diagnoses were: nonspecific abdominal pain 50/99 (51 %), appendicitis 26/99 (26 %), gynaecological 12/99 (12 %), gastrointestinal 9/99 (10 %), and musculoskeletal 2/99 (2 %). Median dose-length product for standard CT was 890.0 (range, 306.3 - 2493.9) mGy.cm. To confidently diagnose/exclude appendicitis or identify alternative diagnoses, maximum superior-inferior anatomic CT coverage was the superior border of L2-superior border of pubic symphysis, for both reviewers. Targeted CT would reduce anatomic coverage by 30-55 % (mean 39 %, median 40 %) compared to standard CT. When CT is performed for appendicitis following inconclusive/nondiagnostic US, targeted CT from the superior border of L2-superior border of pubic symphysis can be used resulting in significant reduction in exposure to ionizing radiation compared to standard CT. (orig.)

  6. A mass campaign too often? results of a vaccination coverage ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives. To determine the routine and mass immunisation coverage in children aged between 12 and 23 months in the Dikgale-Soekmekaar district, Northern Province, South Africa. Design. Cross-sectional community-based vaccination prevalence survey using a two-stage cluster sampling technique. Methods. Data on ...

  7. Preparing States in India for Universal Health Coverage | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Given India's population, geographical diversity, and health inequities, the path to universal health coverage is likely to vary widely across states. Using research evidence, policymakers will need to ensure a balance between prioritizing primary health care and expanding access to insurance for secondary and tertiary care.

  8. Media disaster coverage over time: Methodological issues and results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuttschreuter, M.; Gutteling, Jan M.; Martorell, Sebastian; Soares, C. Guedes; Barnett, Julie

    2008-01-01

    In 2000 disaster struck Enschede in The Netherlands. Due to explosions at a fireworks factory, 22 people were killed. This study aims to describe the developments in the media coverage of this disaster. Content analysis was performed on 4928 articles, derived from four distinct newspapers. After a

  9. 29 CFR 1975.3 - Extent of coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... exercise of its powers to regulate commerce among the several States and with foreign nations and to... safe and healthful working conditions and to preserve our human resources * * * Congressman William Steiger described the scope of the Act's coverage in the following words during a discussion of the...

  10. Graphene transfer process and optimization of graphene coverage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabki Syarifah Norfaezah

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Graphene grown on transition metal is known to be high in quality due to its controlled amount of defects and potentially used for many electronic applications. The transfer process of graphene grown on transition metal to a new substrate requires optimization in order to ensure that high graphene coverage can be obtained. In this work, an improvement in the graphene transfer process is performed from graphene grown on copper foil. It has been observed that the graphene coverage is affected by the pressure given to the top of PDMS to eliminate water and air between graphene and SiO2 (new substrate. This work experimented with different approaches to optimize the graphene coverage, and stamping method has proven to be the best technique in obtaining the largest graphene coverage. This work also highlights the elimination of impurities from graphene after the transfer process, known to be PMMA residues, which involved immersion of graphene in acetone. This method has improved the graphene conductivity.

  11. Cell Phone Coverage Area: Helping Students Achieve in Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zbiek, Rose Mary; Reed, Shari Ann; Boone, Tracy

    2007-01-01

    Cell phone coverage areas arouse students' curiosity in a lesson that engages students with area as a measure that relates to, but is different from, linear measure. Each distinct set of activities (stations) blends concepts and skills to align with and transcend state standards. In reflecting on the lesson planning and implementation, we…

  12. The Ground-Set-Cost Budgeted Maximum Coverage Problem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.I. van Heuven van Staereling (Irving); B. de Keijzer (Bart); G. Schäfer (Guido)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractWe study the following natural variant of the budgeted maximum coverage problem: We are given a budget B and a hypergraph G = (V, E), where each vertex has a non-negative cost and a non-negative profit. The goal is to select a set of hyperedges T subseteq E such that the total cost of

  13. The ground-set-cost budgeted maximum coverage problem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Staereling, I.V.H. (Irving Van Heuven); B. de Keijzer (Bart); G. Schäfer (Guido)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractWe study the following natural variant of the budgeted maximum coverage problem: We are given a budget B and a hypergraph G = (V,E), where each vertex has a non-negative cost and a non-negative profit. The goal is to select a set of hyperedges T c E such that the total cost of the

  14. Handover Incentives for Self-Interested WLANs with Overlapping Coverage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fafoutis, Xenofon; Siris, Vasilios A.

    2012-01-01

    We consider an environment where self-interested IEEE 802.11 Wireless Local Area Networks (WLANs) have overlapping coverage, and investigate the incentives that can trigger handovers between the WLANs. Our focus is on the incentives for supporting handovers due solely to the improved performance ...

  15. Factors influencing child immunization coverage in a rural District of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Multiple logistic regression analysis indicated that residence and mother's education were significant predictors of immunization status of children, children from rural areas and whose mothers were literate had higher immunization coverage. Conclusion: Community mobilization and efforts to raise the awareness of mothers ...

  16. 76 FR 17577 - Increased Scope of Coverage for Electric Motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-30

    ... Part 431 RIN 1904-AC28 Increased Scope of Coverage for Electric Motors AGENCY: Office of Energy... rulemaking to set energy conservation standards for electric motors. Specifically, DOE seeks information to assist DOE in determining whether to develop energy conservation standards for certain types of electric...

  17. No magic pill Pursuing universal health coverage through equitable ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2012-10-25

    Oct 25, 2012 ... For more than 10 years, researchers supported by IDRC have been working with health reformers in low- and middle-income countries. Focusing on governance, equity, and the effective integration of health systems, they have much to contribute to current efforts to extend universal health coverage.

  18. Media coverage as an instrument of language rights activism: The ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Drawing on methods of content analysis and critical discourse analysis, the article demonstrates that media coverage of an activist nature is fraught with biases and subjectivities which are evident in the framing of news reports. The activist nature of the newspaper reports analysed in this article point to an inclination to ...

  19. 9 CFR 303.2 - Experimentation: Intensity of inspection coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Experimentation: Intensity of inspection coverage. 303.2 Section 303.2 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE... AND VOLUNTARY INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION EXEMPTIONS § 303.2 Experimentation: Intensity of inspection...

  20. Nursing challenges for universal health coverage: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Cabral Schveitzer

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives to identify nursing challenges for universal health coverage, based on the findings of a systematic review focused on the health workforce' understanding of the role of humanization practices in Primary Health Care. Method systematic review and meta-synthesis, from the following information sources: PubMed, CINAHL, Scielo, Web of Science, PsycInfo, SCOPUS, DEDALUS and Proquest, using the keyword Primary Health Care associated, separately, with the following keywords: humanization of assistance, holistic care/health, patient centred care, user embracement, personal autonomy, holism, attitude of health personnel. Results thirty studies between 1999-2011. Primary Health Care work processes are complex and present difficulties for conducting integrative care, especially for nursing, but humanizing practices have showed an important role towards the development of positive work environments, quality of care and people-centered care by promoting access and universal health coverage. Conclusions nursing challenges for universal health coverage are related to education and training, to better working conditions and clear definition of nursing role in primary health care. It is necessary to overcome difficulties such as fragmented concepts of health and care and invest in multidisciplinary teamwork, community empowerment, professional-patient bond, user embracement, soft technologies, to promote quality of life, holistic care and universal health coverage.