WorldWideScience

Sample records for program atlas volume

  1. ATLAS forward physics program

    CERN Document Server

    HELLER, M; The ATLAS collaboration

    2010-01-01

    The variety of forward detectors installed in the vicinity of the ATLAS experiment allows to look over a wide range of forward physics topics. They ensure a good information about rapidity gaps, and the installation of very forward detectors (ALFA and AFP) will allow to tag the leading proton(s) remaining from the different processes studied. Most of the studies have to be done at low luminosity to avoid pile-up, but the AFP project offers a really exiting future for the ATLAS forward physics program. We also present how these forward detectors can be used to measure the relative and absolute luminosity.

  2. The ATLAS upgrade program

    CERN Document Server

    Gemme, C; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    After the rst successful LHC run in 2010-2012, plans are actively advancing for a series of upgrades leading eventually to about ve times the design-luminosity in about ten years. The larger luminosity will allow to perform precise measurements of the just discovered Higgs boson and to continue searching for new physics beyond the Standard Model. Coping with the high instantaneous and integrated luminosity will be a great challenge for the ATLAS detector and will require changes in most of the subsystems, specially those at low radii and large pseudorapidity, as well as in its trigger architecture. Plans to consolidate and, whenever possible, to improve the physics performance of the current detector over the next decade are summarized in this paper.

  3. The ATLAS upgrade program

    CERN Document Server

    Gemme, C

    2014-01-01

    After the first successful LHC run in 2010-2012, plans are actively advancing for a series of upgrades leading eventually to about above times the design-luminosity in about ten years. The larger luminosity will allow to perform precise measurements of the just discovered Higgs boson and to continue searching for new physics beyond the Standard Model. Coping with the high instantaneous and integrated luminosity will be a great challenge for the ATLAS detector and will require changes in most of the subsystems, specially those at low radii and large pseudorapidity, as well as in its trigger architecture. Plans to consolidate and, whenever possible, to improve the physics performance of the current detector over the next decade are summarized in this paper.

  4. The commercial Atlas IIAR program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser, Robert L.

    1998-01-01

    The space launch industry is experiencing a tremendous transition from a government-dominated customer base to a commercial customer base. According to the Teal Group World Space Briefing, nearly 75 percent of satellites launched from 1997 to 2006 will be commercial satellites (Caceres 1997). Of these, the vast majority are commercial ventures in mobile communications, broadband multimedia services, or direct broadcast television satellites. With the majority of the demand for launch services coming from commercial satellite providers, the needs and demands of the commercial satellite community are taking an ever increasing role in the development and design of launch vehicle systems. The Atlas IIAR, the R indicating re-engined, specifically addresses the call from commercial users for increased performance to orbit with higher reliability and launch availability. Lockheed Martin's Atlas IIAR launch vehicle will play a significant and crucial role in the launch of commercial satellites over the next several years, helping to bring satellite services to millions of people worldwide.

  5. The Education and Outreach Program of ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    Barnett, M.

    2006-01-01

    The ATLAS Education and Outreach (E&O) program began in 1997, but the advent of LHC has placed a new urgency in our efforts. Even a year away, we can feel the approaching impact of starting an experiment that could make revolutionary discoveries. The public and teachers are beginning to turn their attention our way, and the newsmedia are showing growing interest in ATLAS. When datataking begins, the interest will peak, and the demands on us are likely to be substantial. The collaboration is responding to this challenge in a number of ways. ATLAS management has begun consultation with experts. The official budget for the E&O group has been growing as have the contributions of many ATLAS institutions. The number of collaboration members joining these efforts has grown, and their time and effort is increasing. We are in ongoing consultation with the CERN Public Affairs Office, as well as the other LHC experiments and the European Particle Physics Outreach Group. The E&O group has expanded the scope...

  6. ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Barrel and END-CAP Toroids In order to produce a powerful magnetic field to bend the paths of the muons, the ATLAS detector uses an exceptionally large system of air-core toroids arranged outside the calorimeter volumes. The large volume magnetic field has a wide angular coverage and strengths of up to 4.7tesla. The toroids system contains over 100km of superconducting wire and has a design current of 20 500 amperes. (ATLAS brochure: The Technical Challenges)

  7. Atlas international de la vitalite linguistique. Volume 3: L'Afrique Occidentale = International Atlas of Language Vitality. Volume 3: West Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, Grant D., Ed.; Gendron, Jean-Denis, Ed.

    The third volume in a series of atlases of language vitality covers 13 countries of West Africa (Benin, Burkina Faso, Ivory Coast, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Liberia, Mali, Mauritania, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Togo) and 59 major languages. The atlas consists of four main parts. The first offers comparative data, in bar graph and tabular…

  8. NODC Standard Product: International ocean atlas Volume 11 - Climatic atlas of the Sea of Azov 2008 (1 disc set) (NODC Accession 0098574)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This Atlas, Climatic Atlas of the Sea of Azov 2008 on CD-ROM, is an update to Volume 10, Climatic Atlas of the Sea of Azov 2006 on CD-ROM (NODC Accession 0098572),...

  9. Recent Results from the ATLAS UPC Program

    CERN Document Server

    Cole, Brian; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    Recent results from ATLAS measurements of ultra-peripheral Pb+Pb collisions are presented. Measurements include gamma+gamma -> dimuon, photo-nuclear production of di/multi-jets, and light-by-light scattering.

  10. Joint Program Study. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-07-27

    about non-major programs was that very little changed in the initial program office organization despite significant changes in program requirements... office organization and staffing • Key participating Service personnel responsibilities. 4.3.3 Funding Practices and Agreements Funding agreements...including management philoso- phies and structures, acquisition strategies, program office organization , the POM process, and contracting procedures. 6.2

  11. Volume measurements of individual muscles in human quadriceps femoris using atlas-based segmentation approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Troter, Arnaud; Fouré, Alexandre; Guye, Maxime; Confort-Gouny, Sylviane; Mattei, Jean-Pierre; Gondin, Julien; Salort-Campana, Emmanuelle; Bendahan, David

    2016-04-01

    Atlas-based segmentation is a powerful method for automatic structural segmentation of several sub-structures in many organs. However, such an approach has been very scarcely used in the context of muscle segmentation, and so far no study has assessed such a method for the automatic delineation of individual muscles of the quadriceps femoris (QF). In the present study, we have evaluated a fully automated multi-atlas method and a semi-automated single-atlas method for the segmentation and volume quantification of the four muscles of the QF and for the QF as a whole. The study was conducted in 32 young healthy males, using high-resolution magnetic resonance images (MRI) of the thigh. The multi-atlas-based segmentation method was conducted in 25 subjects. Different non-linear registration approaches based on free-form deformable (FFD) and symmetric diffeomorphic normalization algorithms (SyN) were assessed. Optimal parameters of two fusion methods, i.e., STAPLE and STEPS, were determined on the basis of the highest Dice similarity index (DSI) considering manual segmentation (MSeg) as the ground truth. Validation and reproducibility of this pipeline were determined using another MRI dataset recorded in seven healthy male subjects on the basis of additional metrics such as the muscle volume similarity values, intraclass coefficient, and coefficient of variation. Both non-linear registration methods (FFD and SyN) were also evaluated as part of a single-atlas strategy in order to assess longitudinal muscle volume measurements. The multi- and the single-atlas approaches were compared for the segmentation and the volume quantification of the four muscles of the QF and for the QF as a whole. Considering each muscle of the QF, the DSI of the multi-atlas-based approach was high 0.87 ± 0.11 and the best results were obtained with the combination of two deformation fields resulting from the SyN registration method and the STEPS fusion algorithm. The optimal variables for FFD

  12. Laser program annual report, 1977. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bender, C.F.; Jarman, B.D. (eds.)

    1978-07-01

    This volume contains detailed information on each of the following sections: (1) fusion target design, (2) target fabrication, (3) laser fusion experiments and analysis, (4) advanced lasers, (5) systems and applications studies, and (6) laser isotope separation program. (MOW)

  13. The Persint visualization program for the ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Pomarède, D

    2003-01-01

    The Persint program is designed for the three-dimensional representation of objects and for the interfacing and access to a variety of independent applications, in a fully interactive way. Facilities are provided for the spatial navigation and the definition of the visualization properties, in order to interactively set the viewing and viewed points, and to obtain the desired perspective. In parallel, applications may be launched through the use of dedicated interfaces, such as the interactive reconstruction and display of physics events. Recent developments have focalized on the interfacing to the XML ATLAS General Detector Description AGDD, making it a widely used tool for XML developers. The graphics capabilities of this program were exploited in the context of the ATLAS 2002 Muon Testbeam where it was used as an online event display, integrated in the online software framework and participating in the commissioning and debug of the detector system.

  14. Recent results from the ATLAS heavy ion program

    CERN Document Server

    Havener, Laura Brittany; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    The heavy-ion program in the ATLAS experiment at the LHC originated as an extensive program to probe and characterize the hot, dense matter created in relativistic lead-lead collisions. In recent years, the program has also broadened to a detailed study of collective behavior in smaller systems. In particular, the techniques used to study larger systems are also applied to proton-proton and proton-lead collisions over a wide range of particle multiplicities, to try and understand the early-time dynamics which lead to similar flow-like features in all of the systems. Another recent development is a program studying ultra-peripheral collisions, which provide gamma-gamma and photonuclear processes over a wide range of CM energy, to probe the nuclear wavefunction. This talk presents a subset of the the most recent results from the ATLAS experiment based on Run 1 and Run 2 data, including measurements of collectivity over a wide range of collision systems, potential nPDF modifications — using electroweak bosons,...

  15. Wind energy resource atlas: Volume 6. The Southeast region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zabransky, J.; Vilardo, J.M.; Schakenbach, J.T.; Elliott, D.L.; Barchet, W.R.; George, R.L.

    1981-01-01

    The Southeast atlas assimilates six collections of wind resource data: one for the region and one for each of the five states that compose the Southeast region (Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, and South Carolina). At the state level, features of the climate, topography and wind resource are discussed in greater detail than is provided in the regional discussion, and the data locations on which the assessment is based are mapped. Variations, over several time scales, in the wind resource at selected stations in each state are shown on graphs of monthly average and interannual wind speed and power, and hourly average wind speed for each season. Other graphs present speed, direction and duration frequencies of the wind at these locations.

  16. Wind energy resource atlas. Volume 3. Great Lakes Region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paton, D.L.; Bass, A.; Smith, D.G.; Elliott, D.L.; Barchet, W.R.; George, R.L.

    1981-02-01

    The Great Lakes Region atlas assimilates six collections of wind resource data, one for the region and one for each of the five states that compose the Great Lakes region: Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Ohio, Wisconsin. At the state level, features of the climate, topography, and wind resource are discussed in greater detail than in the regional discussion and the data locations on which the assessment is based are mapped. Variations over several time scales in the wind resource at selected stations in each state are shown on graphs of monthly average and interannual wind speed and power, and of hourly average wind speed for each season. Other graphs present speed, direction, and duration frequencies of the wind at these locations.

  17. Wind energy resource atlas. Volume 4. The Northeast region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pickering, K.E.; Vilardo, J.M.; Schakenbach, J.T.; Elliott, D.L.; Barchet, W.R.; George, R.L.

    1980-09-01

    This atlas of the wind energy resource is composed of introductory and background information, a regional summary of the wind resource, and assessments of the wind resource in each state of the region. Background is presented on how the wind resource is assessed and on how the results of the assessment should be interpreted. A description of the wind resource on a regional scale is then given. The results of the wind energy assessments for each state are assembled in this chapter into an overview and summary of the various features of the regional wind energy resource. An introduction and outline are provided for in the descriptions of the wind resource given for each state. Assessments for individual states are presented. The state wind energy resources are described in greater detail than is the regional wind energy resource, and features of selected stations are discussed. This preface outlines the use and interpretation of the information found in the state chapters.

  18. Wind energy resource atlas. Volume 9. The Southwest Region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon, R.L.; Norman, G.T.; Elliott, D.L.; Barchet, W.R.; George, R.L.

    1980-11-01

    This atlas of the wind energy resource is composed of introductory and background information, a regional summary of the wind resource, and assessments of the wind resource in Nevada and California. Background on how the wind resource is assessed and on how the results of the assessment should be interpreted is presented. A description of the wind resource on a regional scale is then given. The results of the wind energy assessments for each state are assembled into an overview and summary of the various features of the regional wind energy resource. An introduction and outline to the descriptions of the wind resource given for each state are given. Assessments for individual states are presented as separate chapters. The state wind energy resources are described in greater detail than is the regional wind energy resource, and features of selected stations are discussed.

  19. Wind energy resource atlas. Volume 7. The south central region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, R.L.; Graves, L.F.; Sprankle, A.C.; Elliott, D.L.; Barchet, W.R.; George, R.L.

    1981-03-01

    This atlas of the south central region combines seven collections of wind resource data: one for the region, and one for each of the six states (Arkansas, Kansas, Louisiana, Missouri, Oklahoma, and Texas). At the state level, features of the climate, topography, and wind resource are discussed in greater detail than that provided in the regional discussion, and the data locations on which the assessment is based are mapped. Variations, over several time scales, in the wind resource at selected stations in each state are shown on graphs of monthly average and interannual wind speed and power, and hourly average wind speed for each season. Other graphs present speed, direction, and duration frequencies of the wind at these locations.

  20. Wind energy resource atlas. Volume 2. The North Central Region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeman, D.L.; Hadley, D.L.; Elliott, D.L.; Barchet, W.R.; George, R.L.

    1981-02-01

    The North Central atlas assimilates six collections of wind resource data: one for the region and one for each of the five states that compose the North Central region (Iowa, Minnesota, Nebraska, North Dakota, and South Dakota). At the state level, features of the climate, topography and wind resource are discussed in greater detail than is provided in the regional discussion, and that data locations on which the assessment is based are mapped. Variations, over several time scales, in the wind resource at selected stations in each state are shown on graphs of monthly average and international wind speed and power, and hourly average wind speed for each season. Other graphs present speed direction and duration frequencies of the wind at these locations.

  1. Wind energy resource atlas. Volume 5: the East Central Region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brode, R.; Stoner, R.; Elliott, D.L.; Barchet, W.R.; George, R.L.

    1980-01-01

    This atlas of the wind energy resource is composed of introductory and background information, a regional summary of the wind resource, and assessments of the wind resource in each state of the region. Background is presented on how the wind resource is assessed and on how the results of the assessment should be interpreted. A description of the wind resource on a regional scale is then given. The results of the wind energy assessments for each state are assembled into an overview and summary of the various features of the regional wind energy resource. Assessments for individual states are presented as separate chapters. The state wind energy resources are described in greater detail than is the regional wind energy resource, and features of selected stations are discussed. This preface outlines the use and interpretation of the information found in the state chapters. States include Delaware, Maryland, Kentucky, North Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia, and West Virginia.

  2. International Photovoltaic Program Plan. Volume II. Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costello, D.; Koontz, R.; Posner, D.; Heiferling, P.; Carpenter, P.; Forman, S.; Perelman, L.

    1979-12-01

    This second volume of a two-part report on the International Photovoltaic Program Plan contains appendices summarizing the results of analyses conducted in preparation of the plan. These analyses include compilations of relevant statutes and existing Federal programs; strategies designed to expand the use of photovoltaics abroad; information on the domestic photovoltaic plan and its impact on the proposed international plan; perspectives on foreign competition; industry views on the international photovoltaic market and ideas about how US government actions could affect this market; international financing issues; and information on issues affecting foreign policy and developing countries.

  3. Review of the ATLAS B0 model coil test program

    CERN Document Server

    Dolgetta, N; Acerbi, E; Berriaud, C; Boxman, H; Broggi, F; Cataneo, F; Daël, A; Delruelle, N; Dudarev, A; Foussat, A; Haug, F; ten Kate, H H J; Mayri, C; Paccalini, A; Pengo, R; Rivoltella, G; Sbrissa, E

    2004-01-01

    The ATLAS B0 model coil has been extensively tested, reproducing the operational conditions of the final ATLAS Barrel Toroid coils. Two test campaigns have taken place on B0, at the CERN facility where the individual BT coils are about to be tested. The first campaign aimed to test the cool-down, warm-up phases and to commission the coil up to its nominal current of 20.5 kA, reproducing Lorentz forces similar to the ones on the BT coil. The second campaign aimed to evaluate the margins above the nominal conditions. The B0 was tested up to 24 kA and specific tests were performed to assess: the coil temperature margin with respect to the design value, the performance of the double pancake internal joints, static and dynamic heat loads, behavior of the coil under quench conditions. The paper reviews the overall test program with emphasis on second campaign results not covered before. 10 Refs.

  4. 2017 ARL Summer Student Program. Volume 1: Symposium Presentations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    ARL-SR-0387 ● DEC 2017 US Army Research Laboratory 2017 ARL Summer Student Program , Volume I: Symposium Presentations...Student Program , Volume I: Symposium Presentations Compiled by Rose Pesce-Rodriguez Approved for public release...REPORT TYPE Special Report 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) April–August 2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 2017 ARL Summer Student Program , Volume I

  5. Gyri of the human parietal lobe: Volumes, spatial extents, automatic labelling, and probabilistic atlases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather M Wild

    Full Text Available Accurately describing the anatomy of individual brains enables interlaboratory communication of functional and developmental studies and is crucial for possible surgical interventions. The human parietal lobe participates in multimodal sensory integration including language processing and also contains the primary somatosensory area. We describe detailed protocols to subdivide the parietal lobe, analyze morphological and volumetric characteristics, and create probabilistic atlases in MNI152 stereotaxic space. The parietal lobe was manually delineated on 3D T1 MR images of 30 healthy subjects and divided into four regions: supramarginal gyrus (SMG, angular gyrus (AG, superior parietal lobe (supPL and postcentral gyrus (postCG. There was the expected correlation of male gender with larger brain and intracranial volume. We examined a wide range of anatomical features of the gyri and the sulci separating them. At least a rudimentary primary intermediate sulcus of Jensen (PISJ separating SMG and AG was identified in nearly all (59/60 hemispheres. Presence of additional gyri in SMG and AG was related to sulcal features and volumetric characteristics. The parietal lobe was slightly (2% larger on the left, driven by leftward asymmetries of the postCG and SMG. Intersubject variability was highest for SMG and AG, and lowest for postCG. Overall the morphological characteristics tended to be symmetrical, and volumes also tended to covary between hemispheres. This may reflect developmental as well as maturation factors. To assess the accuracy with which the labels can be used to segment newly acquired (unlabelled T1-weighted brain images, we applied multi-atlas label propagation software (MAPER in a leave-one-out experiment and compared the resulting automatic labels with the manually prepared ones. The results showed strong agreement (mean Jaccard index 0.69, corresponding to a mean Dice index of 0.82, average mean volume error of 0.6%. Stereotaxic

  6. ATLAS

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — ATLAS is a particle physics experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research. Scientists from Brookhaven have played...

  7. Virtual Visit to the ATLAS Control Room by QuarkNet program in Portland

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    The LHC fellows of the U.S. QuarkNet program will hold a workshop "Real LHC Data for the Classroom" for teachers using elements of the ATLAS masterclass on July 13, 2013. The workshop is part of the Summer 2013 Meeting of the American Association of Physics Teachers. In the workshop, teachers are introduced to particle physics, the ATLAS experiment, and ways to use actual data from the Large Hadron Collider at CERN to help their students understand fundamental physics. One of the highlights of this one-day workshop is an ATLAS Virtual Visit, in which the teachers connect by videoconference with the ATLAS control room. In the videoconferecne, the participants will be able to to ask questions of and have discussions with an ATLAS physicist.

  8. Highway Safety Program Manual: Volume 3: Motorcycle Safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    Volume 3 of the 19-volume Highway Safety Program Manual (which provides guidance to State and local governments on preferred highway safety practices) concentrates on aspects of motorcycle safety. The purpose and specific objectives of a State motorcycle safety program are outlined. Federal authority in the highway safety area and general policies…

  9. NODC Standard Product: International ocean atlas Volume 12 - Climatic atlas of the North Pacific Seas 2009 (NODC Accession 0098576)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This Atlas contains monthly climatic charts of temperature, salinity, and oxygen at the sea surface and at standard depth levels for the Bering Sea, Sea of Okhotsk,...

  10. Precipitation Frequency for Woleai, Pacific Islands - NOAA Atlas 14 Volume 5

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This GIS grid atlas contains precipitation frequency estimates for the Pacific Islands that are based on precipitation data. This atlas is a new release from the NWS...

  11. Precipitation Frequency for Pingelap, Pacific Islands - NOAA Atlas 14 Volume 5

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This GIS grid atlas contains precipitation frequency estimates for the Pacific Islands that are based on precipitation data. This atlas is a new release from the NWS...

  12. Precipitation Frequency for Nukuoro, Pacific Islands - NOAA Atlas 14 Volume 5

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This GIS grid atlas contains precipitation frequency estimates for the Pacific Islands that are based on precipitation data. This atlas is a new release from the NWS...

  13. Precipitation Frequency for Ulithi, Pacific Islands - NOAA Atlas 14 Volume 5

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This GIS grid atlas contains precipitation frequency estimates for the Pacific Islands that are based on precipitation data. This atlas is a new release from the NWS...

  14. Precipitation Frequency for Guam, Pacific Islands - NOAA Atlas 14 Volume 5

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This GIS grid atlas contains precipitation frequency estimates for the Pacific Islands that are based on precipitation data. This atlas is a new release from the NWS...

  15. Precipitation Frequency for American Samoa, Pacific Islands - NOAA Atlas 14 Volume 5

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This GIS grid atlas contains precipitation frequency estimates for the Pacific Islands that are based on precipitation data. This atlas is a new release from the NWS...

  16. Precipitation Frequency for Northeastern states, USA - NOAA Atlas 14 Volume 10

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This GIS grid atlas contains precipitation frequency estimates for the Northeastern states based on precipitation data collected between 1816-2014. This atlas...

  17. Precipitation Frequency for Republic of the Marshall Islands, Pacific Islands - NOAA Atlas 14 Volume 5

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This GIS grid atlas contains precipitation frequency estimates for the Pacific Islands that are based on precipitation data. This atlas is a new release from the NWS...

  18. Precipitation Frequency for Semiarid Southwest, USA - NOAA Atlas 14 Volume 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This GIS grid atlas contains precipitation frequency estimates for the Semiarid Southwest based on precipitation data collected between 1893-2000. This atlas is an...

  19. Precipitation Frequency for Wake Island, Pacific Islands - NOAA Atlas 14 Volume 5

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This GIS grid atlas contains precipitation frequency estimates for the Pacific Islands that are based on precipitation data. This atlas is a new release from the NWS...

  20. Precipitation Frequency for Yap, Pacific Islands - NOAA Atlas 14 Volume 5

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This GIS grid atlas contains precipitation frequency estimates for the Pacific Islands that are based on precipitation data. This atlas is a new release from the NWS...

  1. Precipitation Frequency for Palau, Pacific Islands - NOAA Atlas 14 Volume 5

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This GIS grid atlas contains precipitation frequency estimates for the Pacific Islands that are based on precipitation data. This atlas is a new release from the NWS...

  2. Precipitation Frequency for Northern Mariana Islands, Pacific Islands - NOAA Atlas 14 Volume 5

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This GIS grid atlas contains precipitation frequency estimates for the Pacific Islands that are based on precipitation data. This atlas is a new release from the NWS...

  3. Precipitation Frequency for Chuuk, Pacific Islands - NOAA Atlas 14 Volume 5

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This GIS grid atlas contains precipitation frequency estimates for the Pacific Islands that are based on precipitation data. This atlas is a new release from the NWS...

  4. CIRMIS Data system. Volume 2. Program listings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedrichs, D.R.

    1980-01-01

    The Assessment of Effectiveness of Geologic Isolation Systems (AEGIS) Program is developing and applying the methodology for assessing the far-field, long-term post-closure safety of deep geologic nuclear waste repositories. AEGIS is being performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) under contract with the Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation (OWNI) for the Department of Energy (DOE). One task within AEGIS is the development of methodology for analysis of the consequences (water pathway) from loss of repository containment as defined by various release scenarios. Analysis of the long-term, far-field consequences of release scenarios requires the application of numerical codes which simulate the hydrologic systems, model the transport of released radionuclides through the hydrologic systems, model the transport of released radionuclides through the hydrologic systems to the biosphere, and, where applicable, assess the radiological dose to humans. The various input parameters required in the analysis are compiled in data systems. The data are organized and prepared by various input subroutines for utilization by the hydraulic and transport codes. The hydrologic models simulate the groundwater flow systems and provide water flow directions, rates, and velocities as inputs to the transport models. Outputs from the transport models are basically graphs of radionuclide concentration in the groundwater plotted against time. After dilution in the receiving surface-water body (e.g., lake, river, bay), these data are the input source terms for the dose models, if dose assessments are required.The dose models calculate radiation dose to individuals and populations. CIRMIS (Comprehensive Information Retrieval and Model Input Sequence) Data System is a storage and retrieval system for model input and output data, including graphical interpretation and display. This is the second of four volumes of the description of the CIRMIS Data System.

  5. ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    Akhnazarov, V; Canepa, A; Bremer, J; Burckhart, H; Cattai, A; Voss, R; Hervas, L; Kaplon, J; Nessi, M; Werner, P; Ten kate, H; Tyrvainen, H; Vandelli, W; Krasznahorkay, A; Gray, H; Alvarez gonzalez, B; Eifert, T F; Rolando, G; Oide, H; Barak, L; Glatzer, J; Backhaus, M; Schaefer, D M; Maciejewski, J P; Milic, A; Jin, S; Von torne, E; Limbach, C; Medinnis, M J; Gregor, I; Levonian, S; Schmitt, S; Waananen, A; Monnier, E; Muanza, S G; Pralavorio, P; Talby, M; Tiouchichine, E; Tocut, V M; Rybkin, G; Wang, S; Lacour, D; Laforge, B; Ocariz, J H; Bertoli, W; Malaescu, B; Sbarra, C; Yamamoto, A; Sasaki, O; Koriki, T; Hara, K; Da silva gomes, A; Carvalho maneira, J; Marcalo da palma, A; Chekulaev, S; Tikhomirov, V; Snesarev, A; Buzykaev, A; Maslennikov, A; Peleganchuk, S; Sukharev, A; Kaplan, B E; Swiatlowski, M J; Nef, P D; Schnoor, U; Oakham, G F; Ueno, R; Orr, R S; Abouzeid, O; Haug, S; Peng, H; Kus, V; Vitek, M; Temming, K K; Dang, N P; Meier, K; Schultz-coulon, H; Geisler, M P; Sander, H; Schaefer, U; Ellinghaus, F; Rieke, S; Nussbaumer, A; Liu, Y; Richter, R; Kortner, S; Fernandez-bosman, M; Ullan comes, M; Espinal curull, J; Chiriotti alvarez, S; Caubet serrabou, M; Valladolid gallego, E; Kaci, M; Carrasco vela, N; Lancon, E C; Besson, N E; Gautard, V; Bracinik, J; Bartsch, V C; Potter, C J; Lester, C G; Moeller, V A; Rosten, J; Crooks, D; Mathieson, K; Houston, S C; Wright, M; Jones, T W; Harris, O B; Byatt, T J; Dobson, E; Hodgson, P; Hodgkinson, M C; Dris, M; Karakostas, K; Ntekas, K; Oren, D; Duchovni, E; Etzion, E; Oren, Y; Ferrer, L M; Testa, M; Doria, A; Merola, L; Sekhniaidze, G; Giordano, R; Ricciardi, S; Milazzo, A; Falciano, S; De pedis, D; Dionisi, C; Veneziano, S; Cardarelli, R; Verzegnassi, C; Soualah, R; Ochi, A; Ohshima, T; Kishiki, S; Linde, F L; Vreeswijk, M; Werneke, P; Muijs, A; Vankov, P H; Jansweijer, P P M; Dale, O; Lund, E; Bruckman de renstrom, P; Dabrowski, W; Adamek, J D; Wolters, H; Micu, L; Pantea, D; Tudorache, V; Mjoernmark, J; Klimek, P J; Ferrari, A; Abdinov, O; Akhoundov, A; Hashimov, R; Shelkov, G; Khubua, J; Ladygin, E; Lazarev, A; Glagolev, V; Dedovich, D; Lykasov, G; Zhemchugov, A; Zolnikov, Y; Ryabenko, M; Sivoklokov, S; Vasilyev, I; Shalimov, A; Lobanov, M; Paramoshkina, E; Mosidze, M; Bingul, A; Nodulman, L J; Guarino, V J; Yoshida, R; Drake, G R; Calafiura, P; Haber, C; Quarrie, D R; Alonso, J R; Anderson, C; Evans, H; Lammers, S W; Baubock, M; Anderson, K; Petti, R; Suhr, C A; Linnemann, J T; Richards, R A; Tollefson, K A; Holzbauer, J L; Stoker, D P; Pier, S; Nelson, A J; Isakov, V; Martin, A J; Adelman, J A; Paganini, M; Gutierrez, P; Snow, J M; Pearson, B L; Cleland, W E; Savinov, V; Wong, W; Goodson, J J; Li, H; Lacey, R A; Gordeev, A; Gordon, H; Lanni, F; Nevski, P; Rescia, S; Kierstead, J A; Liu, Z; Yu, W W H; Bensinger, J; Hashemi, K S; Bogavac, D; Cindro, V; Hoeferkamp, M R; Coelli, S; Iodice, M; Piegaia, R N; Alonso, F; Wahlberg, H P; Barberio, E L; Limosani, A; Rodd, N L; Jennens, D T; Hill, E C; Pospisil, S; Smolek, K; Schaile, D A; Rauscher, F G; Adomeit, S; Mattig, P M; Wahlen, H; Volkmer, F; Calvente lopez, S; Sanchis peris, E J; Pallin, D; Podlyski, F; Says, L; Boumediene, D E; Scott, W; Phillips, P W; Greenall, A; Turner, P; Gwilliam, C B; Kluge, T; Wrona, B; Sellers, G J; Millward, G; Adragna, P; Hartin, A; Alpigiani, C; Piccaro, E; Bret cano, M; Hughes jones, R E; Mercer, D; Oh, A; Chavda, V S; Carminati, L; Cavasinni, V; Fedin, O; Patrichev, S; Ryabov, Y; Nesterov, S; Grebenyuk, O; Sasso, J; Mahmood, H; Polsdofer, E; Dai, T; Ferretti, C; Liu, H; Hegazy, K H; Benjamin, D P; Zobernig, G; Ban, J; Brooijmans, G H; Keener, P; Williams, H H; Le geyt, B C; Hines, E J; Fadeyev, V; Schumm, B A; Law, A T; Kuhl, A D; Neubauer, M S; Shang, R; Gagliardi, G; Calabro, D; Conta, C; Zinna, M; Jones, G; Li, J; Stradling, A R; Hadavand, H K; Mcguigan, P; Chiu, P; Baldelomar, E; Stroynowski, R A; Kehoe, R L; De groot, N; Timmermans, C; Lach-heb, F; Addy, T N; Nakano, I; Moreno lopez, D; Grosse-knetter, J; Tyson, B; Rude, G D; Tafirout, R; Benoit, P; Danielsson, H O; Elsing, M; Fassnacht, P; Froidevaux, D; Ganis, G; Gorini, B; Lasseur, C; Lehmann miotto, G; Kollar, D; Aleksa, M; Sfyrla, A; Duehrssen-debling, K; Fressard-batraneanu, S; Van der ster, D C; Bortolin, C; Schumacher, J; Mentink, M; Geich-gimbel, C; Yau wong, K H; Lafaye, R; Crepe-renaudin, S; Albrand, S; Hoffmann, D; Pangaud, P; Meessen, C; Hrivnac, J; Vernay, E; Perus, A; Henrot versille, S L; Le dortz, O; Derue, F; Piccinini, M; Polini, A; Terada, S; Arai, Y; Ikeno, M; Fujii, H; Nagano, K; Ukegawa, F; Aguilar saavedra, J A; Conde muino, P; Castro, N F; Eremin, V; Kopytine, M; Sulin, V; Tsukerman, I; Korol, A; Nemethy, P; Bartoldus, R; Glatte, A; Chelsky, S; Van nieuwkoop, J; Bellerive, A; Sinervo, J K; Battaglia, A; Barbier, G J; Pohl, M; Rosselet, L; Alexandre, G B; Prokoshin, F; Pezoa rivera, R A; Batkova, L; Kladiva, E; Stastny, J; Kubes, T; Vidlakova, Z; Esch, H; Homann, M; Herten, L G; Zimmermann, S U; Pfeifer, B; Stenzel, H; Andrei, G V; Wessels, M; Buescher, V; Kleinknecht, K; Fiedler, F M; Schroeder, C D; Fernandez, E; Mir martinez, L; Vorwerk, V; Bernabeu verdu, J; Salt, J; Civera navarrete, J V; Bernard, R; Berriaud, C P; Chevalier, L P; Hubbard, R; Schune, P; Nikolopoulos, K; Batley, J R; Brochu, F M; Phillips, A W; Teixeira-dias, P J; Rose, M B D; Buttar, C; Buckley, A G; Nurse, E L; Larner, A B; Boddy, C; Henderson, J; Costanzo, D; Tarem, S; Maccarrone, G; Laurelli, P F; Alviggi, M; Chiaramonte, R; Izzo, V; Palumbo, V; Fraternali, M; Crosetti, G; Marchese, F; Yamaguchi, Y; Hessey, N P; Mechnich, J M; Liebig, W; Kastanas, K A; Sjursen, T B; Zalieckas, J; Cameron, D G; Banka, P; Kowalewska, A B; Dwuznik, M; Mindur, B; Boldea, V; Hedberg, V; Smirnova, O; Sellden, B; Allahverdiyev, T; Gornushkin, Y; Koultchitski, I; Tokmenin, V; Chizhov, M; Gongadze, A; Khramov, E; Sadykov, R; Krasnoslobodtsev, I; Smirnova, L; Kramarenko, V; Minaenko, A; Zenin, O; Beddall, A J; Ozcan, E V; Hou, S; Wang, S; Moyse, E; Willocq, S; Chekanov, S; Le compte, T J; Love, J R; Ciocio, A; Hinchliffe, I; Tsulaia, V; Gomez, A; Luehring, F; Zieminska, D; Huth, J E; Gonski, J L; Oreglia, M; Tang, F; Shochet, M J; Costin, T; Mcleod, A; Uzunyan, S; Martin, S P; Pope, B G; Schwienhorst, R H; Brau, J E; Ptacek, E S; Milburn, R H; Sabancilar, E; Lauer, R; Saleem, M; Mohamed meera lebbai, M R; Lou, X; Reeves, K B; Rijssenbeek, M; Novakova, P N; Rahm, D; Steinberg, P A; Wenaus, T J; Paige, F; Ye, S; Kotcher, J R; Assamagan, K A; Oliveira damazio, D; Maeno, T; Henry, A; Dushkin, A; Costa, G; Meroni, C; Resconi, S; Lari, T; Biglietti, M; Lohse, T; Gonzalez silva, M L; Monticelli, F G; Saavedra, A F; Patel, N D; Ciodaro xavier, T; Asevedo nepomuceno, A; Lefebvre, M; Albert, J E; Kubik, P; Faltova, J; Turecek, D; Solc, J; Schaile, O; Ebke, J; Losel, P J; Zeitnitz, C; Sturm, P D; Barreiro alonso, F; Modesto alapont, P; Soret medel, J; Garzon alama, E J; Gee, C N; Mccubbin, N A; Sankey, D; Emeliyanov, D; Dewhurst, A L; Houlden, M A; Klein, M; Burdin, S; Lehan, A K; Eisenhandler, E; Lloyd, S; Traynor, D P; Ibbotson, M; Marshall, R; Pater, J; Freestone, J; Masik, J; Haughton, I; Manousakis katsikakis, A; Sampsonidis, D; Krepouri, A; Roda, C; Sarri, F; Fukunaga, C; Nadtochiy, A; Kara, S O; Timm, S; Alam, S M; Rashid, T; Goldfarb, S; Espahbodi, S; Marley, D E; Rau, A W; Dos anjos, A R; Haque, S; Grau, N C; Havener, L B; Thomson, E J; Newcomer, F M; Hansl-kozanecki, G; Deberg, H A; Takeshita, T; Goggi, V; Ennis, J S; Olness, F I; Kama, S; Ordonez sanz, G; Koetsveld, F; Elamri, M; Mansoor-ul-islam, S; Lemmer, B; Kawamura, G; Bindi, M; Schulte, S; Kugel, A; Kretz, M P; Kurchaninov, L; Blanchot, G; Chromek-burckhart, D; Di girolamo, B; Francis, D; Gianotti, F; Nordberg, M Y; Pernegger, H; Roe, S; Boyd, J; Wilkens, H G; Pauly, T; Fabre, C; Tricoli, A; Bertet, D; Ruiz martinez, M A; Arnaez, O L; Lenzi, B; Boveia, A J; Gillberg, D I; Davies, J M; Zimmermann, R; Uhlenbrock, M; Kraus, J K; Narayan, R T; John, A; Dam, M; Padilla aranda, C; Bellachia, F; Le flour chollet, F M; Jezequel, S; Dumont dayot, N; Fede, E; Mathieu, M; Gensolen, F D; Alio, L; Arnault, C; Bouchel, M; Ducorps, A; Kado, M M; Lounis, A; Zhang, Z P; De vivie de regie, J; Beau, T; Bruni, A; Bruni, G; Grafstrom, P; Romano, M; Lasagni manghi, F; Massa, L; Shaw, K; Ikegami, Y; Tsuno, S; Kawanishi, Y; Benincasa, G; Blagov, M; Fedorchuk, R; Shatalov, P; Romaniouk, A; Belotskiy, K; Timoshenko, S; Hooft van huysduynen, L; Lewis, G H; Wittgen, M M; Mader, W F; Rudolph, C J; Gumpert, C; Mamuzic, J; Rudolph, G; Schmid, P; Corriveau, F; Belanger-champagne, C; Yarkoni, S; Leroy, C; Koffas, T; Harack, B D; Weber, M S; Beck, H; Leger, A; Gonzalez sevilla, S; Zhu, Y; Gao, J; Zhang, X; Blazek, T; Rames, J; Sicho, P; Kouba, T; Sluka, T; Lysak, R; Ristic, B; Kompatscher, A E; Von radziewski, H; Groll, M; Meyer, C P; Oberlack, H; Stonjek, S M; Cortiana, G; Werthenbach, U; Ibragimov, I; Czirr, H S; Cavalli-sforza, M; Puigdengoles olive, C; Tallada crespi, P; Marti i garcia, S; Gonzalez de la hoz, S; Guyot, C; Meyer, J; Schoeffel, L O; Garvey, J; Hawkes, C; Hillier, S J; Staley, R J; Salvatore, P F; Santoyo castillo, I; Carter, J; Yusuff, I B; Barlow, N R; Berry, T S; Savage, G; Wraight, K G; Steele, G E; Hughes, G; Walder, J W; Love, P A; Crone, G J; Waugh, B M; Boeser, S; Sarkar, A M; Holmes, A; Massey, R; Pinder, A; Nicholson, R; Korolkova, E; Katsoufis, I; Maltezos, S; Tsipolitis, G; Leontsinis, S; Levinson, L J; Shoa, M; Abramowicz, H E; Bella, G; Gershon, A; Urkovsky, E; Taiblum, N; Gatti, C; Della pietra, M; Lanza, A; Negri, A; Flaminio, V; Lacava, F; Petrolo, E; Pontecorvo, L; Rosati, S; Zanello, L; Pasqualucci, E; Di ciaccio, A; Giordani, M; Yamazaki, Y; Jinno, T; Nomachi, M; De jong, P J; Ferrari, P; Homma, J; Van der graaf, H; Igonkina, O B; Stugu, B S; Buanes, T; Pedersen, M; Turala, M; Olszewski, A J; Koperny, S Z; Onofre, A; Castro nunes fiolhais, M; Alexa, C; Cuciuc, C M; Akesson, T P A; Hellman, S L; Milstead, D A; Bondyakov, A; Pushnova, V; Budagov, Y; Minashvili, I; Romanov, V; Sniatkov, V; Tskhadadze, E; Kalinovskaya, L; Shalyugin, A; Tavkhelidze, A; Rumyantsev, L; Karpov, S; Soloshenko, A; Vostrikov, A; Borissov, E; Solodkov, A; Vorob'ev, A; Sidorov, S; Malyaev, V; Lee, S; Grudzinski, J J; Virzi, J S; Vahsen, S E; Lys, J; Penwell, J W; Yan, Z; Bernard, C S; Barreiro guimaraes da costa, J P; Oliver, J N; Merritt, F S; Brubaker, E M; Kapliy, A; Kim, J; Zutshi, V V; Burghgrave, B O; Abolins, M A; Arabidze, G; Caughron, S A; Frey, R E; Radloff, P T; Schernau, M; Murillo garcia, R; Porter, R A; Mccormick, C A; Karn, P J; Sliwa, K J; Demers konezny, S M; Strauss, M G; Mueller, J A; Izen, J M; Klimentov, A; Lynn, D; Polychronakos, V; Radeka, V; Sondericker, J I I I; Bathe, S; Duffin, S; Chen, H; De castro faria salgado, P E; Kersevan, B P; Lacker, H M; Schulz, H; Kubota, T; Tan, K G; Yabsley, B D; Nunes de moura junior, N; Pinfold, J; Soluk, R A; Ouellette, E A; Leitner, R; Sykora, T; Solar, M; Sartisohn, G; Hirschbuehl, D; Huning, D; Fischer, J; Terron cuadrado, J; Glasman kuguel, C B; Lacasta llacer, C; Lopez-amengual, J; Calvet, D; Chevaleyre, J; Daudon, F; Montarou, G; Guicheney, C; Calvet, S P J; Tyndel, M; Dervan, P J; Maxfield, S J; Hayward, H S; Beck, G; Cox, B; Da via, C; Paschalias, P; Manolopoulou, M; Ragusa, F; Cimino, D; Ezzi, M; Fiuza de barros, N F; Yildiz, H; Ciftci, A K; Turkoz, S; Zain, S B; Tegenfeldt, F; Chapman, J W; Panikashvili, N; Bocci, A; Altheimer, A D; Martin, F F; Fratina, S; Jackson, B D; Grillo, A A; Seiden, A; Watts, G T; Mangiameli, S; Johns, K A; O'grady, F T; Errede, D R; Darbo, G; Ferretto parodi, A; Leahu, M C; Farbin, A; Ye, J; Liu, T; Wijnen, T A; Naito, D; Takashima, R; Sandoval usme, C E; Zinonos, Z; Moreno llacer, M; Agricola, J B; Mcgovern, S A; Sakurai, Y; Trigger, I M; Qing, D; De silva, A S; Butin, F; Dell'acqua, A; Hawkings, R J; Lamanna, M; Mapelli, L; Passardi, G; Rembser, C; Tremblet, L; Andreazza, W; Dobos, D A; Koblitz, B; Bianco, M; Dimitrov, G V; Schlenker, S; Armbruster, A J; Rammensee, M C; Romao rodrigues, L F; Peters, K; Pozo astigarraga, M E; Yi, Y; Desch, K K; Huegging, F G; Muller, K K; Stillings, J A; Schaetzel, S; Xella, S; Hansen, J D; Colas, J; Daguin, G; Wingerter, I; Ionescu, G D; Ledroit, F; Lucotte, A; Clement, B E; Stark, J; Clemens, J; Djama, F; Knoops, E; Coadou, Y; Vigeolas-choury, E; Feligioni, L; Iconomidou-fayard, L; Imbert, P; Schaffer, A C; Nikolic, I; Trincaz-duvoid, S; Warin, P; Camard, A F; Ridel, M; Pires, S; Giacobbe, B; Spighi, R; Villa, M; Negrini, M; Sato, K; Gavrilenko, I; Akimov, A; Khovanskiy, V; Talyshev, A; Voronkov, A; Hakobyan, H; Mallik, U; Shibata, A; Konoplich, R; Barklow, T L; Koi, T; Straessner, A; Stelzer, B; Robertson, S H; Vachon, B; Stoebe, M; Keyes, R A; Wang, K; Billoud, T R V; Strickland, V; Batygov, M; Krieger, P; Palacino caviedes, G D; Gay, C W; Jiang, Y; Han, L; Liu, M; Zenis, T; Lokajicek, M; Staroba, P; Tasevsky, M; Popule, J; Svatos, M; Seifert, F; Landgraf, U; Lai, S T; Schmitt, K H; Achenbach, R; Schuh, N; Kiesling, C; Macchiolo, A; Nisius, R; Schacht, P; Von der schmitt, J G; Kortner, O; Atlay, N B; Segura sole, E; Grinstein, S; Neissner, C; Bruckner, D M; Oliver garcia, E; Boonekamp, M; Perrin, P; Gaillot, F M; Wilson, J A; Thomas, J P; Thompson, P D; Palmer, J D; Falk, I E; Chavez barajas, C A; Sutton, M R; Robinson, D; Kaneti, S A; Wu, T; Robson, A; Shaw, C; Buzatu, A; Qin, G; Jones, R; Bouhova-thacker, E V; Viehhauser, G; Weidberg, A R; Gilbert, L; Johansson, P D C; Orphanides, M; Vlachos, S; Behar harpaz, S; Papish, O; Lellouch, D J H; Turgeman, D; Benary, O; La rotonda, L; Vena, R; Tarasio, A; Marzano, F; Gabrielli, A; Di stante, L; Liberti, B; Aielli, G; Oda, S; Nozaki, M; Takeda, H; Hayakawa, T; Miyazaki, K; Maeda, J; Sugimoto, T; Pettersson, N E; Bentvelsen, S; Groenstege, H L; Lipniacka, A; Vahabi, M; Ould-saada, F; Chwastowski, J J; Hajduk, Z; Kaczmarska, A; Olszowska, J B; Trzupek, A; Staszewski, R P; Palka, M; Constantinescu, S; Jarlskog, G; Lundberg, B L A; Pearce, M; Ellert, M F; Bannikov, A; Fechtchenko, A; Iambourenko, V; Kukhtin, V; Pozdniakov, V; Topilin, N; Vorozhtsov, S; Khassanov, A; Fliaguine, V; Kharchenko, D; Nikolaev, K; Kotenov, K; Kozhin, A; Zenin, A; Ivashin, A; Golubkov, D; Beddall, A; Su, D; Dallapiccola, C J; Cranshaw, J M; Price, L; Stanek, R W; Gieraltowski, G; Zhang, J; Gilchriese, M; Shapiro, M; Ahlen, S; Morii, M; Taylor, F E; Miller, R J; Phillips, F H; Torrence, E C; Wheeler, S J; Benedict, B H; Napier, A; Hamilton, S F; Petrescu, T A; Boyd, G R J; Jayasinghe, A L; Smith, J M; Mc carthy, R L; Adams, D L; Le vine, M J; Zhao, X; Patwa, A M; Baker, M; Kirsch, L; Krstic, J; Simic, L; Filipcic, A; Seidel, S C; Cantore-cavalli, D; Baroncelli, A; Kind, O M; Scarcella, M J; Maidantchik, C L L; Seixas, J; Balabram filho, L E; Vorobel, V; Spousta, M; Strachota, P; Vokac, P; Slavicek, T; Bergmann, B L; Biebel, O; Kersten, S; Srinivasan, M; Trefzger, T; Vazeille, F; Insa, C; Kirk, J; Middleton, R; Burke, S; Klein, U; Morris, J D; Ellis, K V; Millward, L R; Giokaris, N; Ioannou, P; Angelidakis, S; Bouzakis, K; Andreazza, A; Perini, L; Chtcheguelski, V; Spiridenkov, E; Yilmaz, M; Kaya, U; Ernst, J; Mahmood, A; Saland, J; Kutnink, T; Holler, J; Kagan, H P; Wang, C; Pan, Y; Xu, N; Ji, H; Willis, W J; Tuts, P M; Litke, A; Wilder, M; Rothberg, J; Twomey, M S; Rizatdinova, F; Loch, P; Rutherfoord, J P; Varnes, E W; Barberis, D; Osculati-becchi, B; Brandt, A G; Turvey, A J; Benchekroun, D; Nagasaka, Y; Thanakornworakij, T; Quadt, A; Nadal serrano, J; Magradze, E; Nackenhorst, O; Musheghyan, H; Kareem, M; Chytka, L; Perez codina, E; Stelzer-chilton, O; Brunel, B; Henriques correia, A M; Dittus, F; Hatch, M; Haug, F; Hauschild, M; Huhtinen, M; Lichard, P; Schuh-erhard, S; Spigo, G; Avolio, G; Tsarouchas, C; Ahmad, I; Backes, M P; Barisits, M; Gadatsch, S; Cerv, M; Sicoe, A D; Nattamai sekar, L P; Fazio, D; Shan, L; Sun, X; Gaycken, G F; Hemperek, T; Petersen, T C; Alonso diaz, A; Moynot, M; Werlen, M; Hryn'ova, T; Gallin-martel, M; Wu, M; Touchard, F; Menouni, M; Fougeron, D; Le guirriec, E; Chollet, J C; Veillet, J; Barrillon, P; Prat, S; Krasny, M W; Roos, L; Boudarham, G; Lefebvre, G; Boscherini, D; Valentinetti, S; Acharya, B S; Miglioranzi, S; Kanzaki, J; Unno, Y; Yasu, Y; Iwasaki, H; Tokushuku, K; Maio, A; Rodrigues fernandes, B J; Pinto figueiredo raimundo ribeiro, N M; Bot, A; Shmeleva, A; Zaidan, R; Djilkibaev, R; Mincer, A I; Salnikov, A; Aracena, I A; Schwartzman, A G; Silverstein, D J; Fulsom, B G; Anulli, F; Kuhn, D; White, M J; Vetterli, M J; Stockton, M C; Mantifel, R L; Azuelos, G; Shoaleh saadi, D; Savard, P; Clark, A; Ferrere, D; Gaumer, O P; Diaz gutierrez, M A; Liu, Y; Dubnickova, A; Sykora, I; Strizenec, P; Weichert, J; Zitek, K; Naumann, T; Goessling, C; Klingenberg, R; Jakobs, K; Rurikova, Z; Werner, M W; Arnold, H R; Buscher, D; Hanke, P; Stamen, R; Dietzsch, T A; Kiryunin, A; Salihagic, D; Buchholz, P; Pacheco pages, A; Sushkov, S; Porto fernandez, M D C; Cruz josa, R; Vos, M A; Schwindling, J; Ponsot, P; Charignon, C; Kivernyk, O; Goodrick, M J; Hill, J C; Green, B J; Quarman, C V; Bates, R L; Allwood-spiers, S E; Quilty, D; Chilingarov, A; Long, R E; Barton, A E; Konstantinidis, N; Simmons, B; Davison, A R; Christodoulou, V; Wastie, R L; Gallas, E J; Cox, J; Dehchar, M; Behr, J K; Pickering, M A; Filippas, A; Panagoulias, I; Tenenbaum katan, Y D; Roth, I; Pitt, M; Citron, Z H; Benhammou, Y; Amram, N Y N; Soffer, A; Gorodeisky, R; Antonelli, M; Chiarella, V; Curatolo, M; Esposito, B; Nicoletti, G; Martini, A; Sansoni, A; Carlino, G; Del prete, T; Bini, C; Vari, R; Kuna, M; Pinamonti, M; Itoh, Y; Colijn, A P; Klous, S; Garitaonandia elejabarrieta, H; Rosendahl, P L; Taga, A V; Malecki, P; Malecki, P; Wolter, M W; Kowalski, T; Korcyl, G M; Caprini, M; Caprini, I; Dita, P; Olariu, A; Tudorache, A; Lytken, E; Hidvegi, A; Aliyev, M; Alexeev, G; Bardin, D; Kakurin, S; Lebedev, A; Golubykh, S; Chepurnov, V; Gostkin, M; Kolesnikov, V; Karpova, Z; Davkov, K I; Yeletskikh, I; Grishkevich, Y; Rud, V; Myagkov, A; Nikolaenko, V; Starchenko, E; Zaytsev, A; Fakhrutdinov, R; Cheine, I; Istin, S; Sahin, S; Teng, P; Chu, M L; Trilling, G H; Heinemann, B; Richoz, N; Degeorge, C; Youssef, S; Pilcher, J; Cheng, Y; Purohit, M V; Kravchenko, A; Calkins, R E; Blazey, G; Hauser, R; Koll, J D; Reinsch, A; Brost, E C; Allen, B W; Lankford, A J; Ciobotaru, M D; Slagle, K J; Haffa, B; Mann, A; Loginov, A; Cummings, J T; Loyal, J D; Skubic, P L; Boudreau, J F; Lee, B E; Redlinger, G; Wlodek, T; Carcassi, G; Sexton, K A; Yu, D; Deng, W; Metcalfe, J E; Panitkin, S; Sijacki, D; Mikuz, M; Kramberger, G; Tartarelli, G F; Farilla, A; Stanescu, C; Herrberg, R; Alconada verzini, M J; Brennan, A J; Varvell, K; Marroquim, F; Gomes, A A; Do amaral coutinho, Y; Gingrich, D; Moore, R W; Dolejsi, J; Valkar, S; Broz, J; Jindra, T; Kohout, Z; Kral, V; Mann, A W; Calfayan, P P; Langer, T; Hamacher, K; Sanny, B; Wagner, W; Flick, T; Redelbach, A R; Ke, Y; Higon-rodriguez, E; Donini, J N; Lafarguette, P; Adye, T J; Baines, J; Barnett, B; Wickens, F J; Martin, V J; Jackson, J N; Prichard, P; Kretzschmar, J; Martin, A J; Walker, C J; Potter, K M; Kourkoumelis, C; Tzamarias, S; Houiris, A G; Iliadis, D; Fanti, M; Bertolucci, F; Maleev, V; Sultanov, S; Rosenberg, E I; Krumnack, N E; Bieganek, C; Diehl, E B; Mc kee, S P; Eppig, A P; Harper, D R; Liu, C; Schwarz, T A; Mazor, B; Looper, K A; Wiedenmann, W; Huang, P; Stahlman, J M; Battaglia, M; Nielsen, J A; Zhao, T; Khanov, A; Kaushik, V S; Vichou, E; Liss, A M; Gemme, C; Morettini, P; Parodi, F; Passaggio, S; Rossi, L; Kuzhir, P; Ignatenko, A; Ferrari, R; Spairani, M; Pianori, E; Sekula, S J; Firan, A I; Cao, T; Hetherly, J W; Gouighri, M; Vassilakopoulos, V; Long, M C; Shimojima, M; Sawyer, L H; Brummett, R E; Losada, M A; Schorlemmer, A L; Mantoani, M; Bawa, H S; Mornacchi, G; Nicquevert, B; Palestini, S; Stapnes, S; Veness, R; Kotamaki, M J; Sorde, C; Iengo, P; Campana, S; Goossens, L; Zajacova, Z; Pribyl, L; Poveda torres, J; Marzin, A; Conti, G; Carrillo montoya, G D; Kroseberg, J; Gonella, L; Velz, T; Schmitt, S; Lobodzinska, E M; Lovschall-jensen, A E; Galster, G; Perrot, G; Cailles, M; Berger, N; Barnovska, Z; Delsart, P; Lleres, A; Tisserant, S; Grivaz, J; Matricon, P; Bellagamba, L; Bertin, A; Bruschi, M; De castro, S; Semprini cesari, N; Fabbri, L; Rinaldi, L; Quayle, W B; Truong, T N L; Kondo, T; Haruyama, T; Ng, C; Do valle wemans, A; Almeida veloso, F M; Konovalov, S; Ziegler, J M; Su, D; Lukas, W; Prince, S; Ortega urrego, E J; Teuscher, R J; Knecht, N; Pretzl, K; Borer, C; Gadomski, S; Koch, B; Kuleshov, S; Brooks, W K; Antos, J; Kulkova, I; Chudoba, J; Chyla, J; Tomasek, L; Bazalova, M; Messmer, I; Tobias, J; Sundermann, J E; Kuehn, S S; Kluge, E; Scharf, V L; Barillari, T; Kluth, S; Menke, S; Weigell, P; Schwegler, P; Ziolkowski, M; Casado lechuga, P M; Garcia, C; Sanchez, J; Costa mezquita, M J; Valero biot, J A; Laporte, J; Nikolaidou, R; Virchaux, M; Nguyen, V T H; Charlton, D; Harrison, K; Slater, M W; Newman, P R; Parker, A M; Ward, P; Mcgarvie, S A; Kilvington, G J; D'auria, S; O'shea, V; Mcglone, H M; Fox, H; Henderson, R; Kartvelishvili, V; Davies, B; Sherwood, P; Fraser, J T; Lancaster, M A; Tseng, J C; Hays, C P; Apolle, R; Dixon, S D; Parker, K A; Gazis, E; Papadopoulou, T; Panagiotopoulou, E; Karastathis, N; Hershenhorn, A D; Milov, A; Groth-jensen, J; Bilokon, H; Miscetti, S; Canale, V; Rebuzzi, D M; Capua, M; Bagnaia, P; De salvo, A; Gentile, S; Safai tehrani, F; Solfaroli camillocci, E; Sasao, N; Tsunada, K; Massaro, G; Magrath, C A; Van kesteren, Z; Beker, M G; Van den wollenberg, W; Bugge, L; Buran, T; Read, A L; Gjelsten, B K; Banas, E A; Turnau, J; Derendarz, D K; Kisielewska, D; Chesneanu, D; Rotaru, M; Maurer, J B; Wong, M L; Lund-jensen, B; Asman, B; Jon-and, K B; Silverstein, S B; Johansen, M; Alexandrov, I; Iatsounenko, I; Krumshteyn, Z; Peshekhonov, V; Rybaltchenko, K; Samoylov, V; Cheplakov, A; Kekelidze, G; Lyablin, M; Teterine, V; Bednyakov, V; Kruchonak, U; Shiyakova, M M; Demichev, M; Denisov, S P; Fenyuk, A; Djobava, T; Salukvadze, G; Cetin, S A; Brau, B P; Pais, P R; Proudfoot, J; Van gemmeren, P; Zhang, Q; Beringer, J A; Ely, R; Leggett, C; Pengg, F X; Barnett, M R; Quick, R E; Williams, S; Gardner jr, R W; Huston, J; Brock, R; Wanotayaroj, C; Unel, G N; Taffard, A C; Frate, M; Baker, K O; Tipton, P L; Hutchison, A; Walsh, B J; Norberg, S R; Su, J; Tsybyshev, D; Caballero bejar, J; Ernst, M U; Wellenstein, H; Vudragovic, D; Vidic, I; Gorelov, I V; Toms, K; Alimonti, G; Petrucci, F; Kolanoski, H; Smith, J; Jeng, G; Watson, I J; Guimaraes ferreira, F; Miranda vieira xavier, F; Araujo pereira, R; Poffenberger, P; Sopko, V; Elmsheuser, J; Wittkowski, J; Glitza, K; Gorfine, G W; Ferrer soria, A; Fuster verdu, J A; Sanchis lozano, A; Reinmuth, G; Busato, E; Haywood, S J; Mcmahon, S J; Qian, W; Villani, E G; Laycock, P J; Poll, A J; Rizvi, E S; Foster, J M; Loebinger, F; Forti, A; Plano, W G; Brown, G J A; Kordas, K; Vegni, G; Ohsugi, T; Iwata, Y; Cherkaoui el moursli, R; Sahin, M; Akyazi, E; Carlsen, A; Kanwal, B; Cochran jr, J H; Aronnax, M V; Lockner, M J; Zhou, B; Levin, D S; Weaverdyck, C J; Grom, G F; Rudge, A; Ebenstein, W L; Jia, B; Yamaoka, J; Jared, R C; Wu, S L; Banerjee, S; Lu, Q; Hughes, E W; Alkire, S P; Degenhardt, J D; Lipeles, E D; Spencer, E N; Savine, A; Cheu, E C; Lampl, W; Veatch, J R; Roberts, K; Atkinson, M J; Odino, G A; Polesello, G; Martin, T; White, A P; Stephens, R; Grinbaum sarkisyan, E; Vartapetian, A; Yu, J; Sosebee, M; Thilagar, P A; Spurlock, B; Bonde, R; Filthaut, F; Klok, P; Hoummada, A; Ouchrif, M; Pellegrini, G; Rafi tatjer, J M; Navarro, G A; Blumenschein, U; Weingarten, J C; Mueller, D; Graber, L; Gao, Y; Bode, A; Capeans garrido, M D M; Carli, T; Wells, P; Beltramello, O; Vuillermet, R; Dudarev, A; Salzburger, A; Torchiani, C I; Serfon, C L G; Sloper, J E; Duperrier, G; Lilova, P T; Knecht, M O; Lassnig, M; Anders, G; Deviveiros, P; Young, C; Sforza, F; Shaochen, C; Lu, F; Wermes, N; Wienemann, P; Schwindt, T; Hansen, P H; Hansen, J B; Pingel, A M; Massol, N; Elles, S L; Hallewell, G D; Rozanov, A; Vacavant, L; Fournier, D A; Poggioli, L; Puzo, P M; Tanaka, R; Escalier, M A; Makovec, N; Rezynkina, K; De cecco, S; Cavalleri, P G; Massa, I; Zoccoli, A; Tanaka, S; Odaka, S; Mitsui, S; Tomasio pina, J A; Santos, H F; Satsounkevitch, I; Harkusha, S; Baranov, S; Nechaeva, P; Kayumov, F; Kazanin, V; Asai, M; Mount, R P; Nelson, T K; Smith, D; Kenney, C J; Malone, C M; Kobel, M; Friedrich, F; Grohs, J P; Jais, W J; O'neil, D C; Warburton, A T; Vincter, M; Mccarthy, T G; Groer, L S; Pham, Q T; Taylor, W J; La marra, D; Perrin, E; Wu, X; Bell, W H; Delitzsch, C M; Feng, C; Zhu, C; Tokar, S; Bruncko, D; Kupco, A; Marcisovsky, M; Jakoubek, T; Bruneliere, R; Aktas, A; Narrias villar, D I; Tapprogge, S; Mattmann, J; Kroha, H; Crespo, J; Korolkov, I; Cavallaro, E; Cabrera urban, S; Mitsou, V; Kozanecki, W; Mansoulie, B; Pabot, Y; Etienvre, A; Bauer, F; Chevallier, F; Bouty, A R; Watkins, P; Watson, A; Faulkner, P J W; Curtis, C J; Murillo quijada, J A; Grout, Z J; Chapman, J D; Cowan, G D; George, S; Boisvert, V; Mcmahon, T R; Doyle, A T; Thompson, S A; Britton, D; Smizanska, M; Campanelli, M; Butterworth, J M; Loken, J; Renton, P; Barr, A J; Issever, C; Short, D; Crispin ortuzar, M; Tovey, D R; French, R; Rozen, Y; Alexander, G; Kreisel, A; Conventi, F; Raulo, A; Schioppa, M; Susinno, G; Tassi, E; Giagu, S; Luci, C; Nisati, A; Cobal, M; Ishikawa, A; Jinnouchi, O; Bos, K; Verkerke, W; Vermeulen, J; Van vulpen, I B; Kieft, G; Mora, K D; Olsen, F; Rohne, O M; Pajchel, K; Nilsen, J K; Wosiek, B K; Wozniak, K W; Badescu, E; Jinaru, A; Bohm, C; Johansson, E K; Sjoelin, J B R; Clement, C; Buszello, C P; Huseynova, D; Boyko, I; Popov, B; Poukhov, O; Vinogradov, V; Tsiareshka, P; Skvorodnev, N; Soldatov, A; Chuguev, A; Gushchin, V; Yazici, E; Lutz, M S; Malon, D; Vanyashin, A; Lavrijsen, W; Spieler, H; Biesiada, J L; Bahr, M; Kong, J; Tatarkhanov, M; Ogren, H; Van kooten, R J; Cwetanski, P; Butler, J M; Shank, J T; Chakraborty, D; Ermoline, I; Sinev, N; Whiteson, D O; Corso radu, A; Huang, J; Werth, M P; Kastoryano, M; Meirose da silva costa, B; Namasivayam, H; Hobbs, J D; Schamberger jr, R D; Guo, F; Potekhin, M; Popovic, D; Gorisek, A; Sokhrannyi, G; Hofsajer, I W; Mandelli, L; Ceradini, F; Graziani, E; Giorgi, F; Zur nedden, M E G; Grancagnolo, S; Volpi, M; Nunes hanninger, G; Rados, P K; Milesi, M; Cuthbert, C J; Black, C W; Fink grael, F; Fincke-keeler, M; Keeler, R; Kowalewski, R V; Berghaus, F O; Qi, M; Davidek, T; Tas, P; Jakubek, J; Duckeck, G; Walker, R; Mitterer, C A; Harenberg, T; Sandvoss, S A; Del peso, J; Llorente merino, J; Gonzalez millan, V; Irles quiles, A; Crouau, M; Gris, P L Y; Liauzu, S; Romano saez, S M; Gallop, B J; Jones, T J; Austin, N C; Morris, J; Duerdoth, I; Thompson, R J; Kelly, M P; Leisos, A; Garas, A; Pizio, C; Venda pinto, B A; Kudin, L; Qian, J; Wilson, A W; Mietlicki, D; Long, J D; Sang, Z; Arms, K E; Rahimi, A M; Moss, J J; Oh, S H; Parker, S I; Parsons, J; Cunitz, H; Vanguri, R S; Sadrozinski, H; Lockman, W S; Martinez-mc kinney, G; Goussiou, A; Jones, A; Lie, K; Hasegawa, Y; Olcese, M; Gilewsky, V; Harrison, P F; Janus, M; Spangenberg, M; De, K; Ozturk, N; Pal, A K; Darmora, S; Bullock, D J; Oviawe, O; Derkaoui, J E; Rahal, G; Sircar, A; Frey, A S; Stolte, P; Rosien, N; Zoch, K; Li, L; Schouten, D W; Catinaccio, A; Ciapetti, M; Delruelle, N; Ellis, N; Farthouat, P; Hoecker, A; Klioutchnikova, T; Macina, D; Malyukov, S; Spiwoks, R D; Unal, G P; Vandoni, G; Petersen, B A; Pommes, K; Nairz, A M; Wengler, T; Mladenov, D; Solans sanchez, C A; Lantzsch, K; Schmieden, K; Jakobsen, S; Ritsch, E; Sciuccati, A; Alves dos santos, A M; Ouyang, Q; Zhou, M; Brock, I C; Janssen, J; Katzy, J; Anders, C F; Nilsson, B S; Bazan, A; Di ciaccio, L; Yildizkaya, T; Collot, J; Malek, F; Trocme, B S; Breugnon, P; Godiot, S; Adam bourdarios, C; Coulon, J; Duflot, L; Petroff, P G; Zerwas, D; Lieuvin, M; Calderini, G; Laporte, D; Ocariz, J; Gabrielli, A; Ohska, T K; Kurochkin, Y; Kantserov, V; Vasilyeva, L; Speransky, M; Smirnov, S; Antonov, A; Bulekov, O; Tikhonov, Y; Sargsyan, L; Vardanyan, G; Budick, B; Kocian, M L; Luitz, S; Young, C C; Grenier, P J; Kelsey, M; Black, J E; Kneringer, E; Jussel, P; Horton, A J; Beaudry, J; Chandra, A; Ereditato, A; Topfel, C M; Mathieu, R; Bucci, F; Muenstermann, D; White, R M; He, M; Urban, J; Straka, M; Vrba, V; Schumacher, M; Parzefall, U; Mahboubi, K; Sommer, P O; Koepke, L H; Bethke, S; Moser, H; Wiesmann, M; Walkowiak, W A; Fleck, I J; Martinez-perez, M; Sanchez sanchez, C A; Jorgensen roca, S; Accion garcia, E; Sainz ruiz, C A; Valls ferrer, J A; Amoros vicente, G; Vives torrescasana, R; Ouraou, A; Formica, A; Hassani, S; Watson, M F; Cottin buracchio, G F; Bussey, P J; Saxon, D; Ferrando, J E; Collins-tooth, C L; Hall, D C; Cuhadar donszelmann, T; Dawson, I; Duxfield, R; Argyropoulos, T; Brodet, E; Livneh, R; Shougaev, K; Reinherz, E I; Guttman, N; Beretta, M M; Vilucchi, E; Aloisio, A; Patricelli, S; Caprio, M; Cevenini, F; De vecchi, C; Livan, M; Rimoldi, A; Vercesi, V; Ayad, R; Mastroberardino, A; Ciapetti, G; Luminari, L; Rescigno, M; Santonico, R; Salamon, A; Del papa, C; Kurashige, H; Homma, Y; Tomoto, M; Horii, Y; Sugaya, Y; Hanagaki, K; Bobbink, G; Kluit, P M; Koffeman, E N; Van eijk, B; Lee, H; Eigen, G; Dorholt, O; Strandlie, A; Strzempek, P B; Dita, S; Stoicea, G; Chitan, A; Leven, S S; Moa, T; Brenner, R; Ekelof, T J C; Olshevskiy, A; Roumiantsev, V; Chlachidze, G; Zimine, N; Gusakov, Y; Grigalashvili, N; Mineev, M; Potrap, I; Barashkou, A; Shoukavy, D; Shaykhatdenov, B; Pikelner, A; Gladilin, L; Ammosov, V; Abramov, A; Arik, M; Sahinsoy, M; Uysal, Z; Azizi, K; Hotinli, S C; Zhou, S; Berger, E; Blair, R; Underwood, D G; Einsweiler, K; Garcia-sciveres, M A; Siegrist, J L; Kipnis, I; Dahl, O; Holland, S; Barbaro galtieri, A; Smith, P T; Parua, N; Franklin, M; Mercurio, K M; Tong, B; Pod, E; Cole, S G; Hopkins, W H; Guest, D H; Severini, H; Marsicano, J J; Abbott, B K; Wang, Q; Lissauer, D; Ma, H; Takai, H; Rajagopalan, S; Protopopescu, S D; Snyder, S S; Undrus, A; Popescu, R N; Begel, M A; Blocker, C A; Amelung, C; Mandic, I; Macek, B; Tucker, B H; Citterio, M; Troncon, C; Orestano, D; Taccini, C; Romeo, G L; Dova, M T; Taylor, G N; Gesualdi manhaes, A; Mcpherson, R A; Sobie, R; Taylor, R P; Dolezal, Z; Kodys, P; Slovak, R; Sopko, B; Vacek, V; Sanders, M P; Hertenberger, R; Meineck, C; Becks, K; Kind, P; Sandhoff, M; Cantero garcia, J; De la torre perez, H; Castillo gimenez, V; Ros, E; Hernandez jimenez, Y; Chadelas, R; Santoni, C; Washbrook, A J; O'brien, B J; Wynne, B M; Mehta, A; Vossebeld, J H; Landon, M; Teixeira dias castanheira, M; Cerrito, L; Keates, J R; Fassouliotis, D; Chardalas, M; Manousos, A; Grachev, V; Seliverstov, D; Sedykh, E; Cakir, O; Ciftci, R; Edson, W; Prell, S A; Rosati, M; Stroman, T; Jiang, H; Neal, H A; Li, X; Gan, K K; Smith, D S; Kruse, M C; Ko, B R; Leung fook cheong, A M; Cole, B; Angerami, A R; Greene, Z S; Kroll, J I; Van berg, R P; Forbush, D A; Lubatti, H; Raisher, J; Shupe, M A; Wolin, S; Oshita, H; Gaudio, G; Das, R; Konig, A C; Croft, V A; Harvey, A; Maaroufi, F; Melo, I; Greenwood jr, Z D; Shabalina, E; Mchedlidze, G; Drechsler, E; Rieger, J K; Blackston, M; Colombo, T

    2002-01-01

    % ATLAS \\\\ \\\\ ATLAS is a general-purpose experiment for recording proton-proton collisions at LHC. The ATLAS collaboration consists of 144 participating institutions (June 1998) with more than 1750~physicists and engineers (700 from non-Member States). The detector design has been optimized to cover the largest possible range of LHC physics: searches for Higgs bosons and alternative schemes for the spontaneous symmetry-breaking mechanism; searches for supersymmetric particles, new gauge bosons, leptoquarks, and quark and lepton compositeness indicating extensions to the Standard Model and new physics beyond it; studies of the origin of CP violation via high-precision measurements of CP-violating B-decays; high-precision measurements of the third quark family such as the top-quark mass and decay properties, rare decays of B-hadrons, spectroscopy of rare B-hadrons, and $ B ^0 _{s} $-mixing. \\\\ \\\\The ATLAS dectector, shown in the Figure includes an inner tracking detector inside a 2~T~solenoid providing an axial...

  6. Fully automatic multi-atlas segmentation of CTA for partial volume correction in cardiac SPECT/CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qingyi; Mohy-ud-Din, Hassan; Boutagy, Nabil E.; Jiang, Mingyan; Ren, Silin; Stendahl, John C.; Sinusas, Albert J.; Liu, Chi

    2017-05-01

    Anatomical-based partial volume correction (PVC) has been shown to improve image quality and quantitative accuracy in cardiac SPECT/CT. However, this method requires manual segmentation of various organs from contrast-enhanced computed tomography angiography (CTA) data. In order to achieve fully automatic CTA segmentation for clinical translation, we investigated the most common multi-atlas segmentation methods. We also modified the multi-atlas segmentation method by introducing a novel label fusion algorithm for multiple organ segmentation to eliminate overlap and gap voxels. To evaluate our proposed automatic segmentation, eight canine 99mTc-labeled red blood cell SPECT/CT datasets that incorporated PVC were analyzed, using the leave-one-out approach. The Dice similarity coefficient of each organ was computed. Compared to the conventional label fusion method, our proposed label fusion method effectively eliminated gaps and overlaps and improved the CTA segmentation accuracy. The anatomical-based PVC of cardiac SPECT images with automatic multi-atlas segmentation provided consistent image quality and quantitative estimation of intramyocardial blood volume, as compared to those derived using manual segmentation. In conclusion, our proposed automatic multi-atlas segmentation method of CTAs is feasible, practical, and facilitates anatomical-based PVC of cardiac SPECT/CT images.

  7. Implementing US Department of Energy lessons learned programs. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    The DOE Lessons Learned Handbook is a two-volume publication developed to supplement the DOE Lessons Learned Standard (DOE-STD-7501-95) with information that will organizations in developing or improving their lessons learned programs. Volume 1 includes greater detail than the Standard in areas such as identification and documentation of lessons learned; it also contains sections on specific processes such as training and performance measurement. Volume 2 (this document) contains examples of program documents developed by existing lessons learned programs as well as communications material, functional categories, transmittal documents, sources of professional and industry lessons learned, and frequently asked questions about the Lessons Learned List Service.

  8. Laser program annual report, 1977. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bender, C.F.; Jarman, B.D. (eds.)

    1978-07-01

    An overview is given of the laser fusion program. The solid-state program covers the Shiva and Nova projects. Laser components, control systems, alignment systems, laser beam diagnostics, power conditioning, and optical components are described. The fusion experimental program concerns the diagnostics and data acquisition associated with Argus and Shiva. (MOW)

  9. Sonar atlas of caverns comprising the U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve. Volume 3, Bryan Mound Site, Texas.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rautman, Christopher Arthur; Lord, Anna Snider

    2007-09-01

    Downhole sonar surveys from the four active U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve sites have been modeled and used to generate a four-volume sonar atlas, showing the three-dimensional geometry of each cavern. This volume 3 focuses on the Bryan Mound SPR site, located in southeastern Texas. Volumes 1, 2, and 4, respectively, present images for the Bayou Choctaw SPR site, Louisiana, the Big Hill SPR site, Texas, and the West Hackberry SPR site, Louisiana. The atlas uses a consistent presentation format throughout. The basic geometric measurements provided by the down-cavern surveys have also been used to generate a number of geometric attributes, the values of which have been mapped onto the geometric form of each cavern using a color-shading scheme. The intent of the various geometrical attributes is to highlight deviations of the cavern shape from the idealized cylindrical form of a carefully leached underground storage cavern in salt. The atlas format does not allow interpretation of such geometric deviations and anomalies. However, significant geometric anomalies, not directly related to the leaching history of the cavern, may provide insight into the internal structure of the relevant salt dome.

  10. Sonar atlas of caverns comprising the U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve. Volume 4, West Hackberry site, Louisiana.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rautman, Christopher Arthur; Lord, Anna Snider

    2007-09-01

    Downhole sonar surveys from the four active U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve sites have been modeled and used to generate a four-volume sonar atlas, showing the three-dimensional geometry of each cavern. This volume 4 focuses on the West Hackberry SPR site, located in southwestern Louisiana. Volumes 1, 2, and 3, respectively, present images for the Bayou Choctaw SPR site, Louisiana, the Big Hill SPR site, Texas, and the Bryan Mound SPR site, Texas. The atlas uses a consistent presentation format throughout. The basic geometric measurements provided by the down-cavern surveys have also been used to generate a number of geometric attributes, the values of which have been mapped onto the geometric form of each cavern using a color-shading scheme. The intent of the various geometrical attributes is to highlight deviations of the cavern shape from the idealized cylindrical form of a carefully leached underground storage cavern in salt. The atlas format does not allow interpretation of such geometric deviations and anomalies. However, significant geometric anomalies, not directly related to the leaching history of the cavern, may provide insight into the internal structure of the relevant salt dome.

  11. Sonar atlas of caverns comprising the U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve. Volume 2, Big Hill Site, Texas.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rautman, Christopher Arthur; Lord, Anna Snider

    2007-08-01

    Downhole sonar surveys from the four active U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve sites have been modeled and used to generate a four-volume sonar atlas, showing the three-dimensional geometry of each cavern. This volume 2 focuses on the Big Hill SPR site, located in southeastern Texas. Volumes 1, 3, and 4, respectively, present images for the Bayou Choctaw SPR site, Louisiana, the Bryan Mound SPR site, Texas, and the West Hackberry SPR site, Louisiana. The atlas uses a consistent presentation format throughout. The basic geometric measurements provided by the down-cavern surveys have also been used to generate a number of geometric attributes, the values of which have been mapped onto the geometric form of each cavern using a color-shading scheme. The intent of the various geometrical attributes is to highlight deviations of the cavern shape from the idealized cylindrical form of a carefully leached underground storage cavern in salt. The atlas format does not allow interpretation of such geometric deviations and anomalies. However, significant geometric anomalies, not directly related to the leaching history of the cavern, may provide insight into the internal structure of the relevant salt dome.

  12. Sonar atlas of caverns comprising the U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve. Volume 1, Bayou Choctaw site, Louisiana.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rautman, Christopher Arthur; Lord, Anna Snider

    2007-10-01

    Downhole sonar surveys from the four active U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve sites have been modeled and used to generate a four-volume sonar atlas, showing the three-dimensional geometry of each cavern. This volume 1 focuses on the Bayou Choctaw SPR site, located in southern Louisiana. Volumes 2, 3, and 4, respectively, present images for the Big Hill SPR site, Texas, the Bryan Mound SPR site, Texas, and the West Hackberry SPR site, Louisiana. The atlas uses a consistent presentation format throughout. The basic geometric measurements provided by the down-cavern surveys have also been used to generate a number of geometric attributes, the values of which have been mapped onto the geometric form of each cavern using a color-shading scheme. The intent of the various geometrical attributes is to highlight deviations of the cavern shape from the idealized cylindrical form of a carefully leached underground storage cavern in salt. The atlas format does not allow interpretation of such geometric deviations and anomalies. However, significant geometric anomalies, not directly related to the leaching history of the cavern, may provide insight into the internal structure of the relevant salt dome.

  13. Energy-efficient buildings program evaluations. Volume 2: Evaluation summaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, A.D.; Mayi, D.; Edgemon, S.D.

    1997-04-01

    This document presents summaries of code and utility building program evaluations reviewed as the basis for the information presented in Energy-Efficient Buildings Program Evaluations, Volume 1: Findings and Recommendations, DOE/EE/OBT-11569, Vol. 1. The main purpose of this volume is to summarize information from prior evaluations of similar programs that may be useful background for designing and conducting an evaluation of the BSGP. Another purpose is to summarize an extensive set of relevant evaluations and provide a resource for program designers, mangers, and evaluators.

  14. INEL BNCT Program: Volume 5, No. 9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ackermann, A.L. (ed.)

    1991-01-01

    This Bulletin presents a summary of accomplishments and highlights of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory's (INEL) Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) Program for September 1991. This bulletin includes information on the brain tumor and melanoma research programs, Power Burst Facility (PBF) technical support and modifications, PBF operations, and updates to the animal data charts.

  15. Resources for Guidance Program Improvement. Volume I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walz, Garry R., Comp.; And Others

    Designed for use by counselors, guidance directors, school administrators, school board members, and anyone interested in the improvement of school guidance programs, this resource book provides a collection of over 100 guidance program models and individual guidance practices. The format consists of references (bibliographic information with…

  16. Standards. Volume 1. Report (Technology Transfer Program)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-06-30

    program presently in operation in the Ishikawajima - Harima Heavy Industries (IHI) of Japan. Administration. the study of the shipyards of Information...following paragraphs: THE TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER PROGRAM (TTP) The U. S. shipbuilding industry is well aware of the significant shipbuilding cost...appli- cation of the TTP results to the American shipbuilding industry , Lev- ingston initiated a cost-sharing contract with MarAd to provide docu

  17. EnviroAtlas - Ecosystem Services Market-Based Programs Web Service, U.S., 2016, Forest Trends' Ecosystem Marketplace

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas web service contains layers depicting market-based programs and projects addressing ecosystem services protection in the United States. Layers...

  18. Clean Coal Technology Programs: Program Update 2003 (Volume 1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy

    2003-12-01

    Annual report on the Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP), Power Plant Improvement Initiative (PPII), and Clean Coal Power Initiative (CCPI). The report addresses the roles of the programs, implementation, funding and costs, project descriptions, legislative history, program history, environmental aspects, and project contacts. The project descriptions describe the technology and provides a brief summary of the demonstration results.

  19. International photovoltaic program. Volume 2: Appendices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costello, D.; Koontz, R.; Posner, D.; Heiferling, P.; Carpenter, P.; Forman, S.; Perelman, L.

    1979-01-01

    The results of analyses conducted in preparation of an international photovoltaic marketing plan are summarized. Included are compilations of relevant statutes and existing Federal programs; strategies designed to expand the use of photovoltaics abroad; information on the domestic photovoltaic plan and its impact on the proposed international plan; perspectives on foreign competition; industry views on the international photovoltaic market and ideas about the how US government actions could affect this market;international financing issues; and information on issues affecting foreign policy and developing countries.

  20. Artificial Intelligence Software Acquisition Program. Volume 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-12-01

    formalize the concelpts, p: obl-ins and information flow into a iniore formal knowlodge representation which defines the data strittres, inference...imtrallcl with (,t(- developinent team, the test team translates the c us otneir spec iiica;t ii l to I- I procedures that trlodel the system behavior...task ait a~Ilo’ 4-llicien.N~ . FX.1I I I les- of Issies inItit Ivl: Ata I txectit iont of translated K( IIS programs, t tI at i. t.tit of .self

  1. The National Toxicology Program Web-based nonneoplastic lesion atlas: a global toxicology and pathology resource.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesta, Mark F; Malarkey, David E; Herbert, Ronald A; Brix, Amy; Hamlin, Melvin H; Singletary, Emily; Sills, Robert C; Bucher, John R; Birnbaum, Linda S

    2014-01-01

    Toxicologists and pathologists worldwide will benefit from a new, website-based, and completely searchable Nonneoplastic Lesion Atlas just released by the U.S. National Toxicology Program (NTP). The atlas is a much-needed resource with thousands of high-quality, zoomable images and diagnostic guidelines for each rodent lesion. Liver, gallbladder, nervous system, bone marrow, lower urinary tract and skin lesion images, and diagnostic strategies are available now. More organ and biological systems will be added with a total of 22 chapters planned for the completed project. The atlas will be used by the NTP and its many pathology partners to standardize lesion diagnosis, terminology, and the way lesions are recorded. The goal is to improve our understanding of nonneoplastic lesions and the consistency and accuracy of their diagnosis between pathologists and laboratories. The atlas is also a useful training tool for pathology residents and can be used to bolster any organization's own lesion databases. Researchers have free access to this online resource at www.ntp.niehs.nih.gov/nonneoplastic.

  2. Wind Atlas Analysis and Application Program: WAsP 11 Help Facility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    The Wind Atlas Analysis and Application Program (WAsP) is a PC-program for horizontal and vertical extrapolation of wind climates. The program contains a complete set of models to calculate the effects on the wind of sheltering obstacles, surface roughness changes and terrain height variations...... of specific wind turbines and wind farms. The WAsP Help Facility includes a Quick Start Tutorial, a User's Guide and a Technical Reference. It further includes descriptions of the Observed Wind Climate Wizard, the WAsP Climate Analyst, the WAsP Map Editor tool, the WAsP Turbine Editor tool, the Air Density...

  3. A public program to get the magnetic field of ATLAS in any point 001

    CERN Document Server

    Nikitina, T

    2003-01-01

    This note presents a fortran 90 public program which gives the magnetic field of the ATLAS detector in an arbitrary point. In the tilecal the user has the possibility to obtain a global (averaged) field or a local field (individual tiles are visible). The contribution of all coils is included. The model used for the calculation is described in note ATL-MAGNET-2001-02.

  4. Highly Insulating Windows Volume Purchase Program Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2013-04-01

    This report documents the development, execution outcomes and lessons learned of the Highly Insulating Windows Volume Purchase (WVP) Program carried out over a three-year period from 2009 through 2012. The primary goals of the program were met: 1) reduce the incremental cost of highly insulating windows compared to ENERGY STAR windows; and 2) raise the public and potential buyers’ awareness of highly insulating windows and their benefits. A key outcome of the program is that the 2013 ENERGY STAR Most Efficient criteria for primary residential windows were adopted from the technical specifications set forth in the WVP program.

  5. Precipitation Frequency for Ohio River Basin, USA - NOAA Atlas 14 Volume 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This GIS grid atlas contains precipitation frequency estimates for the Ohio River Basin and Surrounding states is based on precipitation data collected between...

  6. Precipitation Frequency for Puerto Rico and the US Virgin Islands - NOAA Atlas 14 Volume 3

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This GIS grid atlas contains precipitation frequency estimates for Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands is based on precipitation data collected between...

  7. ATLAS9: Model atmosphere program with opacity distribution functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurucz, Robert L.

    2017-10-01

    ATLAS9 computes model atmospheres using a fixed set of pretabulated opacities, allowing one to work on huge numbers of stars and interpolate in large grids of models to determine parameters quickly. The code works with two different sets of opacity distribution functions (ODFs), one with “big” wavelength intervals covering the whole spectrum and the other with 1221 “little” wavelength intervals covering the whole spectrum. The ODFs use a 12-step representation; the radiation field is computed starting with the highest step and working down. If a lower step does not matter because the line opacity is small relative to the continuum at all depths, all the lower steps are lumped together and not computed to save time.

  8. Advanced volume reduction program for LLW at JAERI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higuchi, H.; Sato, M.; Hirabayashi, T.; Tanaka, M. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Dept. of Decommissioning and Waste Management, Naka, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2000-07-01

    The Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) has recently decided to adopt an advanced volume reduction program and started the construction of facilities, in which volume reduction techniques will be applied and achieved high volume reduction ratio and stabilization by means of melting or super compaction processes. It will be able to produce waste packages for final disposal and to reduce the amount of the wastes by operating the advanced volume reduction facilities. These facilities consist of Waste Size Reduction and Storage Facilities and Waste Volume Reduction Facilities; the former have cutting installations for large size wastes and the latter have melting units and a super compactor. The waste volume reduction will be carried out by a super compactor, a metal melting unit and a non-metal melting unit equipped plasma torch, and an annual processing capacity is around 10,000 drums of 200-liter size. The volume reduction ratio of waste is around 1/3 to 1/6. Molten metal is cast to receptacles for receiving molten slag from non-metal melting unit. Thus the amount of secondary wastes are reduced by utilizing the metallic wastes as receptacles. (authors)

  9. Frequency Domain Computer Programs for Prediction and Analysis of Rail Vehicle Dynamics : Volume 2. Appendixes

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-12-01

    Frequency domain computer programs developed or acquired by TSC for the analysis of rail vehicle dynamics are described in two volumes. Volume 2 contains program listings including subroutines for the four TSC frequency domain programs described in V...

  10. Advanced Thermionic Technology Program: summary report. Volume 4. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-10-01

    This report summarizes the progress made by the Advanced Thermionic Technology Program during the past several years. This Program, sponsored by the US Department of Energy, has had as its goal adapting thermionic devices to generate electricity in a terrestrial (i.e., combustion) environment. Volume 4 (Part E) is a highly technical discussion of the attempts made by the Program to push the state-of-the-art beyond the current generation of converters and is directed toward potential researchers engaged in this same task. These technical discussions are complemented with Appendices where appropriate.

  11. A framework for evaluation of technology transfer programs. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-07-01

    The objective of this volume is to describe a framework with which DOE can develop a program specific methodology to evaluate it`s technology transfer efforts. This approach could also be applied to an integrated private sector technology transfer organization. Several benefits will be realized from the application of this work. While the immediate effect will be to assist program managers in evaluating and improving program performance, the ultimate benefits will accrue to the producing industry, the states, and the nation in the form of sustained or increased domestic oil production. This benefit depends also, of course, on the effectiveness of the technology being transferred. The managers of the Technology Transfer program, and the larger federal oil and gas R&D programs, will be provided with a means to design and assess the effectiveness of program efforts as they are developed, tested and performed. The framework allows deficiencies in critical aspects of the program to be quickly identified, allowing for timely corrections and improvements. The actual process of developing the evaluation also gives the staff of the Oil R&D Program or Technology Transfer subprogram the opportunity to become oriented to the overall program goals. The structure and focus imposed by the evaluation paradigm will guide program staff in selecting activities which are consistent with achieving the goals of the overall R&D program.

  12. Constellation Program: Lessons Learned. Volume 1; Executive Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhatigan, Jennifer L. (Editor)

    2011-01-01

    This document (Volume I) provides an executive summary of the lessons learned from the Constellation Program. A companion Volume II provides more detailed analyses for those seeking further insight and information. In this volume, Section 1.0 introduces the approach in preparing and organizing the content to enable rapid assimilation of the lessons. Section 2.0 describes the contextual framework in which the Constellation Program was formulated and functioned that is necessary to understand most of the lessons. Context of a former program may seem irrelevant in the heady days of new program formulation. However, readers should take some time to understand the context. Many of the lessons would be different in a different context, so the reader should reflect on the similarities and differences in his or her current circumstances. Section 3.0 summarizes key findings developed from the significant lessons learned at the program level that appear in Section 4.0. Readers can use the key findings in Section 3.0 to peruse for particular topics, and will find more supporting detail and analyses in Section 4.0 in a topical format. Appendix A contains a white paper describing the Constellation Program formulation that may be of use to readers wanting more context or background information. The reader will no doubt recognize some very similar themes from previous lessons learned, blue-ribbon committee reviews, National Academy reviews, and advisory panel reviews for this and other large-scale human spaceflight programs; including Apollo, Space Shuttle, Shuttle/Mir, and the ISS. This could represent an inability to learn lessons from previous generations; however, it is more likely that similar challenges persist in the Agency structure and approach to program formulation, budget advocacy, and management. Perhaps the greatest value of these Constellation lessons learned can be found in viewing them in context with these previous efforts to guide and advise the Agency and its

  13. Impact of integrated programs on general surgery operative volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Amanda R; Nickel, Brianne L; Dolejs, Scott C; Canal, David F; Torbeck, Laura; Choi, Jennifer N

    2017-03-01

    Integrated residencies are now commonplace, co-existing with categorical general surgery residencies. The purpose of this study was to define the impact of integrated programs on categorical general surgery operative volume. Case logs from categorical general, integrated plastics, vascular, and thoracic surgery residents from a single institution from 2008 to 2016 were collected and analyzed. Integrated residents have increased the number of cases they perform that would have previously been general surgery resident cases from 11 in 2009-2010 to 1392 in 2015-2016. Despite this, there was no detrimental effect on total major cases of graduating chief residents. Multiple integrated programs can co-exist with a general surgery program through careful collaboration and thoughtful consideration to longitudinal needs of individual trainees. As additional programs continue to be created, both integrated and categorical program directors must continue to collaborate to insure the integrity of training for all residents. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Correction volumes and densities in Vitrea Program; Correcao de volumes e densidades no Programa Vitrea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abrantes, Marcos E.S.; Oliveira, A.H. de, E-mail: marcosabrantes2003@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear; Abrantes, R.C., E-mail: abrantes.rafa1@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Eletrica; Magalhaes, M.J., E-mail: mjuliano100@yahoo.com.br [Ambienttal Protecao Radiologica, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    Introduction: with the increased use of 3D reconstruction techniques to assist in diagnosis, Vitrea® program is widely used. To use this program you need to know the correction values to generate the volumes and number of real CT human tissues. Objective: provide correction values for volumes and number of CT, read the Vitrea program, of the tissues generated by DICOM images from CT. Methodology: this study used a PMMA chest phantom to generate the DICOM images on a scanner. To check the calibration of the scanner was used Catphan phantom and compared the manufacturer of the values associated with its straight linearity. Results: the volume of PMMA phantom was of 11166.58 cm³ and CT number (123.5 ± 33.4) UH. For the volume found in Vitrea program, according to the structures of interest, were 11897.29 cm{sup 3}, 10901.65 cm³, 16906.49 cm{sup 3} and 11848.34 cm³ and corrections values are -6.14%, + 2.43% -6.94% -5.75% respectively for the tissues: lung, bone, soft and full. For the CT numbers found in this program were (97.60 ± 58.9) UH, (72.00 ± 176.00) UH, (143.20 ± 19.50) UH and (31.90 ± 239,10) UH and corrections of + 26.54%, + 71.53%, -13.64% and 387.15% respectively for tissues: lung, bone, soft and full. Conclusion: the procedure performed can be used in other 3D reconstruction programs and where there are tools to reading CT number, observing the necessary corrections.

  15. A proposed application programming interface for a physical volume repository

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Merritt; Williams, Joel; Wrenn, Richard

    1996-01-01

    The IEEE Storage System Standards Working Group (SSSWG) has developed the Reference Model for Open Storage Systems Interconnection, Mass Storage System Reference Model Version 5. This document, provides the framework for a series of standards for application and user interfaces to open storage systems. More recently, the SSSWG has been developing Application Programming Interfaces (APIs) for the individual components defined by the model. The API for the Physical Volume Repository is the most fully developed, but work is being done on APIs for the Physical Volume Library and for the Mover also. The SSSWG meets every other month, and meetings are open to all interested parties. The Physical Volume Repository (PVR) is responsible for managing the storage of removable media cartridges and for mounting and dismounting these cartridges onto drives. This document describes a model which defines a Physical Volume Repository, and gives a brief summary of the Application Programming Interface (API) which the IEEE Storage Systems Standards Working Group (SSSWG) is proposing as the standard interface for the PVR.

  16. Frequency Domain Computer Programs for Prediction and Analysis of Rail Vehicle Dynamics : Volume 1. Technical Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-12-01

    Frequency domain computer programs developed or acquired by TSC for the analysis of rail vehicle dynamics are described in two volumes. Volume I defines the general analytical capabilities required for computer programs applicable to single rail vehi...

  17. Savannah River Site Environmental Implementation Plan. Volume 2, Protection programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-08-01

    Formal sitewide environmental planning at the . Savannah River Site (SRS) began in 1986 with the development and adoption of the Strategic Environmental Plan. The Strategic Environmental Plan describes the philosophy, policy, and overall program direction of environmental programs for the operation of the SRS. The Strategic Environmental Plan (Volume 2) provided the basis for development of the Environmental Implementation Plan (EIP). The EIP is the detailed, comprehensive environmental master plan for operating contractor organizations at the SRS. The EIP provides a process to ensure that all environmental requirements and obligations are being met by setting specific measurable goals and objectives and strategies for implementation. The plan is the basis for justification of site manpower and funding requests for environmental projects and programs over a five-year planning period.

  18. TRU Waste Sampling Program: Volume II. Gas generation studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clements, T.L. Jr.; Kudera, D.E.

    1985-09-01

    Volume II of the TRU Waste Sampling Program report contains the data generated from evaluating the adequacy of venting/filtering devices for maintaining safe hydrogen levels in plutonium contaminated waste drums. Additional studies reported in this volume include gas generation rates, selected waste form monitoring, and evaluation of hydrogen migration from sealed 90-mil rigid polyethylene drum liners containing /sup 238/Pu-contaminated wastes. All wastes used in the studies were newly-generated, and the waste drums were under controlled, experimental conditions. Studies using /sup 239/Pu-contaminated wastes were conducted at the Rocky Flats Plant. Studies using /sup 238/Pu-contaminated wastes were conducted at the Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  19. User's operating procedures. Volume 2: Scout project financial analysis program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, C. G.; Haris, D. K.

    1985-01-01

    A review is presented of the user's operating procedures for the Scout Project Automatic Data system, called SPADS. SPADS is the result of the past seven years of software development on a Prime mini-computer located at the Scout Project Office, NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia. SPADS was developed as a single entry, multiple cross-reference data management and information retrieval system for the automation of Project office tasks, including engineering, financial, managerial, and clerical support. This volume, two (2) of three (3), provides the instructions to operate the Scout Project Financial Analysis program in data retrieval and file maintenance via the user friendly menu drivers.

  20. Synfuel program analysis. Volume I. Procedures-capabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muddiman, J. B.; Whelan, J. W.

    1980-07-01

    This is the first of the two volumes describing the analytic procedures and resulting capabilities developed by Resource Applications (RA) for examining the economic viability, public costs, and national benefits of alternative synfuel projects and integrated programs. This volume is intended for Department of Energy (DOE) and Synthetic Fuel Corporation (SFC) program management personnel and includes a general description of the costing, venture, and portfolio models with enough detail for the reader to be able to specifiy cases and interpret outputs. It also contains an explicit description (with examples) of the types of results which can be obtained when applied to: the analysis of individual projects; the analysis of input uncertainty, i.e., risk; and the analysis of portfolios of such projects, including varying technology mixes and buildup schedules. In all cases, the objective is to obtain, on the one hand, comparative measures of private investment requirements and expected returns (under differing public policies) as they affect the private decision to proceed, and, on the other, public costs and national benefits as they affect public decisions to participate (in what form, in what areas, and to what extent).

  1. Paleozoic and mesozoic GIS data from the Geologic Atlas of the Rocky Mountain Region: Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graeber, Aimee; Gunther, Gregory

    2017-01-01

    The Rocky Mountain Association of Geologists (RMAG) is, once again, publishing portions of the 1972 Geologic Atlas of the Rocky Mountain Region (Mallory, ed., 1972) as a geospatial map and data package. Georeferenced tiff (Geo TIFF) images of map figures from this atlas has served as the basis for these data products. Shapefiles and file geodatabase features have been generated and cartographically represented for select pages from the following chapters:• Phanerozoic Rocks (page 56)• Cambrian System (page 63)• Ordovician System (pages 78 and 79)• Silurian System (pages 87 - 89)• Devonian System (pages 93, 94, and 96 - 98)• Mississippian System (pages 102 and 103)• Pennsylvanian System (pages 114 and 115)• Permian System (pages 146 and 149 - 154)• Triassic System (pages 168 and 169)• Jurassic System (pages 179 and 180)• Cretaceous System (pages 197 - 201, 207 - 210, 215, - 218, 221, 222, 224, 225, and 227).The primary purpose of this publication is to provide regional-scale, as well as local-scale, geospatial data of the Rocky Mountain Region for use in geoscience studies. An important aspect of this interactive map product is that it does not require extensive GIS experience or highly specialized software.

  2. NODC Standard Product: International ocean atlas Volume 10 - Climatic atlas of the Sea of Azov 2006 (1 disc set) (NODC Accession 0098572)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This Atlas and accompanying CD-ROM contains oceanographic data collected by the Academy of Sciences, Ministry of Fisheries, and the Hydrometeorological Service of...

  3. Repeatability of Brain Volume Measurements Made with the Atlas-based Method from T1-weighted Images Acquired Using a 0.4 Tesla Low Field MR Scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Masami; Suzuki, Makoto; Mizukami, Shinya; Abe, Osamu; Aoki, Shigeki; Miyati, Tosiaki; Fukuda, Michinari; Gomi, Tsutomu; Takeda, Tohoru

    2016-10-11

    An understanding of the repeatability of measured results is important for both the atlas-based and voxel-based morphometry (VBM) methods of magnetic resonance (MR) brain volumetry. However, many recent studies that have investigated the repeatability of brain volume measurements have been performed using static magnetic fields of 1-4 tesla, and no study has used a low-strength static magnetic field. The aim of this study was to investigate the repeatability of measured volumes using the atlas-based method and a low-strength static magnetic field (0.4 tesla). Ten healthy volunteers participated in this study. Using a 0.4 tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner and a quadrature head coil, three-dimensional T1-weighted images (3D-T1WIs) were obtained from each subject, twice on the same day. VBM8 software was used to construct segmented normalized images [gray matter (GM), white matter (WM), and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) images]. The regions-of-interest (ROIs) of GM, WM, CSF, hippocampus (HC), orbital gyrus (OG), and cerebellum posterior lobe (CPL) were generated using WFU PickAtlas. The percentage change was defined as[100 × (measured volume with first segmented image - mean volume in each subject)/(mean volume in each subject)]The average percentage change was calculated as the percentage change in the 6 ROIs of the 10 subjects. The mean of the average percentage changes for each ROI was as follows: GM, 0.556%; WM, 0.324%; CSF, 0.573%; HC, 0.645%; OG, 1.74%; and CPL, 0.471%. The average percentage change was higher for the orbital gyrus than for the other ROIs. We consider that repeatability of the atlas-based method is similar between 0.4 and 1.5 tesla MR scanners. To our knowledge, this is the first report to show that the level of repeatability with a 0.4 tesla MR scanner is adequate for the estimation of brain volume change by the atlas-based method.

  4. EnviroAtlas - Acres of USDA Farm Service Agency Conservation Reserve Program land by 12-Digit HUC for the Conterminous United States.

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset shows the acres of land enrolled in the US Department of Agriculture (USDA)'s Conservation Reserve Program (CRP). The CRP is administered by...

  5. Wind Energy Resource Atlas. Volume 11. Hawaii and Pacific Islands Region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, T.A.; Hori, A.M.; Elliott, D.L.; Barchet, W.R.; George, R.L.

    1981-02-01

    This atlas of the wind energy resource is composed of introductory and background information, and assessments of the wind resource in each division of the region. Background on how the wind resource is assessed and on how the results of the assessment should be inerpreted is presented. An introduction and outline to the descriptions of the wind resource for each division are provided. Assessments for individual divisions are presented as separate chapters. Much of the information in the division chapters is given in graphic or tabular form. The sequences for each chapter are similar, but some presentations used for Hawaii are inappropriate or impractical for presentation with the Pacific Islands. Hawaii chapter figure and tables are cited below and appropriate Pacific Islands figure and table numbers are included in brackets ().

  6. Automated compromised right lung segmentation method using a robust atlas-based active volume model with sparse shape composition prior in CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jinghao; Yan, Zhennan; Lasio, Giovanni; Huang, Junzhou; Zhang, Baoshe; Sharma, Navesh; Prado, Karl; D'Souza, Warren

    2015-12-01

    To resolve challenges in image segmentation in oncologic patients with severely compromised lung, we propose an automated right lung segmentation framework that uses a robust, atlas-based active volume model with a sparse shape composition prior. The robust atlas is achieved by combining the atlas with the output of sparse shape composition. Thoracic computed tomography images (n=38) from patients with lung tumors were collected. The right lung in each scan was manually segmented to build a reference training dataset against which the performance of the automated segmentation method was assessed. The quantitative results of this proposed segmentation method with sparse shape composition achieved mean Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) of (0.72, 0.81) with 95% CI, mean accuracy (ACC) of (0.97, 0.98) with 95% CI, and mean relative error (RE) of (0.46, 0.74) with 95% CI. Both qualitative and quantitative comparisons suggest that this proposed method can achieve better segmentation accuracy with less variance than other atlas-based segmentation methods in the compromised lung segmentation. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Evaluation of group-specific, whole-brain atlas generation using Volume-based Template Estimation (VTE): application to normal and Alzheimer's populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yajing; Zhang, Jiangyang; Hsu, Johnny; Oishi, Kenichi; Faria, Andreia V; Albert, Marilyn; Miller, Michael I; Mori, Susumu

    2014-01-01

    MRI-based human brain atlases, which serve as a common coordinate system for image analysis, play an increasingly important role in our understanding of brain anatomy, image registration, and segmentation. Study-specific brain atlases are often obtained from one of the subjects in a study or by averaging the images of all participants after linear or non-linear registration. The latter approach has the advantage of providing an unbiased anatomical representation of the study population. But, the image contrast is influenced by both inherent MR contrasts and residual anatomical variability after the registration; in addition, the topology of the brain structures cannot reliably be preserved. In this study, we demonstrated a population-based template-creation approach, which is based on Bayesian template estimation on a diffeomorphic random orbit model. This approach attempts to define a population-representative template without the cross-subject intensity averaging; thus, the topology of the brain structures is preserved. It has been tested for segmented brain structures, such as the hippocampus, but its validity on whole-brain MR images has not been examined. This paper validates and evaluates this atlas generation approach, i.e., Volume-based Template Estimation (VTE). Using datasets from normal subjects and Alzheimer's patients, quantitative measurements of sub-cortical structural volumes, metric distance, displacement vector, and Jacobian were examined to validate the group-averaged shape features of the VTE. In addition to the volume-based quantitative analysis, the preserved brain topology of the VTE allows surface-based analysis within the same atlas framework. This property was demonstrated by analyzing the registration accuracy of the pre- and post-central gyri. The proposed method achieved registration accuracy within 1mm for these population-preserved cortical structures in an elderly population. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. ATLAS Forward Detectors and Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Soni, N

    2010-01-01

    In this communication I describe the ATLAS forward physics program and the detectors, LUCID, ZDC and ALFA that have been designed to meet this experimental challenge. In addition to their primary role in the determination of ATLAS luminosity these detectors - in conjunction with the main ATLAS detector - will be used to study soft QCD and diffractive physics in the initial low luminosity phase of ATLAS running. Finally, I will briefly describe the ATLAS Forward Proton (AFP) project that currently represents the future of the ATLAS forward physics program.

  9. Automatic and quantitative assessment of regional muscle volume by multi-atlas segmentation using whole-body water-fat MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Anette; Rosander, Johannes; Romu, Thobias; Tallberg, Joakim; Grönqvist, Anders; Borga, Magnus; Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof

    2015-06-01

    To develop and demonstrate a rapid whole-body magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) method for automatic quantification of total and regional skeletal muscle volume. The method was based on a multi-atlas segmentation of intensity corrected water-fat separated image volumes. Automatic lean muscle tissue segmentations were achieved by nonrigid registration of atlas datasets with 10 different manually segmented muscle groups. Ten subjects scanned at 1.5 T and 3.0 T were used as atlases, initial validation and optimization. Further validation used 11 subjects scanned at 3.0 T. The automated and manual segmentations were compared using intraclass correlation, true positive volume fractions, and delta volumes. For the 1.5 T datasets, the intraclass correlation, true positive volume fractions (mean ± standard deviation, SD), and delta volumes (mean ± SD) were 0.99, 0.91 ± 0.02, -0.10 ± 0.70L (whole body), 0.99, 0.93 ± 0.02, 0.01 ± 0.07L (left anterior thigh), and 0.98, 0.80 ± 0.07, -0.08 ± 0.15L (left abdomen). The corresponding values at 3.0 T were 0.97, 0.92 ± 0.03, -0.17 ± 1.37L (whole body), 0.99, 0.93 ± 0.03, 0.03 ± 0.08L (left anterior thigh), and 0.89, 0.90 ± 0.04, -0.03 ± 0.42L (left abdomen). The validation datasets showed similar results. The method accurately quantified the whole-body skeletal muscle volume and the volume of separate muscle groups independent of field strength and image resolution. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. ATLAS Distributed Computing: Experience and Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Nairz, A; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment has just concluded its first running period which commenced in 2010. After two years of remarkable performance from the LHC and ATLAS, the experiment has accumulated more than 25 fb-1 of data. The total volume of beam and simulated data products exceeds 100 PB distributed across more than 150 computing centers around the world, managed by the experiment's distributed data management system. These sites have provided up to 150,000 computing cores to ATLAS's global production and analysis processing system, enabling a rich physics program including the discovery of the Higgs-like boson in 2012. The wealth of accumulated experience in global data-intensive computing at this massive scale, and the considerably more challenging requirements of LHC computing from 2014 when the LHC resumes operation, are driving a comprehensive design and development cycle to prepare a revised computing model together with data processing and management systems able to meet the demands of higher trigger rates, e...

  11. Probabilistic liver atlas construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dura, Esther; Domingo, Juan; Ayala, Guillermo; Marti-Bonmati, Luis; Goceri, E

    2017-01-13

    Anatomical atlases are 3D volumes or shapes representing an organ or structure of the human body. They contain either the prototypical shape of the object of interest together with other shapes representing its statistical variations (statistical atlas) or a probability map of belonging to the object (probabilistic atlas). Probabilistic atlases are mostly built with simple estimations only involving the data at each spatial location. A new method for probabilistic atlas construction that uses a generalized linear model is proposed. This method aims to improve the estimation of the probability to be covered by the liver. Furthermore, all methods to build an atlas involve previous coregistration of the sample of shapes available. The influence of the geometrical transformation adopted for registration in the quality of the final atlas has not been sufficiently investigated. The ability of an atlas to adapt to a new case is one of the most important quality criteria that should be taken into account. The presented experiments show that some methods for atlas construction are severely affected by the previous coregistration step. We show the good performance of the new approach. Furthermore, results suggest that extremely flexible registration methods are not always beneficial, since they can reduce the variability of the atlas and hence its ability to give sensible values of probability when used as an aid in segmentation of new cases.

  12. Farm to School Program. Nourishing News. Volume 4, Issue 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idaho State Department of Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The Idaho Farm to School Program works towards having Idaho grown food served to students in Idaho Child Nutrition Programs. This important program is emerging at meal times across Idaho and nationwide. Child Nutrition programs are buying fresh food directly from local farmers as a way of improving the quality and taste of their meals. These Farm…

  13. Simulation model for wind energy storage systems. Volume III. Program descriptions. [SIMWEST CODE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warren, A.W.; Edsinger, R.W.; Burroughs, J.D.

    1977-08-01

    The effort developed a comprehensive computer program for the modeling of wind energy/storage systems utilizing any combination of five types of storage (pumped hydro, battery, thermal, flywheel and pneumatic). An acronym for the program is SIMWEST (Simulation Model for Wind Energy Storage). The level of detail of SIMWEST is consistent with a role of evaluating the economic feasibility as well as the general performance of wind energy systems. The software package consists of two basic programs and a library of system, environmental, and load components. Volume III, the SIMWEST program description contains program descriptions, flow charts and program listings for the SIMWEST Model Generation Program, the Simulation program, the File Maintenance program and the Printer Plotter program. Volume III generally would not be required by SIMWEST user.

  14. ATLAS Status and First Results

    CERN Document Server

    Lankford, AJ; The ATLAS collaboration

    2010-01-01

    The ATLAS Experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider will study a broad range of particle physics at the highest available laboratory energies, from measurements of the standard model to searches for new physics beyond the standard model. The status of ATLAS commissioning and the ATLAS physics program will be reported, and physics prospects for the 2010 LHC run will be discussed.

  15. Clean Coal Technology Programs: Completed Projects (Volume 2)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy

    2003-12-01

    Annual report on the Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP), Power Plant Improvement Initiative (PPII), and Clean Coal Power Initiative (CCPI). The report addresses the roles of the programs, implementation, funding and costs, project descriptions, legislative history, program history, environmental aspects, and project contacts. The project descriptions describe the technology and provides a brief summary of the demonstration results.

  16. A survey of electric and hybrid vehicles simulation programs. Volume 2: Questionnaire responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevan, J.; Heimburger, D. A.; Metcalfe, M. A.

    1978-01-01

    The data received in a survey conducted within the United States to determine the extent of development and capabilities of automotive performance simulation programs suitable for electric and hybrid vehicle studies are presented. The survey was conducted for the Department of Energy by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Volume 1 of this report summarizes and discusses the results contained in Volume 2.

  17. Proceedings of the 1995 U.S. DOE hydrogen program review, Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    This document containes reports from the proceedings of the 1995 U.S. DOE hydrogen program review. Reports are organized under the topics of systems analysis, utilization, storage, and production. This volume, Volume I, contains the reports concerned with systems analysis and utilization. Individual reports were processed separately for the DOE data bases.

  18. DORCA 2 computer program. Volume 2: Programmer's manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, B. J.

    1972-01-01

    A guide for coding the Dynamic Operational Requirements and Cost Analysis Program (DORCA 2) is presented. The manual provides a detailed operation of every subroutine, the layout in core of the major matrices and arrays, and the meaning of all program values. Flow charts are included.

  19. INEL BNCT Program: Volume 5, No. 9. Bulletin, September 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ackermann, A.L. [ed.

    1991-12-31

    This Bulletin presents a summary of accomplishments and highlights of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory`s (INEL) Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) Program for September 1991. This bulletin includes information on the brain tumor and melanoma research programs, Power Burst Facility (PBF) technical support and modifications, PBF operations, and updates to the animal data charts.

  20. Super Efficient Refrigerator Program (SERP) evaluation. Volume 1: Process evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandahl, L.J.; Ledbetter, M.R.; Chin, R.I.; Lewis, K.S.; Norling, J.M.

    1996-01-01

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted this study for the US Department of Energy (DOE) as part of the Super Efficient Refrigerator Program (SERP) Evaluation. This report documents the SERP formation and implementation process, and identifies preliminary program administration and implementation issues. The findings are based primarily on interviews with those familiar with the program, such as utilities, appliance manufacturers, and SERP administrators. These interviews occurred primarily between March and April 1995, when SERP was in the early stages of program implementation. A forthcoming report will estimate the preliminary impacts of SERP within the industry and marketplace. Both studies were funded by DOE at the request of SERP Inc., which sought a third-party evaluation of its program.

  1. Aquatic Plant Control Research Program. Volume A-00-1

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kirk, James

    2000-01-01

    ... at the Waterways Experiment Station. It is principally intended to be a forum whereby information pertaining to and resulting from the Corps of Engineers' nationwide Aquatic Plant Control Research Program (APCRP...

  2. Resource Programs : Draft Environmental Impact Statement, Volume 2, Appendices.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1992-03-01

    Every two years, Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) prepares a Resource Program which identifies the resource actions BPA will take to meet its obligation to serve the forecasted power requirements of its customers. The Resource Program`s Environmental Impact Statement (RPEIS) is a programmatic environmental document which will support decisions made in several future Resource Programs. Environmental documents tiered to the EIS may be prepared on a site-specific basis. The RPEIS includes a description of the environmental effects and mitigation for the various resource types available in order to evaluate the trade-offs among them. It also assesses the environmental impacts of adding thirteen alternative combinations of resources to the existing power system. This report contains the appendices to the RPEIS.

  3. Management of Urban Construction Programs. Volume II : Supplemental Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-06-01

    This report is part of a program sponsored by the Office of Rail and Construction Technology of the Urban Mass Transportation Administration. The overall objective of the study is to develop guidelines that can be used by local government authorities...

  4. Program Manager, Volume 21, Number 5, September-October 1992

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-10-01

    Management " originally stressed thinking about the forces that affect not simply at the most senior layers by Henry Fayol . Although manage - the destiny of...following the same principles that analytical ability, memory and judg- Program Manager 31 September-October 1992 ment, but strong interpersonal skills...34September-October 1992 PROGRAM%J MANAGER im Journal of the Defense Systems Management College Bar Code Management The Acquisition Officer at War

  5. Workshop on the Suborbital Science Sounding Rocket Program, Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    The unique characteristics of the sounding rocket program is described, with its importance to space science stressed, especially in providing UARS correlative measurements. The program provided opportunities to do innovative scientific studies in regions not other wise accessible; it was a testbed for developing new technologies; and its key attributes were flexibility, reliability, and economy. The proceedings of the workshop are presented in viewgraph form, including the objectives of the workshop and the workshop agenda.

  6. Hydride heat pump. Volume I. Users manual for HYCSOS system design program. [HYCSOS code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorman, R.; Moritz, P.

    1978-05-01

    A method for the design and costing of a metal hydride heat pump for residential use and a computer program, HYCSOS, which automates that method are described. The system analyzed is one in which a metal hydride heat pump can provide space heating and space cooling powered by energy from solar collectors and electric power generated from solar energy. The principles and basic design of the system are presented, and the computer program is described giving detailed design and performance equations used in the program. The operation of the program is explained, and a sample run is presented. This computer program is part of an effort to design, cost, and evaluate a hydride heat pump for residential use. The computer program is written in standard Fortran IV and was run on a CDC Cyber 74 and Cyber 174 computer. A listing of the program is included as an appendix. This report is Volume 1 of a two-volume document.

  7. SOLTECH 92 proceedings: Solar Process Heat Program. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-03-01

    This document is a limited Proceedings, documenting the presentations given at the symposia conducted by the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Solar Industrial Program and Solar Thermal Electrical Program at SOLTECH92. The SOLTECH92 national solar energy conference was held in Albuquerque, New Mexico during the period February 17--20, 1992. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory manages the Solar Industrial Program; Sandia National Laboratories (Albuquerque) manages the Solar Thermal Electric Program. The symposia sessions were as follows: (1) Solar Industrial Program and Solar Thermal Electric Program Overviews, (2) Solar Process Heat Applications, (3) Solar Decontamination of Water and Soil; (4) Solar Building Technologies, (5) Solar Thermal Electric Systems, (6) PV Applications and Technologies. For each presentation given in these symposia, these Proceedings provide a one- to two-page abstract and copies of the viewgraphs and/or 35mm slides utilized by the speaker. Some speakers provided additional materials in the interest of completeness. The materials presented in this document were not subjected to a peer review process.

  8. Assessment of the basic energy sciences program. Volume II. Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-03-01

    A list of experts reviewing the Basic Energy Sciences (BES) program and their organizations are given. The assessment plan is explained; the program examined the following: quality of science being conducted in the program, quality of performers supported by the Basic Energy Sciences (BES) program, and the impact of the research on mission oriented needs. The intent of the assessment is to provide an indication of general status relative to these questions for the BES divisions. The approach to the assessment is described. The sampling plan which was used as a guide in determining the sample size and selecting the sample to evaluate the research program of the Office of Basic Energy Sciences are discussed. Special analyses were conducted on the dispersion of reviewers' ratings, the ratings of the lower funded projects, and the amount of time the principal investigator devoted to the project. These are presented in the final appendix together with histograms for individual rating variables for each program area. (MCW)

  9. Energy extension service pilot program evaluation report: the first year. Volume III: supplementary reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1979-09-01

    The appendices presented in this volume support and supplement Volume I of the Energy Extension Service Pilot Program Evaluation Report: The First Year. The appendices contain back-up data and detailed information on energy savings estimation and other analytic procedures. This volume also describes the data sources used for the evaluation. Appendix I presents the Btu estimation procedures used to calculate state-by-state energy savings. Appendix II contains details of the data sources used for the evaluation. Appendix III presents program activity data, budget, and cost per client analyses. Appendix IV, the Multivariate Analysis of EES Survey Data, provides the basis for the Integrating Statistical Analyses. Appendix V describes the rationale and exclusion rules for outlying data points. The final appendix presents program-by-program fuel costs and self-reported savings and investment.

  10. Research on Secure Systems and Automatic Programming. Volume I

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-10-14

    6I This *prescription" is now given to P who binds its third pattern to the ticket of some account .. This may be a general purpose accont , such as...Bankamericard, or, it may be the patient’s prescription-program accont . The resulting activator is now given to some pharmacy. There, finally, SELL’ is

  11. Automated Construction Management System (ACMS). Volume 2. Program Documentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-06-01

    of program IF mcmd<>𔃼’ @ 21,0 @ 21, 0 SAY "Continue adding attachments or individule components? (yin)" GET mmore PICTURE !0 READ CLEAR GETS ENDIF...meno2=eno).AND.(.NOT.EOF) IF (!(m)=’A’).AND.(title=l) @ row,5 SAY "ATTACHMENTS:" STORE 0 TO title ELSE IF (!(m)=’I’).AND.(title=l) @ row,5 SAY " INDIVIDULE

  12. The Installation Restoration Program Toxicology Guide. Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-05-01

    for acetone in spice oleo- resins when present as a residue from extraction of spine (361). 4i State Water Programs There are no specific state...thought to be clostridial infections since 2 species of pathogenic clostridia were isolated from lung tissue (1748). This hypothesis was disputed because...temperature, and ultraviolet irradiation . j •The data addressing hydrolysis and photolysis in the soil/ground- water system are very limited. Lindane

  13. Middle Atmosphere Program. Handbook for MAP, volume 25

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roper, R. G. (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    GLOBMET (the Global Meteor Observation System) was first proposed by the Soviet Geophysical Committee and was accepted by the Middle Atmosphere Program Steering Committee in 1982. While the atmospheric dynamics data from the system are of primary interest to MAP, GLOBMET also encompasses the astronomical radio and optical observations of meteoroids, and the physics of their interaction with the Earth's atmosphere. These astronomical observations and interactional physics with the Earth's atmosphere are discussed in detail.

  14. Geometric Modeling Applications Interface Program (GMAP). Volume 1. Executive Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-09-01

    342f CI FTR560240OOlU September 1989 SECTION 2 SCOPE OF GMAP GMAP focused on the generacion , control, and exchange of computer information to replace...embraced the idea of PDD and product models that had come out of the PDDI program. As part of the GMAP contract, it was necessay to establish the minimum... ideas and concepts that result from this research and be appropriately motivated to develop commercial products. 5.5 INTEGRATE PD WITH SUPPLIER BASE The

  15. Ship Producibility Research Program Task S-29, Recommended U.S. Shipbuilding Standards Program. Long-Range Plan. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-02-01

    Ishikawajima - Harima Heavy Industries Co., Ltd. of Japan...background, IHI Marine Technology, Inc., an American subsidiary of Ishikawajima - Harima Heavy Industries Co., Ltd. (IHI). Japan, was selected to perform...PROGRAM TASK S-29 LONG-RANGE PLAN VOLUME I FINAL REPORT A P P E N D I C E S IHI MARINE TECHNOLOGY, INC. ISHIKAWAJIMA HARIMA HEAVY INDUSTRIES CO.,

  16. Energy extension service pilot program evaluation report: the first year. Volume II: pilot state reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-09-01

    Volume II of the Energy Extension Service Evaluation presents a discussion of the operations of the ten EES pilot-state programs during the period from October 1, 1977 through September 30, 1978. Each of the ten pilot states - Alabama, Connecticut, Michigan, New Mexico, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Texas, Washington, Wisconsin, and Wyoming - received a grant of approximately $1.1 million to develop and implement a 19-month program beginning on October 1, 1977. Volume II provides a case-study description of the operations of the pilot program in each state, with special attention given to the two programs selected in each state for more detailed study and survey research. Some survey data and analysis are presented for the emphasis programs.

  17. INEL BNCT Program: Bulletin, Volume 5, No. 7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ackermann, A.L. (ed.)

    1991-07-01

    This Bulletin presents a summary of accomplishments and highlights in the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory's (INEL) Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) Program for June, 1991. This bulletin includes information on the brain tumor and melanoma research programs, Power Burst Facility (PBF) technical support and modifications, PBF operations, and animal data charts. Specific highlights include: final-dosage-form BSH samples were analyzed for purity, with the sample from Centronic Ltd the most free from contamination and oxidation products; MRI spectroscopy will be upgraded to provide a potential for boron resolution of 0.75 cm/pixel; neutron and gamma measurements were made for the HFR epithermal neutron beam; the current status of six spontaneous brain-tumor dogs; production of MoAbs against the pituitary CRF receptor; growth of BL6 in low Phe/Tyr medium; an altered synthetic pathway for carboranyl alanine; and encapsulation of {ital i}-B{sub 20}H{sub 18}{sup 2-} into liposomes for baseline murine studies. 2 figs., 4 tabs. (MHB)

  18. The use of integer programming to select bulls across breeding companies with volume price discounts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnel, M B; Galligan, D T

    2004-10-01

    Optimization programs are currently used to aid in the selection of bulls to be used in herd breeding programs. While these programs offer a systematic approach to the problem of semen selection, they ignore the impact of volume discounts. Volume discounts are discounts that vary depending on the number of straws purchased. The dynamic nature of volume discounts means that, in order to be adequately accounted for, they must be considered in the optimization routine. Failing to do this creates a missed economic opportunity because the potential benefits of optimally selecting and combining breeding company discount opportunities are not captured. To address these issues, an integer program was created which used binary decision variables to incorporate the effects of quantity discounts into the optimization program. A consistent set of trait criteria was used to select a group of bulls from 3 sample breeding companies. Three different selection programs were used to select the bulls, 2 traditional methods and the integer method. After the discounts were applied using each method, the integer program resulted in the lowest cost portfolio of bulls. A sensitivity analysis showed that the integer program also resulted in a low cost portfolio when the genetic trait goals were changed to be more or less stringent. In the sample application, a net benefit of the new approach over the traditional approaches was a 12.3 to 20.0% savings in semen cost.

  19. Geothermal energy program summary: Volume 1: Overview Fiscal Year 1988

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-02-01

    Geothermal energy is a here-and-now technology for use with dry steam resources and high-quality hydrothermal liquids. These resources are supplying about 6 percent of all electricity used in California. However, the competitiveness of power generation using lower quality hydrothermal fluids, geopressured brines, hot dry rock, and magma still depends on the technology improvements sought by the DOE Geothermal Energy R and D Program. The successful outcome of the R and D initiatives will serve to benefit the U.S. public in a number of ways. First, if a substantial portion of our geothermal resources can be used economically, they will add a very large source of secure, indigenous energy to the nation's energy supply. In addition, geothermal plants can be brought on line quickly in case of a national energy emergency. Geothermal energy is also a highly reliable resource, with very high plant availability. For example, new dry steam plants at The Geysers are operable over 99 percent of the time, and the small flash plant in Hawaii, only the second in the United States, has an availability factor of 98 percent. Geothermal plants also offer a viable baseload alternative to fossil and nuclear plants -- they are on line 24 hours a day, unaffected by diurnal or seasonal variations. The hydrothermal power plants with modern emission control technology have proved to have minimal environmental impact. The results to date with geopressured and hot dry rock resources suggest that they, too, can be operated so as to reduce environmental effects to well within the limits of acceptability. Preliminary studies on magma are also encouraging. In summary, the character and potential of geothermal energy, together with the accomplishments of DOE's Geothermal R and D Program, ensure that this huge energy resource will play a major role in future U.S. energy markets.

  20. Stirling Space Engine Program. Volume 1; Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhar, Manmohan

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this program was to develop the technology necessary for operating Stirling power converters in a space environment and to demonstrate this technology in full-scale engine tests. Hardware development focused on the Component Test Power Converter (CTPC), a single cylinder, 12.5-kWe engine. Design parameters for the CTPC were 150 bar operating pressure, 70 Hz frequency, and hot-and cold-end temperatures of 1050 K and 525 K, respectively. The CTPC was also designed for integration with an annular sodium heat pipe at the hot end, which incorporated a unique "Starfish" heater head that eliminated highly stressed brazed or weld joints exposed to liquid metal and used a shaped-tubed electrochemical milling process to achieve precise positional tolerances. Selection of materials that could withstand high operating temperatures with long life were another focus. Significant progress was made in the heater head (Udimet 700 and Inconel 718 and a sodium-filled heat pipe); the alternator (polyimide-coated wire with polyimide adhesive between turns and a polyimide-impregnated fiberglass overwrap and samarium cobalt magnets); and the hydrostatic gas bearings (carbon graphite and aluminum oxide for wear couple surfaces). Tests on the CTPC were performed in three phases: cold end testing (525 K), engine testing with slot radiant heaters, and integrated heat pipe engine system testing. Each test phase was successful, with the integrated engine system demonstrating a power level of 12.5 kWe and an overall efficiency of 22 percent in its maiden test. A 1500-hour endurance test was then successfully completed. These results indicate the significant achievements made by this program that demonstrate the viability of Stirling engine technology for space applications.

  1. Environmental projects. Volume 2: Underground storage tanks compliance program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushner, L.

    1987-01-01

    Six large parabolic dish antennas are located at the Goldstone Deep Space Communications Complex north of Barstow, California. As a large-scale facility located in a remote, isolated desert region, the GDSCC operations require numerous on-site storage facilities for gasoline, diesel and hydraulic oil. These essential fluids are stored in underground storage tanks (USTs). Because USTs may develop leaks with the resultant seepage of their hazardous contents into the surrounding soil, local, State and Federal authorities have adopted stringent regulations for the testing and maintenance of USTs. Under the supervision of JPL's Office of Telecommunications and Data Acquisition, a year-long program has brought 27 USTs at the Goldstone Complex into compliance with Federal, State of California and County of San Bernadino regulations. Of these 27 USTs, 15 are operating today, 11 have been temporary closed down, and 1 abandoned in place. In 1989, the 15 USTs now operating at the Goldstone DSCC will be replaced either by modern, double-walled USTs equipped with automatic sensors for leak detection, or by above ground storage tanks. The 11 inactivated USTs are to be excavated, removed and disposed of according to regulation.

  2. Solar energy research and development: program balance. Annex, Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-02-01

    Each of the seven solar energy technologies that have been assessed in the study are treated: photovoltaic devices, solar thermal power systems, wind energy systems, solar heating and cooling systems, agricultural and industrial heat processes, biomass conversion technologies, and ocean thermal energy conversion systems. A brief technical overview of storage for solar electric technologies is presented and some principles concerning how different levels of success on electrical storage can affect the commercial viability of solar electric options are discussed. A description is given of the solar penetration model that was developed and applied as an analytical tool in the study. This computer model has served the primary purpose of evaluating the competiveness of the solar energy systems in the markets in which they are expected to compete relative to that of the alternative energy sources. This is done under a variety of energy supply, demand, and price conditions. The seven sections treating the solar energy technologies contain discussions on each of six subject areas: description of the technology; economic projections; the potential contribution of the technology in different marketplaces; environmental considerations; international potential; and the present and possible future emphases within the RD and D program. The priority item for each of the technology sections has been the documentation of the economic projections.

  3. Introduction to Subject Indexing; a Programmed Text. Volume Two: UDC and Chain Procedure in Subject Cataloguing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, A. G.; And Others

    This is the second of two volumes dealing with practical classification and subject indexing. The programed text considers use of the Universal Decimal Classification (UDC) and techniques of cross referencing based on UDC in the construction of classified and alphabetical subject catalogs. (Author/LS)

  4. National Low-Level Waste Management Program Radionuclide Report Series, Volume 17: Plutonium-239

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. P. Adams; M. L. Carboneau

    1999-03-01

    This report, Volume 17 of the National Low-Level Waste Management Program Radionuclide Report Series, discusses the radiological and chemical characteristics of plutonium-239 (Pu-239). This report also discusses waste types and forms in which Pu-239 can be found, waste and disposal information on Pu-239, and Pu-239 behavior in the environment and in the human body.

  5. National Low-Level Waste Management Program radionuclide report series. Volume 13, Curium-242

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, J.P.

    1995-08-01

    This report, Volume 13 of the National Low-Level Waste Management Program Radionuclide Report Series, discusses the radiological and chemical characteristics of curium-242 ({sup 242}Cm). This report also includes discussions about waste types and forms in which {sup 242}Cm can be found and {sup 242}Cm behavior in the environment and in the human body.

  6. Proceedings of the 1995 U.S. DOE hydrogen program review. Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    The 1995 US DOE Hydrogen Program Review was held April 18-21, 1995 in Coral Gables, FL. Volume II of the Proceedings contains 8 papers presented under the subject of hydrogen storage and 17 papers presented on hydrogen production. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  7. Change in Knee Cartilage Volume in Individuals Completing a Therapeutic Exercise Program for Knee Osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woollard, Jason D.; Gil, Alexandra B.; Sparto, Patrick; Kwoh, C. Kent; Piva, Sara R.; Farrokhi, Shawn; Powers, Christopher M.; Fitzgerald, G. Kelley

    2012-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN Prospective cohort study OBJECTIVES To characterize knee cartilage change in individuals with knee osteoarthritis (KOA) who have completed a therapeutic exercise program. BACKGROUND While therapeutic exercise is frequently used successfully to improve pain and function in individuals with KOA, no studies have reported the volume of cartilage change, or individual factors that may impact volume of cartilage change, in those completing an exercise program for KOA. METHODS 13 individuals with KOA underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MR) to quantify cartilage volume change for the weight-bearing regions of the medial and lateral femoral condyles and the entire surface of the tibial plateaus from baseline to 1-year follow-up. Measurements of body structure and function and activity levels/limitations such as the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) and Physical Activity Scale for the Elderly (PASE) were performed prior to the therapeutic exercise program. At 6 months from baseline follow-up clinical measurements of knee strength and motion were performed. At 1-year from baseline, imaging of the knee cartilage, knee alignment, and the WOMAC and PASE questionnaires were completed. RESULTS The central region of the medial femoral condyle (cMF) had a median volume of cartilage loss of 3.8%. The other 3 knee tibiofemoral articular surfaces had minimal median cartilage volume change. Individuals were dichotomized into progressors (n=6) and non-progressors (n=7) based on the standard error of measurement (SEM) of cartilage volume change for the cMF. Progressors were younger, had a larger body mass index, had a higher Kellgren-Lawrence grade in the medial compartment of the knee, and had a greater increase in knee varus alignment from baseline to 1-year follow-up. The progressors also had frontal plane hip and knee kinetics during baseline gait analysis that potentially increase medial knee joint loading. CONCLUSION The loss of c

  8. Validation of the GEANT4-Based Full Simulation Program for the ATLAS Detector An Overview of Performance and Robustness

    CERN Document Server

    Costanzo, D; Gallas, M; Nairz, A; Benekos, N; Rimoldi, A; Boudreau, J; Tsulaia, V

    2005-01-01

    This paper gives an overview of the validation tests of the ATLAS GEANT4 simulation package G4ATLAS, which were performed in the period from fall 2003 until the end of 2004. This spans the time from first comprehensive tests after G4ATLAS had been fully embedded into the ATLAS common framework in its full functionality and detail, the time of its development into a highly reliable, performant and robust tool, up to its extremely successful usage in ATLAS Data Challenge 2 (DC2) and (Combined) Testbeam simulation productions. In DC2, more than 12 million full physics events were successfully simulated in a world-wide, distributed way. During that validation phase, G4ATLAS became widely accepted as the simulation package for ATLAS.The paper describes in some detail the testing period from its beginning (ATLAS offline release 7.1.0) until arriving at a stable version of G4ATLAS for DC2 (release 8.0.5), and presents results from performance tests carried out after DC2 and in the context of (Combined) Testbeam simu...

  9. Development and field test of a responsible alcohol service program. Volume 2, Server education program materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-05-01

    This report describes a program of server education designed to foster the responsible service of alcohol in bars, restaurants, and other on-sale establishments. The program is administered in two phases. The first phase, three hours in length, is in...

  10. USAF Summer Research Program - 1993 Summer Research Extension Program Final Reports, Volume 1A, Armstrong Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-11-01

    Mammalian Cells and Dr. Donald Robinson Cell Cultures Chemistry Xavier University of Louisiana, New Orleans , LA AL/OE 16 Analysis of Isocyanate...Science 17 Speed-Up of the Phase Diversity Method Via Reduced Region & Dr. Johanna Stenzel Optimization Dimen. Arts & Sciences University of Houston...New Orleans , New Orleans , LA WLUFI viii 1993 SREP FINAL REPORTS Wright Laboratory VOLUME 4B Report Title Report # Author’s University Report Author 19

  11. United States Air Force Summer Faculty Research Program. Program Technical Report. 1990. Volume 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-06-05

    of Jet Fuel: Effects on Vesicular- Arbuscular Mycorrhizae lii Volume IV 145 Mathematical Modeling and Decision-Making Dr. Miguel Medina for Air Force...transfer. Many special features and algorithms of recent advent in the CFD community are also included in the procedure. With an extensive review and...exchange devices. An excellent review of the application of heat pipes in the aerospace field is offered by Chang and llager[l]. Another important advantage

  12. Summer Research Program - 1998 High School Apprenticeship Program. Volume 14. Phillips Laboratory

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moore, Gary

    1998-01-01

    The United States Air Force Summer Research Program (USAF-SRP) is designed to introduce university, college, and technical institute faculty members, graduate students, and high school students to Air Force research...

  13. Summer Research Program - 1998 High School Apprenticeship Program Volume 15B Wright Laboratory

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moore, Gary

    1998-01-01

    The United States Air Force Summer Research Program (USAF-SRP) is designed to introduce university, college, and technical institute faculty members, graduate students, and high school students to Air Force research...

  14. Summer Research Program - 1998 High School Apprenticeship Program Volume 15C Wright Laboratory

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moore, Gary

    1998-01-01

    The United States Air Force Summer Research Program (USAF-SRP) is designed to introduce university, college, and technical institute faculty members, graduate students, and high school students to Air Force research...

  15. Summer Research Program - 1997. High School Apprenticeship Program Final Reports. Volume 15A, Wright Laboratory

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moore, Gary

    1997-01-01

    The United States Air Force Summer Research Program (USAF-SRP) is designed to introduce university, college, and technical institute faculty members, graduate students, and high school students to Air Force research...

  16. Summer Research Program - 1997. High School Apprenticeship Program. Final Reports Volume 15B, Wright Laboratory

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moore, Gary

    1997-01-01

    The United States Air Force Summer Research Program (USAF-SRP) is designed to introduce university, college, and technical institute faculty members, graduate students, and high school students to Air Force research...

  17. Summer Research Program - 1997. High School Apprenticeship Program. Final Reports, Volume 12A, Armstrong Laboratory

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moore, Gary

    1997-01-01

    The United States Air Force Summer Research Program (USAF-SRP) is designed to introduce university, college, and technical institute faculty members, graduate students, and high school students to Air Force research...

  18. USAF Summer Research Program - 1994 High School Apprenticeship Program Final Reports, Volume 14, Rome Laboratory

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moore, Gary

    1994-01-01

    The United States Air Force High School Apprenticeship Program's (USAF-HSAP) purpose is to place outstanding high school students whose interests are in the areas of mathematics, engineering, and science to work in a laboratory environment...

  19. Summer Research Program - 1998 High School Apprenticeship Program Final Reports. Volume 12, Armstrong Laboratory

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moore, Gary

    1998-01-01

    The United States Air Force Summer Research Program (USAF-SRP) is designed to introduce university, college, and technical institute faculty members, graduate students, and high school students to Air Force research...

  20. Summer Research Program - 1996 High School Apprenticeship Program. Volume 16, Arnold Engineering Development Center

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moore, Gary

    1996-01-01

    The United States Air Force Summer Research Program (USAF-SRP) is designed to introduce university, college, and technical institute faculty members, graduate students, and high school students to Air Force research...

  1. USAF Summer Research Program - 1995 High School Apprenticeship Program Final Reports, Volume 13, Phillips Laboratory

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moore, Gary

    1995-01-01

    The United States Air Force High School Apprenticeship Program's (USAF-HSAP) purpose is to place outstanding high school students whose interests are in the areas of mathematics, engineering, and science to work in a laboratory environment...

  2. Summer Research Program - 1998 High School Apprenticeship Program Volume 13 Rome Laboratory

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moore, Gary

    1998-01-01

    The United States Air Force Summer Research Program (USAF-SRP) is designed to introduce university, college, and technical institute faculty members, graduate students, and high school students to Air Force research...

  3. Summer Research Program - 1997. High School Apprenticeship Program. Final Reports. Volume 15C, Wright Laboratory

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moore, Gary

    1997-01-01

    The United States Air Force Summer Research Program (USAF-SRP) is designed to introduce university, college, and technical institute faculty members, graduate students, and high school students to Air Force research...

  4. USAF Summer Research Program - 1994 High School Apprenticeship Program Final Reports, Volume 15B, Wright Laboratory

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moore, Gary

    1994-01-01

    The United States Air Force High School Apprenticeship Program's (USAF-HSAP) purpose is to place outstanding high school students whose interests are in the areas of mathematics, engineering, and science to work in a laboratory environment...

  5. Summer Research Program - 1996 High School Apprenticeship Program Volume 13 Phillips Laboratory

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moore, Gary

    1996-01-01

    The United States Air Force Summer Research Program (USAF-SRP) is designed to introduce university, college, and technical institute faculty members, graduate students, and high school students to Air Force research...

  6. Summer Research Program - 1997 High School Appenticeship Program Volume 16 Arnold Engineering Development Center

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moore, Gary

    1997-01-01

    The United States Air Force Summer Research Program (USAF-SRP) is designed to introduce university, college, and technical institute faculty members, graduate students, and high school students to Air Force research...

  7. USAF Summer Research Program - 1994 High School Apprenticeship Program Final Reports, Volume 13, Phillips Laboratory

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moore, Gary

    1994-01-01

    The United States Air Force High School Apprenticeship Program's (USAF-HSAP) purpose is to place outstanding high school students whose interests are in the areas of mathematics, engineering, and science to work in a laboratory environment...

  8. USAF Summer Research Program - 1994 High School Apprenticeship Program Final Reports, Volume 12B, Armstrong Laboratory

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moore, Gary

    1994-01-01

    The United States Air Force High School Apprenticeship Program's (USAF-HSAP) purpose is to place outstanding high school students whose interests are in the areas of mathematics, engineering, and science to work in a laboratory environment...

  9. Summer Research Program - 1996. High School Apprenticeship Program Final Reports. Volume 15B, Wright Laboratory

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moore, Gary

    1996-01-01

    The United States Air Force Summer Research Program (USAF-SRP) is designed to introduce university, college, and technical institute faculty members, graduate students, and high school students to Air Force research...

  10. 1997 Summer Research Program (SRP), High School Apprenticeship Program (HSAP), Final Reports, Volume 13, Phillips Laboratory

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moore, Gary

    1997-01-01

    The United States Air Force Summer Research Program (USAF-SRP) is designed to introduce university, college, and technical institute faculty members, graduate students, and high school students to Air Force research...

  11. USAF Summer Research Program - 1995 High School Apprenticeship Program Final Reports, Volume 14, Rome Laboratory

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moore, Gary

    1995-01-01

    The United States Air Force High School Apprenticeship Program's (USAF HSAP) purpose is to place outstanding high school students whose interests are in the areas of mathematics, engineering, and science to work in a laboratory environment...

  12. USAF Summer Research Program - 1994 High School Apprenticeship Program Final Reports. Volume 12A, Armstrong Lab

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moore, Gary

    1994-01-01

    The United States Air Force High School Apprenticeship Program's (USAF-HSAP) purpose is to place outstanding high school students whose interests are in the areas of mathematics, engineering, and science to work in a laboratory environment...

  13. Summer Research Program - 1998 High School Apprenticeship Program. Volume 15A. Wright Laboratory

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moore, Gary

    1998-01-01

    The United States Air Force Summer Research Program (USAF-SRP) is designed to introduce university, college, and technical institute faculty members, graduate students, and high school students to Air Force research...

  14. USAF Summer Research Program - 1993 High School Apprenticeship Program Final Reports, Volume 13, Phillips Laboratory

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moore, Gary

    1993-01-01

    The United States Air Force High School Apprenticeship Programs (USAF- HSAP) purpose is to place outstanding high school students whose interests are in the areas of mathematics, engineering, and science to work in a laboratory environment...

  15. Summer Research Program - 1996 High School Apprenticeship Program. Volume 12B, Armstrong Laboratory

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moore, Gary

    1996-01-01

    The United States Air Force Summer Research Program (USAF-SRP) is designed to introduce university, college, and technical institute faculty members, graduate students, and high school students to Air Force research...

  16. Summer Research Program - 1997 High School Apprenticeship Program. Volume 14, Rome Laboratory

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moore, Gary

    1997-01-01

    The United States Air Force Summer Research Program (USAF-SRP) is designed to introduce university, college, and technical institute faculty members, graduate students, and high school students to Air Force research...

  17. Summer Research Program - 1996 High School Apprenticeship Program Volume 15A Wright Laboratory

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moore, Gary

    1996-01-01

    The United States Air Force Summer Research Program (USAF-SRP) is designed to introduce university, college, and technical institute faculty members, graduate students, and high school students to Air Force research...

  18. USAF Summer Research Program - 1994 High School Apprenticeship Program Final Reports, Volume 15A, Wright Laboratory

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moore, Gary

    1994-01-01

    The United States Air Force High School Apprenticeship Program's (USAF-HSAP) purpose is to place outstanding high school students whose interests are in the areas of mathematics, engineering, and science to work in a laboratory environment...

  19. USAF Summer Research Program - 1994 High School Apprenticeship Program Final Reports, Volume 16 AEDC

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moore, Gary

    1994-01-01

    The United States Air Force High School Apprenticeship Program's (USAF-HSAP) purpose is to place outstanding high school students whose interests are in the areas of mathematics, engineering, and science to work in a laboratory environment...

  20. Mixed integer programming with dose-volume constraints in intensity-modulated proton therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Pengfei; Fan, Neng; Shan, Jie; Schild, Steven E; Bues, Martin; Liu, Wei

    2017-09-01

    In treatment planning for intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT), we aim to deliver the prescribed dose to the target yet minimize the dose to adjacent healthy tissue. Mixed-integer programming (MIP) has been applied in radiation therapy to generate treatment plans. However, MIP has not been used effectively for IMPT treatment planning with dose-volume constraints. In this study, we incorporated dose-volume constraints in an MIP model to generate treatment plans for IMPT. We created a new MIP model for IMPT with dose volume constraints. Two groups of IMPT treatment plans were generated for each of three patients by using MIP models for a total of six plans: one plan was derived with the Limited-memory Broyden-Fletcher-Goldfarb-Shanno (L-BFGS) method while the other plan was derived with our MIP model with dose-volume constraints. We then compared these two plans by dose-volume histogram (DVH) indices to evaluate the performance of the new MIP model with dose-volume constraints. In addition, we developed a model to more efficiently find the best balance between tumor coverage and normal tissue protection. The MIP model with dose-volume constraints generates IMPT treatment plans with comparable target dose coverage, target dose homogeneity, and the maximum dose to organs at risk (OARs) compared to treatment plans from the conventional quadratic programming method without any tedious trial-and-error process. Some notable reduction in the mean doses of OARs is observed. The treatment plans from our MIP model with dose-volume constraints can meet all dose-volume constraints for OARs and targets without any tedious trial-and-error process. This model has the potential to automatically generate IMPT plans with consistent plan quality among different treatment planners and across institutions and better protection for important parallel OARs in an effective way. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Applied Clinical Medical Physics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on

  1. Isotope Brayton ground demonstration testing and flight qualification. Volume 1. Technical program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1974-12-09

    A program is proposed for the ground demonstration, development, and flight qualification of a radioisotope nuclear heated dynamic power system for use on space missions beginning in the 1980's. This type of electrical power system is based upon and combines two aerospace technologies currently under intense development; namely, the MHW isotope heat source and the closed Brayton cycle gas turbine. This power system represents the next generation of reliable, efficient economic electrical power equipment for space, and will be capable of providing 0.5 to 2.0 kW of electric power to a wide variety of spacecraft for earth orbital and interplanetary missions. The immediate design will be based upon the requirements for the Air Force SURVSATCOM mission. The proposal is presented in three volumes plus an Executive Summary. This volume describes the tasks in the technical program.

  2. Alternative fuels for vehicles fleet demonstration program. Final report, volume 2: Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-06-01

    The Alternative Fuels for Vehicles Fleet Demonstration Program (AFV-FDP) was a multiyear effort to collect technical data for use in determining the costs and benefits of alternative-fuel vehicles (AFVs) in typical applications in New York State. This report, Volume 2, includes 13 appendices to Volume 1 that expand upon issues raised therein. Volume 1 provides: (1) Information about the purpose and scope of the AFV-FDP; (2) A summary of AFV-FDP findings organized on the basis of vehicle type and fuel type; (3) A short review of the status of AFV technology development, including examples of companies in the State that are active in developing AFVs and AFV components; and (4) A brief overview of the status of AFV deployment in the State. Volume 3 provides expanded reporting of AFV-FDP technical details, including the complete texts of the brochure Garage Guidelines for Alternative Fuels and the technical report Fleet Experience Survey Report, plus an extensive glossary of AFV terminology. The appendices cover a wide range of issues including: emissions regulations in New York State; production and health effects of ozone; vehicle emissions and control systems; emissions from heavy-duty engines; reformulated gasoline; greenhouse gases; production and characteristics of alternative fuels; the Energy Policy Act of 1992; the Clean Fuel Fleet Program; garage design guidelines for alternative fuels; surveys of fleet managers using alternative fuels; taxes on conventional and alternative fuels; and zero-emission vehicle technology.

  3. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) test facilities study program. Final report. Volume II. Part A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-01-17

    Results are presented of an 8-month study to develop alternative non-site-specific OTEC facilities/platform requirements for an integrated OTEC Test Program which may include land and floating test facilities. The document, Volume II - Appendixes is bound in three parts (A, B, and C) which together comprise a compendium of the most significant detailed data developed during the study. Part A contains definitions, baseline revisions, test plans, and energy utilization sections.

  4. Animal Use and Lessons Learned in the U.S. High Production Volume Chemicals Challenge Program

    OpenAIRE

    Bishop, Patricia L.; Manuppello, Joseph R.; Willett, Catherine E.; Sandler, Jessica T.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Launched by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in 1998, the High Production Volume (HPV) Challenge Program was developed to address the perceived gap in basic hazard information for the 2,800 chemicals produced or imported into the United States in quantities of ? 1 million pounds per year. Health and environmental effects data obtained from either existing information or through new vertebrate animal testing were voluntarily submitted by chemical companies (sponsors) ...

  5. National low-level waste management program radionuclide report series, Volume 15: Uranium-238

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, J.P.

    1995-09-01

    This report, Volume 15 of the National Low-Level Waste Management Program Radionuclide Report Series, discusses the radiological and chemical characteristics of uranium-238 ({sup 238}U). The purpose of the National Low-Level Waste Management Program Radionuclide Report Series is to provide information to state representatives and developers of low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities about the radiological, chemical, and physical characteristics of selected radionuclides and their behavior in the waste disposal facility environment. This report also includes discussions about waste types and forms in which {sup 238}U can be found, and {sup 238}U behavior in the environment and in the human body.

  6. Proceedings of the Advanced Turbine Systems Annual Program Review meeting. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-10-01

    Goal of the 8-year program is to develop cleaner, more efficient, and less expensive gas turbine systems for utility and industrial electric power generation, cogeneration, and mechanical drive units. The conference is held annually for energy executives, engineers, scientists, and other interested parties industry, academia, and Government. Advanced turbine systems topics discussed during five technical sessions included policy and strategic issues, program element overviews and technical reviews, related activities, university/industry consortium interactions, and supportive projects. Twenty-one papers presented during the technical sessions are contained in this volume; they are processed separately for the data base.

  7. Energy Economic Data Base (EEDB) Program: Phase I, Volume I. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-12-01

    The Energy Economic Data Base Program, which deals with the development of cost data for nuclear and comparison electric power generating stations, provides periodic updates of technical and cost (capital, fuel, and operating and maintenance) information of significance to DOE. The information allows for evaluation and monitoring of US civilian nuclear power programs and provides a consistent means of evaluation the nuclear option against alternatives. Currently, the EEDB contains 6 nuclear electrical generating plant technical models and 5 comparison coal-fired electrical generating plant technical models. Each of these technical plant models is a complete conceptual design for a single unit, steam electric power generating station located on a standard, hypothetical Middletown site. A description of the site is provided in Appendix A-1 (Volume 2) for nuclear plants, and Appendix A-2 (Volume 2) for coal-fired plants. The EEDB also includes a conceptual design of a coal liquefaction plant for comparison purposes. Volume 1 provides a description of the current Data Base, as of September 30, 1978: gives assumptions and ground rules for the initial-cost update; summarizes the initial cost update, with cost results tabulated; details the initial update of the technical conceptual design, the capital cost, the quantities of commodities and their unit costs, and craft labor man hours and costs for each EEDB program model; and details the fuel-cycle-cost initial update and the operating- and maintenance-cost initial update. Finally, an extensive list of references and a glossary are presented.

  8. Energy Extension Service Pilot Program: evaluation report after two years. Volume II. State reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-04-01

    This report, Vol. II, presents a discussion of the operations of the ten EES pilot state programs during the period from October 1, 1977 through September 30, 1979. Each of the ten pilot states - Alabama, Connecticut, Michigan, New Mexico, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Texas, Washington, Wisconsin, and Wyoming - received a grant of approximately $1.1 million to develop and implement an 18-month program beginning on October 1, 1977. In September 1978, each State received an additional $370,000 for service-delivery programs for the extension of the pilot program, April 1979 through September 1979. A case-study description of the operations of the pilot program in each State is provided here, with special attention given to the two programs selected in each State for more-detailed study and survey research. Although the thrust of this volume is descriptive, some survey data and analyses are presented for the emphasis programs. Two telephone surveys of clients and a non-client sample were conducted, one at the end of the first year of the pilot program (October 1977 - September 1978) and one at the end of the second year (October 1978 - September 1979).

  9. TP Atlas: integration and dissemination of advances in Targeted Proteins Research Program (TPRP)-structural biology project phase II in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwayanagi, Takao; Miyamoto, Sei; Konno, Takeshi; Mizutani, Hisashi; Hirai, Tomohiro; Shigemoto, Yasumasa; Gojobori, Takashi; Sugawara, Hideaki

    2012-09-01

    The Targeted Proteins Research Program (TPRP) promoted by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT) of Japan is the phase II of structural biology project (2007-2011) following the Protein 3000 Project (2002-2006) in Japan. While the phase I Protein 3000 Project put partial emphasis on the construction and maintenance of pipelines for structural analyses, the TPRP is dedicated to revealing the structures and functions of the targeted proteins that have great importance in both basic research and industrial applications. To pursue this objective, 35 Targeted Proteins (TP) Projects selected in the three areas of fundamental biology, medicine and pharmacology, and food and environment are tightly collaborated with 10 Advanced Technology (AT) Projects in the four fields of protein production, structural analyses, chemical library and screening, and information platform. Here, the outlines and achievements of the 35 TP Projects are summarized in the system named TP Atlas. Progress in the diversified areas is described in the modules of Graphical Summary, General Summary, Tabular Summary, and Structure Gallery of the TP Atlas in the standard and unified format. Advances in TP Projects owing to novel technologies stemmed from AT Projects and collaborative research among TP Projects are illustrated as a hallmark of the Program. The TP Atlas can be accessed at http://net.genes.nig.ac.jp/tpatlas/index_e.html .

  10. An atlas of 1975 GEOS-3 radar altimeter data for hurricane/tropical disturbance studies, volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, H. R.; Chan, B.; Munson, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    Geographic locations of 1975 hurricanes and other tropical disturbances were correlated with the closest approaching orbits of the GEOS-3 satellite and its radar altimeter. The disturbance locations and altimeter data were gathered for a seven-month period beginning with GEOS-3 launch in mid-April 1975. Areas of coverage were the Atlantic Ocean, the Carribean, the Gulf of Mexico, the west coast of the continental United States, and the central and western Pacific Ocean. Volume 1 contains disturbance coverage data for the Atlantic Ocean, Gulf of Mexico, and Eastern Pacific Ocean. Central and Western Pacific coverage is documented in Volume II.

  11. Summer Research Program (1992). High School Apprenticeship Program (HSAP) Reports. Volume 15. Wright Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-12-28

    Indigo , I ran the EPIC code, created graphics using the RSCORS graphics program, captured the .rgb files, and then animated the files to create simulation...all of MNSI for putting up with 4 kids this summer (5, counting Bob). You guys are sure fun to work with. Thanks for treating us as equals. 45- 5 -L000

  12. Summer Research Program (1992). Graduate Student Research Program (GSRP) Reports. Volume 10. Wright Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-12-28

    report presents the results of work accomplished during the 8-week AFOSR summer research program at the AARA lab of Wright Patterson Air Force Base...during the 8-week AFOSR summer research pro- gram at the AARA lab of Wright Patterson Air Force Base. The goal of this work is a scheme for detecting

  13. United States Air Force Summer Faculty Research Program (1986). Program Technical Report. Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-12-01

    for Crippled Children, Chicago Unit. At Shriners I have continued to develop instrumented methods for evaluating spasticity and hypertonicity. I have...acceptable. Another aspect of the program aims at assessing high temperature electrical resistivity of several dispersion strengthened conductors with...electrical resistivity measurements on dispersion strengthened materials including copper-niobium, copper-alumina, aluminum-silicon carbide, and aluminum

  14. Preventing Substance Use among High School Athletes: The ATLAS and ATHENA Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Linn; Eliot, Diane

    2005-01-01

    This article will provide information about two worthwhile programs that deal with education of high school athletes about use and abuse of steroids and other areas. Based on rationale and expressed need, program descriptions will be provided including summaries of relevant program results. Guidelines for what practitioners need to consider when…

  15. A Comprehensive Review of Credit Instructional Programs Offered by Pasadena City Colleges, 1981-1982. Volume I. Summary Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvell Education Managment Planning, Inc., Los Angeles, CA.

    The first part of a report on a comprehensive review of the credit instructional programs offered by Pasadena City College (PCC), this volume provides a description of the evaluation procedures used, and a discussion of general issues that are major considerations for program improvement. Section I introduces the program review in terms of its…

  16. Proceedings of the 1998 U.S. DOE Hydrogen Program Review: Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-08-01

    This document contains technical progress reports on 42 research projects funded by the DOE Hydrogen Program in Fiscal Year 1998, in support of its mission to make hydrogen a cost-effective energy carrier for utility, building, and transportation applications. Each year, the Program conducts a rigorous review of its portfolio of projects, utilizing teams of experts to provide vital feedback on the progress of research. These proceedings serve as an important technology reference for the DOE Hydrogen Program. The papers in Volume 2 are arranged under the following topical sections: Storage and separation systems; Thermal systems; and Transportation systems. Selected papers have been indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  17. Animal use and lessons learned in the U.S. High Production Volume Chemicals Challenge Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Patricia L; Manuppello, Joseph R; Willett, Catherine E; Sandler, Jessica T

    2012-12-01

    Launched by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in 1998, the High Production Volume (HPV) Challenge Program was developed to address the perceived gap in basic hazard information for the 2,800 chemicals produced or imported into the United States in quantities of ≥ 1 million pounds per year. Health and environmental effects data obtained from either existing information or through new vertebrate animal testing were voluntarily submitted by chemical companies (sponsors) to the U.S. EPA. Despite the potential for extensive animal testing, animal welfare guidelines were not provided until after the start of the program. We evaluated compliance with the animal welfare principles that arose from an agreement reached between the U.S. EPA and animal protection organizations and tracked the HPV program's use of animals for testing. Under a worst-case scenario, the HPV program had the potential to consume 3.5 million animals in new testing. After application of animal-saving measures, approximately 127,000 were actually used. Categorization of chemicals based on similar structure-activity and application of read-across, along with use of existing test data, were the most effective means of reducing animal testing. However, animal-saving measures were inconsistently used by both sponsors and the U.S. EPA. Lessons learned from the HPV program can be applied to future programs to minimize animal testing and promote more human-relevant chemical risk assessment.

  18. Subseabed disposal program annual report, January-December 1980. Volume II. Appendices (principal investigator progress reports). Part 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinga, K.R. (ed.)

    1981-07-01

    Volume II of the sixth annual report describing the progress and evaluating the status of the Subseabed Disposal Program contains the appendices referred to in Volume I, Summary and Status. Because of the length of Volume II, it has been split into two parts for publication purposes. Part 1 contains Appendices A-Q; Part 2 contains Appendices R-MM. Separate abstracts have been prepared for each appendix for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

  19. Office of Technology Development`s Research, Development, Demonstration, Testing and Evaluation Mid-Year Program Review. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-08-01

    This document, Volume 2, presents brief summaries of programs being investigated at USDOE sites for waste processing, remedial action, underground storage tank remediation, and robotic applications in waste management.

  20. Experimental Engineering Section semiannual progress report, March 1-August 31, 1976. Volume 2. Biotechnology and environmental programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitt, Jr., W. W.; Mrochek, J. E. [comps.

    1978-03-01

    This volume contains the progress report of the biotechnology and environmental programs in the Experimental Engineering Section of the Chemical Technology Division. Research efforts in these programs during this report period have been in five areas: (1) environmental research; (2) centrifugal analyzer development; (3) advanced analytical systems development; (4) bioengineering research; and (5) bioengineering development. Summaries of these programmatic areas are contained in Volume I.

  1. 22 March 2012 - Canada Foundation for Innovation Senior Programs Officer H.-C. Bandulet with spouse in the ATLAS visitor centre guided by Former Spokesperson P. Jenni.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2012-01-01

    CERN-HI-1203073 16: Senior Canadian Scientist, ATLAS Collaboration, University of Toronto/IPP R. Teuscher; L. Andrzejewski(Spouse); H.-C. Bandulet; R.Voss (behind);ATLAS Collaboration, University of Toronto N.Ilic; ;ATLAS Collaboration, University of Toronto, R. Rezvani; ATLAS Collaboration Former Spokesperson P. Jenni.

  2. A stereotaxic, population-averaged T1w ovine brain atlas including cerebral morphology and tissue volumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitzsche, Björn; Frey, Stephen; Collins, Louis D.; Seeger, Johannes; Lobsien, Donald; Dreyer, Antje; Kirsten, Holger; Stoffel, Michael H.; Fonov, Vladimir S.; Boltze, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Standard stereotaxic reference systems play a key role in human brain studies. Stereotaxic coordinate systems have also been developed for experimental animals including non-human primates, dogs, and rodents. However, they are lacking for other species being relevant in experimental neuroscience including sheep. Here, we present a spatial, unbiased ovine brain template with tissue probability maps (TPM) that offer a detailed stereotaxic reference frame for anatomical features and localization of brain areas, thereby enabling inter-individual and cross-study comparability. Three-dimensional data sets from healthy adult Merino sheep (Ovis orientalis aries, 12 ewes and 26 neutered rams) were acquired on a 1.5 T Philips MRI using a T1w sequence. Data were averaged by linear and non-linear registration algorithms. Moreover, animals were subjected to detailed brain volume analysis including examinations with respect to body weight (BW), age, and sex. The created T1w brain template provides an appropriate population-averaged ovine brain anatomy in a spatial standard coordinate system. Additionally, TPM for gray (GM) and white (WM) matter as well as cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) classification enabled automatic prior-based tissue segmentation using statistical parametric mapping (SPM). Overall, a positive correlation of GM volume and BW explained about 15% of the variance of GM while a positive correlation between WM and age was found. Absolute tissue volume differences were not detected, indeed ewes showed significantly more GM per bodyweight as compared to neutered rams. The created framework including spatial brain template and TPM represent a useful tool for unbiased automatic image preprocessing and morphological characterization in sheep. Therefore, the reported results may serve as a starting point for further experimental and/or translational research aiming at in vivo analysis in this species. PMID:26089780

  3. A stereotaxic, population-averaged T1w ovine brain atlas including cerebral morphology and tissue volumes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Björn eNitzsche

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Standard stereotaxic reference systems play a key role in human brain studies. Stereotaxic coordinate systems have also been developed for experimental animals including non-human primates, dogs and rodents. However, they are lacking for other species being relevant in experimental neuroscience including sheep. Here, we present a spatial, unbiased ovine brain template with tissue probability maps (TPM that offer a detailed stereotaxic reference frame for anatomical features and localization of brain areas, thereby enabling inter-individual and cross-study comparability. Three-dimensional data sets from healthy adult Merino sheep (Ovis orientalis aries, 12 ewes and 26 neutered rams were acquired on a 1.5T Philips MRI using a T1w sequence. Data were averaged by linear and non-linear registration algorithms. Moreover, animals were subjected to detailed brain volume analysis including examinations with respect to body weight, age and sex. The created T1w brain template provides an appropriate population-averaged ovine brain anatomy in a spatial standard coordinate system. Additionally, TPM for gray (GM and white (WM matter as well as cerebrospinal fluid (CSF classification enabled automatic prior-based tissue segmentation using statistical parametric mapping (SPM. Overall, a positive correlation of GM volume and body weight explained about 15% of the variance of GM while a positive correlation between WM and age was found. Absolute tissue volume differences were not detected, indeed ewes showed significantly more GM per bodyweight as compared to neutered rams. The created framework including spatial brain template and TPM represent a useful tool for unbiased automatic image preprocessing and morphological characterization in sheep. Therefore, the reported results may serve as a starting point for further experimental and/or translational research aiming at in vivo analysis in this species.

  4. ATLAS production system

    CERN Document Server

    Borodin, Mikhail; The ATLAS collaboration; De, Kaushik; Klimentov, Alexei; Golubkov, Dmitry; Maeno, Tadashi; Mashinistov, Ruslan; Wenaus, Torre; Padolski, Siarhei

    2016-01-01

    The second generation of the ATLAS production system called ProdSys2 is a distributed workload manager which used by thousands of physicists to analyze the data remotely, with the volume of processed data is beyond the exabyte scale, across a more than hundred heterogeneous sites. It achieves high utilization by combining dynamic job definition based on many criterias, such as input and output size, memory requirements and CPU consumption with manageable scheduling policies and by supporting different kind of computational resources, such as GRID, clouds, supercomputers and volunteering computers. Besides jobs definition Production System also includes flexible web user interface, which implements user-friendly environment for main ATLAS workflows, e.g. simple way of combining different data flows, and real-time monitoring, optimised for using with huge amount of information to present. We present an overview of the ATLAS Production System major components: job and task definition, workflow manager web user i...

  5. Regulatory Oversight Program, July 1, 1993--March 3, 1997. Volume 2: Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    On July, 1993, a Regulatory Oversight (RO) organization was established within the US DOE, Oak Ridge Operations to provide regulatory oversight of the DOE uranium enrichment facilities leased to the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC). The purpose of the OR program was to ensure continued plant safety, safeguards and security while the plants were transitioned to regulatory oversight by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Volume 2 contains copies of the documents which established the relationship between NRC, DOE, USEC, and DOL (Dept of Labor) required to facilitate regulatory oversight transition.

  6. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) test facilities study program. Final report. Volume II. Part C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1977-01-17

    Results are presented of an 8-month study to develop alternative non-site-specific OTEC facilities/platform requirements for an integrated OTEC Test Program which may include land and floating test facilities. Volume II--Appendixes is bound in three parts (A, B, and C) which together comprise a compendium of the most significant detailed data developed during the study. Part C describes test facility support, data acquisition and control system design, cost data, energy self-sufficiency, and test facility applications.

  7. The LOGO-S Language and the Portable LOGO System. Volume I: Language and System Descriptions. Volume II: Program Listings. Report No. 3968.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feurzeig, Wallace; And Others

    This two volume report presents descriptions of LOGO-S, an interactive programming language expressly designed for education, and the portable LOGO system, a computer software development. The modular structure of LOGO, along with its simple but powerful extension features, is naturally suited to problem solving in many problem domains with…

  8. Stirling Space Engine Program. Volume 2; Appendixes A, B, C and D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhar, Manmohan

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this program was to develop the technology necessary for operating Stirling power converters in a space environment and to demonstrate this technology in full-scale engine tests. Volume 2 of the report includes the following appendices: Appendix A: Heater Head Development (Starfish Heater Head Program, 1/10th Segment and Full-Scale Heat Pipes, and Sodium Filling and Processing); Appendix B: Component Test Power Converter (CTPC) Component Development (High-temperature Organic Materials, Heat Exchanger Fabrication, Beryllium Issues, Sodium Issues, Wear Couple Tests, Pressure Boundary Penetrations, Heating System Heaters, and Cooler Flow Test); Appendix C: Udimet Testing (Selection of the Reference Material for the Space Stirling Engine Heater Head, Udimet 720LI Creep Test Result Update, Final Summary of Space Stirling Endurance Engine Udimet 720L1 Fatigue Testing Results, Udimet 720l1 Weld Development Summary, and Udimet 720L1 Creep Test Final Results Summary), and Appendix D: CTPC Component Development Photos.

  9. Energy Extension Service Pilot Program: evaluation report after two years. Volume I. Evaluation summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-04-01

    The EES pilot program was initiated in August 1977, when 10 states were selected on a competitive basis for participation. The pilot states (Alabama, Connecticut, Michigan, New Mexico, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Texas, Washington, Wisconsin, and Wyoming) devoted the first 6 months to start-up activities. This document is a follow-up report to the three volume Evaluation Summary of the first year of the pilot EES program published in September 1979. The purpose of this report is to provide an overview of the impacts and costs of the two years of the pilot program, and to check the consistency of findings over the two year period. The analysis addresses the following: (1) were the impact findings of Year I and Year II consistent, or did Year I and Year II attitudes and behavior vary. If variation existed, could it be attributed to program changes as the EES progressed from a start-up phase (Year I) to more normal service delivery (Year II); and (2) did costs of service delivery change (again reflecting start-up and normal service delivery costs). Did cost changes affect conclusions about the relative cost effectiveness of delivering services to different target audiences.

  10. Development, Verification and Validation of Parallel, Scalable Volume of Fluid CFD Program for Propulsion Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Jeff; Yang, H. Q.

    2014-01-01

    There are many instances involving liquid/gas interfaces and their dynamics in the design of liquid engine powered rockets such as the Space Launch System (SLS). Some examples of these applications are: Propellant tank draining and slosh, subcritical condition injector analysis for gas generators, preburners and thrust chambers, water deluge mitigation for launch induced environments and even solid rocket motor liquid slag dynamics. Commercially available CFD programs simulating gas/liquid interfaces using the Volume of Fluid approach are currently limited in their parallel scalability. In 2010 for instance, an internal NASA/MSFC review of three commercial tools revealed that parallel scalability was seriously compromised at 8 cpus and no additional speedup was possible after 32 cpus. Other non-interface CFD applications at the time were demonstrating useful parallel scalability up to 4,096 processors or more. Based on this review, NASA/MSFC initiated an effort to implement a Volume of Fluid implementation within the unstructured mesh, pressure-based algorithm CFD program, Loci-STREAM. After verification was achieved by comparing results to the commercial CFD program CFD-Ace+, and validation by direct comparison with data, Loci-STREAM-VoF is now the production CFD tool for propellant slosh force and slosh damping rate simulations at NASA/MSFC. On these applications, good parallel scalability has been demonstrated for problems sizes of tens of millions of cells and thousands of cpu cores. Ongoing efforts are focused on the application of Loci-STREAM-VoF to predict the transient flow patterns of water on the SLS Mobile Launch Platform in order to support the phasing of water for launch environment mitigation so that vehicle determinantal effects are not realized.

  11. Technology transfer for the US Department of Energy's Energy Storage Program: Volume 2, Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruneau, C.L.; Fassbender, L.L.

    1988-10-01

    This document contains the appendices to Technology Transfer Recommendations for the US Department of Energy's Storage Program (PNL-6484, Vol. 1). These appendices are a list of projects, publications, and presentations connected with the Energy Storage (STOR) program. In Volume 1, the technology transfer activities of the STOR program are examined and mechanisms for increasing the effectiveness of those activities are recommended.

  12. The Herschel ATLAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eales, S.; Dunne, L.; Clements, D.; Cooray, A.; De Zotti, G.; Dye, S.; Ivison, R.; Jarvis, M.; Lagache, G.; Maddox, S.; hide

    2010-01-01

    The Herschel ATLAS is the largest open-time key project that will be carried out on the Herschel Space Observatory. It will survey 570 sq deg of the extragalactic sky, 4 times larger than all the other Herschel extragalactic surveys combined, in five far-infrared and submillimeter bands. We describe the survey, the complementary multiwavelength data sets that will be combined with the Herschel data, and the six major science programs we are undertaking. Using new models based on a previous submillimeter survey of galaxies, we present predictions of the properties of the ATLAS sources in other wave bands.

  13. Recovery Act: Finite Volume Based Computer Program for Ground Source Heat Pump Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James A Menart, Professor

    2013-02-22

    This report is a compilation of the work that has been done on the grant DE-EE0002805 entitled Finite Volume Based Computer Program for Ground Source Heat Pump Systems. The goal of this project was to develop a detailed computer simulation tool for GSHP (ground source heat pump) heating and cooling systems. Two such tools were developed as part of this DOE (Department of Energy) grant; the first is a two-dimensional computer program called GEO2D and the second is a three-dimensional computer program called GEO3D. Both of these simulation tools provide an extensive array of results to the user. A unique aspect of both these simulation tools is the complete temperature profile information calculated and presented. Complete temperature profiles throughout the ground, casing, tube wall, and fluid are provided as a function of time. The fluid temperatures from and to the heat pump, as a function of time, are also provided. In addition to temperature information, detailed heat rate information at several locations as a function of time is determined. Heat rates between the heat pump and the building indoor environment, between the working fluid and the heat pump, and between the working fluid and the ground are computed. The heat rates between the ground and the working fluid are calculated as a function time and position along the ground loop. The heating and cooling loads of the building being fitted with a GSHP are determined with the computer program developed by DOE called ENERGYPLUS. Lastly COP (coefficient of performance) results as a function of time are provided. Both the two-dimensional and three-dimensional computer programs developed as part of this work are based upon a detailed finite volume solution of the energy equation for the ground and ground loop. Real heat pump characteristics are entered into the program and used to model the heat pump performance. Thus these computer tools simulate the coupled performance of the ground loop and the heat pump. The

  14. Finite Volume Based Computer Program for Ground Source Heat Pump System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menart, James A. [Wright State University

    2013-02-22

    This report is a compilation of the work that has been done on the grant DE-EE0002805 entitled ?Finite Volume Based Computer Program for Ground Source Heat Pump Systems.? The goal of this project was to develop a detailed computer simulation tool for GSHP (ground source heat pump) heating and cooling systems. Two such tools were developed as part of this DOE (Department of Energy) grant; the first is a two-dimensional computer program called GEO2D and the second is a three-dimensional computer program called GEO3D. Both of these simulation tools provide an extensive array of results to the user. A unique aspect of both these simulation tools is the complete temperature profile information calculated and presented. Complete temperature profiles throughout the ground, casing, tube wall, and fluid are provided as a function of time. The fluid temperatures from and to the heat pump, as a function of time, are also provided. In addition to temperature information, detailed heat rate information at several locations as a function of time is determined. Heat rates between the heat pump and the building indoor environment, between the working fluid and the heat pump, and between the working fluid and the ground are computed. The heat rates between the ground and the working fluid are calculated as a function time and position along the ground loop. The heating and cooling loads of the building being fitted with a GSHP are determined with the computer program developed by DOE called ENERGYPLUS. Lastly COP (coefficient of performance) results as a function of time are provided. Both the two-dimensional and three-dimensional computer programs developed as part of this work are based upon a detailed finite volume solution of the energy equation for the ground and ground loop. Real heat pump characteristics are entered into the program and used to model the heat pump performance. Thus these computer tools simulate the coupled performance of the ground loop and the heat pump

  15. JAtlasView: a Java atlas-viewer for browsing biomedical 3D images and atlases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Mark

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many three-dimensional (3D images are routinely collected in biomedical research and a number of digital atlases with associated anatomical and other information have been published. A number of tools are available for viewing this data ranging from commercial visualization packages to freely available, typically system architecture dependent, solutions. Here we discuss an atlas viewer implemented to run on any workstation using the architecture neutral Java programming language. Results We report the development of a freely available Java based viewer for 3D image data, descibe the structure and functionality of the viewer and how automated tools can be developed to manage the Java Native Interface code. The viewer allows arbitrary re-sectioning of the data and interactive browsing through the volume. With appropriately formatted data, for example as provided for the Electronic Atlas of the Developing Human Brain, a 3D surface view and anatomical browsing is available. The interface is developed in Java with Java3D providing the 3D rendering. For efficiency the image data is manipulated using the Woolz image-processing library provided as a dynamically linked module for each machine architecture. Conclusion We conclude that Java provides an appropriate environment for efficient development of these tools and techniques exist to allow computationally efficient image-processing libraries to be integrated relatively easily.

  16. JAtlasView: a Java atlas-viewer for browsing biomedical 3D images and atlases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Guangjie; Burton, Nick; Hill, Bill; Davidson, Duncan; Kerwin, Janet; Scott, Mark; Lindsay, Susan; Baldock, Richard

    2005-03-09

    Many three-dimensional (3D) images are routinely collected in biomedical research and a number of digital atlases with associated anatomical and other information have been published. A number of tools are available for viewing this data ranging from commercial visualization packages to freely available, typically system architecture dependent, solutions. Here we discuss an atlas viewer implemented to run on any workstation using the architecture neutral Java programming language. We report the development of a freely available Java based viewer for 3D image data, descibe the structure and functionality of the viewer and how automated tools can be developed to manage the Java Native Interface code. The viewer allows arbitrary re-sectioning of the data and interactive browsing through the volume. With appropriately formatted data, for example as provided for the Electronic Atlas of the Developing Human Brain, a 3D surface view and anatomical browsing is available. The interface is developed in Java with Java3D providing the 3D rendering. For efficiency the image data is manipulated using the Woolz image-processing library provided as a dynamically linked module for each machine architecture. We conclude that Java provides an appropriate environment for efficient development of these tools and techniques exist to allow computationally efficient image-processing libraries to be integrated relatively easily.

  17. Regulatory Oversight Program, July 1, 1993--March 3, 1997. Volume 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    On July, 1993, a Regulatory Oversight (RO) organization was established within the US DOE, Oak Ridge Operations (ORO) to provide regulatory oversight of the DOE uranium enrichment facilities leased to the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC). The purpose of the OR program was to ensure continued plant safety, safeguards and security while the plants were transitioned to regulatory oversight by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Volume 3 contains copies of two reports that document the DOE/ORO regulatory oversight inspection and enforcement history for each gaseous diffusion plant site. Each report provides a formal mechanism by which DOE/ORO could communicate the inspection and enforcement history to NRC. The reports encompass the inspection activities that occurred during July 1, 1993 through March 2, 1997.

  18. Environmental Hazards Assessment Program. Volume 4: Annual report, July 1, 1993--June 30, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-09-01

    The Medical University of South Carolina`s (MUSC) vision is to become the premier national resource for medical information and for environmental/health risk assessment. A key component to the success of the many missions of the Environmental Hazards Assessment Program (EHAP) is timely access to large volumes of data. The significant growth in the number of environmental/health information systems that has occurred over the past few years has made data access challenging. This study documents the results of the needs assessment effort conducted to determine the information access and processing requirements of EHAP. The following topics are addressed in this report: immunological consequences of beryllium exposure; assessment of genetic risks to environmental diseases; low dose-rate radiation health effects; environmental risk perception in defined populations; information support and access systems; and environmental medicine and risk communication: curriculum and a professional support network-Department of Family Medicine.

  19. National Low-Level Waste Management Program radionuclide report series. Volume 2, Niobium-94

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, J.P.; Carboneau, M.L.

    1995-04-01

    The Purpose of the National Low-Level Waste Management Program Radionuclide Report Series is to provide information to, state representatives and developers of low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities about the radiological chemical, and physical characteristics of selected radionuclides and their behavior in the low-level radioactive waste disposal facility environment. Extensive surveys of available literature provided information used to produce this series of reports and an introductory report. This report is Volume 11 of the series. It outlines the basic radiological, chemical, and physical characteristics of niobium-94, waste types and forms that contain it, and its behavior in environmental media such as soils, plants, groundwater, air, animals and the human body.

  20. An atlas of functions: with equator, the atlas function calculator

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Oldham, Keith

    2008-01-01

    ... of arguments. The first edition of An Atlas of Functions, the product of collaboration between a mathematician and a chemist, appeared during an era when the programmable calculator was the workhorse for the numerical evaluation of functions. That role has now been taken over by the omnipresent computer, and therefore the second edition delegates this duty to Equator, the Atlas function calculator. This is a software program that, as well as carrying out other tasks, will calculate va...

  1. Low-Volume Walking Program Improves Cardiovascular-Related Health in Older Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong-Hwan Park, Masashi Miyashita

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Although numerous sources of evidence show that regular physical activity is beneficial to health, most individuals do not engage in a sufficient amount of physical activity to meet the guidelines set out by expert panels. In addition, the minimum amount of physical activity associated with reduced cardiovascular disease risk markers is not clear in older adults. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of a 12-week walking program involving an exercise volume below the current minimum physical activity recommendation on cardiovascular disease risk markers in older adults. The participants were recruited from the following two groups separately: a walking group (n = 14 and a control group (n = 14. In the walking group, participants walked 30 to 60 minutes per session on 2 days per week for 12 weeks (average walking time, 49.4 ± 8.8 min/session. Plasma oxidised low-density lipoprotein concentrations tended to be lower than baseline values in the walking group after 12 weeks (paired t-test, p = 0.127. The ratio of oxidised low-density lipoprotein to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol was significantly lower than the baseline ratio in the walking group after 12 weeks (paired t-test, p = 0.035. Resting systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure were significantly lower than baseline values in the walking group after 12 weeks (paired t-tests, p = 0.002, p < 0.0005, respectively. Our findings demonstrate that a 12-week walking program comprising a low volume of physical activity confers a benefit to cardiovascular-related health in older adults.

  2. ATLAS Overview Week 2009 Barcelona

    CERN Multimedia

    Claudia Marcelloni

    2009-01-01

    From October 5th to October 9th about 400 physicists from the ATLAS Collaboration met in Barcelona (Catalonia) to discuss the status of the experiment. The event was organized by the Institut de Física d'Altes Energies (IFAE), a member of the ATLAS Collaboration. Besides the Scientific program, few social events were organized, such as Reception at the Palau de Pedralbes, a visit to the Fundacio Joan Miro and a social dinner at Maremagnunm hall.

  3. The ATLAS3D project - I. A volume-limited sample of 260 nearby early-type galaxies: science goals and selection criteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cappellari, Michele; Emsellem, Eric; Krajnović, Davor; McDermid, Richard M.; Scott, Nicholas; Verdoes Kleijn, G. A.; Young, Lisa M.; Alatalo, Katherine; Bacon, R.; Blitz, Leo; Bois, Maxime; Bournaud, Frédéric; Bureau, M.; Davies, Roger L.; Davis, Timothy A.; de Zeeuw, P. T.; Duc, Pierre-Alain; Khochfar, Sadegh; Kuntschner, Harald; Lablanche, Pierre-Yves; Morganti, Raffaella; Naab, Thorsten; Oosterloo, Tom; Sarzi, Marc; Serra, Paolo; Weijmans, Anne-Marie

    The ATLAS3D project is a multiwavelength survey combined with a theoretical modelling effort. The observations span from the radio to the millimetre and optical, and provide multicolour imaging, two-dimensional kinematics of the atomic (H I), molecular (CO) and ionized gas (Hβ, [O III] and [N I]),

  4. The ATLAS(3D) project : I. A volume-limited sample of 260 nearby early-type galaxies: science goals and selection criteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cappellari, Michele; Emsellem, Eric; Krajnovic, Davor; McDermid, Richard M.; Scott, Nicholas; Kleijn, G. A. Verdoes; Young, Lisa M.; Alatalo, Katherine; Bacon, R.; Blitz, Leo; Bois, Maxime; Bournaud, Frederic; Bureau, M.; Davies, Roger L.; Davis, Timothy A.; de Zeeuw, P. T.; Duc, Pierre-Alain; Khochfar, Sadegh; Kuntschner, Harald; Lablanche, Pierre-Yves; Morganti, Raffaella; Naab, Thorsten; Oosterloo, Tom; Sarzi, Marc; Serra, Paolo; Weijmans, Anne-Marie

    The ATLAS3D project is a multiwavelength survey combined with a theoretical modelling effort. The observations span from the radio to the millimetre and optical, and provide multicolour imaging, two-dimensional kinematics of the atomic (H i), molecular (CO) and ionized gas (H beta, [O iii] and [N

  5. Variable thickness transient ground-water flow model. Volume 3. Program listings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reisenauer, A.E.

    1979-12-01

    The Assessment of Effectiveness of Geologic Isolation Systems (AEGIS) Program is developing and applying the methodology for assessing the far-field, long-term post-closure safety of deep geologic nuclear waste repositories. AEGIS is being performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) under contract with the Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation (OWNI) for the Department of Energy (DOE). One task within AEGIS is the development of methodology for analysis of the consequences (water pathway) from loss of repository containment as defined by various release scenarios. Analysis of the long-term, far-field consequences of release scenarios requires the application of numerical codes which simulate the hydrologic systems, model the transport of released radionuclides through the hydrologic systems to the biosphere, and, where applicable, assess the radiological dose to humans. Hydrologic and transport models are available at several levels of complexity or sophistication. Model selection and use are determined by the quantity and quality of input data. Model development under AEGIS and related programs provides three levels of hydrologic models, two levels of transport models, and one level of dose models (with several separate models). This is the third of 3 volumes of the description of the VTT (Variable Thickness Transient) Groundwater Hydrologic Model - second level (intermediate complexity) two-dimensional saturated groundwater flow.

  6. The forward Detectors of the ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Vittori, Camilla; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    In this poster, a review of the ATLAS forward detectors operating in the 2015-2016 data taking is given. This includes a description of LUCID, the preferred ATLAS luminosity provider; of the ALFA detector, aimed to measure elastically scattered protons at small angle for the total proton-proton cross section measurement; of the ATLAS Forward Proton project AFP, which was partially installed and took the first data in 2015, and of the Zero Degree Calorimeter ZDC built for the ATLAS Heavy Ions physics program. The near future plans for these detectors will also be addressed.

  7. Development of a community energy conservation program. Volume II. Energy saving techniques for use by local governments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-11-26

    This volume contains technical material related to community energy conservation programs, and supplements the organizational material in Volume I. It is in looseleaf format so that sections related to specific topics can be easily copied or transferred to individuals responsible for various sorts of conservation, such as carpooling programs, building improvements, and community outreach. Three technical chapters are included, discussing topics in the areas of: internal city and county operations; community powers and regulations, and outreach programs. In the first, the concern is with what the community can do to reduce energy use in its own operations, an effective first step in promoting comprehensive energy conservation. The second chapter analyzes ways that the police power and fiscal powers of the community can be used for energy conservation, through building codes, zoning, and similar measures. In the final chapter, ways to promote energy conservation in the community are discussed: programs include outreach to households and firms, carpool promotion, waste oil recycling, etc.

  8. Supporting ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    maximilien brice

    2003-01-01

    Eighteen feet made of stainless steel will support the barrel ATLAS detector in the cavern at Point 1. In total, the ATLAS feet system will carry approximately 6000 tons, and will give the same inclination to the detector as the LHC accelerator.

  9. Forward Detectors and Physics at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Soni, N; The ATLAS collaboration

    2010-01-01

    This talk will cover the current Atlas forward detectors LUCID, ZDC, ALFA and the upgrade project AFP. The current forward detectors are dedicated for the luminosity measurements and the forward physics measurements at first low luminosity LHC phase. The AFP project will significantly extend the ATLAS physics program at high luminosities by tagging the very forward tagging protons.

  10. Surgery resident participation in short-term humanitarian international surgical missions can supplement exposure where program case volumes are low.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bale, Asha G; Sifri, Ziad C

    2016-01-01

    General surgery training programs face declining case volume and diversity. We wanted to determine if resident participation in international surgical missions would increase exposure to cases underrepresented in our program case mix. Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education program data from 2008 to 2011 (University of Medicine and Dentistry-New Jersey Medical School, Newark, NJ) were analyzed to identify categories where volume was below national average. This was compared with case logs from 3 missions conducted by International Surgical Health Initiatives between 2011 and 2012. All chief residents completed more than minimum required index cases. Categories head and neck, alimentary tract, abdomen, and endocrine showed percentile below national average. Seven residents participated in 3 missions to Philippines and Sierra Leone. Sixty-five percent of the operations performed were in the 4 low-volume categories. International surgery missions expose residents to a high volume and variety of cases. Participation can be one way to increase case volume and diversity during training. Cases completed on missions with board certified surgeons should be considered for Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education credit. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Supporting ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Eighteen feet made of stainless steel will support the barrel ATLAS detector in the cavern at Point 1. In total, the ATLAS feet system will carry approximately 6000 tons, and will give the same inclination to the detector as the LHC accelerator. The installation of the feet is scheduled to finish during January 2004 with an installation precision at the 1 mm level despite their height of 5.3 metres. The manufacture was carried out in Russia (Company Izhorskiye Zavody in St. Petersburg), as part of a Russian and JINR Dubna in-kind contribution to ATLAS. Involved in the installation is a team from IHEP-Protvino (Russia), the ATLAS technical co-ordination team at CERN, and the CERN survey team. In all, about 15 people are involved. After the feet are in place, the barrel toroid magnet and the barrel calorimeters will be installed. This will keep the ATLAS team busy for the entire year 2004.

  12. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program, 1998. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannerot, Richard B. (Editor); Sickorez, Donn G. (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    JSC NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted by the University of Houston and JSC, under ASEE. The objectives of the program are to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science members; stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants; and contribute to the research objectives of the NASA Centers. Each faculty fellow spent at least 10 weeks at JSC engaged in a research project commensurate with his/her interests and background and worked in collaboration with a NASA/JSC colleague. This document is a compilation of the final reports on the fellows' research projects performed during the summer of 1998. Volume 1, current volume, contains the first reports, and volume 2 contains the remaining reports.

  13. Nuclear proliferation and civilian nuclear power. Report of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program. Volume II. Proliferation resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-06-01

    The purpose of this volume is limited to an assessment of the relative effects that particular choices of nuclear-power systems, for whatever reasons, may have on the possible spread of nuclear-weapons capabilities. This volume addresses the concern that non-nuclear-weapons states may be able to initiate efforts to acquire or to improve nuclear-weapons capabilities through civilian nuclear-power programs; it also addresses the concern that subnational groups may obtain and abuse the nuclear materials or facilities of such programs, whether in nuclear-weapons states (NWS's) or nonnuclear-weapons states (NNW's). Accordingly, this volume emphasizes one important factor in such decisions, the resistance of nuclear-power systems to the proliferation of nuclear-weapons capabilities.

  14. Multi-atlas pancreas segmentation: Atlas selection based on vessel structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karasawa, Ken'ichi; Oda, Masahiro; Kitasaka, Takayuki; Misawa, Kazunari; Fujiwara, Michitaka; Chu, Chengwen; Zheng, Guoyan; Rueckert, Daniel; Mori, Kensaku

    2017-07-01

    Automated organ segmentation from medical images is an indispensable component for clinical applications such as computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) and computer-assisted surgery (CAS). We utilize a multi-atlas segmentation scheme, which has recently been used in different approaches in the literature to achieve more accurate and robust segmentation of anatomical structures in computed tomography (CT) volume data. Among abdominal organs, the pancreas has large inter-patient variability in its position, size and shape. Moreover, the CT intensity of the pancreas closely resembles adjacent tissues, rendering its segmentation a challenging task. Due to this, conventional intensity-based atlas selection for pancreas segmentation often fails to select atlases that are similar in pancreas position and shape to those of the unlabeled target volume. In this paper, we propose a new atlas selection strategy based on vessel structure around the pancreatic tissue and demonstrate its application to a multi-atlas pancreas segmentation. Our method utilizes vessel structure around the pancreas to select atlases with high pancreatic resemblance to the unlabeled volume. Also, we investigate two types of applications of the vessel structure information to the atlas selection. Our segmentations were evaluated on 150 abdominal contrast-enhanced CT volumes. The experimental results showed that our approach can segment the pancreas with an average Jaccard index of 66.3% and an average Dice overlap coefficient of 78.5%. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Industrial Fuel Gas Demonstration Plant Program. Volume III. Demonstration plant environmental analysis (Deliverable No. 27)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-08-01

    An Environmental Report on the Memphis Light, Gas and Water Division Industrial Fuel Demonstration Plant was prepared for submission to the US Department of Energy under Contract ET-77-C-01-2582. This document is Volume III of a three-volume Environmental Report. Volume I consists of the Summary, Introduction and the Description of the Proposed Action. Volume II consists of the Description of the Existing Environment. Volume III contains the Environmental Impacts of the Proposed Action, Mitigating Measures and Alternatives to the Proposed Action.

  16. Assessment of the Price-Volume Agreement Program in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Euna; Park, Sun-Young; Lee, Eui-Kyung

    2016-10-01

    The Price-Volume Agreement Program (PVAP) was promulgated in 2007 in South Korea as the first attempt to adjust drug pricing according to total consumption in order to contain drug expenditure. This study was designed to assess the impact of the PVAP on diabetes drug expenditure for a period of a 10-year period (2003-2012) using claims data from the National Health Insurance Service. We estimated a multilevel mixed-effects linear regression model by comparing the level of total monthly diabetes drug expenditure for drugs subject to PVAP and existing drugs after adjusting the average differences in drug expenditure before and after the PVAP. The monthly total expenditure for drugs that were newly listed through the PVAP (negotiation drugs) was 7.03% higher on average compared to that for existing drugs, controlling for the baseline differences in expenditure before and after the PVAP. This increase was observed in all four subgroups of diabetes drugs, including sitagliptin, vildagliptin, exenatide, and others. The growth rate of total diabetes drug expenditure was reduced after the PVAP despite the sustained escalation of expenditure levels, which may imply that the PVAP has the potential to be an effective tool for drug expenditure control in the long term. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Taus at ATLAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demers, Sarah M. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States). Dept. of Physics

    2017-12-06

    The grant "Taus at ATLAS" supported the group of Sarah Demers at Yale University over a period of 8.5 months, bridging the time between her Early Career Award and her inclusion on Yale's grant cycle within the Department of Energy's Office of Science. The work supported the functioning of the ATLAS Experiment at CERN's Large Hadron Collider and the analysis of ATLAS data. The work included searching for the Higgs Boson in a particular mode of its production (with a W or Z boson) and decay (to a pair of tau leptons.) This was part of a broad program of characterizing the Higgs boson as we try to understand this recently discovered particle, and whether or not it matches our expectations within the current standard model of particle physics. In addition, group members worked with simulation to understand the physics reach of planned upgrades to the ATLAS experiment. Supported group members include postdoctoral researcher Lotte Thomsen and graduate student Mariel Pettee.

  18. An Icelandic wind atlas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawri, Nikolai; Nína Petersen, Gudrun; Bjornsson, Halldór; Arason, Þórður; Jónasson, Kristján

    2013-04-01

    While Iceland has ample wind, its use for energy production has been limited. Electricity in Iceland is generated from renewable hydro- and geothermal source and adding wind energy has not be considered practical or even necessary. However, adding wind into the energy mix is becoming a more viable options as opportunities for new hydro or geothermal power installation become limited. In order to obtain an estimate of the wind energy potential of Iceland a wind atlas has been developed as a part of the Nordic project "Improved Forecast of Wind, Waves and Icing" (IceWind). The atlas is based on mesoscale model runs produced with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model and high-resolution regional analyses obtained through the Wind Atlas Analysis and Application Program (WAsP). The wind atlas shows that the wind energy potential is considerable. The regions with the strongest average wind are nevertheless impractical for wind farms, due to distance from road infrastructure and power grid as well as harsh winter climate. However, even in easily accessible regions wind energy potential in Iceland, as measured by annual average power density, is among the highest in Western Europe. There is a strong seasonal cycle, with wintertime power densities throughout the island being at least a factor of two higher than during summer. Calculations show that a modest wind farm of ten medium size turbines would produce more energy throughout the year than a small hydro power plants making wind energy a viable additional option.

  19. Exotics searches in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Renjie; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Many theories beyond the Standard Model predict new physics accessible by the LHC. The ATLAS experiment all have rigorous search programs ongoing with the aim to find indications for new physics involving state of the art analysis techniques. This talk reports on new results obtained using the pp collision data sample collected in 2015 and 2016 at the LHC with a centre-of-mass energy of 13 TeV.

  20. The ATLAS Trigger System

    CERN Document Server

    Owen, Rhys Edward; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment employs a complex trigger system to enable the collaborations physics program. The LHC is now well in to its second running period delivering proton proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=13$ TeV with high instantaneous luminosity. This talk will describe the two level hardware and software trigger used to select events in this environment including recent improvements and the latest performance results.

  1. Overview of ATLAS results

    CERN Document Server

    Grabowska-Bold, Iwona; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider has undertaken a broad physics program to probe and characterize the hot nuclear matter created in relativistic lead-lead collisions. This talk presents recent results based on Run 2 data on production of jet, electroweak bosons and quarkonium, electromagnetic processes in ultra-peripheral collisions, and bulk particle collectivity from PbPb, pPb and pp collisions.

  2. Mongolian Atlas

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Climatic atlas dated 1985, in Mongolian, with introductory material also in Russian and English. One hundred eight pages in single page PDFs.

  3. Conference Report: The First ATLAS.ti User Conference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeanine C. Evers

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This report on the First ATLAS.ti User Conference shares our impressions and experiences as longstanding ATLAS.ti users and trainers about the First ATLAS.ti User Conference in Berlin 2013. The origins, conceptual principles and development of the program are outlined, the conference themes discussed and experiences shared. Finally, the future of the program is discussed. URN: http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs1401197

  4. Program evaluation: Weatherization Residential Assistance Partnership (WRAP) Program. Volume 3, Appendices D, E, F, and G: [Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-12-01

    The ``Weatherization Residential Assistance Partnership,`` or WRAP program, is a fuel-blind conservation program designed to assist Northeast Utilities` low-income customers to use energy safely and efficiently. Innovative with respect to its collaborative approach and its focus on utilizing and strengthening the existing low-income weatherization service delivery network, the WRAP program offers an interesting model to other utilities which traditionally have relied on for-profit energy service contractors and highly centralized program implementation structures. This report presents appendices with surveys, participant list, and computers program to examine and predict potential energy savings.

  5. Evaluation of spacecraft technology programs (effects on communication satellite business ventures), volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenburg, J. S.; Kaplan, M.; Fishman, J.; Hopkins, C.

    1985-01-01

    The computational procedures used in the evaluation of spacecraft technology programs that impact upon commercial communication satellite operations are discussed. Computer programs and data bases are described.

  6. Clinical Validation of Atlas-Based Auto-Segmentation of Multiple Target Volumes and Normal Tissue (Swallowing/Mastication) Structures in the Head and Neck

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teguh, David N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus Medical Center-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Levendag, Peter C., E-mail: p.levendag@erasmusmc.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus Medical Center-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Voet, Peter W.J.; Al-Mamgani, Abrahim [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus Medical Center-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Han Xiao; Wolf, Theresa K.; Hibbard, Lyndon S. [Elekta-CMS Software, Maryland Heights, MO 63043 (United States); Nowak, Peter; Akhiat, Hafid; Dirkx, Maarten L.P.; Heijmen, Ben J.M.; Hoogeman, Mischa S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus Medical Center-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To validate and clinically evaluate autocontouring using atlas-based autosegmentation (ABAS) of computed tomography images. Methods and Materials: The data from 10 head-and-neck patients were selected as input for ABAS, and neck levels I-V and 20 organs at risk were manually contoured according to published guidelines. The total contouring times were recorded. Two different ABAS strategies, multiple and single subject, were evaluated, and the similarity of the autocontours with the atlas contours was assessed using Dice coefficients and the mean distances, using the leave-one-out method. For 12 clinically treated patients, 5 experienced observers edited the autosegmented contours. The editing times were recorded. The Dice coefficients and mean distances were calculated among the clinically used contours, autocontours, and edited autocontours. Finally, an expert panel scored all autocontours and the edited autocontours regarding their adequacy relative to the published atlas. Results: The time to autosegment all the structures using ABAS was 7 min/patient. No significant differences were observed in the autosegmentation accuracy for stage N0 and N+ patients. The multisubject atlas performed best, with a Dice coefficient and mean distance of 0.74 and 2 mm, 0.67 and 3 mm, 0.71 and 2 mm, 0.50 and 2 mm, and 0.78 and 2 mm for the salivary glands, neck levels, chewing muscles, swallowing muscles, and spinal cord-brainstem, respectively. The mean Dice coefficient and mean distance of the autocontours vs. the clinical contours was 0.8 and 2.4 mm for the neck levels and salivary glands, respectively. For the autocontours vs. the edited autocontours, the mean Dice coefficient and mean distance was 0.9 and 1.6 mm, respectively. The expert panel scored 100% of the autocontours as a 'minor deviation, editable' or better. The expert panel scored 88% of the edited contours as good compared with 83% of the clinical contours. The total editing time was 66 min

  7. Networks in ATLAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Shawn; ATLAS Collaboration

    2017-10-01

    Networks have played a critical role in high-energy physics (HEP), enabling us to access and effectively utilize globally distributed resources to meet the needs of our physicists. Because of their importance in enabling our grid computing infrastructure many physicists have taken leading roles in research and education (R&E) networking, participating in, and even convening, network related meetings and research programs with the broader networking community worldwide. This has led to HEP benefiting from excellent global networking capabilities for little to no direct cost. However, as other science domains ramp-up their need for similar networking it becomes less clear that this situation will continue unchanged. What this means for ATLAS in particular needs to be understood. ATLAS has evolved its computing model since the LHC started based upon its experience with using globally distributed resources. The most significant theme of those changes has been increased reliance upon, and use of, its networks. We will report on a number of networking initiatives in ATLAS including participation in the global perfSONAR network monitoring and measuring efforts of WLCG and OSG, the collaboration with the LHCOPN/LHCONE effort, the integration of network awareness into PanDA, the use of the evolving ATLAS analytics framework to better understand our networks and the changes in our DDM system to allow remote access to data. We will also discuss new efforts underway that are exploring the inclusion and use of software defined networks (SDN) and how ATLAS might benefit from: • Orchestration and optimization of distributed data access and data movement. • Better control of workflows, end to end. • Enabling prioritization of time-critical vs normal tasks • Improvements in the efficiency of resource usage

  8. Annual review in automatic programming

    CERN Document Server

    Goodman, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Annual Review in Automatic Programming, Volume 2 is a collection of papers that discusses the controversy about the suitability of COBOL as a common business oriented language, and the development of different common languages for scientific computation. A couple of papers describes the use of the Genie system in numerical calculation and analyzes Mercury autocode in terms of a phrase structure language, such as in the source language, target language, the order structure of ATLAS, and the meta-syntactical language of the assembly program. Other papers explain interference or an ""intermediate

  9. Nuclear proliferation and civilian nuclear power: report of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program. Volume IV. Commercial potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1979-12-01

    Volume IV provides time and cost estimates for positioning new nuclear power systems for commercial deployment. The assessment also estimates the rates at which the new systems might penetrate the domestic market, assuming the continuing viability of the massive light-water reactor network that now exists worldwide. This assessment does not recommend specific, detailed program plans and budgets for individual systems; however, it is clear from this analysis that any of the systems investigated could be deployed if dictated by national interest.

  10. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) summer faculty fellowship program, 1986, volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcinnis, Bayliss (Editor); Goldstein, Stanley (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    The Johnson Space Center (JSC) NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted by the University of Houston. The basic objectives of the program are: (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching objectives of participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA Centers. Each faculty fellow spent ten weeks at JSC engaged in a research project commensurate with his interests and background and worked in collaboration with a NASA/JSC colleague. Volume 1 contains sections 1 through 14.

  11. Nuclear proliferation and civilian nuclear power. Report of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program. Volume IV. Commercial potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-06-01

    This volume of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program (NASAP) report provides time and cost estimates for positioning new nuclear power systems for commercial deployment. The assessment also estimates the rates at which the new systems might penetrate the domestic market, assuming the continuing viability of the massive light-water reactor network that now exists worldwide. This assessment does not recommend specific, detailed program plans and budgets for individual systems; however, it is clear from this analysis that any of the systems investigated could be deployed if dictated by national interest.

  12. Advanced transportation system studies technical area 2 (TA-2): Heavy lift launch vehicle development. volume 3; Program Cost estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCurry, J. B.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of the TA-2 contract was to provide advanced launch vehicle concept definition and analysis to assist NASA in the identification of future launch vehicle requirements. Contracted analysis activities included vehicle sizing and performance analysis, subsystem concept definition, propulsion subsystem definition (foreign and domestic), ground operations and facilities analysis, and life cycle cost estimation. The basic period of performance of the TA-2 contract was from May 1992 through May 1993. No-cost extensions were exercised on the contract from June 1993 through July 1995. This document is part of the final report for the TA-2 contract. The final report consists of three volumes: Volume 1 is the Executive Summary, Volume 2 is Technical Results, and Volume 3 is Program Cost Estimates. The document-at-hand, Volume 3, provides a work breakdown structure dictionary, user's guide for the parametric life cycle cost estimation tool, and final report developed by ECON, Inc., under subcontract to Lockheed Martin on TA-2 for the analysis of heavy lift launch vehicle concepts.

  13. The Savannah River Site`s Groundwater Monitoring Program, First Quarter 1996, Volumes I and II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, C.D. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States)

    1996-10-22

    This report summarizes the Savanna River Site (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program conducted by EPD/EMS during the first quarter 1996. It includes the analytical data, field data, data review, quality control, and other documentation for this program. It also provides a record of the program`s activities and serves as an official record of the analytical results.

  14. Universal Documentation System Handbook. Volume 2. Requirement Formats and Instructions; Program Introduction, Program Requirements Document/Operations Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-08-01

    or the Air Force precedence rating. Program Status: State whether the program is proposed or approved and whether the PI is being subitted to obtain...instructions for Format 2CF,,. JT ( TATUOMATION ( ): indicate ’ tetbar each item number sukmitted is a requirement fc: - mort frcm the Support A.-ccy or

  15. Laboratory data manipulation tools basic data handling programs. Volume 2: Detailed software/hardware documentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    The set of computer programs described allows for data definition, data input, and data transfer between the LSI-11 microcomputers and the VAX-11/780 minicomputer. Program VAXCOM allows for a simple method of textual file transfer from the LSI to the VAX. Program LSICOM allows for easy file transfer from the VAX to the LSI. Program TTY changes the LSI-11 operators console to the LSI's printing device. Program DICTIN provides a means for defining a data set for input to either computer. Program DATAIN is a simple to operate data entry program which is capable of building data files on either machine. Program LEDITV is an extremely powerful, easy to use, line oriented text editor. Program COPYSBF is designed to print out textual files on the line printer without character loss from FORTRAN carriage control or wide record transfer.

  16. Balanced program plan. Volume XI. Fission analysis for biomedical and environmental research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foster, R.F.

    1976-06-01

    Factors involved in the formulation of an ERDA-sponsored program for health and environmental research in connection with the fission fuel cycle are discussed under the following section headings: major issues associated with the use of nuclear power; fission fuel cycle technology: milling, UF/sub 6/ production, uranium enrichment, plutonium fuel fabrication, power production (reactors), fuel reprocessing, waste management, fuel and waste transportation; problem definition: characterization, measurement and monitoring, transport processes, health effects, ecological processes and effects, and integrated assessment; budget; characterization, measuring and monitoring program units; transport processes program units; health effects program units; ecological processes and effects program units; and integrated assessment program units. (JGB)

  17. ATLAS Virtual Visits: bringing the world into the ATLAS control room

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldfarb, Steven; Yacoob, Sahal; ATLAS Experiment

    2016-04-01

    ATLAS Virtual Visits is a project initiated in 2011 for the Education & Outreach program of the ATLAS Experiment at CERN [1]. Its goal is to promote public appreciation of the LHC physics program and particle physics, in general, through direct dialogue between ATLAS physicists and remote audiences. A Virtual Visit is an IP-based videoconference, coupled with a public webcast and video recording, between ATLAS physicists and remote locations around the world, that typically include high school or university classrooms, Masterclasses, science fairs, or other special events, usually hosted by collaboration members. Over the past two years, more than 10,000 people, from all of the world's continents, have actively participated in ATLAS Virtual Visits, with many more enjoying the experience from the publicly available webcasts and recordings. We present an overview of our experience and discuss potential development for the future.

  18. ATLAS Virtual Visits bringing the world into the ATLAS control room

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2051192; The ATLAS collaboration; Yacoob, Sahal

    2016-01-01

    ATLAS Virtual Visits is a project initiated in 2011 for the Education & Outreach program of the ATLAS Experiment at CERN. Its goal is to promote public appreciation of the LHC physics program and particle physics, in general, through direct dialogue between ATLAS physicists and remote audiences. A Virtual Visit is an IP-based videoconference, coupled with a public webcast and video recording, between ATLAS physicists and remote locations around the world, that typically include high school or university classrooms, Masterclasses, science fairs, or other special events, usually hosted by collaboration members. Over the past two years, more than 10,000 people, from all of the world’s continents, have actively participated in ATLAS Virtual Visits, with many more enjoying the experience from the publicly available webcasts and recordings. We present an overview of our experience and discuss potential development for the future.

  19. Networks in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00260714; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Networks have played a critical role in high-energy physics (HEP), enabling us to access and effectively utilize globally distributed resources to meet the needs of our physicists. Because of their importance in enabling our grid computing infrastructure many physicists have taken leading roles in research and education (R&E) networking, participating in, and even convening, network related meetings and research programs with the broader networking community worldwide. This has led to HEP benefiting from excellent global networking capabilities for little to no direct cost. However, as other science domains ramp-up their need for similar networking it becomes less clear that this situation will continue unchanged. What this means for ATLAS in particular needs to be understood. ATLAS has evolved its computing model since the LHC started based upon its experience with using globally distributed resources. The most significant theme of those changes has been increased reliance upon, and use of, its networks....

  20. Networks in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Mc Kee, Shawn Patrick; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Networks have played a critical role in high-energy physics (HEP), enabling us to access and effectively utilize globally distributed resources to meet the needs of our physicists. Because of their importance in enabling our grid computing infrastructure many physicists have taken leading roles in research and education (R&E) networking, participating in, and even convening, network related meetings and research programs with the broader networking community worldwide. This has led to HEP benefiting from excellent global networking capabilities for little to no direct cost. However, as other science domains ramp-up their need for similar networking it becomes less clear that this situation will continue unchanged. What this means for ATLAS in particular needs to be understood. ATLAS has evolved its computing model since the LHC started based upon its experience with using globally distributed resources. The most significant theme of those changes has been increased reliance upon, and use of, its networks....

  1. National Center for Advanced Information Components Manufacturing. Program summary report, Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-10-01

    The National Center for Advanced Information Components Manufacturing focused on manufacturing research and development for flat panel displays, advanced lithography, microelectronics, and optoelectronics. This report provides an overview of the program, summaries of the technical projects, and key program accomplishments.

  2. GEODYN programmer's guide, volume 2, part 2. [computer program for estimation of orbit and geodetic parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullins, N. E.; Dao, N. C.; Martin, T. V.; Goad, C. C.; Boulware, N. L.; Chin, M. M.

    1972-01-01

    A computer program for executive control routine for orbit integration of artificial satellites is presented. At the beginning of each arc, the program initiates required constants as well as the variational partials at epoch. If epoch needs to be reset to a previous time, the program negates the stepsize, and calls for integration backward to the desired time. After backward integration is completed, the program resets the stepsize to the proper positive quantity.

  3. The Savannah River Site`s Groundwater Monitoring Program: First quarter 1993, Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, C.D. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)

    1993-08-01

    This report summarizes the Savannah River Site (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program conducted by the Environmental Protection Department`s Environmental Monitoring Section (EPD/EMS) during the first quarter of 1993. It includes the analytical data, field data, data review, quality control, and other documentation for this program; provides a record of the program`s activities; and serves as an official document of the analytical results.

  4. Pre and post test analyses for the core scenarios tested in the ATLAS facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, In Goo; Kim, H. J.; Cho, Y. J.; Yang, C. Y.; Yoo, S. O.; Choi, Y. S.; Bang, Y. S.; Shin, A. D.; Huh, B. G.; Kim, S. J. [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-02-15

    The scope of present study is to establish an environment to operate ATLAS Standard Problem for the core scenarios. Following has been performed in this study : evaluation of the characteristics of ATLAS facility by using RELAP5 code, development of steady input data deck for ATLAS TRACE assessment, evaluation of QA requirements for the important thermal-hydraulic tests, organization of ATLAS standard problem. In this study, the characteristics of ATLAS, which is the first large IET facility, has been analyzed and it was confirmed that ATLAS program will provide meaningful date for the assurance of APR1400 safety. A comparing work on the characteristics of APR1400 and ATLAS confirmed general similarities between two installations. Also, some specific characteristics of each ones were founded in this study. It was recommended that special care should be given to them in developing a test scenario and code assessment. In this study, QA requirements for thermal hydraulic experiments used for proof test and/or code assessment were identified. Finally, an infrastructure for ATLAS Standard Problem (ASP) was successfully established. ASP will play important role of an systematic connection between ATLAS test and code assessment programs, and be actively operated for the next period of ATLAS program. QA requirements proposed in this study would be applied for the quality improvement of experimental programs in Korea. Also, an infrastructure for ATLAS Standard Problem will be directly applied for the next ATLAS program.

  5. National Waste Terminal Storage Program: critical element management concept. Volume I. Management summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-05-01

    CEM is oriented towards identifying, quantifying and curtailing probable impediments to a program originating from both the internal and external program environments. Critical elements are defined as events, trends or conditions that could generate potential uncertainties in the program. The critical elements are broken down into components against which management action is initiated.

  6. National Center for Advanced Information Components Manufacturing. Program summary report, Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-10-01

    The National Center for Advanced Information Components Manufacturing focused on manufacturing research and development for flat panel displays, advanced lithography, microelectronics, and optoelectronics. This report provides an overview of the program, program history, summaries of the technical projects, and key program accomplishments.

  7. 1997 Summer Research Program (SRP), High School Apprenticeship Program (HSAP), Final Reports, Volume 12B, Armstrong Laboratory

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moore, Gary

    1997-01-01

    The United States Air Force Summer Research Program (USAF-SRP) is designed to introduce university, college, and technical institute faculty members, graduate students, and high school students to Air Force research...

  8. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) summer faculty fellowship program, 1986, volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcinnis, Bayliss (Editor); Goldstein, Stanley (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    The Johnson Space Center (JSC) NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted by the University of Houston and JSC. The ten week program was operated under the auspices of the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE). The basic objectives of the program are (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA Centers. Each faculty fellow spent ten weeks at JSC engaged in a research project commensurate with his interests and background and worked in collaboration with a NASA/JSC colleague. The final reports on the research projects are presented. This volume, 2, contains sections 15 through 30.

  9. 1992-1993 Bonneville Appliance Efficiency Program: Showerhead evaluation. Volume I - report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warwick, W.M.

    1995-01-01

    The Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) provides wholesale electric power to over 100 retail distribution utilities in the Pacific Northwest. Bonneville is faced with meeting growing loads from these utilities. It acquires conservation as one means of meeting this load growth. Bonneville has offered a variety of conservation programs since 1980. Efficient showerheads have been a feature in residential conservation programs ever since. Bonneville launched the Residential Appliance Efficiency Program to focus on water-heater energy conservation opportunities in 1992. The Residential Appliance Efficiency Program consists of two parts, a water-heater efficiency program, and a hot-water efficiency program. This report evaluates the savings and costs of the first two years of the showerhead portion of the Residential Appliance Efficiency Program (the showerhead program). Although it is not a formal evaluation of the program limited to implementation or a {open_quotes}process{close_quotes} evaluation, observations about program design and implementation are included as appropriate. Results of this evaluation are limited to program participants within the Bonneville service territory.

  10. Gulf Coast geopressured-geothermal program summary report compilation. Volume 2-A: Resource description, program history, wells tested, university and company based research, site restoration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John, C.J.; Maciasz, G.; Harder, B.J.

    1998-06-01

    The US Department of Energy established a geopressured-geothermal energy program in the mid 1970`s as one response to America`s need to develop alternate energy resources in view of the increasing dependence on imported fossil fuel energy. This program continued for 17 years and approximately two hundred million dollars were expended for various types of research and well testing to thoroughly investigate this alternative energy source. This volume describes the following studies: Geopressured-geothermal resource description; Resource origin and sediment type; Gulf Coast resource extent; Resource estimates; Project history; Authorizing legislation; Program objectives; Perceived constraints; Program activities and structure; Well testing; Program management; Program cost summary; Funding history; Resource characterization; Wells of opportunity; Edna Delcambre No. 1 well; Edna Delcambre well recompletion; Fairfax Foster Sutter No. 2 well; Beulah Simon No. 2 well; P.E. Girouard No. 1 well; Prairie Canal No. 1 well; Crown Zellerbach No. 2 well; Alice C. Plantation No. 2 well; Tenneco Fee N No. 1 well; Pauline Kraft No. 1 well; Saldana well No. 2; G.M. Koelemay well No. 1; Willis Hulin No. 1 well; Investigations of other wells of opportunity; Clovis A. Kennedy No. 1 well; Watkins-Miller No. 1 well; Lucien J. Richard et al No. 1 well; and the C and K-Frank A. Godchaux, III, well No. 1.

  11. A generative model for multi-atlas segmentation across modalities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iglesias, J. E.; Sabuncu, M. R.; Van Leemput, Koen

    2012-01-01

    Current label fusion methods enhance multi-atlas segmentation by locally weighting the contribution of the atlases according to their similarity to the target volume after registration. However, these methods cannot handle voxel intensity inconsistencies between the atlases and the target image......, which limits their application across modalities or even across MRI datasets due to differences in image contrast. Here we present a generative model for multi-atlas image segmentation, which does not rely on the intensity of the training images. Instead, we exploit the consistency of voxel intensities...... within regions in the target volume and their relation to the propagated labels. This is formulated in a probabilistic framework, where the most likely segmentation is obtained with variational expectation maximization (EM). The approach is demonstrated in an experiment where T1-weighted MRI atlases...

  12. Thin section casting program. Volume 2: Horizontal TSC (Thin-Section Casting) approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    In horizontal thin-section casting (HTSC), 1-inch-thick steel sections are produced at speeds up to 600 ipm or about 60 tons per hour per foot of width (tphf). Liquid steel is fed from the ladle, and flows through a specially designed tundish, then flows through a refractory feeding tube and nozzle, with approximately the same external dimensions as the cast section, into a near-horizontal rectangular mold whose all four sides are traveling in the same direction and speed as the steel casting. This report is the second of a six volume set on thin section casting. This volume covers the research on horizontal thin section casting (TSC).

  13. Smolt Monitoring Program, Volume II, Migrational Characteristics of Columbia Basin Salmon and Steelhead Trout, 1986 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fish Passage Center

    1987-02-01

    Smolt Monitoring Program Annual Report, 1986, Volume I, describes the results of travel time monitoring and other migrational characteristics of yearling and sub-yearling chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka), and steelhead trout (Salmo gairdneri). This volume presents the data from Fish Passage Center freeze brands used in the analysis of travel time for Lewiston, Lower Granite, Lower Monumental, Rock Island, McNary, and John Day dams. Summary of data collection procedures and explanation of data listings are presented in conjunction with the mark recapture data. Data for marked fish not presented in this report will be provided upon request. Daily catch statistics (by species), flow, and sample parameters for the smolt monitoring sites, Clearwater, Lewiston, Lower Granite, Lower Monumental, Rock Island, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville also will be provided upon request.

  14. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program, 1987, volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, William B. (Editor); Goldstein, Stanley H. (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    The objective of the NASA/ASEE program were: (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA centers. Each faculty fellow spent 10 weeks at Johnson Space Center engaged in a research project commensurate with his/her interests and background and worked in collaboration with a NASA/JSC colleague. A compilation is presented of the final reports on the research projects done by the fellows during the summer of 1987. This is volume 1 of a 2 volume report.

  15. 1992-1993 Bonneville Appliance Efficiency Program: Showerhead Evaluation Volume II - Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warwick, W.M.

    1995-01-01

    This report included the appendices for 1992-1993 Bonneville appliance efficiency program: showerhead evaluation. It consists of nine appendices, titled: Bonneville documents; overview of research projects; Puget Power and Light persistence study; hot-water flow analyses and assumptions documentation; regional end-use metering program; showerhead and faucet aerator performance assessment; Bonneville showerhead program distribution methods by participating utility; water- and energy-saving measure distribution methods literature review; REMP study load shape results.

  16. TSAR User’s Manual: Volume II. Data Input, Program Operation and Redimensioning, and Sample Problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-02-01

    This Note is one of five documents that collectively describe the TSAR and TSARINA computer models developed to assess the effect of air attacks on...variety of airbase improvements may be tested. The present volume of the User’s Manual is intended primarily for those responsible for preparing input materials and for operating the TSAR simulation model. (Author)

  17. The NASA digital VGH program. Exploration of methods and final results. Volume 1: Development of methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crabill, Norman L.

    1989-01-01

    Two hundred hours of Lockheed L 1011 digital flight data recorder data taken in 1973 were used to develop methods and procedures for obtaining statistical data useful for updating airliner airworthiness design criteria. Five thousand hours of additional data taken in 1978 to 1982 are reported in volumes 2, 3, 4 and 5.

  18. Defense Small Business Innovation Research Program (SBIR). Volume 1. Army Abstracts of Phase 1 Awards 1991

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    TECHNIQUES, THE IDENTIFICATION AND SELECTION OF CONDUCTIVE POLYMERS, CONDUCTIVE FILLERS, AND NONWOVEN AND FIBER MATERIALS WHICH CAN BE MADE COMPATIBLE WITH...COMPACT PORTABLE SYSTEM FOR RAPID INFUSION AND WARMING OF CRYSTALLOID FLUID OR BLOOD SUBSTITUTE FOR VOLUME REPLACEMENT IN HEMORRHAGIC SHOCK. THE SYSTEM...SOPHISTICATED FLOW AND TEMPERATURE CONTROL, USER INTERFACE, FILTRATION , AIR DETECTION, AND INTEGRAL POWER SOURCE. IN ADDITION TO ITS MILITARY

  19. Virtual Visit to the ATLAS Control Room by the University of Genova

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Experiment

    2012-01-01

    The ATLAS Virtual Visit is included in the program of the Course in Particle and Nuclear Experimental Physics at the Physics Department of the Genova University. Students are introduced to experimental techniques and instrumentation and run few experiences in the laboratory. Besides that, they visit the Department groups that are involved both in Nuclear or High Energy Particle physics experiments. In this context, the ATLAS team will open them the doors to laboratory where ~1/3 of the Pixel detector has been built and where we are currently assembling and qualifying part of the electrical services and modules for the Insertable B layer (IBL) that will be installed in 2014 in ATLAS. Students will be introduced to LHC, ATLAS and the physics program before having the possibility to meet ATLAS physicists in ATLAS control room. http://atlas-live-virtual-visit.web.cern.ch/atlas-live-virtual-visit/2012/Genova-2012.html

  20. Virtual Visit to the ATLAS Control Room by the Genova University

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    The ATLAS Virtual Visit is included in the program of the Course in Particle and Nuclear Experimental Physics at the Physics Department of the Genova University. Students are introduced to experimental techniques and instrumentation and run few experiences in the laboratory. Besides that, they visit the Department groups that are involved both in Nuclear or High Energy Particle physics experiments. In this context, the ATLAS team will open them the doors to laboratory where ~1/3 of the Pixel detector has been built and where we are currently assembling and qualifying part of the electrical services and modules for the Insertable B layer (IBL) that will be installed in 2014 in ATLAS. Students will be introduced to LHC, ATLAS and the physics program before having the possibility to meet ATLAS physicists in ATLAS control room. http://atlas-live-virtual-visit.web.cern.ch/atlas-live-virtual-visit/2013/Genova-2013_1.html

  1. Virtual Visit to the ATLAS Control Room by the Genova University

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    The ATLAS Virtual Visit is included in the program of the Course in Particle and Nuclear Experimental Physics at the Physics Department of the Genova University. Students are introduced to experimental techniques and instrumentation and run few experiences in the laboratory. Besides that, they visit the Department groups that are involved both in Nuclear or High Energy Particle physics experiments. In this context, the ATLAS team will open them the doors to laboratory where ~1/3 of the Pixel detector has been built and where we are currently assembling and qualifying part of the electrical services and modules for the Insertable B layer (IBL) that will be installed in 2014 in ATLAS. Students will be introduced to LHC, ATLAS and the physics program before having the possibility to meet ATLAS physicists in ATLAS control room. http://atlas-live-virtual-visit.web.cern.ch/atlas-live-virtual-visit/2013/Genova-2013_2.html

  2. Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation. Volume 1, Base program activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robbins, G.A.; Brandes, S.D.; Winschel, R.A.; Burke, F.P.

    1994-05-01

    This 4.5-year project consisted of routine analytical support to DOE`s direct liquefaction process development effort (the Base Program), and an extensive effort to develop, demonstrate, and apply new analytical methods for the characterization of liquefaction process streams (the Participants Program). The objective of the Base Program was to support the on-going DOE direct coal liquefaction process development program. Feed, process, and product samples were used to assess process operations, product quality, and the effects of process variables, and to direct future testing. The primary objective of the Participants Program was to identify and demonstrate analytical methods for use in support of liquefaction process development, and in so doing, provide a bridge between process design, and development, and operation and analytical chemistry. To achieve this objective, novel analytical methods were evaluated for application to direct coal liquefaction-derived materials. CONSOL teamed with 24 research groups in the program. Well-defined and characterized samples of coal liquefaction process-derived materials were provided to each group. CONSOL made an evaluation of each analytical technique. During the performance of this project, we obtained analyses on samples from numerous process development and research programs and we evaluated a variety of analytical techniques for their usefulness in supporting liquefaction process development. Because of the diverse nature of this program, we provide here an annotated bibliography of the technical reports, publications, and formal presentations that resulted from this program to serve as a comprehensive summary of contract activities.

  3. The relation between media promotions and service volume for a statewide tobacco quitline and a web-based cessation program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schillo, Barbara A; Mowery, Andrea; Greenseid, Lija O; Luxenberg, Michael G; Zieffler, Andrew; Christenson, Matthew; Boyle, Raymond G

    2011-12-16

    This observational study assessed the relation between mass media campaigns and service volume for a statewide tobacco cessation quitline and stand-alone web-based cessation program. Multivariate regression analysis was used to identify how weekly calls to a cessation quitline and weekly registrations to a web-based cessation program are related to levels of broadcast media, media campaigns, and media types, controlling for the impact of external and earned media events. There was a positive relation between weekly broadcast targeted rating points and the number of weekly calls to a cessation quitline and the number of weekly registrations to a web-based cessation program. Additionally, print secondhand smoke ads and online cessation ads were positively related to weekly quitline calls. Television and radio cessation ads and radio smoke-free law ads were positively related to web program registration levels. There was a positive relation between the number of web registrations and the number of calls to the cessation quitline, with increases in registrations to the web in 1 week corresponding to increases in calls to the quitline in the subsequent week. Web program registration levels were more highly influenced by earned media and other external events than were quitline call volumes. Overall, broadcast advertising had a greater impact on registrations for the web program than calls to the quitline. Furthermore, registrations for the web program influenced calls to the quitline. These two findings suggest the evolving roles of web-based cessation programs and Internet-use practices should be considered when creating cessation programs and media campaigns to promote them. Additionally, because different types of media and campaigns were positively associated with calls to the quitline and web registrations, developing mass media campaigns that offer a variety of messages and communicate through different types of media to motivate tobacco users to seek services

  4. The relation between media promotions and service volume for a statewide tobacco quitline and a web-based cessation program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schillo Barbara A

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This observational study assessed the relation between mass media campaigns and service volume for a statewide tobacco cessation quitline and stand-alone web-based cessation program. Methods Multivariate regression analysis was used to identify how weekly calls to a cessation quitline and weekly registrations to a web-based cessation program are related to levels of broadcast media, media campaigns, and media types, controlling for the impact of external and earned media events. Results There was a positive relation between weekly broadcast targeted rating points and the number of weekly calls to a cessation quitline and the number of weekly registrations to a web-based cessation program. Additionally, print secondhand smoke ads and online cessation ads were positively related to weekly quitline calls. Television and radio cessation ads and radio smoke-free law ads were positively related to web program registration levels. There was a positive relation between the number of web registrations and the number of calls to the cessation quitline, with increases in registrations to the web in 1 week corresponding to increases in calls to the quitline in the subsequent week. Web program registration levels were more highly influenced by earned media and other external events than were quitline call volumes. Conclusion Overall, broadcast advertising had a greater impact on registrations for the web program than calls to the quitline. Furthermore, registrations for the web program influenced calls to the quitline. These two findings suggest the evolving roles of web-based cessation programs and Internet-use practices should be considered when creating cessation programs and media campaigns to promote them. Additionally, because different types of media and campaigns were positively associated with calls to the quitline and web registrations, developing mass media campaigns that offer a variety of messages and communicate through

  5. ATLAS Nightly Build System Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Dimitrov, G; The ATLAS collaboration; Simmons, B; Undrus, A

    2013-01-01

    The ATLAS Nightly Build System is a facility for automatic production of software releases. Being the major component of ATLAS software infrastructure, it supports more than 50 multi-platform branches of nightly releases and provides ample opportunities for testing new packages, for verifying patches to existing software, and for migrating to new platforms and compilers. The Nightly System testing framework runs several hundred integration tests of different granularity and purpose. The nightly releases are distributed and validated, and some are transformed into stable releases used for data processing worldwide. The first LHC long shutdown (2013-2015) activities will elicit increased load on the Nightly System as additional releases and builds are needed to exploit new programming techniques, languages, and profiling tools. This paper describes the plan of the ATLAS Nightly Build System Long Shutdown upgrade. It brings modern database and web technologies into the Nightly System, improves monitoring of nigh...

  6. ATLAS Nightly Build System Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Dimitrov, G; The ATLAS collaboration; Simmons, B; Undrus, A

    2014-01-01

    The ATLAS Nightly Build System is a facility for automatic production of software releases. Being the major component of ATLAS software infrastructure, it supports more than 50 multi-platform branches of nightly releases and provides ample opportunities for testing new packages, for verifying patches to existing software, and for migrating to new platforms and compilers. The Nightly System testing framework runs several hundred integration tests of different granularity and purpose. The nightly releases are distributed and validated, and some are transformed into stable releases used for data processing worldwide. The first LHC long shutdown (2013-2015) activities will elicit increased load on the Nightly System as additional releases and builds are needed to exploit new programming techniques, languages, and profiling tools. This paper describes the plan of the ATLAS Nightly Build System Long Shutdown upgrade. It brings modern database and web technologies into the Nightly System, improves monitoring of nigh...

  7. Stuart R. Stidolph diatom atlas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stidolph, S.R.; Sterrenburg, F.A.S.; Smith, K.E.L.; Kraberg, A.

    2012-01-01

    The "Stuart R. Stidolph Diatom Atlas" is a comprehensive volume of diatom taxa identified and micrographed by Stuart R. Stidoph during the 1980s and 1990s. The samples were collected from marine coasts of various geographic regions within tropical and subtropical climates. The plates included within this report have never been published and are being published by the USGS as an online reference so that others may have access to this incredible collection.

  8. Short-term moderate intensive high volume training program provides aerobic endurance benefit in wheelchair basketball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skucas, Kestutis; Pokvytyte, Vaida

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this paper was to investigate the effect of short-term period, moderate intensity and high volume endurance training on physiological variables in elite wheelchair basketball players. Eight wheelchair basketball players were examined. The subjects participated in a two-week intervention program of mainly two training types: wheelchair basketball and wheelchair driving endurance training. The subjects performed the continuously increasing cycling exercise (CCE) at the constant 60 rpm arm cranking speed at the beginning of the program and after two weeks of the program. The initial workload was 20 W, then the workload was increased by 2 W every 5 seconds until fatigue. The post training of the wheelchair basketball group in the study showed a significant improvement in the peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak) and the peak power output (POpeak). VO2peak increased by 9% from 2.32±0.16 L/min to 2.53±0.2 L/min (Ptraining and post training test power output (PO [w]), relative power output (PO [w/kg]) increased significantly in all zones of energy production. In conclusion, this study indicated that the wheelchair basketball squad had relatively high levels of aerobic fitness prior to participating in the endurance training program. Nevertheless, the high-volume, moderate-intensity, short-term training program, which evolved over the two-weeks period, resulted in the improvement of the athlete's aerobic endurance. The ventilatory threshold (VT) and the second ventilatory threshold (VT2) are good markers for aerobic capacity of wheelchair athletes.

  9. Assessing the sustained impact of a school-based obesity prevention program for adolescent boys: the ATLAS cluster randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubans, David R; Smith, Jordan J; Plotnikoff, Ronald C; Dally, Kerry A; Okely, Anthony D; Salmon, Jo; Morgan, Philip J

    2016-08-20

    Obesity prevention interventions targeting 'at-risk' adolescents are urgently needed. The aim of this study is to evaluate the sustained impact of the 'Active Teen Leaders Avoiding Screen-time' (ATLAS) obesity prevention program. Cluster RCT in 14 secondary schools in low-income communities of New South Wales, Australia. Participants were 361 adolescent boys (aged 12-14 years) 'at risk' of obesity. The intervention was based on Self-Determination Theory and Social Cognitive Theory and involved: professional development, fitness equipment for schools, teacher-delivered physical activity sessions, lunch-time activity sessions, researcher-led seminars, a smartphone application, and parental strategies. Assessments for the primary (body mass index [BMI], waist circumference) and secondary outcomes were conducted at baseline, 8- (post-intervention) and 18-months (follow-up). Analyses followed the intention-to-treat principle using linear mixed models. After 18-months, there were no intervention effects for BMI or waist circumference. Sustained effects were found for screen-time, resistance training skill competency, and motivational regulations for school sport. There were no clinically meaningful intervention effects for the adiposity outcomes. However, the intervention resulted in sustained effects for secondary outcomes. Interventions that more intensively target the home environment, as well as other socio-ecological determinants of obesity may be needed to prevent unhealthy weight gain in adolescents from low-income communities. Australian Clinical Trial Registry ACTRN12612000978864.

  10. Report on Activities and Programs for Countering Proliferation and NBC Terrorism. Volume 1. Executive Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-07-01

    improved CWMD targeting and planning. The Simu- lation Environment & Response Program Execution Nesting Tool ( SERPENT ), version 2.2, improved the...effects to support target analysis for conventional and agent defeat weapons ( SERPENT ); and neutralization effects of various environments on CB agents...WMD USSTRATCOM Center for Combating Weapons of Mass Destruction SERPENT Simulation Environment & Response Program Execution Nesting Tool SLD Second

  11. Guide to reducing energy use. budget costs. Volume II. Local energy management program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brooks, S O; Wood, E S; Guenther, S; Graves, T

    1979-10-01

    Information is presented to aid communities tailor an energy conservation program specifically to themselves. Existing and new buildings, procurement, employee transportation programs, street lighting systems, and energy resource recovery are discussed. Examples are given on what can and has been done in communities. (MCW)

  12. Scheduling language and algorithm development study. Volume 2, phase 2: Introduction to plans programming. [user guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochran, D. R.; Ishikawa, M. K.; Paulson, R. E.; Ramsey, H. R.

    1975-01-01

    A user guide for the Programming Language for Allocation and Network Scheduling (PLANS) is presented. Information is included for the construction of PLANS programs. The basic philosophy of PLANS is discussed, and access and update reference techniques are described along with the use of tree structures.

  13. Evaluation of spacecraft technology programs (effects on communication satellite business ventures), volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenburg, J. S.; Gaelick, C.; Kaplan, M.; Fishman, J.; Hopkins, C.

    1985-01-01

    Commercial organizations as well as government agencies invest in spacecraft (S/C) technology programs that are aimed at increasing the performance of communications satellites. The value of these programs must be measured in terms of their impacts on the financial performane of the business ventures that may ultimately utilize the communications satellites. An economic evaluation and planning capability was developed and used to assess the impact of NASA on-orbit propulsion and space power programs on typical fixed satellite service (FSS) and direct broadcast service (DBS) communications satellite business ventures. Typical FSS and DBS spin and three-axis stabilized spacecraft were configured in the absence of NASA technology programs. These spacecraft were reconfigured taking into account the anticipated results of NASA specified on-orbit propulsion and space power programs. In general, the NASA technology programs resulted in spacecraft with increased capability. The developed methodology for assessing the value of spacecraft technology programs in terms of their impact on the financial performance of communication satellite business ventures is described. Results of the assessment of NASA specified on-orbit propulsion and space power technology programs are presented for typical FSS and DBS business ventures.

  14. Feasibility Study for Hotel/Motel Career Program for Harper College. Volume XIX, No. 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, John A.; And Others

    In spring 1990, a study was conducted at William Rainey Harper College (WRHC) to determine the feasibility of adding a career program in Hotel/Motel Management (HMM) to the current Food Service Program. Surveys were sent to 53 hotels and motels in the WRHC service area to determine employment demands that would affect the hiring of graduates of…

  15. Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation. Volume 2, Participants program final summary evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandes, S.D.; Robbins, G.A.; Winschel, R.A.; Burke, F.P.

    1994-05-01

    This 4.5-year project consisted of routine analytical support to DOE`s direct liquefaction process development effort (the Base Program), and an extensive effort to develop, demonstate, and apply new analytical methods for the characterization of liquefaction process streams (the Participants Program). The objective of the Base Program was to support the on-going DOE direct coal liquefaction process development program. Feed, process, and product samples were used to assess process operations, product quality, and the effects of process variables, and to direct future testing. The primary objective of the Participants Program was to identify and demonstrate analytical methods for use in support of liquefaction process develpment, and in so doing, provide a bridge between process design, development, and operation and analytical chemistry. To achieve this direct coal liquefaction-derived materials. CONSOL made an evaluation of each analytical technique. During the performance of this project, we obtained analyses on samples from numerous process development and research programs and we evaluated a variety of analytical techniques for their usefulness in supporting liquefaction process development. Because of the diverse nature of this program, we provide here an annotated bibliography of the technical reports, publications, and formal presentations that resulted from this program to serve as a comprehensive summary of contract activities.

  16. Indian Economic Development: An Evaluation of EDA's Selected Indian Reservation Program. Volume I: Narrative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boise Cascade Center for Community Development, ID.

    The Selected Indian Reservation Program established under the Economic Development Administration in 1967 was evaluated in terms of actual or potential job creation via detailed assessment of EDA activities on 16 reservations, discussions at the regional and national levels of EDA program tools (public work grants/loans, business development…

  17. World Energy Data System (WENDS). Volume XI. Nuclear fission program summaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-06-01

    Brief management and technical summaries of nuclear fission power programs are presented for nineteen countries. The programs include the following: fuel supply, resource recovery, enrichment, fuel fabrication, light water reactors, heavy water reactors, gas cooled reactors, breeder reactors, research and test reactors, spent fuel processing, waste management, and safety and environment. (JWR)

  18. Super-Efficient Refrigerator Program (SERP) evaluation volume 2: Preliminary impact and market transformation assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, A.D.; Conger, R.L.

    1996-08-01

    The Super Efficient Refrigerator Program (SERP) is a collaborative utility program intended to transform the market for energy-efficient and environmentally friendly refrigerators. It is one of the first examples of a large-scale {open_quotes}market transformation{close_quotes} energy efficiency program. This report documents the preliminary impact and market transformation evaluation of SERP ({open_quotes}the Program{close_quotes}). Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted this evaluation for the U.S. Department of Energy. This study focuses on the preliminary impact evaluation and market transformation assessment, but also presents limited process evaluation information. It is based on interviews with refrigerator dealers and manufacturers, interviews with utility participants, industry data, and information from the Program administrators. Results from this study complement those from prior process evaluation also conducted by PNNL. 42 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. Medical University of South Carolina Environmental Hazards Assessment Program. Volume 6: Annual report, July 1, 1993--June 30, 1994 deliverables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-09-01

    The Medical University of South Carolina`s vision is to become the premier national resource for medical information and for environmental/health risk assessment. A key component to the success of the many missions of the Environmental Hazards Assessment Program (EHAP) is timely access to large volumes of data. This study documents the results of the needs assessment effort conducted to determine the information access and processing requirements of EHAP. This report addresses the Department of Environmental Health Science, education and training initiative.

  20. SUSY (ATLAS)

    CERN Document Server

    Sopczak, Andre; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    During the data-taking period at LHC (Run-II), several searches for supersymmetric particles were performed. The results from searches by the ATLAS collaborations are concisely reviewed. Model-independent and model-dependent limits on new particle production are set, and interpretations in supersymmetric models are given.

  1. ATLAS Story

    CERN Multimedia

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2108663

    2012-01-01

    This film produced in July 2012 explains how fundamental research connects to Society and what benefits collaborative way of working can and may generate in the future, using ATLAS Collaboration as a case study. The film is intellectually inspired by the book "Collisions and Collaboration" (OUP) by Max Boisot (ed.), see: collisionsandcollaboration.com. The film is directed by Andrew Millington (OMNI Communications)

  2. SUSY (ATLAS)

    CERN Document Server

    Sopczak, Andre; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    During the LHC Run-II data-taking period, several searches for supersymmetric particles were performed by the ATLAS collaboration. The results from these searches are concisely reviewed. Model-independent and model-dependent limits on new particle production are set, and interpretations in supersymmetric models are given.

  3. ATLAS Thesis Award 2017

    CERN Multimedia

    Anthony, Katarina

    2018-01-01

    Winners of the ATLAS Thesis Award were presented with certificates and glass cubes during a ceremony on 22 February, 2018. They are pictured here with Karl Jakobs (ATLAS Spokesperson), Max Klein (ATLAS Collaboration Board Chair) and Katsuo Tokushuku (ATLAS Collaboration Board Deputy Chair).

  4. ATLAS Outreach Highlights

    CERN Document Server

    Cheatham, Susan; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS outreach team is very active, promoting particle physics to a broad range of audiences including physicists, general public, policy makers, students and teachers, and media. A selection of current outreach activities and new projects will be presented. Recent highlights include the new ATLAS public website and ATLAS Open Data, the very recent public release of 1 fb-1 of ATLAS data.

  5. ATLAS Data Preservation Policy

    CERN Document Server

    The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The principal intent of this document is to describe the ATLAS policy ensuring that its data are maintained reliably in a form accessible to ATLAS members. A separate document describes the ATLAS policy for making its data available, and potentially useful, to scientists who are not members of ATLAS.

  6. Noise and Sonic Boom Impact Technology. BOOMAP2 Computer Program for Sonic Boom Research. Volume 3. Program Maintenance Manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-08-01

    Boom Impact Technology Program Systems AcqulsiRIon Division Human Systems Division Brooks Air Force Base, TX 78235-5000 88 1013 059 NOTICz When...report from the Human Systems Division. Copies may be obtained from DTIC. Address your request for additional copies to: Defense Technical Information...CURRENT TIME C EQUAL TO EMMISSION TIME. THE RATES OF CHANGE ARE WITH RESPECT TO NOT C ONLY CURRENT TIME, BUT ALSO THE RAY PARAMETERS OF PHI ANGLE AND

  7. Using a profiling process to insure program quality: Volume I - a self-instructional manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaser, J.S.; Roody, D.S.; Raizen, S.A.

    1996-11-01

    Between 1990 and 1995 the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Center for Improving Science Education (National Center) developed a system for ongoing evaluation of K-12 educational programs in the DOE-supported national energy Laboratories. As part of the formative evaluation component of this collaborative endeavor, field staff in the Laboratories began creating profiles of their programs. However, many individuals within DOE Headquarters were not familiar with this profiling process and were unprepared to use the valuable information that the profiles generated. This manual was produced to orient Headquarters staff to profiling. It focuses on how Headquarters staff can use the profiling process to help their funded programs establish and/or maintain high quality. Its purpose, then, is not to train Headquarters staff to become proficient in profiling, but to show them how to draw on the Laboratories` use of profiling to bring about program improvement. Profiling is the process of systematically examining and describing a program`s elements against a set of components that define Effective Practice. The instrument used to capture the data for analysis is called a template, and most of this manual focuses on the templates and how to read and interpret them. However, since it is important to understand these data in context, the authors also describe what should accompany each template in a complete profiling packet and offer guidelines for reviewing complete packets and providing feedback to program managers.

  8. Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions: A selected bibliography, Volume 12. Environmental Restoration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-09-01

    The 664 abstracted references on environmental restoration, nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions constitute the twelfth in a series of reports prepared annually for the US Department of Energy Remedial Action Programs. Citations to foreign and domestic literature of all types -- technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, symposia proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions -- have been included. The bibliography contains scientific, technical, economic, regulatory, and legal information pertinent to the US Department of Energy Remedial Action Programs. Major sections are (1) Decontamination and Decommissioning Program, (2) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning, (3) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program, (4) Facilities Contaminated with Naturally Occurring Radionuclides, (5) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program, (6) Uranium Mill Tailings Management, (7) Technical Measurements Center, and (8) Environmental Restoration Program. Within these categories, references are arranged alphabetically by first author. Those references having no individual author are listed by corporate affiliation or by publication title. Indexes are provided for author, corporate affiliation, title word, publication description, geographic location, subject category, and key word. This report is a product of the Remedial Action Program Information Center (RAPIC), which selects, analyzes, and disseminates information on environmental restoration and remedial actions. RAPIC staff and resources are available to meet a variety of information needs. Contact the center at FTS 624-7764 or (615) 574-7764.

  9. Research programs at the Department of Energy National Laboratories. Volume 2: Laboratory matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-01

    For nearly fifty years, the US national laboratories, under the direction of the Department of Energy, have maintained a tradition of outstanding scientific research and innovative technological development. With the end of the Cold War, their roles have undergone profound changes. Although many of their original priorities remain--stewardship of the nation`s nuclear stockpile, for example--pressing budget constraints and new federal mandates have altered their focus. Promotion of energy efficiency, environmental restoration, human health, and technology partnerships with the goal of enhancing US economic and technological competitiveness are key new priorities. The multiprogram national laboratories offer unparalleled expertise in meeting the challenge of changing priorities. This volume aims to demonstrate each laboratory`s uniqueness in applying this expertise. It describes the laboratories` activities in eleven broad areas of research that most or all share in common. Each section of this volume is devoted to a single laboratory. Those included are: Argonne National Laboratory; Brookhaven National Laboratory; Idaho National Engineering Laboratory; Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory; Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; Los Alamos National Laboratory; National Renewable Energy Laboratory; Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Pacific Northwest Laboratory; and Sandia National Laboratories. The information in this volume was provided by the multiprogram national laboratories and compiled at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory.

  10. Search for exotic physics with ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Delsart, Pierre-Antoine

    2006-01-01

    At the LHC, the program of research in particle physics beyond the Standard Model is extremely rich. With the ATLAS detector, besides SUSY mainstream studies, many exotic theoretical models will be investigated. They range from compositeness of fundamental fermions to extra dimension scenarii through GUT models and include many variants. I shall review some selected typical studies by the ATLAS collaboration on exotic physics, highlighting the discovery prospects and the recent analyses using the latest full detector simulations.

  11. A digital computer program for the dynamic interaction simulation of controls and structure (DISCOS), volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodley, C. S.; Devers, A. D.; Park, A. C.; Frisch, H. P.

    1978-01-01

    A theoretical development and associated digital computer program system for the dynamic simulation and stability analysis of passive and actively controlled spacecraft are presented. The dynamic system (spacecraft) is modeled as an assembly of rigid and/or flexible bodies not necessarily in a topological tree configuration. The computer program system is used to investigate total system dynamic characteristics, including interaction effects between rigid and/or flexible bodies, control systems, and a wide range of environmental loadings. In addition, the program system is used for designing attitude control systems and for evaluating total dynamic system performance, including time domain response and frequency domain stability analyses.

  12. Low Cost High Performance Generator Technology Program. Volume 5. Heat pipe topical, appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1975-07-01

    Work performed by Dynatherm Corporation for Teledyne Isotopes during a program entitled ''Heat Pipe Fabrication, Associated Technical Support and Reporting'' is reported. The program was initiated on November 29, 1972; the main objectives were accomplished with the delivery of the heat pipes for the HPG. Life testing of selected heat pipe specimens is continuing to and beyond the present date. The program consisted of the following tasks: Heat Pipe Development of Process Definition; Prototype Heat Pipes for Fin Segment Test; HPG Heat Pipe Fabrication and Testing; Controlled Heat Pipe Life Test; and Heat Pipe Film Coefficient Determination. (TFD)

  13. Ion channels involved in cell volume regulation: effects on migration, proliferation, and programmed cell death in non adherent EAT cells and adherent ELA cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Else Kay

    2011-01-01

    This mini review outlines studies of cell volume regulation in two closely related mammalian cell lines: nonadherent Ehrlich ascites tumour cells (EATC) and adherent Ehrlich Lettre ascites (ELA) cells. Focus is on the regulatory volume decrease (RVD) that occurs after cell swelling, the volume regulatory ion channels involved, and the mechanisms (cellular signalling pathways) that regulate these channels. Finally, I shall also briefly review current investigations in these two cell lines that focuses on how changes in cell volume can regulate cell functions such as cell migration, proliferation, and programmed cell death. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Medical University of South Carolina Environmental Hazards Assessment Program. Volume 5: Annual report, July 1, 1993--June 30, 1994 deliverables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-09-01

    The Medical University of South Carolina`s vision is to become the premier national resource for medical information and for environmental/health risk assessment. A key component to the success of the many missions of the Environmental Hazards Assessment Program (EHAP) is timely access to large volumes of data. This study documents the results of the needs assessment effort conducted to determine the information access and processing requirement of EHAP. The following topics are addressed in this report: environmental medicine and risk communication: curriculum and a professional support network-Department of Family Medicine; environmental hazards assessment and education program in pharmacy graduate education in risk assessment; and graduate education risk assessment.

  15. Space station systems technology study (add-on task). Volume 3: Technology advancement program plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    Program plans are given for an integrating controller for space station autonomy as well as for controls and displays. The technical approach, facility requirements and candidate facilities, development schedules, and resource requirements estimates are given.

  16. Report on Activities and Programs for Countering Proliferation and NBC Terrorism. Volume 1. Executive Summary

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2006-01-01

    This Report on Activities and Programs for Countering Proliferation and NBC Terrorism is submitted to the United States Congress as required by the 1994 National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) (as amended...

  17. Report on Activities and Programs for Countering Proliferation and NBC Terrorism. Volume 1: Executive Summary

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2007-01-01

    This Report on Activities and Programs for Countering Proliferation and NBC Terrorism is submitted to the United States Congress as required by the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1994 (as amended...

  18. Middle Atmosphere Program. Handbook for MAP. Volume 13: Ground-based Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, R. A. (Editor)

    1984-01-01

    Topics of activities in the middle Atmosphere program covered include: lidar systems of aerosol studies; mesosphere temperature; upper atmosphere temperatures and winds; D region electron densities; nitrogen oxides; atmospheric composition and structure; and optical sounding of ozone.

  19. MoDOT pavement preservation research program volume IV, pavement evaluation tools-data collection methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    The overarching goal of the MoDOT Pavement Preservation Research Program, Task 3: Pavement Evaluation Tools Data : Collection Methods was to identify and evaluate methods to rapidly obtain network-level and project-level information relevant to :...

  20. Program Manager: Volume 26, Number 6, DSMC 141. November-December 1997

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1997-01-01

    .... Some of the articles are Coming Soon - Army's New Integrated, Digitized C2 System for Medical and Tactical Commanders, Small Business Innovation Research Program - A Potent DoD Resource,, Defense...

  1. Effects of a multidisciplinary body weight reduction program on static and dynamic thoraco-abdominal volumes in obese adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LoMauro, Antonella; Cesareo, Ambra; Agosti, Fiorenza; Tringali, Gabriella; Salvadego, Desy; Grassi, Bruno; Sartorio, Alessandro; Aliverti, Andrea

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize static and dynamic thoraco-abdominal volumes in obese adolescents and to test the effects of a 3-week multidisciplinary body weight reduction program (MBWRP), entailing an energy-restricted diet, psychological and nutritional counseling, aerobic physical activity, and respiratory muscle endurance training (RMET), on these parameters. Total chest wall (VCW), pulmonary rib cage (VRC,p), abdominal rib cage (VRC,a), and abdominal (VAB) volumes were measured on 11 male adolescents (Tanner stage: 3-5; BMI standard deviation score: >2; age: 15.9 ± 1.3 years; percent body fat: 38.4%) during rest, inspiratory capacity (IC) maneuver, and incremental exercise on a cycle ergometer at baseline and after 3 weeks of MBWRP. At baseline, the progressive increase in tidal volume was achieved by an increase in end-inspiratory VCW (p weight loss was concentrated in the abdomen and total IC decreased. During exercise, abdominal rib cage hyperinflation was delayed and associated with 15% increased performance and reduced dyspnea at high workloads (p muscles, and reduced dyspnea.

  2. Exploring the Unknown: Selected Documents in the History of the US Civilian Space Program. Volume 3; Using Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logsdon, John M. (Editor); Launius, Roger D. (Editor); Onkst, David H. (Editor); Garber, Stephen J. (Editor)

    1998-01-01

    One of the most important developments of the twentieth century has been the movement of humanity into space with machines and people. The underpinnings of that movement -why it took the shape it did; which individuals and organizations were involved; what factors drove a particular choice of scientific objectives and technologies to be used; and the political, economic, managerial, and international contexts in which the events of the space age unfolded- are all important ingredients of this epoch transition from an earthbound to spacefaring people. This desire to understand the development of spaceflight in the United States sparked this documentary history series. 'Exploring the Unknown' is a multi-volume series containing a selection of key documents in history of the U.S. civil space program. This current volume, Volume III, focusing on the use of space for practical applications, prints 112 key documents on the history of satellite communications, remote sensing of earth, and space as an investment in economic growth, edited for ease of use. Each is introduced by a headnote providing context, bibliographical information, and background information necessary to understanding the document.

  3. Power Burst Facility/Boron Neutron Capture Therapy program for cancer treatment, Volume 4, No. 7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ackermann, A.L. (ed.)

    1990-07-01

    This report discusses the monthly progress of the Power Burst Facility/Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (PBF/BNLT) program for cancer treatment. Highlights of the PBF/BNCT Program during July 1990 include progress within the areas of: Gross boron analysis in tissue, blood, and urine; noninvasive boron quantitative determination; analytical radiation transport and interaction modeling for BNCT; large animal model studies; neutron source and facility preparation; administration and common support and PBF operations.

  4. EFFECTS OF FOOD ASSISTANCE AND NUTRITION PROGRAMS ON NUTRITION AND HEALTH, VOLUME 1, RESEARCH DESIGN

    OpenAIRE

    Hamilton, William L.; Rossi, Peter H.

    2002-01-01

    This is the first of four reports in the "Nutrition and Health Outcome Study," which assesses the effects of USDA's food assistance and nutrition programs on nutrition and health outcomes. This report reviews the research designs available to evaluators for assessing the effect of USDA's food assistance and nutrition programs. The random assignment experiment is the "gold standard" design for such an evaluation. Where random assignment is impossible, quasi-experimental designs are used to inf...

  5. Proceedings of the 1996 U.S. DOE hydrogen program review. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-10-01

    The 29 papers contained in Volume 1 are related to systems analysis and hydrogen production. Papers in the systems analysis section discuss utility markets, comparison of hydrogen with other alternative fuels, hydrogen vehicles, renewable hydrogen production, storage, and detection, and hydrogen storage systems development. Hydrogen production methods include the use of algae, photosynthesis, glucose dehydrogenase, syngas, photoelectrochemical reactions, photovoltaics, water electrolysis, solar photochemical reactions, pyrolysis, catalytic steam reforming, municipal solid wastes, thermocatalytic cracking of natural gas, and plasma reformers. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  6. A Computer Program for the Prediction of Radiation from Rocket Exhaust Plumes. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-05-31

    circle positions are checked to determine if the length of the line of sight needs to be ad- justed due to occlusion by one of the circles. Next...SADIATION , UOST E.3 EA : ~Prepared under C~ntract OAAH~l-73-C-•-52"l " for- ’ - U. $. fAry ;.;ss11e CarvnndPed~t~ne Arseral Alba •𔃾V 35809 Io I. ImT...interval when only a single line of sight through the gas is considered. ii REMWTCH INCORpORATED RTR 013-1 CONTENTS VOLUME I Section SU MMARY Page 11

  7. Alternative energy sources II; Proceedings of the Second Miami International Conference, Miami Beach, Fla., December 10-13, 1979. Volume 5 - Geothermal power/energy program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veziroglu, T. N.

    This volume examines the geothermal resource and geothermal energy utilization, and surveys regional energy programs worldwide. The particular papers presented on geothermal energy include those on the temperature indicators for geothermal use, geothermal drilling research in the United States, and geothermal energy and biofuel production in agriculture. Energy programs from India, Egypt, Turkey, Greece and Puerto Rico are reviewed.

  8. Automated design and optimization of flexible booster autopilots via linear programming, volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser, F. D.

    1972-01-01

    A nonlinear programming technique was developed for the automated design and optimization of autopilots for large flexible launch vehicles. This technique, which resulted in the COEBRA program, uses the iterative application of linear programming. The method deals directly with the three main requirements of booster autopilot design: to provide (1) good response to guidance commands; (2) response to external disturbances (e.g. wind) to minimize structural bending moment loads and trajectory dispersions; and (3) stability with specified tolerances on the vehicle and flight control system parameters. The method is applicable to very high order systems (30th and greater per flight condition). Examples are provided that demonstrate the successful application of the employed algorithm to the design of autopilots for both single and multiple flight conditions.

  9. Evaluation of Public Service Electric & Gas Company`s standard offer program, Volume I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldman, C.A.; Kito, M.S.; Moezzi, M.M.

    1995-07-01

    In May 1993, Public Service Electric and Gas (PSE&G), the largest investor-owned utility in New Jersey, initiated the Standard Offer program, an innovative approach to acquiring demand-side management (DSM) resources. In this program, PSE&G offers longterm contracts with standard terms and conditions to project sponsors, either customers or third-party energy service companies (ESCOs), on a first-come, first-serve basis to fill a resource block. The design includes posted, time-differentiated prices which are paid for energy savings that will be verified over the contract term (5, 10, or 15 years) based on a statewide measurement and verification (M&V) protocol. The design of the Standard Offer differs significantly from DSM bidding programs in several respects. The eligibility requirements and posted prices allow ESCOs and other energy service providers to market and develop projects among customers with few constraints on acceptable end use efficiency technologies. In contrast, in DSM bidding, ESCOs typically submit bids without final commitments from customers and the utility selects a limited number of winning bidders who often agree to deliver a pre-specified mix of savings from various end uses in targeted markets. The major objectives of the LBNL evaluation were to assess market response and customer satisfaction; analyze program costs and cost-effectiveness; review and evaluate the utility`s administration and delivery of the program; examine the role of PSE&G`s energy services subsidiary (PSCRC) in the program and the effect of its involvement on the development of the energy services industry in New Jersey; and discuss the potential applicability of the Standard Offer concept given current trends in the electricity industry (i.e., increasing competition and the prospect of industry restructuring).

  10. Industrial Fuel Gas Demonstration Plant Program. Volume II. Commercial plant design (Deliverable Nos. 15 and 16)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-01-01

    This report presents a Conceptual Design and Evaluation of Commercial Plant report in four volumes as follows: I - Executive Summary, II - Commercial Plant Design, III - Economic Analyses, IV - Demonstration Plant Recommendations. Volume II presents the commercial plant design and various design bases and design analyses. The discussion of design bases includes definition of plant external and internal considerations. The basis is described for process configuration selection of both process units and support facilities. Overall plant characteristics presented include a summary of utilities/chemicals/catalysts, a plant block flow diagram, and a key plot plan. Each process unit and support facility is described. Several different types of process analyses are presented. A synopsis of environmental impact is presented. Engineering requirements, including design considerations and materials of construction, are summarized. Important features such as safety, startup, control, and maintenance are highlighted. The last section of the report includes plant implementation considerations that would have to be considered by potential owners including siting, coal and water supply, product and by-product characteristics and uses, overall schedule, procurement, construction, and spare parts and maintenance philosophy.

  11. Reconstructive surgery training: increased operative volume in plastic surgery residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanna, Neil; Boyd, J Brian; Kawamoto, Henry K; Miller, Timothy A; Da Lio, Andrew L; Azhar, Hamdan; Bradley, James P

    2012-03-01

    Practitioners in other surgical specialties have increasingly advanced their volume of reconstructive procedures traditionally served by plastic surgeons. Because there has not been a previous specialty training comparison, the average operative reconstructive volume of graduating plastic surgery residents was formally compared with that of other specialties. The authors review the case log statistical reports of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. For each specialty, this annual report highlights the average number of cases performed for all graduating residents. The national case log reports were reviewed for orthopedic surgery, otolaryngology, and plastic surgery. Six procedures were compared for residents graduating in the 2006 to 2010 academic years and are reviewed. A two-sample Welch-Satterthwaite t test for independent samples with heterogeneous variance was conducted to compare the average number of procedures performed per graduating resident. Graduates of plastic surgery residencies compared with graduates of other specialties performed more cleft lip and palate repairs, hand amputation, hand fracture, and nasal fracture procedures. This difference showed statistical significance for all years examined (2006 to 2010). For repair of mandible fractures, plastic surgery trainees had significantly more cases for 2006 to 2009 but not 2010. The quantitative operative experience of graduating plastic surgery residents for selected reconstructive cases is above that of the average graduating trainee outside of plastic surgery. Given the exposure and strength of plastic surgery training, plastic surgeons should remain at the forefront of reconstructive surgery.

  12. An adaptive maneuvering logic computer program for the simulation of one-on-one air-to-air combat. Volume 1: General description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgin, G. H.; Fogel, L. J.; Phelps, J. P.

    1975-01-01

    A technique for computer simulation of air combat is described. Volume 1 decribes the computer program and its development in general terms. Two versions of the program exist. Both incorporate a logic for selecting and executing air combat maneuvers with performance models of specific fighter aircraft. In the batch processing version the flight paths of two aircraft engaged in interactive aerial combat and controlled by the same logic are computed. The realtime version permits human pilots to fly air-to-air combat against the adaptive maneuvering logic (AML) in Langley Differential Maneuvering Simulator (DMS). Volume 2 consists of a detailed description of the computer programs.

  13. PREIMS - AT Atlas | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available switchLanguage; BLAST Search Image Search Home About Archive Update History Data ...Targeted Proteins Research Program (TPRP). Data file File name: at_atlas_preims.zip File URL: ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archiv...base Database Description Download License Update History of This Database Site Policy | Contact Us PREIMS - AT Atlas | LSDB Archive ...

  14. USAF/SCEEE Summer Faculty Research Program (1982). Research Reports. Volume 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-10-01

    Summer Faculty Research Program. He would particularly like to thank Mr David Moorhouse, Group Leader , Flying Qualities Group, for having provided him...by Fluorocarbons in Liver Microsauaes", Eur. J. Biochen., 20:509-512. 8. Recknagel, R. 0. and Ghoshal , A. K. 1966. "Lipoperoxidaticn as a Vector in

  15. Water Treatment Plant Operation. Volume II. A Field Study Training Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    California State Univ., Sacramento. School of Engineering.

    The purpose of this water treatment field study training program is to: (1) develop new qualified water treatment plant operators; (2) expand the abilities of existing operators, permitting better service both to employers and public; and (3) prepare operators for civil service and certification examinations (examinations administered by…

  16. Water Treatment Plant Operation. Volume I. A Field Study Training Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    California State Univ., Sacramento. School of Engineering.

    The purpose of this water treatment field study training program is to: (1) develop new qualified water treatment plant operators; (2) expand the abilities of existing operators, permitting better service both to employers and public; and (3) prepare operators for civil service and certification examinations (examinations administered by…

  17. Water Treatment Plant Operation Volume 2. A Field Study Training Program. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    California State Univ., Sacramento. School of Engineering.

    The purpose of this water treatment field study training program is to: (1) develop new qualified water treatment plant operators; (2) expand the abilities of existing operators, permitting better service both to employers and public; and (3) prepare operators for civil service and certification examinations (examinations administered by…

  18. An Evaluation Report of the Harvard Health Careers Summer Program for Minority Students: Volume I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blacklow, Robert S.; And Others

    One of the most important factors in improving health care among minority groups is the training of adequate numbers of minority health care workers. In view of this need, the Harvard Medical School and the Harvard School of Dental Medicine initiated a Health Careers Summer Program designed to attract more minority group students into medicine and…

  19. National Waste Terminal Storage Program: critical element management concept. Volume II. Concept description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-05-01

    The objective of the CEM Concept is to describe techniques for systematically identifying, evaluating, and influencing those technical, social, economic, political and institutional factors (i.e., events, trends and conditions) that are perceived as being probable uncertainties to the attainment of planned program objectives.

  20. Fourth update of the Energy Economic Data Base (EEDB) Program. Phase IV, Final report. Volume I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, R.E.; Brown, P.E.; Kaminski, R.S.; Smith, M.H.; Ziegler, E.J.

    1981-09-01

    EEDB deals with the development of cost data for nuclear and comparison electric power plants. Its objective is to provide periodic updates of technical and cost (capital, fuel and operating and maintenance) information for use in evaluating and monitoring US civilian nuclear power programs. It contains six nuclear power plant technical models and five comparison coal-fired fossil power plant technical models. (DLC)

  1. Secretary's annual report to Congress. Volume I. Posture statement, outlook and program review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1981-01-01

    Activities of all elements of the Department of Energy (DOE) except those of FERC are reported. Chapter I, the Posture Statement, gives an overview of the policies, programs, and strategies of DOE. It describes the national energy policy and its effects, sets out the current state of energy supply and demand in the US and around the world, describes the present assessment of future energy availability, and outlines the strategy for 1982. Additional chapters detail the major programs in the following Offices or Assistant Secretaryships: Conservation, Fossil Fuel, Nuclear Energy, Renewable Energy Resources, Electric Energy Systems and Energy Storage, Environment, Energy Supporting Research, Energy Production and Power Marketing, Energy Information, Economic Regulation, General Science, Defense, International Programs, Nuclear Non-Proliferation, Energy Contingency Planning, and Administration. Information is included in appendices on foreign direct investment in US energy sources and supplies for 1979, exports of energy resources by foreign companies, major recipients of DOE funding, DOE actions taken regarding disclosure of energy assets by DOE employees, and financial assistance programs. (MCW)

  2. Deaf/Blind. Resource Manuals for Program for Exceptional Children. Volume X.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgia State Dept. of Education, Atlanta. Office of Instructional Services.

    The manual is intended to help local education agencies implement Georgia's laws for providing effective instructional programs for deaf-blind children. A definition and eligibility criteria for deaf-blind children are presented. A section discussing due process considers screening, referral, comprehensive evaluation, individualized education…

  3. GRIDGEN Version 1.0: a computer program for generating unstructured finite-volume grids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lien, Jyh-Ming; Liu, Gaisheng; Langevin, Christian D.

    2015-01-01

    GRIDGEN is a computer program for creating layered quadtree grids for use with numerical models, such as the MODFLOW–USG program for simulation of groundwater flow. The program begins by reading a three-dimensional base grid, which can have variable row and column widths and spatially variable cell top and bottom elevations. From this base grid, GRIDGEN will continuously divide into four any cell intersecting user-provided refinement features (points, lines, and polygons) until the desired level of refinement is reached. GRIDGEN will then smooth, or balance, the grid so that no two adjacent cells, including overlying and underlying cells, differ by more than a user-specified level tolerance. Once these gridding processes are completed, GRIDGEN saves a tree structure file so that the layered quadtree grid can be quickly reconstructed as needed. Once a tree structure file has been created, GRIDGEN can then be used to (1) export the layered quadtree grid as a shapefile, (2) export grid connectivity and cell information as ASCII text files for use with MODFLOW–USG or other numerical models, and (3) intersect the grid with shapefiles of points, lines, or polygons, and save intersection output as ASCII text files and shapefiles. The GRIDGEN program is demonstrated by creating a layered quadtree grid for the Biscayne aquifer in Miami-Dade County, Florida, using hydrologic features to control where refinement is added.

  4. BASIC Simulation Programs; Volumes I and II. Biology, Earth Science, Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Digital Equipment Corp., Maynard, MA.

    Computer programs which teach concepts and processes related to biology, earth science, and chemistry are presented. The seven biology problems deal with aspects of genetics, evolution and natural selection, gametogenesis, enzymes, photosynthesis, and the transport of material across a membrane. Four earth science problems concern climates, the…

  5. Operation of Wastewater Treatment Plants. Volume 1. A Field Study Training Program. Third Edition. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    California State Univ., Sacramento. Dept. of Civil Engineering.

    The purpose of this wastewater treatment field study training program is to: (1) develop new qualified wastewater treatment plant operators; (2) expand the abilities of existing operators, permitting better service both to employers and public; and (3) prepare operators for civil service and certification examinations (examinations administered by…

  6. Tabulations of Responses from the 2000 Survey of Reserve Component Personnel: Volume 3. Benefits and Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-08-01

    or Working in a Family Business : By Reserve Component......................................................................................1618...in a Family Business : By Paygrade and Gender....................................................................................1619 104e.3 Spouse’s...Employment Status -- Managing or Working in a Family Business : By Reserve Program and Ever Deployed

  7. ATLAS Recordings

    CERN Multimedia

    Steven Goldfarb; Mitch McLachlan; Homer A. Neal

    Web Archives of ATLAS Plenary Sessions, Workshops, Meetings, and Tutorials from 2005 until this past month are available via the University of Michigan portal here. Most recent additions include the Trigger-Aware Analysis Tutorial by Monika Wielers on March 23 and the ROOT Workshop held at CERN on March 26-27.Viewing requires a standard web browser with RealPlayer plug-in (included in most browsers automatically) and works on any major platform. Lectures can be viewed directly over the web or downloaded locally.In addition, you will find access to a variety of general tutorials and events via the portal.Feedback WelcomeOur group is making arrangements now to record plenary sessions, tutorials, and other important ATLAS events for 2007. Your suggestions for potential recording, as well as your feedback on existing archives is always welcome. Please contact us at wlap@umich.edu. Thank you.Enjoy the Lectures!

  8. Gulf Coast geopressured-geothermal program summary report compilation. Volume 2-B: Resource description, program history, wells tested, university and company based research, site restoration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John, C.J.; Maciasz, G.; Harder, B.J.

    1998-06-01

    The US Department of Energy established a geopressured-geothermal energy program in the mid 1970`s as one response to America`s need to develop alternate energy resources in view of the increasing dependence on imported fossil fuel energy. This program continued for 17 years and approximately two hundred million dollars were expended for various types of research and well testing to thoroughly investigate this alternative energy source. This volume describes the following studies: Design well program; LaFourche Crossing; MG-T/DOE Amoco Fee No. 1 (Sweet Lake); Environmental monitoring at Sweet Lake; Air quality; Water quality; Microseismic monitoring; Subsidence; Dow/DOE L.R. Sweezy No. 1 well; Reservoir testing; Environmental monitoring at Parcperdue; Air monitoring; Water runoff; Groundwater; Microseismic events; Subsidence; Environmental consideration at site; Gladys McCall No. 1 well; Test results of Gladys McCall; Hydrocarbons in production gas and brine; Environmental monitoring at the Gladys McCall site; Pleasant Bayou No. 2 well; Pleasant Bayou hybrid power system; Environmental monitoring at Pleasant Bayou; and Plug abandonment and well site restoration of three geopressured-geothermal test sites. 197 figs., 64 tabs.

  9. Information management architecture for an integrated computing environment for the Environmental Restoration Program. Environmental Restoration Program, Volume 3, Interim technical architecture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-09-01

    This third volume of the Information Management Architecture for an Integrated Computing Environment for the Environmental Restoration Program--the Interim Technical Architecture (TA) (referred to throughout the remainder of this document as the ER TA)--represents a key milestone in establishing a coordinated information management environment in which information initiatives can be pursued with the confidence that redundancy and inconsistencies will be held to a minimum. This architecture is intended to be used as a reference by anyone whose responsibilities include the acquisition or development of information technology for use by the ER Program. The interim ER TA provides technical guidance at three levels. At the highest level, the technical architecture provides an overall computing philosophy or direction. At this level, the guidance does not address specific technologies or products but addresses more general concepts, such as the use of open systems, modular architectures, graphical user interfaces, and architecture-based development. At the next level, the technical architecture provides specific information technology recommendations regarding a wide variety of specific technologies. These technologies include computing hardware, operating systems, communications software, database management software, application development software, and personal productivity software, among others. These recommendations range from the adoption of specific industry or Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems) standards to the specification of individual products. At the third level, the architecture provides guidance regarding implementation strategies for the recommended technologies that can be applied to individual projects and to the ER Program as a whole.

  10. Thermosphere-ionosphere-mesosphere energetics and dynamics (TIMED). The TIMED mission and science program report of the science definition team. Volume 1: Executive summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    A Science Definition Team was established in December 1990 by the Space Physics Division, NASA, to develop a satellite program to conduct research on the energetics, dynamics, and chemistry of the mesosphere and lower thermosphere/ionosphere. This two-volume publication describes the TIMED (Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Mesosphere, Energetics and Dynamics) mission and associated science program. The report outlines the scientific objectives of the mission, the program requirements, and the approach towards meeting these requirements.

  11. Effects of Two Different Volume-Equated Weekly Distributed Short-Term Plyometric Training Programs on Futsal Players' Physical Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanci, Javier; Castillo, Daniel; Iturricastillo, Aitor; Ayarra, Rubén; Nakamura, Fábio Y

    2017-07-01

    Yanci, J, Castillo, D, Iturricastillo, A, Ayarra, R, and Nakamura, FY. Effects of two different volume-equated weekly distributed short-term plyometric training programs on futsal players' physical performance. J Strength Cond Res 31(7): 1787-1794, 2017-The aim was to analyze the effect of 2 different plyometric training programs (i.e., 1 vs. 2 sessions per week, same total weekly volume) on physical performance in futsal players. Forty-four futsal players were divided into 3 training groups differing in weekly plyometric training load: the 2 days per week plyometric training group (PT2D, n = 15), the 1 day per week plyometric training group (PT1D, n = 12), and the control group (CG, n = 12) which did not perform plyometric training. The results of this study showed that in-season futsal training per se was capable of improving repeat sprint ability (RSA) (effect size [ES] = -0.59 to -1.53). However, while change of direction ability (CODA) was maintained during the training period (ES = 0.00), 15-m sprint (ES = 0.73), and vertical jump (VJ) performance (ES = -0.30 to -1.37) were significantly impaired. By contrast, PT2D and PT1D plyometric training were effective in improving futsal players' 15-m sprint (ES = -0.64 to -1.00), CODA (ES = -1.83 to -5.50), and horizontal jump (ES = 0.33-0.64) performance. Nonetheless, all groups (i.e., PT2D, PT1D, and CG) presented a reduction in VJ performance (ES = -0.04 to -1.37). Regarding RSA performance, PT1D showed a similar improvement compared with CG (ES = -0.65 to -1.53) after the training intervention, whereas PT2D did not show significant change (ES = -0.04 to -0.38). These results may have considerable practical relevance for the optimal design of plyometric training programs for futsal players, given that a 1-day-per-week plyometric training program is more efficient than a 2-day-per-week plyometric training program to improve the futsal players' physical performance.

  12. Heavy ion Physics with the ATLAS Detector

    CERN Document Server

    White, S N

    2006-01-01

    Soon after the LHC is commissioned with proton beams the ATLAS experiment will begin studies of Pb-Pb collisions with a center of mass energy of ?sNN = 5.5 TeV. The ATLAS program is a natural extension of measurements at RHIC in a direction that exploits the higher LHC energies and the superb ATLAS calorimeter and tracking coverage. At LHC energies, collisions will be produced with even higher energy density than observed at RHIC. The properties of the resulting hot medium can be studied with higher energy probes, which are more directly interpreted through modification of jet properties emerging from these collisions, for example. Other topics which are enabled by the 30-fold increase in center of mass energy include probing the partonic structure of nuclei with hard photoproduction (in UltraPeripheral collisions) and in p-Pb collisions. Here we report on evaluation of ATLAS capabilities for Heavy Ion Physics.

  13. Simulation strategies for the LHC ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Buckley, A; The ATLAS collaboration

    2010-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment, operational at the new LHC collider, is fully simulated using the Geant4 tool. The simulation program has been built within the ATLAS common framework Athena. The simulation software for the ATLAS Experiment at the Large Hadron Collider is being used for large-scale production of events on the LHC Computing Grid. This simulation requires many components, from the generators that simulate particle collisions, through packages simulating the response of the various detectors and triggers. All of these components come together under the ATLAS simulation infrastructure. The latest developments went into the direction to better represent the reality of the detector in all the possible details. The latest developments provide increased functionality and robustness. The full process is constantly monitored and profiled. Increased performance guarantee the best use of available resources without any degradation in the quality and accuracy of the simulation itself. In the presentation emphasis is...

  14. Early Site Permit Demonstration Program: Plant parameters envelope report. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-03-01

    The Early Site Permit (ESP) Demonstration Program is the nuclear industry`s initiative for piloting the early resolution of siting-related issues before the detailed design proceedings of the combined operating license review. The ESP Demonstration Program consists of three phases. The plant parameters envelopes task is part of Phase 1, which addresses the generic review of applicable federal regulations and develops criteria for safety and environmental assessment of potential sites. The plant parameters envelopes identify parameters that characterize the interface between an ALWR design and a potential site, and quantify the interface through values selected from the Utility Requirements Documents, vendor design information, or engineering assessments. When augmented with site-specific information, the plant parameters envelopes provide sufficient information to allow ESPs to be granted based on individual ALWR design information or enveloping design information for the evolutionary, passive, or generic ALWR plants. This document is expected to become a living document when used by future applicants.

  15. Low-rank coal study. Volume 5. RD and D program evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-11-01

    A national program is recommended for research, development, and demonstration (RD and D) of improved technologies for the enviromentally acceptable use of low-rank coals. RD and D project recommendations are outlined in all applicable technology areas, including extraction, transportation, preparation, handling and storage, conventional combustion and environmental control technology, fluidized bed combustion, gasification, liquefaction, and pyrolysis. Basic research topics are identified separately, as well as a series of crosscutting research activities addressing environmental, economic, and regulatory issues. The recommended RD and D activities are classified into Priority I and Priority II categories, reflecting their relative urgency and potential impact on the advancement of low-rank coal development. Summaries of ongoing research projects on low-rank coals in the US are presented in an Appendix, and the relationships of these ongoing efforts to the recommended RD and D program are discussed.

  16. United States Air Force College Science and Engineering Program. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-12-01

    Geomod, and learning the nozzle geometry used in TDK. (See figure 1) The model is constructed by first plotting the nozzle profile , then revolving it...were plotted, they were joined by splines to form the nozzle profile . The profile was then revolved about the x-axis to form a three- dimensional...many types of nozzles. IV. a. In order to build many different types of nozzles with one program file, it is necessary to define points on the nozzle

  17. Kernel Ada Programming Support Environment (KAPSE) Interface Team. Volume I. Public Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-04-01

    system software in high level languages. In particular, Wirth’s Lilith project demonstrates that a complete programming support environment can be...or the Lilith system written in Modula. We then discuss the performance issues of this approach and its extension to multiple user environments...written in Concurrent Pascal or the Lilith system written in Modula. Once these issues have been mastered, we could proceed to add functions in reasonably

  18. Proceedings of the workshop on program options in intermediate-energy physics. Volume 1. Summary and panel reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allred, J.C.; Talley, B. (comps.)

    1980-05-01

    A Workshop on Program Options in Intermediate-Energy Physics sponsored by the US Department of Energy was held at Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory, August 20 to 31, 1979. The scope of the workshop included all laboratories in intermediate-energy physics, worldwide, and all of these sent representatives to the workshop. The workshop addressed itself to the critical questions on nuclear and particle physics and how they can best be investigated by intermediate-energy accelerators. Among the questions that the workshop members considered were: (1) what are the important physics topics which might be understood through research on these accelerators in the next 10 years. These topics include, but are not restricted to, fundamental interactions and symmetries in particle physics, and nuclear modes of motion, structure, and reaction mechanisms; (2) what experiments should be undertaken to carry out the program. What are the kinematical conditions, accuracies, resolutions, and other parameters required to obtain the desired knowledge; (3) which accelerators are best suited for each experiment. What work at other laboratories (low-, intermediate-, or high-energy) could be undertaken to complement and/or supplement the proposed LAMPF program; and (4) what new facility capabilities should be explored for the long-term future. The workshop was divided into small panels in order to promote effective interchange of ideas. After reports to other panels and plenary sessions, the panelists prepared reports stating the results of their deliberations. These reports comprise the principal part of Volume I.

  19. Commercial applications of solar total energy systems. Volume 4. Appendices. Final report. [Solar Total Energy System Evaluation Program (STESEP) code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boobar, M.G.; McFarland, B.L.; Nalbandian, S.J.; Willcox, W.W.; French, E.P.; Smith, K.E.

    1978-07-01

    A methodology has been developed by Atomics International under contract to the Department of Energy to define the applicability of solar total energy systems (STES) to the commercial sector (e.g., retail stores, shopping centers, offices, etc.) in the United States. Candidate STES concepts were selected to provide on-site power generation capability, as well as thermal energy for both heating and cooling applications. Each concept was evaluated on the basis of its cost effectiveness (i.e., as compared to other concepts) and its ability to ultimately penetrate and capture a significant segment of this market, thereby resulting in a saving of fossil fuel resources. This volume contains the appendices. Topics include deterministic insolation model computer code; building energy usage data; computer simulation programs for building energy demand analysis; model buildings for STES evaluation; Solar Total Energy System Evaluation Program (STESEP) computer code; transient simulation of STES concept; solar data tape analysis; program listings and sample output for use with TRNSYS; transient simulation, and financial parameters sensitivities. (WHK)

  20. Lightweight two-stroke cycle aircraft diesel engine technology enablement program, volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freen, P. D.; Berenyi, S. G.; Brouwers, A. P.; Moynihan, M. E.

    1985-01-01

    An experimental Single Cylinder Test Engine Program is conducted to confirm the analytically projected performance of a two-stroke cycle diesel engine for aircraft applications. The test engine delivered 78kW indicated power from 1007cc displacement, operating at 3500 RPM on Schnuerle loop scavenged two-stroke cycle. Testing confirms the ability of a proposed 4-cylinder version of such an engine to reach the target power at altitude, in a highly turbocharged configuration. The experimental program defines all necessary parameters to permit design of a multicylinder engine for eventual flight applications; including injection system requirement, turbocharging, heat rejection, breathing, scavenging, and structural requirements. The multicylinder engine concept is configured to operate with an augmented turbocharger, but with no primary scavenge blower. The test program is oriented to provide a balanced turbocharger compressor to turbine power balance without an auxiliary scavenging system. Engine cylinder heat rejection to the ambient air has been significantly reduced and the minimum overall turbocharger efficiency required is within the range of commercially available turbochargers. Analytical studies and finite element modeling is made of insulated configurations of the engines - including both ceramic and metallic versions. A second generation test engine is designed based on current test results.

  1. Nuclear proliferation and civilian nuclear power. Report of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program. Volume VIII. Advanced concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-06-01

    The goal of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program has been to provide recommendations for the development and deployment of more proliferation-resistant civilian nuclear-power systems without jeopardizing the development of nuclear energy. In principle, new concepts for nuclear-power systems could be designed so that materials and facilities would be inherently more proliferation-resistant. Such advanced, i.e., less-developed systems, are the subject of this volume. Accordingly, from a number of advanced concepts that were proposed for evaluation, six representative concepts were selected: the fast mixed-spectrum reactor; the denatured molten-salt reactor; the mixed-flow gaseous-core reactor; the linear-accelerator fuel-regenerator reactor; the ternary metal-fueled electronuclear fuel-producer reactor; and the tokamak fusion-fission hybrid reactor.

  2. Artificial heart development program. Volume II. System support. Phase III summary report, July 1, 1973--September 30, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-01-01

    Volume 2 covers major activities of the Artificial Heart Development program that supported the design, fabrication, and test of the system demonstration units. Section A.1.0 provides a listing beyond that of the body of the report on the components needed for an implantation. It also presents glove box sterilization calibration results and results of an extensive mock circulation calibration. Section A.2.0 provides detailed procedures for assembly, preparing for use, and the use of the system and major components. Section A.3.0 covers the component research and development activities undertaken to improve components of the existing system units and to prepare for a future prototype system. Section A.4.0 provides a listing of the top assembly drawings of the major systems variations fabricated and tested.

  3. Engineering the ATLAS TAG Browser

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Q; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    ELSSI is a web-based event metadata (TAG) browser and event-level selection service for ATLAS. TAGs from all ATLAS physics and Monte Carlo data sets are routinely loaded into Oracle databases as an integral part of event processing. As data volumes increase, more and more sites are joining the distributed TAG data hosting topology. Meanwhile, TAG content and database schemata continue to evolve as new user requirements and additional sources of metadata emerge. All of this has posed many challenges to the development of ELSSI, which must support vast amounts of TAG data while source, content, geographic locations, and user query patterns may change over time. In this paper, we describe some of the challenges encountered in the process of developing ELSSI, and the software engineering strategies adopted to address those challenges. Approaches to management of access to data, browsing, data rendering, query building, query validation, execution, connection management, and communication with auxiliary services a...

  4. Engineering the ATLAS TAG Browser

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Q; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    ELSSI is a web-based event metadata (TAG) browser and event-level selection service for ATLAS. TAGs from all ATLAS physics and Monte Carlo data sets are routinely loaded into Oracle databases as an integral part of event processing. As data volumes increase, more and more sites are joining the distributed TAG data hosting topology[1]. Meanwhile, TAG content and database schemata continue to evolve as new user requirements and additional sources of metadata emerge. All of this has posed many challenges to the development of ELSSI, which must support vast amounts of TAG data while source, content, geographic locations, and user query patterns may change over time. In this paper, we describe some of the challenges encountered in the process of developing ELSSI, and the software engineering strategies adopted to address those challenges. Approaches to management of access to data, browsing, data rendering, query building, query validation, execution, connection management, and communication with auxiliary service...

  5. Atlas nacional da Espanha, demografia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hervé Théry

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Calvo Palacios J.L., Pueyo Campos Á. (2008, Atlas nacional de España, Demografía. Madrid: Centro Nacional de Información Geográfica, 386 p. ISBN: 978-8-4416-0685-2.O volume, que faz parte da série Monografias do Atlas Nacional de Espanha, inclui 420 mapas, 91 dos quais apresentam informações por município que dão uma visão global, concisa e muito completa da realidade da população espanhola e da sua evolução (em alguns casos analisada desde 1857. Seus diretores científicos são José Luis Cal...

  6. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) test facilities study program. Final report. Volume I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1977-01-17

    A comprehensive test program has been envisioned by ERDA to accomplish the OTEC program objectives of developing an industrial and technological base that will lead to the commercial capability to successfully construct and economically operate OTEC plants. This study was performed to develop alternative non-site specific OTEC test facilities/platform requirements for an integrated OTEC test program including both land and floating test facilities. A progression of tests was established in which OTEC power cycle component designs proceed through advanced research and technology, component, and systems test phases. This progression leads to the first OTEC pilot plant and provides support for following developments which potentially reduce the cost of OTEC energy. It also includes provisions for feedback of results from all test phases to enhance modifications to existing designs or development of new concepts. The tests described should be considered as representative of generic types since specifics can be expected to change as the OTEC plant design evolves. Emphasis is placed on defining the test facility which is capable of supporting the spectrum of tests envisioned. All test support facilities and equipment have been identified and included in terms of space, utilities, cost, schedule, and constraints or risks. A highly integrated data acquisition and control system has been included to improve test operations and facility effectiveness through a centralized computer system capable of automatic test control, real-time data analysis, engineering analyses, and selected facility control including safety alarms. Electrical power, hydrogen, and ammonia are shown to be technically feasible as means for transmitting OTEC power to a land-based distribution point. (WHK)

  7. Review of Army Officer Educational System. Volume 3. Annex A - Good Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    1971-12-01

    release. The distribution Ls unLiited. FOR THE CHIF: Major, Infant R&D Coordinator ANNEX A - GOOD PROGRAMS TABLE OF CONTENTS P age I INTRODUCTION TO...Indefinite status lies in the joint efforts and close cooperation between the Ordnance Branch of OPO and the Ordnance Center and School. The emphasis placed...on individual treatment by both the Ordnance Branch of OPO and the USAOC&S, coupled with the concept that every Ordnance Officer has a "HOME" at the

  8. Rotorcraft Flight Simulation Computer Program C81 with Datamap Interface, Volume 2. Programmer’s Manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-10-01

    resulting computer programs for the evaluation of rotary-wing aircraft performance, stability and control, rotor blade loads, maneuvering characteristics ...coefficients. (169) WRMS. It prints out mode shapes associated with the rotorcraft characteristic roots determined in the rotorcraft stability analysis. (170...SVWAt 20C 49 92 9 S U IALO SEPIA ’ £4 CC 56 - f ’uNOYR IT ifSNIAHi 33 LU 0 Eo F , USILD 2 IVU IS £2 £0 £0 IAVS 4 WPtl .34 4 -]a 16 105~ l4IL or!) " lp uI

  9. The Coastal Ocean Prediction Systems program: Understanding and managing our coastal ocean. Volume 1: Strategic summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-05-15

    The proposed COPS (Coastal Ocean Prediction Systems) program is concerned with combining numerical models with observations (through data assimilation) to improve our predictive knowledge of the coastal ocean. It is oriented toward applied research and development and depends upon the continued pursuit of basic research in programs like COOP (Coastal Ocean Processes); i.e., to a significant degree it is involved with ``technology transfer`` from basic knowledge to operational and management applications. This predictive knowledge is intended to address a variety of societal problems: (1) ship routing, (2) trajectories for search and rescue operations, (3) oil spill trajectory simulations, (4) pollution assessments, (5) fisheries management guidance, (6) simulation of the coastal ocean`s response to climate variability, (7) calculation of sediment transport, (8) calculation of forces on structures, and so forth. The initial concern is with physical models and observations in order to provide a capability for the estimation of physical forces and transports in the coastal ocean. For all these applications, there are common needs for physical field estimates: waves, tides, currents, temperature, and salinity, including mixed layers, thermoclines, fronts, jets, etc. However, the intent is to work with biologists, chemists, and geologists in developing integrated multidisciplinary prediction systems as it becomes feasible to do so. From another perspective, by combining observations with models through data assimilation, a modern approach to monitoring is provided through whole-field estimation.

  10. Coal conversion and biomass conversion: Volume 1: Final report on USAID (Agency for International Development)/GOI (Government of India) Alternate Energy Resources and Development Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulkarni, A.; Saluja, J.

    1987-06-30

    The United States Agency for International Development (AID), in joint collaboration with the Government of India (GOI), supported a research and development program in Alternate Energy Resources during the period March 1983 to June 1987. The primary emphasis of this program was to develop new and advanced coal and biomass conversion technologies for the efficient utilization of coal and biomass feedstocks in India. This final ''summary'' report is divided into two volumes. This Report, Volume I, covers the program overview and coal projects and Volume II summarizes the accomplishments of the biomass projects. The six projects selected in the area of coal were: Evaluation of the Freeboard Performance in a Fluidized-Bed Combustor; Scale-up of AFBC boilers; Rheology, Stability and Combustion of Coal-Water Slurries; Beneficiation of Fine Coal in Dense Medium Cyclones; Hot Gas Cleanup and Separation; and Cold Gas Cleanup and Separation.

  11. Improved Stability of Whole Brain Surface Parcellation with Multi-Atlas Segmentation

    OpenAIRE

    Huo, Yuankai; Bao, Shunxing; Parvathaneni, Prasanna; Landman, Bennett A.

    2017-01-01

    Whole brain segmentation and cortical surface parcellation are essential in understanding the anatomical-functional relationships of the brain. Multi-atlas segmentation has been regarded as one of the leading segmentation methods for the whole brain segmentation. In our recent work, the multi-atlas technique has been adapted to surface reconstruction using a method called Multi-atlas CRUISE (MaCRUISE). The MaCRUISE method not only performed consistent volume-surface analyses but also showed a...

  12. Electric and Magnetic Fields (EMF) RAPID Program Engineering Project 8: FINAL REPORT, Evaluation of Field Reduction Technologies, Volume 1 (Report) and Volume 2 (Appendices)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Commonwealth Associates, Inc.; IIT Research Institute

    1997-08-01

    This draft report consists of two volumes. Volume 1, the main body, contains an introducto~ sectionj an overview of magnetic fields sectio~ and field reduction technology evaluation section. Magnetic field reduction methods are evalpated for transmission lines, distribution Iines,sulxtations, building wiring applkmd machinery, and transportation systems. The evaluation considers effectiveness, co% and other ftiors. Volume 2 contains five appendices, Append~ A presents magnetic field shielding information. Appendices B and C present design assumptions and magnetic field plots for transmission and distribution lines, respectively. Appendices D and E present cost estimate details for transmission and distribution limes, respectively.

  13. Early Site Permit Demonstration Program: Guidelines for determining design basis ground motions. Volume 2, Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-03-18

    This report develops and applies a methodology for estimating strong earthquake ground motion. The motivation was to develop a much needed tool for use in developing the seismic requirements for structural designs. An earthquake`s ground motion is a function of the earthquake`s magnitude, and the physical properties of the earth through which the seismic waves travel from the earthquake fault to the site of interest. The emphasis of this study is on ground motion estimation in Eastern North America (east of the Rocky Mountains), with particular emphasis on the Eastern United States and southeastern Canada. Eastern North America is a stable continental region, having sparse earthquake activity with rare occurrences of large earthquakes. While large earthquakes are of interest for assessing seismic hazard, little data exists from the region to empirically quantify their effects. The focus of the report is on the attributes of ground motion in Eastern North America that are of interest for the design of facilities such as nuclear power plants. This document, Volume II, contains Appendices 2, 3, 5, 6, and 7 covering the following topics: Eastern North American Empirical Ground Motion Data; Examination of Variance of Seismographic Network Data; Soil Amplification and Vertical-to-Horizontal Ratios from Analysis of Strong Motion Data From Active Tectonic Regions; Revision and Calibration of Ou and Herrmann Method; Generalized Ray Procedure for Modeling Ground Motion Attenuation; Crustal Models for Velocity Regionalization; Depth Distribution Models; Development of Generic Site Effects Model; Validation and Comparison of One-Dimensional Site Response Methodologies; Plots of Amplification Factors; Assessment of Coupling Between Vertical & Horizontal Motions in Nonlinear Site Response Analysis; and Modeling of Dynamic Soil Properties.

  14. Experimental plan for the fuel-oil study. Weatherization Assistance Program: Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ternes, M.P.; Levins, W.P.; Brown, M.A.

    1992-01-01

    An up-to-date assessment of the Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP) is being performed by the US Department of Energy WAP Division and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Five studies form the evaluation. Major goals of the Fuel-Oil Study are to estimate the fuel oil saved by the WAP in the Northeast during the 1990 and 1991 program years, identify and quantify non-energy impacts of the WAP, assess the cost effectiveness of the WAP within this submarket, and assess factors which may cause savings and cost effectiveness to vary. The study will only analyze single-family houses in the nine states in the Northeast census region and will be carried out over two heating seasons (1990 and 1991 WAP program years). A split-winter, pre- and post-weatherization experimental design with a control group will be used. Houses will be monitored over one winter. Energy conservation measures will be installed in the weatherized houses in January of each winter by the local WAP subgrantee. One hundred twenty five weatherized houses and 75 control houses will be monitored over the 1990--1991 winter; a different set of 200 houses will be monitored over the 1991--1992 winter. The houses will be evenly distributed among 25 subgrantees. Space-heating fuel-oil consumption, indoor temperature, and outdoor temperature data will be collected for all houses. Fuel-oil delivery data will be collected for each house monitored over the 1990--1991 winter for at least a year before weatherization. The delivery data will be analyzed to determine if the accuracy of the study can be improved by collecting fuel-oil delivery data on a larger sample of houses over the 1991--1992 winter. Detailed survey information will be obtained on all the houses. This information includes descriptive details of the house and its mechanical systems, details on household size and other demographics, and occupant answers to questions regarding comfort, safety, and operation of their space-heating system and house.

  15. Progress in ATLAS central solenoid magnet

    CERN Document Server

    Yamamoto, A; Makida, Y; Tanaka, K; Haruyama, T; Yamaoka, H; Kondo, T; Mizumaki, S; Mine, S; Wada, K; Meguro, S; Sotoki, T; Kikuchi, K; ten Kate, H H J

    2000-01-01

    The ATLAS central solenoid magnet is being developed to provide a magnetic field of 2 Tesla in the central tracking volume of the ATLAS detector under construction at the CERN/LHC project. The solenoid coil design features high-strength aluminum stabilized superconductor to make the coil thinnest while maintaining its stability and the pure-aluminum strip technique for quench protection and safety. The solenoid coil is installed in a common cryostat with the LAr calorimeter in order to minimize the cryostat wall. A transparency of 0.66 radiation length is achieved with these integrated efforts. The progress in the solenoid coil fabrication is reported. (8 refs).

  16. Schedule Optimization Study, Hanford RI/FS Program. Volume 2, Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-12-01

    A Schedule Optimization Study (SOS) of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) Program was conducted by an independent team of professionals from other federal agencies and the private sector experienced in environmental restoration. This team spent two weeks at Hanford in September 1992 examining the reasons for the lengthy RI/FS process at Hanford and developing recommendations to expedite the process. The need for the study arose out of a schedule dispute regarding the submission of the 1100-EM-1 Operable Unit RI/FS Work Plan. This report documents the study called for in the August 29, 1991, Dispute Resolution Committee Decision Statement. Battelle`s Environmental Management Operations (EMO) coordinated the effort for DOE`s Richland Field Office (RL).

  17. Feasibility study of an Integrated Program for Aerospace vehicle Design (IPAD). Volume 4: IPAD system design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldfarb, W.; Carpenter, L. C.; Redhed, D. D.; Hansen, S. D.; Anderson, L. O.; Kawaguchi, A. S.

    1973-01-01

    The computing system design of IPAD is described and the requirements which form the basis for the system design are discussed. The system is presented in terms of a functional design description and technical design specifications. The functional design specifications give the detailed description of the system design using top-down structured programming methodology. Human behavioral characteristics, which specify the system design at the user interface, security considerations, and standards for system design, implementation, and maintenance are also part of the technical design specifications. Detailed specifications of the two most common computing system types in use by the major aerospace companies which could support the IPAD system design are presented. The report of a study to investigate migration of IPAD software between the two candidate 3rd generation host computing systems and from these systems to a 4th generation system is included.

  18. Advanced Platform Systems Technology study. Volume 4: Technology advancement program plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    An overview study of the major technology definition tasks and subtasks along with their interfaces and interrelationships is presented. Although not specifically indicated in the diagram, iterations were required at many steps to finalize the results. The development of the integrated technology advancement plan was initiated by using the results of the previous two tasks, i.e., the trade studies and the preliminary cost and schedule estimates for the selected technologies. Descriptions for the development of each viable technology advancement was drawn from the trade studies. Additionally, a logic flow diagram depicting the steps in developing each technology element was developed along with descriptions for each of the major elements. Next, major elements of the logic flow diagrams were time phased, and that allowed the definition of a technology development schedule that was consistent with the space station program schedule when possible. Schedules show the major milestone including tests required as described in the logic flow diagrams.

  19. GPACC program cost work breakdown structure-dictionary. General purpose aft cargo carrier study, volume 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    The results of detailed cost estimates and economic analysis performed on the updated Model 101 configuration of the general purpose Aft Cargo Carrier (ACC) are given. The objective of this economic analysis is to provide the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) with information on the economics of using the ACC on the Space Transportation System (STS). The detailed cost estimates for the ACC are presented by a work breakdown structure (WBS) to ensure that all elements of cost are considered in the economic analysis and related subsystem trades. Costs reported by WBS provide NASA with a basis for comparing competing designs and provide detailed cost information that can be used to forecast phase C/D planning for new projects or programs derived from preliminary conceptual design studies. The scope covers all STS and STS/ACC launch vehicle cost impacts for delivering payloads to a 160 NM low Earth orbit (LEO).

  20. Directory of Certificates of Compliance for radioactive materials packages: Report of NRC approved quality assurance programs for radioactive materials packages. Volume 3, Revision 15

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-10-01

    The purpose of this directory is to make available a convenient source of information on packagings which have been approved by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. To assist in identifying packaging, an index by Model Number and corresponding Certificate of Compliance Number is included at the front of Volumes 1 and 2. An alphabetical listing by user name is included in the back of Volume 3 of approved QA programs. The reports include a listing of all users of each package design and approved QA programs prior to the publication date.

  1. EnviroAtlas

    Data.gov (United States)

    City and County of Durham, North Carolina — This EnviroAtlas web service supports research and online mapping activities related to EnviroAtlas (https://www.epa.gov/enviroatlas). The layers in this web...

  2. Heavy-ion Physics (ATLAS)

    CERN Document Server

    Przybycien, Mariusz; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider has undertaken a broad physics program to probe and characterize the hot nuclear matter created in relativistic heavy-ion collisions. This talk presents recent results on production of electroweak bosons and quarkonium, charged particles and jets, bulk particle collectivity and electromagnetic processes in ultra-peripheral collisions, from Pb+Pb and p+Pb collisions.

  3. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program: 1995. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyman, William A. (Editor); Sickorez, Donn G. (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    The objectives of the JSC NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program, which began nationally in 1964 and at JSC in 1965, are (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of the participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA centers. Each faculty fellow spent at least 10 weeks at JSC engaged in a research project in collaboration with a NASA/JSC colleague. In addition to the faculty participants, the 1995 program included five students. This document is a compilation of the first fifteen of twenty-seven final reports on the research projects completed by the faculty fellows and visiting students during the summer of 1995. The reports of two of the students are integral with that of the respective fellow. Three students wrote separate reports included in Volume 2.

  4. Gulf Coast geopressured-geothermal program summary report compilation. Volume 3: Applied and direct uses, resource feasibility, economics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John, C.J.; Maciasz, G.; Harder, B.J.

    1998-06-01

    The US Department of Energy established a geopressured-geothermal energy program in the mid 1970`s as one response to America`s need to develop alternate energy resources in view of the increasing dependence on imported fossil fuel energy. This program continued for 17 years and approximately two hundred million dollars were expended for various types of research and well testing to thoroughly investigate this alternative energy source. This volume describes the following studies: Geopressured-geothermal hybrid cycle power plant: design, testing, and operation summary; Feasibility of hydraulic energy recovery from geopressured-geothermal resources: economic analysis of the Pelton turbine; Brine production as an exploration tool for water drive gas reservoirs; Study of supercritical Rankine cycles; Application of the geopressured-geothermal resource to pyrolytic conversion or decomposition/detoxification processes; Conclusions on wet air oxidation, pyrolytic conversion, decomposition/detoxification process; Co-location of medium to heavy oil reservoirs with geopressured-geothermal resources and the feasibility of oil recovery using geopressured-geothermal fluids; Economic analysis; Application of geopressured-geothermal resources to direct uses; Industrial consortium for the utilization of the geopressured-geothermal resource; Power generation; Industrial desalination, gas use and sales, pollutant removal, thermal EOR, sulfur frasching, oil and natural gas pipelining, coal desulfurization and preparation, lumber and concrete products kilning; Agriculture and aquaculture applications; Paper and cane sugar industries; Chemical processing; Environmental considerations for geopressured-geothermal development. 27 figs., 25 tabs.

  5. Consolidated guidance about materials licenses: Program-specific guidance about portable gauge licenses. Final report; Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vacca, P.C.; Whitten, J.E.; Pelchat, J.M.; Arredondo, S.A.; Matson, E.R.; Lewis, S.H.; Collins, D.J.; Santiago, P.A. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Div. of Industrial and Medical Nuclear Safety; Tingle, W. [Dept. of Environment, Health, and Natural Resources, Raleigh, NC (United States). Div. of Radiation Protection

    1997-05-01

    As part of its redesign of the materials licensing process, NRC is consolidating and updating numerous guidance documents into a single comprehensive repository as described in NUREG-1539 and draft NUREG-1541. NUREG-1556, Vol. 1, is the first program-specific guidance developed for the new process and will serve as a template for subsequent program-specific guidance. This document is intended for use by applicants, licensees, and NRC staff and will also be available to Agreement States. This document supersedes the guidance previously found in draft Regulatory Guide DG-0008, ``Applications for the Use of Sealed Sources in Portable Gauging Devices,`` and in NMSs Policy and guidance Directive 2-07, ``Standard Review Plan for Applications for Use of Sealed Sources in Portable Gauging Devices.`` This final report takes a more risk-informed, performance-based approach to licensing portable gauges, and reduces the information(amount and level of detail) needed to support an application to use these devices. It incorporates many suggests submitted during the comment period on draft NUREG-1556, Volume 1. When published, this final report should be used in preparing portable gauge license applications. NRC staff will use this final report in reviewing these applications.

  6. The Consistency Service of the ATLAS Distributed Data Management system

    CERN Document Server

    Serfon, C; The ATLAS collaboration

    2010-01-01

    With the continuously increasing volume of data produced by ATLAS and stored on the WLCG sites, the probability of data corruption or data losses, due to software and hardware failure is increasing. In order to ensure the consistency of all data produced by ATLAS a Consistency Service has been developed as part of the DQ2 Distributed Data Management system. This service is fed by the different ATLAS tools, i.e. the analysis tools, production tools, DQ2 site services or by site administrators that report corrupted or lost files. It automatically correct the errors reported and informs the users in case of irrecoverable file loss.

  7. The consistency service of the ATLAS Distributed Data Management system

    CERN Document Server

    Serfon, C; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    With the continuously increasing volume of data produced by ATLAS and stored on the WLCG sites, the probability of data corruption or data losses, due to software and hardware failures is increasing. In order to ensure the consistency of all data produced by ATLAS a Consistency Service has been developed as part of the DQ2 Distributed Data Management system. This service is fed by the different ATLAS tools, i.e. the analysis tools, production tools, DQ2 site services or by site administrators that report corrupted or lost files. It automatically corrects the errors reported and informs the users in case of irrecoverable file loss.

  8. Discovery of SM Higgs Boson in ATLAS Experiment

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 18; Issue 3. Discovery of SM Higgs Boson in ATLAS Experiment. Prafulla Kumar Behera. General Article Volume 18 Issue 3 March 2013 pp 248-263. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  9. ATLAS experimentet

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Outreach Committee

    2000-01-01

    Filmen innehåller mycket information om fysik och varför LHC behövs tilsammans med stora detektorer och specielt om behovet av ATLAS Experimentet. Mycket bra film för att förklara det okända- som man undersöker i CERN för att ge svar på frågor som människor har försökt förklara under flere tusen år.

  10. Upgraded automotive gas turbine engine design and development program, volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, C. E. (Editor); Pampreen, R. C. (Editor)

    1979-01-01

    Results are presented for the design and development of an upgraded engine. The design incorporated technology advancements which resulted from development testing on the Baseline Engine. The final engine performance with all retro-fitted components from the development program showed a value of 91 HP at design speed in contrast to the design value of 104 HP. The design speed SFC was 0.53 versus the goal value of 0.44. The miss in power was primarily due to missing the efficiency targets of small size turbomachinery. Most of the SFC deficit was attributed to missed goals in the heat recovery system relative to regenerator effectiveness and expected values of heat loss. Vehicular fuel consumption, as measured on a chassis dynamometer, for a vehicle inertia weight of 3500 lbs., was 15 MPG for combined urban and highway driving cycles. The baseline engine achieved 8 MPG with a 4500 lb. vehicle. Even though the goal of 18.3 MPG was not achieved with the upgraded engine, there was an improvement in fuel economy of 46% over the baseline engine, for comparable vehicle inertia weight.

  11. NMFS Cooperative SharkTagging Program, 1962-93: An Atlas of SharkTag and Recapture Data

    OpenAIRE

    Kohler, Nancy E.; Casey, John G.; Turner, Patricia A.

    1998-01-01

    The National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) Cooperative Shark Tagging Program (CSTP) is part of continuing research directed to the study of the biology of large Atlantic sharks. The CSTP was initiated in 1962 at the Sandy Hook Laboratory in New Jersey under the Department of Interior's U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS). During the late 1950's and early 1960's, sharks were considered a liability to the economy of resort communities, of little or no commercial value, and a detriment to f...

  12. Recent ATLAS Articles on WLAP

    CERN Multimedia

    J. Herr

    As reported in the September 2004 ATLAS eNews, the Web Lecture Archive Project is a system for the archiving and publishing of multimedia presentations, using the Web as medium. We list here newly available WLAP items relating to ATLAS: Atlas Physics Workshop 6-11 June 2005 June 2005 ATLAS Week Plenary Session Click here to browse WLAP for all ATLAS lectures.

  13. Berliner Philarmoniker ATLAS visit

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The Berliner Philarmoniker in on tour through Europe. They stopped on June 27th in Geneva, for a concert at the Victoria Hall. An ATLAS visit was organised the morning after, lead by the ATLAS spokesperson Karl Jakobs (welcome and overview talk) and two ATLAS guides (AVC visit and 3D movie).

  14. EnviroAtlas - Rare Ecosystems in the Conterminous United States

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset identifies rare ecosystems using base landcover data from the USGS GAP Analysis Program (Version 2, 2011) combined with landscape ecology...

  15. Alternative fuels for vehicles fleet demonstration program final report. Volume 1: Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    The Alternative Fuels for Vehicles Fleet Demonstration Program (AFV-FDP) was a multiyear effort to collect technical data for use in determining the costs and benefits of alternative-fuel vehicles in typical applications in New York State. During 3 years of collecting data, 7.3 million miles of driving were accumulated, 1,003 chassis-dynamometer emissions tests were performed, 862,000 gallons of conventional fuel were saved, and unique information was developed about garage safety recommendations, vehicle performance, and other topics. Findings are organized by vehicle and fuel type. For light-duty compressed natural gas (CNG) vehicles, technology has evolved rapidly and closed-loop, electronically-controlled fuel systems provide performance and emissions advantages over open-loop, mechanical systems. The best CNG technology produces consistently low tailpipe emissions versus gasoline, and can eliminate evaporative emissions. Reduced driving range remains the largest physical drawback. Fuel cost is low ($/Btu) but capital costs are high, indicating that economics are best with vehicles that are used intensively. Propane produces impacts similar to CNG and is less expensive to implement, but fuel cost is higher than gasoline and safety codes limit use in urban areas. Light-duty methanol/ethanol vehicles provide performance and emissions benefits over gasoline with little impact on capital costs, but fuel costs are high. Heavy-duty CNG engines are evolving rapidly and provide large reductions in emissions versus diesel. Capital costs are high for CNG buses and fuel efficiency is reduced, but the fuel is less expensive and overall operating costs are about equal to those of diesel buses. Methanol buses provide performance and emissions benefits versus diesel, but fuel costs are high. Other emerging technologies were also evaluated, including electric vehicles, hybrid-electric vehicles, and fuel cells.

  16. A Program Manager’s Guide for Program Improvement in Ongoing Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury Programs. The RAND Toolkit, Volume 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    seek care at a specific referral site (based on a computer algorithm that identifies the site nearest to the caller’s home address); (b) offers to...Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE Publications, 2008. de Vries H, Weijts W, Dijkstra M, Kok G. “The Utilization of Qualitative and Quantitative Data for Health...Health and Traumatic Brain Injury. “Program Evaluation Guide.” 2012. As of March 27, 2013: http://www.dcoe.health.mil/Content/ Navigation /Documents

  17. Final proceedings of the second solar heating and cooling commercial demonstration program contractors' review. Volume 1. Summary and analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-07-01

    The Second Solar Heating and Cooling Commercial Demonstration Program Contractors' Review was attended by over 300 representatives from demonstration projects, the Department of Energy (DOE), other Federal agencies, and Government contractors. This volume presents a thorough study of the 140 project papers printed in the three-volume proceedings. A comprehensive table describing the 140 sites is included. This table presents a description of the sites not only in terms of equipment and performance, but also those regarding their problems, successes, and other experiences. The panel discussions on demonstration projects, the National Solar Data Program and the Commercial Demonstration Program are summarized and analyzed. The results of a special survey of Commercial Demonstration Program contractors are presented. Finally, the results of a polling of Review participants on the effectiveness of the meeting are detailed. (WHK)

  18. ATLAS distributed computing: experience and evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Nairz, A; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment has just concluded its first running period which commenced in 2010. After two years of remarkable performance from the LHC and ATLAS, the experiment has accumulated more than 25/fb of data. The total volume of beam and simulated data products exceeds 100~PB distributed across more than 150 computing centres around the world, managed by the experiment's distributed data management system. These sites have provided up to 150,000 computing cores to ATLAS's global production and analysis processing system, enabling a rich physics programme including the discovery of the Higgs-like boson in 2012. The wealth of accumulated experience in global data-intensive computing at this massive scale, and the considerably more challenging requirements of LHC computing from 2015 when the LHC resumes operation, are driving a comprehensive design and development cycle to prepare a revised computing model together with data processing and management systems able to meet the demands of higher trigger rates, e...

  19. Hierarchical Control of the ATLAS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Barriuso-Poy, Alex; Llobet-Valero, E

    2007-01-01

    Control systems at High Energy Physics (HEP) experiments are becoming increasingly complex mainly due to the size, complexity and data volume associated to the front-end instrumentation. In particular, this becomes visible for the ATLAS experiment at the LHC accelerator at CERN. ATLAS will be the largest particle detector ever built, result of an international collaboration of more than 150 institutes. The experiment is composed of 9 different specialized sub-detectors that perform different tasks and have different requirements for operation. The system in charge of the safe and coherent operation of the whole experiment is called Detector Control System (DCS). This thesis presents the integration of the ATLAS DCS into a global control tree following the natural segmentation of the experiment into sub-detectors and smaller sub-systems. The integration of the many different systems composing the DCS includes issues such as: back-end organization, process model identification, fault detection, synchronization ...

  20. ATLAS Recordings

    CERN Multimedia

    Jeremy Herr; Homer A. Neal; Mitch McLachlan

    The University of Michigan Web Archives for the 2006 ATLAS Week Plenary Sessions, as well as the first of 2007, are now online. In addition, there are a wide variety of Software and Physics Tutorial sessions, recorded over the past couple years, to chose from. All ATLAS-specific archives are accessible here.Viewing requires a standard web browser with RealPlayer plug-in (included in most browsers automatically) and works on any major platform. Lectures can be viewed directly over the web or downloaded locally.In addition, you will find access to a variety of general tutorials and events via the portal. Shaping Collaboration 2006The Michigan group is happy to announce a complete set of recordings from the Shaping Collaboration conference held last December at the CICG in Geneva.The event hosted a mix of Collaborative Tool experts and LHC Users, and featured presentations by the CERN Deputy Director General, Prof. Jos Engelen, the President of Internet2, and chief developers from VRVS/EVO, WLAP, and other tools...

  1. ATLAS DBM Module Qualification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soha, Aria [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Gorisek, Andrej [J. Stefan Inst., Ljubljana (Slovenia); Zavrtanik, Marko [J. Stefan Inst., Ljubljana (Slovenia); Sokhranyi, Grygorii [J. Stefan Inst., Ljubljana (Slovenia); McGoldrick, Garrin [Univ. of Toronto, ON (Canada); Cerv, Matevz [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland)

    2014-06-18

    This is a technical scope of work (TSW) between the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) and the experimenters of Jozef Stefan Institute, CERN, and University of Toronto who have committed to participate in beam tests to be carried out during the 2014 Fermilab Test Beam Facility program. Chemical Vapour Deposition (CVD) diamond has a number of properties that make it attractive for high energy physics detector applications. Its large band-gap (5.5 eV) and large displacement energy (42 eV/atom) make it a material that is inherently radiation tolerant with very low leakage currents and high thermal conductivity. CVD diamond is being investigated by the RD42 Collaboration for use very close to LHC interaction regions, where the most extreme radiation conditions are found. This document builds on that work and proposes a highly spatially segmented diamond-based luminosity monitor to complement the time-segmented ATLAS Beam Conditions Monitor (BCM) so that, when Minimum Bias Trigger Scintillators (MTBS) and LUCID (LUminosity measurement using a Cherenkov Integrating Detector) have difficulty functioning, the ATLAS luminosity measurement is not compromised.

  2. EnviroAtlas - Green Bay, WI - Atlas Area Boundary

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset shows the boundary of the Green Bay, WI Atlas Area. It represents the outside edge of all the block groups included in the EnviroAtlas Area....

  3. EnviroAtlas - Paterson, NJ - Atlas Area Boundary

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset shows the boundary of the Paterson, NJ Atlas Area. It represents the outside edge of all the block groups included in the EnviroAtlas Area....

  4. EnviroAtlas - Portland, ME - Atlas Area Boundary

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset shows the boundary of the Portland, ME Atlas Area. It represents the outside edge of all the block groups included in the EnviroAtlas Area....

  5. ATLAS note ATL-COM-PHYS-2009.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chekanov, S.; Boomsma, J.; High Energy Physics

    2009-12-22

    The program InvMass has been developed to perform a general model-independent search for new particles using the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), a proton-proton collider at CERN. The search is performed by examining statistically significant variations from the Standard Model predictions in exclusive event classes classified according to the number of identified objects. The program, called InvMass, finds all relevant particle groups identified with the ATLAS detector and analyzes their production rates, invariant masses and the total transverse momenta. The generic code of InvMass can easily be adapted for any particle types identified with the ATLAS detector. Several benchmark tests are presented.

  6. ATLAS Distributed Data Analysis: performance and challenges

    CERN Document Server

    Fassi, Farida; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    In the LHC operations era the key goal is to analyse the results of the collisions of high-energy particles as a way of probing the fundamental forces of nature. The ATLAS experiment at the LHC at CERN is recording and simulating several 10's of PetaBytes of data per year. The ATLAS Computing Model was designed around the concepts of Grid Computing. Large data volumes from the detectors and simulations require a large number of CPUs and storage space for data processing. To cope with this challenge a global network known as the Worldwide LHC Computing Grid (WLCG) was built. This is the most sophisticated data taking and analysis system ever built. ATLAS accumulated more than 140 PB of data between 2009 and 2014. To analyse these data ATLAS developed, deployed and now operates a mature and stable distributed analysis (DA) service on the WLCG. The service is actively used: more than half a million user jobs run daily on DA resources, submitted by more than 1500 ATLAS physicists. A significant reliability of the...

  7. ATLAS Distributed Data Analysis: challenges and performance

    CERN Document Server

    Fassi, Farida; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    In the LHC operations era the key goal is to analyse the results of the collisions of high-energy particles as a way of probing the fundamental forces of nature. The ATLAS experiment at the LHC at CERN is recording and simulating several 10's of PetaBytes of data per year. The ATLAS Computing Model was designed around the concepts of Grid Computing. Large data volumes from the detectors and simulations require a large number of CPUs and storage space for data processing. To cope with this challenge a global network known as the Worldwide LHC Computing Grid (WLCG) was built. This is the most sophisticated data taking and analysis system ever built. ATLAS accumulated more than 140 PB of data between 2009 and 2014. To analyse these data ATLAS developed, deployed and now operates a mature and stable distributed analysis (DA) service on the WLCG. The service is actively used: more than half a million user jobs run daily on DA resources, submitted by more than 1500 ATLAS physicists. A significant reliability of the...

  8. Frontier use in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, D A; The ATLAS collaboration; DeStefano, J; Dewhurst, A; Donno, F; Dykstra, D; Front, D; Gallas, E; Hawkings, R; Luehring, F; Walker, R

    2010-01-01

    Frontier is a distributed database access system, including data caching, that was developed originally for the CMS experiment. This system has been in production for CMS for some time, providing world-wide access to the experiment's conditions data for all user jobs. The ATLAS experiment, which has had similar problems with global data distribution, investigated the use of the system for ATLAS jobs. After months of trials and verification, ATLAS put the Frontier system into production late in 2009. Frontier now supplies database access for ATLAS jobs at over 50 computing sites. This successful deployment of Frontier in ATLAS will be described, along with the scope of the system and necessary resources.

  9. ATLAS25: Facebook Live Events

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN

    2017-01-01

    This video is a montage of the 5 Facebook Live events that were broadcast on 2nd October 2017, to celebrate ATLAS25. For more details visit: http://atlas.cern/updates/atlas-news/celebrating-25-years-discovery

  10. Individual plant examination program: Perspectives on reactor safety and plant performance. Part 1: Final summary report; Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-01

    This report provides perspectives gained by reviewing 75 Individual Plant Examination (IPE) submittals pertaining to 108 nuclear power plant units. IPEs are probabilistic analyses that estimate the core damage frequency (CDF) and containment performance for accidents initiated by internal events. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) reviewed the IPE submittals with the objective of gaining perspectives in three major areas: (1) improvements made to individual plants as a result of their IPEs and the collective results of the IPE program, (2) plant-specific design and operational features and modeling assumptions that significantly affect the estimates of CDF and containment performance, and (3) strengths and weaknesses of the models and methods used in the IPEs. These perspectives are gained by assessing the core damage and containment performance results, including overall CDF, accident sequences, dominant contributions to component failure and human error, and containment failure modes. Methods, data, boundary conditions, and assumptions used in the IPEs are considered in understanding the differences and similarities observed among the various types of plants. This report is divided into three volumes containing six parts. Part 1 is a summary report of the key perspectives gained in each of the areas identified above, with a discussion of the NRC`s overall conclusions and observations. Part 2 discusses key perspectives regarding the impact of the IPE Program on reactor safety. Part 3 discusses perspectives gained from the IPE results regarding CDF, containment performance, and human actions. Part 4 discusses perspectives regarding the IPE models and methods. Part 5 discusses additional IPE perspectives. Part 6 contains Appendices A, B and C which provide the references of the information from the IPEs, updated PRA results, and public comments on draft NUREG-1560 respectively.

  11. Individual plant examination program: Perspectives on reactor safety and plant performance. Parts 2--5: Final report; Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-01

    This report provides perspectives gained by reviewing 75 Individual Plant Examination (IPE) submittals pertaining to 108 nuclear power plant units. IPEs are probabilistic analyses that estimate the core damage frequency (CDF) and containment performance for accidents initiated by internal events. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) reviewed the IPE submittals with the objective of gaining perspectives in three major areas: (1) improvements made to individual plants as a result of their IPEs and the collective results of the IPE program, (2) plant-specific design and operational features and modeling assumptions that significantly affect the estimates of CDF and containment performance, and (3) strengths and weaknesses of the models and methods used in the IPEs. These perspectives are gained by assessing the core damage and containment performance results, including overall CDF, accident sequences, dominant contributions to component failure and human error, and containment failure modes. Methods, data, boundary conditions, and assumptions used in the IPEs are considered in understanding the differences and similarities observed among the various types of plants. This report is divided into three volumes containing six parts. Part 1 is a summary report of the key perspectives gained in each of the areas identified above, with a discussion of the NRC`s overall conclusions and observations. Part 2 discusses key perspectives regarding the impact of the IPE Program on reactor safety. Part 3 discusses perspectives gained from the IPE results regarding CDF, containment performance, and human actions. Part 4 discusses perspectives regarding the IPE models and methods. Part 5 discusses additional IPE perspectives. Part 6 contains Appendices A, B and C which provide the references of the information from the IPEs, updated PRA results, and public comments on draft NUREG-1560 respectively.

  12. ATLAS Distributed Computing Automation

    CERN Document Server

    Schovancova, J; The ATLAS collaboration; Borrego, C; Campana, S; Di Girolamo, A; Elmsheuser, J; Hejbal, J; Kouba, T; Legger, F; Magradze, E; Medrano Llamas, R; Negri, G; Rinaldi, L; Sciacca, G; Serfon, C; Van Der Ster, D C

    2012-01-01

    The ATLAS Experiment benefits from computing resources distributed worldwide at more than 100 WLCG sites. The ATLAS Grid sites provide over 100k CPU job slots, over 100 PB of storage space on disk or tape. Monitoring of status of such a complex infrastructure is essential. The ATLAS Grid infrastructure is monitored 24/7 by two teams of shifters distributed world-wide, by the ATLAS Distributed Computing experts, and by site administrators. In this paper we summarize automation efforts performed within the ATLAS Distributed Computing team in order to reduce manpower costs and improve the reliability of the system. Different aspects of the automation process are described: from the ATLAS Grid site topology provided by the ATLAS Grid Information System, via automatic site testing by the HammerCloud, to automatic exclusion from production or analysis activities.

  13. The ATLAS hadronic tau trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Black, C; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    With the high luminosities of proton-proton collisions achieved at the LHC, the strategies for triggering have become more important than ever for physics analysis. The naive inclusive single tau lepton triggers now suffer from severe rate limitations. To allow for a large program of physics analyses with taus, the development of topological triggers that combine tau signatures with other measured quantities in the event is required. These combined triggers open many opportunities to study new physics beyond the Standard Model and to search for the Standard Model Higgs. We present the status and performance of the hadronic tau trigger in ATLAS. We demonstrate that the ATLAS tau trigger ran remarkably well over 2011, and how the lessons learned from 2011 led to numerous improvements in the preparation of the 2012 run. These improvements include the introduction of tau selection criteria that are robust against varying pileup scenarios, and the implementation of multivariate selection techniques in the tau trig...

  14. The ATLAS hadronic tau trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Black, C; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    With the high luminosities of proton-proton collisions achieved at the LHC, the strategies for triggering have become more important than ever for physics analysis. The naïve inclusive single tau lepton triggers now suffer from severe rate limitations. To allow for a large program of physics analyses with taus, the development of topological triggers that combine tau signatures with other measured quantities in the event is required. These combined triggers open many opportunities to study new physics beyond the Standard Model and to search for the Standard Model Higgs. We present the status and performance of the hadronic tau trigger in ATLAS. We demonstrate that the ATLAS tau trigger ran remarkably well over 2011, and how the lessons learned from 2011 led to numerous improvements in the preparation of the 2012 run. These improvements include the introduction of tau selection criteria that are robust against varying pileup scenarios, and the implementation of multivariate selection techniques in the tau tri...

  15. Dark Matter Searches at ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    The astrophysical evidence of dark matter provides some of the most compelling clues to the nature of physics beyond the Standard Model. From these clues, ATLAS has developed a broad and systematic search program for dark matter production in LHC collisions. These searches are now entering their prime, with the LHC now colliding protons at the increased 13 TeV centre-of-mass energy and set to deliver much larger datasets than ever before. The results of these searches on the first 13 TeV data, their interpretation, and the design and possible evolution of the search program will be presented.

  16. Constraining Dark Matter with ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Czodrowski, Patrick; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The presence of a non-baryonic dark matter component in the Universe is inferred from the observation of its gravitational interaction. If dark matter interacts weakly with the Standard Model it would be produced at the LHC, escaping the detector and leaving a large missing transverse momentum as their signature. The ATLAS detector has developed a broad and systematic search program for dark matter production in LHC collisions. The results of these searches on the first 13 TeV data, their interpretation, and the design and possible evolution of the search program will be presented.

  17. Consumer Energy Atlas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-06-01

    This first edition of the Atlas provides, in reference form, a central source of information to consumers on key contacts concerned with energy in the US. Energy consumers need information appropriate to local climates and characteristics - best provided by state and local governments. The Department of Energy recognizes the authority of state and local governments to manage energy programs on their own. Therefore, emphasis has been given to government organizations on both the national and state level that influence, formulate, or administer policies affecting energy production, distribution, and use, or that provide information of interest to consumers and non-specialists. In addition, hundreds of non-government energy-related membership organizations, industry trade associations, and energy publications are included.

  18. North American Atlas - Railroads - Direct Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A joint venture involving the National Atlas programs in Canada (Natural Resources Canada), Mexico (Instituto Nacional de Estadística Geografía e Informática), and...

  19. Heavy ion physics with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Przybycien, Mariusz; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider has undertaken a broad physics program to probe and characterize the hot nuclear matter created in relativistic lead-lead collisions. This talk presents recent results on production of jet, electroweak bosons and quarkonium, electromagnetic processes in ultra-peripheral collisions, and bulk particle collectivity from Pb+Pb and p+Pb collisions.

  20. North American Atlas - Populated Places - Direct Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A joint venture involving the National Atlas programs in Canada (Natural Resources Canada), Mexico (Instituto Nacional de Estadística Geografía e Informática), and...

  1. North American Atlas - Glaciers - Direct Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A joint venture involving the National Atlas programs in Canada (Natural Resources Canada), Mexico (Instituto Nacional de Estadística Geografía e Informática), and...

  2. North American Atlas - Political Boundaries - Direct Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A joint venture involving the National Atlas programs in Canada (Natural Resources Canada), Mexico (Instituto Nacional de Estadística Geografía e Informática), and...

  3. North American Atlas - Sea Ice - Direct Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A joint venture involving the National Atlas programs in Canada (Natural Resources Canada), Mexico (Instituto Nacional de Estadística Geografía e Informática), and...

  4. North American Atlas - Bathymetry - Direct Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A joint venture involving the National Atlas programs in Canada (Natural Resources Canada), Mexico (Instituto Nacional de Estadística Geografía e Informática), and...

  5. North American Atlas - Roads - Direct Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A joint venture involving the National Atlas programs in Canada (Natural Resources Canada), Mexico (Instituto Nacional de Estadística Geografía e Informática), and...

  6. North American Atlas - Hydrography - Direct Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A joint venture involving the National Atlas programs in Canada (Natural Resources Canada), Mexico (Instituto Nacional de Estadística Geografía e Informática), and...

  7. Recent Heavy Ion results from ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Olszewski, Andrzej; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider has undertaken a broad physics program to probe and characterize the hot nuclear matter created in relativistic lead-lead collisions. This talk presents recent results on production of jet, eletroweak bosons and quarkonium, electromagnetic processes in ultra-peripheral collisions, and bulk particle collectivity from PbPb and pPb collisions.

  8. Near-term hybrid vehicle program, phase 1. Appendix B: Design trade-off studies report. Volume 3: Computer program listings

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    A description and listing is presented of two computer programs: Hybrid Vehicle Design Program (HYVELD) and Hybrid Vehicle Simulation Program (HYVEC). Both of the programs are modifications and extensions of similar programs developed as part of the Electric and Hybrid Vehicle System Research and Development Project.

  9. Research investigations in oil shale, tar sand, coal research, advanced exploratory process technology, and advanced fuels research: Volume 1 -- Base program. Final report, October 1986--September 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, V.E.

    1994-05-01

    Numerous studies have been conducted in five principal areas: oil shale, tar sand, underground coal gasification, advanced process technology, and advanced fuels research. In subsequent years, underground coal gasification was broadened to be coal research, under which several research activities were conducted that related to coal processing. The most significant change occurred in 1989 when the agreement was redefined as a Base Program and a Jointly Sponsored Research Program (JSRP). Investigations were conducted under the Base Program to determine the physical and chemical properties of materials suitable for conversion to liquid and gaseous fuels, to test and evaluate processes and innovative concepts for such conversions, to monitor and determine environmental impacts related to development of commercial-sized operations, and to evaluate methods for mitigation of potential environmental impacts. This report is divided into two volumes: Volume 1 consists of 28 summaries that describe the principal research efforts conducted under the Base Program in five topic areas. Volume 2 describes tasks performed within the JSRP. Research conducted under this agreement has resulted in technology transfer of a variety of energy-related research information. A listing of related publications and presentations is given at the end of each research topic summary. More specific and detailed information is provided in the topical reports referenced in the related publications listings.

  10. ATLAS database application enhancements using Oracle 11g

    CERN Document Server

    Dimitrov, G; The ATLAS collaboration; Blaszczyk, M; Sorokoletov, R

    2012-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment at LHC relies on databases for detector online data-taking, storage and retrieval of configurations, calibrations and alignments, post data-taking analysis, file management over the grid, job submission and management, condition data replication to remote sites. Oracle Relational Database Management System (RDBMS) has been addressing the ATLAS database requirements to a great extent for many years. Ten database clusters are currently deployed for the needs of the different applications, divided in production, integration and standby databases. The data volume, complexity and demands from the users are increasing steadily with time. Nowadays more than 20 TB of data are stored in the ATLAS production Oracle databases at CERN (not including the index overhead), but the most impressive number is the hosted 260 database schemas (for the most common case each schema is related to a dedicated client application with its own requirements). At the beginning of 2012 all ATLAS databases at CERN have...

  11. Physics with Tau Lepton Final States in ATLAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pingel Almut M.

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The ATLAS detector records collisions from two high-energetic proton beams circulating in the LHC. An integral part of the ATLAS physics program are analyses with tau leptons in the final state. Here an overview is given over the studies done in ATLAS with hadronically-decaying final state tau leptons: Standard Model cross-section measurements of Z → ττ, W → τν and tt̅ → bb̅ e/μν τhadν; τ polarization measurements in W → τν decays; Higgs searches and various searches for physics beyond the Standard Model.

  12. ATLAS and ultra high energy cosmic ray physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinfold James

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available After a brief introduction to extended air shower cosmic ray physics the current and future deployment of forward detectors at ATLAS is discussed along with the various aspects of the current and future ATLAS programs to explore hadronic physics. The emphasis is placed on those results and future plans that have particular relevance for high-energy, and ultra high-energy, cosmic ray physics. The possible use of ATLAS as an “underground” cosmic muon observatory is briefly considered.

  13. Advanced Technology Lifecycle Analysis System (ATLAS) Technology Tool Box (TTB)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Monica; ONeil, Daniel A.; Christensen, Carissa B.

    2005-01-01

    The Advanced Technology Lifecycle Analysis System (ATLAS) is a decision support tool designed to aid program managers and strategic planners in determining how to invest technology research and development dollars. It is an Excel-based modeling package that allows a user to build complex space architectures and evaluate the impact of various technology choices. ATLAS contains system models, cost and operations models, a campaign timeline and a centralized technology database. Technology data for all system models is drawn from a common database, the ATLAS Technology Tool Box (TTB). The TTB provides a comprehensive, architecture-independent technology database that is keyed to current and future timeframes.

  14. The ATLAS Analysis Model

    CERN Multimedia

    Amir Farbin

    The ATLAS Analysis Model is a continually developing vision of how to reconcile physics analysis requirements with the ATLAS offline software and computing model constraints. In the past year this vision has influenced the evolution of the ATLAS Event Data Model, the Athena software framework, and physics analysis tools. These developments, along with the October Analysis Model Workshop and the planning for CSC analyses have led to a rapid refinement of the ATLAS Analysis Model in the past few months. This article introduces some of the relevant issues and presents the current vision of the future ATLAS Analysis Model. Event Data Model The ATLAS Event Data Model (EDM) consists of several levels of details, each targeted for a specific set of tasks. For example the Event Summary Data (ESD) stores calorimeter cells and tracking system hits thereby permitting many calibration and alignment tasks, but will be only accessible at particular computing sites with potentially large latency. In contrast, the Analysis...

  15. ATLAS Offline Software Performance Monitoring and Optimization

    CERN Document Server

    Chauhan, N; Kittelmann, T; Langenberg, R; Mandrysch , R; Salzburger, A; Seuster, R; Ritsch, E; Stewart, G; van Eldik, N; Vitillo, R

    2014-01-01

    In a complex multi-developer, multi-package software environment, such as the ATLAS offline Athena framework, tracking the performance of the code can be a non-trivial task in itself. In this paper we describe improvements in the instrumentation of ATLAS offline software that have given considerable insight into the performance of the code and helped to guide optimisation. Code can be instrumented firstly using the PAPI tool, which is a programing interface for accessing hardware performance counters. PAPI events can count floating point operations, cycles and instructions and cache accesses. Triggering PAPI to start/stop counting for each algorithm and processed event gives a good understanding of the whole algorithm level performance of ATLAS code. Further data can be obtained using pin, a dynamic binary instrumentation tool. Pintools can be used to obtain similar statistics as PAPI, but advantageously without requiring recompilation of the code. Fine grained routine and instruction level instrumentation is...

  16. ATLAS Offline Software Performance Monitoring and Optimization

    CERN Document Server

    Chauhan, N; The ATLAS collaboration; Kittelmann, T; Langenberg, R; Mandrysch , R; Salzburger, A; Seuster, R; Ritsch, E; Stewart, G; van Eldik, N; Vitillo, R

    2013-01-01

    In a complex multi-developer, multi-package software environment, such as the ATLAS offline Athena framework, tracking the performance of the code can be a non-trivial task in itself. In this paper we describe improvements in the instrumentation of ATLAS offline software that have given considerable insight into the performance of the code and helped to guide optimisation. Code can be instrumented firstly using the PAPI tool, which is a programing interface for accessing hardware performance counters. PAPI events can count floating point operations, cycles and instructions and cache accesses. Triggering PAPI to start/stop counting for each algorithm and processed event gives a good understanding of the whole algorithm level performance of ATLAS code. Further data can be obtained using pin, a dynamic binary instrumentation tool. Pintools can be used to obtain similar statistics as PAPI, but advantageously without requiring recompilation of the code. Fine grained routine and instruction level instrumentation is...

  17. Book review: World atlas of mangroves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauss, Ken W.; Friess, Daniel A.

    2011-01-01

    Nearly 14 years have passed since the first atlas, World Mangrove Atlas (Spalding et al. 1997), was published. While scientists throughout the world have shared their insights about these ecosystems from a handful of “classic” mangrove ecology treatises, no book since has provided the same platform for understanding the global importance of mangroves by simply defining their distribution. The vast majority of mangrove research programs are modest in size and limited in funding. Nonetheless, much knowledge has been gained since the last atlas, including a potential role for mangroves in storm protection, proactive adjustment of soil surface elevation with sea-level rise, coastal water conservation, economic importance locally, etc. Furthermore, by documenting what can be lost, this book allows the reader to imagine what a world without mangroves might look like (see also Science 317, 41–42). If the first atlas established a mere image of an important wetland community type in peril, then this current edition paints a picture rivaling what an artist may have envisioned. The World Atlas of Mangroves is a comprehensive, well-written, ambitious, and artistic work that we can certainly recommend, and that should be part of any serious wetland library.

  18. The ATLAS Missing ET trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Beauchemin, P; The ATLAS collaboration

    2010-01-01

    Over the last few months, the ATLAS detector collected 900 GeV LHC collision events which allowed for the study the performance of the ATLAS Trigger and Data Acquisition system (TDAQ). With the 7 TeV collision data collected recently, the performance studies of the trigger system are critical for a successful physics program. In particular a large spectrum of physics results will rely on the capacity of the ATLAS TDAQ system to collect events based on the estimate of the missing transverse energy (MET) contained in each event. The MET trigger would be, for example, the primary trigger to be used in new physics searches for processes involving new weakly interacting particles, which could account for the astronomically observed dark matter. In addition to discovery perspectives, the MET trigger can also be used in combination with other triggers to control the rate of signatures involving low energy objects. For example, the MET trigger is necessary in order to measure non-boosted W in the tau channel. Finally...

  19. ATLAS Nightly Build System Upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrov, G.; Obreshkov, E.; Simmons, B.; Undrus, A.; Atlas Collaboration

    2014-06-01

    The ATLAS Nightly Build System is a facility for automatic production of software releases. Being the major component of ATLAS software infrastructure, it supports more than 50 multi-platform branches of nightly releases and provides ample opportunities for testing new packages, for verifying patches to existing software, and for migrating to new platforms and compilers. The Nightly System testing framework runs several hundred integration tests of different granularity and purpose. The nightly releases are distributed and validated, and some are transformed into stable releases used for data processing worldwide. The first LHC long shutdown (2013-2015) activities will elicit increased load on the Nightly System as additional releases and builds are needed to exploit new programming techniques, languages, and profiling tools. This paper describes the plan of the ATLAS Nightly Build System Long Shutdown upgrade. It brings modern database and web technologies into the Nightly System, improves monitoring of nightly build results, and provides new tools for offline release shifters. We will also outline our long-term plans for distributed nightly releases builds and testing.

  20. The Irish Wind Atlas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, R. [Univ. College Dublin, Dept. of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, Dublin (Ireland); Landberg, L. [Risoe National Lab., Meteorology and Wind Energy Dept., Roskilde (Denmark)

    1999-03-01

    The development work on the Irish Wind Atlas is nearing completion. The Irish Wind Atlas is an updated improved version of the Irish section of the European Wind Atlas. A map of the irish wind resource based on a WA{sup s}P analysis of the measured data and station description of 27 measuring stations is presented. The results of previously presented WA{sup s}P/KAMM runs show good agreement with these results. (au)

  1. Future ATLAS Higgs Studies

    CERN Document Server

    Smart, Ben; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The High-Luminosity LHC will prove a challenging environment to work in, with for example $=200$ expected. It will however also provide great opportunities for advancing studies of the Higgs boson. The ATLAS detector will be upgraded, and Higgs prospects analyses have been performed to assess the reach of ATLAS Higgs studies in the HL-LHC era. These analyses are presented, as are Run-2 ATLAS di-Higgs analyses for comparison.

  2. Construction and Application of Human Neonatal DTI Atlases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajiv eDeshpande

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Atlas-based analysis is one of many analytical methods and is used to investigate typical as well as abnormal neurodevelopment. It has been widely applied to the adult and pediatric populations. Successful applications of atlas-based analysis (ABA in those cohorts have motivated the creation of a neonatal atlas and parcellation map. The purpose of this review is to discuss the various neonatal diffusion tensor imaging (DTI atlases that are available for use in ABA, examine how such atlases are constructed, review their applications, and observe future directions in DTI. Neonatal DTI atlases are created from a template, which can be study-specific or standardized, and merged with the corresponding parcellation map. Study-specific templates can retain higher image registration accuracy, but are usually not applicable across different studies. However, standardized templates can be used to make comparisons among various studies, but may not accurately reflect the anatomies of the study population. Methods such as volume-based template estimation are being developed to overcome these limitations. The applications for ABA, including atlas-based image quantification and atlas-based connectivity analysis, vary from quantifying neurodevelopmental progress to analyzing population differences in groups of neonates. ABA can also be applied to detect pathology related to prematurity at birth or exposure to toxic substances. Future directions for this method include research designed to increase the accuracy of the image parcellation. Methods such as multi-atlas label fusion and multi-modal analysis applied to neonatal DTI currently comprise an active field of research. Moreover, ABA can be used in high-throughput analysis to efficiently process medical images and to assess longitudinal brain changes. Nevertheless, the overarching goal of neonatal ABA is application to the clinical setting, to assist with diagnoses, monitor disease progression, and outcome

  3. Construction and application of human neonatal DTI atlases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, Rajiv; Chang, Linda; Oishi, Kenichi

    2015-01-01

    Atlas-based MRI analysis is one of many analytical methods and is used to investigate typical as well as abnormal neurodevelopment. It has been widely applied to the adult and pediatric populations. Successful applications of atlas-based analysis (ABA) in those cohorts have motivated the creation of a neonatal atlas and parcellation map (PM). The purpose of this review is to discuss the various neonatal diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) atlases that are available for use in ABA, examine how such atlases are constructed, review their applications, and discuss future directions in DTI. Neonatal DTI atlases are created from a template, which can be study-specific or standardized, and merged with the corresponding PM. Study-specific templates can retain higher image registration accuracy, but are usually not applicable across different studies. However, standardized templates can be used to make comparisons among various studies, but may not accurately reflect the anatomies of the study population. Methods such as volume-based template estimation are being developed to overcome these limitations. The applications for ABA, including atlas-based image quantification and atlas-based connectivity analysis, vary from quantifying neurodevelopmental progress to analyzing population differences in groups of neonates. ABA can also be applied to detect pathology related to prematurity at birth or exposure to toxic substances. Future directions for this method include research designed to increase the accuracy of the image parcellation. Methods such as multi-atlas label fusion and multi-modal analysis applied to neonatal DTI currently comprise an active field of research. Moreover, ABA can be used in high-throughput analysis to efficiently process medical images and to assess longitudinal brain changes. The overarching goal of neonatal ABA is application to the clinical setting, to assist with diagnoses, monitor disease progression and, ultimately, outcome prediction. PMID:26578899

  4. NIPER Lab WARDEN -- Description and LabVIEW{reg_sign} executable code of a general-purpose laboratory-automation program. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahmood, S.M.; Olsen, D.K.

    1994-04-01

    This report is Volume 1 (the description) of a two volume series that describes a general purpose, automation computer program developed by NIPER for data acquisition/control/analysis/presentation. This software was developed to provide interactive computer control of a variety of instruments typically found in laboratories and pilot plants in order to improve efficiency in operation and safe handling of potentially hazardous operations. For example, it is easily adaptable for operating a laboratory that conducts experiments at extreme conditions of pressure and temperature, such as those found in a steamflooding laboratory. The software was developed in an object-oriented graphical language around National Instruments` LabVIEW{reg_sign} which is the future trend in automation programming.

  5. DORMAN computer program (study 2.5). Volume 2: User's guide and programmer's guide. [development of data bank for computerized information storage of NASA programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wray, S. T., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    The DORMAN program was developed to create and modify a data bank containing data decks which serve as input to the DORCA Computer Program. Via a remote terminal a user can access the bank, extract any data deck, modify that deck, output the modified deck to be input to the DORCA program, and save the modified deck in the data bank. This computer program is an assist in the utilization of the DORCA program. The program is dimensionless and operates almost entirely in integer mode. The program was developed on the CDC 6400/7600 complex for implementation on a UNIVAC 1108 computer.

  6. Department of Energy Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs draft environmental impact statement. Volume 1, Appendix B: Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Spent Nuclear Fuel Management Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-06-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this report to assist its management in making two decisions. The first decision, which is programmatic, is to determine the management program for DOE spent nuclear fuel. The second decision is on the future direction of environmental restoration, waste management, and spent nuclear fuel management activities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Volume 1 of the EIS, which supports the programmatic decision, considers the effects of spent nuclear fuel management on the quality of the human and natural environment for planning years 1995 through 2035. DOE has derived the information and analysis results in Volume 1 from several site-specific appendixes. Volume 2 of the EIS, which supports the INEL-specific decision, describes environmental impacts for various environmental restoration, waste management, and spent nuclear fuel management alternatives for planning years 1995 through 2005. This Appendix B to Volume 1 considers the impacts on the INEL environment of the implementation of various DOE-wide spent nuclear fuel management alternatives. The Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program, which is a joint Navy/DOE program, is responsible for spent naval nuclear fuel examination at the INEL. For this appendix, naval fuel that has been examined at the Naval Reactors Facility and turned over to DOE for storage is termed naval-type fuel. This appendix evaluates the management of DOE spent nuclear fuel including naval-type fuel.

  7. Defense Small Business Innovation Research Program (SBIR). Volume 1. Army Projects, Abstracts of Phase 1 Awards from FY 1989 SBIR Solicitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-04-01

    KIORITZ DM-9 BACKPACK SPRAYER THAT WILL (1) DISPENSE METERED VOLUME OF PEDICULICIDE, (2) EMPLOY EXISTING SYSTEM ENERGY SOURCE, (3) ACCESS 17 DISPERSAL SITES...INC 10016 S 51ST ST PHOENIX, AZ 85044 CONTRACT NUMBER: JOSEPH W COLTMAN TITLE: CONCEPT DEVELOPMENT FOR AN AIRBAG CRASH-PROTECTION SYSTEM TOPIC# 21...BUSINESS INNOVATION RESEARCH (SBIR) PROGRAM - PHASE 1 PAGE 50 BY SERVICE FISCAL YEAR 1989 ARMY SUBMITTED BY STALLING AIRBAGS INTO A HELICOPTER COCKPIT TO

  8. Nuclear proliferation and civilian nuclear power. Report of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program. Volume IX. Reactor and fuel cycle description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-06-01

    The Nonproliferation Alterntive Systems Assessment Program (NASAP) has characterized and assessed various reactor/fuel-cycle systems. Volume IX provides, in summary form, the technical descriptions of the reactor/fuel-cycle systems studied. This includes the status of the system technology, as well as a discussion of the safety, environmental, and licensing needs from a technical perspective. This information was then used in developing the research, development, and demonstration (RD and D) program, including its cost and time frame, to advance the existing technology to the level needed for commercial use. Wherever possible, the cost data are given as ranges to reflect the uncertainties in the estimates.

  9. An adaptive maneuvering logic computer program for the simulation of one-to-one air-to-air combat. Volume 2: Program description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgin, G. H.; Owens, A. J.

    1975-01-01

    A detailed description is presented of the computer programs in order to provide an understanding of the mathematical and geometrical relationships as implemented in the programs. The individual sbbroutines and their underlying mathematical relationships are described, and the required input data and the output provided by the program are explained. The relationship of the adaptive maneuvering logic program with the program to drive the differential maneuvering simulator is discussed.

  10. An exercise therapy program can increase oxygenation and blood volume of the erector spinae muscle during exercise in chronic low back pain patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivier, Nicolas; Thevenon, André; Berthoin, Serge; Prieur, Fabrice

    2013-03-01

    To determine whether erector spinae muscle oxygenation (OXY) and blood volume during a progressive isoinertial lifting evaluation (PILE) are modified by an exercise therapy program. Pre- (t1) and post- (t2) exercise therapy experimental design. Hospital. Subjects with chronic low back pain (LBP group) (n=24) and healthy subjects (control group) (n=24) were evaluated. Exercise program. The control group was evaluated once, and the LBP group was evaluated before (t1) the exercise therapy program and 28 days thereafter (t2). The maximal load lifted, total work, and total power were determined using the PILE test. Continuous-wave near-infrared spectroscopy was used to measure OXY and blood volume during the PILE test. The maximal load lifted, total power, and total work were significantly lower in the LBP group (-42%±5%, -46%±6%, and -67%±6% at t1, respectively; Ptherapy program (+20%±3%, +56%±4%, and +61%±5%; Poxygen at the level of the erector spinae muscle, which can be partly restored by an exercise therapy program. Copyright © 2013 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Recent ATLAS Articles on WLAP

    CERN Multimedia

    Goldfarb, S

    2005-01-01

    As reported in the September 2004 ATLAS eNews, the Web Lecture Archive Project is a system for the archiving and publishing of multimedia presentations, using the Web as medium. We list here newly available WLAP items relating to ATLAS: Atlas Software Week Plenary 6-10 December 2004 North American ATLAS Physics Workshop (Tucson) 20-21 December 2004 (17 talks) Physics Analysis Tools Tutorial (Tucson) 19 December 2004 Full Chain Tutorial 21 September 2004 ATLAS Plenary Sessions, 17-18 February 2005 (17 talks) Coming soon: ATLAS Tutorial on Electroweak Physics, 14 Feb. 2005 Software Workshop, 21-22 February 2005 Click here to browse WLAP for all ATLAS lectures.

  12. Early Site Permit Demonstration Program, plant parameters envelopes: Comparison with ranges of values for four hypothetical sites. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-09-01

    The purpose of this volume is to report the results of the comparison of the ALWR plan parameters envelope with values of site characteristics developed for our hypothetical sites that generally represent conditions encountered within the United States. This effort is not intended to identify or address the suitability of any existing site, site area, or region in the United States. Also included in this volume is Appendix F, SERCH Summaries Regarding Siting.

  13. ATLAS honours one of its suppliers

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    On 12 February the Netherlands firm Schelde Exotech was awarded a prize for best ATLAS supplier for the construction of the two vacuum chambers for the ATLAS endcap toroid magnets. The award for best supplier is handed over to representatives of the firm Schelde Exotech in front of one of the two vacuum chambers built by the firm. From left to right: E. Baynham (RAL), H. Geerink (NIKHEF), Y. Lefevere (NIKHEF), J. Engelen (NIKHEF), P. Jenni (CERN), E. Holtom (RAL), R. Boddaert (Schelde Exotech), G. Luijckx (NIKHEF), H. Klumpus (Schelde Exotech), M. Nessi (CERN), H. ten Kate (CERN), M. Nordberg (CERN), H. Hoffmann (CERN).This ceremony has now become something of a tradition. For the third consecutive year, ATLAS has given best supplier awards for the most exceptional contributors to the construction of the future detector. The Netherlands firm Schelde Exotech has just received the award for the construction of the two vacuum chambers for the ATLAS endcap toroid magnets. With a diameter of 11 metres and a volum...

  14. Multi-atlas-based fully automatic segmentation of individual muscles in rat leg.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sdika, Michael; Tonson, Anne; Le Fur, Yann; Cozzone, Patrick J; Bendahan, David

    2016-04-01

    To quantify individual muscle volume in rat leg MR images using a fully automatic multi-atlas-based segmentation method. We optimized a multi-atlas-based segmentation method to take into account the voxel anisotropy of numbers of MRI acquisition protocols. We mainly tested an image upsampling process along Z and a constraint on the nonlinear deformation in the XY plane. We also evaluated a weighted vote procedure and an original implementation of an artificial atlas addition. Using this approach, we measured gastrocnemius and plantaris muscle volumes and compared the results with manual segmentation. The method reliability for volume quantification was evaluated using the relative overlap index. The most accurate segmentation was obtained using a nonlinear registration constrained in the XY plane by zeroing the Z component of the displacement and a weighted vote procedure for both muscles regardless of the number of atlases. The performance of the automatic segmentation and the corresponding volume quantification outperformed the interoperator variability using a minimum of three original atlases. We demonstrated the reliability of a multi-atlas segmentation approach for the automatic segmentation and volume quantification of individual muscles in rat leg and found that constraining the registration in plane significantly improved the results.

  15. ATLAS brochure (Polish version)

    CERN Document Server

    Lefevre, C

    2007-01-01

    ATLAS is the largest detector at the LHC, the most powerful particle accelerator in the world, which will start up in 2008. ATLAS is a multi-purpose detector, designed to throw light on fundamental questions such as the origin of mass and the nature of the Universe's dark matter.

  16. ATLAS TV PROJECT

    CERN Multimedia

    OMNI communication

    2005-01-01

    La Givrine near St Cergue Cross Country Skiing and Fondue at Basse Ruche with M Nordberg, P Jenni, M Nessi, F Gianotti and Co. ATLAS Management Fondu dinner, reviewing state of play of the experiment Many fun scenes from cross country skiing and after 41 minutes of the film starts the fondue dinner in a nice chalet with many persons working for ATLAS experiment

  17. ATLAS-Hadronic Calorimeter

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Hall 180 work on Hadronic Calorimeter The ATLAS hadronic tile calorimeter The Tile Calorimeter, which constitutes the central section of the ATLAS hadronic calorimeter, is a non-compensating sampling device made of iron and scintillating tiles. (IEEE Trans. Nucl. Sci. 53 (2006) 1275-81)

  18. ATLAS brochure (Catalan version)

    CERN Document Server

    Lefevre, C

    2008-01-01

    ATLAS is the largest detector at the LHC, the most powerful particle accelerator in the world, which will start up in 2008. ATLAS is a multi-purpose detector, designed to throw light on fundamental questions such as the origin of mass and the nature of the Universe's dark matter.

  19. ATLAS Colouring Book

    CERN Multimedia

    Anthony, Katarina

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS Experiment Colouring Book is a free-to-download educational book, ideal for kids aged 5-9. It aims to introduce children to the field of High-Energy Physics, as well as the work being carried out by the ATLAS Collaboration.

  20. ATLAS Thesis Awards 2015

    CERN Multimedia

    Biondi, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Winners of the ATLAS Thesis Award were presented with certificates and glass cubes during a ceremony on Thursday 25 February. The winners also presented their work in front of members of the ATLAS Collaboration. Winners: Javier Montejo Berlingen, Barcelona (Spain), Ruth Pöttgen, Mainz (Germany), Nils Ruthmann, Freiburg (Germany), and Steven Schramm, Toronto (Canada).

  1. ATLAS brochure (Danish version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Lefevre, C

    2010-01-01

    ATLAS is the largest detector at the LHC, the most powerful particle accelerator in the world. ATLAS is a multi-purpose detector, designed to throw light on fundamental questions such as the origin of mass and the nature of the Universe's dark matter.

  2. ATLAS Visitors Centre

    CERN Multimedia

    claudia Marcelloni

    2009-01-01

    ATLAS Visitors Centre has opened its shiny new doors to the public. Officially launched on Monday February 23rd, 2009, the permanent exhibition at Point 1 was conceived as a tour resource for ATLAS guides, and as a way to preserve the public’s opportunity to get a close-up look at the experiment in action when the cavern is sealed.

  3. ATLAS brochure (Spanish version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Lefevre, C

    2008-01-01

    ATLAS is the largest detector at the LHC, the most powerful particle accelerator in the world, which will start up in 2008. ATLAS is a multi-purpose detector, designed to throw light on fundamental questions such as the origin of mass and the nature of the Universe's dark matter.

  4. ATLAS Brochure (french version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Marcastel, F

    2007-01-01

    ATLAS is the largest detector at the LHC, the most powerful particle accelerator in the world, which will start up in 2008. ATLAS is a multi-purpose detector, designed to throw light on fundamental questions such as the origin of mass and the nature of the Universe's dark matter.

  5. ATLAS Brochure (english version)

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    ATLAS is the largest detector at the LHC, the most powerful particle accelerator in the world, which will start up in 2008. ATLAS is a multi-purpose detector, designed to throw light on fundamental questions such as the origin of mass and the nature of the Universe's dark matter.

  6. ATLAS brochure (German version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Lefevre, C

    2012-01-01

    ATLAS is the largest detector at the LHC, the most powerful particle accelerator in the world. ATLAS is a multi-purpose detector, designed to throw light on fundamental questions such as the origin of mass and the nature of the Universe's dark matter.

  7. ATLAS brochure (French version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Lefevre, C

    2012-01-01

    ATLAS is the largest detector at the LHC, the most powerful particle accelerator in the world. ATLAS is a multi-purpose detector, designed to throw light on fundamental questions such as the origin of mass and the nature of the Universe's dark matter.

  8. ATLAS TV PROJECT

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    Budker Nuclear Physics Institute, Novosibirsk Sequence 1 Shots of aircraft factory where machining for ATLAS is done Shots of aircraft Work on components for ATLAS big wheel Discussions between Tikhonov and Nordberg in workshop Sequence 2 Shots of downtown Novosibirsk, including little church which is mid-point of Russian Federation Sequence 3 Interview of Yuri Tikhonov by Andrew Millington

  9. A Slice of ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    An entire section of the ATLAS detector is being assembled at Prévessin. Since May the components have been tested using a beam from the SPS, giving the ATLAS team valuable experience of operating the detector as well as an opportunity to debug the system.

  10. ATLAS people can run!

    CERN Multimedia

    Claudia Marcelloni de Oliveira; Pauline Gagnon

    It must be all the training we are getting every day, running around trying to get everything ready for the start of the LHC next year. This year, the ATLAS runners were in fine form and came in force. Nine ATLAS teams signed up for the 37th Annual CERN Relay Race with six runners per team. Under a blasting sun on Wednesday 23rd May 2007, each team covered the distances of 1000m, 800m, 800m, 500m, 500m and 300m taking the runners around the whole Meyrin site, hills included. A small reception took place in the ATLAS secretariat a week later to award the ATLAS Cup to the best ATLAS team. For the details on this complex calculation which takes into account the age of each runner, their gender and the color of their shoes, see the July 2006 issue of ATLAS e-news. The ATLAS Running Athena Team, the only all-women team enrolled this year, won the much coveted ATLAS Cup for the second year in a row. In fact, they are so good that Peter Schmid and Patrick Fassnacht are wondering about reducing the women's bonus in...

  11. The ATLAS tile calorimeter

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2003-01-01

    Louis Rose-Dulcina, a technician from the ATLAS collaboration, works on the ATLAS tile calorimeter. Special manufacturing techniques were developed to mass produce the thousands of elements in this detector. Tile detectors are made in a sandwich-like structure where these scintillator tiles are placed between metal sheets.

  12. ATLAS rewards industry

    CERN Document Server

    Maximilien Brice

    2006-01-01

    For contributing vital pieces to the ATLAS puzzle, three industries were recognized on Friday 5 May during a supplier awards ceremony. After a welcome and overview of the ATLAS experiment by spokesperson Peter Jenni, CERN Secretary-General Maximilian Metzger stressed the importance of industry to CERN's scientific goals. Picture 30 : representatives of the three award-wining companies after the ceremony

  13. Space shuttle solid rocket booster recovery system definition. Volume 3: SRB water impact loads computer program, user's manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-01-01

    This user's manual describes the FORTRAN IV computer program developed to compute the total vertical load, normal concentrated pressure loads, and the center of pressure of typical SRB water impact slapdown pressure distributions specified in the baseline configuration. The program prepares the concentrated pressure load information in punched card format suitable for input to the STAGS computer program. In addition, the program prepares for STAGS input the inertia reacting loads to the slapdown pressure distributions.

  14. Oak Ridge Reservation Federal Facility Agreement: Quarterly report for the Environmental Restoration Program. Volume 2, January--March 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-04-01

    This report provides information about ER Program activities conducted on the Oak Ridge Reservation under the Federal Facility Agreement (FFA). Specifically, it includes information on milestones scheduled for completion during the reporting period as well as scheduled for completion during the next reporting period (quarter), accomplishments of the ER Program, concerns related to program work, and scheduled activities for the next quarter. It also provides a listing of the identity and assigned tasks of contractors performing ER Program work under the FFA.

  15. U.S. Department of Energy Space and Defense Power Systems Program Ten-Year Strategic Plan, Volume 1 and Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dwight, Carla

    2013-06-01

    The Department of Energy's Space and Defense Power Systems program provides a unique capability for supplying power systems that function in remote or hostile environments. This capability has been functioning since the early 1960s and counts the National Aeronautics and Space Administration as one of its most prominent customers. This enabling technology has assisted the exploration of our solar system including the planets Jupiter, Saturn, Mars, Neptune, and soon Pluto. This capability is one-of-kind in the world in terms of its experience (over five decades), breadth of power systems flown (over two dozen to date) and range of power levels (watts to hundreds of watts). This document describes the various components of that infrastructure, work scope, funding needs, and its strategic plans going forward.

  16. Wind Atlas for Egypt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The results of a comprehensive, 8-year wind resource assessment programme in Egypt are presented. The objective has been to provide reliable and accurate wind atlas data sets for evaluating the potential wind power output from large electricityproducing wind turbine installations. The regional wind...... climates of Egypt have been determined by two independent methods: a traditional wind atlas based on observations from more than 30 stations all over Egypt, and a numerical wind atlas based on long-term reanalysis data and a mesoscale model (KAMM). The mean absolute error comparing the two methods is about...... 10% for two large-scale KAMM domains covering all of Egypt, and typically about 5% for several smaller-scale regional domains. The numerical wind atlas covers all of Egypt, whereas the meteorological stations are concentrated in six regions. The Wind Atlas for Egypt represents a significant step...

  17. Wind Atlas for Egypt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Niels Gylling; Said Said, Usama; Badger, Jake

    2006-01-01

    The results of a comprehensive, 8-year wind resource assessment programme in Egypt are presented. The objective has been to provide reliable and accurate wind atlas data sets for evaluating the potential wind power output from large electricityproducing wind turbine installations. The regional wind...... climates of Egypt have been determined by two independent methods: a traditional wind atlas based on observations from more than 30 stations all over Egypt, and a numerical wind atlas based on long-term reanalysis data and a mesoscale model (KAMM). The mean absolute error comparing the two methods is about...... 10% for two large-scale KAMM domains covering all of Egypt, and typically about 5% for several smaller-scale regional domains. The numerical wind atlas covers all of Egypt, whereas the meteorological stations are concentrated in six regions. The Wind Atlas for Egypt represents a significant step...

  18. Dear ATLAS colleagues,

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2008-01-01

    We are collecting old pairs of glasses to take out to Mali, where they can be re-used by people there. The price for a pair of glasses can often exceed 3 months salary, so they are prohibitively expensive for many people. If you have any old spectacles you can donate, please put them in the special box in the ATLAS secretariat, bldg.40-4-D01 before the Christmas closure on 19 December so we can take them with us when we leave for Africa at the end of the month. (more details in ATLAS e-news edition of 29 September 2008: http://atlas-service-enews.web.cern.ch/atlas-service-enews/news/news_mali.php) many thanks! Katharine Leney co-driver of the ATLAS car on the Charity Run to Mali

  19. ATLAS' major cooling project

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    In 2005, a considerable effort has been put into commissioning the various units of ATLAS' complex cryogenic system. This is in preparation for the imminent cooling of some of the largest components of the detector in their final underground configuration. The liquid helium and nitrogen ATLAS refrigerators in USA 15. Cryogenics plays a vital role in operating massive detectors such as ATLAS. In many ways the liquefied argon, nitrogen and helium are the life-blood of the detector. ATLAS could not function without cryogens that will be constantly pumped via proximity systems to the superconducting magnets and subdetectors. In recent weeks compressors at the surface and underground refrigerators, dewars, pumps, linkages and all manner of other components related to the cryogenic system have been tested and commissioned. Fifty metres underground The helium and nitrogen refrigerators, installed inside the service cavern, are an important part of the ATLAS cryogenic system. Two independent helium refrigerators ...

  20. ATLAS offline software performance monitoring and optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, N.; Kabra, G.; Kittelmann, T.; Langenberg, R.; Mandrysch, R.; Salzburger, A.; Seuster, R.; Ritsch, E.; Stewart, G.; van Eldik, N.; Vitillo, R.; Atlas Collaboration

    2014-06-01

    In a complex multi-developer, multi-package software environment, such as the ATLAS offline framework Athena, tracking the performance of the code can be a non-trivial task in itself. In this paper we describe improvements in the instrumentation of ATLAS offline software that have given considerable insight into the performance of the code and helped to guide the optimization work. The first tool we used to instrument the code is PAPI, which is a programing interface for accessing hardware performance counters. PAPI events can count floating point operations, cycles, instructions and cache accesses. Triggering PAPI to start/stop counting for each algorithm and processed event results in a good understanding of the algorithm level performance of ATLAS code. Further data can be obtained using Pin, a dynamic binary instrumentation tool. Pin tools can be used to obtain similar statistics as PAPI, but advantageously without requiring recompilation of the code. Fine grained routine and instruction level instrumentation is also possible. Pin tools can additionally interrogate the arguments to functions, like those in linear algebra libraries, so that a detailed usage profile can be obtained. These tools have characterized the extensive use of vector and matrix operations in ATLAS tracking. Currently, CLHEP is used here, which is not an optimal choice. To help evaluate replacement libraries a testbed has been setup allowing comparison of the performance of different linear algebra libraries (including CLHEP, Eigen and SMatrix/SVector). Results are then presented via the ATLAS Performance Management Board framework, which runs daily with the current development branch of the code and monitors reconstruction and Monte-Carlo jobs. This framework analyses the CPU and memory performance of algorithms and an overview of results are presented on a web page. These tools have provided the insight necessary to plan and implement performance enhancements in ATLAS code by identifying

  1. Pre-Test Analysis of Major Scenarios for ATLAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Euh, Dong-Jin; Choi, Ki-Yong; Park, Hyun-Sik; Kwon, Tae-Soon

    2007-02-15

    A thermal-hydraulic integral effect test facility, ATLAS was constructed at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI). The ATLAS is a 1/2 reduced height and 1/288 volume scaled test facility based on the design features of the APR1400. The simulation capability of the ATLAS for major design basis accidents (DBAs), including a large-break loss-of-coolant (LBLOCA), DVI line break and main steam line break (MSLB) accidents, is evaluated by the best-estimate system code, MARS, with the same control logics, transient scenarios and nodalization scheme. The validity of the applied scaling law and the thermal-hydraulic similarity between the ATLAS and the APR1400 for the major design basis accidents are assessed. It is confirmed that the ATLAS has a capability of maintaining an overall similarity with the reference plant APR1400 for the major design basis accidents considered in the present study. However, depending on the accident scenarios, there are some inconsistencies in certain thermal hydraulic parameters. It is found that the inconsistencies are mainly due to the reduced power effect and the increased stored energy in the structure. The present similarity analysis was successful in obtaining a greater insight into the unique design features of the ATLAS and would be used for developing the optimized experimental procedures and control logics.

  2. on behalf of the ATLAS and CMS Collaborations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics. on behalf of the ATLAS and CMS Collaborations. Articles written in Pramana – Journal of Physics. Volume 69 Issue 5 November 2007 pp 801-807 Higgs and Electroweak Symmetry Breaking. Search for Higgs boson in beyond standard model scenarios at large hadron ...

  3. A Multi-Atlas Based Method for Automated Anatomical Rat Brain MRI Segmentation and Extraction of PET Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancelot, Sophie; Roche, Roxane; Slimen, Afifa; Bouillot, Caroline; Levigoureux, Elise; Langlois, Jean-Baptiste; Zimmer, Luc; Costes, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Preclinical in vivo imaging requires precise and reproducible delineation of brain structures. Manual segmentation is time consuming and operator dependent. Automated segmentation as usually performed via single atlas registration fails to account for anatomo-physiological variability. We present, evaluate, and make available a multi-atlas approach for automatically segmenting rat brain MRI and extracting PET activies. Methods High-resolution 7T 2DT2 MR images of 12 Sprague-Dawley rat brains were manually segmented into 27-VOI label volumes using detailed protocols. Automated methods were developed with 7/12 atlas datasets, i.e. the MRIs and their associated label volumes. MRIs were registered to a common space, where an MRI template and a maximum probability atlas were created. Three automated methods were tested: 1/registering individual MRIs to the template, and using a single atlas (SA), 2/using the maximum probability atlas (MP), and 3/registering the MRIs from the multi-atlas dataset to an individual MRI, propagating the label volumes and fusing them in individual MRI space (propagation & fusion, PF). Evaluation was performed on the five remaining rats which additionally underwent [18F]FDG PET. Automated and manual segmentations were compared for morphometric performance (assessed by comparing volume bias and Dice overlap index) and functional performance (evaluated by comparing extracted PET measures). Results Only the SA method showed volume bias. Dice indices were significantly different between methods (PF>MP>SA). PET regional measures were more accurate with multi-atlas methods than with SA method. Conclusions Multi-atlas methods outperform SA for automated anatomical brain segmentation and PET measure’s extraction. They perform comparably to manual segmentation for FDG-PET quantification. Multi-atlas methods are suitable for rapid reproducible VOI analyses. PMID:25330005

  4. Gas Reactor International Cooperative program. Pebble bed reactor plant: screening evaluation. Volume 2. Conceptual balance of plant design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-11-01

    This report consists of three volumes which describe the design concepts and screening evaluation for a 3000 MW(t) Pebble Bed Reactor Multiplex Plant (PBR-MX). The Multiplex plant produces both electricity and transportable chemical energy via the thermochemical pipeline (TCP). The evaluation was limited to a direct cycle plant which has the steam generators and steam reformers in the primary circuit. This volume describes the conceptual balance-of-plant (BOP) design and was prepared by United Engineers and Constructors, Inc. of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The major emphasis of the BOP study was a preliminary design of an overall plant to provide a basis for future studies.

  5. Algorithm Acceleration from GPGPUs for the ATLAS Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Washbrook, A; The ATLAS collaboration

    2010-01-01

    The future upgrades to the LHC are expected to increase the design luminosity by an order of magnitude leading to new computational challenges for the ATLAS experiment. One such challenge will be the ability to handle a much higher rate of interesting physics events by the ATLAS High Level Trigger system. We will present results from the adoption of General Purpose Graphics Processing Units (GPGPUs) to provide computational acceleration for key algorithms in the ATLAS Inner Detector Trigger. The z-finder algorithm - used to determine the accurate z position of primary interactions - and the Kalman Filter based track reconstruction routine have been adapted for GPGPU execution using the CUDA parallel computing architecture. We describe the programming and benchmarking methods used and demonstrate the relative throughput performance for different trigger scenarios. Where significant performance boost is found we will outline how GPGPU acceleration could be exploited and incorporated into the future ATLAS comput...

  6. The simulation for the ATLAS experiment Present status and outlook

    CERN Document Server

    Rimoldi, A; Gallas, M; Nairz, A; Boudreau, J; Tsulaia, V; Costanzo, D

    2004-01-01

    The simulation program for the ATLAS experiment is presently operational in a full OO environment. This important physics application has been successfully integrated into ATLAS's common analysis framework, ATHENA. In the last year, following a well stated strategy of transition from a GEANT3 to a GEANT4-based simulation, a careful validation programme confirmed the reliability, performance and robustness of this new tool, as well as its consistency with the results of previous simulation. Generation, simulation and digitization steps on different sets of full physics events we retested for performance. The same software used to simulate the full the ATLAS detector is also used with testbeam configurations. Comparisons to real data in the testbeam validate both the detector description and the physics processes within each subcomponent. In this paper we present the current status of ATLAS GEANT4 simulation, describe the functionality tests performed during its validation phase, and the experience with distrib...

  7. Simulation Strategies for the ATLAS Experiment at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Rimoldi, A; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment, operational at the new LHC collider, is fully simulated using the Geant4 tool. The simulation program has been built within the ATLAS common framework Athena. The simulation software for the ATLAS Experiment at the Large Hadron Collider is being used for large-scale production of events on the LHC Computing Grid. This simulation requires many components, from the generators that simulate particle collisions, through packages simulating the response of the various detectors and triggers. All of these components come together under the ATLAS simulation infrastructure. The latest developments went into the direction to better represent the reality of the detector in all the possible details. The latest developments provide increased functionality and robustness. The full process is constantly monitored and profiled. Increased performance guarantee the best use of available resources without any degradation in the quality and accuracy of the simulation itself. In the presentation emphasis is...

  8. 76 FR 72005 - NUREG-1556, Volume 2, Revision 1, “Consolidated Guidance About Materials Licenses Program...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY... Report for Comment.'' The document has been updated to include safety culture, security of radioactive... incorporated changes in regulatory policies and practices. The NRC originally published NUREG-1556, Volume 2...

  9. Nuclear proliferation and civilian nuclear power: report of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program. Volume II. Proliferation resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-12-01

    Volume II assesses proliferation resistance. Chapters are devoted to: assessment of civilian nuclear systems (once-through fuel-cycle systems, closed fuel cycle systems, research reactors and critical facilities); assessment of associated sensitive materials and facilities (enrichment, problems with storage of spent fuel and plutonium content, and reprocessing and refabrication facilities); and safeguards for alternative fuel cycles.

  10. A normalized thoracic coordinate system for atlas mapping in 3D CT images

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, a normalized thoracic coordinate system (NTCS) is defined for rapidly mapping the 4D thoracic organ atlas into individual CT volume images. This coordinate system is defined based on the thoracic skeleton. The coordinate values are normalized by the size of the individual thorax so that this coordinate system is universal to different individuals. For compensating the respiratory motion of the organs, a 4D dynamic torso atlas is introduced. A method for mapping this dynamic atlas into the individual image using the NTCS is also proposed. With this method, the dynamic atlas was mapped into the clinical thoracic CT images and rough positions of the organs were found rapidly. This NTCS-based 4D atlas mapping method may provide a novel way for estimating the thoracic organ positions in low-resolution molecular imaging modalities, as well as in modern 4D medical images.

  11. Heavy-Section Steel Technology Program. Semiannual progress report, October 1991--March 1992: Volume 9, No. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pennell, W E [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1992-11-01

    The Heavy-Section Steel Technology (HSST) Program is conducted for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The program focus is on the development and validation of technology for the assessment of fracture-prevention margins in commercial nuclear reactor pressure vessels. The HSST Program is organized in 11 tasks: program management, fracture methodology and analysis, material characterization and properties, special technical assistance, fracture analysis computer programs, cleavage-crack initiation, cladding evaluations, pressurized-thermal-shock technology, analysis methods validation, fracture evaluation tests, and warm prestressing. The program tasks have been structured to place emphasis on the resolution fracture issues with near-term licensing significance. Resources to execute the research tasks are drawn from ORNL with subcontract support from universities and other research laboratories. Close contact is maintained with the sister Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation (HSSI) Program at ORNL and with related research programs both in the United States and abroad. This report provides an overview of principal developments in each of the II program tasks from October 1, 1991 to March 31, 1992.

  12. Office of Technology Development`s Research, Development, Demonstration, Testing and Evaluation Mid-Year Program Review. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-08-01

    This document presents brief summaries of waste management, remedial action, decommissioning/decontamination, and waste processing programs and issues currently being developed at Department of Energy Facilities.

  13. Lecture Notes on a Machine Independent Compiler for ATLAS (MICA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-10-01

    RESISTANCE 26 DISPLAY, RESULT, ’MEASUREMENT’ 30 DISPLAY, MESSAGE, KILOHMS 000255 REMVE, ALL 000265 FINISH 000270 TERMINATE , ATLAS PROGRAM ’TEST’$ Figure 5...CORAL PROCESO 66:z::z~Z::Z:::::::::::::::z::::.:. . .* . . . ..... .... CORAL 66OGRAM ... Figure.16 23 ..... SAMPLE CORAL 66 PROGRAM PRODUCED BY THE

  14. ATLAS: A Community Policing Response to Adverse Student Athlete Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Robert

    2011-01-01

    The University at Albany Police and the University at Albany Athletics Department have teamed together to implement a ground breaking program aimed at identifying, addressing and managing negative behavior among student athletes. ATLAS stands for: Athletics, Team Building, Leadership Development, And Mentoring for Student Athletes. The program was…

  15. Responding to Variability among Exceptional Children. Volume I: Management and Programming. A Manual for Teacher Corps' Exceptional Child Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Philip H.; And Others

    The first of a two part series designed for Teacher Corps staff working with exceptional students addresses topics related to management and programing. Six chapters deal with the following aspects (sample subtopics in parentheses): diagnostic-prescriptive education (individual education program, behavior observation); role of the exceptional…

  16. Defense Small Business Innovation Research Program (SBIR). Volume 4. Defense Agencies Abstracts of Phase 1 Awards. 1990

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    THE LOGGING OF OIL AND GAS WELLS. NORTH AMERICAN GEOTECHNICAL CO 3658 LAKE ST HOUSTON, TX 77098 Program Manager: E MERCADO Contract #: Title: A... PLAZA - #238 NEWPORT BEACH, CA 92663 Program Manager: DR T P HARASZTI Contract #: Title: FAULT-TOLERANT INTELLIGENT STATIC RANDOM ACCESS MEMORY Topic

  17. A Study of NSF Teacher Enhancement Program (TEP) Participants and Principal Investigators: 1984-1989. Volume I: Summary Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abt Associates, Inc., Cambridge, MA.

    The National Science Foundation (NSF) supported more than 600 inservice teacher training programs between 1984 and 1989 under its Teacher Enhancement Program (TEP). Two studies were undertaken of TEP: the first was a survey of the 600 Principal Investigators (PIs) who had operated inservice teacher enhancement projects and the second, a survey of…

  18. A Study of NSF Teacher Enhancement Program (TEP) Participants and Principal Investigators: 1984-1989. Volume II: Technical Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abt Associates, Inc., Cambridge, MA.

    This study documents the effects of participation in the Teacher Enhancement Program (TEP) of the National Science Foundation (NSF). The NSF awarded more than 600 grants to scientists, mathematicians, and educators to develop and operate inservice teacher training programs between 1984 and 1989. The present study focuses specifically upon the…

  19. Heavy-section steel technology program: Semiannual progress report for April--September 1996. Volume 13, Number 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pennell, W.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1998-03-01

    The Heavy-Section Steel Technology (HSST) Program is conducted for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The program focus is on the development and validation of technology for the assessment of fracture-prevention margins in commercial nuclear reactor pressure vessels. The HSST Program is organized in seven tasks: (1) program management, (2) constraint effects analytical development and validation, (3) evaluation of cladding effects, (4) ductile to cleavage fracture mode conversion, (5) fracture analysis methods development and applications, (6) material property data and test methods, and (7) integration of results into a state-of-the-art methodology. The program tasks have been structured to place emphasis on the resolution fracture issues with near-term licensing significance. Resources to execute the research tasks are drawn from ORNL with subcontract support from universities and other research laboratories. Close contact is maintained with the sister Heavy-Section Steel irradiation Program at ORNL and with related research programs both in the US and abroad. This report provides an overview of principal developments in each of the seven program tasks from April 1996--September 1996.

  20. Heavy-section steel technology program: Semiannual progress report, October 1993--March 1994. Volume 11, No. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pennell, W.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-11-01

    The Heavy-Section Steel Technology (HSST) Program is conducted for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The Program focus is on the development and validation of technology for the assessment Of fracture-prevention margins in commercial nuclear reactor pressure vessels. The HSST Program is organized in seven tasks: (1) program management (2) constraint effects analytical development and validation, (3) evaluation of cladding effects, (4) ductile to cleavage fracture mode conversion, (5) fracture analysis methods development and applications, (6) material Property data and test methods, and (7) integration of results into a state-of-the-art methodology. The program tasks have been structured to place emphasis on the resolution fracture issues with near-term licensing significance. Resources to execute the research tasks are drawn from ORNL with subcontract support from universities and other research laboratories. Close contact is maintained with the sister Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation Program at ORNL and with related research programs both in the United States and abroad. This report provides an overview of principal developments in each of the seven program tasks from October 1993--March 1994.

  1. M-DCPS Student Performance in International Baccalaureate and Cambridge Advanced International Certificate of Education Programs. Research Brief. Volume 1102

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blazer, Christie

    2011-01-01

    This Research Brief summarizes the performance of M-DCPS students participating in the International Baccalaureate (IB) and Cambridge Advanced International Certificate of Education (AICE) programs. Outcome data are provided for the eight M-DCPS schools offering the two programs and corresponding examinations. Participation in international…

  2. Wartime Requirements for Ammunition, Materiel, and Personnel (WARRAMP). Volume IV. Ammunition Post-Processor Program Maintenance Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-02-01

    09 00 9 0:0 : a 0 w cocoa 0 00000 00000 00000 00 000 0oco0 00000 0000 0m0000 a ....... ....... .............. Figure 111.1.6 43 : 0 00 0 00 C 0 0 00 0...associated with the program are: 1) Input data errors, either in content or format; 2) Program errors or bugs and 3) operating system errors

  3. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program 1988, volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannerot, Richard B.; Goldstein, Stanley H.

    1989-01-01

    The 1988 Johnson Space Center (JSC) National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted by the University of Houston and JCS. The 10-week program was operated under the auspices of the ASEE. The program at JSC, as well as the programs at other NASA Centers, was funded by the Office of University Affairs, NASA Headquarters, Washington, D.C. The objectives of the program, which began in 1965 at JSC and in 1964 nationally, are: (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA Centers.

  4. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program, 1989, volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, William B., Jr. (Editor); Goldstein, Stanley H. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    The 1989 Johnson Space Center (JSC) National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted by Texas A and M University and JSC. The 10-week program was operated under the auspices of the ASEE. The program at JSC, as well as the programs at other NASA Centers, was funded by the Office of University Affairs, NASA Headquarters, Washington, D.C. The objectives of the program, which began nationally in 1964 and at JSC in 1965, are: (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objective of the NASA Centers.

  5. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program 1988, volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannerot, Richard B. (Editor); Goldstein, Stanley H. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    The 1988 Johnson Space Center (JSC) National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted by the University of Houston and JSC. The 10-week program was operated under the auspices of the ASEE. The program at JSC, as well as the programs at other NASA Centers, was funded by the Office of University Affairs, NASA Headquarters, Washington, D.C. The objectives of the program, which began in 1965 at JSC and in 1964 nationally, are (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA Centers.

  6. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program, 1989, volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, William B., Jr. (Editor); Goldstein, Stanley H. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    The 1989 Johnson Space Center (JSC) National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted by Texas A and M University and JSC. The 10-week program was operated under the auspices of the ASEE. The program at JSC, as well as the programs at other NASA Centers, was funded by the Office of University Affairs, NASA Headquarters, Washington, D.C. The objectives of the program, which began nationally in 1964 and at JSC in 1965, are: (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objective of the NASA Centers.

  7. Phase II final report and second update of the energy economic data base (EEDB) program. Volume 1 of 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-04-01

    The Energy Economic Data Base (EEDB) Program deals with the development of cost data for nuclear and comparison electric power generating stations. The objective of the USDOE EEDB Program is to provide periodic updates of technical and cost (capital, fuel and operating and maintenance) information of significance to the US Department of Energy. This information is intended to be used by USDOE in evaluating and monitoring US Civilian nuclear power programs, and to provide them with a consistent means of evaluating the nuclear option against alternatives. This report presents the Second Update of the EEDB for a cost and regulation date of January 1, 1979, prepared during Phase II of the EEDB Program. The Second Update is the first of a series of periodic updates marking the beginning of the next step in meeting the objective of the EEDB Program.

  8. ATLAS-plus: Multimedia Instruction in Embryology, Gross Anatomy, and Histology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, CM; Miller, JG; Bush, LC; Bruenger, JA; Wysor, WJ; Meininger, ET; Wolf, FM; Fischer, TV; Beaudoin, AR; Burkel, WE; MacCallum, DK; Fisher, DL; Carlson, BM

    1992-01-01

    ATLAS-plus [Advanced Tools for Learning Anatomical Structure] is a multimedia program used to assist in the teaching of anatomy at the University of Michigan Medical School. ATLAS-plus contains three courses: Histology, Embryology, and Gross Anatomy. In addition to the three courses, a glossary containing terms from the three courses is available. All three courses and the glossary are accessible in the ATLAS-plus environment. The ATLAS-plus environment provides a consistent set of tools and options so that the user can navigate easily and intelligently in and between the various courses and modules in the ATLAS-plus world. The program is a collaboration between anatomy and cell biology faculty, medical students, graphic artists, systems analysts, and instructional designers. PMID:1482964

  9. EnviroAtlas - Cleveland, OH - EnviroAtlas Community Boundary

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset shows the boundary of the Cleveland, OH EnviroAtlas Community. It represents the outside edge of all the block groups included in the...

  10. ATLAS Data Preservation

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, Roger; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    Complementary to parallel open access and analysis preservation initiatives, ATLAS is taking steps to ensure that the data taken by the experiment during run-1 remain accessible and available for future analysis by the collaboration. An evaluation of what is required to achieve this is underway, examining the ATLAS data production chain to establish the effort required and potential problems. Several alternatives are explored, but the favoured solution is to bring the run 1 data and software in line with the equivalent to that which will be used for run 2. This will result in a coherent ATLAS dataset for the data already taken and that to come in the future.

  11. Highlights from ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Charlton, D; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    Highlights of recent results from ATLAS were presented. The data collected to date, the detector and physics performance, and measurements of previously established Standard Model processes were reviewed briefly before summarising the latest ATLAS results in the Brout-Englert-Higgs sector, where big progress has been made in the year since the discovery. Finally, selected prospects for measurements including the data from the HL-LHC luminosity upgrade were presented, for both ATLAS and CMS. Many of the results mentioned are preliminary. These proceedings reflect only a brief summary of the material presented, and the status at the time of the conference is reported.

  12. Gulf Coast geopressured-geothermal program summary report compilation. Volume 4: Bibliography (annotated only for all major reports)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John, C.J.; Maciasz, G.; Harder, B.J.

    1998-06-01

    This bibliography contains US Department of Energy sponsored Geopressured-Geothermal reports published after 1984. Reports published prior to 1984 are documented in the Geopressured Geothermal bibliography Volumes 1, 2, and 3 that the Center for Energy Studies at the University of Texas at Austin compiled in May 1985. It represents reports, papers and articles covering topics from the scientific and technical aspects of geopressured geothermal reservoirs to the social, environmental, and legal considerations of exploiting those reservoirs for their energy resources.

  13. Gas Reactor International Cooperative program. Pebble bed reactor plant: screening evaluation. Volume 3. Appendix A. Equipment list

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-11-01

    This report consists of three volumes which describe the design concepts and screening evaluation for a 3000 MW(t) Pebble Bed Reactor Multiplex Plant (PBR-MX). The Multiplex plant produces both electricity and transportable chemical energy via the thermochemical pipeline (TCP). The evaluation was limited to a direct cycle plant which has the steam generators and steam reformers in the primary circuit. Volume 1 reports the overall plant and reactor system and was prepared by the General Electric Company. Core scoping studies were performed which evaluated the effects of annular and cylindrical core configurations, radial blanket zones, burnup, and ball heavy metal loadings. The reactor system, including the PCRV, was investigated for both the annular and cylindrical core configurations. Volume 3 is an Appendix containing the equipment list for the plant and was also prepared by United Engineers and Constructors, Inc. It tabulates the major components of the plant and describes each in terms of quantity, type, orientation, etc., to provide a basis for cost estimation.

  14. Standalone Vertex Finding in the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Aad, Georges; Abbott, Brad; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdel Khalek, Samah; Abdinov, Ovsat; Aben, Rosemarie; Abi, Babak; Abolins, Maris; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Abulaiti, Yiming; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adams, David; Addy, Tetteh; Adelman, Jahred; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adye, Tim; Aefsky, Scott; Agatonovic-Jovin, Tatjana; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Agustoni, Marco; Ahlen, Steven; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahmadov, Faig; Aielli, Giulio; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimoto, Ginga; Akimov, Andrei; Alam, Muhammad Aftab; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Alconada Verzini, Maria Josefina; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alessandria, Franco; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexandre, Gauthier; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Aliev, Malik; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alio, Lion; Alison, John; Allbrooke, Benedict; Allison, Lee John; Allport, Phillip; Allwood-Spiers, Sarah; Almond, John; Aloisio, Alberto; Alon, Raz; Alonso, Alejandro; Alonso, Francisco; Altheimer, Andrew David; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amako, Katsuya; Amaral Coutinho, Yara; Amelung, Christoph; Ammosov, Vladimir; Amor Dos Santos, Susana Patricia; Amorim, Antonio; Amoroso, Simone; Amram, Nir; Amundsen, Glenn; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, Gabriel; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Anduaga, Xabier; Angelidakis, Stylianos; Anger, Philipp; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anisenkov, Alexey; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonaki, Ariadni; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antos, Jaroslav; Anulli, Fabio; Aoki, Masato; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Apolle, Rudi; Arabidze, Giorgi; Aracena, Ignacio; Arai, Yasuo; Arce, Ayana; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Argyropoulos, Spyridon; Arik, Engin; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnal, Vanessa; Arslan, Ozan; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Asai, Shoji; Asbah, Nedaa; Ask, Stefan; Åsman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astalos, Robert; Astbury, Alan; Atkinson, Markus; Atlay, Naim Bora; Auerbach, Benjamin; Auge, Etienne; Augsten, Kamil; Aurousseau, Mathieu; Avolio, Giuseppe; Azuelos, Georges; Azuma, Yuya; Baak, Max; Bacci, Cesare; Bach, Andre; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Backus Mayes, John; Badescu, Elisabeta; Bagiacchi, Paolo; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bai, Yu; Bailey, David; Bain, Travis; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Baker, Sarah; Balek, Petr; Balli, Fabrice; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Swagato; Banfi, Danilo; Bangert, Andrea Michelle; Bansal, Vikas; Bansil, Hardeep Singh; Barak, Liron; Baranov, Sergei; Barber, Tom; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Barillari, Teresa; Barisonzi, Marcello; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartos, Pavol; Bartsch, Valeria; Bassalat, Ahmed; Basye, Austin; Bates, Richard; Batkova, Lucia; Batley, Richard; Battistin, Michele; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Beccherle, Roberto; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans Peter; Becker, Anne Kathrin; Becker, Sebastian; Beckingham, Matthew; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bedikian, Sourpouhi; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bee, Christopher; Beemster, Lars; Beermann, Thomas; Begel, Michael; Behr, Katharina; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Bell, Paul; Bell, William; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellerive, Alain; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belloni, Alberto; Beloborodova, Olga; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Bendtz, Katarina; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benhar Noccioli, Eleonora; Benitez Garcia, Jorge-Armando; Benjamin, Douglas; Bensinger, James; Benslama, Kamal; Bentvelsen, Stan; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Berghaus, Frank; Berglund, Elina; Beringer, Jürg; Bernard, Clare; Bernat, Pauline; Bernhard, Ralf; Bernius, Catrin; Bernlochner, Florian Urs; Berry, Tracey; Berta, Peter; Bertella, Claudia; Bertolucci, Federico; Besana, Maria Ilaria; Besjes, Geert-Jan; Bessidskaia, Olga; Besson, Nathalie; Bethke, Siegfried; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianchini, Louis; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Bieniek, Stephen Paul; Bierwagen, Katharina; Biesiada, Jed; Biglietti, Michela; Bilbao De Mendizabal, Javier; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Binet, Sebastien; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare; Bittner, Bernhard; Black, Curtis; Black, James; Black, Kevin; Blackburn, Daniel; Blair, Robert; Blanchard, Jean-Baptiste; Blazek, Tomas; Bloch, Ingo; Blocker, Craig; Blum, Walter; Blumenschein, Ulrike; Bobbink, Gerjan; Bobrovnikov, Victor; Bocchetta, Simona Serena; Bocci, Andrea; Boddy, Christopher Richard; Boehler, Michael; Boek, Jennifer; Boek, Thorsten Tobias; Boelaert, Nele; Bogaerts, Joannes Andreas; Bogdanchikov, Alexander; Bogouch, Andrei; Bohm, Christian; Bohm, Jan; Boisvert, Veronique; Bold, Tomasz; Boldea, Venera; Boldyrev, Alexey; Bolnet, Nayanka Myriam; Bomben, Marco; Bona, Marcella; Boonekamp, Maarten; Bordoni, Stefania; Borer, Claudia; Borisov, Anatoly; Borissov, Guennadi; Borri, Marcello; Borroni, Sara; Bortfeldt, Jonathan; Bortolotto, Valerio; Bos, Kors; Boscherini, Davide; Bosman, Martine; Boterenbrood, Hendrik; Bouchami, Jihene; Boudreau, Joseph; Bouhova-Thacker, Evelina Vassileva; Boumediene, Djamel Eddine; Bourdarios, Claire; Bousson, Nicolas; Boutouil, Sara; Boveia, Antonio; Boyd, James; Boyko, Igor; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, Ivanka; Bracinik, Juraj; Branchini, Paolo; Brandt, Andrew; Brandt, Gerhard; Brandt, Oleg; Bratzler, Uwe; Brau, Benjamin; Brau, James; Braun, Helmut; Brazzale, Simone Federico; Brelier, Bertrand; Brendlinger, Kurt; Brenner, Richard; Bressler, Shikma; Bristow, Timothy Michael; Britton, Dave; Brochu, Frederic; Brock, Ian; Brock, Raymond; Broggi, Francesco; Bromberg, Carl; Bronner, Johanna; Brooijmans, Gustaaf; Brooks, Timothy; Brooks, William; Brosamer, Jacquelyn; Brost, Elizabeth; Brown, Gareth; Brown, Jonathan; Bruckman de Renstrom, Pawel; Bruncko, Dusan; Bruneliere, Renaud; Brunet, Sylvie; Bruni, Alessia; Bruni, Graziano; Bruschi, Marco; Bryngemark, Lene; Buanes, Trygve; Buat, Quentin; Bucci, Francesca; Buchholz, Peter; Buckingham, Ryan; Buckley, Andrew; Buda, Stelian Ioan; Budagov, Ioulian; Budick, Burton; Buehrer, Felix; Bugge, Lars; Bugge, Magnar Kopangen; Bulekov, Oleg; Bundock, Aaron Colin; Bunse, Moritz; Burckhart, Helfried; Burdin, Sergey; Burgess, Thomas; Burghgrave, Blake; Burke, Stephen; Burmeister, Ingo; Busato, Emmanuel; Büscher, Volker; Bussey, Peter; Buszello, Claus-Peter; Butler, Bart; Butler, John; Butt, Aatif Imtiaz; Buttar, Craig; Butterworth, Jonathan; Buttinger, William; Buzatu, Adrian; Byszewski, Marcin; Cabrera Urbán, Susana; Caforio, Davide; Cakir, Orhan; Calafiura, Paolo; Calderini, Giovanni; Calfayan, Philippe; Calkins, Robert; Caloba, Luiz; Caloi, Rita; Calvet, David; Calvet, Samuel; Camacho Toro, Reina; Camarri, Paolo; Cameron, David; Caminada, Lea Michaela; Caminal Armadans, Roger; Campana, Simone; Campanelli, Mario; Canale, Vincenzo; Canelli, Florencia; Canepa, Anadi; Cantero, Josu; Cantrill, Robert; Cao, Tingting; Capeans Garrido, Maria Del Mar; Caprini, Irinel; Caprini, Mihai; Capua, Marcella; Caputo, Regina; Cardarelli, Roberto; Carli, Tancredi; Carlino, Gianpaolo; Carminati, Leonardo; Caron, Sascha; Carquin, Edson; Carrillo-Montoya, German D; Carter, Antony; Carter, Janet; Carvalho, João; Casadei, Diego; Casado, Maria Pilar; Caso, Carlo; Castaneda-Miranda, Elizabeth; Castelli, Angelantonio; Castillo Gimenez, Victoria; Castro, Nuno Filipe; Catastini, Pierluigi; Catinaccio, Andrea; Catmore, James; Cattai, Ariella; Cattani, Giordano; Caughron, Seth; Cavaliere, Viviana; Cavalli, Donatella; Cavalli-Sforza, Matteo; Cavasinni, Vincenzo; Ceradini, Filippo; Cerio, Benjamin; Cerny, Karel; Santiago Cerqueira, Augusto; Cerri, Alessandro; Cerrito, Lucio; Cerutti, Fabio; Cervelli, Alberto; Cetin, Serkant Ali; Chafaq, Aziz; Chakraborty, Dhiman; Chalupkova, Ina; Chan, Kevin; Chang, Philip; Chapleau, Bertrand; Chapman, John Derek; Charfeddine, Driss; Charlton, Dave; Chavda, Vikash; Chavez Barajas, Carlos Alberto; Cheatham, Susan; Chekanov, Sergei; Chekulaev, Sergey; Chelkov, Gueorgui; Chelstowska, Magda Anna; Chen, Chunhui; Chen, Hucheng; Chen, Karen; Chen, Liming; Chen, Shenjian; Chen, Xin; Chen, Yujiao; Cheng, Yangyang; Cheplakov, Alexander; Cherkaoui El Moursli, Rajaa; Chernyatin, Valeriy; Cheu, Elliott; Chevalier, Laurent; Chiarella, Vitaliano; Chiefari, Giovanni; Childers, John Taylor; Chilingarov, Alexandre; Chiodini, Gabriele; Chisholm, Andrew; Chislett, Rebecca Thalatta; Chitan, Adrian; Chizhov, Mihail; Chouridou, Sofia; Chow, Bonnie Kar Bo; Christidi, Ilektra-Athanasia; Chromek-Burckhart, Doris; Chu, Ming-Lee; Chudoba, Jiri; Ciapetti, Guido; Ciftci, Abbas Kenan; Ciftci, Rena; Cinca, Diane; Cindro, Vladimir; Ciocio, Alessandra; Cirilli, Manuela; Cirkovic, Predrag; Citron, Zvi Hirsh; Citterio, Mauro; Ciubancan, Mihai; Clark, Allan G; Clark, Philip James; Clarke, Robert; Cleland, Bill; Clemens, Jean-Claude; Clement, Benoit; Clement, Christophe; Coadou, Yann; Cobal, Marina; Coccaro, Andrea; Cochran, James H; Coelli, Simone; Coffey, Laurel; Cogan, Joshua Godfrey; Coggeshall, James; Colas, Jacques; Cole, Brian; Cole, Stephen; Colijn, Auke-Pieter; Collins-Tooth, Christopher; Collot, Johann; Colombo, Tommaso; Colon, German; Compostella, Gabriele; Conde Muiño, Patricia; Coniavitis, Elias; Conidi, Maria Chiara; Connelly, Ian; Consonni, Sofia Maria; Consorti, Valerio; Constantinescu, Serban; Conta, Claudio; Conti, Geraldine; Conventi, Francesco; Cooke, Mark; Cooper, Ben; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; Cooper-Smith, Neil; Copic, Katherine; Cornelissen, Thijs; Corradi, Massimo; Corriveau, Francois; Corso-Radu, Alina; Cortes-Gonzalez, Arely; Cortiana, Giorgio; Costa, Giuseppe; Costa, María José; Costa Batalha Pedro, Rute; Costanzo, Davide; Côté, David; Cottin, Giovanna; Courneyea, Lorraine; Cowan, Glen; Cox, Brian; Cranmer, Kyle; Cree, Graham; Crépé-Renaudin, Sabine; Crescioli, Francesco; Crispin Ortuzar, Mireia; Cristinziani, Markus; Crosetti, Giovanni; Cuciuc, Constantin-Mihai; Cuenca Almenar, Cristóbal; Cuhadar Donszelmann, Tulay; Cummings, Jane; Curatolo, Maria; Cuthbert, Cameron; Czirr, Hendrik; Czodrowski, Patrick; Czyczula, Zofia; D'Auria, Saverio; D'Onofrio, Monica; D'Orazio, Alessia; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, Mario Jose; Da Via, Cinzia; Dabrowski, Wladyslaw; Dafinca, Alexandru; Dai, Tiesheng; Dallaire, Frederick; Dallapiccola, Carlo; Dam, Mogens; Daniells, Andrew Christopher; Dano Hoffmann, Maria; Dao, Valerio; Darbo, Giovanni; Darlea, Georgiana Lavinia; Darmora, Smita; Dassoulas, James; Davey, Will; David, Claire; Davidek, Tomas; Davies, Eleanor; Davies, Merlin; Davignon, Olivier; Davison, Adam; Davygora, Yuriy; Dawe, Edmund; Dawson, Ian; Daya-Ishmukhametova, Rozmin; De, Kaushik; de Asmundis, Riccardo; De Castro, Stefano; De Cecco, Sandro; de Graat, Julien; De Groot, Nicolo; de Jong, Paul; De La Taille, Christophe; De la Torre, Hector; De Lorenzi, Francesco; De Nooij, Lucie; De Pedis, Daniele; De Salvo, Alessandro; De Sanctis, Umberto; De Santo, Antonella; De Vivie De Regie, Jean-Baptiste; De Zorzi, Guido; Dearnaley, William James; Debbe, Ramiro; Debenedetti, Chiara; Dechenaux, Benjamin; Dedovich, Dmitri; Degenhardt, James; Del Peso, Jose; Del Prete, Tarcisio; Delemontex, Thomas; Deliot, Frederic; Deliyergiyev, Maksym; Dell'Acqua, Andrea; Dell'Asta, Lidia; Della Pietra, Massimo; della Volpe, Domenico; Delmastro, Marco; Delsart, Pierre-Antoine; Deluca, Carolina; Demers, Sarah; Demichev, Mikhail; Demilly, Aurelien; Demirkoz, Bilge; Denisov, Sergey; Derendarz, Dominik; Derkaoui, Jamal Eddine; Derue, Frederic; Dervan, Paul; Desch, Klaus Kurt; Deviveiros, Pier-Olivier; Dewhurst, Alastair; DeWilde, Burton; Dhaliwal, Saminder; Dhullipudi, Ramasudhakar; Di Ciaccio, Anna; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Donato, Camilla; Di Girolamo, Alessandro; Di Girolamo, Beniamino; Di Mattia, Alessandro; Di Micco, Biagio; Di Nardo, Roberto; Di Simone, Andrea; Di Sipio, Riccardo; Di Valentino, David; Diaz, Marco Aurelio; Diehl, Edward; Dietrich, Janet; Dietzsch, Thorsten; Diglio, Sara; Dindar Yagci, Kamile; Dingfelder, Jochen; Dionisi, Carlo; Dita, Petre; Dita, Sanda; Dittus, Fridolin; Djama, Fares; Djobava, Tamar; Barros do Vale, Maria Aline; Do Valle Wemans, André; Doan, Thi Kieu Oanh; Dobos, Daniel; Dobson, Ellie; Dodd, Jeremy; Doglioni, Caterina; Doherty, Tom; Dohmae, Takeshi; Dolejsi, Jiri; Dolezal, Zdenek; Dolgoshein, Boris; Donadelli, Marisilvia; Donati, Simone; Dondero, Paolo; Donini, Julien; Dopke, Jens; Doria, Alessandra; Dos Anjos, Andre; Dotti, Andrea; Dova, Maria-Teresa; Doyle, Tony; Dris, Manolis; Dubbert, Jörg; Dube, Sourabh; Dubreuil, Emmanuelle; Duchovni, Ehud; Duckeck, Guenter; Ducu, Otilia Anamaria; Duda, Dominik; Dudarev, Alexey; Dudziak, Fanny; Duflot, Laurent; Duguid, Liam; Dührssen, Michael; Dunford, Monica; Duran Yildiz, Hatice; Düren, Michael; Dwuznik, Michal; Ebke, Johannes; Edson, William; Edwards, Clive; Edwards, Nicholas Charles; Ehrenfeld, Wolfgang; Eifert, Till; Eigen, Gerald; Einsweiler, Kevin; Eisenhandler, Eric; Ekelof, Tord; El Kacimi, Mohamed; Ellert, Mattias; Elles, Sabine; Ellinghaus, Frank; Ellis, Katherine; Ellis, Nicolas; Elmsheuser, Johannes; Elsing, Markus; Emeliyanov, Dmitry; Enari, Yuji; Endner, Oliver Chris; Endo, Masaki; Engelmann, Roderich; Erdmann, Johannes; Ereditato, Antonio; Eriksson, Daniel; Ernis, Gunar; Ernst, Jesse; Ernst, Michael; Ernwein, Jean; Errede, Deborah; Errede, Steven; Ertel, Eugen; Escalier, Marc; Esch, Hendrik; Escobar, Carlos; Espinal Curull, Xavier; Esposito, Bellisario; Etienne, Francois; Etienvre, Anne-Isabelle; Etzion, Erez; Evangelakou, Despoina; Evans, Hal; Fabbri, Laura; Facini, Gabriel; Fakhrutdinov, Rinat; Falciano, Speranza; Fang, Yaquan; Fanti, Marcello; Farbin, Amir; Farilla, Addolorata; Farooque, Trisha; Farrell, Steven; Farrington, Sinead; Farthouat, Philippe; Fassi, Farida; Fassnacht, Patrick; Fassouliotis, Dimitrios; Fatholahzadeh, Baharak; Favareto, Andrea; Fayard, Louis; Federic, Pavol; Fedin, Oleg; Fedorko, Wojciech; Fehling-Kaschek, Mirjam; Feligioni, Lorenzo; Feng, Cunfeng; Feng, Eric; Feng, Haolu; Fenyuk, Alexander; Fernando, Waruna; Ferrag, Samir; Ferrando, James; Ferrara, Valentina; Ferrari, Arnaud; Ferrari, Pamela; Ferrari, Roberto; Ferreira de Lima, Danilo Enoque; Ferrer, Antonio; Ferrere, Didier; Ferretti, Claudio; Ferretto Parodi, Andrea; Fiascaris, Maria; Fiedler, Frank; Filipčič, Andrej; Filipuzzi, Marco; Filthaut, Frank; Fincke-Keeler, Margret; Finelli, Kevin Daniel; Fiolhais, Miguel; Fiorini, Luca; Firan, Ana; Fischer, Julia; Fisher, Matthew; Fitzgerald, Eric Andrew; Flechl, Martin; Fleck, Ivor; Fleischmann, Philipp; Fleischmann, Sebastian; Fletcher, Gareth Thomas; Fletcher, Gregory; Flick, Tobias; Floderus, Anders; Flores Castillo, Luis; Florez Bustos, Andres Carlos; Flowerdew, Michael; Fonseca Martin, Teresa; Formica, Andrea; Forti, Alessandra; Fortin, Dominique; Fournier, Daniel; Fox, Harald; Francavilla, Paolo; Franchini, Matteo; Franchino, Silvia; Francis, David; Franklin, Melissa; Franz, Sebastien; Fraternali, Marco; Fratina, Sasa; French, Sky; Friedrich, Conrad; Friedrich, Felix; Froidevaux, Daniel; Frost, James; Fukunaga, Chikara; Fullana Torregrosa, Esteban; Fulsom, Bryan Gregory; Fuster, Juan; Gabaldon, Carolina; Gabizon, Ofir; Gabrielli, Alessandro; Gabrielli, Andrea; Gadatsch, Stefan; Gadfort, Thomas; Gadomski, Szymon; Gagliardi, Guido; Gagnon, Pauline; Galea, Cristina; Galhardo, Bruno; Gallas, Elizabeth; Gallo, Valentina Santina; Gallop, Bruce; Gallus, Petr; Galster, Gorm Aske Gram Krohn; Gan, KK; Gandrajula, Reddy Pratap; Gao, Jun; Gao, Yongsheng; Garay Walls, Francisca; Garberson, Ford; García, Carmen; García Navarro, José Enrique; Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice; Gardner, Robert; Garelli, Nicoletta; Garonne, Vincent; Gatti, Claudio; Gaudio, Gabriella; Gaur, Bakul; Gauthier, Lea; Gauzzi, Paolo; Gavrilenko, Igor; Gay, Colin; Gaycken, Goetz; Gazis, Evangelos; Ge, Peng; Gecse, Zoltan; Gee, Norman; Geerts, Daniël Alphonsus Adrianus; Geich-Gimbel, Christoph; Gellerstedt, Karl; Gemme, Claudia; Gemmell, Alistair; Genest, Marie-Hélène; Gentile, Simonetta; George, Matthias; George, Simon; Gerbaudo, Davide; Gershon, Avi; Ghazlane, Hamid; Ghodbane, Nabil; Giacobbe, Benedetto; Giagu, Stefano; Giangiobbe, Vincent; Giannetti, Paola; Gianotti, Fabiola; Gibbard, Bruce; Gibson, Stephen; Gilchriese, Murdock; Gillam, Thomas; Gillberg, Dag; Gillman, Tony; Gingrich, Douglas; Giokaris, Nikos; Giordani, MarioPaolo; Giordano, Raffaele; Giorgi, Francesco Michelangelo; Giovannini, Paola; Giraud, Pierre-Francois; Giugni, Danilo; Giuliani, Claudia; Giunta, Michele; Gjelsten, Børge Kile; Gkialas, Ioannis; Gladilin, Leonid; Glasman, Claudia; Glatzer, Julian; Glazov, Alexandre; Glonti, George; Goblirsch-Kolb, Maximilian; Goddard, Jack Robert; Godfrey, Jennifer; Godlewski, Jan; Goeringer, Christian; Goldfarb, Steven; Golling, Tobias; Golubkov, Dmitry; Gomes, Agostinho; Gomez Fajardo, Luz Stella; Gonçalo, Ricardo; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, Joao; Gonella, Laura; González de la Hoz, Santiago; Gonzalez Parra, Garoe; Gonzalez Silva, Laura; Gonzalez-Sevilla, Sergio; Goodson, Jeremiah Jet; Goossens, Luc; Gorbounov, Petr Andreevich; Gordon, Howard; Gorelov, Igor; Gorfine, Grant; Gorini, Benedetto; Gorini, Edoardo; Gorišek, Andrej; Gornicki, Edward; Goshaw, Alfred; Gössling, Claus; Gostkin, Mikhail Ivanovitch; Gouighri, Mohamed; Goujdami, Driss; Goulette, Marc Phillippe; Goussiou, Anna; Goy, Corinne; Gozpinar, Serdar; Grabas, Herve Marie Xavier; Graber, Lars; Grabowska-Bold, Iwona; Grafström, Per; Grahn, Karl-Johan; Gramling, Johanna; Gramstad, Eirik; Grancagnolo, Francesco; Grancagnolo, Sergio; Grassi, Valerio; Gratchev, Vadim; Gray, Heather; Gray, Julia Ann; Graziani, Enrico; Grebenyuk, Oleg; Greenwood, Zeno Dixon; Gregersen, Kristian; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Grenier, Philippe; Griffiths, Justin; Grigalashvili, Nugzar; Grillo, Alexander; Grimm, Kathryn; Grinstein, Sebastian; Gris, Philippe Luc Yves; Grishkevich, Yaroslav; Grivaz, Jean-Francois; Grohs, Johannes Philipp; Grohsjean, Alexander; Gross, Eilam; Grosse-Knetter, Joern; Grossi, Giulio Cornelio; Groth-Jensen, Jacob; Grout, Zara Jane; Grybel, Kai; Guescini, Francesco; Guest, Daniel; Gueta, Orel; Guicheney, Christophe; Guido, Elisa; Guillemin, Thibault; Guindon, Stefan; Gul, Umar; Gumpert, Christian; Gunther, Jaroslav; Guo, Jun; Gupta, Shaun; Gutierrez, Phillip; Gutierrez Ortiz, Nicolas Gilberto; Gutschow, Christian; Guttman, Nir; Guyot, Claude; Gwenlan, Claire; Gwilliam, Carl; Haas, Andy; Haber, Carl; Hadavand, Haleh Khani; Haefner, Petra; Hageboeck, Stephan; Hajduk, Zbigniew; Hakobyan, Hrachya; Haleem, Mahsana; Hall, David; Halladjian, Garabed; Hamacher, Klaus; Hamal, Petr; Hamano, Kenji; Hamer, Matthias; Hamilton, Andrew; Hamilton, Samuel; Han, Liang; Hanagaki, Kazunori; Hanawa, Keita; Hance, Michael; Hanke, Paul; Hansen, John Renner; Hansen, Jørgen Beck; Hansen, Jorn Dines; Hansen, Peter Henrik; Hansson, Per; Hara, Kazuhiko; Hard, Andrew; Harenberg, Torsten; Harkusha, Siarhei; Harper, Devin; Harrington, Robert; Harris, Orin; Harrison, Paul Fraser; Hartjes, Fred; Harvey, Alex; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Hasegawa, Yoji; Hassani, Samira; Haug, Sigve; Hauschild, Michael; Hauser, Reiner; Havranek, Miroslav; Hawkes, Christopher; Hawkings, Richard John; Hawkins, Anthony David; Hayashi, Takayasu; Hayden, Daniel; Hays, Chris; Hayward, Helen; Haywood, Stephen; Head, Simon; Heck, Tobias; Hedberg, Vincent; Heelan, Louise; Heim, Sarah; Heinemann, Beate; Heisterkamp, Simon; Hejbal, Jiri; Helary, Louis; Heller, Claudio; Heller, Matthieu; Hellman, Sten; Hellmich, Dennis; Helsens, Clement; Henderson, James; Henderson, Robert; Henrichs, Anna; Henriques Correia, Ana Maria; Henrot-Versille, Sophie; Hensel, Carsten; Herbert, Geoffrey Henry; Medina Hernandez, Carlos; Hernández Jiménez, Yesenia; Herrberg-Schubert, Ruth; Herten, Gregor; Hertenberger, Ralf; Hervas, Luis; Hesketh, Gavin Grant; Hessey, Nigel; Hickling, Robert; Higón-Rodriguez, Emilio; Hill, John; Hiller, Karl Heinz; Hillert, Sonja; Hillier, Stephen; Hinchliffe, Ian; Hines, Elizabeth; Hirose, Minoru; Hirschbuehl, Dominic; Hobbs, John; Hod, Noam; Hodgkinson, Mark; Hodgson, Paul; Hoecker, Andreas; Hoeferkamp, Martin; Hoffman, Julia; Hoffmann, Dirk; Hofmann, Julia Isabell; Hohlfeld, Marc; Holmes, Tova Ray; Hong, Tae Min; Hooft van Huysduynen, Loek; Hostachy, Jean-Yves; Hou, Suen; Hoummada, Abdeslam; Howard, Jacob; Howarth, James; Hrabovsky, Miroslav; Hristova, Ivana; Hrivnac, Julius; Hryn'ova, Tetiana; Hsu, Pai-hsien Jennifer; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Hu, Diedi; Hu, Xueye; Huang, Yanping; Hubacek, Zdenek; Hubaut, Fabrice; Huegging, Fabian; Huettmann, Antje; Huffman, Todd Brian; Hughes, Emlyn; Hughes, Gareth; Huhtinen, Mika; Hülsing, Tobias Alexander; Hurwitz, Martina; Huseynov, Nazim; Huston, Joey; Huth, John; Iacobucci, Giuseppe; Iakovidis, Georgios; Ibragimov, Iskander; Iconomidou-Fayard, Lydia; Idarraga, John; Ideal, Emma; Iengo, Paolo; Igonkina, Olga; Iizawa, Tomoya; Ikegami, Yoichi; Ikematsu, Katsumasa; Ikeno, Masahiro; Iliadis, Dimitrios; Ilic, Nikolina; Inamaru, Yuki; Ince, Tayfun; Ioannou, Pavlos; Iodice, Mauro; Iordanidou, Kalliopi; Ippolito, Valerio; Irles Quiles, Adrian; Isaksson, Charlie; Ishino, Masaya; Ishitsuka, Masaki; Ishmukhametov, Renat; Issever, Cigdem; Istin, Serhat; Ivashin, Anton; Iwanski, Wieslaw; Iwasaki, Hiroyuki; Izen, Joseph; Izzo, Vincenzo; Jackson, Brett; Jackson, John; Jackson, Matthew; Jackson, Paul; Jaekel, Martin; Jain, Vivek; Jakobs, Karl; Jakobsen, Sune; Jakoubek, Tomas; Jakubek, Jan; Jamin, David Olivier; Jana, Dilip; Jansen, Eric; Jansen, Hendrik; Janssen, Jens; Janus, Michel; Jared, Richard; Jarlskog, Göran; Jeanty, Laura; Jeng, Geng-yuan; Jen-La Plante, Imai; Jennens, David; Jenni, Peter; Jentzsch, Jennifer; Jeske, Carl; Jézéquel, Stéphane; Jha, Manoj Kumar; Ji, Haoshuang; Ji, Weina; Jia, Jiangyong; Jiang, Yi; Jimenez Belenguer, Marcos; Jin, Shan; Jinaru, Adam; Jinnouchi, Osamu; Joergensen, Morten Dam; Joffe, David; Johansson, Erik; Johansson, Per; Johns, Kenneth; Jon-And, Kerstin; Jones, Graham; Jones, Roger; Jones, Tim; Jorge, Pedro; Joshi, Kiran Daniel; Jovicevic, Jelena; Ju, Xiangyang; Jung, Christian; Jungst, Ralph Markus; Jussel, Patrick; Juste Rozas, Aurelio; Kaci, Mohammed; Kaczmarska, Anna; Kadlecik, Peter; Kado, Marumi; Kagan, Harris; Kagan, Michael; Kajomovitz, Enrique; Kalinin, Sergey; Kama, Sami; Kanaya, Naoko; Kaneda, Michiru; Kaneti, Steven; Kanno, Takayuki; Kantserov, Vadim; Kanzaki, Junichi; Kaplan, Benjamin; Kapliy, Anton; Kar, Deepak; Karakostas, Konstantinos; Karastathis, Nikolaos; Karnevskiy, Mikhail; Karpov, Sergey; Karthik, Krishnaiyengar; Kartvelishvili, Vakhtang; Karyukhin, Andrey; Kashif, Lashkar; Kasieczka, Gregor; Kass, Richard; Kastanas, Alex; Kataoka, Yousuke; Katre, Akshay; Katzy, Judith; Kaushik, Venkatesh; Kawagoe, Kiyotomo; Kawamoto, Tatsuo; Kawamura, Gen; Kazama, Shingo; Kazanin, Vassili; Kazarinov, Makhail; Keeler, Richard; Keener, Paul; Kehoe, Robert; Keil, Markus; Keller, John; Keoshkerian, Houry; Kepka, Oldrich; Kerševan, Borut Paul; Kersten, Susanne; Kessoku, Kohei; Keung, Justin; Khalil-zada, Farkhad; Khandanyan, Hovhannes; Khanov, Alexander; Kharchenko, Dmitri; Khodinov, Alexander; Khomich, Andrei; Khoo, Teng Jian; Khoriauli, Gia; Khoroshilov, Andrey; Khovanskiy, Valery; Khramov, Evgeniy; Khubua, Jemal; Kim, Hyeon Jin; Kim, Shinhong; Kimura, Naoki; Kind, Oliver; King, Barry; King, Matthew; King, Robert Steven Beaufoy; King, Samuel Burton; Kirk, Julie; Kiryunin, Andrey; Kishimoto, Tomoe; Kisielewska, Danuta; Kitamura, Takumi; Kittelmann, Thomas; Kiuchi, Kenji; Kladiva, Eduard; Klein, Max; Klein, Uta; Kleinknecht, Konrad; Klimek, Pawel; Klimentov, Alexei; Klingenberg, Reiner; Klinger, Joel Alexander; Klinkby, Esben; Klioutchnikova, Tatiana; Klok, Peter; Kluge, Eike-Erik; Kluit, Peter; Kluth, Stefan; Kneringer, Emmerich; Knoops, Edith; Knue, Andrea; Kobayashi, Tomio; Kobel, Michael; Kocian, Martin; Kodys, Peter; Koenig, Sebastian; Koevesarki, Peter; Koffas, Thomas; Koffeman, Els; Kogan, Lucy Anne; Kohlmann, Simon; Kohout, Zdenek; Kohriki, Takashi; Koi, Tatsumi; Kolanoski, Hermann; Koletsou, Iro; Koll, James; Komar, Aston; Komori, Yuto; Kondo, Takahiko; Köneke, Karsten; König, Adriaan; Kono, Takanori; Konoplich, Rostislav; Konstantinidis, Nikolaos; Kopeliansky, Revital; Koperny, Stefan; Köpke, Lutz; Kopp, Anna Katharina; Korcyl, Krzysztof; Kordas, Kostantinos; Korn, Andreas; Korol, Aleksandr; Korolkov, Ilya; Korolkova, Elena; Korotkov, Vladislav; Kortner, Oliver; Kortner, Sandra; Kostyukhin, Vadim; Kotov, Sergey; Kotov, Vladislav; Kotwal, Ashutosh; Kourkoumelis, Christine; Kouskoura, Vasiliki; Koutsman, Alex; Kowalewski, Robert Victor; Kowalski, Tadeusz; Kozanecki, Witold; Kozhin, Anatoly; Kral, Vlastimil; Kramarenko, Viktor; Kramberger, Gregor; Krasny, Mieczyslaw Witold; Krasznahorkay, Attila; Kraus, Jana; Kravchenko, Anton; Kreiss, Sven; Kretzschmar, Jan; Kreutzfeldt, Kristof; Krieger, Nina; Krieger, Peter; Kroeninger, Kevin; Kroha, Hubert; Kroll, Joe; Kroseberg, Juergen; Krstic, Jelena; Kruchonak, Uladzimir; Krüger, Hans; Kruker, Tobias; Krumnack, Nils; Krumshteyn, Zinovii; Kruse, Amanda; Kruse, Mark; Kruskal, Michael; Kubota, Takashi; Kuday, Sinan; Kuehn, Susanne; Kugel, Andreas; Kuhl, Thorsten; Kukhtin, Victor; Kulchitsky, Yuri; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kuna, Marine; Kunkle, Joshua; Kupco, Alexander; Kurashige, Hisaya; Kurata, Masakazu; Kurochkin, Yurii; Kurumida, Rie; Kus, Vlastimil; Kuwertz, Emma Sian; Kuze, Masahiro; Kvita, Jiri; Kwee, Regina; La Rosa, Alessandro; La Rotonda, Laura; Labarga, Luis; Lablak, Said; Lacasta, Carlos; Lacava, Francesco; Lacey, James; Lacker, Heiko; Lacour, Didier; Lacuesta, Vicente Ramón; Ladygin, Evgueni; Lafaye, Remi; Laforge, Bertrand; Lagouri, Theodota; Lai, Stanley; Laier, Heiko; Laisne, Emmanuel; Lambourne, Luke; Lampen, Caleb; Lampl, Walter; Lançon, Eric; Landgraf, Ulrich; Landon, Murrough; Lang, Valerie Susanne; Lange, Clemens; Lankford, Andrew; Lanni, Francesco; Lantzsch, Kerstin; Lanza, Agostino; Laplace, Sandrine; Lapoire, Cecile; Laporte, Jean-Francois; Lari, Tommaso; Larner, Aimee; Lassnig, Mario; Laurelli, Paolo; Lavorini, Vincenzo; Lavrijsen, Wim; Laycock, Paul; Le, Bao Tran; Le Dortz, Olivier; Le Guirriec, Emmanuel; Le Menedeu, Eve; LeCompte, Thomas; Ledroit-Guillon, Fabienne Agnes Marie; Lee, Claire Alexandra; Lee, Hurng-Chun; Lee, Jason; Lee, Shih-Chang; Lee, Lawrence; Lefebvre, Guillaume; Lefebvre, Michel; Legger, Federica; Leggett, Charles; Lehan, Allan; Lehmacher, Marc; Lehmann Miotto, Giovanna; Lei, Xiaowen; Leister, Andrew Gerard; Leite, Marco Aurelio Lisboa; Leitner, Rupert; Lellouch, Daniel; Lemmer, Boris; Lendermann, Victor; Leney, Katharine; Lenz, Tatiana; Lenzen, Georg; Lenzi, Bruno; Leone, Robert; Leonhardt, Kathrin; Leontsinis, Stefanos; Leroy, Claude; Lessard, Jean-Raphael; Lester, Christopher; Lester, Christopher Michael; Levêque, Jessica; Levin, Daniel; Levinson, Lorne; Lewis, Adrian; Lewis, George; Leyko, Agnieszka; Leyton, Michael; Li, Bing; Li, Bo; Li, Haifeng; Li, Ho Ling; Li, Shu; Li, Xuefei; Liang, Zhijun; Liao, Hongbo; Liberti, Barbara; Lichard, Peter; Lie, Ki; Liebal, Jessica; Liebig, Wolfgang; Limbach, Christian; Limosani, Antonio; Limper, Maaike; Lin, Simon; Linde, Frank; Lindquist, Brian Edward; Linnemann, James; Lipeles, Elliot; Lipniacka, Anna; Lisovyi, Mykhailo; Liss, Tony; Lissauer, David; Lister, Alison; Litke, Alan; Liu, Bo; Liu, Dong; Liu, Jianbei; Liu, Kun; Liu, Lulu; Liu, Miaoyuan; Liu, Minghui; Liu, Yanwen; Livan, Michele; Livermore, Sarah; Lleres, Annick; Llorente Merino, Javier; Lloyd, Stephen; Lo Sterzo, Francesco; Lobodzinska, Ewelina; Loch, Peter; Lockman, William; Loddenkoetter, Thomas; Loebinger, Fred; Loevschall-Jensen, Ask Emil; Loginov, Andrey; Loh, Chang Wei; Lohse, Thomas; Lohwasser, Kristin; Lokajicek, Milos; Lombardo, Vincenzo Paolo; Long, Jonathan; Long, Robin Eamonn; Lopes, Lourenco; Lopez Mateos, David; Lopez Paredes, Brais; Lorenz, Jeanette; Lorenzo Martinez, Narei; Losada, Marta; Loscutoff, Peter; Losty, Michael; Lou, XinChou; Lounis, Abdenour; Love, Jeremy; Love, Peter; Lowe, Andrew; Lu, Feng; Lubatti, Henry; Luci, Claudio; Lucotte, Arnaud; Ludwig, Dörthe; Ludwig, Inga; Luehring, Frederick; Lukas, Wolfgang; Luminari, Lamberto; Lund, Esben; Lundberg, Johan; Lundberg, Olof; Lund-Jensen, Bengt; Lungwitz, Matthias; Lynn, David; Lysak, Roman; Lytken, Else; Ma, Hong; Ma, Lian Liang; Maccarrone, Giovanni; Macchiolo, Anna; Maček, Boštjan; Machado Miguens, Joana; Macina, Daniela; Mackeprang, Rasmus; Madar, Romain; Madaras, Ronald; Maddocks, Harvey Jonathan; Mader, Wolfgang; Madsen, Alexander; Maeno, Mayuko; Maeno, Tadashi; Magnoni, Luca; Magradze, Erekle; Mahboubi, Kambiz; Mahlstedt, Joern; Mahmoud, Sara; Mahout, Gilles; Maiani, Camilla; Maidantchik, Carmen; Maio, Amélia; Majewski, Stephanie; Makida, Yasuhiro; Makovec, Nikola; Mal, Prolay; Malaescu, Bogdan; Malecki, Pawel; Maleev, Victor; Malek, Fairouz; Mallik, Usha; Malon, David; Malone, Caitlin; Maltezos, Stavros; Malyshev, Vladimir; Malyukov, Sergei; Mamuzic, Judita; Mandelli, Luciano; Mandić, Igor; Mandrysch, Rocco; Maneira, José; Manfredini, Alessandro; Manhaes de Andrade Filho, Luciano; Manjarres Ramos, Joany Andreina; Mann, Alexander; Manning, Peter; Manousakis-Katsikakis, Arkadios; Mansoulie, Bruno; Mantifel, Rodger; Mapelli, Livio; March, Luis; Marchand, Jean-Francois; Marchese, Fabrizio; Marchiori, Giovanni; Marcisovsky, Michal; Marino, Christopher; Marques, Carlos; Marroquim, Fernando; Marshall, Zach; Marti, Lukas Fritz; Marti-Garcia, Salvador; Martin, Brian; Martin, Brian Thomas; Martin, Jean-Pierre; Martin, Tim; Martin, Victoria Jane; Martin dit Latour, Bertrand; Martinez, Homero; Martinez, Mario; Martin-Haugh, Stewart; Martyniuk, Alex; Marx, Marilyn; Marzano, Francesco; Marzin, Antoine; Masetti, Lucia; Mashimo, Tetsuro; Mashinistov, Ruslan; Masik, Jiri; Maslennikov, Alexey; Massa, Ignazio; Massol, Nicolas; Mastrandrea, Paolo; Mastroberardino, Anna; Masubuchi, Tatsuya; Matsunaga, Hiroyuki; Matsushita, Takashi; Mättig, Peter; Mättig, Stefan; Mattmann, Johannes; Mattravers, Carly; Maurer, Julien; Maxfield, Stephen; Maximov, Dmitriy; Mazini, Rachid; Mazzaferro, Luca; Mazzanti, Marcello; Mc Goldrick, Garrin; Mc Kee, Shawn Patrick; McCarn, Allison; McCarthy, Robert; McCarthy, Tom; McCubbin, Norman; McFarlane, Kenneth; Mcfayden, Josh; Mchedlidze, Gvantsa; Mclaughlan, Tom; McMahon, Steve; McPherson, Robert; Meade, Andrew; Mechnich, Joerg; Mechtel, Markus; Medinnis, Mike; Meehan, Samuel; Meera-Lebbai, Razzak; Mehlhase, Sascha; Mehta, Andrew; Meier, Karlheinz; Meineck, Christian; Meirose, Bernhard; Melachrinos, Constantinos; Mellado Garcia, Bruce Rafael; Meloni, Federico; Mendoza Navas, Luis; Mengarelli, Alberto; Menke, Sven; Meoni, Evelin; Mercurio, Kevin Michael; Mergelmeyer, Sebastian; Meric, Nicolas; Mermod, Philippe; Merola, Leonardo; Meroni, Chiara; Merritt, Frank; Merritt, Hayes; Messina, Andrea; Metcalfe, Jessica; Mete, Alaettin Serhan; Meyer, Carsten; Meyer, Christopher; Meyer, Jean-Pierre; Meyer, Jochen; Meyer, Joerg; Michal, Sebastien; Middleton, Robin; Migas, Sylwia; Mijović, Liza; Mikenberg, Giora; Mikestikova, Marcela; Mikuž, Marko; Miller, David; Mills, Corrinne; Milov, Alexander; Milstead, David; Milstein, Dmitry; Minaenko, Andrey; Miñano Moya, Mercedes; Minashvili, Irakli; Mincer, Allen; Mindur, Bartosz; Mineev, Mikhail; Ming, Yao; Mir, Lluisa-Maria; Mirabelli, Giovanni; Mitani, Takashi; Mitrevski, Jovan; Mitsou, Vasiliki A; Mitsui, Shingo; Miyagawa, Paul; Mjörnmark, Jan-Ulf; Moa, Torbjoern; Moeller, Victoria; Mohapatra, Soumya; Mohr, Wolfgang; Molander, Simon; Moles-Valls, Regina; Molfetas, Angelos; Mönig, Klaus; Monini, Caterina; Monk, James; Monnier, Emmanuel; Montejo Berlingen, Javier; Monticelli, Fernando; Monzani, Simone; Moore, Roger; Mora Herrera, Clemencia; Moraes, Arthur; Morange, Nicolas; Morel, Julien; Moreno, Deywis; Moreno Llácer, María; Morettini, Paolo; Morgenstern, Marcus; Morii, Masahiro; Moritz, Sebastian; Morley, Anthony Keith; Mornacchi, Giuseppe; Morris, John; Morvaj, Ljiljana; Moser, Hans-Guenther; Mosidze, Maia; Moss, Josh; Mount, Richard; Mountricha, Eleni; Mouraviev, Sergei; Moyse, Edward; Mudd, Richard; Mueller, Felix; Mueller, James; Mueller, Klemens; Mueller, Thibaut; Mueller, Timo; Muenstermann, Daniel; Munwes, Yonathan; Murillo Quijada, Javier Alberto; Murray, Bill; Mussche, Ido; Musto, Elisa; Myagkov, Alexey; Myska, Miroslav; Nackenhorst, Olaf; Nadal, Jordi; Nagai, Koichi; Nagai, Ryo; Nagai, Yoshikazu; Nagano, Kunihiro; Nagarkar, Advait; Nagasaka, Yasushi; Nagel, Martin; Nairz, Armin Michael; Nakahama, Yu; Nakamura, Koji; Nakamura, Tomoaki; Nakano, Itsuo; Namasivayam, Harisankar; Nanava, Gizo; Napier, Austin; Narayan, Rohin; Nash, Michael; Nattermann, Till; Naumann, Thomas; Navarro, Gabriela; Neal, Homer; Nechaeva, Polina; Neep, Thomas James; Negri, Andrea; Negri, Guido; Negrini, Matteo; Nektarijevic, Snezana; Nelson, Andrew; Nelson, Timothy Knight; Nemecek, Stanislav; Nemethy, Peter; Nepomuceno, Andre Asevedo; Nessi, Marzio; Neubauer, Mark; Neumann, Manuel; Neusiedl, Andrea; Neves, Ricardo; Nevski, Pavel; Newcomer, Mitchel; Newman, Paul; Nguyen, Duong Hai; Nguyen Thi Hong, Van; Nickerson, Richard; Nicolaidou, Rosy; Nicquevert, Bertrand; Nielsen, Jason; Nikiforou, Nikiforos; Nikiforov, Andriy; Nikolaenko, Vladimir; Nikolic-Audit, Irena; Nikolics, Katalin; Nikolopoulos, Konstantinos; Nilsson, Paul; Ninomiya, Yoichi; Nisati, Aleandro; Nisius, Richard; Nobe, Takuya; Nodulman, Lawrence; Nomachi, Masaharu; Nomidis, Ioannis; Norberg, Scarlet; Nordberg, Markus; Novakova, Jana; Nozaki, Mitsuaki; Nozka, Libor; Ntekas, Konstantinos; Nuncio-Quiroz, Adriana-Elizabeth; Nunes Hanninger, Guilherme; Nunnemann, Thomas; Nurse, Emily; O'Brien, Brendan Joseph; O'grady, Fionnbarr; O'Neil, Dugan; O'Shea, Val; Oakes, Louise Beth; Oakham, Gerald; Oberlack, Horst; Ocariz, Jose; Ochi, Atsuhiko; Ochoa, Ines; Oda, Susumu; Odaka, Shigeru; Ogren, Harold; Oh, Alexander; Oh, Seog; Ohm, Christian; Ohshima, Takayoshi; Okamura, Wataru; Okawa, Hideki; Okumura, Yasuyuki; Okuyama, Toyonobu; Olariu, Albert; Olchevski, Alexander; Olivares Pino, Sebastian Andres; Oliveira, Miguel Alfonso; Oliveira Damazio, Denis; Oliver Garcia, Elena; Olivito, Dominick; Olszewski, Andrzej; Olszowska, Jolanta; Onofre, António; Onyisi, Peter; Oram, Christopher; Oreglia, Mark; Oren, Yona; Orestano, Domizia; Orlando, Nicola; Oropeza Barrera, Cristina; Orr, Robert; Osculati, Bianca; Ospanov, Rustem; Otero y Garzon, Gustavo; Otono, Hidetoshi; Ouchrif, Mohamed; Ouellette, Eric; Ould-Saada, Farid; Ouraou, Ahmimed; Oussoren, Koen Pieter; Ouyang, Qun; Ovcharova, Ana; Owen, Mark; Owen, Simon; Ozcan, Veysi Erkcan; Ozturk, Nurcan; Pachal, Katherine; Pacheco Pages, Andres; Padilla Aranda, Cristobal; Pagan Griso, Simone; Paganis, Efstathios; Pahl, Christoph; Paige, Frank; Pais, Preema; Pajchel, Katarina; Palacino, Gabriel; Palestini, Sandro; Pallin, Dominique; Palma, Alberto; Palmer, Jody; Pan, Yibin; Panagiotopoulou, Evgenia; Panduro Vazquez, William; Pani, Priscilla; Panikashvili, Natalia; Panitkin, Sergey; Pantea, Dan; Papadopoulou, Theodora; Papageorgiou, Konstantinos; Paramonov, Alexander; Paredes Hernandez, Daniela; Parker, Michael Andrew; Parodi, Fabrizio; Parsons, John; Parzefall, Ulrich; Pashapour, Shabnaz; Pasqualucci, Enrico; Passaggio, Stefano; Passeri, Antonio; Pastore, Fernanda; Pastore, Francesca; Pásztor, Gabriella; Pataraia, Sophio; Patel, Nikhul; Pater, Joleen; Patricelli, Sergio; Pauly, Thilo; Pearce, James; Pedersen, Maiken; Pedraza Lopez, Sebastian; Peleganchuk, Sergey; Pelikan, Daniel; Peng, Haiping; Penning, Bjoern; Penwell, John; Perepelitsa, Dennis; Perez Cavalcanti, Tiago; Perez Codina, Estel; Pérez García-Estañ, María Teresa; Perez Reale, Valeria; Perini, Laura; Pernegger, Heinz; Perrino, Roberto; Peschke, Richard; Peshekhonov, Vladimir; Peters, Krisztian; Peters, Yvonne; Petersen, Brian; Petersen, Jorgen; Petersen, Troels; Petit, Elisabeth; Petridis, Andreas; Petridou, Chariclia; Petrolo, Emilio; Petrucci, Fabrizio; Petteni, Michele; Pezoa, Raquel; Phillips, Peter William; Piacquadio, Giacinto; Pianori, Elisabetta; Picazio, Attilio; Piccaro, Elisa; Piccinini, Maurizio; Piec, Sebastian Marcin; Piegaia, Ricardo; Pignotti, David; Pilcher, James; Pilkington, Andrew; Pina, João Antonio; Pinamonti, Michele; Pinder, Alex; Pinfold, James; Pingel, Almut; Pinto, Belmiro; Pizio, Caterina; Pleier, Marc-Andre; Pleskot, Vojtech; Plotnikova, Elena; Plucinski, Pawel; Poddar, Sahill; Podlyski, Fabrice; Poettgen, Ruth; Poggioli, Luc; Pohl, David-leon; Pohl, Martin; Polesello, Giacomo; Policicchio, Antonio; Polifka, Richard; Polini, Alessandro; Pollard, Christopher Samuel; Polychronakos, Venetios; Pomeroy, Daniel; Pommès, Kathy; Pontecorvo, Ludovico; Pope, Bernard; Popeneciu, Gabriel Alexandru; Popovic, Dragan; Poppleton, Alan; Portell Bueso, Xavier; Pospelov, Guennady; Pospisil, Stanislav; Potamianos, Karolos; Potrap, Igor; Potter, Christina; Potter, Christopher; Poulard, Gilbert; Poveda, Joaquin; Pozdnyakov, Valery; Prabhu, Robindra; Pralavorio, Pascal; Pranko, Aliaksandr; Prasad, Srivas; Pravahan, Rishiraj; Prell, Soeren; Price, Darren; Price, Joe; Price, Lawrence; Prieur, Damien; Primavera, Margherita; Proissl, Manuel; Prokofiev, Kirill; Prokoshin, Fedor; Protopapadaki, Eftychia-sofia; Protopopescu, Serban; Proudfoot, James; Prudent, Xavier; Przybycien, Mariusz; Przysiezniak, Helenka; Psoroulas, Serena; Ptacek, Elizabeth; Pueschel, Elisa; Puldon, David; Purohit, Milind; Puzo, Patrick; Pylypchenko, Yuriy; Qian, Jianming; Quadt, Arnulf; Quarrie, David; Quayle, William; Quilty, Donnchadha; Radeka, Veljko; Radescu, Voica; Radhakrishnan, Sooraj Krishnan; Radloff, Peter; Ragusa, Francesco; Rahal, Ghita; Rajagopalan, Srinivasan; Rammensee, Michael; Rammes, Marcus; Randle-Conde, Aidan Sean; Rangel-Smith, Camila; Rao, Kanury; Rauscher, Felix; Rave, Tobias Christian; Ravenscroft, Thomas; Raymond, Michel; Read, Alexander Lincoln; Rebuzzi, Daniela; Redelbach, Andreas; Redlinger, George; Reece, Ryan; Reeves, Kendall; Reinsch, Andreas; Reisin, Hernan; Reisinger, Ingo; Relich, Matthew; Rembser, Christoph; Ren, Zhongliang; Renaud, Adrien; Rescigno, Marco; Resconi, Silvia; Resende, Bernardo; Reznicek, Pavel; Rezvani, Reyhaneh; Richter, Robert; Ridel, Melissa; Rieck, Patrick; Rijssenbeek, Michael; Rimoldi, Adele; Rinaldi, Lorenzo; Ritsch, Elmar; Riu, Imma; Rivoltella, Giancesare; Rizatdinova, Flera; Rizvi, Eram; Robertson, Steven; Robichaud-Veronneau, Andree; Robinson, Dave; Robinson, James; Robson, Aidan; Rocha de Lima, Jose Guilherme; Roda, Chiara; Roda Dos Santos, Denis; Rodrigues, Luis; Roe, Shaun; Røhne, Ole; Rolli, Simona; Romaniouk, Anatoli; Romano, Marino; Romeo, Gaston; Romero Adam, Elena; Rompotis, Nikolaos; Roos, Lydia; Ros, Eduardo; Rosati, Stefano; Rosbach, Kilian; Rose, Anthony; Rose, Matthew; Rosendahl, Peter Lundgaard; Rosenthal, Oliver; Rossetti, Valerio; Rossi, Elvira; Rossi, Leonardo Paolo; Rosten, Rachel; Rotaru, Marina; Roth, Itamar; Rothberg, Joseph; Rousseau, David; Royon, Christophe; Rozanov, Alexandre; Rozen, Yoram; Ruan, Xifeng; Rubbo, Francesco; Rubinskiy, Igor; Rud, Viacheslav; Rudolph, Christian; Rudolph, Matthew Scott; Rühr, Frederik; Ruiz-Martinez, Aranzazu; Rumyantsev, Leonid; Rurikova, Zuzana; Rusakovich, Nikolai; Ruschke, Alexander; Rutherfoord, John; Ruthmann, Nils; Ruzicka, Pavel; Ryabov, Yury; Rybar, Martin; Rybkin, Grigori; Ryder, Nick; Saavedra, Aldo; Sacerdoti, Sabrina; Saddique, Asif; Sadeh, Iftach; Sadrozinski, Hartmut; Sadykov, Renat; Safai Tehrani, Francesco; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Sakurai, Yuki; Salamanna, Giuseppe; Salamon, Andrea; Saleem, Muhammad; Salek, David; Sales De Bruin, Pedro Henrique; Salihagic, Denis; Salnikov, Andrei; Salt, José; Salvachua Ferrando, Belén; Salvatore, Daniela; Salvatore, Pasquale Fabrizio; Salvucci, Antonio; Salzburger, Andreas; Sampsonidis, Dimitrios; Sanchez, Arturo; Sánchez, Javier; Sanchez Martinez, Victoria; Sandaker, Heidi; Sander, Heinz Georg; Sanders, Michiel; Sandhoff, Marisa; Sandoval, Tanya; Sandoval, Carlos; Sandstroem, Rikard; Sankey, Dave; Sansoni, Andrea; Santoni, Claudio; Santonico, Rinaldo; Santos, Helena; Santoyo Castillo, Itzebelt; Sapp, Kevin; Sapronov, Andrey; Saraiva, João; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, Edward; Sarrazin, Bjorn; Sartisohn, Georg; Sasaki, Osamu; Sasaki, Yuichi; Sasao, Noboru; Satsounkevitch, Igor; Sauvage, Gilles; Sauvan, Emmanuel; Sauvan, Jean-Baptiste; Savard, Pierre; Savinov, Vladimir; Savu, Dan Octavian; Sawyer, Craig; Sawyer, Lee; Saxon, David; Saxon, James; Sbarra, Carla; Sbrizzi, Antonio; Scanlon, Tim; Scannicchio, Diana; Scarcella, Mark; Schaarschmidt, Jana; Schacht, Peter; Schaefer, Douglas; Schaelicke, Andreas; Schaepe, Steffen; Schaetzel, Sebastian; Schäfer, Uli; Schaffer, Arthur; Schaile, Dorothee; Schamberger, R. Dean; Scharf, Veit; Schegelsky, Valery; Scheirich, Daniel; Schernau, Michael; Scherzer, Max; Schiavi, Carlo; Schieck, Jochen; Schillo, Christian; Schioppa, Marco; Schlenker, Stefan; Schmidt, Evelyn; Schmieden, Kristof; Schmitt, Christian; Schmitt, Christopher; Schmitt, Sebastian; Schneider, Basil; Schnellbach, Yan Jie; Schnoor, Ulrike; Schoeffel, Laurent; Schoening, Andre; Schoenrock, Bradley Daniel; Schorlemmer, Andre Lukas; Schott, Matthias; Schouten, Doug; Schovancova, Jaroslava; Schram, Malachi; Schramm, Steven; Schreyer, Manuel; Schroeder, Christian; Schroer, Nicolai; Schuh, Natascha; Schultens, Martin Johannes; Schultz-Coulon, Hans-Christian; Schulz, Holger; Schumacher, Markus; Schumm, Bruce; Schune, Philippe; Schwartzman, Ariel; Schwegler, Philipp; Schwemling, Philippe; Schwienhorst, Reinhard; Schwindling, Jerome; Schwindt, Thomas; Schwoerer, Maud; Sciacca, Gianfranco; Scifo, Estelle; Sciolla, Gabriella; Scott, Bill; Scutti, Federico; Searcy, Jacob; Sedov, George; Sedykh, Evgeny; Seidel, Sally; Seiden, Abraham; Seifert, Frank; Seixas, José; Sekhniaidze, Givi; Sekula, Stephen; Selbach, Karoline Elfriede; Seliverstov, Dmitry; Sellers, Graham; Seman, Michal; Semprini-Cesari, Nicola; Serfon, Cedric; Serin, Laurent; Serkin, Leonid; Serre, Thomas; Seuster, Rolf; Severini, Horst; Sforza, Federico; Sfyrla, Anna; Shabalina, Elizaveta; Shamim, Mansoora; Shan, Lianyou; Shank, James; Shao, Qi Tao; Shapiro, Marjorie; Shatalov, Pavel; Shaw, Kate; Sherwood, Peter; Shimizu, Shima; Shimojima, Makoto; Shin, Taeksu; Shiyakova, Mariya; Shmeleva, Alevtina; Shochet, Mel; Short, Daniel; Shrestha, Suyog; Shulga, Evgeny; Shupe, Michael; Shushkevich, Stanislav; Sicho, Petr; Sidorov, Dmitri; Sidoti, Antonio; Siegert, Frank; Sijacki, Djordje; Silbert, Ohad; Silva, José; Silver, Yiftah; Silverstein, Daniel; Silverstein, Samuel; Simak, Vladislav; Simard, Olivier; Simic, Ljiljana; Simion, Stefan; Simioni, Eduard; Simmons, Brinick; Simoniello, Rosa; Simonyan, Margar; Sinervo, Pekka; Sinev, Nikolai; Sipica, Valentin; Siragusa, Giovanni; Sircar, Anirvan; Sisakyan, Alexei; Sivoklokov, Serguei; Sjölin, Jörgen; Sjursen, Therese; Skinnari, Louise Anastasia; Skottowe, Hugh Philip; Skovpen, Kirill; Skubic, Patrick; Slater, Mark; Slavicek, Tomas; Sliwa, Krzysztof; Smakhtin, Vladimir; Smart, Ben; Smestad, Lillian; Smirnov, Sergei; Smirnov, Yury; Smirnova, Lidia; Smirnova, Oxana; Smith, Kenway; Smizanska, Maria; Smolek, Karel; Snesarev, Andrei; Snidero, Giacomo; Snow, Joel; Snyder, Scott; Sobie, Randall; Socher, Felix; Sodomka, Jaromir; Soffer, Abner; Soh, Dart-yin; Solans, Carlos; Solar, Michael; Solc, Jaroslav; Soldatov, Evgeny; Soldevila, Urmila; Solfaroli Camillocci, Elena; Solodkov, Alexander; Solovyanov, Oleg; Solovyev, Victor; Soni, Nitesh; Sood, Alexander; Sopko, Vit; Sopko, Bruno; Sosebee, Mark; Soualah, Rachik; Soueid, Paul; Soukharev, Andrey; South, David; Spagnolo, Stefania; Spanò, Francesco; Spearman, William Robert; Spighi, Roberto; Spigo, Giancarlo; Spousta, Martin; Spreitzer, Teresa; Spurlock, Barry; St Denis, Richard Dante; Stahlman, Jonathan; Stamen, Rainer; Stanecka, Ewa; Stanek, Robert; Stanescu, Cristian; Stanescu-Bellu, Madalina; Stanitzki, Marcel Michael; Stapnes, Steinar; Starchenko, Evgeny; Stark, Jan; Staroba, Pavel; Starovoitov, Pavel; Staszewski, Rafal; Stavina, Pavel; Steele, Genevieve; Steinbach, Peter; Steinberg, Peter; Stekl, Ivan; Stelzer, Bernd; Stelzer, Harald Joerg; Stelzer-Chilton, Oliver; Stenzel, Hasko; Stern, Sebastian; Stewart, Graeme; Stillings, Jan Andre; Stockton, Mark; Stoebe, Michael; Stoerig, Kathrin; Stoicea, Gabriel; Stonjek, Stefan; Stradling, Alden; Straessner, Arno; Strandberg, Jonas; Strandberg, Sara; Strandlie, Are; Strauss, Emanuel; Strauss, Michael; Strizenec, Pavol; Ströhmer, Raimund; Strom, David; Stroynowski, Ryszard; Stucci, Stefania Antonia; Stugu, Bjarne; Stumer, Iuliu; Stupak, John; Sturm, Philipp; Styles, Nicholas Adam; Su, Dong; Su, Jun; Subramania, Halasya Siva; Subramaniam, Rajivalochan; Succurro, Antonella; Sugaya, Yorihito; Suhr, Chad; Suk, Michal; Sulin, Vladimir; Sultansoy, Saleh; Sumida, Toshi; Sun, Xiaohu; Sundermann, Jan Erik; Suruliz, Kerim; Susinno, Giancarlo; Sutton, Mark; Suzuki, Yu; Svatos, Michal; Swedish, Stephen; Swiatlowski, Maximilian; Sykora, Ivan; Sykora, Tomas; Ta, Duc; Tackmann, Kerstin; Taenzer, Joe; Taffard, Anyes; Tafirout, Reda; Taiblum, Nimrod; Takahashi, Yuta; Takai, Helio; Takashima, Ryuichi; Takeda, Hiroshi; Takeshita, Tohru; Takubo, Yosuke; Talby, Mossadek; Talyshev, Alexey; Tam, Jason; Tamsett, Matthew; Tan, Kong Guan; Tanaka, Junichi; Tanaka, Reisaburo; Tanaka, Satoshi; Tanaka, Shuji; Tanasijczuk, Andres Jorge; Tani, Kazutoshi; Tannoury, Nancy; Tapprogge, Stefan; Tarem, Shlomit; Tarrade, Fabien; Tartarelli, Giuseppe Francesco; Tas, Petr; Tasevsky, Marek; Tashiro, Takuya; Tassi, Enrico; Tavares Delgado, Ademar; Tayalati, Yahya; Taylor, Christopher; Taylor, Frank; Taylor, Geoffrey; Taylor, Wendy; Teischinger, Florian Alfred; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, Matilde; Teixeira-Dias, Pedro; Temming, Kim Katrin; Ten Kate, Herman; Teng, Ping-Kun; Terada, Susumu; Terashi, Koji; Terron, Juan; Terzo, Stefano; Testa, Marianna; Teuscher, Richard; Therhaag, Jan; Theveneaux-Pelzer, Timothée; Thoma, Sascha; Thomas, Juergen; Thompson, Emily; Thompson, Paul; Thompson, Peter; Thompson, Stan; Thomsen, Lotte Ansgaard; Thomson, Evelyn; Thomson, Mark; Thong, Wai Meng; Thun, Rudolf; Tian, Feng; Tibbetts, Mark James; Tic, Tomáš; Tikhomirov, Vladimir; Tikhonov, Yury; Timoshenko, Sergey; Tiouchichine, Elodie; Tipton, Paul; Tisserant, Sylvain; Todorov, Theodore; Todorova-Nova, Sharka; Toggerson, Brokk; Tojo, Junji; Tokár, Stanislav; Tokushuku, Katsuo; Tollefson, Kirsten; Tomlinson, Lee; Tomoto, Makoto; Tompkins, Lauren; Toms, Konstantin; Topilin, Nikolai; Torrence, Eric; Torres, Heberth; Torró Pastor, Emma; Toth, Jozsef; Touchard, Francois; Tovey, Daniel; Tran, Huong Lan; Trefzger, Thomas; Tremblet, Louis; Tricoli, Alessandro; Trigger, Isabel Marian; Trincaz-Duvoid, Sophie; Tripiana, Martin; Triplett, Nathan; Trischuk, William; Trocmé, Benjamin; Troncon, Clara; Trottier-McDonald, Michel; Trovatelli, Monica; True, Patrick; Trzebinski, Maciej; Trzupek, Adam; Tsarouchas, Charilaos; Tseng, Jeffrey; Tsiareshka, Pavel; Tsionou, Dimitra; Tsipolitis, Georgios; Tsirintanis, Nikolaos; Tsiskaridze, Shota; Tsiskaridze, Vakhtang; Tskhadadze, Edisher; Tsukerman, Ilya; Tsulaia, Vakhtang; Tsung, Jieh-Wen; Tsuno, Soshi; Tsybychev, Dmitri; Tua, Alan; Tudorache, Alexandra; Tudorache, Valentina; Tuna, Alexander Naip; Tupputi, Salvatore; Turchikhin, Semen; Turecek, Daniel; Turk Cakir, Ilkay; Turra, Ruggero; Tuts, Michael; Tykhonov, Andrii; Tylmad, Maja; Tyndel, Mike; Uchida, Kirika; Ueda, Ikuo; Ueno, Ryuichi; Ughetto, Michael; Ugland, Maren; Uhlenbrock, Mathias; Ukegawa, Fumihiko; Unal, Guillaume; Undrus, Alexander; Unel, Gokhan; Ungaro, Francesca; Unno, Yoshinobu; Urbaniec, Dustin; Urquijo, Phillip; Usai, Giulio; Usanova, Anna; Vacavant, Laurent; Vacek, Vaclav; Vachon, Brigitte; Valencic, Nika; Valentinetti, Sara; Valero, Alberto; Valery, Loic; Valkar, Stefan; Valladolid Gallego, Eva; Vallecorsa, Sofia; Valls Ferrer, Juan Antonio; Van Berg, Richard; Van Der Deijl, Pieter; van der Geer, Rogier; van der Graaf, Harry; Van Der Leeuw, Robin; van der Ster, Daniel; van Eldik, Niels; van Gemmeren, Peter; Van Nieuwkoop, Jacobus; van Vulpen, Ivo; van Woerden, Marius Cornelis; Vanadia, Marco; Vandelli, Wainer; Vaniachine, Alexandre; Vankov, Peter; Vannucci, Francois; Vardanyan, Gagik; Vari, Riccardo; Varnes, Erich; Varol, Tulin; Varouchas, Dimitris; Vartapetian, Armen; Varvell, Kevin; Vassilakopoulos, Vassilios; Vazeille, Francois; Vazquez Schroeder, Tamara; Veatch, Jason; Veloso, Filipe; Veneziano, Stefano; Ventura, Andrea; Ventura, Daniel; Venturi, Manuela; Venturi, Nicola; Venturini, Alessio; Vercesi, Valerio; Verducci, Monica; Verkerke, Wouter; Vermeulen, Jos; Vest, Anja; Vetterli, Michel; Viazlo, Oleksandr; Vichou, Irene; Vickey, Trevor; Vickey Boeriu, Oana Elena; Viehhauser, Georg; Viel, Simon; Vigne, Ralph; Villa, Mauro; Villaplana Perez, Miguel; Vilucchi, Elisabetta; Vincter, Manuella; Vinogradov, Vladimir; Virzi, Joseph; Vitells, Ofer; Viti, Michele; Vivarelli, Iacopo; Vives Vaque, Francesc; Vlachos, Sotirios; Vladoiu, Dan; Vlasak, Michal; Vogel, Adrian; Vokac, Petr; Volpi, Guido; Volpi, Matteo; Volpini, Giovanni; von der Schmitt, Hans; von Radziewski, Holger; von Toerne, Eckhard; Vorobel, Vit; Vos, Marcel; Voss, Rudiger; Vossebeld, Joost; Vranjes, Nenad; Vranjes Milosavljevic, Marija; Vrba, Vaclav; Vreeswijk, Marcel; Vu Anh, Tuan; Vuillermet, Raphael; Vukotic, Ilija; Vykydal, Zdenek; Wagner, Wolfgang; Wagner, Peter; Wahrmund, Sebastian; Wakabayashi, Jun; Walch, Shannon; Walder, James; Walker, Rodney; Walkowiak, Wolfgang; Wall, Richard; Waller, Peter; Walsh, Brian; Wang, Chiho; Wang, Haichen; Wang, Hulin; Wang, Jike; Wang, Jin; Wang, Kuhan; Wang, Rui; Wang, Song-Ming; Wang, Tan; Wang, Xiaoxiao; Warburton, Andreas; Ward, Patricia; Wardrope, David Robert; Warsinsky, Markus; Washbrook, Andrew; Wasicki, Christoph; Watanabe, Ippei; Watkins, Peter; Watson, Alan; Watson, Ian; Watson, Miriam; Watts, Gordon; Watts, Stephen; Waugh, Anthony; Waugh, Ben; Webb, Samuel; Weber, Michele; Weber, Stefan Wolf; Webster, Jordan S; Weidberg, Anthony; Weigell, Philipp; Weingarten, Jens; Weiser, Christian; Weits, Hartger; Wells, Phillippa; Wenaus, Torre; Wendland, Dennis; Weng, Zhili; Wengler, Thorsten; Wenig, Siegfried; Wermes, Norbert; Werner, Matthias; Werner, Per; Wessels, Martin; Wetter, Jeffrey; Whalen, Kathleen; White, Andrew; White, Martin; White, Ryan; White, Sebastian; Whiteson, Daniel; Whittington, Denver; Wicke, Daniel; Wickens, Fred; Wiedenmann, Werner; Wielers, Monika; Wienemann, Peter; Wiglesworth, Craig; Wiik-Fuchs, Liv Antje Mari; Wijeratne, Peter Alexander; Wildauer, Andreas; Wildt, Martin Andre; Wilkens, Henric George; Will, Jonas Zacharias; Williams, Hugh; Williams, Sarah; Willis, William; Willocq, Stephane; Wilson, John; Wilson, Alan; Wingerter-Seez, Isabelle; Winkelmann, Stefan; Winklmeier, Frank; Wittgen, Matthias; Wittig, Tobias; Wittkowski, Josephine; Wollstadt, Simon Jakob; Wolter, Marcin Wladyslaw; Wolters, Helmut; Wong, Wei-Cheng; Wosiek, Barbara; Wotschack, Jorg; Woudstra, Martin; Wozniak, Krzysztof; Wraight, Kenneth; Wright, Michael; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, Xin; Wu, Yusheng; Wulf, Evan; Wyatt, Terry Richard; Wynne, Benjamin; Xella, Stefania; Xiao, Meng; Xu, Chao; Xu, Da; Xu, Lailin; Yabsley, Bruce; Yacoob, Sahal; Yamada, Miho; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Yamaguchi, Yohei; Yamamoto, Akira; Yamamoto, Kyoko; Yamamoto, Shimpei; Yamamura, Taiki; Yamanaka, Takashi; Yamauchi, Katsuya; Yamazaki, Yuji; Yan, Zhen; Yang, Haijun; Yang, Hongtao; Yang, Un-Ki; Yang, Yi; Yanush, Serguei; Yao, Liwen; Yasu, Yoshiji; Yatsenko, Elena; Yau Wong, Kaven Henry; Ye, Jingbo; Ye, Shuwei; Yen, Andy L; Yildirim, Eda; Yilmaz, Metin; Yoosoofmiya, Reza; Yorita, Kohei; Yoshida, Rikutaro; Yoshihara, Keisuke; Young, Charles; Young, Christopher John; Youssef, Saul; Yu, David Ren-Hwa; Yu, Jaehoon; Yu, Jie; Yuan, Li; Yurkewicz, Adam; Zabinski, Bartlomiej; Zaidan, Remi; Zaitsev, Alexander; Zaman, Aungshuman; Zambito, Stefano; Zanello, Lucia; Zanzi, Daniele; Zaytsev, Alexander; Zeitnitz, Christian; Zeman, Martin; Zemla, Andrzej; Zengel, Keith; Zenin, Oleg; Ženiš, Tibor; Zerwas, Dirk; Zevi della Porta, Giovanni; Zhang, Dongliang; Zhang, Huaqiao; Zhang, Jinlong; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Xueyao; Zhang, Zhiqing; Zhao, Zhengguo; Zhemchugov, Alexey; Zhong, Jiahang; Zhou, Bing; Zhou, Lei; Zhou, Ning; Zhu, Cheng Guang; Zhu, Hongbo; Zhu, Junjie; Zhu, Yingchun; Zhuang, Xuai; Zibell, Andre; Zieminska, Daria; Zimin, Nikolai; Zimmermann, Christoph; Zimmermann, Robert; Zimmermann, Simone; Zimmermann, Stephanie; Zinonos, Zinonas; Ziolkowski, Michael; Zitoun, Robert; Živković, Lidija; Zobernig, Georg; Zoccoli, Antonio; zur Nedden, Martin; Zurzolo, Giovanni; Zutshi, Vishnu; Zwalinski, Lukasz

    2014-02-04

    A dedicated reconstruction algorithm to find decay vertices in the ATLAS muon spectrometer is presented. The algorithm searches the region just upstream of or inside the muon spectrometer volume for multi-particle vertices that originate from the decay of particles with long decay paths. The performance of the algorithm is evaluated using both a sample of simulated Higgs boson events, in which the Higgs boson decays to long-lived neutral particles that in turn decay to b bbar final states, and pp collision data at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV collected with the ATLAS detector at the LHC during 2011.

  15. ATLAS RPC Quality Assurance results at INFN Lecce

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00211509; Borjanovic, I.; Cataldi, G.; Cazzato, A.; Chiodini, G.; Coluccia, M. R.; Creti, P.; Gorini, E.; Grancagnolo, F.; Perrino, R.; Primavera, M.; Spagnolo, S.; Tassielli, G.; Ventura, A.

    2006-01-01

    The main results of the quality assurance tests performed on the Resistive Plate Chamber used by the ATLAS experiment at LHC as muon trigger chambers are reported and discussed. Since July 2004, about 270 RPC units has been certified at INFN Lecce site and delivered to CERN, for being integrated in the final muon station of the ATLAS barrel region. We show the key RPC characteristics which qualify the performance of this detector technology as muon trigger chamber in the harsh LHC enviroments. These are dark current, chamber efficiency, noise rate, gas volume tomography, and gas leakage.

  16. ATLAS Event - First Splash of Particles in ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Outreach

    2008-01-01

    A simulated event. September 10, 2008 - The ATLAS detector lit up as a flood of particles traversed the detector when the beam was occasionally directed at a target near ATLAS. This allowed ATLAS physicists to study how well the various components of the detector were functioning in preparation for the forthcoming collisions. The first ATLAS data recorded on September 10, 2008 is seen here. Running time 24 seconds

  17. The ATLAS ROBIN. A high-performance data-acquisition module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kugel, Andreas

    2009-08-19

    This work presents the re-configurable processor ROBIN, which is a key element of the data-acquisition-system of the ATLAS experiment, located at the new LHC at CERN. The ATLAS detector provides data over 1600 channels simultaneously towards the DAQ system. The ATLAS dataflow model follows the ''PULL'' strategy in contrast to the commonly used ''PUSH'' strategy. The data volume transported is reduced by a factor of 10, however the data must be temporarily stored at the entry to the DAQ system. The input layer consists of approx. 160 ROS read-out units comprising 1 PC and 4 ROBIN modules. Each ROBIN device acquires detector data via 3 input channels and performs local buffering. Board control is done via a 64-bit PCI interface. Event selection and data transmission runs via PCI in the baseline bus-based ROS. Alternatively, a local GE interface can take over part or all of the data traffic in the switch-based ROS, in order to reduce the load on the host PC. The performance of the ROBIN module stems from the close cooperation of a fast embedded processor with a complex FPGA. The efficient task-distribution lets the processor handle all complex management functionality, programmed in ''C'' while all movement of data is performed by the FPGA via multiple, concurrently operating DMA engines. The ROBIN-project was carried-out by and international team and comprises the design specification, the development of the ROBIN hardware, firmware (VHDL and C-Code), host-code (C++), prototyping, volume production and installation of 700 boards. The project was led by the author of this thesis. The hardware platform is an evolution of a FPGA processor previously designed by the author. He has contributed elementary concepts of the communication mechanisms and the ''C''-coded embedded application software. He also organised and supervised the prototype and series productions including the various design

  18. Department of Energy Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs Draft Environmental Impact Statement. Volume 1, Appendix C, Savannah River Site Spent Nuclear Fuel Mangement Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-06-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is engaged in two related decision making processes concerning: (1) the transportation, receipt, processing, and storage of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) at the DOE Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) which will focus on the next 10 years; and (2) programmatic decisions on future spent nuclear fuel management which will emphasize the next 40 years. DOE is analyzing the environmental consequences of these spent nuclear fuel management actions in this two-volume Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). Volume 1 supports broad programmatic decisions that will have applicability across the DOE complex and describes in detail the purpose and need for this DOE action. Volume 2 is specific to actions at the INEL. This document, which limits its discussion to the Savannah River Site (SRS) spent nuclear fuel management program, supports Volume 1 of the EIS. Following the introduction, Chapter 2 contains background information related to the SRS and the framework of environmental regulations pertinent to spent nuclear fuel management. Chapter 3 identifies spent nuclear fuel management alternatives that DOE could implement at the SRS, and summarizes their potential environmental consequences. Chapter 4 describes the existing environmental resources of the SRS that spent nuclear fuel activities could affect. Chapter 5 analyzes in detail the environmental consequences of each spent nuclear fuel management alternative and describes cumulative impacts. The chapter also contains information on unavoidable adverse impacts, commitment of resources, short-term use of the environment and mitigation measures.

  19. Liquid rocket combustion computer model with distributed energy release. DER computer program documentation and user's guide, volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combs, L. P.

    1974-01-01

    A computer program for analyzing rocket engine performance was developed. The program is concerned with the formation, distribution, flow, and combustion of liquid sprays and combustion product gases in conventional rocket combustion chambers. The capabilities of the program to determine the combustion characteristics of the rocket engine are described. Sample data code sheets show the correct sequence and formats for variable values and include notes concerning options to bypass the input of certain data. A seperate list defines the variables and indicates their required dimensions.

  20. Summer Research Program - 1997 Summer Faculty Research Program Volume 6 Arnold Engineering Development Center United States Air Force Academy Air Logistics Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-12-01

    Fracture Analysis of the F-5, 15%-Spar Bolt DR Devendra Kumar SAALC/LD 6- 16 CUNY-City College, New York, NY A Simple, Multiversion Concurrency Control...Program, University of Dayton, Dayton, OH. [3]AFGROW, Air Force Crack Propagation Analysis Program, Version 3.82 (1997) 15-8 A SIMPLE, MULTIVERSION ...Office of Scientific Research Boiling Air Force Base, DC and San Antonio Air Logistic Center August 1997 16-1 A SIMPLE, MULTIVERSION CONCURRENCY