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  1. Argonne Research Library | Argonne National Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argonne Argonne Research Library The Argonne Research Library supports the scientific and technical research needs of Argonne National Laboratory employees. Our library catalog is available via the Research questions or concerns, please contact us at librarians@anl.gov. Contact the Library Argonne Research Library

  2. Flow Induced Vibration Program at Argonne National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory has had a Flow Induced Vibration Program since 1967; the Program currently resides in the Laboratory's Components Technology Division. Throughout its existence, the overall objective of the program has been to develop and apply new and/or improved methods of analysis and testing for the design evaluation of nuclear reactor plant components and heat exchange equipment from the standpoint of flow induced vibration. Historically, the majority of the program activities have been funded by the US Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA), and Department of Energy (DOE). Current DOE funding is from the Breeder Mechanical Component Development Division, Office of Breeder Technology Projects; Energy Conversion and Utilization Technology (ECUT) Program, Office of Energy Systems Research; and Division of Engineering, Mathematical and Geosciences, Office of Basic Energy Sciences. Testing of Clinch River Breeder Reactor upper plenum components has been funded by the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP) Project Office. Work has also been performed under contract with Foster Wheeler, General Electric, Duke Power Company, US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and Westinghouse

  3. Flow Induced Vibration Program at Argonne National Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    The Argonne National Laboratory's Flow Induced Vibration Program, currently residing in the Laboratory's Components Technology Division is discussed. Throughout its existence, the overall objective of the program was to develop and apply new and/or improved methods of analysis and testing for the design evaluation of nuclear reactor plant components and heat exchange equipment from the standpoint of flow induced vibration. Historically, the majority of the program activities were funded by the US Atomic Energy Commission, the Energy Research and Development Administration, and the Department of Energy. Current DOE funding is from the Breeder Mechanical Component Development Division, Office of Breeder Technology Projects; Energy Conversion and Utilization Technology Program, Office of Energy Systems Research; and Division of Engineering, Mathematical and Geosciences, office of Basic Energy Sciences. Testing of Clinch River Breeder Reactor upper plenum components was funded by the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant Project Office. Work was also performed under contract with Foster Wheeler, General Electric, Duke Power Company, US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and Westinghouse.

  4. Science | Argonne National Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Security Photon Sciences Physical Sciences & Engineering Energy Frontier Research Centers Scientific Publications Researchers Postdocs Exascale Computing Institute for Molecular Engineering at Argonne Work with Us About Safety News Careers Education Community Diversity Directory Argonne National Laboratory

  5. Environment | Argonne National Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content Argonne National Laboratory Toggle Navigation Toggle Search Energy Environment Laboratory About Safety News Careers Education Community Diversity Directory Energy Environment National Security User Facilities Science Work with Us Environment Atmospheric and Climate Science Ecological

  6. Energy | Argonne National Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content Argonne National Laboratory Toggle Navigation Toggle Search Energy Batteries and Energy Storage Energy Systems Modeling Materials for Energy Nuclear Energy Renewable Energy Smart Laboratory About Safety News Careers Education Community Diversity Directory Energy Environment National

  7. Careers | Argonne National Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    community. Learn More » Life at Argonne Our diverse community values work-life balance. Find your niche ; enjoy life at work! Learn More » Back to top Twitter Flickr Facebook Linked In YouTube Pinterest Google National Security User Facilities Science Work with Us About Safety News Careers Apply for a Job External

  8. Argonne National Laboratory annual report of Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program Activities FY 2009.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Office of the Director

    2010-04-09

    I am pleased to submit Argonne National Laboratory's Annual Report on its Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) activities for fiscal year 2009. Fiscal year 2009 saw a heightened focus by DOE and the nation on the need to develop new sources of energy. Argonne scientists are investigating many different sources of energy, including nuclear, solar, and biofuels, as well as ways to store, use, and transmit energy more safely, cleanly, and efficiently. DOE selected Argonne as the site for two new Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) - the Institute for Atom-Efficient Chemical Transformations and the Center for Electrical Energy Storage - and funded two other EFRCs to which Argonne is a major partner. The award of at least two of the EFRCs can be directly linked to early LDRD-funded efforts. LDRD has historically seeded important programs and facilities at the lab. Two of these facilities, the Advanced Photon Source and the Center for Nanoscale Materials, are now vital contributors to today's LDRD Program. New and enhanced capabilities, many of which relied on LDRD in their early stages, now help the laboratory pursue its evolving strategic goals. LDRD has, since its inception, been an invaluable resource for positioning the Laboratory to anticipate, and thus be prepared to contribute to, the future science and technology needs of DOE and the nation. During times of change, LDRD becomes all the more vital for facilitating the necessary adjustments while maintaining and enhancing the capabilities of our staff and facilities. Although I am new to the role of Laboratory Director, my immediate prior service as Deputy Laboratory Director for Programs afforded me continuous involvement in the LDRD program and its management. Therefore, I can attest that Argonne's program adhered closely to the requirements of DOE Order 413.2b and associated guidelines governing LDRD. Our LDRD program management continually strives to be more efficient. In

  9. Argonne National Laboratory annual report of Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program Activities FY 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    I am pleased to submit Argonne National Laboratory's Annual Report on its Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) activities for fiscal year 2009. Fiscal year 2009 saw a heightened focus by DOE and the nation on the need to develop new sources of energy. Argonne scientists are investigating many different sources of energy, including nuclear, solar, and biofuels, as well as ways to store, use, and transmit energy more safely, cleanly, and efficiently. DOE selected Argonne as the site for two new Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) - the Institute for Atom-Efficient Chemical Transformations and the Center for Electrical Energy Storage - and funded two other EFRCs to which Argonne is a major partner. The award of at least two of the EFRCs can be directly linked to early LDRD-funded efforts. LDRD has historically seeded important programs and facilities at the lab. Two of these facilities, the Advanced Photon Source and the Center for Nanoscale Materials, are now vital contributors to today's LDRD Program. New and enhanced capabilities, many of which relied on LDRD in their early stages, now help the laboratory pursue its evolving strategic goals. LDRD has, since its inception, been an invaluable resource for positioning the Laboratory to anticipate, and thus be prepared to contribute to, the future science and technology needs of DOE and the nation. During times of change, LDRD becomes all the more vital for facilitating the necessary adjustments while maintaining and enhancing the capabilities of our staff and facilities. Although I am new to the role of Laboratory Director, my immediate prior service as Deputy Laboratory Director for Programs afforded me continuous involvement in the LDRD program and its management. Therefore, I can attest that Argonne's program adhered closely to the requirements of DOE Order 413.2b and associated guidelines governing LDRD. Our LDRD program management continually strives to be more efficient. In addition to

  10. GCFR Fuels and Materials Program at Argonne National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neimark, L.A.; Greenberg, S.; Johnson, C.E.; Purohit, A.; Liu, Y.Y.; Rest, J.; Reimann, K.J.; McLennan, G.A.

    1979-01-01

    The F-5 fuel-pin irradiation experiment in EBR-II is a cornerstone of the GCFR program. It is the largest-scale fuel-pin experiment in the present program and will provide data on the performance of pins and a pin-support structure that are prototypic of the GCFR Demonstration Plant. The fuel pins are presently undergoing interim examination after successfully achieving 4.6 at.% burnup. Studies of the thermodynamics and kinetics of the U--Cs--O system, supplemented by analysis of the results of previously irradiated fuel pins, have led to the incorporation of fuel-design modifications in the F-5 experiment to insure adequate performance of the vented fuel. The effect of ribbing, as well as the ribbing process, on the short- and long-term structural performance of fuel-pin cladding is being evaluated via in-reactor and out-of-reactor tests and with the fuel-element modeling code LIFE-GCFR and the finite element program, ADINA

  11. Argonne National Laboratory Annual Report of Laboratory Directed Research and Development program activities FY 2011.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    (Office of The Director)

    2012-04-25

    As a national laboratory Argonne concentrates on scientific and technological challenges that can only be addressed through a sustained, interdisciplinary focus at a national scale. Argonne's eight major initiatives, as enumerated in its strategic plan, are Hard X-ray Sciences, Leadership Computing, Materials and Molecular Design and Discovery, Energy Storage, Alternative Energy and Efficiency, Nuclear Energy, Biological and Environmental Systems, and National Security. The purposes of Argonne's Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program are to encourage the development of novel technical concepts, enhance the Laboratory's research and development (R and D) capabilities, and pursue its strategic goals. projects are selected from proposals for creative and innovative R and D studies that require advance exploration before they are considered to be sufficiently developed to obtain support through normal programmatic channels. Among the aims of the projects supported by the LDRD Program are the following: establishment of engineering proof of principle, assessment of design feasibility for prospective facilities, development of instrumentation or computational methods or systems, and discoveries in fundamental science and exploratory development.

  12. Argonne National Laboratory Annual Report of Laboratory Directed Research and Development program activities FY 2010.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    (Office of The Director)

    2012-04-25

    As a national laboratory Argonne concentrates on scientific and technological challenges that can only be addressed through a sustained, interdisciplinary focus at a national scale. Argonne's eight major initiatives, as enumerated in its strategic plan, are Hard X-ray Sciences, Leadership Computing, Materials and Molecular Design and Discovery, Energy Storage, Alternative Energy and Efficiency, Nuclear Energy, Biological and Environmental Systems, and National Security. The purposes of Argonne's Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program are to encourage the development of novel technical concepts, enhance the Laboratory's research and development (R and D) capabilities, and pursue its strategic goals. projects are selected from proposals for creative and innovative R and D studies that require advance exploration before they are considered to be sufficiently developed to obtain support through normal programmatic channels. Among the aims of the projects supported by the LDRD Program are the following: establishment of engineering proof of principle, assessment of design feasibility for prospective facilities, development of instrumentation or computational methods or systems, and discoveries in fundamental science and exploratory development.

  13. Welcome to the home page of the Decontamination and Decommissioning Program at Argonne National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    This report presents the details of the Argonne National Laboratory Home Page. Topics discussed include decontamination and decommissioning of the following: hot cells; remedial action; Experimental Boiling Water Reactor; glove boxes; the Chicago Pile No. 5 Research Reactor Facility; the Janus Reactor; Building 310 Retention Tanks; Zero Power Reactors 6 and 9; Argonne Thermal Source Reactor; cyclotron facility; and Juggernaut reactor

  14. Batteries and Energy Storage | Argonne National Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content Argonne National Laboratory Toggle Navigation Toggle Search Energy Batteries Security User Facilities Science Work with Us Energy Batteries and Energy Storage Energy Systems Modeling Transportation SPOTLIGHT Batteries and Energy Storage Argonne's all- encompassing battery research program spans

  15. Physics Division Argonne National Laboratory description of the programs and facilities.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thayer, K.J. [ed.

    1999-05-24

    The ANL Physics Division traces its roots to nuclear physics research at the University of Chicago around the time of the second world war. Following the move from the University of Chicago out to the present Argonne site and the formation of Argonne National Laboratory: the Physics Division has had a tradition of research into fundamental aspects of nuclear and atomic physics. Initially, the emphasis was on areas such as neutron physics, mass spectrometry, and theoretical studies of the nuclear shell model. Maria Goeppert Maier was an employee in the Physics Division during the time she did her Nobel-Prize-winning work on the nuclear shell model. These interests diversified and at the present time the research addresses a wide range of current problems in nuclear and atomic physics. The major emphasis of the current experimental nuclear physics research is in heavy-ion physics, centered around the ATLAS facility (Argonne Tandem-Linac Accelerator System) with its new injector providing intense, energetic ion beams over the fill mass range up to uranium. ATLAS is a designated National User Facility and is based on superconducting radio-frequency technology developed in the Physics Division. A small program continues in accelerator development. In addition, the Division has a strong program in medium-energy nuclear physics carried out at a variety of major national and international facilities. The nuclear theory research in the Division spans a wide range of interests including nuclear dynamics with subnucleonic degrees of freedom, dynamics of many-nucleon systems, nuclear structure, and heavy-ion interactions. This research makes contact with experimental research programs in intermediate-energy and heavy-ion physics, both within the Division and on the national and international scale. The Physics Division traditionally has strong connections with the nation's universities. We have many visiting faculty members and we encourage students to participate in our

  16. News | Argonne National Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    to give second life to EV batteries Yemen News National Lab Licensing Hydrogen Refueling Method Could Computing Center Centers, Institutes, and Programs RISCRisk and Infrastructure Science Center Other

  17. Argonne National Laboratory: Laboratory Directed Research and Development FY 1993 program activities. Annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1993-12-23

    The purposes of Argonne`s Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program are to encourage the development of novel concepts, enhance the Laboratory`s R&D capabilities, and further the development of its strategic initiatives. Projects are selected from proposals for creative and innovative R&D studies which are not yet eligible for timely support through normal programmatic channels. Among the aims of the projects supported by the Program are establishment of engineering ``proof-of-principle`` assessment of design feasibility for prospective facilities; development of an instrumental prototype, method, or system; or discovery in fundamental science. Several of these projects are closely associated with major strategic thrusts of the Laboratory as described in Argonne`s Five Year Institutional Plan, although the scientific implications of the achieved results extend well beyond Laboratory plans and objectives. The projects supported by the Program are distributed across the major programmatic areas at Argonne as indicated in the Laboratory LDRD Plan for FY 1993.

  18. Computerization aspects of the Health Physics' Radiation Control Program at Argonne National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolecek, Elwyn H.

    1978-01-01

    Greater public awareness of the potential hazards of ionizing radiation and the more stringent governmental compliance programs have made accountability of radioactive materials an item of increasingly major concern for all radionuclide users. For low-volume (radioisotopically) organizations, manual record keeping techniques may suffice without requiring significant work-hour allocations. When considering high-volume users, the workload contingent with manual inventory is usually excessive from an employee time-allocation standpoint. Therefore, various automation systems are employed, usually with the aid of an in-house or time-purchase computer system. The computer programs developed for these systems often do not allow for future modification without major rewriting. Therefore, to facilitate in program concept, modification, and implementation the Health Physics Section at Argonne National Laboratory chose to design and code its computer program(s) and has instituted a Radiation Administrative Program (RAP) as a major component of the Section's laboratory-wide radiation control program. Coded in ANSI PL/I, RAP provides both flexibility in present concept and allowance for future growth. It requires less than 300K words of computer memory and can be easily incorporated at other organizations with minimal modifications. The modular design provides run cost benefits and versatility of report generation and modification. Through the use of this type of information processing and retrieval system, one can manipulate large amounts of radionuclide data, providing control and identification, while still maintaining commitment of computer costs and employee time at a reasonable level. (author)

  19. Fire protection program evaluation of Argonne National Laboratory, West for the Department of Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    A fire protection engineering survey was conducted of the Argonne National Laboratory, West Facility, near Idaho Falls, Idaho. This facility includes EBR-II, TREAT, ZPPR, and HFEF. The facility meets the improved risk criteria as set forth in DOE Order 5480.1, Chapter VII. Some recommendations are given

  20. Push technology at Argonne National Laboratory.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noel, R. E.; Woell, Y. N.

    1999-04-06

    Selective dissemination of information (SDI) services, also referred to as current awareness searches, are usually provided by periodically running computer programs (personal profiles) against a cumulative database or databases. This concept of pushing relevant content to users has long been integral to librarianship. Librarians traditionally turned to information companies to implement these searches for their users in business, academia, and the science community. This paper describes how a push technology was implemented on a large scale for scientists and engineers at Argonne National Laboratory, explains some of the challenges to designers/maintainers, and identifies the positive effects that SDI seems to be having on users. Argonne purchases the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI) Current Contents data (all subject areas except Humanities), and scientists no longer need to turn to outside companies for reliable SDI service. Argonne's database and its customized services are known as ACCESS (Argonne-University of Chicago Current Contents Electronic Search Service).

  1. Development and pilot demonstration program of a waste minimization plan at Argonne National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, R.W.; Wentz, C.A.; Thuot, J.R.

    1991-01-01

    In response to US Department of Energy directives, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has developed a waste minimization plan aimed at reducing the amount of wastes at this national research and development laboratory. Activities at ANL are primarily research- oriented and as such affect the amount and type of source reduction that can be achieved at this facility. The objective of ANL's waste minimization program is to cost-effectively reduce all types of wastes, including hazardous, mixed, radioactive, and nonhazardous wastes. The ANL Waste Minimization Plan uses a waste minimization audit as a systematic procedure to determine opportunities to reduce or eliminate waste. To facilitate these audits, a computerized bar-coding procedure is being implemented at ANL to track hazardous wastes from where they are generated to their ultimate disposal. This paper describes the development of the ANL Waste Minimization Plan and a pilot demonstration of the how the ANL Plan audited the hazardous waste generated within a selected divisions of ANL. It includes quantitative data on the generation and disposal of hazardous waste at ANL and describes potential ways to minimize hazardous wastes. 2 refs., 5 figs., 8 tabs

  2. Argonne National Laboratory Annual Report of Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program Activities for FY 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1995-02-25

    The purposes of Argonne's Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program are to encourage the development of novel concepts, enhance the Laboratory's R and D capabilities, and further the development of its strategic initiatives. Projects are selected from proposals for creative and innovative R and D studies which are not yet eligible for timely support through normal programmatic channels. Among the aims of the projects supported by the Program are establishment of engineering proof-of-principle; assessment of design feasibility for prospective facilities; development of an instrumental prototype, method, or system; or discovery in fundamental science. Several of these projects are closely associated with major strategic thrusts of the Laboratory as described in Argonne's Five-Year Institutional Plan, although the scientific implications of the achieved results extend well beyond Laboratory plans and objectives. The projects supported by the Program are distributed across the major programmatic areas at Argonne as indicated in the Laboratory's LDRD Plan for FY 1994. Project summaries of research in the following areas are included: (1) Advanced Accelerator and Detector Technology; (2) X-ray Techniques for Research in Biological and Physical Science; (3) Nuclear Technology; (4) Materials Science and Technology; (5) Computational Science and Technology; (6) Biological Sciences; (7) Environmental Sciences: (8) Environmental Control and Waste Management Technology; and (9) Novel Concepts in Other Areas.

  3. Chemical research at Argonne National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-04-01

    Argonne National Laboratory is a research and development laboratory located 25 miles southwest of Chicago, Illinois. It has more than 200 programs in basic and applied sciences and an Industrial Technology Development Center to help move its technologies to the industrial sector. At Argonne, basic energy research is supported by applied research in diverse areas such as biology and biomedicine, energy conservation, fossil and nuclear fuels, environmental science, and parallel computer architectures. These capabilities translate into technological expertise in energy production and use, advanced materials and manufacturing processes, and waste minimization and environmental remediation, which can be shared with the industrial sector. The Laboratory`s technologies can be applied to help companies design products, substitute materials, devise innovative industrial processes, develop advanced quality control systems and instrumentation, and address environmental concerns. The latest techniques and facilities, including those involving modeling, simulation, and high-performance computing, are available to industry and academia. At Argonne, there are opportunities for industry to carry out cooperative research, license inventions, exchange technical personnel, use unique research facilities, and attend conferences and workshops. Technology transfer is one of the Laboratory`s major missions. High priority is given to strengthening U.S. technological competitiveness through research and development partnerships with industry that capitalize on Argonne`s expertise and facilities. The Laboratory is one of three DOE superconductivity technology centers, focusing on manufacturing technology for high-temperature superconducting wires, motors, bearings, and connecting leads. Argonne National Laboratory is operated by the University of Chicago for the U.S. Department of Energy.

  4. Argonne National Laboratory 1985 publications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kopta, J.A. (ED.); Hale, M.R. (comp.)

    1987-08-01

    This report is a bibliography of scientific and technical 1985 publications of Argonne National Laboratory. Some are ANL contributions to outside organizations' reports published in 1985. This compilation, prepared by the Technical Information Services Technical Publications Section (TPB), lists all nonrestricted 1985 publications submitted to TPS by Laboratory's Divisions. The report is divided into seven parts: Journal Articles - Listed by first author, ANL Reports - Listed by report number, ANL and non-ANL Unnumbered Reports - Listed by report number, Non-ANL Numbered Reports - Listed by report number, Books and Book Chapters - Listed by first author, Conference Papers - Listed by first author, Complete Author Index.

  5. Argonne National Laboratory 1985 publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopta, J.A.; Hale, M.R.

    1987-08-01

    This report is a bibliography of scientific and technical 1985 publications of Argonne National Laboratory. Some are ANL contributions to outside organizations' reports published in 1985. This compilation, prepared by the Technical Information Services Technical Publications Section (TPB), lists all nonrestricted 1985 publications submitted to TPS by Laboratory's Divisions. The report is divided into seven parts: Journal Articles - Listed by first author, ANL Reports - Listed by report number, ANL and non-ANL Unnumbered Reports - Listed by report number, Non-ANL Numbered Reports - Listed by report number, Books and Book Chapters - Listed by first author, Conference Papers - Listed by first author, Complete Author Index

  6. Environmental monitoring at Argonne National Laboratory. Annual report for 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golchert, N.W.; Duffy, T.L.; Sedlet, J.

    1979-03-01

    The results of the environmental monitoring program at Argonne National Laboratory for 1978 are presented and discussed. To evaluate the effect of Argonne operations on the environment, measurements were made for a variety of radionuclides in air, surface water, Argonne effluent water, soil, grass, bottom sediment, and foodstuffs; for a variety of chemical constituents in air, surface water, and Argonne effluent water; and of the environmental penetrating radiation dose. Sample collections and measurements were made at the site boundary and off the Argonne site for comparison purposes. Some on-site measurements wee made to aid in the interpretation of the boundary and off-site data. The results of the program are interpreted in terms of the sources and origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (natural, fallout, Argonne, and other) and are compared with applicable environmental quality standards. The potential radiation dose to off-site population groups is also estimated

  7. Environmental monitoring at Argonne National Laboratory. Annual report for 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golchert, N.W.; Duffy, T.L.; Sedlet, J.

    1977-03-01

    The results of the environmental monitoring program at Argonne National Laboratory for 1976 are presented and discussed. To evaluate the effect of Argonne operations on the environment, measurements were made for a variety of radionuclides in air, surface water, Argonne effluent water, soil, grass, bottom sediment, and foodstuffs; for a variety of chemical constituents in surface and Argonne effluent water; and of the environmental penetrating radiation dose. Sample collections and measurements were made at the site boundary and off the Argonne site for comparison purposes. Some on-site measurements were made to aid in the interpretation of the boundary and off-site data. The results of the program are interpreted in terms of the sources and origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (natural, fallout, Argonne, and other) and are compared with accepted environmental quality standards. The potential radiation dose to off-site population groups is also estimated

  8. Argonne Nuclear Data Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondev, F. [US Nuclear Data Program, U.S. DOE/SC (United States)

    2013-08-15

    Nuclear Data Compilations and Evaluations: - Nuclear structure and decay data compilations and evaluations for the International NSDD network (ENSDF and XUNDL); - AME12 and NuBase12 - in collaboration with G. Audi and M. MacCormick, CSNSM (Orsay), M. Wang, IMP (Lanzhou) and B. Pfeiffer, GSI (Darmstadt) - presentation by M. Wang; - DDEP coordinator - completed; - Horizontal nuclear data evaluation activities -IAEA CRP's, Isomers, Medical Isotopes; Complementary ND research Activities: - CARIBU, FRIB and other RIB facilities, Gretina, IAEA-CRP - emphasis on nuclear structure physics and astrophysics, and their intersection with applied nuclear physics programs.

  9. Argonne National Laboratory 1986 publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopta, J.A.; Springer, C.J.

    1987-12-01

    This report is a bibliography of scientific and technical 1986 publications of Argonne National Laboratory. Some are ANL contributions to outside organizations' reports published in 1986. This compilation, prepared by the Technical Information Services Technical Publications Section (TPS), lists all nonrestricted 1986 publications submitted to TPS by the Laboratory's Divisions. Author indexes list ANL authors only. If a first author is not an ANL employee, an asterisk in the bibliographic citation indicates the first ANL author. The report is divided into seven parts: Journal Articles -- Listed by first author; ANL Reports -- Listed by report number; ANL and non-ANL Unnumbered Reports -- Listed by report number; Non-ANL Numbered Reports -- Listed by report number; Books and Book Chapters -- Listed by first author; Conference Papers -- Listed by first author; and Complete Author Index

  10. Argonne National Laboratory 1986 publications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kopta, J.A.; Springer, C.J.

    1987-12-01

    This report is a bibliography of scientific and technical 1986 publications of Argonne National Laboratory. Some are ANL contributions to outside organizations' reports published in 1986. This compilation, prepared by the Technical Information Services Technical Publications Section (TPS), lists all nonrestricted 1986 publications submitted to TPS by the Laboratory's Divisions. Author indexes list ANL authors only. If a first author is not an ANL employee, an asterisk in the bibliographic citation indicates the first ANL author. The report is divided into seven parts: Journal Articles -- Listed by first author; ANL Reports -- Listed by report number; ANL and non-ANL Unnumbered Reports -- Listed by report number; Non-ANL Numbered Reports -- Listed by report number; Books and Book Chapters -- Listed by first author; Conference Papers -- Listed by first author; and Complete Author Index.

  11. Argonne National Laboratory 1983-1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    This publication presents significant developments at Argonne National Laboratory during 1983-84. Argonne is a multidisciplinary research center with primary focus on nuclear energy, basic research, biomedical-environmental studies and alternate energy research. The laboratory is operated by the University of Chicago for the Department of Energy

  12. Environmental monitoring at Argonne National Laboratory. Annual report for 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golchert, N.W.; Duffy, T.L.; Sedlet, J.

    1984-03-01

    The results of the environmental monitoring program at Argonne National Laboratory for 1983 are presented and discussed. To evaluate the effect of Argonne operations on the environment, measurements were made for a variety of radionuclides in air, surface water, soil, grass, bottom sediment, and milk; for a variety of chemical constituents in air, surface water, ground water, and Argonne effluent water; and of the environmental penetrating radiation dose. Sample collections and measurements were made at the site boundary and off the Argonne site for comparison purposes. Some on-site measurements were made to aid in the interpretation of the boundary and off-site data. The potential radiation dose to off-site population groups is also estimated. The results of the program are interpreted in terms of the sources and origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (natural, fallout, Argonne, and other) and are compared with applicable environmental quality standards. 19 references, 8 figures, 49 tables

  13. Environmental monitoring at Argonne National Laboratory. Annual report for 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golchert, N.W.; Duffy, T.L.; Sedlet, J.

    1981-03-01

    The results of the environmental monitoring program at Argonne National Laboratory for 1980 are presented and discussed. To evaluate the effect of Argonne operations on the environment, measurements were made for a variety of radionuclides in air, surface water, soil, grass, bottom sediment, and foodstuffs; for a variety of chemical constituents in air, surface water, and Argonne effluent water; and of the environmental penetrating radiation dose. Sample collections and measurements were made at the site boundary and off the Argonne site for comparison purposes. Some on-site measurements were made to aid in the interpretation of the boundary and off-site data. The results of the program are interpreted in terms of the sources and origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (natural, fallout, Argonne, and other) and are compared with applicable environmental quality standards. The potential radiation dose to off-site population groups is also estimated

  14. Environmental monitoring at Argonne National Laboratory. Annual report, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golchert, N.W.; Duffy, T.L.; Sedlet, J.

    1982-03-01

    The results of the environmental monitoring program at Argonne National Laboratory for 1981 are presented and discussed. To evaluate the effect of Argonne operations on the environment, measurements were made for a variety of radionuclides in air, surface water, soil, grass, bottom sediment, and milk; for a variety of chemical constituents in air, surface water, and Argonne effluent water; and of the environmental penetrating radiation dose. Sample collections and measurements were made at the site boundary and off the Argonne site for comparison purposes. Some on-site measurements were made to aid in the interpretation of the boundary and off-site data. The results of the program are interpreted in terms of the sources and origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (natural, fallout, Argonne, and other) and are compared with applicable environmental quality standards. The potential radiation dose to off-site population groups is also estimated

  15. Environmental monitoring at Argonne National Laboratory. Annual report for 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golchert, N.W.; Duffy, T.L.; Sedlet, J.

    1980-03-01

    The results of the environmental monitoring program at Argonne National Laboratory for 1979 are presented and discussed. To evaluate the effect of Argonne operations on the environment, measurements were made for a variety of radionuclides in air, surface water, Argonne effluent water, soil, grass, bottom sediment, and foodstuffs; for a variety of chemical constituents in air, surface water, and Argonne effluent water; and of the environemetal penetrating radiation dose. Sample collections and measurements were made at the site boundary and off the Argonne site for comparison purposes. Some on-site measuremenets were made to aid in the interpretation of the boundary and off-site data. The results of the program are interpreted in terms of the sources and origin of the radioactive and chemical substances and are compared with applicable environmental quality standards. The potential radiation dose to off-site population groups is also estimated

  16. Mathematics and Computer Science | Argonne National Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Extreme Computing Data-Intensive Science Applied Mathematics Science & Engineering Applications Software Extreme Computing Data-Intensive Science Applied Mathematics Science & Engineering Opportunities For Employees Staff Directory Argonne National Laboratory Mathematics and Computer Science Tools

  17. Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor Program: Argonne facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephens, S.V.

    1976-09-01

    The objective of the document is to present in one volume an overview of the Argonne National Laboratory test facilities involved in the conduct of the national LMFBR research and development program. Existing facilities and those under construction or authorized as of September 1976 are described. Each profile presents brief descriptions of the overall facility and its test area and data relating to its experimental and testing capability. The volume is divided into two sections: Argonne-East and Argonne-West. Introductory material for each section includes site and facility maps. The profiles are arranged alphabetically by title according to their respective locations at Argonne-East or Argonne-West. A glossary of acronyms and letter designations in common usage to describe organizations, reactor and test facilities, components, etc., involved in the LMFBR program is appended

  18. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-11-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings of the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), conducted June 15 through 26, 1987. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. The team includes outside experts supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with ANL. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. The on-site phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at ANL, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team developed a Sampling and Analysis (S ampersand A) Plan to assist in further assessing certain of the environmental problems identified during its on-site activities. The S ampersand A Plan will be executed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). When completed, the S ampersand A results will be incorporated into the Argonne National Laboratory Environmental Survey findings for inclusion in the Environmental Survey Summary Report. 75 refs., 24 figs., 60 tabs

  19. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-11-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings of the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), conducted June 15 through 26, 1987. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. The team includes outside experts supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with ANL. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. The on-site phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at ANL, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team developed a Sampling and Analysis (S A) Plan to assist in further assessing certain of the environmental problems identified during its on-site activities. The S A Plan will be executed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). When completed, the S A results will be incorporated into the Argonne National Laboratory Environmental Survey findings for inclusion in the Environmental Survey Summary Report. 75 refs., 24 figs., 60 tabs.

  20. Energy Systems | Argonne National Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissan spins up new plant to give second life to EV batteries Yemen News National Lab Licensing Hydrogen Computing Center Centers, Institutes, and Programs RISCRisk and Infrastructure Science Center Other

  1. Proposed environmental remediation at Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-05-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment evaluating proposed environmental remediation activity at Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E), Argonne, Illinois. The environmental remediation work would (1) reduce, eliminate, or prevent the release of contaminants from a number of Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Solid Waste Management Units (SWMUs) and two radiologically contaminated sites located in areas contiguous with SWMUs, and (2) decrease the potential for exposure of the public, ANL-E employees, and wildlife to such contaminants. The actions proposed for SWMUs are required to comply with the RCRA corrective action process and corrective action requirements of the Illinois Environmental Protection Agency; the actions proposed are also required to reduce the potential for continued contaminant release. Based on the analysis in the EA, the DOE has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement is not required

  2. Environmental assessment related to the operation of Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-08-01

    In order to evaluate the environmental impacts of Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) operations, this assessment includes a descriptive section which is intended to provide sufficient detail to allow the various impacts to be viewed in proper perspective. In particular, details are provided on site characteristics, current programs, characterization of the existing site environment, and in-place environmental monitoring programs. In addition, specific facilities and operations that could conceivably impact the environment are described at length. 77 refs., 16 figs., 47 tabs.

  3. 1986 annual site environmental report for Argonne National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golchert, N.W.; Duffy, T.L.

    1987-03-01

    The results of the environmental monitoring program at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for 1986 are presented and discussed. To evaluate the effect of Argonne operations on the environment, measurements were made for a variety of radionuclides in air, surface water, ground water, soil, grass, bottom sediment, and milk; of the environmental penetrating radiation dose; and for a variety of chemical constituents in surface water, ground water, and Argonne effluent water. Sample collections and measurements were made on the site, at the site boundary, and off the Argonne site for comparison purposes. The results of the program are interpreted in terms of the sources and origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (natural, fallout, Argonne, and other) and are compared with applicable environmental quality standards. A US Department of Energy (DOE) dose calculation methodology based on recent International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) recommendations is required and used in this report. The radiation dose to off-site population groups is estimated. The average concentrations and total amounts of radioactive and chemical pollutants released by Argonne to the environment were all below appropriate standards. 21 refs., 7 figs., 52 tabs

  4. GRAPHIC, time-sharing magnet design computer programs at Argonne

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lari, R.J.

    1974-01-01

    This paper describes three magnet design computer programs in use at the Zero Gradient Synchrotron of Argonne National Laboratory. These programs are used in the time sharing mode in conjunction with a Tektronix model 4012 graphic display terminal. The first program in called TRIM, the second MAGNET, and the third GFUN. (U.S.)

  5. Argonne National Laboratory Site Environmental report for calendar year 2009.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golchert, N. W.; Davis, T. M.; Moos, L. P.

    2010-08-04

    This report discusses the status and the accomplishments of the environmental protection program at Argonne National Laboratory for calendar year 2009. The status of Argonne environmental protection activities with respect to compliance with the various laws and regulations is discussed, along with the progress of environmental corrective actions and restoration projects. To evaluate the effects of Argonne operations on the environment, samples of environmental media collected on the site, at the site boundary, and off the Argonne site were analyzed and compared with applicable guidelines and standards. A variety of radionuclides were measured in air, surface water, on-site groundwater, and bottom sediment samples. In addition, chemical constituents in surface water, groundwater, and Argonne effluent water were analyzed. External penetrating radiation doses were measured, and the potential for radiation exposure to off-site population groups was estimated. Results are interpreted in terms of the origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (i.e., natural, Argonne, and other) and are compared with applicable environmental quality standards. A U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) dose calculation methodology, based on International Commission on Radiological Protection recommendations and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) CAP-88 Version 3 (Clean Air Act Assessment Package-1988) computer code, was used in preparing this report.

  6. Argonne National Laboratory Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, T. M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Gomez, J. L. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Moos, L. P. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2014-09-02

    This report discusses the status and the accomplishments of the environmental protection program at Argonne National Laboratory for calendar year 2013. The status of Argonne environmental protection activities with respect to compliance with the various laws and regulations is discussed, along with environmental management, sustainability efforts, environmental corrective actions, and habitat restoration. To evaluate the effects of Argonne operations on the environment, samples of environmental media collected on the site, at the site boundary, and off the Argonne site were analyzed and compared with applicable guidelines and standards. A variety of radionuclides were measured in air, surface water, on-site groundwater, and bottom sediment samples. In addition, chemical constituents in surface water, groundwater, and Argonne effluent water were analyzed. External penetrating radiation doses were measured, and the potential for radiation exposure to off-site population groups was estimated. Results are interpreted in terms of the origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (i.e., natural, Argonne, and other) and are compared with applicable standards intended to protect human health and the environment. A U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) dose calculation methodology, based on International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) recommendations and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) CAP-88 Version 3 computer code, was used in preparing this report.

  7. Argonne National Laboratory site environmental report for calendar year 2007.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golchert, N. W.; Davis, T. M.; Moos, L. P.; ESH/QA Oversight

    2008-09-09

    This report discusses the status and the accomplishments of the environmental protection program at Argonne National Laboratory for calendar year 2007. The status of Argonne environmental protection activities with respect to compliance with the various laws and regulations is discussed, along with the progress of environmental corrective actions and restoration projects. To evaluate the effects of Argonne operations on the environment, samples of environmental media collected on the site, at the site boundary, and off the Argonne site were analyzed and compared with applicable guidelines and standards. A variety of radionuclides were measured in air, surface water, on-site groundwater, and bottom sediment samples. In addition, chemical constituents in surface water, groundwater, and Argonne effluent water were analyzed. External penetrating radiation doses were measured, and the potential for radiation exposure to off-site population groups was estimated. Results are interpreted in terms of the origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (i.e., natural, fallout, Argonne, and other) and are compared with applicable environmental quality standards. A U.S. Department of Energy dose calculation methodology, based on International Commission on Radiological Protection recommendations and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's CAP-88 Version 3 (Clean Air Act Assessment Package-1988) computer code, was used in preparing this report.

  8. Argonne National Laboratory site enviromental report for calendar year 2008.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golchert, N. W.; Davis, T. M.; Moos, L. P.

    2009-09-02

    This report discusses the status and the accomplishments of the environmental protection program at Argonne National Laboratory for calendar year 2008. The status of Argonne environmental protection activities with respect to compliance with the various laws and regulations is discussed, along with the progress of environmental corrective actions and restoration projects. To evaluate the effects of Argonne operations on the environment, samples of environmental media collected on the site, at the site boundary, and off the Argonne site were analyzed and compared with applicable guidelines and standards. A variety of radionuclides were measured in air, surface water, on-site groundwater, and bottom sediment samples. In addition, chemical constituents in surface water, groundwater, and Argonne effluent water were analyzed. External penetrating radiation doses were measured, and the potential for radiation exposure to off-site population groups was estimated. Results are interpreted in terms of the origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (i.e., natural, fallout, Argonne, and other) and are compared with applicable environmental quality standards. A U.S. Department of Energy dose calculation methodology, based on International Commission on Radiological Protection recommendations and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's CAP-88 Version 3 (Clean Air Act Assessment Package-1988) computer code, was used in preparing this report.

  9. Argonne National Laboratory site environmental report for calendar year 2006.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golchert, N. W.; ESH/QA Oversight

    2007-09-13

    This report discusses the status and the accomplishments of the environmental protection program at Argonne National Laboratory for calendar year 2006. The status of Argonne environmental protection activities with respect to compliance with the various laws and regulations is discussed, along with the progress of environmental corrective actions and restoration projects. To evaluate the effects of Argonne operations on the environment, samples of environmental media collected on the site, at the site boundary, and off the Argonne site were analyzed and compared with applicable guidelines and standards. A variety of radionuclides were measured in air, surface water, on-site groundwater, and bottom sediment samples. In addition, chemical constituents in surface water, groundwater, and Argonne effluent water were analyzed. External penetrating radiation doses were measured, and the potential for radiation exposure to off-site population groups was estimated. Results are interpreted in terms of the origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (i.e., natural, fallout, Argonne, and other) and are compared with applicable environmental quality standards. A U.S. Department of Energy dose calculation methodology, based on International Commission on Radiological Protection recommendations and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's CAP-88 Version 3 (Clean Air Act Assessment Package-1988) computer code, was used in preparing this report.

  10. Classroom Resources | Argonne National Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center Community Outreach Learning Experiences School Competitions Teacher Programs Classroom Resources Learning Center Community Outreach Learning Experiences School Competitions Teacher Programs Classroom every student and that is free from harassment and discrimination based upon race, color, religion

  11. Marc Snir | Argonne National Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Computer Science Energy and Global Security ESEnergy Systems GSSGlobal Security Sciences NENuclear National Security User Facilities Science Work with Us About Safety News Careers Education Community Outreach OutLoud Lecture Series Our Impact Education Environmental Protection Sustainability Diversity

  12. Argonne National Laboratory institutional plan FY 2001--FY 2006.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beggs, S.D.

    2000-12-07

    This Institutional Plan describes what Argonne management regards as the optimal future development of Laboratory activities. The document outlines the development of both research programs and support operations in the context of the nation's R and D priorities, the missions of the Department of Energy (DOE) and Argonne, and expected resource constraints. The Draft Institutional Plan is the product of many discussions between DOE and Argonne program managers, and it also reflects programmatic priorities developed during Argonne's summer strategic planning process. That process serves additionally to identify new areas of strategic value to DOE and Argonne, to which Laboratory Directed Research and Development funds may be applied. The Draft Plan is provided to the Department before Argonne's On-Site Review. Issuance of the final Institutional Plan in the fall, after further comment and discussion, marks the culmination of the Laboratory's annual planning cycle. Chapter II of this Institutional Plan describes Argonne's missions and roles within the DOE laboratory system, its underlying core competencies in science and technology, and six broad planning objectives whose achievement is considered critical to the future of the Laboratory. Chapter III presents the Laboratory's ''Science and Technology Strategic Plan,'' which summarizes key features of the external environment, presents Argonne's vision, and describes how Argonne's strategic goals and objectives support DOE's four business lines. The balance of Chapter III comprises strategic plans for 23 areas of science and technology at Argonne, grouped according to the four DOE business lines. The Laboratory's 14 major initiatives, presented in Chapter IV, propose important advances in key areas of fundamental science and technology development. The ''Operations and Infrastructure Strategic Plan'' in Chapter V includes

  13. Argonne National Laboratory Research Highlights 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1988-01-01

    The research and development highlights are summarized. The world's brightest source of X-rays could revolutionize materials research. Test of a prototype insertion device, a key in achieving brilliant X-ray beams, have given the first glimpse of the machine's power. Superconductivity research focuses on the new materials' structure, economics and applications. Other physical science programs advance knowledge of material structures and properties, nuclear physics, molecular structure, and the chemistry and structure of coal. New programming approaches make advanced computers more useful. Innovative approaches to fighting cancer are being developed. More experiments confirm the passive safety of Argonne's Integral Fast Reactor concept. Device simplifies nuclear-waste processing. Advanced fuel cell could provide better mileage, more power than internal combustion engine. New instruments find leaks in underground pipe, measure sodium impurities in molten liquids, detect flaws in ceramics. New antibody findings may explain ability to fight many diseases. Cadmium in cigarettes linked to bone loss in women. Programs fight deforestation in Nepal. New technology could reduce acid rain, mitigate greenhouse effect, enhance oil recovery. Innovative approaches transfer Argonne-developed technology to private industry. Each year Argonne educational programs reach some 1200 students

  14. Fiscal year 1996 decontamination and decommissioning activities photobriefing book for the Argonne National Laboratory-East Site, Technology Development Division, Waste Management Program, Decontamination and Decommissioning Projects Department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The Photobriefing Book describes the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D and D) Program at the Argonne National Laboratory-East Site (ANL-E) near Lemont, Illinois. This book summarizes current D and D projects, reviews fiscal year (FY) 1996 accomplishments, and outlines FY 1997 goals. A section on D and D Technology Development provides insight on new technologies for D and D developed or demonstrated at ANL-E. Past projects are recapped and upcoming projects are described as Argonne works to accomplish its commitment to, ''Close the Circle on the Splitting of the Atom.'' Finally, a comprehensive review of the status and goals of the D and D Program is provided to give a snap-shot view of the program and the direction it's taking as it moves into FY 1997. The D and D projects completed to date include: Plutonium Fuel Fabrication Facility; East Area Surplus Facilities; Experimental Boiling Water Reactor; M-Wing Hot Cell Facilities; Plutonium Gloveboxes; and Fast Neutron Generator

  15. Recent developments in the target facilities at Argonne National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greene, J.P.; Thomas, G.E.

    1989-01-01

    A description is given of recent developments in the target facility at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). Highlights include equipment upgrades which enable us to provide enhanced capabilities for support of the Argonne Heavy-Ion ATLAS Accelerator Project. Also, future plans and additional equipment acquisitions will be discussed. (orig.)

  16. Recent developments in the target facilities at Argonne National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greene, J.P.; Thomas, G.E.

    1988-01-01

    A description is given of recent developments in the target facility at Argonne National Laboratory. Highlights include equipment upgrades which enables us to provide enhanced capabilities for support of the Argonne Heavy-Ion ATLAS Accelerator Project. Also future plans and additional equipment acquisitions will be discussed. 3 refs., 3 tabs

  17. Argonne National Laboratory institutional plan FY 2002 - FY 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beggs, S. D.

    2001-01-01

    The national laboratory system provides a unique resource for addressing the national needs inherent in the mission of the Department of Energy. Argonne, which grew out of Enrico Fermi's pioneering work on the development of nuclear power, was the first national laboratory and, in many ways, has set the standard for those that followed. As the Laboratory's new director, I am pleased to present the Argonne National Laboratory Institutional Plan for FY 2002 through FY 2007 on behalf of the extraordinary group of scientists, engineers, technicians, administrators, and others who re responsible for the Laboratory's distinguished record of achievement. Like our sister DOE laboratories, Argonne uses a multifaceted approach to advance U.S. R and D priorities. First, we assemble interdisciplinary teams of scientists and engineers to address complex problems. For example, our initiative in Functional Genomics will bring together biologists, computer scientists, environmental scientists, and staff of the Advanced Photon Source to develop complete maps of cellular function. Second, we cultivate specific core competencies in science and technology; this Institutional Plan discusses the many ways in which our core competencies support DOE's four mission areas. Third, we serve the scientific community by designing, building, and operating world-class user facilities, such as the Advanced Photon Source, the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source, and the Argonne Tandem-Linac Accelerator System. This Plan summarizes the visions, missions, and strategic plans for the Laboratory's existing major user facilities, and it explains our approach to the planned Rare Isotope Accelerator. Fourth, we help develop the next generation of scientists and engineers through educational programs, many of which involve bright young people in research. This Plan summarizes our vision, objectives, and strategies in the education area, and it gives statistics on student and faculty participation. Finally, we

  18. Environmental monitoring at Argonne National Laboratory. Annual report for 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golchert, N.W.; Duffy, T.L.; Sedlet, J.

    1983-03-01

    The results of the environmental monitoring program at Argonne Ntaional Laboratory for 1982 are presented and discussed. To evaluate the effect of Argonne operations on the environment, measurements were made for a variety of radionuclides in air, surface water, soil, grass, bottom sediment, and milk; for a variety of chemical constituents in air, surface water, ground water, and Argonne effluent water; and of the environmental penetrating radiation dose. Sample collections and masurements were made at the site boundary and off the Argonne site for comparison purposes. Some on-site measurements were made to aid in the interpretation of the boundary and off-site data. The results of the program are interpreted in terms of the sources and origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (natural, fallout, Argonne, and other) and are compared with applicable environmental quality standards. The potential radiation dose to off-site population groups is also estimated

  19. Argonne National Laboratory research offers clues to Alzheimer's plaques

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Researchers from Argonne National Laboratory and the University of Chicago have developed methods to directly observe the structure and growth of microscopic filaments that form the characteristic plaques found in the brains of those with Alzheimer's Disease (1 page).

  20. Argonne National Laboratory Summary Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golchert, N. W.; ESH/QA Oversight

    2007-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory is a place where scientists and engineers come together to open up new possibilities for the future. Argonne has brought us many important projects in the past. It was at Argonne that researchers confirmed that Beethoven suffered from lead poisoning, and it was through the amazing Access Grid, pioneered at Argonne, that researchers in the United States were able to aid doctors on the other side of the world who were fighting the SARS outbreak. Researchers at Argonne are currently researching and developing new strategies in areas as varied as advanced nuclear reactors and other energy sources, medicine, and environmental science that will likely prove to be just as significant as Argonne's past achievements. Nuclear reactor development has been a priority at Argonne since its beginning. Argonne is very involved with the development of alternate strategies for safely treating and disposing of nuclear wastes. The first designs and prototypes of most of the nuclear reactors producing energy around the world today were originally conceived and tested by Argonne. While it may seem intimidating to live near a nuclear research site, the community surrounding Argonne is in no danger. The laboratory's Environmental Management Program provides Argonne's neighbors with quantitative risk data and has determined that the Argonne site is very safe. As a U.S. Department of Energy laboratory, Argonne has always been interested in finding new and more efficient energy sources. Current energy projects include fuel efficient cars, new batteries and fuel cells, and the conservation of U.S. oil and gas resources. The U.S. Department of Energy recently named Argonne the lead laboratory to test and evaluate new technologies for plug-in hybrid vehicles. Pharmaceutical companies use Argonne in their research, including a study discovering the structure of the HIV virus. Conducted at Argonne's Advanced Photon Source, this landmark research led Abbott Labs to

  1. Argonne National Lab gets Linux network teraflop cluster

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    "Linux NetworX, Salt Lake City, Utah, has delivered an Evolocity II (E2) Linux cluster to Argonne National Laboratory that is capable of performing more than one trillion calculations per second (1 teraFLOP). The cluster, named "Jazz" by Argonne, is designed to provide optimum performance for multiple disciplines such as chemistry, physics and reactor engineering and will be used by the entire scientific community at the Lab" (1 page).

  2. Electron scattering. Lectures given at Argonne National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walecka, J.D.

    1984-01-01

    This report is an almost verbatim copy of lectures on Electron Scattering given at Argonne National Laboratory in the Fall of 1982 by John Dirk Walecka. Professor Walecka was an Argonne Fellow in the Physics Division from October 1982 to January 1983. Broad headings include general considerations, coincidence cross section (e,e'x), quantum electrodynamics and radiative corrections, unification of electroweak interactions, relativistic models of nuclear structure, electroproduction of pions and nucleon resonances, and deep inelastic (e,e')

  3. Materials technology at Argonne National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Betten, P.

    1989-01-01

    Argonne is actively involved in the research and development of new materials research and development (R ampersand D). Five new materials technologies have been identified for commercial potential and are presented in this paper as follows: (1) nanophase materials, (2) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging of ceramics, (3) superconductivity developments and technology transfer mechanisms, and (4) COMMIX computer code modeling for metal castings, and (5) tribology using ion-assisted deposition (IAB). 4 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab

  4. Aerial radiological survey of the Argonne National Laboratory and surrounding area, Argonne, Illinois. Date of survey: May 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-12-01

    An aerial radiological survey was conducted over the facilities of the Argonne National Laboratory in Argonne, Illinois, on 2 to 13 May 1977. The survey was flown at an altitude of 46 m by a helicopter containing 20 sodium iodide detectors. The line spacing was also 46 m. Enhanced gamma exposure rate levels, which could be attributed to Argonne operations, were observed at many locations

  5. Argonne National Laboratory-East site environmental report for calendar year 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golchert, N.W.; Kolzow, R.G. [Environmental Management Operation, Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1996-09-01

    This report presents the environmental report for the Argonne National Laboratory-East for the year of 1995. Topics discussed include: general description of the site including climatology, geology, seismicity, hydrology, vegetation, endangered species, population, water and land use, and archaeology; compliance summary; environmental program information; environmental nonradiological program information; ground water protection; and radiological monitoring program.

  6. Cooling systems research at Argonne National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spigarelli, S.A.

    1977-01-01

    Studies of the thermal plumes resulting from discharges from once-through cooling systems of electric generating stations are reviewed. The collection of large amounts of water temperature data for definition of the three-dimensional structure of a thermal plume, of current data, and related ambient data for model evaluation purposes required the development of an integrated data collection system. The Argonne system employs measurements of water temperature over the water column from a moving small boat. Temperatures are measured with thermistors attached to a rigid strut for surface plumes and to a flexible, faired cable for submerged plumes. Water temperatures and boat location, determined by a microwave ranging system, are recorded on magnetic tape while the boat is underway and prove a quasi-synoptic map of plume temperatures. Automated data handling and processing procedures provide for the production of isotherm maps of the plume at several elevations and in cross section. Mathematical model evaluation for surface discharges of waste heat included the consideration of over 40 different models and detailed evaluation of 11 models. Most models were run on Argonne's computers, and all models were evaluated in terms of their limitations and capabilities as well as their predictive performance against prototype data. Measurements were made of thermal plumes at the discharges of nuclear power plants located on the shores of Lake Michigan

  7. Studies of acute and chronic radiation injury at the Biological and Medical Research Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 1970-1992: The JANUS Program Survival and Pathology Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grahn, D.; Wright, B.J.; Carnes, B.A.; Williamson, F.S.; Fox, C.

    1995-02-01

    A research reactor for exclusive use in experimental radiobiology was designed and built at Argonne National Laboratory in the 1960`s. It was located in a special addition to Building 202, which housed the Division of Biological and Medical Research. Its location assured easy access for all users to the animal facilities, and it was also near the existing gamma-irradiation facilities. The water-cooled, heterogeneous 200-kW(th) reactor, named JANUS, became the focal point for a range of radiobiological studies gathered under the rubic of {open_quotes}the JANUS program{close_quotes}. The program ran from about 1969 to 1992 and included research at all levels of biological organization, from subcellular to organism. More than a dozen moderate- to large-scale studies with the B6CF{sub 1} mouse were carried out; these focused on the late effects of whole-body exposure to gamma rays or fission neutrons, in matching exposure regimes. In broad terms, these studies collected data on survival and on the pathology observed at death. A deliberate effort was made to establish the cause of death. This archieve describes these late-effects studies and their general findings. The database includes exposure parameters, time of death, and the gross pathology and histopathology in codified form. A series of appendices describes all pathology procedures and codes, treatment or irradiation codes, and the manner in which the data can be accessed in the ORACLE database management system. A series of tables also presents summaries of the individual experiments in terms of radiation quality, sample sizes at entry, mean survival times by sex, and number of gross pathology and histopathology records.

  8. Argonne National Laboratory High Energy Physics Division semiannual report of research activities, January 1, 1989--June 30, 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    This paper discuss the following areas on High Energy Physics at Argonne National Laboratory: experimental program; theory program; experimental facilities research; accelerator research and development; and SSC detector research and development

  9. The restoration of an Argonne National Laboratory foundry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shearer, T.; Pancake, D.; Shelton, B.

    1997-01-01

    The Environmental Management Operations' Waste Management Department (WMD) at Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E) undertook the restoration of an unused foundry with the goal of restoring the area for general use. The foundry was used in the fabrication of reactor components for ANL's research and development programs; many of the items fabricated in the facility were radioactive, thereby contaminating the foundry equipment. This paper very briefly describes the dismantling and decontamination of the facility. The major challenges associated with the safe removal of the foundry equipment included the sheer size of the equipment, a limited overhead crane capability (4.5 tonne), the minimization of radioactive and hazardous wastes, and the cost-effective completion of the project, the hazardous and radioactive wastes present, and limited process knowledge (the facility was unused for many years)

  10. Action-oriented characterization at Argonne National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moos, L.P.; Swale, R.E.

    1995-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory-East and the US Department of Energy have initiated a voluntary corrective action strategy to characterize and clean up some of the on-site solid waste management units that are subject to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Corrective Action process. This strategy is designed for the current atmosphere of reduced funding levels and, increased demands for cleanup actions. A focused characterization program is used to identify and roughly delineate the areas of greatest risk, relying as much as possible on existing data about the site; then, removal or interim remedial actions are implemented, where appropriate. Two interim cleanup operations were completed in 1994. Two additional interim actions are planned for 1995. Future actions may include decontamination operations, soil remediation, and construction of containment barriers

  11. Studies of acute and chronic radiation injury at the Biological and Medical Research Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 1970-1992: The JANUS Program Survival and Pathology Data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grahn, D.; Wright, B.J.; Carnes, B.A.; Williamson, F.S.; Fox, C.

    1995-02-01

    A research reactor for exclusive use in experimental radiobiology was designed and built at Argonne National Laboratory in the 1960's. It was located in a special addition to Building 202, which housed the Division of Biological and Medical Research. Its location assured easy access for all users to the animal facilities, and it was also near the existing gamma-irradiation facilities. The water-cooled, heterogeneous 200-kW(th) reactor, named JANUS, became the focal point for a range of radiobiological studies gathered under the rubic of open-quotes the JANUS programclose quotes. The program ran from about 1969 to 1992 and included research at all levels of biological organization, from subcellular to organism. More than a dozen moderate- to large-scale studies with the B6CF 1 mouse were carried out; these focused on the late effects of whole-body exposure to gamma rays or fission neutrons, in matching exposure regimes. In broad terms, these studies collected data on survival and on the pathology observed at death. A deliberate effort was made to establish the cause of death. This archieve describes these late-effects studies and their general findings. The database includes exposure parameters, time of death, and the gross pathology and histopathology in codified form. A series of appendices describes all pathology procedures and codes, treatment or irradiation codes, and the manner in which the data can be accessed in the ORACLE database management system. A series of tables also presents summaries of the individual experiments in terms of radiation quality, sample sizes at entry, mean survival times by sex, and number of gross pathology and histopathology records

  12. Status of Data Base Management Systems at Argonne National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuja, P.M.; Lindeman, A.J.

    1978-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory has been using the System 2000 data base management system for the past two years. It has been used for technical as well as administrative applications. This paper describes some of the experience gained relating to advantages and disadvantages of data base management systems as well as of System 2000 in particular

  13. Routine environmental reaudit of the Argonne National Laboratory - West

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-04-01

    This report documents the results of the Routine Environmental Reaudit of the Argonne National Laboratory - West (ANL-W), Idaho Falls, Idaho. During this audit, the activities conducted by the audit team included reviews of internal documents and reports from previous audits and assessments; interviews with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), State of Idaho Department of Health and Welfare (IDHW), and DOE contractor personnel; and inspections and observations of selected facilities and operations. The onsite portion of the audit was conducted from October 11 to October 22, 1993, by the DOE Office of Environmental Audit (EH-24), located within the Office of Environment, Safety and Health (EH). DOE 5482.113, {open_quotes}Environment, Safety, and Health Appraisal Program,{close_quotes} established the mission of EH-24 to provide comprehensive, independent oversight of Department-wide environmental programs on behalf of the Secretary of Energy. The ultimate goal of EH-24 is enhancement of environmental protection and minimization of risk to public health and the environment. EH-24 accomplishes its mission by conducting systematic and periodic evaluations of the Department`s environmental programs within line organizations, and by utilizing supplemental activities that serve to strengthen self-assessment and oversight functions within program, field, and contractor organizations.

  14. Routine environmental reaudit of the Argonne National Laboratory - West

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    This report documents the results of the Routine Environmental Reaudit of the Argonne National Laboratory - West (ANL-W), Idaho Falls, Idaho. During this audit, the activities conducted by the audit team included reviews of internal documents and reports from previous audits and assessments; interviews with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), State of Idaho Department of Health and Welfare (IDHW), and DOE contractor personnel; and inspections and observations of selected facilities and operations. The onsite portion of the audit was conducted from October 11 to October 22, 1993, by the DOE Office of Environmental Audit (EH-24), located within the Office of Environment, Safety and Health (EH). DOE 5482.113, open-quotes Environment, Safety, and Health Appraisal Program,close quotes established the mission of EH-24 to provide comprehensive, independent oversight of Department-wide environmental programs on behalf of the Secretary of Energy. The ultimate goal of EH-24 is enhancement of environmental protection and minimization of risk to public health and the environment. EH-24 accomplishes its mission by conducting systematic and periodic evaluations of the Department's environmental programs within line organizations, and by utilizing supplemental activities that serve to strengthen self-assessment and oversight functions within program, field, and contractor organizations

  15. Argonne National Laboratory high performance network support of APS experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knot, M.J.; McMahon, R.J.

    1996-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory is currently positioned to provide access to high performance regional and national networks. Much of the impetus for this effort is the anticipated needs of the upcoming experimental program at the APS. Some APS collaborative access teams (CATs) are already pressing for network speed improvements and security enhancements. Requirements range from the need for high data rate, secure transmission of experimental data, to the desire to establish a open-quote open-quote virtual experimental environment close-quote close-quote at their home institution. In the near future, 155 megabit/sec (Mb/s) national and regional asynchronous transfer mode (ATM) networks will be operational and available to APS users. Full-video teleconferencing, virtual presence operation of experiments, and high speed, secure transmission of data are being tested and, in some cases, will be operational. We expect these efforts to enable a substantial improvement in the speed of processing experimental results as well as an increase in convenience to the APS experimentalist. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  16. Decontamination and decommissioning of the JANUS reactor at the Argonne National Laboratory-East site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fellhauer, C.R.; Garlock, G.A.

    1997-05-01

    Argonne National Laboratory has begun the decontamination and decommissioning (D ampersand D) of the JANUS Reactor Facility. The project is managed by the Technology Development Division's D ampersand D Program personnel. D ampersand D procedures are performed by sub-contractor personnel. Specific activities involving the removal, size reduction, and packaging of radioactive components and facilities are discussed

  17. Reactor D and D at Argonne National Laboratory - lessons learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fellhauer, C. R.

    1998-01-01

    This paper focuses on the lessons learned during the decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) of two reactors at Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E). The Experimental Boiling Water Reactor (EBWR) was a 100 MW(t), 5 MSV(e) proof-of-concept facility. The Janus Reactor was a 200 kW(t) reactor located at the Biological Irradiation Facility and was used to study the effects of neutron radiation on animals

  18. Radioactive target and source development at Argonne National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greene, J.P.; Ahmad, I.; Thomas, G.E.

    1992-01-01

    An increased demand for low-level radioactive targets has created the need for a laboratory dedicated to the production of these foils. A description is given of the radioactive target produced as well as source development work being performed at the Physics Division target facility of Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). Highlights include equipment used and the techniques employed. In addition, some examples of recent source preparation are given as well as work currently in progress

  19. Site characteristics of Argonne National Laboratory in Illinois

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Y.W.

    1995-01-01

    This report reviews the geology and topography of the Argonne National Laboratory, near Lemont, Illinois. It describes the thickness and stratigraphy of soils, glacial till, and bedrock in and adjacent to the laboratory and support facilities. Seismic surveys were also conducted through the area to help determine the values of seismic wave velocities in the glacial till which is important in determining the seismic hazard of the area. Borehole log descriptions are summarized along with information on area topography

  20. Argonne National Laboratory, east hazardous waste shipment data validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casey, C.; Graden, C.; Coveleskie, A.

    1995-09-01

    At the request of EM-331, the Radioactive Waste Technical Support Program (TSP) is conducting an evaluation of data regarding past hazardous waste shipments from DOE sites to commercial TSDFs. The intent of the evaluation is to find out if, from 1984 to 1991, DOE sites could have shipped hazardous waste contaminated with DOE-added radioactivity to commercial TSDFs not licensed to receive radioactive material. A team visited Argonne National Laboratory, East (ANL-E) to find out if any data existed that would help to make such a determination at ANL-E. The team was unable to find any relevant data. The team interviewed personnel who worked in waste management at the time. All stated that ANL-E did not sample and analyze hazardous waste shipments for radioactivity. Waste generators at ANL-E relied on process knowledge to decide that their waste was not radioactive. Also, any item leaving a building where radioisotopes were used was surveyed using hand-held instrumentation. If radioactivity above the criteria in DOE Order 5400.5 was found, the item was considered radioactive. The only documentation still available is the paperwork filled out by the waste generator and initialed by a health physics technician to show no contamination was found. The team concludes that, since all waste shipped offsite was subjected at least once to health physics instrumentation scans, the waste shipped from ANL-E from 1984 to 1991 may be considered clean

  1. Argonne National Laboratory site environmental report for calendar year 2004.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golchert, N. W.; Kolzow, R. G.

    2005-09-02

    This report discusses the accomplishments of the environmental protection program at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for calendar year 2004. The status of ANL environmental protection activities with respect to compliance with the various laws and regulations is discussed, along with the progress of environmental corrective actions and restoration projects. To evaluate the effects of ANL operations on the environment, samples of environmental media collected on the site, at the site boundary, and off the ANL site were analyzed and compared with applicable guidelines and standards. A variety of radionuclides were measured in air, surface water, on-site groundwater, and bottom sediment samples. In addition, chemical constituents in surface water, groundwater, and ANL effluent water were analyzed. External penetrating radiation doses were measured, and the potential for radiation exposure to off-site population groups was estimated. Results are interpreted in terms of the origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (i.e., natural, fallout, ANL, and other) and are compared with applicable environmental quality standards. A U.S. Department of Energy dose calculation methodology, based on International Commission on Radiological Protection recommendations and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's CAP-88 (Clean Air Act Assessment Package-1988) computer code, was used in preparing this report.

  2. Argonne National Laboratory summary site environmental report for calendar year 2006.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golchert, N. W.; ESH/QA Oversight

    2008-03-27

    This booklet is designed to inform the public about what Argonne National Laboratory is doing to monitor its environment and to protect its employees and neighbors from any adverse environmental impacts from Argonne research. The Downers Grove South Biology II class was selected to write this booklet, which summarizes Argonne's environmental monitoring programs for 2006. Writing this booklet also satisfies the Illinois State Education Standard, which requires that students need to know and apply scientific concepts to graduate from high school. This project not only provides information to the public, it will help students become better learners. The Biology II class was assigned to condense Argonne's 300-page, highly technical Site Environmental Report into a 16-page plain-English booklet. The site assessment relates to the class because the primary focus of the Biology II class is ecology and the environment. Students developed better learning skills by working together cooperatively, writing and researching more effectively. Students used the Argonne Site Environmental Report, the Internet, text books and information from Argonne scientists to help with their research on their topics. The topics covered in this booklet are the history of Argonne, groundwater, habitat management, air quality, Argonne research, Argonne's environmental non-radiological program, radiation, and compliance. The students first had to read and discuss the Site Environmental Report and then assign topics to focus on. Dr. Norbert Golchert and Mr. David Baurac, both from Argonne, came into the class to help teach the topics more in depth. The class then prepared drafts and wrote a final copy. Ashley Vizek, a student in the Biology class stated, 'I reviewed my material and read it over and over. I then took time to plan my paper out and think about what I wanted to write about, put it into foundation questions and started to write my paper. I rewrote and revised so I

  3. Applications of stable isotopes of /sup 2/H, /sup 13/C and /sup 15/N to clinical problems. Experience of a collaborative program at Argonne National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, P D; Szczepanik, P A; Hachey, D L [Argonne National Lab., Evanston, Ill. (USA)

    1974-08-01

    The function of the Argonne Program is to provide synthetic, analytical instrumental capability in a core facility for the clinical investigator who needs to use /sup 2/H, /sup 13/C, or /sup 15/N labelled compounds for metabolic or clinical research on pregnant women, newborn infants, young children, or for mass screening. To carry out such application development, there were six stages which were recurrent steps in every application. Five fundamental strategies should be adopted to establish the use of stable isotopes in clinical work. The instrument required for measurements was a combined gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer, and its use was schematically illustrated. Some of the successful experiences with compounds labelled by stable isotopes, such as deuterium labelled chenodeoxycholic acid, and respective /sup 13/C and /sup 15/N-labelled glycine were described. Deutrium labelled bile acid enabled easy and safe determination of the size of the bile acid pool and the replacement rate, providing clearer diagnoses for cholestatic liver disease and gallstones. /sup 13/C and /sup 15/N labelled compounds were used in clinical studies, of children with genetic disorders of amino acid metabolism, i.e., non ketotic hyperflycinemia, B/sub 12/-responsive methyl malonic acidemia, and Lesch-Nyhan syndrome. /sup 15/N-labelled glycine was also studied in a child with Lesch-Nyhan syndrome.

  4. Argonne program to assess superconducting stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, S.T.; Turner, L.R.; Huang, Y.C.; Dawson, J.W.; Harrang, J.; Hilal, M.A.; Lieberg, M.; Gonczy, J.D.; Kim, S.H.

    1978-01-01

    To assess superconductor stability, a complete program is developed to obtain basic information on the effects of local mechanical perturbations on the cryostatic stability. An analytical model for computing the transient recovery following the mechanical perturbation is developed. A test program is undertaken to develop data needed to verify the conclusions reached through the analytical studies

  5. Argonne Code Center: compilation of program abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butler, M.K.; DeBruler, M.; Edwards, H.S.; Harrison, C. Jr.; Hughes, C.E.; Jorgensen, R.; Legan, M.; Menozzi, T.; Ranzini, L.; Strecok, A.J.

    1977-08-01

    This publication is the eleventh supplement to, and revision of, ANL-7411. It contains additional abstracts and revisions to some earlier abstracts and other pages. Sections of the complete document ANL-7411 are as follows: preface, history and acknowledgements, abstract format, recommended program package contents, program classification guide and thesaurus, and the abstract collection. (RWR)

  6. Argonne Code Center: compilation of program abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butler, M.K.; DeBruler, M.; Edwards, H.S.

    1976-08-01

    This publication is the tenth supplement to, and revision of, ANL-7411. It contains additional abstracts and revisions to some earlier abstracts and other pages. Sections of the document are as follows: preface; history and acknowledgements; abstract format; recommended program package contents; program classification guide and thesaurus; and abstract collection. (RWR)

  7. Argonne Code Center: compilation of program abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butler, M.K.; DeBruler, M.; Edwards, H.S.; Harrison, C. Jr.; Hughes, C.E.; Jorgensen, R.; Legan, M.; Menozzi, T.; Ranzini, L.; Strecok, A.J.

    1977-08-01

    This publication is the eleventh supplement to, and revision of, ANL-7411. It contains additional abstracts and revisions to some earlier abstracts and other pages. Sections of the complete document ANL-7411 are as follows: preface, history and acknowledgements, abstract format, recommended program package contents, program classification guide and thesaurus, and the abstract collection

  8. Argonne Code Center: compilation of program abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butler, M.K.; DeBruler, M.; Edwards, H.S.

    1976-08-01

    This publication is the tenth supplement to, and revision of, ANL-7411. It contains additional abstracts and revisions to some earlier abstracts and other pages. Sections of the document are as follows: preface; history and acknowledgements; abstract format; recommended program package contents; program classification guide and thesaurus; and abstract collection

  9. Computing, Environment and Life Sciences | Argonne National Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Computing, Environment and Life Sciences Research Divisions BIOBiosciences CPSComputational Science DSLData Argonne Leadership Computing Facility Biosciences Division Environmental Science Division Mathematics and Computer Science Division Facilities and Institutes Argonne Leadership Computing Facility News Events About

  10. Quality management at Argonne National Laboratory: Status, accomplishments, and lessons learned

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-06-01

    In April 1992, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) launched the implementation of quality management (QM) as an initiative of the Laboratory Director. The goal of the program is to seek ways of improving Laboratory performance and effectiveness by drawing from the realm of experiences in the global total quality management movement. The Argonne QM initiative began with fact finding and formulating a strategy for implementation; the emphasis is that the underlying principles of QM should be an integral part of how the Laboratory is managed and operated. A primary theme that has guided the Argonne QM initiative is to consider only those practices that offer the potential for real improvement, make sense, fit the culture, and would be credible to the broad population. In October 1993, the Laboratory began to pilot a targeted set of QM activities selected to produce outcomes important to the Laboratory--strengthening the customer focus, improving work processes, enhancing employee involvement and satisfaction, and institutionalizing QM. This report describes the results of the just-concluded QM development and demonstration phase in terms of detailed strategies, accomplishments, and lessons learned. These results are offered as evidence to support the conclusion that the Argonne QM initiative has achieved value-added results and credibility and is well positioned to support future deployment across the entire Laboratory as an integrated management initiative. Recommendations for follow-on actions to implement future deployment are provided separately.

  11. Draft environmental assessment of Argonne National Laboratory, East

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1975-10-01

    This environmental assessment of the operation of the Argonne National Laboratory is related to continuation of research and development work being conducted at the Laboratory site at Argonne, Illinois. The Laboratory has been monitoring various environmental parameters both offsite and onsite since 1949. Meteorological data have been collected to support development of models for atmospheric dispersion of radioactive and other pollutants. Gaseous and liquid effluents, both radioactive and non-radioactive, have been measured by portable monitors and by continuous monitors at fixed sites. Monitoring of constituents of the terrestrial ecosystem provides a basis for identifying changes should they occur in this regime. The Laboratory has established a position of leadership in monitoring methodologies and their application. Offsite impacts of nonradiological accidents are primarily those associated with the release of chlorine and with sodium fires. Both result in releases that cause no health damage offsite. Radioactive materials released to the environment result in a cumulative dose to persons residing within 50 miles of the site of about 47 man-rem per year, compared to an annual total of about 950,000 man-rem delivered to the same population from natural background radiation. 100 refs., 17 figs., 33 tabs.

  12. NNWSI waste form testing at Argonne National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bates, J.K.; Gerding, T.J.; Abrajano, T.A. Jr.; Ebert, W.L.; Mazer, J.J.

    1988-11-01

    The Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigation (NNWSI) Project is investigating the tuff beds of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, as a potential location for a high-level radioactive waste repository. As part of the waste package development portion of this project, experiments are being performed by the Chemical Technology Division of Argonne National Laboratory to study the behavior of the waste form under anticipated repository conditions. These experiments include the development and performance of a test to measure waste form behavior in unsaturated conditions and the performance of experiments designed to study the behavior of waste package components in an irradiated environment. Previous reports document developments in these areas through 1986. This report summarizes progress during the period January--June 1987, 19 refs., 17 figs., 20 tabs

  13. Treatment of mixed radioactive liquid wastes at Argonne National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vandegrift, G.F.; Chamberlain, D.B.; Conner, C.

    1994-01-01

    Aqueous mixed waste at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is traditionally generated in small volumes with a wide variety of compositions. A cooperative effort at ANL between Waste Management (WM) and the Chemical Technology Division (CMT) was established, to develop, install, and implement a robust treatment operation to handle the majority of such wastes. For this treatment, toxic metals in mixed-waste solutions are precipitated in a semiautomated system using Ca(OH) 2 and, for some metals, Na 2 S additions. This step is followed by filtration to remove the precipitated solids. A filtration skid was built that contains several filter types which can be used, as appropriate, for a variety of suspended solids. When supernatant liquid is separated from the toxic-metal solids by decantation and filtration, it will be a low-level waste (LLW) rather than a mixed waste. After passing a Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) test, the solids may also be treated as LLW

  14. Argonne National Lab deploys Force10 networks' massively dense ethernet switch for supercomputing cluster

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    "Force10 Networks, Inc. today announced that Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne, IL) has successfully deployed Force10 E-Series switch/routers to connect to the TeraGrid, the world's largest supercomputing grid, sponsored by the National Science Foundation (NSF)" (1/2 page).

  15. Frontiers: Research highlights 1946-1996 [50th Anniversary Edition. Argonne National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    This special edition of 'Frontiers' commemorates Argonne National Laboratory's 50th anniversary of service to science and society. America's first national laboratory, Argonne has been in the forefront of U.S. scientific and technological research from its beginning. Past accomplishments, current research, and future plans are highlighted.

  16. Argonne National Laboratory summary site environmental report for calendar year 2007.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golchert, N. W.

    2009-05-22

    This summary of Argonne National Laboratory's Site Environmental Report for calendar year 2007 was written by 20 students at Downers Grove South High School in Downers Grove, Ill. The student authors are classmates in Mr. Howard's Bio II course. Biology II is a research-based class that teaches students the process of research by showing them how the sciences apply to daily life. For the past seven years, Argonne has worked with Biology II students to create a short document summarizing the Site Environmental Report to provide the public with an easy-to-read summary of the annual 300-page technical report on the results of Argonne's on-site environmental monitoring program. The summary is made available online and given to visitors to Argonne, researchers interested in collaborating with Argonne, future employees, and many others. In addition to providing Argonne and the public with an easily understandable short summary of a large technical document, the participating students learn about professional environmental monitoring procedures, achieve a better understanding of the time and effort put forth into summarizing and publishing research, and gain confidence in their own abilities to express themselves in writing. The Argonne Summary Site Environmental Report fits into the educational needs for 12th grade students. Illinois State Educational Goal 12 states that a student should understand the fundamental concepts, principles, and interconnections of the life, physical, and earth/space sciences. To create this summary booklet, the students had to read and understand the larger technical report, which discusses in-depth many activities and programs that have been established by Argonne to maintain a safe local environment. Creating this Summary Site Environmental Report also helps students fulfill Illinois State Learning Standard 12B5a, which requires that students be able to analyze and explain biodiversity issues, and the causes and effects of

  17. Radiation-induced DNA damage and repair: Argonne National Laboratory symposium, Argonne, Illinois 60439, 15 April, 1988. Symposium report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peak, M J; Peak, J G; Blazek, E R

    1988-10-01

    The Argonne National Laboratory Symposium brought together 109 scientists from five countries to discuss the molecular effects of radiation on DNA and the responses of cells to radiation exposure. Six speakers covered three general areas: (1) DNA damages caused by radiations; (2) repair of these damages in prokaryotes and eukaryotes; and (3) aminothiols as radioprotectors. In addition, a round table discussion chaired by J. Ward dealt with alkaline and neutral elution methodology.

  18. Safety analysis of IFR fuel processing in the Argonne National Laboratory Fuel Cycle Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charak, I; Pedersen, D.R.; Forrester, R.J.; Phipps, R.D.

    1993-01-01

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) concept developed by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) includes on-site processing and recycling of discharged core and blanket fuel materials. The process is being demonstrated in the Fuel Cycle Facility (FCF) at ANL's Idaho site. This paper describes the safety analyses that were performed in support of the FCF program; the resulting safety analysis report was the vehicle used to secure authorization to operate the facility and carry out the program, which is now under way. This work also provided some insights into safety-related issues of a commercial IFR fuel processing facility. These are also discussed

  19. Argonne National Laboratory as an interface between physics and industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sachs, R.G.

    1976-01-01

    Application of physics to industry requires the involvement of many other disciplines, including chemistry, material sciences, and many other fields of engineering; and the national laboratories in the United States have a mix of such disciplines particularly conducive to such transfer. They have participated in one of the most striking transfers of physics to industry in history, namely, the development of the nuclear power industry. Scientific feasibility of nuclear power was established when the first chain reaction was demonstrated at the Metallurgical Laboratory. Argonne National Laboratory as the successor to the Metallurgical Laboratory has played a major role in transferring the results of this physics experiment to industry, especially in demonstrating engineering feasibility of nuclear power. Major developments in industrial instrumentation have taken place in parallel with the development of nuclear energy, and many of these developments are applicable to other industrial systems as well. The responsibilities of the national laboratories have recently been extended into many energy technologies other than nuclear, offering them the opportunity to serve as an interface for transfer of physics into many new industries. A number of examples are cited. (author)

  20. Argonne National Laboratory Physics Division annual report, January--December 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thayer, K.J. [ed.

    1997-08-01

    The past year has seen several of the Physics Division`s new research projects reach major milestones with first successful experiments and results: the atomic physics station in the Basic Energy Sciences Research Center at the Argonne Advanced Photon Source was used in first high-energy, high-brilliance x-ray studies in atomic and molecular physics; the Short Orbit Spectrometer in Hall C at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator (TJNAF) Facility that the Argonne medium energy nuclear physics group was responsible for, was used extensively in the first round of experiments at TJNAF; at ATLAS, several new beams of radioactive isotopes were developed and used in studies of nuclear physics and nuclear astrophysics; the new ECR ion source at ATLAS was completed and first commissioning tests indicate excellent performance characteristics; Quantum Monte Carlo calculations of mass-8 nuclei were performed for the first time with realistic nucleon-nucleon interactions using state-of-the-art computers, including Argonne`s massively parallel IBM SP. At the same time other future projects are well under way: preparations for the move of Gammasphere to ATLAS in September 1997 have progressed as planned. These new efforts are imbedded in, or flowing from, the vibrant ongoing research program described in some detail in this report: nuclear structure and reactions with heavy ions; measurements of reactions of astrophysical interest; studies of nucleon and sub-nucleon structures using leptonic probes at intermediate and high energies; atomic and molecular structure with high-energy x-rays. The experimental efforts are being complemented with efforts in theory, from QCD to nucleon-meson systems to structure and reactions of nuclei. Finally, the operation of ATLAS as a national users facility has achieved a new milestone, with 5,800 hours beam on target for experiments during the past fiscal year.

  1. Survey of biomedical and environental data bases, models, and integrated computer systems at Argonne National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murarka, I.P.; Bodeau, D.J.; Scott, J.M.; Huebner, R.H.

    1978-08-01

    This document contains an inventory (index) of information resources pertaining to biomedical and environmental projects at Argonne National Laboratory--the information resources include a data base, model, or integrated computer system. Entries are categorized as models, numeric data bases, bibliographic data bases, or integrated hardware/software systems. Descriptions of the Information Coordination Focal Point (ICFP) program, the system for compiling this inventory, and the plans for continuing and expanding it are given, and suggestions for utilizing the services of the ICFP are outlined

  2. Survey of biomedical and environental data bases, models, and integrated computer systems at Argonne National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murarka, I.P.; Bodeau, D.J.; Scott, J.M.; Huebner, R.H.

    1978-08-01

    This document contains an inventory (index) of information resources pertaining to biomedical and environmental projects at Argonne National Laboratory--the information resources include a data base, model, or integrated computer system. Entries are categorized as models, numeric data bases, bibliographic data bases, or integrated hardware/software systems. Descriptions of the Information Coordination Focal Point (ICFP) program, the system for compiling this inventory, and the plans for continuing and expanding it are given, and suggestions for utilizing the services of the ICFP are outlined.

  3. Preliminary characterization of the 100 area at Argonne National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biang, C.; Biang, R.; Patel, P.

    1994-06-01

    This characterization report is based on the results of sampling and an initial environmental assessment of the 100 Area of Argonne National Laboratory. It addresses the current status, projected data requirements, and recommended actions for five study areas within the 100 Area: the Lime Sludge Pond, the Building 108 Liquid Retention Pond, the Coal Yard, the East Area Burn Pit, and the Eastern Perimeter Area. Two of these areas are solid waste management units under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (the Lime Sludge Pond and the Building 108 Liquid Retention Pond); however, the Illinois Environmental Protection Agency has determined that no further action is necessary for the Lime Sludge Pond. Operational records for some of the activities were not available, and one study area (the East Area Burn Pit) could not be precisely located. Recommendations for further investigation include sample collection to obtain the following information: (1) mineralogy of major minerals and clays within the soils and underlying aquifer, (2) pH of the soils, (3) total clay fraction of the soils, (4) cation exchange capacity of the soils and aquifer materials, and (5) exchangeable cations of the soils and aquifer material. Various other actions are recommended for the 100 Area, including an electromagnetic survey, sampling of several study areas to determine the extent of contamination and potential migration pathways, and sampling to determine the presence of any radionuclides. For some of the study areas, additional actions are contingent on the results of the initial recommendations.

  4. Frequency selective bolometer development at Argonne National Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datesman, Aaron; Pearson, John; Wang, Gensheng; Yefremenko, Volodymyr; Divan, Ralu; Downes, Thomas; Chang, Clarence; McMahon, Jeff; Meyer, Stephan; Carlstrom, John; Logan, Daniel; Perera, Thushara; Wilson, Grant; Novosad, Valentyn

    2008-07-01

    We discuss the development, at Argonne National Laboratory, of a four-pixel camera suitable for photometry of distant dusty galaxies located by Spitzer and SCUBA, and for study of other millimeter-wave sources such as ultra-luminous infrared galaxies, the Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) effect in clusters, and galactic dust. Utilizing Frequency Selective Bolometers (FSBs) with superconducting Transition-Edge Sensors (TESs), each of the camera's four pixels is sensitive to four colors, with frequency bands centered approximately at 150, 220, 270, and 360 GHz. The current generation of these devices utilizes proximity effect superconducting bilayers of Mo/Au or Ti/Au for TESs, along with frequency selective circuitry on membranes of silicon nitride 1 cm across and 1 micron thick. The operational properties of these devices are determined by this circuitry, along with thermal control structures etched into the membranes. These etched structures do not perforate the membrane, so that the device is both comparatively robust mechanically and carefully tailored in terms of its thermal transport properties. In this paper, we report on development of the superconducting bilayer TES technology and characterization of the FSB stacks. This includes the use of new materials, the design and testing of thermal control structures, the introduction of desirable thermal properties using buried layers of crystalline silicon underneath the membrane, detector stability control, and optical and thermal test results. The scientific motivation, FSB design, FSB fabrication, and measurement results are discussed.

  5. The Sodium Process Facility at Argonne National Laboratory-West

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michelbacher, J.A.; Henslee, S.P.; McDermott, M.D.; Price, J.R.; Rosenberg, K.E.; Wells, P.B.

    1998-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) has approximately 680,000 liters of raw sodium stored in facilities on site. As mandated by the State of Idaho and the US Department of Energy (DOE), this sodium must be transformed into a stable condition for land disposal. To comply with this mandate, ANL-W designed and built the Sodium Process Facility (SPF) for the processing of this sodium into a dry, sodium carbonate powder. The major portion of the sodium stored at ANL-W is radioactively contaminated. The sodium will be processed in three separate and distinct campaigns: the 290,000 liters of Fermi-1 primary sodium, the 50,000 liters of the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) secondary sodium, and the 330,000 liters of the EBR-II primary sodium. The Fermi-1 and the EBR-II secondary sodium contain only low-level of radiation, while the EBR-II primary sodium has radiation levels up to 0.5 mSv (50 mrem) per hour at 1 meter. The EBR-II primary sodium will be processed last, allowing the operating experience to be gained with the less radioactive sodium prior to reacting the most radioactive sodium. The sodium carbonate will be disposed of in 270 liter barrels, four to a pallet. These barrels are square in cross-section, allowing for maximum utilization of the space on a pallet, minimizing the required landfill space required for disposal

  6. The Sodium Process Facility at Argonne National Laboratory-West

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michelbacher, J.A.; Henslee, S.P. McDermott, M.D.; Price, J.R.; Rosenberg, K.E.; Wells, P.B.

    1998-07-01

    Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) has approximately 680,000 liters of raw sodium stored in facilities on site. As mandated by the State of Idaho and the US Department of Energy (DOE), this sodium must be transformed into a stable condition for land disposal. To comply with this mandate, ANL-W designed and built the Sodium Process Facility (SPF) for the processing of this sodium into a dry, sodium carbonate powder. The major portion of the sodium stored at ANL-W is radioactively contaminated. The sodium will be processed in three separate and distinct campaigns: the 290,000 liters of Fermi-1 primary sodium, the 50,000 liters of the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) secondary sodium, and the 330,000 liters of the EBR-II primary sodium. The Fermi-1 and the EBR-II secondary sodium contain only low-level of radiation, while the EBR-II primary sodium has radiation levels up to 0.5 mSv (50 mrem) per hour at 1 meter. The EBR-II primary sodium will be processed last, allowing the operating experience to be gained with the less radioactive sodium prior to reacting the most radioactive sodium. The sodium carbonate will be disposed of in 270 liter barrels, four to a pallet. These barrels are square in cross-section, allowing for maximum utilization of the space on a pallet, minimizing the required landfill space required for disposal.

  7. Argonne National Laboratory's thermal plume measurements: instruments and techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Loon, L.S.; Frigo, A.A.; Paddock, R.A.

    1977-12-01

    Instrumentation and techniques were developed at Argonne National Laboratory for measuring the three-dimensional temperature structure of thermal plumes from power plants, along with the limnological, meteorological, and plant operating conditions affecting their behavior. The equipment and procedures were designed to provide field data for use in evaluating predictive models that describe thermal plume behavior, and over 100 sets of these data have been collected. The instrument systems and techniques employed in a typical thermal discharge survey are highly integrated. Continuous monitoring of ambient and plant conditions is coupled with plume mapping from a moving survey boat. The instantaneous location of the boat together with subsurface temperature measurements from a towed thermistor chain provide a quasisynoptic view of the plume structure. Real-time, onboard display of the boat path and vertical temperatures supply feedback to investigators for determining the extent and spatial resolution of measurements required. The unique design, reliability, accuracy, calibration, and historical development of the components of these integrated systems are described. Survey system interfaces with data handling and processing techniques are also explained. Special supportive studies to investigate plume dynamics, values of eddy diffusivities, time-temperature histories of water parcels in thermal plumes, and rapid changes in plume shape are also described along with instrumentation used

  8. Preliminary characterization of the 100 area at Argonne National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biang, C.; Biang, R.; Patel, P.

    1994-06-01

    This characterization report is based on the results of sampling and an initial environmental assessment of the 100 Area of Argonne National Laboratory. It addresses the current status, projected data requirements, and recommended actions for five study areas within the 100 Area: the Lime Sludge Pond, the Building 108 Liquid Retention Pond, the Coal Yard, the East Area Burn Pit, and the Eastern Perimeter Area. Two of these areas are solid waste management units under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (the Lime Sludge Pond and the Building 108 Liquid Retention Pond); however, the Illinois Environmental Protection Agency has determined that no further action is necessary for the Lime Sludge Pond. Operational records for some of the activities were not available, and one study area (the East Area Burn Pit) could not be precisely located. Recommendations for further investigation include sample collection to obtain the following information: (1) mineralogy of major minerals and clays within the soils and underlying aquifer, (2) pH of the soils, (3) total clay fraction of the soils, (4) cation exchange capacity of the soils and aquifer materials, and (5) exchangeable cations of the soils and aquifer material. Various other actions are recommended for the 100 Area, including an electromagnetic survey, sampling of several study areas to determine the extent of contamination and potential migration pathways, and sampling to determine the presence of any radionuclides. For some of the study areas, additional actions are contingent on the results of the initial recommendations

  9. Argonne National Laboratory-East summary site environmental report for calendar year 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golchert, N.W.; Kolzow, R.G.

    2004-01-01

    Argonne performs research and development in many areas of science and technology. General fields of research at Argonne include, but are not limited to, biosciences, biotechnology, chemical engineering, chemistry, decision and information sciences, energy systems and technology, high energy physics, materials science, math and computer science, nuclear reactors, physics, and environmental science. Argonne is not, and never has been, a weapons laboratory. Several missions provide focus for Argonne scientists. Basic research helps better understand the world, and applied research helps protect and improve it. For example, the prairies of Argonne provide sites for environmental studies that provide valuable information about invader species and the food webs within ecosystems. Argonne also operates world-class research facilities, such as the Advanced Photon Source (APS), which is a national research facility funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Scientists use high brilliance X-rays from the APS for basic and applied research in many fields. Argonne also seeks to ensure our energy future. Currently, scientists and engineers are developing cleaner and more efficient energy sources, such as fuel cells and advanced electric power generation. Argonne has spent much of its history on developing nuclear reactor technology. That research is now being applied to American and Soviet nuclear reactors to improve the safety and life of the reactors. Other Argonne research seeks to improve the way we manage our environment. For example, Argonne scientists created a new catalyst that could help carmakers eliminate 95 percent of nitrogen-oxide emitted by diesel engines by the year 2007. Research and development solutions such as these will help protect our ecosystems

  10. Radiation chemistry at the Metallurgical Laboratory, Manhattan Project, University of Chicago (1942-1947) and the Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (1947-1984)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, S.

    1989-01-01

    The events in radiation chemistry which occurred in the Manhattan Project Laboratory and Argonne National Laboratory during World War II are reviewed. Research programmes from then until the present day are presented, with emphasis on pulse radiolysis studies. (UK)

  11. Argonne National Laboratory Publications July 1, 1968 - June 30, 1969.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    1969-08-01

    This publication list is a bibliography of scientific and technical accounts originated at Argonne and published during the fiscal year 1969 (July 1, 1968 through June 30, 1969). It includes items published as journal articles, technical reports, books, etc., all of which have been made available to the public.

  12. Argonne National Laboratory Physics Division annual report, January--December 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thayer, K.J.

    1997-08-01

    The past year has seen several of the Physics Division's new research projects reach major milestones with first successful experiments and results: the atomic physics station in the Basic Energy Sciences Research Center at the Argonne Advanced Photon Source was used in first high-energy, high-brilliance x-ray studies in atomic and molecular physics; the Short Orbit Spectrometer in Hall C at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator (TJNAF) Facility that the Argonne medium energy nuclear physics group was responsible for, was used extensively in the first round of experiments at TJNAF; at ATLAS, several new beams of radioactive isotopes were developed and used in studies of nuclear physics and nuclear astrophysics; the new ECR ion source at ATLAS was completed and first commissioning tests indicate excellent performance characteristics; Quantum Monte Carlo calculations of mass-8 nuclei were performed for the first time with realistic nucleon-nucleon interactions using state-of-the-art computers, including Argonne's massively parallel IBM SP. At the same time other future projects are well under way: preparations for the move of Gammasphere to ATLAS in September 1997 have progressed as planned. These new efforts are imbedded in, or flowing from, the vibrant ongoing research program described in some detail in this report: nuclear structure and reactions with heavy ions; measurements of reactions of astrophysical interest; studies of nucleon and sub-nucleon structures using leptonic probes at intermediate and high energies; atomic and molecular structure with high-energy x-rays. The experimental efforts are being complemented with efforts in theory, from QCD to nucleon-meson systems to structure and reactions of nuclei. Finally, the operation of ATLAS as a national users facility has achieved a new milestone, with 5,800 hours beam on target for experiments during the past fiscal year

  13. Advanced reactor development: The LMR integral fast reactor program at Argonne

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Till, C.E.

    1990-01-01

    Reactor technology for the 21st Century must develop with characteristics that can now be seen to be important for the future, quite different from the things when the fundamental materials and design choices for present reactors were made in the 1950s. Argonne National Laboratory, since 1984, has been developing the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR). This paper will describe the way in which this new reactor concept came about; the technical, public acceptance, and environmental issues that are addressed by the IFR; the technical progress that has been made; and our expectations for this program in the near term. 3 figs

  14. Argonne National Laboratory's photo-oxidation organic mixed waste treatment system - installation and startup testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shearer, T.L.; Nelson, R.A.; Torres, T.; Conner, C.; Wygmans, D.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes the installation and startup testing of the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL-E) Photo-Oxidation Organic Mixed Waste Treatment System. This system will treat organic mixed (i.e., radioactive and hazardous) waste by oxidizing the organics to carbon dioxide and inorganic salts in an aqueous media. The residue will be treated in the existing radwaste evaporators. The system is installed in the Waste Management Facility at the ANL-E site in Argonne, Illinois. 1 fig

  15. An in-house alternative to traditional SDI services at Argonne National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noel, R.E.; Dominiak, R.R.

    1997-02-20

    Selective Dissemination of Information (SDIs) are based on automated, well-defined programs that regularly produce precise, relevant bibliographic information. Librarians have typically turned to information vendors such as Dialog or STN international to design and implement these searches for their users in business, academia, and the science community. Because Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) purchases the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI) Current Contents tapes (all subject areas excluding Humanities). ANL scientists enjoy the benefit of in-house developments with BASISplus software programming and no longer need to turn to outside companies for reliable SDI service. The database and its customized services are known as ACCESS (Argonne Current Contents Electronic Search Service). Through collaboration with librarians on Boolean logic and selection of terms, users can now design their own personal profiles to comb the new data, thereby avoiding service fees from outside providers. Based on the feedback from scientists, it seems that this new service can help transform the ANL distributed libraries into more efficient central functioning entities that better serve the users. One goal is to eliminate the routing of paper copies of many new journal issues to different library locations for users to browse; instead users may be expected to rely more on electronic dissemination of both table of contents and customized SDIs for new scientific and technical information.

  16. Argonne National Laboratory-east site environmental report for calendar year 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golchert, N.W.; Duffy, T.L.

    1989-04-01

    The results of the environmental monitoring program at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for 1988 are presented and discussed. Sample collections were made on the site, at the site boundary, and off the ANL site for comparison purposes. Measurements were made for a variety of radionuclides in air, surface water, ground water, soil, grass, bottom sediment, and milk. Samples were also analyzed for a variety of chemical constituents in surface water, ground water, and ANL effluent water. External penetrating radiation doses were also measured. The potential for radiation exposure to off-site population groups is estimated. The results of the program are interpreted in terms of the origin of the radioactive and chemical substances and are compared with applicable environmental quality standards. A United States Department of Energy dose calculation methodology, is used in this report. 28 refs., 9 figs., 81 tabs

  17. The sodium process facility at Argonne National Laboratory - West

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michelbacher, J.A.; Henslee, S.P.; McDermott, M.D.; Price, J.R.; Rosenberg, K.E.; Wells, P.B.

    1997-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory - West (ANL-W) has approximately 680,000 liters (180,000 gallons) of raw sodium stored in facilities on site. As mandated by the State of Idaho and the United States Department of Energy (DOE), this sodium must be transformed into a stable condition for land disposal. To comply with this mandate, ANL-W designed and built the Sodium Process Facility (SPF) for the processing of this sodium into a dry, sodium carbonate powder. The major portion of the sodium stored at ANL-W is radioactively contaminated. The SPF was designed to react elemental sodium to sodium carbonate through two-stages involving caustic process and carbonate process steps. The sodium is first reacted to sodium hydroxide in the caustic process step. The caustic process step involves the injection of sodium into a nickel reaction vessel filled with a 50 wt% solution of sodium hydroxide. Water is also injected, controlling the boiling point of the solution. In the carbonate process, the sodium hydroxide is reacted with carbon dioxide to form sodium carbonate. This dry powder, similar in consistency to baking soda, is a waste form acceptable for burial in the State of Idaho as a non-hazardous, radioactive waste. The caustic process was originally designed and built in the 1980s for reacting the 290,000 liters (77,000 gallons) of primary sodium from the Fermi-1 Reactor to sodium hydroxide. The hydroxide was slated to be used to neutralize acid products from the PUREX process at the Hanford site. However, changes in the DOE mission precluded the need for hydroxide and the caustic process was never operated. With the shutdown of the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II), the necessity for a facility to react sodium was identified. In order to comply with Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) requirements, the sodium had to be converted into a waste form acceptable for disposal in a Sub-Title D low-level radioactive waste disposal facility. Sodium hydroxide is a RCRA

  18. 1985 annual site environmental report for Argonne National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golchert, N.W.; Duffy, T.L.; Sedlet, J.

    1986-03-01

    This is one in a series of annual reports prepared to provide DOE, environmental agencies, and the public with information on the level of radioactive and chemical pollutants in the environment and on the amounts of such substances, if any, added to the environment as a result of Argonne operations. Included in this report are the results of measurements obtained in 1985 for a number of radionuclides in air, surface water, ground water, soil, grass, bottom sediment, and milk; for a variety of chemical constituents in surface and subsurface water; and for the external penetrating radiation dose

  19. Leidos Biomed Teams with NCI, DOE, and Argonne National Lab to Support National X-Ray Resource | FNLCR Staging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scientists are making progress in understanding a bleeding disorder caused by prescription drug interactions, thanks to a high-tech research facility involving two federal national laboratories, Argonne and Frederick. Miroslawa Dauter is a Senior Res

  20. Leidos Biomed Teams with NCI, DOE, and Argonne National Lab to Support National X-Ray Resource | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scientists are making progress in understanding a bleeding disorder caused by prescription drug interactions, thanks to a high-tech research facility involving two federal national laboratories, Argonne and Frederick.

  1. Verification Survey of the Building 315 Zero Power Reactor-6 Facility, Argonne National Laboratory-East, Argonne, Illinois

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    W. C. Adams

    2007-01-01

    Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) conducted independent verification radiological survey activities at Argonne National Laboratory's Building 315, Zero Power Reactor-6 facility in Argonne, Illinois. Independent verification survey activities included document and data reviews, alpha plus beta and gamma surface scans, alpha and beta surface activity measurements, and instrumentation comparisons. An interim letter report and a draft report, documenting the verification survey findings, were submitted to the DOE on November 8, 2006 and February 22, 2007, respectively (ORISE 2006b and 2007). Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E) is owned by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and is operated under a contract with the University of Chicago. Fundamental and applied research in the physical, biomedical, and environmental sciences are conducted at ANL-E and the laboratory serves as a major center of energy research and development. Building 315, which was completed in 1962, contained two cells, Cells 5 and 4, for holding Zero Power Reactor (ZPR)-6 and ZPR-9, respectively. These reactors were built to increase the knowledge and understanding of fast reactor technology. ZPR-6 was also referred to as the Fast Critical Facility and focused on fast reactor studies for civilian power production. ZPR-9 was used for nuclear rocket and fast reactor studies. In 1967, the reactors were converted for plutonium use. The reactors operated from the mid-1960's until 1982 when they were both shut down. Low levels of radioactivity were expected to be present due to the operating power levels of the ZPR's being restricted to well below 1,000 watts. To evaluate the presence of radiological contamination, DOE characterized the ZPRs in 2001. Currently, the Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) and Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction (MCCI) Experiments are being conducted in Cell 4 where the ZPR-9 is located (ANL 2002 and 2006). ANL has performed final

  2. Argonne National Laboratory superconducting pulsed coil program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, S.T.; Kim, S.H.

    1979-01-01

    The main objectives are to develop high current (approx. 100 kA) cryostable cable configurations with reasonably low ac losses, to build a demonstration pulsed coil, and to develop a rather inexpensive large fiberglass reinforced helium cryostat. A 1.5-MJ cryostable pulsed superconducting coil has been developed and constructed at ANL. The coil has a peak field of 4.5 T at an operating current of 11.0 kA. A large inexpensive plastic cryostat has been developed for testing the pulsed coil. The coil has been pulsed with a maximum dB/dt of 11 T/s. The coil was pulsed more than 4000 cycles. Detailed results of the ac loss measurements and the current sharing of the cryostability will be described

  3. Project plan for the decontamination and decommissioning of the Argonne National Laboratory Experimental Boiling Water Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boing, L.E.

    1989-12-01

    In 1956, the Experimental Boiling Water Reactor (EBWR) Facility was first operated at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) as a test reactor to demonstrate the feasibility of operating an integrated power plant using a direct cycle boiling water reactor as a heat source. In 1967, ANL permanently shut down the EBWR and placed it in dry lay-up. This project plan presents the schedule and organization for the decontamination and decommissioning of the EBWR Facility which will allow it to be reused by other ANL scientific research programs. The project total estimated cost is $14.3M and is projected to generate 22,000 cubic feet of low-level radioactive waste which will be disposed of at an approved DOE burial ground. 18 figs., 3 tabs

  4. Project plan for the decontamination and decommissioning of the Argonne National Laboratory Experimental Boiling Water Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boing, L.E.

    1989-12-01

    In 1956, the Experimental Boiling Water Reactor (EBWR) Facility was first operated at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) as a test reactor to demonstrate the feasibility of operating an integrated power plant using a direct cycle boiling water reactor as a heat source. In 1967, ANL permanently shut down the EBWR and placed it in dry lay-up. This project plan presents the schedule and organization for the decontamination and decommissioning of the EBWR Facility which will allow it to be reused by other ANL scientific research programs. The project total estimated cost is $14.3M and is projected to generate 22,000 cubic feet of low-level radioactive waste which will be disposed of at an approved DOE burial ground. 18 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Alpha-Gamma Hot-Cell Facility at Argonne National Laboratory East

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neimark, L.A.; Jackson, W.D.; Donahue, D.A.

    1979-01-01

    The Alpha-Gamma Hot-Cell Facility has been in operation at Argonne National Laboratory East (ANL-E) for 15 years. The facility was designed for plutonium research in support of ANL's LMFBR program. The facility consists of a kilocurie, nitrogen-atmosphere alpha-gamma hot cell and supporting laboratories. Modifications to the facility and its equipment have been made over the years as the workload and nature of the work changed. These modifications included inerting the entire hot cell, adding four work stations, modifying in-loading procedures and examination equipment to handle longer test articles, and changing to a new sodium-vapor lighting system. Future upgrading includes the addition of a decontamination and repair facility, use of radio-controlled transfer carts, refurbishment of the zinc bromide windows, and the installation of an Auger microprobe

  6. Radiological safety at Argonne National Laboratory's heavy ion research facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooke, R.H.; Wynveen, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    This paper discusses the radiological safety system to be employed at the Argonne tandem-linac accelerator system (ATLAS). The design parameters of ATLAS that affect safety have remained unchanged since ATLAS construction began in 1982. This paper will present the details of the hardware, the administrative controls, and the radiation monitoring that will be in effect when beam is produced in April 1985. The experimental hall utilizing the maximum energy beam (proportional27 MeV per nucleon) from the completed ATLAS has been partitioned with shielding blocks into its final configuration. Because scientists want access to some of the partitioned-off areas while beam is present in other areas, an interlock and logic system allowing such occupancy has been designed. The rationale and hardware of the system will be discussed. Since one of the potential radiation hazards is high-energy forward-directed neutrons from any location where the beam impinges (such as collimators, bending and focussing systems, experimental targets, and beam stops), radiation surveys and hazard assessments are necessary for the administrative controls that allow occupancy of various areas. Because of the various uses of ATLAS, neutrons (the dominant beam hazard) will be non-existent in some experiments and will be of energies > or approx.10 MeV for a few experiments. These conditions may exist at specific locations during beam preparation but may change rapidly when beam is finally delivered to an experimental area. Monitoring and assessing such time varying and geographically changing hazards will be a challenge since little data will be available on source terms until various beams are produced of sufficient intensity and energy to make measurements. How the operating division for ATLAS and the Argonne safety division are addressing this aspect through administrative controls will also be discussed. (orig./HSI)

  7. Status of rf superconductivity at Argonne National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markovich, P.M.; Shepard, K.W.; Zinkann, G.P.

    1987-01-01

    This paper reports the status of hardware development for the linac portion of the Argonne tandem-linac accelerator system (ATLAS). The ATLAS superconducting linac consists of an independent-phased array of 45 superconducting niobium resonators of the split-ring type. The linac has been operating in its present form since 1985, on a 24-hours per day, 5 days per week schedule. An upgrade of the ATLAS system is currently under construction the positive-ion injector (PII). The PII system will consist of an ECR positive-ion source mounted on a high-voltage platform injecting a very-low-velocity superconducting linac. The completed system will provide for the acceleration of beams of mass up to uranium, and will replace the tandem electrostatic accelerator as the injector for ATLAS. The status of resonator development for the superconducting linac is reported in this paper. Accelerating gradients in the existing ATLAS linac are currently limited by excessive heating and rf loss in the fast-tuning system associated with each superconducting resonator. Development of an upgraded fast-tuning system is also reported here. 7 refs., 5 figs

  8. Argonne National Laboratory research to help U.S. steel industry

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory has joined a $1.29 million project to develop technology software that will use advanced computational fluid dynamics (CFD), a method of solving fluid flow and heat transfer problems. This technology allows engineers to evaluate and predict erosion patterns within blast furnaces (1 page).

  9. 'Experience with decommissioning of research and test reactors at Argonne National Laboratory'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharyya, S.K.; Yule, T.J.; Fellhauer, C.R.; Boing, L.E.

    2002-01-01

    A large number of research reactors around the world have reached the end of their useful operational life. Many of these are kept in a controlled storage mode awaiting decontamination and decommissioning (D and D). At Argonne National Laboratory located near Chicago in the United States of America, significant experience has been gained in the D and D of research and test reactors. These experiences span the entire range of activities in D and D - from planning and characterization of the facilities to the eventual disposition of all waste. A multifaceted D nd D program has been in progress at the Argonne National Laboratory - East site for nearly a decade. The program consists of three elements: - D and D of nuclear facilities on the site that have reached the end of their useful life; - Development and demonstrations of technologies that help in safe and cost effective D and D; - Presentation of training courses in D and D practices. Nuclear reactor facilities have been constructed and operated at the ANL-E site since the earliest days of nuclear power. As a result, a number of these early reactors reached end-of-life long before reactors on other sites and were ready for D and D earlier. They presented an excellent set of test beds on which D and D practices and technologies could be demonstrated in environments that were similar to commercial reactors, but considerably less hazardous. As shown, four reactor facilities, plutonium contaminated glove boxes and hot cells, a cyclotron facility and assorted other nuclear related facilities have been decommissioned in this program. The overall cost of the program has been modest relative to the cost of comparable projects undertaken both in the U.S. and abroad. The safety record throughout the program was excellent. Complementing the actual operations, a set of D and D technologies are being developed. These include robotic methods of tool handling and operation, chemical and laser decontamination techniques, sensors

  10. Users Handbook for the Argonne Premium Coal Sample Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vorres, K.S.

    1993-10-01

    This Users Handbook for the Argonne Premium Coal Samples provides the recipients of those samples with information that will enhance the value of the samples, to permit greater opportunities to compare their work with that of others, and aid in correlations that can improve the value to all users. It is hoped that this document will foster a spirit of cooperation and collaboration such that the field of basic coal chemistry may be a more efficient and rewarding endeavor for all who participate. The different sections are intended to stand alone. For this reason some of the information may be found in several places. The handbook is also intended to be a dynamic document, constantly subject to change through additions and improvements. Please feel free to write to the editor with your comments and suggestions.

  11. Argonne National Laboratory-East site environmental report for calendar year 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golchert, N.W.; Kolzow, R.G.

    1993-05-01

    This report discusses the results of the Environmental Protection Program at Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL) for 1992. To evaluate the effects of ANL operations on the environment, samples of environmental media collected on the site, at the site boundary, and off the ANL site were analyzed and compared to applicable guidelines and standards. A variety of radionuclides was measured in air, surface water, groundwater, soil, grass, and bottom sediment samples. In addition, chemical constituents in surface water, groundwater, and ANL effluent water were analyzed. External penetrating radiation doses were measured and the potential for radiation exposure to off-site population groups was estimated. The results of the surveillance program are interpreted in terms of the origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (natural, fallout, ANL, and other) and are compared with applicable environmental quality standards. A US Department of Energy (DOE) dose calculation methodology, based on International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) recommendations and the CAP-88 version of the EPA-AIRDOSE/RADRISK computer code, is used in this report. The status of ANL environmental protection activities with respect to the various laws and regulations which govern waste handling and disposal is discussed.

  12. Argonne National Laboratory-East site environmental report for calendar year 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golchert, N.W.; Duffy, T.L.

    1990-04-01

    This report discusses the results of the environmental monitoring program at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for 1989. To evaluate the effects of ANL operations on the environment, samples of environmental media collected on the site, at the site boundary, and off the ANL site were analyzed and compared. A variety of radionuclides were measured in air, surface water, groundwater, soil, grass, bottom sediment, and milk samples. In addition, chemical constituents in surface water, groundwater, and ANL effluent water were analyzed. External penetrating radiation doses were measured and the potential for radiation exposure to off-site population groups was estimated. The results of the monitoring program are interpreted in terms of the origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (natural, fallout, ANL, and other) and are compared with applicable environmental quality standards. A US Department of Energy (DOE) dose calculation methodology, based on International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) recommendations, is used in this report. This report also discusses progress being made on corrective actions and restoration projects from past activities. 27 refs., 7 figs., 75 tabs

  13. Argonne National Laboratory-East site environmental report for calendar year 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golchert, N.W.; Kolzow, R.G.

    1997-09-01

    This report discusses the results of the environmental protection program at Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E) for 1996. To evaluate the effects of ANL-E operations on the environment, samples of environmental media collected on the site, at the site boundary, and off the ANL-E site were analyzed and compared to applicable guidelines and standards. A variety of radionuclides were measured in air, surface water, on-site groundwater, soil, grass, and bottom sediment samples. In addition, chemical constituents in surface water, groundwater, and ANL-E effluent water were analyzed. External penetrating radiation doses were measured, and the potential for radiation exposure to off-site population groups was estimated. The results of the surveillance program are interpreted in terms of the origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (natural, fallout, ANL-E, and other) and are compared with applicable environmental quality standards. A US Department of Energy dose calculation methodology, based on International Commission on Radiological Protection recommendations and the CAP-88 version of the EPA-AIRDOSE/RADRISK computer code, is used in this report. The status of ANL-E environmental protection activities with respect to the various laws and regulations that govern waste handling and disposal is discussed. This report also discusses progress being made on environmental corrective actions and restoration projects

  14. Argonne National Laboratory-East site environmental report for calendar year 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golchert, N.W.; Kolzow, R.G.

    1993-05-01

    This report discusses the results of the Environmental Protection Program at Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL) for 1992. To evaluate the effects of ANL operations on the environment, samples of environmental media collected on the site, at the site boundary, and off the ANL site were analyzed and compared to applicable guidelines and standards. A variety of radionuclides was measured in air, surface water, groundwater, soil, grass, and bottom sediment samples. In addition, chemical constituents in surface water, groundwater, and ANL effluent water were analyzed. External penetrating radiation doses were measured and the potential for radiation exposure to off-site population groups was estimated. The results of the surveillance program are interpreted in terms of the origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (natural, fallout, ANL, and other) and are compared with applicable environmental quality standards. A US Department of Energy (DOE) dose calculation methodology, based on International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) recommendations and the CAP-88 version of the EPA-AIRDOSE/RADRISK computer code, is used in this report. The status of ANL environmental protection activities with respect to the various laws and regulations which govern waste handling and disposal is discussed

  15. Argonne National Laboratory-East site environmental report for calendar year 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golchert, N.W.; Kolzow, R.G.

    1995-05-01

    This report discusses the results of the environmental protection program at Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL) for 1994. To evaluate the effects of ANL operations on the environment, samples of environmental media collected on the site, at the site boundary, and off the ANL site were analyzed and compared to applicable guidelines and standards. A variety of radionuclides was measured in air, surface water, groundwater, soil, grass, and bottom sediment samples. In addition, chemical constituents in surface water, groundwater, and ANL effluent water were analyzed. External penetrating radiation doses were measured and the potential for radiation exposure to off-site population groups was estimated. The results of the surveillance program are interpreted in terms of the origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (natural, fallout, ANL, and other) and are compared with applicable environmental quality standards. A US Department of Energy (DOE) dose calculation methodology, based on International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) recommendations and the CAP-88 version of the EPA-AIRDOSE/RADRISK COMPUTER CODE, is used in this report. The status of ANL environmental protection activities with respect to the various laws and regulations which govern waste handling and disposal is discussed. This report also discusses progress being made on environmental corrective actions and restoration projects.

  16. Argonne National Laboratory--East site environmental report for calendar year 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golchert, N.W.; Duffy, T.L.; Moos, L.P.

    1991-07-01

    This report discusses the results of the environmental protection program at Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL) for 1990. To evaluate the effects of ANL operations on the environment, samples of environmental media collected on the site, at the site boundary, and off the ANL site were analyzed and compared to applicable guidelines and standards. A variety of radionuclides was measured in air, surface water, groundwater, soil, grass, bottom sediment, and milk samples. In addition, chemical constituents in surface water, groundwater, and ANL effluent water were analyzed. External penetrating radiation doses were measured and the potential for radiation exposure to off-site population groups was estimated. The results of the surveillance program are interpreted in terms of the origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (natural, fallout, ANL, and other) and are compared with applicable environmental quality standards. A US Department of Energy (DOE) dose calculation methodology, based on International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) recommendations, is used in this report. The status of ANL environmental protection activities with respect to the various laws and regulations which govern waste handling and disposal is discussed. This report also discusses progress being made on environmental corrective actions and restoration projects from past activities

  17. Argonne National Laboratory-East site environmental report for calendar year 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golchert, N.W.; Kolzow, R.G.

    1994-05-01

    This report discusses the results of the environmental protection program at Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL) for 1993. To evaluate the effects of ANL operations on the environment, samples of environmental media collected on the site, at the site boundary, and off the ANL site were analyzed and compared to applicable guidelines and standards. A variety of radionuclides was measured in air, surface water, groundwater, soil, grass, and bottom sediment samples. In addition, chemical constituents in surface water, groundwater, and ANL effluent water were analyzed. External penetrating radiation doses were measured and the potential for radiation exposure to off-site population groups was estimated. The results of the surveillance program are interpreted in terms of the origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (natural, fallout, ANL, and other) and are compared with applicable environmental quality standards. A US Department of Energy (DOE) dose calculation methodology, based on International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) recommendations and the CAP-88 version of the EPA-AIRDOSE/RADRISK computer code, is used in this report. The status of ANL environmental protection activities with respect to the various laws and regulations which govern waste handling and disposal is discussed. This report also discusses progress being made on environmental corrective actions and restoration projects from past activities

  18. Argonne National Laboratory-East site environmental report for calendar year 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golchert, N.W.; Kolzow, R.G.

    1995-05-01

    This report discusses the results of the environmental protection program at Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL) for 1994. To evaluate the effects of ANL operations on the environment, samples of environmental media collected on the site, at the site boundary, and off the ANL site were analyzed and compared to applicable guidelines and standards. A variety of radionuclides was measured in air, surface water, groundwater, soil, grass, and bottom sediment samples. In addition, chemical constituents in surface water, groundwater, and ANL effluent water were analyzed. External penetrating radiation doses were measured and the potential for radiation exposure to off-site population groups was estimated. The results of the surveillance program are interpreted in terms of the origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (natural, fallout, ANL, and other) and are compared with applicable environmental quality standards. A US Department of Energy (DOE) dose calculation methodology, based on International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) recommendations and the CAP-88 version of the EPA-AIRDOSE/RADRISK COMPUTER CODE, is used in this report. The status of ANL environmental protection activities with respect to the various laws and regulations which govern waste handling and disposal is discussed. This report also discusses progress being made on environmental corrective actions and restoration projects

  19. Argonne National Laboratory-East site environmental report for calendar year 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golchert, N.W.; Kolzow, R.G.

    1997-09-01

    This report discusses the results of the environmental protection program at Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E) for 1996. To evaluate the effects of ANL-E operations on the environment, samples of environmental media collected on the site, at the site boundary, and off the ANL-E site were analyzed and compared to applicable guidelines and standards. A variety of radionuclides were measured in air, surface water, on-site groundwater, soil, grass, and bottom sediment samples. In addition, chemical constituents in surface water, groundwater, and ANL-E effluent water were analyzed. External penetrating radiation doses were measured, and the potential for radiation exposure to off-site population groups was estimated. The results of the surveillance program are interpreted in terms of the origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (natural, fallout, ANL-E, and other) and are compared with applicable environmental quality standards. A US Department of Energy dose calculation methodology, based on International Commission on Radiological Protection recommendations and the CAP-88 version of the EPA-AIRDOSE/RADRISK computer code, is used in this report. The status of ANL-E environmental protection activities with respect to the various laws and regulations that govern waste handling and disposal is discussed. This report also discusses progress being made on environmental corrective actions and restoration projects.

  20. Status report on the positive ion injector (PII) for ATLAS at Argonne National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zinkann, G.P.; Added, N.; Billquist, P.; Bogaty, J.; Clifft, B.; Markovich, P.; Phillips, D.; Strickhorn, P.; Shepard, K.W.

    1991-01-01

    The Positive Ion Injector (PII) is part of the Uranuim upgrade for ATLAS accelerator at Argonne National Laboratory. This paper will include a technical discussion of the Positive Ion Injector (PII) accelerator with its superconducting, niobium, very low-velocity accelerating structures. It will also discuss the current construction schedule of PII, and review an upgrade of the fast- tuning system. 10 refs., 6 figs

  1. Argonne National Laboratory contributions to the International Symposium on Fusion Nuclear Technology (ISFNT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-10-01

    A total of sixteen papers with authors from Argonne National Laboratory were presented at the First International Symposium on Fusion Nuclear Technology (ISFNT), held in Tokyo, Japan, in April 1988. The papers cover the results of recent investigations in blanket design and analysis, fusion neutronics, materials experiments in liquid metal corrosion and solid breeders, tritium recovery analysis, experiments and analysis for liquid metal MHD, reactor safety and economic analysis, and transient electromagnetic analysis

  2. A five-picosecond electron pulse from ANL (Argonne National Laboratory) L-Band Linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, G.L.; Jonah, C.D.; Ficht, D.T.; Mavrogenes, G.S.; Sauer, M.C. Jr.

    1989-01-01

    The pulse-compression system of the Argonne National Laboratory Chemistry Division L-Band Linac, presented at the 1986 Linear Accelerator Conference at Stanford, California, has been completed. A five-picosecond-wide electron pulse containing 6 x 10 -9 coulomb charge has been achieved. Acceleration parameters and the pulse-width measurement technique are discussed, and future plans for the utilization of this pulse in radiation chemistry studies are presented. 5 refs., 4 figs

  3. Argonne National Laboratory contributions to the International Symposium on Fusion Nuclear Technology (ISFNT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-10-01

    A total of sixteen papers with authors from Argonne National Laboratory were presented at the First International Symposium on Fusion Nuclear Technology (ISFNT), held in Tokyo, Japan, in April 1988. The papers cover the results of recent investigations in blanket design and analysis, fusion neutronics, materials experiments in liquid metal corrosion and solid breeders, tritium recovery analysis, experiments and analysis for liquid metal MHD, reactor safety and economic analysis, and transient electromagnetic analysis.

  4. Derived concentration guideline levels for Argonne National Laboratory's building 310 area.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamboj, S., Dr.; Yu, C ., Dr. (Environmental Science Division)

    2011-08-12

    The derived concentration guideline level (DCGL) is the allowable residual radionuclide concentration that can remain in soil after remediation of the site without radiological restrictions on the use of the site. It is sometimes called the single radionuclide soil guideline or the soil cleanup criteria. This report documents the methodology, scenarios, and parameters used in the analysis to support establishing radionuclide DCGLs for Argonne National Laboratory's Building 310 area.

  5. Status report on the positive ion injector (PII) for ATLAS at Argonne National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zinkann, G.P.; Added, N.; Billquist, P.; Bogaty, J.; Clifft, B.; Markovich, P.; Phillips, D.; Strickhorn, P.; Shepard, K.W.

    1991-01-01

    The Positive Ion Injector (PII) is part of the Uranuim upgrade for ATLAS accelerator at Argonne National Laboratory. This paper will include a technical discussion of the Positive Ion Injector (PII) accelerator with its superconducting, niobium, very low-velocity accelerating structures. It will also discuss the current construction schedule of PII, and review an upgrade of the fast- tuning system. 10 refs., 6 figs.

  6. Argonne National Laboratory-East site environmental report for calendar year 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golchert, N.W.; Kolzow, R.G.

    1999-01-01

    This report discusses the results of the environmental protection program at Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E) for 1998. To evaluate the effects of ANL-E operations on the environment, samples of environmental media collected on the site, at the site boundary, and off the ANL-E site were analyzed and compared with applicable guidelines and standards. A variety of radionuclides were measured in air, surface water, on-site groundwater, and bottom sediment samples. In addition, chemical constituents in surface water, groundwater, and ANL-E effluent water were analyzed. External penetrating radiation doses were measured, and the potential for radiation exposure to off-site population groups was estimated. Results are interpreted in terms of the origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (i.e., natural, fallout, ANL-E, and other) and are compared with applicable environmental quality standards. A US Department of Energy dose calculation methodology, based on International Commission on Radiological Protection recommendations and the US Environmental Protection Agency's CAP-88 (Clean Air Act Assessment Package-1988) computer code, was used in preparing this report. The status of ANL-E environmental protection activities with respect to the various laws and regulations that govern waste handling and disposal is discussed, along with the progress of environmental corrective actions and restoration projects

  7. Waste characterization for radioactive liquid waste evaporators at Argonne National Laboratory - West

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christensen, B. D.

    1999-01-01

    Several facilities at Argonne National Laboratory - West (ANL-W) generate many thousand gallons of radioactive liquid waste per year. These waste streams are sent to the AFL-W Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility (RLWTF) where they are processed through hot air evaporators. These evaporators remove the liquid portion of the waste and leave a relatively small volume of solids in a shielded container. The ANL-W sampling, characterization and tracking programs ensure that these solids ultimately meet the disposal requirements of a low-level radioactive waste landfill. One set of evaporators will process an average 25,000 gallons of radioactive liquid waste, provide shielding, and reduce it to a volume of six cubic meters (container volume) for disposal. Waste characterization of the shielded evaporators poses some challenges. The process of evaporating the liquid and reducing the volume of waste increases the concentrations of RCIU regulated metals and radionuclides in the final waste form. Also, once the liquid waste has been processed through the evaporators it is not possible to obtain sample material for characterization. The process for tracking and assessing the final radioactive waste concentrations is described in this paper, The structural components of the evaporator are an approved and integral part of the final waste stream and they are included in the final waste characterization

  8. Argonne National Laboratory-East site environmental report for calendar year 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golchert, N. W.; Kolzow, R. G.

    2000-01-01

    This report discusses the results of the environmental protection program at Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E) for 1999. To evaluate the effects of ANL-E operations on the environment, samples of environmental media collected on the site, at the site boundary, and off the ANL-E site were analyzed and compared with applicable guidelines and standards. A variety of radionuclides were measured in air, surface water, on-site groundwater, and bottom sediment samples. In addition, chemical constituents in surface water, groundwater, and ANL-E effluent water were analyzed. External penetrating radiation doses were measured, and the potential for radiation exposure to off-site population groups was estimated. Results are interpreted in terms of the origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (i.e., natural, fallout, ANL-E, and other) and are compared with applicable environmental quality standards. A US Department of Energy dose calculation methodology, based on International Commission on Radiological Protection recommendations and the US Environmental Protection Agency's CAP-88 (Clean Air Act Assessment Package-1988) computer code, was used in preparing this report. The status of ANL-E environmental protection activities with respect to the various laws and regulations that govern waste handling and disposal is discussed, along with the progress of environmental corrective actions and restoration projects

  9. Argonne National Laboratory-East site environmental report for calendar year 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golchert, N.W.; Duffy, T.L.; Moos, L.P.

    1992-05-01

    This report discusses the results of the environmental protection program at Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL) for 1991. To evaluate the effects of ANL operations on the environment, samples of environmental media collected on the site, at the site boundary, and off the ANL site were analyzed and compared to applicable guidelines and standards. A variety of radionuclides was measured in air, surface water, groundwater, soil, grass, and bottom sediment samples. Chemical constituents in surface water, groundwater, and ANL effluent water were analyzed. External penetrating radiation doses were measured and the potential for radiation exposure to off-site population groups was estimated. Results are interpreted in terms of the origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (natural, fallout, ANL, and other) and are compared with applicable environmental quality standards. A US Department of Energy (DOE) dose calculation methodology, based on International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) recommendations and the CAP-88 version of the EPA-AIRDOSE/RADRISK computer code, is used in this report. The status of ANL environmental protection activities with respect to the various laws and regulations which govern waste handling and disposal is discussed. This report also discusses progress being made on environmental corrective actions and restoration projects from past activities

  10. 2009 Argonne National Laboratory Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2010-08-19

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  11. Proactive maintenance initiatives at Argonne National Laboratory-West

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duckwitz, N.R.; Duncan, L.W.; Whipple, J.J.

    1995-01-01

    In the late 1980's, ANL-W Management foresaw a need to provide dedicated technical support for maintenance supervisors. Maintenance supervisors were facing increased challenges to ensure all environmental, safety, and waste management regulations were followed in daily maintenance activities. This increased burden was diverting supervisory time away from on-the-job supervision. Supervisors were finding less time for their ''mentor'' roles to ensure maintenance focused on finding and correcting root causes. Additionally the traditional maintenance organization could not keep up with the explosion in predictive maintenance technologies. As a result, engineers were tasked to provide direct technical support to the maintenance organization. Today the maintenance technical support group consists of two mechanical engineers, two electrical engineers and an I ampersand C engineer. The group provides a readily available, quick response resource for crafts people and their supervisors. They can and frequently do ask the support group for help to determine the root cause and to effect permanent fixes. Crafts and engineers work together informally to make an effective maintenance team. In addition to day-to-day problem solving, the technical support group has established several maintenance improvement programs for the site. This includes vibration analysis of rotating machinery, testing of fuel for emergency diesel generators, improving techniques for testing of high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters, and capacity testing of UPS and emergency diesel starting batteries. These programs have increased equipment reliability, reduced conventional routine maintenance, reduced unexpected maintenance, and improved testing accuracy. This paper will discuss the interaction of the technical support group within the maintenance department. Additionally the maintenance improvement programs will be presented along with actual cases encountered, the resolutions and lessons learned

  12. Surveys of research in the Chemistry Division, Argonne National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grazis, B.M. [ed.

    1992-11-01

    Research reports are presented on reactive intermediates in condensed phase (radiation chemistry, photochemistry), electron transfer and energy conversion, photosynthesis and solar energy conversion, metal cluster chemistry, chemical dynamics in gas phase, photoionization-photoelectrons, characterization and reactivity of coal and coal macerals, premium coal sample program, chemical separations, heavy elements coordination chemistry, heavy elements photophysics/photochemistry, f-electron interactions, radiation chemistry of high-level wastes (gas generation in waste tanks), ultrafast molecular electronic devices, and nuclear medicine. Separate abstracts have been prepared. Accelerator activites and computer system/network services are also reported.

  13. Surveys of research in the Chemistry Division, Argonne National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grazis, B.M. (ed.)

    1992-01-01

    Research reports are presented on reactive intermediates in condensed phase (radiation chemistry, photochemistry), electron transfer and energy conversion, photosynthesis and solar energy conversion, metal cluster chemistry, chemical dynamics in gas phase, photoionization-photoelectrons, characterization and reactivity of coal and coal macerals, premium coal sample program, chemical separations, heavy elements coordination chemistry, heavy elements photophysics/photochemistry, f-electron interactions, radiation chemistry of high-level wastes (gas generation in waste tanks), ultrafast molecular electronic devices, and nuclear medicine. Separate abstracts have been prepared. Accelerator activites and computer system/network services are also reported.

  14. Argonne National Laboratory, High Energy Physics Division, semiannual report of research activities, July 1, 1989--December 31, 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    This report discusses research being conducted at the Argonne National Laboratory in the following areas: Experimental High Energy Physics; Theoretical High Energy Physics; Experimental Facilities Research; Accelerator Research and Development; and SSC Detector Research and Development

  15. Flood-hazard analysis of four headwater streams draining the Argonne National Laboratory property, DuPage County, Illinois

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soong, David T.; Murphy, Elizabeth A.; Straub, Timothy D.; Zeeb, Hannah L.

    2016-11-22

    Results of a flood-hazard analysis conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Argonne National Laboratory, for four headwater streams within the Argonne National Laboratory property indicate that the 1-percent and 0.2-percent annual exceedance probability floods would cause multiple roads to be overtopped. Results indicate that most of the effects on the infrastructure would be from flooding of Freund Brook. Flooding on the Northeast and Southeast Drainage Ways would be limited to overtopping of one road crossing for each of those streams. The Northwest Drainage Way would be the least affected with flooding expected to occur in open grass or forested areas.The Argonne Site Sustainability Plan outlined the development of hydrologic and hydraulic models and the creation of flood-plain maps of the existing site conditions as a first step in addressing resiliency to possible climate change impacts as required by Executive Order 13653 “Preparing the United States for the Impacts of Climate Change.” The Hydrological Simulation Program-FORTRAN is the hydrologic model used in the study, and the Hydrologic Engineering Center‒River Analysis System (HEC–RAS) is the hydraulic model. The model results were verified by comparing simulated water-surface elevations to observed water-surface elevations measured at a network of five crest-stage gages on the four study streams. The comparison between crest-stage gage and simulated elevations resulted in an average absolute difference of 0.06 feet and a maximum difference of 0.19 feet.In addition to the flood-hazard model development and mapping, a qualitative stream assessment was conducted to evaluate stream channel and substrate conditions in the study reaches. This information can be used to evaluate erosion potential.

  16. Noise reduction techniques used on the high power klystron modulators at Argonne National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, T.J.

    1993-01-01

    The modulators used in the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory have been redesigned with an emphasis on electrical noise reduction. Since the modulators are 100 MW modulators with <700 ns rise time, electrical noise can be coupled very easily to other electronic equipment in the area. This paper will detail the efforts made to reduce noise coupled to surrounding equipment. Shielding and sound grounding techniques accomplished the goal of drastically reducing the noise induced in surrounding equipment. The approach used in grounding and shielding will be discussed, and data will be presented comparing earlier designs to the improved design

  17. The integral fast reactor fuels reprocessing laboratory at Argonne National Laboratory, Illinois

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolson, R.D.; Tomczuk, Z.; Fischer, D.F.; Slawecki, M.A.; Miller, W.E.

    1986-09-01

    The processing of Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) metal fuel utilizes pyrochemical fuel reprocessing steps. These steps include separation of the fission products from uranium and plutonium by electrorefining in a fused salt, subsequent concentration of uranium and plutonium for reuse, removal, concentration, and packaging of the waste material. Approximately two years ago a facility became operational at Argonne National Laboratory-Illinois to establish the chemical feasibility of proposed reprocessing and consolidation processes. Sensitivity of the pyroprocessing melts to air oxidation necessitated operation in atmosphere-controlled enclosures. The Integral Fast Reactor Fuels Reprocessing Laboratory is described

  18. Low-level radioactive waste management at Argonne National Laboratory-East

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rock, C.M.; Shearer, T.L.; Nelson, R.A.

    1997-01-01

    This paper is an overview of the low-level radioactive waste management practices and treatment systems at Argonne National Laboratory - East (ANL-E). It addresses the systems, processes, types of waste treated, and the status and performance of the systems. ANL-E is a Department of Energy laboratory that is engaged in a variety of research projects, some of which generate radioactive waste, in addition a significant amount of radioactive waste remains from previous projects and decontamination and decommissioning of facilities where this work was performed

  19. The Chemical Technology Division at Argonne National Laboratory: Applying chemical innovation to environmental problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The Chemical Technology Division is one of the largest technical divisions at Argonne National Laboratory, a leading center for research and development related to energy and environmental issues. Since its inception in 1948, the Division has pioneered in developing separations processes for the nuclear industry. The current scope of activities includes R ampersand D on methods for disposing of radioactive and hazardous wastes and on energy conversion processes with improved efficiencies, lower costs, and reduced environmental impact. Many of the technologies developed by CMT can be applied to solve manufacturing as well as environmental problems of industry

  20. Status report on the Advanced Photon Source Project at Argonne National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huebner, R.H. Sr.

    1989-01-01

    The Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory is designed as a national synchrotron radiation user facility which will provide extremely bright, highly energetic x-rays for multidisciplinary research. When operational, the Advanced Photon Source will accelerate positrons to a nominal energy of 7 GeV. The positrons will be manipulated by insertion devices to produce x-rays 10,000 times brighter than any currently available for research. Accelerator components, insertion devices, optical elements, and optical-element cooling schemes have been and continue to be the subjects of intensive research and development. A call for Letters of Intent from prospective users of the Advanced Photon Source has resulted in a substantial response from industrial, university, and national laboratory researchers

  1. Physics with fast molecular-ion beams. Proceedings of workshop held at Argonne National Laboratory, August 20-21, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gemmell, D.S.

    1979-01-01

    The Workshop on Physics with Fast Molecular-Ion Beams was held in the Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory on August 20 and 21, 1979. The meeting brought together representatives from several groups studying the interactions of fast (MeV) molecular-ion beams with matter. By keeping the Workshop program sharply focussed on current work related to the interactions of fast molecular ions, it was made possible for the participants to engage in vigorous and detailed discussions concerning such specialized topics as molecular-ion dissociation and transmission, wake effects, ionic charge states, cluster stopping powers, beam-foil spectroscopy, electron-emissions studies with molecular-ion beams, and molecular-ion structure determinations

  2. Argonne National Laboratory: An example of a US nuclear research centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharyya, S.

    2001-01-01

    The nuclear era was ushered in 1942 with the demonstration of a sustained nuclear chain reaction in Chicago Pile 1 facility. The USA then set up five large national multi disciplinary laboratories for developing nuclear technology for civilian use and three national laboratories for military applications. Reactor development, including prototype construction, was the main focus of the Argonne National Laboratory. More than 100 power reactors operating in the USA have benefited from R and D in the national laboratories. However, currently the support for nuclear power has waned. With the end of the cold war there has also been a need to change the mission of laboratories involved in military applications. For all laboratories of the Department of Energy (DOE) the mission, which was clearly focused earlier on high risk, high payoff long term R and D has now become quite diffused with a number of near term programmes. Cost and mission considerations have resulted in shutting down of many large facilities as well as auxiliary facilities. Erosion of infrastructure has also resulted in reduced opportunities for research which means dwindling of interest in nuclear science and engineering among the younger generation. The current focus of nuclear R and D in the DOE laboratories is on plant life extension, deactivation and decommissioning, spent fuel management and waste management. Advanced aspects include space nuclear applications and nuclear fusion R and D. At the Argonne National Laboratory, major initiatives for the future would be in the areas of science, energy, environment and non-proliferation technologies. International collaboration would be useful mechanisms to achieve cost effective solutions for major developmental areas. These include reactor operation and safety, repositories for high level nuclear waste, reactor system decommissioning, large projects like a nuclear fusion reactor and advanced power reactors. The IAEA could have a positive role in these

  3. Argonne Chemical Sciences & Engineering - Awards Home

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argonne National Laboratory Chemical Sciences & Engineering DOE Logo CSE Home About CSE Argonne Home > Chemical Sciences & Engineering > Fundamental Interactions Catalysis & Energy Computational Postdoctoral Fellowships Contact Us CSE Intranet Awards Argonne's Chemical Sciences and

  4. Vibration considerations in the design of the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jendrzejczyk, J.A.; Wambsganss, M.W.

    1991-01-01

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS), a new synchrotron radiation facility being built at Argonne National Laboratory, will provide the world's most brilliant X-ray beams for research in a wide range of technical fields. Successful operation of the APS requires an extremely stable positron closed orbit. Vibration of the storage ring quadrupole magnets, even in the submicron range, can lead to distortion of the positron closed orbit and to potentially unacceptable beam emittance growth, which results in degraded performance. This paper presents an overview of the technical approach used to minimize vibration response, beginning at the conceptual stage, through design and construction, and on to successful operation. Acceptance criteria relating to maximum allowable quadrupole magnet vibration are discussed. Soil properties are used to determine resonant frequencies of foundations and to predict attenuation characteristics. Two sources are considered to have the potential to excite the foundation: far-field sources, which are produced external to the facility, and near-field sources, which are produced within the facility. Measurements of ambient ground motion, monitored to determine far- field excitation, are presented. Ambient vibration was measured at several operating facilities within Argonne to gain insight on typical near-field excitation sources. Discussion covers the dynamic response characteristics of a prototypic magnet support structure to various excitations, including ambient floor motion, coolant flow, and magnet power. 19 refs., 10 figs., 5 tabs.

  5. Vibration considerations in the design of the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jendrzejczyk, J.A.; Wambsganss, M.W.

    1991-01-01

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS), a new synchrotron radiation facility being built at Argonne National Laboratory, will provide the world's most brilliant X-ray beams for research in a wide range of technical fields. Successful operation of the APS requires an extremely stable positron closed orbit. Vibration of the storage ring quadrupole magnets, even in the submicron range, can lead to distortion of the positron closed orbit and to potentially unacceptable beam emittance growth, which results in degraded performance. This paper presents an overview of the technical approach used to minimize vibration response, beginning at the conceptual stage, through design and construction, and on to successful operation. Acceptance criteria relating to maximum allowable quadrupole magnet vibration are discussed. Soil properties are used to determine resonant frequencies of foundations and to predict attenuation characteristics. Two sources are considered to have the potential to excite the foundation: far-field sources, which are produced external to the facility, and near-field sources, which are produced within the facility. Measurements of ambient ground motion, monitored to determine far- field excitation, are presented. Ambient vibration was measured at several operating facilities within Argonne to gain insight on typical near-field excitation sources. Discussion covers the dynamic response characteristics of a prototypic magnet support structure to various excitations, including ambient floor motion, coolant flow, and magnet power. 19 refs., 10 figs., 5 tabs

  6. Innovative environmental restoration and waste management technologies at Argonne National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helt, J.E.

    1993-01-01

    Cleanup of contaminated sites and management of wastes have become major efforts of the US Department of Energy. Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is developing several new technologies to meet the needs of this national effort. Some of these efforts are being done in collaboration with private sector firms. An overview of the ANL and private sector efforts will be presented. The following four specific technologies will be discussed in detail: (1) a minimum additive waste stabilization (MAWS) system for treating actinide-contaminated soil and groundwater; (2) a magnetic separation system, also for cleanup of actinide-contaminated soil and groundwater; (3) a mobile evaporator/concentrator system for processing aqueous radioactive and mixed waste; and (4) a continuous emission monitor for ensuring that waste incineration meets environmental goals

  7. Argonne Physics Division Colloquium

    Science.gov (United States)

    [Argonne Logo] [DOE Logo] Physics Division Home News Division Information Contact PHY Org Chart Physics Division Colloquium Auditorium, Building 203, Argonne National Laboratory Fridays at 11:00 AM 2017 : Sereres Johnston 15 Sep 2017 Joint Physics and Materials Science Colloquium J. C. Séamus Davis, Cornell

  8. Decontamination and dismantlement of the JANUS Reactor at Argonne National Laboratory-East. Project final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fellhauer, C.R.; Clark, F.R.

    1997-10-01

    The decontamination and dismantlement of the JANUS Reactor at Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E) was completed in October 1997. Descriptions and evaluations of the activities performed and analyses of the results obtained during the JANUS D and D Project are provided in this Final Report. The following information is included: objective of the JANUS D and D Project; history of the JANUS Reactor facility; description of the ANL-E site and the JANUS Reactor facility; overview of the D and D activities performed; description of the project planning and engineering; description of the D and D operations; summary of the final status of the JANUS Reactor facility based upon the final survey results; description of the health and safety aspects of the project, including personnel exposure and OSHA reporting; summary of the waste minimization techniques utilized and total waste generated by the project; and summary of the final cost and schedule for the JANUS D and D Project

  9. NNWSI waste from testing at Argonne National Laboratory. Semiannual report, July-December 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bates, J.K.; Gerding, T.J.; Abrajano, T.A. Jr.; Ebert, W.

    1986-03-01

    The Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) Project is investigating the volcanic tuff beds of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, as a potential location for a high-level radioactive waste repository. As part of the waste package development portion of this project, experiments are being performed by the Chemical Technology Division of Argonne National Laboratory to study the behavior of the waste forms under anticipated repository conditions. These experiments include (1) the development and performance of a test to measure waste form behavior in unsaturated conditions and (2) the performance of tests designed to study the behavior of waste package components in an irradiated environment. Previous reports document developments in these areas through 1984. This report summarizes progress in 1985. Reports will be issued semi-annually hereafter

  10. Human-health effects of radium: an epidemiolgic perspective of research at Argonne National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stebbings, J.H.

    1982-01-01

    The topic of health effects of radium has recently been considerably broadened by the identification of multiple myeloma as a specific outcome of bone-seeking radionuclides, and by evidence that the incidence of breast cancer may be significantly increased by radium exposure. All soft-tissue tumors are now suspect, especially leukemias. Concepts of dose-response need to be broadened to include the concept of risk factors, or, if one prefers, of susceptible subgroups. Biological factors relating to radium uptake and retention require study, as do risk factors modifying risk of both the clasical tumors, osteosarcoma and nasal sinus/mastoid, and the more recently suspect soft-tissue tumors. The history, organization, and current research activities in epidemiology at Argonne National Laboratory are described, and findings of the last decade and a half reviewed. Plans for future research are briefly discussed

  11. Human health effects of radium: an epidemiologic perspective of research at Argonne National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stebbings, J.H.

    1982-01-01

    The topic of health effects of radium has recently been considerably broadened by the identification of multiple myeloma as a specific outcome of bone-seeking radionuclides, and by evidence that the incidence of breast cancer may be significantly increased by radium exposure. All soft-tissue tumors are now suspect, especially leukemias. Concepts of dose-response need to be broadened to include the concept of risk factors, or, if one prefers, of susceptible subgroups. Biological factors relating to radium uptake and retention require study, as do risk factors modifying risk of both the classical tumors, osteosarcoma and nasal sinus/mastoid, and the more recently suspect soft-tissue tumors. The history, organization, and current research activities in epidemiology at Argonne National Laboratory are described, and findings of the last decade and a half reviewed. Plans for future research are briefly discussed

  12. Human-health effects of radium: an epidemiolgic perspective of research at Argonne National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stebbings, J.H.

    1982-01-01

    The topic of health effects of radium has recently been considerably broadened by the identification of multiple myeloma as a specific outcome of bone-seeking radionuclides, and by evidence that the incidence of breast cancer may be significantly increased by radium exposure. All soft-tissue tumors are now suspect, especially leukemias. Concepts of dose-response need to be broadened to include the concept of risk factors, or, if one prefers, of susceptible subgroups. Biological factors relating to radium uptake and retention require study, as do risk factors modifying risk of both the clasical tumors, osteosarcoma and nasal sinus/mastoid, and the more recently suspect soft-tissue tumors. The history, organization, and current research activities in epidemiology at Argonne National Laboratory are described, and findings of the last decade and a half reviewed. Plans for future research are briefly discussed.

  13. Quality Assurance Program: Argonne peer review activities for the salt host-rock portion of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edgar, D.E.

    1986-01-01

    This Quality Assurance (QA) Program sets forth the methods, controls, and procedures used to ensure that the results of Argonne National Laboratory's peer review activities are consistently of the highest quality and responsive to Salt Repository Project Office's needs and directives. Implementation of the QA procedures described herein establishes an operational framework so that task activities are traceable and the activities and decisions that influence the overall quality of the peer review process and results are fully documented. 56 refs., 5 figs., 6 tabs

  14. Argonne National Laboratory high-performance network support of APS experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knott, M.J.; McMahon, R.J.

    1995-01-01

    Under the Scientific Facilities Initiative, IPNS is planning to double its operation to 32 weeks/yr. Additional scientific and technical support staff will be added for the greatly expanded user program. The IPNS Upgrade Feasibility Study was published in April 1995 and is a thoroughly documented study on a 1-MW pulsed spallation neutron source at Argonne, including cost and schedule. A new booster target ( 235 U-Mo alloy) has been designed that will increase the neutron flux by a factor of ∼3 and construction will begin soon. A new small angle diffractometer (SAND) is in the final stages of commissioning, a prototype inelastic scattering spectrometer for Chemical Excitations (CHEX) was recently constructed and an upgraded quasielastic spectrometer (QENS) has been designed. IPNS has gained considerable operating experience with solid methane moderators, including controlled heating at periodic intervals in order to anneal the accumulated radiation induced stored energy

  15. Argonne National Laboratory high-performance network support of APS experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knott, M.J.; McMahon, R.J.

    1995-12-31

    Under the Scientific Facilities Initiative, IPNS is planning to double its operation to 32 weeks/yr. Additional scientific and technical support staff will be added for the greatly expanded user program. The IPNS Upgrade Feasibility Study was published in April 1995 and is a thoroughly documented study on a 1-MW pulsed spallation neutron source at Argonne, including cost and schedule. A new booster target ({sup 235}U-Mo alloy) has been designed that will increase the neutron flux by a factor of {approximately}3 and construction will begin soon. A new small angle diffractometer (SAND) is in the final stages of commissioning, a prototype inelastic scattering spectrometer for Chemical Excitations (CHEX) was recently constructed and an upgraded quasielastic spectrometer (QENS) has been designed. IPNS has gained considerable operating experience with solid methane moderators, including controlled heating at periodic intervals in order to anneal the accumulated radiation induced stored energy.

  16. Deployment of Phytotechnology in the 317/319 Area at Argonne National Laboratory-East, Innovative Technology Evaluation Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hybrid poplar and hybrid willow trees were planted for several environmental objectives at the Argonne National Laboratory - East, near Chicago, IL. Some trees were planted to clean TCE and other solvents from soil, some were planted to control surface water flow on a landfill, a...

  17. Changes in the Vegetation Cover in a Constructed Wetland at Argonne National Laboratory, Illinois

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergman, C.L.; LaGory, K.

    2004-01-01

    Wetlands are valuable resources that are disappearing at an alarming rate. Land development has resulted in the destruction of wetlands for approximately 200 years. To combat this destruction, the federal government passed legislation that requires no net loss of wetlands. The United States Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) is responsible for regulating wetland disturbances. In 1991, the USACE determined that the construction of the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory would damage three wetlands that had a total area of one acre. Argonne was required to create a wetland of equal acreage to replace the damaged wetlands. For the first five years after this wetland was created (1992-1996), the frequency of plant species, relative cover, and water depth was closely monitored. The wetland was not monitored again until 2002. In 2003, the vegetation cover data were again collected with a similar methodology to previous years. The plant species were sampled using quadrats at randomly selected locations along transects throughout the wetland. The fifty sampling locations were monitored once in June and percent cover of each of the plant species was determined for each plot. Furthermore, the extent of standing water in the wetland was measured. In 2003, 21 species of plants were found and identified. Eleven species dominated the wetland, among which were reed canary grass (Phalaris arundinacea), crown vetch (Coronilla varia), and Canada thistle (Cirsium arvense). These species are all non-native, invasive species. In the previous year, 30 species were found in the same wetland. The common species varied from the 2002 study but still had these non-native species in common. Reed canary grass and Canada thistle both increased by more than 100% from 2002. Unfortunately, the non-native species may be contributing to the loss of biodiversity in the wetland. In the future, control measures should be taken to ensure the establishment of more desired native species.

  18. The time-of-flight small-angle neutron diffractometer (SAD) at IPNS, Argonne National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thiyagarajan, P.; Epperson, J.E.; Crawford, R.K.; Carpenter, J.M.; Klippert, T.E.; Wozniak, D.G.

    1997-01-01

    The design, development and performance of the time-of-flight (TOF) small-angle diffractometer (SAD) at the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) at Argonne National Laboratory are described. Similar TOF-SANS instruments are in operation at the pulsed neutron sources at Los Alamos National Laboratory, USA, at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, England, and at KEK, Japan. These instruments have an advantage by comparison with their steady-state counterparts in that a relatively wide range of momentum transfer (q) can be monitored in a single experiment without the need to alter the collimation or the sample-to-detector distance. This feature makes SANS experiments easy and very effective for studying systems such as those undergoing phase transitions under different conditions, samples that cannot be easily reproduced for repetitive experiments, and systems under high temperature, pressure or shear. Three standard samples are used to demonstrate that the quality of the SANS data from SAD is comparable with those from other established steady-state SANS facilities. Two examples are given to illustrate that the wide q region accessible in a single measurement at SAD is very effective for following the time-dependent phase transitions in paraffins and temperature- and pressure-dependent phase transitions in model biomembranes. (orig.)

  19. Evaluation of the Argonne National Laboratory servo-controlled calorimeter system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foster, L.A.

    1997-01-01

    The control system of a replacement mode, twin-bridge, water-bath calorimeter originally built by Mound EG ampersand G Applied Technologies was modified by Argonne National Laboratory. The calorimeter was upgraded with a PC-based computer control and data acquisition system. The system was redesigned to operate in a servo-control mode, and a preheater was constructed to allow pre-equilibration of samples. The instrument was sent to the Plutonium Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory for testing and evaluation of its performance in the field using heat source standards and plutonium process materials. The important parameters for calorimeter operation necessary to satisfy the nuclear materials control and accountability requirements of the Plutonium Facility were evaluated over a period of several months. These parameters include calorimeter stability, measurement precision and accuracy, and average measurement time. The observed measurement precision and accuracy were found to be acceptable for most accountability measurements, although they were slightly larger than the values for calorimeters in routine use at the Plutonium Facility. Average measurement times were significantly shorter than measurement times for identical items in the Plutonium Facility calorimeters. Unexplained shifts in the baseline measurements were observed on numerous occasions. These shifts could lead to substantial measurement errors if they are not very carefully monitored by the operating facility. Detailed results of the experimental evaluation are presented in this report

  20. Management of wildlife causing damage at Argonne National Laboratory-East, DuPage County, Illinois

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-04-01

    The DOE, after an independent review, has adopted an Environmental Assessment (EA) prepared by the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) which evaluates use of an Integrated Wildlife Damage Management approach at Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E) in DuPage County, Illinois (April 1995). In 1994, the USDA issued a programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) that covers nationwide animal damage control activities. The EA for Management of Wildlife Causing Damage at ANL-E tiers off this programmatic EIS. The USDA wrote the EA as a result of DOE`s request to USDA to prepare and implement a comprehensive Wildlife Management Damage Plan; the USDA has authority for animal damage control under the Animal Damage Control Act of 1931, as amended, and the Rural Development, Agriculture and Related Agencies Appropriations Act of 1988. DOE has determined, based on the analysis in the EA, that the proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). Therefore, the preparation of an EIS is not required. This report contains the Environmental Assessment, as well as the Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  1. Do you want to build such a machine? : Designing a high energy proton accelerator for Argonne National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paris, E.

    2004-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory's efforts toward researching, proposing and then building a high-energy proton accelerator have been discussed in a handful of studies. In the main, these have concentrated on the intense maneuvering amongst politicians, universities, government agencies, outside corporations, and laboratory officials to obtain (or block) approval and/or funds or to establish who would have control over budgets and research programs. These ''top-down'' studies are very important but they can also serve to divorce such proceedings from the individuals actually involved in the ground-level research which physically served to create theories, designs, machines, and experiments. This can lead to a skewed picture, on the one hand, of a lack of effect that so-called scientific and technological factors exert and, on the other hand, of the apparent separation of the so-called social or political from the concrete practice of doing physics. An exception to this approach can be found in the proceedings of a conference on ''History of the ZGS'' held at Argonne at the time of the Zero Gradient Synchrotron's decommissioning in 1979. These accounts insert the individuals quite literally as they are, for the most part, personal reminiscences of those who took part in these efforts on the ground level. As such, they are invaluable raw material for historical inquiry but generally lack the rigor and perspective expected in a finished historical work. The session on ''Constructing Cold War Physics'' at the 2002 annual History of Science Society Meeting served to highlight new approaches circulating towards history of science and technology in the post-WWII period, especially in the 1950s. There is new attention towards the effects of training large numbers of scientists and engineers as well as the caution not to equate ''national security'' with military preparedness, but rather more broadly--at certain points--with the explicit ''struggle for the hearts and minds of

  2. Historic preservation requirements and the evaluation of cold war era nuclear facilities at Argonne National Laboratory-East

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wescott, K. L.

    1999-01-01

    Project design for the decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) of federal facilities must address the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act which includes compliance with the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA). Section 106 of the NHPA requires that Federal agencies consider any effect their activities may have on historic properties. While a cultural property is not usually considered historic until it has reached an age of 50 years or older, special consideration is given to younger properties if they are of exceptional importance in demonstrating unique development in American history, architecture, archaeology, engineering, or culture. As part of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) D and D program at Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E), site properties are evaluated within the context of the Cold War Era and within themes associated with nuclear technology. Under this program, ANL-E staff have conducted archival research on three nuclear reactor facilities, one accelerator, and one laboratory building. DOE and ANL-E have been working closely with the Illinois Historic Preservation Agency (IHPA) to determine the eligibility of these properties for listing on the National Register of Historic Places. In 1998, in consultation with the IHPA, the DOE determined that the reactor facilities were eligible. Memoranda of Agreement were signed between the DOE and the IHPA stipulating mitigation requirements for the recordation of two of these properties. The laboratory building was recently determined eligible and will likely undergo similar documentation procedures. The accelerator was determined not eligible. Similar studies and determinations will be required for all future D and D projects

  3. Decontamination and decommissioning of the Argonne National Laboratory Building 350 Plutonium Fabrication Facility. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kline, W.H.; Moe, H.J.; Lahey, T.J.

    1985-02-01

    In 1973, Argonne National Laboratory began consolidating and upgrading its plutonium-handling operations with the result that the research fuel-fabrication facility located in Building 350 was shut down and declared surplus. Sixteen of the twenty-three gloveboxes which comprised the system were disassembled and relocated for reuse or placed into controlled storage during 1974 but, due to funding constraints, full-scale decommissioning did not start until 1978. Since that time the fourteen remaining contaminated gloveboxes, including all internal and external equipment as well as the associated ventilation systems, have been assayed for radioactive content, dismantled, size reduced to fit acceptable packaging and sent to a US Department of Energy (DOE) transuranic retrievable-storage site or to a DOE low-level nuclear waste burial ground. The project which was completed in 1983, required 5 years to accomplish, 32 man years of effort, produced some 540 m 3 (19,000 ft 3 ) of radioactive waste of which 60% was TRU, and cost 2.4 million dollars

  4. Inspection and monitoring plan, contaminated groundwater seeps 317/319/ENE Area, Argonne National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    During the course of completing the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation (RFI) in the 317/319/East-Northeast (ENE) Area of Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E), groundwater was discovered moving to the surface through a series of groundwater seeps. The seeps are located in a ravine approximately 600 ft south of the ANL-E fence line in Waterfall Glen Forest Preserve. Samples of the seep water were collected and analyzed for selected parameters. Two of the five seeps sampled were found to contain detectable levels of organic contaminants. Three chemical species were identified: chloroform (14--25 microg/L), carbon tetrachloride (56--340 microg/L), and tetrachloroethylene (3--6 microg/L). The other seeps did not contain detectable levels of volatile organics. The nature of the contaminants in the seeps will also be monitored on a regular basis. Samples of surface water flowing through the bottom of the ravine and groundwater emanating from the seeps will be collected and analyzed for chemical and radioactive constituents. The results of the routine sampling will be compared with the concentrations used in the risk assessment. If the concentrations exceed those used in the risk assessment, the risk calculations will be revised by using the higher numbers. This revised analysis will determine if additional actions are warranted

  5. Decontamination and decommissioning of the Experimental Boiling Water Reactor (EBWR): Project final report, Argonne National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fellhauer, C.R.; Boing, L.E.; Aldana, J.

    1997-03-01

    The Final Report for the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D ampersand D) of the Argonne National Laboratory - East (ANL-E) Experimental Boiling Water Reactor (EBWR) facility contains the descriptions and evaluations of the activities and the results of the EBWR D ampersand D project. It provides the following information: (1) An overall description of the ANL-E site and EBWR facility. (2) The history of the EBWR facility. (3) A description of the D ampersand D activities conducted during the EBWR project. (4) A summary of the final status of the facility, including the final and confirmation surveys. (5) A summary of the final cost, schedule, and personnel exposure associated with the project, including a summary of the total waste generated. This project report covers the entire EBWR D ampersand D project, from the initiation of Phase I activities to final project closeout. After the confirmation survey, the EBWR facility was released as a open-quotes Radiologically Controlled Area,close quotes noting residual elevated activity remains in inaccessible areas. However, exposure levels in accessible areas are at background levels. Personnel working in accessible areas do not need Radiation Work Permits, radiation monitors, or other radiological controls. Planned use for the containment structure is as an interim transuranic waste storage facility (after conversion)

  6. Advanced liquid metal reactor development at Argonne National Laboratory during the 1980s

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wade, D.C.

    1990-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory's (ANL'S) effort to pursue the exploitation of liquid metal cooled reactor (LMR) characteristics has given rise to the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) concept, and has produced substantial technical advancement in concept implementation which includes demonstration of high burnup capability of metallic fuel, demonstration of injection casting fabrication, integral demonstration of passive safety response, and technical feasibility of pyroprocessing. The first half decade of the 90's will host demonstration of the IFR closed fuel cycle technology at the prototype scale. The EBR-II reactor will be fueled with ternary alloy fuel in HT-9 cladding and ducts, and pyroprocessing and injection casting refabrication of EBR-II fuel will be conducted using near-commercial sized equipment at the Fuel cycle Facility (FCF) which is co-located adjacent to EBR-II. Demonstration will start in 1992. The demonstration of passive safety response achievable with the IFR design concept, (already done in EBR-II in 1986) will be repeated in the mid 90's using the IFR prototype recycle fuel from the FCF. The demonstration of scrubbing of the reprocessing fission product waste stream, with recycle of the transuranics to the reactor for consumption, will also occur in the mid 90's. 30 refs

  7. Waste minimization and pollution prevention in D ampersand D operations at the Argonne National Laboratory-East site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boing, L.E.; Coffey, M.J.; Ditch, R.W.; Fellhauer, C.R.; Rose, R.W.

    1996-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is implementing waste minimization and pollution prevention activities into its conduct of decontamination and decommissioning (D ampersand D) projects. Many of these activities are rather straight forward and simple approaches, yet they are often overlooked and not implemented as often as they should or could be. Specific activities involving recycling and reuse of materials and structures, which have proven useful in lowering decommissioning and disposal costs on D ampersand D projects at ANL are presented

  8. Argonne National Laboratory, High Energy Physics Division: Semiannual report of research activities, July 1, 1986-December 31, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    This paper discusses the research activity of the High Energy Physics Division at the Argonne National Laboratory for the period, July 1986-December 1986. Some of the topics included in this report are: high resolution spectrometers, computational physics, spin physics, string theories, lattice gauge theory, proton decay, symmetry breaking, heavy flavor production, massive lepton pair production, collider physics, field theories, proton sources, and facility development

  9. Yucca Mountain Project - Argonne National Laboratory annual progress report, FY 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bates, J.K.; Fortner, J.A.; Finn, P.A.; Wronkiewicz, D.J.; Hoh, J.C.; Emery, J.W.; Buck, E.C.; Wolf, S.F.

    1995-02-01

    This document reports on the work done by the Nuclear Waste Management Section of the Chemical Technology Division (CMT), Argonne National Laboratory, in the period October 1993-September 1994. Studies have been performed to evaluate the performance of nuclear waste glass and spent fuel samples under unsaturated conditions (low volume water contact) that are likely to exist in the Yucca Mountain environment being considered as a potential site for a high-level waste repository. Tests with simulated waste glasses have been in progress for over eight years and demonstrate that actinides from initially fresh glass surfaces will be released as a result of the spallation of reacted glass layers from the surface, as the small volume of water passes over the waste form. Studies are also underway to evaluate the performance of spent fuel samples and unirradiated UO{sub 2} in projected repository conditions. Tests with UO{sub 2} have been ongoing for nine years and show that the oxidation of UO{sub 2} occurs rapidly, and the resulting paragenetic sequence of secondary phases that form on the sample surface is similar to that observed in natural analogues. The reaction of spent fuel samples under conditions similar to those used with UO{sub 2} have been in progress for nearly two years, and the results suggest that spent fuel follows the same reaction progress as UO{sub 2}. The release of individual fission products and transuranic elements was not congruent, with the release being controlled by the formation of small particles or colloids that are suspended in solution and transported away from the waste form. The reaction progress depends on the composition of the spent fuel samples used and, likely, on the composition of the groundwater that contacts the waste form.

  10. Criticality safety strategy for the Fuel Cycle Facility electrorefiner at Argonne National Laboratory, West

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mariani, R.D.; Benedict, R.W.; Lell, R.M.; Turski, R.B.; Fujita, E.K.

    1993-01-01

    The Integral Fast Reactor being developed by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) combines the advantages of metal-fueled, liquid-metal-cooled reactors and a closed fuel cycle. Presently, the Fuel Cycle Facility (FCF) at ANL-West in Idaho Falls, Idaho is being modified to recycle spent metallic fuel from Experimental Breeder Reactor II as part of a demonstration project sponsored by the Department of Energy. A key component of the FCF is the electrorefiner (ER) in which the actinides are separated from the fission products. In the electrorefining process, the metal fuel is anodically dissolved into a high-temperature molten salt and refined uranium or uranium/plutonium products are deposited at cathodes. In this report, the criticality safety strategy for the FCF ER is summarized. FCF ER operations and processes formed the basis for evaluating criticality safety and control during actinide metal fuel refining. In order to show criticality safety for the FCF ER, the reference operating conditions for the ER had to be defined. Normal operating envelopes (NOES) were then defined to bracket the important operating conditions. To keep the operating conditions within their NOES, process controls were identified that can be used to regulate the actinide forms and content within the ER. A series of operational checks were developed for each operation that wig verify the extent or success of an operation. The criticality analysis considered the ER operating conditions at their NOE values as the point of departure for credible and incredible failure modes. As a result of the analysis, FCF ER operations were found to be safe with respect to criticality

  11. Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — ATLAS is a national user facility at Argonne National Laboratory in Argonne, Illinois. The ATLAS facility is a leading facility for nuclear structure research in the...

  12. ARDISC (Argonne Dispersion Code): computer programs to calculate the distribution of trace element migration in partially equilibrating media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strickert, R.; Friedman, A.M.; Fried, S.

    1979-04-01

    A computer program (ARDISC, the Argonne Dispersion Code) is described which simulates the migration of nuclides in porous media and includes first order kinetic effects on the retention constants. The code allows for different absorption and desorption rates and solves the coupled migration equations by arithmetic reiterations. Input data needed are the absorption and desorption rates, equilibrium surface absorption coefficients, flow rates and volumes, and media porosities

  13. Argonne National Laboratory energy storage and transfer experimental program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kustom, R.L.; Wehrle, R.B.; Smith, R.P.; Fuja, R.E.

    1978-01-01

    Magnetic fusion reactor, equilibrium field, and ohmic heating (OH) coils require the coil energy to be cycled in relatively short periods of time. For large fusion reactor systems, the energy can be in the thousands of MJ range. These large amounts of energy cannot be removed from or returned to the power grid without having an adverse effect on the grid. Several schemes have been proposed which can minimize the amount of energy required from the power grid over a fusion-reactor cycle. They include the flying capacitor, the inductor-convertor bridge, the homopolar generator, and the motor-generator flywheel (MGF). The MGF is best understood and has been in use for this purpose for many years. It requires the least amount of development. The other schemes have not been applied to the energy buffering problem and require considerable development. Of the three remaining schemes, the homopolar generator and the inductor-convertor bridge seem to be the most desirable

  14. Do you want to build such a machine? : Designing a high energy proton accelerator for Argonne National Laboratory.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paris, E.

    2004-04-05

    Argonne National Laboratory's efforts toward researching, proposing and then building a high-energy proton accelerator have been discussed in a handful of studies. In the main, these have concentrated on the intense maneuvering amongst politicians, universities, government agencies, outside corporations, and laboratory officials to obtain (or block) approval and/or funds or to establish who would have control over budgets and research programs. These ''top-down'' studies are very important but they can also serve to divorce such proceedings from the individuals actually involved in the ground-level research which physically served to create theories, designs, machines, and experiments. This can lead to a skewed picture, on the one hand, of a lack of effect that so-called scientific and technological factors exert and, on the other hand, of the apparent separation of the so-called social or political from the concrete practice of doing physics. An exception to this approach can be found in the proceedings of a conference on ''History of the ZGS'' held at Argonne at the time of the Zero Gradient Synchrotron's decommissioning in 1979. These accounts insert the individuals quite literally as they are, for the most part, personal reminiscences of those who took part in these efforts on the ground level. As such, they are invaluable raw material for historical inquiry but generally lack the rigor and perspective expected in a finished historical work. The session on ''Constructing Cold War Physics'' at the 2002 annual History of Science Society Meeting served to highlight new approaches circulating towards history of science and technology in the post-WWII period, especially in the 1950s. There is new attention towards the effects of training large numbers of scientists and engineers as well as the caution not to equate ''national security'' with military preparedness, but rather

  15. An evaluation of alternative reactor vessel cutting technologies for the experimental boiling water reactor at Argonne National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boing, L.E.; Henley, D.R.; Manion, W.J.; Gordon, J.W.

    1989-12-01

    Metal cutting techniques that can be used to segment the reactor pressure vessel of the Experimental Boiling Water Reactor (EBWR) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) have been evaluated by Nuclear Energy Services. Twelve cutting technologies are described in terms of their ability to perform the required task, their performance characteristics, environmental and radiological impacts, and cost and schedule considerations. Specific recommendations regarding which technology should ultimately be used by ANL are included. The selection of a cutting method was the responsibility of the decommissioning staff at ANL, who included a relative weighting of the parameters described in this document in their evaluation process. 73 refs., 26 figs., 69 tabs

  16. An evaluation of alternative reactor vessel cutting technologies for the experimental boiling water reactor at Argonne National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boing, L.E.; Henley, D.R. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA)); Manion, W.J.; Gordon, J.W. (Nuclear Energy Services, Inc., Danbury, CT (USA))

    1989-12-01

    Metal cutting techniques that can be used to segment the reactor pressure vessel of the Experimental Boiling Water Reactor (EBWR) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) have been evaluated by Nuclear Energy Services. Twelve cutting technologies are described in terms of their ability to perform the required task, their performance characteristics, environmental and radiological impacts, and cost and schedule considerations. Specific recommendations regarding which technology should ultimately be used by ANL are included. The selection of a cutting method was the responsibility of the decommissioning staff at ANL, who included a relative weighting of the parameters described in this document in their evaluation process. 73 refs., 26 figs., 69 tabs.

  17. Contributions to and expectations from the CRP - Argonne National Laboratory (USA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cahalan, J.E.

    2007-01-01

    For us, the chief benefit of the CRP will be validation of multidimensional fluid dynamics capabilities for analysis of outlet plenum temperature distributions. As reactor designers seek new fuel handling features to reduce costs, upper internal structure configurations are becoming more compact, and higher fidelity analysis techniques are required to assess thermal stresses. Argonne currently has 1) a reactor systems analysis code with an experimentally-based model for plenum stratification, 2) the COMMIX code (parent of the JAEA AQUA code), and 3) commercial fluid dynamics analysis codes. It is anticipated that all or some combination of these capabilities will be employed to perform the CRP analysis

  18. Addendum to a proposal for ATLAS: a precision heavy-ion accelerator at Argonne National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-12-01

    This revised proposal for the construction of the Argonne Tandem-Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS) is in all essentials the same as the proposal originally presented to NUSAC in March 1978. The only differences worth mentioning are the plan to expand the experimental area somewhat more than was originally proposed and an increased cost, brought about principally by inflation. The outline presented is the same as in the original document, reproduced for the convenience of the reader. The objective of the proposed Argonne Tandem-Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS) is to provide precision beams of heavy ions for nuclear physics research in the region of projectile energies comparable to nuclear binding energies (5 to 25 MeV/A). By using the demonstrated potential of superconducting rf technology, beams of exceptional quality and flexibility can be obtained. The proposed system is designed to provide beams with tandem-like energy resolution and ease of energy variation, and the energy range is comparable to that of a approx. 50 MV tandem. In addition, the beam will be bunched into very short (approx. 50 psec) pulses, permitting fast-timing measurements that can open up major new experimental approaches

  19. An Applied Study on the Decontamination and Decommissioning of the Map Tube Facility 317 Area Argonne National Laboratory, Chicago

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varley, Geoff; Rusch, Chris [NAC International, Henley-on-Thames (United Kingdom)

    2005-01-01

    The Map Tube Facility (MTF) was a large concrete block structure constructed in 1952 at the Argonne National Laboratory site in the United States, for the purpose of storing radioactive waste. The block contained 129 storage tubes that were positioned vertically in the block during construction. From 1952 though the early 1980s, the MTF was used to store containers of highly radioactive materials. The items stored included: - Nuclear fuel elements, - Nuclear reactor components, - Materials samples, - Irradiated metal objects (bolts, wire, rods, etc), - Concrete-encased objects. After MTF operations were discontinued in the early 1980s, most of the materials were removed from most of the tubes. Decontamination and decommissioning of the MTF tool place in 1994. The objective was to eliminate the radiological and chemical materials within the MTF tubes to prevent ground water and soil contamination. Once these materials were removed, the block would no longer be a source of contamination (chemical or radioactive) and could then remain in place without risk to the environment. The decontamination scope included the following actions. 1. Mechanically clean each tube (wire brush), 2. Dewater each tube, 3. Remove the debris and sludge from the bottom of each tube, 4. Fill each tube with concrete, 5. Remove the tubes using a core drilling technique. Project constraints precluded the use of excavation around the facility and sectioning of the MTF block or simple demolition, which led to the use of the core drilling technique. The cost of decommissioning the MTF was approximately $2.6 million (1994 money values). Escalating this at 2.5 percent per year to January 2005 and converting to Swedish currency at the current exchange rate (July 2005 approximately 7.6 SEK/$) gives an equivalent cost today of MSEK 25. The AT facility in Studsvik is considerably larger than the MTF facility in Argonne, between six and seven times in terms of volume but with storage tube depth somewhat

  20. An Applied Study on the Decontamination and Decommissioning of the Map Tube Facility 317 Area Argonne National Laboratory, Chicago

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varley, Geoff; Rusch, Chris

    2005-01-01

    The Map Tube Facility (MTF) was a large concrete block structure constructed in 1952 at the Argonne National Laboratory site in the United States, for the purpose of storing radioactive waste. The block contained 129 storage tubes that were positioned vertically in the block during construction. From 1952 though the early 1980s, the MTF was used to store containers of highly radioactive materials. The items stored included: - Nuclear fuel elements, - Nuclear reactor components, - Materials samples, - Irradiated metal objects (bolts, wire, rods, etc), - Concrete-encased objects. After MTF operations were discontinued in the early 1980s, most of the materials were removed from most of the tubes. Decontamination and decommissioning of the MTF tool place in 1994. The objective was to eliminate the radiological and chemical materials within the MTF tubes to prevent ground water and soil contamination. Once these materials were removed, the block would no longer be a source of contamination (chemical or radioactive) and could then remain in place without risk to the environment. The decontamination scope included the following actions. 1. Mechanically clean each tube (wire brush), 2. Dewater each tube, 3. Remove the debris and sludge from the bottom of each tube, 4. Fill each tube with concrete, 5. Remove the tubes using a core drilling technique. Project constraints precluded the use of excavation around the facility and sectioning of the MTF block or simple demolition, which led to the use of the core drilling technique. The cost of decommissioning the MTF was approximately $2.6 million (1994 money values). Escalating this at 2.5 percent per year to January 2005 and converting to Swedish currency at the current exchange rate (July 2005 approximately 7.6 SEK/$) gives an equivalent cost today of MSEK 25. The AT facility in Studsvik is considerably larger than the MTF facility in Argonne, between six and seven times in terms of volume but with storage tube depth somewhat

  1. A preliminary assessment of sup(239,240)Pu concentrations in a stream near Argonne National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, H.; Marshall, J.S.

    1977-01-01

    The plutonium levels in Sawmill Creek, a stream which flows through the site of the Argonne National Laboratory have been determined and are compared here with the environmental levels reported in related studies. The major source of artificial radioactivity in the creek is Argonne's nuclear facilities which produce low-level wastes following clean-up and dilution in the ANL sewage plant. Samples were collected within 1 mile upstream and 1 mile downstream of ANL's waste discharge into the creek. Samples consisted of filtered water, filterable solids, whole water, Cladophora sp., sunfish (gill and G.I. tracts), isopods, and sediments. Results showed that: (1) The filterable solids from the effluent water contained 99% of 239 Pu in contrast to 37% from the upstream water sample. (2) The downstream 239 Pu levels in the whole water of Sawmill Creek were much higher than those reported in related studies. (3) 239 Pu appears to be scavenged primarily by Cladophora sp. in the downstream water of the creek. (4) Fish G.I. tract and its content contained seven times more 239 Pu activity than fish gills. (U.K.)

  2. ATLAS: a proposal for a precision heavy ion accelerator at Argonne National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-02-01

    The objective of the proposed Argonne Tandem-Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS) is to provide precision beams of heavy ions for nuclear physics research in the region of projectile energies comparable to nuclear binding energies (5-25 MeV/A). By using the demonstrated potential of superconducting rf technology, beams of exceptional quality and flexibility can be obtained. The system is designed to provide beams with tandem-like energy resolution and ease of energy variation, the energy range is comparable to that of a approx. 50 MV tandem and, in addition, the beam will be bunched into very short (approx. 50 psec) pulses, permitting fast-timing measurements that can open up major new experimental approaches.

  3. ATLAS: a proposal for a precision heavy ion accelerator at Argonne National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-02-01

    The objective of the proposed Argonne Tandem-Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS) is to provide precision beams of heavy ions for nuclear physics research in the region of projectile energies comparable to nuclear binding energies (5-25 MeV/A). By using the demonstrated potential of superconducting rf technology, beams of exceptional quality and flexibility can be obtained. The system is designed to provide beams with tandem-like energy resolution and ease of energy variation, the energy range is comparable to that of a approx. 50 MV tandem and, in addition, the beam will be bunched into very short (approx. 50 psec) pulses, permitting fast-timing measurements that can open up major new experimental approaches

  4. Argonne's Expedited Site Characterization: An integrated approach to cost- and time-effective remedial investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burton, J.C.; Walker, J.L.; Aggarwal, P.K.; Meyer, W.T.

    1995-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory has developed a methodology for remedial site investigation that has proven to be both technically superior to and more cost- and time-effective than traditional methods. This methodology is referred to as the Argonne Expedited Site Characterization (ESC). Quality is the driving force within the process. The Argonne ESC process is abbreviated only in time and cost and never in terms of quality. More usable data are produced with the Argonne ESC process than with traditional site characterization methods that are based on statistical-grid sampling and multiple monitoring wells. This paper given an overview of the Argonne ESC process and compares it with traditional methods for site characterization. Two examples of implementation of the Argonne ESC process are discussed to illustrate the effectiveness of the process in CERCLA (Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act) and RCRA (Resource Conservation and Recovery Act) programs

  5. Production-scale LLW and RMW solidification system operational testing at Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wescott, J.; Wagh, A.; Singh, D.; Nelson, R.; No, H.

    1997-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E) has begun production-scale testing of a low-level waste and radioactive mixed waste solidification system. This system will be used to treat low-level and mixed radioactive waste to meet land burial requirements. The system can use any of several types of solidification media, including a chemically bonded phosphate ceramic developed by ANL-E scientists. The final waste product will consist of a solidified mass in a standard 208-liter drum. The system uses commercial equipment and incorporates several unique process control features to ensure proper treatment. This paper will discuss the waste types requiring treatment, the system configuration, and operation results for these waste streams

  6. Global climate change and international security. Report on a conference held at Argonne National Laboratory, May 8--10, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rice, M.

    1991-12-31

    On May 8--10, 1991, the Midwest Consortium of International Security Studies (MCISS) and Argonne National Laboratory cosponsored a conference on Global Climate Change and International Security. The aim was to bring together natural and social scientists to examine the economic, sociopolitical, and security implications of the climate changes predicted by the general circulation models developed by natural scientists. Five themes emerged from the papers and discussions: (1) general circulation models and predicted climate change; (2) the effects of climate change on agriculture, especially in the Third World; (3) economic implications of policies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions; (4) the sociopolitical consequences of climate change; and (5) the effect of climate change on global security.

  7. In situ ion irradiation/implantation studies in the HVEM-Tandem Facility at Argonne National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, C.W.; Funk, L.L.; Ryan, E.A.; Taylor, A.

    1988-09-01

    The HVEM-Tandem User Facility at Argonne National Laboratory interfaces two ion accelerators, a 2 MV tandem accelerator and a 650 kV ion implanter, to a 1.2 MV high voltage electron microscope. This combination allows experiments involving simultaneous ion irradiation/ion implantation, electron irradiation and electron microscopy/electron diffraction to be performed. In addition the availability of a variety of microscope sample holders permits these as well as other types of in situ experiments to be performed at temperatures ranging from 10-1300 K, with the sample in a stressed state or with simultaneous determination of electrical resistivity of the specimen. This paper summarizes the details of the Facility which are relevant to simultaneous ion beam material modification and electron microscopy, presents several current applications and briefly describes the straightforward mechanism for potential users to access this US Department of Energy supported facility. 7 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  8. Post-test analysis of lithium-ion battery materials at Argonne National Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bareno, Javier; Dietz-Rago, Nancy; Bloom, Ira

    2014-03-01

    Electrochemical performance is often limited by surface and interfacial reactions at the electrodes. However, routine handling of samples can alter the very surfaces that are the object of study. Our approach combines standardized testing of batteries with sample harvesting under inert atmosphere conditions. Cells of different formats are disassembled inside an Argon glove box with controlled water and oxygen concentrations below 2 ppm. Cell components are characterized in situ, guaranteeing that observed changes in physicochemical state are due to electrochemical operation, rather than sample manipulation. We employ a complementary set of spectroscopic, microscopic, electrochemical and metallographic characterization to obtain a complete picture of cell degradation mechanisms. The resulting information about observed degradation mechanisms is provided to materials developers, both academic and industrial, to suggest new strategies and speed up the Research & Development cycle of Li-ion and related technologies. This talk will describe Argonne's post-test analysis laboratory, with an emphasis on capabilities and opportunities for collaboration. Cell disassembly, sample harvesting procedures and recent results will be discussed. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Vehicle Technologies, Hybrid and Electric Systems, under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  9. Preparing for radiological assessments in the event of a tornado strike at Argonne National Lab.-East

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodkind, M.E.; Klimczak, C.A.; Munyon, W.J.

    1993-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL) is a Department of Energy (DOE)-owned, contractor-operated national laboratory located 22 miles southwest of downtown Chicago on a wooded, 1700-acre site. The principal nuclear facilities at ANL include a large fast neutron source (Intense Pulse Neutron Source) in which high-energy protons strike a uranium target to produce neutrons for research studies; 60 Co irradiation sources; chemical and metallurgical plutonium laboratories, some of which are currently being decommissioned; several large hot cell facilities designed for work with multicurie quantities of actinide elements and irradiated reactor fuel materials; a few small research reactors currently in different phases of being decommissioned; and a variety of research laboratories handling many different sources in various chemical and physical forms. The hazards analysis for the ANL site shows that tornado strikes are a serious threat. The site has been struck twice in the past 20 yr, receiving only minor building damage and no release of radioactivity to the environment. Although radioactive materials in general are handled in areas that provide good tornado protection, ANL is prepared to address the problems that would occur should there be a loss of control of radioactive materials due to severe building damage

  10. Materials Science Division HVEM-Tandem Facility at Argonne National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, A.

    1981-10-01

    The ANL-Materials Science Division High Voltage Electron Microscope-Tandem Facility is a unique national research facility available to scientists from industry, universities, and other national laboratories, following a peer evaluation of their research proposals by the Facility Steering Committee. The principal equipment consists of a Kratos EM7 1.2-MV high voltage electron microscope, a 300-kV Texas Nuclear ion accelerator, and a National Electrostatics 2-MV Tandem accelerator. Ions from both accelerators are transmitted into the electron microscope through the ion-beam interface. Recent work at the facility is summarized

  11. Vibratory response of a mirror support/positioning system for the Advanced Photon Source project at Argonne National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basdogan, I.; Shu, Deming; Kuzay, T.M.; Royston, T.J.; Shabana, A.A.

    1996-01-01

    The vibratory response of a typical mirror support/positioning system used at the experimental station of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) project at Argonne National Laboratory is investigated. Positioning precision and stability are especially critical when the supported mirror directs a high-intensity beam aimed at a distant target. Stability may be compromised by low level, low frequency seismic and facility-originated vibrations traveling through the ground and/or vibrations caused by flow-structure interactions in the mirror cooling system. The example case system has five positioning degrees of freedom through the use of precision actuators and rotary and linear bearings. These linkage devices result in complex, multi-dimensional vibratory behavior that is a function of the range of positioning configurations. A rigorous multibody dynamical approach is used for the development of the system equations. Initial results of the study, including estimates of natural frequencies and mode shapes, as well as limited parametric design studies, are presented. While the results reported here are for a particular system, the developed vibratory analysis approach is applicable to the wide range of high-precision optical positioning systems encountered at the APS and at other comparable facilities

  12. Safety analysis report: packages. Argonne National Laboratory SLSF test train shipping container, P-1 shipment. Fissile material. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, C.A.

    1975-06-01

    The package is used to ship an instrumented test fuel bundle (test train) containing fissile material. The package assembly is Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) Model R1010-0032. The shipment is fissile class III. The packaging consists of an outer carbon steel container into which an inner container is placed; the inner container is separated from the outer container by urethane foam cushioning material. The test train is supported in the inner container by a series of transverse supports spaced along the length of the test train. Both the inner and outer containers are closed with bolted covers. The covers do not seal the containers in a leaktight manner. The gross weight of the shipment is about 8350 lb. The unirradiated fissile material content is less than 3 kg of UO 2 of up to 93.2 percent enrichment. This is a Type A quantity (transport group III and less than 3 curies) of radioactive material which does not require shielding, cooling or heating, or neutron absorption or moderation functions in its packaging. The maximum exterior dimensions of the container are 37 ft 11 in. long, 24 1 / 2 in. wide, and 19 3 / 4 in. high

  13. The path to the future: The role of science and technology at Argonne National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reck, R.A.

    1996-04-30

    Today some scientists are concerned that present budget considerations in Washington will make it impossible for the US to maintain its preeminence in important areas of science and technology. In the private sector there has been a demise of substantive R & D efforts through most of the major industries. For DOE a lack of future support for science and technology would be an important issue because this could impact DOE`s abilities to solve problems in its major areas of concern, national security, energy, environment. In fact some scientists maintain that were the present trend to continue unabated it could lead to a national security issue. Preeminence in science and technology plays a critical role in our nation`s position as the leader of world democracy. In contrast with this point of view of gloom and doom, however, in this presentation I hope to bring to you what I see as an exciting message of good news. Today I will list the important opportunities and challenges for the future that I note for ANL, the leadership role that I believe ANL can play and the qualities that will help our laboratory to maintain its status as an outstanding DOE National Laboratory.

  14. ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEWS AND CASE STUDIES: Addressing the Public Outreach Responsibilities of the National Historic Preservation Act: Argonne National Laboratory’s Box Digital Display Platform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O’Rourke, Daniel J.; Weber, Cory C.; Richmond, Pamela D.

    2016-07-29

    Federal agencies are made responsible for managing the historic properties under their jurisdiction by the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966, as amended. A component of this responsibility is to mitigate the effect of a federal undertaking on historic properties through mitigation often through documentation. Providing public access to this documentation has always been a challenge. To address the issue of public access to mitigation information, personnel from Argonne National Laboratory created the Box Digital Display Platform, a system for communicating information about historic properties to the public. The platform, developed for the US Army Dugway Proving Ground, uses short introductory videos to present a topic but can also incorporate photos, drawings, GIS information, and documents. The system operates from a small, self-contained computer that can be attached to any digital monitor via an HDMI cable. The system relies on web-based software that allows the information to be republished as a touch-screen device application or as a website. The system does not connect to the Internet, and this increases security and eliminates the software maintenance fees associated with websites. The platform is designed to incorporate the products of past documentation to make this information more accessible to the public; specifically those documentations developed using the Historic American Building Survey/ Historic American Engineering Record (HABS/HAER) standards. Argonne National Laboratory’s Box Digital Display Platform can assist federal agencies in complying with the requirements of the National Historic Preservation Act.

    Environmental Practice 18: 209–213 (2016)

  15. Radioactive waste isolation in salt: rationale and methodology for Argonne-conducted reviews of site characterization programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, W.; Ditmars, J.D.; Tisue, M.W.; Hambley, D.F.; Fenster, D.F.; Rote, D.M.

    1985-07-01

    Both regulatory and technical concerns must be addressed in Argonne-conducted peer reviews of site characterization programs for individual sites for a high-level radioactive waste repository in salt. This report describes the regulatory framework within which reviews must be conducted and presents background information on the structure and purpose of site characterization programs as found in US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Regulatory Guide 4.17 and Title 10, Part 60, of the Code of Federal Regulations. It also presents a methodology to assist reviewers in addressing technical concerns relating to their respective areas of expertise. The methodology concentrates on elements of prime importance to the US Department of Energy's advocacy of a given salt repository system during the NRC licensing process. Instructions are given for reviewing 12 site characterization program elements, starting with performance objectives, performance issues, and levels of performance of repository subsystem components; progressing through performance assessment; and ending with plans for data acquisition and evaluation. The success of a site characterization program in resolving repository performance issues will be determined by judging the likelihood that the proposed data acquisition activities will reduce uncertainties in the performance predictions. 8 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs

  16. Webinar: Fuzzy Mud and the Future of Alternative Fuels | Argonne National

    Science.gov (United States)

    --Postdoctoral Program --Rube Goldberg Machine Contest --Science Careers in Search of Women -Site environmental every student and that is free from harassment and discrimination based upon race, color, religion , gender, gender identity, sexual orientation, or disability. Research Divisions Computing, Environment and

  17. Waste reduction efforts through the evaluation and procurement of a digital camera system for the Alpha-Gamma Hot Cell Facility at Argonne National Laboratory-East

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bray, T. S.; Cohen, A. B.; Tsai, H.; Kettman, W. C.; Trychta, K.

    1999-01-01

    The Alpha-Gamma Hot Cell Facility (AGHCF) at Argonne National Laboratory-East is a research facility where sample examinations involve traditional photography. The AGHCF documents samples with photographs (both Polaroid self-developing and negative film). Wastes generated include developing chemicals. The AGHCF evaluated, procured, and installed a digital camera system for the Leitz metallograph to significantly reduce labor, supplies, and wastes associated with traditional photography with a return on investment of less than two years

  18. A comparative study of the systems for neutronics calculations used in Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amorim, E.S. do; D'Oliveira, A.B.; Oliveira, E.C. de.

    1980-11-01

    A comparative study of the systems for neutronics calculations used in Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has been performed using benchmark results available in the literature, in order to analyse tghe convenience of using the respective codes MINX/NJOY and ETOE/MC 2 -2 for performing neutronics calculations in course at the Divisao de Estudos Avancados. (Author) [pt

  19. Utilization of the intense pulsed neutron source (IPNS) at Argonne National Laboratory for neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinrich, R.R.; Greenwood, L.R.; Popek, R.J.; Schulke, A.W. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    The Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) neutron scattering facility (NSF) has been investigated for its applicability to neutron activation analysis. A polyethylene insert has been added to the vertical hole VT3 which enhances the thermal neutron flux by a factor of two. The neutron spectral distribution at this position has been measured by the multiple-foil technique which utilized 28 activation reactions and the STAYSL computer code. The validity of this spectral measurement was tested by two irradiations of National Bureau of Standards SRM-1571 (orchard leaves), SRM-1575 (pine needles), and SRM-1645 (river sediment). The average thermal neutron flux for these irradiations normalized to 10 μamp proton beam is 4.0 x 10 11 n/cm 2 -s. Concentrations of nine trace elements in each of these SRMs have been determined by gamma-ray spectrometry. Agreement of measured values to certified values is demonstrated to be within experiment error

  20. Decontamination and reconditioning of the Argonne National Laboratory-West Casting Laboratory alpha glove box

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poston, J.W. Jr.; Burke, L.L.

    1998-01-01

    The Casting Laboratory (CL) alpha glove box was used to melt and cast metallic uranium and plutonium fuels as part of the Department of Energy''s Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor Program. This highly contaminated alpha glove box was decontaminated and reconditioned to allow a change in mission. The goal of reconditioning was to install experimental apparatus and to improve contamination control prior to introducing plutonium-238 into the CL glove box. Construction of a glove box containment structure and an increase in room ventilation were required. A temporary breathing air station was provided for personnel protection as well as personnel comfort. The historical contamination levels, the decontamination techniques, and the results of decontamination also are presented. The health physics aspects of the CL alpha glove box project may be applicable to other glove box refurbishment or decommissioning projects

  1. Tiger team assessment of the Argonne Illinois site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-10-19

    This report documents the results of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Tiger Team Assessment of the Argonne Illinois Site (AIS) (including the DOE Chicago Operations Office, DOE Argonne Area Office, Argonne National Laboratory-East, and New Brunswick Laboratory) and Site A and Plot M, Argonne, Illinois, conducted from September 17 through October 19, 1990. The Tiger Team Assessment was conducted by a team comprised of professionals from DOE, contractors, consultants. The purpose of the assessment was to provide the Secretary of Energy with the status of Environment, Safety, and Health (ES H) Programs at AIS. Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E) is the principal tenant at AIS. ANL-E is a multiprogram laboratory operated by the University of Chicago for DOE. The mission of ANL-E is to perform basic and applied research that supports the development of energy-related technologies. There are a significant number of ES H findings and concerns identified in the report that require prompt management attention. A significant change in culture is required before ANL-E can attain consistent and verifiable compliance with statutes, regulations and DOE Orders. ES H activities are informal, fragmented, and inconsistently implemented. Communication is seriously lacking, both vertically and horizontally. Management expectations are not known or commondated adequately, support is not consistent, and oversight is not effective.

  2. Tiger team assessment of the Argonne Illinois site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This report documents the results of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Tiger Team Assessment of the Argonne Illinois Site (AIS) (including the DOE Chicago Operations Office, DOE Argonne Area Office, Argonne National Laboratory-East, and New Brunswick Laboratory) and Site A and Plot M, Argonne, Illinois, conducted from September 17 through October 19, 1990. The Tiger Team Assessment was conducted by a team comprised of professionals from DOE, contractors, consultants. The purpose of the assessment was to provide the Secretary of Energy with the status of Environment, Safety, and Health (ES ampersand H) Programs at AIS. Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E) is the principal tenant at AIS. ANL-E is a multiprogram laboratory operated by the University of Chicago for DOE. The mission of ANL-E is to perform basic and applied research that supports the development of energy-related technologies. There are a significant number of ES ampersand H findings and concerns identified in the report that require prompt management attention. A significant change in culture is required before ANL-E can attain consistent and verifiable compliance with statutes, regulations and DOE Orders. ES ampersand H activities are informal, fragmented, and inconsistently implemented. Communication is seriously lacking, both vertically and horizontally. Management expectations are not known or commondated adequately, support is not consistent, and oversight is not effective

  3. Evaluation of NDE Round-Robin Exercises Using the NRC Steam Generator Mockup at Argonne National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muscara, Joseph; Kupperman, David S.; Bakhtiari, Sasab; Park, Jang-Yul; Shack, William J.

    2002-01-01

    This paper discusses round-robin exercises using the NRC steam generator (SG) mock-up at Argonne National Laboratory to assess inspection reliability. The purpose of the round robins was to assess the current reliability of SG tubing inservice inspection, determine the probability of detection (POD) as function of flaw size or severity, and assess the capability for sizing of flaws. For the round robin and subsequent evaluation completed in 2001, eleven teams participated. Bobbin and rotating coil mock-up data collected by qualified industry personnel were evaluated. The mock-up contains hundreds of cracks and simulations of artifacts such as corrosion deposits and tube support plates that make detection and characterization of cracks more difficult in operating steam generators than in most laboratory situations. An expert Task Group from industry, Argonne National Laboratory, and the NRC have reviewed the signals from the laboratory-grown cracks used in the mock-up to ensure that they provide reasonable simulations of those obtained in the field. The mock-up contains 400 tube openings. Each tube contains nine 22.2-mm (7/8-in.) diameter, 30.5-cm (1-ft) long, Alloy 600 test sections. The flaws are located in the tube sheet near the roll transition zone (RTZ), in the tube support plate (TSP), and in the free-span. The flaws are primarily intergranular stress corrosion cracks (axial and circumferential, ID and OD) though intergranular attack (IGA) wear and fatigue cracks are also present, as well as cracks in dents. In addition to the simulated tube sheet and TSP the mock-up has simulated sludge and magnetite deposits. A multiparameter eddy current algorithm, validated for mock-up flaws, provided a detailed isometric plot for every flaw and was used to establish the reference state of defects in the mock-up. The detection results for the 11 teams were used to develop POD curves as a function of maximum depth, voltage and the parameter m p, for the various types of

  4. Overview and status of the advanced photon source at Argonne National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, M.

    1994-01-01

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) is a state-of-the-art synchrotron light source facility dedicated to the production of extremely brilliant X-ray beams for research. Its super-intense X-ray beams will be used for many areas of research including industrial research, biological and medical research, defense-related research, and basic research. The APS X-ray beams will allow scientists to study smaller samples, more complex systems, faster reactions and processes, and gather data at a greater level of detail than has been possible to date. Creation of these beams begins with electron production by an electron with a thermionic cathode. The electrons are accelerated to 200 MeV by a linear accelerator (linac) and then impinge on a tungsten target. resulting in electron-positron pair production. The positrons are accelerated to 450 MeV in the remainder of the linac, then accumulated, damped, and transferred to a synchrotron which increases their energy to 7-GeV. The 7-GeV positrons are injected into a storage ring, where they pass through special magnets and emit X-rays of the desired quality. The APS is under construction at ANL at this time, and will begin operating for users in 1996. The accelerator and experimental facilities are described in this paper, and an overview of some of the experimental programs is given

  5. Computational Science at the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Nichols

    2014-03-01

    The goal of the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF) is to extend the frontiers of science by solving problems that require innovative approaches and the largest-scale computing systems. ALCF's most powerful computer - Mira, an IBM Blue Gene/Q system - has nearly one million cores. How does one program such systems? What software tools are available? Which scientific and engineering applications are able to utilize such levels of parallelism? This talk will address these questions and describe a sampling of projects that are using ALCF systems in their research, including ones in nanoscience, materials science, and chemistry. Finally, the ways to gain access to ALCF resources will be presented. This research used resources of the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility at Argonne National Laboratory, which is supported by the Office of Science of the U.S. Department of Energy under contract DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  6. National Transuranic Program Charter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-10-01

    The National Transuranic Program Plan and Charter describes the functional elements of the National TRU Program, organizational relationships, programmatic responsibilities, division of work scope among the various DOE organizations that comprise the program, and program baselines against which overall progress will be measured. The charter defines the authorities and responsibilities of various organizations involved in the management of TRU waste throughout the DOE complex

  7. News | Argonne National Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    wins the Department of Energy Cyber Defense Competition Warm introductions to science and engineering Defense Competition April 2, 2018 Nanotechnology moves from the clean room to the classroom August 18 ESEnergy Systems GSSGlobal Security Sciences NENuclear Engineering Photon Sciences ASDAccelerator Systems

  8. Nuclear Accident Dosimetry at Argonne National Laboratory; Dosimetrie dans les Cas d'Accidents Nucleaires au Laboratoire National d'Argonne; 0421 041b 0423 0416 0411 0410 0414 ; Dosimetria en Casos de Accidente Nuclear en el Laboratorio Nacional de Argonne

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, L. L.; Duffy, T. L.; Sedlet, J.; O' Neil, D. P. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (United States)

    1965-06-15

    This report summarizes current planning at Argonne National Laboratory with respect to dose determination following a criticality incident. The discussion relates chiefly to two types of commercially obtained dosimeter packages, and includes the results of independent calibrations performed at the Laboratory. The primary dosimeter system incorporates threshold detectors developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory for neutron spectrum measurement. Fission foil decay calibration curves have been determined experimentally for scintillation counting equipment routinely used at Argonne. This equipment also has been calibrated for determination of sodium-24 activity in blood. Dosimeter units of the type designed at Savannah River Laboratory are deployed as secondary stations. Data from the neutron activation components of these units will be used to make corrections to, the neutron spectrum for intermediate as well as thermal energies. The epicadmium copper foil activation, for a given fluence of intermediate energy neutrons, has been shown relatively insensitive to neutron spectrum variations within the region, and a meaningful average of copper cross-section has been determined. Counter calibration factors determined at Argonne are presented for the copper, indium, and sulphur components. The total neutron fluence is computed using the corrected spectrum in conjunction with a capture probability function and the blood sodium result. One or more specifications of neutron dose then may be calculated by applying the spectral information to the appropriate conversion function. The gamma portion of the primary dosimeter package contains fluorescent rods and a thermoluminescent dosimeter in addition to a two-phase chemical dosimeter. The gamma dosimeter in the secondary package is a polyacrylamide solution which is degraded by exposure to gamma radiation. The absorbed dose is derived from a measured change insolution viscosity. Difficulties in evaluation, placement, and

  9. Argonne's atlas control system upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munson, F.; Quock, D.; Chapin, B.; Figueroa, J.

    1999-01-01

    The ATLAS facility (Argonne Tandem-Linac Accelerator System) is located at the Argonne National Laboratory. The facility is a tool used in nuclear and atomic physics research, which focuses primarily on heavy-ion physics. The accelerator as well as its control system are evolutionary in nature, and consequently, continue to advance. In 1998 the most recent project to upgrade the ATLAS control system was completed. This paper briefly reviews the upgrade, and summarizes the configuration and features of the resulting control system

  10. Weerts to lead Physical Sciences and Engineering directorate | Argonne

    Science.gov (United States)

    Physical Sciences and Engineering directorate By Lynn Tefft Hoff * August 10, 2015 Tweet EmailPrint Hendrik Engineering (PSE) directorate at the U.S. Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory. Weerts has , chemistry, materials science and nanotechnology. Weerts joined Argonne in 2005 as director of Argonne's High

  11. National Diabetes Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Living Tips About WIN NIDDK Information Clearinghouses National Diabetes Education Program Together with more than 200 partners ... type 2 diabetes. Learn more about NDEP . National Diabetes Month You are the center of your diabetes ...

  12. National Toxicology Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NTP? NTP develops and applies tools of modern toxicology and molecular biology to identify substances in the ... depend on for decisions that matter. The National Toxicology Program provides the scientific basis for programs, activities, ...

  13. National School Lunch Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    US Department of Agriculture, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The National School Lunch Program is a federally assisted meal program operating in over 101,000 public and non-profit private schools and residential child care institutions. It provides nutritionally balanced, low-cost or free lunches to more than 30.5 million children each school day in 2008. In 1998, Congress expanded the National School Lunch…

  14. The Argonne Radiological Impact Program (ARIP). Part II. MONITOR: A Program and Data Base for Retrieval and Utilization of Pollutant Monitoring Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eckerman, Keith F.; Stowe, Ralph F.; Frigerio, Norman A.

    1977-02-01

    The Argonne Radiological Impact Program (ARIP) is an ongoing project of the Laboratory's Division of Environmental Impact Studies that aims at developing methodologies for assessing the carcinogenic hazards associated with nuclear power development. The project's first report (ANL/ES-26, Part I), published in September.l973, discussed models of radiation carcinogenesis and the contribution of U .. S. background radiation levels to hazardous dose rates. The current report (Part II) treats the storage and access of available data on radiation and radioactivity levels in the u. S. A compute-r code. (the MONITOR program) is prf!sented, which can serve as a ready-access data. bank for all monitoring data acquired over the past two decades. The MONITOR program currently stores data on monitoring locations, types of monitoring efforts, and types of monitoring data. reported in Radiation Data and Reports by the various state and federal ne-tworks; expansion of this data base to include nuclear power facilities in operation or on order is ongoing ·. The MONITOR code retrieves information within a search radius, or rectangl.e ,. circumscribed by parameters of latitude and longitude, and l:.ists or maps the data_as: requested. The code, with examples, is given in full in the report ..

  15. National Pediatric Program Update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    The book of the National Pediatric Program Update, issued by the Argentina Society of Pediatrics, describes important issues, including: effective treatment of addictions (drugs); defects of the neural tube; and the use of radiation imaging in diagnosis. [es

  16. National Coastal Mapping Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — The U. S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) National Coastal Mapping Program (NCMP) is designed to provide high-resolution elevation and imagery data along U.S....

  17. Was Argonne whistleblower really blowing smoke?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshall, E.

    1992-01-01

    Tension between scientists and lawyers is on the rise at one federal lab as a result of a recent Department of Energy (DOE) investigation of staffers at the Argonne National Laboratory near Chicago. In the past, DOE Tiger Teams have clashed with lab personnel over enforcement of safety and health codes. Now the battle is joined on the definition of good and bad science. Officials at DOE headquarters in Washington, DC say that scientific dissent was being suppressed at Argonne. Argonne's director Alan Schriesheim vehemently disagrees. The case that brought these issues to the fore last week involves a whistleblower named James Smith, a former assistant engineer at the Argonne National Laboratory's western branch near Idaho Falls, Idaho. Specifically, he charged that a consultant and staffers had used inaccurate data on the metallurgy and thermochemistry of fuel being designed for an experimental breeder reactor. Smith also claimed the errors might endanger public safety

  18. YUCCA Mountain Project - Argonne National Laboratory, Annual Progress Report, FY 1997 for activity WP 1221 unsaturated drip condition testing of spent fuel and unsaturated dissolution tests of glass.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bates, J. K.; Buck, E. C.; Emery, J. W.; Finch, R. J.; Finn, P. A.; Fortner, J.; Hoh, J. C.; Mertz, C.; Neimark, L. A.; Wolf, S. F.; Wronkiewicz, D. J.

    1998-09-18

    This document reports on the work done by the Nuclear Waste Management Section of the Chemical Technology Division of Argonne National Laboratory in the period of October 1996 through September 1997. Studies have been performed to evaluate the behavior of nuclear waste glass and spent fuel samples under the unsaturated conditions (low-volume water contact) that are likely to exist in the Yucca Mountain environment being considered as a potential site for a high-level waste repository. Tests with actinide-doped waste glasses, in progress for over 11 years, indicate that the transuranic element release is dominated by colloids that continuously form and span from the glass surface. The nature of the colloids that form in the glass and spent fuel testing programs is being investigated by dynamic light scattering to determine the size distribution, by autoradiography to determine the chemistry, and by zeta potential to measure the electrical properties of the colloids. Tests with UO{sub 2} have been ongoing for 12 years. They show that the oxidation of UO{sub 2} occurs rapidly, and the resulting paragenetic sequence of secondary phases forming on the sample surface is similar to that observed for uranium found in natural oxidizing environments. The reaction of spent fuel samples in conditions similar to those used with UO{sub 2} have been in progress for over six years, and the results suggest that spent fuel forms many of the same alteration products as UO{sub 2}. With spent fuel, the bulk of the reaction occurs via a through-grain reaction process, although grain boundary attack is sufficient to have reacted all of the grain boundary regions in the samples. New test methods are under development to evaluate the behavior of spent fuel samples with intact cladding: the rate at which alteration and radionuclide release occurs when water penetrates fuel sections and whether the reaction causes the cladding to split. Alteration phases have been formed on fine grains of UO

  19. YUCCA Mountain Project - Argonne National Laboratory, Annual Progress Report, FY 1997 for activity WP 1221 unsaturated drip condition testing of spent fuel and unsaturated dissolution tests of glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bates, J.K.; Buck, E.C.; Emery, J.W.; Finch, R.J.; Finn, P.A.; Fortner, J.; Hoh, J.C.; Mertz, C.; Neimark, L.A.; Wolf, S.F.; Wronkiewicz, D.J.

    1998-01-01

    This document reports on the work done by the Nuclear Waste Management Section of the Chemical Technology Division of Argonne National Laboratory in the period of October 1996 through September 1997. Studies have been performed to evaluate the behavior of nuclear waste glass and spent fuel samples under the unsaturated conditions (low-volume water contact) that are likely to exist in the Yucca Mountain environment being considered as a potential site for a high-level waste repository. Tests with actinide-doped waste glasses, in progress for over 11 years, indicate that the transuranic element release is dominated by colloids that continuously form and span from the glass surface. The nature of the colloids that form in the glass and spent fuel testing programs is being investigated by dynamic light scattering to determine the size distribution, by autoradiography to determine the chemistry, and by zeta potential to measure the electrical properties of the colloids. Tests with UO 2 have been ongoing for 12 years. They show that the oxidation of UO 2 occurs rapidly, and the resulting paragenetic sequence of secondary phases forming on the sample surface is similar to that observed for uranium found in natural oxidizing environments. The reaction of spent fuel samples in conditions similar to those used with UO 2 have been in progress for over six years, and the results suggest that spent fuel forms many of the same alteration products as UO 2 . With spent fuel, the bulk of the reaction occurs via a through-grain reaction process, although grain boundary attack is sufficient to have reacted all of the grain boundary regions in the samples. New test methods are under development to evaluate the behavior of spent fuel samples with intact cladding: the rate at which alteration and radionuclide release occurs when water penetrates fuel sections and whether the reaction causes the cladding to split. Alteration phases have been formed on fine grains of UO 2 in contact with

  20. Argonne Laboratory Computing Resource Center - FY2004 Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bair, R.

    2005-04-14

    In the spring of 2002, Argonne National Laboratory founded the Laboratory Computing Resource Center, and in April 2003 LCRC began full operations with Argonne's first teraflops computing cluster. The LCRC's driving mission is to enable and promote computational science and engineering across the Laboratory, primarily by operating computing facilities and supporting application use and development. This report describes the scientific activities, computing facilities, and usage in the first eighteen months of LCRC operation. In this short time LCRC has had broad impact on programs across the Laboratory. The LCRC computing facility, Jazz, is available to the entire Laboratory community. In addition, the LCRC staff provides training in high-performance computing and guidance on application usage, code porting, and algorithm development. All Argonne personnel and collaborators are encouraged to take advantage of this computing resource and to provide input into the vision and plans for computing and computational analysis at Argonne. Steering for LCRC comes from the Computational Science Advisory Committee, composed of computing experts from many Laboratory divisions. The CSAC Allocations Committee makes decisions on individual project allocations for Jazz.

  1. Generation IV national program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preville, M.; Sadhankar, R.; Brady, D.

    2007-01-01

    This paper outlines the Generation IV National Program. This program involves evolutionary and innovative design with significantly higher efficiencies (∼50% compared to present ∼30%) - sustainable, economical, safe, reliable and proliferation resistant - for future energy security. The Generation IV Forum (GIF) effectively leverages the resources of the participants to meet these goals. Ten countries signed the GIF Charter in 2001

  2. National Geospatial Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carswell, William J.

    2011-01-01

    The National Geospatial Program (NGP; http://www.usgs.gov/ngpo/) satisfies the needs of customers by providing geospatial products and services that customers incorporate into their decisionmaking and operational activities. These products and services provide geospatial data that are organized and maintained in cost-effective ways and developed by working with partners and organizations whose activities align with those of the program. To accomplish its mission, the NGP— organizes, maintains, publishes, and disseminates the geospatial baseline of the Nation's topography, natural landscape, and manmade environment through The National Map

  3. Particulate Emissions Control using Advanced Filter Systems: Final Report for Argonne National Laboratory, Corning Inc. and Hyundai Motor Company CRADA Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seong, Hee Je [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Choi, Seungmok [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-10-09

    This is a 3-way CRADA project working together with Corning, Inc. and Hyundai Motor Co. (HMC). The project is to understand particulate emissions from gasoline direct-injection engines (GDI) and their physico-chemical properties. In addition, this project focuses on providing fundamental information about filtration and regeneration mechanisms occurring in gasoline particulate filter (GPF) systems. For the work, Corning provides most advanced filter substrates for GPF applications and HMC provides three-way catalyst (TWC) coating services of these filter by way of a catalyst coating company. Then, Argonne National Laboratory characterizes fundamental behaviors of filtration and regeneration processes as well as evaluated TWC functionality for the coated filters. To examine aging impacts on TWC and GPF performance, the research team evaluates gaseous and particulate emissions as well as back-pressure increase with ash loading by using an engine-oil injection system to accelerate ash loading in TWC-coated GPFs.

  4. Report of investigation into allegations of retaliation for raising safety and quality of work issues regarding Argonne National Laboratory's Integral Fast Reactor project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-12-01

    In August 1990 James A. Smith resigned his position as an experimenter at Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W), located near Idaho Falls, Idaho. Smith who holds a Ph.D. in metallurgy, had worked at the Laboratory since 1988, primarily on its Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) project. He alleged that the quality of the Laboratory's work on that project had been undermined by fundamental errors in metallurgy and related sciences, at least some of which had nuclear safety implications; that the Laboratory had published false and misleading accounts of its work; that prevailing attitudes at the Laboratory were antithetical to quality scientific work; and that because he had expressed concerns about these matters his job was threatened by his managers. Evidence gathered during an investigation by the Department of Energy's Office of Nuclear Safety (NS) is presented and conclusions and recommendations are provided

  5. Neutron source investigations in support of the cross section program at the Argonne Fast-Neutron Generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meadows, J.W.; Smith, D.L.

    1980-05-01

    Experimental methods related to the production of neutrons for cross section studies at the Argonne Fast-Neutron Generator are reviewed. Target assemblies commonly employed in these measurements are described, and some of the relevant physical properties of the neutron source reactions are discussed. Various measurements have been performed to ascertain knowledge about these source reaction that is required for cross section data analysis purposes. Some results from these studies are presented, and a few specific examples of neutron-source-related corrections to cross section data are provided. 16 figures, 3 tables

  6. National Hansen's Disease (Leprosy) Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Caring and Curing Since 1894 National Hansen's Disease (Leprosy) Program Caring and Curing Since 1894 A genetic ... Louisiana New York Texas The National Hansen's Disease (Leprosy) Program The National Hansen's Disease Program is the ...

  7. Comprehensive resurvey program to prevent radiological incidents at a national laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipton, W.V.; Hunckler, C.A.

    1978-01-01

    A comprehensive resurvey program in a general purpose research building at Argonne National Laboratory is being implemented. The program was designed to prevent radiological incidents by increasing the awareness of Health Physics personnel of radiological hazards, initiating corrective actions, and providing information for improving routine survey schedules, and for establishing manpower requirements. The following aspects of the program are described: scheduling, surveys, records, follow-up, and statistics

  8. Status of RF superconductivity at Argonne

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shepard, K.W.

    1989-01-01

    Development of a superconducting (SC) slow-wave structures began at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) in 1971, and led to the first SC heavy-ion linac (ATLAS - the Argonne Tandem-Linac Accelerating System), which began regularly scheduled operation in 1978. To date, more than 40,000 hours of bean-on target operating time has been accumulated with ATLAS. The Physics Division at ANL has continued to develop SC RF technology for accelerating heavy-ions, with the result that the SC linac has, up to the present, has been in an almost continuous process of upgrade and expansion. It should be noted that this has been accomplished while at the same time maintaining a vigorous operating schedule in support of the nuclear and atomic physics research programs of the division. In 1987, the Engineering Physics Division at ANL began development of SC RF components for the acceleration of high-brightness proton and deuterium beams. This work has included the evaluation of RF properties of high-T c oxide superconductors, both for the above and for other applications. The two divisions collaborated while they worked on several applications of RF SC, and also worked to develop the technology generally. 11 refs., 6 figs

  9. Status of RF superconductivity at Argonne

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shepard, K.W.

    1989-01-01

    Development of a superconducting (SC) slow-wave structures began at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) in 1971, and led to the first SC heavy-ion linac (ATLAS - the Argonne Tandem-Linac Accelerating System), which began regularly scheduled operation in 1978. To date, more than 40,000 hours of bean-on target operating time has been accumulated with ATLAS. The Physics Division at ANL has continued to develop SC RF technology for accelerating heavy-ions, with the result that the SC linac has, up to the present, has been in an almost continuous process of upgrade and expansion. It should be noted that this has been accomplished while at the same time maintaining a vigorous operating schedule in support of the nuclear and atomic physics research programs of the division. In 1987, the Engineering Physics Division at ANL began development of SC RF components for the acceleration of high-brightness proton and deuterium beams. This work has included the evaluation of RF properties of high-{Tc} oxide superconductors, both for the above and for other applications. The two divisions collaborated while they worked on several applications of RF SC, and also worked to develop the technology generally. 11 refs., 6 figs.

  10. Chronic radiation injury with mice and dogs exposed to external whole-body irradiation at the Argonne National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grahn, D.; Fritz, T.E.

    1986-01-01

    This document describes studies on chronic radiation injury in experimental animals and the extrapolation of derived injury parameters to man. Most of the large studies have used mice given single, weekly, or continuous exposure to cobalt-60 gamma rays, or, more recently, single or weekly exposure to fission neutrons from the JANUS reactor. Primary measures of injury have been life shortening and the associated major pathological changes, particularly neoplastic diseases. Recent and ongoing studies compare the effects of extremely low neutron exposures with gamma irradiations delivered as a single dose or in 60 equal weekly increments. Total neutron doses range from 1 to 40 rads; gamma-ray doses range from 22.5 to 600 rads. Selected genetic studies are performed concurrently to provide a nearly complete matrix of somatic and genetic effects of these low exposures. Studies with the beagle have complemented those with mice and have shown a strong parallelism in the responses of the two species. Present exposures are at 0.3, 0.75, and 1.88 rads per day of continuous gamma irradiation to test a model for the prediction of life shortening in man which has evolved from Argonne's long-term studies. The dog offers the opportunity for longitudinal clinical evaluations that are not possible in the mouse, to develop a broader view of the neoplastic disease spectrum, and to study the mechanisms of radiation induction of leukemia. Diverse statistical approaches have been used to measure excess risk, dose-response functions, and rates of injury and repair. Actuarial statistical methods have been favored since they permit a more direct means of extrapolation to man. 50 refs., 4 figs

  11. National HTGR safety program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, D.E.; Kelley, A.P. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the National HTGR Program in the US with emphasis on the safety and licensing strategy being pursued. This strategy centers upon the development of an integrated approach to organizing and classifying the functions needed to produce safe and economical nuclear power production. At the highest level, four plant goals are defined - Normal Operation, Core and Plant Protection, Containment Integrity and Emergency Preparedness. The HTGR features which support the attainment of each goal are described and finally a brief summary is provided of the current status of the principal safety development program supporting the validation of the four plant goals

  12. National nuclear scientific program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plecas, I.; Matausek, M.V.; Neskovic, N.

    2001-01-01

    National scientific program of the Vinca Institute Nuclear Reactors And Radioactive Waste comprises research and development in the following fields: application of energy of nuclear fission, application of neutron beams, analyses of nuclear safety and radiation protection. In the first phase preparatory activities, conceptual design and design of certain processes and facilities should be accomplished. In the second phase realization of the projects is expected. (author)

  13. Argonne National Laboratory heavy ion beam transport experiments with a 2 mA 80 keV Xe+1 source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazarakis, M.; Price, D.; Watson, J.

    1978-01-01

    The critical dimensions of the Argonne heavy ion beam transmission experiments and the experimental set-up are considered. Experimental results of beam transmission and emittance measurements are discussed

  14. Report on the workshop "Decay spectroscopy at CARIBU: advanced fuel cycle applications, nuclear structure and astrophysics". 14-16 April 2011, Argonne National Laboratory, USA.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondev, F.; Carpenter, M.P.; Chowdhury, P.; Clark, J.A.; Lister, C.J.; Nichols, A.L.; Swewryniak, D. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (Univ. of Massachusetts); (Univ. of Surrey)

    2011-10-06

    A workshop on 'Decay Spectroscopy at CARIBU: Advanced Fuel Cycle Applications, Nuclear Structure and Astrophysics' will be held at Argonne National Laboratory on April 14-16, 2011. The aim of the workshop is to discuss opportunities for decay studies at the Californium Rare Isotope Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) of the ATLAS facility with emphasis on advanced fuel cycle (AFC) applications, nuclear structure and astrophysics research. The workshop will consist of review and contributed talks. Presentations by members of the local groups, outlining the status of relevant in-house projects and availabile equipment, will also be organized. time will also be set aside to discuss and develop working collaborations for future decay studies at CARIBU. Topics of interest include: (1) Decay data of relevance to AFC applications with emphasis on reactor decay heat; (2) Discrete high-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy following radioactive decya and related topics; (3) Calorimetric studies of neutron-rich fission framgents using Total ABsorption Gamma-Ray Spectrometry (TAGS) technique; (4) Beta-delayed neutron emissions and related topics; and (5) Decay data needs for nuclear astrophysics.

  15. Decontamination and decommissioning of 61 plutonium gloveboxes in D-Wing, Building 212 Argonne National Laboratory-East: Final project report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheever, C.L.; Rose, R.W.

    1996-09-01

    Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E) is a government-owned, contractor operated, multipurpose research facility located 25 miles southwest of downtown Chicago on 689 hectares (1,700 acres) in DuPage County, Illinois, as shown in Figure 1.1. Building 212 is located in the central area of ANL-E, as shown in Figure 1.2. The purpose of this project was to eliminate the risk of radioactive material release from the contaminated glovebox systems and to make the laboratories available for unrestricted use. The following work objectives were established: (1) Identify and remove radioactive materials for return to ANL-E Special Materials control. (2) Remove and package the radioactively contaminated materials and equipment from the gloveboxes. (3) Decontaminate the gloveboxes to nontransuranic (non-TRU) levels. (4) Size-reduce and package the gloveboxes and support systems. (5) Document and dispose of the radioactive and mixed waste. (6) Decontaminate, survey, and release the nine laboratories and corridor areas for unrestricted use

  16. National transuranic program plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    As a result of various program initiatives, the U.S. generated and will continue to generate waste contaminated with radioactive materials. Because of increased awareness of the risks and special requirements to safely manage long-lived alpha-emitting radionuclides, a new category of radioactive waste, transuranic (TRU) waste, was adopted in 1970. Heads of Field Elements can determine that other alpha-contaminated wastes, peculiar to a specific site, must be managed as transuranic wasteclose quotes. TRU waste is generated and stored at various DOE sites around the country. In December 1993, the National Transuranic Program Office (NTPO) was established as part of the Carlsbad Area Office (CAO) to integrate and coordinate the diverse organizational elements that contribute to the complex-wide management of TRU waste. Numerous sites with small TRU waste inventories are also part of the national TRU waste system. The majority of TRU waste is also contaminated with hazardous materials and is thus considered mixed waste. Mixed waste must be managed in compliance with all federal, state, and local regulations that are applicable to the radioactive and/or hazardous component of the waste. Each generator site is responsible for the management of its respective waste. Sites must plan and implement programs to minimize, characterize, package, treat, store, ship, and dispose of all TRU waste; construct required waste management facilities and equipment; obtain permits; perform site-specific National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) analyses; conduct environmental studies; perform laboratory analyses; and certify that waste meets appropriate disposal facility criteria. Due to the toxicity and long half-lives of TRU radionuclides, TRU waste must be disposed in a manner that offers greater confinement than shallow land burial

  17. Intense pulsed neutron source (IPNS) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL): a status report as of June, 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, J.M.; Potts, C.W.; Lander, G.H.

    1983-01-01

    In this status report a general overview is given of the IPNS program. The facility has been operating since August 1981 and in a routine way for outside users since November 1981. The accelerator performance has been exceptional. Most instruments are now operational, or nearly so. For details of the individual instruments and experimental program the reader is referred to papers later in these proceedings

  18. Development of high temperature secondary Li-Al/FeS/sub x/ batteries at Argonne National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Battles, J E; Gay, E C; Steunenberg, R K; Barney, D L

    1980-01-01

    A general introduction to the battery program is given first. Subsequent sections discuss cell development, results of cell testing, and materials and component development - electrical feedthrough, electrode separators, materials for current collectors, and post-test cell examination (cell failure mechanisms, copper deposition in electrode separators, lithium gradient in negative electrodes). The Mark IA battery developed a short circuit in one of the modules that resulted in complete failure of the module; the other module was unaffected. 10 tables. (RWR)

  19. National nuclear program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa A, D.

    1980-01-01

    The basic concepts of the Nuclear program that Mexico plans are presented, to develop pointing out that it constitutes an outstanding event within the history of the country, that will result in an equilibrated profit of the resources of oil exploitation consolidating each step of its technical evolution; all of this represents a challenge since it establishes a qualitative transformation in the very roots of the National economy. Being certain that oil is a non renovable natural resource, the author points out that Mexican Government has emphasized the promotion of the research of alternate resource of energy in the future. According to this panorama, the quidelines that Mexico must undertake regarding production, distribution and consumption of nuclear energy, will point primarily to a global program, which will avoid the imports of equipment and technicians, to achieve maximum advantages for the Country. It stresses the fact that this program cannot start from zero; since first, Mexico, has to import foreign technology, which once assimilated, will give to the Mexican technicians the starting point to establish the proper solution to the foreseen objectives. Therefore, any kind of International cooperation must tend to accelerate the nuclear development and to obtain the transference to technology, within a frame of respect to Mexican sovereignity. The conclusion is that the task at which Mexico aims must be based on the existing human potentiality and on the one that will be prepared in the future, and also on the knowledge and adequate exploitation of the uranium reserves, having the ININ a prominent role of creating the necessary human infrastructure, the development of a Mexican nuclear energy can be achieved in a medium term. (author)

  20. Upgrade of 400,000 gallon water storage tank at Argonne National Laboratory-West to UCRL-15910 high hazard seismic requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffin, M.J.; Harris, B.G.

    1993-01-01

    As part of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) Project at Argonne National Laboratory West (ANL-W), it was necessary to strengthen an existing 400,000 gallon flat-bottom water storage tank to meet UCRL-15910 (currently formulated as DOE Standard DOE-STD-1020-92, Draft) high hazard natural phenomena requirements. The tank was constructed in 1988 and preliminary calculations indicated that the existing base anchorage was insufficient to prevent buckling and potential failure during a high hazard seismic event. General design criteria, including ground motion input, load combinations, etc., were based upon the requirements of UCRL-15910 for high hazard facilities. The analysis and capacity assessment criteria were based on the Generic Implementation Procedure developed by the Seismic Qualification Utilities Group (SQUG). Upgrade modifications, consisting of increasing the size of the Generic Implementation Procedure developed by the Seismic Qualification Utilities Group (SQUG). Upgrade modifications, consisting of increasing the size of the foundation and installing additional anchor bolts and chairs, were necessary to increase the capacity of the tank anchorage/support system. The construction of the upgrades took place in 1992 while the tank remained in service to allow continued operation of the EBR-II reactor. The major phases of construction included the installation and testing of 144 1/14in. x 15in., and 366 1in. x 16in. epoxied concrete anchors, placement of 220 cubic yards of concrete heavily reinforced, and installation of 24 1-1/2in. x 60in. tank anchor bolts and chairs. A follow-up inspection of the tank interior by a diver was conducted to determine if the interior tank coating had been damaged by the chair welding. The project was completed on schedule and within budget

  1. Treatment of EBR-I NaK mixed waste at Argonne National Laboratory and subsequent land disposal at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrmann, S. D.; Buzzell, J. A.; Holzemer, M. J.

    1998-01-01

    Sodium/potassium (NaK) liquid metal coolant, contaminated with fission products from the core meltdown of Experimental Breeder Reactor I (EBR-I) and classified as a mixed waste, has been deactivated and converted to a contact-handled, low-level waste at Argonne's Sodium Component Maintenance Shop and land disposed at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex. Treatment of the EBR-I NaK involved converting the sodium and potassium to its respective hydroxide via reaction with air and water, followed by conversion to its respective carbonate via reaction with carbon dioxide. The resultant aqueous carbonate solution was solidified in 55-gallon drums. Challenges in the NaK treatment involved processing a mixed waste which was incompletely characterized and difficult to handle. The NaK was highly radioactive, i.e. up to 4.5 R/hr on contact with the mixed waste drums. In addition, the potential existed for plutonium and toxic characteristic metals to be present in the NaK, resultant from the location of the partial core meltdown of EBR-I in 1955. Moreover, the NaK was susceptible to degradation after more than 40 years of storage in unmonitored conditions. Such degradation raised the possibility of energetic exothermic reactions between the liquid NaK and its crust, which could have consisted of potassium superoxide as well as hydrated sodium/potassium hydroxides

  2. Treatment of EBR-I NaK mixed waste at Argonne National Laboratory and subsequent land disposal at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrmann, S. D.; Buzzell, J. A.; Holzemer, M. J.

    1998-02-03

    Sodium/potassium (NaK) liquid metal coolant, contaminated with fission products from the core meltdown of Experimental Breeder Reactor I (EBR-I) and classified as a mixed waste, has been deactivated and converted to a contact-handled, low-level waste at Argonne's Sodium Component Maintenance Shop and land disposed at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex. Treatment of the EBR-I NaK involved converting the sodium and potassium to its respective hydroxide via reaction with air and water, followed by conversion to its respective carbonate via reaction with carbon dioxide. The resultant aqueous carbonate solution was solidified in 55-gallon drums. Challenges in the NaK treatment involved processing a mixed waste which was incompletely characterized and difficult to handle. The NaK was highly radioactive, i.e. up to 4.5 R/hr on contact with the mixed waste drums. In addition, the potential existed for plutonium and toxic characteristic metals to be present in the NaK, resultant from the location of the partial core meltdown of EBR-I in 1955. Moreover, the NaK was susceptible to degradation after more than 40 years of storage in unmonitored conditions. Such degradation raised the possibility of energetic exothermic reactions between the liquid NaK and its crust, which could have consisted of potassium superoxide as well as hydrated sodium/potassium hydroxides.

  3. Advances by the Integral Fast Reactor Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lineberry, M.J.; Pedersen, D.R.; Walters, L.C.; Cahalan, J.E.

    1991-01-01

    The advances by the Integral Fast Reactor Program at Argonne National Laboratory are the subject of this paper. The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) is an advanced liquid-metal-cooled reactor concept being developed at Argonne National Laboratory. The advances stressed in the paper include fuel irradiation performance, improved passive safety, and the development of a prototype fuel cycle facility. 14 refs

  4. Argonne National Laboratory patent portfolio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huguelet, B.C.

    1976-01-01

    This booklet contains the abstracts of all active U. S. patents on technology items that originated at ANL, the applicability of which is not limited to nuclear reactors. Also listed are the titles of all ANL-originated nuclear-related U. S. patents that are still in force. Selected technology items for which patent applications have been filed and are available for licensing are included in several categories. Categories included in this booklet are as follows: atmospheric and earth sciences; biological and medical sciences; chemistry and chemical engineering; cryogenics and superconductivity; electronics and electrical engineering; energy conversion; measurements and controls; methods and devices; materials and fabrication; physics, accelerators and fusion; and selected nuclear-related technology

  5. Increase Workshop | Argonne National Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facility ALCF's mission is to accelerate major scientific discoveries and engineering breakthroughs for interndisciplinary nanoscience and nanotechnology reserach. Academic, industry, and international researchers can with the Interdisciplinary Consortium for Research and Educational Access in Science and Engineering

  6. Argonne's Laboratory computing center - 2007 annual report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bair, R.; Pieper, G. W.

    2008-05-28

    Argonne National Laboratory founded the Laboratory Computing Resource Center (LCRC) in the spring of 2002 to help meet pressing program needs for computational modeling, simulation, and analysis. The guiding mission is to provide critical computing resources that accelerate the development of high-performance computing expertise, applications, and computations to meet the Laboratory's challenging science and engineering missions. In September 2002 the LCRC deployed a 350-node computing cluster from Linux NetworX to address Laboratory needs for mid-range supercomputing. This cluster, named 'Jazz', achieved over a teraflop of computing power (1012 floating-point calculations per second) on standard tests, making it the Laboratory's first terascale computing system and one of the 50 fastest computers in the world at the time. Jazz was made available to early users in November 2002 while the system was undergoing development and configuration. In April 2003, Jazz was officially made available for production operation. Since then, the Jazz user community has grown steadily. By the end of fiscal year 2007, there were over 60 active projects representing a wide cross-section of Laboratory expertise, including work in biosciences, chemistry, climate, computer science, engineering applications, environmental science, geoscience, information science, materials science, mathematics, nanoscience, nuclear engineering, and physics. Most important, many projects have achieved results that would have been unobtainable without such a computing resource. The LCRC continues to foster growth in the computational science and engineering capability and quality at the Laboratory. Specific goals include expansion of the use of Jazz to new disciplines and Laboratory initiatives, teaming with Laboratory infrastructure providers to offer more scientific data management capabilities, expanding Argonne staff use of national computing facilities, and improving the scientific

  7. Results from the Argonne, Los Alamos, JAERI collaboration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meadows, J.; Smith, D.; Greenwood, L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Haight, R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Ikeda, Y.; Konno, C. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Ibaraki (Japan)

    1993-07-01

    Four sample packets containing elemental Ti, Fe, Ni, Cu, Nb, Ag, Eu, Tb and Hf have been irradiated in three distinct accelerator neutron fields, at Argonne National Laboratory and Los Alamos National Laboratory, USA, and Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Tokai, Japan. The acquired experimental data include differential cross sections and integral cross sections for the continuum neutron spectrum produced by 7-MeV deuterons incident on thick Be-metal target. The U-238(n,f) cross section was also measured at 10.3 MeV as a consistency check on the experimental technique. This the third progress report on a project which has been carried out under the auspices of an IAEA Coordinated Research Program entitled ``Activation Cross Sections for the Generation Of Long-lived Radionuclides of Importance in Fusion Reactor Technology``. The present report provides the latest results from this work. Comparison is made between the 14.7-MeV cross-section values obtained from the separate investigations at Argonne and JAERI. Generally, good agreement observed within the experimental errors when consistent sample parameters, radioactivity decay data and reference cross values are employed. A comparison is also made between the experimental results and those derived from calculations using a nuclear model. Experimental neutron information on the Be(d,n) neutron spectrum was incorporated in the comparisons for the integral results. The agreement is satisfactory considering the various uncertainties that are involved.

  8. National Kidney Disease Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Living Tips About WIN NIDDK Information Clearinghouses National Kidney Disease Education Program Improving the understanding, detection, and ... Group Learn more about Working Groups Learn about Kidney Disease Find information for people with or at ...

  9. Polymer solidification national program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalb, P.D.; Colombo, P.

    1993-04-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has developed several new and innovative polymer processes for the solidification of low-level radioactive, hazardous and mixed wastes streams. Polyethylene and modified sulfur cement solidification technologies have undergone steady, gradual development at BNL over the past nine years. During this time they have progressed through each of the stages necessary for logical technology maturation: from process conception, parameter optimization, waste form testing, evaluation of long-term durability, economic analysis, and scale-up feasibility. This technology development represents a significant investment which can potentially provide DOE with both short- and long-term savings

  10. Transforming Argonne's waste management organization - the road to energy quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres, T.A.; Sodaro, M.A.; Thuot, J.R.

    1996-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory's (ANL's) Waste Management Department began its journey to excellence in 1990. The department was organized to provide for waste cleanup, waste handling, decontamination, and other services. The staff was principally workers and foremen with few professional staff. The department has transitioned into a highly effective organization that has competed for the President's Energy Quality Award. The department is currently staffed by 58 people, including professional staff and waste mechanics. The department began by recognizing and addressing the problems that existed: There was no formal waste safety program or waste reduction culture. Formal procedures did not cover all aspects of waste operations, waste handling procedures and acceptance criteria were out of date, and the Waste Management Department did not have a customer-centered culture. The department began a step by step program to improve the waste management organization

  11. Argonne Wakefield Accelerator Update '92

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosing, M.; Balka, L.; Chojnacki, E.; Gai, W.; Ho, C.; Konecny, R.; Power, J.; Schoessow, P.; Simpson, J.

    1992-01-01

    The Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA) is an experiment designed to test various ideas related to wakefield technology. Construction is now underway for a 100 nC electron beam in December of 1992. This report updates this progress

  12. Plutonium working group report on environmental, safety and health vulnerabilities associated with the Department's plutonium storage. Volume II, Appendix B, Part 8: Argonne National Laboratory - East and New Brunswick Laboratory site assessment team report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    The objective of the Plutonium ES ampersand H Vulnerability Assessment Project is to conduct a comprehensive assessment of the environmental, safety and health (ES ampersand H) vulnerabilities arising from the Department's storage and handling of Its current plutonium holdings. The term open-quote ES ampersand H vulnerabilitiesclose quotes is defined for the purpose of this project to mean conditions or weaknesses that could lead to unnecessary or increased radiation exposure of workers, release of radioactive materials to the environment, or radiation exposure of the public. The assessment will identify and prioritize ES ampersand H vulnerabilities, and will serve as an information base for identifying corrective actions and options for the safe management of fissile materials. The Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E) Site Assessment Team (SAT) was formed from Department of Energy (DOE) Chicago Operations Office-Argonne Area Office Personnel, to conduct a self-assessment of the plutonium holdings and any associated ES ampersand H vulnerabilities at the ANL-E site

  13. Argonne Bubble Experiment Thermal Model Development III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buechler, Cynthia Eileen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2018-01-11

    This report describes the continuation of the work reported in “Argonne Bubble Experiment Thermal Model Development” and “Argonne Bubble Experiment Thermal Model Development II”. The experiment was performed at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) in 2014. A rastered 35 MeV electron beam deposited power in a solution of uranyl sulfate, generating heat and radiolytic gas bubbles. Irradiations were performed at beam power levels between 6 and 15 kW. Solution temperatures were measured by thermocouples, and gas bubble behavior was recorded. The previous report2 described the Monte-Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) calculations and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis performed on the as-built solution vessel geometry. The CFD simulations in the current analysis were performed using Ansys Fluent, Ver. 17.2. The same power profiles determined from MCNP calculations in earlier work were used for the 12 and 15 kW simulations. The primary goal of the current work is to calculate the temperature profiles for the 12 and 15 kW cases using reasonable estimates for the gas generation rate, based on images of the bubbles recorded during the irradiations. Temperature profiles resulting from the CFD calculations are compared to experimental measurements.

  14. Experimental investigations of long-term interactions of molten UO2 with MgO and concrete at Argonne National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stein, R.P.; Farhadieh, R.; Pedersen, D.R.; Gunther, W.H.; Purviance, R.T.

    1982-01-01

    Experimental work at Argonne is being performed to investigate the long-term molten-core-debris retention capability of the ex-vessel cavity following a postulated meltdown accident. The eventual objective of the work is to determine if normal structural material (concrete) or a specifically selected sacrificial material (MgO) located in the ex-vessel cavity region can effectively contain molten core debris. The materials under investigation at ANL are various types of concrete (limestone, basalt and magnetite) and commercially-available MgO brick. Results are presented of the status of real material experimental investigation at ANL into (1) molten UO 2 pool heat transfer, (2) long-term molten UO 2 penetration into concrete and (3) long-term molten UO 2 penetration into refractory substrates. The decay heating in the fuel has been simulated by direct electrical heating permitting the study of the long-term interaction

  15. Experimental investigations of long-term interactions of molten UO2 with MgO and concrete at Argonne National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stein, R.P.; Farhadieh, R.; Pedersen, D.R.; Gunther, W.H.; Purviance, R.T.

    1982-01-01

    Experimental work at Argonne is being performed to investigate the long-term molten core debris retention capability of the ex-vessel cavity following a postulated meltdown accident. The eventual objective of the work is to determine if normal structural material (concrete) or a specifically selected sacrificial material (MgO) located in the ex-vessel cavity region can effectively contain molten core debris. The materials under investigation at ANL are various types of concrete (limestone, basalt and magnetite) and commercially-available MgO brick. Results are presented of the status of real material experimental investigation at ANL into 1) molten UO 2 pool heat transfer, 2) long-term molten UO 2 penetration into concrete and 3) long-term molten UO 2 penetration into refractory substrates. The decay heating in the fuel has been simulated by direct electrical heating permitting the study of the long-term interaction

  16. Characterization of mixed CH-TRU waste at Argonne-West

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dwight, C.C.; Guay, K.P.; Courtney, J.C.; Higgins, P.J.

    1993-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory is participating in the Department of Energy's Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Experimental Test Program by characterizing and repackaging mixed contact-handled transuranic waste. Argonne's initial activities in the Program were described last year at Waste Management '92. Since then, additional waste has been characterized and repackaged, resulting in six bins ready for shipment to WIPP upon the initiation of the bin tests. Lessons learned from these operations are being factored in the design and installation of a new characterization facility, the Enhanced Waste Characterization Facility (EWCF). The objectives of the WIPP Experimental Test Program have also undergone change since last year leading to an accelerated effort to factor sludge sampling capability into the EWCF. Consequently, the initiation of non-sludge operations in the waste characterization chamber has been delayed to Summer 1993 while the sludge sampling modifications are incorporated into the facility. Benefits in operational flexibility, effectiveness, and efficiency and reductions in potential facility and personnel contamination and exposure are expected from the enhanced waste characterization facility within the Hot Fuel Examination Facility at Argonne-West. This paper summarizes results and lessons learned from recent characterization and repackaging efforts and future plans for characterization. It also describes design features and status of the EWCF

  17. Argonne to lead 8 DOE Grid Modernization Projects | Argonne National

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inverters Develop a holistic attack-resilient architecture and layered cyber-physical solution portfolio to ensuring that the grid is resilient and secure to withstand growing cyber security and climate challenges vehicles to buildings, as well as system-level vehicle-grid integration, analysis and cyber security. Find

  18. Brookhaven Lab and Argonne Lab scientists invent a plasma valve

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Scientists from Brookhaven National Laboratory and Argonne National Laboratory have received U.S. patent number 6,528,948 for a device that shuts off airflow into a vacuum about one million times faster than mechanical valves or shutters that are currently in use (1 page).

  19. Plutonium working group report on environmental, safety and health vulnerabilities associated with the Department's plutonium storage. Volume II, Part 5: Argonne National Laboratory - west working group assessment team report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    Based on the site visit and walkdowns, the Working Group Assessment Team (WGAT) considers the Site Assessment Team (SAT) report and question sets to be a factual assessment of the facilities. As a result of the Site and WGAT's reviews, six vulnerabilities were identified for further consideration by the Department of Energy (DOE) Plutonium Vulnerability Working Group preparing the final report. All six vulnerabilities were discussed among the respective site teams members and facility experts and agreement was reached. The vulnerabilities by facility identified by the SAT and WGAT are described below. No ranking or priority is implied by the order in which they are listed. In addition the WGAT identified and included issues for the Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) and DOE line management organizations that are not explicit Environment Safety ampersand Health (ES ampersand H) vulnerabilities

  20. Computer-based accountability system (Phase I) for special nuclear materials at Argonne-West

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ingermanson, R.S.; Proctor, A.E.

    1982-05-01

    An automated accountability system for special nuclear materials (SNM) is under development at Argonne National Laboratory-West. Phase I of the development effort has established the following basic features of the system: a unique file organization allows rapid updating or retrieval of the status of various SNM, based on batch numbers, storage location, serial number, or other attributes. Access to the program is controlled by an interactive user interface that can be easily understood by operators who have had no prior background in electronic data processing. Extensive use of structured programming techniques make the software package easy to understand and to modify for specific applications. All routines are written in FORTRAN

  1. Script for Argonne lithium process video

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    Approximately 2700 metric tons of spent nuclear fuel, representing over 40 years of reactor research and development, has accumulated within the DOE complex. This fuel reflects the varied purposes of DOE reactors and covers a wide range of composition, enrichment, cladding, and chemical reactivity. The varied nature of these fuels complicates their long term disposal. To attempt to individually qualify each type for disposal in a repository would be prohibitively expensive. The electrometallurgical treatment technique, developed by Argonne National Laboratory, is designed to homogenize the wide variety of spent fuel types into a single set of acceptable disposal forms

  2. ARGONNE/ NOVOSIBIRSK: Storing polarized deuterons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    Promising new results come from a collaboration between the Institute of Physics, Novosibirsk, and the US Argonne Laboratory, initiated in 1988 to look at the possibilities for using polarized (spin oriented) gas targets in high current electron storage rings, the object being to maximize target polarization levels

  3. Argonne Wakefield Accelerator update '92

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosing, M.; Balka, L.; Chojnacki, E.; Gai, W.; Ho, C.; Konecny, R.; Power, J.; Schoessow, P.; Simpson, J.

    1992-01-01

    The construction of the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA) is under way. The majority of the hardware is about to be delivered or is installed. Radiation safety systems are in the review process, and the laser system is operational. Bunch production should begin in December 1992. 4 refs., 5 figs

  4. Women in Energy: Rinku Gupta - Argonne Today

    Science.gov (United States)

    -performance clusters and supercomputers. What is the best part of your job? The best part is working with Argonne Today Argonne Today Mission People Work/Life Connections Focal Point Women in Energy: Rinku Gupta Home People Women in Energy: Rinku Gupta Women in Energy: Rinku Gupta Apr 1, 2016 | Posted by Argonne

  5. Environment, Safety and Health Progress Assessment of the Argonne Illinois Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-11-01

    This report documents the results of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Environment, Safety and Health (ES&H) Progress Assessment of the Argonne Illinois Site (AIS), near Chicago, Illinois, conducted from October 25 through November 9, 1993. During the Progress Assessment, activities included a selective review of the ES&H management systems and programs with principal focus on the DOE Office of Energy Research (ER); CH, which includes the Argonne Area Office; the University of Chicago; and the contractor`s organization responsible for operation of Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The ES&H Progress Assessments are part of DOE`s continuing effort to institutionalize line management accountability and the self-assessment process throughout DOE and its contractor organizations. The purpose of the AIS ES&H Progress Assessment was to provide the Secretary of Energy, senior DOE managers, and contractor management with concise independent information on the following: change in culture and attitude related to ES&H activities; progress and effectiveness of the ES&H corrective actions resulting from the previous Tiger Team Assessment; adequacy and effectiveness of the ES&H self-assessment process of the DOE line organizations, the site management, and the operating contractor; and effectiveness of DOE and contractor management structures, resources, and systems to effectively address ES&H problems and new ES&H initiatives.

  6. Environment, Safety and Health Progress Assessment of the Argonne Illinois Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-11-01

    This report documents the results of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Environment, Safety and Health (ES ampersand H) Progress Assessment of the Argonne Illinois Site (AIS), near Chicago, Illinois, conducted from October 25 through November 9, 1993. During the Progress Assessment, activities included a selective review of the ES ampersand H management systems and programs with principal focus on the DOE Office of Energy Research (ER); CH, which includes the Argonne Area Office; the University of Chicago; and the contractor's organization responsible for operation of Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The ES ampersand H Progress Assessments are part of DOE's continuing effort to institutionalize line management accountability and the self-assessment process throughout DOE and its contractor organizations. The purpose of the AIS ES ampersand H Progress Assessment was to provide the Secretary of Energy, senior DOE managers, and contractor management with concise independent information on the following: change in culture and attitude related to ES ampersand H activities; progress and effectiveness of the ES ampersand H corrective actions resulting from the previous Tiger Team Assessment; adequacy and effectiveness of the ES ampersand H self-assessment process of the DOE line organizations, the site management, and the operating contractor; and effectiveness of DOE and contractor management structures, resources, and systems to effectively address ES ampersand H problems and new ES ampersand H initiatives

  7. Argonne to open new facility for advanced vehicle testing

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory will open it's Advanced Powertrain Research Facility on Friday, Nov. 15. The facility is North America's only public testing facility for engines, fuel cells, electric drives and energy storage. State-of-the-art performance and emissions measurement equipment is available to support model development and technology validation (1 page).

  8. Three Argonne technologies win R&D 100 awards

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    "Three technologies developed or co-developed at the U.S. Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory have been recognized with R&D 100 Awards, which highlight some of the best products and technologies from around the world" (1 page).

  9. Argonne's new Wakefield Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, J.D.

    1992-01-01

    The first phase of a high current, short bunch length electron beam research facility, the AWA, is near completion at Argonne. At the heart of the facility is a photocathode based electron gun and accelerating sections designed to deliver 20 MeV pulses with up to 100 nC per pulse and with pulse lengths of approximately 15 ps (fw). Using a technique similar to that originated at Argonne's AATF facility, a separate weak probe pulse can be generated and used to diagnose wake effects produced by the intense pulses. Initial planned experiments include studies of plasma wakefields and dielectric wakefield devices, and expect to demonstrate large, useful accelerating gradients (> 100 MeV/m). Later phases of the facility will increase the drive bunch energy to more than 100 MeV to enable acceleration experiments up to the GeV range. Specifications, design details, and commissioning progress are presented

  10. Status of RF superconductivity at Argonne

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shepard, K.W.

    1990-01-01

    Development of a superconducting slow-wave structures began at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) in 1971, and led to the first superconducting heavy-ion linac (ATLAS - the Argonne Tandem-Linac Accelerator System). The Physics Division at ANL has continued to develop superconducting RF technology for accelerating heavy-ions, with the result that the linac has been in an almost continuous process of upgrade and expansion. In 1987, the Engineering Physics Division at ANL began developing of superconducting RF components for the acceleration of high-brightness proton and deuterium beams. The two divisions collaborate in work on several applications of RF superconductivity, and also in work to develop the technology generally. The present report briefly describes major features of the superconducting heavy-ion linac (very-low-velocity superconducting linac, positive ion injector), proton accelerating structures (superconducting resonant cavities for acceleration of high-current proton and deuteron beams, RF properties of oxide superconductors), and future work. Both divisions expect to continue a variety of studies, frequently in collaboration, to advance the basic technology of RF superconductivity. (N.K.)

  11. Argonne Bubble Experiment Thermal Model Development II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buechler, Cynthia Eileen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-07-01

    This report describes the continuation of the work reported in “Argonne Bubble Experiment Thermal Model Development”. The experiment was performed at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) in 2014. A rastered 35 MeV electron beam deposited power in a solution of uranyl sulfate, generating heat and radiolytic gas bubbles. Irradiations were performed at three beam power levels, 6, 12 and 15 kW. Solution temperatures were measured by thermocouples, and gas bubble behavior was observed. This report will describe the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model that was developed to calculate the temperatures and gas volume fractions in the solution vessel during the irradiations. The previous report described an initial analysis performed on a geometry that had not been updated to reflect the as-built solution vessel. Here, the as-built geometry is used. Monte-Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) calculations were performed on the updated geometry, and these results were used to define the power deposition profile for the CFD analyses, which were performed using Fluent, Ver. 16.2. CFD analyses were performed for the 12 and 15 kW irradiations, and further improvements to the model were incorporated, including the consideration of power deposition in nearby vessel components, gas mixture composition, and bubble size distribution. The temperature results of the CFD calculations are compared to experimental measurements.

  12. Plutonium working group report on environmental, safety and health vulnerabilities associated with the Department's plutonium storage. Volume II, part 8: Argonne National Laboratory - East and New Brunswick Laboratory working group assessment team report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    The Plutonium Vulnerability Working Group Assessment Team No. 1 (WGAT-1) visited Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E) and New Brunswick Laboratory (NBL), located at the ANL-Illinois site, from May 23 through May 27 and June 6 through June 10, 1994. The objective of the WGAT-1, the ANL-E Site Assessment Team (SAT), and the NBL SAT was to conduct a comprehensive assessment of the environment, safety, and health (ES ampersand H) vulnerabilities arising at ANL-E and NBL from the storage and handling of the Department's current plutonium holdings. During the first visit to the site (May 23-27), WGAT-1 toured various site facilities and, after each tour, met with SAT members to conduct 'table-top' discussions. In addition, various briefings were given to ANL-E management, NBL management, and DOE management. During the second visit (June 6-10), WGAT-1 completed their assessment report, and met with various site technical representatives

  13. Argonne Natl Lab receives TeraFLOP Cluster Linux NetworX

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    " Linux NetworX announced today it has delivered an Evolocity II (E2) Linux cluster to Argonne National Laboratory that is capable of performing more than one trillion calculations per second (1 teraFLOP)" (1/2 page).

  14. Studies of acute and chronic radiation injury at the Biological and Medical Research Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 1953-1970: Description of individual studies, data files, codes, and summaries of significant findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grahn, D.; Fox, C.; Wright, B.J.; Carnes, B.A.

    1994-05-01

    Between 1953 and 1970, studies on the long-term effects of external x-ray and {gamma} irradiation on inbred and hybrid mouse stocks were carried out at the Biological and Medical Research Division, Argonne National Laboratory. The results of these studies, plus the mating, litter, and pre-experimental stock records, were routinely coded on IBM cards for statistical analysis and record maintenance. Also retained were the survival data from studies performed in the period 1943-1953 at the National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland. The card-image data files have been corrected where necessary and refiled on hard disks for long-term storage and ease of accessibility. In this report, the individual studies and data files are described, and pertinent factors regarding caging, husbandry, radiation procedures, choice of animals, and other logistical details are summarized. Some of the findings are also presented. Descriptions of the different mouse stocks and hybrids are included in an appendix; more than three dozen stocks were involved in these studies. Two other appendices detail the data files in their original card-image format and the numerical codes used to describe the animal`s exit from an experiment and, for some studies, any associated pathologic findings. Tabular summaries of sample sizes, dose levels, and other variables are also given to assist investigators in their selection of data for analysis. The archive is open to any investigator with legitimate interests and a willingness to collaborate and acknowledge the source of the data and to recognize appropriate conditions or caveats.

  15. Studies of acute and chronic radiation injury at the Biological and Medical Research Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 1953-1970: Description of individual studies, data files, codes, and summaries of significant findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grahn, D.; Fox, C.; Wright, B.J.; Carnes, B.A.

    1994-05-01

    Between 1953 and 1970, studies on the long-term effects of external x-ray and γ irradiation on inbred and hybrid mouse stocks were carried out at the Biological and Medical Research Division, Argonne National Laboratory. The results of these studies, plus the mating, litter, and pre-experimental stock records, were routinely coded on IBM cards for statistical analysis and record maintenance. Also retained were the survival data from studies performed in the period 1943-1953 at the National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland. The card-image data files have been corrected where necessary and refiled on hard disks for long-term storage and ease of accessibility. In this report, the individual studies and data files are described, and pertinent factors regarding caging, husbandry, radiation procedures, choice of animals, and other logistical details are summarized. Some of the findings are also presented. Descriptions of the different mouse stocks and hybrids are included in an appendix; more than three dozen stocks were involved in these studies. Two other appendices detail the data files in their original card-image format and the numerical codes used to describe the animal's exit from an experiment and, for some studies, any associated pathologic findings. Tabular summaries of sample sizes, dose levels, and other variables are also given to assist investigators in their selection of data for analysis. The archive is open to any investigator with legitimate interests and a willingness to collaborate and acknowledge the source of the data and to recognize appropriate conditions or caveats

  16. 2015 Annual Report - Argonne Leadership Computing Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, James R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Papka, Michael E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Cerny, Beth A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Coffey, Richard M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The Argonne Leadership Computing Facility provides supercomputing capabilities to the scientific and engineering community to advance fundamental discovery and understanding in a broad range of disciplines.

  17. 2014 Annual Report - Argonne Leadership Computing Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, James R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Papka, Michael E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Cerny, Beth A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Coffey, Richard M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The Argonne Leadership Computing Facility provides supercomputing capabilities to the scientific and engineering community to advance fundamental discovery and understanding in a broad range of disciplines.

  18. An update on Argonne's AWA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosing, M.; Chojnacki, E.; Gai, W.; Ho, C.; Konecny, R.; Mtingwa, S.; Norem, J.; Schoessow, P.; Simpson, J.

    1991-01-01

    The Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA) is a new research facility which will possess unprecedented research capabilities for the study of wakefields and related areas requiring short, intense electron bunches. The AWA is designed to produce 100 nC, 14 ps (full width) electron bunches at rep rates up to 30 Hz. Phase-1 of the AWA, now under construction, will provide these pulses at 20 MeV for various experiments. Current designs, related research and development, and construction status are presented in this general overview and project update. 6 refs., 4 figs

  19. Proc. of the sixteenth symposium on energy engineering sciences, May 13-15, 1998, Argonne, IL.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1998-05-13

    This Proceedings Volume includes the technical papers that were presented during the Sixteenth Symposium on Energy Engineering Sciences on May 13--15, 1998, at Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois. The Symposium was structured into eight technical sessions, which included 30 individual presentations followed by discussion and interaction with the audience. A list of participants is appended to this volume. The DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES), of which Engineering Research is a component program, is responsible for the long-term, mission-oriented research in the Department. The Office has prime responsibility for establishing the basic scientific foundation upon which the Nation's future energy options will be identified, developed, and built. BES is committed to the generation of new knowledge necessary to solve present and future problems regarding energy exploration, production, conversion, and utilization, while maintaining respect for the environment. Consistent with the DOE/BES mission, the Engineering Research Program is charged with the identification, initiation, and management of fundamental research on broad, generic topics addressing energy-related engineering problems. Its stated goals are to improve and extend the body of knowledge underlying current engineering practice so as to create new options for enhancing energy savings and production, prolonging the useful life of energy-related structures and equipment, and developing advanced manufacturing technologies and materials processing. The program emphasis is on reducing costs through improved industrial production and performance and expanding the nation's store of fundamental knowledge for solving anticipated and unforeseen engineering problems in energy technologies. To achieve these goals, the Engineering Research Program supports approximately 130 research projects covering a broad spectrum of topics that cut across traditional engineering disciplines. The program

  20. Plan for the future of neutron research on condensed matter: an Argonne National Laboratory report prepared in response to the Report of the Review Panel on Neutron Scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    The Review Panel on Neutron Scattering has recommended an expanded budget to allow systematic development of the field. An alternative plan for the future of neutron research on condensed matter is presented here, in case it is not possible to fund the expanded budget. This plan leads, in a rational and logical way, to a world-class neutron source that will ensure the vitality of the field and exploit the many benefits that state-of-the-art neutron facilities can bring to programs in the materials and biological sciences. 2 tables

  1. Fuel cells for transportation program: FY1997 national laboratory annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Fuel Cells for Transportation Program is structured to effectively implement the research and development (R and D) required for highly efficient, low or zero emission fuel cell power systems to be a viable replacement for the internal combustion engine in automobiles. The Program is part of the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles (PNGV), a government-industry initiative aimed at development of an 80 mile-per-gallon vehicle. This Annual Report summarizes the technical accomplishments of the laboratories during 1997. Participants include: Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). During 1997, the laboratory R and D included one project on solid oxide fuel cells; this project has since been terminated to focus Department resources on PEM fuel cells. The technical component of this report is divided into five key areas: fuel cell stack research and development; fuel processing; fuel cell modeling, testing, and evaluation; direct methanol PEM fuel cells; and solid oxide fuel cells.

  2. Monte Carlo work at Argonne National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelbard, E.M.; Prael, R.E.

    1974-01-01

    A simple model of the Monte Carlo process is described and a (nonlinear) recursion relation between fission sources in successive generations is developed. From the linearized form of these recursion relations, it is possible to derive expressions for the mean square coefficients of error modes in the iterates and for correlation coefficients between fluctuations in successive generations. First-order nonlinear terms in the recursion relation are analyzed. From these nonlinear terms an expression for the bias in the eigenvalue estimator is derived, and prescriptions for measuring the bias are formulated. Plans for the development of the VIM code are reviewed, and the proposed treatment of small sample perturbations in VIM is described. 6 references. (U.S.)

  3. National Waste Terminal Storage Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zerby, C.D.

    1976-01-01

    Objective of this program is to provide facilities (Federal repositories) in various deep geologic formations at several locations in USA for the safe disposal of commercial radioactive waste from power reactors. The four types of containerized waste are described. The steps for developing the repositories are outlined

  4. National Status and Trends: Mussel Watch Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Mussel Watch is the longest running continuous chemical contaminant monitoring program in U.S. coastal and Great Lakes waters and was created in response to concerns...

  5. National Estuary Program Study Area Boundaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — There are 28 National Estuary Programs (NEPs) in the U.S.that implement habitat protection and restoration projects with their partners. This work takes place within...

  6. National Cardiac Device Surveillance Program Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The National Cardiac Device Surveillance Program Database supports the Eastern Pacemaker Surveillance Center (EPSC) staff in its function of monitoring some 11,000...

  7. Get Your Automotive Program Nationally Certified!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundquist, Patricia A.

    2000-01-01

    Automotive programs that nationally certified enhance student recruitment and give students better employment opportunities. Technicians who earn the Automotive Service Excellence credential have joined the ranks of professionals in the automotive service industry. (Author/JOW)

  8. CWDD accelerator at Argonne: Status and future opportunities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McMichael, G.; Carwardine, J.; Den Hartog, P.; Sagalovsky, L.; Yule, T.; Clarkson, I.; Papsco, R.; Pile, G.

    1994-01-01

    The Continuous Wave Deuterium Demonstrator (CWDD) accelerator, a cryogenically-cooled (26K) linac, was designed to accelerate 80 mA cw of D to 7.5 MeV. CWDD was being built to demonstrate the launching of a beam with characteristics suitable for a space-based neutral particle beam (NPB). A considerable amount of hardware was constructed and installed in the Argonne-based facility, and major performance milestones were achieved before program funding ended in October 1993. Existing assets have been turned over to Argonne for continuation under other sponsors. These include a fully functional 200 kV cw D injector and high power (1 MW) cw rf amplifier, a cw RFQ that has been tuned, leak checked and aligned, and a partially completed ramped-gradient DTL. Project status and achievements are reviewed and proposals for future use of the equipment are discussed

  9. National Toxic Substance Incidents Program (NTSIP)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-02-03

    This podcast gives an overview of the three components of the National Toxic Substance Incidents Program: state surveillance, national database, and response teams.  Created: 2/3/2011 by Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry.   Date Released: 2/3/2011.

  10. National Reform Programs in Local Practices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjelholt, Morten; Jensen, Tina Blegind

    . In particular, we emphasize the practices in which national strategic formulations are legitimized and accepted or abandoned by the actors involved. Building on a case study conducted over a two-year time span, we show how a local actor engages with and promotes a national reform program by evoking a discourse...

  11. A tau-charm-factory at Argonne

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norem, J.; Repond, J.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper we explore the possibility of building a tau-charm-factory at the Argonne National Laboratory. A tau-charm-factory is an e + e - collider with a center-of-mass energy between 3.0 GeV and 5.0 GeV and a luminosity of at least 1 x 10 33 cm -2 s -1 . Once operational, the facility will produce large samples of τ pairs, charm mesons, and charmonium with either negligible or well understood backgrounds. This will lead to high precision measurements in the second generation quark and the third generation lepton sectors that cannot be done at other facilities. Basic physical properties and processes, such as the tau neutrino mass, rare tau decays, charm decay constants, rare charm meson decays, neutral D 0 -- meson mixing, and many more will be studied with unique precision. An initial design of the collider including the injector system is described. The design shows that a luminosity of at least 1 x 10 33 cm -2 s -1 can be achieved over the entire center-of-mass energy range of the factory

  12. The Argonne Leadership Computing Facility 2010 annual report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drugan, C. (LCF)

    2011-05-09

    Researchers found more ways than ever to conduct transformative science at the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF) in 2010. Both familiar initiatives and innovative new programs at the ALCF are now serving a growing, global user community with a wide range of computing needs. The Department of Energy's (DOE) INCITE Program remained vital in providing scientists with major allocations of leadership-class computing resources at the ALCF. For calendar year 2011, 35 projects were awarded 732 million supercomputer processor-hours for computationally intensive, large-scale research projects with the potential to significantly advance key areas in science and engineering. Argonne also continued to provide Director's Discretionary allocations - 'start up' awards - for potential future INCITE projects. And DOE's new ASCR Leadership Computing (ALCC) Program allocated resources to 10 ALCF projects, with an emphasis on high-risk, high-payoff simulations directly related to the Department's energy mission, national emergencies, or for broadening the research community capable of using leadership computing resources. While delivering more science today, we've also been laying a solid foundation for high performance computing in the future. After a successful DOE Lehman review, a contract was signed to deliver Mira, the next-generation Blue Gene/Q system, to the ALCF in 2012. The ALCF is working with the 16 projects that were selected for the Early Science Program (ESP) to enable them to be productive as soon as Mira is operational. Preproduction access to Mira will enable ESP projects to adapt their codes to its architecture and collaborate with ALCF staff in shaking down the new system. We expect the 10-petaflops system to stoke economic growth and improve U.S. competitiveness in key areas such as advancing clean energy and addressing global climate change. Ultimately, we envision Mira as a stepping-stone to exascale-class computers

  13. Effect of synchrotron radiation in the proposed 4 GeV Argonne microtron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crosbie, E.A.

    1983-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation in the sector magnets of the 4-GeV microtron designed at the Argonne National Laboratory produces a small but noticeable distortion of the closed orbits of the system and a very-significant growth of the horizontal and longitudinal phase-space emittances. Because of the small apertures in the three 25-meter linacs, it is important that the expected growth of the beam be calculated as accurately as possible. For this reason, a computer program has been written which follows the motions of individual electrons in the four dimensional horizontal and longitudinal phase space as they are accelerated in the system. As the electrons go through the sector magnets, they emit quanta at random with randomly chosen energies. The final results show 63% emittance (area π) values of 0.15 mm mrad and 630 keV degrees for the horizontal and longitudinal phase spaces, respectively. The 99% values are about 4.6 times larger

  14. National waste terminal storage program bibliography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asher, J.M.

    1977-01-01

    In February 1976, the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) announced a greatly expanded waste management program for defense and commercial radioactive waste. In that announcement, ERDA indicated that the Oak Ridge Operations Office (ORO) of ERDA would have lead responsibility for overall coordination of the expanded commercial geologic disposal program and that an Office of Waste Isolation (OWI) would be created within Union Carbide Corporation-Nuclear Division (UCC-ND) with the responsibility for program management of that activity. This bibliography lists many of the documents authored since 1958 by UCC-ND's technical personnel, consultants, and subcontractors as part of the geologic waste disposal programs at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the current National Waste Terminal Storage (NWTS) Program. Future editions will contain new documents as well as other prior-year documents which, because of our schedule, we were unable to identify, locate, and include in this first edition. Longer-range plans include broadening the scope of coverage to include documents authored by other NWTS Program participants. This edition, as well as future editions, will list only those documents that have been processed through ERDA's Technical Information Center for public availability from the National Technical Information Service, Springfield, Virginia. Full reference and citation information appears only once, with various indexes provided for the convenience of the user. Report references are arranged by issuing organization with sequencing according to document numbers; references to journal articles and conference proceedings are arranged by issue date

  15. NIST commitment to national MQA programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caswell, R.S. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States)

    1993-12-31

    The program of the Ionizing Radiation Division, Physics Laboratory is discussed, especially relating to standards, calibrations, and measurement quality assurance (MQA). The NIST program is {open_quotes}vertically integrated,{close_quotes} meaning that activities extend from fundamental research to measurement research to supplying services and data. Typical methods NIST uses to assure the quality of the national standards are presented. Some of the programs in x-ray, gamma-ray, electron, neutron, and radioactivity research which support MQA are presented. Examples are given of MQA activities.

  16. NIST commitment to national MQA programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caswell, R.S.

    1993-01-01

    The program of the Ionizing Radiation Division, Physics Laboratory is discussed, especially relating to standards, calibrations, and measurement quality assurance (MQA). The NIST program is open-quotes vertically integrated,close quotes meaning that activities extend from fundamental research to measurement research to supplying services and data. Typical methods NIST uses to assure the quality of the national standards are presented. Some of the programs in x-ray, gamma-ray, electron, neutron, and radioactivity research which support MQA are presented. Examples are given of MQA activities

  17. Argonne Chemical Sciences & Engineering - Center for Electrical Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laboratory Chemical Sciences & Engineering DOE Logo CSE Home About CSE Research Facilities People Publications Awards News & Highlights Events Search Argonne ... Search Argonne Home > Chemical Sciences & Engineering > Fundamental Interactions Catalysis & Energy Conversion Electrochemical

  18. Applying national survey results for strategic planning and program improvement: the National Diabetes Education Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffey, Susan; Piccinino, Linda; Gallivan, Joanne; Lotenberg, Lynne Doner; Tuncer, Diane

    2015-02-01

    Since the 1970s, the federal government has spearheaded major national education programs to reduce the burden of chronic diseases in the United States. These prevention and disease management programs communicate critical information to the public, those affected by the disease, and health care providers. The National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP), the leading federal program on diabetes sponsored by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), uses primary and secondary quantitative data and qualitative audience research to guide program planning and evaluation. Since 2006, the NDEP has filled the gaps in existing quantitative data sources by conducting its own population-based survey, the NDEP National Diabetes Survey (NNDS). The NNDS is conducted every 2–3 years and tracks changes in knowledge, attitudes and practice indicators in key target audiences. This article describes how the NDEP has used the NNDS as a key component of its evaluation framework and how it applies the survey results for strategic planning and program improvement. The NDEP's use of the NNDS illustrates how a program evaluation framework that includes periodic population-based surveys can serve as an evaluation model for similar national health education programs.

  19. 2016 Annual Report - Argonne Leadership Computing Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, Jim [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Papka, Michael E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Cerny, Beth A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Coffey, Richard M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF) helps researchers solve some of the world’s largest and most complex problems, while also advancing the nation’s efforts to develop future exascale computing systems. This report presents some of the ALCF’s notable achievements in key strategic areas over the past year.

  20. Wire chamber degradation at the Argonne ZGS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haberichter, W.; Spinka, H.

    1986-01-01

    Experience with multiwire proportional chambers at high rates at the Argonne Zero Gradient Synchrotron is described. A buildup of silicon on the sense wires was observed where the beam passed through the chamber. Analysis of the chamber gas indicated that the density of silicon was probably less than 10 ppM

  1. Argonne's Laboratory Computing Resource Center : 2005 annual report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bair, R. B.; Coghlan, S. C; Kaushik, D. K.; Riley, K. R.; Valdes, J. V.; Pieper, G. P.

    2007-06-30

    Argonne National Laboratory founded the Laboratory Computing Resource Center in the spring of 2002 to help meet pressing program needs for computational modeling, simulation, and analysis. The guiding mission is to provide critical computing resources that accelerate the development of high-performance computing expertise, applications, and computations to meet the Laboratory's challenging science and engineering missions. The first goal of the LCRC was to deploy a mid-range supercomputing facility to support the unmet computational needs of the Laboratory. To this end, in September 2002, the Laboratory purchased a 350-node computing cluster from Linux NetworX. This cluster, named 'Jazz', achieved over a teraflop of computing power (10{sup 12} floating-point calculations per second) on standard tests, making it the Laboratory's first terascale computing system and one of the fifty fastest computers in the world at the time. Jazz was made available to early users in November 2002 while the system was undergoing development and configuration. In April 2003, Jazz was officially made available for production operation. Since then, the Jazz user community has grown steadily. By the end of fiscal year 2005, there were 62 active projects on Jazz involving over 320 scientists and engineers. These projects represent a wide cross-section of Laboratory expertise, including work in biosciences, chemistry, climate, computer science, engineering applications, environmental science, geoscience, information science, materials science, mathematics, nanoscience, nuclear engineering, and physics. Most important, many projects have achieved results that would have been unobtainable without such a computing resource. The LCRC continues to improve the computational science and engineering capability and quality at the Laboratory. Specific goals include expansion of the use of Jazz to new disciplines and Laboratory initiatives, teaming with Laboratory infrastructure

  2. Argonne's Laboratory computing resource center : 2006 annual report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bair, R. B.; Kaushik, D. K.; Riley, K. R.; Valdes, J. V.; Drugan, C. D.; Pieper, G. P.

    2007-05-31

    Argonne National Laboratory founded the Laboratory Computing Resource Center (LCRC) in the spring of 2002 to help meet pressing program needs for computational modeling, simulation, and analysis. The guiding mission is to provide critical computing resources that accelerate the development of high-performance computing expertise, applications, and computations to meet the Laboratory's challenging science and engineering missions. In September 2002 the LCRC deployed a 350-node computing cluster from Linux NetworX to address Laboratory needs for mid-range supercomputing. This cluster, named 'Jazz', achieved over a teraflop of computing power (10{sup 12} floating-point calculations per second) on standard tests, making it the Laboratory's first terascale computing system and one of the 50 fastest computers in the world at the time. Jazz was made available to early users in November 2002 while the system was undergoing development and configuration. In April 2003, Jazz was officially made available for production operation. Since then, the Jazz user community has grown steadily. By the end of fiscal year 2006, there were 76 active projects on Jazz involving over 380 scientists and engineers. These projects represent a wide cross-section of Laboratory expertise, including work in biosciences, chemistry, climate, computer science, engineering applications, environmental science, geoscience, information science, materials science, mathematics, nanoscience, nuclear engineering, and physics. Most important, many projects have achieved results that would have been unobtainable without such a computing resource. The LCRC continues to foster growth in the computational science and engineering capability and quality at the Laboratory. Specific goals include expansion of the use of Jazz to new disciplines and Laboratory initiatives, teaming with Laboratory infrastructure providers to offer more scientific data management capabilities, expanding Argonne staff

  3. The National Geothermal Energy Research Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    The continuous demand for energy and the concern for shortages of conventional energy resources have spurred the nation to consider alternate energy resources, such as geothermal. Although significant growth in the one natural steam field located in the United States has occurred, a major effort is now needed if geothermal energy, in its several forms, is to contribute to the nation's energy supplies. From the early informal efforts of an Interagency Panel for Geothermal Energy Research, a 5-year Federal program has evolved whose objective is the rapid development of a commercial industry for the utilization of geothermal resources for electric power production and other products. The Federal program seeks to evaluate the realistic potential of geothermal energy, to support the necessary research and technology needed to demonstrate the economic and environmental feasibility of the several types of geothermal resources, and to address the legal and institutional problems concerned in the stimulation and regulation of this new industry.

  4. National NIF Diagnostic Program Interim Management Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warner, B

    2002-01-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) has the mission of supporting Stockpile Stewardship and Basic Science research in high-energy-density plasmas. To execute those missions, the facility must provide diagnostic instrumentation capable of observing and resolving in time events and radiation emissions characteristic of the plasmas of interest. The diagnostic instrumentation must conform to high standards of operability and reliability within the NIF environment. These exacting standards, together with the facility mission of supporting a diverse user base, has led to the need for a central organization charged with delivering diagnostic capability to the NIF. The National NIF Diagnostics Program (NNDP) has been set up under the aegis of the NIF Director to provide that organization authority and accountability to the wide user community for NIF. The funds necessary to perform the work of developing diagnostics for NIF will be allocated from the National NIF Diagnostics Program to the participating laboratories and organizations. The participating laboratories and organizations will design, build, and commission the diagnostics for NIF. Restricted availability of funding has had an adverse impact, unforeseen at the time of the original decision to projectize NIF Core Diagnostics Systems and Cryogenic Target Handing Systems, on the planning and initiation of these efforts. The purpose of this document is to provide an interim project management plan describing the organizational structure and management processes currently in place for NIF Core Diagnostics Systems. Preparation of a Program Execution Plan for NIF Core Diagnostics Systems has been initiated and a current draft is provided as Attachment 1 to this document. The National NIF Diagnostics Program Interim Management Plan provides a summary of primary design criteria and functional requirements, current organizational structure, tracking and reporting procedures, and current planning estimates of project scope

  5. National Ignition Facility Project Site Safety Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dun, C

    2003-01-01

    This Safety Program for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) presents safety protocols and requirements that management and workers shall follow to assure a safe and healthful work environment during activities performed on the NIF Project site. The NIF Project Site Safety Program (NPSSP) requires that activities at the NIF Project site be performed in accordance with the ''LLNL ES and H Manual'' and the augmented set of controls and processes described in this NIF Project Site Safety Program. Specifically, this document: (1) Defines the fundamental NIF site safety philosophy. (2) Defines the areas covered by this safety program (see Appendix B). (3) Identifies management roles and responsibilities. (4) Defines core safety management processes. (5) Identifies NIF site-specific safety requirements. This NPSSP sets forth the responsibilities, requirements, rules, policies, and regulations for workers involved in work activities performed on the NIF Project site. Workers are required to implement measures to create a universal awareness that promotes safe practice at the work site and will achieve NIF management objectives in preventing accidents and illnesses. ES and H requirements are consistent with the ''LLNL ES and H Manual''. This NPSSP and implementing procedures (e.g., Management Walkabout, special work procedures, etc.,) are a comprehensive safety program that applies to NIF workers on the NIF Project site. The NIF Project site includes the B581/B681 site and support areas shown in Appendix B

  6. Harbin Institute of Technology collaborative base project at APS of Argonne

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, H.; Liu, L. L.

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, the progress of Harbin Institute of Technology (HIT) collaborative base project, which was launched at Argonne National Laboratory in 2010, will be presented. The staff and students from HIT involved in advanced technological developments, which included tomography, high energy PDF, diffraction and scattering, and inelastic scattering techniques in APS to study structures changes of minerals and materials under high pressure conditions.

  7. Applied mathematical sciences research at Argonne, April 1, 1981-March 31, 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pieper, G.W.

    1982-01-01

    This report reviews the research activities in Applied Mathematical Sciences at Argonne National Laboratory for the period April 1, 1981, through March 31, 1982. The body of the report discusses various projects carried out in three major areas of research: applied analysis, computational mathematics, and software engineering. Information on section staff, visitors, workshops, and seminars is found in the appendices

  8. Bush will tour Illionois lab working to fight terrorism Argonne develops chemical detectors

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    "A chemical sensor that detects cyanide gas, a biochip that can determine the presence of anthrax, and a portable device that finds concealed nuclear materials are among the items scientists at Argonne National Laboratory are working on to combat terrorism" (1/2 page).

  9. Collaborative Potential between National Estuary Programs ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estuaries are among the most productive ecosystems in the world, providing unique habitat for freshwater and marine species as well as valuable social and economic benefits. The wealth of ecosystem goods and services from estuaries has led to growth and development of human communities in adjacent areas and an increase in human activities that can adversely affect water quality and critical habitat. Managing for sustainable estuaries requires a balance of environmental concerns with community social and economic values. This has created an opportunity to leverage Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) scientific knowledge and tools with National Estuary Program (NEP) planning and management expertise to address environmental challenges in important estuarine ecosystems. The non-regulatory National Estuary Program (NEP) was outlined in the Clean Water Act to provide stakeholders an opportunity to monitor and manage ‘nationally significant’ estuaries. Currently there are 28 estuaries in the NEP, broadly distributed across the Atlantic, Pacific and Gulf Coasts, and in Puerto Rico. The local NEP management conferences must address a variety of environmental issues, from water quality and natural resources to coastal and watershed development. While the underlying objectives of each NEP are quite similar, each has unique landscapes, land uses, waterbodies, habitats, biological resources, economies and social culture. Consequently, the effects and severity of anthr

  10. 75 FR 82037 - National Protection and Programs Directorate; President's National Security Telecommunications...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-29

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY [Docket No. DHS-2010-0050] National Protection and Programs Directorate; President's National Security Telecommunications Advisory Committee AGENCY: National Protection... Committee Meeting. SUMMARY: The President's National Security Telecommunications Advisory Committee (NSTAC...

  11. Environmental Programs at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Patricia [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-11

    Summary of this project is: (1) Teamwork, partnering to meet goals - (a) Building on cleanup successes, (b) Solving legacy waste problems, (c) Protecting the area's environment; (2) Strong performance over the past three years - (a) Credibility from four successful Recovery Act Projects, (b) Met all Consent Order milestones, (c) Successful ramp-up of TRU program; (3) Partnership between the National Nuclear Security Administration's Los Alamos Site Office, DOE Carlsbad Field Office, New Mexico Environment Department, and contractor staff enables unprecedented cleanup progress; (4) Continued focus on protecting water resources; and (5) All consent order commitments delivered on time or ahead of schedule.

  12. National Earthquake Hazards Program at a Crossroads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showstack, Randy

    The U.S.National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program, which turns 25 years old on 1 October 2003, is passing through two major transitions, which experts said either could weaken or strengthen the program. On 1 March, a federal government reorganization placed NEHRP's lead agency,the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA),within the new Department of Homeland Security (DHS). A number of earthquake scientists and engineers expressed concern that NEHRP, which already faces budgetary and organizational challenges, and lacks visibility,could end up being marginalized in the bureaucratic shuffle. Some experts, though,as well as agency officials, said they hope DHS will recognize synergies between dealing with earthquakes and terrorist attacks.

  13. Nevada National Security Site Radiation Protection Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2013-04-30

    Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 835, “Occupational Radiation Protection,” establishes radiation protection standards, limits, and program requirements for protecting individuals from ionizing radiation resulting from the conduct of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) activities. 10 CFR 835.101(a) mandates that DOE activities be conducted in compliance with a documented Radiation Protection Program (RPP) as approved by DOE. This document promulgates the RPP for the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), related (on-site or off-site) U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO) operations, and environmental restoration off-site projects. This RPP section consists of general statements that are applicable to the NNSS as a whole. The RPP also includes a series of appendices which provide supporting detail for the associated NNSS Tennant Organizations (TOs). Appendix H, “Compliance Demonstration Table,” contains a cross-walk for the implementation of 10 CFR 835 requirements. This RPP does not contain any exemptions from the established 10 CFR 835 requirements. The RSPC and TOs are fully compliant with 10 CFR 835 and no additional funding is required in order to meet RPP commitments. No new programs or activities are needed to meet 10 CFR 835 requirements and there are no anticipated impacts to programs or activities that are not included in the RPP. There are no known constraints to implementing the RPP. No guides or technical standards are adopted in this RPP as a means to meet the requirements of 10 CFR 835.

  14. Oak Ridge National Laboratory's isotope enrichment program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tracy, J.G.; Aaron, W.C.

    1997-01-01

    The Isotope Enrichment Program (IEP) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is responsible for the production and distribution of ∼225 enriched stable isotopes from 50 multi-isotopic elements. In addition, ORNL distributes enriched actinide isotopes and provides extensive physical- and chemical-form processing of enriched isotopes to meet customer requirements. For more than 50 yr, ORNL has been a major provider of enriched isotopes and isotope-related services to research, medical, and industrial institutions throughout the world. Consolidation of the Isotope Distribution Office (IDO), the Isotope Research Materials Laboratory (IRML), and the stable isotope inventories in the Isotope Enrichment Facility (IEF) have improved operational efficiencies and customer services. Recent changes in the IEP have included adopting policies for long-term contracts, which offer program stability and pricing advantages for the customer, and prorated service charges, which greatly improve pricing to the small research users. The former U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Loan Program has been converted to a lease program, which makes large-quantity or very expensive isotopes available for nondestructive research at a nominal cost. Current efforts are being pursued to improve and expand the isotope separation capabilities as well as the extensive chemical- and physical-form processing that now exists. The IEF's quality management system is ISO 9002 registered and accredited in the United States, Canada, and Europe

  15. National Research Council Research Associateships Program with Methane Hydrates Fellowships Program/National Energy Technology Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basques, Eric O. [National Academy of Sciences, Washington, DC (United States)

    2014-03-20

    This report summarizes work carried out over the period from July 5, 2005-January 31, 2014. The work was carried out by the National Research Council Research Associateships Program of the National Academies, under the US Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) program. This Technical Report consists of a description of activity from 2005 through 2014, broken out within yearly timeframes, for NRC/NETL Associateships researchers at NETL laboratories which includes individual tenure reports from Associates over this time period. The report also includes individual tenure reports from associates over this time period. The report also includes descriptions of program promotion efforts, a breakdown of the review competitions, awards offered, and Associate's activities during their tenure.

  16. 76 FR 39857 - Alaska Coastal Management Program Withdrawal From the National Coastal Management Program Under...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-07

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration Alaska Coastal Management Program Withdrawal From the National Coastal Management Program Under the Coastal Zone Management Act (CZMA) AGENCY: Office of Ocean and Coastal Resource Management (OCRM), National Ocean Service (NOS...

  17. USACE National Coastal Mapping Program Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylvester, C.

    2017-12-01

    The Joint Airborne Lidar Bathymetry Technical Center of Expertise (JALBTCX) formed in 1998 to support the coastal mapping and charting requirements of the USACE, NAVO, NOAA and USGS. This partnership fielded three generations of airborne lidar bathymeters, executed operational data collection programs within the U.S. and overseas, and advanced research and development in airborne lidar bathymetry and complementary technologies. JALBTCX executes a USACE Headquarters-funded National Coastal Mapping Program (NCMP). Initiated in 2004, the NCMP provides high-resolution, high-accuracy elevation and imagery data along the sandy shorelines of the U.S. on a recurring basis. NCMP mapping activities are coordinated with Federal mapping partners through the Interagency Working Group on Ocean and Coastal Mapping and the 3D Elevation Program. The NCMP, currently in it's third cycle, is performing operations along the East Coast in 2017, after having completed surveys along the Gulf Coast in 2016 and conducting emergency response operations in support of Hurricane Matthew. This presentation will provide an overview of JALBTCX, its history in furthering airborne lidar bathymetry technology to meet emerging mapping requirements, current NCMP operations and data products, and Federal mapping coordination activities.

  18. FELIX construction status and experimental program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, L.R.; Peag, W.F.

    1983-01-01

    FELIX (Fusion Electromagnetic Induction eXperiment) is an experimental test facility being constructed at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for the study of electromagnetic effects in the first wall/blanket/shield (FWBS) systems of fusion reactors. The facility design, construction status, experimental program, instrumentation, and associated computer-code comparisons are described

  19. FELIX construction status and experimental program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, L.R.; Praeg, W.F.; Knott, M.J.; Lari, R.J.; McGhee, D.G.; Wehrle, R.B.

    1983-01-01

    FELIX (Fusion Electromagnetic Induction Experiment) is an experimental test facility being constructed at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for the study of electromagnetic effects in the first wall/blanket/shield (FWBS) systems of fusion reactors. The facility design, construction status, experimental program, instrumentation, and associated computer-code comparisons are described

  20. Results of the national audits radiotherapy program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso Samper, Jose Luis; Alert Silva, Jose; Alfonso Laguardia, Rodolfo

    2009-01-01

    The National Audit Programme in Radiotherapy in Cuba works regularly 8 years visiting each country's radiotherapy service at least once every two years, during the visit involving two physicists and an oncologist radiation therapist. This paper presents the main features of the program and its main . Early detection deficiencies in the work of the Radiation Therapy Services to may cause radiological risk situations for both patients and workers and the general public. Help with their comments to the continuous improvement of quality treatments. During audit visits is reviewed throughout the process of radiation from that the patient comes to the monitoring service. This is done by dividing the audits into three groups or aspects Clinical Aspects, Aspects of Safety and Quality Control Aspects of the equipment. Methodological guidelines have been established for conducting audits and they serve as standards of quality in radiation therapy, these guidelines also allow quantification of the . It has identified the main gaps in services that affect quality treatments. After each visit, leave recommendations may be directed to service itself, to the direction of the provincial hospital or health. We believe that the National Audit Programme in Radiotherapy is a efficient tool in controlling the quality of treatments given and at the same time with its recommendations to help improve services of continuous quality. (author)

  1. A review of ANL base technology studies in support of the U.S. LMFBR vibration program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wambsganss, M.W.; Chen, S.S.; Mulcahy, T.M.; Shin, Y.S.

    1977-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is the center for base technology studies of flow induced vibration for the U.S. LMFBR Program. This paper reviews and summarizes published results, reports on the status of ongoing programs, and discusses future needs as outlined in the U.S. LMFBR Vibrations Program Plan. (author)

  2. A review of ANL base technology studies in support of the U.S. LMFBR vibration program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wambsganss, M W; Chen, S S [Components Technology Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (United States); Mulcahy, T M; Shin, Y S

    1977-12-01

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is the center for base technology studies of flow induced vibration for the U.S. LMFBR Program. This paper reviews and summarizes published results, reports on the status of ongoing programs, and discusses future needs as outlined in the U.S. LMFBR Vibrations Program Plan. (author)

  3. 75 FR 1566 - National Industrial Security Program Directive No. 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-12

    ... NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION Information Security Oversight Office 32 CFR Part 2004 [NARA-09-0005] RIN 3095-AB34 National Industrial Security Program Directive No. 1 AGENCY... the National Industrial Security Program Directive No. 1. This correction assigns a Federal Docket...

  4. Sandia National Laboratories: Careers: Special Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Program Master's Fellowship Program Wounded Warrior Career Development Program Careers Special Programs Special career opportunities for select individuals Join Sandia's workforce while receiving support and Laboratories' Affirmative Action Plan. Learn more about MFP. Wounded Warrior Career Development Program U.S

  5. Argonne Liquid-Metal Advanced Burner Reactor : components and in-vessel system thermal-hydraulic research and testing experience - pathway forward.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasza, K.; Grandy, C.; Chang, Y.; Khalil, H.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2007-06-30

    from normal high-flow operation to natural circulation. Low-flow coolant events are the most difficult to design for because they involve the most complex thermal-hydraulic behavior induced by the dominance of thermal-buoyancy forces acting on the coolants. Such behavior can cause multiple-component flow interaction phenomena, which are not adequately understood or appreciated by reactor designers as to their impact on reactor performance and safety. Since the early 1990s, when DOE canceled the U.S. Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) program, little has been done experimentally to further understand the importance of the complex thermal-buoyancy phenomena and their impact on reactor design or to improve the ability of three-dimensional (3-D) transient computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and structures codes to model the phenomena. An improved experimental data base and the associated improved validated codes would provide needed design tools to the reactor community. The improved codes would also facilitate scale-up from small-scale testing to prototype size and would facilitate comparing performance of one reactor/component design with another. The codes would also have relevance to the design and safety of water-cooled reactors. To accomplish the preceding, it is proposed to establish a national GNEP-LMR research and development center at Argonne having as its foundation state-of-art science-based infrastructure consisting of: (a) thermal-hydraulic experimental capabilities for conducting both water and sodium testing of individual reactor components and complete reactor in-vessel models and (b) a computational modeling development and validation capability that is strongly interfaced with the experimental facilities. The proposed center would greatly advance capabilities for reactor development by establishing the validity of high-fidelity (i.e., close to first principles) models and tools. Such tools could be used directly for reactor design or for qualifying

  6. Use of nuclear facilities at Argonne-West to support new environmental missions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Black, D.B.; Dwight, C.C.; Lineberry, M.J.

    1994-08-01

    At Argonne National Laboratory-West, facilities that were originally constructed to support the development of liquid-metal reactor technology are being used to meet the environmental and waste management need of the US Department of Energy. These needs include waste characterization, waste testing, and waste treatment technology development. Waste characterization and repackaging activities are being performed in the Hot Fuel Examination Facility for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Experimental Test Program. Characterization activities include sampling the gas in actual waste containers, categorizing waste contents for their gas generation potential, and extracting solid samples. A new waste testing project will utilize the Zero Powered Physics Reactor facility. In the workroom of these facility, laboratory gas generation experiments will be conducted with contact-handled transuranic waste. Both the characterization and waste testing activities are part of the effort to prepare the WIPP performance assessment. Waste treatment demonstrations have or will be conducted at the Transient Reactor Test facility and involve private sector participants. The demonstrations involve the development of thermal treatment for materials containing residual amounts of plutonium using plasma-arc technology. The success of these new programs is largely due to experience gained from past missions in such areas as radiological control and nuclear safety

  7. FAA National Aviation Safety Inspection Program. Annual Report FY90

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-06-01

    This report was undertaken to document, analyze, and place : into national perspective the findings from the 1990 National : Aviation Safety Inspection Program (NASIP). This report is the : fifth in a series of annual reports covering the results of ...

  8. Programming in Fortran M

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foster, I.; Olson, R.; Tuecke, S.

    1993-08-01

    Fortran M is a small set of extensions to Fortran that supports a modular approach to the construction of sequential and parallel programs. Fortran M programs use channels to plug together processes which may be written in Fortran M or Fortran 77. Processes communicate by sending and receiving messages on channels. Channels and processes can be created dynamically, but programs remain deterministic unless specialized nondeterministic constructs are used. Fortran M programs can execute on a range of sequential, parallel, and networked computers. This report incorporates both a tutorial introduction to Fortran M and a users guide for the Fortran M compiler developed at Argonne National Laboratory. The Fortran M compiler, supporting software, and documentation are made available free of charge by Argonne National Laboratory, but are protected by a copyright which places certain restrictions on how they may be redistributed. See the software for details. The latest version of both the compiler and this manual can be obtained by anonymous ftp from Argonne National Laboratory in the directory pub/fortran-m at info.mcs.anl.gov.

  9. Advancing prion science: guidance for the National Prion Research Program

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Erdtmann, Rick; Sivitz, Laura

    2004-01-01

    ...€™s National Prion Research Program (NPRP). Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs), also called prion diseases, are invariably fatal neurodegenerative infectious diseases that include bovine spongiform encephalopathy...

  10. National Security Education Program: Background and Issues

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kuenzi, Jeffrey J; Riddle, Wayne C

    2005-01-01

    ... knowledgeable about the languages and cultures of foreign nations, especially those which are of national security concern and have not traditionally been the focus of American interest and study...

  11. 6th international conference on biophysics and synchrotron radiation. Program/Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pittroff, Connie; Strasser, Susan Barr

    1999-01-01

    This STI product consists of the Program/Abstracts book that was prepared for the participants in the Sixth International Conference on Biophysics and Synchrotron Radiation that was held August 4-8, 1998, at the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory. This book contains the full conference program and abstracts of the scientific presentations

  12. 6th international conference on biophysics and synchrotron radiation. Program/Abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pittroff, Connie; Strasser, Susan Barr [lead editors

    1999-08-03

    This STI product consists of the Program/Abstracts book that was prepared for the participants in the Sixth International Conference on Biophysics and Synchrotron Radiation that was held August 4-8, 1998, at the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory. This book contains the full conference program and abstracts of the scientific presentations.

  13. Sandia National Laboratories, California Waste Management Program annual report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brynildson, Mark E.

    2010-02-01

    The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) Waste Management Program. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/CA Environmental Management System Program Manual. This annual program report describes the activities undertaken during the past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Waste Management (WM) Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/CA.

  14. Sandia National Laboratories, California Hazardous Materials Management Program annual report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brynildson, Mark E.

    2011-02-01

    The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) Hazardous Materials Management Program. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/CA Environmental Management System Program Manual. This program annual report describes the activities undertaken during the calender past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Hazardous Materials Management Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/CA.

  15. 77 FR 47913 - The National Center for Mobility Management Under FTA's National Research Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-10

    ... Management Under FTA's National Research Program AGENCY: Federal Transit Administration (FTA), DOT. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Federal Transit Administration (FTA), as the primary staff agency to the Federal... transportation service delivery. FTA, under its National Research Program, plans to fund a National Center for...

  16. 78 FR 79567 - National School Lunch Program and School Breakfast Program: Nutrition Standards for All Foods...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-31

    ... Program: Nutrition Standards for All Foods Sold in Schools as Required by the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids... interim rule entitled National School Lunch Program and School Breakfast Program: Nutrition Standards for..., 2013 / Rules and Regulations [[Page 79567

  17. Environmental Programs: National Renewable Energy Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2001-05-01

    Major NREL environmental programs and initiatives include: integrated energy and environmental strategies; implementation of air pollution programs and climate change programs; Green Power Network; environmental and economic impacts and benefits of energy efficiency and renewable energy (EERE) technologies; technology transfer between developed and developing countries; greenhouse gas emission reduction projects; climate change action plans with developing countries and development of life cycle assessments.

  18. Small Business Programs - The National Guard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshal Office of the Joint Surgeon PARC Small Business Programs Chaplain Diversity NGB-GOMO Resources Legislative Liaison Small Business Programs Social Media State Websites Videos Featured Videos On Every Front ARNG Readiness Home : Leadership : Joint Staff : Special Staff : Small Business Programs Small Business

  19. National investment programs and sustainable development

    OpenAIRE

    Szyja, Paulina

    2014-01-01

    In situation of economic crisis many countries, for example the United States, members of European Union prepared anti-crisis programs to conduct investments. In most cases, they concentrated on modernization of transport or energy infrastructure. In Poland it would have been presented program "Polish Investments". The main purposes of the article is presentation of public investments programs and their role in sustainable development.

  20. Test procedure for anion exchange testing with Argonne 10-L solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Compton, J.A.

    1995-01-01

    Four anion exchange resins will be tested to confirm that they will sorb and release plutonium from/to the appropriate solutions in the presence of other cations. Certain cations need to be removed from the test solutions to minimize adverse behavior in other processing equipment. The ion exchange resins will be tested using old laboratory solutions from Argonne National Laboratory; results will be compared to results from other similar processes for application to all plutonium solutions stored in the Plutonium Finishing Plant

  1. Analysis of transient fuel failure mechanisms: selected ANL programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deitrich, L.W.

    1975-01-01

    Analytical programs at Argonne National Laboratory related to fuel pin failure mechanisms in fast-reactor accident transients are described. The studies include transient fuel pin mechanics, mechanics of unclad fuel, and mechanical effects concerning potential fuel failure propagation. (U.S.).

  2. Graphical programming at Sandia National Laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, M.J.; Palmquist, R.D.; Desjarlais, L.

    1993-09-01

    Sandia has developed an advanced operational control system approach, called Graphical Programming, to design, program, and operate robotic systems. The Graphical Programming approach produces robot systems that are faster to develop and use, safer in operation, and cheaper overall than altemative teleoperation or autonomous robot control systems. Graphical Programming also provides an efficient and easy-to-use interface to traditional robot systems for use in setup and programming tasks. This paper provides an overview of the Graphical Programming approach and lists key features of Graphical Programming systems. Graphical Programming uses 3-D visualization and simulation software with intuitive operator interfaces for the programming and control of complex robotic systems. Graphical Programming Supervisor software modules allow an operator to command and simulate complex tasks in a graphic preview mode and, when acceptable, command the actual robots and monitor their motions with the graphic system. Graphical Programming Supervisors maintain registration with the real world and allow the robot to perform tasks that cannot be accurately represented with models alone by using a combination of model and sensor-based control

  3. 75 FR 57658 - National Veterinary Accreditation Program; Correcting Amendment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-22

    ... [Docket No. APHIS-2006-0093] RIN 0579-AC04 National Veterinary Accreditation Program; Correcting Amendment..., Docket No. APHIS-2006-0093), and effective on February 1, 2010, we amended the National Veterinary... Veterinary Accreditation Program, VS, APHIS, 4700 River Road Unit 200, Riverdale, MD 20737; (301) 851-3401...

  4. The national standards program for research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whittemore, W.L.

    1977-01-01

    In 1970 a standards committee called ANS-15 was established by the American Nuclear Society (ANS) to prepare appropriate standards for research reactors. In addition, ANS acts as Secretariat for a national standards committee N17 which is responsible to the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) for the national consensus efforts for standards related to research reactors. To date ANS-15 has completed or is working on 14 standards covering all aspects of the operation of research reactors. Of the 11 research reactor standards submitted to the ANSI N17 Committee since its inception, six have been issued as National standards, and the remaining are still in the process of review. (author)

  5. 75 FR 14454 - National Protection and Programs Directorate; National Infrastructure Advisory Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-25

    ..., National Infrastructure Advisory Council. [FR Doc. 2010-6633 Filed 3-24-10; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 9110-9P-P ... Directorate; National Infrastructure Advisory Council AGENCY: National Protection and Programs Directorate... Infrastructure Advisory Council (NIAC) will meet on Tuesday, April 13, 2010, at the National Press Club's...

  6. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration: National Weather Service Modernization and Weather Satellite Program

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Willemssen, Joel

    2000-01-01

    ...). At your request, we will discuss the status of the National Weather Service (NWS) systems modernization and the National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service's Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) program...

  7. Dewitt Wallace-Reader's Digest Fund National Library Power Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    School Library Media Annual (SLMA), 1993

    1993-01-01

    Describes the National Library Power Program, a collaborative effort sponsored by the Dewitt Wallace-Reader's Digest Fund in cooperation with local education funds and public school districts that was designed to create public elementary and middle school library programs that are central to the education program of the school. (LRW)

  8. Sandia National Laboratories, California Environmental Management System program manual.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, Barbara L.

    2013-04-01

    The Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) Environmental Management System (EMS) Program Manual documents the elements of the site EMS Program. The SNL/CA EMS Program conforms to the International Standard on Environmental Management Systems, ISO 14001:2004 and Department of Energy (DOE) Order 436.1.

  9. Sandia National Laboratories, California Environmental Management System program manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, Barbara L.

    2014-04-01

    The Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) Environmental Management System (EMS) Program Manual documents the elements of the site EMS Program. The SNL/CA EMS Program conforms to the International Standard on Environmental Management Systems, ISO 14001:2004 and Department of Energy (DOE) Order 436.1.

  10. National Hispanic Bilingual Engineering Program (NHBEP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruz, M.

    2000-10-31

    This report describes program goals, activities, processes, benefits for the profession of engineering and for the project participants, coordination, and impact of NHBEP throughout the three years of implementation.

  11. Project Management Plan for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Experimental Test Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connolly, M.J.; Sayer, D.L.

    1993-11-01

    EG ampersand G Idaho, Inc. and Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) are participating in the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory's (INEL's) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Experimental Test Program (WETP). The purpose of the INEL WET is to provide chemical, physical, and radiochemical data on transuranic (TRU) waste to be stored at WIPP. The waste characterization data collected will be used to support the WIPP Performance Assessment (PA), development of the disposal No-Migration Variance Petition (NMVP), and to support the WIPP disposal decision. The PA is an analysis required by the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Title 40, Part 191 (40 CFR 191), which identifies the processes and events that may affect the disposal system (WIPP) and examines the effects of those processes and events on the performance of WIPP. A NMVP is required for the WIPP by 40 CFR 268 in order to dispose of land disposal restriction (LDR) mixed TRU waste in WIPP. It is anticipated that the detailed Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) waste characterization data of all INEL retrievably-stored TRU waste to be stored in WIPP will be required for the NMVP. Waste characterization requirements for PA and RCRA may not necessarily be identical. Waste characterization requirements for the PA will be defined by Sandia National Laboratories. The requirements for RCRA are defined in 40 CFR 268, WIPP RCRA Part B Application Waste Analysis Plan (WAP), and WIPP Waste Characterization Program Plan (WWCP). This Project Management Plan (PMP) addresses only the characterization of the contact handled (CH) TRU waste at the INEL. This document will address all work in which EG ampersand G Idaho is responsible concerning the INEL WETP. Even though EG ampersand G Idaho has no responsibility for the work that ANL-W is performing, EG ampersand G Idaho will keep a current status and provide a project coordination effort with ANL-W to ensure that the INEL, as a whole, is effectively and

  12. Argonne Tau-charm factory collider design study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teng, L.C.; Crosbie, E.A.; Norem, J.

    1995-01-01

    The design approach and design principles for a Tau-charm Factory at Argonne were studied. These studies led to a set of preliminary parameters and tentative component features as presented in this paper

  13. Argonne Tau-charm Factory collider design study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teng, L.C.; Crosbie, E.A.; Norem, J.; Repond, J.

    1996-01-01

    The design approach and design principles for a Tau-charm Factory at Argonne were studied. These studies led to a set of preliminary parameters and tentative component features as presented in this paper. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  14. Nevada National Security Site Radiation Protection Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Managers' Council, Radiological Control

    2018-03-12

    This is a shared document required by 10 CFR 835 for all contractors conducting radiological work at the Nevada National Security Site. Please record the Author as "Radiological Control Managers' Council" for consistency with previous RPPs and Rad Con Manuals.

  15. National Syrian Program for Radioactive Waste Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Othman, I.; Takriti, S.

    2009-06-01

    A national plan for radioactive waste management has been presented. It includes identifying, transport, recording, classifying, processing and disposal. It is an important reference for radioactive waste management for those dealing with radioactive waste, and presents a complete protection to environemnt and people. (author)

  16. Applied programs at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-09-01

    This document overviews the areas of current research at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Technology transfer and the user facilities are discussed. Current topics are presented in the areas of applied physics, chemical science, material science, energy efficiency and conservation, environmental health and mathematics, biosystems and process science, oceanography, and nuclear energy. (GHH)

  17. The Argonne silicon strip-detector array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wuosmaa, A H; Back, B B; Betts, R R; Freer, M; Gehring, J; Glagola, B G; Happ, Th; Henderson, D J; Wilt, P [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Bearden, I G [Purdue Univ., Lafayette, IN (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1992-08-01

    Many nuclear physics experiments require the ability to analyze events in which large numbers of charged particles are detected and identified simultaneously, with good resolution and high efficiency, either alone, or in coincidence with gamma rays. The authors have constructed a compact large-area detector array to measure these processes efficiently and with excellent energy resolution. The array consists of four double-sided silicon strip detectors, each 5x5 cm{sup 2} in area, with front and back sides divided into 16 strips. To exploit the capability of the device fully, a system to read each strip-detector segment has been designed and constructed, based around a custom-built multi-channel preamplifier. The remainder of the system consists of high-density CAMAC modules, including multi-channel discriminators, charge-sensing analog-to-digital converters, and time-to-digital converters. The array`s performance has been evaluated using alpha-particle sources, and in a number of experiments conducted at Argonne and elsewhere. Energy resolutions of {Delta}E {approx} 20-30 keV have been observed for 5 to 8 MeV alpha particles, as well as time resolutions {Delta}T {<=} 500 ps. 4 figs.

  18. 75 FR 39266 - National Protection and Programs Directorate; National Infrastructure Advisory Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-08

    ... Infrastructure Disruptions VII. New Business VIII. Closing Remarks IX. Adjournment Procedural While this meeting... Directorate; National Infrastructure Advisory Council AGENCY: National Protection and Programs Directorate... Infrastructure Advisory Council (NIAC) will meet on Tuesday, July 13, 2010, at the National Press Club's Ballroom...

  19. 77 FR 12623 - National Industrial Security Program Policy Advisory Committee (NISPPAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    ... NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION Information Security Oversight Office National Industrial Security Program Policy Advisory Committee (NISPPAC) AGENCY: National Archives and Records... discuss National [[Page 12624

  20. Development of tritium technology for the United States magnetic fusion energy program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, J.L.; Wilkes, W.R.

    1980-01-01

    Tritium technology development for the DOE fusion program is taking place principally at three laboratories, Mound Facility, Argonne National Laboratory and the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory. This paper will review the major aspects of each of the three programs and look at aspects of the tritium technology being developed at other laboratories within the United States. Facilities and experiments to be discussed include the Tritium Effluent Control Laboratory and the Tritium Storage and Delivery System for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor at Mound Facility; the Lithium Processing Test Loop and the solid breeder blanket studies at Argonne; and the Tritium Systems Test Assembly at Los Alamos

  1. Selected charts: National Waste Terminal Storage Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    Staff members of the Office of Waste Isolation on October 21, 1977 reviewed the status of the OWI Waste Management Program for Commissioner E.E. Varanini III, State of California Energy Resources Conservation and Development Commission, and members of his staff. Copies of the viewgraphs and 35-mm slides shown at the briefing are compiled

  2. National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) Residential Historical Claims

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — The National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) aims to reduce the impact of flooding—a burden not covered by homeowner’s insurance—by providing insurance to homeowners,...

  3. National Nanotechnology Initiative Investments by Agency and Program Component Area

    Data.gov (United States)

    Office of Science and Technology Policy, Executive Office of the President — Data represents National Nanotechnology Initiative investments by agency and program component area (PCA) from FY 2001 through FY 2010 (requested). While this data...

  4. Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program (EMAP) National Coastal Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program (EMAP) National Coastal Database contains estuarine and coastal data that EMAP and Regional-EMAP have collected...

  5. National Program of Quality Assurance in Radiotherapy in Cuba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso Samper, J. L.; Dominguez Hung, L.; Morales Lopez, J. L.; Alfonso Laguardia, R.; Garcia Yip, F.

    2001-01-01

    It tries on the establishment of a Quality Assurance Nacional System, a Quality Assurance Committee implemented in Cuba, and a Quality Auditory National Program implemented in Cuba to control and assure radiotherapy quality

  6. Program Spotlight: National Outreach Network's Community Health Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Outreach Network of Community Health Educators located at Community Network Program Centers, Partnerships to Advance Cancer Health Equity, and NCI-designated cancer centers help patients and their families receive survivorship support.

  7. Labeling of Pesticide Products under the National Organic Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    This notice describes how registrants can obtain EPA approval of label language indicating that all ingredients in a pesticide product and all uses of that pesticide meet the criteria defined in the USDA National Organic Program Rule.

  8. The National Agriculture Imagery Program Change 2002-2017

    Data.gov (United States)

    Farm Service Agency, Department of Agriculture — The National Agriculture Imagery Program Change 2002-2017 is a web mapping application hosted on the ArcGIS online FSA Organizational Subscription. This web...

  9. The FELIX experimental program and future upgrades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, L.R.; Praeg, W.F.; Lari, R.J.; Wehrle, R.B.

    1981-01-01

    As part of the DOE First Wall/Blanket/Shield (FW/B/S) Engineering Test Program, Argonne National Laboratory FELIX (Fusion ELectromagnetic Induction EXperiment to study electromagnetic effects. T.he earliest test will select and verify appropriate eddy current simulation computer program (codes), followed by component concept tests, component model tests, and finally tests with prototypes. This paper describes the experimental and computer code plans and future upgrades for the FELIX facility

  10. National Space Weather Program Advances on Several Fronts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunzelman, Mark; Babcock, Michael

    2008-10-01

    The National Space Weather Program (NSWP; http://www.nswp.gov) is a U.S. federal government interagency initiative through the Office of the Federal Coordinator for Meteorology that was created to speed the improvement of space weather services for the nation. The Committee for Space Weather (CSW) under the NSWP has continued to advance the program on a number of fronts over the past 12 months.

  11. Use of the ''MURA'' transformation to generate the fields and calculate the motion of protons in the designed Argonne Mini-ASPUN FFAG Spiral Sector Accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crosbie, E.A.

    1985-01-01

    As a long range goal for the production of high intensity neutrons, Argonne National Laboratory has proposed the construction of a 1.5 GeV FFAG Spiral Sector Accelerator called ASPUN. The 500-MeV injector for this proposed accelerator is a smaller FFAG Spiral Sector Accelerator named Mini-ASPUN. Until such a time as the larger machine could be built, it was planned that Mini-ASPUN would replace the present RCS now being used for the IPNS program at Argonne. In order to obtain an accurate estimation of the orbits and betatron oscillations in such a machine, it is necessary that realistic field values be used in the equations of motion. Obtaining these fields from 3-dimensional relaxation calculations is both time consuming and costly. However, because of the required scaling of the machine, the field-generating potential of three variables can be separated into a known function of the radius and a function of two variables. The second order differential equation satisfied by this function can be solved by ordinary relaxation methods. The fields generated from a mesh of values for this function will be accurate except for the extreme inside and outside orbits, which will be affected by the necessary termination of the inside and outside ends of the magnet. 2 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  12. Perceptions of a National Achievement Assessment Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marielle Simon

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available The School Achievement Indicators Program (SAIP has been collecting data across Canada on 13- and 16-year-old student achievement in mathematics, in science, and in reading and writing since 1993. In 1999, it completed its second assessment cycle and was reviewed in Spring 2000. The review design included a survey of officials from all the school boards/districts that participated in the science assessment program held in 1999. The results of this study show that this stakeholder views as the most pressing issue for SAIP to succeed in its mandate, the need for development in four areas: a Increased teacher and student motivation to participate wholeheartedly in the program; b Effective dissemination options; c Leadership through innovation in teaching and in assessment practices despite high accountability orientation; and d Cost-effective, yet rigorous means of providing both snapshot information and longitudinal means of comparisons. Although universally appealing, such approaches have yet to be supported by sound educational theory and methodology.

  13. A model for a national low level waste program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blankenhorn, James A.

    2009-01-01

    A national program for the management of low level waste is essential to the success of environmental clean-up, decontamination and decommissioning, current operations and future missions. The value of a national program is recognized through procedural consistency and a shared set of resources. A national program requires a clear waste definition and an understanding of waste characteristics matched against available and proposed disposal options. A national program requires the development and implementation of standards and procedures for implementing the waste hierarchy, with a specitic emphasis on waste avoidance, minimization and recycling. It requires a common set of objectives for waste characterization based on the disposal facility's waste acceptance criteria, regulatory and license requirements and performance assessments. Finally, a national waste certification program is required to ensure compliance. To facilitate and enhance the national program, a centralized generator services organization, tasked with providing technical services to the generators on behalf of the national program, is necessary. These subject matter experts are the interface between the generating sites and the disposal facility(s). They provide an invaluable service to the generating organizations through their involvement in waste planning prior to waste generation and through championing implementation of the waste hierarchy. Through their interface, national treatment and transportation services are optimized and new business opportunities are identified. This national model is based on extensive experience in the development and on-going management of a national transuranic waste program and management of the national repository, the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. The Low Level Program at the Savannah River Site also successfully developed and implemented the waste hierarchy, waste certification and waste generator services concepts presented below. The Savannah River Site

  14. Surviving to tell the tale: Argonne's Intense Pulsed Neutron Source from an ecosystem perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westfall, C.

    2010-01-01

    At first glance the story of the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS), an accelerator-driven neutron source for exploring the structure of materials through neutron scattering, seems to be one of puzzling ups and downs. For example, Argonne management, Department of Energy officials, and materials science reviewers continued to offer, then withdraw, votes of confidence even though the middling-sized IPNS produced high-profile research, including work that made the cover of Nature in 1987. In the midst of this period of shifting opinion and impressive research results, some Argonne materials scientists were unenthusiastic, members of the laboratory's energy physics group were key supporters, and materials scientists at another laboratory provided, almost fortuitously, a new lease on life. What forces shaped the puzzling life cycle of the IPNS? And what role - if any - did the moderate price tag and the development of scientific and technological ideas play in the course it took? To answer these questions this paper looks to an ecosystem metaphor for inspiration, exploring how opinions, ideas, and machinery emerged from the interrelated resource economies of Argonne, the DOE, and the materials science community by way of a tangled web of shifting group interactions. The paper will conclude with reflections about what the resulting focus on relationality explains about the IPNS story as well as the underlying dynamic that animates knowledge production at U.S. national laboratories.

  15. Research programs at the Department of Energy National Laboratories. Volume 2: Laboratory matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-01

    For nearly fifty years, the US national laboratories, under the direction of the Department of Energy, have maintained a tradition of outstanding scientific research and innovative technological development. With the end of the Cold War, their roles have undergone profound changes. Although many of their original priorities remain--stewardship of the nation`s nuclear stockpile, for example--pressing budget constraints and new federal mandates have altered their focus. Promotion of energy efficiency, environmental restoration, human health, and technology partnerships with the goal of enhancing US economic and technological competitiveness are key new priorities. The multiprogram national laboratories offer unparalleled expertise in meeting the challenge of changing priorities. This volume aims to demonstrate each laboratory`s uniqueness in applying this expertise. It describes the laboratories` activities in eleven broad areas of research that most or all share in common. Each section of this volume is devoted to a single laboratory. Those included are: Argonne National Laboratory; Brookhaven National Laboratory; Idaho National Engineering Laboratory; Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory; Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; Los Alamos National Laboratory; National Renewable Energy Laboratory; Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Pacific Northwest Laboratory; and Sandia National Laboratories. The information in this volume was provided by the multiprogram national laboratories and compiled at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory.

  16. National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research Program Directory, 1999.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Inst. on Disability and Rehabilitation Research (ED/OSERS), Washington, DC.

    This directory lists all projects funded by the National Institute of Disability and Rehabilitation Research (NIDRR) during the 1999 fiscal year. It includes summaries, funding data, and contact information for a broad range of programs. Programs are grouped into the following research priorities: (1) employment outcomes; (2) health and function;…

  17. 76 FR 288 - National Organic Program (NOP); Sunset Review (2011)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-04

    ....C. 6507(b)(2)), a State organic certification program may contain additional requirements for the... the certification of organic farm and handling operations located within the State under certain... Service 7 CFR Part 205 [Document Number AMS-TM-07-0136; TM-07-14PR] RIN 0581-AC77 National Organic Program...

  18. Argonne-West facility requirements for a radioactive waste treatment demonstration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dwight, C.C.; Felicione, F.S.; Black, D.B.; Kelso, R.B.; McClellan, G.C.

    1995-01-01

    At Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W), near Idaho Falls, Idaho, facilities that were originally constructed to support the development of liquid-metal reactor technology are being used and/or modified to meet the environmental and waste management research needs of DOE. One example is the use of an Argonne-West facility to conduct a radioactive waste treatment demonstration through a cooperative project with Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) and Lockheed Idaho Technologies Company. The Plasma Hearth Process (PBP) project will utilize commercially-adapted plasma arc technology to demonstrate treatment of actual mixed waste. The demonstration on radioactive waste will be conducted at Argonne's Transient Reactor Test Facility (TREAT). Utilization of an existing facility for a new and different application presents a unique set of issues in meeting applicable federal state, and local requirements as well as the additional constraints imposed by DOE Orders and ANL-W site requirements. This paper briefly describes the PHP radioactive demonstrations relevant to the interfaces with the TREAT facility. Safety, environmental design, and operational considerations pertinent to the PHP radioactive demonstration are specifically addressed herein. The personnel equipment, and facility interfaces associated with a radioactive waste treatment demonstration are an important aspect of the demonstration effort. Areas requiring significant effort in preparation for the PBP Project being conducted at the TREAT facility include confinement design, waste handling features, and sampling and analysis considerations. Information about the facility in which a radioactive demonstration will be conducted, specifically Argonne's TREAT facility in the case of PHP, may be of interest to other organizations involved in developing and demonstrating technologies for mixed waste treatment

  19. Progress report of the National Weatherization Assistance Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berry, L.G.; Brown, M.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Kinney, L.F. [Synertech Systems Corp. (United States)

    1997-09-01

    The National Weatherization Evaluation of the 1989 Program Year and the Metaevaluation of 1996 are described in two ways in this summary document. The text pages summarize the results of the two evaluations conducted by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The photographs and explanations illustrate weatherization operations and tactics. An overview and history of the program is provided, followed by the scope of weatherization, metaevaluation methods and results for 1996, national evaluation methods and results for 1989, response to evaluation findings, remaining opportunities, and next steps. Conclusions and significant findings are then given.

  20. National NIF Diagnostic Program Fiscal Year 2002 Second Quarter Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacGowan, B

    2002-01-01

    Since October 2001 the development of the facility diagnostics for NIF has been funded by the NIF Director through the National NIF Diagnostic Program (NNDP). The current emphasis of the NNDP is on diagnostics for the early NIF quad scheduled to be available for experiment commissioning in FY03. During the past six months the NNDP has set in place processes for funding diagnostics, developing requirements for diagnostics, design reviews and monthly status reporting. Those processes are described in an interim management plan for diagnostics (National NIF Diagnostic Program Interim Plan, NIF-008 13 15, April 2002) and a draft Program Execution Plan (Program Execution Plan for the National NlF Diagnostic Program, NIF-0072083, October 2001) and documents cited therein. Work has been funded at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), Bechtel Nevada at Los Alamos and Santa Barbara. There are no major technical risks with the early diagnostics. The main concerns relate to integration of the diagnostics into the facility, all such issues are being worked. This report is organized to show the schedule and budget status and a summary of Change Control Board actions for the past six months. The following sections then provide short descriptions of the status of each diagnostic. Where design reviews or requirements documents are cited, the documents are available on the Diagnostics file server or on request

  1. Youth exposure to violence prevention programs in a national sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkelhor, David; Vanderminden, Jennifer; Turner, Heather; Shattuck, Anne; Hamby, Sherry

    2014-04-01

    This paper assesses how many children and youth have had exposure to programs aimed at preventing various kinds of violence perpetration and victimization. Based on a national sample of children 5-17, 65% had ever been exposed to a violence prevention program, 55% in the past year. Most respondents (71%) rated the programs as very or somewhat helpful. Younger children (5-9) who had been exposed to higher quality prevention programs had lower levels of peer victimization and perpetration. But the association did not apply to older youth or youth exposed to lower quality programs. Disclosure to authorities was also more common for children with higher quality program exposure who had experienced peer victimizations or conventional crime victimizations. The findings are consistent with possible benefits from violence prevention education programs. However, they also suggest that too few programs currently include efficacious components. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. National Conversion Pilot Project Waste Management Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engelmann, G.G.; Simmons, M.S.

    1995-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy facilities are in the process of downsizing. Most plans for downsizing focus on the decontamination and decommissioning of excess production facilities. A different approach for downsizing is taken at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS), which has four production buildings. These buildings were used for the production of weapons components from uranium and beryllium and contain unique and valuable equipment, such as rolling mills, furnaces, and high-capacity presses, which could be utilized for stage-III metal recycling. The mission of this National Conversion Pilot Project (NCPP) open-quotes is to explore and demonstrate, at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS), the feasibility of economic conversion at Department of Energy facilities.close quotes The NCPP has been divided into three stages: 1. Stage I-planning and feasibility determination 2. Stage II-facility cleanup for reuse and operational assessment 3. Stage III-metals recycling. The NCPP has recently been approved to begin stage II. The objective of the NCPP stage II is to prepare the four NCPP buildings for stage III, to remove unwanted equipment, and to decontaminate buildings and essential equipment to levels consistent with those that commercial industrial operations must meet pursuant to applicable Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and state workplace regulations

  3. Secondary calibration laboratory for ionizing radiation laboratory accreitation program National Institute of Standards and Technology National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, P.R.

    1993-12-31

    This paper presents an overview of the procedures and requirements for accreditation under the Secondary Calibration Laboratory for Ionizing Radiation Program (SCLIR LAP). The requirements for a quality system, proficiency testing and the onsite assessment are discussed. The purpose of the accreditation program is to establish a network of secondary calibration laboratories that can provide calibrations traceable to the primary national standards.

  4. Secondary calibration laboratory for ionizing radiation laboratory accreitation program National Institute of Standards and Technology National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, P.R.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the procedures and requirements for accreditation under the Secondary Calibration Laboratory for Ionizing Radiation Program (SCLIR LAP). The requirements for a quality system, proficiency testing and the onsite assessment are discussed. The purpose of the accreditation program is to establish a network of secondary calibration laboratories that can provide calibrations traceable to the primary national standards

  5. 76 FR 5186 - National Protection and Programs Directorate; Agency Information Collection Activities; Office of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-28

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY [Docket No. DHS-2010-0084] National Protection and Programs... Protection Stakeholder Input Project--Generic Clearance AGENCY: National Protection and Programs Directorate.... SUMMARY: The Department of Homeland Security (DHS), National Protection and Programs Directorate (NPPD...

  6. 78 FR 9431 - National Industrial Security Program Policy Advisory Committee (NISPPAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-08

    ... NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION Information Security Oversight Office National Industrial Security Program Policy Advisory Committee (NISPPAC) AGENCY: National Archives and Records... meeting to discuss National Industrial Security Program policy matters. DATES: The meeting will be held on...

  7. 78 FR 38077 - National Industrial Security Program Policy Advisory Committee (NISPPAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-25

    ... NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION Information Security Oversight Office [NARA-13-0030] National Industrial Security Program Policy Advisory Committee (NISPPAC) AGENCY: National Archives and... following committee meeting to discuss National Industrial Security Program policy matters. DATES: The...

  8. 78 FR 64024 - National Industrial Security Program Policy Advisory Committee (NISPPAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-25

    ... NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION Information Security Oversight Office [NARA-2014-001] National Industrial Security Program Policy Advisory Committee (NISPPAC) AGENCY: National Archives and... following committee meeting to discuss National Industrial Security Program policy matters. DATES: The...

  9. 77 FR 63893 - National Industrial Security Program Policy Advisory Committee (NISPPAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-17

    ... NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION Information Security Oversight Office National Industrial Security Program Policy Advisory Committee (NISPPAC) AGENCY: National Archives and Records... meeting to discuss National Industrial Security Program policy matters. DATES: The meeting will be held on...

  10. Energy Programs at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheffield, J.

    1999-05-11

    ;'a secure and reliable energy system that is environmentally and economically sustainable'' as the first component of its mission. The strategic goal established for energy resources, identified as one of DOE's four businesses, is for ''the Department of Energy and its partners [to] promote secure, competitive, and environmentally responsible energy systems that serve the needs of the public.'' DOE has also identified four strategic goals for its programs in energy resources: (1) strengthening the economy and raising living standards through improvements in the energy field; (2) protecting the environment by reducing the adverse environmental impacts associated with energy production, distribution, and use; (3) keeping America secure by reducing vulnerabilities to global energy market shocks; and (4) enhancing American competitiveness in a growing world energy market.

  11. Jamaica National Net-Billing Pilot Program Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doris, Elizabeth [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Stout, Sherry [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Peterson, Kimberly [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-12-18

    This technical report discusses the effectiveness of the Jamaica Public Service Company Limited Net-Billing Pilot Program. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) collected and analyzed data from a wide range of stakeholders, conducted in-country research, and compared program elements to common interconnection practices to form programmatic recommendations for the Jamaica context. NREL finds that the net-billing pilot program has successfully contributed to the support of the emerging solar market in Jamaica with the interconnection of 80 systems under the program for a total of 1.38 megawatts (MW) at the time of original analysis.

  12. Framework for a National Testing and Evaluation Program ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abstract:The National STEPP Program seeks to improve water quality by accelerating the effective implementation and adoption of innovative stormwater management technologies. Itwill attempt to accomplish this by establishing practices through highly reliable, and cost-effective Stormwater control measures (SCM) testing, evaluation, and verification services. The program will aim to remove barriers to innovation, minimize duplicative performance evaluation needs, increase confidence that regulatory requirements are met by creating consistency among testing and evaluation protocols, and establishing equity between public domain and proprietary SCM evaluation approaches.The Environmental Technology Verification Program, established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) 18 years ago, was the only national program of its kindin the stormwater sector, but is now defunct, leaving a national leadership void. The STEPP initiative was triggered in part by regulatory demands in the government and private sectors to fill this vacuum. A concerted focus and study of this matter led to the release of a Water Environment Federation (WEF) white paper entitled “Investigation into the Feasibility of a National Testing and Evaluation Program for Stormwater Products and Practices” in February 2014. During this second phase of the STEPP initiative, and with EPA support, five analogous technology evaluation programs related to both stormwater and non-stormwater were an

  13. 76 FR 2700 - National Protection and Programs Directorate; National Emergency Communications Plan (NECP) Goal...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-14

    ... Programs Directorate (NPPD)/Office of Cybersecurity and Communications (CS&C)/Office of Emergency Communications (OEC) will submit the following Information Collection Request to the Office of Management and... Directorate; National Emergency Communications Plan (NECP) Goal 2 Performance Report AGENCY: National...

  14. 75 FR 41796 - National School Lunch, Special Milk, and School Breakfast Programs, National Average Payments...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-19

    ... National Average Payments for free, reduced price and paid afterschool snacks as part of the National...; Hawaii--free lunch-- 288 cents, reduced price lunch--248 cents. Afterschool Snacks in Afterschool Care Programs--The payments are: Contiguous States--free snack--74 cents, reduced price snack--37 cents, paid...

  15. 76 FR 43256 - National School Lunch, Special Milk, and School Breakfast Programs, National Average Payments...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-20

    ... National Average Payments for free, reduced price and paid afterschool snacks as part of the National...; Hawaii--free lunch-- 294 cents, reduced price lunch--254 cents. Afterschool Snacks in Afterschool Care Programs--The payments are: Contiguous States--free snack--76 cents, reduced price snack--38 cents, paid...

  16. [Extraction of management information from the national quality assurance program].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stausberg, Jürgen; Bartels, Claus; Bobrowski, Christoph

    2007-07-15

    Starting with clinically motivated projects, the national quality assurance program has established a legislative obligatory framework. Annual feedback of results is an important means of quality control. The annual reports cover quality-related information with high granularity. A synopsis for corporate management is missing, however. Therefore, the results of the University Clinics in Greifswald, Germany, have been analyzed and aggregated to support hospital management. Strengths were identified by the ranking of results within the state for each quality indicator, weaknesses by the comparison with national reference values. The assessment was aggregated per clinical discipline and per category (indication, process, and outcome). A composition of quality indicators was claimed multiple times. A coherent concept is still missing. The method presented establishes a plausible summary of strengths and weaknesses of a hospital from the point of view of the national quality assurance program. Nevertheless, further adaptation of the program is needed to better assist corporate management.

  17. Relating Operational Art to the National Guard State Partnership Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-15

    Program Coordinator GEF Global Employment of the Force DSCA Defense Support of Civil Authorities BCA Budget Control Act NATO North Atlantic Treaty...between Florida and the U.S. Virgin Islands are referred to as the Regional Security System (RSS). Florida and the U.S. Virgin Islands partner with... Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) in 2004 due, in part, to the mentorship from the Maryland National Guard.54 Not only did the Maryland National Guard

  18. Roadmap for a National Wildland Fire Research and Development Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagoner, R; Bradley, M M; Lin, R R

    2003-02-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and the National Center for Atmospheric Research have formed a partnership to facilitate an innovative National Wildfire Research and Development Program. The ultimate purpose of the program will be to establish a deeper scientific understanding of the physics of fire than currently exists, to establish a solid scientific basis for strategic planning and policy making, and to develop and implement a set of advanced, scientifically based decision-making tools for the wildfire management community. The three main components of the program will be wildfire science, societal impacts, and operational applications. Smoke management, prescribed burns, wildfire mitigation and fuels assessment will be cross-cutting themes. We anticipate that this multidisciplinary, interagency program will bridge organizational and institutional barriers, and will be highly collaborative with numerous organizations and agencies, including other national laboratories; universities: federal, state, and county fire agencies; the Environmental Protection Agency; the Federal Emergency Management Agency; and the Western Governor's Association.

  19. National toxicology program chemical nomination and selection process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selkirk, J.K. [National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

    1990-12-31

    The National Toxicology Program (NTP) was organized to support national public health programs by initiating research designed to understand the physiological, metabolic, and genetic basis for chemical toxicity. The primary mandated responsibilities of NTP were in vivo and vitro toxicity testing of potentially hazardous chemicals; broadening the spectrum of toxicological information on known hazardous chemicals; validating current toxicological assay systems as well as developing new and innovative toxicity testing technology; and rapidly communicating test results to government agencies with regulatory responsibilities and to the medical and scientific communities. 2 figs.

  20. Establishing a national biological laboratory safety and security monitoring program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaine, James W

    2012-12-01

    The growing concern over the potential use of biological agents as weapons and the continuing work of the Biological Weapons Convention has promoted an interest in establishing national biological laboratory biosafety and biosecurity monitoring programs. The challenges and issues that should be considered by governments, or organizations, embarking on the creation of a biological laboratory biosafety and biosecurity monitoring program are discussed in this article. The discussion focuses on the following questions: Is there critical infrastructure support available? What should be the program focus? Who should be monitored? Who should do the monitoring? How extensive should the monitoring be? What standards and requirements should be used? What are the consequences if a laboratory does not meet the requirements or is not willing to comply? Would the program achieve the results intended? What are the program costs? The success of a monitoring program can depend on how the government, or organization, responds to these questions.

  1. Argonne National Laboratory - West's approach to filter characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, T. A.

    1999-01-01

    Like other DOE facilities, ANL-W uses a variety of nuclear grade, industrial grade, or furnace-type particulate filters to control airborne radioactivity and hazardous contaminants in radiological containment structures or processes. As designed, these filters entrain and ultimately concentrate contaminants in the media. Toxic metal contaminants include cadmium, chromium, lead; and mercury present in sufficient concentrations to exhibit the hazardous waste characteristic of toxicity as defined in 40 CFR 261.24. Radionuclide contaminants deposited in the media may at times accumulate in sufficient quantity to classify the filter as transuranic or remote-handled waste. Upon their removal from the ventilation system, these particulate filters become wastes, which must be characterized to determine their hazardous and radioactive classifications. A well defined filter characterization process is essential for the proper/consistent waste characterization and minimization and for maintaining personnel radiological exposures as-low-as-reasonably-achievable (ALARA) (1,2). ANL-W has developed an approach to filter sampling and characterization to meet these needs. The ANL-W filter sampling and characterization process is designed to ensure representative sampling and/or process knowledge is utilized in characterizing the filters. The data obtained through sampling and/or process knowledge is used to show compliance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (3) and Treatment/Storage/Disposal Facility Waste Acceptance Criteria. The ANL-W filter characterization involves the collection of process information, filter handling and sampling, sample analysis, data management filter characterization, and waste handling. Each element of the process is streamlined to ensure proper characterization while minimizing radiological exposure to maintenance workers, samplers, laboratory personnel, and waste handlers

  2. Beam-foil spectroscopy at Argonne National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berry, H.G.

    1981-01-01

    We have completed a set of precision wavelength measurements of the transitions 1s2s 3 S 1 - 1s2p 3 P 0 2 of the helium-like ions of silicon, sulfur, and chlorine. We have calculated the wavelengths of these transitions for Z = 2-50 using a nonrelativisitc 1/Z expansion, one-electron Dirac energies, plus relativistic corrections in first-order perturbation theory, plus one-electron QED or Lamb-shift corrections. By comparisons of measurements of Z = 4-26 and theory, we find a discrepancy which is approximately 0.015 Z 3 cm - 1 . We have shown that this arises from a first-order screening correction to the one-electron Lamb shift and we have obtained an ab initio estimate of the correction

  3. Student Intern: Non-Traditional Water Resources | Argonne National

    Science.gov (United States)

    Community -Outreach --Speakers Bureau -Education --EcoCAR Challenge --Middle school --High school harassment and discrimination based upon race, color, religion, gender, gender identity, sexual orientation

  4. Argonne National Laboratory HVEM Summer Institute lecture - kinetics II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westmacott, K.H.

    1982-08-01

    The purpose of this contribution is to outline some of the ways in which the High Voltage Electron Microscope can be used to study the kinetics of secondary defect shrinkage and precipitate particle growth and dissolution. In many cases, good agreement between the predictions of theory and the experimental observations are found and this provides not only insights into the mechanisms underlying the processes, but also quantitative measurement of parameters of metallurgical importance. To summarize, some of the advantages of the HVEM in kinetic studies include: (1) unlike bulk studies where only average behavior is measured, precise measurements on individual particles may be made; (2) in some systems it is useful for rapidly establishing phase boundaries, (3) anomolous behavior such as may occur by interactions with lattice defects and boundaries may be studied (4) growth and dissolution mechanisms may be established, (5) phase stability in an irradiation environment may be studied directly

  5. TMI-2 instrument nozzle examinations at Argonne National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neimark, L.A.; Shearer, T.L.; Purohit, A.; Hins, A.G.

    1993-09-01

    Six of the 14 instrument-penetration-tube nozzles removed from the lower head of TMI-2 were examined to identify damage mechanisms, provide insight to the fuel relocation scenario, and provide input data to the margin-to-failure analysis. Visual inspection, gamma scanning, metallography, microhardness measurements, and scanning electron microscopy were used to obtain the desired information. The results showed varying degrees of damage to the lower head nozzles, from ∼50% melt-off to no damage at all to near-neighbor nozzles. The elevations of nozzle damage suggested that the lower elevations (near the lower head) were protected from molten fuel, apparently by an insulating layer of fuel debris. The pattern of nozzle damage was consistent with fuel movement toward the hot-spot location identified in the vessel wall. Evidence was found for the existence of a significant quantity of control assembly debris on the lower head before the massive relocation of fuel occurred

  6. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Robotics and Intelligent Systems Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meacham, S.A.

    1987-01-01

    The goals of the newly formed Robotics and Intelligent Systems Program are discussed. The application of the remote systems technology developed by the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program for the Department of Energy is presented. The activities (satellite refueling and space station truss assembly) with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration are presented in a videotape format with narration by the presenter. The goals of technology transfer to the private sector and the potential positive impact on the community conclude the oral presentation

  7. Construction program for a large superconducting MHD magnet system at the coal-fired flow facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, S.T.; Genens, L.; Gonczy, J.; Ludwig, H.; Lieberg, M.; Kraft, E.; Gacek, D.; Huang, Y.C.; Chen, C.J.

    1980-01-01

    The Argonne National Laboratory has designed and is constructing a 6 T large aperture superconducting MHD magnet for use in the Coal-Fired Flow Facility (CFFF) at the University of Tennessee Space Institute (UTSI) at Tullahoma, Tennessee. The magnet system consists of the superconducting magnet, a magnet power supply, an integrated instrumentation for operation, control and protection, and a complete cryogenic facility including a CTI Model 2800 helium refrigerator/liquefier with two compressors, helium gas handling system and a 7500 liter liquid helium dewar. The complete system will be tested at Argonne, IL in 1981. The magnet design is reviewed, and the coil fabrication programs are described in detail

  8. Needs of National Infrastructure for Nuclear Energy Program in Macedonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaushevski, A.; Poceva, S.N.; Spasevska, H.; Popov, N.

    2016-01-01

    The introduction of a nuclear energy program is a major undertaking with significant implications for many aspects of national infrastructure, ranging from capacity of the power grid, access roads and production facilities, to the involvement of stakeholders and the development of human resources. For new comers countries without nuclear power, even for those who wish to realize substantial expansion of existing nuclear capacity, it can take up to 10-15 years to develop the necessary infrastructure. One of the crucial problems in nuclear energy implementation are human resources needs and educational infrastructure development in this field. No matter what will be the future energy scenario in the Republic of Macedonia, the nuclear educational program is the first step to have HR in the field of nuclear energy. This paper presents the proposed direction for having HR for establishing national infrastructure in nuclear energy program in Macedonia. This includes establishing and developing of MONEP (Macedonian NEPIO), and the enhancing the capabilities of the national regulatory body in the Republic of Macedonia. Keywords: NEP (Nuclear Energy Program), HR (Human Resources), NEPIO (Nuclear Energy Program Implementation Organization), MONEP Macedonian Organization for Nuclear Energy Program (Macedonian NEPIO), NRB (Nuclear Regulatory Body)

  9. Sandia National Laboratories, California Environmental Management System Program Manual.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2009-04-01

    The Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) Environmental Management System (EMS) Program Manual documents the elements of the site EMS Program. The SNL/CA EMS Program conforms to the International Standard on Environmental Management Systems, ISO 14001:2004 and Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1. Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) has maintained functional environmental programs to assist with regulatory compliance for more than 30 years. During 2005, these existing programs were rolled into a formal environmental management system (EMS) that expands beyond the traditional compliance focus to managing and improving environmental performance and stewardship practices for all site activities. An EMS is a set of inter-related elements that represent a continuing cycle of planning, implementing, evaluating, and improving processes and actions undertaken to achieve environmental policy and goals. The SNL/CA EMS Program conforms to the International Standard for Environmental Management Systems, ISO 14001:2004 (ISO 2004). The site received ISO 14001 certification in September 2006. SNL/CA's EMS Program is applicable to the Sandia, Livermore site only. Although SNL/CA operates as one organizational division of the overall Sandia National Laboratories, the EMS Program is site-specific, with site-specific objectives and targets. SNL/CA (Division 8000) benefits from the organizational structure as it provides corporate level policies, procedures, and standards, and established processes that connect to and support elements of the SNL/CA EMS Program. Additionally, SNL/CA's EMS Program benefits from two corporate functional programs (Facilities Energy Management and Fleet Services Environmental programs) that maintain responsibility for energy management and fleet services for all Sandia locations. Each EMS element is further enhanced with site-specific processes and standards. Division 8000 has several groups operating at Sandia

  10. Sandia National Laboratories, California Environmental Management System program manual.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, Barbara L.

    2012-03-01

    The Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) Environmental Management System (EMS) Program Manual documents the elements of the site EMS Program. The SNL/CA EMS Program conforms to the International Standard on Environmental Management Systems, ISO 14001:2004and Department of Energy (DOE) Order 436.1. Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) has maintained functional environmental programs to assist with regulatory compliance for more than 30 years. During 2005, these existing programs were rolled into a formal environmental management system (EMS) that expands beyond the traditional compliance focus to managing and improving environmental performance and stewardship practices for all site activities. An EMS is a set of inter-related elements that represent a continuing cycle of planning, implementing, evaluating, and improving processes and actions undertaken to achieve environmental policy and goals. The SNL/CA EMS Program conforms to the International Standard for Environmental Management Systems, ISO 14001:2004 (ISO 2004). The site first received ISO 14001 certification in September 2006 and recertification in 2009. SNL/CA's EMS Program is applicable to the Sandia, Livermore site only. Although SNL/CA operates as one organizational division of the overall Sandia National Laboratories, the EMS Program is site-specific, with site-specific objectives and targets. SNL/CA (Division 8000) benefits from the organizational structure as it provides corporate level policies, procedures, and standards, and established processes that connect to and support elements of the SNL/CA EMS Program. Additionally, SNL/CA's EMS Program benefits from two corporate functional programs (Facilities Energy and Water Resource Management and Fleet Services programs) that maintain responsibility for energy management and fleet services for all Sandia locations. Each EMS element is further enhanced with site-specific processes and standards. Division 8000 has

  11. Sandia National Laboratories, California Environmental Management System Program Manual.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, Barbara L.

    2011-04-01

    The Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) Environmental Management System (EMS) Program Manual documents the elements of the site EMS Program. The SNL/CA EMS Program conforms to the International Standard on Environmental Management Systems, ISO 14001:2004and Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1. Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) has maintained functional environmental programs to assist with regulatory compliance for more than 30 years. During 2005, these existing programs were rolled into a formal environmental management system (EMS) that expands beyond the traditional compliance focus to managing and improving environmental performance and stewardship practices for all site activities. An EMS is a set of inter-related elements that represent a continuing cycle of planning, implementing, evaluating, and improving processes and actions undertaken to achieve environmental policy and goals. The SNL/CA EMS Program conforms to the International Standard for Environmental Management Systems, ISO 14001:2004 (ISO 2004). The site received ISO 14001 certification in September 2006. SNL/CA's EMS Program is applicable to the Sandia, Livermore site only. Although SNL/CA operates as one organizational division of the overall Sandia National Laboratories, the EMS Program is site-specific, with site-specific objectives and targets. SNL/CA (Division 8000) benefits from the organizational structure as it provides corporate level policies, procedures, and standards, and established processes that connect to and support elements of the SNL/CA EMS Program. Additionally, SNL/CA's EMS Program benefits from two corporate functional programs (Facilities Energy Management and Fleet Services programs) that maintain responsibility for energy management and fleet services for all Sandia locations. Each EMS element is further enhanced with site-specific processes and standards. Division 8000 has several groups operating at Sandia National Laboratories

  12. National Low-Level Waste Management Program Radionuclide Report Series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudin, M.J.; Stanton, C.; Patterson, R.G.; Garcia, R.S.

    1992-02-01

    This report, Volume 2 of the National Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Program Radionuclide Report Series, discusses radiological and chemical characteristics of technetium-99. This report also includes discussions about waste streams in which technetium-99 can be found, waste forms that contain technetium-99, and technetium-99's behavior in the environment and in the human body

  13. 75 FR 54076 - National Flood Insurance Program, Policy Wording Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-03

    ... line with the format of the insurance industry's homeowners policy. FEMA also proposed changes in the...: FEMA-2010-0021] RIN 1660-AA70 National Flood Insurance Program, Policy Wording Correction AGENCY... correction to the FEMA, Federal Insurance and Mitigation Administration, Standard Flood Insurance Policy...

  14. 76 FR 7508 - National Flood Insurance Program, Policy Wording Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-10

    ... the insurance industry's homeowners policy. FEMA also proposed changes in the coverage. On October 12...: FEMA-2010-0021] RIN 1660-AA70 National Flood Insurance Program, Policy Wording Correction AGENCY... Insurance and Mitigation Administration, Standard Flood Insurance Policy regulations. In order to increase...

  15. National screening program vs. standardized neurodevelopmental follow-up

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maschke, Cornelia; Ellenrieder, Birte; Hecher, Kurt; Bartmann, Peter

    Background: Long-term follow-up is urgently needed to decide on the consequences of new therapies. Objective: This study assesses the use of a national child development screening program for a follow-up examination of a defined patient group. Patients and methods: Neurodevelopmental outcome of 139

  16. Social assessment for the Colville National Forest CROP program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angela J. Findley; Matthew S. Carroll; Keith A. Blatner

    2000-01-01

    A qualitative social assessment targeted salient issues connected to the Colville National Forest creating opportunities (CROP) research program that examines forest management alternatives for small-diameter stands in northeastern Washington. Research spanned various communities in three counties and investigated the diversity of fundamental values people attach to...

  17. Thailand's National Nutritional Program : Lessons in Management and Capacity Development

    OpenAIRE

    Heaver, Richard; Kachondam, Yongyout

    2002-01-01

    Thailand's community nutrition program has been the most successful in Asia. This paper looks at what made it work from a management and capacity development point of view. Key lessons are identified in the following areas: Building a strong consensus at national and local levels about the importance of nutrition as an investment in the country's future, rather than as a welfare expenditur...

  18. 75 FR 14500 - National Organic Program, Sunset Review (2012)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-26

    ... as Generally Recognized As Safe; Approved by the FDA as a food additive; or Included in the FDA... the National Organic Program (NOP) is required by the Organic Foods Production Act of 1990 (OFPA). The... oil (CAS 8006-75-5); Fish oil (Fatty acid CAS 's: 10417- 94-4, and 25167-62-8); Fructooligosaccharides...

  19. National Low-Level Waste Management Program Radionuclide Report Series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudin, M.J.; Garcia, R.S.

    1992-02-01

    This report, Volume 3 of the National Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Program Radionuclide Report Series, discusses the radiological and chemical characteristics of carbon-14. The report also discusses waste streams that contain carbon-14, waste forms that contain carbon-14, and carbon-14 behavior in the environment and in the human body

  20. College of Lake County National Workplace Literacy Program. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gee, Mary Kay

    The College of Lake County's 3-year National Workplace Literacy Program (1994-1997) contributed to economic development by meeting companies' changing educational and production needs as they fluctuated and met new challenges for global marketing and improvement. It assessed 883 employees at 8 business sites with customized assessment tools and…

  1. Evaluation of farmer's participation in National Special Program for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evaluation of farmer's participation in National Special Program for Food Security in Niger State, Nigeria. ... Loans provided for the project participants assisted the recipients in boosting their farm production. The t-test result revealed that significant increases were found in the farm size, output, p. 0.01 (1%) and income of ...

  2. TRU partnership-benefits to the national TRU program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lippis, J.; Lott, S.A.

    1995-01-01

    Because increased regulatory authority has been given to the states, the management of transuranic (TRU) wastes varies considerably. One effective tool for facilitating better communications, coordination, and cooperation among the generator/storage sites is the formation of topic specific interface working groups. The National TRU Program supports these groups, and in 1994, a policy was adopted to manage these interface working groups

  3. Phase II Vault Testing of the Argonne RFID System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willoner, T.; Turlington, R.; Koenig, R.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) (Environmental Management (EM), Office of Packaging and Transportation (EM-45)) Packaging and Certification Program (DOE PCP) has developed a Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) tracking and monitoring system, called ARG-US, for the management of nuclear materials packages during transportation and storage. The performance of the ARG-US RFID equipment and system has been fully tested in two demonstration projects in April 2008 and August 2009. With the strong support of DOE-SR and DOE PCP, a field testing program was completed in Savannah River Site's K-Area Material Storage (KAMS) Facility, an active Category I Plutonium Storage Facility, in 2010. As the next step (Phase II) of continued vault testing for the ARG-US system, the Savannah River Site K Area Material Storage facility has placed the ARG-US RFIDs into the 910B storage vault for operational testing. This latest version (Mark III) of the Argonne RFID system now has the capability to measure radiation dose and dose rate. This paper will report field testing progress of the ARG-US RFID equipment in KAMS, the operability and reliability trend results associated with the applications of the system, and discuss the potential benefits in enhancing safety, security and materials accountability. The purpose of this Phase II K Area test is to verify the accuracy of the radiation monitoring and proper functionality of the ARG-US RFID equipment and system under a realistic environment in the KAMS facility. Deploying the ARG-US RFID system leads to a reduced need for manned surveillance and increased inventory periods by providing real-time access to status and event history traceability, including environmental condition monitoring and radiation monitoring. The successful completion of the testing program will provide field data to support a future development and testing. This will increase Operation efficiency and cost effectiveness for vault operation. As the next step (Phase

  4. PHASE II VAULT TESTING OF THE ARGONNE RFID SYSTEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willoner, T.; Turlington, R.; Koenig, R.

    2012-06-25

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) (Environmental Management [EM], Office of Packaging and Transportation [EM-45]) Packaging and Certification Program (DOE PCP) has developed a Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) tracking and monitoring system, called ARG-US, for the management of nuclear materials packages during transportation and storage. The performance of the ARG-US RFID equipment and system has been fully tested in two demonstration projects in April 2008 and August 2009. With the strong support of DOE-SR and DOE PCP, a field testing program was completed in Savannah River Site's K-Area Material Storage (KAMS) Facility, an active Category I Plutonium Storage Facility, in 2010. As the next step (Phase II) of continued vault testing for the ARG-US system, the Savannah River Site K Area Material Storage facility has placed the ARG-US RFIDs into the 910B storage vault for operational testing. This latest version (Mark III) of the Argonne RFID system now has the capability to measure radiation dose and dose rate. This paper will report field testing progress of the ARG-US RFID equipment in KAMS, the operability and reliability trend results associated with the applications of the system, and discuss the potential benefits in enhancing safety, security and materials accountability. The purpose of this Phase II K Area test is to verify the accuracy of the radiation monitoring and proper functionality of the ARG-US RFID equipment and system under a realistic environment in the KAMS facility. Deploying the ARG-US RFID system leads to a reduced need for manned surveillance and increased inventory periods by providing real-time access to status and event history traceability, including environmental condition monitoring and radiation monitoring. The successful completion of the testing program will provide field data to support a future development and testing. This will increase Operation efficiency and cost effectiveness for vault operation. As the next step

  5. Waste certification program plan for Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kornegay, F.C.

    1996-09-01

    This document defines the waste certification program being developed for implementation at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The document describes the program structure, logic, and methodology for certification of ORNL wastes. The purpose of the waste certification program is to provide assurance that wastes are properly characterized and that the Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) for receiving facilities are met. The program meets the waste certification requirements outlined in U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5820.2A, Radioactive Waste Management, and ensures that 40 CFR documentation requirements for waste characterization are met for mixed (both radioactive and hazardous) and hazardous (including polychlorinated biphenyls) waste. Program activities will be conducted according to ORNL Level 1 document requirements

  6. Major national human biomonitoring programs in chemical exposure assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judy Choi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Human biomonitoring (HBM programs have been established in several countries around the world in order to monitor the levels of chemical exposures in the general population and qualify health risk assessment of national and international interest. Study design, population, sample collection, and chemical analysis must be considered when comparing and interpreting the results. In this review, the objectives and brief descriptions of the major national HBM programs in North America, Europe, and Asia are provided. Similarities and differences observed from a comparative analysis among these programs, including the stratification of data according to age, sex, socioeconomic background, etc. as well as the identification of chemical exposure associated with food intake, are discussed. Overall, although there are some discrepancies in the study designs among the reviewed national HBM programs, results from the programs can provide useful information such as chemical levels found within the general population of a country that can be compared. Furthermore, the results can be used by regulatory authorities or the government to enforce legislations in order to reduce the exposure of chemicals into the human body.

  7. Achieving public acceptance. Lessons from national repository programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isaacs, Tom

    2008-01-01

    Essentially all countries pursuing nuclear waste repository programs have had long and dynamic histories. There have had changes in policies, programs, and national laws, many successes and more failures. Most continue to pursue the siting and development of geologic repositories for the ultimate disposal of the spent nuclear fuel (or reprocessed wastes) arising from the operation of nuclear power plants. And while many have had very strong repository science and technology programs, they have continued to find significant challenges associated with the societal acceptance issues required for such programs to be successful. Over recent years repository programs have developed and implemented rather different approaches to managing the non-technical (e.g. societal, political, and institutional) aspects of repository program development. This is not unexpected as programs have had different histories, operate under different laws, reside in countries with different cultures and values, and are managed under different formulations. For example, the U.S. program is implemented by a branch of the Department of Energy while in several other countries the program is managed by a separate corporation on behalf of the nuclear waste owners or dedicated quasi-governmental organizations. These similar, but different programs, and their rich histories and current work, provide an excellent opportunity to investigate features that have and have not proven successful in helping to achieve public acceptance. This paper will review some of the compelling aspects and provide some guidelines for applications in other national circumstances. Recent experiences will be evaluated to discern emerging trends for achieving public acceptance in nuclear repository development and in the broader dimensions associated with the potential renaissance of nuclear power. (author)

  8. Sandia National Laboratories, California Chemical Management Program annual report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brynildson, Mark E.

    2012-02-01

    The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) Chemical Management Program. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/CA Environmental Management System Program Manual. This program annual report describes the activities undertaken during the calender past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Chemical Management Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/CA. SNL/CA is responsible for tracking chemicals (chemical and biological materials), providing Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) and for regulatory compliance reporting according to a variety of chemical regulations. The principal regulations for chemical tracking are the Emergency Planning Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA) and the California Right-to-Know regulations. The regulations, the Hazard Communication/Lab Standard of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) are also key to the CM Program. The CM Program is also responsible for supporting chemical safety and information requirements for a variety of Integrated Enabling Services (IMS) programs primarily the Industrial Hygiene, Waste Management, Fire Protection, Air Quality, Emergency Management, Environmental Monitoring and Pollution Prevention programs. The principal program tool is the Chemical Information System (CIS). The system contains two key elements: the MSDS library and the chemical container-tracking database that is readily accessible to all Members of the Sandia Workforce. The primary goal of the CM Program is to ensure safe and effective chemical management at Sandia/CA. This is done by efficiently collecting and managing chemical information for our customers who include Line, regulators, DOE and ES and H programs to ensure compliance with regulations and to streamline customer business processes that require chemical information.

  9. 32 CFR 2004.20 - National Industrial Security Program Operating Manual (NISPOM) [201(a)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false National Industrial Security Program Operating... Defense INFORMATION SECURITY OVERSIGHT OFFICE, NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION NATIONAL INDUSTRIAL SECURITY PROGRAM DIRECTIVE NO. 1 Operations § 2004.20 National Industrial Security Program...

  10. 76 FR 67484 - National Industrial Security Program Policy Advisory Committee (NISPPAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-01

    ... NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION Information Security Oversight Office National Industrial Security Program Policy Advisory Committee (NISPPAC) AGENCY: Information Security Oversight Office... made for the following committee meeting to discuss National Industrial Security Program policy matters...

  11. 76 FR 28099 - National Industrial Security Program Policy Advisory Committee (NISPPAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-13

    ... NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION Information Security Oversight Office National Industrial Security Program Policy Advisory Committee (NISPPAC) AGENCY: Information Security Oversight Office... made for the following committee meeting to discuss National Industrial Security Program policy matters...

  12. 76 FR 6636 - National Industrial Security Program Policy Advisory Committee (NISPPAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-07

    ... NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION Information Security Oversight Office National Industrial Security Program Policy Advisory Committee (NISPPAC) AGENCY: Information Security Oversight Office... made for the following committee meeting. To discuss National Industrial Security Program policy...

  13. 75 FR 65526 - National Industrial Security Program Policy Advisory Committee (NISPPAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-25

    ... NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION Information Security Oversight Office National Industrial Security Program Policy Advisory Committee (NISPPAC) AGENCY: Information Security Oversight Office..., announcement is made for the following committee meeting, to discuss National Industrial Security Program...

  14. 78 FR 24762 - National Toxicology Program Board of Scientific Counselors; Announcement of Meeting; Request for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-26

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Toxicology Program... announces the next meeting of the National Toxicology Program (NTP) Board of Scientific Counselors (BSC... authorities knowledgeable in fields such as toxicology, pharmacology, pathology, biochemistry, epidemiology...

  15. 77 FR 60707 - National Toxicology Program Board of Scientific Counselors; Announcement of Meeting; Request for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-04

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Toxicology Program... announces the next meeting of the National Toxicology Program (NTP) Board of Scientific Counselors (BSC... such as toxicology, pharmacology, pathology, biochemistry, epidemiology, risk assessment...

  16. Research training among pediatric residency programs: a national assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramson, Erika L; Naifeh, Monique M; Stevenson, Michelle D; Todd, Christopher; Henry, Emilie D; Chiu, Ya-Lin; Gerber, Linda M; Li, Su-Ting T

    2014-12-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) states that "residents should participate in scholarly activity." However, there is little guidance for effectively integrating scholarly activity into residency. This study was conducted to understand how pediatric residency programs meet ACGME requirements and to identify characteristics of successful programs. The authors conducted an online cross-sectional survey of all pediatric residency program directors in October 2012, assessing program characteristics, resident participation in scholarly activity, program infrastructure, barriers, and outcomes. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify characteristics of programs in the top quartile for resident scholarly activity participation. The response rate was 52.8% (105/199 programs). Seventy-seven (78.6%) programs required scholarly activity, although definitions were variable. When including only original research, systematic reviews or meta-analyses, and case reports or series with references, resident participation averaged 56% (range 0%-100%). Characteristics associated with high-participation programs included a scholarly activity requirement (odds ratio [OR] = 5.5, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.03-30.0); program director belief that all residents should present work regionally or nationally (OR = 4.7, 95% CI = 1.5-15.1); and mentorship by >25% of faculty (OR = 3.6, CI = 1.2-11.4). Only 47.1% (41) of program directors were satisfied with resident participation, and only 30.7% (27) were satisfied with the quality of research training provided. The findings suggest that resident scholarly activity experience is highly variable and suboptimal. Identifying characteristics of successful programs can improve the resident research training experience.

  17. Program plan for the National Uranium Mine Tailings Office

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-03-01

    The National Uranium Mine Tailings Program was formed to conduct research into the long-term environmental behaviour of uranium mine tailings. This research is necessary to provide a data base upon which close-cut criteria for uranium mines can be based. The research program to be carried out under the auspices of the National Tailings Program Office has, as its goal, the development of this data base, and the formulation of a series of reports based on that data base. These documents are to be designed to allow the uranium mining industry to produce site-specific close-out plans which will be acceptable to the regulatory authorities. This report addresses the program to be undertaken to meet the above broad objective. It focusses on defining in more specific and explicit terms what the program objectives need to be to meet the close-out requirements currently perceived by the regulatory agencies involved. These program objectives have been refined and summarized as follows: On close-out, the tailings site shall: 1. Meet currently accepted individual exposure criteria, and meet air and water quality regulations. 2. Ensure a predictable decline in release rates of contaminants to the environment. Ideally, this decline would be monotonic in nature. 3. Meet the ALARA principle both at present and into the long-term future. 4. Ensure that the management strategy or technologies employed in close-out shall be of a passive nature and not require ongoing institutional intervention. On the basis of these program objectives, this report identifies specific program product in terms of manuals of practice, guidelines, etc. that are to be produced as a result of program activity. These documents will effectively provide guidance on acceptable close-out technology to the uranium industry and regulatory agencies

  18. A National Survey of Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) Participants on Environmental Effects, Wildlife Issues, and Vegetation Management on Program Lands

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Allen, Arthur

    2003-01-01

    A national survey of Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) contractees was completed to obtain information about environmental and social effects of the program on participants, farms, and communities...

  19. 78 FR 53466 - Modification of Two National Customs Automation Program (NCAP) Tests Concerning Automated...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-29

    ... Customs Automation Program (NCAP) Tests Concerning Automated Commercial Environment (ACE) Document Image... National Customs Automation Program (NCAP) tests concerning document imaging, known as the Document Image... the National Customs Automation Program (NCAP) tests concerning document imaging, known as the...

  20. The DEVELOP National Program's Strategy for Communicating Applied Science Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childs-Gleason, L. M.; Ross, K. W.; Crepps, G.; Favors, J.; Kelley, C.; Miller, T. N.; Allsbrook, K. N.; Rogers, L.; Ruiz, M. L.

    2016-12-01

    NASA's DEVELOP National Program conducts rapid feasibility projects that enable the future workforce and current decision makers to collaborate and build capacity to use Earth science data to enhance environmental management and policy. The program communicates its results and applications to a broad spectrum of audiences through a variety of methods: "virtual poster sessions" that engage the general public through short project videos and interactive dialogue periods, a "Campus Ambassador Corps" that communicates about the program and its projects to academia, scientific and policy conference presentations, community engagement activities and end-of-project presentations, project "hand-offs" providing results and tools to project partners, traditional publications (both gray literature and peer-reviewed), an interactive website project gallery, targeted brochures, and through multiple social media venues and campaigns. This presentation will describe the various methods employed by DEVELOP to communicate the program's scientific outputs, target audiences, general statistics, community response and best practices.

  1. The 3D Elevation Program national indexing scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thatcher, Cindy A.; Heidemann, Hans Karl; Stoker, Jason M.; Eldridge, Diane F.

    2017-11-02

    The 3D Elevation Program (3DEP) of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) acquires high-resolution elevation data for the Nation. This program has been operating under an opportunity-oriented approach, acquiring light detection and ranging (lidar) projects of varying sizes scattered across the United States. As a result, the national 3DEP elevation layer is subject to data gaps or unnecessary overlap between adjacent collections. To mitigate this problem, 3DEP is adopting a strategic, systematic approach to national data acquisition that will create efficiencies in efforts to achieve nationwide elevation data coverage and help capture additional Federal and non-Federal investments resulting from advance awareness of proposed acquisitions and partnership opportunities. The 3DEP Working Group, an interagency group managed by the USGS, has agreed that all future 3DEP collections within the lower 48 States should be coordinated by using a 1-kilometer by 1-kilometer tiling scheme for the conterminous United States. Fiscal Year 2018 is being considered a transition year, and in Fiscal Year 2019 the national indexing scheme will be fully implemented, so that all 3DEP-supported projects will be acquired and delivered in the national indexing scheme and projected into the Albers Equal Area projection. 

  2. ASPUN: design for an Argonne super-intense pulsed neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khoe, T.K.; Kustom, R.L.

    1983-01-01

    Argonne pioneered the pulsed spallation neutron source with the ZING-P and IPNS-I concepts. IPNS-I is now a reliable and actively used source for pulsed spallation neutrons. The accelerator is a 500-MeV, 8 to 9 μa, 30-Hz rapid-cycling proton synchrotron. Other proton spallation sources are now in operation or in construction. These include KENS-I at the National Laboratory for High Energy Physics in Japan, the WNR/PSR at Los Alamos National Laboratory in the USA, and the SNS at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory in England. Newer and bolder concepts are being developed for more-intense pulsed spallation neutron sources. These include SNQ at the KFA Laboratory in Juelich, Germany, ASTOR at the Swiss Institute for Nuclear Physics in Switzerland, and ASPUN, the Argonne concept. ASPUN is based on the Fixed-Field Alternating Gradient concept. The design goal is to provide a time-averaged beam of 3.5 ma at 1100 MeV on a spallation target in intense bursts, 100 to 200 nanoseconds long, at a repetition rate of no more than 60 to 85 Hz

  3. Understanding parenting in Manitoba First nations: implications for program development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eni, Rachel; Rowe, Gladys

    2011-01-01

    This qualitative study introduced the "Manitoba First Nation Strengthening Families Maternal Child Health Pilot Project" program and evaluation methodologies. The study provided a knowledge base for programmers, evaluators, and communities to develop relevant health promotion, prevention, and intervention programming to assist in meeting health needs of pregnant women and young families. Sixty-five open-ended, semistructured interviews were completed in 13 communities. Data analysis was through grounded theory. Three major themes emerged from the data: interpersonal support and relationships; socioeconomic factors; and community initiatives. Complex structural, historical events compromise parenting; capacity and resilience are supported through informal and formal health and social supports.

  4. 2015 Key Wind Program and National Laboratory Accomplishments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

    2015-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Wind Program is committed to helping the nation secure cost-competitive sources of renewable energy through the development and deployment of innovative wind power technologies. By investing in improvements to wind plant design, technology development, and operation as well as developing tools to identify the highest quality wind resources, the Wind Program serves as a leader in making wind energy technologies more competitive with traditional sources of energy and a larger part of our nation’s renewable energy portfolio.

  5. National energy peak leveling program (NEPLP). Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1977-12-01

    This three-volume report is responsive to the requirements of Contract E (04-3)-1152 to provide a detailed methodology, to include management, technology, and socio-economic aspects, of a voluntary community program of computer-assisted peak load leveling and energy conservation in commercial community facilities. The demonstration project established proof-of-concept in reducing the kW-demand peak by the unofficial goal of 10%, with concurrent kWh savings. This section of the three volume report is a final report appendix with information on the National Energy Peak Leveling Program (NEPLP).

  6. The Canadian kidney paired donation program: a national program to increase living donor transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Edward H; Nickerson, Peter; Campbell, Patricia; Yetzer, Kathy; Lahaie, Nick; Zaltzman, Jeffery; Gill, John S

    2015-05-01

    Establishment of a national kidney paired donation (KPD) program represents a unique achievement in Canada's provincially organized health care system. Key factors enabling program implementation included consultation with international experts, formation of a unique organization with a mandate to facilitate interprovincial collaboration, and the volunteer efforts of members of the Canadian transplant community to overcome a variety of logistical barriers. As of December 2013, the program had facilitated 240 transplantations including 10% with Calculated panel reactive antibody (cPRA) ≥97%. Unique features of the Canadian KPD program include participation of n = 55 nondirected donors, performance of only donor specific antibody negative transplants, the requirement for donor travel, and nonuse of bridge donors. The national KPD program has helped maintain the volume of living kidney donor transplants in Canada over the past 5 years and serves as a model of inter-provincial collaboration to improve the delivery of health care to Canadians.

  7. Cultural Diversity and the National Parks: Working Together for Change. The National Parks Community Partners Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spears, Alan

    This guidebook was developed to assist in the creation of partnerships. It discusses some of the best practices and lessons learned in the program's first year, and gives novice community-based organizers a sense of how effective partnerships can be formed. The guidebook will help the more experienced organizers of National Park Service employees…

  8. 77 FR 43232 - National School Lunch, Special Milk, and School Breakfast Programs, National Average Payments...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-24

    ...) establishes National Average Payments for free, reduced price and paid afterschool snacks as part of the...--free lunch-- 303 cents, reduced price lunch--263 cents. Afterschool Snacks in Afterschool Care Programs--The payments are: Contiguous States--free snack--78 cents, reduced price snack--39 cents, paid snack...

  9. R programming for the Quarterly National Accounts: Moroccan case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Houssam HACHIMI

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The compilation of quarterly national accounts (QNA has different methods based on the specificity of the statistical system of the country, in effect, the method of calibration adopted by the Moroccan national account department has several steps that estimates indirectly the quarterly components of the Gross Domestic Product (GDP by using statistics indicators as regressors in a linear model. The use of R, as statistical software for the compilation of that official statistics presents some challenges for the statisticians from the first step of the data import, until the export of the results, the responsible of the compilation of the QNA must have good algorithmic coding skills so as he can build his R program by choosing the adequate packages and version of the R software. The objective of this work is to present the R program and challenges that face the Moroccan case.

  10. Australia’s National Health Programs: An Ontological Mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arkalgud Ramaprasad

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Australia has a large number of health program initiatives whose comprehensive assessment will help refine and redefine priorities by highlighting areas of emphasis, under-emphasis, and non-emphasis. The objectives of our research are to: (a systematically map all the programs onto an ontological framework, and (b systemically analyse their relative emphases at different levels of granularity. We mapped all the health program initiatives onto an ontology with five dimensions, namely: (a Policy-scope, (b Policy-focus, (c Outcomes, (d Type of care, and (e Population served. Each dimension is expanded into a taxonomy of its constituent elements. Each combination of elements from the five dimensions is a possible policy initiative component. There are 30,030 possible components encapsulated in the ontology. It includes, for example: (a National financial policies on accessibility of preventive care for family, and (b Local-urban regulatory policies on cost of palliative care for individual-aged. Four of the authors mapped all of Australia’s health programs and initiatives on to the ontology. Visualizations of the data are used to highlight the relative emphases in the program initiatives. The dominant emphasis of the program initiatives is: [National] [educational, personnel-physician, information] policies on [accessibility, quality] of [preventive, wellness] care for the [community]. However, although (a information is emphasized technology is not; and (b accessibility and quality are emphasized cost, satisfaction, and quality are not. The ontology and the results of the mapping can help systematically reassess and redirect the relative emphases of the programs and initiatives from a systemic perspective.

  11. R&D PROPOSAL FOR THE NATIONAL MUON ACCELERATOR PROGRAM

    OpenAIRE

    Zisman, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    This document contains a description of a multi-year national R&D program aimed at completing a Design Feasibility Study (DFS) for a Muon Collider and, with international participation, a Reference Design Report (RDR) for a muon-based Neutrino Factory. It also includes the supporting component development and experimental efforts that will inform the design studies and permit an initial down-selection of candidate technologies for the ionization cooling and acceleration systems. We intend to ...

  12. Argonne's Laboratory Computing Resource Center 2009 annual report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bair, R. B. (CLS-CI)

    2011-05-13

    Now in its seventh year of operation, the Laboratory Computing Resource Center (LCRC) continues to be an integral component of science and engineering research at Argonne, supporting a diverse portfolio of projects for the U.S. Department of Energy and other sponsors. The LCRC's ongoing mission is to enable and promote computational science and engineering across the Laboratory, primarily by operating computing facilities and supporting high-performance computing application use and development. This report describes scientific activities carried out with LCRC resources in 2009 and the broad impact on programs across the Laboratory. The LCRC computing facility, Jazz, is available to the entire Laboratory community. In addition, the LCRC staff provides training in high-performance computing and guidance on application usage, code porting, and algorithm development. All Argonne personnel and collaborators are encouraged to take advantage of this computing resource and to provide input into the vision and plans for computing and computational analysis at Argonne. The LCRC Allocations Committee makes decisions on individual project allocations for Jazz. Committee members are appointed by the Associate Laboratory Directors and span a range of computational disciplines. The 350-node LCRC cluster, Jazz, began production service in April 2003 and has been a research work horse ever since. Hosting a wealth of software tools and applications and achieving high availability year after year, researchers can count on Jazz to achieve project milestones and enable breakthroughs. Over the years, many projects have achieved results that would have been unobtainable without such a computing resource. In fiscal year 2009, there were 49 active projects representing a wide cross-section of Laboratory research and almost all research divisions.

  13. The USA National Phenology Network: A national science and monitoring program for understanding climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weltzin, J.

    2009-04-01

    Patterns of phenology for plants and animals control ecosystem processes, determine land surface properties, control biosphere-atmosphere interactions, and affect food production, health, conservation, and recreation. Although phenological data and models have applications related to scientific research, education and outreach, agriculture, tourism and recreation, human health, and natural resource conservation and management, until recently there was no coordinated effort to understand phenology at the national scale in the United States. The USA National Phenology Network (USA-NPN; www.usanpn.org), established in 2007, is an emerging and exciting partnership between federal agencies, the academic community, and the general public to establish a national science and monitoring initiative focused on phenology. The first year of operation of USA-NPN produced many new phenology products and venues for phenology research and citizen involvement. Products include a new web-site (www.usanpn.org) that went live in June 2008; the web-site includes a tool for on-line data entry, and serves as a clearinghouse for products and information to facilitate research and communication related to phenology. The new core Plant Phenology Program includes profiles for 200 vetted local, regional, and national plant species with descriptions and (BBCH-consistent) monitoring protocols, as well as templates for addition of new species. A partnership program describes how other monitoring networks can engage with USA-NPN to collect, manage or disseminate phenological information for science, health, education, management or predictive service applications. Project BudBurst, a USA-NPN field campaign for citizen scientists, went live in February 2008, and now includes over 3000 registered observers monitoring 4000 plants across the nation. For 2009 and beyond, we will initiate a new Wildlife Phenology Program, create an on-line clearing-house for phenology education and outreach, strengthen

  14. Cost Effectiveness of Iran National Plasma Contract Fractionation Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdol Majid Cheraghali

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Plasma derived medicines (PDM including immunoglobulins, clotting factors and albumin are life saving medicines which due to their high costs are inaccessible for many patients living in developing countries. By contrary substantial volume of plasma as raw materials for production of these medicines are discarded worldwide. Good quality recovered plasma, as a result of separation of donated blood into its components, could be used for production of PDM. In 2011 Iranian donors donated about 2 million units of blood. A shift fromadministration of whole blood to components therapy has resulted in the generation of over 250,000 liters of surplus of recovered plasma. This created a good opportunity for Iran’s health care system to use this plasma for production of PDM. Therefore Iran national transfusion service has started a contract fractionation program for converting recovered plasma into PDM. This program not only provided essential PDM for Iran pharmaceutical market but also has created a direct saving of about 8.5 million Euros in 2011 for national health sector. In addition this program has drastically contributed to improvement of overall quality of working procedures and services provided by Iran national blood transfusion organization.

  15. Social Media Programs at the National Optical Astronomy Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparks, Robert T.; Walker, Constance Elaine; Pompea, Stephen M.

    2015-08-01

    Observatories and other science research organizations want to share their research and activities with the public. The last several years, social media has become and increasingly important venue for communicating information about observatory activities, research and education and public outreach.The National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO) uses a wide variety of social media to communicate with different audiences. NOAO is active on social media platforms including Facebook, Twitter, Google+ and Pinterest. Our social media accounts include those for the National Optical Astronomy Observatory, Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, Kitt Peak National Observatory and our dark skies conservation program Globe at Night.Our social media programs have a variety of audiences. NOAO uses social media to announce and promote NOAO sponsored meetings, observatory news and proposal deadlines to the professional astronomical community. Social media accounts are used to disseminate NOAO press releases, images from the observatory and other science using data from NOAO telescopes.Social media is important in our Education and Public Outreach programs (EPO). Globe at Night has very active facebook and twitter accounts encouraging people to become involved in preserving dark skies. Social media plays a role in recruiting teachers for professional development workshops such as Project Astro.NOAO produces monthly podcasts for the 365 Days of Astronomy podcast featuring interviews with NOAO astronomers. Each podcast highlights the science of an NOAO astronomer, an NOAO operated telescope or instrument, or an NOAO program. A separate series of podcasts is produced for NOAO’s Dark Skies Education programs. All the podcasts are archived at 365daysofastronomy.org.

  16. 76 FR 71037 - Proposed National Toxicology Program (NTP) Review Process for the Report on Carcinogens: Request...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-16

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Proposed National Toxicology Program (NTP) Review Process...: Division of the National Toxicology Program (DNTP), National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences.... Bucher, Associate Director, National Toxicology Program. [FR Doc. 2011-29615 Filed 11-15-11; 8:45 am...

  17. 78 FR 45253 - National Toxicology Program Scientific Advisory Committee on Alternative Toxicological Methods...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-26

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Toxicology Program... Alternative Methods (ICCVAM), the National Toxicology Program (NTP) Interagency Center for the Evaluation of... Director, National Toxicology Program. [FR Doc. 2013-17919 Filed 7-25-13; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4140-01-P ...

  18. A survey of an air monitoring program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, M.B.

    1997-01-01

    The objective of this report is to compare personal air sampling data to stationary air sampling data and to bioassay data that was taken during the decontamination and decommissioning of sixty-one plutonium glove boxes at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) in 1995. An air monitoring program administered at Argonne National Laboratory was assessed by comparing personal air sampler (PAS) data, stationary air sampler (SAS) data, and bioassay data. The study revealed that the PAS and SAS techniques were equivalent when averaged over all employees and all workdays, but the standard deviation was large. Also, large deviations were observed in individual samples. The correlation between individual PAS results and bioassay results was low. Personal air samplers and bioassay monitoring played complementary roles in assessing the workplace and estimating intakes. The PAS technique is adequate for detection and evaluation of contaminated atmospheres, whereas bioassay monitoring is better for determining individual intakes

  19. The advanced controls program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knee, H.E.; White, J.D.

    1990-01-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), under sponsorship of the US Department of Energy (DOE), is conducting research that will lead to advanced, automated control of new liquid-metal-reactor (LMR) nuclear power plants. Although this program of research (entitled the ''Advanced Controls Program'') is focused on LMR technology, it will be capable of providing control design, test, and qualification capability for other advanced reactor designs (e.g., the advanced light water reactor [ALWR] and high temperature gas-cooled reactor [HTGR] designs), while also benefiting existing nuclear plants. The Program will also have applicability to complex, non-nuclear process control environments (e.g., petrochemical, aerospace, etc.). The Advanced Controls Program will support capabilities throughout the entire plant design life cycle, i.e., from the initial interactive first-principle dynamic model development for the process, systems, components, and instruments through advanced control room qualification. The current program involves five principal areas of research activities: (1) demonstrations of advanced control system designs, (2) development of an advanced controls design environment, (3) development of advanced control strategies, (4) research and development (R ampersand D) in human-system integration for advanced control system designs, and (5) testing and validation of advanced control system designs. Discussion of the research in these five areas forms the basis of this paper. Also included is a description of the research directions of the program. 8 refs

  20. National waste terminal storage program. Supplementary quality-assurance requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garland, D.L.

    1980-01-01

    The basic Quality Assurance Program Requirements standard for the National Waste Terminal Storage Program has been developed primarily for nuclear reactors and other fairly well established nuclear facilities. In the case of waste isolation, however, there are many ongoing investigations for which quality assurance practices and requirements have not been well defined. This paper points out these problems which require supplementary requirements. Briefly these are: (1) the language barrier, that is geologists and scientists are not familiar with quality assurance (QA) terminology; (2) earth sciences deal with materials that cannot be characterized as easily as metals or other materials that are reasonably homogeneous; (3) development and control of mathematical models and associated computer programs; (4) research and development

  1. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Transuranic Waste Certification Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, J.H.; Bates, L.D.; Box, W.D.; Aaron, W.S.; Setaro, J.A.

    1988-08-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has requested that all DOE facilities handling defense transuranic (TRU) waste develop and implement a program whereby all TRU waste will be contained, stored, and shipped to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in accordance with the requirements set forth in the DOE certification documents WIPP-DOE-069, 114, 120, 137, 157, and 158. The program described in this report describes how Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) intends to comply with these requirements and the techniques and procedures used to ensure that ORNL TRU wastes are certifiable for shipment to WIPP. This document describes the program for certification of newly generated (NG) contact-handled transuranic (CH-TRU) waste. Previsions have been made for addenda, which will extend the coverage of this document to include certification of stored CH-TRU and NG and stored remote-handled transuranic (RH-TRU) waste, as necessary. 24 refs., 11 figs., 4 tabs

  2. National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency Academic Research Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loomer, S. A.

    2004-12-01

    "Know the Earth.Show the Way." In fulfillment of its vision, the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA) provides geospatial intelligence in all its forms and from whatever source-imagery, imagery intelligence, and geospatial data and information-to ensure the knowledge foundation for planning, decision, and action. To achieve this, NGA conducts a multi-disciplinary program of basic research in geospatial intelligence topics through grants and fellowships to the leading investigators, research universities, and colleges of the nation. This research provides the fundamental science support to NGA's applied and advanced research programs. The major components of the NGA Academic Research Program (NARP) are: - NGA University Research Initiatives (NURI): Three-year basic research grants awarded competitively to the best investigators across the US academic community. Topics are selected to provide the scientific basis for advanced and applied research in NGA core disciplines. - Historically Black College and University - Minority Institution Research Initiatives (HBCU-MI): Two-year basic research grants awarded competitively to the best investigators at Historically Black Colleges and Universities, and Minority Institutions across the US academic community. - Director of Central Intelligence Post-Doctoral Research Fellowships: Fellowships providing access to advanced research in science and technology applicable to the intelligence community's mission. The program provides a pool of researchers to support future intelligence community needs and develops long-term relationships with researchers as they move into career positions. This paper provides information about the NGA Academic Research Program, the projects it supports and how other researchers and institutions can apply for grants under the program.

  3. The big and little of fifty years of Moessbauer spectroscopy at Argonne

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westfall, C.

    2005-01-01

    the $50 million Zero Gradient Synchrotron (ZGS) and the $30 million Experimental Breeder Reactor (EBR) II. Starting in the mid-1990s, Argonne physicists expanded their exploration of the properties of matter by employing a new type of Moessbauer spectroscopy--this time using synchrotron light sources such as Argonne's Advanced Photon Source (APS), which at $1 billion was the most expensive U.S. accelerator project of its time. Traditional Moessbauer spectroscopy looks superficially like prototypical ''Little Science'' and Moessbauer spectroscopy using synchrotrons looks like prototypical ''Big Science''. In addition, the growth from small to larger scale research seems to follow the pattern familiar from high energy physics even though the wide range of science performed using Moessbauer spectroscopy did not include high energy physics. But is the story of Moessbauer spectroscopy really like the tale told by high energy physicists and often echoed by historians? What do U.S. national laboratories, the ''Home'' of Big Science, have to offer small-scale research? And what does the story of the 50-year development of Moessbauer spectroscopy at Argonne tell us about how knowledge is produced at large laboratories? In a recent analysis of the development of relativistic heavy ion science at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory I questioned whether it was wise for historians to speak in terms of ''Big Science'', pointing out at that Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory hosted large-scale projects at three scales, the grand scale of the Bevatron, the modest scale of the HILAC, and the mezzo scale of the combined machine, the Bevalac. I argue that using the term ''Big Science'', which was coined by participants, leads to a misleading preoccupation with the largest projects and the tendency to see the history of physics as the history of high energy physics. My aim here is to provide an additional corrective to such views as well as further information about the web of connections that allows

  4. The big and little of fifty years of Moessbauer spectroscopy at Argonne.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westfall, C.

    2005-09-20

    equipment that cost $100,000 by the 1970s alongside work at the $50 million Zero Gradient Synchrotron (ZGS) and the $30 million Experimental Breeder Reactor (EBR) II. Starting in the mid-1990s, Argonne physicists expanded their exploration of the properties of matter by employing a new type of Moessbauer spectroscopy--this time using synchrotron light sources such as Argonne's Advanced Photon Source (APS), which at $1 billion was the most expensive U.S. accelerator project of its time. Traditional Moessbauer spectroscopy looks superficially like prototypical ''Little Science'' and Moessbauer spectroscopy using synchrotrons looks like prototypical ''Big Science''. In addition, the growth from small to larger scale research seems to follow the pattern familiar from high energy physics even though the wide range of science performed using Moessbauer spectroscopy did not include high energy physics. But is the story of Moessbauer spectroscopy really like the tale told by high energy physicists and often echoed by historians? What do U.S. national laboratories, the ''Home'' of Big Science, have to offer small-scale research? And what does the story of the 50-year development of Moessbauer spectroscopy at Argonne tell us about how knowledge is produced at large laboratories? In a recent analysis of the development of relativistic heavy ion science at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory I questioned whether it was wise for historians to speak in terms of ''Big Science'', pointing out at that Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory hosted large-scale projects at three scales, the grand scale of the Bevatron, the modest scale of the HILAC, and the mezzo scale of the combined machine, the Bevalac. I argue that using the term ''Big Science'', which was coined by participants, leads to a misleading preoccupation with the largest projects and the tendency to see the history of physics as the history

  5. 76 FR 67200 - Proposed National Toxicology Program (NTP) Review Process for the Report on Carcinogens: Request...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-31

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Proposed National Toxicology... Session AGENCY: Division of the National Toxicology Program (DNTP), National Institute of Environmental.... Bucher, Associate Director, National Toxicology Program. [FR Doc. 2011-28132 Filed 10-28-11; 8:45 am...

  6. Argonne Leadership Computing Facility 2011 annual report : Shaping future supercomputing.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papka, M.; Messina, P.; Coffey, R.; Drugan, C. (LCF)

    2012-08-16

    The ALCF's Early Science Program aims to prepare key applications for the architecture and scale of Mira and to solidify libraries and infrastructure that will pave the way for other future production applications. Two billion core-hours have been allocated to 16 Early Science projects on Mira. The projects, in addition to promising delivery of exciting new science, are all based on state-of-the-art, petascale, parallel applications. The project teams, in collaboration with ALCF staff and IBM, have undertaken intensive efforts to adapt their software to take advantage of Mira's Blue Gene/Q architecture, which, in a number of ways, is a precursor to future high-performance-computing architecture. The Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF) enables transformative science that solves some of the most difficult challenges in biology, chemistry, energy, climate, materials, physics, and other scientific realms. Users partnering with ALCF staff have reached research milestones previously unattainable, due to the ALCF's world-class supercomputing resources and expertise in computation science. In 2011, the ALCF's commitment to providing outstanding science and leadership-class resources was honored with several prestigious awards. Research on multiscale brain blood flow simulations was named a Gordon Bell Prize finalist. Intrepid, the ALCF's BG/P system, ranked No. 1 on the Graph 500 list for the second consecutive year. The next-generation BG/Q prototype again topped the Green500 list. Skilled experts at the ALCF enable researchers to conduct breakthrough science on the Blue Gene system in key ways. The Catalyst Team matches project PIs with experienced computational scientists to maximize and accelerate research in their specific scientific domains. The Performance Engineering Team facilitates the effective use of applications on the Blue Gene system by assessing and improving the algorithms used by applications and the techniques used to

  7. Present and future radioactive nuclear beam developments at Argonne

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decrock, P.

    1996-01-01

    A scheme for building an ISOL-based radioactive nuclear beam facility at the Argonne Physics Division, is currently evaluated. The feasibility and efficiency of the different steps in the proposed production- and acceleration cycles are being tested. At the Dynamitron Facility of the ANL Physics Division, stripping yields of Kr, Xe and Ph beams in a windowless gas cell have been measured and the study of fission of 238 U induced by fast neutrons from the 9 Be(dn) reaction is in progress. Different aspects of the post-acceleration procedure are currently being investigated. In parallel with this work, energetic radioactive beams such as 17 F, 18 F and 56 Ni have recently been developed at Argonne using the present ATLAS facility

  8. R and D Proposal for the National Muon Acccelerator Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    This document contains a description of a multi-year national R and D program aimed at completing a Design Feasibility Study (DFS) for a Muon Collider and, with international participation, a Reference Design Report (RDR) for a muon-based Neutrino Factory. It also includes the supporting component development and experimental efforts that will inform the design studies and permit an initial down-selection of candidate technologies for the ionization cooling and acceleration systems. We intend to carry out this plan with participants from the host national laboratory (Fermilab), those from collaborating U.S. national laboratories (ANL, BNL, Jlab, LBNL, and SNAL), and those from a number of other U.S. laboratories, universities, and SBIR companies. The R and D program that we propose will provide the HEP community with detailed information on future facilities based on intense beams of muons - the Muon Collider and the Neutrino Factory. We believe that these facilities offer the promise of extraordinary physics capabilities. The Muon Collider presents a powerful option to explore the energy frontier and the Neutrino Factory gives the opportunity to perform the most sensitive neutrino oscillation experiments possible, while also opening expanded avenues for the study of new physics in the neutrino sector. The synergy between the two facilities presents the opportunity for an extremely broad physics program and a unique pathway in accelerator facilities. Our work will give clear answers to the questions of expected capabilities and performance of these muon-based facilities, and will provide defensible ranges for their cost. This information, together with the physics insights gained from the next-generation neutrino and LHC experiments, will allow the HEP community to make well-informed decisions regarding the optimal choice of new facilities. We believe that this work is a critical part of any broad strategic program in accelerator R and D and, as the P5 panel has

  9. R&D Proposal for the National Muon Acccelerator Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2010-02-01

    This document contains a description of a multi-year national R&D program aimed at completing a Design Feasibility Study (DFS) for a Muon Collider and, with international participation, a Reference Design Report (RDR) for a muon-based Neutrino Factory. It also includes the supporting component development and experimental efforts that will inform the design studies and permit an initial down-selection of candidate technologies for the ionization cooling and acceleration systems. We intend to carry out this plan with participants from the host national laboratory (Fermilab), those from collaborating U.S. national laboratories (ANL, BNL, Jlab, LBNL, and SNAL), and those from a number of other U.S. laboratories, universities, and SBIR companies. The R&D program that we propose will provide the HEP community with detailed information on future facilities based on intense beams of muons - the Muon Collider and the Neutrino Factory. We believe that these facilities offer the promise of extraordinary physics capabilities. The Muon Collider presents a powerful option to explore the energy frontier and the Neutrino Factory gives the opportunity to perform the most sensitive neutrino oscillation experiments possible, while also opening expanded avenues for the study of new physics in the neutrino sector. The synergy between the two facilities presents the opportunity for an extremely broad physics program and a unique pathway in accelerator facilities. Our work will give clear answers to the questions of expected capabilities and performance of these muon-based facilities, and will provide defensible ranges for their cost. This information, together with the physics insights gained from the next-generation neutrino and LHC experiments, will allow the HEP community to make well-informed decisions regarding the optimal choice of new facilities. We believe that this work is a critical part of any broad strategic program in accelerator R&D and, as the P5 panel has recently

  10. R&D PROPOSAL FOR THE NATIONAL MUON ACCELERATOR PROGRAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muon Accelerator Program; Zisman, Michael S.; Geer, Stephen

    2010-02-24

    This document contains a description of a multi-year national R&D program aimed at completing a Design Feasibility Study (DFS) for a Muon Collider and, with international participation, a Reference Design Report (RDR) for a muon-based Neutrino Factory. It also includes the supporting component development and experimental efforts that will inform the design studies and permit an initial down-selection of candidate technologies for the ionization cooling and acceleration systems. We intend to carry out this plan with participants from the host national laboratory (Fermilab), those from collaborating U.S. national laboratories (ANL, BNL, Jlab, LBNL, and SNAL), and those from a number of other U.S. laboratories, universities, and SBIR companies. The R&D program that we propose will provide the HEP community with detailed information on future facilities based on intense beams of muons--the Muon Collider and the Neutrino Factory. We believe that these facilities offer the promise of extraordinary physics capabilities. The Muon Collider presents a powerful option to explore the energy frontier and the Neutrino Factory gives the opportunity to perform the most sensitive neutrino oscillation experiments possible, while also opening expanded avenues for the study of new physics in the neutrino sector. The synergy between the two facilities presents the opportunity for an extremely broad physics program and a unique pathway in accelerator facilities. Our work will give clear answers to the questions of expected capabilities and performance of these muon-based facilities, and will provide defensible ranges for their cost. This information, together with the physics insights gained from the next-generation neutrino and LHC experiments, will allow the HEP community to make well-informed decisions regarding the optimal choice of new facilities. We believe that this work is a critical part of any broad strategic program in accelerator R&D and, as the P5 panel has recently

  11. Specialists' meeting on advanced controls for fast reactors, Argonne, Illinois, USA June 20-22, 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    The Specialists' Meeting on ''Advanced Controls for Fast Reactors'' was held in Argonne, Illinois, USA, from June 20 to 22, 1989. The meeting was sponsored by the International Atomic Energy Agency on the recommendation of the IAEA International Working Group on Fast Reactors and was hosted by Argonne National Laboratory and the US Department of Energy. It was attended by 20 participants and observers from Argentina, France, Germany, Japan, India, the USSR, the United Kingdom, the United States of America, and the IAEA. The purpose of the meeting was to provide an opportunity for participating countries to review and discuss their views on design and technology for advanced control in fast reactors. During the meeting papers were presented by the participants on behalf of their countries and organizations. Presentations were followed by open discussions on the subjects covered by the papers and summaries of the discussions were drafted. After the formal sessions were completed, a final discussion session was held and summaries, general conclusions and recommendations were approved by consensus. A separate abstract was prepared for each of the 22 papers presented at this meeting. Refs, figs, tabs, diagrams and photos

  12. National Radon Contractor Proficiency Program. Proficiency report, October 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-10-01

    The report lists those individual contractors in the United States who have met the requirements of the Radon Contractor Proficiency (RCP) Program as of August 18, 1990. These requirements are designed to provide minimum proficiency criteria for individuals who design and supervise the installation of radon mitigation systems in buildings. (Some States have more stringent requirements as part of their radon certification programs. The States should be consulted directly for details on their programs; see Section 5 for a list of State radon contacts). The RCP Program measures the proficiency of an individual contractor, not their company. Therefore, users of the report who select a mitigation firm should ensure that the services are provided by the listed contractor. The National RCP Program does not accredit mitigation contractors, nor does it certify, recommend, or endorse participating companies. Only the listed contractor, not their company of affilation, are deemed proficient. The inclusion of a contractor in the report should not be interpreted as a certification or accreditation of the individual or affiliated company

  13. The Argonne beamline-B telescope control system: A study of adaptability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuka, M.A.; Clout, P.N.; Conley, A.P.; Hill, J.O.; Rothrock, R.B.; Trease, L.L.; Zander, M.E.

    1987-01-01

    A beam-expanding telescope to study high-precision H - particle optics and beam sensing was designed by the Accelerator Technology Division at Los Alamos National Laboratory and will be installed on beamline-B at Argonne National Laboratory. The control system for this telescope was developed in a relatively short period of time using experience gained from building the Proton Storage Ring (PSR) control system. The designers modified hardware and software to take advantage of new technology as well as to meet the requirements of the new system. This paper discusses lessons learned in the process of adapting hardware and software from an existing control system to one with rather different requirements

  14. Role of the National Cancer Institute in the National Cancer Program on environmental carcinogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flamm, W.G.

    1977-01-01

    The following topics are discussed: the need for the National Cancer Institute to coordinate all cancer-related activities at the federal level and the desirability of programming so as to exploit the best opportunities for alleviating the mortality, morbidity, and incidence of cancer in the United States; need for assessing opportunities for prevention of environmental carcinogenesis; creation of the Smoking and Health Program in the NCI; development of cancer atlases from a nationwide survey; and role of the NCI with respect to waterborne carcinogens. (HLW)

  15. National control and eradication program of bovine tuberculosis in Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Max, Vanessa; Paredes, Luis; Rivera, Alejandro; Ternicier, Claudio

    2011-07-05

    There have been reports of the presence of bovine tuberculosis (TB) in Chile for more than 100 years. Several prevalence studies have revealed that there is a wide spectrum of disease across the country with certain geographic areas where the disease is endemic through to other geographic areas where infection is sporadic and at very low prevalence. In 2009, this information was used to divide Chile into different geographic zones based on prevalence rates. This will enable the correct actions to be undertaken to reduce the prevalence of TB. Thus the northern part of Chile which has a medium to high prevalence of TB will be categorized as a control zone. In contrast, the southern part of Chile which has a high proportion of the bovine population, has a low prevalence of TB and will be classified as an eradication zone (Paredes, 2008). Although there have been several past attempts to create a national control and eradication program in Chile, none has been successful. A national program is proposed, and outlined in this paper. Progress toward program initiation in 2009 has been difficult, mostly because of the global economic crisis, difficulties in the milk and meat industry, and social and political issues. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. National Space Weather Program Releases Strategy for the New Decade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Samuel P.; Babcock, Michael R.; Bonadonna, Michael F.

    2010-12-01

    The National Space Weather Program (NSWP; http://www.nswp.gov) is a U.S. federal government interagency program established by the Office of the Federal Coordinator for Meteorology (OFCM) in 1995 to coordinate, collaborate, and leverage capabilities across stakeholder agencies, including space weather researchers, service providers, users, policy makers, and funding agencies, to improve the performance of the space weather enterprise for the United States and its international partners. Two important documents released in recent months have established a framework and the vision, goals, and strategy to move the enterprise forward in the next decade. The U.S. federal agency members of the NSWP include the departments of Commerce, Defense, Energy, Interior, State, and Transportation, plus NASA, the National Science Foundation, and observers from the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) and the Office of Management and Budget (OMB). The OFCM is also working with the Department of Homeland Security's Federal Emergency Management Agency to formally join the program.

  17. [The new national program for tuberculosis elimination in Israel].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemtob, Daniel; Leventhal, Alex; Berlowitz, Yitzhak; Weiler-Ravell, Daniel

    2002-03-01

    The rise in the incidence of TB in Israel, mostly due to immigration from endemic areas, led to the establishment of a new TB control program which follows the guidelines of the World Health Organization (WHO). Reorganization of the TB infrastructure was enabled by specific legislative, administrative and budgetary measures initiated by the Ministry of Health (MOH) in conjunction with the Sick Funds. To present the theoretical and practical aspects of this new program to the physicians of Israel. The essence of this program is the use of directly observed therapy (DOT) for all patients together with centralization of TB care in nine national centers, closely supervised by the MOH. This centralization allows a critical mass of patients to be seen in each clinic, thus enabling the labor-intensive task of modern TB treatment, including the supervision and/or the administration of DOT, to be performed in a cost-effective manner. Day to day treatment is conducted by general community clinics and supervised by District Health Offices. Hospitalization, a relatively rare necessity in the new program, is available in two dedicated centers with modern isolation facilities. Centralized laboratory services provide timely susceptibility testing. Billing is simplified according to disease categories, using a global assessment of costs negotiated with the Sick Funds. Management and quality control of the program are carried out on an ongoing basis by the Department of TB and AIDS at the MOH. In the first two years that have elapsed since the inception of the program, almost 93% of cases have documented evidence of completion of treatment (under DOT), compared to 54% (without any treatment supervision) before the program came into effect.

  18. National Report on the NASA Sounding Rocket and Balloon Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberspeaker, Philip; Fairbrother, Debora

    2013-01-01

    The U. S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Sounding Rockets and Balloon Programs conduct a total of 30 to 40 missions per year in support of the NASA scientific community and other users. The NASA Sounding Rockets Program supports the science community by integrating their experiments into the sounding rocket payloads, and providing both the rocket vehicle and launch operations services. Activities since 2011 have included two flights from Andoya Rocket Range, more than eight flights from White Sands Missile Range, approximately sixteen flights from Wallops Flight Facility, two flights from Poker Flat Research Range, and four flights from Kwajalein Atoll. Other activities included the final developmental flight of the Terrier-Improved Malemute launch vehicle, a test flight of the Talos-Terrier-Oriole launch vehicle, and a host of smaller activities to improve program support capabilities. Several operational missions have utilized the new Terrier-Malemute vehicle. The NASA Sounding Rockets Program is currently engaged in the development of a new sustainer motor known as the Peregrine. The Peregrine development effort will involve one static firing and three flight tests with a target completion data of August 2014. The NASA Balloon Program supported numerous scientific and developmental missions since its last report. The program conducted flights from the U.S., Sweden, Australia, and Antarctica utilizing standard and experimental vehicles. Of particular note are the successful test flights of the Wallops Arc Second Pointer (WASP), the successful demonstration of a medium-size Super Pressure Balloon (SPB), and most recently, three simultaneous missions aloft over Antarctica. NASA continues its successful incremental design qualification program and will support a science mission aboard WASP in late 2013 and a science mission aboard the SPB in early 2015. NASA has also embarked on an intra-agency collaboration to launch a rocket from a balloon to

  19. Regional Innovation System Strengthening Program (SIDa as an Exit Strategy National Community Development Program (PNPM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teguh Narutomo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the PNPM program and follow the program with SIDA Strengthening Program. The research method used is a qualitative method approach of this research through the evaluation research design that builds on the CIPP evaluation model (Context-Input-Process-Product. Since the failure of theories and models of development are too glorifies growth, makes many people turn to focus on people development, which includes requiring optimization of local resources, participation, and empowerment. Since then, "empowerment" which was introduced in Indonesia has been anesthetized and made many hopes among many parties. In 2007 started the National Program for Community Empowerment (PNPM which continue Kecamatan Development Program (KDP. PNPM 2014 which is part of the United Indonesia Cabinet Volume 2 is going to end. For that we need to look for an exit strategy program that can maintain sustainability of PNPM. Regional Innovation Systems Strengthening Program (SIDA is a program of the whole process in one system to foster innovation made between government institutions, local governments, research institutions, educational institutions, innovation support institutions, businesses, and communities in areas that have been implemented since the 2012 SIDA program is an empowerment program as well, both to the public and even empowering to all elements such as academia, private industry, government and society.

  20. Talks and status of the national conference of the national program of fight against climate change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    In order to fulfill its commitments in the Kyoto protocol for the abatement of greenhouse gases emissions, France has started important environmental actions: the creation of the national program of fight against climate change (validated in January 2000), the integration of the problem of climate change in government actions (collective services and state-region contracts), creation of a national laboratory of global warming effects, creation of a research council on climate change and durable development, presentation of an annual status of the actions carried out in the framework of the national program. This last point was the aim of the conference held in Paris in June 2001. Debates were organized around four main sectors: industry, energy, buildings and transportation systems. The topics approached during the round-tables raised several essential questions for the fight against climate change: which practice changes are needed in the industry and energy production activities? Which actions need to be carried out in new and existing buildings to save energy? Which consistent transportation policies need to be implemented in urban areas? Is a rail-road traffic re-balancing possible? Which importance can have the territory organizations? What are the public expectations in front of the climate change risk? This document brings together the talks of Mrs D. Voynet, Minister of national development and environment, the talk of Mr R.G. Schwartzenberg, Minister of research, the talk of Mr C. Pierret, State Secretary of Industry, and a sectoral status (transports, industry, energy, buildings and mastery of electricity demand) of the first year of the program presented by Mr M. Mousel, head of the inter-ministry mission on greenhouse effect. The document ends with a presentation of the British and European climate change programs. (J.S.)