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Sample records for program amchitka alaska

  1. Amchitka Island, Alaska, special sampling project 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office

    2000-06-28

    This 1997 special sampling project represents a special radiobiological sampling effort to augment the 1996 Long-Term Hydrological Monitoring Program (LTHMP) for Amchitka Island in Alaska. Lying in the western portion of the Aleutian Islands arc, near the International Date Line, Amchitka Island is one of the southernmost islands of the Rat Island Chain. Between 1965 and 1971, the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission conducted three underground nuclear tests on Amchitka Island. In 1996, Greenpeace collected biota samples and speculated that several long-lived, man-made radionuclides detected (i.e., americium-241, plutonium-239 and -240, beryllium-7, and cesium-137) leaked into the surface environment from underground cavities created during the testing. The nuclides of interest are detected at extremely low concentrations throughout the environment. The objectives of this special sampling project were to scientifically refute the Greenpeace conclusions that the underground cavities were leaking contaminants to the surface. This was achieved by first confirming the presence of these radionuclides in the Amchitka Island surface environment and, second, if the radionuclides were present, determining if the source is the underground cavity or worldwide fallout. This special sampling and analysis determined that the only nonfallout-related radionuclide detected was a low level of tritium from the Long Shot test, which had been previously documented. The tritium contamination is monitored and continues a decreasing trend due to radioactive decay and dilution.

  2. Alternatives Analysis Amchitka Island Mud Pit Cap Repair, Amchitka, Alaska January 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darr, Paul S. [US Department of Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Legacy Management

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) manages the Nevada Offsites program, which includes a series of reclaimed drilling mud impoundments on Amchitka Island, Alaska (Figure 1). Navarro Research and Engineering, Inc. is the Legacy Management Support contractor (the Contractor) for LM. The Contractor has procured Tetra Tech, Inc. to provide engineering support to the Amchitka mud pit reclamation project. The mud pit caps were damaged during a 7.9-magnitude earthquake that occurred in 2014. The goals of the current project are to investigate conditions at the mud pit impoundments, identify feasible alternatives for repair of the cover systems and the contents, and estimate relative costs of repair alternatives. This report presents descriptions of the sites and past investigations, existing conditions, summaries of various repair/mitigation alternatives, and direct, unburdened, order-of-magnitude (-15% to +50%) associated costs.

  3. The higher fungi of Amchitka and Adak Islands, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Fruiting body collections of higher fungi, basidiomycetes and ascomycetes, were made during a twelve day field study on two of Alaska's Aleutian Islands, Amchitka...

  4. Amchitka Island, Alaska, Biological Monitoring Report 2011 Sampling Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2013-09-01

    The Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance (LTS&M) Plan for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) Amchitka Island sites describes how LM plans to conduct its mission to protect human health and the environment at the three nuclear test sites located on Amchitka Island, Alaska. Amchitka Island, near the western end of the Aleutian Islands, is approximately 1,340 miles west-southwest of Anchorage, Alaska. Amchitka is part of the Aleutian Island Unit of the Alaska Maritime National Wildlife Refuge, which is administered by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS). Since World War II, Amchitka has been used by multiple U.S. government agencies for various military and research activities. From 1943 to 1950, it was used as a forward air base for the U.S. Armed Forces. During the middle 1960s and early 1970s, the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) and the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) used a portion of the island as a site for underground nuclear tests. During the late 1980s and early 1990s, the U.S. Navy constructed and operated a radar station on the island. Three underground nuclear tests were conducted on Amchitka Island. DOD, in conjunction with AEC, conducted the first nuclear test (named Long Shot) in 1965 to provide data that would improve the United States' capability of detecting underground nuclear explosions. The second nuclear test (Milrow) was a weapons-related test conducted by AEC in 1969 as a means to study the feasibility of detonating a much larger device. Cannikin, the third nuclear test on Amchitka, was a weapons-related test detonated on November 6, 1971. With the exception of small concentrations of tritium detected in surface water shortly after the Long Shot test, radioactive fission products from the tests remain in the subsurface at each test location As a continuation of the environmental monitoring that has taken place on Amchitka Island since before 1965, LM in the summer of 2011 collected biological

  5. Marine mammal observations, Amchitka Island, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Three marine mammals were regularly observed at Amchitka Island: sea otters (Enhydra lutris), Steller's sea lions (Eumetopias jubata), and harbor seals (Phoca...

  6. SURFACE REMEDIATION IN THE ALEUTIAN ISLANDS: A CASE STUDY OF AMCHITKA ISLAND, ALASKA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giblin, M. O.; Stahl, D. C.; Bechtel, J. A.

    2002-02-25

    Amchitka Island, Alaska, was at one time an integral player in the nation's defense program. Located in the North Pacific Ocean in the Aleutian Island archipelago, the island was intermittently inhabited by several key government agencies, including the U.S. Army, the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (predecessor agency to the U.S. Department of Energy), and the U.S. Navy. Since 1993, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has conducted extensive investigations on Amchitka to determine the nature and extent of contamination resulting from historic nuclear testing. The uninhabited island was the site of three high-yield nuclear tests from 1965 to 1971. These test locations are now part of the DOE's National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office's Environmental Management Program. In the summer of 2001, the DOE launched a large-scale remediation effort on Amchitka to perform agreed-upon corrective actions to the surface of the island. Due to the lack of resources available on Amchitka and logistical difficulties with conducting work at such a remote location, the DOE partnered with the Navy and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) to share certain specified costs and resources. Attempting to negotiate the partnerships while organizing and implementing the surface remediation on Amchitka proved to be a challenging endeavor. The DOE was faced with unexpected changes in Navy and USACE scope of work, accelerations in schedules, and risks associated with construction costs at such a remote location. Unfavorable weather conditions also proved to be a constant factor, often slowing the progress of work. The Amchitka Island remediation project experience has allowed the DOE to gain valuable insights into how to anticipate and mitigate potential problems associated with future remediation projects. These lessons learned will help the DOE in conducting future work more efficiently, and can also serve as a guide for other agencies performing similar

  7. Record of Decision for Amchitka Surface Closure, Alaska

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2008-08-01

    This Record of Decision has been prepared to document the remedial actions taken on Amchitka Island to stabilize contaminants associated with drilling mud pits generated as a result of nuclear testing operations conducted on the island. This document has been prepared in accordance with the recommended outline in the Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation guidance on decision documentation under the Site Cleanup Rules (18 AAC 75.325-18 AAC 75.390) (ADEC 1999). It also describes the decision-making process used to establish the remedial action plans and defines the associated human health and ecological risks for the remediation.

  8. Arctic and Aleutian terns, Amchitka Island, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Baird (1980) has recently reported on the ecology of Arctic terns (Sterna paradisaea) and Aleutian terns (Sterna aleutica) from 4 areas of mainland Alaska. However,...

  9. 1980 raptor survey: The breeding peregrine falcon (Falco peregrinus) population of Amchitka Island, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A survey of the breeding peregrine falcon (Falco peregrinus) population was made on Amchitka Island, Alaska, during the 1980 summer field season. The survey was...

  10. Propagation of Aleutian Canada geese on Amchitka Island, Alaska, 1980

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The methods of propagation on Amchitka Island were changed from past years in that artificial incubation and rearing were abandoned in favor of more natural goose...

  11. The plant ecology of Amchitka Island, Alaska: Quarterly report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This quarterly report summarizes the findings of a study on the plant ecology of Amchitka Island. Observations of topographic forms, microclimate relations,...

  12. Amchitka Radiobiological Program progress report, January 1979-December 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thornberg, L.D.; Sibley, T.H.; Nakatani, R.E.

    1980-07-01

    The objective of the Amchitka Radiobiological Program for the period 1970-1979 was to determine the extent of radionuclide contamination from world-wide atmospheric fallout and from the detonation of three underground nuclear blasts on Amchitka Island. The objective is achieved, by the collection and radiological analyses of biological and environmental samples and by background radiation measurements. Leakage of radionuclides from the underground sites of the Amchitka nuclear detonations would be suspected if the contamination was significntly greater than would be expected from world fallout. An account of the program from July 1970 to December 1978 has been given in nine previous reports from the Laboratory of Radiation Ecology to the Nevada Operations Office of the US Department of Energy. This report is an account of the program for calendar year 1979. The results of analyses of the samples collected in 1979 lead to the same conclusions as in previous years; i.e., there is no evidence that the radionuclide contamination at Amchitka Island is greater than would be expected from world fallout except for a slight contamination of the Long Shot Mud Pits with tritium.

  13. Amchitka radiobiological program progress report, January 1976--December 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, V.A.; Seymour, A.H.

    1977-05-01

    The Amchitka Radiobiological Program is a continuing program to collect biological and environmental samples for radiometric analyses. Results of analyses for samples collected during 1976 include gamma-emitting radionuclides in air filters, freshwater, birds, lichens, marine algae, marine invertebrates, fish, aufwuchs, and freshwater moss and plants; /sup 90/Sr in rats, birds, and soil; /sup 239/ /sup 240/Pu in sand, soil, marine algae and fish; and tritium (/sup 3/H) in seawater, freshwater, and biological organisms.

  14. Amchitka Radiobiological Program. Progress report, January-December 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tornberg, L.D.; Nakatani, R.E.

    1979-07-01

    The Amchitka Radiobiological Program began in 1970 and is a continuing program to collect biological and environmental samples for radiometric analyses. This report is an account of the program for calendar year 1978. Results of analyses for samples collected in August 1978 have been added to the tables of Seymour and Johnson (1978) which summarize the Amchitka program from 1970 to 1977 and include analyses for: (1) gamma-emitting radionuclides in freshwater, birds, lichens, marine algae, marine invertebrates, fish, aufwuchs, and freshwater moss and plants; (2) strontium-90 (/sup 90/Sr) in rats, birds, and soil; (3) /sup 239/, /sup 240/Pu in sand, soil, marine algae, and fish; and (4) tritium (/sup 3/H) in seawater, freshwater, and biological organisms. Monitoring of background radiation with survey instruments was added to the Laboratory's program in 1974, and the results of the five annual surveys since that date are included in this report. Conclusions from the results of the recent analyses are a reiteration of the results stated in Nelson and Seymour (1975a); namely, (1) no new radionuclides are present; (2) the most abundant radionuclides are naturally occurring beryllium-7 (/sup 7/Be) and potassium-40 (/sup 40/K); (3) the trace quantities of fission products and induced radionuclides are from world fallout; and (4) a trace of /sup 3/H contamination remains in some Long Shot ponds, as previously reported. It is concluded that there were no radionuclides of Milrow or Cannikin origin in the water, plants, or animals of Amchitka Island.

  15. Amchitka radiobiological program progress report, January 1975--December 1975

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, V.A.; Seymour, A.H.

    1976-05-01

    Begun in 1970, the Amchitka Radiobiological Program is a continuing program to collect biological and environmental samples for radiometric analyses. This report is an account of the program for Calendar Year 1975. Results of analyses for samples collected in August 1975 have been added to the tables that summarize the results of analyses of samples collected from 1970 to 1975 and include analyses for gamma-emitting radionuclides in air filters, freshwater, birds, lichens, marine algae, marine invertebrates, fish, aufwuchs, and freshwater moss and plants; strontium-90 (/sup 90/Sr) in rats, birds, and soil; /sup 239/ /sup 240/Pu in sand, soil, marine algae and fish; and tritium (/sup 3/H) in seawater, freshwater, and biological organisms. Monitoring of background radiation with survey instruments was added to the Laboratory's program in 1974 and the results of the 1974 and 1975 surveys are included in this report. It is concluded from the results of analyses of samples collected between September 1969 and August 1975 as reported in this and the five previous progress reports, that there were no radionuclides of Milrow or Cannikin origin in the water, plants, or animals of Amchitka Island.

  16. Human Health and Ecological Risk Assessment Work Plan Mud Pit Release Sites, Amchitka Island, Alaska

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DOE/NV

    2001-03-12

    This Work Plan describes the approach that will be used to conduct human health and ecological risk assessments for Amchitka Island, Alaska, which was utilized as an underground nuclear test site between 1965 and 1971. During this period, the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (now the U.S. Department of Energy) conducted two nuclear tests (known as Long Shot and Milrow) and assisted the U.S. Department of Defense with a third test (known as Cannikin). Amchitka Island is approximately 42 miles long and located 1,340 miles west-southwest of Anchorage, Alaska, in the western end of the Aleutian Island archipelago in a group of islands known as the Rat Islands. Historically including deep drilling operations required large volumes of drilling mud, a considerable amount of which was left on the island in exposed mud pits after testing was completed. Therefore, there is a need for drilling mud pit remediation and risk assessment of historical mud pit releases. The scope of this work plan is to document the environmental objectives and the proposed technical site investigation strategies that will be utilized for the site characterization of the constituents in soil, surface water, and sediment at these former testing sites. Its goal is the collection of data in sufficient quantity and quality to determine current site conditions, support a risk assessment for the site surfaces, and evaluate what further remedial action is required to achieve permanent closure of these three sites that will protect both human health and the environment. Suspected compounds of potential ecological concern for investigative analysis at these sites include diesel-range organics, polyaromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, volatile organic compounds, and chromium. The results of these characterizations and risk assessments will be used to evaluate corrective action alternatives to include no further action, the implementation of institutional controls, capping on site, or off-sit e

  17. Inter-decadal patterns of population and dietary change in sea otters at Amchitka Island, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watt, J.; Siniff, D.B.; Estes, J.A.

    2000-01-01

    After having been hunted to near-extinction in the Pacific maritime fur trade, the sea otter population at Amchitka Island, Alaska increased from very low numbers in the early 1900s to near equilibrium density by the 1940s. The population persisted at or near equilibrium through the 1980s, but declined sharply in the 1990s in apparent response to increased killer whale predation. Sea otter diet and foraging behavior were studied at Amchitka from August 1992 to March 1994 and the data compared with similar information obtained during several earlier periods. In contrast with dietary patterns in the 1960s and 1970s, when the sea otter population was at or near equilibrium density and kelp-forest fishes were the dietary mainstay, these fishes were rarely eaten in the 1990s. Benthic invertebrates, particularly sea urchins, dominated the otter's diet from early summer to midwinter, then decreased in importance during late winter and spring when numerous Pacific smooth lumpsuckers (a large and easily captured oceanic fish) were eaten. The occurrence of spawning lumpsuckers in coastal waters apparently is episodic on a scale of years to decades. The otters' recent dietary shift away from kelp-forest fishes is probably a response to the increased availability of lumpsuckers and sea urchins (both high-preference prey). Additionally, increased urchin densities have reduced kelp beds, thus further reducing the availability of kelp-forest fishes. Our findings suggest that dietary patterns reflect changes in population status and show how an ecosystem normally under top-down control and limited by coastal zone processes can be significantly perturbed by exogenous events.

  18. Activity patterns and time budgets of the declining sea otter population at Amchitka Island, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelatt, Thomas S.; Siniff, Donald B.; Estes, James A.

    2002-01-01

    Time budgets of predators may reflect population status if time spent foraging varies with local prey abun- dance. We assumed that the sea otter (Enhydra lutris) population at Amchitka Island, Alaska, USA, had been at equilibrium since the early 1960s and collected time budgets of otters to be used to represent future conditions of currently expanding sea otter populations. We used radiotelemetry to monitor activity-time budgets of otters from August 1992 to March 1994. Sea otter activity was directly linked to sex, age, weather condition, season, and time of day. Sea otters differed in percent time foraging among cohorts but not within cohorts. Percent time foraging ranged from 21% for females with very young (≤ 3weeks of age) dependent pups to 52% for females with old (≥10 weeks of age) pups. Otters foraged more and hauled out more as local sea conditions worsened. Adult males spent less time foraging during winter and spring, consistent with seasonal changes in prey selection. Time spent for- aging was similar to that reported for otters in California and an established population in Prince William Sound, Alaska, but greater than that of otters in recently established populations in Oregon and Alaska. Despite current evidence indicating that the population was in decline during our study, we were unable to recognize this change using time budgets. Our results illustrate the importance of stratifying analyses of activity patterns by age and sex cohorts and the complexity inherent in comparisons of behavioral data between different populations relying on distinct prey bases.

  19. Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Plan for the U.S. Department of Energy Amchitka, Alaska, Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2008-09-01

    This Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Plan describes how the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) intends to fulfill its mission to maintain protection of human health and the environment at the Amchitka, Alaska, Site1. Three underground nuclear tests were conducted on Amchitka Island. The U.S. Department of Defense, in conjunction with the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), conducted the first nuclear test (Long Shot) to provide data that would improve the United States' capability of detecting underground nuclear explosions. The second nuclear test (Milrow) was a weapons-related test conducted by AEC as a means to study the feasibility of detonating a much larger device. The final nuclear test (Cannikin), the largest United States underground test, was a weapons-related test. Surface disturbances associated with these tests have been remediated. However, radioactivity remains deep below the surface, contained in and around the test cavities, for which no feasible remediation technology has been identified. In 2006, the groundwater model (Hassan et al. 2002) was updated using 2005 data collected by the Consortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation. Model simulation results indicate there is no breakthrough or seepage of radionuclides into the marine environment within 2,000 years. The Amchitka conceptual model is reasonable; the flow and transport simulation is based on the best available information and data. The simulation results are a quantitative prediction supported by the best available science and technology. This Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Plan is an additional step intended for the protection of human health and the environment. This plan may be modified from time to time in the future consistent with the mission to protect human health

  20. Determination of Plutonium Activity Concentrations and 240Pu/239Pu Atom Ratios in Brown Algae (Fucus distichus) Collected from Amchitka Island, Alaska.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamilton, T F; Brown, T A; Marchetti, A A; Martinelli, R E; Kehl, S R

    2005-05-02

    Plutonium-239 ({sup 239}Pu) and plutonium-240 ({sup 240}Pu) activity concentrations and {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratios are reported for Brown Algae (Fucus distichus) collected from the littoral zone of Amchitka Island (Alaska) and at a control site on the Alaskan peninsula. Plutonium isotope measurements were performed in replicate using Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS). The average {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratio observed in dried Fucus d. collected from Amchitka Island was 0.227 {+-} 0.007 (n=5) and compares with the expected {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratio in integrated worldwide fallout deposition in the Northern Hemisphere of 0.1805 {+-} 0.0057 (Cooper et al., 2000). In general, the characteristically high {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu content of Fucus d. analyzed in this study appear to indicate the presence of a discernible basin-wide secondary source of plutonium entering the marine environment. Of interest to the study of plutonium source terms within the Pacific basin are reports of elevated {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratios in fallout debris from high-yield atmospheric nuclear tests conducted in the Marshall Islands during the 1950s (Diamond et al., 1960), the wide range of {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratio values (0.19 to 0.34) observed in sea water, sediments, coral and other environmental media from the North Pacific Ocean (Hirose et al., 1992; Buesseler, 1997) and updated estimates of the relative contributions of close-in and intermediate fallout deposition on oceanic inventories of radionuclidies, especially in the Northern Pacific Ocean (Hamilton, 2004).

  1. Geothermal Technologies Program: Alaska

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2005-02-01

    This fact sheets provides a summary of geothermal potential, issues, and current development in Alaska. This fact sheet was developed as part of DOE's GeoPowering the West initiative, part of the Geothermal Technologies Program.

  2. Amchitka Radiobiological Program. Progress report, January 1977--December 1977. [/sup 3/H, /sup 90/Sr, /sup 239/Pu, /sup 240/Pu, /sup 40/K, /sup 7/Be

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seymour, A.H.; Johnson, A.F.

    1978-07-01

    The Amchitka Radiobiological Program began in 1970 and is a continuing program to collect biological and environmental samples for radiometric analyses. An account of the program from July 1970, to December 1976, has been given in seven previous progress reports from the Laboratory of Radiation Ecology to the Nevada Operations Office of the U.S. Department of Energy. This report is an account of the program for calendar year 1977. Results of analyses for samples collected in September 1977 have been added to the tables in Nelson and Seymour (1977) that summarize the results of analyses of samples collected from 1970 to 1977, and include analyses for: gamma-emitting radionuclides in air filters, freshwater, birds, lichens, marine algae, marine invertebrates, fish, aufwuchs, and freshwater moss and plants; strontium-90 (/sup 90/Sr) in rats, birds, and soil; /sup 239/ /sup 240/Pu in sand, soil, marine algae, and fish; and tritium (/sup 3/H) in seawater, freshwater, and biological organisms. Monitoring of background radiation with survey instruments was added to the Laboratory's program in 1974, and the results of the four annual surveys since that date are included in this report. Conclusions from the results of the recent analyses are a reiteration of the results stated in Nelson and Seymour (1975a); namely, no new radionuclides are present; the most abundant radionuclides are naturally occurring beryllium-7 (/sup 7/Be) and potassium-40 (/sup 40/K); the trace quantities of fission products and induced radionuclides are from world fallout; and a trace of /sup 3/H contamination remains in some Long Shot ponds, as previously reported.'' It is concluded from the results of analyses of samples collected between September 1969, and September 1977, as reported in this and the seven previous progress reports, that there were no radionuclides of Milrow or Cannikin origin in the water, plants, or animals of Amchitka Island.

  3. A biomonitoring plan for assessing potential radionuclide exposure using Amchitka Island in the Aleutian chain of Alaska as a case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burger, Joanna [Division of Life Sciences, Rutgers University, 604 Allison Road, Nelson Hall, Piscataway, NJ 08854-8082 (United States); Consortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation (CRESP), Nashville, TN, and Piscataway, NJ (United States); Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute (EOHSI), Piscataway, NJ (United States)], E-mail: burger@biology.rutgers.edu; Gochfeld, Michael [Consortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation (CRESP), Nashville, TN, and Piscataway, NJ (United States); Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute (EOHSI), Piscataway, NJ (United States); Environmental and Occupational Medicine, UMDNJ - Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Kosson, D.S. [Consortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation (CRESP), Nashville, TN, and Piscataway, NJ (United States); Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN (United States); Powers, Charles W. [Consortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation (CRESP), Nashville, TN, and Piscataway, NJ (United States); Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute (EOHSI), Piscataway, NJ (United States); Environmental and Occupational Medicine, UMDNJ - Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN (United States)

    2007-12-15

    With the ending of the Cold War, the US and other nations were faced with a legacy of nuclear wastes. For some sites where hazardous nuclear wastes will remain in place, methods must be developed to protect human health and the environment. Biomonitoring is one method of assessing the status and trends of potential radionuclide exposure from nuclear waste sites, and of providing the public with early warning of any potential harmful exposure. Amchitka Island (51{sup o} N lat, 179{sup o} E long) was the site of three underground nuclear tests from 1965 to 1971. Following a substantive study of radionuclide levels in biota from the marine environment around Amchitka and a reference site, we developed a suite of bioindicators (with suggested isotopes) that can serve as a model for other sites contaminated with radionuclides. Although the species selection was site-specific, the methods can provide a framework for other sites. We selected bioindicators using five criteria: (1) occurrence at all three test shots (and reference site), (2) receptor groups (subsistence foods, commercial species, and food chain nodes), (3) species groups (plants, invertebrates, fish, and birds), (4) trophic levels, and (5) an accumulator of one or several radionuclides. Our major objective was to identify bioindicators that could serve for both human health and the ecosystem, and were abundant enough to collect adjacent to the three test sites and at the reference site. Site-specific information on both biota availability and isotope levels was essential in the final selection of bioindicators. Actinides bioaccumulated in algae and invertebrates, while radiocesium accumulated in higher trophic level birds and fish. Thus, unlike biomonitoring schemes developed for heavy metals or other contaminants, top-level predators are not sufficient to evaluate potential radionuclide exposure at Amchitka. The process described in this paper resulted in the selection of Fucus, Alaria fistulosa, blue

  4. Alaska Dental Health Aide Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Shoffstall-Cone

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background. In 1999, An Oral Health Survey of American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN Dental Patients found that 79% of 2- to 5-year-olds had a history of tooth decay. The Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium in collaboration with Alaska’s Tribal Health Organizations (THO developed a new and diverse dental workforce model to address AI/AN oral health disparities. Objectives. This paper describes the workforce model and some experience to date of the Dental Health Aide (DHA Initiative that was introduced under the federally sanctioned Community Health Aide Program in Alaska. These new dental team members work with THO dentists and hygienists to provide education, prevention and basic restorative services in a culturally appropriate manner. Results. The DHA Initiative introduced 4 new dental provider types to Alaska: the Primary Dental Health Aide, the Expanded Function Dental Health Aide, the Dental Health Aide Hygienist and the Dental Health Aide Therapist. The scope of practice between the 4 different DHA providers varies vastly along with the required training and education requirements. DHAs are certified, not licensed, providers. Recertification occurs every 2 years and requires the completion of 24 hours of continuing education and continual competency evaluation. Conclusions. Dental Health Aides provide evidence-based prevention programs and dental care that improve access to oral health care and help address well-documented oral health disparities.

  5. The Alaska Native diabetes program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schraer, C D; Mayer, A M; Vogt, A M; Naylor, J; Brown, T L; Hastie, J; Moore, J

    2001-11-01

    To provide optimum health care to indigenous people with diabetes, to prevent diabetes, and to monitor the epidemiology of diabetes and selected complications. The purposes of this paper are to describe the program and to present data that highlights the major problems and successes. Descriptive epidemiology report of diabetes and population service program based on yearly chart review data. Almost half of Alaska Natives with diabetes have no direct access to physicians or hospitals. Health care delivery is now managed by the tribes themselves. Program emphases include maintenance of a population-based registry, formal training for village health aides, physical activity programs, patient education, primary prevention activities and adherence to standards of care to prevent complications. A centralized registry is maintained to assure that epidemiological data is available and patients are not lost to follow-up. Each year a random sample of charts at each major facility is audited against nationally standardized care guidelines. The prevalence of diabetes among Alaska Natives increased 80% over the 13 years from 1985 to 1998 (15.7/1000 to 28.3/1000, age adjusted to U.S. 1980 population). For the years 1986-1998 the incidence rates of lower extremity amputation and end stage renal disease were 6.1/1000 and 2.0/1000 respectively. The level of care provided to Alaska Native patients is comparable to that provided to the general diabetic patient population seen in Alaskan urban clinics. In spite of logistic challenges, care provided to Alaska Native people with diabetes compares favorably to that provided in other settings. Incidence rates of lower extremity amputation and end stage renal disease also remain comparable to or lower than those in other U.S. populations. Many aspects of our system could be extended to other chronic disease programs serving isolated indigenous populations. Primary prevention of diabetes remains a major challenge as life styles change.

  6. Remedial Action Work Plan Amchitka Island Mud Pit Closures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DOE/NV

    2001-04-05

    This remedial action work plan presents the project organization and construction procedures developed for the performance of the remedial actions at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE's) sites on Amchitka Island, Alaska. During the late1960s and early 1970s, the U.S. Department of Defense and the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (the predecessor agency to DOE) used Amchitka Island as a site for underground nuclear tests. A total of nine sites on the Island were considered for nuclear testing; however, tests were only conducted at three sites (i.e., Long Shot in 1965, Milrow in 1969, and Cannikin in 1971). In addition to these three sites, large diameter emplacement holes were drilled in two other locations (Sites D and F) and an exploratory hole was in a third location (Site E). It was estimated that approximately 195 acres were disturbed by drilling or preparation for drilling in conjunction with these activities. The disturbed areas include access roads, spoil-disposal areas, mud pits which have impacted the environment, and an underground storage tank at the hot mix plant which was used to support asphalt-paving operations on the island. The remedial action objective for Amchitka Island is to eliminate human and ecological exposure to contaminants by capping drilling mud pits, removing the tank contents, and closing the tank in place. The remedial actions will meet State of Alaska regulations, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service refuge management goals, address stakeholder concerns, and address the cultural beliefs and practices of the native people. The U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office will conduct work on Amchitka Island under the authority of the Comprehensive Emergency Response, Compensation, and Liability Act. Field activities are scheduled to take place May through September 2001. The results of these activities will be presented in a subsequent Closure Report.

  7. Central Gulf of Alaska Rockfish Permit Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The North Pacific Fishery Management Council adopted the Central Gulf of Alaska Rockfish Program (Rockfish Program) on June 14, 2010, to replace the expiring Pilot...

  8. A conservation program for Alaska's commercial fisheries

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — It is the purpose of this report to show how the present programs of the Alaska Region of the Bureau of Commercial Fisheries relate to problems of the various...

  9. 76 FR 270 - Alaska: Adequacy of Alaska Municipal Solid Waste Landfill Permit Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-04

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Parts 239 and 258 Alaska: Adequacy of Alaska Municipal Solid Waste Landfill Permit Program... modification to Alaska's approved Municipal Solid Waste Landfill (MSWLF) permit program. The approved... Waste Landfill (MSWLF) criteria in 40 CFR part 258 to allow for Research, Development and Demonstration...

  10. Alaska Dental Health Aide Program

    OpenAIRE

    Shoffstall-Cone, Sarah; Williard, Mary

    2013-01-01

    Background. In 1999, An Oral Health Survey of American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) Dental Patients found that 79% of 2- to 5-year-olds had a history of tooth decay. The Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium in collaboration with Alaska’s Tribal Health Organizations (THO) developed a new and diverse dental workforce model to address AI/AN oral health disparities.Objectives. This paper describes the workforce model and some experience to date of the Dental Health Aide (DHA) Initiative tha...

  11. 1980 migratory bird report, Amchitka Island, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the breeding bald eagle population, the peregrine falcon breeding population, the waterfowl banding report, the Aleutian and arctic tern...

  12. AFSC/REFM: Atka mackerel Tagging Studies, Aleutian Islands, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — From 1999-2015, approximately 130,000 Atka mackerel have been tagged and released in the Aleutian Islands, Alaska, specifically at Seguam Pass, Tanaga Pass, Amchitka...

  13. Alaska Program Point and Line Feature GIS Data from COMIDA, ANIMIDA and cANIMIDA Programs

    Data.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Department of the Interior — Alaska Program Map Service contains point and line features from the following BOEM Alaska Region environmental monitoring programs: Chukchi Sea Offshore Monitoring...

  14. 76 FR 45253 - Public Water Supply Supervision Program; Program Revision for the State of Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-28

    ... AGENCY Public Water Supply Supervision Program; Program Revision for the State of Alaska AGENCY... State of Alaska has revised its approved State Public Water Supply Supervision Primacy Program. Alaska has adopted regulations analogous to the EPA's Ground Water Rule. The EPA has determined that these...

  15. Subsurface Completion Report for Amchitka Underground Nuclear Test Sites: Long Shot, Milrow, and Cannikin, Rev. No.: 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Echelard, Tim

    2006-09-01

    Three underground nuclear tests were conducted on Amchitka Island, Alaska, in 1965, 1969, and 1971. The effects of the Long Shot, Milrow, and Cannikin tests on the environment were extensively investigated during and following the detonations, and the area continues to be monitored today. This report is intended to document the basis for the Amchitka Underground Nuclear Test Sites: Long Shot, Milrow, and Cannikin (hereafter referred to as ''Amchitka Site'') subsurface completion recommendation of No Further Remedial Action Planned with Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance, and define the long-term surveillance and maintenance strategy for the subsurface. A number of factors were considered in evaluating and selecting this recommendation for the Amchitka Site. Historical studies and monitoring data, ongoing monitoring data, the results of groundwater modeling, and the results of an independent stakeholder-guided scientific investigation were also considered in deciding the completion action. Water sampling during and following the testing showed no indication that radionuclides were released to the near surface, or marine environment with the exception of tritium, krypton-85, and iodine-131 found in the immediate vicinity of Long Shot surface ground zero. One year after Long Shot, only tritium was detectable (Merritt and Fuller, 1977). These tritium levels, which were routinely monitored and have continued to decline since the test, are above background levels but well below the current safe drinking water standard. There are currently no feasible means to contain or remove radionuclides in or around the test cavities beneath the sites. Surface remediation was conducted in 2001. Eleven drilling mud pits associated with the Long Shot, Milrow and Cannikin sites were remediated. Ten pits were remediated by stabilizing the contaminants and constructing an impermeable cap over each pit. One pit was remediated by removing all of the contaminated mud

  16. 76 FR 5157 - Public Water Supply Supervision Program; Program Revision for the State of Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-28

    ... AGENCY Public Water Supply Supervision Program; Program Revision for the State of Alaska AGENCY... that the State of Alaska has revised its approved State Public Water Supply Supervision Primacy Program...; Long Term 2 Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule; and Lead and Copper Short-Term Regulatory Revisions...

  17. 78 FR 29331 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Western Alaska Community Development Quota Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-20

    ... current information collection. The Western Alaska Community Development Quota (CDQ) Program is an... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Western Alaska Community Development Quota Program AGENCY: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA...

  18. Changes in Aleut concerns following the stakeholder-driven Amchitka independent science assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Joanna; Gochfeld, Michael

    2009-08-01

    There is widespread agreement that stakeholders should be included in the problem-formulation phase of addressing environment problems and, more recently, there have been attempts to include stakeholders in other phases of environmental research. However, there are few studies that evaluate the effects of including stakeholders in all phases of research aimed at solving environmental problems. Three underground nuclear blasts were detonated on Amchitka Island from 1965 to 1971. Considerable controversy developed when the Department of Energy (DOE) decided to "close" Amchitka. Concerns were voiced by subsistence Aleuts living in the region, resource trustees, and the State of Alaska, among others. This article evaluates perceptions of residents of three Aleutian village before (2003) and after (2005) the Consortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation's (CRESP) Amchitka Independent Science Assessment (AISA). The CRESP AISA provided technical information on radionuclide levels in biota to inform questions of seafood safety and food chain health. CRESP used the questions asked at public meetings in the Aleut communities of Atka, Nikolski, and Unalaska to evaluate attitudes and perceptions before and after the AISA. Major concerns before the AISA were credibility/trust of CRESP and the DOE, and information about biological methodology of the study. Following the AISA, people were most concerned about health effects and risk reduction, and trust issues with CRESP declined while those for the DOE remained stable. People's relative concerns about radionuclides declined, while their concerns about mercury (not addressed in the AISA) increased, and interest in ecological issues (population changes of local species) and the future (continued biomonitoring) increased from 2003 to 2005. These results suggest that questions posed at public meetings can be used to evaluate changes in attitudes and perceptions following environmental research, and the results are

  19. The plant ecology of Amchita Island, Alaska: Report on a research contract between the Department of Botany, the University of Tennessee and Battelle Memorial Institute, Columbus Laboratories for the period 1 August 1967 through 30 June 1968

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Department of Botany of The University of Tennessee is conducting a study of the plant ecology of Amchitka Island, Alaska, as a subcontractor for Battelle...

  20. Screening Risk Assessment for Possible Radionuclides in the Amchitka Marine Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NNSA/NV

    2002-10-31

    As part of its environmental stewardship program the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is reevaluating three sites where underground nuclear tests were conducted in the deep subsurface of Amchitka Island, Alaska. The tests (i.e., Long Shot, Milrow, and Cannikin) were conducted in 1965, 1969, and 1971, respectively. Extensive investigations were conducted on these tests and their effect on the environment. Evaluations at the time of testing indicated limited release of radionuclides and absence of risk related to the testing; however, these are being reevaluated under the current DOE environmental stewardship program. A screening risk assessment of potential radionuclide release into the marine environment is an important part of this reevaluation. The risk assessment is one of three interrelated activities: a groundwater model and this screening risk assessment, both of which guide the decisions in the third activity, the site closure plan. Thus, the overall objective of the work is to understand, and subsequently manage, any risk to humans and the environment through a closure and long-term stewardship plan. The objective of this screening risk assessment is to predict whether possible releases of radionuclides at the ocean floor would represent potential risks to Native Alaskans by consumption of marine subsistence species. In addition, risks were predicted for consumers of commercial catches of marine organisms. These risks were calculated beginning with estimates of possible radionuclide release at the seafloor (from a groundwater modeling study), into the seawater, through possible uptake by marine organisms, and finally possible consumption by humans. The risk assessment model has 11 elements, progressing from potential release at the seafloor through water and food chains to human intake. Data for each of these elements were systematically found and synthesized from many sources, and represent the best available knowledge. Whenever precise data were lacking

  1. Pacific Northwest Laboratory Alaska (ARCTIC) research program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanson, W.C.; Eberhardt, L.E.

    1980-03-01

    The current program continues studies of arctic ecosystems begun in 1959 as part of the Cape Thompson Program. Specific ecosystem aspects include studies of the ecology of arctic and red foxes, small mammel and bird population studies, lichen studies, and radiation ecology studies. (ACR)

  2. Amchitka Island Environmental Analysis at Idaho National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gracy Elias; W. F. Bauer; J.G. Eisenmenger; C.C. Jensen; B.K. Schuetz; T. C. Sorensen; B.M. White; A. L. Freeman; M. E. McIlwain

    2005-08-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) provided support to Consortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation (CRESP) in their activities which is supported by the Department of Energy (DOE) to assess the impact of past nuclear testing at Amchitka Island on the ecosystemof the island and surrounding ocean. INL participated in this project in three phases, Phase 1, Phase 2 and Phase 3.

  3. Geospatial Education in Alaska's High Schools: A new Initiative of the Alaska Space Grant Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, N.; Prakash, A.

    2005-05-01

    In the summer of 2004, the Alaska Space Grant Program (ASGP) made its first step to start a new and unique initiative to bring geospatial education to the high schools. Setting up this education outreach effort in the largest of the 50 states of US that has a population density of about one person per square mile, has its unique benefits and challenges. It is particularly rewarding as one reaches out to distant native and minority communities in their own local environment. Introducing Earth and Space Science topics with a geospatial context makes such educational efforts of local relevance. Training in the use of Earth and Space Science data and tools is of practical significance to the distant communities and also contributes to the development of a new technically skilled geospatial workforce that is prepared to meet the state and national needs. In the summer of 2004 ASGP ran the first two week summer workshop on "Global Positioning System (GPS) and Geographic Information System (GIS) for Alaska School Teachers". Fourteen high school teachers from various parts of the state participated and received training on the use of GPS and GIS and carried out small projects of significance to their local regions. Follow up visits were made by the course instructors to some selected schools and within six months, two high schools incorporated these in their class room teaching (www.gi.alaska.edu/~prakash/teaching/geos595). To reach out to schools that do not have well established computational facilities, ASGP build a mobile GIS laboratory with 15 laptops-GPS-GIS software assemblage. This mobile set up will be used in the second two week summer course scheduled to be run in June 2005. This batch of teachers will be more comfortable introducing GPS/GIS technology in their class rooms where they will have the possibility to use the same hardware and software setup as they used during their training, ensuring even greater success of this initiative.

  4. 76 FR 303 - Alaska: Adequacy of Alaska's Municipal Solid Waste Landfill Permit Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Parts 239 and 258 Alaska: Adequacy of Alaska's Municipal Solid Waste Landfill Permit... proposes to approve Alaska's modification of its approved Municipal Solid Waste Landfill (MSWLF) permit...

  5. 76 FR 3120 - Native American and Alaska Native Children in School Program; Office of English Language...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-19

    ... Native American and Alaska Native Children in School Program; Office of English Language Acquisition, Language Enhancement, and Academic Achievement for Limited English Proficient Students; Overview... parental and community participation in language instruction educational programs. Projects funded under...

  6. 76 FR 35221 - Epidemiology Program for American Indian/Alaska Native Tribes and Urban Indian Communities...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Indian Health Service Epidemiology Program for American Indian/Alaska Native Tribes and..., concerning competitive cooperative agreement applications to establish Tribal Epidemiology Centers serving...

  7. 75 FR 5760 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Western Alaska Community Development Quota Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-04

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Western Alaska Community Development Quota Program AGENCY: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA... opportunity to comment on proposed and/or continuing information collections, as required by the Paperwork...

  8. The Effect of Alaska's Home Visitation Program for High-Risk Families on Trends in Abuse and Neglect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gessner, Bradford D.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: At 6 sites serving 21 communities, Alaska implemented Healthy Families Alaska, a home visitation program using paraprofessionals designed to decrease child abuse and neglect. The primary study objective was to compare changes over time in Child Protective Services outcomes by Healthy Families Alaska enrollment status. Methods:…

  9. 77 FR 4581 - Alaska Region's Subsistence Resource Commission (SRC) Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-30

    ... Meeting Agenda The proposed meeting agenda for each meeting includes the following: 1. Call to Order.... New Business 11. Federal Subsistence Board Updates 12. Alaska Board of Game Updates 13. National Park...

  10. 76 FR 57763 - Alaska Region's Subsistence Resource Commission (SRC) Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-16

    ...: 1. Call to order 2. Welcome and Introductions 3. Administrative Announcements 4. Approve Agenda 5... a. Wildlife b. Fisheries 10. Alaska Board of Game Update 11. Old Business a. Subsistence Uses of...

  11. 77 FR 4578 - Alaska Region's Subsistence Resource Commission (SRC) Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-30

    ... The proposed meeting agenda for each meeting includes the following: 1. Call to Order 2. Welcome and..., Resources and Visitor Protection) 8. Federal Subsistence Board Updates 9. Alaska Board of Game Updates 10...

  12. Pacific Northwest and Alaska Bioenergy Program Year Book; 1992-1993 Yearbook with 1994 Activities.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pacific Northwest and Alaska Bioenergy Program (U.S.); United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1994-04-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy administers five Regional Bioenergy Programs to encourage regionally specific application of biomass and municipal waste-to-energy technologies to local needs, opportunities and potentials. The Pacific Northwest and Alaska region has taken up a number of applied research and technology projects, and supported and guided its five participating state energy programs. This report describes the Pacific Northwest and Alaska Regional Bioenergy Program, and related projects of the state energy agencies, and summarizes the results of technical studies. It also considers future efforts of this regional program to meet its challenging assignment.

  13. Preliminary report on the avian ecology of Amchitka Islands, June 1967

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The avifauna of Amchitka Island was surveyed during June, 1967, in order to: form a basis for predicting the nature and magnitude of effects on the bird population...

  14. A qualitative study of motivation in Alaska Native Science and Engineering Program (ANSEP) precollege students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yatchmeneff, Michele

    The dramatic underrepresentation of Alaska Natives in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) degrees and professions calls for rigorous research in how students access these fields. Research has shown that students who complete advanced mathematics and science courses while in high school are more academically prepared to pursue and succeed in STEM degree programs and professions. There is limited research on what motivates precollege students to become more academically prepared before they graduate from high school. In Alaska, Alaska Native precollege students regularly underperform on required State of Alaska mathematics and science exams when compared to non-Alaska Native students. Research also suggests that different things may motivate Alaska Native students than racial majority students. Therefore there is a need to better understand what motivates Alaska Native students to take and successfully complete advanced mathematics and science courses while in high school so that they are academically prepared to pursue and succeed in STEM degrees and professions. The Alaska Native Science & Engineering Program (ANSEP) is a longitudinal STEM educational enrichment program that works with Alaska Native students starting in middle school through doctoral degrees and further professional endeavors. Research suggests that Alaska Native students participating in ANSEP are completing STEM degrees at higher rates than before the program was available. ANSEP appears to be unique due to its longitudinal approach and the large numbers of Alaska Native precollege, university, and graduate students it supports. ANSEP provides precollege students with opportunities to take advanced high school and college-level mathematics and science courses and complete STEM related projects. Students work and live together on campus during the program components. Student outcome data suggests that ANSEP has been successful at motivating precollege participants to

  15. Alaska Native Weatherization Training and Jobs Program First Steps Toward Tribal Weatherization – Human Capacity Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiita, Joanne

    2013-07-30

    The Alaska Native Weatherization Training and Jobs Project expanded weatherization services for tribal members’ homes in southeast Alaska while providing weatherization training and on the job training (OJT) for tribal citizens that lead to jobs and most probably careers in weatherization-related occupations. The program resulted in; (a) 80 Alaska Native citizens provided with skills training in five weatherization training units that were delivered in cooperation with University of Alaska Southeast, in accordance with the U.S. Department of Energy Core Competencies for Weatherization Training that prepared participants for employment in three weatherizationrelated occupations: Installer, Crew Chief, and Auditor; (b) 25 paid OJT training opportunities for trainees who successfully completed the training course; and (c) employed trained personnel that have begun to rehab on over 1,000 housing units for weatherization.

  16. 77 FR 77005 - Subsistence Management Program for Public Lands in Alaska; Rural Determination Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-31

    ... Forest Service DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Fish and Wildlife Service Subsistence Management Program for Public Lands in Alaska; Rural Determination Process AGENCIES: Forest Service, Agriculture; Fish and... Secretary of the Interior initiated a review of the Federal Subsistence Management Program. An ensuing...

  17. Methods used for Undergraduate Education at the University of Alaska Southeast Environmental Sciences Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heavner, M. J.; Hood, E. W.; Connor, C. L.

    2004-12-01

    The Environmental Science Program at the University of Alaska Southeast in Juneau, Alaska utilizes our unique outdoor field experience opportunities as part of both the classroom experience and our undergraduate research component. This presentation focuses on our successes in taking advantage of our surrounding environment in the maritime rainforest of the Alaska panhandle to enhance our undergraduate program. We will highlight some of our most successful undergraduate experiences, which include a snow pack monitoring site at our local ski area, glacier mass balance studies on the Mendenhall Glacier, glacial geology studies in Glacier Bay National Park, and the development of wireless networks to monitor bats. We will describe methods we have used to integrate the field opportunities into our program.

  18. Ground beetle (Coleoptera: Carabidae) assemblages in the Conservation Reserve Program crop rotation systems in Interior Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adult ground beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae) abundance and diversity were documented on Conservation Research Program (CRP) agricultural lands in Delta Junction, Alaska (64ºN, 145º W). Twenty species were documented based on a total sample of 6,116 specimens collected during 2006 and 2007. Two speci...

  19. Alaska's lumber-drying industry—impacts from a federal grant program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David L. Nicholls; Allen M. Brackley; Thomas D. Rojas

    2006-01-01

    A survey determined that installed dry kiln capacity in Alaska more than doubled to an estimated 220 thousand board feet (mbf) within 4 years (2000-2004). This increased ability to produce dry lumber and value-added products resulted from industry efforts to obtain federal funding to support a dry kiln grant program. This report reviews grantees' progress in...

  20. 78 FR 66885 - Subsistence Management Program for Public Lands in Alaska; Rural Determination Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-07

    ... Subsistence Management Program for Public Lands in Alaska; Rural Determination Process AGENCIES: Forest... determination process. These comments will be used by the Board, coordinating with the Secretaries of the... to improve the rural determination process. DATES: Comments: The comment period for the document...

  1. 77 FR 15740 - Application for New Awards; Alaska Native Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-16

    ..., (2) other measures of student learning, such as those described in paragraph (b) of this definition... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Application for New Awards; Alaska Native Education Program AGENCY: Office of Elementary and Secondary...

  2. The 3D Elevation Program: summary for Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carswell, William J.

    2013-01-01

    Elevation data are essential to a broad range of applications, including forest resources management, wildlife and habitat management, national security, recreation, and many others. For the State of Alaska, elevation data are critical for aviation navigation and safety, natural resources conservation, oil and gas resources, flood risk management, geologic resource assessment and hazards mitigation, forest resources management, and other business uses. Today, high-quality light detection and ranging (lidar) data and interferometric synthetic aperture radar (ifsar) are the primary sources for deriving elevation models and datasets. Federal, State, and local agencies work in partnership to (1) replace data, on a national basis, that are older and of lower quality and (2) provide coverage where publicly accessible data do not exist.

  3. Tobacco use and preferences for wellness programs among health aides and other employees of an Alaska Native Health Corporation in Western Alaska

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christi A. Patten

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This study assessed health behaviors and preferences for wellness programs among employees of a worksite serving Alaska Native-people. Village-based Community Health Aides/Practitioners (CHA/Ps were compared with all other employees on health indicators and program preferences. Using a cross-sectional design, all 1290 employees at the Yukon Kuskokwim Health Corporation (YKHC in Western Alaska were invited in 2015 to participate in a 30-item online survey. Items assessed health behaviors, perceived stress, resiliency, and preferences for wellness topics and program delivery formats. Respondents (n = 429 were 77% female and 57% Alaska Natives. CHA/Ps (n = 46 were more likely than all other employees (n = 383 to currently use tobacco (59% vs. 36%; p = 0.003. After adjusting for covariates, greater stress levels were associated (p = 0.013 with increased likelihood of tobacco use. Employees reported lower than recommended levels of physical activity; 74% had a Body Mass Index (BMI indicating overweight or obese. Top preferences for wellness topics were for eating healthy (55%, physical activity (50%, weight loss (49%, reducing stress (49%, and better sleep (41%. CHA/Ps reported greater interest in tobacco cessation than did other employees (37% vs. 21%; p = 0.016. Preferred program delivery format among employees was in-person (51%. The findings are important because tailored wellness programs have not been previously evaluated among employees of worksites serving Alaska Native people. Promoting healthy lifestyles among CHAP/s and other YKHC employees could ultimately have downstream effects on the health of Alaska Native patients and communities.

  4. Tobacco use and preferences for wellness programs among health aides and other employees of an Alaska Native Health Corporation in Western Alaska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patten, Christi A; Bronars, Carrie A; Scott, Matthew; Boyer, Rahnia; Lando, Harry; Clark, Matthew M; Resnicow, Kenneth; Decker, Paul A; Brockman, Tabetha A; Roland, Agnes; Hanza, Marcelo

    2017-06-01

    This study assessed health behaviors and preferences for wellness programs among employees of a worksite serving Alaska Native-people. Village-based Community Health Aides/Practitioners (CHA/Ps) were compared with all other employees on health indicators and program preferences. Using a cross-sectional design, all 1290 employees at the Yukon Kuskokwim Health Corporation (YKHC) in Western Alaska were invited in 2015 to participate in a 30-item online survey. Items assessed health behaviors, perceived stress, resiliency, and preferences for wellness topics and program delivery formats. Respondents (n = 429) were 77% female and 57% Alaska Natives. CHA/Ps (n = 46) were more likely than all other employees (n = 383) to currently use tobacco (59% vs. 36%; p = 0.003). After adjusting for covariates, greater stress levels were associated (p = 0.013) with increased likelihood of tobacco use. Employees reported lower than recommended levels of physical activity; 74% had a Body Mass Index (BMI) indicating overweight or obese. Top preferences for wellness topics were for eating healthy (55%), physical activity (50%), weight loss (49%), reducing stress (49%), and better sleep (41%). CHA/Ps reported greater interest in tobacco cessation than did other employees (37% vs. 21%; p = 0.016). Preferred program delivery format among employees was in-person (51%). The findings are important because tailored wellness programs have not been previously evaluated among employees of worksites serving Alaska Native people. Promoting healthy lifestyles among CHAP/s and other YKHC employees could ultimately have downstream effects on the health of Alaska Native patients and communities.

  5. Pacific Northwest and Alaska Regional Bioenergy Program : Five Year Report, 1985-1990.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pacific Northwest and Alaska Bioenergy Program (U.S.)

    1991-02-01

    This five-year report describes activities of the Pacific Northwest and Alaska Regional Bioenergy Program between 1985 and 1990. Begun in 1979, this Regional Bioenergy Program became the model for the nation's four other regional bioenergy programs in 1983. Within the time span of this report, the Pacific Northwest and Alaska Regional Bioenergy Program has undertaken a number of applied research and technology projects, and supported and guided the work of its five participating state energy programs. During this period, the Regional Bioenergy Program has brought together public- and private-sector organizations to promote the use of local biomass and municipal-waste energy resources and technologies. This report claims information on the mission, goals and accomplishments of the Regional Bioenergy Program. It describes the biomass projects conducted by the individual states of the region, and summarizes the results of the programs technical studies. Publications from both the state and regional projects are listed. The report goes on to consider future efforts of the Regional Bioenergy Program under its challenging assignment. Research activities include: forest residue estimates; Landsat biomass mapping; woody biomass plantations; industrial wood-fuel market; residential space heating with wood; materials recovery of residues; co-firing wood chips with coal; biomass fuel characterization; wood-boosted geothermal power plants; wood gasification; municipal solid wastes to energy; woodstove study; slash burning; forest depletion; and technology transfer. 9 figs., 6 tabs.

  6. Sea otter studies on Amchitka Island 27 July to 5 October 1955 including studies on captive otters in Seattle

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — During our stay on Amchitka we had three primary objectives: 1. To study otters in their natural environment with the purpose of learning more about feeding habits,...

  7. UNAVCO Plate Boundary Observatory 2007 Student Field Assistant Program in the Alaska Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzulla, A.; Gasparich, S.; Pauk, B.; Feaux, K.; Jackson, M.

    2007-12-01

    The UNAVCO, Inc. Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) Student Field Assistant Program strives to engage students in further study and careers in the Earth Sciences. Student Field Assistants from a variety of educational backgrounds ranging from high school graduates to master's level students spend a three to five month field season working in tandem with UNAVCO regional Field Engineers. The students work closely with senior staff to reconnaissance, install, and maintain a network of 875 permanent Global Positioning System (GPS) stations in one of the five PBO regions covering the western United States, including Alaska. Practical skills, such as power tool use, drilling, welding, firearms training, and proper field safety procedures, are taught and expected of the students. Installation and maintenance of new and existing GPS stations composes the bulk of the student's responsibilities and duties. When not in the field, students prepare gear and arrange logistics for site installations and maintenance as well as enter metadata and complete installation reports from recently constructed sites. An understanding of the operations of the GPS receivers and the scientific benefit of the network allows for an appreciation and great attention to detail during installation of the sites. Student assistance in the Alaska region during 2007 PBO AK field season was critical to the successful installation of 36 new GPS stations throughout Alaska. Significant benchmarks of the field season included installing six logistically difficult stations in Prince William Sounds, completing the Denali Fault GPS network, four new tiltmeters on Akutan Volcano, completing all installs on the Seward Peninsula as well as several new GPS stations throughout the western interior of the state. Alaska is a prominent area for much movement and deformation as the Pacific Plate subducts beneath the North American Plate resulting in an area of high volcanic activity and heightened crustal deformation. The

  8. Deep-sea coral research and technology program: Alaska deep-sea coral and sponge initiative final report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rooper, Chris; Stone, Robert P.; Etnoyer, Peter; Conrath, Christina; Reynolds, Jennifer; Greene, H. Gary; Williams, Branwen; Salgado, Enrique; Morrison, Cheryl L.; Waller, Rhian G.; Demopoulos, Amanda W.J.

    2017-01-01

    Deep-sea coral and sponge ecosystems are widespread throughout most of Alaska’s marine waters. In some places, such as the central and western Aleutian Islands, deep-sea coral and sponge resources can be extremely diverse and may rank among the most abundant deep-sea coral and sponge communities in the world. Many different species of fishes and invertebrates are associated with deep-sea coral and sponge communities in Alaska. Because of their biology, these benthic invertebrates are potentially impacted by climate change and ocean acidification. Deepsea coral and sponge ecosystems are also vulnerable to the effects of commercial fishing activities. Because of the size and scope of Alaska’s continental shelf and slope, the vast majority of the area has not been visually surveyed for deep-sea corals and sponges. NOAA’s Deep Sea Coral Research and Technology Program (DSCRTP) sponsored a field research program in the Alaska region between 2012–2015, referred to hereafter as the Alaska Initiative. The priorities for Alaska were derived from ongoing data needs and objectives identified by the DSCRTP, the North Pacific Fishery Management Council (NPFMC), and Essential Fish Habitat-Environmental Impact Statement (EFH-EIS) process.This report presents the results of 15 projects conducted using DSCRTP funds from 2012-2015. Three of the projects conducted as part of the Alaska deep-sea coral and sponge initiative included dedicated at-sea cruises and fieldwork spread across multiple years. These projects were the eastern Gulf of Alaska Primnoa pacifica study, the Aleutian Islands mapping study, and the Gulf of Alaska fish productivity study. In all, there were nine separate research cruises carried out with a total of 109 at-sea days conducting research. The remaining projects either used data and samples collected by the three major fieldwork projects or were piggy-backed onto existing research programs at the Alaska Fisheries Science Center (AFSC).

  9. A framework for conducting a national study of substance abuse treatment programs serving American Indian and Alaska native communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novins, Douglas K; Moore, Laurie A; Beals, Janette; Aarons, Gregory A; Rieckmann, Traci; Kaufman, Carol E

    2012-09-01

    Because of their broad geographic distribution, diverse ownership and operation, and funding instability, it is a challenge to develop a framework for studying substance abuse treatment programs serving American Indian and Alaska Native communities at a national level. This is further complicated by the historic reluctance of American Indian and Alaska Native communities to participate in research. We developed a framework for studying these substance abuse treatment programs (n ≈ 293) at a national level as part of a study of attitudes toward, and use of, evidence-based treatments among substance abuse treatment programs serving AI/AN communities with the goal of assuring participation of a broad array of programs and the communities that they serve. Because of the complexities of identifying specific substance abuse treatment programs, the sampling framework divides these programs into strata based on the American Indian and Alaska Native communities that they serve: (1) the 20 largest tribes (by population); (2) urban AI/AN clinics; (3) Alaska Native Health Corporations; (4) other Tribes; and (5) other regional programs unaffiliated with a specific AI/AN community. In addition, the recruitment framework was designed to be sensitive to likely concerns about participating in research. This systematic approach for studying substance abuse and other clinical programs serving AI/AN communities assures the participation of diverse AI/AN programs and communities and may be useful in designing similar national studies.

  10. Vegetation changes in Conservation Reserve Program Lands in Interior Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Over 14 million ha of cropland in the United States has been converted into grasslands through the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) administered by the United States Department of Agriculture, however, studies of the effects of CRP enrollment on plant communities and plant succession are largely l...

  11. GeoFORCE Alaska: Four-Year Field Program Brings Rural Alaskan High School Students into the STEM Pipeline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowell, S. J.; Rittgers, A.; Stephens, L.; Hutchinson, S.; Peters, H.; Snow, E.; Wartes, D.

    2016-12-01

    GeoFORCE Alaska is a four-year, field-based, summer geoscience program designed to raise graduation rates in rural Alaskan high schools, encourage participants to pursue college degrees, and increase the diversity of Alaska's technical workforce. Residents of predominantly Alaska Native villages holding degrees in science, technology, engineering, or math (STEM) bring valuable perspectives to decisions regarding management of cultural and natural resources. However, between 2010 and 2015 the average dropout rate for students in grades 7-12 was 8.5% per year in the North Slope School District and 7% per year in the Northwest Arctic School District. 2015 graduation rates were 70% and 75%, respectively. Statewide statistics highlight the challenge for Alaska Native students. During the 2014-2015 school year alone 37.6% of Alaska Native students dropped out of Alaskan public schools. At the college level, Alaska Native students are underrepresented in University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF) science departments. Launched in 2012 by UAF in partnership with the longstanding University of Texas at Austin program, GeoFORCE applies the cohort model, leading the same group of high school students on geological field academies during four consecutive summers. Through a combination of active learning, teamwork, and hands-on projects at spectacular geological locations, students gain academic skills and confidence that facilitate high school and college success. To date, GeoFORCE Alaska has recruited two cohorts. 78% of these students identify as Alaska Native, reflecting community demographics. The inaugural cohort of 18 students from the North Slope Borough completed the Fourth-Year Academy in summer 2015. 94% of these students graduated from high school, at least 72% plan to attend college, and 33% will major in geoscience. A second cohort of 34 rising 9th and 10th graders entered the program in 2016. At the request of corporate sponsors, this cohort was recruited from both the

  12. Teachers for Rural Alaska (TRA) Program. Part A: Project Portrayal. Part B: Program Assessment Report. Part C: Practice Profile. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinfeld, Judith; Noordhoff, Karen

    Teachers for Rural Alaska is a fifth year program leading to secondary teacher certification and focusing on preparation for teaching in small village high schools with predominantly Native populations. Emphasizing a reflective inquiry orientation, the program aims to develop teachers who (1) can identify crucial problems and dilemmas in rural,…

  13. Natural Science of Alaska Handbook. Revised. Anchorage School District Elementary Science Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Valerie Smith; Sumner, Jim

    This handbook is a collection of printed materials that are available to students about the geology, weather, plants, animals and people of Alaska. Topics included are: (1) "Alaska History Line"; (2) "Geography of Alaska" (including maps, rivers, and islands); (3) "Geologic Time"; (4) "Geology" (including…

  14. A Process Evaluation of the Alaska Native Colorectal Cancer Family Outreach Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redwood, Diana; Provost, Ellen; Lopez, Ellen D S; Skewes, Monica; Johnson, Rhonda; Christensen, Claudia; Sacco, Frank; Haverkamp, Donald

    2016-02-01

    This article presents the results of a process evaluation of the Alaska Native (AN) Colorectal Cancer (CRC) Family Outreach Program, which encourages CRC screening among AN first-degree relatives (i.e., parents, siblings, adult children; hereafter referred to as relatives) of CRC patients. Among AN people incidence and death rates from CRC are the highest of any ethnic/racial group in the United States. Relatives of CRC patients are at increased risk; however, CRC can be prevented and detected early through screening. The evaluation included key informant interviews (August to November 2012) with AN and non-AN stakeholders and program document review. Five key process evaluation components were identified: program formation, evolution, outreach responses, strengths, and barriers and challenges. Key themes included an incremental approach that led to a fully formed program and the need for dedicated, culturally competent patient navigation. Challenges included differing relatives' responses to screening outreach, health system data access and coordination, and the program impact of reliance on grant funding. This program evaluation indicated a need for more research into motivating patient screening behaviors, electronic medical records systems quality improvement projects, improved data-sharing protocols, and program sustainability planning to continue the dedicated efforts to promote screening in this increased risk population. © 2015 Society for Public Health Education.

  15. Conceptualizing a Mentoring Program for American Indian/Alaska Native Students in the STEM Fields: A Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windchief, Sweeney; Brown, Blakely

    2017-01-01

    In order to address the disparity of American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) doctorates in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM), culturally congruent mentorship program development is needed. Because traditional Western academic paradigms are typically constrained to a non-Indigenous perspective, the authors question how American Indian…

  16. Verification and Uncertainty Reduction of Amchitka Underground Nuclear Testing Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed Hassan; Jenny Chapman

    2006-02-01

    The modeling of Amchitka underground nuclear tests conducted in 2002 is verified and uncertainty in model input parameters, as well as predictions, has been reduced using newly collected data obtained by the summer 2004 field expedition of CRESP. Newly collected data that pertain to the groundwater model include magnetotelluric (MT) surveys conducted on the island to determine the subsurface salinity and porosity structure of the subsurface, and bathymetric surveys to determine the bathymetric maps of the areas offshore from the Long Shot and Cannikin Sites. Analysis and interpretation of the MT data yielded information on the location of the transition zone, and porosity profiles showing porosity values decaying with depth. These new data sets are used to verify the original model in terms of model parameters, model structure, and model output verification. In addition, by using the new data along with the existing data (chemistry and head data), the uncertainty in model input and output is decreased by conditioning on all the available data. A Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) approach is adapted for developing new input parameter distributions conditioned on prior knowledge and new data. The MCMC approach is a form of Bayesian conditioning that is constructed in such a way that it produces samples of the model parameters that eventually converge to a stationary posterior distribution. The Bayesian MCMC approach enhances probabilistic assessment. Instead of simply propagating uncertainty forward from input parameters into model predictions (i.e., traditional Monte Carlo approach), MCMC propagates uncertainty backward from data onto parameters, and then forward from parameters into predictions. Comparisons between new data and the original model, and conditioning on all available data using MCMC method, yield the following results and conclusions: (1) Model structure is verified at Long Shot and Cannikin where the high-resolution bathymetric data collected by CRESP

  17. Final quality assurance project plan, installation restoration program remedial investigation/feasibility study, Kotzebue Long Range Radar Station, Alaska. Volume 1. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-10-01

    This quality assurance project plan describes relevant quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) procedures to be used by Analytical Resources, Inc. for the installation restoration program at Kotzebue Long Range Radar Station, Alaska.

  18. Final quality assurance project plan, installation restoration program remedial investigation/feasibility study, Kotzebue Long Range Radar Station, Alaska. Volume 2. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-10-01

    This quality assurance project plan describes relevant quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) procedures to be used by Analytical Resources, Inc. for the installation restoration program at Kotzebue Long Range Radar Station, Alaska.

  19. A National Study of American Indian and Alaska Native Substance Abuse Treatment: Provider and Program Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieckmann, Traci; Moore, Laurie A; Croy, Calvin D; Novins, Douglas K; Aarons, Gregory

    2016-09-01

    American Indians and Alaska Natives (AIANs) experience major disparities in accessing quality care for mental health and substance use disorders. There are long-standing concerns about access to and quality of care for AIANs in rural and urban areas including the influence of staff and organizational factors, and attitudes toward evidence-based treatment for addiction. We conducted the first national survey of programs serving AIAN communities and examined workforce and programmatic differences between clinics located in urban/suburban (n=50) and rural (n=142) communities. We explored the correlates of openness toward using evidence-based treatments (EBTs). Programs located in rural areas were significantly less likely to have nurses, traditional healing consultants, or ceremonial providers on staff, to consult outside evaluators, to use strategic planning to improve program quality, to offer pharmacotherapies, pipe ceremonies, and cultural activities among their services, and to participate in research or program evaluation studies. They were significantly more likely to employ elders among their traditional healers, offer AA-open group recovery services, and collect data on treatment outcomes. Greater openness toward EBTs was related to a larger clinical staff, having addiction providers, being led by directors who perceived a gap in access to EBTs, and working with key stakeholders to improve access to services. Programs that provided early intervention services (American Society of Addiction Medicine level 0.5) reported less openness. This research provides baseline workforce and program level data that can be used to better understand changes in access and quality for AIAN over time. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Modeling Groundwater Flow and Transport of Radionuclides at Amchitka Island's Underground Nuclear Tests: Milrow, Long Shot, and Cannikin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed Hassan; Karl Pohlmann; Jenny Chapman

    2002-11-19

    Since 1963, all United States nuclear tests have been conducted underground. A consequence of this testing has been the deposition of large amounts of radioactive material in the subsurface, sometimes in direct contact with groundwater. The majority of this testing occurred on the Nevada Test Site (NTS), but a limited number of experiments were conducted in other locations. One of these locations, Amchitka Island, Alaska is the subject of this report. Three underground nuclear tests were conducted on Amchitka Island. Long Shot was an 80-kiloton-yield test conducted at a depth of 700 meters (m) on October 29, 1965 (DOE, 2000). Milrow had an announced yield of about 1,000 kilotons, and was detonated at a depth of 1,220 m on October 2, 1969. Cannikin had an announced yield less than 5,000 kilotons, and was conducted at a depth of 1,790 m on November 6, 1971. The purpose of this work is to provide a portion of the information needed to conduct a human-health risk assessment of the potential hazard posed by the three underground nuclear tests on Amchitka Island. Specifically, the focus of this work is the subsurface transport portion, including the release of radionuclides from the underground cavities and their movement through the groundwater system to the point where they seep out of the ocean floor and into the marine environment. This requires a conceptual model of groundwater flow on the island using geologic, hydrologic, and chemical information, a numerical model for groundwater flow, a conceptual model of contaminant release and transport properties from the nuclear test cavities, and a numerical model for contaminant transport. Needed for the risk assessment are estimates of the quantity of radionuclides (in terms of mass flux) from the underground tests on Amchitka that could discharge to the ocean, the time of possible discharge, and the location in terms of distance from shoreline. The radionuclide data presented here are all reported in terms of normalized

  1. Alaska biological control program directed at amber-marked birch leaf miner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    J.E. Lundquist; K.F. Zogas; C.L. Snyder; B.K. Schulz

    2008-01-01

    Nonnative invasive insects are having major impacts on the economics and ecology of forests nationwide. Until recently, Alaska was fortunately mostly free of these pests. Because of the remoteness of much of Alaska's native forests, an invasive pest infestation would be extremely difficult to control. Global markets, global climate change, and the ever-increasing...

  2. The role of culture in substance abuse treatment programs for American Indian and Alaska Native communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legha, Rupinder Kaur; Novins, Douglas

    2012-07-01

    Culture figures prominently in discussions regarding the etiology of alcohol and substance abuse in American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) communities, and a substantial body of literature suggests that it is critical to developing meaningful treatment interventions. However, no study has characterized how programs integrate culture into their services. Furthermore, reports regarding the associated challenges are limited. Twenty key informant interviews with administrators and 15 focus groups with clinicians were conducted in 18 alcohol and substance abuse treatment programs serving AI/AN communities. Transcripts were coded to identify relevant themes. Substance abuse treatment programs for AI/AN communities are integrating culture into their services in two discrete ways: by implementing specific cultural practices and by adapting Western treatment models. More important, however, are the fundamental principles that shape these programs and their interactions with the people and communities they serve. These foundational beliefs and values, defined in this study as the core cultural constructs that validate and incorporate AI/AN experience and world view, include an emphasis on community and family, meaningful relationships with and respect for clients, a homelike atmosphere within the program setting, and an “open door” policy for clients. The primary challenges for integrating these cultural practices include AI/AN communities' cultural diversity and limited socioeconomic resources to design and implement these practices. The prominence of foundational beliefs and values is striking and suggests a broader definition of culture when designing services. This definition of foundational beliefs and values should help other diverse communities culturally adapt their substance abuse interventions in more meaningful ways.

  3. NIJ's Program of Research on Violence Against American Indian and Alaska Native women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crossland, Christine; Palmer, Jane; Brooks, Alison

    2013-06-01

    The Violence Against Women Act of 2005 (Public Law Number 109-162), at Title IX, Section 904(a) (codified at 42 U.S.C. § 3796gg-10 note) mandates that the National Institute of Justice (NIJ), in consultation with the U.S. Department of Justice's Office on Violence Against Women (OVW), conduct a national baseline study on violence against American Indian and Alaska Native (AI and AN) women living in tribal communities. As a result, NIJ has developed a comprehensive research program consisting of multiple projects that will be accomplished over an extended period of time to address this much needed research. The purpose of the research program is to: examine violence against AI and AN women (including domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, stalking, and murder) and identify factors that place AI and AN women at risk for victimization; evaluate the effectiveness of federal, state, tribal, and local responses to violence against AI and AN women; and propose recommendations to improve effectiveness of these responses.

  4. Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well, Alaska North Slope: Overview of scientific and technical program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, R.B.; Collett, T.S.; Boswell, R.; Anderson, B.J.; Digert, S.A.; Pospisil, G.; Baker, R.; Weeks, M.

    2011-01-01

    The Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well was drilled within the Alaska North Slope (ANS) Milne Point Unit (MPU) from February 3 to 19, 2007. The well was conducted as part of a Cooperative Research Agreement (CRA) project co-sponsored since 2001 by BP Exploration (Alaska), Inc. (BPXA) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in collaboration with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to help determine whether ANS gas hydrate can become a technically and commercially viable gas resource. Early in the effort, regional reservoir characterization and reservoir simulation modeling studies indicated that up to 0.34 trillion cubic meters (tcm; 12 trillion cubic feet, tcf) gas may be technically recoverable from 0.92 tcm (33 tcf) gas-in-place within the Eileen gas hydrate accumulation near industry infrastructure within ANS MPU, Prudhoe Bay Unit (PBU), and Kuparuk River Unit (KRU) areas. To further constrain these estimates and to enable the selection of a test site for further data acquisition, the USGS reprocessed and interpreted MPU 3D seismic data provided by BPXA to delineate 14 prospects containing significant highly-saturated gas hydrate-bearing sand reservoirs. The "Mount Elbert" site was selected to drill a stratigraphic test well to acquire a full suite of wireline log, core, and formation pressure test data. Drilling results and data interpretation confirmed pre-drill predictions and thus increased confidence in both the prospect interpretation methods and in the wider ANS gas hydrate resource estimates. The interpreted data from the Mount Elbert well provide insight into and reduce uncertainty of key gas hydrate-bearing reservoir properties, enable further refinement and validation of the numerical simulation of the production potential of both MPU and broader ANS gas hydrate resources, and help determine viability of potential field sites for future extended term production testing. Drilling and data acquisition operations demonstrated that gas hydrate

  5. A final report of the peregrine falcon surveillance program between Circle, Alaska and the Alaska-Yukon border, 1978

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — In 1977, a surveillance program on Peregrine Falcons (Falco peregrinus anatum) was initiated on the upper Yukon River (Ambrose and Curatolo, 1977). The program was...

  6. 76 FR 8378 - National Park Service Alaska Region's Subsistence Resource Commission (SRC) Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-14

    ... Meeting Agenda The proposed meeting agenda includes the following: 1. Call to order 2. SRC Roll Call and... Agency Comments 10. Federal Subsistence Board Update 11. Alaska Board of Game Update 12. Old Business a...

  7. 76 FR 21404 - National Park Service Alaska Region's Subsistence Resource Commission (SRC) Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-15

    ... following: 1. Call to order 2. SRC Roll Call and Confirmation of Quorum 3. Welcome and Introductions 4... Reports 9. Public and Other Agency Comments 10. Federal Subsistence Board Update 11. Alaska Board of Game...

  8. Memorandum of Understanding for the Alaska Landbird Monitoring Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between the Alaska Bird Observatory, Alaska Department of Fish and Game, Alaska Natural Heritage Program, Bureau of Land...

  9. Preliminary assessment report for Camp Carroll Training Center, Installation 02045, Anchorage, Alaska. Installation Restoration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krokosz, M.; Sefano, J.

    1993-08-01

    This report presents the results of the preliminary assessment (PA) conducted by Argonne National Laboratory at the Alaska Army National Guard property known as Camp Carroll Training Center, located on the Fort Richardson Army facility near Anchorage, Alaska. Preliminary assessments of federal facilities are being conducted to compile the information necessary for the completion of preremedial activities and to provide a basis for establishing, corrective actions in response to releases of hazardous substances. The principal objective of the PA is to characterize the site accurately and determine the need for further action by examining site activities, types and quantities of hazardous substances used, the nature and amounts of wastes generated or stored at the facility, and potential pathways by which contamination could affect public health and the environment. The primary environmentally significant operations (ESOs) associated with the property are (1) the Alaska Air National Guard storage area behind Building S57112 (Organizational Maintenance Shop [OMS] 6); (2) the state of Alaska maintenance facility and the soil/tar-type spill north of the state of Alaska maintenance facility; (3) the waste storage area adjacent to OMS 6; (4) the contaminated area from leaking underground storage tanks (USTs) and the oil-water separator; and (5) soil staining in the parking area at the Camp Carroll Headquarters Building. Camp Carroll appears to be in excellent condition from an environmental standpoint, and current practices are satisfactory. Argonne recommends that the Alaska Department of Military Affairs consider remediation of soil contamination associated with all storage areas, as well as reviewing the practices of other residents of the facility. Argonne also recommends that the current methods of storing waste material behind Building S57112 (OMS 6) be reviewed for alternatives.

  10. 76 FR 44605 - Alaska Region's Subsistence Resource Commission (SRC) Program; Public Meeting and Teleconference

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-26

    ... receive a toll-free call-in telephone number on or before Monday, August 1, 2011. The number of... National Park SRC Agenda 1. Call to order. 2. Welcome and Introductions. 3. Administrative Announcements. 4.... Public and Other Agency Comments. 9. Federal Subsistence Board Update. 10. Alaska Board of Game Update...

  11. 75 FR 39892 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Community Development Quota Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-13

    ... economic development in western Alaska, to alleviate poverty and provide economic and social benefits for... species caught by catcher vessels targeting halibut, sablefish, or pollock CDQ. These proposed revisions... unlimited amounts of pollock while it is nominally targeting for other types of groundfish. The annual...

  12. 77 FR 72832 - Applications for New Awards; Native American and Alaska Native Children in School Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-06

    ... English Language Acquisition, Department of Education. Overview Information Native American and Alaska... English among English learners (ELs),\\1\\ and to promote parental and community participation in language... amended (ESEA), may support the teaching and studying of Native American languages, but must have, as a...

  13. Alaskan Exemplary Program The Rural Alaska Honors Institute (RAHI) A Quarter Century of Success of Educating, Nurturing, and Retaining Alaska Native and Rural Students An International Polar Year Adventure in Barrow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wartes, D.; Owens, G.

    2007-12-01

    RAHI, the Rural Alaska Honors Institute, began in 1983 after a series of meetings between the Alaska Federation of Natives and the University of Alaska, to discuss the retention rates of Alaska Native and rural students. RAHI is a six-week college-preparatory summer bridge program on the University of Alaska Fairbanks campus for Alaska Native and rural high school juniors and seniors. The student body is approximately 94 percent Alaska Native. RAHI students take classes that earn them seven to ten college credits, thus giving them a head start on college. Courses include: writing, study skills, desk top publishing, Alaska Native dance or swimming, and a choice of geoscience, biochemistry, math, business, rural development, or engineering. A program of rigorous academic activity combines with social, cultural, and recreational activities to make up the RAHI program of early preparation for college. Students are purposely stretched beyond their comfort levels academically and socially to prepare for the big step from home or village to a large culturally western urban campus. They are treated as honors students and are expected to meet all rigorous academic and social standards set by the program. All of this effort and activity support the principal goal of RAHI: promoting academic success for rural students in college. Over 25 years, 1,200 students have attended the program. Sixty percent of the RAHI alumni have entered four-year academic programs. Over 230 have earned a bachelors degree, twenty-nine have earned masters degrees, and seven have graduated with professional degrees (J.D., Ph.D., or M.D.), along with 110 associate degrees and certificates. In looking at the RAHI cohort, removing those students who have not been in college long enough to obtain a degree, 27.3 percent of RAHI alums have received a bachelors degree. An April 2006 report by the American Institutes for Research through the National Science Foundation found that: Rural Native students in the

  14. Proceedings of the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Vol. 341: Expedition reports Southern Alaska margin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Jaeger, J.M.; Gulick, S.P.S.; Le; Asahi, H.; Bahlburg, H.; Belanger, C.L.; Berbel, G.B.B.; Childress, L.B.; Cowan, E.A.; Drab, L.; Forwick, M.; Fukumura, A.; Ge, S.; Gupta, S.M.; et

    ). Deposition of the eroded sediments in the outer part of an orogen can, in J.M. Jaeger et al. Expedition 341 summary Proc. IODP | Volume 341 4 turn, suppress deformation due to loading (e.g., Simpson, 2010; Worthington et al., 2010). A critical question... al., 1994; En- kelmann et al., 2008; Perry et al., 2009; Witmer et al., 2009). Physical and oceanographic setting The morphology of the Gulf of Alaska shelf has been strongly influenced by active tectonics and glacial deposition overprinted by glacial...

  15. "It runs in the family": intergenerational transmission of historical trauma among urban American Indians and Alaska Natives in culturally specific sobriety maintenance programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myhra, Laurelle L

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this exploratory study, which was informed by ethnographic principles, was to better understand the intergenerational transmission of historical trauma among urban American Indians/Alaska Natives (AI/ANs) in culturally specific sobriety maintenance programs. The results of the study were organized into 3 overarching categories, which included 10 themes that emerged contextually in relation to participants' lived experience of historical and associated traumas, substance abuse, and current involvement in a culturally specific sobriety maintenance program.

  16. Southeast Alaska forests: inventory highlights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sally Campbell; Willem W.S. van Hees; Bert. Mead

    2004-01-01

    This publication presents highlights of a recent southeast Alaska inventory and analysis conducted by the Pacific Northwest Research Station Forest Inventory and Analysis Program (USDA Forest Service). Southeast Alaska has about 22.9 million acres, of which two-thirds are vegetated. Almost 11 million acres are forest land and about 4 million acres have nonforest...

  17. Intertidal organism and habitat data from the Gulf of Alaska from the HUMDINGER as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 20 April 1976 to 24 August 1976 (NODC Accession 7800272)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Intertidal organism and habitat data were collected in the Gulf of Alaska from the HUMDINGER as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program...

  18. Drifting buoy and other data from the Gulf of Alaska as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 26 October 1980 to 27 March 1981 (NODC Accession 8200115)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Drifting buoy data was collected from the Gulf of Alaska by the Science Application INC (SAI) as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program...

  19. United States Air Force 611th Civil Engineer Squadron, Elmendorf AFB, Alaska installation restoration program, remedial investigation/feasibility study, Galena Airport, Alaska. Treatability study report. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-01-27

    The USAF contracted Radian Corporation to perform treatability studies to evaluate soil vacuum extraction (SVE) and biodegradation technologies for remediating soil contaminated with motor and jet fuel at the Petroleum, Oils, and Lubricants (POL) Tank Farm, Galena Airport, Alaska. This technical report describes the experimental methods and interprets the analytical and operational results from the bench-scale biotreatment tests and pilot-scale SVE tests conducted between July 1992 and February 1994.

  20. Use of evidence-based treatments in substance abuse treatment programs serving American Indian and Alaska Native communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novins, Douglas K; Croy, Calvin D; Moore, Laurie A; Rieckmann, Traci

    2016-04-01

    Research and health surveillance activities continue to document the substantial disparities in the impacts of substance abuse on the health of American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) people. While Evidence-Based Treatments (EBTs) hold substantial promise for improving treatment for AI/ANs with substance use problems (as they do for non-AI/ANs), anecdotal reports suggest that their use is limited. In this study, we examine the awareness of, attitudes toward, and use of EBTs in substance abuse treatment programs serving AI/AN communities. Data are drawn from the first national survey of tribal substance abuse treatment programs. Clinicians or clinical administrators from 192 programs completed the survey. Participants were queried about their awareness of, attitudes toward, and use of 9 psychosocial and 3 medication EBTs. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (82.2%), Motivational Interviewing (68.6%), and Relapse Prevention Therapy (66.8%) were the most commonly implemented psychosocial EBTs; medications for psychiatric comorbidity was the most commonly implemented medication treatment (43.2%). Greater EBT knowledge and use were associated with both program (e.g., funding) and staff (e.g., educational attainment) characteristics. Only two of the commonly implemented psychosocial EBTs (Motivational Interviewing and Relapse Prevention Therapy) were endorsed as culturally appropriate by a majority of programs that had implemented them (55.9% and 58.1%, respectively). EBT knowledge and use is higher in substance abuse treatment programs serving AI/AN communities than has been previously estimated. However, many users of these EBTs continue to have concerns about their cultural appropriateness, which likely limits their further dissemination. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Radionuclides in marine macroalgae from Amchitka and Kiska Islands in the Aleutians: establishing a baseline for future biomonitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burger, Joanna [Div. of Life Sciences, Rutgers Univ., Piscataway, NJ (United States)]|[Consortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation (CRESP), Piscataway, NJ (United States)]|[Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Inst. - EOHSI, Piscataway, NJ (United States)]. E-mail: burger@biology.rutgers.edu; Gochfeld, Michael [Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute (EOHSI), Piscataway, NJ (United States)]|[Environmental and Occupational Medicine, UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, NJ (United States)]. E-mail: gochfeld@eohsi.rutgers.edu; Kosson, David S. [Consortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation (CRESP), Piscataway, NJ (United States)]|[Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States)]. E-mail: david.kosson@vanderbilt.edu; Powers, Charles W. [Consortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation (CRESP), Piscataway, NJ (United States)]|[Environmental and Occupational Medicine, UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, NJ (United States)]|[Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States); Jewett, Stephen [Consortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation (CRESP), Piscataway, NJ (United States)]|[School of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences, Univ. of Alaska, Fairbanks, Alaska (United States)]. E-mail: jewett@ims.uaf.edu; Friedlander, Barry [Consortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation (CRESP), Piscataway, NJ (United States)]|[Environmental and Occupational Medicine, UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Chenelot, Heloise [Consortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation (CRESP), Piscataway, NJ (United States)]|[School of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences, Univ. of Alaska, Fairbanks, Alaska (United States); Volz, Conrad D.; Jeitner, Christian

    2006-07-01

    Levels of radionuclides in seven species of marine brown algae and Ulva were determined to establish a baseline for the Northern Pacific Ocean/Bering Sea (Aleutian Islands). There were differences in levels among algal species and locations (Amchitka Island vs Kiska Island). No values were above the minimum detectable activity (MDA) level for {sup 137}Cs, {sup 129}I, {sup 6}Co, {sup 152}Eu, {sup 9}Sr, and {sup 99}Tc. There were interspecific differences in some radionuclides: Ulva lactuca (=Ulva fenestrata) had the highest levels of {sup 241}Am, Alaria fistulosa had the highest levels of {sup 239,24}Pu, and Fucus distichus (=Fucus gardneri) had the highest levels of {sup 234}U, {sup 235}U, and {sup 238}U. However, levels of all radionuclides were generally low and near the MDA for all isotopes. Although Amchitka Island had higher levels of {sup 239,24}Pu than Kiska, the differences were very small and not significant biologically. The data indicate that algae can be useful bioindicators of actinides because they accumulate them at very low environmental levels, allowing them to provide early warning of any potential seepage of radionuclides into the marine environment. Further, the data indicate that some species (the intertidal Fucus) are better accumulators than others, and these should be used as bioindicators in future monitoring schemes.

  2. Satellite Operations in Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreller, M. A.

    2016-12-01

    Numerous observational challenges exist across Alaska impacting National Weather Service (NWS) forecast operations and providing decision support services (DSS) to critical core partners and customers. These observational challenges range from limited utility of GOES imagery at higher latitudes, scarcity of observing platforms, to limited radar coverage. Although we are fortunate to receive these valuable and limited data sets, there still remain extensive spatial and temporal data gaps across Alaska. Many forecast challenges in Alaska are similar to those in the CONUS with the detection and monitoring of wildfire conditions, severe thunderstorms, river flooding, and coastal flooding, etc. There are additional unique DSS provided in Alaska including sea ice forecasting, ivu (ice shoves onshore), coastal erosion due to permafrost melt, and extreme hazardous winter conditions (temperatures as low as -80F). In addition to the observational and forecast challenges, the sheer size of the area of responsibility in Alaska is a challenge. NWS operations have always heavily relied on satellite imagery to quickly assess the current weather situation and provide forecast guidance. NWS operations have established several partnerships with the satellite community to help with these challenges. In particular the GOES-R and Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) OCONUS Satellite Proving Ground (PG) Programs have not only improved Alaska's observational challenges, but continue to identify new capabilities with the next generation geostationary and polar-orbiting satellite products.. For example, River ice and flood detection products derived from the Suomi-NPP VIIRS satellite imagery with the support of the JPSS Proving Ground and Risk Reduction Program. This presentation will provide examples of how new satellite capabilities are being used in NWS Alaska forecast operations to support DSS, with emphasis on JPSS satellite products. Future satellite utilization or operational needs

  3. Fisheries Education in Alaska. Conference Report. Alaska Sea Grant Report 82-4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smoker, William W., Ed.

    This conference was an attempt to have the fishing industry join the state of Alaska in building fisheries education programs. Topics addressed in papers presented at the conference include: (1) fisheries as a part of life in Alaska, addressing participation of Alaska natives in commercial fisheries and national efforts; (2) the international…

  4. 77 FR 41754 - Fishing Capacity Reduction Program for the Southeast Alaska Purse Seine Salmon Fishery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-16

    ...,133,030 to remove 64 permits, which post- reduction harvesters will repay over a 40-year period. NMFS has tendered reduction payments to the selected bidders. DATES: Fee payment collection will begin on... referendum period on March 29, 2012 (77 FR 19004). Interested persons should review these for further program...

  5. 77 FR 26744 - Fishing Capacity Reduction Program for the Southeast Alaska Purse Seine Salmon Fishery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-07

    ... Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of reduction payment tender of... fishery. The program authorizes NMFS to make payments to permit holders who voluntarily relinquish their... loan repayment fees of $13,133,030 which post-reduction harvesters will repay over a 40-year period...

  6. Long Term Ecological Monitoring Program on the Kenai National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska: An FIA adjunct inventory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowser John M. Morton; Edward Berg; Dawn Magness; Todd Eskelin

    2009-01-01

    Kenai National Wildlife Refuge (KENWR) has a legislative mandate "to conserve fish and wildlife populations and habitats in their natural diversity". To improve our understanding of spatial and temporal variation at the landscape level, we are developing the Long Term Ecological Monitoring Program (LTEMP) to assess change in biota on the sample frame used by...

  7. 77 FR 65843 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Revisions to IFQ Program Regulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-31

    ... governs the halibut fishery. The IFQ Program is a limited access system for managing the fixed- gear... definition. The proposed regulations had used the phrase ``constructive total loss,'' which is a term used by... that in the final rule the regulations be revised to define the phrase ``constructive total loss'' to...

  8. Minto, Alaska Lakeview Lodge START Program Weatherization and Rehab Project Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Titus, Bessie [Minto Tribal Council, Minto, AK (United States); Messier, Dave [Minto Tribal Council, Minto, AK (United States)

    2015-11-20

    This report details the process that Minto Village Council undertook during the DOE sponsored START program and the work that was completed on the main energy consumer in the community, the Minto Lakeview Lodge. The report takes a look at the steps leading up to the large weatherization and renovation project, the work the was completed as a result of the funding and the results in terms of effect on the community and real energy savings.

  9. "Please Don't Just Hang a Feather on a Program or Put a Medicine Wheel on Your Logo and Think 'Oh Well, This Will Work'": Theoretical Perspectives of American Indian and Alaska Native Substance Abuse Prevention Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh-Buhi, Margaret L

    Many current theories guiding substance abuse prevention (SAP) programs stem from Western ideologies, leading to a scarcity of research on theories from, and a disconnect with, Indigenous perspectives. This qualitative research study explored perceptions of theory by SAP researchers (N = 22) working with American Indian and Alaska Native communities. In-depth interviews identified components of Indigenous theoretical perspectives, including cultural elements such as balance, social cohesion, and belonging as being particularly significant and currently absent from many SAP programs. Recommendations for conducting metatheory studies and operationalization of Indigenous perspectives into guiding theoretical underpinnings for future SAP programming are provided.

  10. Advancing Efforts to Energize Native Alaska (Brochure)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2013-04-01

    This brochure describes key programs and initiatives of the DOE Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs to advance energy efficiency, renewable energy, and energy infrastructure projects in Alaska Native villages.

  11. Alaska GeoFORCE, A New Geologic Adventure in Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wartes, D.

    2011-12-01

    RAHI, the Rural Alaska Honors Institute is a statewide, six-week, summer college-preparatory bridge program at the University of Alaska Fairbanks for Alaska Native and rural high school juniors and seniors. A program of rigorous academic activity combines with social, cultural, and recreational activities. Students are purposely stretched beyond their comfort levels academically and socially to prepare for the big step from home or village to a large culturally western urban campus. This summer RAHI is launching a new program, GeoFORCE Alaska. This outreach initiative is designed to increase the number and diversity of students pursuing STEM degree programs and entering the future high-tech workforce. It uses Earth science as the hook because most kids get excited about dinosaurs, volcanoes and earthquakes, but it includes physics, chemistry, math, biology and other sciences. Students will be recruited, initially from the Arctic North Slope schools, in the 8th grade to begin the annual program of approximately 8 days, the summer before their 9th grade year and then remain in the program for all four years of high school. They must maintain a B or better grade average and participate in all GeoFORCE events. The carrot on the end of the stick is an exciting field event each summer. Over the four-year period, events will include trips to Fairbanks, Arizona, Oregon and the Appalachians. All trips are focused on Earth science and include a 100+ page guidebook, with tests every night culminating with a final exam. GeoFORCE Alaska is being launched by UAF in partnership with the University of Texas at Austin, which has had tremendous success with GeoFORCE Texas. GeoFORCE Alaska will be managed by UAF's long-standing Rural Alaska Honors Insitute (RAHI) that has been successfully providing intense STEM educational opportunities for Alaskan high school students for almost 30 years. The Texas program, with adjustments for differences in culture and environment, will be

  12. South-central Alaska forests: inventory highlights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sally Campbell; Willem W.S. van Hees; Bert. Mead

    2005-01-01

    This publication presents highlights of a recent south-central Alaska inventory conducted by the Pacific Northwest Research Station Forest Inventory and Analysis Program (USDA Forest Service). South-central Alaska has about 18.5 million acres, of which one-fifth (4 million acres) is forested. Species diversity is greatest in closed and open Sitka spruce forests, spruce...

  13. Alaska`s nest egg

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stauffer, Thomas

    1997-12-01

    Twenty years ago, the Alaska Permanent Fund was established to receive a substantial share of the state`s oil receipts and to invest these monies each year. Four key aspects are unique to Alaska`s providential fund among oil-producing states. Firstly a constitutional amendment is needed to touch the assets so the capital is safe from encroachment by the government. Secondly, each Alaskan gets a detailed breakdown of what is invested and what is earned. In the third place, and most importantly, each Alaskan receives an annual dividend from the Fund. Fourthly, the funds have been prudently invested almost entirely outside Alaska rather than in unremunerative vanity infrastructure projects. Now, however, oil production is falling and revenues per barrel from new fields with higher costs are projected to decline as well. Given the budget shortfall, there is now a debate about whether the dividends paid directly to the people, should be shifted, at least in part to the state budget. Although the Fund`s capital cannot be touched by the government, the Legislature does have the right to dispose of the income. The arguments in this debate over policy and political philosophy are examined. (UK)

  14. Internet-Based Delivery of Evidence-Based Health Promotion Programs Among American Indian and Alaska Native Youth: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig Rushing, Stephanie; Jessen, Cornelia; Gorman, Gwenda; Torres, Jennifer; Lambert, William E; Prokhorov, Alexander V; Miller, Leslie; Allums-Featherston, Kelly; Addy, Robert C; Peskin, Melissa F; Shegog, Ross

    2016-01-01

    Background American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) youth face multiple health challenges compared to other racial/ethnic groups, which could potentially be ameliorated by the dissemination of evidence-based adolescent health promotion programs. Previous studies have indicated that limited trained personnel, cultural barriers, and geographic isolation may hinder the reach and implementation of evidence-based health promotion programs among AI/AN youth. Although Internet access is variable in AI/AN communities across the United States, it is swiftly and steadily improving, and it may provide a viable strategy to disseminate evidence-based health promotion programs to this underserved population. Objective We explored the potential of using the Internet to disseminate evidence-based health promotion programs on multiple health topics to AI/AN youth living in diverse communities across 3 geographically dispersed regions of the United States. Specifically, we assessed the Internet’s potential to increase the reach and implementation of evidence-based health promotion programs for AI/AN youth, and to engage AI/AN youth. Methods This randomized controlled trial was conducted in 25 participating sites in Alaska, Arizona, and the Pacific Northwest. Predominantly AI/AN youth, aged 12-14 years, accessed 6 evidence-based health promotion programs delivered via the Internet, which focused on sexual health, hearing loss, alcohol use, tobacco use, drug use, and nutrition and physical activity. Adult site coordinators completed computer-based education inventory surveys, connectivity and bandwidth testing to assess parameters related to program reach (computer access, connectivity, and bandwidth), and implementation logs to assess barriers to implementation (program errors and delivery issues). We assessed youths’ perceptions of program engagement via ratings on ease of use, understandability, credibility, likeability, perceived impact, and motivational appeal, using

  15. Internet-Based Delivery of Evidence-Based Health Promotion Programs Among American Indian and Alaska Native Youth: A Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markham, Christine M; Craig Rushing, Stephanie; Jessen, Cornelia; Gorman, Gwenda; Torres, Jennifer; Lambert, William E; Prokhorov, Alexander V; Miller, Leslie; Allums-Featherston, Kelly; Addy, Robert C; Peskin, Melissa F; Shegog, Ross

    2016-11-21

    American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) youth face multiple health challenges compared to other racial/ethnic groups, which could potentially be ameliorated by the dissemination of evidence-based adolescent health promotion programs. Previous studies have indicated that limited trained personnel, cultural barriers, and geographic isolation may hinder the reach and implementation of evidence-based health promotion programs among AI/AN youth. Although Internet access is variable in AI/AN communities across the United States, it is swiftly and steadily improving, and it may provide a viable strategy to disseminate evidence-based health promotion programs to this underserved population. We explored the potential of using the Internet to disseminate evidence-based health promotion programs on multiple health topics to AI/AN youth living in diverse communities across 3 geographically dispersed regions of the United States. Specifically, we assessed the Internet's potential to increase the reach and implementation of evidence-based health promotion programs for AI/AN youth, and to engage AI/AN youth. This randomized controlled trial was conducted in 25 participating sites in Alaska, Arizona, and the Pacific Northwest. Predominantly AI/AN youth, aged 12-14 years, accessed 6 evidence-based health promotion programs delivered via the Internet, which focused on sexual health, hearing loss, alcohol use, tobacco use, drug use, and nutrition and physical activity. Adult site coordinators completed computer-based education inventory surveys, connectivity and bandwidth testing to assess parameters related to program reach (computer access, connectivity, and bandwidth), and implementation logs to assess barriers to implementation (program errors and delivery issues). We assessed youths' perceptions of program engagement via ratings on ease of use, understandability, credibility, likeability, perceived impact, and motivational appeal, using previously established measures. Sites

  16. Evidence-Based Practices, Attitudes, and Beliefs in Substance Abuse Treatment Programs Serving American Indians and Alaska Natives: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larios, Sandra E.; Wright, Serena; Jernstrom, Amanda; Lebron, Dorothy; Sorensen, James L.

    2012-01-01

    Substance abuse disproportionately impacts American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) communities in the United States. For the increasing numbers of AI/AN individuals who enter and receive treatment for their alcohol or other drug problem it is imperative that the service they receive be effective. This study used qualitative methodology to examine attitudes toward evidence-based practices, also known as evidence-based treatments (EBTs) in minority-serving substance abuse treatment programs in the San Francisco Bay area. Twenty-two interviews were conducted in the study, of which seven were with program directors and substance abuse counselors at two urban AI/AN focused sites. These clinics were more likely than other minority-focused programs to have experience with research and knowledge about adapting EBTs. Only in the AI/AN specific sites did an issue arise concerning visibility, that is, undercounting AI/AN people in national and state databases. Similar to other minority-focused programs, these clinics described mistrust, fear of exploitation from the research community, and negative attitudes towards EBTs. The underutilization of EBTs in substance abuse programs is prevalent and detrimental to the health of patients who would benefit from their use. Future research should explore how to use this research involvement and experience with adaptation to increase the adoption of EBTs in AI/AN serving clinics. PMID:22400469

  17. Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (IFSAR) Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Geospatial Program (NGP) developed the Alaska Mapping Initiative (AMI) to collaborate with the State and other Federal...

  18. Permanent first molar eruption and caries patterns in American Indian and Alaska Native children: challenging the concept of targeting second grade for school-based sealant programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phipps, Kathy R; Ricks, Timothy L; Blahut, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    To describe first permanent molar eruption and caries patterns among American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) children in order to identify the appropriate target grade for school-based sealant programs. We used data from the 2011-2012 Indian Health Service oral health surveillance survey of AI/AN children in kindergarten through third grade. Children were screened by trained examiners. Cavitated lesions were classified as decayed, and teeth with any portion of the crown exposed were considered erupted. We screened 15,611 AI/AN children in 186 schools. The percentage with four erupted first molars was 27 percent of kindergarten, 76 percent of first, 96 percent of second, and 99 percent of third-grade children. About 7 percent of kindergarteners had decayed, missing, or filled molars compared with 20 percent, 30 percent, and 38 percent of first, second, and third graders, respectively. School-based sealant programs for AI/AN children should target kindergarten and first grade with follow-up programs for second-grade children. Published 2013. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  19. Alaska Steller Sea Lion and Northern Fur Seal Argos Telemetry Data Archive

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Alaska Ecosystems Program of the NOAA Alaska Fisheries Science Center National Marine Mammal Laboratory conducts research and monitoring on Steller sea lions and...

  20. A five-year plan for the management and development of the Alaska fisheries

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This 5-year management program of the Alaska fisheries combines the ideas of the field men and administrators of the Division of Alaska Fisheries. Requirements for...

  1. Gulf Watch Alaska Forage Fish Component: Hydroacoustic Surveys in Prince William Sound, Alaska 2014-2015

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data are part of the Gulf Watch Alaska (GWA) long term monitoring program, forage fish component. These datasets consist of echointegration data from forage...

  2. Recruitment and retention of Alaska natives into nursing (RRANN).

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLapp, Tina; Hautman, Mary Ann; Anderson, Mary Sue

    2008-07-01

    In recognition of the severe underrepresentation of Alaska Natives in the Alaska RN workforce, the University of Alaska Anchorage School of Nursing implemented Project RRANN (Recruitment and Retention of Alaska Natives into Nursing) to recruit Alaska Natives into a nursing career and to facilitate their success in the nursing programs. Activities that created connections and facilitated student success were implemented. Connection-creating activities included establishing community partnerships, sponsoring a dormitory wing, hosting social and professionally related events, and offering stipends. Success facilitation activities included intensive academic advising, tutoring, and mentoring. The effectiveness of Project RRANN is evident in the 66 Alaska Native/American Indian students admitted to the clinical major since 1998, when Project RRANN was initiated; of those, 70% have completed the major and become licensed, and 23% continue to pursue program completion.

  3. Sea otter studies, field trip to Amchitka Island, March-April 1963: Preliminary summary report of information obtained and activities of BSFW and Alaska Department of Game personnel

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Specimens collected for all sea otters taken by the ADF&G were pelage samples, stomachs, female reproductive tracts, bacula, and testes with epididymis and vas...

  4. Cooperative Alaska Forest Inventory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas Malone; Jingjing Liang; Edmond C. Packee

    2009-01-01

    The Cooperative Alaska Forest Inventory (CAFI) is a comprehensive database of boreal forest conditions and dynamics in Alaska. The CAFI consists of field-gathered information from numerous permanent sample plots distributed across interior and south-central Alaska including the Kenai Peninsula. The CAFI currently has 570 permanent sample plots on 190 sites...

  5. Alaska landbird monitoring survey and off-road point count

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Alaska Landbird Monitoring Survey (ALMS) program is a cooperative statewide program established to monitor population trends of landbirds and other birds across...

  6. Physical data from CTD and bottle casts from the R/V ALPHA HELIX in the Gulf of Alaska by the University of Alaska; Institute of Marine Science (UAK/IMS) in support of the Exxon Oil Spill Monitoring Program and the Gulf of Alaska Recirculation Project from 05 May 1989 to 28 May 1989 (NODC Accession 8900171)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature, salinity, and sigma-t profiles from CTD and bottle casts from the R/V ALPHA HELIX. Data were collected in the Gulf of Alaska by the University of...

  7. Sources of organochlorine contaminants and mercury in seabirds from the Aleutian archipelago of Alaska: Inferences from spatial and trophic variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricca, Mark A.; Miles, A. Keith; Anthony, Robert G.

    2008-01-01

    Persistent organochlorine compounds and mercury (Hg) have been detected in numerous coastal organisms of the Aleutian archipelago of Alaska, yet sources of these contaminants are unclear. We collected glaucous-winged gulls, northern fulmars, and tufted puffins along a natural longitudinal gradient across the western and central Aleutian Islands (Buldir, Kiska, Amchitka, Adak), and an additional 8 seabird species representing different foraging and migratory guilds from Buldir Island to evaluate: 1) point source input from former military installations, 2) westward increases in contaminant concentrations suggestive of distant source input, and 3) effects of trophic status (δ15N) and carbon source (δ13C) on contaminant accumulation. Concentrations of Σ polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and most chlorinated pesticides in glaucous-winged gulls consistently exhibited a ‘U’-shaped pattern of high levels at Buldir and the east side of Adak and low levels at Kiska and Amchitka. In contrast, concentrations of Σ PCBs and chlorinated pesticides in northern fulmars and tufted puffins did not differ among islands. Hg concentrations increased westward in glaucous-winged gulls and were highest in northern fulmars from Buldir. Among species collected only at Buldir, Hg was notably elevated in pelagic cormorants, and relatively high Σ PCBs were detected in black-legged kittiwakes. Concentrations of Σ PCBs, dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (p,p′ DDE), and Hg were positively correlated with δ15N across all seabird species, indicating biomagnification across trophic levels. The east side of Adak Island (a former military installation) was a likely point source of Σ PCBs and p,p′ DDE, particularly in glaucous-winged gulls. In contrast, elevated levels of these contaminants and Hg, along with PCB congener and chlorinated pesticide compositional patterns detected at Buldir Island indicated exposure from distant sources influenced by a combination of atmospheric

  8. Dental caries in rural Alaska Native children--Alaska, 2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-23

    In April 2008, the Arctic Investigations Program (AIP) of CDC was informed by the Alaska Department of Health and Social Services (DHSS) of a large number of Alaska Native (AN) children living in a remote region of Alaska who required full mouth dental rehabilitations (FMDRs), including extractions and/or restorations of multiple carious teeth performed under general anesthesia. In this remote region, approximately 400 FMDRs were performed in AN children aged Dental caries can cause pain, which can affect children's normal growth and development. AIP and Alaska DHSS conducted an investigation of dental caries and associated risk factors among children in the remote region. A convenience sample of children aged 4-15 years in five villages (two with fluoridated water and three without) was examined to estimate dental caries prevalence and severity. Risk factor information was obtained by interviewing parents. Among children aged 4-5 years and 12-15 years who were evaluated, 87% and 91%, respectively, had dental caries, compared with 35% and 51% of U.S. children in those age groups. Among children from the Alaska villages, those aged 4-5 years had a mean of 7.3 dental caries, and those aged 12-15 years had a mean of 5.0, compared with 1.6 and 1.8 dental caries in same-aged U.S. children. Of the multiple factors assessed, lack of water fluoridation and soda pop consumption were significantly associated with dental caries severity. Collaborations between tribal, state, and federal agencies to provide effective preventive interventions, such as water fluoridation of villages with suitable water systems and provision of fluoride varnishes, should be encouraged.

  9. 78 FR 54629 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; American Fisheries Act, Amendment 80 Program...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-05

    ... accessible to people with disabilities. Requests for sign language interpretation or other auxiliary aids... potential impacts of cost recovery programs; and (3) an overview of proposed regulatory approaches to... participation by people who are knowledgeable about the AFA, Aleutian Islands pollock fishery, Amendment 80, CDQ...

  10. A Prototype Two-tier Mentoring Program for Undergraduate Summer Interns from Minority-Serving Institutions at the University of Alaska Fairbanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gens, R.; Prakash, A.; Ozbay, G.; Sriharan, S.; Balazs, M. S.; Chittambakkam, A.; Starkenburg, D. P.; Waigl, C.; Cook, S.; Ferguson, A.; Foster, K.; Jones, E.; Kluge, A.; Stilson, K.

    2013-12-01

    The University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF) is partnering with Delaware State University, Virginia State University, Elizabeth City State University, Bethune-Cookman University, and Morgan State University on a U.S. Department of Agriculture - National Institute for Food and Agriculture funded grant for ';Enhancing Geographic Information System Education and Delivery through Collaboration: Curricula Design, Faculty, Staff, and Student Training and Development, and Extension Services'. As a part of this grant, in summer 2013, UAF hosted a week long workshop followed by an intense two week undergraduate internship program. Six undergraduate students from partnering Universities worked with UAF graduate students as their direct mentors. This cohort of undergraduate mentees and graduate student mentors were in-turn counseled by the two UAF principal investigators who served as ';super-mentors'. The role of each person in the two-tier mentoring system was well defined. The super-mentors ensured that there was consistency in the way the internship was setup and resources were allocated. They also ensured that there were no technical glitches in the research projects and that there was healthy communication and interaction among participants. Mentors worked with the mentees ahead of time in outlining a project that aligned with the mentees research interest, provided basic reading material to the interns to get oriented, prepared the datasets required to start the project, and guided the undergraduates throughout the internship. Undergraduates gained hands-on experience in geospatial data collection and application of tools in their projects related to mapping geomorphology, landcover, geothermal sites, fires, and meteorological conditions. Further, they shared their research results and experiences with a broad university-wide audience at the end of the internship period. All participants met at lunch-time for a daily science talk from external speakers. The program offered

  11. Biological monitoring at Bulder Island, Alaska in 1997: summary appendices

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Alaska Maritime National Wildlife Refuge (AMNWR) has a long-term program to monitor selected species of seabirds that nest on the refuge. Many of these species...

  12. AFSC/REFM: Alaska groundfish AGEDATA database,1982 to present

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The AFSC AGEDATA database is a collection of historic and ongoing fish ageing efforts by the Alaska Fisheries Science Center's Age and Growth Program from 1982 to...

  13. Alaska Phocid Argos Telemetry Archive (2004-2013)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Polar Ecosystems Program conducts research and monitoring on phocid seals in the East Bering Sea, West Bering Sea, Gulf of Alaska, Beaufort Sea, and Chukchi Sea...

  14. Installation restoration program (irp) remedial investigation/feasibility study, Kotzebue Long Range Radar Station, Alaska. Human health and ecological risk assessment. Final baseline report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    The purpose of the Baseline Human Health and Ecological Risk Assessment Report is to provide an assessment of the risk to human and ecological receptors from exposure to contaminants measured during the 1994 Remedial Investigation at Kotzebue Long Range Radar Station, Alaska.

  15. Renewable Energy in Alaska

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2013-03-01

    This report examines the opportunities, challenges, and costs associated with renewable energy implementation in Alaska and provides strategies that position Alaska's accumulating knowledge in renewable energy development for export to the rapidly growing energy/electric markets of the developing world.

  16. Alaska geothermal bibliography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liss, S.A.; Motyka, R.J.; Nye, C.J. (comps.)

    1987-05-01

    The Alaska geothermal bibliography lists all publications, through 1986, that discuss any facet of geothermal energy in Alaska. In addition, selected publications about geology, geophysics, hydrology, volcanology, etc., which discuss areas where geothermal resources are located are included, though the geothermal resource itself may not be mentioned. The bibliography contains 748 entries.

  17. Tourism in rural Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katrina Church-Chmielowski

    2007-01-01

    Tourism in rural Alaska is an education curriculum with worldwide relevance. Students have started small businesses, obtained employment in the tourism industry and gotten in touch with their people. The Developing Alaska Rural Tourism collaborative project has resulted in student scholarships, workshops on website development, marketing, small...

  18. Adoption of engineered wood products in Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph A. Roos; Indroneil Ganguly; Allen Brackley

    2009-01-01

    Based on an in-grade testing program, the Ketchikan Wood Technology Center has registered three proprietary grademarks for Alaska species of hemlock (Tsuga heterophylla (Raf.) Sarg.), yellow-cedar (Chamaecyparis nootkatensis (D. Don) Spach), and spruce (combined Sitka spruce [Picea sitchensis (Bong.) Carr...

  19. Cancer disparities among Alaska native people, 1970-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Janet J; Lanier, Anne P; Schade, Teresa; Brantley, Jennifer; Starkey, B Michael

    2014-12-18

    Cancer is the leading cause of death among Alaska Native people. The objective of this study was to examine cancer incidence data for 2007-2011, age-specific rates for a 15-year period, incidence trends for 1970-2011, and mortality trends for 1990-2011. US data were from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program SEER*Stat database and from the SEER Alaska Native Tumor Registry. Age-adjusted cancer incidence rates among Alaska Native people and US whites were compared using rate ratios. Trend analyses were performed using the Joinpoint Regression Program. Mortality data were from National Center for Health Statistics. During 2007-2011 the cancer incidence rate among Alaska Native women was 16% higher than the rate among US white women and was similar among Alaska Native men and US white men. Incidence rates among Alaska Native people exceeded rates among US whites for nasopharyngeal, stomach, colorectal, lung, and kidney cancer. A downward trend in colorectal cancer incidence among Alaska Native people occurred from 1999 to 2011. Significant declines in rates were not observed for other frequently diagnosed cancers or for all sites combined. Cancer mortality rates among Alaska Native people during 2 periods, 1990-2000 and 2001-2011, did not decline. Cancer mortality rates among Alaska Native people exceeded rates among US whites for all cancers combined; for cancers of the lung, stomach, pancreas, kidney, and cervix; and for colorectal cancer. Increases in colorectal screening among Alaska Native people may be responsible for current declines in colorectal cancer incidence; however; improvements in treatment of colon and rectal cancers may also be contributing factors.

  20. Successful aging through the eyes of Alaska Natives: exploring generational differences among Alaska Natives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Jordan P

    2010-12-01

    There is very little research on Alaska Native (AN) elders and how they subjectively define a successful older age. The lack of a culturally-specific definition often results in the use of a generic definition that portrays Alaska Native elders as aging less successfully than their White counterparts. However, there is a very limited understanding of a diverse array of successful aging experiences across generations. This research explores the concept of successful aging from an Alaska Native perspective, or what it means to age well in Alaska Native communities. An adapted Explanatory Model (EM) approach was used to gain a sense of the beliefs about aging from Alaska Natives. Research findings indicate that aging successfully is based on local understandings about personal responsibility and making the conscious decision to live a clean and healthy life, abstaining from drugs and alcohol. The findings also indicate that poor aging is often characterized by a lack of personal responsibility, or not being active, not being able to handle alcohol, and giving up on oneself. Most participants stated that elder status is not determined by reaching a certain age (e.g., 65), but instead is designated when an individual has demonstrated wisdom because of the experiences he or she has gained throughout life. This research seeks to inform future studies on rural aging that prioritizes the perspectives of elders to impact positively on the delivery of health care services and programs in rural Alaska.

  1. Current and other data from meters attached to fixed platforms in the Gulf of Alaska as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 24 April 1978 to 21 September 1978 (NODC Accession 7900207)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current and other data were collected from meters attached to fixed platforms in the Gulf of Alaska by the University of Alaska - Fairbanks; Institute of Marine...

  2. Current and other data from meters attached to fixed platforms in the Gulf of Alaska as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 13 May 1979 to 29 July 1979 (NODC Accession 8000542)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current and other data were collected from meters attached to fixed platforms in the Gulf of Alaska by the University of Alaska - Fairbanks; Institute of Marine...

  3. Benthic organism and other data from otter trawls from the Gulf of Alaska from the BIG VALLEY as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 17 June 1976 to 18 March 1977 (NODC Accession 7700849)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Benthic organism and other data were collected from otter trawls in the Gulf of Alaska from the BIG VALLEY by University of Alaska; Institute of Marine Science...

  4. Benthic organism and other data from the MOANA WAVE in the Gulf of Alaska as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 01 April 1976 (NODC Accession 7601558)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Benthic organism and other data were collected in the Gulf of Alaska from the MOANA WAVE by the University of Alaska - Fairbanks; Institute of Marine Science...

  5. Benthic organism and other data from the Gulf of Alaska from the USNS SILAS BENT as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 31 August 1975 to 14 September 1975 (NODC Accession 7700434)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Benthic organism and other data were collected in the Gulf of Alaska from the USNS SILAS BENT by University of Alaska; Institute of Marine Science (UAK/IMS). Data...

  6. Benthic organism and other data from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER from the Gulf of Alaska as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1975-11-23 to 1975-12-02 (NODC Accession 7700435)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Benthic organism and other data were collected in the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER by University of Alaska; Institute of Marine Science (UAK/IMS). Data...

  7. Benthic organism and other data from NOAA Ship MILLER FREEMAN from the Gulf of Alaska as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1979-02-15 to 1979-02-24 (NODC Accession 8100499)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Benthic organism and other data were collected in the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship MILLER FREEMAN by University of Alaska; Institute of Marine Science (UAK/IMS)....

  8. Physical and other data from bottle and CTD casts in the Gulf of Alaska from the ACONA as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 03 June 1975 to 13 June 1975 (NODC Accession 7601552)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical and other data were collected from bottle and CTD casts in the Gulf of Alaska from the ACONA. Data were collected by the University of Alaska - Fairbanks;...

  9. Libraries in Alaska: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: https://medlineplus.gov/libraries/alaska.html Libraries in Alaska To use the sharing features on ... JavaScript. Anchorage University of Alaska Anchorage Alaska Medical Library 3211 Providence Drive Anchorage, AK 99508-8176 907- ...

  10. Alaska geology revealed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Frederic H.; Labay, Keith A.

    2016-11-09

    This map shows the generalized geology of Alaska, which helps us to understand where potential mineral deposits and energy resources might be found, define ecosystems, and ultimately, teach us about the earth history of the State. Rock units are grouped in very broad categories on the basis of age and general rock type. A much more detailed and fully referenced presentation of the geology of Alaska is available in the Geologic Map of Alaska (http://dx.doi.org/10.3133/sim3340). This product represents the simplification of thousands of individual rock units into just 39 broad groups. Even with this generalization, the sheer complexity of Alaskan geology remains evident.

  11. Alaska Volcano Observatory at 20

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichelberger, J. C.

    2008-12-01

    research opportunities for Russian and American students. AVO was a three-way partnership of the federal and state geological surveys and the state university from the start. This was not a flowering of ecumenism but was rather at the insistence of the Alaska congressional delegation. Such shared enterprises are not managerially convenient, but they do bring a diversity of roles, thinking, and expertise that would not otherwise be possible. Through AVO, the USGS performs its federally mandated role in natural hazard mitigation and draws on expertise available from its network of volcano observatories. The Alaska Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys performs a similar role at the state level and, in the tradition of state surveys, provides important public communications, state data base, and mapping functions. The University of Alaska Fairbanks brought seismological, remote sensing, geodetic, petrological, and physical volcanological expertise, and uniquely within US academia was able to engage students directly in volcano observatory activities. Although this "model" cannot be adopted in total elsewhere, it has served to point the USGS Volcano Hazards Program in a direction of greater openness and inclusiveness.

  12. Alaska Peninsula NWR Land Status

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is a map of Alaska PeninsulaNational Wildlife Refuge within the State of Alaska. It depicts the refuge and wilderness boundaries, hillshaded topography, and...

  13. Prehistoric Alaska: The land

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Frederic H.; Weber, Florence R.; Rennick, Penny

    1994-01-01

    Many Alaskans know the dynamic nature of Alaska’s landscape firsthand. The 1964 earthquake, the 1989 eruption of Mount Redoubt volcano, the frequent earthquakes in the Aleutians and the ever-shifting meanders of the Yukon and Kuskokwim rivers remind them of constant changes to the land. These changes are part of the continuing story of the geologic growth and development of Alaska during hundreds of millions of years. By geologic time, Alaska has only recently come into existence and the dynamic processes that formed it continue to affect it. The landscape we see today has been shaped by glacier and stream erosion or their indirect effects, and to a lesser extent by volcanoes. Most prominently, if less obviously, Alaska has been built by slow movements of the Earth’s crust we call tectonic or mountain-building.During 5 billion years of geologic time, the Earth’s crust has repeatedly broken apart into plates. These plates have recombined, and have shifted positions relative to each other, to the Earth’s rotational axis and to the equator. Large parts of the Earth’s crust, including Alaska, have been built and destroyed by tectonic forces. Alaska is a collage of transported and locally formed fragments of crusts As erosion and deposition reshape the land surface, climatic changes, brought on partly by changing ocean and atmospheric circulation patterns, alter the location and extent of tropical, temperate and arctic environments. We need to understand the results of these processes as they acted upon Alaska to understand the formation of Alaska. Rocks can provide hints of previous environments because they contain traces of ocean floor and lost lands, bits and pieces of ancient history.

  14. 75 FR 51103 - Notice of Public Meetings for the National Park Service (NPS) Alaska Region's Subsistence...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-18

    ... Subsistence Board--Fish and Wildlife Update. 2. Federal Subsistence Board Program Review Update. 3. Alaska Board of Game Update. 4. Subsistence Projects. b. Resource Management Program Update. c. SRC Chairs...

  15. Alaska Native Parkinson’s Disease Registry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Parkinson’s Institute Sunnyvale, CA 94085-2934 This registry initiates a program of epidemiological assessments of PS among...Center. Alaska Native; Parkinson’s disease; Registry; Etiology; Epidemiology ; Ascertainment 8 23 June 2012 - 22 June 2013AnnualJuly 2013 ctanner...Investigator 4 A. Introduction Parkinsonism (PS) is a syndrome characterized by tremor , rigidity, slowness of movement, and problems with walking and

  16. Source evaluation report phase 2 investigation: Limited field investigation. Final report: United States Air Force Environmental Restoration Program, Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-10-01

    This report describes the limited field investigation work done to address issues and answer unresolved questions regarding a collection of potential contaminant sources at Eielson Air Force Base (AFB), near Fairbanks, Alaska. These sources were listed in the Eielson AFB Federal Facility Agreement supporting the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) cleanup of the base. The limited field investigation began in 1993 to resolve all remaining technical issues and provide the data and analysis required to evaluate the environmental hazard associated with these sites. The objective of the limited field investigation was to allow the remedial project managers to sort each site into one of three categories: requiring remedial investigation/feasibility study, requiring interim removal action, or requiring no further remedial action.

  17. A users guide for SAMM: a prototype southeast Alaska multiresource model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D.L. Weyermann; R.D. Fight; L.D. Garrett

    1991-01-01

    This paper instructs resource analysts on using the southeast Alaska multiresource model (SAMM). SAMM is an interactive microcomputer program that allows users to explore relations among several resources in southeast Alaska (timber, anadromous fish. deer, and hydrology) and the effects of timber management activities (logging, thinning, and road building) on those...

  18. EPA Research in Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA’s collaboration with the DEC and the Air Force on PFAS sampling and analytical methods is key to ensuring valid, defensible data are collected on these emerging contaminants that are being found in soil, groundwater and drinking water in Alaska.

  19. Venetie, Alaska energy assessment.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, Richard Pearson; Baca, Michael J.; Schenkman, Benjamin L.; Brainard, James Robert

    2013-07-01

    This report summarizes the Energy Assessment performed for Venetie, Alaska using the principals of an Energy Surety Microgrid (ESM) The report covers a brief overview of the principals of ESM, a site characterization of Venetie, a review of the consequence modeling, some preliminary recommendations, and a basic cost analysis.

  20. Population dynamics of caribou herds in southwestern Alaska

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Valkenburg

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available The five naturally occurring and one transplanted caribou (Rangifer tarandus granti herd in southwestern Alaska composed about 20% of Alaska's caribou population in 2001. All five of the naturally occurring herds fluctuated considerably in size between the late 1800s and 2001 and for some herds the data provide an indication of long-term periodic (40-50 year fluctuations. At the present time, the Unimak (UCH and Southern Alaska Peninsula (SAP are recovering from population declines, the Northern Alaska Peninsula Herd (NAP appears to be nearing the end of a protracted decline, and the Mulchatna Herd (MCH appears to now be declining after 20 years of rapid growth. The remaining naturally occurring herd (Kilbuck has virtually disappeared. Nutrition had a significant effect on the size of 4-month-old and 10-month-old calves in the NAP and the Nushagak Peninsula Herd (NPCH and probably also on population growth in at least 4 (SAP, NAP, NPCH, and MCH of the six caribou herds in southwestern Alaska. Predation does not appear to be sufficient to keep caribou herds in southwestern Alaska from expanding, probably because rabies is endemic in red foxes (Vulpes vulpes and is periodically transferred to wolves (Canis lupus and other canids. However, we found evidence that pneumonia and hoof rot may result in significant mortality of caribou in southwestern Alaska, whereas there is no evidence that disease is important in the dynamics of Interior herds. Cooperative conservation programs, such as the Kilbuck Caribou Management Plan, can be successful in restraining traditional harvest and promoting growth in caribou herds. In southwestern Alaska we also found evidence that small caribou herds can be swamped and assimilated by large herds, and fidelity to traditional calving areas can be lost.

  1. Physical and nutrient profile data from bottle casts in the Bering Sean and the Gulf of Alaska from the R/V Alpha Helix as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) and Gulf of Alaska-1 (GAK-1) projects from 25 April 1988 to 15 May 1988 (NODC Accession 0000222)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical and nutrient profile data were collected from bottle casts in the Bering Sea and the Gulf of Alaska from the R/V Alpha Helix. Data were collected from from...

  2. Sustainable Energy Solutions for Rural Alaska

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, Riley [Regulatory Assistance Project, Montpelier, VT (United States); Brutkoski, Donna [Regulatory Assistance Project, Montpelier, VT (United States); Farnsworth, David [Regulatory Assistance Project, Montpelier, VT (United States); Larsen, Peter [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2016-04-22

    The state of Alaska recognizes the challenges these rural communities face and provides financial support via the Power Cost Equalization (PCE) program. The PCE subsidizes the electricity prices paid by customers of these high-cost utilities. The PCE program is designed to spread the benefits of Alaska’s natural resources more evenly throughout the state. Yet even with this subsidy, electricity is still much more expensive for these rural customers. And beyond the PCE, other forms of assistance to rural utilities are becoming scarce given the state’s current fiscal environment. Nearly 90 percent of Alaska’s unrestricted budget funds in recent years have been tied to oil royalties—a sector experiencing significant declines in production and oil prices. Consequently, as Alaska looks to tighten budgets, the challenge of lowering rural utility costs, while encouraging self-sufficiency, has become more urgent.This study examines reliability, capital and strategic planning, management, workforce development, governance, financial performance and system efficiency in the various communities visited by the research team. Using those attributes, a tier system was developed to categorize rural Alaska utilities into Leading and Innovating Systems (Tier I), Advanced Diesel Systems (Tier II), Basic Systems (Tier III), and Underperforming Systems (Tier IV). The tier approach is not meant to label specific utilities, but rather to provide a general set of benchmarks and guideposts for improvement.

  3. Sea otter population structure and ecology in Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodkin, James L.; Monson, Daniel H.

    2002-01-01

    one reaching its peak about 1800 and averaging about 15,000 per year and a second about 1870, averaging about 4,000 per year. The causes for this harvest pattern are unknown, but it may represent two distinct periods of overexploitation separated by a brief period of population recovery.By 1890 the species had been eliminated throughout most of its range, persisting in small numbers at 13 isolated locations in California, Alaska, and Russia. The number of sea otters that survived the fur trade is unknown, but available data suggest that some remnant populations may have been as small as a few dozen individuals. In 1911, sea otters were afforded protection under the International Fur Seal Treaty, and populations apparently responded by gradually increasing in abundance. The rates of population recovery varied among locations, averaging 9% annually and ranging from 6 to 13%. The population at Amchitka Island in the central Aleutians had the highest growth rate among those surviving, apparently reaching carrying capacity by about 1950.Efforts to aid the recovery of the species into the vast unoccupied habitats between California and Prince William Sound began in 1965. Sea otters from Amchitka and Prince William Sound were translocated to Oregon, Washington, British Columbia, and several locations in southeastern Alaska. With the exception of Oregon, these translocations have resulted in the establishment of successful colonies. Population growth rates of translocated sea otters have been significantly greater than among remnant populations, averaging 21% and ranging from 18 to 24%. We don’t know why the growth rates of the remnant and translocated populations are so different, but it may be partly because of the abundant food and space available at the translocated sites.The varying patterns of sea otter population decline and recovery provide a unique and powerful tool for studying the effects of historic reductions on populations, as well as how populations respond to varying

  4. e-Learning Programs Come in All Shapes and Sizes: From Alaska to Arkansas, Districts Are Experimenting with Online Learning to Solve Access Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyle, Shawn; Jones, Thea; Pickle, Shirley Kirk

    2009-01-01

    This article presents a sample of online learning programs serving very different populations: a small district spread over a vast area, a large inner school district, and a statewide program serving numerous districts. It describes how these districts successfully implemented e-learning programs in their schools and discusses the positive impact…

  5. Focus Groups of Alaska Native Adolescent Tobacco Users: Preferences for Tobacco Cessation Interventions and Barriers to Participation

    OpenAIRE

    Patten, Christi A.; Enoch, Carrie; Renner, Caroline C.; Offord, Kenneth P; Nevak, Caroline; Kelley, Stacy F.; Thomas, Janet; Decker, Paul A.; Hurt, Richard D.; Lanier, Anne; Kaur, Judith S.

    2007-01-01

    Tobacco cessation interventions developed for Alaska Native adolescents do not exist. This study employed focus group methodology to explore preferences for tobacco cessation interventions and barriers to participation among 49 Alaska Natives (61% female) with a mean age of 14.6 (SD = 1.6) who resided in western Alaska. Using content analysis, themes from the 12 focus groups were found to be consistent across village, gender, and age groups. Program location or site (e.g., away from the villa...

  6. Occupational safety and health training in Alaska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hild, C M

    1992-01-01

    We have eleven years of experience delivering a wide variety of worker education programs in cross-cultural settings to reduce the levels of occupational fatalities and injuries in Alaska. We published an instructional manual and informational poster for workers, on Alaska's "Right-To-Know" law regarding chemical and physical hazards. The "Job Hazard Recognition Program" curriculum for high school students has received national acclaim for being proactive in dealing with worker safety education before the student becomes a member of the work force. Adult educational programs and materials have been designed to include less lecture and formal presentation, and more practical "hands on" and on-the-job experience for specific trades and hazards. New industry specific manuals deal with hazardous waste reduction as a method to reduce harm to the employee. Difficulty in getting instructors and training equipment to rural locations is dealt with by becoming creative in scheduling classes, using locally available equipment, and finding regional contacts who support the overall program. Alternative approaches to funding sources include building on regional long-term plans and establishing complementary program objectives.

  7. Gulf of Alaska Acoustic-Trawl Survey of Walleye Pollock (DY1506, EK60)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Midwater Assessment and Conservation Engineering (MACE) program of NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), Alaska Fisheries Science Center (AFSC)...

  8. Gulf of Alaska Acoustic-Trawl Survey of Walleye Pollock (DY1307, ME70)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Midwater Assessment and Conservation Engineering (MACE) program of NOAA's National Marine Fisheries Service, Alaska Fisheries Science Center (AFSC) conducted an...

  9. Gulf of Alaska Acoustic-Trawl Survey of Walleye Pollock (DY1602, EK60)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Midwater Assessment and Conservation Engineering (MACE) program of NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), Alaska Fisheries Science Center (AFSC)...

  10. 2015 Pollock Acoustic/Trawl Survey Gulf of Alaska EK60 Raw Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Scientists from the Midwater Assessment and Conservation Engineering (MACE) Program of the Alaska Fisheries Science Center's (AFSC) Resource Assessment and...

  11. Gulf of Alaska Acoustic-Trawl Survey of Walleye Pollock (DY1401, EK60)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Midwater Assessment and Conservation Engineering (MACE) program of NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), Alaska Fisheries Science Center (AFSC)...

  12. Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar Orthorectified Radar Image Alaska: 2010-2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Geospatial Program (NGP) developed the Alaska Mapping Initiative (AMI) to collaborate with the State and other Federal...

  13. Assessment of Rockfish Species in Untrawlable Habitat in the Gulf of Alaska (DY0912, EK60)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Midwater Assessment and Conservation Engineering (MACE) program of NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), Alaska Fisheries Science Center (AFSC)...

  14. Gulf of Alaska Acoustic-Trawl Survey of Walleye Pollock (DY1403, EK60)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Midwater Assessment and Conservation Engineering (MACE) program of NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), Alaska Fisheries Science Center (AFSC)...

  15. Gulf of Alaska Acoustic-Trawl Survey of Walleye Pollock (DY1303, EK60)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Midwater Assessment and Conservation Engineering (MACE) program of NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), Alaska Fisheries Science Center (AFSC)...

  16. Gulf of Alaska Acoustic-Trawl Survey of Walleye Pollock (DY1506, ME70)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Midwater Assessment and Conservation Engineering (MACE) program of NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), Alaska Fisheries Science Center (AFSC)...

  17. Acoustic-Trawl Survey of Walleye Pollock in the Gulf of Alaska (DY1604, EK60)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Midwater Assessment and Conservation Engineering (MACE) program of NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), Alaska Fisheries Science Center (AFSC)...

  18. AFSC/RACE/MACE: Results of 2013 acoustic trawl survey Gulf of Alaska DY1307

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Scientists from the Midwater Assessment and Conservation Engineering (MACE) Program of the Alaska Fisheries Science Center (AFSC) Resource Assessment and...

  19. Acoustic-Trawl Survey of Walleye Pollock in the Gulf of Alaska (DY1503, EK60)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Midwater Assessment and Conservation Engineering (MACE) program of NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), Alaska Fisheries Science Center (AFSC)...

  20. Gulf of Alaska Acoustic-Trawl Surveys of Walleye Pollock (DY1201, EK60)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Midwater Assessment and Conservation Engineering (MACE) program of NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), Alaska Fisheries Science Center (AFSC)...

  1. Gulf of Alaska Acoustic-Trawl Survey of Walleye Pollock (DY1302, EK60)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Midwater Assessment and Conservation Engineering (MACE) program of NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), Alaska Fisheries Science Center (AFSC)...

  2. AFSC/REFM: Beaufort Sea Marine Fish Survey, Beaufort Sea, Alaska, August 2008, Fisheries Interaction Team

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Alaska Fisheries Science Center's Status of Stocks and Multispecies Assessment (SSMA) Programs Fishery Interaction Team (FIT) conducted a fish survey in the...

  3. Gulf of Alaska Acoustic-Trawl Surveys of Walleye Pollock (DY1203, EK60)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Midwater Assessment and Conservation Engineering (MACE) program of NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), Alaska Fisheries Science Center (AFSC)...

  4. Acoustic-Trawl Survey of Walleye Pollock in the Gulf of Alaska (OD0501, EK60)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Midwater Assessment and Conservation Engineering (MACE) program of NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), Alaska Fisheries Science Center (AFSC)...

  5. Gulf of Alaska Acoustic-Trawl Survey of Walleye Pollock (DY1307, EK60)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Midwater Assessment and Conservation Engineering (MACE) program of NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), Alaska Fisheries Science Center (AFSC)...

  6. Acoustic-Trawl Survey of Walleye Pollock in the Gulf of Alaska (MF0309, EK500)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Midwater Assessment and Conservation Engineering (MACE) program of NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), Alaska Fisheries Science Center (AFSC)...

  7. Gulf of Alaska Acoustic-Trawl Surveys of Walleye Pollock (DY1002, EK60)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Midwater Assessment and Conservation Engineering (MACE) program of NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), Alaska Fisheries Science Center (AFSC)...

  8. AFSC/RACE/MACE: Results of 2011 acoustic trawl survey Gulf of Alaska DY1103

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Scientists from the Midwater Assessment and Conservation Engineering (MACE) Program of the Alaska Fisheries Science Center (AFSC) Resource Assessment and...

  9. The geochemical atlas of Alaska, 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Gregory K.; Yager, Douglas B.; Mauk, Jeffrey L.; Granitto, Matthew; Denning, Paul D.; Wang, Bronwen; Werdon, Melanie B.

    2016-06-21

    A rich legacy of geochemical data produced since the early 1960s covers the great expanse of Alaska; careful treatment of such data may provide significant and revealing geochemical maps that may be used for landscape geochemistry, mineral resource exploration, and geoenvironmental investigations over large areas. To maximize the spatial density and extent of data coverage for statewide mapping of element distributions, we compiled and integrated analyses of more than 175,000 sediment and soil samples from three major, separate sources: the U.S. Geological Survey, the National Uranium Resource Evaluation program, and the Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys geochemical databases. Various types of heterogeneity and deficiencies in these data presented major challenges to our development of coherently integrated datasets for modeling and mapping of element distributions. Researchers from many different organizations and disparate scientific studies collected samples that were analyzed using highly variable methods throughout a time period of more than 50 years, during which many changes in analytical techniques were developed and applied. Despite these challenges, the U.S. Geological Survey has produced a new systematically integrated compilation of sediment and soil geochemical data with an average sample site density of approximately 1 locality per 10 square kilometers (km2) for the entire State of Alaska, although density varies considerably among different areas. From that compilation, we have modeled and mapped the distributions of 68 elements, thus creating an updated geochemical atlas for the State.

  10. Drifting buoy and other data from the Gulf of Alaska as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 21 October 1976 to 11 November 1976 (NODC Accession 7700740)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Drifting buoy data was collected from the Gulf of Alaska by the Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory (AOML) as part of the Outer Continental Shelf...

  11. Fish survey, fishing duration and other data in the Gulf of Alaska from the HUMDINGER as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 23 July 1975 to 22 June 1976 (NODC Accession 8200114)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Fish survey, fishing duration, and other data were collected in the Gulf of Alaska from the HUMDINGER from 23 July 1975 to 22 June 1976. Data were collected by Dames...

  12. Fish survey, fishing duration, and other data from net trawls in the Gulf of Alaska from the NORTH PACIFIC as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 03 May 1975 to 07 August 1975 (NODC Accession 7601886)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Fish survey, fishing duration, and other data were collected from net trawls in the Gulf of Alaska from the NORTH PACIFIC from 03 May 1975 to 07 August 1975. Data...

  13. Fish survey, fishing duration, and other data from net trawls in the Gulf of Alaska from the NORTH PACIFIC as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 03 May 1975 to 07 August 1975 (NODC Accession 7601885)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Fish survey, fishing duration, and other data were collected from net trawls in the Gulf of Alaska from the NORTH PACIFIC from 03 May 1975 to 07 August 1975. Data...

  14. Zooplankton and other data from net casts in the Gulf of Alaska from the SURVEYOR as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 30 September 1975 to 24 October 1975 (NODC Accession 7601809)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Zooplankton and other data were collected from net casts in the Gulf of Alaska from the SURVEYOR from 30 September 1975 to 24 October 1975. Data were collected by...

  15. Toxic substance and other data from bottle casts in the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program from 1975-10-08 to 1975-11-09 (NODC Accession 7600630)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Toxic substances and pollutants data were collected from bottle casts in the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER. Data were collected by Pacific Marine...

  16. Marine toxic substance and other data from the Gulf of Alaska from the MOANA WAVE as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program from 1976-06-25 to 078 July 1976 (NCEI Accession 7601849)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine toxic substance and other data were collected in the Gulf of Alaska from the MOANA WAVE. Data were collected by Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory (PMEL)...

  17. Physical and other data from CTD casts in the Gulf of Alaska as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 20 March 1981 to 03 April 1981 (NODC Accession 8300087)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical and other data were collected from CTD casts in the Gulf of Alaska from 20 March 1981 to 03 April 1981. Data were collected by Science Applications, INC....

  18. Pressure gauge and other data from MOANA WAVE in the Gulf of Alaska as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 04 March 1976 to 22 August 1976 (NODC Accession 7601926)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Pressure gauge and other data were collected from the MOANA WAVE in the Gulf of Alaska from 04 March 1976 to 22 August 1976. Data were collected by the Pacific...

  19. Pressure gauge and other data in the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1976-05-13 to 1976-08-26 (NODC Accession 7700097)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Pressure gauge and other data were collected in the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER from 13 May 1976 to 26 August 1976. Data were collected by the Pacific...

  20. Marine toxic substance and other data from the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1977-05-05 to 1979-05-18 (NODC Accession 8100493)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine toxic substance and other data were collected in the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER from 05 May 1977 to 18 May 1979. Data were collected by the...

  1. Marine Toxic Substance and other data from bottle casts in the Gulf of Alaska from the ACONA as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 28 June 1977 to 16 July 1977 (NODC Accession 7700756)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine Toxic Substance and other data were collected from bottle casts in the Gulf of Alaska from the ACONA. Data were collected by Pacific Marine Environmental...

  2. Current and other data from meters attached to fixed platforms in the Gulf of Alaska and other locations as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 17 August 1974 to 01 September 1975 (NODC Accession 7601625)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current and other data were collected from meters attached to fixed platforms in the Gulf of Alaska and other locations by the Pacific Marine Environmental...

  3. Physical and other data from surface sensors and CTD casts in the Gulf of Alaska from the SURVEYOR as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 05 June 1975 to 12 June 1975 (NODC Accession 7601225)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical and other data were collected from surface sensors and CTD casts in the Gulf of Alaska from the SURVEYOR. Data were collected by the Pacific Marine...

  4. Temperature and salinity profiles from surface sensors and CTD casts in the Gulf of Alaska from the SURVEYOR as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 21 September 1975 to 22 September 1975 (NODC Accession 7601224)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature and salinity profiles were collected from surface sensors and CTD casts in the Gulf of Alaska from the SURVEYOR. Data were collected by the Pacific...

  5. Wood and fish residuals composting in Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    David Nicholls; Thomas Richard; Jesse A. Micales

    2002-01-01

    The unique climates and industrial mix in southeast and south central Alaska are challenges being met by the region's organics recyclers. OMPOSTING wood residuals in Alaska has become increasingly important in recent years as wood processors and other industrial waste managers search for environmentally sound and profitable outlets. Traditionally, Alaska?s...

  6. Calcareous fens in Southeast Alaska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael H. McClellan; Terry Brock; James F. Baichtal

    2003-01-01

    Calcareous fens have not been identified previously in southeast Alaska. A limited survey in southeast Alaska identified several wetlands that appear to be calcareous fens. These sites were located in low-elevation discharge zones that are below recharge zones in carbonate highlands and talus foot-slopes. Two of six surveyed sites partly met the Minnesota Department of...

  7. Spruce reproduction dynamics on Alaska's Kenai Peninsula, 1987-2000.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willem W.S. van Hees

    2005-01-01

    During the past 30 years, spruce forests of Alaska’s Kenai Peninsula have undergone dramatic changes resulting from widespread spruce bark beetle(Dendroctonus rufipennis (Kirby)) infestation. In 1987 and again in 2000, the Pacific Northwest Research Station's Forest Inventory and Analysis Program conducted initial and remeasurement inventories...

  8. Scallop License Limitation Program (SLLP) Permit Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A federal Scallop License Limitation Program (SLLP) license is required onboard any vessel deployed in scallop fisheries in Federal waters off Alaska (except for...

  9. Diets and food web relationships of seabirds in the Gulf of Alaska and adjacent marine regions: Final report to the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the findings of a research program focused on the effects of petroleum development. Field studies were conducted from 1975 to 1978 on the...

  10. Small mammal baseline surveys, Alaska Peninsula/Becharof NWR, Alaska, Summer 2004, addendum

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of the Interior — This document supplements the report Small Mammal Baseline Surveys, Alaska Peninsula / Becharof NWR, Alaska – Summer 2004. After completion of that report additional...

  11. 78 FR 17340 - Control Date for Qualifying Landings History in the Western Gulf of Alaska Trawl Groundfish...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-21

    ... history for an allocation-based management or catch share program in the Western Gulf of Alaska (GOA... future management measures in determining how to credit landings and permit history acquired before or... Landings History in the Western Gulf of Alaska Trawl Groundfish Fisheries AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries...

  12. 77 FR 75966 - Control Date for Qualifying Landings History in the Central Gulf of Alaska Trawl Groundfish...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-26

    ... permit history for an allocation-based management or catch share program in the Central Gulf of Alaska..., so that the full catch history for 2012 may be considered in any such future management actions. We... Landings History in the Central Gulf of Alaska Trawl Groundfish Fisheries AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries...

  13. 76 FR 14102 - Notice of a Change in Status of an Extended Benefit (EB) Period for Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-15

    ... Employment and Training Administration Notice of a Change in Status of an Extended Benefit (EB) Period for... announces a change in benefit period eligibility under the EB program for Alaska. The following changes have... total unemployment rate for Alaska met or exceeded the 8.0% threshold to enter a high unemployment...

  14. 2005 Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys Lidar: Unalakleet, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This report is a summary of a LiDAR data collection over the community of Unalakleet, in the Norton Sound region of Alaska. The original data were collected on...

  15. Technology and Engineering Advances Supporting EarthScope's Alaska Transportable Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miner, J.; Enders, M.; Busby, R.

    2015-12-01

    EarthScope's Transportable Array (TA) in Alaska and Canada is an ongoing deployment of 261 high quality broadband seismographs. The Alaska TA is the continuation of the rolling TA/USArray deployment of 400 broadband seismographs in the lower 48 contiguous states and builds on the success of the TA project there. The TA in Alaska and Canada is operated by the IRIS Consortium on behalf of the National Science Foundation as part of the EarthScope program. By Sept 2015, it is anticipated that the TA network in Alaska and Canada will be operating 105 stations. During the summer of 2015, TA field crews comprised of IRIS and HTSI station specialists, as well as representatives from our partner agencies the Alaska Earthquake Center and the Alaska Volcano Observatory and engineers from the UNAVCO Plate Boundary Observatory will have completed a total of 36 new station installations. Additionally, we will have completed upgrades at 9 existing Alaska Earthquake Center stations with borehole seismometers and the adoption of an additional 35 existing stations. Continued development of battery systems using LiFePO4 chemistries, integration of BGAN, Iridium, Cellular and VSAT technologies for real time data transfer, and modifications to electronic systems are a driving force for year two of the Alaska Transportable Array. Station deployment utilizes custom heliportable drills for sensor emplacement in remote regions. The autonomous station design evolution include hardening the sites for Arctic, sub-Arctic and Alpine conditions as well as the integration of rechargeable Lithium Iron Phosphate batteries with traditional AGM batteries We will present new design aspects, outcomes, and lessons learned from past and ongoing deployments, as well as efforts to integrate TA stations with other existing networks in Alaska including the Plate Boundary Observatory and the Alaska Volcano Observatory.

  16. Interior Alaska Bouguer Gravity Anomaly

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A 1 kilometer Complete Bouguer Anomaly gravity grid of interior Alaska. Only those grid cells within 10 kilometers of a gravity data point have gravity values....

  17. Level III Ecoregions of Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and quantity of environmental resources. The ecoregions of Alaska are a...

  18. Seabirds - Alaska's most neglected resource

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Our purpose in this paper is to describe the nature of current and potential problems confronting seabirds in Alaska and to identify approaches to management and...

  19. Kevadel Alaska talves / Tiiu Ehrenpreis

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Ehrenpreis, Tiiu

    2007-01-01

    Autori muljeid 22.-25. märtsini Fairbanksis toimunud Alaska Ülikooli ja Ülemaailmse Arktika Uurimise Keskuse (IARC) juhtimisel GLOBE'i programmi uue projekti "Aastaajad ja bioomid" koolitusseminarist

  20. LED Street Lights in Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    During winter nights in Alaska, streetlights often remain lit more than half the day, using energy all the while. Around the nation, communities are exploring the use of : light-emitting diode technology for lighting streets and reducing energy use. ...

  1. Alaska Geoid Heights (GEOID96)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This 2' x 4' geoid height grid for Alaska is distributed as a GEOID96 model. The computation used 1.1 million terrestrial and marine gravity data held in the...

  2. Predator control problems in Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One of the important wildlife management activities in Alaska is that of predator control. This simple statement requires some explanation. In the course of these...

  3. Interior Alaska Bouguer Gravity Anomaly

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A 1 kilometer Complete Bouguer Anomaly gravity grid of interior Alaska. All grid cells within the rectangular data area (from 61 to 66 degrees North latitude and...

  4. Installation restoration program, remedial investigation/feasibility study report addendum for Indian Mountain Long Range Radar Station, Alaska. Final report, 1 August-18 December 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-01-01

    The following report is an addendum to the Indian Mountain Long Range Radar Station (LRRS) Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) report dated October 1995 (Air Force 1995a). This report and the activities described were undertaken to fulfill the goals and objectives of the Air Force Installation Restoration Program (IRP). This report includes findings from additional characterization activities conducted in August 1995 at five of 11 Indian Mountain IRP source areas and revisions to RI/FS report conclusions for those source areas.

  5. Final Environmental Assessment for the Military Housing Privatization Initiative (MHPI), Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-01

    trapped in the thawed layer over the permanently frozen subsurface ( permafrost ). Flood periods tend to occur during spring snowmelt and during the...FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR THE MILITARY HOUSING PRIVATIZATION INITIATIVE (MHPI) EIELSON AIR FORCE BASE, ALASKA MAY 2011...Privatization Initiative (MHPI) Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d

  6. Preventing Commercial Fishing Deaths in Alaska

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jennifer M. Lincoln; George A. Conway

    1999-01-01

    ... (200/100 000/year in 1991–2) among Alaska's commercial fishermen. Methods—Comprehensive surveillance of deaths in commercial fishing was established by our office during 1991 and 1992 for Alaska...

  7. Satellite View of Alaska - Direct Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Satellite View of Alaska map layer is a 200-meter-resolution simulated-natural-color image of Alaska. Vegetation is generally green, with darker greens...

  8. Life cycle costs for Alaska bridges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    A study was implemented to assist the Alaska Department of Transportation and Public Facilities (ADOT&PF) with life cycle costs for : the Alaska Highway Bridge Inventory. The study consisted of two parts. Part 1 involved working with regional offices...

  9. 40 CFR 147.101 - EPA-administered program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... program requirements of 40 CFR parts 124, 144, 146, 148, and any additional requirements set forth in the... (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Alaska § 147.101 EPA-administered program. (a) Contents. The UIC program in the State of Alaska for Class I, III, IV, and V wells...

  10. Technical document to support no further action decision for site SS17-building 102, installation restoration program remedial investigation/feasibility study, Kotzebue Long Range Radar Station, Alaska. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    This decision document is to support the No Further Action alternative for Site SS17-Building 102 at the Kotzebue LRRS, Alaska. The purpose of the decision document is to summarize existing data for the site and describe the Air Force`s rationale for selecting the no-further-action alternative.

  11. Technical document to support no further action decision for site SS07-lake, installation restoration program remedial investigation/feasibility study, Kotzebue Long Range Radar Station, Alaska. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    This decision document is to support the No Further Action alternative for Site SS07-Lake at the Kotzebue LRRS, Alaska. The purpose of the decision document is to summarize existing data for the site and describe the Air Force`s rationale for selecting the no-further-action alternative.

  12. USGS Alaska IfSAR and DEM Acquisition Plan Objectives for FY15 - FY17 from The National Map 3D Elevation Program (3DEP) - National Geospatial Data Asset (NGDA) National Elevation Data Set (NED)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior - The annual Alaska IfSAR and DEM acquisition plan is part of the 3DEP initiative to collect high-quality...

  13. Renewable energy and sustainable communities: Alaska's wind generator experience†

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Steven Konkel

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background . In 1984, the Alaska Department of Commerce and Economic Development (DCED issued the State's first inventory/economic assessment of wind generators, documenting installed wind generator capacity and the economics of replacing diesel-fuel-generated electricity. Alaska's wind generation capacity had grown from hundreds of installed kilowatts to over 15.3 megawatts (MW by January 2012. Method . This article reviews data and conclusions presented in “Alaska's Wind Energy Systems; Inventory and Economic Assessment” (1. (Alaska Department of Commerce and Economic Development, S. Konkel, 1984. It provides a foundation and baseline for understanding the development of this renewable energy source. Results . Today's technologies have evolved at an astonishing pace; a typical generator in an Alaska wind farm now is likely rated at 1.5-MW capacity, compared to the single-kilowatt (kW machines present in 1984. Installed capacity has mushroomed, illustrated by Unalakleet's 600-kW wind farm dwarfing the original three 10-kW machines included in the 1984 inventory. Kodiak Electric had three 1.5-MW turbines installed at Pillar Mountain in 2009, with three additional turbines of 4.5-MW capacity installed in 2012. Utilities now actively plan for wind generation and compete for state funding. Discussion . State of Alaska energy policy provides the context for energy project decision-making. Substantial renewable energy fund (REF awards – $202,000,000 to date for 227 REF projects in the first 5 cycles of funding – along with numerous energy conservation programs – are now in place. Increasing investment in wind is driven by multiple factors. Stakeholders have interests both in public policy and meeting private investment objectives. Wind generator investors should consider project economics and potential impacts of energy decisions on human health. Specifically this article considers: a. changing environmental conditions in remote Alaska

  14. Renewable energy and sustainable communities: Alaska's wind generator experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konkel, R Steven

    2013-01-01

    In 1984, the Alaska Department of Commerce and Economic Development (DCED) issued the State's first inventory/economic assessment of wind generators, documenting installed wind generator capacity and the economics of replacing diesel-fuel-generated electricity. Alaska's wind generation capacity had grown from hundreds of installed kilowatts to over 15.3 megawatts (MW) by January 2012. This article reviews data and conclusions presented in "Alaska's Wind Energy Systems; Inventory and Economic Assessment" (1). (Alaska Department of Commerce and Economic Development, S. Konkel, 1984). It provides a foundation and baseline for understanding the development of this renewable energy source. Today's technologies have evolved at an astonishing pace; a typical generator in an Alaska wind farm now is likely rated at 1.5-MW capacity, compared to the single-kilowatt (kW) machines present in 1984. Installed capacity has mushroomed, illustrated by Unalakleet's 600-kW wind farm dwarfing the original three 10-kW machines included in the 1984 inventory. Kodiak Electric had three 1.5-MW turbines installed at Pillar Mountain in 2009, with three additional turbines of 4.5-MW capacity installed in 2012. Utilities now actively plan for wind generation and compete for state funding. State of Alaska energy policy provides the context for energy project decision-making. Substantial renewable energy fund (REF) awards--$202,000,000 to date for 227 REF projects in the first 5 cycles of funding--along with numerous energy conservation programs--are now in place. Increasing investment in wind is driven by multiple factors. Stakeholders have interests both in public policy and meeting private investment objectives. Wind generator investors should consider project economics and potential impacts of energy decisions on human health. Specifically this article considers: changing environmental conditions in remote Alaska villages, impacts associated with climate change on human health, progress in

  15. Renewable energy and sustainable communities: Alaska's wind generator experience†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konkel, R. Steven

    2013-01-01

    Background In 1984, the Alaska Department of Commerce and Economic Development (DCED) issued the State's first inventory/economic assessment of wind generators, documenting installed wind generator capacity and the economics of replacing diesel-fuel-generated electricity. Alaska's wind generation capacity had grown from hundreds of installed kilowatts to over 15.3 megawatts (MW) by January 2012. Method This article reviews data and conclusions presented in “Alaska's Wind Energy Systems; Inventory and Economic Assessment” (1). (Alaska Department of Commerce and Economic Development, S. Konkel, 1984). It provides a foundation and baseline for understanding the development of this renewable energy source. Results Today's technologies have evolved at an astonishing pace; a typical generator in an Alaska wind farm now is likely rated at 1.5-MW capacity, compared to the single-kilowatt (kW) machines present in 1984. Installed capacity has mushroomed, illustrated by Unalakleet's 600-kW wind farm dwarfing the original three 10-kW machines included in the 1984 inventory. Kodiak Electric had three 1.5-MW turbines installed at Pillar Mountain in 2009, with three additional turbines of 4.5-MW capacity installed in 2012. Utilities now actively plan for wind generation and compete for state funding. Discussion State of Alaska energy policy provides the context for energy project decision-making. Substantial renewable energy fund (REF) awards – $202,000,000 to date for 227 REF projects in the first 5 cycles of funding – along with numerous energy conservation programs – are now in place. Increasing investment in wind is driven by multiple factors. Stakeholders have interests both in public policy and meeting private investment objectives. Wind generator investors should consider project economics and potential impacts of energy decisions on human health. Specifically this article considers:changing environmental conditions in remote Alaska villages,impacts associated

  16. Harvesting morels after wildfire in Alaska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tricia L. Wurtz; Amy L. Wiita; Nancy S. Weber; David. Pilz

    2005-01-01

    Morels are edible, choice wild mushrooms that sometimes fruit prolifically in the years immediately after an area has been burned by wildfire. Wildfires are common in interior Alaska; an average of 708,700 acres burned each year in interior Alaska between 1961 and 2000, and in major fire years, over 2 million acres burned. We discuss Alaska's boreal forest...

  17. $32 Million in EPA funds help Northwest and Alaska tribes protect communities' health, water, air and natural resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has awarded $32 million in funding for the Indian Environmental General Assistance Program (GAP) capacity building grants to tribes and tribal consortia in Alaska, Idaho, Oregon and Washington.

  18. Gulf Watch Alaska Nearshore Component: Sea Otter Aerial Survey Data Kenai Fjords National Park, 2002-2016

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — These data are part of the Gulf Watch Alaska (GWA) long term monitoring program, nearshore monitoring component. Specifically, these data describe sea otter (Enhydra...

  19. Acoustic-trawl (AT) survey of Walleye Pollock in the Gulf of Alaska (DY1502, EK60)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Midwater Assessment and Conservation Engineering (MACE) program of NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), Alaska Fisheries Science Center (AFSC)...

  20. Acoustic-Trawl Surveys of Walleye Pollock in the Central Gulf of Alaska (DY0904, ME70)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Midwater Assessment and Conservation Engineering (MACE) program of NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), Alaska Fisheries Science Center (AFSC)...

  1. Improving Sanitation and Health in Rural Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bubenheim, David L.

    2013-01-01

    system determined. The testbed will be a part of the university education and operator training program. The "Forgotten Alaska" has long awaited this technology to augment the traditional

  2. Alaska Energy Inventory Project: Consolidating Alaska's Energy Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papp, K.; Clough, J.; Swenson, R.; Crimp, P.; Hanson, D.; Parker, P.

    2007-12-01

    Alaska has considerable energy resources distributed throughout the state including conventional oil, gas, and coal, and unconventional coalbed and shalebed methane, gas hydrates, geothermal, wind, hydro, and biomass. While much of the known large oil and gas resources are concentrated on the North Slope and in the Cook Inlet regions, the other potential sources of energy are dispersed across a varied landscape from frozen tundra to coastal settings. Despite the presence of these potential energy sources, rural Alaska is mostly dependent upon diesel fuel for both electrical power generation and space heating needs. At considerable cost, large quantities of diesel fuel are transported to more than 150 roadless communities by barge or airplane and stored in large bulk fuel tank farms for winter months when electricity and heat are at peak demands. Recent increases in the price of oil have severely impacted the price of energy throughout Alaska, and especially hard hit are rural communities and remote mines that are off the road system and isolated from integrated electrical power grids. Even though the state has significant conventional gas resources in restricted areas, few communities are located near enough to these resources to directly use natural gas to meet their energy needs. To address this problem, the Alaska Energy Inventory project will (1) inventory and compile all available Alaska energy resource data suitable for electrical power generation and space heating needs including natural gas, coal, coalbed and shalebed methane, gas hydrates, geothermal, wind, hydro, and biomass and (2) identify locations or regions where the most economic energy resource or combination of energy resources can be developed to meet local needs. This data will be accessible through a user-friendly web-based interactive map, based on the Alaska Department of Natural Resources, Land Records Information Section's (LRIS) Alaska Mapper, Google Earth, and Terrago Technologies' Geo

  3. Benthic organism and other data from the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship MILLER FREEMAN and other platforms as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1978-07-30 to 1979-11-26 (NODC Accession 8200057)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Benthic organism and other data were collected in the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship MILLER FREEMAN and other platforms by University of Alaska; Institute of Marine...

  4. Benthic organism and other data from grab casts from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER in the Gulf of Alaska as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1975-10-08 to 1975-10-16 (NODC Accession 7601793)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Benthic organism and other data were collected from grab casts in the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER by the University of Alaska - Fairbanks; Institute of...

  5. Benthic organism and other data from otter trawls and bottom grabs in the Gulf of Alaska from the NORTH PACIFIC as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 03 May 1975 to 07 August 1975 (NODC Accession 7601352)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Benthic organism and other data were collected from otter trawls and bottom grabs in the Gulf of Alaska from the NORTH PACIFIC by the University of Alaska -...

  6. Benthic organism and other data from bottom grabs from the ACONA and other platforms in the Gulf of Alaska as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 02 July 1974 to 16 May 1975 (NODC Accession 7601353)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Benthic organism and other data were collected in the Gulf of Alaska from the ACONA and other platforms by the University of Alaska - Fairbanks; Institute of Marine...

  7. Benthic organism and other data from net trawls in the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship MILLER FREEMAN and other platforms as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1977-11-05 to 1978-11-16 (NODC Accession 8000164)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Benthic organism and other data were collected from net trawls in the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship MILLER FREEMAN and other platforms by University of Alaska;...

  8. Benthic organism and other data from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER and other platforms from the Gulf of Alaska as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1976-06-14 to 1976-09-15 (NODC Accession 7800759)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Benthic organism and other data were collected in the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER and other platforms by the University of Alaska; Institute of Marine...

  9. Differences in cancer incidence among Indians in Alaska and New Mexico and U.S. Whites, 1993-2002.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Janet J; Lanier, Anne P; Alberts, Steven; Wiggins, Charles L

    2006-08-01

    Cancer incidence for American Indians and Alaska Natives is typically reported as a single rate for all U.S. indigenous populations combined. Previously reported combined rates suggest that American Indians and Alaska Natives have lower cancer incidence rates compared with the U.S. population. Alaska Native people comprise three major ethnic groups: Eskimo, Indian, and Aleut people. We examined cancer incidence from only Alaska Indians and compared incidence rates with an American Indian population living in New Mexico. These data indicate striking differences in cancer patterns between two American Indian populations. Cancer data for the years 1993 to 2002 for American Indians of New Mexico and U.S. Whites are from the National Cancer Institute Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program Public-use data set. Data for Alaska Indians are from the Alaska Native Tumor Registry, which is also a Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results Program participant. Overall, cancer incidence rates for all sites combined in New Mexico Indian men and women were lower than U.S. White rates, whereas Alaska Indian men and women exceeded U.S. rates. In comparing Alaska and New Mexico Indians, we observed a 2.5-fold higher incidence of cancer among Alaska Indians. The largest differences between the two Indian populations were noted primarily in cancers associated with tobacco use, including cancers of the oral cavity/pharynx, esophagus (only in men), colon and rectum, pancreas, larynx (men), lung, prostate, and urinary bladder (men). Lung cancer rates in Alaska Indian men and women were 7 and 10 times those of New Mexico Indian men and women.

  10. Alaska volcanoes guidebook for teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adleman, Jennifer N.

    2011-01-01

    Alaska’s volcanoes, like its abundant glaciers, charismatic wildlife, and wild expanses inspire and ignite scientific curiosity and generate an ever-growing source of questions for students in Alaska and throughout the world. Alaska is home to more than 140 volcanoes, which have been active over the last 2 million years. About 90 of these volcanoes have been active within the last 10,000 years and more than 50 of these have been active since about 1700. The volcanoes in Alaska make up well over three-quarters of volcanoes in the United States that have erupted in the last 200 years. In fact, Alaska’s volcanoes erupt so frequently that it is almost guaranteed that an Alaskan will experience a volcanic eruption in his or her lifetime, and it is likely they will experience more than one. It is hard to imagine a better place for students to explore active volcanism and to understand volcanic hazards, phenomena, and global impacts. Previously developed teachers’ guidebooks with an emphasis on the volcanoes in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park (Mattox, 1994) and Mount Rainier National Park in the Cascade Range (Driedger and others, 2005) provide place-based resources and activities for use in other volcanic regions in the United States. Along the lines of this tradition, this guidebook serves to provide locally relevant and useful resources and activities for the exploration of numerous and truly unique volcanic landscapes in Alaska. This guidebook provides supplemental teaching materials to be used by Alaskan students who will be inspired to become educated and prepared for inevitable future volcanic activity in Alaska. The lessons and activities in this guidebook are meant to supplement and enhance existing science content already being taught in grade levels 6–12. Correlations with Alaska State Science Standards and Grade Level Expectations adopted by the Alaska State Department of Education and Early Development (2006) for grades six through eleven are listed at

  11. Institutional innovation in less than ideal conditions: Management of commons by an Alaska Native village corporation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dixie Dayo

    2009-09-01

    innovative solutions that overcome formal institutional shortfalls. We draw on the experiences of Native corporations in several regions of Alaska, with a focus on Bean Ridge Corporation (BRC, the village corporation which owns lands in and around the community of Manley Hot Springs, Alaska. Programs to distribute corporate earnings, address trespassing, and maintain cultural traditions are described.

  12. Dynamics of change in Alaska's boreal forests: resilience and vulnerability in response to climate warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    A. David McGuire; F.S. Chapin; R.W. Ruess

    2010-01-01

    Long-term research by the Bonanza Creek (BNZ) Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) program has documented natural patterns of interannual and successional variability of the boreal forest in interior Alaska against which we can detect changes in system behavior. Between 2004 and 2010 the BNZ LTER program focused on understanding the dynamics of change through studying...

  13. Geologic framework of the Alaska Peninsula, southwest Alaska, and the Alaska Peninsula terrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Frederic H.; Detterman, Robert L.; DuBois, Gregory D.

    2015-01-01

    The Alaska Peninsula is composed of the late Paleozoic to Quaternary sedimentary, igneous, and minor metamorphic rocks that record the history of a number of magmatic arcs. These magmatic arcs include an unnamed Late Triassic(?) and Early Jurassic island arc, the early Cenozoic Meshik arc, and the late Cenozoic Aleutian arc. Also found on the Alaska Peninsula is one of the most complete nonmetamorphosed, fossiliferous, marine Jurassic sedimentary sections known. As much as 8,500 m of section of Mesozoic sedimentary rocks record the growth and erosion of the Early Jurassic island arc.

  14. Chronic Liver Disease and American Indians/Alaska Natives

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... American Indian/Alaska Native > Chronic Liver Disease Chronic Liver Disease and American Indians/Alaska Natives Among American Indians and Alaska Natives, chronic liver disease is a leading cause of death. While the ...

  15. Alaska Coal Geology, Resources, and Coalbed Methane Potential

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Estimated Alaska coal resources are largely in Cretaceous and Tertiary rocks distributed in three major provinces. Northern Alaska-Slope, Central Alaska-Nenana, and...

  16. DOE/NREL supported wind energy activities in Alaska

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drouilhet, S.

    1997-12-01

    This paper describes three wind energy projects implemented in Alaska. The first, a sustainable technology energy partnerships (STEP) wind energy deployment project in Kotzebue will install 6 AOC 15/50 wind turbines and connect to the existing village diesel grid, consisting of approximately 1 MW average load. It seeks to develop solutions to the problems of arctic wind energy installations (transport, foundations, erection, operation, and maintenance), to establish a wind turbine test site, and to establish the Kotzebue Electric Association as a training and deployment center for wind/diesel technology in rural Alaska. The second project, a large village medium-penetration wind/diesel system, also in Kotzebue, will install a 1-2 MW windfarm, which will supplement the AOC turbines of the STEP project. The program will investigate the impact of medium penetration wind energy on power quality and system stability. The third project, the Alaska high-penetration wind/diesel village power pilot project in Wales will install a high penetration (80-100%) wind/diesel system in a remote Alaskan village. The system will include about 180 kW installed wind capacity, meeting an average village load of about 60 kW. This program will provide a model for high penetration wind retrofits to village diesel power systems and build the capability in Alaska to operate, maintain, and replicate wind/diesel technology. The program will also address problems of: effective use of excess wind energy; reliable diesel-off operation; and the role of energy storage.

  17. Alaska's indigenous muskoxen: a history

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter C. Lent

    1998-03-01

    Full Text Available Muskoxen (Ovibos moschatus were widespread in northern and interior Alaska in the late Pleistocene but were never a dominant component of large mammal faunas. After the end of the Pleistocene they were even less common. Most skeletal finds have come from the Arctic Coastal Plain and the foothills of the Brooks Range. Archaeological evidence, mainly from the Point Barrow area, suggests that humans sporadically hunted small numbers of muskoxen over about 1500 years from early Birnirk culture to nineteenth century Thule culture. Skeletal remains found near Kivalina represent the most southerly Holocene record for muskoxen in Alaska. Claims that muskoxen survived into the early nineteenth century farther south in the Selawik - Buckland River region are not substantiated. Remains of muskox found by Beechey's party in Eschscholtz Bay in 1826 were almost certainly of Pleistocene age, not recent. Neither the introduction of firearms nor overwintering whalers played a significant role in the extinction of Alaska's muskoxen. Inuit hunters apparently killed the last muskoxen in northwestern Alaska in the late 1850s. Several accounts suggest that remnant herds survived in the eastern Brooks Range into the 1890s. However, there is no physical evidence or independent confirmation of these reports. Oral traditions regarding muskoxen survived among the Nunamiut and the Chandalar Kutchin. With human help, muskoxen have successfully recolonized their former range from the Seward Peninsula north, across the Arctic Slope and east into the northern Yukon Territory.

  18. Spring staging waterfowl on the Naknek River, Alaska Peninsula, Alaska, March-May 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A survey of spring staging waterfowl on the Naknek River in the Bristol Bay drainage, Alaska Peninsula, Alaska, was conducted from 17 March – 18 May, 2005....

  19. Prehistoric and historic subsistence-settlement patterns on the central Alaska Peninsula, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Alaska Peninsula, Alaska, is the home of three major historic hunter-gatherer cultures --- the Alutiit, the Central Yup'ik, and the Unangan. Regional questions...

  20. IMPROVING SCIENCE EDUCATION AND CAREER OPPORTUNITIES IN RURAL ALASKA:The Synergistic Connection between Educational Outreach Efforts in the Copper Valley, Alaska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solie, D. J.; McCarthy, S.

    2004-12-01

    The objective of the High frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) Education Outreach is to enhance the science education opportunities in the Copper Valley region in Alaska. In the process, we also educate local residents about HAARP and its research. Funded jointly by US Air Force and Navy, HAARP is located at Gakona Alaska, a very rural region of central Alaska with a predominantly Native population. The main instrument at HAARP is a vertically directed, phased array RF transmitter which is primarily an ionospheric research tool, however, its geophysical research applications range from terrestrial to near-space. Research is conducted at HAARP in collaboration with scientists and institutions world-wide. The HAARP Education Outreach Program, run through the University of Alaska Geophysical Institute has been active for over six years and in that time has become an integral part of science education in the Copper Valley for residents of all ages. HAARP education outreach efforts are through direct involvement in local schools in the Copper River School District (CRSD) and the Prince William Sound Community College (PWSCC), as well as public lectures and workshops, and intern and student research programs. These outreach efforts require cooperation and coordination between the CRSD, PWSCC, the University of Alaska Fairbanks Physics Department and the NSF sponsored Alaska Native Science & Engineering Program (ANSEP) and HAARP researchers. The HAARP Outreach program also works with other organizations promoting science education in the region, such as the National Park Service (Wrangell- St. Elias National Park) and the Wrangell Institute for Science and Environment (WISE) a newly formed regional non-profit organization. We work closely with teachers in the schools, adapting to their needs and the particular scientific topic they are covering at the time. Because of time and logistic constraints, outreach visits to schools are episodic, occurring roughly

  1. Smoking-related knowledge, attitudes, and behaviours among Alaska Native people: a population-based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristen Rohde

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background. Several studies have shown that Alaska Native people have higher smoking prevalence than non-Natives. However, no population-based studies have explored whether smoking-related knowledge, attitudes, and behaviours also differ among Alaska Native people and non-Natives. Objective. We compared current smoking prevalence and smoking-related knowledge, attitudes, and behaviour of Alaska Native adults living in the state of Alaska with non-Natives. Methods. We used Alaska Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System data for 1996 to 2010 to compare smoking prevalence, consumption, and cessation- and second-hand smoke-related knowledge, attitudes, and behaviours among self-identified Alaska Native people and non-Natives. Results. Current smoking prevalence was 41% (95% CI: 37.9%–44.4% among Alaska Native people compared with 17.1% (95% CI: 15.9%–18.4% among non-Natives. Among current every day smokers, Alaska Natives were much more likely to smoke less than 10 cigarettes per day (OR=5.0, 95% CI: 2.6–9.6 than non-Natives. Compared with non-Native smokers, Alaska Native smokers were as likely to have made a past year quit attempt (OR=1.4, 95% CI: 0.9–2.1, but the attempt was less likely to be successful (OR=0.5, 95% CI: 0.2–0.9. Among current smokers, Alaska Natives were more likely to believe second-hand smoke (SHS was very harmful (OR=4.5, 95% CI: 2.8–7.2, to believe that smoking should not be allowed in indoor work areas (OR=1.9, 95% CI: 1.1–3.1 or in restaurants (OR=4.2, 95% CI: 2.5–6.9, to have a home smoking ban (OR=2.5, 95% CI: 1.6–3.9, and to have no home exposure to SHS in the past 30 days (OR=2.3, 95% CI: 1.5–3.6 than non-Natives. Conclusion. Although a disparity in current smoking exists, Alaska Native people have smoking-related knowledge, attitudes, and behaviours that are encouraging for reducing the burden of smoking in this population. Programs should support efforts to promote cessation, prevent relapse

  2. Introduction: The Alaska Synthetic Aperture Radar Facility special section

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carsey, Frank D.; McNutt, Lyn; Rothrock, D. Andrew

    1994-11-01

    In 1985 the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the University of Alaska agreed to implement, at the Geophysical Institute of the Fairbanks campus, a facility dedicated to the acquisition, processing, distribution, and archival of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data to be downlinked from satellites. Since then, the Alaska SAR Facility (ASF) has been an active part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. ASF Program goals were outlined by Carsey et al. [1987]. Plans were put in place to support three satellites, and the first two, the First European Remote Sensing Satellite (ERS 1) (launched in My 1991) and the Japanese Earth Resources Satellite (JERS 1) (launched in February 1992) are presently in orbit and are being supported by ASF. The third, the Canadian RADARSAT, is scheduled for launch in the spring of 1995. Future satellite missions by U.S. or foreign agencies may well be added in time.

  3. Sensor emplacement testing at Poker Flat, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reusch, A.; Beaudoin, B. C.; Anderson, K. E.; Azevedo, S.; Carothers, L.; Love, M.; Miller, P. E.; Parker, T.; Pfeifer, M.; Slad, G.; Thomas, D.; Aderhold, K.

    2013-12-01

    PASSCAL provides equipment and support for temporary seismic projects. Speed and efficiency of deployments are essential. A revised emplacement technique of putting broadband sensors directly into soil (aka direct burial) is being tested. The first phase (fall 2011 to spring 2013) comparing data quality and sensor stability between the direct burial and the traditional 1 m deep temporary PASSCAL-style vault in a wet and noisy site near San Antonio, NM is complete. Results suggest there is little or no difference in sensor performance in the relatively high-noise environment of this initial test. The second phase was started in November 2012 with the goal of making the same comparison, but at Poker Flat, Alaska, in a low-noise, high-signal, cold and wet environment, alongside a Transportable Array (TA) deployment to be used as a performance control. This location is in an accessible and secure area with very low site noise. In addition to benefiting future worldwide PASSCAL deployments, the Poker Flat experiment serves a secondary purpose of testing modifications necessary to successfully deploy and recover broadband stations in a cold environment with the limited logistics anticipated for remote Flexible Array (FA) and PASSCAL Program deployments in Alaska. Developing emplacement techniques that maintain high data quality and data return while minimizing logistics is critical to enable principle investigators to effectively and efficiently co-locate within the future TA Alaska footprint. Three Nanometrics sensors were installed in November 2012 in power-augered holes 76 cm in depth: a Trillium Compact Posthole (PH) and two Trillium 120PH units (one standard PH and one enhanced PHQ). The installations took less than 8 hours in -30°C conditions with 4 hours of usable daylight. The Compact PH and the 120PHQ are delivering data in realtime, while the 120PH is testing standalone power and data collection systems. Preliminary results compare favorably to each other as

  4. Alaska Phocid Morphometrics

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Polar Ecosystems Program research projects focus primarily on abundance, trends, distribution, health and condition, and foraging behavior of phocids (harbor,...

  5. Northern Alaska Landscape/Permafrost GIS Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    Arctic Landscape Conservation Cooperative — This data set represents an updated Ecological Subsection Map for Northern Alaska. This update includes permafrost mapping to include the following new layers:...

  6. Alaska's renewable energy potential.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2009-02-01

    This paper delivers a brief survey of renewable energy technologies applicable to Alaska's climate, latitude, geography, and geology. We first identify Alaska's natural renewable energy resources and which renewable energy technologies would be most productive. e survey the current state of renewable energy technologies and research efforts within the U.S. and, where appropriate, internationally. We also present information on the current state of Alaska's renewable energy assets, incentives, and commercial enterprises. Finally, we escribe places where research efforts at Sandia National Laboratories could assist the state of Alaska with its renewable energy technology investment efforts.

  7. USGS releases Alaska oil assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showstack, Randy

    With the U.S. Congress gearing up for a House-Senate conference committee battle about whether to open the Alaska National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) for oil drilling, a new assessment of the amount of oil in the federal portion of the U.S. National Petroleum Reserve in Alaska (NRPA) is influencing the debate.The U.S. Geological Survey has found that the NPRA holds "significantly greater" petroleum resources than had been estimated previously This finding was disclosed in a 16 May report. The assessment estimated that technically recoverable oil on NPRA federal lands are between 5.9 and 13.2 billion barrels of oil; a 1980 assessment estimated between 0.3 and 5.4 billion barrels.

  8. 1964 Great Alaska Earthquake: a photographic tour of Anchorage, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoms, Evan E.; Haeussler, Peter J.; Anderson, Rebecca D.; McGimsey, Robert G.

    2014-01-01

    On March 27, 1964, at 5:36 p.m., a magnitude 9.2 earthquake, the largest recorded earthquake in U.S. history, struck southcentral Alaska (fig. 1). The Great Alaska Earthquake (also known as the Good Friday Earthquake) occurred at a pivotal time in the history of earth science, and helped lead to the acceptance of plate tectonic theory (Cox, 1973; Brocher and others, 2014). All large subduction zone earthquakes are understood through insights learned from the 1964 event, and observations and interpretations of the earthquake have influenced the design of infrastructure and seismic monitoring systems now in place. The earthquake caused extensive damage across the State, and triggered local tsunamis that devastated the Alaskan towns of Whittier, Valdez, and Seward. In Anchorage, the main cause of damage was ground shaking, which lasted approximately 4.5 minutes. Many buildings could not withstand this motion and were damaged or collapsed even though their foundations remained intact. More significantly, ground shaking triggered a number of landslides along coastal and drainage valley bluffs underlain by the Bootlegger Cove Formation, a composite of facies containing variably mixed gravel, sand, silt, and clay which were deposited over much of upper Cook Inlet during the Late Pleistocene (Ulery and others, 1983). Cyclic (or strain) softening of the more sensitive clay facies caused overlying blocks of soil to slide sideways along surfaces dipping by only a few degrees. This guide is the document version of an interactive web map that was created as part of the commemoration events for the 50th anniversary of the 1964 Great Alaska Earthquake. It is accessible at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Alaska Science Center website: http://alaska.usgs.gov/announcements/news/1964Earthquake/. The website features a map display with suggested tour stops in Anchorage, historical photographs taken shortly after the earthquake, repeat photography of selected sites, scanned documents

  9. Appendix 1: Regional summaries - Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jane M. Wolken; Teresa N. Hollingsworth

    2012-01-01

    Alaskan forests cover one-third of the state’s 52 million ha of land (Parson et al. 2001), and are regionally and globally significant. Ninety percent of Alaskan forests are classified as boreal, representing 4 percent of the world’s boreal forests, and are located throughout interior and south-central Alaska (fig. A1-1). The remaining 10 percent of Alaskan forests are...

  10. Bering Strait, Alaska, United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Summer run off from the Yukon River, the source of which is hidden by clouds on image right, is filling the Norton Sound (image center) with brownish sediment. The Bering Sea (image left) appears to be supporting a large phytoplankton population, as blue-green swirls are evident from north to south in this true-color MODIS image of Alaska. Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team

  11. Recruiting first generation college students into the Geosciences: Alaska's EDGE project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, A.; Connor, C.

    2008-12-01

    Funded in 2005-2008, by the National Science Foundation's Geoscience Education Division, the Experiential Discoveries in Geoscience Education (EDGE) project was designed to use glacier and watershed field experiences as venues for geospatial data collected by Alaska's grade 6-12 middle and high school teachers and their students. EDGE participants were trained in GIS and learned to analyze geospatial data to answer questions about the warming Alaska environment and to determine rates of ongoing glacier recession. Important emphasis of the program was the recruitment of Alaska Native students of Inupiat, Yup'ik, Athabascan, and Tlingit populations, living in both rural and urban areas around the state. Twelve of Alaska's 55 school districts have participated in the EDGE program. To engage EDGE students in the practice of scientific inquiry, each was required to carry out a semester scale research project using georeferenced data, guided by their EDGE teacher and mentor. Across Alaska students investigated several Earth systems processes including freezing conditions of lake ice; the changes in water quality in storm drains after rainfall events; movements of moose, bears, and bison across Alaskan landscapes; changes in permafrost depth in western Alaska; and the response of migrating waterfowl to these permafrost changes. Students correlated the substrate beneath their schools with known earthquake intensities; measured cutbank and coastal erosion on northern rivers and southeastern shorelines; tracked salmon infiltration of flooded logging roads; noted the changing behavior of eagles during late winter salmon runs; located good areas for the use of tidal power for energy production; tracked the extent and range of invasive plant species with warming; and the change of forests following deglaciation. Each cohort of EDGE students and teachers finished the program by attended a 3-day EDGE symposium at which students presented their research projects first in a

  12. AFSC/RACE/MACE: Results of 2009 ACOUSTIC-TRAWL SURVEYS OF THE SHUMAGINS, SANAK TROUGH & WESTERN GULF OF ALASKA SHELFBREAK DY0901

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Scientists from the Midwater Assessment and Conservation Engineering (MACE) Program of the Alaska Fisheries Science Center's (AFSC) Resource Assessment and...

  13. U.S. Geological Survey Polar Bear Mark-Recapture Records, Alaska Portion of the Southern Beaufort Sea, 2001-2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — These data were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey, Alaska Science Center, Polar Bear Research Program as part of long-term research on the southern Beaufort...

  14. Gulf Watch Alaska, Nearshore Monitoring Component: Sea Otter Foraging Observations from Prince William Sound, Katmai National Park and Preserve, and Kenai Fjords National Park, 2012-2016

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data is part of the Gulf Watch Alaska (GWA) long term monitoring program, benthic monitoring component and a seasonal diet study in Kenai Fjords National Park....

  15. Gulf Watch Alaska Nearshore Component: Intertidal Mussel Site Data from Prince William Sound, Katmai National Park and Preserve, and Kenai Fjords National Park, 2016

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data is part of the Gulf Watch Alaska (GWA) long term monitoring program, nearshore monitoring component. Specifically, these data describe mussel sampling and...

  16. Gulf Watch Alaska Nearshore Component: Intertidal Mussel Site Data from Prince William Sound, Katmai National Park and Preserve, and Kenai Fjords National Park, 2008-2015

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data is part of the Gulf Watch Alaska (GWA) long term monitoring program, nearshore monitoring component. Specifically, these data describe mussel sampling and...

  17. Economic growth and change in southeast Alaska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhonda Mazza

    2004-01-01

    This report focuses on economic trends since the 1970s in rural southeast Alaska. These trends are compared with those in the Nation and in nonmetropolitan areas of the country to determine the extent to which the economy in rural southeast Alaska is affected by regional activity and by larger market forces. Many of the economic changes occurring in rural southeast...

  18. Nontimber forest product opportunities in Alaska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David Pilz; Susan J. Alexander; Jerry Smith; Robert Schroeder; Jim. Freed

    2006-01-01

    Nontimber forest products from southern Alaska (also called special forest products) have been used for millennia as resources vital to the livelihoods and culture of Alaska Natives and, more recently, as subsistence resources for the welfare of all citizens. Many of these products are now being sold, and Alaskans seek additional income opportunities through...

  19. Potential for forest products in interior Alaska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George R. Sampson; Willem W.S. van Hees; Theodore S. Setzer; Richard C. Smith

    1988-01-01

    Future opportunities for producing Alaska forest products were examined from the perspective of timber supply as reported in timber inventory reports and past studies of forest products industry potential. The best prospects for increasing industrial production of forest products in interior Alaska are for softwood lumber. Current softwood lumber production in the...

  20. Beverage consumption in an Alaska Native village: a mixed-methods study of behaviour, attitudes and access

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deena Elwan

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: American Indians/Alaska Natives (AI/AN have the highest prevalence of obesity for any racial/ethnic group. Previous studies examining risk factors for obesity have identified excessive sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB and inadequate water consumption as major risk factors for this population group. The historical scarcity of water in rural Alaska may explain consumption patterns including reliance on SSBs and other packaged drinks. Methods: Our study was designed to assess SSB, water and other beverage consumption and attitudes towards consumption in Alaska Native children and adults residing in rural Alaska. During summer 2014, 2 focus groups were conducted employing community members in a small rural village more than 200 air miles west of Fairbanks, Alaska. Interviews were completed with shop owners, Early Head Start and Head Start program instructors (n=7. SSB and total beverage intakes were measured using a modified version of the BEVQ-15, (n=69. Results: High rates of SSB consumption (defined as sweetened juice beverages, soda, sweet tea, energy drink or sports drinks and low rates of water consumption were reported for all age groups in the village. All adolescents and 81% of children reported drinking SSBs at least once per week in the last month, and 48% of adolescents and 29% of younger children reported daily consumption. Fifty-two per cent of adults reported consuming SSBs at least once per week and 20% reported daily consumption. Twenty-five per cent of adolescents reported never drinking water in the past month, and 19% of younger children and 21% of adults did not consume water daily. Conclusion: Alaska Native children and adults living in the Interior Alaska consume high amounts of SSBs including energy drinks and insufficient amounts of water. Interventions targeting beverage consumption are urgently needed for the Alaska Native population in rural Alaska.

  1. 77 FR 44472 - Safety Zone; Port Valdez, Alaska Maritime Highway System Ferry Terminal

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-30

    ... . If you have questions on viewing the docket, call Renee V. Wright, Program Manager, Docket Operations... Game, which does not afford time for public feedback on a safety zone that will be in effect only when... month of July, the Alaska Department of Fish and Game has announced fishing openers in the Port of...

  2. Conterminous U.S. and Alaska Forest Type Mapping Using Forest Inventory and Analysis Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    B. Ruefenacht; M.V. Finco; M.D. Nelson; R. Czaplewski; E.H. Helmer; J. A. Blackard; G.R. Holden; A.J. Lister; D. Salajanu; D. Weyermann; K. Winterberger

    2008-01-01

    Classification-trees were used to model forest type groups and forest types for the conterminous United States and Alaska. The predictor data were a geospatial data set with a spatial resolution of 250 m developed by the U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service (USFS). The response data were plot data from the USFS Forest Inventory and Analysis program. Overall...

  3. Forest community classification of the Porcupine River drainage, interior Alaska, and its application to forest management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John. Yarie

    1983-01-01

    The forest vegetation of 3,600,000 hectares in northeast interior Alaska was classified. A total of 365 plots located in a stratified random design were run through the ordination programs SIMORD and TWINSPAN. A total of 40 forest communities were described vegetatively and, to a limited extent, environmentally. The area covered by each community was similar, ranging...

  4. Map and table showing isotopic age data in Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Frederic H.; Shew, Nora B.; DuBois, G.D.

    1994-01-01

    The source of the data reported here is a compilation of radiometric ages maintained in conjunction with the Alaska Mineral Resource Assessment Program (AMRAP) studies for Alaska. The symbol shape plotted at each location is coded for rock type, whether igneous, metamorphic, or other; the color of the symbol shows the geologic era or period for the Sample(s) at each locale. A list of references for each quadrangle is given to enable the user to find specific information including analytical data for each sample dated within a particular quadrangle. At the scale of this map, the very large number of Samples and the clustering of the samples in limited areas prevented the showing of individual sample numbers on the map.Synthesis and interpretation of any data set requires the user to evaluate the reliability or value of each component of the data set with respect to his or her intended use of the data. For geochronological data, this evaluation must be based on both analytical and geological criteria. Most age determinations are published with calculated estimates of analytical precision, Replicate analyses are infrequently performed; therefore, reported analytical precision is based on estimates of the precision of various components of the analysis and often on an intuitive factor to cover components that may have not been considered. Analytical accuracy is somewhat more difficult to determine; it is not only dependent on the actual measurement, it is also concerned with uncertainties in decay and abundance constants, uncertainties in the isotopic composition and size of the tracer for conventional K-Ar ages, and uncertainties in the Original isotopic composition of the sample, Geologic accuracy of a date is Variable; the interpretation of the meaning of an age determination, is important in the evaluation of its geologic accuracy. Potassium-argon, rubidium-strontium, and uranium-lead age determinations on a single sample can differ widely yet none or all may be

  5. Occupational fatalities in Alaska: two decades of progress, 1990-1999 and 2000-2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lincoln, Jennifer M; O'Connor, Mary B; Retzer, Kyla D; Hill, Ryan D; Teske, Theodore D; Woodward, Chelsea C; Lucas, Devin L; Somervell, Philip D; Burton, Jason T; Mode, Nicolle A; Husberg, Brad J; Conway, George A

    2013-02-01

    Alaska had the highest work-related fatality rate of any state during 1980-1989. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health established the Alaska Field Station (AFS) to address this problem. AFS established surveillance systems to provide scientific assessments of occupational hazards. Interventions were developed in collaboration with partners and evaluated. During 2000-2009, Alaska experienced a 42.5% decline in work-related fatalities over the previous decade of 1990-1999. In 2009, the workplace fatality rate for Alaska was 5.6/100,000 workers. Commercial pilot deaths were reduced by 50% and Bering Sea crab fishing death rates were reduced by 60%. Building on this success, AFS established national programs to improve safety in the commercial fishing and oil and gas extraction industries. A focused, epidemiological approach to reducing fatalities in high-risk occupations is effective. Ongoing commitment to this type of approach will assist in continued success in Alaska and elsewhere. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. The State of Alaska's early experience with institutionalization of health impact assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul J. Anderson

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background . Many nations routinely include health impact assessments (HIA in public policy decisions. Institutionalization of HIA formally integrates health considerations into a governmental decision-making process. We describe an example of institutionalization in the United States through Alaska's early experience with institutionalization of HIA. Literature review . HIA arose from a series of health conferences in the 1970s that affirmed the importance of “health for all.” A number of key milestones eventually defined HIA as a unique field of impact assessment. There are several approaches to institutionalization, and one common approach in the United States is through the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA. NEPA formed the basis for the earliest HIAs in Alaska. Program description . Early HIAs in Alaska led to conferences, working groups, a state guidance document and the institutionalization of a HIA program within the Department of Health and Social Services in 2010. A medical epidemiologist staffs the program, which utilizes contractors to meet rising demand for HIA. The HIA program has sustainable funding from the state budget and from the state's natural resource permitting process. The HIA document is the main deliverable, but the program performs other tasks, including fieldwork and technical reviews. The HIA program works closely with a host of collaborative partners. Conclusion . Alaska's institutionalized HIA program benefits from sustainable funding that promotes continuous quality improvement and involves the program in the entire life cycle of a development project. The program structure adapts well to variations in workflow and supports a host of quality control activities. Currently, the program focuses on HIAs for natural resource development projects.

  7. Alaska Village Electric Load Calculator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devine, M.; Baring-Gould, E. I.

    2004-10-01

    As part of designing a village electric power system, the present and future electric loads must be defined, including both seasonal and daily usage patterns. However, in many cases, detailed electric load information is not readily available. NREL developed the Alaska Village Electric Load Calculator to help estimate the electricity requirements in a village given basic information about the types of facilities located within the community. The purpose of this report is to explain how the load calculator was developed and to provide instructions on its use so that organizations can then use this model to calculate expected electrical energy usage.

  8. The State of Alaska's early experience with institutionalization of health impact assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Paul J; Yoder, Sarah; Fogels, Ed; Krieger, Gary; McLaughlin, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Many nations routinely include health impact assessments (HIA) in public policy decisions. Institutionalization of HIA formally integrates health considerations into a governmental decision-making process. We describe an example of institutionalization in the United States through Alaska's early experience with institutionalization of HIA. HIA arose from a series of health conferences in the 1970s that affirmed the importance of "health for all." A number of key milestones eventually defined HIA as a unique field of impact assessment. There are several approaches to institutionalization, and one common approach in the United States is through the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). NEPA formed the basis for the earliest HIAs in Alaska. Early HIAs in Alaska led to conferences, working groups, a state guidance document and the institutionalization of a HIA program within the Department of Health and Social Services in 2010. A medical epidemiologist staffs the program, which utilizes contractors to meet rising demand for HIA. The HIA program has sustainable funding from the state budget and from the state's natural resource permitting process. The HIA document is the main deliverable, but the program performs other tasks, including fieldwork and technical reviews. The HIA program works closely with a host of collaborative partners. Alaska's institutionalized HIA program benefits from sustainable funding that promotes continuous quality improvement and involves the program in the entire life cycle of a development project. The program structure adapts well to variations in workflow and supports a host of quality control activities. Currently, the program focuses on HIAs for natural resource development projects.

  9. First regional super ESPC a success on Kodiak Island, Alaska

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Epstein, K.

    2000-12-23

    The Coast Guard military base on Kodiak Island, Alaska, is the largest Coast Guard base in the world. By taking a leadership role in a pilot program to streamline Federal financing and procurement for energy saving projects, the Coast Guard is saving more than $220,000 a year in energy costs at this base. Using the Super ESPC (Energy Savings Performance Contracting) program, the Coast Guard was able to quickly contract with an experienced contractor with energy savings expertise. Working with ERI, one of FEMP's (Federal Energy Management Program) approved energy services contractors, the Coast Guard determined areas of potential energy savings and designed a retrofit to upgrade inefficient equipment and infrastructure. When energy-efficient modifications are complete, the base will be 30% more cost effective.

  10. Western Alaska ESI: FISHL (Fish Lines)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for anadromous fish species in Western Alaska. Vector lines in this data set represent species occurrences...

  11. Western Alaska ESI: INVERT (Invertebrate Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for marine and estuarine invertebrate species in Western Alaska. Vector polygons in this data set represent...

  12. Alaska1(ak1_iso) Gravity Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The gravity station data (72,677 records) were compiled by the U.S. Geological Survey and the State of Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys. This...

  13. Alaska1(ak1_wpn) Gravity Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The gravity station data (10,578 records) were compiled by the U.S. Geological Survey and the State of Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys. This...

  14. Avian Habitat Data; Seward Peninsula, Alaska, 2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of the Interior — This data product contains avian habitat data collected on the Seward Peninsula, Alaska, USA, during 21 May – 10 June 2012. We conducted replicated 10-min surveys...

  15. Prince William Sound, Alaska ESI: INDEX

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set comprises the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) data for Prince William Sound, Alaska. ESI data characterize estuarine environments and wildlife by...

  16. Southeast Alaska ESI: NESTS (Nest Points)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains biological resource data for alcids, shorebirds, waterfowl, diving birds, pelagic birds, gulls, and terns in Southeast Alaska. Points in this...

  17. North Slope, Alaska ESI: BIRDS (Bird Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for diving birds, gulls and terns, seabirds, shorebirds, and waterfowl for the North Slope of Alaska....

  18. Stratigraphic framework of the Alaska Peninsula

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This paper describes the sedimentary rocks exposed on the Alaska Peninsula, as well as some interlayered volcanic and intrusive rocks. This sequence of rocks has a...

  19. Southeast Alaska ESI: FISH (Fish Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains biological resource data for estuarine, benthic, and pelagic fish in Southeast Alaska. Vector polygons in this data set represent locations of...

  20. Seabirds in marine habitats of southeast Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report covers seabirds in marine habitats of southeast Alaska. The methods, study areas (ocean, shelf break, continental shelf, and inland passage waters) and...

  1. Western Alaska ESI: HABITATS (Habitat Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) in Western Alaska. Vector polygons in this data set represent...

  2. Western Alaska ESI: LAKES (Lake Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains vector polygons representing lakes and land masses used in the creation of the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) for Western Alaska. The...

  3. Southeast Alaska ESI: SOCECON (Socioeconomic Resource Points)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains human-use resource data for airports, aquaculture sites, boat ramps, marinas, heliports, and log storage areas in Southeast Alaska. Vector...

  4. Fish and wildlife research in Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Problems, information needs, research facilities, current research, and documents related to long term planning of fish and wildlife research in Alaska. Appendices...

  5. Sitka, Alaska 3 arc-second DEM

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Sitka, Alaska Elevation Grid provides bathymetric data in ASCII raster format of 3 arc-second resolution in geographic coordinates. This grid is strictly for...

  6. OCS Planning Areas Alaska NAD 83

    Data.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Department of the Interior — This data set contains BOEM Planning Area outlines in ESRI shapefile format for the BOEM Alaska Region. The Submerged Lands Act (SLA) boundary, along with the...

  7. Alaska Steller Sea Lion Pup Count Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This database contains counts of Steller sea lion pups on rookeries in Alaska made between 1961 and 2015. Pup counts are conducted in late June-July. Pups are...

  8. Alaska Steller Sea Lion Food Habits Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains food habits samples, usually scats, collected opportunistically on Steller sea lion rookeries and haulouts in Alaska from 1985 to present....

  9. Continental Shelf Boundary - Alaska NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Department of the Interior — This data set contains Continental Shelf Boundaries (CSB) lines in ESRI shapefile format for the BOEM Alaska Region. The CSB defines the seaward limit of federally...

  10. Seldovia, Alaska 1 arc-second DEM

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Seldovia, Alaska Elevation Grid provides bathymetric data in ASCII raster format of 1 arc-second resolution in geographic coordinates. This grid is strictly for...

  11. Alaska LandCarbon Wetland Distribution Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This product provides regional estimates of specific wetland types (bog and fen) in Alaska. Available wetland types mapped by the National Wetlands Inventory (NWI)...

  12. Alaska East-West Deflections (DEFLEC96)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This 2' x 4' surface deflection of the vertical grid for Alaska is the DEFLEC96 model. The computation used about 1.1 millionterrestrial and marine gravity data held...

  13. Alaska North-South Deflections (DEFLEC96)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This 2' x 4' surface deflection of the vertical grid for Alaska is the DEFLEC96 model. The computation used about 1.1 million terrestrial and marine gravity data...

  14. Permafrost Soils Database for Northern Alaska 2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    Arctic Landscape Conservation Cooperative — This database contains soil and permafrost stratigraphy for northern Alaska compiled from numerous project data files and reports. The Access Database has main data...

  15. Notes on game conditions in Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is a report on game conditions in Alaska. This report covers laws that relate to the game animals, as well as physically attributes and ecology of the...

  16. North Slope, Alaska ESI: NESTS (Nest Points)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for waterfowl, seabirds, gulls and terns for the North Slope of Alaska. Vector points in this data set...

  17. Geologic Map of Alaska: geologic units

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset consists of a polygon coverage and associated attribute data derived from the 1980 Geologic Map of Alaska compiled by H.M. Beikman and published by the...

  18. Prince William Sound, Alaska ESI: INVERT (Invertebrates)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set comprises the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) data for Prince William Sound, Alaska. ESI data characterize estuarine environments and wildlife by...

  19. Seldovia, Alaska 3 arc-second DEM

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The 3-second Seldovia Alaska Elevation Grid provides bathymetric data in ASCII raster format of 3-second resolution in geographic coordinates. This grid is strictly...

  20. Wild resource use in Northway, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report describes contemporary and recent historic use of fish and wildlife resources by residents of Northway, Alaska. Northway today consists primarily of an...

  1. Klawock Lagoon, Alaska Benthic Habitats 2011 Substrate

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Klawock River on Alaska's Prince of Wales Island drains a 29,061 acre watershed with 132 miles of streambed habitat supporting seven salmon and trout species....

  2. Klawock Lagoon, Alaska Benthic Habitats 2011 Geoform

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Klawock River on Alaska's Prince of Wales Island drains a 29,061 acre watershed with 132 miles of streambed habitat supporting seven salmon and trout species....

  3. Klawock Lagoon, Alaska Benthic Habitats 2011 Geodatabase

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Klawock River on Alaska's Prince of Wales Island drains a 29,061 acre watershed with 132 miles of streambed habitat supporting seven salmon and trout species....

  4. Klawock Lagoon, Alaska Benthic Habitats 2011 Biotic

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Klawock River on Alaska's Prince of Wales Island drains a 29,061 acre watershed with 132 miles of streambed habitat supporting seven salmon and trout species....

  5. Kensington Mine Area Baseline Contaminants Study, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Hardrock mining for gold and other metals is proposed for the Kensington Mine, located on Lynn Canal in Southeast Alaska, approximately 45 miles north of Juneau. The...

  6. American Indians, Alaska Natives, and the Flu

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Past Emails American Indians, Alaska Natives, and the Flu Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Vaccination against ... the flu. Protect Indian Country by Getting Your Flu Vaccine A flu vaccine not only protects you ...

  7. North Slope, Alaska ESI: FACILITY (Facility Points)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains data for oil field facilities for the North Slope of Alaska. Vector points in this data set represent oil field facility locations. This data...

  8. Generalized thermal maturity map of Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset consists of a polygon coverage and associated attribute data derived from the onshore portion of the 1996 "Generalized Thermal Maturity Map of Alaska"...

  9. Kodiak, Alaska 3 arc-second DEM

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The 3-second Kodiak Alaska Elevation Grid provides bathymetric data in ASCII raster format of 2.67-second resolution in geographic coordinates. This grid is strictly...

  10. Kodiak, Alaska 8 arc-second DEM

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The 8-second Kodiak Alaska Elevation Grid provides bathymetric data in ASCII raster format of 8-second resolution in geographic coordinates. This grid is strictly...

  11. Kodiak, Alaska 1 arc-second DEM

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The 1-second Kodiak Alaska Elevation Grid provides bathymetric data in ASCII raster format of 0.88-second resolution in geographic coordinates. This grid is strictly...

  12. Invertebrate inventory of the Alaska Peninsula

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The composition and distribution of invertebrate species on the Alaska Peninsula is not well known. This pilot project was intended to test methods and to document...

  13. North Slope, Alaska ESI: FISHL (Fish Lines)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for anadromous and freshwater fish species for the North Slope of Alaska. Vector lines in this data set...

  14. Southeast Alaska ESI: FISHL (Fish Lines)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains biological resource data for anadromous fish streams in Southeast Alaska. Vector lines in this data set represent locations of fish streams....

  15. Southeast Alaska ESI: FISHPT (Fish Points)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains biological resource data for anadromous fish streams in Southeast Alaska. Vector points in this data set represent locations of fish streams....

  16. Western Alaska ESI: NESTS (Nest Points)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for nesting birds in Western Alaska. Vector points in this data set represent locations of nesting birds....

  17. Prince William Sound, Alaska ESI: BIRDS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set comprises the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) data for Prince William Sound, Alaska. ESI data characterize estuarine environments and wildlife by...

  18. Alaska Maritime Resources National Wildlife Refuge Proposal

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Alaska Marine Resources National Wildlife Refuge, containing the approximately two million nine hundred and eighty thousand acres of the existing refuge specified in...

  19. ANWR and Alaska Peninsula Gravity Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The gravity station data (1252 records) were compiled by the U.S. Geological Survey and the State of Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys. This...

  20. Yakutat, Alaska 1 arc-second DEM

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The 1-second Yakutat Alaska Elevation Grid provides bathymetric data in ASCII raster format of 1-second resolution in geographic coordinates. This grid is strictly...

  1. Alaska Marine Mammal Strandings/Entanglements

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This database represents a summary of information on stranded marine mammals reported to NMFS throughout the State of Alaska in fulfillment of Title IV of the Marine...

  2. Caribou survey of northeastern Alaska: Preliminary report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report covers the Caribou survey of Northeastern Alaska. Objectives of the study are to determine the approximate total size of the caribou herd whose main...

  3. The Alaska Peninsula Terrane; a definition

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Alaska Peninsula (fig. I), long thought to be an area with a simple geologic and tectonic history, is proving to have had a long and involved hlstary since...

  4. 75 FR 8105 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-23

    ... conveyance pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act will be issued to Zho-Tse, Incorporated. The... conveyed to Doyon, Limited, when the surface estate is conveyed to Zho-Tse, Incorporated. Notice of the...

  5. 76 FR 16805 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-25

    ... Bristol Bay Native Corporation. The decision approves conveyance of the surface and subsurface estates in... Interest Lands Conservation Act. The lands are in the vicinity of Clarks Point, Alaska, and are located in...

  6. Preventing commercial fishing deaths in Alaska

    OpenAIRE

    Lincoln, J M; Conway, G A

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effectiveness of the United States Commercial Fishing Industry Vessel Safety Act of 1988 in reducing the high occupational death rate (200/100,000/year in 1991-2) among Alaska's commercial fishermen. METHODS: Comprehensive surveillance of deaths in commercial fishing was established by our office during 1991 and 1992 for Alaska. Demographic data and data on risk factors and incidents were compiled and analysed for trend. RESULTS: During 1991-8, there was a s...

  7. Crustal structure of Bristol Bay Region, Alaska

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, A.K.; McLean, H.; Marlow, M.S.

    1985-04-01

    Bristol Bay lies along the northern side of the Alaska Peninsula and extends nearly 600 km southwest from the Nushagak lowlands on the Alaska mainland to near Unimak Island. The bay is underlain by a sediment-filled crustal downwarp known as the north Aleutian basin (formerly Bristol basin) that dips southeast toward the Alaska Peninsula and is filled with more than 6 km of strata, dominantly of Cenozoic age. The thickest parts of the basin lie just north of the Alaska Peninsula and, near Port Mollar, are in fault contact with older Mesozoic sedimentary rocks. These Mesozoic rocks form the southern structural boundary of the basin and extend as an accurate belt from at least Cook Inlet to Zhemchug Canyon (central Beringian margin). Offshore multichannel seismic-reflection, sonobuoy seismic-refraction, gravity, and magnetic data collected by the USGS in 1976 and 1982 indicate that the bedrock beneath the central and northern parts of the basin comprises layered, high-velocity, and highly magnetic rocks that are locally deformed. The deep bedrock horizons may be Mesozoic(.) sedimentary units that are underlain by igneous or metamorphic rocks and may correlate with similar rocks of mainland western Alaska and the Alaska Peninsula. Regional structural and geophysical trends for these deep horizons change from northeast-southwest to northwest-southeast beneath the inner Bering shelf and may indicate a major crustal suture along the northern basin edge.

  8. The future of successful aging in Alaska

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordan Lewis

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background. There is a paucity of research on Alaska Natives and their views on whether or not they believe they will age successfully in their home and community. There is limited understanding of aging experiences across generations. Objective. This research explores the concept of successful aging from an urban Alaska Native perspective and explores whether or not they believe they will achieve a healthy older age. Design. A cultural consensus model (CCM approach was used to gain a sense of the cultural understandings of aging among young Alaska Natives aged 50 years and younger. Results. Research findings indicate that aging successfully is making the conscious decision to live a clean and healthy life, abstaining from drugs and alcohol, but some of Alaska Natives do not feel they will age well due to lifestyle factors. Alaska Natives see the inability to age well as primarily due to the decrease in physical activity, lack of availability of subsistence foods and activities, and the difficulty of living a balanced life in urban settings. Conclusions. This research seeks to inform future studies on successful aging that incorporates the experiences and wisdom of Alaska Natives in hopes of developing an awareness of the importance of practicing a healthy lifestyle and developing guidelines to assist others to age well.

  9. The future of successful aging in Alaska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Jordan

    2013-01-01

    There is a paucity of research on Alaska Natives and their views on whether or not they believe they will age successfully in their home and community. There is limited understanding of aging experiences across generations. This research explores the concept of successful aging from an urban Alaska Native perspective and explores whether or not they believe they will achieve a healthy older age. A cultural consensus model (CCM) approach was used to gain a sense of the cultural understandings of aging among young Alaska Natives aged 50 years and younger. Research findings indicate that aging successfully is making the conscious decision to live a clean and healthy life, abstaining from drugs and alcohol, but some of Alaska Natives do not feel they will age well due to lifestyle factors. Alaska Natives see the inability to age well as primarily due to the decrease in physical activity, lack of availability of subsistence foods and activities, and the difficulty of living a balanced life in urban settings. This research seeks to inform future studies on successful aging that incorporates the experiences and wisdom of Alaska Natives in hopes of developing an awareness of the importance of practicing a healthy lifestyle and developing guidelines to assist others to age well.

  10. American Indian and Alaska Native Men's Use of Sexual Health Services, 2006-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahn, Megan A; Harvey, S Marie; Town, Matthew A

    2017-09-01

    American Indian and Alaska Native men experience poorer sexual health than white men. Barriers related to their sex and racial identity may prevent them from seeking care; however, little is known about this population's use of sexual health services. Sexual health service usage was examined among 923 American Indian and Alaska Native men and 5,322 white men aged 15-44 who participated in the 2006-2010 National Survey of Family Growth. Logistic regression models explored differences in service use by race and examined correlates of use among American Indians and Alaska Natives. Among men aged 15-19 and those aged 35-44, men with incomes greater than 133% of the federal poverty level, men with private insurance, those living in the Northeast and those living in rural areas, American Indians and Alaska Natives were more likely than whites to use STD or HIV services (odds ratios, 1.5-3.2). The odds of birth control service use did not differ by race. Differences in service use were found among American Indian and Alaska Native men: For example, those with a usual source of care had elevated odds of using sexual health services (1.9-3.4), while those reporting no recent testicular exam had reduced odds of using these services (0.3-0.4). This study provides baseline data on American Indian and Alaska Native men's use of sexual health services. Research exploring these men's views on these services is needed to help develop programs that better serve them. Copyright © 2017 by the Guttmacher Institute.

  11. 75 FR 3888 - Migratory Bird Subsistence Harvest in Alaska; Harvest Regulations for Migratory Birds in Alaska...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-25

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service 50 CFR Part 92 RIN 1018-AW67 Migratory Bird Subsistence Harvest in Alaska; Harvest Regulations for Migratory Birds in Alaska During the 2010 Season AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service... Wildlife Service, are reopening the public comment period on our proposed rule to establish migratory bird...

  12. Alaska - Russian Far East connection in volcano research and monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izbekov, P. E.; Eichelberger, J. C.; Gordeev, E.; Neal, C. A.; Chebrov, V. N.; Girina, O. A.; Demyanchuk, Y. V.; Rybin, A. V.

    2012-12-01

    The Kurile-Kamchatka-Alaska portion of the Pacific Rim of Fire spans for nearly 5400 km. It includes more than 80 active volcanoes and averages 4-6 eruptions per year. Resulting ash clouds travel for hundreds to thousands of kilometers defying political borders. To mitigate volcano hazard to aviation and local communities, the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) and the Institute of Volcanology and Seismology (IVS), in partnership with the Kamchatkan Branch of the Geophysical Survey of the Russian Academy of Sciences (KBGS), have established a collaborative program with three integrated components: (1) volcano monitoring with rapid information exchange, (2) cooperation in research projects at active volcanoes, and (3) volcanological field schools for students and young scientists. Cooperation in volcano monitoring includes dissemination of daily information on the state of volcanic activity in neighboring regions, satellite and visual data exchange, as well as sharing expertise and technologies between AVO and the Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT) and Sakhalin Volcanic Eruption Response Team (SVERT). Collaboration in scientific research is best illustrated by involvement of AVO, IVS, and KBGS faculty and graduate students in mutual international studies. One of the most recent examples is the NSF-funded Partnerships for International Research and Education (PIRE)-Kamchatka project focusing on multi-disciplinary study of Bezymianny volcano in Kamchatka. This international project is one of many that have been initiated as a direct result of a bi-annual series of meetings known as Japan-Kamchatka-Alaska Subduction Processes (JKASP) workshops that we organize together with colleagues from Hokkaido University, Japan. The most recent JKASP meeting was held in August 2011 in Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky and brought together more than 130 scientists and students from Russia, Japan, and the United States. The key educational component of our collaborative program

  13. 100-Meter Resolution Grayscale Shaded Relief of Alaska - Direct Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Grayscale Shaded Relief of Alaska map layer is a 100-meter resolution grayscale shaded relief image of Alaska, in an Albers Equal-Area Conic projection. Shaded...

  14. Alaska Satellite Facility ASF5 SAR Data Processing System Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, K.; Cuddy, D.; Chen, M.

    1994-01-01

    The Alaska SAR Facility (ASF) situated at the University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF) is currently undergoing an extensive development effort to increase its capabilities in handling new sensors and in the areas of throughput, data handling, archive, and distribution [15].

  15. Wildlife use of disturbed habitats in arctic Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — In summer 1989, BP Exploration (Alaska) Inc. (BPX) and LGL Alaska Research Associates, Inc. (LGL) initiated a study of wildlife use of disturbed habitats in arctic...

  16. Alaska Regional Refuge Inventory and Monitoring Strategic Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Alaska Inventory and Monitoring team (I Message-ID: ). Alaska Region I&M Team members: Anna-Marie Benson , Greta Burkart , McCrea Cobb , Carol Damberg ,...

  17. Crater Peak (Mt. Spurr), Alaska: Eruptions of 1992

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Alaska has a number of active and potentially active volcanoes. More than one-half of the population of Alaska lives within 300 km of an active volcano. In the last...

  18. Biological monitoring at St. George Island, Alaska in 2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Alaska Maritime National Wildlife Refuge (AMNWR) conducts annual ecological monitoring at nine sites throughout Alaska. The objective of this long-term...

  19. Northern Alaska Peninsula Caribou Herd Composition Surveys products

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Products associated with the Northern Alaska Peninsula Caribou Herd Composition surveys performed on Alaska Peninsula and Becharof National Wildlife Refuges.

  20. Color Alaska Shaded Relief ? 200-Meter Resolution - Direct Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The color Alaska shaded relief data were derived from National Elevation Dataset (NED) data, and show the terrain of Alaska at a resolution of 200 meters. The NED is...

  1. 100-Meter Resolution Color Shaded Relief of Alaska - Direct Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Color Shaded Relief of Alaska map layer is a 100-meter resolution color-sliced elevation image of Alaska, with relief shading added to accentuate terrain...

  2. Satellite View of Alaska, with Shaded Relief - Direct Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Satellite View of Alaska, with Shaded Relief map layer is a 200- meter-resolution simulated-natural-color image of Alaska. Vegetation is generally green, with...

  3. 100-Meter Resolution Satellite View of Alaska - Direct Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Satellite View of Alaska map layer is a 100-meter resolution simulated natural-color image of Alaska. Vegetation is generally green, with forests in darker green...

  4. Timber productivity of seven forest ecosystems in southeastern Alaska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willem W.S. van Hees

    1988-01-01

    Observations of growth on Alaska-cedar (Chamaecyparis nootkatensis), mountain hemlock (Tsuga mertensiana), Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis), western hemlock (Tsuga heterophylla), and western redcedar (Thuja plicata) on seven forest ecosystems in southeastern Alaska...

  5. Biological monitoring at St. George Island, Alaska in 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Alaska Maritime National Wildlife Refuge (AMNWR) conducts annual ecological monitoring at nine sites throughout Alaska. The objective of this long-term...

  6. Remote-site power generation opportunities for Alaska

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, M.L.

    1997-03-01

    The Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) has been working with the Federal Energy Technology Center in Morgantown, West Virginia, to assess options for small, low-cost, environmental acceptable power generation for application in remote areas of Alaska. The goal of this activity was to reduce the use of fuel in Alaskan villages by developing small, low-cost power generation applications. Because of the abundance of high-quality coal throughout Alaska, emphasis was placed on clean coal applications, but other energy sources, including geothermal, wind, hydro, and coalbed methane, were also considered. The use of indigenous energy sources would provide cheaper cleaner power, reduce the need for PCE (Power Cost Equalization program) subsidies, increase self-sufficiency, and retain hard currency in the state while at the same time creating jobs in the region. The introduction of economical, small power generation systems into Alaska by US equipment suppliers and technology developers aided by the EERC would create the opportunities for these companies to learn how to engineer, package, transport, finance, and operate small systems in remote locations. All of this experience would put the US developers and equipment supply companies in an excellent position to export similar types of small power systems to rural areas or developing countries. Thus activities in this task that relate to determining the generic suitability of these technologies for other countries can increase US competitiveness and help US companies sell these technologies in foreign countries, increasing the number of US jobs. The bulk of this report is contained in the two appendices: Small alternative power workshop, topical report and Global market assessment of coalbed methane, fluidized-bed combustion, and coal-fired diesel technologies in remote applications.

  7. Glaciers of North America - Glaciers of Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molnia, Bruce F.

    2008-01-01

    Glaciers cover about 75,000 km2 of Alaska, about 5 percent of the State. The glaciers are situated on 11 mountain ranges, 1 large island, an island chain, and 1 archipelago and range in elevation from more than 6,000 m to below sea level. Alaska's glaciers extend geographically from the far southeast at lat 55 deg 19'N., long 130 deg 05'W., about 100 kilometers east of Ketchikan, to the far southwest at Kiska Island at lat 52 deg 05'N., long 177 deg 35'E., in the Aleutian Islands, and as far north as lat 69 deg 20'N., long 143 deg 45'W., in the Brooks Range. During the 'Little Ice Age', Alaska's glaciers expanded significantly. The total area and volume of glaciers in Alaska continue to decrease, as they have been doing since the 18th century. Of the 153 1:250,000-scale topographic maps that cover the State of Alaska, 63 sheets show glaciers. Although the number of extant glaciers has never been systematically counted and is thus unknown, the total probably is greater than 100,000. Only about 600 glaciers (about 1 percent) have been officially named by the U.S. Board on Geographic Names (BGN). There are about 60 active and former tidewater glaciers in Alaska. Within the glacierized mountain ranges of southeastern Alaska and western Canada, 205 glaciers (75 percent in Alaska) have a history of surging. In the same region, at least 53 present and 7 former large ice-dammed lakes have produced jokulhlaups (glacier-outburst floods). Ice-capped volcanoes on mainland Alaska and in the Aleutian Islands have a potential for jokulhlaups caused by subglacier volcanic and geothermal activity. Because of the size of the area covered by glaciers and the lack of large-scale maps of the glacierized areas, satellite imagery and other satellite remote-sensing data are the only practical means of monitoring regional changes in the area and volume of Alaska's glaciers in response to short- and long-term changes in the maritime and continental climates of the State. A review of the

  8. Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapin, F. Stuart; Trainor, Sarah F.; Cochran, Patricia; Huntington, Henry; Markon, Carl J.; McCammon, Molly; McGuire, A. David; Serreze, Mark; Melillo, J.M.; Richmond, Terese; Yohe, G.W.

    2014-01-01

    Key Messages Arctic summer sea ice is receding faster than previously projected and is expected to virtually disappear before mid-century. This is altering marine ecosystems and leading to greater ship access, offshore development opportunity, and increased community vulnerability to coastal erosion.

  9. A survey of spring staging of waterfowl along the Naknek River, Alaska Peninsula, Alaska, March — May, 2002-2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A survey of spring staging waterfowl along the Naknek River of the Alaska Peninsula, Alaska, was conducted from 17 March through 10 May 2002 and 14 March through 22...

  10. Marine Toxic Substance and other data from bottle casts in the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1977-04-05 to 1977-04-16 (NODC Accession 7800383)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine Toxic Substance and other data were collected from bottle casts in the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER. Data were collected by Pacific Marine...

  11. Marine Toxic Substance and other data from bottle casts in the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1977-10-05 to 1977-10-09 (NODC Accession 7800450)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine Toxic Substance and other data were collected from bottle casts in the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER. Data were collected by Pacific Marine...

  12. Marine Toxic Substance and other data from bottle casts in the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER and other platforms as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1976-04-14 to 1976-06-26 (NODC Accession 7700241)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine Toxic Substance and other data were collected from bottle casts in the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER and other platforms. Data were collected by...

  13. Physical, meteorological, and other data from surface sensors and CTD casts in the Gulf of Alaska and other locations from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1976-09-27 to 1976-10-23 (NODC Accession 7700134)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical, meteorological, and other data were collected from surface sensors and CTD casts in the Gulf of Alaska and other locations from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER. Data...

  14. Physical, meteorological, and other data from surface sensors, bottle casts, and CTD casts in the Gulf of Alaska and other locations from the ACONA and other platforms as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 30 March 1977 to 17 May 1979 (NODC Accession 7900265)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical, meteorological, and other data were collected from surface sensors, bottle casts, and CTD casts in the Gulf of Alaska and other locations from the ACONA...

  15. Fish pathology and other data from fish trawls in the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship MILLER FREEMAN as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1977-01-27 to 1977-02-10 (NODC Accession 7700662)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Fish pathology and other data were collected from fish trawls in the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship MILLER FREEMAN from 27 January 1977 to 10 February 1977. Data were...

  16. Marine toxic substance and other data from bottle casts in the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1976-07-19 to 1976-07-31 (NODC Accession 7601930)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine toxic substance and other data were collected from bottle casts in the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER. Data were collected by Pacific Marine...

  17. Current meter data from moored current meter casts in the Coastal Waters of SE Alaska/Brit.Colum. as part of the Long-Range Effects Program Puget Sound project from 1983-03-15 to 1983-11-01 (NODC Accession 8600321)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter data were collected using moored current meter casts in the Coastal Waters of SE Alaska/Brit.Colum. from March 15, 1983 to November 1, 1983. Data were...

  18. Temperature profile data from surface sensors and CTD casts from the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship MILLER FREEMAN as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1990-04-17 to 1990-10-11 (NODC Accession 9100188)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile data were collected from surface sensors and CTD casts in the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship MILLER FREEMAN from 17 April 1990 to 11 October 1990....

  19. Physical, meteorological, and other data from surface sensors, bottle casts, and CTD casts in the Gulf of Alaska from the ACONA as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 09 April 1977 to 10 April 1977 (NODC Accession 7700680)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical, meteorological, and other data were collected from surface sensors, bottle casts, and CTD casts in the Gulf of Alaska from the ACONA. Data were collected...

  20. Phytoplankton and other data from net and bottle casts in the Gulf of Alaska from the ACONA and other platforms as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 25 May 1976 to 31 August 1976 (NODC Accession 7700120)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Phytoplankton and other data were collected from net and bottle casts in the Gulf of Alaska from the ACONA and other platforms from 25 May 1976 to 31 August 1976....

  1. Physical, meteorological, and other data from surface sensors, bottle casts, and CTD casts in the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship MILLER FREEMAN as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1977-03-29 to 1977-04-02 (NODC Accession 7700681)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical, meteorological, and other data were collected from surface sensors, bottle casts, and CTD casts in the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship MILLER FREEMAN. Data...

  2. Physical, meteorological, and other data from surface sensors, bottle casts, and CTD casts in the Gulf of Alaska from the ACONA as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 16 February 1978 to 25 February 1978 (NODC Accession 7800444)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical, meteorological, and other data were collected from surface sensors, bottle casts, and CTD casts in the Gulf of Alaska from the ACONA. Data were collected...

  3. Marine mammal specimen and other data from the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship SURVEYOR and other platforms as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1978-04-06 to 1978-09-12 (NODC Accession 8000004)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine mammal specimen and other data were collected in the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship SURVEYOR and other platforms from 06 April 1978 to 12 September 1978. Data...

  4. Marine mammal specimen, CTD, and other data from the Gulf of Alaska and other locations from the ACONA and other platforms as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 22 March 1978 to 28 July 1979 (NODC Accession 8000009)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine mammal specimen, CTD, and other data were collected in the Gulf of Alaska and other locations from the ACONA and other platforms from 22 March 1978 to 28 July...

  5. Marine Toxic Substance and other data from bottle casts in the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1978-05-06 to 1978-05-16 (NODC Accession 7800684)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine Toxic Substance and other data were collected from bottle casts in the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER. Data were collected by Pacific Marine...

  6. Physical, meteorological, and other data from surface sensors, bottle casts, and CTD casts in the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship SURVEYOR as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1975-10-28 to 1975-11-17 (NODC Accession 7601830)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical, meteorological, and other data were collected from surface sensors, bottle casts, and CTD casts in the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship SURVEYOR. Data were...

  7. Physical, meteorological, and other data from surface sensors and CTD casts in the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1977-03-02 to 1977-03-10 (NODC Accession 7700659)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical, meteorological, and other data were collected from surface sensors and CTD casts in the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER. Data were collected by...

  8. Marine toxic substance and other data from bottle casts in the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program from 1976-04-13 to 1976-04-30 (NODC Accession 7601548)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine toxic substance and other data were collected in the Gulf of Alaska from bottle casts from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER. Data were collected by Pacific Marine...

  9. Physical, meteorological, and other data from surface sensors, bottle casts, and CTD casts in the Gulf of Alaska from the SURVEYOR and other platforms as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 22 July 1976 to 02 October 1976 (NODC Accession 7800045)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical, meteorological, and other data were collected from surface sensors, bottle casts, and CTD casts in the Gulf of Alaska from the SURVEYOR and other...

  10. Marine bird sighting and other data from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER and other platforms from the Gulf of Alaska and other locations as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1976-04-26 to 1976-11-20 (NODC Accession 7900049)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine bird sighting and other data were collected from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER and other platforms in the Gulf of Alaska and other locations. Data were collected by...

  11. Physical and other data from surface sensors and CTD casts in the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship RAINIER as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1975-04-28 to 1975-05-07 (NODC Accession 7601226)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical and other data were collected from surface sensors and CTD casts in the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship RAINIER. Data were collected by the Pacific Marine...

  12. Physical, meteorological, and other data from surface sensors, bottle casts, and CTD casts in the Gulf of Alaska and other locations from NOAA Ship MILLER FREEMAN and other platforms as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1976-09-08 to 1976-11-19 (NODC Accession 7700461)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical, meteorological, and other data were collected from surface sensors, bottle casts, and CTD casts in the Gulf of Alaska and other locations from NOAA Ship...

  13. Phytoplankton and other data from net and bottle casts in the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship MILLER FREEMAN and other platforms as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1978-03-24 to 1978-08-16 (NODC Accession 7900142)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Phytoplankton and other data were collected from net and bottle casts in the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship MILLER FREEMAN and other platforms from 24 March 1978 to...

  14. Marine Toxic Substance and other data from bottle casts in the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1976-07-19 to 1976-07-31 (NCEI Accession 7700784)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine Toxic Substance and other data were collected from bottle casts in the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER. Data were collected by Pacific Marine...

  15. Benthic organism and other data from pipe dredge from the Gulf of Alaska and other locations NOAA Ship MILLER FREEMAN and other platforms as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1976-04-01 to 1976-10-29 (NODC Accession 7800538)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Benthic organism and other data were collected from a pipe drege in the Gulf of Alaska and other locations from NOAA Ship MILLER FREEMAN and other platforms by...

  16. Physical, meteorological, and other data from surface sensors and CTD casts in the Gulf of Alaska from the MOANA WAVE as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 19 August 1976 to 23 August 1976 (NODC Accession 7700164)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical, meteorological, and other data were collected from surface sensors and CTD casts in the Gulf of Alaska from the MOANA WAVE. Data were collected by the...

  17. Marine bird sighting and other data from aircraft and other platforms from the Gulf of Alaska and other locations as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 01 March 1976 to 08 June 1976 (NODC Accession 7900046)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine bird sighting and other data were collected from aircraft and other platforms in the Gulf of Alaska and other locations. Data were collected by the Fish and...

  18. Marine Toxic Substance and other data from bottle casts in the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1977-04-05 to 1977-04-22 (NODC Accession 7700755)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine Toxic Substance and other data were collected from bottle casts in the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER. Data were collected by Pacific Marine...

  19. Physical, meteorological, and other data from surface sensors, bottle casts, and CTD casts in the Gulf of Alaska from the MOANA WAVE as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 20 April 1976 to 20 May 1976 (NODC Accession 7601825)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical, physical, meteorological, and other data were collected from surface sensors, bottle casts, and CTD casts in the Gulf of Alaska from the MOANA WAVE. Data...

  20. Marine toxic substance, phytoplankton, and other data from bottle casts and other instruments in the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1975-10-24 to 1976-04-13 (NODC Accession 7601545)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine toxic substance, phytoplankton, and other data were collected in the Gulf of Alaska from bottle casts and other instruments from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER. Data...

  1. Physical, meteorological, and other data from surface sensors, bottle casts, and CTD casts in the Gulf of Alaska from the ALPHA HELIX and other platforms as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 04 May 1980 to 15 May 1983 (NODC Accession 8300155)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical, meteorological, and other data were collected from surface sensors, bottle casts, and CTD casts in the Gulf of Alaska from the ALPHA HELIX and other...

  2. Physical, meteorological, and other data from surface sensors and CTD casts in the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER and other platforms as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1977-04-05 to 1977-06-10 (NODC Accession 7700741)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical, meteorological, and other data were collected from surface sensors and CTD casts in the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER and other platforms. Data...

  3. 24 CFR 598.515 - Alaska and Hawaii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Alaska and Hawaii. 598.515 Section 598.515 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued....515 Alaska and Hawaii. A nominated area in Alaska or Hawaii is deemed to satisfy the criteria of...

  4. Wilderness insights From Alaska: Past, present, and future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deborah L. Williams

    2007-01-01

    For many reasons, a significant percentage of Alaska’s wildlands have been successfully protected. The passage of the Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act (ANILCA), in particular, represents one of the greatest land protection measures in human history. Numerous important factors have contributed to Alaska’s conservation successes, and many of these factors...

  5. Gulf Watch Alaska Nearshore Component: Black Oystercatcher Nest Density and Chick Diets Data from Prince William Sound, Katmai National Park and Preserve, and Kenai Fjords National Park, 2006-2016

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data is part of the Gulf Watch Alaska (GWA) long term monitoring program, nearshore monitoring component. Specifically, these data describe black oystercatcher...

  6. Geologic framework of the Aleutian arc, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallier, Tracy L.; Scholl, David W.; Fisher, Michael A.; Bruns, Terry R.; Wilson, Frederic H.; von Huene, Roland E.; Stevenson, Andrew J.

    1994-01-01

    The Aleutian arc is the arcuate arrangement of mountain ranges and flanking submerged margins that forms the northern rim of the Pacific Basin from the Kamchatka Peninsula (Russia) eastward more than 3,000 km to Cooke Inlet (Fig. 1). It consists of two very different segments that meet near Unimak Pass: the Aleutian Ridge segment to the west and the Alaska Peninsula-the Kodiak Island segment to the east. The Aleutian Ridge segment is a massive, mostly submerged cordillera that includes both the islands and the submerged pedestal from which they protrude. The Alaska Peninsula-Kodiak Island segment is composed of the Alaska Peninsula, its adjacent islands, and their continental and insular margins. The Bering Sea margin north of the Alaska Peninsula consists mostly of a wide continental shelf, some of which is underlain by rocks correlative with those on the Alaska Peninsula.There is no pre-Eocene record in rocks of the Aleutian Ridge segment, whereas rare fragments of Paleozoic rocks and extensive outcrops of Mesozoic rocks occur on the Alaska Peninsula. Since the late Eocene, and possibly since the early Eocene, the two segments have evolved somewhat similarly. Major plutonic and volcanic episodes, however, are not synchronous. Furthermore, uplift of the Alaska Peninsula-Kodiak Island segment in late Cenozoic time was more extensive than uplift of the Aleutian Ridge segment. It is probable that tectonic regimes along the Aleutian arc varied during the Tertiary in response to such factors as the directions and rates of convergence, to bathymetry and age of the subducting Pacific Plate, and to the volume of sediment in the Aleutian Trench.The Pacific and North American lithospheric plates converge along the inner wall of the Aleutian trench at about 85 to 90 mm/yr. Convergence is nearly at right angles along the Alaska Peninsula, but because of the arcuate shape of the Aleutian Ridge relative to the location of the plates' poles of rotation, the angle of convergence

  7. The Alaska Commercial Fisheries Water Quality Sampling Methods and Procedures Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Folley, G.; Pearson, L.; Crosby, C. [Alaska Dept. of Environmental Conservation, Soldotna, AK (United States); DeCola, E.; Robertson, T. [Nuka Research and Planning Group, Seldovia, AK (United States)

    2006-07-01

    A comprehensive water quality sampling program was conducted in response to the oil spill that occurred when the M/V Selendang Ayu ship ran aground near a major fishing port at Unalaska Island, Alaska in December 2004. In particular, the sampling program focused on the threat of spilled oil to the local commercial fisheries resources. Spill scientists were unable to confidently model the movement of oil away from the wreck because of limited oceanographic data. In order to determine which fish species were at risk of oil contamination, a real-time assessment of how and where the oil was moving was needed, because the wreck became a continual source of oil release for several weeks after the initial grounding. The newly developed methods and procedures used to detect whole oil during the sampling program will be presented in the Alaska Commercial Fisheries Water Quality Sampling Methods and Procedures Manual which is currently under development. The purpose of the manual is to provide instructions to spill managers while they try to determine where spilled oil has or has not been encountered. The manual will include a meaningful data set that can be analyzed in real time to assess oil movement and concentration. Sections on oil properties and processes will be included along with scientific water quality sampling methods for whole and dissolved phase oil to assess potential contamination of commercial fishery resources and gear in Alaska waters during an oil spill. The manual will present a general discussion of factors that should be considered when designing a sampling program after a spill. In order to implement Alaska's improved seafood safety measures, the spatial scope of spilled oil must be known. A water quality sampling program can provide state and federal fishery managers and food safety inspectors with important information as they identify at-risk fisheries. 11 refs., 7 figs.

  8. Offshore Wind Energy Resource Assessment for Alaska

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doubrawa Moreira, Paula [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Scott, George N. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Musial, Walter D. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Kilcher, Levi F. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Draxl, Caroline [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Lantz, Eric J. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2018-01-02

    This report quantifies Alaska's offshore wind resource capacity while focusing on its unique nature. It is a supplement to the existing U.S. Offshore Wind Resource Assessment, which evaluated the offshore wind resource for all other U.S. states. Together, these reports provide the foundation for the nation's offshore wind value proposition. Both studies were developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. The analysis presented herein represents the first quantitative evidence of the offshore wind energy potential of Alaska. The technical offshore wind resource area in Alaska is larger than the technical offshore resource area of all other coastal U.S. states combined. Despite the abundant wind resource available, significant challenges inhibit large-scale offshore wind deployment in Alaska, such as the remoteness of the resource, its distance from load centers, and the wealth of land available for onshore wind development. Throughout this report, the energy landscape of Alaska is reviewed and a resource assessment analysis is performed in terms of gross and technical offshore capacity and energy potential.

  9. Seamonster Education: A Sensor Network Project in Southeast Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatland, D. R.; Nagorski, S.; Connor, C.; Heavner, M. J.; Hood, E.

    2006-12-01

    The NASA Research Opportunities in Space and Earth Science (ROSES) program is supporting a wireless sensor network project as part of its Advanced Information Systems Technology "Smart Sensor Web" initiative. The project, entitled Seamonster (for SouthEast Alaska MONitoring Network for Science, Telecomm, and Education Research) is led by the University of Alaska Southeast (Juneau) in collaboration with Microsoft- Vexcel in Boulder Colorado. This paper describes the Education Research component of Seamonster with emphasis on live scientist connection to educators, field experience, and inquiry-based student learning opportunity. Part of the Seamonster science will focus on a succession of valleys near Juneau in various stages of deglaciation, in effect providing a synopsis of a millennium-timescale process in a single moment. The Seamonster sensor configuration is designed to initially focus on a single watershed--Lemon Creek--and to subsequently expand to this larger region of interest. The aim is to provide data that narrates the story of watershed processes in real time, for example connecting precipitation to outflow volume and turbidity throughout the course of the year. As the project grows in scope the educational component will expand to keep pace. Having educators and by extension their students connected to data-driven stories as they unfold is a major objective of the project and will represent a milestone in efforts to include more people in front-end science as it happens.

  10. Surge dynamics on Bering Glacier, Alaska, in 2008–2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Braun

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available A surge cycle of the Bering Glacier system, Alaska, is examined using observations of surface velocity obtained using synthetic aperture radar (SAR offset tracking, and elevation data obtained from the University of Alaska Fairbanks LiDAR altimetry program. After 13 yr of quiescence, the Bering Glacier system began to surge in May 2008 and had two stages of accelerated flow. During the first stage, flow accelerated progressively for at least 10 months and reached peak observed velocities of ~ 7 m d−1. The second stage likely began in 2010. By 2011 velocities exceeded 9 m d−1 or ~ 18 times quiescent velocities. Fast flow continued into July 2011. Surface morphology indicated slowing by fall 2011; however, it is not entirely clear if the surge is yet over. The quiescent phase was characterized by small-scale acceleration events that increased driving stresses up to 70%. When the surge initiated, synchronous acceleration occurred throughout much of the glacier length. Results suggest that downstream propagation of the surge is closely linked to the evolution of the driving stress during the surge, because driving stress appears to be tied to the amount of resistive stress provided by the bed. In contrast, upstream acceleration and upstream surge propagation is not dependent on driving stress evolution.

  11. 2014 volcanic activity in Alaska: Summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Cheryl E.; Dixon, James P.; Neal, Christina A.; Waythomas, Christopher F.; Schaefer, Janet R.; McGimsey, Robert G.

    2017-09-07

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, possible eruptions, volcanic unrest or suspected unrest, and seismic events at 18 volcanic centers in Alaska during 2014. The most notable volcanic activity consisted of intermittent ash eruptions from long-active Cleveland and Shishaldin Volcanoes in the Aleutian Islands, and two eruptive episodes at Pavlof Volcano on the Alaska Peninsula. Semisopochnoi and Akutan volcanoes had seismic swarms, both likely the result of magmatic intrusion. The AVO also installed seismometers and infrasound instruments at Mount Cleveland during 2014.

  12. 76 FR 8700 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands Crab...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-15

    ... Initial Regulatory Flexibility Analysis (IRFA), and the Categorical Exclusion prepared for this proposed... Social Impact Assessment prepared for the Crab Rationalization Program are available from the NMFS Alaska... signatory at 50 CFR 680.4(o)(2)(i). For the cities of Adak and Atka, it is assumed that the Mayor or City...

  13. American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Projects - Facility Energy Improvements and Wind Turbine and Photovoltaic Panels at Fort Wainwright, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-07

    Investment Program (ECIP) projects, "Facility Energy Improvements" and " Wind Turbine and Photovoltaic Panels" at Fort Wainwright, Fairbanks, Alaska. We...reporting this project to the www.recovery.gov Web site. Army personnel did not ensure the " Wind Turbine and Photovoltaic Panels" project was properly

  14. 76 FR 7758 - Subsistence Management Regulations for Public Lands in Alaska-Subpart B, Federal Subsistence Board

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-11

    ... National Forest System lands, contact Steve Kessler, Regional Subsistence Program Leader, USDA, Forest... economy or adversely affect an economic sector, productivity, jobs, the environment, or other units of the... Wildlife Service; and Steve Kessler, Alaska Regional Office, U.S. Forest Service. List of Subjects 36 CFR...

  15. 76 FR 6730 - Subsistence Management Regulations for Public Lands in Alaska-2012-13 and 2013-14 Subsistence...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-08

    ... National Forest System lands, contact Steve Kessler, Regional Subsistence Program Leader, USDA, Forest... effect of $100 million or more on the economy or adversely affect an economic sector, productivity, jobs... Indian Affairs; Jerry Berg, Alaska Regional Office, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service; and Steve Kessler...

  16. 78 FR 2350 - Subsistence Management Regulations for Public Lands in Alaska-2014-15 and 2015-16 Subsistence...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-11

    ... to National Forest System lands, contact Steve Kessler, Regional Subsistence Program Leader, USDA... or more on the economy or adversely affect an economic sector, productivity, jobs, the environment...; Jerry Berg and Jack Lorrigan, Alaska Regional Office, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service; and Steve Kessler...

  17. 77 FR 12477 - Subsistence Management Regulations for Public Lands in Alaska-Subpart C-Board Determinations...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    ... questions specific to National Forest System lands, contact Steve Kessler, Regional Subsistence Program... adversely affect an economic sector, productivity, jobs, the environment, or other units of the government... Steve Kessler, Alaska Regional Office, U.S. Forest Service. List of Subjects 36 CFR Part 242...

  18. 77 FR 7603 - Notice of a Change in Status of an Extended Benefit (EB) Period for Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-13

    ... Employment and Training Administration Notice of a Change in Status of an Extended Benefit (EB) Period for... announces a change in benefit period eligibility under the EB program for Alaska. The following changes have... unemployment rate (IUR) for the week ending January 7, 2012 rose to meet the 6% threshold to trigger ``on'' to...

  19. 78 FR 68390 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands Management...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-14

    ... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands Management Area; Amendment 102 AGENCY: National... the Aleutian Islands to establish a non-profit organization as a CQE to purchase halibut catcher.... Although the IFQ Program resulted in significant safety and economic benefits for many fishermen, since the...

  20. Forests of southeast and south-central Alaska, 2004–2008: five-year forest inventory and analysis report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tara M. Barrett; Glenn A. Christensen

    2011-01-01

    This report highlights key findings from the most recent (2004–2008) data collected by the Forest Inventory and Analysis program across all ownerships in southeast and south-central Alaska. We present basic resource information such as forest area, ownership, volume, biomass, carbon sequestration, growth, and mortality; structure and function topics such as vegetation...

  1. Protocols for long-term monitoring of seabird ecology in the Gulf of Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piatt, John F.; Byrd, G. Vernon; Harding, Ann M.A.; Kettle, Arthur B.; Kitaysky, Sasha; Litzow, Michael A.; Roseneau, David G.; Shultz, Michael T.; van Pelt, Thomas I.

    2003-01-01

    Seabird populations will need to be monitored for many years to assess both recovery and ecological conditions affecting recovery. Detailed studies of individual seabird colonies and marine ecosystems in the Gulf of Alaska have been conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service under the auspices of damage assessment and restoration programs of the Trustee Council. Much has been learned about factors influencing seabird populations and their capacity to recover from the spill in the Gulf of Alaska. As the restoration program moves toward long-term monitoring of populations, however, protocols and long-term monitoring strategies that focus on key parameters of interest and that are inexpensive, practical, and applicable over a large geographic area need to be developed.

  2. Framework for ecological monitoring on lands of Alaska National Wildlife Refuges and their partners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, Andrea; Beever, Erik A.

    2010-01-01

    National Wildlife Refuges in Alaska and throughout the U.S. have begun developing a spatially comprehensive monitoring program to inform management decisions, and to provide data to broader research projects. In an era of unprecedented rates of climate change, monitoring is essential to detecting, understanding, communicating and mitigating climate-change effects on refuge and other resources under the protection of U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and requires monitoring results to address spatial scales broader than individual refuges. This document provides guidance for building a monitoring program for refuges in Alaska that meets refuge-specific management needs while also allowing synthesis and summary of ecological conditions at the ecoregional and statewide spatial scales.

  3. Biomass District Heat System for Interior Rural Alaska Villages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wall, William A.; Parker, Charles R.

    2014-09-01

    Alaska Village Initiatives (AVI) from the outset of the project had a goal of developing an integrated village approach to biomass in Rural Alaskan villages. A successful biomass project had to be ecologically, socially/culturally and economically viable and sustainable. Although many agencies were supportive of biomass programs in villages none had the capacity to deal effectively with developing all of the tools necessary to build a complete integrated program. AVI had a sharp learning curve as well. By the end of the project with all the completed tasks, AVI developed the tools and understanding to connect all of the dots of an integrated village based program. These included initially developing a feasibility model that created the capacity to optimize a biomass system in a village. AVI intent was to develop all aspects or components of a fully integrated biomass program for a village. This meant understand the forest resource and developing a sustainable harvest system that included the “right sized” harvest equipment for the scale of the project. Developing a training program for harvesting and managing the forest for regeneration. Making sure the type, quality, and delivery system matched the needs of the type of boiler or boilers to be installed. AVI intended for each biomass program to be of the scale that would create jobs and a sustainable business.

  4. Alaska, Gulf spills share similarities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Usher, D. (Marine Pollution Control Co., Detroit, MI (United States))

    The accidental Exxon Valdez oil spill in Alaska and the deliberate dumping of crude oil into the Persian Gulf as a tactic of war contain both glaring differences and surprising similarities. Public reaction and public response was much greater to the Exxon Valdez spill in pristine Prince William Sound than to the war-related tragedy in the Persian Gulf. More than 12,000 workers helped in the Alaskan cleanup; only 350 have been involved in Kuwait. But in both instances, environmental damages appear to be less than anticipated. Natures highly effective self-cleansing action is primarily responsible for minimizing the damages. One positive action growing out of the two incidents is increased international cooperation and participation in oil-spill clean-up efforts. In 1990, in the aftermath of the Exxon Valdez spill, 94 nations signed an international accord on cooperation in future spills. The spills can be historic environmental landmarks leading to creation of more sophisticated response systems worldwide.

  5. Climate Drivers of Alaska Summer Stream Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieniek, P.; Bhatt, U. S.; Plumb, E. W.; Thoman, R.; Trammell, E. J.

    2016-12-01

    The temperature of the water in lakes, rivers and streams has wide ranging impacts from local water quality and fish habitats to global climate change. Salmon fisheries in Alaska, a critical source of food in many subsistence communities, are sensitive to large-scale climate variability and river and stream temperatures have also been linked with salmon production in Alaska. Given current and projected climate change, understanding the mechanisms that link the large-scale climate and river and stream temperatures is essential to better understand the changes that may occur with aquatic life in Alaska's waterways on which subsistence users depend. An analysis of Alaska stream temperatures in the context of reanalysis, downscaled, station and other climate data is undertaken in this study to fill that need. Preliminary analysis identified eight stream observation sites with sufficiently long (>15 years) data available for climate-scale analysis in Alaska with one station, Terror Creek in Kodiak, having a 30-year record. Cross-correlation of summer (June-August) water temperatures between the stations are generally high even though they are spread over a large geographic region. Correlation analysis of the Terror Creek summer observations with seasonal sea surface temperatures (SSTs) in the North Pacific broadly resembles the SST anomaly fields typically associated with the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO). A similar result was found for the remaining stations and in both cases PDO-like correlation patterns also occurred in the preceding spring. These preliminary results demonstrate that there is potential to diagnose the mechanisms that link the large-scale climate system and Alaska stream temperatures.

  6. Colorectal cancer in alaska native people, 2005-2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Janet J; Alberts, Steven R; Sacco, Frank; Lanier, Anne P

    2012-09-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the most frequently diagnosed cancer among Alaska Native (AN) people, and the second leading cause of cancer death. The incidence rate for the combined years 1999 through 2003 was 30% higher than the rate among U.S. whites (USWs) for the same period. Current incidence rates may serve to monitor the impact of screening programs in reducing CRC in the AN population. Incidence data are from the Alaska Native Tumor Registry and the National Cancer Institute Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program. We compared AN CRC incidence, survival rates, and stage at diagnosis with rates in USWs for cases diagnosed from 2005 through 2009. Relative survival calculations were produced in SEER*Stat by the actuarial method. The CRC age-adjusted incidence rate among AN men and women combined was higher than those in USW men and women (84 vs. 43/100,000; P < .05; AN:USW rate ratio [RR] = 2.0). The greatest differences between rates in AN people and USWs were for tumors in the hepatic flexure (RR = 3.1) and in the transverse (RR = 2.9) and sigmoid (RR = 2.5) regions of the colon. Rectal cancer rates among AN people were significantly higher than rates in USWs (21 vs.12/100,000). Five-year relative survival proportions by stage at diagnosis indicate that the CRC 5-year relative survival was similar in AN people and USWs for the period 2004 through 2009. The high rate of CRC in AN people emphasizes the need for screening programs and interventions to reduce known modifiable risks. Research in methods to promote healthy behaviors among AN people is greatly needed.

  7. Assessing the Everyday Discrimination Scale Among American Indians and Alaska Natives

    OpenAIRE

    Gonzales, Kelly L.; Noonan, Carolyn; Goins, R. Turner; Henderson, William G.; Beals, Janette; Manson, Spero M.; Acton, Kelly J.; Roubideaux, Yvette

    2015-01-01

    The Everyday Discrimination Scale (EDS) has been used widely as a measure of subjective experiences of discrimination. The usefulness of this measure for assessments of perceived experiences of discrimination by American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) peoples has not been explored. Data derived from the Special Diabetes Program for Indians – Healthy Heart Demonstration Project (SDPI-HH), a large-scale initiative to reduce cardiovascular risk among AI/ANs with Type 2 diabetes. Participants (...

  8. ALASKA1964_INUNDATION - Alaska 1964 Estimated Tsunami Inundation Line at Seaside, Oregon

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set is a polyline shapefile representing the tsunami inundation line for the Alaska 1964 event based on observations and associated information obtained by...

  9. Brown bear density on the Alaska Peninsula at Black Lake, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A final report on completion of the density estimation objective and progress report on other objectives of cooperative interagency brown bear studies on the Alaska...

  10. Spring staging of waterfowl along the Naknek River, Alaska Peninsula, Alaska, April — May, 1991

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A spring survey, aerial and ground, of staging waterfowl along the Naknek River of the Alaska Peninsula was conducted from February 26 to May 19, 1993. The purpose...

  11. Spring staging of waterfowl along the Naknek River, Alaska Peninsula, Alaska, February — May, 1992

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A spring survey, aerial and ground, of staging waterfowl along the Naknek River of the Alaska Peninsula was conducted from February 26 to May 19, 1993. The major...

  12. Spring staging of waterfowl along the Naknek River, Alaska Peninsula, Alaska, March — May, 1993

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A spring survey, aerial and ground, of staging waterfowl along the Naknek River of the Alaska Peninsula was conducted from February 26 to May 19, 1993. The major...

  13. 2012 Alaska Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys (DGGS) Lidar: Whittier, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In support of geologic mapping and hazards evaluation in and near Whittier, Alaska, the Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys (DGGS) acquired, and is making...

  14. Valuing Residential Energy Efficiency in Two Alaska Real Estate Markets: A Hedonic Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pride, Dominique J.

    Alaska households have high home energy consumption and expenditures. Improving the energy efficiency of the housing stock can reduce home energy consumption, thereby reducing home energy expenditures and CO2 emissions. Improving the energy efficiency of a home may also increase its transaction price if the energy efficiency improvements are capitalized into the value of the home. The relationship between energy efficiency and transaction prices in the Fairbanks and Anchorage, Alaska residential real estate markets is examined. Using a hedonic pricing framework and difference-in-differences analysis, the impact of the Alaska Home Energy Rebate program on the transaction prices of single-family homes in the Fairbanks and Anchorage housing markets from 2008 through 2015 is examined. The results indicate that compared to homes that did not complete the program, homes that completed the program sell for a statistically significant price premium between 15.1% and 15.5% in the Fairbanks market and between 5% and 11% in the Anchorage market. A hedonic pricing framework is used to relate energy efficiency ratings and transaction prices of homes in the Fairbanks and Anchorage residential real estate markets from 2008 through 2015. The results indicate that homes with above-average energy efficiency ratings sell for a statistically significant price premium between 6.9% and 17.5% in the Fairbanks market and between 1.8% and 6.0% in the Anchorage market.

  15. Cancers of the breast, uterus, ovary and cervix among Alaska Native women, 1974-2003.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Gretchen Ehrsam; Lanier, Anne P; Bulkow, Lisa; Kelly, Janet J; Murphy, Neil

    2010-02-01

    Alaska Native (AN) women have exhibited some of the highest incidence rates of cancer overall, and different patterns of site-specific incidence compared to other U.S. populations. This study compares incidence rates between AN and U.S. white women (USW) for cancers of the breast, uterus, ovary and cervix, and examines effects of time period and birth cohort as determinants of incidence trends among AN women. Observational, population-based study. Cancer incidence data from the Alaska Native Tumor Registry and SEERStat, 1974-2003. Age-adjusted World Standard Population rates were calculated for a current 5-year period and over time (30 years), and compared to other populations using rate ratios with 95% confidence intervals. Log-linear regression models used to assess impact on trend of age, time period and birth cohort. Compared to U.S. white women, current cancer rates among AN women are not significantly different for cancer of the breast and cervix, and significantly lower for cancers of the ovary and uterus. Trends over time over a 30-year time period also differ for these cancer sites. There were significant increases in breast and uterine cancer, and in contrast, a marked decline in cervical cancer. There was no significant change for cancer of the ovary. Changes appear to be due largely to period, not birth cohort effects. Increases in breast cancer may be due to a combination of modifiable behaviours; increased BMI and a shift to a non-traditional diet. Increases in uterine cancer could be associated with increased BMI and diabetes. Cervical cancer rates have declined to USW levels. The marked decline is likely due to enhanced screening and control efforts within the Alaska Native Women's cancers among Alaska Natives Tribal Health System (formerly Alaska Area USPHS, Indian Health Service utilizing resources available from the Centers for Disease Control tribal and state Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Programs).

  16. A Step Towards Conservation for Interior Alaska Tribes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimberly Carlo

    2012-07-07

    This project includes a consortium of tribes. The tribes include Hughes (representing the consortium) Birch Creek, Huslia, and Allakaket. The project proposed by Interior Regional Housing Authority (IRHA) on behalf of the villages of Hughes, Birch Creek, Huslia and Allakaket is to develop an energy conservation program relevant to each specific community, educate tribe members and provide the tools to implement the conservation plan. The program seeks to achieve both energy savings and provide optimum energy requirements to support each tribe's mission. The energy management program will be a comprehensive program that considers all avenues for achieving energy savings, from replacing obsolete equipment, to the design and construction of energy conservation measures, the implementation of energy saving operation and maintenance procedures, the utilization of a community-wide building energy management system, and a commitment to educating the tribes on how to decrease energy consumption. With the implementation of this program and the development of an Energy Management Plan, these communities can then work to reduce the high cost of living in rural Alaska.

  17. Monitoring Bioclimatic Indicators in Southwest Alaska National Parks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchner, P. B.; Kimball, J. S.; Moghaddam, M.

    2016-12-01

    The high latitudes of the northern hemisphere are experiencing rapid regional climate warming resulting in changes to ecosystem processes. These changes are most profound in locations where small increases in temperature shift precipitation regimes from snow to rain, melt snow earlier and increase soil temperatures above freezing. The Southwest Alaska Network of the National Park Service Inventory and Monitoring program monitors long term trends and changes in ecosystem process supporting regional ecosystem research in some of the region's landscapes that are most vulnerable to increasing temperatures. We present satellite observations for 16 years of semi-polar snow phenology along with in-situ observations from climate station networks and vegetation monitoring plots over a 3° latitudinal gradient and discuss the application of the networks real-time and archived data for calibration and validation of the Arctic Boreal Vulnerability Experiments airborne science and permafrost research.

  18. Tobacco use prevalence – disentangling associations between Alaska Native race, low socio-economic status and rural disparities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia A. Dilley

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background . Tobacco use rates are exceptionally high among indigenous people in North America. Alaska Native, low socio-economic status (SES and rural communities are high-priority populations for Alaska's Tobacco Control program. Design . For the purpose of better informing tobacco control interventions, we conducted a descriptive study to describe high-priority groups using prevalence-based and proportion-based approaches. Methods . With data from 22,311 adults interviewed for Alaska's 2006–2010 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS, we used stratified analysis and logistic regression models to describe the current use of cigarettes and smokeless tobacco (SLT (including iq'mik, a unique Alaska Native SLT product among the 3 populations of interest. Results . “Population segments” were created with combinations of responses for Alaska Native race, SES and community type. We identified the highest prevalence and highest proportion of tobacco users for each type of tobacco by “segment.” For cigarette smoking, while the largest proportion (nearly one-third of the state's smokers are non-Native, high SES and live in urban settings, this group also has lower smoking prevalence than most other groups. Alaska Native, low SES, rural residents had both high smoking prevalence (48% and represented a large proportion of the state's smokers (nearly 10%. Patterns were similar for SLT, with non-Native high-SES urban residents making up the largest proportion of users despite lower prevalence, and Alaska Native, low SES, rural residents having high prevalence and making up a large proportion of users. For iq'mik use, Alaska Native people in rural settings were both the highest prevalence and proportion of users. Conclusion . While Alaska Native race, low SES status and community of residence can be considered alone when developing tobacco control interventions, creating “population segments” based on combinations of factors may be

  19. 50 CFR 17.5 - Alaska natives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., POSSESSION, TRANSPORTATION, SALE, PURCHASE, BARTER, EXPORTATION, AND IMPORTATION OF WILDLIFE AND PLANTS... threatened wildlife, shall not apply to: (1) Any Indian, Aleut, or Eskimo who is an Alaskan native and who resides in Alaska; or (2) Any non-native permanent resident of an Alaskan native village who is primarily...

  20. 76 FR 8375 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior.... 1 to 18, inclusive; Secs. 19 to 24, inclusive, those lands lying north of the highway right-of-way...

  1. Alaska Terrain Corrected Free Air Anomalies (96)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This 2' x 4' gravity anomaly grid for Alaska is NOT the input data set used in development of the GEOID96 model. This gravity grid models the 1.1 million terrestrial...

  2. Product Recovery From Hemlock "Pulpwood" From Alaska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas D. Fahey

    1983-01-01

    A total of 363 western hemlock (Tsuga heterophylla (Raf.) Sarg.) logs from Alaska were sawn to compare recovery at a stud mill and at a dimension mill. Recovery at both mills varied by log diameters and by log scaling system. Lumber grade recovery was primarily in Stud grade at the stud mill and in Standard and Construction grade at the dimension...

  3. The eastern larch beetle in Alaska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard A. Werner

    1986-01-01

    The eastern larch beetle (Dendroctonus simplex LeConte) exists throughout the range of tamarack (Larix laricina (Du Roi) K. Koch) in interior Alaska where it has a 1-year life cycle. Beetles overwinter as adults in the bark of the trunk below snowline in infested trees. Tamarack trees that are slow growing because of repeated...

  4. Alaska midgrade logs: supply and offshore demand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donald F. Flora; Wendy J. McGinnis

    1989-01-01

    The outlook for shipments and prices of export logs from Alaska differs significantly by grade (quality class). For the majority lying in the middle of the value range, the trend of prices is projected to increase $200 per thousand board feet, or about 55 percent, by 2000. Shipments are expected to rise about 30 percent by 1995 and then subside about 10 percent. These...

  5. SAMM: a prototype southeast Alaska multiresource model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roger D. Fight; Lawrence D. Garrett; Dale L. Weyermann

    1990-01-01

    The adaptive environmental assessment method was used by an interdisciplinary team of forest specialists to gain an understanding of resource interactions and tradeoffs resulting from forest management activities in southeast Alaska. A forest multiresource projection model was developed in the process. The multiresource model, “SAMM,” is capable of characterizing and...

  6. Preventing deaths in Alaska's commercial fishing industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, G A; Lincoln, J M; Jorgensen, S A; Klatt, M L; Manwaring, J C

    1998-01-01

    The arctic and sub-arctic waters of Alaska provide a very hazardous work setting, with special hazards posed by great distances, seasonal darkness, cold waters, high winds, brief fishing seasons, and icing. Our intent is to reduce the remarkably high occupational fatality rate (200/100,000/year in 1991-1992) among Alaska's commercial fishing workers. Over 90% of these deaths have been due to drowning or drowning plus hypothermia, primarily associated with vessel capsizings and sinkings. Comprehensive surveillance for commercial fishing occupational fatalities was established during 1991 in Alaska. During 1990 through 1994, the U.S. Commercial Fishing Industry Vessel Safety Act of 1988 required the implementation of comprehensive prevention measures for all fishing vessels in offshore cold waters, including immersion suits and other personal flotation devices, survival craft (life rafts), emergency position-indicating radio beacons, and crew training in emergency response and first aid. Parallel to this, voluntary training efforts by nonprofit organizations have greatly increased. During 1990-1994, drowning was the leading cause of occupational death in Alaska. During this period, 117 fishers died, 101 of them from drowning or drowning/hypothermia. During 1991-1994, there was a substantial decrease in Alaskan commercial fishing-related deaths, from 34 in 1991 to 35 in 1992, 22 in 1993, and 10 in 1994. While man-overboard drownings and some other categories of deaths (falls, fires) have continued to occur, the most marked progress has been in vessel-related events. Specific measures tailored to prevent drowning in vessel capsizings and sinkings in Alaska's commercial fishing industry have been very successful so far. Additional efforts must be made to reduce the frequency of vessel events and to prevent man-overboard events and drownings associated with them.

  7. 75 FR 74078 - Information Collection for Tribal Energy Development Capacity Program; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-30

    ... the Tribal Energy Development Capacity (TEDC) program. Indian tribes, including Alaska Native regional... collection to Ashley Stockdale, Department of the Interior, Office of Indian Energy and Economic Development... development on Indian land from Indian tribes, including Alaska Native regional and village corporations under...

  8. Geothermal energy in Alaska: site data base and development status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markle, D.

    1979-04-01

    The following are presented: the history of geothermal energy in Alaska; a history of Alaska land ownership; legal and institutional barriers; and economics. Development, the socio-economic and physical data concerning geothermal energy are documented by regions. The six regions presented are those of the present Alaska State Planning Activities and those of the Federal Land Use Commission. Site data summaries of the one hundred and four separate geothermal spring locations are presented by these regions. (MHR)

  9. Population dynamics of caribou herds in southwestern Alaska

    OpenAIRE

    Valkenburg, Patrick; Sellers, Richard A.; Squibb, Ronald C.; Woolington, James D.; Aderman, Andrew R.; Dale, Bruce W.

    2003-01-01

    The five naturally occurring and one transplanted caribou (Rangifer tarandus granti) herd in southwestern Alaska composed about 20% of Alaska's caribou population in 2001. All five of the naturally occurring herds fluctuated considerably in size between the late 1800s and 2001 and for some herds the data provide an indication of long-term periodic (40-50 year) fluctuations. At the present time, the Unimak (UCH) and Southern Alaska Peninsula (SAP) are recovering from population declines, the N...

  10. Development of a quantitative food frequency questionnaire for use among the Yup'ik people of Western Alaska.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fariba Kolahdooz

    Full Text Available Alaska Native populations are experiencing a nutrition transition and a resulting decrease in diet quality. The present study aimed to develop a quantitative food frequency questionnaire to assess the diet of the Yup'ik people of Western Alaska. A cross-sectional survey was conducted using 24-hour recalls and the information collected served as a basis for developing a quantitative food frequency questionnaire. A total of 177 males and females, aged 13-88, in six western Alaska communities, completed up to three 24-hour recalls as part of the Alaska Native Dietary and Subsistence Food Assessment Project. The frequency of the foods reported in the 24-hour recalls was tabulated and used to create a draft quantitative food frequency questionnaire, which was pilot tested and finalized with input from community members. Store-bought foods high in fat and sugar were reported more frequently than traditional foods. Seven of the top 26 foods most frequently reported were traditional foods. A 150-item quantitative food frequency questionnaire was developed that included 14 breads and crackers; 3 cereals; 11 dairy products; 69 meats, poultry and fish; 13 fruit; 22 vegetables; 9 desserts and snacks; and 9 beverages. The quantitative food frequency questionnaire contains 39 traditional food items. This quantitative food frequency questionnaire can be used to assess the unique diet of the Alaska Native people of Western Alaska. This tool will allow for monitoring of dietary changes over time as well as the identification of foods and nutrients that could be promoted in a nutrition intervention program intended to reduce chronic disease.

  11. Conceptual ecological models to support detection of ecological change on Alaska National Wildlife Refuges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, Andrea; Beever, Erik A.

    2011-01-01

    More than 31 million hectares of land are protected and managed in 16 refuges by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) in Alaska. The vastness and isolation of Alaskan refuges give rise to relatively intact and complete ecosystems. The potential for these lands to provide habitat for trust species is likely to be altered, however, due to global climate change, which is having dramatic effects at high latitudes. The ability of USFWS to effectively manage these lands in the future will be enhanced by a regional inventory and monitoring program that integrates and supplements monitoring currently being implemented by individual refuges. Conceptual models inform monitoring programs in a number of ways, including summarizing important ecosystem components and processes as well as facilitating communication, discussion and debate about the nature of the system and important management issues. This process can lead to hypotheses regarding future changes, likely results of alternative management actions, identification of monitoring indicators, and ultimately, interpretation of monitoring results. As a first step towards developing a monitoring program, the 16 refuges in Alaska each created a conceptual model of their refuge and the landscape context. Models include prominent ecosystem components, drivers, and processes by which components are linked or altered. The Alaska refuge system also recognizes that designing and implementing monitoring at regional and ecoregional extents has numerous scientific, fiscal, logistical, and political advantages over monitoring conducted exclusively at refuge-specific scales. Broad-scale monitoring is particularly advantageous for examining phenomena such as climate change because effects are best interpreted at broader spatial extents. To enable an ecoregional perspective, a rationale was developed for deriving ecoregional boundaries for four ecoregions (Polar, Interior Alaska, Bering Coast, and North Pacific Coast) from the

  12. Alaska Phocid Health and Disease

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Polar Ecosystems Program research projects focus primarily on abundance, trends, distribution, health and condition, and foraging behavior of phocids (harbor,...

  13. Alaska Landscape Conservation Cooperative Boundaries, Feb 2013 update.

    Data.gov (United States)

    Arctic Landscape Conservation Cooperative — This dataset depicts the terrestrial boundaries of the Landscape Conservation Cooperatives (LCC) within Alaska. Those LCCs are: Aleutian and Bering Sea Islands,...

  14. Seamonster: A Smart Sensor Web in Southeast Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatland, D. R.; Heavner, M. J.; Hood, E.; Connor, C.; Nagorski, S.

    2006-12-01

    The NASA Research Opportunities in Space and Earth Science (ROSES) program is supporting a wireless sensor network project as part of its Advanced Information Systems Technology "Smart Sensor Web" initiative. The project, entitled Seamonster (for SouthEast Alaska MONitoring Network for Science, Telecomm, and Education Research) is led by the University of Alaska Southeast (Juneau) in collaboration with Microsoft- Vexcel in Boulder Colorado. This paper describes both the data acquisition components and science research objectives of Seamonster. The underlying data acquisition concept is to facilitate geophysics data acquisition by providing a wireless backbone for data recovery. Other researchers would be encouraged to emplace their own sensors together with short-range wireless (ZigBee, Bluetooth, etc). Through a common protocol the backbone will receive data from these sensors and relay them to a wired server. This means that the investigator can receive their data via email on a daily basis thereby cutting cost and monitoring sensor health. With environmental hardening and fairly high bandwidth and long range (100kbps/50km to 5mpbs/15km per hop) the network is intended to cover large areas and operate in harsh environments. Low power sensors and intelligent power management within the backbone are the dual ideas to contend with typical power/cost/data dilemmas. Seamonster science will focus over the next three years on hydrology and glaciology in a succession of valleys near Juneau in various stages of deglaciation, in effect providing a synopsis of a millennium-timescale process in a single moment. The instrumentation will include GPS, geophones, digital photography, met stations, and a suite of stream state and water quality sensors. Initial focus is on the Lemon Creek watershed with expansion to follow in subsequent years. The project will ideally expand to include marine and biological monitoring components.

  15. Catalog of earthquake hypocenters at Redoubt Volcano and Mt. Spurr, Alaska: October 12, 1989 - December 31, 1990

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, John A.; March, Gail D.; Lahr, John C.; Jolly, Arthur D.; Cruse, Gina R.

    1993-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO), a cooperative program of the U.S. Geological Survey, the Geophysical Institute of the University of Alaska, Fairbanks, and the Alaska Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys, began a program of seismic monitoring at potentially active volcanoes in the Cook Inlet region in 1988. Seismic monitoring of this area was previously accomplished by two independent seismic networks operated by the U.S. Geological Survey (Northern Cook Inlet) and the Geophysical Institute (Southern Cook Inlet). In 1989 the AVO seismic program consisted of three small-aperture networks of six, five, and six stations on Mt. Spurr, Redoubt Volcano, and Augustine Volcano respectively. Thirty-five other stations were operated in the Cook Inlet region as part of the AVO program. During 1990 six additional stations were added to the Redoubt network in response to eruptive activity, and three stations were installed at Iliamna Volcano. The principal objectives of the AVO program have been the seismic surveillance of the Cook Inlet volcanoes and the investigation of seismic processes associated with active volcanism.

  16. 24 CFR 1003.2 - Program objective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) OFFICE OF ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR PUBLIC AND INDIAN HOUSING, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT BLOCK GRANTS FOR INDIAN TRIBES AND ALASKA NATIVE VILLAGES General Provisions § 1003.2 Program objective. The primary objective of the Indian CDBG (ICDBG) Program and of the community...

  17. Alaska Highway bibliography, 3rd edition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prange, Laurie

    land route to Alaska for defence purposes. The military was not interested in developing or planning a highway for the civilian needs of the future. The chosen route ran from Edmonton to Whitehorse, then on to Fairbanks. The U.S. Army and U.S. Public Roads Administration (PRA) roughed out a “pioneer...... increasing military needs. The unexpected bombing of Pearl Harbour in December 1941 stimulated interest in the construction of the Alaska Highway by the American government. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers selected a route based on the location of the NWSR airfields and the military needs for an alternative....... Thus the Canol project was developed to ensure a continuing supply of petroleum to meet military needs. The end result of the Canol project was a pipeline and road network transporting oil from Norman Wells on the Mackenzie River, Northwest Territories, to Whitehorse, Watson Lake and Fairbanks...

  18. Surface melt dominates Alaska glacier mass balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen Chris F,; Burgess, E; Arendt, A.A.; O'Neel, Shad; Johnson, A.J.; Kienholz, C.

    2015-01-01

    Mountain glaciers comprise a small and widely distributed fraction of the world's terrestrial ice, yet their rapid losses presently drive a large percentage of the cryosphere's contribution to sea level rise. Regional mass balance assessments are challenging over large glacier populations due to remote and rugged geography, variable response of individual glaciers to climate change, and episodic calving losses from tidewater glaciers. In Alaska, we use airborne altimetry from 116 glaciers to estimate a regional mass balance of −75 ± 11 Gt yr−1 (1994–2013). Our glacier sample is spatially well distributed, yet pervasive variability in mass balances obscures geospatial and climatic relationships. However, for the first time, these data allow the partitioning of regional mass balance by glacier type. We find that tidewater glaciers are losing mass at substantially slower rates than other glaciers in Alaska and collectively contribute to only 6% of the regional mass loss.

  19. High Resolution Regional Climate Simulations over Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monaghan, A. J.; Clark, M. P.; Arnold, J.; Newman, A. J.; Musselman, K. N.; Barlage, M. J.; Xue, L.; Liu, C.; Gutmann, E. D.; Rasmussen, R.

    2016-12-01

    In order to appropriately plan future projects to build and maintain infrastructure (e.g., dams, dikes, highways, airports), a number of U.S. federal agencies seek to better understand how hydrologic regimes may shift across the country due to climate change. Building on the successful completion of a series of high-resolution WRF simulations over the Colorado River Headwaters and contiguous USA, our team is now extending these simulations over the challenging U.S. States of Alaska and Hawaii. In this presentation we summarize results from a newly completed 4-km resolution WRF simulation over Alaska spanning 2002-2016 at 4-km spatial resolution. Our aim is to gain insight into the thermodynamics that drive key precipitation processes, particularly the extremes that are most damaging to infrastructure.

  20. Broadening the Quality and Capabilities of the EarthScope Alaska Transportable Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busby, R. W.

    2016-12-01

    In 2016, the EarthScope Transportable Array (TA) program will have 195 broadband seismic stations operating in Alaska and western Canada. This ambitious project will culminate in a network of 268 new or upgraded real-time seismic stations operating through 2019. The challenging environmental conditions and the remoteness of Alaska have motivated a new method for constructing a high-quality, temporary seismic network. The Alaska TA station design builds on experience of the Lower 48 TA deployment and adds design requirements because most stations are accessible only by helicopter. The stations utilize new high-performance posthole sensors, a specially built hammer/auger drill, and lightweight lithium ion batteries to minimize sling loads. A uniform station design enables a modest crew to build the network on a short timeline and operate them through the difficult conditions of rural Alaska. The Alaska TA deployment has increased the quality of seismic data, with some well-sited 2-3 m posthole stations approaching the performance of permanent Global Seismic Network stations emplaced in 100 m boreholes. The real-time data access, power budget, protective enclosure and remote logistics of these TA stations has attracted collaborations with NASA, NOAA, USGS, AVO and other organizations to add auxiliary sensors to the suite of instruments at many TA stations. Strong motion sensors have been added to (18) stations near the subduction trench to complement SM stations operated by AEC, ANSS and GSN. All TA and most upgraded stations have pressure and infrasound sensors, and 150 TA stations are receiving a Vaisala weather sensor, supplied by the National Weather Service Alaska Region and NASA, capable of measuring temperature, pressure, relative humidity, wind speed/direction, and precipitation intensity. We are also installing about (40) autonomous soil temperature profile kits adjacent to northern stations. While the priority continues to be collecting seismic data, these

  1. Southwest Alaska Regional Geothermal Energy Projec

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holdmann, Gwen [Univ. of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK (United States)

    2015-04-30

    Drilling and temperature logging campaigns between the late 1970's and early 1980’s measured temperatures at Pilgrim Hot Springs in excess of 90°C. Between 2010 and 2014 the University of Alaska used a variety of methods including geophysical surveys, remote sensing techniques, heat budget modeling, and additional drilling to better understand the resource and estimate the available geothermal energy.

  2. Bechevin Bay, Alaska, Inlet Stability Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-05-01

    Krenitzin. Bechevin Inlet, Bechevin Bay, and Isanotski Strait form an inlet system which * separates Unimak Island from the Alaska Peninsula. This...from the North Pacific must travel around Unimak Island through Unimak Pass. This route is 100-150 miles longer than the route through the Bechevin...period was semidiurnal, while the tidal flow at Unimak Pass (not too far southwest from the study area) was, interestingly, diurnal. Second, the phase

  3. Alaska research natural areas: 2. Limestone jags.

    Science.gov (United States)

    G.P. Juday

    1989-01-01

    The 2083-hectare Limestone Jags Research Natural Area in the White Mountains National Recreation Area of central Alaska contains old limestone terrain features––caves, natural bridges, disappearing streams, and cold springs in a subarctic setting. A limestone dissolution joint-type cave in the area is one of the largest reported in high-latitude North America. A...

  4. Tsunami Source Specification for Southeast Alaska with Focus on Inundation Mapping and Hazard Risk Assessment in Sitka

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suleimani, E. N.; Nicolsky, D. J.; Hansen, R. A.

    2012-12-01

    The Alaska Earthquake Information Center (AEIC) conducts tsunami inundation mapping for coastal communities in Alaska. This activity provides local emergency officials with tsunami hazard assessment and mitigation tools. At-risk communities are spread along several segments of the Alaska-Aleutian Subduction Zone, with each segment having a unique seismic history and potential tsunami hazard. As a result, almost every community has a distinct set of potential tsunami sources that need to be considered in order to make a tsunami inundation map. Therefore, an important component of the inundation mapping effort is identification and specification of potential tsunami sources. We are creating tsunami inundation maps for Sitka, Alaska, in the scope of the National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program. Tsunami potential from tectonic and submarine landslide sources must be evaluated in this case for comprehensive mapping of areas at risk for inundation. The community of Sitka, the former capital of Russian Alaska, is located in Southeast Alaska, on the west coast of Baranof Island, facing the Pacific Ocean. In this area of southern Alaska, the subduction of the Pacific plate beneath the North America plate becomes a transform boundary that continues down the coast as the Fairweather - Queen Charlotte (FW-QC) transform fault system. The Sitka segment of the FW-QC fault system ruptured in large strike-slip earthquakes in 1927 (Ms7.1) and in 1972 (Ms7.6). We numerically model the extent of inundation in Sitka due to tsunami waves generated from earthquake and landslide sources. Tsunami scenarios include a repeat of the tsunami triggered by the 1964 Great Alaska earthquake, repeat of the tsunami triggered by the 2011 Tohoku earthquake, tsunami waves generated by a hypothetically extended 1964 rupture, a hypothetical Cascadia megathrust earthquake, and hypothetical earthquakes in the FW-QC fault system. Underwater landslide events off the continental shelf along the FW-QC fault

  5. Bedrock geologic map of the northern Alaska Peninsula area, southwestern Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Frederic H.; Blodgett, Robert B.; Blome, Charles D.; Mohadjer, Solmaz; Preller, Cindi C.; Klimasauskas, Edward P.; Gamble, Bruce M.; Coonrad, Warren L.

    2017-03-03

    The northern Alaska Peninsula is a region of transition from the classic magmatic arc geology of the Alaska Peninsula to a Proterozoic and early Paleozoic carbonate platform and then to the poorly understood, tectonically complex sedimentary basins of southwestern Alaska. Physiographically, the region ranges from the high glaciated mountains of the Alaska-Aleutian Range to the coastal lowlands of Cook Inlet on the east and Bristol Bay on the southwest. The lower Ahklun Mountains and finger lakes on the west side of the map area show strong effects from glaciation. Structurally, a number of major faults cut the map area. Most important of these are the Bruin Bay Fault that parallels the coast of Cook Inlet, the Lake Clark Fault that cuts diagonally northeast to southwest across the eastern part of the map area, and the presently active Holitna Fault to the northwest that cuts surficial deposits.Distinctive rock packages assigned to three provinces are overlain by younger sedimentary rocks and intruded by widely dispersed latest Cretaceous and (or) early Tertiary granitic rocks. Much of the east half of the map area lies in the Alaska-Aleutian Range province; the Jurassic to Tertiary Alaska-Aleutian Range batholith and derivative Jurassic sedimentary rocks form the core of this province, which is intruded and overlain by the Aleutian magmatic arc. The Lime Hills province, the carbonate platform, occurs in the north-central part of the map area. The Paleozoic and Mesozoic Ahklun Mountains province in the western part of the map area includes abundant chert, argillite, and graywacke and lesser limestone, basalt, and tectonic mélange. The Kuskokwim Group, an Upper Cretaceous turbidite sequence, is extensively exposed and bounds all three provinces in the west-central part of the map area.

  6. Bryophytes from Tuxedni Wilderness area, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schofield, W.B.; Talbot, S. S.; Talbot, S.L.

    2002-01-01

    The bryoflora of two small maritime islands, Chisik and Duck Island (2,302 ha), comprising Tuxedni Wilderness in western lower Cook Inlet, Alaska, was examined to determine species composition in an area where no previous collections had been reported. The field study was conducted from sites selected to represent the totality of environmental variation within Tuxedni Wilderness. Data were analyzed using published reports to compare the bryophyte distribution patterns at three levels, the Northern Hemisphere, North America, and Alaska. A total of 286 bryophytes were identified: 230 mosses and 56 liverworts. Bryum miniatum, Dichodontium olympicum, and Orthotrichum pollens are new to Alaska. The annotated list of species for Tuxedni Wilderness expands the known range for many species and fills distribution gaps within Hulte??n's Central Pacific Coast district. Compared with bryophyte distribution in the Northern Hemisphere, the bryoflora of Tuxedni Wilderness primarily includes taxa of boreal (61%), montane (13%), temperate (11%), arctic-alpine (7%), cosmopolitan (7%), distribution; 4% of the total moss flora are North America endemics. A brief summary of the botanical exploration of the general area is provided, as is a description of the bryophytes present in the vegetation and habitat types of Chisik and Duck Islands.

  7. Preventing commercial fishing deaths in Alaska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lincoln, J M; Conway, G A

    1999-10-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of the United States Commercial Fishing Industry Vessel Safety Act of 1988 in reducing the high occupational death rate (200/100,000/year in 1991-2) among Alaska's commercial fishermen. Comprehensive surveillance of deaths in commercial fishing was established by our office during 1991 and 1992 for Alaska. Demographic data and data on risk factors and incidents were compiled and analysed for trend. During 1991-8, there was a significant (p deaths in Alaska related to commercial fishing. Although drownings from fishermen falling overboard and events related to crab fishing vessels (often conducted far offshore and in winter) have continued to occur, marked progress (significant downward trend, p fishing industry have been successful. However, these events continue to occur, and place fishermen and rescue personnel at substantial risk. Additional strategies must be identified to reduce the frequency of vessels capsizing and sinking, to enable parallel improvements in the mortality among crab fishermen, and to prevent fishermen falling overboard and drownings associated with them.

  8. Interactive modeling of permafrost in Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, K.; Jafarov, E. E.; Schaefer, K. M.; Clow, G. D.; Piper, M.; Stewart, S.; Overeem, I.; Cyrus, J.

    2016-12-01

    Permafrost distribution and evolution are critically important for scientists, engineers, policy makers, indigenous communities, and the general public. There is an urgent need to investigate permafrost dynamics via modeling using emerging new data products. However, the availability of such models to the community of permafrost scientists is quite limited. We developed an online modeling tool that provides an easy access to several permafrost models. The tool is based on the Community Surface Dynamics Modeling System Modeling (CSDMS) Framework platform. We employed one of the online permafrost models to study permafrost distribution and dynamics in Alaska. The model was forced by using ERA-Interim dataset with a spatial resolution of 0.125×0.125°, including air temperature, snow depth, snow density, and volumetric soil water content. We provide a general parameterization of soil thermal parameters based on soil textures. We validated modeled active layer thickness (ALT) using observations of 15 years (2001-2015) from more than 40 CALM sites across Alaska. Results show a good agreement with observations. We quantified model uncertainty using Monte Carlo sampling method on parameters of soil and snow. Using near-surface temperature and precipitation data from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5), our results indicate a wide permafrost degradation in Alaska over next 40 to 50 years.

  9. Triggered tremor sweet spots in Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomberg, Joan; Prejean, Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    To better understand what controls fault slip along plate boundaries, we have exploited the abundance of seismic and geodetic data available from the richly varied tectonic environments composing Alaska. A search for tremor triggered by 11 large earthquakes throughout all of seismically monitored Alaska reveals two tremor “sweet spots”—regions where large-amplitude seismic waves repeatedly triggered tremor between 2006 and 2012. The two sweet spots locate in very different tectonic environments—one just trenchward and between the Aleutian islands of Unalaska and Akutan and the other in central mainland Alaska. The Unalaska/Akutan spot corroborates previous evidence that the region is ripe for tremor, perhaps because it is located where plate-interface frictional properties transition between stick-slip and stably sliding in both the dip direction and laterally. The mainland sweet spot coincides with a region of complex and uncertain plate interactions, and where no slow slip events or major crustal faults have been noted previously. Analyses showed that larger triggering wave amplitudes, and perhaps lower frequencies (probability of triggering tremor. However, neither the maximum amplitude in the time domain or in a particular frequency band, nor the geometric relationship of the wavefield to the tremor source faults alone ensures a high probability of triggering. Triggered tremor at the two sweet spots also does not occur during slow slip events visually detectable in GPS data, although slow slip below the detection threshold may have facilitated tremor triggering.

  10. Atmospheric deposition and critical loads for nitrogen and metals in Arctic Alaska: Review and current status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linder, Greg L.; Brumbaugh, William G.; Neitlich, Peter; Little, Edward

    2013-01-01

    To protect important resources under their bureau’s purview, the United States National Park Service’s (NPS) Arctic Network (ARCN) has developed a series of “vital signs” that are to be periodically monitored. One of these vital signs focuses on wet and dry deposition of atmospheric chemicals and further, the establishment of critical load (CL) values (thresholds for ecological effects based on cumulative depositional loadings) for nitrogen (N), sulfur, and metals. As part of the ARCN terrestrial monitoring programs, samples of the feather moss Hylocomium splendens are being col- lected and analyzed as a cost-effective means to monitor atmospheric pollutant deposition in this region. Ultimately, moss data combined with refined CL values might be used to help guide future regulation of atmospheric contaminant sources potentially impacting Arctic Alaska. But first, additional long-term studies are needed to determine patterns of contaminant deposition as measured by moss biomonitors and to quantify ecosystem responses at particular loadings/ ranges of contaminants within Arctic Alaska. Herein we briefly summarize 1) current regulatory guidance related to CL values 2) derivation of CL models for N and metals, 3) use of mosses as biomonitors of atmospheric deposition and loadings, 4) preliminary analysis of vulnerabilities and risks associated with CL estimates for N, 5) preliminary analysis of existing data for characterization of CL values for N for interior Alaska and 6) implications for managers and future research needs.

  11. High seroprevalence of antibodies to avian influenza viruses among wild waterfowl in Alaska: implications for surveillance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Heather M.; Hall, Jeffery S.; Flint, Paul L.; Franson, J. Christian; Ely, Craig R.; Schmutz, Joel A.; Samuel, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    We examined seroprevalence (presence of detectable antibodies in serum) for avian influenza viruses (AIV) among 4,485 birds, from 11 species of wild waterfowl in Alaska (1998–2010), sampled during breeding/molting periods. Seroprevalence varied among species (highest in eiders (Somateria and Polysticta species), and emperor geese (Chen canagica)), ages (adults higher than juveniles), across geographic locations (highest in the Arctic and Alaska Peninsula) and among years in tundra swans (Cygnus columbianus). All seroprevalence rates in excess of 60% were found in marine-dependent species. Seroprevalence was much higher than AIV infection based on rRT-PCR or virus isolation alone. Because pre-existing AIV antibodies can infer some protection against highly pathogenic AIV (HPAI H5N1), our results imply that some wild waterfowl in Alaska could be protected from lethal HPAIV infections. Seroprevalence should be considered in deciphering patterns of exposure, differential infection, and rates of AIV transmission. Our results suggest surveillance programs include species and populations with high AIV seroprevalences, in addition to those with high infection rates. Serologic testing, including examination of serotype-specific antibodies throughout the annual cycle, would help to better assess spatial and temporal patterns of AIV transmission and overall disease dynamics.

  12. Demography of Dall's sheep in northwestern Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleckner, Christopher; Udevitz, Mark S.; Adams, Layne G.; Shults, Brad S.

    2003-01-01

    Dall’s sheep in northwestern Alaska declined in the early 1990s following the severe 1989-90 and 1990-91 winters. In the Baird Mountains of Noatak National Preserve, estimates of adult sheep declined by 50% from 800 in 1989 to under 400 in 1991. Population counts remained low throughout 1991 to 1996, reaching a minimum of 244 adult sheep in 1996. Few lambs were observed during annual midsummer aerial surveys in 1991 to 1994. We suspect that these declines resulted from a combination of poorer nutritional condition and increased vulnerability of sheep to predation resulting from severe winter conditions.As a result of these declines, both subsistence and sport hunting seasons were closed by emergency order in 1991, resulting in substantial management controversy. The affected publics, although willing to accept the closures, questioned the validity of the sheep survey data and strongly emphasized their interest in restoring harvests as soon as populations increased sufficiently. In 1995 the Northwest Arctic Regional Advisory Council, the local advisory committee for the Federal Subsistence Board, passed a motion supporting efforts to initiate research on sheep populations in the region to better understand the factors limiting sheep populations and to evaluate sheep survey methodologies.Currently estimates of Dall’s sheep population size and composition in the western Brooks Range are based on intensive fixed-wing aerial surveys conducted annually since 1986 in areas including the Baird Mountains. The annual variation in recent Baird Mountains aerial counts cannot be explained with reasonable assumptions about reproduction and survival, suggesting that there is some variability in the proportion of the population observed each year or that a substantial number of sheep move during the survey. Prior to our research, no attempt had been made to estimate visibility bias or precision for these surveys.Our understanding of Dall’s sheep population biology comes

  13. Alaska Seismic Network Upgrade and Expansion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandru, J. M.; Hansen, R. A.; Estes, S. A.; Fowler, M.

    2009-12-01

    AEIC (Alaska Earthquake Information Center) has begun the task of upgrading the older regional seismic monitoring sites that have been in place for a number of years. Many of the original sites (some dating to the 1960's) are still single component analog technology. This was a very reasonable and ultra low power reliable system for its day. However with the advanced needs of today's research community, AEIC has begun upgrading to Broadband and Strong Motion Seismometers, 24 bit digitizers and high-speed two-way communications, while still trying to maintain the utmost reliability and maintaining low power consumption. Many sites have been upgraded or will be upgraded from single component to triaxial broad bands and triaxial accerometers. This provided much greater dynamic range over the older antiquated technology. The challenge is compounded by rapidly changing digital technology. Digitizersand data communications based on analog phone lines utilizing 9600 baud modems and RS232 are becoming increasingly difficult to maintain and increasingly expensive compared to current methods that use Ethernet, TCP/IP and UDP connections. Gaining a reliable Internet connection can be as easy as calling up an ISP and having a DSL connection installed or may require installing our own satellite uplink, where other options don't exist. LANs are accomplished with a variety of communications devices such as spread spectrum 900 MHz radios or VHF radios for long troublesome shots. WANs are accomplished with a much wider variety of equipment. Traditional analog phone lines are being used in some instances, however 56K lines are much more desirable. Cellular data links have become a convenient option in semiurban environments where digital cellular coverage is available. Alaska is slightly behind the curve on cellular technology due to its low population density and vast unpopulated areas but has emerged into this new technology in the last few years. Partnerships with organizations

  14. Recreation and scenic resources in Alaska: an annotated bibliography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert M. Muth; Sally Anne Fitchet

    1976-01-01

    This bibliography provides descriptions of material published on recreation and scenic resources in Alaska. Included are publications on research and supporting material in the form of studies and reports, proposals, plans, historical and cultural references, bibliographic documents, and popular books and articles describing the resources of Alaska and issues relating...

  15. Resilience of Athabascan subsistence systems to interior Alaska's changing climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gary P. Kofinas; F. Stuart Chapin; Shauna BurnSilver; Jennifer I. Schmidt; Nancy L. Fresco; Knut Kielland; Stephanie Martin; Anna Springsteen; T. Scott Rupp

    2010-01-01

    Subsistence harvesting and wild food production by Athabascan peoples is part of an integrated social-ecological system of interior Alaska. We describe effects of recent trends and future climate change projections on the boreal ecosystem of interior Alaska and relate changes in ecosystem services to Athabascan subsistence. We focus primarily on moose, a keystone...

  16. Click beetles (Coleopter: Elateridae) associated with potatoes in Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this research was to study the species composition, seasonal biology, and geographic distribution of adult elaterids associated with potato production in Alaska. Adult elaterids were collected in the major potato producing areas of Alaska and from a subsistence farm above the arctic...

  17. Downed woody material in southeast Alaska forest stands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederic R. Larson

    1992-01-01

    Data collected in conjunction with the multiresource inventory of southeast Alaska in 1985-86 included downed wood along 234 transects at 60 locations. Transects occurred in 11 forest types and 19 plant associations within the entire southeastern Alaska archipelago. Downed wood weights in forest types ranged from 1232 kilograms per hectare (0.6 ton per acre) in muskeg...

  18. The Alaska Arctic Vegetation Archive (AVA-AK)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walker, Donald A.; Breen, Amy L.; Druckenmiller, Lisa A.; Wirth, Lisa W.; Fisher, Will; Raynolds, Martha K.; Šibík, Jozef; Walker, Marilyn D.; Hennekens, Stephan; Boggs, Keith; Boucher, Tina; Buchhorn, Marcel; Bültmann, Helga; Cooper, David J.; Daniëls, Fred J.A.; Davidson, Scott J.; Ebersole, James J.; Elmendorf, Sara C.; Epstein, Howard E.; Gould, William A.; Hollister, Robert D.; Iversen, Colleen M.; Jorgenson, M.T.; Kade, Anja; Lee, Michael T.; MacKenzie, William H.; Peet, Robert K.; Peirce, Jana L.; Schickhoff, Udo; Sloan, Victoria L.; Talbot, Stephen S.; Tweedie, Craig E.; Villarreal, Sandra; Webber, Patrick J.; Zona, Donatella

    2016-01-01

    The Alaska Arctic Vegetation Archive (AVA-AK, GIVD-ID: NA-US-014) is a free, publically available database archive of vegetation-plot data from the Arctic tundra region of northern Alaska. The archive currently contains 24 datasets with 3,026 non-overlapping plots. Of these, 74% have geolocation

  19. Alaska Humans Factors Safety Study: The Southern Coastal Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappell, Sheryl L.; Reynard, William (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    At the request of the Alaska Air Carriers Association, researchers from the NASA Aviation Safety Reporting System, at NASA Ames Research Center, conducted a study on aspects of safety in Alaskan Part 135 air taxi operations. An interview form on human factors safety issues was created by a representative team from the FAA-Alaska, NTSB-Alaska, NASA-ASRS, and representatives of the Alaska Air Carriers Association which was subsequently used in the interviews of pilots and managers. Because of the climate and operational differences, the study was broken into two geographical areas, the southern coastal areas and the northern portion of the state. This presentation addresses the southern coastal areas, specifically: Anchorage, Dillingham, King Salmon, Kodiak, Cold Bay, Juneau, and Ketchikan. The interview questions dealt with many of the potential pressures on pilots and managers associated with the daily air taxi operations in Alaska. The impact of the environmental factors such as the lack of available communication, navigation and weather information systems was evaluated. The results of this study will be used by government and industry working in Alaska. These findings will contribute important information on specific Alaska safety issues for eventual incorporation into training materials and policies that will help to assure the safe conduct of air taxi flights in Alaska.

  20. Alaska oil and gas: Energy wealth or vanishing opportunity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, C.P.; Doughty, T.C.; Faulder, D.D.; Harrison, W.E.; Irving, J.S.; Jamison, H.C.; White, G.J.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to systematically identify and review (a) the known and undiscovered reserves and resources of arctic Alaska, (b) the economic factors controlling development, (c) the risks and environmental considerations involved in development, and (d) the impacts of a temporary shutdown of the Alaska North Slope Oil Delivery System (ANSODS). 119 refs., 45 figs., 41 tabs.

  1. Satellite Sounder Data Assimilation for Improving Alaska Region Weather Forecast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jiang; Stevens, E.; Zavodsky, B. T.; Zhang, X.; Heinrichs, T.; Broderson, D.

    2014-01-01

    Data assimilation has been demonstrated very useful in improving both global and regional numerical weather prediction. Alaska has very coarser surface observation sites. On the other hand, it gets much more satellite overpass than lower 48 states. How to utilize satellite data to improve numerical prediction is one of hot topics among weather forecast community in Alaska. The Geographic Information Network of Alaska (GINA) at University of Alaska is conducting study on satellite data assimilation for WRF model. AIRS/CRIS sounder profile data are used to assimilate the initial condition for the customized regional WRF model (GINA-WRF model). Normalized standard deviation, RMSE, and correlation statistic analysis methods are applied to analyze one case of 48 hours forecasts and one month of 24-hour forecasts in order to evaluate the improvement of regional numerical model from Data assimilation. The final goal of the research is to provide improved real-time short-time forecast for Alaska regions.

  2. Promising Practices and Strategies To Reduce Alcohol and Substance Abuse among American Indians and Alaska Natives. An OJP Issues & Practices Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melton, Ada Pecos; Chino, Michelle; May, Phillip A.; Gossage, J. Phillip

    This report presents case studies of nine successful programs designed to reduce alcohol and substance abuse among American Indians and Alaska Natives. These case studies highlight effective solutions developed within tribal communities and combining Western and traditional approaches to build upon the strengths of the respective Indian…

  3. Creating a Culturally Appropriate Web-Based Behavioral Intervention for American Indian/Alaska Native Women in Southern California: The Healthy Women Healthy Native Nation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorman, Jessica R.; Clapp, John D.; Calac, Daniel; Kolander, Chelsea; Nyquist, Corinna; Chambers, Christina D.

    2013-01-01

    Health disparities in fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) are of high importance to American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) communities. We conducted focus groups and interviews with 21 AI/AN women and key informants in Southern California to modify a brief, Web-based program for screening and prevention of prenatal alcohol use. This process…

  4. 76 FR 7788 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone off Alaska; Western Alaska Community Development Quota...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-11

    ... at time of crab delivery; standardize reporting time limits for recording discard, disposition... regulations related to time and time limits, as follows: Time limits for recording information in the paper... time limit to record scale weights in the DCPL for C/Ps participating in the Central Gulf of Alaska...

  5. Natality and calf mortality of the Northern Alaska Peninsula and Southern Alaska Peninsula caribou herds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard A. Sellers

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available We studied natality in the Northern Alaska Peninsula (NAP and Southern Alaska Peninsula (SAP caribou (Rangifer tarandus granti herds during 1996-1999, and mortality and weights of calves during 1998 and 1999- Natality was lower in the NAP than the SAP primarily because most 3-year-old females did not produce calves in the NAP Patterns of calf mortality in the NAP and SAP differed from those in Interior Alaska primarily because neonatal (i.e., during the first 2 weeks of life mortality was relatively low, but mortality continued to be significant through August in both herds, and aggregate annual mortality was extreme (86% in the NAP Predators probably killed more neonatal calves in the SAP, primarily because a wolf den (Canis lupus was located on the calving area. Despite the relatively high density of brown bears (Ursus arctos and bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus, these predators killed surprisingly few calves. Golden eagles (Aquila chrysaetos were uncommon on the Alaska Peninsula. At least 2 calves apparently died from pneu¬monia in the range of the NAP but none were suspected to have died from disease in the range of the SAP. Heavy scav¬enging by bald eagles complicated determining cause of death of calves in both the NAP and SAP.

  6. The altitudinal distribution of snow algae on an Alaska glacier (Gulkana Glacier in the Alaska Range)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Nozomu

    2001-12-01

    The altitudinal distribution of a snow algal community was investigated on an Alaska glacier (Gulkana Glacier in the Alaska Range) from 1270 to 1770 m a.s.l.. Seven species of snow and ice algae (Chlorophyta and cyanobacteria) were observed on the glacier surface. These species were Chlamydomonas nivalis, Mesotaenium berggrenii, Ancylonema nordenskioldii, Cylindrocystis brébissonii, Raphidonema sp., and two Oscillatoriaceae cyanobacteria. The altitudinal distribution of snow algae was different among the species: Cd. nivalis was distributed on the middle to upper area, M. berggrenii; A. nordenskioldii, and one Oscillatoriaceae cyanobacterium on the middle to lower area; Raphidonema sp. on the middle area; and Cyl. brébissonii and one Oscillatoriaceae cyanobacterium on the lower area. The total cell concentration and the cell volume biomass of the snow algae ranged from 4·4 × 103 to 9·9 × 105 cells ml-1 and from 33 to 2211 µl m-2 respectively. The cell volume biomass changed with altitude; the biomass increased with altitude below 1600 m a.s.l., and decreased above 1600 m a.s.l. The community structure showed that algae is discussed in terms of the physical and chemical condition of the glacier surface, and is compared with that on a Himalayan glacier. A larger biomass in the snow area on the Alaska glacier than that of the Himalayan glacier is likely due to less frequent snow cover in summer in Alaska. Small amounts of filamentous cyanobacteria on the Alaska glacier may allow washouts of unicellular green algae by running melt water and may cause a different pattern of altitudinal distribution of algal biomass on the ice area from the Himalayan glacier.

  7. 76 FR 20715 - National Environmental Policy Act; Sounding Rockets Program; Poker Flat Research Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-13

    ... Program (SRP) and the University of Alaska-Fairbanks' PFRR may be found on the internet at http://sites... understanding the interactions between the sun and Earth as well as the origin and evolution of the solar system...

  8. 77 FR 4579 - Alaska Region's Subsistence Resource Commission (SRC) Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-30

    ... includes the following: 1. Call to Order--Confirm Quorum 2. Welcome and Introductions 3. Administrative... Board of Game Updates 13. National Park Service Reports: a. Superintendent Updates b. Subsistence...

  9. Installation Restoration Program Records Search for Alaska DEW Line Stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-06-01

    svoa mebe of MIssinq Values ou__ ~t of 10 (P50wSer. sea Dvided by"alu pgesseneqe of musming values -. Q USure amMa Nltip~ied by 1001 . .... ..M A L...overall mebe at Assmed Value. - -5 out of 25 ovezauJ percent"*e of Assmed VaLuell OVEN"________ (Receptors Subscure X~ 0.22 pLus Pathways Subscofe 1 8.20

  10. 77 FR 4580 - Alaska Region's Subsistence Resource Commission (SRC) Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-30

    .... Superintendent Updates 1. Unit 23 User Issues 2. Local Hire/Internship 3. Cross Cultural Education 4... published in local newspapers and announced on local radio stations prior to the meeting date. SRC meeting... Monument SRC Meeting Contact: Frank Hays, Superintendent or Willie Goodwin, Subsistence Community Liaison...

  11. Installation Restoration Program. Phase 1 - Records Search, Elmendorf AFB, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-09-01

    Service (1979). Soils of this portion of the base are typically upland varieties formed over dense gravelly till, occasionally possessing a thin veneer of... resin and suspension vinyl resin waste streams and sized settling basins from the studies. Proposed bench-scale study of the effect of ethyleneamines...HAMMMOUS, WAST: The discharge, deposit, injection , dump- inq, spilling, or placing of any hazardous waste into or on land or water so that such waste

  12. Installation Restoration Program Preliminary Assessment Naknek Recreational Camps, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-04-01

    characterized by only moderate diurnal and annual temperature ranges and by the occurrence of maximum and minimum3 temperatures longer after the summer...and winter solstices, respectively, than in a continental climate. I Temperature ranges from above 70°F in summer to minimum temperatures below O°F...The second period of the Mesozoic (after the Triassic and before the Cretaceous) from 190 to 135 million years ago. 3 KNOLL - A small, low, rounded

  13. Tributyltin contamination and imposex in Alaska harbors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tallmon, David A

    2012-02-01

    We quantified imposex in file dogwinkles (Nucella lima) and tributyltin (TBT) contamination in bay mussels (Mytilus trossulus) from 10 harbors and nearby control sites throughout Alaska. We found evidence of TBT contamination in mussels from four harbors (29-54 ng TBT/g wet tissue wt). Two of these harbors now show reduced TBT contamination relative to levels found in 1987. We were able to find and collect dogwinkles from seven sites. Of these, all three dogwinkle samples from harbor sites exhibited imposex, with 36%-87.5% females affected per site. In total, six of the 10 harbors had some evidence of TBT contamination.

  14. Alaska's rare earth deposits and resource potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, James C.; Van Gosen, Bradley S.

    2012-01-01

    Alaska’s known mineral endowment includes some of the largest and highest grade deposits of various metals, including gold, copper and zinc. Recently, Alaska has also been active in the worldwide search for sources of rare earth elements (REE) to replace exports now being limitedby China. Driven by limited supply of the rare earths, combined with their increasing use in new ‘green’ energy, lighting, transportation, and many other technological applications, the rare earth metals neodymium, europium and, in particular, the heavy rare earth elements terbium, dysprosium and yttrium are forecast to soon be in critical short supply (U.S. Department of Energy, 2010).

  15. The effects of global warming on the distribution of steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) populations on the Alaska Peninsula, Alaska, 1995 final report.

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — An investigation to determine the distribution and population characteristics of steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) on the Alaska Peninsula, Alaska, was conducted...

  16. Calibration and Change Detection of [Alaska Satellite Facility] ASF/ERS-1 SAR Image Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatland, Rob; Freeman, Anthony

    1992-01-01

    The results of a calibration analysis performed on ERS-1 synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images produced by the Alaska SAR facility (ASF) are presented, together with some preliminary results on change detection on the Alaskan north slope derived from the same images. Image quality, geometric and radiometric fidelity, and repeat pass radiometric stability have all been determined to be satisfactory. A calibration workstation has been designed and implemented for use in operational data quality analysis of ASF data products. Higher-level data analysis programs have been developed for interferometry, texture analysis, and change detection.

  17. Water-quality data from lakes in the Yukon Flats, Alaska, 2010-2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halm, Douglas R.; Griffith, Brad

    2014-01-01

    Over a two-year period (2010–2011), in-place measurements were made and water-quality samples were collected from 122 lakes in the Yukon Flats, Alaska, during a U.S. Geological Survey lake biological diversity inventory. The U.S. Geological Survey National Research Program performed the chemical analyses on the retrieved water-quality samples. Results from the analyses of water samples for dissolved carbon gases and carbon isotopes, hydrogen and oxygen stable isotopes, dissolved organic carbon, and major cations and anions, along with supporting site data, are presented in this report.

  18. Satellite Sounder Data Assimilation for Improving Alaska Region Weather Forecast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jiang; Stevens, E.; Zhang, X.; Zavodsky, B. T.; Heinrichs, T.; Broderson, D.

    2014-01-01

    A case study and monthly statistical analysis using sounder data assimilation to improve the Alaska regional weather forecast model are presented. Weather forecast in Alaska faces challenges as well as opportunities. Alaska has a large land with multiple types of topography and coastal area. Weather forecast models must be finely tuned in order to accurately predict weather in Alaska. Being in the high-latitudes provides Alaska greater coverage of polar orbiting satellites for integration into forecasting models than the lower 48. Forecasting marine low stratus clouds is critical to the Alaska aviation and oil industry and is the current focus of the case study. NASA AIRS/CrIS sounder profiles data are used to do data assimilation for the Alaska regional weather forecast model to improve Arctic marine stratus clouds forecast. Choosing physical options for the WRF model is discussed. Preprocess of AIRS/CrIS sounder data for data assimilation is described. Local observation data, satellite data, and global data assimilation data are used to verify and/or evaluate the forecast results by the MET tools Model Evaluation Tools (MET).

  19. Reconnecting Alaska: Mexican Movements and the Last Frontier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara V. Komarnisky

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the initial findings of on-going research with Mexican migrants and immigrants to Alaska. The paper outlines the historical and on-going connections between Alaska and Mexico and explores how and why those connections have been obscured or ignored. Powerful imaginaries are associated with places: Alaska, and 'the north' more generally, and Latin America, and Mexico specifically. My research shows how interesting things happen when they are brought together through movement. People from Acuitzio del Canje, Michoacán began travelling to Alaska (Anchorage, and elsewhere to work in the 1950s, and movement between Mexico and Alaska has continued across generations since then. Today, many Acuitzences who live in Anchorage maintain a close relationship with friends and family members in Acuitzio, and travel back and forth regularly. However, this movement is obscured by ideological work that makes Alaska seem separate, isolated, wild, and a place where Mexicans are not imagined to be. Mexican movements into Alaska over time disrupt this vision, showing how Alaska is connected to multiple other geographies, and making the US-Mexico border a salient reference point in everyday life in Anchorage. When the South moves into the North, it can make us think about both 'Alaska' and 'Mexico' in different ways. When the US-Mexico border is relocated to Anchorage, if only for a moment, it can elicit a reaction of humour or surprise. Why is that? And what does this have to do with how people actually live in an interconnected place?

  20. Reconnecting Alaska: Mexican Movements and the Last Frontier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara V. Komarnisky

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the initial findings of on-going research with Mexican migrants and immigrants to Alaska. The paper outlines the historical and on-going connections between Alaska and Mexico and explores how and why those connections have been obscured or ignored. Powerful imaginaries are associated with places: Alaska, and 'the north' more generally, and Latin America, and Mexico specifically. My research shows how interesting things happen when they are brought together through movement. People from Acuitzio del Canje, Michoacán began travelling to Alaska (Anchorage, and elsewhere to work in the 1950s, and movement between Mexico and Alaska has continued across generations since then. Today, many Acuitzences who live in Anchorage maintain a close relationship with friends and family members in Acuitzio, and travel back and forth regularly. However, this movement is obscured by ideological work that makes Alaska seem separate, isolated, wild, and a place where Mexicans are not imagined to be. Mexican movements into Alaska over time disrupt this vision, showing how Alaska is connected to multiple other geographies, and making the US-Mexico border a salient reference point in everyday life in Anchorage. When the South moves into the North, it can make us think about both 'Alaska' and 'Mexico' in different ways. When the US-Mexico border is relocated to Anchorage, if only for a moment, it can elicit a reaction of humour or surprise. Why is that? And what does this have to do with how people actually live in an interconnected place?