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Sample records for program adult treatment

  1. The National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipsy, Robert J

    2003-01-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) persists as a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States, with more than 40% of all deaths each year directly attributed to the disease. Dyslipidemia is recognized as a major risk factor for the development and progression of CHD, with clinical trials clearly demonstrating the public health and economic benefits of favorable cholesterol modification. As a result of this evidence, the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) has developed guidelines for the detection, evaluation, and treatment of high blood cholesterol in adults. The most recent of the NCEP recommendations, the Adult Treatment Panel III (ATP III) guidelines, were released in May 2001 and build on the earlier editions and reiterate the importance of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) reduction to modify CHD risk. New features of the guidelines include the identification of CHD risk equivalents; lower treatment target goals; an emphasis on conditions conferring a higher risk for CHD, such as the metabolic syndrome; and a scoring system for calculating CHD risk. The ATP III emphasis on risk assessment will result in a substantial increase in the number of patients considered at risk for CHD and will expand the number eligible for lifestyle and drug intervention.

  2. Integrating forensically and civilly committed adult inpatients in a treatment mall program at a state hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Steven L; Sheitman, Brian B; Barboriak, Peter N; Harmon, Susan H; Paesler, Betty T; Gordon, Pamela A; Kelly, Shirley Y; Geller, Jeffrey L

    2009-02-01

    This brief report presents outcome data from a 350-bed state psychiatric hospital that integrated its adult forensically and civilly committed inpatient populations within one rehabilitative program. Dorothea Dix Hospital, located in Raleigh, North Carolina, used the "treatment mall" model to offer all of its resources to all adult patients in a centralized setting. Program participation of 100 patients from two long-term civil units was compared with program participation of 94 patients from the hospital's medium- and maximum-security forensic units. The forensic patients were significantly less likely to refuse to join or to leave a group, and they were better engaged in their treatment. The use of restrictive interventions and the incidence of assault were minimal for both groups. The experience at Dorothea Dix Hospital suggests that integrating these populations in rehabilitative programming is not only fiscally responsible but also clinically promising, with no evidence of greater disruptiveness attributable to forensic patients.

  3. Evaluation of a brief treatment program of cognitive behavior therapy for insomnia in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovato, Nicole; Lack, Leon; Wright, Helen; Kennaway, David J

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of a brief 4-w group-administered treatment program of cognitive behavior therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) for older adults with sleep maintenance insomnia. Randomized controlled trial of CBT-I compared to waitlist control with comparisons at pretreatment, posttreatment, and 3-mo follow-up. Flinders University Sleep and Circadian Rhythm Research Laboratory, Adelaide, South Australia. One-hundred eighteen adults with sleep maintenance insomnia (mean age = 63.76 y, standard deviation = 6.45 y, male = 55). A 4-w, group-based treatment program of CBT-I including bedtime restriction therapy, sleep education, and cognitive restructuring. Seven-day sleep diaries, actigraphy, and several self-report measures to assess perceived insomnia severity, daytime functioning, and confidence in and beliefs about sleep. The brief group-administered CBT-I program produced improvements in the timing and quality of sleep including later bedtimes, earlier out-of-bed times, reduced wake after sleep onset, and improved sleep efficiency. Participants also reported a reduction of the Insomnia Severity Index, Flinders Fatigue Scale, Epworth Sleepiness Scale, Daytime Feeling and Functioning Scale, Sleep Anticipatory Anxiety Questionnaire, the Dysfunctional Beliefs and Attitudes Scale, and increased Sleep Self-Efficacy Scale. The treatment program used in the current study has demonstrated potential for a brief, inexpensive, and effective treatment of sleep maintenance insomnia in the older adult population.

  4. Behavioural effect of self-treatment guidelines in a self-management program for adults with asthma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palen, J.A.M. van der; Klein, J.J.; Zielhuis, G.A.; Herwaarden, C.L.A. van; Seydel, E.R.

    2001-01-01

    To assess the efficacy of self-management programs it is important to know what behavioural changes take place. This paper assesses whether including self-treatment guidelines (action plans) in a self-management program for adult asthmatics, leads to greater behavioural changes than a program

  5. Update on the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III guidelines: getting to goal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenney, James M

    2003-09-01

    Considerable data on the pathophysiology, epidemiology, and treatment of dyslipidemia-induced coronary heart disease (CHD) have accumulated in recent years. These data have been assessed and incorporated into the guidelines of the National Cholesterol Education Program Expert Panel on the Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Cholesterol in Adults (Adult Treatment Panel [ATP] III). A major focus of the new guidelines is the assessment of the near-term (i.e., 10-yr) risk of experiencing a CHD event and matching the intensity of treatment to this risk. Patients with diabetes and those with a greater than 20% 10-year risk of experiencing a CHD event have been elevated to the risk level of CHD equivalent. The ATP III guidelines also modify several lipid and lipoprotein classifications. A low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL) level below 100 mg/dl is now considered optimum for all individuals. In addition, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL) and triglyceride cutoff points have been modified to reflect more accurately the risk associated with abnormalities in these lipoproteins. As with the previous guidelines, the primary target of therapy remains LDL. Therapeutic lifestyle changes consisting of diet, weight reduction, and increased physical activity should be included in all treatment regimens. Based on their potent LDL-lowering properties and their proven ability to decrease mortality in a variety of patient populations, statins are generally the first choice for pharmacologic therapy. A secondary target of therapy includes non-HDL goals for patients with high triglyceride levels and the metabolic syndrome, which is characterized by abdominal obesity, elevated triglyceride levels, low HDL levels, and insulin resistance. Management of these secondary targets includes weight reduction and increased physical activity, and treatment of the lipid and nonlipid risk factors. Overall, ATP III represents an aggressive approach to treating dyslipidemia

  6. Role of the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult treatment panel III guidelines in managing dyslipidemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbert, Robert L

    2003-07-01

    Using recently updated guidelines to evaluate and manage lipid disorders is discussed. Coronary heart disease (CHD) is a costly chronic condition associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Epidemiologic data further indicate that dyslipidemia and associated conditions, which may lead to CHD, are grossly undertreated. In 2001, the third National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) Adult Treatment Panel (ATP III) released updated guidelines for the evaluation and treatment of lipid disorders. Significant changes to the updated guidelines include designation of a CHD risk equivalent category identifying patients who require aggressive management, recommendation of Framingham-based CHD risk assessment in patients with multiple risk factors, revised target levels for several of the lipids and lipoproteins, and criteria for the identification of patients with the metabolic syndrome. Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) continues to be the primary target of therapy. In addition, non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) is now defined as a secondary treatment target in patients with hypertriglyceridemia. Increased emphasis is placed on the metabolic syndrome, low HDL-C levels, and the presence of multiple and emerging risk factors in guiding the intensity of therapy. The NCEP ATP III guidelines acknowledge challenges in implementing and maintaining patient adherence to both lifestyle changes and pharmacotherapy regimens and provide strategies for increasing treatment success. Implementation of these new guidelines will likely enhance identification, management, and treatment success rates among patients at risk for CHD in the United States.

  7. Risk analysis of coronary heart diseases in Korean adults by using the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong-Wha; Min, Won-Ki; Lee, Woochang; Chun, Sail; Park, Hyosoon; Lee, Do-Hoon; Lee, You Kyoung

    2007-01-01

    The National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP ATP III), updated in 2001, quantified the risk factors and made it possible to assess risks for metabolic syndrome (MS) and coronary heart diseases (CHD). Many reported the prevalence of MS by NCEP ATP III in Orientals but few did risk analysis of CHD. We investigated the risk of CHD in Korean adults and the distribution of population for therapeutic lifestyle change (TLC) and drug therapy according to the NCEP ATP III guidelines. Based on ATP III risk factors, estimates of the 10-year risk for CHD on 16,383 Koreans and the distributions of population for the TLC and additional drug therapy by sex and age were calculated. High-, intermediate-, and low-risk groups were 8.1%, 24.1%, and 67.8%, respectively; 12.1% (high-, intermediate-, and low-risk groups: 32.0%, 45.1%, and 6.0%, respectively) needed TLC and 6.1% (high-, intermediate-, and low-risk groups: 39.4%, 16.6%, and 1.3%, respectively) needed additional drug therapy. The groups with higher risk needed more TLC and drug therapy. In the same age group, the rates of high risk in men showed a 1.0-6.6 fold increase compared with those in women. In Koreans, those who needed TLC and drug therapy were substantially lower than those in Americans. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. Four-year treatment outcomes of adult patients enrolled in Mozambique's rapidly expanding antiretroviral therapy program.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew F Auld

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In Mozambique during 2004-2007 numbers of adult patients (≥15 years old enrolled on antiretroviral therapy (ART increased about 16-fold, from 60 kg, WHO stage IV (AHR 1.7; 95% CI, 1.3-2.4, reference group WHO stage I/II, lack of co-trimoxazole prescription (AHR 1.4; 95% CI, 1.0-1.8, and later calendar year of ART initiation (AHR 1.5; 95% CI, 1.2-1.8. Rates of immunologic treatment failure and regimen-switch were 14.0 and 0.6 events per 100-patient years, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: ART initiation at earlier disease stages and scale-up of co-trimoxazole among ART patients could improve outcomes. Research to determine reasons for low regimen-switch rates and increasing rates of attrition during program expansion is needed.

  9. New features of the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III lipid-lowering guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, H Bryan

    2003-04-01

    The National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) Adult Treatment Panel III (ATP III) guidelines for lipid-lowering therapy to reduce coronary heart disease (CHD) risk contain a number of features that distinguish them from the previous ATP guidelines. These new features include modifications in lipid/lipoprotein levels considered optimal, abnormal, or reflective of risk; increased focus on primary prevention through use of Framingham risk scoring to define risk in persons with multiple lipid/nonlipid risk factors; and increased focus on the association of the metabolic syndrome with CHD risk. The introduction of the category of CHD risk equivalents-including persons with atherosclerotic disease, diabetes, or 10-year CHD risk > 20% based on Framingham scoring-results in an increase over previous guidelines in the proportion of patients categorized as being at high risk and therefore eligible for more intensive low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C)-lowering therapy. Use of the new secondary therapeutic target of non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol should improve management of lipid risk factors in patients who have elevated triglyceride levels after LDL-C goals have been met. These new features of the NCEP ATP III guidelines should improve identification and treatment of patients with dyslipidemias associated with CHD risk.

  10. Presenting concerns of emerging adults seeking treatment at an early intervention outpatient mood and anxiety program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcaro, Justin; Summerhurst, Carolyn; Vingilis, Evelyn; Wammes, Michael; Osuch, Elizabeth

    2017-09-01

    This study examined presenting concerns and characteristics of emerging adults (EAs) seeking treatment at an early intervention program for mood and anxiety disorders to better understand presenting concerns when treatment is needed. During an intake assessment conducted by a social worker or clinical psychologist, participants (N = 548; 62% female, 38% male) reported their top three current life concerns, which were analyzed qualitatively using thematic analysis. Participants completed a battery of questionnaires assessing demographic information, symptomatology, and daily functioning. Females presented with significantly higher levels of anxiety, and both females and younger individuals (age 16-18) presented with significantly higher levels of depression compared to males and older individuals (age 19-26), respectively. The two most commonly reported presenting concerns were problems in interpersonal relationships and academics, and females were more likely to report academic concerns than males. The majority of participants reported seeking help for a wide range of problems commonly faced by EAs (83.7%), and participants rarely expressed concerns about particular symptoms of mood and/or anxiety disorders (16.3%). EAs and those supporting EAs may benefit from learning when psychosocial concerns are indicative of mental health challenges warranting professional attention.

  11. The relative influence of secondary versus primary prevention using the national cholesterol education program adult treatment panel II guidelines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goldman, L; Coxson, P; Hunink, MGM; Goldman, PA; Tosteson, ANA; Mittleman, M; Williams, L; Weinstein, MC

    OBJECTIVES This study was undertaken to project the population-wide effect of full implementation of the Adult Treatment Panel (ATP) II guidelines of the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP). BACKGROUND The ATP II has proposed guidelines for cholesterol reduction, but the long-term

  12. New therapeutic options in the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbert, Robert L

    2002-09-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is a common, costly, and undertreated disorder in the United States, and dyslipidemia is one of its most important modifiable risk factors. Recently, the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) Adult Treatment Panel III (ATP III) published updated guidelines for the treatment of lipid disorders, greatly expanding the number of patients eligible for therapy. In the new recommendations, several significant changes have been made in the identification and management of patients at risk for CHD. Although ATP III maintains that low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol should be the primary target of lipid-lowering therapy, it identifies non-high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol (total cholesterol minus HDL cholesterol) as a secondary target in patients with elevated triglycerides. Patients with > or = 2 CHD risk factors should now be assessed for 10-year absolute CHD risk based on the Framingham Point Scale to identify those who require more aggressive treatment. The guidelines also designate a new category, CHD risk equivalent, which recognizes that certain patients have the same high risk as those with established CHD. Diabetes is now identified as a CHD risk equivalent, as are other forms of atherosclerotic disease and multiple risk factors comprising a CHD 10-year risk of > 20%. New lipoprotein classifications are given, and increased emphasis is placed on the metabolic syndrome, a constellation of metabolic risk factors, as a marker for CHD risk. Since adherence poses a major challenge in the management of patients with or at risk for CHD, the new guidelines provide physicians with several strategies for increasing patient compliance. The new guidelines should help physicians better identify and manage patients at risk for CHD, help more patients reach their lipid goals, and thereby decrease cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.

  13. Intensive patient education and treatment program for young adults with atopic dermatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coenraads, PJ; Span, L; Jaspers, JPC; Fidler, [No Value

    Background and Objective. By means of a 2-week intensive multidisciplinary training & treatment course in small groups (ISBP), young adults with atopic dermatitis may be able to achieve better self-management of their disease and reduce their number of doctor visits. Methods. Patients aged 18-35

  14. Implications of recent clinical trials for the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grundy, Scott M; Cleeman, James I; Merz, C Noel Bairey; Brewer, H Bryan; Clark, Luther T; Hunninghake, Donald B; Pasternak, Richard C; Smith, Sidney C; Stone, Neil J

    2004-08-04

    The Adult Treatment Panel III (ATP III) of the National Cholesterol Education Program issued an evidence-based set of guidelines on cholesterol management in 2001. Since the publication of ATP III, 5 major clinical trials of statin therapy with clinical end points have been published. These trials addressed issues that were not examined in previous clinical trials of cholesterol-lowering therapy. The present document reviews the results of these recent trials and assesses their implications for cholesterol management. Therapeutic lifestyle changes (TLC) remain an essential modality in clinical management. The trials confirm the benefit of cholesterol-lowering therapy in high-risk patients and support the ATP III treatment goal of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) III treatment algorithm are the following. In high-risk persons, the recommended LDL-C goal is <100 mg/dL, but when risk is very high, an LDL-C goal of <70 mg/dL is a therapeutic option, ie, a reasonable clinical strategy, on the basis of available clinical trial evidence. This therapeutic option extends also to patients at very high risk who have a baseline LDL-C < 100 mg/dL. Moreover, when a high-risk patient has high triglycerides or low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), consideration can be given to combining a fibrate or nicotinic acid with an LDL-lowering drug. For moderately high-risk persons (2+ risk factors and 10-year risk 10% to 20%), the recommended LDL-C goal is <130 mg/dL, but an LDL-C goal <100 mg/dL is a therapeutic option on the basis of recent trial evidence. The latter option extends also to moderately high-risk persons with a baseline LDL-C of 100 to 129 mg/dL. When LDL-lowering drug therapy is employed in high-risk or moderately high-risk persons, it is advised that intensity of therapy be sufficient to achieve at least a 30% to 40% reduction in LDL-C levels. Moreover, any person at high risk or moderately high risk who has lifestyle-related risk factors (eg

  15. Recent National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III update: adjustments and options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Neil J; Bilek, Sarah; Rosenbaum, Sara

    2005-08-22

    In the summer of 2004, an evidence-based update of the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) Adult Treatment Panel III (ATP III) guidelines for management of hypercholesterolemia was published. This detailed assessment of 5 major clinical trials, published since the ATP III report in 2001, was designed to provide guidance for physicians in decision making for patients at high risk and very high risk. We have tried to summarize this assessment by suggesting the following to clinicians: (1) Calculate global risk of coronary artery disease (CAD) to determine an overall strategy for cholesterol management. (2) Emphasize the benefits of diet, exercise, and weight control or therapeutic lifestyle change, especially in those with lifestyle risk factors. (3) Use 3-hydroxy-3-methyglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors (statins) as first-line drugs to reduce risk of CAD and stroke in those at moderate to high risk. (4) If statins are prescribed, use moderate doses that reduce plasma levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol by > or = 30% to 40%. (5) Strongly consider statin therapy in those with diabetes (with the exception of severe hypertriglyceridemia). (6) Consider LDL cholesterol-lowering drug therapy for lipids in older patients at risk. (7) Consider adding either a fibrate or nicotinic acid in high-risk patients with elevated plasma triglyceride values or low levels of plasma high-density lipoprotein cholesterol after statin therapy has achieved the LDL cholesterol goal. (8) Continue to treat those at low risk in similar fashion as before. This update is to inform current physician judgment in this area. Further clinical trial data that may modify or extend these recommendations are eagerly awaited.

  16. National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III guidelines and obesity: implications for Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardern, Christopher I; Katzmarzyk, Peter T

    2003-09-01

    The National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel (ATP) III recommendations incorporate new evidence for treating elevated low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Comparisons between the prevalence of drug-eligible Canadians under the old ATP II and the new ATP III guidelines were made, and the impact of obesity on current and future drug eligibility was explored using various models. Participants from the Canadian Heart Health Surveys (1986 to 1992; n=17,728; 20 to 74 years of age) were assigned to therapeutic lifestyle change or drug-eligible groups in the event of elevated low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Body mass index was used to classify participants as having normal weight, or as being overweight or obese. The prevalence of overweight and obese status for 2001, 2006 and 2011 were projected from past trends by linear regression. Population attributable risk was used to model reductions or increases in the prevalence of obesity in drug-eligible participants using several nationally representative population health surveys. In 2001, an additional 1.1 million Canadians were drug-eligible under ATP III (16.0% of men, 9.5% of women), compared with ATP II (7.7% of men, 7.7% of women). Drug eligibility was elevated in overweight participants (men: OR=1.87 [1.51 to 2.31]; women: OR=1.60 [1.13 to 2.28]) and the obese (men: OR=2.86 [1.86 to 4.38]; women: OR=2.28 [1.63 to 3.18]) versus normal weight participants. The population attributable risk was higher in men (overweight 22.6%, obese 11.5%) than in women (overweight 9.4%, obese 9.2%). A 10% reduction in overweight and obesity prevalence could have prevented 69,530 cases of drug eligibility in 2001. On the other hand, by 2011 over one million Canadians will be drug-eligible because of an elevated body mass index, if the recent trends in overweight and obese status continue.

  17. Stanol esters as a component of maximal dietary therapy in the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grundy, Scott M

    2005-07-04

    Use of plant stanols/sterols in forms that are sufficiently bioavailable for therapeutic effect should be a key element of maximal dietary therapy. This principle was recognized by National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) Adult Treatment Panel III (ATP III) and has been amply confirmed by experimental studies in humans. Since the introduction of statins, dietary therapy for control of elevated low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels has received less attention. The time has come, however, to reassert the importance of maximal dietary therapy as a cost-effective means for treatment of elevated LDL concentrations and for lifetime prevention of coronary heart disease.

  18. Maternal leptin treatment during lactation programs the thyroid function of adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passos, Magna Cottini Fonseca; Lins, Márcia Clements; Lisboa, Patrícia Cristina; Toste, Fabiane Pereira; Bonomo, Isabela Teixeira; de Moura, Egberto Gaspar

    2007-04-17

    Recently, we showed that both maternal malnutrition during lactation and leptin treatment during the neonatal period program thyroid function. In this study we evaluate whether maternal leptin treatment during lactation programs thyroid function of the offspring in the adulthood. The dams were divided into 2 groups: Lep-daily sc single injected with 8 microg/100 g of body weight with recombinant rat leptin during the last 3 days of lactation and control group (C) that received the same volume of saline. The 180 day-old animals received a single i.p. injection of (125)I (2.22x10(4) Bq) and they were killed 2 h after the injection. Triiodothyronine (T3), thyroxine (T4), thyrotropin (TSH) and leptin concentrations were measured by radioimmunoassay. The milk of leptin-treated mothers on the last day of treatment had higher leptin (pthyroid (125)I uptake, T4 and TSH serum concentrations compared to the controls. So, the mother's hyperleptinaemia during lactation programs to a higher T3 serum concentration on the offspring, probably by a higher leptin transfer through the milk.

  19. Comparison between Turkish Cardiovascular Risk Platform and United States National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III definitions of the metabolic syndrome in Turkish adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Can, Ahmet Selçuk; Ozbayrakçi, Sinan; Palaoğlu, K Erhan; Bersot, Thomas P

    2009-01-01

    The Turkish Cardiovascular Risk Platform (TCRP) calls for the diagnosis of the metabolic syndrome (MS) if insulin resistance, impaired fasting glucose, impaired glucose tolerance, or diabetes mellitus and >or=2 other established criteria are present. TCRP defines insulin resistance as a homeostasis model assessment >2.7. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to compare TCRP guidelines with the United States National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP) definition of MS in Turkish adults (N=1690). The age- and sex-adjusted prevalence of MS was 25% with the TCRP and 40% for the NCEP definition. Patients with MS identified by the NCEP definition but not by the TCRP definition had lower body mass index and less insulin resistance, but had a similarly adverse cardiovascular risk factor profile to those with TCRP-identified MS, with high blood pressure, waist circumference, triglycerides, and total cholesterol/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio. Other national health organizations should avoid using homeostasis model assessment as a prerequisite for diagnosing MS. Modification of the NCEP definition would be more appropriate for ethnic groups with different body sizes.

  20. Prevalence of Metabolic Syndrome among Korean Adolescents According to the National Cholesterol Education Program, Adult Treatment Panel III and International Diabetes Federation

    OpenAIRE

    Seonho Kim; Wi-Young So

    2016-01-01

    In both adults and children, metabolic syndrome (MetS) has been attributed to risk factors for type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease such as insulin resistance, abdominal obesity, hypertension, and dyslipidemia. This descriptive study aimed to compare the prevalence of MetS and diagnostic components according to the National Cholesterol Education Program, Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP-ATP III) and International Diabetes Federation (IDF) in 2330 Korean adolescents (10–18 years), using d...

  1. Waiting for the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel IV Guidelines, and in the meantime, some challenges and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Seth S; Metkus, Thomas S; Horne, Aaron; Blaha, Michael J; Hasan, Rani; Campbell, Catherine Y; Yousuf, Omair; Joshi, Parag; Kaul, Sanjay; Miller, Michael; Michos, Erin D; Jones, Steven R; Gluckman, Ty J; Cannon, Christopher P; Sperling, Laurence S; Blumenthal, Roger S

    2012-07-15

    The National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel (ATP) has provided education and guidance for decades on the management of hypercholesterolemia. Its third report (ATP III) was published 10 years ago, with a white paper update in 2004. There is a need for translation of more recent evidence into a revised guideline. To help address the significant challenges facing the ATP IV writing group, this statement aims to provide balanced recommendations that build on ATP III. The authors aim for simplicity to increase the likelihood of implementation in clinical practice. To move from ATP III to ATP IV, the authors recommend the following: (1) assess risk more accurately, (2) simplify the starting algorithm, (3) prioritize statin therapy, (4) relax the follow-up interval for repeat lipid testing, (5) designate <70 mg/dl as an "ideal" low-density lipoprotein cholesterol target, (6) endorse targets beyond low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, (7) refine therapeutic target levels to the equivalent population percentile, (8) remove misleading descriptors such as "borderline high," and (9) make lifestyle messages simpler. In conclusion, the solutions offered in this statement represent ways to translate the totality of published reports into enhanced hyperlipidemia guidelines to better combat the devastating impact of hyperlipidemia on cardiovascular health. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Metabolic Syndrome in Obese Thai Children: Defined Using Modified 'The National Cholesterol Education Program/Adult Treatment Panel III' Criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rerksuppaphol, Sanguansak; Rerksuppaphol, Lakkana

    2015-11-01

    Obesity is considered to be a risk of metabolic syndrome; however, data on the prevalence of metabolic syndrome in Thai obese children are scarce. The present study aims to determine the prevalence of metabolic syndrome in Thai obese children. A cross-sectional study was conducted on 113 obese children who were students of a public elementary school in Ongkharak district, Thailand, in 2013. Anthropometric data, blood pressure and biochemical parameters were measured. Metabolic syndrome was defined using modified 'the National Cholesterol Education Program/Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP/ATPIII)' criteria. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome in obese children was 50.4%. Children with metabolic syndrome had significantly higher waist circumference (86.9 vs. 82.4 cm, p-value = 0.049), biceps skinfold thickness (17.2 vs. 14.9 mm, p-value = 0.017), suprailiac skinfold thickness (36.5 vs. 31.8 mm, p-value = 0.019), systolic blood pressure (119.7 vs. 112.6 mmHg, p-value = 0.007), diastolic blood pressure (73.7 vs. 69.0 mmHg, p-value = 0.022), fasting blood glucose (97.4 vs. 93.6 mg/dL, p-value = 0.009) and triglyceride levels (140.0 vs. 85.6 mg/dL, p-value < 0.001) than those without metabolic syndrome. HDL-cholesterol was significantly lower in children with metabolic syndrome than those in without metabolic syndrome (48.7 vs. 63.1 mg/dL, p-value < 0.001). Of the sample, approximately half of children with obesity had metabolic syndrome. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome appears to be on the increase. Strategies for childhood obesity and metabolic syndrome prevention are urgently needed for Thai children.

  3. Statin treatment patterns and clinical profile of patients with risk factors for coronary heart disease defined by National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, David M; Balu, Sanjeev; Tunceli, Ozgur; Anzalone, Deborah

    2014-12-01

    To compare clinical characteristics, statin treatment patterns and adherence among patients at different risk for coronary heart disease (CHD) as defined by National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) Adult Treatment Panel (ATP) III guidelines. Patients ≥ 18 years old with ≥ 1 claim for dyslipidemia, ≥ 1 statin claim, or ≥ 1 LDL-C value ≥ 100 mg/dL were identified from 1 January 2007 to 31 July 2012. Patients were classified as low risk (LR) (0-1 risk factor: hypertension, age ≥ 45 years [men] or ≥ 55 years [women], or low HDL-C), moderate/moderately high risk (MR) (≥ 2 risk factors), high risk (HR) (CHD or CHD risk equivalent), or very high risk (VHR) (acute coronary syndrome, or established cardiovascular disease plus diabetes or metabolic syndrome). Medication use and lipid levels during the 12 months before and statin use during the 6 months after index were compared across risk groups. There were 1,524,351 LR, 242,357 MR, 188,222 HR, and 57,469 VHR patients identified. Statin use was observed in 15% of all patients, but was higher in the VHR group (45%) versus LR (12%), MR (18%), and HR (29%) groups. Simvastatin accounted for 50%-52% of all statin use, and average statin dose was higher among VHR patients compared with all other groups. Adherence was low overall (mean proportion of days covered [PDC]: 0.57), but higher among VHR (0.69) versus others (mean PDC: 0.55, 0.59, and 0.59 in LR, MR, and HR groups, respectively). Statin treatment was low across all risk groups, and VHR patients had higher doses and better adherence compared with other risk groups. However, adherence was not optimal, indicating a potential limited benefit from statin treatment.

  4. Library Adult Program Attendance

    Data.gov (United States)

    Town of Chapel Hill, North Carolina — A list of events put on by the Chapel Hill Library both on site and offsite with adults as the primary audience. This data also includes the list of partners used...

  5. Treatment Option Overview (Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Lymphoma Patient Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment Adult NHL Treatment AIDS-Related Lymphoma Treatment Mycosis Fungoides (Including Sézary Syndrome) ... Health Professional Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment Adult NHL Treatment AIDS-Related Lymphoma Treatment Mycosis Fungoides (Including Sézary Syndrome) ...

  6. Treatment Option Overview (Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Adult ...

  7. Treatment Options for Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Adult ...

  8. Treatment Options for Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Adult ...

  9. Treatment Option Overview (Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Adult ...

  10. Treatment Options for Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Childhood NHL Treatment Research Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Hodgkin ... Certain factors affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. The prognosis (chance of recovery ) and treatment ...

  11. Evaluation of the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III algorithm for selecting candidates for statin therapy: insights from the A to Z trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lemos, James A; Wiviott, Stephen D; Murphy, Sabina A; Blazing, Michael A; Lewis, Eldrin F; Califf, Robert M; Pfeffer, Marc A; Braunwald, Eugene

    2006-09-15

    The National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III recommends an algorithm to integrate iterative risk-stratification information with low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels to identify candidates for statin therapy. We used the Aggrastat to Zocor (A to Z) trial, in which all patients presented with an acute coronary syndrome (ACS) event in the absence of previous statin therapy, to evaluate the performance of this algorithm. Of 1,750 patients with ACS included in this analysis, 1,126 (64%) had an indication for statin therapy before enrollment and 624 (36%) did not have a statin indication before enrollment. We estimate that initiating statin therapy at moderate dosages (decreasing LDL by 1 mmol/L) according to the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III guidelines would have prevented approximately 15% of the ACS events leading to enrollment in the A to Z trial, whereas more intensive statin therapy (decreasing LDL by 1.5 mmol/L) would have prevented >21% of events. Aspirin use before enrollment was reported in only 38% of subjects with a statin indication. In conclusion, these observations represent missed opportunities for primary and secondary prevention and highlight the need for assessment of patient risk and better adherence to existing prevention guidelines.

  12. Adult Treatment Panel II versus Adult Treatment Panel III: what has changed and why?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasternak, Richard

    2002-03-07

    The Third Report of the Expert Panel on Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Cholesterol in Adults (Adult Treatment Panel [ATP] III) differs in several ways from the ATP II guidelines. Several principal advances include (1) new risk levels for major lipid measures, (2) increased emphasis on primary prevention, (3) inclusion of high-risk groups in secondary prevention, (4) broader lifestyle program, and (5) increased focus on implementation and adherence. The purpose of this article is to discuss the major changes in ATP III and to highlight the benefits of the new guidelines in the management of hypercholesterolemia in adults.

  13. Header: Do adult DTC programs prevent child maltreatment? Parental criminal justice involvement and children’s involvement with child protective services: Do adult drug treatment courts prevent child maltreatment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldred, Lindsey M.; Sloan, Frank A.; Evans, Kelly E.

    2016-01-01

    Background In light of evidence showing reduced criminal recidivism and cost savings, adult drug treatment courts have grown in popularity. However, the potential spillover benefits to family members are understudied. Objectives To examine: 1) the overlap between parents who were convicted of a substance-related offense and their children’s involvement with child protective services (CPS); and 2) whether parental participation in an adult drug treatment court program reduces children’s risk for CPS involvement. Methods Administrative data from North Carolina courts, birth records, and social services were linked at the child level. First, children of parents convicted of a substance-related offense were matched to (a) children of parents convicted of a non-substance-related offense and (b) those not convicted of any offense. Second, we compared children of parents who completed a DTC program with children of parents who were referred but did not enroll, who enrolled for Children of parents convicted of a substance-related offense were at greater risk of CPS involvement than children whose parents were not convicted of any charge, but DTC participation did not mitigate this risk. Conclusion/Importance The role of specialty courts as a strategy for reducing children’s risk of maltreatment should be further explored. PMID:26789656

  14. Prevalence of Metabolic Syndrome among Korean Adolescents According to the National Cholesterol Education Program, Adult Treatment Panel III and International Diabetes Federation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seonho; So, Wi-Young

    2016-10-01

    In both adults and children, metabolic syndrome (MetS) has been attributed to risk factors for type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease such as insulin resistance, abdominal obesity, hypertension, and dyslipidemia. This descriptive study aimed to compare the prevalence of MetS and diagnostic components according to the National Cholesterol Education Program, Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP-ATP III) and International Diabetes Federation (IDF) in 2330 Korean adolescents (10-18 years), using data from the 2010-2012 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey-V. The NCEP-ATP III and IDF were used to diagnose MetS and yielded prevalence rates of 5.7% and 2.1%, respectively, with no sex-related differences. The most frequent MetS diagnostic components according to the NCEP-ATP III and IDF criteria were high triglyceride levels (21.2%) and low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels (13.6%), respectively; approximately 50.1% and 33.1% of adolescents had at least one MetS diagnostic component according to the respective criteria. Both overweight/obese male and female adolescents exhibited significantly increased prevalence rates of MetS and related diagnostic components, compared to normal-weight adolescents. In conclusion, the prevalence rates of MetS and diagnostic components differ according to the NCEP-ATP III and IDF criteria. Henceforth, efforts are needed to establish diagnostic criteria for Korean adolescents.

  15. Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) versus the health-enhancement program (HEP) for adults with treatment-resistant depression: a randomized control trial study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisendrath, Stuart J; Gillung, Erin P; Delucchi, Kevin L; Chartier, Maggie; Mathalon, Daniel H; Sullivan, Jude C; Segal, Zindel V; Feldman, Mitchell D

    2014-03-11

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is the leading cause of disability in the developed world, yet broadly effective treatments remain elusive. Up to 40% of patients with depression are unresponsive to at least two trials of antidepressant medication and thus have "treatment-resistant depression" (TRD). There is an urgent need for cost-effective, non-pharmacologic, evidence-based treatments for TRD. Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT) is an effective treatment for relapse prevention and residual depression in major depression, but has not been previously studied in patients with TRD in a large randomized trial. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether MBCT is an effective augmentation of antidepressants for adults with MDD who failed to respond to standard pharmacotherapy. MBCT was compared to an active control condition, the Health-Enhancement Program (HEP), which incorporates physical activity, functional movement, music therapy and nutritional advice. HEP was designed as a comparator condition for mindfulness-based interventions to control for non-specific effects. Originally investigated in a non-clinical sample to promote stress reduction, HEP was adapted for a depressed population for this study. Individuals age 18 and older with moderate to severe TRD, who failed to respond to at least two trials of antidepressants in the current episode, were recruited to participate. All participants were taking antidepressants (Treatment as usual; TAU) at the time of enrollment. After signing an informed consent, participants were randomly assigned to either MBCT or HEP condition. Participants were followed for 1 year and assessed at weeks 1-7, 8, 24, 36, and 52. Change in depression severity, rate of treatment response and remission after 8 weeks were the primary outcomes measured by the clinician-rated Hamilton Depression Severity Rating (HAM-D) 17-item scale. The participant-rated Quick Inventory of Depression Symptomology (QIDS-SR) 16-item scale was the

  16. Developmental programming: Prenatal BPA treatment disrupts timing of LH surge and ovarian follicular wave dynamics in adult sheep

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veiga-Lopez, A.; Beckett, E.M.; Abi Salloum, B. [Department of Pediatrics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Ye, W. [Department of Biostatistics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Padmanabhan, V., E-mail: vasantha@umich.edu [Department of Pediatrics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); The Reproductive Sciences Program, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Developmental exposure to BPA adversely affects reproductive function. In sheep, prenatal BPA treatment induces reproductive neuroendocrine defects, manifested as LH excess and dampened LH surge and perturbs early ovarian gene expression. In this study we hypothesized that prenatal BPA treatment will also disrupt ovarian follicular dynamics. Pregnant sheep were treated from days 30 to 90 of gestation with 3 different BPA doses (0.05, 0.5, or 5 mg/kg BW/day). All female offspring were estrus synchronized and transrectal ultrasonography was performed daily for 22 days to monitor ovarian follicular and corpora lutea dynamics. Blood samples were collected to assess preovulatory hormonal changes and luteal progesterone dynamics. Statistical analysis revealed that the time interval between the estradiol rise and the preovulatory LH surge was shortened in the BPA-treated females. None of the three BPA doses had an effect on corpora lutea, progestogenic cycles, and mean number or duration of ovulatory and non-ovulatory follicles. However, differences in follicular count trajectories were evident in all three follicular size classes (2–3 mm, 4–5 mm, and ≥ 6 mm) of prenatal BPA-treated animals compared to controls. Number of follicular waves tended also to be more variable in the prenatal BPA-treated groups ranging from 2 to 5 follicular waves per cycle, while this was restricted to 3 to 4 waves in control females. These changes in ovarian follicular dynamics coupled with defects in time interval between estradiol rise and preovulatory LH release are likely to lead to subfertility in prenatal BPA-treated females. - Highlights: • Prenatal BPA shortens interval between estradiol rise and preovulatory LH surge. • Prenatal BPA affects follicular count trajectory and follicular wave occurrence. • Prenatal BPA does not affect ovulatory rate and progesterone dynamics.

  17. Cohesion to the Group and Its Association with Attendance and Early Treatment Response in an Adult Day-Hospital Program for Eating Disorders: A Preliminary Clinical Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crino, Natalie; Djokvucic, Ivana

    2010-01-01

    Treatment outcome studies demonstrate that day-hospital programs are effective in the treatment of eating disorders. Few descriptions are available on the specifics of treatment, particularly the process of therapy. The group therapy modality is thought to provide important therapeutic benefits. The present study aimed to examine the association…

  18. Contrasting prevalence of and demographic disparities in the World Health Organization and National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III definitions of metabolic syndrome among adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Elizabeth; Daniels, Stephen R; Morrison, John A; Huang, Bin; Dolan, Lawrence M

    2004-10-01

    To determine prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MS) among adolescents by using definitions from the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP) and World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines and to compare the populations identified by these definitions. School-based, cross-sectional study of 1513 black, white, and Hispanic teens who had a fasting morning blood sample drawn and a physical examination. Overall, the prevalence of NCEP-defined MS was 4.2% and of WHO-defined MS was 8.4%. MS was found almost exclusively among obese teens, for whom prevalence of NCEP-defined MS was 19.5% and prevalence of WHO-defined MS was 38.9%. Agreement between definitions was poor (kappa statistic=0.41). No race or sex differences were present for NCEP-defined MS. However, nonwhite teens were more likely to have MS by WHO criteria (RR, 1.40; 95% CI, 1.04, 1.87), and MS was more common among girls if the WHO-based definition was used (RR, 1.26; 95% CI, 1.08, 1.88). Among adolescents, obesity is a powerful risk for MS. Important demographic and clinical differences exist in the typology of MS, depending on the definition. Such discrepancies suggest that the concept of a common pathologic syndrome or etiologic mechanism underlying MS as defined by these guidelines may be flawed.

  19. Geographic variations of the International Diabetes Federation and the National Cholesterol Education Program-Adult Treatment Panel III definitions of the metabolic syndrome in nondiabetic subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzo, Carlos; Serrano-Ríos, Manuel; Martínez-Larrad, María T; González-Sánchez, José L; Seclén, Segundo; Villena, Arturo; Gonzalez-Villalpando, Clicerio; Williams, Ken; Haffner, Steven M

    2006-03-01

    We have carried out international comparisons of the metabolic syndrome using the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) and National Cholesterol Education Program-Adult Treatment Panel III (ATP III) definitions. This analysis could help to discern the applicability of these definitions across populations. Nondiabetic subjects aged 35-64 years were eligible for analysis in population-based studies from San Antonio (Mexican Americans and non-Hispanic whites, n = 2,473), Mexico City (n = 1,990), Spain (n = 2,540), and Peru (n = 346). Kappa statistics examined the agreement between metabolic syndrome definitions. Because of the lower cutoff points for elevated waist circumference, the IDF definition of the metabolic syndrome generated greater prevalence estimates than the ATP III definition. Prevalence difference between definitions was more significant in Mexican-origin and Peruvian men than in Europid men from San Antonio and Spain because the IDF definition required ethnic group-specific cutoff points for elevated waist circumference. ATP III and IDF definitions disagreed in the classification of 13-29% of men and 3-7% of women. In men, agreement between these definitions was 0.54 in Peru, 0.43 in Mexico City, 0.62 in San Antonio Mexican Americans, 0.69 in San Antonio non-Hispanic whites, and 0.64 in Spain. In women, agreement between definitions was 0.87, 0.89, 0.86, 0.87, and 0.93, respectively. The IDF definition of the metabolic syndrome generates greater prevalence estimates than the ATP III definition. Agreement between ATP III and IDF definitions was lower for men than for women in all populations and was relatively poor in men from Mexico City.

  20. Intra-abdominal fat is a major determinant of the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III criteria for the metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Darcy B; Utzschneider, Kristina M; Hull, Rebecca L; Kodama, Keiichi; Retzlaff, Barbara M; Brunzell, John D; Shofer, Jane B; Fish, Brian E; Knopp, Robert H; Kahn, Steven E

    2004-08-01

    The underlying pathophysiology of the metabolic syndrome is the subject of debate, with both insulin resistance and obesity considered as important factors. We evaluated the differential effects of insulin resistance and central body fat distribution in determining the metabolic syndrome as defined by the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) Adult Treatment Panel III. In addition, we determined which NCEP criteria were associated with insulin resistance and central adiposity. The subjects, 218 healthy men (n = 89) and women (n = 129) with a broad range of age (26-75 years) and BMI (18.4-46.8 kg/m2), underwent quantification of the insulin sensitivity index (Si) and intra-abdominal fat (IAF) and subcutaneous fat (SCF) areas. The metabolic syndrome was present in 34 (15.6%) of subjects who had a lower Si [median: 3.13 vs. 6.09 x 10(-5) min(-1)/(pmol/l)] and higher IAF (166.3 vs. 79.1 cm2) and SCF (285.1 vs. 179.8 cm2) areas compared with subjects without the syndrome (P < 0.001). Multivariate models including Si, IAF, and SCF demonstrated that each parameter was associated with the syndrome. However, IAF was independently associated with all five of the metabolic syndrome criteria. In multivariable models containing the criteria as covariates, waist circumference and triglyceride levels were independently associated with Si and IAF and SCF areas (P < 0.001). Although insulin resistance and central body fat are both associated with the metabolic syndrome, IAF is independently associated with all of the criteria, suggesting that it may have a pathophysiological role. Of the NCEP criteria, waist circumference and triglycerides may best identify insulin resistance and visceral adiposity in individuals with a fasting plasma glucose <6.4 mmol/l.

  1. Serum lipid profile on admission for ischemic stroke: failure to meet National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel (NCEP-ATPIII) guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Eric E; Abdullah, Abdul R; Amirfarzan, Houman; Schwamm, Lee H

    2007-02-27

    To determine the characteristics of patients with stroke/TIA whose admission low-density lipoprotein (LDL) levels were above goals defined by National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel (NCEP-ATPIII) guidelines. From January 1, 2003, to June 30, 2005, there were 1,212 discharges (1,033 stroke, 179 TIA), of whom 1,040/1,212 (86%) had lipid measurement. The preadmission individual LDL goal was determined using 2001 NCEP-ATPIII guidelines. There were 284/1,040 (27%) whose measured LDL was greater than the individual preadmission LDL goal. Failure to be at goal was common even among those with previously diagnosed dyslipidemia (159/527, 30%) and those taking lipid-lowering agents (LLA) (71/370, 19%). LLA would have been indicated in 121/213 (57%) of those above LDL goal who were not already taking LLA, with optional consideration in 77/213 (36%). Lower LDL therapeutic targets were the strongest predictor, in a multivariable model, of failure to be at goal. Compared to LDL target <160 (reference), the OR for LDL target <130 was 6.4 (95% CI 3.4 to 12.0, p < 0.0001) and for LDL target <100 was 26.2 (95% CI 13.3 to 51.5, p < 0.0001). An increased likelihood of being at goal was associated with preadmission LLA (OR 4.2, 95% CI 2.9 to 6.2, p < 0.0001) and increasing calendar time (OR 1.09 per 3-month period, 95% CI 1.03 to 1.15, p = 0.004). Many patients hospitalized with ischemic stroke/TIA, including those with known dyslipidemia and those taking lipid lowering agents, have measured low-density lipoprotein (LDL) that is higher than recommended by national guidelines. Patients at the greatest risk of cardiovascular events are the least likely to be at guideline-recommended LDL levels.

  2. Intrauterine nutritional programming of adult disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piersma AH; Siemelink M; Opperhuizen A; LEO

    2001-01-01

    The intrauterine programming hypothesis states that the risk of acquiring diseases in adult life is determined in part by environmental factors during embryofetal development. Especially maternal nutrition has been related to the risk of cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes and infectious

  3. Participation in an Indian Adult Education Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blunt, Adrian; Thornton, James E.

    Differences between participants and nonparticipants in an on-reserve Indian adult education program in British Columbia were identified by interviewing 22.5 percent of the adult population in a random sample. Eight of 17 socioeconomic variables and 5 of 13 sociopsychological variables differentiated between the 42 participants and 44…

  4. Costs and Cost-Effectiveness of Hypertension Screening and Treatment in Adults with Hypertension in Rural Nigeria in the Context of a Health Insurance Program.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole T A Rosendaal

    Full Text Available High blood pressure is a leading risk factor for death and disability in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA. We evaluated the costs and cost-effectiveness of hypertension care provided within the Kwara State Health Insurance (KSHI program in rural Nigeria.A Markov model was developed to assess the costs and cost-effectiveness of population-level hypertension screening and subsequent antihypertensive treatment for the population at-risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD within the KSHI program. The primary outcome was the incremental cost per disability-adjusted life year (DALY averted in the KSHI scenario compared to no access to hypertension care. We used setting-specific and empirically-collected data to inform the model. We defined two strategies to assess eligibility for antihypertensive treatment based on 1 presence of hypertension grade 1 and 10-year CVD risk of >20%, or grade 2 hypertension irrespective of 10-year CVD risk (hypertension and risk based strategy and 2 presence of hypertension in combination with a CVD risk of >20% (risk based strategy. We generated 95% confidence intervals around the primary outcome through probabilistic sensitivity analysis. We conducted one-way sensitivity analyses across key model parameters and assessed the sensitivity of our results to the performance of the reference scenario.Screening and treatment for hypertension was potentially cost-effective but the results were sensitive to changes in underlying assumptions with a wide range of uncertainty. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for the first and second strategy respectively ranged from US$ 1,406 to US$ 7,815 and US$ 732 to US$ 2,959 per DALY averted, depending on the assumptions on risk reduction after treatment and compared to no access to antihypertensive treatment.Hypertension care within a subsidized private health insurance program may be cost-effective in rural Nigeria and public-private partnerships such as the KSHI program may provide opportunities

  5. Treatment of high-risk patients with ezetimibe plus simvastatin co-administration versus simvastatin alone to attain National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III low-density lipoprotein cholesterol goals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Theodore; Koren, Michael; Insull, William; McKenney, James; Schrott, Helmut; Lewin, Andrew; Shah, Sukrut; Sidisin, Michelle; Cho, Meehyung; Kush, Debra; Mitchel, Yale

    2004-06-15

    This study assessed whether the co-administration of ezetimibe and simvastatin would be more effective than simvastatin monotherapy in allowing high-risk patients to achieve a low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol goal of /=130 mg/dl and meeting National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III criteria for coronary heart disease (CHD) or CHD risk equivalent were randomized to 1 of 4 daily treatments for 23 weeks: simvastatin 20 mg (n = 253), ezetimibe 10 mg plus simvastatin 10 mg (n = 251), ezetimibe 10 mg plus simvastatin 20 mg (n = 109), and ezetimibe 10 mg plus simvastatin 40 mg (n = 97). In all groups, patients not at goal had their simvastatin doses doubled at weeks 6, 12, and/or 18, up to a maximum of 80 mg. The primary efficacy objective was LDL cholesterol goal attainment (treatment. Ezetimibe plus any dose of simvastatin produced greater reductions in LDL cholesterol and allowed more patients to achieve goal after 5 weeks (p <0.001) and at the end of the study (p <0.001) than simvastatin 20 mg alone. At 5 weeks, 75%, 83%, and 87% of patients receiving ezetimibe plus simvastatin 10, 20, and 40 mg had LDL cholesterol <100 mg/dl compared with 46% of patients receiving simvastatin 20 mg. In patients who started on ezetimibe plus simvastatin 10, 20 and 40 mg, 33%, 22%, and 12%, respectively, required simvastatin titration during the study compared with 68% of patients who started on simvastatin 20 mg. The corresponding median simvastatin doses used were 10, 20, 40, and 40 mg, respectively. Ezetimibe plus simvastatin was well tolerated, with an overall safety profile similar to that of simvastatin monotherapy. Thus, through the dual inhibition of cholesterol absorption and synthesis, ezetimibe plus simvastatin allowed more patients to reach LDL cholesterol <100 mg/dl at a lower simvastatin dose and with fewer dose titrations than simvastatin monotherapy.

  6. Adult hearing screening: the Cyprus Pilot Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Thodi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Hearing loss is the third most common condition affecting adults over 65 (Cruickshanks et al., 1998. It can affect quality of life, limiting the ability to communicate efficiently, and leading to isolation, psychological strain, and functional decline (LaForge, Spector, Sternberg, 1992; Yueh, Shapiro, MacLean, Shekelle, 2003. Communication limitations impinge on the person directly, as well as the family, friends, and social circle. Reports on hearing loss among adults indicate that less than 25% of people who can benefit from amplification are actually using hearing aids, and that people diagnosed with a hearing loss delay seeking amplification by about seven years (Kochkin, 1997. Often, family members are the driving force behind a person with a hearing loss who decides to seek help. Adult hearing screening programs might have a positive effect on raising public awareness on hearing loss and its implications, and shortening delay time for intervention. There is no routine hearing screening for the adult population in Cyprus. The health system provides hearing tests for beneficiaries upon physician recommendation or self-referral. The Cyprus pilot adult hearing screening program (ΑΠΑΣ- EVERYONE- Greek acronym for Screening- Intervention-Hearing-Participation to Life screened hearing in retired adults.

  7. Adult asthma: Diagnosis and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durham, Catherine O; Fowler, Terri; Smith, Whitney; Sterrett, James

    2017-11-16

    Adult asthma is a prevalent chronic medical condition that is associated with high morbidity, mortality, and cost. Early identification, evidence-based diagnosis, and step-wise management can lead to improvements in patient outcomes, decrease exacerbations, and eliminate respiratory function decline as the patient ages.

  8. The Gerontology Alcohol Project: A Behavioral Treatment Program for Elderly Alcohol Abusers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupree, Larry W.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Assessed the effectiveness of the Gerontology Alcohol Project, a self management treatment program for adult-onset alcohol abusers. Results indicated a marked success for those completing the treatment program, including an improved social support network. (JAC)

  9. Treatment issues for children with epilepsy transitioning to adult care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabbout, Rima; Camfield, Carol S; Andrade, Danielle M; Arzimanoglou, Alexis; Chiron, Catherine; Cramer, Joyce A; French, Jacqueline A; Kossoff, Eric; Mula, Marco; Camfield, Peter R

    2017-04-01

    This is the third of three papers that summarize the second symposium on Transition in Epilepsies held in Paris in June 2016. This paper focuses on treatment issues that arise during the course of childhood epilepsy and make the process of transition to adult care more complicated. Some AEDs used during childhood, such as stiripentol, vigabatrin, and cannabidiol, are unfamiliar to adult epilepsy specialists. In addition, new drugs are being developed for treatment of specific childhood onset epilepsy syndromes and have no indication yet for adults. The ketogenic diet may be effective during childhood but is difficult to continue in adult care. Regional adult epilepsy diet clinics could be helpful. Polytherapy is common for patients transitioning to adult care. Although these complex AED regimes are difficult, they are often possible to simplify. AEDs used in childhood may need to be reconsidered in adulthood. Rescue medications to stop prolonged seizures and clusters of seizures are in wide home use in children and can be continued in adulthood. Adherence/compliance is notoriously difficult for adolescents, but there are simple clinical approaches that should be helpful. Mental health issues including depression and anxiety are not always diagnosed and treated in children and young adults even though effective treatments are available. Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and aggressive behavior disorders may interfere with transition and successful adulthood but these can be treated. For the majority, the adult social outcome of children with epilepsy is unsatisfactory with few proven interventions. The interface between pediatric and adult care for children with epilepsy is becoming increasingly complicated with a need for more comprehensive transition programs and adult epileptologists who are knowledgeable about special treatments that benefit this group of patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. ORIGINAL ARTICLES Estimation of adult antiretroviral treatment ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ORIGINAL ARTICLES. 661. Estimation of adult antiretroviral treatment coverage in. South Africa. Muhammad Aarif Adam, Leigh F Johnson. Death notification statistics confirm that AIDS is dramatically affecting mortality in South Africa.1 Demographic and epidemiological models suggest that antiretroviral treatment is.

  11. Prevention and Treatment of Cardiovascular Disease in Adolescents and Adults through the Transcendental Meditation(®) Program: A Research Review Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Vernon A; Orme-Johnson, David W

    2012-08-01

    The pathogenesis and progression of cardiovascular diseases are thought to be exacerbated by stress. Basic research indicates that the Transcendental Meditation(®) technique produces acute and longitudinal reductions in sympathetic tone and stress reactivity. In adolescents at risk for hypertension, the technique has been found to reduce resting and ambulatory blood pressure, left ventricular mass, cardiovascular reactivity, and to improve school behavior. Research on adults with mild or moderate essential hypertension has reported decreased blood pressure and reduced use of anti-hypertensive medication. The technique has also been reported to decrease symptoms of angina pectoris and carotid atherosclerosis, to reduce cardiovascular risk factors, including alcohol and tobacco use, to markedly reduce medical care utilization for cardiovascular diseases, and to significantly decrease cardiovascular and all-cause morbidity and mortality. These findings have important implications for inclusion of the Transcendental Meditation program in efforts to prevent and treat cardiovascular diseases and their clinical consequences.(®)Transcendental Meditation and TM are trademarks registered in the US. Patent and Trademark Office, licensed to Maharishi Vedic Education Development Corporation and are used with permission.

  12. Marketing and Retention Strategies for Adult Degree Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Joann A.

    2004-01-01

    Four marketing strategies are critical to the success of adult degree programs: integrating marketing, knowing your students (research), shaping programs and services for adults, and staying the course (retention).

  13. Treatment of specific phobia in older adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pachana, Nancy A; Woodward, Rana M; Byrne, Gerard JA

    2007-01-01

    Phobias are common in later life, yet treatment research in this population remains scant. The efficacy of exposure therapy, in combination with other Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT) components, in the treatment of specific phobia with a middle and older aged sample was examined. Sixteen adults aged 45–68 with DSM-IV diagnosis of a specific phobia received a manualized intervention over ten weeks, and were compared with a control group. Results indicated significant time effects in the treatment group for the primary outcome variables of phobic severity and avoidance as well as secondary outcome variables including depression and anxiety. Symptom presence and severity also significantly declined in the treatment group. No significant changes in state anxiety were noted across the treatment period. Such results provide support for the efficacy of exposure combined with CBT treatment for specific phobia in middle to older aged adults. PMID:18044196

  14. 40 CFR 264.271 - Treatment program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Treatment program. 264.271 Section 264... Treatment § 264.271 Treatment program. (a) An owner or operator subject to this subpart must establish a land treatment program that is designed to ensure that hazardous constituents placed in or on the...

  15. National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III Versus International Diabetic Federation Definition of Metabolic Syndrome, Which One is Associated with Diabetes Mellitus and Coronary Artery Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaianzadeh, Abbas; Namayandeh, Seyedeh-Mahdieh; Sadr, Seyed-Mahmood

    2012-08-01

    A cluster of risk factors for cardiovascular diseases and type 2 diabetes mellitus, which occur together more often than by chance alone, have been known as the metabolic syndrome. Various definitions have been proposed by different organizations over the past decade. This study was designed to evaluate a new definition of the metabolic syndrome for the prediction of diabetes mellitus among the Iranian population. This study was carried out in an urban population, aged 20 to 74 years, from Yazd, a city in the center of Iran. The study is a part of the phase I of Yazd Healthy Heart Program, that is, a community-based intervention study for the prevention of cardiovascular disease. The significance level has been defined as PAdult Treatment Panel III (NCEP ATP III) criteria was 21.3 ± .017%, and by International Diabetes Federation (IDF) criteria it was 30.16 ± .02%. The multivariate analysis showed that the most important relevant factors of diabetes mellitus were: Increased age and metabolic syndrome by both definitions of NCEP and IDF criteria, and also, the most important relevant factors of stable angina were: Increased age, male sex, and metabolic syndrome by only IDF definitions, but the NCEP definition of the metabolic syndrome cannot predict diabetes mellitus independent of age and sex. This study showed that increased age and metabolic syndrome are the most important relevant factors for diabetes mellitus, especially by using the IDF criteria for definition of the metabolic syndrome.

  16. Programs for Deaf-blind Children and Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Annals of the Deaf, 2001

    2001-01-01

    This directory provides information on programs for deaf-blind children and adults including national and state programs, the Helen Keller Centers for Deaf-Blind Youth and Adults, and programs for training teachers of deaf-blind students. Within each broad category, programs are listed alphabetically by state and provide detailed contact…

  17. Temporal trends in treatment outcomes for HIV-1 and HIV-2-infected adults enrolled in Côte d'Ivoire's national antiretroviral therapy program.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew F Auld

    Full Text Available In Côte d'Ivoire during 2004-2007, numbers of ART enrollees increased from <5,000 to 36,943. Trends in nationally representative ART program outcomes have not yet been reported.We conducted a retrospective chart review to assess trends in patient characteristics and attrition [death or loss to follow-up (LTFU] over time, among a nationally representative sample of 3,682 adults (≥15 years initiating ART during 2004-2007 at 34 health facilities. Among ART enrollees during 2004-2007, median age was 36, the proportion female was 67%, the proportion HIV-2-infected or dually HIV-1&2 reactive was 5%, and median baseline CD4+ T-cell (CD4 count was 135 cells/µL. Comparing cohorts initiating ART in 2004 with cohorts initiating ART in 2007, median baseline weight declined from 55 kg to 52 kg (p = 0.008 and the proportion weighing <45 kg increased from 17% to 22% (p = 0.014. During 2004-2007, pharmacy-based estimates of the percentage of new ART enrollees ≥95% adherent to ART declined from 74% to 60% (p = 0.026, and twelve-month retention declined from 86% to 69%, due to increases in 12-month mortality from 2%-4% and LTFU from 12%-28%. In univariate analysis, year of ART initiation was associated with increasing rates of both LTFU and mortality. Controlling for baseline CD4, weight, adherence, and other risk factors, year of ART initiation was still strongly associated with LTFU but not mortality. In multivariate analysis, weight <45 kg and adherence <95% remained strong predictors of LTFU and mortality.During 2004-2007, increasing prevalence among ART enrollees of measured mortality risk factors, including weight <45 kg and ART adherence <95%, might explain increases in mortality over time. However, the association between later calendar year and increasing LTFU is not explained by risk factors evaluated in this analysis. Undocumented transfers, political instability, and patient dissatisfaction with crowded facilities might explain

  18. Treatment of specific phobia in older adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy A Pachana

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Nancy A Pachana1, Rana M Woodward1, Gerard JA Byrne21School of Psychology, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia 2School of Medicine, University of Queensland, Brisbane, AustraliaAbstract: Phobias are common in later life, yet treatment research in this population remains scant. The efficacy of exposure therapy, in combination with other Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT components, in the treatment of specific phobia with a middle and older aged sample was examined. Sixteen adults aged 45–68 with DSM-IV diagnosis of a specific phobia received a manualized intervention over ten weeks, and were compared with a control group. Results indicated significant time effects in the treatment group for the primary outcome variables of phobic severity and avoidance as well as secondary outcome variables including depression and anxiety. Symptom presence and severity also significantly declined in the treatment group. No significant changes in state anxiety were noted across the treatment period. Such results provide support for the efficacy of exposure combined with CBT treatment for specific phobia in middle to older aged adults.Keywords: anxiety, phobia, older adults, cognitive behavioral therapy

  19. Hybrid Governance in an Adult Program: A Nuanced Relationship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockley, Suzanne

    2012-01-01

    Eastern Mennonite University's adult program uses a hybrid governance structure. Functions separated from the traditional program include marketing, admissions, and student advising. Functions that remain connected to the traditional program include the registrar, financial aid, and student business accounts.

  20. Adult Education Faculty and Programs in North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tisdell, Elizabeth J.; Wright, Robin Redmon; Taylor, Edward W.

    2016-01-01

    This article reports on the findings of a quantitative survey of North American adult education faculty and a textual analysis of websites of adult education graduate programs in North America conducted in the fall of 2013. This study examined background information about adult education faculty and programs; the nature of faculty work interests,…

  1. Academic Autonomy for Adult Degree Programs: Independence with Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curry, Judson

    2012-01-01

    North Park University's adult program has moved steadily from a centralized governance structure toward a more distributed structure in many ways. The School of Adult Learning hires its own faculty, some of whom are full time in the adult program. The school also has autonomy over academic policy. Ultimately, this academic autonomy has fostered…

  2. [Detection, evaluation, and treatment of high blood cholesterol in adults].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-05-01

    This report is based on the Third Report of the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) Expert Panel on Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Cholesterol in Adults, which was recently issued by the National Institutes of Health of the United States of America. Also known as the Adult Treatment Panel (ATP) III, this new report updates two earlier such reports on high cholesterol. While continuing to concentrate on treating patients with coronary heart disease, the new report advocates more intensive treatment in order to reduce low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol in specific groups of individuals, pays special attention to primary prevention among patients with multiple risk factors, and recognizes as a secondary prevention concern a cluster of heart disease risk factors known as "the metabolic syndrome." Other issues that the ATP III report covers include therapeutic lifestyle changes to reduce LDL, LDL-lowering drug therapy, and the management of specific dyslipidemias.

  3. Current treatment of adult Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Kathryn R; Lechtzin, Noah; Judge, Daniel P

    2007-02-01

    Patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) are living longer into adulthood due to a variety of improvements in health care practices. This growing patient population presents new therapeutic challenges. In this article, we review the literature on current treatment of adult DMD as well as our own experience as a multidisciplinary team actively caring for 23 men ages 19-38 years of age. Approximately one quarter of our adult DMD patients have remained on moderate dose corticosteroids. Daily stretching exercises are recommended, particularly of the distal upper extremities. Cardiomyopathy is anticipated, detected, and treated early with afterload reduction. Oxygen saturation monitoring, noninvasive positive pressure ventilation and cough assist devices are routinely used. Other medical issues such as osteoporosis, gastrointestinal and urinary symptoms are addressed. Current and future therapies directed at prolonging the lifespan of those with DMD will result in further increases in this adult population with special needs and concerns. These needs are best addressed in a multidisciplinary clinic.

  4. An Assessment of the Federal Adult Education Act Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Advisory Council on Adult Education, Washington, DC.

    This study is an initial attempt by the National Advisory Council on Adult Education to review the program and administration effectiveness of the Adult Education Act (program effectiveness in terms of the impact of the program on people's lives, using existing statistical data; administration effectiveness using five basic management functions…

  5. Programs for Deaf-Blind Children and Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Annals of the Deaf, 2000

    2000-01-01

    This annual directory lists programs for deaf-blind children and adults including programs for deaf-blind children and youth (national and state level), the Helen Keller Centers for deaf-blind youth and adults, and programs for training teachers of deaf-blind students. (DB)

  6. Developing Adult Education Programs for Probation and Parole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wimer, Maija

    This handbook, consisting of a program development model that is based on three programs for ex-offenders that were implemented in Texas in fiscal year 1983, is designed to assist adult educators in implementing adult education programs for persons on parole or probation. Discussed first are the purpose of the handbook, the individual sites of the…

  7. Prevention and Treatment of Cardiovascular Disease in Adolescents and Adults through the Transcendental Meditation® Program: A Research Review Update

    OpenAIRE

    Vernon A. Barnes; Orme-Johnson, David W.

    2012-01-01

    The pathogenesis and progression of cardiovascular diseases are thought to be exacerbated by stress. Basic research indicates that the Transcendental Meditation® technique produces acute and longitudinal reductions in sympathetic tone and stress reactivity. In adolescents at risk for hypertension, the technique has been found to reduce resting and ambulatory blood pressure, left ventricular mass, cardiovascular reactivity, and to improve school behavior. Research on adults with mild or modera...

  8. Costs and cost-effectiveness of hypertension screening and treatment in adults with hypertension in rural Nigeria in the context of a health insurance program

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosendaal, N.T.A. (Nicole T. A.); M.E. Hendriks (Marleen); Verhagen, M.D. (Mark D.); O.A. Bolarinwa (Oladimeji Akeem); Sanya, E.O. (Emmanuel O.); Kolo, P.M. (Philip M.); P. Adenusi (Peju); K. Agbede (Kayode); Van Eck, D. (Diederik); S.S. Tan (Siok Swan); T.M. Akande (Tanimola); W.K. Redekop (Ken); C. Schultsz (Constance); Gomez, G.B. (Gabriela B.)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground: High blood pressure is a leading risk factor for death and disability in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). We evaluated the costs and cost-effectiveness of hypertension care provided within the Kwara State Health Insurance (KSHI) program in rural Nigeria. Methods: A Markov model was

  9. Hypercholesterolemia. The NCEP Adult Treatment Panel III Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, John M; Capuzzi, David M

    2003-08-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in older patients. Therefore, its treatment and prevention is vital to improving the length and quality of life for the geriatric population at large. Clinical trial data have demonstrated that patients age 65 and older derive the same benefit from blood cholesterol reduction as younger adults. As a result, the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) Adult Treatment Panel III (ATP III) recommends appropriate therapeutic lifestyle changes and drug therapy for older individuals with established CHD or for those at high risk for CHD. Drug therapy in this population, while safe, requires careful monitoring and dose adjustment due to potentially altered drug metabolism and concomitant medications. These factors lead to use of lower starting doses of lipid-lowering medications in older patients. Prudent individualized evaluation and customized therapy provide optimal cardiovascular outcomes.

  10. Treatment of periodontal disease in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renvert, Stefan; Persson, G Rutger

    2016-10-01

    Within the next 40 years the number of older adults worldwide will more than double. This will impact periodontal treatment needs and presents a challenge to health-care providers and governments worldwide, as severe periodontitis has been reported to be the sixth most prevalent medical condition in the world. Older adults (≥ 80 years of age) who receive regular dental care retain more teeth than those who do not receive such care, but routine general dental care for these individuals is not sufficient to prevent the progression of periodontitis with the same degree of success as in younger individuals. There is a paucity of data on the efficacy of different periodontal therapies for older individuals. However, considering the higher prevalence of chronic medical conditions seen in older adults, it cannot be assumed that periodontal therapy will yield the same degree of success seen in younger individuals. Furthermore, medications can influence the status of the periodontium and the delivery of periodontal care. As an example, anticoagulant drugs are common among older patients and may be a contraindication to certain treatments. Newer anticoagulants will, however, facilitate surgical intervention in older patients. Furthermore, prescription medications taken for chronic conditions, such as osteoporosis and cardiovascular diseases, can affect the periodontium in a variety of ways. In summary, consideration of socio-economic factors, general health status and multiple-drug therapies will, in the future, be an important part of the management of periodontitis in older adults. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. [Support for Adult ASD in Medical Rework Program: Mutual Communication Program and Psychodrama].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Motonori

    2015-01-01

    While carrying out the Medical Rework Program, we realized the necessity for a supplementary medical treatment program aimed at adult ASD. Consequently, we started the Mutual Communication Program, which consists of standard SST and the new element of psychodrama. As a result, 32 participants have returned to their workplace in the three-year period, and the rate of successfully continuing to work was 93.8% at the time of the investigation. Various psychological tests also indicated significant improvement. In this article, we present a case study, explain psychodrama techniques employed in the program, and discuss their usefulness. The results suggest that psychodrama is a very effective assistive technique when the characteristics of ASD are taken into consideration.

  12. Intensity of lipid-lowering therapy and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol goal attainment among the elderly before and after the 2004 National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Gregory A; Nag, Soma; Chan, Wiley

    2007-09-01

    In 2004, the Coordinating Committee of the National Cholesterol Education Program issued an update to the Adult Treatment Panel III guidelines on cholesterol management (the Update). Our objectives were to compare the proportion of elderly patients receiving intensive or minimal-guideline lipid-lowering therapy and the proportions meeting low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) goals before and after the update. We used dispense records from Kaiser Permanente Northwest (Portland, OR) to identify elderly patients who received statin therapy in 2003 (n = 14425) and 2005 (n = 19422) and laboratory records to assess LDL-C goal attainment. Among new statin initiators, 85.4% of very-high-risk patients received minimal-guideline therapy in 2005, compared with 65.3% (P treatment, a significantly greater proportion of patients in 2005 versus 2003 attained the optional goal of <70 mg/dL (45.5% vs 34.4% P = .014). However, there was no significant difference in the proportion attaining <100 mg/dL (77.8% vs 81.8%, P = .281). After the Update, more elderly patients were receiving intensive or minimal-guideline statin therapy. Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol goal attainment was isolated and appeared to occur by shifting already well-controlled patients to lower LDL-C levels. Although these findings may translate into less overall coronary heart disease risk, more aggressive lipid-lowering therapy would likely further reduce risk.

  13. A Socialization Program for Developmentally Disabled Deaf Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, Carole

    This paper describes the need for and the structure of a socialization program designed to provide a social environment for five deaf adults with developmental disabilities residing in two different group homes. The program was developed to address the isolation experienced by such adults living in a community with others who do not use sign…

  14. World Perspective Case Descriptions on Educational Programs for Adults: Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassett, Michael; And Others

    Fifteen adult education programs being conducted in Ireland are described in the case studies in this packet. The courses range from adult basic education to university degree courses in management and industrial relations, from marriage preparation to inservice teacher education. The following programs are profiled: (1) certificate in farming…

  15. Characteristics of Child Sexual Abuse Treatment Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Robert A.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    This article presents the findings from a nationwide survey of 553 child sexual abuse treatment programs. The survey focused on program context, client, and service characteristics. Most programs were affiliated with a larger agency, focused on treating victims, and relied on a combination of individual, family, dyad, and group therapy approaches.…

  16. Fear of flying treatment programs for passengers: an international review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Gerwen, L J; Diekstra, R F

    2000-04-01

    There are facilities established around the world for treating passenger flight anxiety, often as a joint activity of airlines and private entrepreneurs or mental health professionals. In the scientific and professional literature, there is little information about how these facilities operate and what the components of their treatment programs are. This paper is the first review to date to provide this information. There were 212 airlines and treatment facilities approached for information on treatment programs for flying phobia, 43 of which were active in this field. Extensive information could be obtained from 15, which were the best known and well-developed. Information was collected both with a questionnaire and by meeting representatives from 15 international fear of flying treatment facilities that participated in the First International Conference on Fear of Flying (Feb. 1996). Fear of flying among passengers is a phenomenon with epidemic proportions, effecting roughly 10-40% of the adult population. All treatment programs share two basic elements, an information component and a test flight. The programs vary considerably in terms of treatment components. However, there is little available information on efficacy. To date there is a wide variety between facilities for the treatment for fear of flying in terms of methods and protocols used. Experts agree on the clear-cut need for standardization of a "best" minimum protocol for fear of flying treatment programs for which the main components where identified.

  17. Does Information Improve the Health Behavior of Adults Targeted by a Conditional Transfer Program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avitabile, Ciro

    2012-01-01

    We use data from the evaluation sample of Mexico's Food Assistance Program (PAL) to study whether including the attendance at health and nutrition classes among the requirements for receiving a transfer affects the health behavior of adults living in localities targeted by the program. The experimental trial has four different treatment types,…

  18. Frequency of obtaining national cholesterol education program adult treatment panel III goals for all major serum lipoproteins after initiation of lipid altering therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Gregory A; Ambegaonkar, Baishali M; Sazonov, Vasilisa; Brown, Jonathan B

    2009-12-15

    Statin treatment targeting low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol is widely used for cardiovascular risk reduction, but many statin users still face greatly elevated risks. Some experts advocate additional therapy that targets high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol. However, the size of the patient group that could benefit from HDL cholesterol or triglyceride therapy has not been reported. Using observational data from a large health maintenance organization, 5,158 patients were identified who initiated dyslipidemia pharmacotherapy from July 2004 to June 2006, continued therapy for 1 year, and had full lipid panels within 6 months before and 9 to 15 months after therapy initiation. Therapy (primarily statins) reduced the proportion of patients not at LDL cholesterol goals from 77% to 22% and the proportion with high triglyceride levels from 34% to 20%. HDL cholesterol levels were unchanged (49% and 50% were less than normal levels before and after therapy, respectively) in the aggregate and in high-risk subgroups (patients with coronary artery disease, diabetes, and 10-year heart disease risk >20%). After therapy, 29% of high-risk patients still had multiple lipid abnormalities. In conclusion, current dyslipidemia therapy substantially improved LDL cholesterol goal attainment in this cohort, but low HDL cholesterol levels were unaffected. About half the patients starting statins could be candidates for additional therapy targeting non-LDL cholesterol lipid fractions.

  19. The reliability of the National Cholesterol Education Program's Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP/ATP III) and the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) definitions in diagnosing metabolic syndrome (MetS) among Gaza Strip Palestinians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirdah, Mahmoud M; Abu Ghali, Asmaa S; Al Laham, Nahed A

    2012-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) which is a multifaceted syndrome, has been demonstrated as a common precursor for developing cardiovascular diseases and/or type 2 diabetes mellitus. Different diagnostic definitions for MetS have been proposed and recommended. We set up to evaluate the reliabilities of the National Cholesterol Education Program's Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP/ATP III) and the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) definitions in diagnosing MetS among Gaza Strip Palestinians. This cross sectional study involved a randomly selected two hundred and thirty apparently healthy adults from the Gaza Strip. Anthropometric measurements, blood pressure, fasting plasma glucose, lipid profile, and questionnaire interviews were performed. The overall prevalence of MetS in our Gaza Strip cohort was 23.0% and 39.5% according to NCEP/ATP III and IDF definitions respectively (pIII showed an increased prevalence of MetS with age, and body mass index (BMI), however they revealed different prevalence trends with sex. Except for BMI, there were no significant differences in the general and metabolic related characteristics between subjects with MetS of IDF and NCEP/ATP III definitions. Independently of the definition used, MetS is highly prevalent in Gaza Strip population, with a steady increase in MetS prevalence through age and BMI. The IDF definition tends to give higher values for MetS prevalence, and therefore could be more appropriate for diagnosing MetS in Gaza Strip cohort. Copyright © 2012 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Progression and treatment of chronic adult periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preshaw, P M; Lauffart, B; Zak, E; Jeffcoat, M K; Barton, I; Heasman, P A

    1999-10-01

    The periodontal status of 41 medically healthy adults with untreated chronic periodontitis was monitored before and after scaling and root planing (SRP). During a 6-month pretreatment phase, clinical measurements, digital subtraction radiography (DSR) analysis of alveolar bone, and measurement of gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) levels were undertaken. SRP was provided during a 1-month treatment phase. Clinical, radiographic, and biochemical analyses were repeated in a 6-month post-treatment healing period. Pretreatment: no clinically significant changes in mean plaque indices (PI), probing depths (PD), bleeding on probing (BOP), or relative clinical attachment levels (CAL) were detected (P>0.05). DSR revealed small but statistically significant bone height (0.04 mm) and mass (0.97 mg) loss (Pdisease progression over a 6-month period. Significant improvements were observed in clinical parameters after SRP, and a trend towards progressive bone loss was halted and reversed. Regular and frequent maintenance visits are important following treatment to maintain improvements in clinical parameters. Smokers had deeper probing depths than non- and ex-smokers, but pockets were reduced significantly and comparably in all 3 smoking subgroups following efficacious treatment.

  1. A Comprehensive Child Sexual Abuse Treatment Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giarretto, Henry

    1982-01-01

    The Child Sexual Abuse Treatment Program (CSATP) of Santa Clara, California, uses professionals from the community, volunteers, and self-help groups of parents and children to provide treatment with a humanistic attitude. A case study illustrates CSATP treatment for father-daughter incest. Effects of father, mother, daughter, and family are…

  2. Prevalence of the metabolic syndrome using the Third Report of the National Cholesterol Educational Program Expert Panel on Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Cholesterol in Adults (ATP III) and the modified ATP III definitions for Japanese and Mongolians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enkhmaa, Byambaa; Shiwaku, Kuninori; Anuurad, Erdembileg; Nogi, Akiko; Kitajima, Keiko; Yamasaki, Masayuki; Oyunsuren, Tsendsuren; Yamane, Yosuke

    2005-02-01

    A clustering of insulin resistance, hypertension, and dyslipidemia has been labeled as metabolic syndrome. Asians have a lower frequency of obesity than do Caucasians but have an increasing tendency toward metabolic syndrome. We conducted a cross-sectional study of individuals aged 30-60 years. We analyzed the health data of 596 Japanese and Mongolians for metabolic syndrome based on the Third Report of the National Cholesterol Educational Program Expert Panel on Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Cholesterol in Adults (ATP III) definition and the three modified ATP III definitions. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome using ATP III criteria was 6% for the Japanese and 12% for the Mongolians, a remarkable lower prevalence relative to the reported prevalence in the United States. With the exception of visceral obesity, the prevalences of individual metabolic abnormalities within each of the two Asian groups were similar to each other and to reported rates of prevalence in the United States. A universal metabolic syndrome definition is inappropriate for comparisons of metabolic syndrome among Asian ethnic groups. We believe that the ATP III index for visceral obesity should be adjusted for Asian populations.

  3. Orthodontic treatment in adults: restoring smile esthetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leopoldino Capelozza Filho

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The search for orthodontic treatment by adult patients is increasing. This demand may be explained by many reasons, but the most important was the change in the concept of normality, allowing the selection of simpler and more conservative and consistent therapeutic objectives. This conceptual evolution, combined with the technological advances allowed an improvement in orthodontic management, making it more effective, fast and comfortable. The promotion of awareness of the society on the advantages of this treatment and the increase in esthetic demands, with an increasingly longer and active social, affective and professional life, creates a context in which the need for Orthodontics is absolutely established for the adult individuals. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this article is to report the nuances in diagnosis and orthodontic treatment of an adult patient, in a different perspective. Within this approach, the objective is to recover the shape, i.e. to establish occlusal conditions that would probably be present if the patient had been assisted at the proper time, namely during growth and tooth irruption.INTRODUÇÃO: a procura de tratamento ortodôntico por pacientes adultos é cada vez maior. Essa demanda pode ser justificada por vários fatores, mas o mais relevante foi a mudança do conceito de normal, permitindo a opção por metas terapêuticas mais conservadoras, simples e consistentes. Essa evolução conceitual, mais os avanços tecnológicos, permitiram melhora no manejo ortodôntico, tornando-o mais efetivo, rápido e confortável. A conscientização, por parte da sociedade, das vantagens desse tratamento e o aumento da exigência estética entre os adultos, com uma vida social, afetiva e profissional cada vez mais longa e ativa, cria um contexto onde fica absolutamente estabelecida a necessidade de uma Ortodontia para os indivíduos adultos. OBJETIVO: o objetivo desse artigo foi relatar as nuances de diagnóstico e

  4. [Results of an educational program for adults with asthma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segura Méndez, N; Espínola Reyna, G; Juárez Morales, D; Vázquez Estupiñan, F; Salas Ramírez, M; Ortiz Vázquez, J U; Mejía Ortega, J

    2001-01-01

    Asthma is a world health problem. Education of asthmatic patient has been proposed as a choice for diminishing mortality due to asthma. To demonstrate that educational programs for asthmatic patients help to reduce disease's severity, crises and hospitalizations number and encourage a bigger therapeutic compliance. 80 asthmatic patients were divided into two groups; first one received educational curse and second one does not. All patients received treatment according to international guides, including monthly consultation, flow-meter, and symptoms day book; an initial and final evaluation was made about disease's knowledge. Course consisted of a workshop including crisis management, use of inhaled medication, flow-metry and relaxation techniques. We studied 76 patients, with a mean age of 34 years; 36 were assigned to group 1 and 40 to group 2. Initial assessment of both groups was of 7.8, while final evaluation of groups 1 and 2 was of 9.3 and 8.4, respectively. Group 1 had lesser number of hospitalizations than group 2 (p-0.005), lesser number of emergency consultations (p-0.005) and a higher overall improvement than group 2, in which only 8 patients got well. A third part of the group 1 abandoned treatment, while patients that abandoned treatment in group 2 accounted for 79% (p < 0.0005). Educational programs for asthmatic adult patients diminish severity of disease, number of crises and hospitalizations, and also increase therapeutic compliance.

  5. [Coblation treatment for laryngeal papilloma in adult].

    Science.gov (United States)

    She, Cui-ping; Zhang, Qing-feng; Cheng, Chen-jing

    2011-04-01

    To evaluate the effect and feasibility of coblation treatment for laryngeal papilloma in adult. A total of 18 patients with laryngeal papilloma treated by coblation from April 2008 to June 2010 was retrospectively analysed. There were 4 cases of multiple laryngeal papilloma and 14 cases of single laryngeal papilloma. All of these patients were treated with CoblatorTM Reflex #7070 under general anesthesia without tracheotomy. The volumes of blood loss during surgery varied from 1 ml to 10 ml, 2 ml on average. There was no postoperative bleeding or other complications. Follow-ups ranged from 6 months to 33 months after surgery, median 18 months. Recurrence occurred 4 months and 8 months after surgery in two patients. They were treated with coblation for the second time and followed up for 4 months and 12 months respectively. Recurrence occurred again in one patient. Coblation under suspension laryngoscope for laryngeal papilloma in adult was an ideal way due to less bleeding and less damage.

  6. Evaluation of an Eight Week Adult Education Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasson, John B.

    As part of a training program for families receiving public assistance, an eight-week summer adult education program for 54 students was conducted in 1965 by the Ramsey County (Minnesota) Welfare Department and the Saint Paul Public Schools under Title V of the Economic Opportunity Act. Each day's program included a staff planning period, an…

  7. Approaches to a Successful Adult Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petty, Tanjula; Thomas, Christine C.

    2014-01-01

    An estimated 40 million Americans adults live their lives deprived of prosperity, pleasures, and the rewards of lifelong learning (Comings & Cuban, 2007). With the economic, social, and technical changes in society, there are shifts in the labor market (Champagne, 1987). Many adults are having to set their sights on obtaining sufficient skills…

  8. Treatment of adult T-cell leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uozumi, Kimiru

    2010-01-01

    Adult T-cell Leukemia (ATL) is an aggressive malignant disease of CD4+ T-cells associated with human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I). Prognosis of ATL patients is directly correlated to the subtype of ATL. Treatment of the aggressive forms (acute and lymphoma types) of ATL remains inadequate, as most ATL patients receive conventional chemotherapy without stem cell rescue. At present, LSG15 is the standard chemotherapy for the treatment of aggressive ATL, but the efficacy of LSG15 in most patients is transient. To prolong median survival time, additional therapies for maintenance of complete response (CR) are needed after achieving CR by induction chemotherapy. Improved outcome after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT), despite a high incidence of graft-versus-host disease, has been reported. Thus, allogeneic bone marrow transplantation and allogeneic peripheral blood SCT may have great potential for eradication of HTLV-1 and cure of ATL. Recently, reduced-intensity conditioning stem cell transplantation was also reported to be effective for ATL. Although several issues, including selection criteria for patients and sources of stem cells remain to be resolved, allo-SCT may be considered as a treatment option for patients with aggressive ATL. To evaluate whether allo-SCT is more effective than the standard chemotherapy (LSG15) for aggressive ATL, an up front phase II clinical trial of JCOG-LSG is now being planned. Novel innovative targeted strategies, such as antiretroviral therapy, arsenic trioxide, nuclear factor-kappaB inhibitors, proteasome inhibitors, histone deacetylase inhibitors, several monoclonal antibodies including anti-CC chemokine receptor 4, anti-folate, purine nucleotide phosphorylase inhibitor, mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) inhibitor, bendamustine, small molecule Bcl-2 inhibitors and Tax-targeted immunotherapy, should be promptly studied in order to develop curative treatments for ATL in the near future.

  9. Psychotherapeutic treatment levels of personality disorders in older adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Videler, Arjan; Cornelis, Christina; Rossi, G.; van Royen, R.J.J.; Rosowsky, E.; van Alphen, S.P.J.

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of personality disorders (PDs) in older adults is a highly underexplored topic. In this article clinical applicability of the findings from a recent Delphi study regarding treatment aspects of PDs in older adults is explored. This concerns the relevance of three psychotherapeutic treatment

  10. Atomoxetine Treatment for ADHD: Younger Adults Compared with Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durell, Todd; Adler, Lenard; Wilens, Timothy; Paczkowski, Martin; Schuh, Kory

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Atomoxetine is a nonstimulant medication for treating child, adolescent, and adult ADHD. This meta-analysis compared the effects in younger and older adults. Method: A post hoc analysis was conducted using data from two double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials. Data from patients aged 18-25 years were compared with data from…

  11. Adult Education and Literacy Program: Fiscal Year 2014 Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iowa Department of Education, 2014

    2014-01-01

    The Division of Community Colleges of the Iowa Department of Education has a variety of diverse programs that enhance Iowa's educational system. Adult Education has a rich history in Iowa of providing services that assist adults in improving their skills, achieving their educational goals, and transitioning to further education or employment.…

  12. Correctional Officers' Attitudes toward Selected Treatment Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teske, Raymond H. C.; Williamson, Harold E.

    1979-01-01

    Examined the attitudes of a sample of correctional officers toward selected treatment programs. Besides a number of factors which correlated with positive attitudes toward treatment, several factors correlated negatively, including number of years of service and a belief that the primary function of corrections is punishment. (Author)

  13. Developmental Programming of Adult Disease: Reprogramming by Melatonin?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tain, You-Lin; Huang, Li-Tung; Hsu, Chien-Ning

    2017-02-16

    Adult-onset chronic non-communicable diseases (NCDs) can originate from early life through so-called the "developmental origins of health and disease" (DOHaD) or "developmental programming". The DOHaD concept offers the "reprogramming" strategy to shift the treatment from adulthood to early life, before clinical disease is apparent. Melatonin, an endogenous indoleamine produced by the pineal gland, has pleiotropic bioactivities those are beneficial in a variety of human diseases. Emerging evidence support that melatonin is closely inter-related to other proposed mechanisms contributing to the developmental programming of a variety of chronic NCDs. Recent animal studies have begun to unravel the multifunctional roles of melatonin in many experimental models of developmental programming. Even though some progress has been made in research on melatonin as a reprogramming strategy to prevent DOHaD-related NCDs, future human studies should aim at filling the translational gap between animal models and clinical trials. Here, we review several key themes on the reprogramming effects of melatonin in DOHaD research. We have particularly focused on the following areas: mechanisms of developmental programming; the interrelationship between melatonin and mechanisms underlying developmental programming; pathophysiological roles of melatonin in pregnancy and fetal development; and insight provided by animal models to support melatonin as a reprogramming therapy. Rates of NCDs are increasing faster than anticipated all over the world. Hence, there is an urgent need to understand reprogramming mechanisms of melatonin and to translate experimental research into clinical practice for halting a growing list of DOHaD-related NCDs.

  14. Prevalence and determinants of metabolic syndrome: a cross-sectional survey of general medical outpatient clinics using National Cholesterol Education Program-Adult Treatment Panel III criteria in Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omech, Bernard; Tshikuka, Jose-Gaby; Mwita, Julius C; Tsima, Billy; Nkomazana, Oathokwa; Amone-P'Olak, Kennedy

    2016-01-01

    Low- and middle-income countries, including Botswana, are facing rising prevalence of obesity and obesity-related cardiometabolic complications. Very little information is known about clustering of cardiovascular risk factors in the outpatient setting during routine visits. We aimed to assess the prevalence and identify the determinants of metabolic syndrome among the general outpatients' attendances in Botswana. A cross-sectional study was conducted from August to October 2014 involving outpatients aged ≥20 years without diagnosis of diabetes mellitus. A precoded questionnaire was used to collect data on participants' sociodemographics, risk factors, and anthropometric indices. Fasting blood samples were drawn and analyzed for glucose and lipid profile. Metabolic syndrome was assessed using National Cholesterol Education Program-Adult Treatment Panel III criteria. In total, 291 participants were analyzed, of whom 216 (74.2%) were females. The mean age of the total population was 50.1 (±11) years. The overall prevalence of metabolic syndrome was 27.1% (n=79), with no significant difference between the sexes (female =29.6%, males =20%, P=0.11). A triad of central obesity, low high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, and elevated blood pressure constituted the largest proportion (38 [13.1%]) of cases of metabolic syndrome, followed by a combination of low high-density lipoprotein, elevated triglycerides, central obesity, and elevated blood pressure, with 17 (5.8%) cases. Independent determinants of metabolic syndrome were antihypertensive use and increased waist circumference. Metabolic syndrome is highly prevalent in the general medical outpatients clinics. Proactive approaches are needed to screen and manage cases targeting its most important predictors.

  15. The usefulness of the International Diabetes Federation and the National Cholesterol Education Program's Adult Treatment Panel III definitions of the metabolic syndrome in predicting coronary heart disease in subjects with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Peter C; Kong, Alice P; So, Wing-Yee; Yang, Xilin; Ho, Chung-Shun; Ma, Ronald C; Ozaki, Risa; Chow, Chun-Chung; Lam, Christopher W; Chan, Juliana C N; Cockram, Clive S

    2007-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the predictive value for coronary heart disease (CHD) of the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) definition (with Asian criteria for central obesity) of the metabolic syndrome with existing criteria of the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) Adult Treatment Panel III (ATP III) in Chinese subjects with type 2 diabetes. Subjects with type 2 diabetes and without macrovascular diseases or end-stage renal disease were categorized by the criteria of the IDF and the NCEP ATP III. CHD was defined as myocardial infarction, ischemic heart disease, coronary revascularization, heart failure, and death related to CHD. Of 4,350 patients (aged 54.4 +/- 13.4 years; median follow-up period 7.1 [interquartile range 5.2-8.5] years), 65.9% had metabolic syndrome according to either IDF or NCEP ATP III criteria. The NCEP ATP III definition identified metabolic syndrome in 786 subjects (18.1%) who did not fulfill the criteria of the IDF. HDL cholesterol and systolic blood pressure were predictors of CHD after adjustment for other confounding factors. Compared with subjects without metabolic syndrome, the IDF criteria failed to predict CHD (hazard ratio 1.13 [95% CI 0.86-1.48], P = 0.374). In contrast, the NCEP ATP III definition (2.51 [1.80-3.50], P < 0.001) predicted an increased risk of CHD with the NCEP-only group having the highest risk (2.49 [1.66-3.73], P < 0.001). With established type 2 diabetes, the IDF definition of the metabolic syndrome failed to identify a subgroup of patients who had the highest risk for CHD. Practitioners must recognize the appropriate setting for its application.

  16. The National Cholesterol Education Program - Adult Treatment Panel III, International Diabetes Federation, and World Health Organization definitions of the metabolic syndrome as predictors of incident cardiovascular disease and diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzo, Carlos; Williams, Ken; Hunt, Kelly J; Haffner, Steven M

    2007-01-01

    The clinical value of metabolic syndrome is uncertain. Thus, we examined cardiovascular disease (CVD) and diabetes risk prediction by the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP)-Adult Treatment Panel III (ATPIII), International Diabetes Federation, and World Health Organization definitions of the metabolic syndrome. We analyzed the risks associated with metabolic syndrome, the NCEP multiple risk factor categories, and 2-h glucose values in the San Antonio Heart Study (n = 2,559; age range 25-64 years; 7.4 years of follow-up). Both ATPIII metabolic syndrome plus age > or = 45 years (odds ratio 9.25 [95% CI 4.85-17.7]) and multiple (two or more) risk factors plus a 10-year coronary heart disease (CHD) risk of 10-20% (11.9 [6.00-23.6]) had similar CVD risk in men without CHD, as well as CHD risk equivalents. In women counterparts, multiple (two or more) risk factors plus a 10-year CHD risk of 10-20% was infrequent (10 of 1,254). However, either a 10-year CHD risk of 5-20% (7.72 [3.42-17.4]) or ATPIII metabolic syndrome plus age > or = 55 years (4.98 [2.08-12.0]) predicted CVD. ATPIII metabolic syndrome increased the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of a model containing age, sex, ethnic origin, family history of diabetes, and 2-h and fasting glucose values (0.857 vs. 0.842, P = 0.013). All three metabolic syndrome definitions imparted similar CVD and diabetes risks. Metabolic syndrome is associated with a significant CVD risk, particularly in men aged > or = 45 years and women aged > or = 55 years. The metabolic syndrome predicts diabetes beyond glucose intolerance alone.

  17. Metabolic syndrome and cardiac disease in Japanese men: applicability of the concept of metabolic syndrome defined by the National Cholesterol Education Program-Adult Treatment Panel III to Japanese men--the Tanno and Sobetsu Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Hiroshi; Saitoh, Shigeyuki; Takagi, Satoru; Ohnishi, Hirofumi; Ohhata, Junichi; Isobe, Takeshi; Shimamoto, Kazuaki

    2005-03-01

    Results of a 6-year follow-up study were used to determine whether the concept of and the criteria for metabolic syndrome as defined by the National Cholesterol Education Program-Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP-ATP III) can be applied to Japanese men for prediction of the occurrence of cardiac disease. The subjects were 808 men who underwent mass health check-ups in 1993 and who were not on medication for hypertension, diabetes or hyperlipidemia. Individuals who had hypertriglyceridemia, hypo-high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterolemia, high blood pressure, and/or high fasting plasma glucose levels were identified on the basis of the NCEP-ATP III criteria. Not in conformity with the NCEP-ATP Ill, however, a cut-off value of 85 cm was used for waist girth as an indicator of abdominal obesity. The subjects who had 3 or more risk factors were judged as having metabolic syndrome. The proportion of subjects having metabolic syndrome was 25.3%. In the 6-year follow-up study, cardiac disease occurred in 11.7% of the subjects in the metabolic syndrome group and in 6.7% of the subjects in the non-metabolic syndrome group. Results of regression analysis using Cox's proportional hazards model showed that subjects in the metabolic syndrome group had a 2.2-times greater risk of developing cardiac disease than did subjects in the non-metabolic syndrome group. The concept of metabolic syndrome as defined in the NCEP-ATP III was therefore considered to be useful for predicting the occurrence of cardiac disease in Japanese men.

  18. Comparison of the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and its association with diabetes and cardiovascular disease in the rural population of Bangladesh using the modified National Cholesterol Education Program Expert Panel Adult Treatment Panel III and International Diabetes Federation definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhowmik, Bishwajit; Afsana, Faria; Siddiquee, Tasnima; Munir, Sanjida B; Sheikh, Fareeha; Wright, Erica; Bhuiyan, Farjana R; Ashrafuzzaman, Sheikh Mohammad; Mahtab, Hajera; Azad Khan, Abul Kalam; Hussain, Akhtar

    2015-05-01

    To compare the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MS) using the modified National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Plan III (NCEP) and the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) definitions and, using both definitions, determine and compare the association of MS, prediabetes, type 2 diabetes, hypertension (HTN) and cardiovascular disease risk (CVD). A total of 2,293 randomly selected participants (aged ≥20 years) in a rural community in Bangladesh were investigated in a population-based cross-sectional study. Sociodemographic and anthropometric characteristics, blood pressure, blood glucose, and lipid profiles were studied. Age-adjusted data for MS and cardiometabolic risk factors were assessed, and their relationships were examined. The age-adjusted prevalence of MS was 30.7% (males 30.5%; females 30.5%) using the NCEP definition, and 24.5% (males 19.2%, females 27.5%) using the IDF definition. The prevalence of MS using the NCEP definition was also higher in study participants with prediabetes, type 2 diabetes, HTN and CVD risk. The agreement rate between both definitions was 92% (k = 0.80). The NCEP definition had a stronger association with type 2 diabetes and HTN (odds ratio 12.4 vs 5.2; odds ratio 7.0 vs 4.7, respectively) than the IDF definition. However, the odds ratios for prediabetes and CVD risk were not significantly different. The prevalence of MS was higher using the NCEP definition, and was more strongly associated with prediabetes, type 2 diabetes, HTN and CVD in this Bangladeshi population.

  19. [Treatment of acute lymphocytic leukemia in adult].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, I; Inagaki, N; Nakada, H; Nishimura, M; Hayashi, N; Sekito, N; Nonaka, K; Takeuchi, M; Osada, K; Matuzaki, T

    1989-08-01

    Since April, 1978 to October, 1988, 66 acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) patients aged 15 to 79 (21 L1, 43 L2, 2 L3/6 Ph1+) were treated with 3 different therapeutic protocols. The drugs used for induction were VCR (VDS) + Pred, followed by DNR + VCR (VDS) + 6MP + Pred and VCR (VDS) + L-asp + Pred in protocol I, Ad + VCR + Pred in protocol II and DNR + VCR + Pred in protocol III. Complete remission (CR) was attained in 72.7% of 66 patients. The CR rate of each group as followings; 71.4% in protocol I and 75.0% in protocol II and III, respectively. The median duration of remission was 10.2 months + and the probability of being in continuous CR at 3 years was 21.9%. For the 48 patients in remission the median survival was 17.8 months and the probability of being alive at 3 years was 24.3%. The intensified induction and consolidation therapy is expected in the cure oriented treatment of adult ALL.

  20. The role of programming in linguistic education of adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadja Dobnik

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available From the viewpoint of didactics and programming, not enough attention is paid to linguistic education of adults. Abilities for learning foreign languages do not decrease with age neither can they be measured with the same mechanisms as the knowledge of children. The author emphasises that topics are of the utmost importance; more and more adults need individually structured programs. Therefore, topics can only be chosen according to an agreement between or a mutual plan of the educator and the student. The very phase of programming is the disadvantage of numerous linguistic courses for adults; therefore, linguistic education of adults is still quite closely linked with the ideas valid for educating children and youths.

  1. European consensus statement on diagnosis and treatment of adult ADHD: The European Network Adult ADHD

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kooij, Sandra J J; Bejerot, Susanne; Blackwell, Andrew; Caci, Herve; Casas-Brugué, Miquel; Carpentier, Pieter J; Edvinsson, Dan; Fayyad, John; Foeken, Karin; Fitzgerald, Michael; Gaillac, Veronique; Ginsberg, Ylva; Henry, Chantal; Krause, Johanna; Lensing, Michael B; Manor, Iris; Niederhofer, Helmut; Nunes-Filipe, Carlos; Ohlmeier, Martin D; Oswald, Pierre; Pallanti, Stefano; Pehlivanidis, Artemios; Ramos-Quiroga, Josep A; Rastam, Maria; Ryffel-Rawak, Doris; Stes, Steven; Asherson, Philip

    2010-01-01

    .... The evidence on persistence poses several difficulties for adult psychiatry considering the lack of expertise for diagnostic assessment, limited treatment options and patient facilities across Europe...

  2. A History of Baccalaureate Programs for Adults 1945-1970.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, James C.

    An external degree is one that may be earned outside the central structure of a college or university. The most common form of external degree program is the evening college in which students, who are usually working adults, meet the standard requirements for a four-year degree by taking a part-time program after work. No allowances are made in…

  3. Camp Verde Adult Reading Program. Final Performance Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynard, David A.

    This document begins with a four-page performance report describing how the Camp Verde Adult Reading Program site was relocated to the Community Center Complex, and the Town Council contracted directly with the Friends of the Camp Verde Library to provide for the requirements of the program. The U.S. Department of Education grant allowed the…

  4. Working memory intervention programs for adults: A systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maria Netto, Tânia; Greca, Denise Vieira; Zimmermann, Nicolle; Oliveira, Camila; Fonseca, Rochele Paz; Landeira-Fernandez, J.

    2010-01-01

    This systematic review aimed to identify the designs, procedures, and results of empirical studies that performed neuropsychological interventions on WM in adults. Methods A PubMed and LILACS literature search was conducted using the keywords working memory AND (training OR rehabilitation OR intervention) AND adult. Results Of the seven studies found, three were randomized controlled trials, two were case reports, one was a clinical trial, and one was an evaluation study. With regard to the type of programs and samples, three studies employed global programs with healthy elderly adults and four employed specific programs for samples with neurologically-impaired adults. Conclusions The effectiveness of the WM intervention programs was more evident in studies that employed specific methods of rehabilitation for samples with neurological disorders than in those based on global programs with healthy adults. There is a need for more empirical studies to verify the effectiveness of WM intervention programs in order to provide adequate guidance for clinical neuropsychologists and future research. PMID:29213690

  5. Working memory intervention programs for adults: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tânia Maria Netto

    Full Text Available Abstract This systematic review aimed to identify the designs, procedures, and results of empirical studies that performed neuropsychological interventions on WM in adults. Methods: A PubMed and LILACS literature search was conducted using the keywords working memory AND (training OR rehabilitation OR intervention AND adult. Results: Of the seven studies found, three were randomized controlled trials, two were case reports, one was a clinical trial, and one was an evaluation study. With regard to the type of programs and samples, three studies employed global programs with healthy elderly adults and four employed specific programs for samples with neurologically-impaired adults. Conclusions: The effectiveness of the WM intervention programs was more evident in studies that employed specific methods of rehabilitation for samples with neurological disorders than in those based on global programs with healthy adults. There is a need for more empirical studies to verify the effectiveness of WM intervention programs in order to provide adequate guidance for clinical neuropsychologists and future research.

  6. Developmental Programming of Adult Disease: Reprogramming by Melatonin?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    You-Lin Tain

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Adult-onset chronic non-communicable diseases (NCDs can originate from early life through so-called the “developmental origins of health and disease” (DOHaD or “developmental programming”. The DOHaD concept offers the “reprogramming” strategy to shift the treatment from adulthood to early life, before clinical disease is apparent. Melatonin, an endogenous indoleamine produced by the pineal gland, has pleiotropic bioactivities those are beneficial in a variety of human diseases. Emerging evidence support that melatonin is closely inter-related to other proposed mechanisms contributing to the developmental programming of a variety of chronic NCDs. Recent animal studies have begun to unravel the multifunctional roles of melatonin in many experimental models of developmental programming. Even though some progress has been made in research on melatonin as a reprogramming strategy to prevent DOHaD-related NCDs, future human studies should aim at filling the translational gap between animal models and clinical trials. Here, we review several key themes on the reprogramming effects of melatonin in DOHaD research. We have particularly focused on the following areas: mechanisms of developmental programming; the interrelationship between melatonin and mechanisms underlying developmental programming; pathophysiological roles of melatonin in pregnancy and fetal development; and insight provided by animal models to support melatonin as a reprogramming therapy. Rates of NCDs are increasing faster than anticipated all over the world. Hence, there is an urgent need to understand reprogramming mechanisms of melatonin and to translate experimental research into clinical practice for halting a growing list of DOHaD-related NCDs.

  7. Developmental Programming of Adult Disease: Reprogramming by Melatonin?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tain, You-Lin; Huang, Li-Tung; Hsu, Chien-Ning

    2017-01-01

    Adult-onset chronic non-communicable diseases (NCDs) can originate from early life through so-called the “developmental origins of health and disease” (DOHaD) or “developmental programming”. The DOHaD concept offers the “reprogramming” strategy to shift the treatment from adulthood to early life, before clinical disease is apparent. Melatonin, an endogenous indoleamine produced by the pineal gland, has pleiotropic bioactivities those are beneficial in a variety of human diseases. Emerging evidence support that melatonin is closely inter-related to other proposed mechanisms contributing to the developmental programming of a variety of chronic NCDs. Recent animal studies have begun to unravel the multifunctional roles of melatonin in many experimental models of developmental programming. Even though some progress has been made in research on melatonin as a reprogramming strategy to prevent DOHaD-related NCDs, future human studies should aim at filling the translational gap between animal models and clinical trials. Here, we review several key themes on the reprogramming effects of melatonin in DOHaD research. We have particularly focused on the following areas: mechanisms of developmental programming; the interrelationship between melatonin and mechanisms underlying developmental programming; pathophysiological roles of melatonin in pregnancy and fetal development; and insight provided by animal models to support melatonin as a reprogramming therapy. Rates of NCDs are increasing faster than anticipated all over the world. Hence, there is an urgent need to understand reprogramming mechanisms of melatonin and to translate experimental research into clinical practice for halting a growing list of DOHaD-related NCDs. PMID:28212315

  8. Treatment of adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dusan Kolar

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Dusan Kolar, Amanda Keller, Maria Golfinopoulos, Lucy Cumyn, Cassidy Syer, Lily HechtmanDepartment of Psychiatry, Montreal Children’s Hospital, McGill University, Montreal, CanadaAbstract: This review focuses on the treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD in adults. It briefly addresses prevalence, diagnostic and differential diagnostic issues specific to adults. Stimulant medication, non-stimulant medication, and psychosocial treatments are thoroughly reviewed. For each class of medication possible mechanism of action, efficacy and side effects are summarized. Special attention is given to the pharmacological treatment for patients with adult ADHD and various comorbidities. In summary, stimulant medications are most effective and combined medication and psychosocial treatment is the most beneficial treatment option for most adult patients with ADHD.Keywords: adult ADHD, medication, stimulants, cognitive-behavioral therapy

  9. Treatment of adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dusan Kolar

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Dusan Kolar, Amanda Keller, Maria Golfinopoulos, Lucy Cumyn, Cassidy Syer, Lily HechtmanDepartment of Psychiatry, Montreal Children’s Hospital, McGill University, Montreal, CanadaAbstract: This review focuses on the treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD in adults. It briefly addresses prevalence, diagnostic and differential diagnostic issues specific to adults. Stimulant medication, non-stimulant medication, and psychosocial treatments are thoroughly reviewed. For each class of medication possible mechanism of action, efficacy and side effects are summarized. Special attention is given to the pharmacological treatment for patients with adult ADHD and various comorbidities. In summary, stimulant medications are most effective and combined medication and psychosocial treatment is the most beneficial treatment option for most adult patients with ADHD.Keywords: adult ADHD, medication, stimulants, cognitive-behavioral therapy

  10. Fostering Hand Washing before Lunch by Students Attending a Special Needs Young Adult Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walmsley, Christopher; Mahoney, Amanda; Durgin, Amy; Poling, Alan

    2013-01-01

    A multiple baseline across groups design was used to investigate the effects of a treatment package on hand washing before lunch by five students with disabilities who attended a young adult educational program. To evaluate hand washing, a lotion called Glo Germ was applied to participants' hands. Glo Germ is visible under a black light, which…

  11. Exploring Post-Program Psychological Adjustment for Adult Staff Facilitating a Wilderness Adventure Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence-Wood, Ellie; Raymond, Ivan

    2011-01-01

    This paper outlines a pilot study of the post-program psychological adjustment outcomes of adult staff facilitating an Australian-based wilderness adventure program for youth at risk. The descriptive and correlational survey study (N = 62) examined the psychological adjustment processes staff underwent following program completion, and the factors…

  12. European consensus statement on diagnosis and treatment of adult ADHD: the European Network adult ADHD

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kooij, Sandra JJ

    2010-09-03

    Abstract Background Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is among the most common psychiatric disorders of childhood that persists into adulthood in the majority of cases. The evidence on persistence poses several difficulties for adult psychiatry considering the lack of expertise for diagnostic assessment, limited treatment options and patient facilities across Europe. Methods The European Network Adult ADHD, founded in 2003, aims to increase awareness of this disorder and improve knowledge and patient care for adults with ADHD across Europe. This Consensus Statement is one of the actions taken by the European Network Adult ADHD in order to support the clinician with research evidence and clinical experience from 18 European countries in which ADHD in adults is recognised and treated. Results Besides information on the genetics and neurobiology of ADHD, three major questions are addressed in this statement: (1) What is the clinical picture of ADHD in adults? (2) How can ADHD in adults be properly diagnosed? (3) How should ADHD in adults be effectively treated? Conclusions ADHD often presents as an impairing lifelong condition in adults, yet it is currently underdiagnosed and treated in many European countries, leading to ineffective treatment and higher costs of illness. Expertise in diagnostic assessment and treatment of ADHD in adults must increase in psychiatry. Instruments for screening and diagnosis of ADHD in adults are available and appropriate treatments exist, although more research is needed in this age group.

  13. European consensus statement on diagnosis and treatment of adult ADHD: The European Network Adult ADHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is among the most common psychiatric disorders of childhood that persists into adulthood in the majority of cases. The evidence on persistence poses several difficulties for adult psychiatry considering the lack of expertise for diagnostic assessment, limited treatment options and patient facilities across Europe. Methods The European Network Adult ADHD, founded in 2003, aims to increase awareness of this disorder and improve knowledge and patient care for adults with ADHD across Europe. This Consensus Statement is one of the actions taken by the European Network Adult ADHD in order to support the clinician with research evidence and clinical experience from 18 European countries in which ADHD in adults is recognised and treated. Results Besides information on the genetics and neurobiology of ADHD, three major questions are addressed in this statement: (1) What is the clinical picture of ADHD in adults? (2) How can ADHD in adults be properly diagnosed? (3) How should ADHD in adults be effectively treated? Conclusions ADHD often presents as an impairing lifelong condition in adults, yet it is currently underdiagnosed and treated in many European countries, leading to ineffective treatment and higher costs of illness. Expertise in diagnostic assessment and treatment of ADHD in adults must increase in psychiatry. Instruments for screening and diagnosis of ADHD in adults are available and appropriate treatments exist, although more research is needed in this age group. PMID:20815868

  14. Treatment Options for Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Li-Fraumeni syndrome . Werner syndrome (adult progeria). Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (Gorlin syndrome). Other risk factors ... ray : An x-ray of the organs and bones inside the chest. An x-ray is a ...

  15. Treatment Option Overview (Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Li-Fraumeni syndrome . Werner syndrome (adult progeria). Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (Gorlin syndrome). Other risk factors ... ray : An x-ray of the organs and bones inside the chest. An x-ray is a ...

  16. A quality framework for addiction treatment programs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nabitz, Udo; van den Brink, Wim; Walburg, Jan

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To identify and specify the structure and the elements of a quality framework for addiction treatment programs. METHOD: Concept mapping strategy was applied. In brainstorm sessions, 70 statements were generated and rated by 90 representatives of three stakeholder groups. Using multivariate

  17. The hypertriglyceridemic waist phenotype versus the National Cholesterol Education Program-Adult Treatment Panel III and International Diabetes Federation clinical criteria to identify high-risk men with an altered cardiometabolic risk profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackburn, Patricia; Lemieux, Isabelle; Alméras, Natalie; Bergeron, Jean; Côté, Mélanie; Tremblay, Angelo; Lamarche, Benoît; Després, Jean-Pierre

    2009-08-01

    The hypertriglyceridemic waist phenotype, the National Cholesterol Education Program-Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP-ATP III) criteria, and the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) criteria have been proposed as screening tools to identify subjects with features of the metabolic syndrome and therefore at increased cardiometabolic risk. The aim of the present study was to compare the ability of these 3 clinical approaches to identify individuals at increased cardiometabolic risk as suggested by the presence of deteriorated markers such as hyperinsulinemia, elevated apolipoprotein B levels, small low-density lipoprotein particles, high C-reactive protein concentrations, and low adiponectin levels. For that purpose, physical and cardiometabolic characteristics of a sample of 272 white men recruited for various metabolic investigations were studied. The hypertriglyceridemic waist phenotype was defined as having both a high waist circumference (>or=90 cm) and increased fasting triglyceride levels (>or=2.0 mmol/L). Having at least 3 of the 5 NCEP-ATP III criteria or waist circumference of at least 94 cm plus any 2 of the 4 additional IDF criteria was also used to identify individuals at increased cardiometabolic risk. A large proportion of men with the hypertriglyceridemic waist phenotype also met the NCEP-ATP III (82.7%) or IDF (89.2%) criteria. Men with the hypertriglyceridemic waist phenotype were characterized by alterations in their lipoprotein-lipid profile that included small low-density lipoprotein particles, increased apolipoprotein B and insulin levels, as well as reduced adiponectin concentrations, which were similar to individuals meeting the NCEP-ATP III or the IDF criteria. Moreover, the Framingham risk score of men meeting any of the 3 screening tools criteria was higher and was similar across the 3 approaches (4.2, 3.8, and 3.7, respectively). These results suggest that hypertriglyceridemic waist may be as discriminant as the NCEP-ATP III or the IDF

  18. Late Onset of Prescription Drug Abuse or Dependence Among Older Adults: Implications for Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathy Lay

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Prescription drug abuse and dependence is an increasing concern for older adults. This article describes issues specific to older adults with late onset abuse or dependence on prescription sedatives and/or opiates.The older adult with late onset should not be viewed as having the same issues as individuals who have a life pat- tern of drug and alcohol abuse/dependence.A chart review of older adults in a treatment program contrasts late onset prescription dependence clients (n=12 and early onset addiction clients (n=104 and outlines differences and similarities between the two samples. Social workers need to understand the specific and changing needs of older adults as they relate to assessment and treatment of drug abuse and dependence.

  19. Older adults' engagement with a video game training program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belchior, Patrícia; Marsiske, Michael; Sisco, Shannon; Yam, Anna; Mann, William

    2012-12-19

    The current study investigated older adults' level of engagement with a video game training program. Engagement was measured using the concept of Flow (Csikszentmihalyi, 1975). Forty-five older adults were randomized to receive practice with an action game (Medal of Honor), a puzzle-like game (Tetris), or a gold-standard Useful Field of View (UFOV) training program. Both Medal of Honor and Tetris participants reported significantly higher Flow ratings at the conclusion, relative to the onset of training. Participants are more engaged in games that can be adjusted to their skill levels and that provide incremental levels of difficulty. This finding was consistent with the Flow theory (Csikszentmihalyi, 1975).

  20. Influence of different heat treatment programs on properties of sol ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    DTA) experiments, five heat treatment programs were developed. All programs lead to single phase perovskite KNN films with random crystal orientation, but only the programs that included a treatment after each single spin-coating step ...

  1. Research Forum on Psychological Treatment of Adults with ADHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Margaret; Safren, Steven A.; Solanto, Mary V.; Hechtman, Lily; Rostain, Anthony L.; Ramsay, J. Russell; Murray, Candice

    2008-01-01

    Background: A literature search found five empirical studies of psychological treatment for adults with ADHD, out of 1,419 articles on ADHD in adults. Practice guidelines to date all recommend multimodal intervention, given that a significant number of patients cannot tolerate, do not respond to, or fail to reach optimal outcomes with medication…

  2. Functional Outcomes in the Treatment of Adults with ADHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Lenard A.; Spencer, Thomas J.; Levine, Louise R.; Ramsey, Janet L.; Tamura, Roy; Kelsey, Douglas; Ball, Susan G.; Allen, Albert J.; Biederman, Joseph

    2008-01-01

    Objective: ADHD is associated with significant functional impairment in adults. The present study examined functional outcomes following 6-month double-blind treatment with either atomoxetine or placebo. Method: Patients were 410 adults (58.5% male) with "DSM-IV"--defined ADHD. They were randomly assigned to receive either atomoxetine 40 mg/day to…

  3. Dental caries experience and treatment needs of an adult female ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Experience and awareness of adult females concerning dental caries is important in its prevention particularly in children because of their natural role as care givers. Objectives: To determine the prevalence of dental caries and treatment needs in an adult female Nigerian population. Methods: In this ...

  4. Dental caries experience and treatment needs of an adult female ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-09-03

    Sep 3, 2017 ... Objectives: To determine the prevalence of dental caries and treatment needs in an adult female Nigerian population. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, adult females attending outreach programmes were examined for dental caries using the. Decayed Missing and Filled Teeth caries index (DMFT).

  5. Perspectives: some thoughts on the Adult Treatment Panel III report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Conrad B

    2002-01-01

    The guidelines of the Adult Treatment Panel III (ATP III) of the National Cholesterol Education Program are similar to prior recommendations in focusing on elevations of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol as the primary target of therapy and in gauging the intensity of therapy to the degree of coronary heart disease risk. New elements in the current guidelines include: quantification of risk, heightened attention to the risk imparted by low high-density lipoprotein levels, utilization of non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels in risk assessment for hypertriglyceridemic individuals, and emphasis on the metabolic syndrome. Nonetheless, the current guidelines are not perfect. The recommended algorithm for treatment is excessively complex; this complexity may keep the guidelines from being widely used. This complexity is generated by a hybrid scheme of risk assessment utilizing both counting of categorical coronary heart disease risk factors and calculation of coronary heart disease using the Framingham model. This hybrid method also results in undesirable inconsistencies in treatment. ATP III explicitly agrees that the therapeutic LDL goal should be determined by the burden of non-LDL risk factors. However, the current guidelines violate this principle by giving the baseline LDL cholesterol level a role in determining the therapeutic LDL goal. Additionally, the ATP III guidelines lead to under-treatment of women. Simplification should be a goal of the next iteration of the guidelines. Specific suggestions are given for simplification of the guidelines and for enhanced treatment of women. Furthermore, it is urged that the risk-assessing spreadsheet be provided in an "unlocked" form so that its details can be inspected. (c)2002 CHF, Inc.

  6. Inpatient Treatment of Early Sexually Abused Adults: Dissociation and Outcome

    OpenAIRE

    Jepsen, Ellen K. K.

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted within a naturalistic setting at the Department for Trauma Treatment at Modum Bad Psychiatric Center, Norway. Several follow-up studies have shown that adults with polysymptomatology related to child sexual abuse (CSA) may develop chronic symptoms and disorders that seriously impair their daily life. There are few studies on the course of illness in early traumatized adults following residential (first phase) trauma treatment. The present work provides knowledge of th...

  7. Tackling sleeplessness: psychological treatment options for insomnia in older adults

    OpenAIRE

    Dzierzewski, Joseph M.; O'Brien, Erin M.; Kay, Daniel; McCrae, Christina S.

    2010-01-01

    This paper provides a broad review of the extant literature involving the treatment of sleeplessness in older adults with insomnia. First, background information (including information regarding key issues in late-life insomnia and epidemiology of late-life insomnia) pertinent to achieving a general understanding of insomnia in the elderly is presented. Next, theories of insomnia in older adults are examined and discussed in relation to treatment of insomnia in late-life. With a general knowl...

  8. Treatment of adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Hechtman, Lily

    2008-01-01

    Dusan Kolar, Amanda Keller, Maria Golfinopoulos, Lucy Cumyn, Cassidy Syer, Lily HechtmanDepartment of Psychiatry, Montreal Children’s Hospital, McGill University, Montreal, CanadaAbstract: This review focuses on the treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in adults. It briefly addresses prevalence, diagnostic and differential diagnostic issues specific to adults. Stimulant medication, non-stimulant medication, and psychosocial treatments are thoroughly reviewed....

  9. Characteristics of older adult physical activity program users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Dori E; Grothaus, Lou; Arterburn, David

    2014-07-01

    Physical activity levels are low among older adults. Many Medicare members have access to low-cost programs including Silver Sneakers (SS) and EnhanceFitness (EF) at no additional cost, however, utilization of these programs is low. We aimed to compare characteristics of people using SS and EF to nonusers of these programs to better understand the characteristics of these 2 populations and to guide future physical activity promotion program design. Cross-sectional. We used 2010 and 2011 electronic health records including demographic, health condition, Charlson comorbidity score, healthcare cost and utilization, and SS and EF program utilization data from 37,492 Medicare members from a large integrated health care system. Models were fit using logistic and negative binomial regression adjusting for age, gender, race, ethnicity, BMI category, and primary care clinic location. Compared with nonusers (N = 30,733; 82%), SS users (N = 6200; 16.5%) were younger and less likely to be male, obese, or have diabetes or cardiovascular disease; they also had lower Charlson scores and fewer hospital admissions than nonusers. EF users (N = 721; 2%) were older, were less likely to be male, had lower Charlson scores, and had fewer hospital admissions compared to nonusers. Low-cost, evidence-based physical activity programs are vastly underused by Medicare members. Our data suggest that targeting more chronically ill and obese older adults for physical activity programs might help improve the reach of existing evidence-based programs.

  10. Strategies in an Arts Program for Adults with Atypical Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukac, Christina

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to observe and implement strategies and adaptations in an arts program for adults with atypical communication due to developmental and intellectual disabilities. This study was conducted in the field using an action research approach with triangulated methods of data collection including semi-structured interviews,…

  11. Project SAVE (State Adult Volunteers in Education). Organizing a Community Based Literacy Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sizemore, Mamie, Ed.

    This handbook provides administrators and staffs of adult education programs with general information on volunteerism in adult education; information on specific programs and strategies, specifically Project SAVE (State Adult Volunteers in Education); and guidelines for program implementation. An overview of the impact of adult illiteracy precedes…

  12. 34 CFR 460.2 - What programs are authorized by the Adult Education Act?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What programs are authorized by the Adult Education Act...) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ADULT EDUCATION-GENERAL PROVISIONS § 460.2 What programs are authorized by the Adult Education Act? The following programs are authorized...

  13. Adherence to a Videogame-Based Physical Activity Program for Older Adults with Schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, Erin M.; Dowling, Glenna A.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objectives: Adults with schizophrenia are a growing segment of the older adult population. Evidence suggests that they engage in limited physical activity. Interventions are needed that are tailored around their unique limitations. An active videogame-based physical activity program that can be offered at a treatment facility can overcome these barriers and increase motivation to engage in physical activity. The purpose of this report is to describe the adherence to a videogame-based physical activity program using the Kinect® for Xbox® 360 game system (Microsoft®, Redmond, WA) in older adults with schizophrenia. Materials and Methods: This was a descriptive longitudinal study among 34 older adults with schizophrenia to establish the adherence to an active videogame-based physical activity program. In our ongoing program, once a week for 6 weeks, participants played an active videogame, using the Kinect for Xbox 360 game system, for 30 minutes. Adherence was measured with a count of sessions attended and with the total minutes attended out of the possible total minutes of attendance (180 minutes). Results: Thirty-four adults with schizophrenia enrolled in the study. The mean number of groups attended was five out of six total (standard deviation=2), and the mean total minutes attended were 139 out of 180 possible (standard deviation=55). Fifty percent had perfect attendance. Conclusions: Older adults with schizophrenia need effective physical activity programs. Adherence to our program suggests that videogames that use the Kinect for Xbox 360 game system are an innovative way to make physical activity accessible to this population. PMID:26192371

  14. Adult-Rated Oceanography Part 1: A Project Integrating Ocean Sciences into Adult Basic Education Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowles, S.; Collier, R.; Torres, M. K.

    2004-12-01

    Busy scientists seek opportunities to implement education and outreach efforts, but often don't know where to start. One easy and tested method is to form collaborations with federally-funded adult education and adult literacy programs. These programs exist in every U.S. state and territory and serve underrepresented populations through such major initiatives as adult basic education, adult secondary education (and GED preparation), and English language acquisition. These students are workers, consumers, voters, parents, grandparents, and members of every community. They have specific needs that are often overlooked in outreach activities. This presentation will describe the steps by which the Oregon Ocean Science and Math Collaborative program was developed. It is based on a partnership between the Oregon Department of Community Colleges and Workforce Development, Oregon State University College of Oceanic and Atmospheric Sciences, Oregon Sea Grant, and the OSU Hatfield Marine Science Center. It includes professional development through instructor institutes; teachers at sea and informal education opportunities; curriculum and web site development. Through the partnership described here, instructors in adult basic education programs participate in a yearlong experience in which they develop, test, and adapt innovative instructional strategies to meet the specific needs of adult learners. This, in turn, leads to new prospects for study in the areas of ocean science and math and introduces non-academic careers in marine science to a new community. Working directly with instructors, we have identified expertise level, instructional environment, instructor background and current teaching strategies used to address science literacy and numeracy goals of the adult learners in the State of Oregon. Preliminary evaluation of our ongoing project in meeting these goals will be discussed. These efforts contribute to national goals of science literacy for all, by providing

  15. Treatment of depression in older adults beyond fluoxetine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Arantes Wagner

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This review aimed to discuss the importance of the comprehensive treatment of depression among older adults in Brazil. The abuse of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, including fluoxetine hydrochloride, as antidepressants has been considered a serious public health problem, particularly among older adults. Despite the consensus on the need for a comprehensive treatment of depression in this population, Brazil is still unprepared. The interface between pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy is limited due to the lack of healthcare services, specialized professionals, and effective healthcare planning. Fluoxetine has been used among older adults as an all-purpose drug for the treatment of depressive disorders because of psychosocial adversities, lack of social support, and limited access to adequate healthcare services for the treatment of this disorder. Preparing health professionals is a sine qua non for the reversal of the age pyramid, but this is not happening yet.

  16. Treatment of depression in older adults beyond fluoxetine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Gabriela Arantes

    2015-01-01

    This review aimed to discuss the importance of the comprehensive treatment of depression among older adults in Brazil. The abuse of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, including fluoxetine hydrochloride, as antidepressants has been considered a serious public health problem, particularly among older adults. Despite the consensus on the need for a comprehensive treatment of depression in this population, Brazil is still unprepared. The interface between pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy is limited due to the lack of healthcare services, specialized professionals, and effective healthcare planning. Fluoxetine has been used among older adults as an all-purpose drug for the treatment of depressive disorders because of psychosocial adversities, lack of social support, and limited access to adequate healthcare services for the treatment of this disorder. Preparing health professionals is a sine qua non for the reversal of the age pyramid, but this is not happening yet. PMID:25830872

  17. Treatment of Adult Primary Alveolar Proteinosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez Portal, José Antonio

    2015-07-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is a rare disease characterized by the accumulation of surfactant-like lipoproteinaceous material in the distal air spaces and terminal bronchi, which may lead to impaired gas exchange. This accumulation of surfactant is due to decreased clearance by the alveolar macrophages. Its primary, most common form, is currently considered an autoimmune disease. Better knowledge of the causes of PAP have led to the emergence of alternatives to whole lung lavage, although this is still considered the treatment of choice. Most studies are case series, often with limited patient numbers, so the level of evidence is low. Since the severity of presentation and clinical course are variable, not all patients will require treatment. Due to the low level of evidence, some objective criteria based on expert opinion have been arbitrarily proposed in an attempt to define in which patients it is best to initiate treatment. Copyright © 2014 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  18. Intensive treatment of dysarthria in two adults with Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahler, Leslie A; Jones, Harrison N

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the impact of an established behavioural dysarthria treatment on acoustic and perceptual measures of speech in two adults with Down syndrome (DS) and dysarthria to obtain preliminary measures of treatment effect, effect size and treatment feasibility. A single-subject A-B-A experimental design was used to measure the effects of the Lee Silverman Voice treatment (LSVT®) on speech in two adults with DS and dysarthria. Dependent measures included vocal sound pressure level (dB SPL), phonatory stability and listener intelligibility scores. Statistically significant improvements (p dysarthria can respond positively to intensive speech treatment such as LSVT. Further investigations are needed to develop speech treatments specific to DS.

  19. Treatment Options for Adults with Snoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of a more serious health condition known as obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), characterized by a repetitive stopping or slowing ... There are also other available treatments such as oral appliances, nasal devices, ... Home Copyright © 2018 American Academy of Otolaryngology–Head ...

  20. Adult orthodontics: multi- or interdisciplinary treatment approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melsen, Birte

    2007-01-01

    experiments carried out on monkeys and dogs have repeatedly demonstrated that it is possible to regain lost attachment even in the case of horizontal bone loss through a carefully conducted combined periodontal- and orthodontic treatment and long-term follow-up have confirmed that the results can...

  1. Behavioral treatments for children and adults who stutter: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blomgren M

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Michael Blomgren Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, USA Abstract: This paper provides a brief overview of stuttering followed by a synopsis of current approaches to treat stuttering in children and adults. Treatment is discussed in terms of multifactorial, operant, speech restructuring, and anxiolytic approaches. Multifactorial and operant treatments are designed for young children who stutter. Both of these approaches involve parent training and differ primarily in their focus on reducing demands on the child (multifactorial or in their use of response contingent stimulation (operant conditioning. Speech restructuring and anxiolytic approaches are used with adults who stutter. Speech restructuring approaches focus on the mechanics of speech production, and anxiolytic treatments tend to focus on the symptoms and social and vocational challenges of stuttering. The evidence base for these different approaches is outlined. Response contingent therapy (for children and speech restructuring therapy (for adults have the most robust empirical evidence base. Multifactorial treatments for children and stuttering management approaches for adults are popular but are based on theoretical models of stuttering; the evidence base is not robust and tends to be inferred from work in areas such as cognitive behavior therapy and desensitization. Comprehensive, or holistic, approaches to treating stuttering are also discussed. Comprehensive approaches for treating stuttering in adults address both improved speech fluency and stuttering management. Keywords: stuttering, treatment, stuttering management, speech restructuring, cognitive restructuring

  2. Immune function during GH treatment in GH-deficient adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sneppen, S B; Mersebach, H; Ullum, H

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of the present study was to investigate natural killer (NK) cell function and lymphocyte subsets in GH-deficient (GHD) adults, before and during long-term GH treatment. STUDY DESIGN: We investigated immune function in 19 adults with severe GHD, before and during 18 months...... of randomized treatment with GH or placebo. Measurement of lymphocyte subsets and NK cell activity was performed. Data obtained from 110 healthy adults served as reference values. RESULTS: NK cell activity, both unstimulated and stimulated by interferon-a or interleukin-2, was significantly impaired in GHD...... may serve as an autocrine/paracrine factor in immunomodulation and explain the clinical normal immune function in adult GH-deficient patients....

  3. Methadone Maintenance Treatment for Older Adults: Cost and Logistical Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton, Brandi P; Bryson, William Culbertson; Bruce, Martha L

    2017-11-01

    In a demographic shift, older adults now comprise an increasing proportion of those receiving methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) for opioid use disorder. A study of MMT recipients in New York City suggests that 13% of the population is over 60 years of age. Adults ages 50-59 are among the largest age demographic, evidence that the number of older adults receiving MMT will continue to increase. Because medical comorbidities, cognitive impairment, and neurobehavioral changes often accumulate with age, older adults on MMT become increasingly vulnerable. The cost of MMT and logistical considerations also pose challenges to continued care. Together, these issues warrant a reconsideration of emerging concerns and health policies related to use of MMT in this growing and understudied population. Given the changing health care system and the opioid epidemic, the need for evidence-based guidelines and supportive policies that consider the unique treatment needs of older populations is especially relevant.

  4. 34 CFR 460.4 - What definitions apply to the adult education programs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... the Act: Academic education Adult Adult education Community-based organization Community school program Correctional institution Criminal offender Educationally disadvantaged adult English literacy..., or special institution. Literacy means an individual's ability to read, write, and speak in English...

  5. An investigation of scale effects in family substance abuse treatment programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee A James

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This short report investigates scale effects in family substance abuse treatment programs. In Massachusetts, the family substance abuse treatment programs were much more costly than other adult residential treatment models. State officials were concerned that the "scale" or size of these programs (averaging just eight families was too small to be economical. Although the sample size (just nine programs was too small to permit reliable inference, the data clearly signalled the importance of "scale effects" in these family substance abuse treatment programs. To further investigate scale effects in family substance abuse treatment programs, data from the Center for Substance Abuse Treatment's (CSAT's Residential Women and Children and Pregnant and Postpartum Women (RWC-PPW Demonstration were re-analyzed, focusing on the relationship between cost per family-day and the estimated average family census. This analysis indicates strong economies of scale up until an average family census of about 14, and less apparent scale effects beyond that point. In consideration of these and other study findings, a multidisciplinary interagency team redesigned the Massachusetts' family treatment program model. The new programs are larger than the former family treatment programs, with each new program having capacity to treat 11 to 15 families depending on family makeup.

  6. Pediatric Patient Blood Management Programs: Not Just Transfusing Little Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, Ruchika; Cushing, Melissa M; Tobian, Aaron A R

    2016-10-01

    Red blood cell transfusions are a common life-saving intervention for neonates and children with anemia, but transfusion decisions, indications, and doses in neonates and children are different from those of adults. Patient blood management (PBM) programs are designed to assist clinicians with appropriately transfusing patients. Although PBM programs are well recognized and appreciated in the adult setting, they are quite far from standard of care in the pediatric patient population. Adult PBM standards cannot be uniformly applied to children, and there currently is significant variation in transfusion practices. Because transfusing unnecessarily can expose children to increased risk without benefit, it is important to design PBM programs to standardize transfusion decisions. This article assesses the key elements necessary for a successful pediatric PBM program, systematically explores various possible pediatric specific blood conservation strategies and the current available literature supporting them, and outlines the gaps in the evidence suggesting need for further/improved research. Pediatric PBM programs are critically important initiatives that not only involve a cooperative effort between pediatric surgery, anesthesia, perfusion, critical care, and transfusion medicine services but also need operational support from administration, clinical leadership, finance, and the hospital information technology personnel. These programs also expand the scope for high-quality collaborative research. A key component of pediatric PBM programs is monitoring pediatric blood utilization and assessing adherence to transfusion guidelines. Data suggest that restrictive transfusion strategies should be used for neonates and children similar to adults, but further research is needed to assess the best oxygenation requirements, hemoglobin threshold, and transfusion strategy for patients with active bleeding, hemodynamic instability, unstable cardiac disease, and cyanotic cardiac

  7. Effectiveness of an exercise program on postural control in frail older adults

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Alfieri, Fábio Marcon; Riberto, Marcelo; Abril-Carreres, Angels; Boldó-Alcaine, Maria; Rusca-Castellet, Elisabet; Garreta-Figuera, Roser; Battistella, Linamara Rizzo

    2012-01-01

    Exercise programs have proved to be helpful for frail older adults. This study aimed to investigate the effects of an exercise program with a focus on postural control exercises in frail older adults...

  8. Correlates and Treatments of Nightmares in Adults

    OpenAIRE

    Hasler, Brant; Germain, Anne

    2009-01-01

    Nightmares, distressing dreams that primarily arise from REM sleep, are prevalent among the general population and even more so among clinical populations. The frequency of nightmares and related nightmare distress are linked to both sleep disturbance and waking psychopathology. Based on the extant evidence, nightmares appear to be particularly relevant to posttraumatic stress disorder, and may even be implicated in its pathophysiology. Significant advances in treatment have occurred in recen...

  9. The Impact of Adult Degree Programs on the Private College or University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles, Pamela A.

    2012-01-01

    Those who work within adult higher education know there is something unique about their perspective on academic life. Employed in the adult education arena in one capacity or another since 1993, the author has had the privilege of working at an institution with a small adult program and an institution with a very large adult program. In this…

  10. 34 CFR 491.1 - What is the Adult Education for the Homeless Program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What is the Adult Education for the Homeless Program? 491.1 Section 491.1 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ADULT EDUCATION FOR THE HOMELESS PROGRAM General § 491.1 What is the Adult Education...

  11. 34 CFR 460.3 - What regulations apply to the adult education programs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What regulations apply to the adult education programs...) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ADULT EDUCATION-GENERAL PROVISIONS § 460.3 What regulations apply to the adult education programs? The following regulations apply to the...

  12. Pharmacological treatment of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slatkoff, Joshua; Greenfield, Brian

    2006-06-01

    With increased awareness that attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) can persist beyond childhood, pharmacological treatment options for adults have expanded. Short-acting stimulants continue to be the first-line approach, demonstrating clinical efficacy and few adverse events in well-controlled trials, with long-acting stimulants also showing promise. Atomoxetine has also been reported to improve ADHD symptoms and associated dysfunction, although longer-term, head-to-head studies with stimulants are needed. Several antidepressants (e.g., desipramine and buproprion) appear to be effective in the treatment of adult ADHD, but to a lesser extent than stimulants. Data are limited in evaluating the impact of combining pharmacological treatments for ADHD and comorbid conditions. This paper describes the safety and efficacy of medications for treating the core symptoms, psychosocial features and cognitive dysfunctions associated with adult ADHD.

  13. Prenatal centrifugation: A model for fetal programming of adult weight?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baer, Lisa A.; Rushing, Linda; Wade, Charles E.; Ronca, April E.

    2005-08-01

    'Fetal programming' is a newly emerging field that is revealing astounding insights into the prenatal origins of adult disease, including metabolic, endocrine, and cardiovascular pathophysiology. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that rat pups conceived, gestated and born at 2-g have significantly reduced birth weights and increased adult body weights as compared to 1-g controls. Offspring were produced by mating young adult male and female rats that were adapted to 2-g centrifugation. Female rats underwent conception, pregnancy and birth at 2-g. Newborn pups in the 2-g condition were removed from the centrifuge and fostered to non-manipulated, newly parturient dams maintained at 1-g. Comparisons were made with 1-g stationary controls, also cross- fostered at birth. As compared to 1-g controls, birth weights of pups gestated and born at 2-g were significantly reduced. Pup body weights were significantly reduced until Postnatal day (P)12. Beginning on P63, body weights of 2-g-gestated offspring exceeded those of 1-g controls by 7-10%. Thus, prenatal rearing at 2-g restricts neonatal growth and increases adult body weight. Collectively, these data support the hypothesis that 2-g centrifugation alters the intrauterine milieu, thereby inducing persistent changes in adult phenotype.

  14. Staff perspectives: What is the function of adult mental health day hospital programs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taube-Schiff, Marlene; Ruhig, Megan; Mehak, Adrienne; Deathe van Dyk, Melanie; Cassin, Stephanie E; Ungar, Thomas; Koczerginski, David; Sockalingam, Sanjeev

    2017-10-01

    WHAT IS KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT?: Psychiatric day hospital (DH) treatment has been offered since the 1930s and is appropriate for individuals experiencing intense psychiatric symptoms without requiring 24-hour inpatient care. No empirical research has examined the specific purpose of DH treatment from the perspectives of healthcare providers within these programs. WHAT THIS PAPER ADDS TO EXISTING KNOWLEDGE?: This study was the first to address the question of the purpose and function of DH treatment from the outlook of frontline workers within this setting, and confirmed anecdotal observations that DH treatment provides an alternative to intensive psychiatric care, and also operates as "bridge" between these intensive services and purely outpatient treatment. Additional information emerged, such as the importance of the name of DH programs avoiding connotations of illness, the benefits and skills that draw patients to these programs, and challenges that staff and patients experience within DH programs (e.g. short length of treatment, barriers to treatment access). WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE?: This information can enhance curriculum development within these settings. For example, given the importance of skill building, it is essential to integrate the provision of skill building and coping strategies within these settings. In addition, given that the name of the setting can impact staff (and perhaps service users as well), ensuring that the name of such program highlight wellness and recovery may enable a different type of therapeutic community to develop within these settings. Introduction Despite the benefits of psychiatric day hospitals (DH), research has not addressed staff perspectives of these programs' effectiveness and barriers. Aim To elucidate staff perceptions of Adult Mental Health DH programs at two hospitals in Canada, allowing for improved programming, enhanced structure and increased understanding of DH settings within the continuum of care

  15. Treatment of paraphilia in young adults with leuprolide acetate: a preliminary case report series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Fabian M; Niel, Tracey; Fishman, Marc J

    2004-11-01

    Some juveniles who engage in sexual offenses may have a paraphilia, a psychiatric disorder characterized by a pervasive pattern of deviant and impairing sexual fantasies, thoughts, and/or behaviors. Though there is no known cure for these conditions, paraphilias can be effectively managed using a multimodal treatment approach. This may include the use of psychotherapeutic and pharmacological treatment interventions, including antiandrogen medications. One such agent, leuprolide acetate (leuprolide), a luteinizing hormone-releasing-hormone agonist, has been shown to be effective in reducing paraphilic symptoms in adult patients. To date, however, there is no published data on its use and effectiveness in adolescent and young adult paraphilic patients. This study consists of a case report series of six young adult patients treated with leuprolide. All subjects had been diagnosed with at least one paraphilia (i.e., Pedophilia, Sexual Sadism, Frotteurism, and Paraphilia Not Otherwise Specified). All subjects had been refractory to treatment in a residential program for adolescent sex offenders prior to initiation of leuprolide. All six subjects reported a reduction in sexually deviant symptoms following treatment with leuprolide. Clinicians rated four as much improved and two as moderately improved. The treatment was well tolerated in all six subjects. This preliminary case series supports the conclusion that leuprolide deserves further examination as a potentially safe and effective component in the treatment of young adult patients with paraphilia.

  16. Frontline treatment of AML in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Toshihiro; Kikushige, Yoshikane; Yoshimoto, And Goichi

    2017-01-01

    Despite recent progress in diagnosis and leukemogenesis based on genomic landscapes in acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), advances in AML treatment lag behind. Over the past four decades, combination chemotherapy with anthracycline and cytarabine remains the standard induction therapy. Subsequent post-remission consolidation therapy stratifies patients into favorable-risk, intermediate-risk, and unfavorable-risk groups to assign post-remission therapies based on cytogenetic abnormalities and molecular mutations. Allogeneic stem-cell transplant decreases the risk of AML recurrence compared to standard chemotherapy, but it also raises the risk of serious complications. Recent large collections of matched genomic and clinical data may assist in selecting the best individualized therapy for each AML patient. Emerging evidence indicates that molecularly targeted therapies such as FLT3 and IDH inhibitors may be effective in distinct AML subtypes, providing further rationale for a personalized medicine approach. An umbrella trial, such as "BEAT AML Master Trial," designed to offer novel targeted therapy to AML patients based on their genetic characteristics, will be launching worldwide in the near future.

  17. European consensus statement on diagnosis and treatment of adult ADHD: The European Network Adult ADHD

    OpenAIRE

    Kooij Sandra JJ; Bejerot Susanne; Blackwell Andrew; Caci Herve; Casas-Brugué Miquel; Carpentier Pieter J; Edvinsson Dan; Fayyad John; Foeken Karin; Fitzgerald Michael; Gaillac Veronique; Ginsberg Ylva; Henry Chantal; Krause Johanna; Lensing Michael B

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is among the most common psychiatric disorders of childhood that persists into adulthood in the majority of cases. The evidence on persistence poses several difficulties for adult psychiatry considering the lack of expertise for diagnostic assessment, limited treatment options and patient facilities across Europe. Methods The European Network Adult ADHD, founded in 2003, aims to increase awareness of this disorder and improve...

  18. Expansion/Facemask Treatment of an Adult Class III Malocclusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory W. Jackson

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The orthodontic treatment of class III malocclusion with a maxillary deficiency is often treated with maxillary protraction with or without expansion. Skeletal and dental changes have been documented which have combined for the protraction of the maxilla and the correction of the class III malocclusion. Concerning the ideal time to treat a developing class III malocclusion, studies have reported that, although early treatment may be the most effective, face mask therapy can provide a viable option for older children as well. But what about young adults? Can the skeletal and dental changes seen in expansion/facemask therapy in children and adolescents be demonstrated in this age group as well, possibly eliminating the need for orthodontic dental camouflage treatment or orthognathic surgery? A case report is presented of an adult class III malocclusion with a Class III skeletal pattern and maxillary retrusion. Treatment was with nonextraction, comprehensive edgewise mechanics with slow maxillary expansion with a bonded expander and protraction facemask.

  19. Expansion/Facemask Treatment of an Adult Class III Malocclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Gregory W; Kravitz, Neal D

    2014-01-01

    The orthodontic treatment of class III malocclusion with a maxillary deficiency is often treated with maxillary protraction with or without expansion. Skeletal and dental changes have been documented which have combined for the protraction of the maxilla and the correction of the class III malocclusion. Concerning the ideal time to treat a developing class III malocclusion, studies have reported that, although early treatment may be the most effective, face mask therapy can provide a viable option for older children as well. But what about young adults? Can the skeletal and dental changes seen in expansion/facemask therapy in children and adolescents be demonstrated in this age group as well, possibly eliminating the need for orthodontic dental camouflage treatment or orthognathic surgery? A case report is presented of an adult class III malocclusion with a Class III skeletal pattern and maxillary retrusion. Treatment was with nonextraction, comprehensive edgewise mechanics with slow maxillary expansion with a bonded expander and protraction facemask.

  20. Atomoxetine: a novel treatment for child and adult ADHD

    OpenAIRE

    Ledbetter, Marcialee

    2006-01-01

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a common chronic condition with childhood onset that can continue into adulthood. Medication is a fundamental element in the management of this disorder. Atomoxetine is the newest nonstimulant medication approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of ADHD. It is the only nonstimulant medication approved by the FDA for treatment of adult ADHD. Atomoxetine is a norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor that select...

  1. A Bilingual Community School Program in Nutrition Education for Hispanic Youth and Adults. An Exemplary Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crabtree, Myrna P.; Mireles, Mary Ann

    This curriculum guide contains materials for use in conducting a bilingual community school program in nutrition education for Hispanic youth and adults. Topics covered in the lessons include food choice, nutrients, nutrition, food groups, meal planning, and shopping. Provided first are separate matrices for six lessons geared to young adolescents…

  2. Epigenetic mechanisms in developmental programming of adult disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Man; Zhang, Lubo

    2011-01-01

    Adverse insults during intrauterine life can result in permanent changes in the physiology and metabolism of the offspring, which in turn leads to an increased risk of disease in adulthood. This is an adaptational response by the fetus to changes in the environmental signals that it receives during early life to ensure its survival and prepare itself for postnatal life. Increasing evidence suggests that the epigenetic regulation of gene expression patterns has a crucial role in the developmental programming of adult disease. This review summarizes recent studies of epigenetic mechanisms and focuses particularly on studies that explore identifiable epigenetic biomarkers in the promoters of specific disease-associated genes. Such biomarkers would enable early recognition of children who might be at risk of developing adult disease with fetal origins. PMID:21945859

  3. Legal and Definitional Issues Affecting the Identification and Education of Adults with Specific Learning Disabilities in Adult Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taymans, Juliana M.

    2012-01-01

    Although the exact prevalence is not determined, a noticeable subset of individuals who enroll in adult education and training programs have either diagnosed or undiagnosed specific learning disabilities (SLD). Understanding SLD is important basic information for adult educators to inform program policies as well as determine effective…

  4. Epilepsy treatment in adults and adolescents: Expert opinion, 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Jerry J; Whitlock, Julia B; Chimato, Nicole; Vargas, Emily; Karceski, Steven C; Frank, Ryan D

    2017-04-01

    There are over twenty anti-seizure medications and anti-seizure devices available commercially in the United States. The multitude of treatment options for seizures can present a challenge to clinicians, especially those who are not subspecialists in the epilepsy field. Many clinical questions are not adequately answered in double-blind randomized controlled studies. In the presence of a knowledge gap, many clinicians consult a respected colleague with acknowledged expertise in the field. Our survey was designed to provide expert opinions on the treatment of epilepsy in adults and adolescents. We surveyed a group of 42 physicians across the United States who are considered experts based on publication record in the field of epilepsy, or a leadership role in a National Association of Epilepsy Centers comprehensive epilepsy program. The survey consisted of 43 multiple-part patient scenario questions and was administered online using Redcap software. The experts provided their opinion on 1126 treatment options based on a modified Rand 9-point scale. The patient scenarios focused on genetically-mediated generalized epilepsy and focal epilepsy. The scenarios first focused on overall treatment strategy and then on specific pharmacotherapies. Other questions focused on treatment of specific patient populations (pregnancy, the elderly, patients with brain tumors, and post organ transplant patients), epilepsy patients with comorbidities (renal and hepatic disease, depression), and how to combine medications after failure of monotherapy. Statistical analysis of data used the expert consensus method. Valproate was considered a drug of choice in all genetically-mediated generalized epilepsies, except in the population of women of child-bearing age. Ethosuximide was a drug of choice in patient with absence seizures, and levetiracetam was a drug of choice in patients with genetic generalized tonic-clonic seizures and myoclonic seizures. Lamotrigine, levetiracetam and

  5. Factors related to orthodontic treatment time in adult patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Camila Esteves de Oliveira Melo

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The length of time that it takes an orthodontist to treat adult patients varies widely. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate how different variables influence treatment time. METHODS: Seventy clinical case reports of successfully treated adult patients were examined. The patients were selected from 4,723 records held by three experienced orthodontists. The influence exerted by the following variables on treatment time was assessed: age, sex, facial pattern, severity of malocclusion (measured by the PAR index, sagittal relationship of canines, type of brackets (ceramic or metal, tooth extractions, missed appointments and orthodontic appliance issues/breakages, the latter being the dependent variable. Assessment was performed by multiple linear regression analysis, followed by the stepwise method with P < 0.05. RESULTS: The number of times a patient missed their appointment (no-show (R² = 14.4%, p < 0.0001 and the number of appliance issues/breakages (R² = 29.71%, p = 0.0037 significantly affected variability in treatment time, and these two variables together can predict 43.75% (R² total of the overall variability in treatment time. Other factors, such as canine relationship at the beginning of treatment, bracket type (metal or ceramic, tooth extractions, age at start of treatment, severity of the initial malocclusion, sex and facial pattern had no significant bearing on treatment time. CONCLUSIONS: The duration of orthodontic treatment in adults, when performed by experienced orthodontists, is mainly influenced by factors related to patient compliance. However, several factors which were not included in this study may contribute to variability in orthodontic treatment time.

  6. [Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and the Treatment of ADHD in Adults].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auclair, Vickie; Harvey, Philippe-Olivier; Lepage, Martin

    Background The international prevalence of adult attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is estimated at 2.5%. ADHD is associated with serious impairment in academic, occupational, social and emotional functioning. Despite the debilitating nature of this disorder, few individuals with ADHD receive appropriate help. Further, although psychopharmacology is considered the first-line treatment of adults with ADHD, it is now recognized that medication alone may be insufficient. Thus, cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is a promising approach.Objectives This study aimed to review literature and investigate the efficacy of CBT, in reducing ADHD symptoms and comorbid conditions such anxiety and depression for adults with ADHD, by several studies through a meta-analysis.Methods We searched the literature from 1946 through 2015 using especially MEDLINE, EMBASE and PsycINFO. We used a random-effects model, Odds Ratios (OR) and Hedge's g.Results Data from 12 randomized controlled studies were included, totaling 575 subjects. The results showed a significant reduction in ADHD symptoms (Hedge's g = 0.95) and comorbid anxiety (Hedge's g = 0.39) and depression (Hedge's g = 0.30) for the CBT group in comparison with controls. Following the end of treatment, ADHD symptoms continue to improve, but not the comorbid conditions.Conclusion In summary, in adults with ADHD, CBT appears to be a promising treatment.

  7. Dietary treatment in adults with refractory epilepsy: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Pavel; Tyrlikova, Ivana; Mathews, Gregory C

    2014-11-18

    We review adjunctive ketogenic diet (KD) and modified Atkins diet (MAD) treatment of refractory epilepsy in adults. Only a few studies have been published, all open-label. Because of the disparate, uncontrolled nature of the studies, we analyzed all studies individually, without a meta-analysis. Across all studies, 32% of KD-treated and 29% of MAD-treated patients achieved ≥ 50% seizure reduction, including 9% and 5%, respectively, of patients with >90% seizure frequency reduction. The effect persists long term, but, unlike in children, may not outlast treatment. The 3:1 and 4:1 [fat]:[carbohydrate + protein] ratio KD variants and MAD are similarly effective. The anticonvulsant effect occurs quickly with both diets, within days to weeks. Side effects of both diets are benign and similar. The most serious, hyperlipidemia, reverses with treatment discontinuation. The most common, weight loss, may be advantageous in patients with obesity. Potential barriers to large-scale use of both diets in adults include low rate of diet acceptance and high rates of diet discontinuation. The eligible screened/enrolled subject ratios ranged from 2.9 to 7.2. Fifty-one percent of KD-treated and 42% of MAD-treated patients stopped the diet before study completion. Refusal to participate was due to diet restrictiveness and complexity, which may be greater for KD than MAD. However, long-term adherence is low for both diets. Most patients eventually stop the diet because of culinary and social restrictions. For treatment of refractory status epilepticus, only 14 adult cases of KD treatment have been published, providing insufficient data to allow evaluation. In summary, KD and MAD treatment show modest efficacy, although in some patients the effect is remarkable. The diets are well-tolerated, but often discontinued because of their restrictiveness. In patients willing to try dietary treatment, the effect is seen quickly, giving patients the option whether to continue the treatment.

  8. Depressive symptoms and stressful life events predict metabolic syndrome among middle-aged women: a comparison of World Health Organization, Adult Treatment Panel III, and International Diabetes Foundation definitions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Räikkönen, Katri; Matthews, Karen A; Kuller, Lewis H

    2007-01-01

    .... Metabolic syndrome was defined via the World Health Organization, the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III, and the International Diabetes Foundation clinical criteria...

  9. What works for survivors of childhood abuse: learning from participants in an inpatient treatment program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Sally; Stalker, Carol; Gadbois, Sue; Harper, Kim

    2004-04-01

    Thirty adults were interviewed about their experiences in a 6-week program for recovery from posttraumatic stress. The most valued aspects were their relationships with staff and the staff's expertise in treating the long-term effects of abuse. They valued the structured group treatment that allowed them to process emotions with the goal of healing. A few were upset by process groups, whereas others had difficulty with the sudden loss of support at discharge from the program.

  10. Prevalence, Awareness, Treatment, and Control of Hypertension among Saudi Adult Population: A National Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdalla A. Saeed

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This cross-sectional study aimed at estimating prevalence, awareness, treatment, control, and predictors of hypertension among Saudi adult population. Multistage stratified sampling was used to select 4758 adult participants. Three blood pressure measurements using an automatic sphygmomanometer, sociodemographics, and antihypertensive modalities were obtained. The overall prevalence of hypertension was 25.5%. Only 44.7% of hypertensives were aware, 71.8% of them received pharmacotherapy, and only 37.0% were controlled. Awareness was significantly associated with gender, age, geographical location, occupation, and comorbidity. Applying drug treatment was significantly more among older patients, but control was significantly higher among younger patients and patients with higher level of physical activity. Significant predictors of hypertension included male gender, urbanization, low education, low physical activity, obesity, diabetes, and hypercholesterolemia. In conclusion prevalence is high, but awareness, treatment, and control levels are low indicating a need to develop a national program for prevention, early detection, and control of hypertension.

  11. 42 CFR 8.11 - Opioid treatment program certification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... accreditation with an accreditation body, are eligible to receive a provisional certification for up to 1 year... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Opioid treatment program certification. 8.11... PROVISIONS CERTIFICATION OF OPIOID TREATMENT PROGRAMS Certification and Treatment Standards § 8.11 Opioid...

  12. Assessment and Treatment of Co-occurring Eating Disorders in Privately Funded Addiction Treatment Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killeen, Therese K.; Greenfield, Shelly F.; Bride, Brian E.; Cohen, Lisa; Gordon, Susan Merle; Roman, Paul M.

    2011-01-01

    Privately-funded addiction treatment programs were surveyed to increase understanding of assessment and current treatment options for patients with co-occurring substance use and eating disorders. Data were collected from face-to-face interviews with program administrators of a nationally representative sample of 345 private addiction treatment programs. Although the majority of programs reported screening for eating disorders, programs varied in screening instruments used. Sixty-seven percent reported admitting cases of low severity. Twenty-one percent of programs attempt to treat eating disorders. These results highlight the need for education of addiction treatment professionals in assessment, referral and treatment of eating disorders. PMID:21477048

  13. Intensive treatment for adults with anorexia nervosa: The cost of weight restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarda, Angela S; Schreyer, Colleen C; Fischer, Laura K; Hansen, Jennifer L; Coughlin, Janelle W; Kaminsky, Michael J; Attia, Evelyn; Redgrave, Graham W

    2017-03-01

    Weight restoration in anorexia nervosa (AN) is associated with lower relapse risk; however rate of weight gain and percent of patients achieving weight restoration (BMI ≥ 19 at discharge) vary among treatment programs. We compared both cost/pound of weight gained and cost of weight restoration in a hospital-based inpatient (IP)-partial hospitalization (PH) eating disorders program to estimates of these costs for residential treatment. All adult first admissions to the IP-PH program with AN (N = 314) from 2003 to 2015 were included. Cost of care was based on hospital charges, rates of weight gain, and weight restoration data. Results were compared with residential treatment costs extracted from a national insurance claims database and published weight gain data. Average charge/day in the IP-PH program was $2295 for IP and $1567 for PH, yielding an average cost/pound gained of $4089 and $7050, respectively, with 70% of patients achieving weight restoration. Based on published mean weight gain data and conservative cost/day estimates, residential treatment is associated with higher cost/pound, and both higher cost and lower likelihood of weight restoration for most patients. The key metrics used in this study are recommended for comparing the cost-effectiveness of intensive treatment programs for patients with AN. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Adult chronic sleepwalking and its treatment based on polysomnography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilleminault, Christian; Kirisoglu, Ceyda; Bao, Gang; Arias, Viola; Chan, Allison; Li, Kasey K

    2005-05-01

    Adult sleepwalking affects 2.5% of the general population and may lead to serious injuries. Fifty young adults with chronic sleepwalking were studied prospectively. Clinical evaluation, questionnaires from patients and bed partners, and polysomnography were obtained on all subjects in comparison with 50 age-matched controls. Subjects were examined for the presence of psychiatric anxiety, depression and any other associated sleep disorder. Isolated sleepwalking or sleepwalking with psychiatric disorders was treated with medication. All other patients with other sleep disorders were treated only for their associated problem. Prospective follow-up lasted 12 months after establishment of the most appropriate treatment. Patients with only sleepwalking, treated with benzodiazepines, dropped out of follow-up testing and reported persistence of sleepwalking, as did patients with psychiatric-related treatment. Chronic sleepwalkers frequently presented with sleep-disordered breathing (SDB). All these patients were treated only for their SDB, using nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). All nasal CPAP-compliant patients had control of sleepwalking at all stages of follow-up. Non-compliant nasal CPAP patients had persistence of sleepwalking. They were offered surgical treatment for SDB. Those successfully treated with surgery also had complete resolution of sleepwalking. Successful treatment of SDB, which is frequently associated with chronic sleepwalking, controlled the syndrome in young adults.

  15. Empowering Adult Learners. NIF Literacy Program Helps ABE Accomplish Human Development Mission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, Mary E.

    1991-01-01

    The National Issues Forum's Literacy Program uses study circles and group discussion to promote empowerment and enhance adult literacy through civic education. The program has helped the Westonka (Minnesota) Adult Basic Education project accomplish its mission and has expanded the staff's view of adult learning. (SK)

  16. 76 FR 23479 - Civilian Health and Medical Program of the Uniformed Services (CHAMPUS); TRICARE Young Adult

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-27

    ... (CHAMPUS); TRICARE Young Adult AGENCY: Office of the Secretary, DoD. ACTION: Interim final rule with... Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2011 (NDAA for FY11). It establishes the TRICARE Young Adult... age of 26 of uniformed services sponsors. The TRICARE Young ] Adult program is a premium-based program...

  17. 34 CFR 403.117 - What definitions apply to the Postsecondary and Adult Vocational Education Programs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What definitions apply to the Postsecondary and Adult... of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION STATE... the Basic Programs? Secondary, Postsecondary, and Adult Vocational Education Programs § 403.117 What...

  18. Attitudes of Older Adults Towards a Blended Exercise Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumit Mehra

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Meer Bewegen voor Ouderen is a Dutch umbrella organization that aims to improve the physical, social and psychological wellbeing of senior citizens. Weekly 300,000 older adults participate nationwide in community based ‘gym classes’. In order to achieve the recommended amount of physical activity, the participants are stimulated to repeat the exercises outside the classroom. Aims: As part of the VITAMINE project a qualitative study was conducted in order to determine a the motivation of the participants to join the weekly classes b the current level of physical activity outside the classes c the susceptibility to an additional exercise program for the home environment and d attitudes towards technology to support such an exercise program. Method: Seven focusgroups were conducted with an average of 6 participants. During the focusgroups a semi-structured interview and brainstorming session was held. The focusgroups lasted approximately 1.5 hours. In total 41 older adults participated in the study. The results were recorded with video and afterwards transcribed and coded with software for qualitative data analysis (MAXQDA. Results: Due to technical difficulties the responses of two focusgroups were not included in the analysis. The average age of the remaining 31 participants was 74 years (SD=9. All participants were female and in general had a low education. Their motivation to participate in the weekly gym classes was to stay fit. Most participants believed this would contribute to their ability to live longer independently. However, all the participants indicated that the social aspect of the weekly classes was also a major reason for them to join. Furthermore, they indicated they had a moderate to active life style. The need to do exercises at home was acknowledged in part. Participants indicated they were willing to spend daily 15 minutes for a home-based exercise program. Some emphasized the program should be varied, whilst

  19. 34 CFR 461.1 - What is the Adult Education State-administered Basic Grant Program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What is the Adult Education State-administered Basic... (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ADULT EDUCATION STATE-ADMINISTERED BASIC GRANT PROGRAM General § 461.1 What is the Adult Education State-administered Basic Grant...

  20. TREATMENT OF ADOLESCENT AND YOUNG ADULTS WITH ACUTE LYMPHOBLASTIC LEUKEMIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josep-Maria Ribera

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The primary objective of this review was to update and discuss the current concepts andthe results of the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL in adolescents and young adults(AYA. After a brief consideration of the epidemiologic and clinicobiologic characteristics of ALLin the AYA population, the main retrospective comparative studies stating the superiority ofpediatric over adult-based protocols were reviewed. The most important prospective studies inyoung adults using pediatric inspired or pediatric unmodified protocols were also reviewedemphasizing their feasibility at least up to the age of 40 yr and their promising results, with eventfreesurvival rates of 60-65% or greater. Results of trials from pediatric groups have shown that theunfavourable prognosis of adolescents is no more adequate. The majority of the older adolescentswith ALL can be cured with risk-adjusted and minimal residual disease-guided intensivechemotherapy, without stem cell transplantation. However, some specific subgroups, which aremore frequent in adolescents than in children (e.g., early pre-T, iAMP21, and BCR-ABL-like,deserve particular attention. In summary, the advances in treatment of ALL in adolescents havebeen translated to young adults, and that explains the significant improvement in survival of thesepatients in recent years.

  1. Multidisciplinary orthodontic treatment in adult patients: the future of orthodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez Flores, José Maria

    2010-01-01

    There is currently great demand among adult patients for aesthetic solutions. In the great majority of cases, patients present with serious oral problems in their mouths, such as over-crowding, ageneses, edentulous spaces from old extractions, periodontal problems, etc. In the face of all these problems we need interdisciplinary strategies that will help us carry out the complex and imaginative treatments that these cases require. In this article we are going to describe the interdisciplinary treatment that we provided to two adult patients. 1--On a 25 year old male patient with significant upper maxillary crowding with transversal constriction and absence of the upper right lateral incisor; through correction of the over-crowding, the maxillary constriction and rehabilitation with an implant-supported fixed prosthesis in the edentulous space, we will treat and correct this case. 2--A 29 year old male patient with agenesis of the superior canines and edentulous gap in the inferior dental arch.

  2. A dedicated scholarly research program in an adult and pediatric neurology residency program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Matthew S; Haut, Sheryl R; Lipton, Richard B; Milstein, Mark J; Ocava, Lenore C; Ballaban-Gil, Karen; Moshé, Solomon L; Mehler, Mark F

    2017-04-04

    To describe and assess the effectiveness of a formal scholarly activity program for a highly integrated adult and pediatric neurology residency program. Starting in 2011, all graduating residents were required to complete at least one form of scholarly activity broadly defined to include peer-reviewed publications or presentations at scientific meetings of formally mentored projects. The scholarly activity program was administered by the associate residency training director and included an expanded journal club, guided mentorship, a required grand rounds platform presentation, and annual awards for the most scholarly and seminal research findings. We compared scholarly output and mentorship for residents graduating within a 5-year period following program initiation (2011-2015) and during the preceding 5-year preprogram baseline period (2005-2009). Participation in scholarship increased from the preprogram baseline (24 of 53 graduating residents, 45.3%) to the postprogram period (47 of 57 graduating residents, 82.1%, p Neurology.

  3. Tackling sleeplessness: psychological treatment options for insomnia in older adults

    OpenAIRE

    McCrae, Christina

    2010-01-01

    Joseph M Dzierzewski1, Erin M O’Brien2, Daniel Kay1, Christina S McCrae11University of Florida, FL, USA; 2Brown University, RI, USAAbstract: This paper provides a broad review of the extant literature involving the treatment of sleeplessness in older adults with insomnia. First, background information (including information regarding key issues in late-life insomnia and epidemiology of late-life insomnia) pertinent to achieving a general understanding of insomnia in the elderly is p...

  4. Expanded adult day program as a transition option from hospital to home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Katherine R; Tullai-McGuinness, Susan; Dolansky, Mary; Farag, Amany; Krivanek, Mary Jo; Matthews, Laura

    2011-02-01

    This article describes a pilot program for provision of postacute care (PAC) in an established adult day program. Demographic, clinical, utilization, and satisfaction data were abstracted retrospectively from program records; postdischarge readmission and emergency department visit data were obtained from the electronic health record. Comparative data were obtained from the health records of patients who were offered but declined the adult day program. Between 2005 and 2008, 78 patients requiring PAC were approached by the RN coordinator; 33 selected the adult day program, and 45 selected alternative destinations. The majority of patients had a neurological diagnosis, most commonly stroke. Participants and their family caregivers were highly satisfied with the program. The 30-day readmission rate for adult day program participants was significantly lower than that for nonparticipants. An expanded adult day program may represent a viable Transitional Care Model for selected patients and a feasible alternative to skilled nursing facility and home health care for PAC.

  5. Supporting Nutrition in Early Care and Education Settings: The Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Samuel A.

    2016-01-01

    Child care centers, Head Start programs, and family child care providers serving young children--as well as after school programs and homeless shelters that reach older children, adults, and families--are supported in providing healthy meals and snacks by reimbursements through the Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP). Administered by the…

  6. Treatments for somnambulism in adults: assessing the evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Melanie; Grunstein, Ronald R

    2009-08-01

    Somnambulism, or sleepwalking, is a parasomnia of non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep where movement behaviours usually confined to wakefulness are displayed during sleep. Generally, if sleepwalking is causing distress or danger in spite of safety measures, medical or psychological treatment is indicated. Clinicians will need to assess the evidence for treatment options. MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO and the Ovid Evidence-Based Medicine Reviews (EBM) multifile databases were searched. No properly powered rigorous controlled trials were found for treatment of sleepwalking in adults. Seven reports described small trials with some kind of control arm, or retrospective case series which included 30 or more patients. With no high quality evidence to underpin recommendations for treatments of somnambulism, full discussion with patients is advised. Adequately powered, well-designed clinical trials are now needed, and multi-centre collaborations may be required to obtain the sample sizes required.

  7. Relapse prevention medications in community treatment for young adults with opioid addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vo, Hoa T; Robbins, Erika; Westwood, Meghan; Lezama, Debra; Fishman, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Despite the well-known effectiveness and widespread use of relapse prevention medications such as extended release naltrexone (XR-NTX) and buprenorphine for opioid addiction in adults, less is known about their use in younger populations. This was a naturalistic study using retrospective chart review of N = 56 serial admissions into a specialty community treatment program that featured the use of relapse prevention medications for young adults (19-26 years old) with opioid use disorders. Treatment outcomes over 24 weeks included retention and weekly opioid-negative urine tests. Patients were of mean age 23.1, 70% male, 86% Caucasian, 82% with history of injection heroin use, and treated with either buprenorphine (77%) or XR-NTX (23%). The mean number of XR-NTX doses received was 4.1. Retention was approximately 65% at 12 weeks and 40% at 24 weeks, and rates of opioid-negative urine were 50% at 12 weeks and 39% at 24 weeks, with missing samples imputed as positive. There were no statistically significant differences in retention (t = 1.87, P = .06) or in rates of weekly opioid-negative urine tests (t = 1.96, P = .06) between medication groups, over the course of 24 weeks. The XR-NTX group had higher rates of weekly negative urine drug tests for other nonopioid substances (t = 2.83, P < .05) compared with the buprenorphine group. Males were retained in treatment longer and had higher rates of opioid-negative weeks compared with females. These results suggest that relapse prevention medications including both buprenorphine and XR-NTX can be effectively incorporated into standard community treatment for opioid addiction in young adults with good results. Specialty programming focused on opioid addiction in young adults may provide a promising model for further treatment development.

  8. Use of recommended osteoarthritis pain treatment by older adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkle, Diane; McDonald, Deborah Dillon

    2009-01-01

    Aim This paper reports on a study conducted to describe what traditional and nontraditional treatments older adults with osteoarthritis use for pain management, their reported pain relief, and factors associated with use of recommended initial gold standard treatment (acetaminophen/paracetamol or non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and exercise and/or physical therapy) as designated by conventional western medicine. Background Osteoarthritis is characterized by joint pain, stiffness and limited range of motion and has been designated an international health burden by the World Health Organization. Demographic and cultural factors have been shown to affect both traditional and non-traditional osteoarthritis treatment decisions. Method A descriptive correlational design was used, with secondary analysis of data collected between July 2006 and July 2007 in two randomized controlled studies using the Brief Pain Inventory Short Form and testing older adults’ pain communication. Results The frequency of use of gold standard treatment was 28·0% (n = 128). Both traditional and non-traditional treatments were used by 46·4% (n = 212) of the participants. Logistic regression revealed that those with higher education (odds ratio 1·56, CI 1·24–1·96, P = 0·001), and non-White race, regardless of educational level (odds ratio 2·02, CI 1·20–3·40, P = 0·008), were more likely to use gold standard treatment. Conclusion Factors influencing older adults’ use of gold standard treatment for their osteoarthritis pain need to be identified so that greater numbers of older adults can be supported to use recommended treatment to obtain greater pain relief. PMID:19228234

  9. Treatment Emergent Suicidal Ideation in depressed older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristancho, Pilar; O'Connor, Brendan; Lenze, Eric J; Blumberger, Daniel M; Reynolds, Charles F; Dixon, David; Mulsant, Benoit H

    2017-06-01

    Treatment-Emergent Suicidal Ideation (TESI) in older adults is poorly understood. We characterized TESI in older depressed adults during treatment with venlafaxine and explored whether TESI is related to antidepressant exposure versus dimensions of the psychiatric illness. We examined the relationship among medication exposure, onset of TESI, and clinical characteristics. We analyzed data on 233 clinical trial participants with major depression and no baseline suicidal ideation who were treated for up to 12 weeks with venlafaxine XR (target dose: 150-300 mg/day). Suicidal ideation was assessed weekly with the Scale for Suicide Ideation. A Kaplan-Meier curve displayed the time course of TESI. Differences in baseline demographic and clinical variables between the TESI and Non-TESI groups were assessed with analyses of covariance or logistic regression. A final multivariate logistic regression model indicated baseline predictors of TESI. Depression treatment outcomes in subjects developing TESI versus those who did not were examined with a mixed effects model. TESI occurred in 10% of participants, typically with onset within 4 weeks of the start of treatment. Anxiety, and depression severity at baseline were predictors of TESI. Most TESI was mild and transient, with 6/233 participants having TESI considered clinically meaningful. TESI was not associated with venlafaxine blood levels or side effects. In older depressed adults, TESI is relatively uncommon and it is likely related to the underlying illness rather than to a medication adverse effect. This suggests that TESI requires continuing rather than discontinuing antidepressant treatment. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. [Maintenance Treatment With Antipsychotics for Adult Patients Diagnosed With Schizophrenia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Restrepo, Carlos; Bohórquez Peñaranda, Adriana Patricia; de la Hoz Bradford, Ana María; Tamayo Martínez, Nathalie; García Valencia, Jenny; Jaramillo González, Luis Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    To determine the effectiveness and security of the antipsychotics available for the management of adult patients with schizophrenia in the maintenance phase. To develop recommendations of treatment for the maintenance phase of the disease. A clinical practice guideline was elaborated under the parameters of the Methodological Guide of the Ministerio de Salud y Protección Social to identify, synthesize and evaluate the evidence and make recommendations about the treatment and follow-up of adult patients with schizophrenia. The evidence of NICE guide 82 was adopted and updated. The evidence was presented to the Guideline Developing Group and recommendations, employing the GRADE system, were produced. 18 studies were included to evaluate the effectiveness and / or safety of different antipsychotic drugs first and second generation. Overall, antipsychotics (AP) showed superiority over placebo in relapse rate over 12 months (RR 0.59 95% CI 0.42, 0.82) and hospitalization rate over 24 months of follow-up (RR 0.38 95% 0.27, 0.55); its use is associated with increased risk of treatment dropout (RR 0.53 95% CI 0.46, 0.61) and adverse events such as weight gain, dystonia, extrapyramidal symptoms and sedation. There was no difference in the outcome of re hospitalizations, comparisons on quality of life, negative symptoms or weight gain between AP first and second generation. Continuous or standard dose regimens appear to be superior to intermittent or low doses in reducing the risk of abandonment of treatment regimes. Adult patients diagnosed with schizophrenia should receive maintenance treatment with antipsychotics. The medication of choice will depend on the management of the acute phase, the patient's tolerance to it and the presentation of adverse events. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  11. Treatment decisions for older adults with advanced chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosansky, Steven J; Schell, Jane; Shega, Joseph; Scherer, Jennifer; Jacobs, Laurie; Couchoud, Cecile; Crews, Deidra; McNabney, Matthew

    2017-06-19

    Dialysis initiation rates among older adults, aged 75 years or greater, are increasing at a faster rate than for younger age groups. Older adults with advanced CKD (eGFR 10 ml/min/1.73 m(2) and many initiate dialysis in hospital, often in association with an episode of acute renal failure. In the US older adults start dialysis at a mean e GFR of 12.6 ml/min/1.73 m(2) and 20.6% die within six months of dialysis initiation. In both the acute in hospital and outpatient settings, many older adults appear to be initiating dialysis for non-specific, non-life threatening symptoms and clinical contexts. Observational data suggests that dialysis does not provide a survival benefit for older adults with poor mobility and high levels of comorbidity. To optimize the care of this population, early and repeat shared decision making conversations by health care providers, patients, and their families should consider the risks, burdens, and benefits of dialysis versus conservative management, as well as the patient specific symptoms and clinical situations that could justify dialysis initiation. The potential advantages and disadvantages of dialysis therapy should be considered in conjunction with each patient's unique goals and priorities.In conclusion, when considering the morbidity and quality of life impact associated with dialysis, many older adults may prefer to delay dialysis until there is a definitive indication or may opt for conservative management without dialysis. This approach can incorporate all CKD treatments other than dialysis, provide psychosocial and spiritual support and active symptom management and may also incorporate a palliative care approach with less medical monitoring of lab parameters and more focus on the use of drug therapies directed to relief of a patient's symptoms.

  12. Development and Pilot Randomized Control Trial of a Drama Program to Enhance Well-being Among Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Raeanne C; Straus, Elizabeth; Dev, Sheena I; Parish, Steven M; Sueko, Seema; Eyler, Lisa T

    2017-02-01

    Develop a novel theatre-based program and test its feasibility, tolerability, and preliminary efficacy for improving empathy/compassion and well-being among older adults. Thirteen older adults were randomized to a 6-week Drama Workshop (DW) program or time-equivalent Backstage Pass (BP) control condition. Pre- and post-treatment measures included empathy, compassion, and mood scales. Additional post-treatment measures included self-rated change in empathy/compassion, confidence, and affect. Participants also rated their mood/affect after each session. The program was successfully completed and well-liked. No pre-to-post-treatment changes in empathy/compassion or mood symptoms were found in either group. Compared to BP, DW weekly ratings indicated higher levels of anxiety and lower happiness; however, the DW program had higher self-ratings of positive change in self-esteem, confidence, and happiness post-treatment. While the DW may not promote empathy/compassion and was personally challenging during the program, engagement in dramatic exercises and rehearsing and performing a dramatic piece was seen by participants as a positive growth experience, as indicated by the post-treatment ratings of enhanced self-esteem, confidence and happiness. Thus, such a program might be useful for counteracting some of the potential negative aspects of aging, including reduced self-efficacy due to physical limitations and negative affect due to losses.

  13. Documenting Program Outcomes of Relationship Education with Incarcerated Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate Taylor Harcourt

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The current study examined program outcomes for an understudied population of Relationship Education (RE participants: incarcerated men and women. In addition to relationship functioning, we examined a number of individual and parenting outcomes which had not previously been explored. In a sample of 453 adult inmates, we found improvements in (a trust, (b confidence in the relationship, (c intimacy, (d individual empowerment, (e conflict management, (f help-seeking attitudes, (g self-esteem, (h depression, (i global life stress, (j faulty relationship beliefs, and (k parenting efficacy. Tests of moderation by gender and race indicated minimal differences in change patterns between groups; however, we found a significant time by gender interaction on intimacy and a time by race interaction on parenting efficacy. Implications for research and practice are presented

  14. A Dutch day treatment program for anorexia and bulimia nervosa in comparison with internationally described programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lammers, M W; Exterkate, C C; De Jong, C A J

    2007-03-01

    A Dutch day treatment program for patients with anorexia and bulimia nervosa is described and compared to intensive day treatment programs for patients with eating disorders outlined in international literature. The 5-day program is described in terms of its general characteristics, intended outcome and specific treatment interventions. Along these parameters it is compared to the programs found in a systematic literature search of day hospitalization programs for eating disorders. Global inspection shows a lot of similarities between all the programs. Looking more closely, also many important differences exist (concerning, e.g. treatment duration, intensity of treatment, theoretical orientation, goals of treatment and weight gain regime). Because of the differences, it is hard to compare outcome data between centres. Besides, on many of these dimensions, the literature does not yet tell us unambiguously what is best for our patients. Therefore, it is necessary to keep the dialogue between treatment centres going. 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association

  15. Attitudes Toward Stimulant Treatment of Offspring of Adult Patients with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canela, Carlos; Buadze, Anna; Dube, Anish; Eich, Dominique; Liebrenz, Michael

    2017-06-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate how adult patients with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder viewed the testing and use of stimulants in their children. Using a qualitative approach, we interviewed 32 outpatients from a special care unit of a university hospital. Emerging themes centered around concerns about the right age to test children and opinions about stimulant treatment ranging from unreserved agreement to reluctance, as well as the need for a shared decision with the child. Our results suggest that better psychoeducational programs are needed, especially for adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, in which long-term consequences of the disorder, areas of impairment, and possible treatment effects in their children are explained and concerns about unknown side effects and the right time to test and treat are addressed.

  16. Interactive programs with preschool children bring smiles and conversation to older adults: time-sampling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Kumiko; Kobayashi, Minako

    2013-10-18

    Keeping older adults healthy and active is an emerging challenge of an aging society. Despite the importance of personal relationships to their health and well-being, changes in family structure have resulted in a lower frequency of intergenerational interactions. Limited studies have been conducted to compare different interaction style of intergenerational interaction. The present study aimed to compare the changes in visual attention, facial expression, engagement/behaviour, and intergenerational conversation in older adults brought about by a performance-based intergenerational (IG) program and a social-oriented IG program to determine a desirable interaction style for older adults. The subjects of this study were 25 older adults who participated in intergenerational programs with preschool children aged 5 to 6 years at an adult day care centre in Tokyo. We used time sampling to perform a structured observation study. The 25 older participants of intergenerational programs were divided into two groups based on their interaction style: performance-based IG program (children sing songs and dance) and social-oriented IG program (older adults and children play games together). Based on the 5-minute video observation, we compared changes in visual attention, facial expression, engagement/behaviour, and intergenerational conversation between the performance-based and social-oriented IG programs. Constructive behaviour and intergenerational conversation were significantly higher in the social-oriented IG programming group than the performance-based IG programming group (pprogramming group than the performance-based IG programming (pprogramming group than the social-oriented IG programming group (pIntergenerational programs with preschool children brought smiles and conversation to older adults. The social-oriented IG program allowed older adults to play more roles than the performance-based IG program. The intergenerational programs provide opportunities to fulfil

  17. [Treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in adults using virtual reality through a mindfulness programme].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra-Pla, J F; Pozuelo, M; Richarte, V; Corrales, M; Ibanez, P; Bellina, M; Vidal, R; Calvo, E; Casas, M; Ramos-Quiroga, J A

    2017-02-24

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a highly prevalent neurodevelopmental disorder, which presents a high comorbidity with anxiety and affective signs and symptoms. It has repercussions on the functioning of those suffering from it, who also have low therapy compliance and generate a significant cost both at a personal level and for society. Mindfulness is a psychological treatment that has proved to be effective for ADHD. Virtual reality is widely used as treatment in cases of phobias and other pathologies, with positive results. To develop the first treatment for ADHD in adults based on virtual reality and mindfulness, while also resulting in increased treatment adherence and reduced costs. We conducted a pilot study with 25 patients treated by means of virtual reality, in four 30-minute sessions, and 25 treated with psychostimulants. Measures will be taken pre-treatment, post-treatment and at 3 and 12 months post-treatment, to evaluate both ADHD and also depression, anxiety, functionality and quality of life. Data will be later analysed with the SPSS v. 20 statistical program. An ANOVA of independent groups will be performed to see the differences between treatments and also a test-retest to detect whether the changes will be maintained. It is necessary to use treatments that are effective, reduce costs and increase therapy adherence. Treatment with virtual reality is an interesting alternative to the classical treatments, and is shorter and more attractive for patients.

  18. Ketogenic diet treatment in adults with refractory epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Pavel; Janousek, Jaromir; Barber, Arkady; Weissberger, Randi

    2010-12-01

    The ketogenic diet (KD) is an effective treatment for refractory epilepsy in children. It has been little studied in adults. We evaluated the efficacy of, safety of, and compliance with adjunctive KD treatment in adults with refractory epilepsy in a prospective open-label pilot study. Seizure frequency was evaluated for 4 baseline months, 4 months of adjunctive KD treatment with a 3:1 [fat]:[carbohydrate+protein] weight ratio and 1600 kcal/day, and subsequent elective open-ended KD treatment. A 3:1 ratio was used instead of the 4:1 ratio employed in children because of greater palatability. Average monthly seizure frequency and seizure-free months at baseline were compared with KD months 1-4 (phase 1) and all KD treatment (phase 2). Diet compliance was evaluated with daily urine ketone body and monthly serum β-hydroxybutyrate levels. Twelve subjects were treated for up to 26 months. Three stopped treatment early for psychosocial reasons (n=2) or lack of efficacy. Seven of the 12 subjects were fully compliant, 4 were partially compliant, and 1 was noncompliant. Mean seizure frequency declined by 38.4 and 44.1% for phases 1 and 2, respectively (P=0.04). Forty-two percent and 50% of subjects had a >50% reduction during phases 1 and 2, respectively. Four of 12 subjects (33%) had a >85% seizure reduction. Twenty percent of subject-months were seizure free at baseline versus 56% during both study phases (P=0.04). Adverse effects were mild: nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, constipation, and weight loss. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Utilization of oral health care services among adults attending community outreach programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadaluru, Umashankar Gangadhariah; Kempraj, Vanishree Mysore; Muddaiah, Pramila

    2012-01-01

    Good oral health is a mirror of overall health and well-being. Oral health is determined by diet, oral hygiene practices, and the pattern of dental visits. Poor oral health has significant social and economic consequences. Outreach programs conducted by dental schools offer an opportunity for early diagnosis and treatment, dental health education, and institution of preventive measures. To assess the utilization of oral healthcare services among adults attending outreach programs. This study included 246 adults aged 18-55 years attending community outreach programs in and around Bangalore. Using a questionnaire we collected data on dental visits, perceived oral health status, reasons for seeking care, and barriers in seeking care. Statistical significance was assessed using the Chi-square test. In this sample, 28% had visited the dentist in the last 12 months. Males visited dentist more frequently than females. The main reason for a dental visit was for tooth extraction (11%), followed by restorative and endodontic treatment 6%. The main barriers to utilization of dental services were high cost (22%), inability to take time off from child care duties (19.5%), and fear of the dentist or dental tools (8.5%). The utilization of dental services in this population was poor. The majority of the dental visits were for treatment of acute symptoms rather than for preventive care. High cost was the main barrier to the utilization of dental services. Policies and programs should focus on these factors to decrease the burden of oral diseases and to improve quality of life among the socioeconomically disadvantaged.

  20. Use of Q methodology to assess the concerns of adult female individuals seeking orthodontic treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao L

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Linjie Yao,1 Xingqiao Xu,2 Zhenyu Ni,3 Minling Zheng,3 Feiou Lin3 1Department of Pedodontics, 2Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, 3Department of Orthodontics, School and Hospital of Stomatology, Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, People’s Republic of China Background: Orthodontic treatment may cause functional restrictions, discomfort, and pain, which may lead to dental anxiety and noncooperation among patients. This study aimed to assess the concerns of adult female patients with respect to such treatment.Patients and methods: We conducted an explorative study using Q methodology among 40 adult female patients with different educational and social backgrounds in Wenzhou, People’s Republic of China. We asked participants to rank a set of 41 statements about seeking orthodontic treatment on an 11-point scale from “agree most” to “disagree most”. The collected data were analyzed using the PQ Method 2.35 program. We extracted significant viewpoints using centroid factor extraction and varimax rotation.Results: We identified major factors based on how the patients ranked statements. Patients in group 1 worried about lack of information about orthodontic treatment, and may have suffered from dental phobia; patients in group 2 were all single women, and they were worried that the braces might lower their chances of finding a partner; patients in group 3 worried about appearance and speech with braces; and patients in group 4 worried about cost, pain, and dental hygiene. The remaining participants who had other viewpoints did not load to any of these four groups.Conclusion: The concerns of adult female individuals seeking orthodontic treatment are complex. A significant feature of this study was using Q methodology to analyze the psychological characteristics of the patients. This study identified four typical characterizations that are associated with each group, and our findings may aid orthodontists in improving doctor

  1. [Treatment of Adult Schizophrenic Patients With Depot Antipsychotics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaramillo González, Luis Eduardo; Gómez Restrepo, Carlos; García Valencia, Jenny; de la Hoz Bradford, Ana María; Ávila-Guerra, Mauricio; Bohórquez Peñaranda, Adriana

    2014-01-01

    To determine the indications of long-acting antipsychotic injection and what its effectiveness and safety in adult patients with schizophrenia during the treatment maintenance phase. A clinical practice guideline was elaborated under the parameters of the Methodological Guide of the Ministerio de Salud y Protección Social to identify, synthesize and evaluate the evidence and make recommendations about the treatment and follow-up of adult patients with schizophrenia. The evidence of NICE guide 82 was adopted and updated. The evidence was presented to the Guideline Developing Group and recommendations, employing the GRADE system, were produced. The literature review shows that the evidence has moderate to low quality. 8 articles were used. The risk of relapse was lower with depot risperidone and paliperidone palmitate when compared with placebo. For the risk of hospitalizations comparing depot antipsychotics (APD) versus oral AP, the result is inconclusive. Globally the second-generation APD had a lower risk of discontinuation when compared with placebo. The second generation AP had higher risk of extrapyramidal syndromes than placebo, as in the use of antiparkinsonian. The comparison of second-generation AP injections versus placebo showed an increased risk of early weight gain. The use of depot antipsychotics in the maintenance phase of adult patients diagnosed with schizophrenia is recommended if there is no adherence to oral antipsychotics as the patient's preference. It is not recommended depot antipsychotics in the acute phase of schizophrenia in adults. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  2. Exposure to Smoke During Development: Fetal Programming of Adult Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bergen Hugo T

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract It is well established that smoking has potent effects on a number of parameters including food intake, body weight, metabolism, and blood pressure. For example, it is well documented that 1 there is an inverse relationship between smoking and body weight, and 2 smoking cessation is associated with weight gain. However, there is increasing evidence that smoking can exert deleterious effects on energy balance through maternal exposure during fetal development. Specifically, there appears to be an increased incidence of metabolic disease (including obesity, and cardiovascular disease in children and adults that were exposed to smoke during fetal development. The present review will examine the relationship between maternal smoke and adult disease in offspring. The epidemiological studies highlighting this relationship will be reviewed as well as the experimental animal models that point to potential mechanisms underlying this relationship. A better understanding of how smoking effects changes in energy balance may lead to treatments to ameliorate the long-lasting effects of perinatal exposure to smoke as well as increasing the health benefits associated with smoking cessation.

  3. Osteogenesis Imperfecta in Adult Twins Responded To Treatment With Pamidronate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehtap Çakır

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Bisphosphonates are strong inhibitors of bone resorption and are used in the treatment of osteoporosis. Bisphosphonates are known to be effective in prevention of fractures, improvement of bone mineral density as well as in relieving bone pain in osteogenesis imperfecta (OI patients. Recent studies have shown that especially intravenous pamidronate may be more effective when given in childhood and adolescence. This effect was also shown in adult OI patients in some clinical trials.22-year-old twin brothers known to have OI were admitted to our endocrinology and metabolism outpatient clinic. On medical history, OI was diagnosed at the age of three and for the last eight years, they were not able to walk and were using wheelchairs. On physical examination, blue sclerae and dentinogenesis imperfecta were detected in both patients. According to the expanded Sillence classification of OI, the clinical findings were consistent with type IV OI. Intravenous pamidronate treatment was given three times at four-month intervals, according to Montreal protocol. During this period, the patients were also doing isometric exercises and were on physical therapy, diet, and bioresonance therapy.At the end of one year, bone pain regressed significantly in both patients and they were able to walk independently. These outcomes demonstrate that in selected adult OI patients, intravenous pamidronate treatment may be beneficial in preventing bone fractures and relieving pain. Türk Jem 2011; 15: 39-43

  4. Updating the treatment of recurrent tonsillitis in adults. Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Cristina GASCÓN-RUBIO

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and Objectives: Acute pharyngitis in adults (APA is one of the most frequent reasons for consultation in primary care. The main objective of this review is to update the therapeutic options for the prevention and treatment of APA and to determine which interventions have the greatest impact in reducing morbidity and improving the quality of life of patients, which directly affects the consumption of health resources. Material and Methods: First clinical criteria of the FAA, indications of tonsillectomy and patterns of antibiotic therapy according to clinical guidelines of national and international scientific societies were defined. Subsequently, the literature related to the treatment of the FAA including other therapeutic options not covered in previous clinical guidelines (P. Leucotomos extract, vaccination by the mucosal route, AM3 and beta-glucans, homeopathy and herbal medicine was revised. ClinicalKey bases and PubMed data were used. Results: The comparison of the studies was difficult due to the disparity of criteria for inclusion and diagnostics, sample sizes, time tracking and poor uniformity in the clinical scales measuring variations. Conclusions: Therefore we cannot conclude whether a therapeutic option is more effective than another in the treatment and prevention of adult APA.

  5. The Adverse Effects of Motherhood on Substance Use Treatment Program Outcomes Among Adolescent Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Rebekah J; Durant, Nefertiti; Clark, C Brendan; Nair, Parvathy; Cropsey, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Adolescent mothers have differing risks and responsibilities compared to adolescent women without children that may impact substance use treatment. This study sought to describe characteristics of adolescent women in a substance use treatment program and determine the effect of adolescent motherhood on treatment program outcomes. Data were collected from standardized interviews of female adolescents in a case management criminal justice diversion program for substance-using adolescents and adults. Variables included sociodemographic factors (ie, race/ethnicity, age, financial support, education, insurance, marital status, sexual abuse), Diagnostic and Statistical Manual-IV (DSM-IV) substance use disorder diagnoses, and motherhood (ie, childbirth and residence with a child). Treatment program outcome was documented by case workers at the end of the participants' time in the program. Chi-square analyses and analysis of variances determined associations between variables. Logistic regression was used to assess characteristics associated with negative treatment program outcome. Data from 1080 adolescent women aged 16-21 years (mean 19.7 years, SD = 1.16) were analyzed; 403 (37%) were mothers. After controlling for sociodemographic factors and substance use disorder diagnoses, adolescent mothers were less likely to successfully complete the treatment program than nonmothers. Adolescent women with reliance on family or friends for financial support, lower education status, and cannabis and cocaine use disorders had worse treatment program outcomes. Childbirth and parenting adversely affect substance use treatment outcomes for adolescent women in the criminal justice system. Future research should explore tailored substance use treatments for adolescents with children. Job training and educational support may improve outcomes.

  6. Relative Effectiveness of Reading Intervention Programs for Adults with Low Literacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabatini, John P; Shore, Jane; Holtzman, Steven; Scarborough, Hollis S

    2011-01-01

    To compare the efficacy of instructional programs for adult learners with basic reading skills below the seventh grade level, 300 adults were randomly assigned to one of three supplementary tutoring programs designed to strengthen decoding and fluency skills, and gains were examined for the 148 adult students who completed the program. The three intervention programs were based on or adapted from instructional programs that have been shown to benefit children with reading levels similar to those of the adult sample. Each program varied in its relative emphasis on basic decoding versus reading fluency instruction. A repeated measures MANOVA confirmed small to moderate reading gains from pre- to post-testing across a battery of targeted reading measures, but no significant relative differences across interventions. An additional 152 participants who failed to complete the intervention differed initially from those who persisted. Implications for future research and adult literacy instruction are discussed.

  7. Classification System for Individualized Treatment of Adult Buried Penis Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tausch, Timothy J; Tachibana, Isamu; Siegel, Jordan A; Hoxworth, Ronald; Scott, Jeremy M; Morey, Allen F

    2016-09-01

    The authors present their experience with reconstructive strategies for men with various manifestations of adult buried penis syndrome, and propose a comprehensive anatomical classification system and treatment algorithm based on pathologic changes in the penile skin and involvement of neighboring abdominal and/or scrotal components. The authors reviewed all patients who underwent reconstruction of adult buried penis syndrome at their referral center between 2007 and 2015. Patients were stratified by location and severity of involved anatomical components. Procedures performed, demographics, comorbidities, and clinical outcomes were reviewed. Fifty-six patients underwent reconstruction of buried penis at the authors' center from 2007 to 2015. All procedures began with a ventral penile release. If the uncovered penile skin was determined to be viable, a phalloplasty was performed by anchoring penoscrotal skin to the proximal shaft, and the ventral shaft skin defect was closed with scrotal flaps. In more complex patients with circumferential nonviable penile skin, the penile skin was completely excised and replaced with a split-thickness skin graft. Complex patients with severe abdominal lipodystrophy required adjacent tissue transfer. For cases of genital lymphedema, the procedure involved complete excision of the lymphedematous tissue, and primary closure with or without a split-thickness skin graft, also often involving the scrotum. The authors' overall success rate was 88 percent (49 of 56), defined as resolution of symptoms without the need for additional procedures. Successful correction of adult buried penis often necessitates an interdisciplinary, multimodal approach. Therapeutic, IV.

  8. Children and Adults Reading Interactively: The Social Benefits of an Exploratory Intergenerational Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaki, Emi; Harmon, Mary Towle

    2015-01-01

    This exploratory Intergenerational Program (IGP) focused on reading to determine whether it affects mood and communication in older adults with mild dementia and neurocognitive deficits, and if it influences school-aged children's perceptions of older adults over time. Six older adults with cognitive-communication deficits and 12 school-aged…

  9. Learning To Hope: A Study of the Adult Education for the Homeless Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drury, Darrel; Koloski, Judy

    A comprehensive study of the Adult Education for the Homeless Program (AEH) was conducted using data from the following sources: program files; focus groups conducted with state project administrators; site visits to 9 local programs in 3 states; surveys of 32 state projects, 230 local programs, 588 service delivery sites, and 2,943 program…

  10. [Which treatments for the hyperventilation syndrome in adults?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapin, A; Deslee, G; Percebois-Macadre, L; Jonvel, A-C; Demangeon, S; Boyer, F C

    2017-02-01

    The hyperventilation syndrome is a complex entity whose management is poorly codified. We report a synthesis about the management of adult patients diagnosed with hyperventilation syndrome. A systematic literature review has identified fifteen articles dealing, among them three studies about drug treatment and the others about non-pharmacological approaches. Among the last ones, a re-educational approach based on abdominal ventilation and regulation of the ventilatory rate seems and an educative approach seems to be the most effective. Methodological biases did not permit a conclusion on the efficacy of these treatments. Practically, teaching abdominal ventilation and respiratory rate regulation, associated with a personalized therapeutic education, seems to be a pertinent management approach. Other clinical studies should explore this issue. Copyright © 2016 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Mathematical literacy in the infant and adult phase of students in adult education programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dione Lucchesi de Carvalho

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper brings the deepening of an analysis of interviews done by participants of a post graduation course in Education with students of Adult Education Programs –EJA– in the region of Córdoba,Argentina. We underline the importance of the development of the theoreticalmethodological approaches about literacy, mainly those that consider it as cultural manifestation and are developed by deepening the studies of its autonomous and ideological dimensions. The analysis was developed through a theoretical-methodological interlocution with the bartonian critical ethnography. The interviewed students refer not only to numerical questions, but also to the measures and geometric aspects of mathematical literacy. In their speech, the aspects that point to the relations with the community are those that refer to the autonomy of options in the purchases, the desire to teach their artifact knowledge does not involve mathematical literacy.

  12. [Depression in older adults with extreme poverty belonging to Social Program in City Juarez, Chihuahua, Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Padilla, Luis; Ramírez-Martínez, Flor Rocío; Trueba-Gómez, Rocío

    2016-01-01

    To identify depression in older adults living in extreme poverty beneficiaries of social program in City Juarez, Chihuahua. Analytical study in 941 adults > 60 years, studied variables: age, sex, marital status, education and work, extreme poverty, place of residence, asylum. Yesavage Geriatric scale was used. X², IC work, incomplete education, living in asylum, have hypertension and pulmonary diseases increase depression risk (p < 0.05). Older Adults program beneficiaries living in extreme poverty depression is greater than that reported in the literature. The support granted by the Mexican Government to social programs that benefit older adults should be planned strategically with aims on improving the long-term health.

  13. Incorporating a Computer Assisted Reading Program into an Adult Vocational Basic Skills Lab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vescial, Ann; And Others

    A computer-assisted reading program was implemented in the VESL (Vocational English as a Second Language) Center at Hacienda La Puente Adult Schools (California), which provides support services to adult special needs vocational students. The purpose of the program was to improve the technical reading skills of the vocational students. The basic…

  14. The Effect of Emotional Intelligence on Program Completion among Adult Basic Education Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batiste, Mildred M.

    2014-01-01

    Program completion among adult learners attending adult basic education programs has been found to be an area of struggle. Cognitive ability has always been the primary factor for determining an individual's ability. However, non-cognitive ability has been proposed as a significant factor in academic success. Many attrition models have been…

  15. Accentuate the Positive: A Peer Group Counseling Program for Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Mary Lou; Waters, Elinor

    1991-01-01

    Describes a stress management program for older adults, discusses the advantages and limitations of using peer counselors, and makes suggestions for professionals who work with both older adults and peer counselors. Notes benefits of program include reinforcement of participants' coping skills and opportunity for peer interaction. (Author/NB)

  16. The Impact of Spiritual Learning on the Lives of Adults in Postsecondary Martial Arts Educational Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, Jeffrey G.

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated whether spiritual learning impacts the lives of adult learners in martial arts educational programs. The impact of spirituality has been claimed as a meaningful connection; however, it is not currently known how spiritual learning impacts the lives and experiences of adult learners with these programs. Spiritual learning…

  17. Positive Side Effects of a Job-Related Training Program for Older Adults in South Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Minhong; Choi, Jae-Sung

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the current study was to evaluate empirically positive side effects of a job-related training program on older adults' self-esteem, depression, and social networks. A total of 70 older adults participated in the study after completing the Older Paraprofessional Training Program developed and provided by the Continuing Education…

  18. Professional Training Programs of Masters in Adult Education at Universities of Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hizhynska, Tetiana

    2015-01-01

    The German experience in professional training of teaching staff in adult education has been analyzed; it has been clarified that modern educational programs of Bachelor and Master specialties are based on the basic educational program offered by Adult Education Sectional Commission of Pedagogical Sciences in Germany (DGfE); value-targeted and…

  19. [The prevalence of pain and different pain treatments in adults].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuru, Tuğba; Yeldan, Ipek; Zengin, Ayşe; Kostanoğlu, Alis; Tekeoğlu, Anil; Akbaba, Yildiz Analay; Tarakçi, Devrim

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine prevalence of pain (p) in adults and their preference for pain treatment, by using questionnaire. First 7 questions of "Brief Pain Inventory-Short Form" and "Cornell Musculoskeletal Discomfort Questionnaire" were applied to 250 participants in face to face interview. A hundred eighty of the individuals were women (38.3±14.0 years old) and 70 were men (36.6±13.2 years old). Data analysis were performed using SPSS, version 10. Eighteen individuals (7.2%) had no pain and 232 (92.8%) of them had pain in different parts of the body. A hundred fourty five individuals had lowback p, 116 neck p, 101 dorsal p, 152 shoulder p, 69 upperarm p, 66 forearm p, 75 wrist p, 59 hip p, 69 upper leg p, 98 knee p, 81 crus pain. Their mean pain score was 3.6±1.8, mean pain score at its worst in the last 24 hours was 4.4±2.6. Thirty three percent of individuals had used non-steroidal anti-inflammatory and/or analgesic drugs to relieve pain, 22.7% had physical therapy, 4.1% had other pain-relief methods, 1.2% had surgery, and 38% had nothing. Our results showed that 92.8% adults had pain. Although shoulder has highest pain prevalance, severe pain was mostly described in lowback area. Knee pain was largely interfered work ability. An important percent of persons experiencing pain has recieved no treatment and first preference for treatment was drug. Inspite of high pain prevalence in our study, slightly uncomfortable pain severity and no need for treatment can be explain a result of individual differences in pain perception.

  20. Fear of flying treatment programs for passengers: an international update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Gerwen, Lucas J; Diekstra, René F W; Arondeus, Josine M; Wolfger, Robert

    2004-02-01

    This article is an update of an earlier international review of fear of flying treatment programs. METHOD. One hundred and sixty two airlines and treatment facilities around the world were approached for information on treatment programs for flying phobia. In comparison to the earlier review, the number of treatment facilities able to provide relevant and valid information increased from 15 to 36. Information was obtained both with a written questionnaire and by obtaining oral information from treatment facility representatives. This information was obtained at the second international fear of flying conference in Vienna on December 2000. The increase in the number of participating facilities can presumably be attributed both to a world wide increase in the demand for treatment for fear of flying and professionals becoming more interested in entering the field of fear of flying treatment. However, the increase may also be due to the fact that some clinics or programs have only recently discovered the international network of treatment facilities. RESULTS. In comparison to the previous review, the number of facilities that provide treatment programs that meet high professional standards has increased considerably over the past few years. Although there is still substantial variety in the quality and components of treatment programs, there is also a significant number of facilities that provide more or less similar qualified treatment programs and carry out treatment evaluation on a regular basis. Furthermore, experts from the participating centers reached consensus on 'golden rules' for fear of flying patients and flying-phobia therapists. CONCLUSIONS. There is a growing consensus among fear of flying treatment facilities on methods and protocols.

  1. Differences in treatment outcome among marijuana-dependent young adults with and without antisocial personality disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easton, Caroline J; Oberleitner, Lindsay M; Scott, Melanie C; Crowley, Michael J; Babuscio, Theresa A; Carroll, Kathleen M

    2012-07-01

    Few studies have addressed comorbid antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) and marijuana dependence in young adults, and results from previous studies are inconsistent. This study evaluated differences in pretreatment characteristics and treatment outcomes between marijuana-dependent young adults with and without ASPD. Data for this study were derived from a randomized trial, in which marijuana-dependent young adults (n = 136) between 18 and 25 years of age were randomized to four behavioral conditions: (1) MET/CBT with CM, (2) MET/CBT without CM, (3) DC with CM, and (4) DC without CM. Forty-four percent of the participants met DSM-IV-TR criteria for ASPD. ASPD clients had significantly more lifetime alcohol dependence disorders, marijuana use in the 28 days pretreatment, arrests, and assault and weapon charges compared to those without ASPD. ASPD clients did not differ in retention or substance use outcomes at 8 weeks posttreatment or the 6-month follow-up. In general, both groups had more attendance in the voucher condition, but there were no significant ASPD by treatment interactions. These data suggest that marijuana-dependent young adults with comorbid ASPD do not necessarily have poorer retention or substance use outcomes compared with marijuana-dependent young adults who do not have ASPD when treated in a well-defined behavioral therapy protocol. Previous research has shown increased risks for clients with comorbid ASPD and marijuana dependence; however, our findings suggest that specialized programs for clients with ASPD may not be necessary if they are provided with empirically supported, structured treatments.

  2. Adult tibial shaft fractures - different patterns, various treatments and complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madadi, Firooz; Eajazi, Alireza; Madadi, Firoozeh; Daftari Besheli, Laleh; Sadeghian, Reza; Nasri Lari, Mehdi

    2011-11-01

    Tibial Fractures constitute a large number of emergency operations in most trauma centers. There are different approaches for tibial fractures. To our knowledge, there is insufficient evidence to consider post-operative complications in relation to both surgical methods and the types of fractures. Our purpose is to report our experience regarding the efficacy and complications associated with diverse surgical methods of different patterns of tibial shaft fractures in adults. We studied 387 adult patients. The patients' information was registered from the charts and after examination. The methods used were intramedullary interlocking nails, simple intramedullary rods, plating and external fixation. Early and late complications were recorded and by applying the DELPHI method different treatments were compared. Finally, the safest mode of treatment is proposed. In the intramedullary interlocking nails method the most noticeable complication was delayed union and the highest rate of complications was seen in open oblique fractures. In the simple intramedullary rods method the most frequent complication was pain, and in the with butterfly fractures the complications were the most. In the plating method the most frequent complication was pain, and most of the complications were seen in open comminuted fractures. Finally, in the external fixation method the most frequent complication was non-union and complications were the highest in the patients with oblique, comminuted and segmented fractures. The proposed method to treat transverse, oblique and butterfly fractures is simple intramedullary rods; whereas intramedullary interlocking nails is the better method for comminuted, segmented and spiral fractures.

  3. [Refusal of treatments by an adult cancer patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauchy, Sarah; Faivre, Jean-Christophe; Block, Véronique; Metzger, Maude; Salleron, Julia; Charles, Cécile; Adam, Virginie

    2018-02-22

    Refusal of treatment questions the treatment's adequacy as well as the quality of the care relationship. A rigorous analysis of these situations is necessary in order to respect the patient's fundamental right to decide for him/herself while preventing a potential loss of chance. This paper proposes practical guidelines for assessment and management of the refusal of treatment by adult cancer patients. The French Association for Supportive Care in Cancer and the French Society for Psycho-Oncology formed a task force that applied a consensus methodology to draft guidelines. We propose five guidelines: (1) be informed of the conditions most often associated with refusal of treatment so as to reinforce adequate support measures; (2) understand the complexity of the process of refusal and accurately identify what is precisely refused; (3) apply an approach of systematic analysis to refusal, to try and increase the possibilities of finding an agreement while reinforcing the respect of the patient's position; (4) establish a legal procedure to address refusal of treatment that safeguards the stakeholders when no accord can be found; and (5) know the indications for ethical collective decision-making. A systematic assessment procedure of treatment refusal is necessary in order to ensure that all the physical, psychological and contextual aspects of it are taken into account, and to provide patients with the best treatment possible. The setting of good care relationship, the improvement of communication skills training and of comprehensive multidisciplinary care are all crucial elements in the prevention of these situations. Copyright © 2018 Société Française du Cancer. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Resource Review: Youth and Adult Leaders for Program Excellence: A Practical Guide for Program Assessment and Action Planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hartley Hobson

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The Youth and Adult Leaders for Program Excellence (YALPE Resource Kit was developed to assist groups working to promote positive youth development. The Kit includes a variety of assessment tools and templates for data analysis and report writing. The tools are grounded in research on youth development and are user-friendly for adults and youth.

  5. Housing Assistance Programs and Adult Health in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenelon, Andrew; Mayne, Patrick; Simon, Alan E; Rossen, Lauren M; Helms, Veronica; Lloyd, Patricia; Sperling, Jon; Steffen, Barry L

    2017-04-01

    To examine whether access to housing assistance is associated with better health among low-income adults. We used National Health Interview Survey data (1999-2012) linked to US Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) administrative records (1999-2014) to examine differences in reported fair or poor health and psychological distress. We used multivariable models to compare those currently receiving HUD housing assistance (public housing, housing choice vouchers, and multifamily housing) with those who will receive housing assistance within 2 years (the average duration of HUD waitlists) to account for selection into HUD assistance. We found reduced odds of fair or poor health for current public housing (odds ratio [OR] = 0.77; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.57, 0.97) and multifamily housing (OR = 0.75; 95% CI = 0.60, 0.95) residents compared with future residents. Public housing residents also had reduced odds of psychological distress (OR = 0.59; 95% CI = 0.40, 0.86). These differences were not mediated by neighborhood-level characteristics, and we did not find any health benefits for current housing choice voucher recipients. Housing assistance is associated with improved health and psychological well-being for individuals entering public housing and multifamily housing programs.

  6. Lifitegrast for the treatment of dry eye disease in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnenfeld, Eric D; Perry, Henry D; Nattis, Alanna S; Rosenberg, Eric D

    2017-10-01

    Dry eye disease (DED) is a common ocular disorder that can have a substantial burden on quality of life and daily activities. Lifitegrast ophthalmic solution 5.0% is the first medication approved in the US for the treatment of the signs and symptoms of DED. The aim of this article is to summarize the preclinical and clinical data on lifitegrast and discuss how lifitegrast may fit into the current treatment landscape for DED. Areas covered: A literature search of published preclinical and clinical data was conducted to review the chemistry, pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics, and clinical efficacy/safety of lifitegrast. The impact that lifitegrast may have on DED treatment practices is also discussed. Expert opinion: The introduction of lifitegrast provides a potentially important additional option for eye care professionals treating DED. In clinical trials conducted in adults with DED, lifitegrast ophthalmic solution 5.0% improved both signs and symptoms of DED. Of note, in 2 phase 3 trials, symptom improvements were observed as early as 2 weeks, which may be explained by lifitegrast's unique mechanism of action of blocking a specific signaling pathway in inflammation. Future research should include evaluation of whether lifitegrast can be used in combination with other DED treatments.

  7. Treatment of adult-onset still's disease: up to date.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Dae Hyun

    2017-09-01

    Adult onset Still's disease (AOSD) is a systemic inflammatory disorder of unknown etiology, and approximately 60-70% of patients may develop a chronic polyphasic form of the disease or a chronic polyarthritis. Due to rarity of disease, treatment of AOSD is not based on controlled study, but on case based experiences. Areas covered: Recently, the application of anti-cytokine therapy based on pathophysiology has resulted in significant progress in the treatment of AOSD. Here, we review current knowledge of the pathogenesis, disease progression, currently available biomarkers of disease activity, standard therapeutic agents, utility of biologic agents, future perspectives for treatment and treatment of macrophage activation syndrome. Expert commentary: Accumulated clinical data suggest that chronic disease can be classified into two subsets: dominant systemic disease, and the arthritis subgroup. IL-1 inhibitors may be more efficient for systemic manifestations and IL-6 inhibitor for both joint involvement and systemic manifestations. TNF inhibitors must be reserved for patients with purely chronic articular manifestations. For ideal management of patients, it is very important to measure disease activity accurately during follow up, but no single biomarker has been classified as ideal. New therapeutic agents and composite biomarkers are needed to improve the outcome of patients with AOSD by identifying disease activity properly.

  8. Nuclear Waste Treatment Program: Annual report for FY 1986

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burkholder, H.C.; Brouns, R.A. (comps.); Powell, J.A. (ed.)

    1987-09-01

    To support DOE's attainment of its goals, Nuclear Waste Treatment Program (NWTP) is to provide technology necessary for the design and operation of nuclear waste treatment facilities by commercial enterprises as part of a licensed waste management system and problem-specific treatment approaches, waste form and treatment process adaptations, equipment designs, and trouble-shooting. This annual report describes progress during FY 1986 toward meeting these two objectives. 29 refs., 59 figs., 25 tabs.

  9. Strategies to improve Adult Treatment Panel III guideline adherence and patient compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Michael H

    2002-03-07

    The National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) Adult Treatment Panel (ATP) III report outlines the management of hypercholesterolemia through guidelines. These guidelines call for more aggressive diagnosis and treatment of hypercholesterolemia, which will substantially increase the number of individuals in the United States considered to be at risk for heart disease and will expand the number who will receive dietary and drug treatment. The new features of ATP III add complexity to the guidelines, which will impact adherence as well as add challenges to the management of hypercholesterolemia. Following key recommendations and incorporating essential elements of adherence can improve implementation of the NCEP ATP III guidelines. The use of global risk scoring aids, including the Palm Pilot cholesterol risk calculators, can improve guideline adherence and provide education and motivation to patients to maintain compliance.

  10. Clinical issues: music therapy in an adult cancer inpatient treatment setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Callaghan, Clare

    2006-01-01

    The adult oncology inpatient music therapy program at Peter MacCallum Cancer Center, which is Australia's only hospital solely dedicated to cancer treatment, research and care, is described. Patients' treatment requirements and often changing conditions compel music therapist to be flexible in their approach, offering both pre-planned treatment sessions and spontaneous sessions in open ward contexts. Patients and families who wish to engage im music therapy choose from various music therapy methods, including live song choice, music imagery and relaxation, therapeutic music lessons, and improvisation. Complex variables inevitable in such human relationship therapies necessitate that, alongside randomized controlled trials, research methods are grounded in the social sciences to meaningfully substantiate, and further advance, oncologic music therapy.

  11. Behavioral Activation Treatment for Depression in Older Adults Delivered via Videoconferencing: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazzari, Claudia; Egan, Sarah J.; Rees, Clare S.

    2011-01-01

    Depression affects up to 25% of older adults. Underdetection and subsequent undertreatment of depression in older adults has been attributed in part to difficulties in older adults being able to access treatment. This uncontrolled pilot study, N = 3, explored the acceptability and efficacy of a brief behavioral activation treatment delivered via…

  12. AMG 145, a monoclonal antibody against PCSK9, facilitates achievement of national cholesterol education program-adult treatment panel III low-density lipoprotein cholesterol goals among high-risk patients: an analysis from the LAPLACE-TIMI 57 trial (LDL-C assessment with PCSK9 monoclonal antibody inhibition combined with statin thErapy-thrombolysis in myocardial infarction 57).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Nihar R; Giugliano, Robert P; Zhou, Jing; Kohli, Payal; Somaratne, Ransi; Hoffman, Elaine; Liu, Thomas; Scott, Robert; Wasserman, Scott M; Sabatine, Marc S

    2014-02-11

    This study sought to define the ability of AMG 145, a monoclonal antibody directed against proprotein convertase subtilisin kexin type 9 (PCSK9), to enable subjects at high risk for major adverse cardiovascular events to achieve National Cholesterol Education Program-Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP-ATP III) parameters for low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and other lipid goals. Many patients at high risk for adverse cardiovascular events are unable to achieve the NCEP-ATP III LDL-C goal of III criteria, we compared the proportion of subjects achieving the NCEP-ATP III recommended LDL-C goal of treatment arms. Other outcomes included the triple goals of LDL-C <70 mg/dl, non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) <100 mg/dl, and apolipoprotein B (ApoB) <80 mg/dl. During the dosing interval, more than 90% of subjects in both of the top dose groups every 2 weeks and every 4 weeks attained this lipid target over the dosing interval, with similar success rates for the triple lipid goal. PCSK9 inhibition with AMG 145 enables high-risk patients to achieve established lipid goals. If this therapy demonstrates efficacy for reducing cardiovascular events with a favorable safety profile in ongoing phase 3 trials, we believe it will have major public health implications. Copyright © 2014 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Pilot treatment program for shoplifting in eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birmingham, C L; Hlynsky, J; Russell, B; Gritzner, S

    2005-12-01

    There are no established treatment programs for shoplifting in eating disorder patients. Our objective was to observe the effect of an established behavioural treatment program in a series of eating disorder patients. Patients with eating disorders who shoplift voluntarily took part in an 8-week behavioral treatment program at the Elizabeth Fry Society of Greater Vancouver, British Columbia. They completed assessments at the first session, last session, and at 1 and 6 months post intervention. Six patients enrolled in the study and three patients completed the treatment program. Only one patient reported a decrease in shoplifting frequency. All subjects reported an increase in self-esteem and ability to control shoplifting impulses. Our findings suggest that behavioral therapy may be effective in treating shoplifting in eating disorders, but that longer sessions and follow-up may be necessary to show benefit. A randomized control trial with longer-term follow-up is needed to determine whether there is a benefit.

  14. Formalized exercise program for paediatric and young adult cancer survivors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Y. Wonders

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Survival rates of childhood cancer patients has steadily increased through the years, making it necessary to develop strategies aimed at long term improvements to quality of life. This paper presents a formalized exercise program for paediatric cancer survivors, based on current risk-based exercise recommendations, with the primary goal of helping families return to a normal life that emphasizes overall wellness and physical activity. Background Children tend to respond better to anti-cancer treatments, including chemotherapy. Research indicates that proper nutrition and regular physical activity will help a paediatric cancer survivor continue to grow and develop properly, however, at present, there is no standard of care with regards to this subject. Aims To create a fun and supportive atmosphere that encourages movement and healthy eating for the participants while increasing participant knowledge regarding proper nutrition and exercise.

  15. Treatment Priorities in a Family-Oriented Alcoholism Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nace, Edgar P.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Recommends that family therapists be aware of the dynamics of the malfunctioning family which affects the process of alcoholism. Describes a family program which is part of a comprehensive alcoholism treatment program. Individual and group intervention address the family problems set in motion by alcoholism. (Author/JAC)

  16. Influence of different heat treatment programs on properties of sol ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    C, respectively. In the three-step program, T1, the sample was first dried, then pyrolyzed, and finally calcinated, in the two-step pro- gram, T2, the drying step was omitted, while in program. T3 (one step), the sample was directly heated to the calcina- tion temperature. Heat treatment programs T4 and T5 were similar to heat ...

  17. The effects of a Self-Alert Training (SAT program in adults with ADHD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona eSalomone

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD, a neuropsychiatric condition characterised by attention and impulsivity problems, is one of the most common behavioral disorders. The first line of treatment for ADHD is psychostimulant medication, but this has limited effectiveness, particularly in adults, and is often associated with adverse side-effects. Thus, it is imperative that new non-pharmaceutical approaches to treatment are developed. This study aims to evaluate the impact of a non-pharmacological Self-Alert Training (SAT intervention on ADHD symptom prevalence, psychological and cognitive functioning, and on everyday functional impairment in adults with ADHD. Fifty-one adult participants with a current diagnosis of ADHD were randomized to either SAT or a Control Training (CT program. They were assessed at baseline, immediately following the 5-week training period, and after 3 months using ADHD symptoms scales, as well as a series of neuropsychological tests and psychological questionnaires. Subjective ratings of everyday life attention and memory problems were also collected. The SAT group showed significant improvements in ADHD inattentive and impulsive symptoms, depressive symptoms and in self-efficacy ratings compared to the CT group at both post-training and at the 3-month assessment. Pre-post improvements in SAT participants on untrained cognitive tasks measuring selective attention and executive functions were also observed. Finally, the SAT group reported improved subjective ratings of everyday life attention at both assessment points. This pattern of results suggests that SAT may be beneficial in treating ADHD symptoms as well as psychological and cognitive impairments in adult ADHD. A large-scale randomized controlled trial is needed.

  18. The effects of a Self-Alert Training (SAT) program in adults with ADHD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomone, Simona; Fleming, Grainne R; Shanahan, Jacqueline M; Castorina, Marco; Bramham, Jessica; O'Connell, Redmond G; Robertson, Ian H

    2015-01-01

    Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), a neuropsychiatric condition characterized by attention and impulsivity problems, is one of the most common behavioral disorders. The first line of treatment for ADHD is psychostimulant medication, but this has limited effectiveness, particularly in adults, and is often associated with adverse side-effects. Thus, it is imperative that new non-pharmaceutical approaches to treatment are developed. This study aims to evaluate the impact of a non-pharmacological Self-Alert Training (SAT) intervention on ADHD symptom prevalence, psychological and cognitive functioning, and on everyday functional impairment in adults with ADHD. Fifty-one adult participants with a current diagnosis of ADHD were randomized to either SAT or a Control Training (CT) program. They were assessed at baseline, immediately following the 5-week training period, and after 3-months using ADHD symptoms scales, as well as a series of neuropsychological tests and psychological questionnaires. Subjective ratings of everyday life attention and memory problems were also collected. The SAT group showed significant improvements in ADHD inattentive and impulsive symptoms, depressive symptoms and in self-efficacy ratings compared to the CT group at both post-training and at the 3-month assessment. Pre-post improvements in SAT participants on untrained cognitive tasks measuring selective attention and executive functions were also observed. Finally, the SAT group reported improved subjective ratings of everyday life attention at both assessment points. This pattern of results suggests that SAT may be beneficial in treating ADHD symptoms as well as psychological and cognitive impairments in adult ADHD. A large-scale randomized controlled trial (RCT) is needed.

  19. Innovative treatments for adults with obstructive sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Terri E; Calik, Michael W; Farabi, Sarah S; Fink, Anne M; Galang-Boquiren, Maria T; Kapella, Mary C; Prasad, Bharati; Carley, David W

    2014-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) affects one in five adult males and is associated with significant comorbidity, cognitive impairment, excessive daytime sleepiness, and reduced quality of life. For over 25 years, the primary treatment has been continuous positive airway pressure, which introduces a column of air that serves as a pneumatic splint for the upper airway, preventing the airway collapse that is the physiologic definition of this syndrome. However, issues with patient tolerance and unacceptable levels of treatment adherence motivated the exploration of other potential treatments. With greater understanding of the physiologic mechanisms associated with OSA, novel interventions have emerged in the last 5 years. The purpose of this article is to describe new treatments for OSA and associated complex sleep apnea. New approaches to complex sleep apnea have included adaptive servoventilation. There is increased literature on the contribution of behavioral interventions to improve adherence with continuous positive airway pressure that have proven quite effective. New non-surgical treatments include oral pressure devices, improved mandibular advancement devices, nasal expiratory positive airway pressure, and newer approaches to positional therapy. Recent innovations in surgical interventions have included laser-assisted uvulopalatoplasty, radiofrequency ablation, palatal implants, and electrical stimulation of the upper airway muscles. No drugs have been approved to treat OSA, but potential drug therapies have centered on increasing ventilatory drive, altering the arousal threshold, modifying loop gain (a dimensionless value quantifying the stability of the ventilatory control system), or preventing airway collapse by affecting the surface tension. An emerging approach is the application of cannabinoids to increase upper airway tone.

  20. Innovative treatments for adults with obstructive sleep apnea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Terri E; Calik, Michael W; Farabi, Sarah S; Fink, Anne M; Galang-Boquiren, Maria T; Kapella, Mary C; Prasad, Bharati; Carley, David W

    2014-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) affects one in five adult males and is associated with significant comorbidity, cognitive impairment, excessive daytime sleepiness, and reduced quality of life. For over 25 years, the primary treatment has been continuous positive airway pressure, which introduces a column of air that serves as a pneumatic splint for the upper airway, preventing the airway collapse that is the physiologic definition of this syndrome. However, issues with patient tolerance and unacceptable levels of treatment adherence motivated the exploration of other potential treatments. With greater understanding of the physiologic mechanisms associated with OSA, novel interventions have emerged in the last 5 years. The purpose of this article is to describe new treatments for OSA and associated complex sleep apnea. New approaches to complex sleep apnea have included adaptive servoventilation. There is increased literature on the contribution of behavioral interventions to improve adherence with continuous positive airway pressure that have proven quite effective. New non-surgical treatments include oral pressure devices, improved mandibular advancement devices, nasal expiratory positive airway pressure, and newer approaches to positional therapy. Recent innovations in surgical interventions have included laser-assisted uvulopalatoplasty, radiofrequency ablation, palatal implants, and electrical stimulation of the upper airway muscles. No drugs have been approved to treat OSA, but potential drug therapies have centered on increasing ventilatory drive, altering the arousal threshold, modifying loop gain (a dimensionless value quantifying the stability of the ventilatory control system), or preventing airway collapse by affecting the surface tension. An emerging approach is the application of cannabinoids to increase upper airway tone. PMID:25429246

  1. Different yet similar: Examining race and ethnicity in treatment-seeking adults with binge eating disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lydecker, Janet A; Grilo, Carlos M

    2016-01-01

    This study examined racial/ethnic differences in demographic variables and the clinical presentation of treatment-seeking adults with binge eating disorder (BED) who participated in treatment research at a medical school-based program. Participants were 775 (n = 195 men, n = 560 women) treatment-seeking adults with DSM-IV-defined BED who self-identified as Black (n = 121), Hispanic (n = 54), or White (n = 580). Doctoral-level research clinicians assessed participants for BED and for eating disorder psychopathology using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Disorders and the Eating Disorder Examination (EDE) interview, and measured height and weight. Participants also completed established self-report measures. Black participants had a greater proportion of women than White participants and White participants had higher education than Black and Hispanic participants. Black participants had higher body mass index (BMI) and reported more frequent binge eating episodes than White participants but eating-disorder psychopathology (EDE scales and Global Severity) did not significantly differ across racial/ethnic groups. Black participants had lower levels of depression than Hispanic and White participants. These differences in clinical presentation remained unchanged after adjusting for age, education, sex, and BMI. White participants had younger ages of onset for dieting, binge eating, and obesity, but not BED, than Black and Hispanic participants. There are some racial/ethnic differences in the developmental trajectories and clinical presentation of treatment-seeking adults with BED that remain unchanged after adjusting for demographic differences. Black participants presented for treatment with higher BMI and binge eating frequency than White participants and with lower depression than White and Hispanic groups, but associated eating disorder psychopathology levels were similar across racial/ethnic groups. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  2. Neuro-Linguistic Programming Treatment for Anxiety: Magic or Myth?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krugman, Martin; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Compared neuro-linguistic programing treatment for anxiety with self-control desensitization of equal duration and a waiting-list control group in treating public speaking anxiety. Results indicated that neither treatment was more effective in reducing anxiety than merely waiting for one hour. (Author/MCF)

  3. Television use and binge eating in adults seeking weight loss treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burmeister, Jacob M; Carels, Robert A

    2014-01-01

    Binge eating has a complex etiology and is likely influenced by a wide range of biological, psychological, social, and environmental factors. Among the environmental and behavioral contributors, television use has been strongly linked to obesity and unhealthy eating behaviors. The current study tested whether television use predicts binge eating symptomatology in adults seeking behavioral weight loss treatment. Participants (N=116) were adults seeking weight loss treatment in group-based behavioral weight loss programs. Average body mass index was 38.5; average age was 45.3. They completed measures of binge eating symptomatology, television use, internalized weight stigma, depression, body satisfaction, and habitual physical activity. The amount of television participants watched per week was associated with binge eating symptomatology even after controlling for relevant covariates. Binge eating symptomatology was positively associated with television use, internalized weight stigma, depression, and decreased body satisfaction. The findings of the current study support the hypothesis that television use is a significant predictor of binge eating symptomatology for adults attempting weight loss. Determining the causal nature of the relationship and whether binge eating is occurring during television viewing will be important areas of future inquiry. © 2013.

  4. Internalized weight stigma and its ideological correlates among weight loss treatment seeking adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carels, R A; Young, K M; Wott, C B; Harper, J; Gumble, A; Hobbs, M Wagner; Clayton, A M

    2009-01-01

    There are significant economic and psychological costs associated with the negative weight-based social stigma that exists in American society. This pervasive anti-fat bias has been strongly internalized among the overweight/obese. While the etiology of weight stigma is complex, research suggests that it is often greater among individuals who embrace certain etiological views of obesity or ideological views of the world. This investigation examined 1) the level of internalized weight stigma among overweight/obese treatment seeking adults, and 2) the association between internalized weight stigma and perceived weight controllability and ideological beliefs about the world ('just world beliefs', Protestant work ethic). Forty-six overweight or obese adults (BMI >or=27 kg/m2) participating in an 18- week behavioral weight loss program completed implicit (Implicit Associations Test) and explicit (Obese Person's Trait Survey) measures of weight stigma. Participants also completed two measures of ideological beliefs about the world ("Just World Beliefs", Protestant Ethic Scale) and one measure of beliefs about weight controllability (Beliefs about Obese Persons). Significant implicit and explicit weight bias was observed. Greater weight stigma was consistently associated with greater endorsement of just world beliefs, Protestant ethic beliefs and beliefs about weight controllability. Results suggest that the overweight/obese treatment seeking adults have internalized the negative weight-based social stigma that exists in American society. Internalized weight stigma may be greater among those holding specific etiological and ideological beliefs about weight and the world.

  5. Low socioeconomic status is a risk factor for CPAP acceptance among adult OSAS patients requiring treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon-Tuval, Tzahit; Reuveni, Haim; Greenberg-Dotan, Sari; Oksenberg, Arie; Tal, Asher; Tarasiuk, Ariel

    2009-04-01

    To evaluate whether socioeconomic status (SES) has a role in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) patients' decision to accept continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment. Cross-sectional study; patients were recruited between March 2007 and December 2007. University-affiliated sleep laboratory. 162 consecutive newly diagnosed (polysomnographically) adult OSAS patients who required CPAP underwent attendant titration and a 2-week adaptation period. 40% (n = 65) of patients who required CPAP therapy accepted this treatment. Patients accepting CPAP were older, had higher apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) and higher income level, and were more likely to sleep in a separate room than patients declining CPAP treatment. More patients who accepted treatment also reported receiving positive information about CPAP treatment from family or friends. Multiple logistic regression (after adjusting for age, body mass index, Epworth Sleepiness Scale, and AHI) revealed that CPAP purchase is determined by: each increased income level category (OR, 95% CI) (2.4; 1.2-4.6), age + 1 year (1.07; 1.01-1.1), AHI ( > or = 35 vs. CPAP (2.9, 1.1-7.5), and partner sleeps separately (4.3, 1.4-13.3). In addition to the already known determinants of CPAP acceptance, patients with low SES are less receptive to CPAP treatment than groups with higher SES. CPAP support and patient education programs should be better tailored for low SES people in order to increase patient treatment initiation and adherence.

  6. Be Clear: A New Intensive Speech Treatment for Adults With Nonprogressive Dysarthria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Stacie; Theodoros, Deborah; Finch, Emma; Cardell, Elizabeth

    2016-02-01

    This article describes the effects of a new intensive dysarthria treatment program (Be Clear) on speech intelligibility in adults with dysarthria secondary to stroke and traumatic brain injury. A small group-repeated measures research design was used to examine the effects of treatment on the speech of 8 participants with nonprogressive dysarthria. Treatment consisted of a 1-hr prepractice session followed by 1-hr therapy sessions, 4 times per week, for 4 weeks (16 sessions). Paired-comparison ratings of speech intelligibility served as the primary outcome measure for the study. Perceptual data, quality of life, and communication partner opinion were obtained at 3 time intervals: (a) prior to treatment, (b) immediately posttreatment, and (c) 1-3 months posttreatment. Following treatment, group data demonstrated substantial improvements in speech intelligibility as perceived by naive listeners on a paired-comparison rating task. Word intelligibility was clinically significantly improved posttreatment and sentence intelligibility demonstrated statistically significant improvement. Communication partner ratings of speech intelligibility and overall communicative function were statistically significantly improved posttreatment. The results of this study suggest that this new intensive treatment may have potential as an effective intervention for nonprogressive dysarthria. However, controlled studies are required to establish treatment efficacy.

  7. Handbook for the Development of a Cooperative Adult Basic Education Program in Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felton, Mimi Edge

    Based on experience gained during the development of the Planters Employee Training (PET) program in cooperation with the Suffolk City Schools, Virginia, this handbook provides guidelines for similar cooperative adult basic education (CABE) programs. The table of contents is arranged in the order in which the CABE/PET program was developed and…

  8. Health Literacy Programs for Older Adults: A Systematic Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manafo, Elizabeth; Wong, Sharon

    2012-01-01

    Older adults make up the fastest growing age group in North America. This has demanded increased attention in supporting the health and well-being of this population and, in particular, the role of health information in promoting the health and well-being of older adults. Increased availability and accessibility of information as well as a greater…

  9. Adult Education and Literacy. Program Year 2015 Annual Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iowa Department of Education, 2016

    2016-01-01

    This report is Iowa's response to the four questions that the United States Department of Education, Office of Career, Technical, and Adult Education (OCTAE), requires of all states and territories receiving federal funding through the Workforce Investment Act (WIA), Title II, Adult Education and Family Literacy Act (AEFLA). The overall goal of…

  10. Differences between older and younger adults in residential treatment for co-occurring disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, Siobhan A; Watson, Cayce; MacMaster, Samuel A; Bride, Brian E

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine differences between older and younger adults who received integrated treatment for co-occurring substance use and mental disorders, including differences on demographic and baseline characteristics (e.g., substance use, readiness for change, mental health symptoms, and severity of problems associated with substance use), as well as predictors of retention in treatment. This study included 1400 adults who received integrated substance abuse and mental health treatment services at one of two private residential facilities offering residential and outpatient services. Initial analyses consisted of basic descriptive and bivariate analyses to examine differences between older (≥ 50 years old) and younger (old) adults on baseline variables. Next, three ordinary least squares regression models were employed to examine the influence of baseline characteristics on length of stay. Three main findings emerged. First, older adults differed from younger adults on pre-treatment characteristics. Older adults used more alcohol and experienced greater problem severity in the medical and alcohol domains, while younger adults used more illicit drugs (e.g., heroin, marijuana, and cocaine) and experienced problems in the drug, legal, and family/social domains. Second, while readiness to change did not differ between groups at baseline, older adults remained enrolled in treatment for a shorter period of time (nearly four days on average) than younger adults. Third, the pattern of variables that influenced length of stay in treatment for older adults differed from that of younger adults. Treatment retention for older adults was most influenced by internal factors, like psychological symptoms and problems, while younger adults seemed influenced primarily by external factors, like drug use, employment difficulties, and readiness for change. The results of this study add to the limited knowledge base regarding older adults receiving integrated

  11. 34 CFR 403.116 - How does a State allocate funds under the Postsecondary and Adult Vocational Education Programs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... and Adult Vocational Education Programs? 403.116 Section 403.116 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Secretary Assist Under the Basic Programs? Secondary, Postsecondary, and Adult Vocational Education Programs...

  12. Treatment of prostate cancer in unfit senior adult patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falci, Cristina; Morello, Elisabetta; Droz, Jean Pierre

    2009-10-01

    Prostate cancer is a disease typical of the elderly with a peak of incidence at 80 years. As most patients aged > or = 70 years show impairment of physical and/or cognitive performance, a complete geriatric assessment should be mandatory before planning any oncological treatment, in order to remove treatable conditions and to estimate the individual cancer-independent survival probability. In unfit patients with early prostate cancer watchful waiting represent the best strategy when the chance of living patients having high risk prostate cancer. Even in locally advanced prostate cancer active treatment could be deferred in asymptomatic patients, with short individual cancer-independent survival and well or moderately differentiated tumour. When hormonal deprivation therapy is administered a great attention should be paid to potential adverse events, that could precipitate the physical performance and accelerate the development of severe frailty. In the metastatic setting, the best supportive care, including bisphosphonates, should have the priority in the management of unfit patients. Chemotherapy, with Docetaxel as the standard regimen, should be reserved to patients showing diffuse symptoms, rapidly increasing PSA and/or presence of visceral metastasis, after all steps of endocrine therapy were covered. As regard the second line, a number of possibilities are available, but none have been tested in vulnerable and frail patients. At the present a number of issues about prostate cancer in unfit senior adults patients are still unsolved and should be debated in the light of results from dedicate prospective trials.

  13. Innovative treatments for adults with obstructive sleep apnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weaver TE

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Terri E Weaver,1,2 Michael W Calik,1,2 Sarah S Farabi,1,2 Anne M Fink,1,2 Maria T Galang-Boquiren,2,3 Mary C Kapella,1,2 Bharati Prasad,2,4 David W Carley1,21Biobehavioral Health Science Department, College of Nursing, University of Illinois at Chicago; 2Center for Narcolepsy, Sleep and Health, University of Illinois at Chicago College of Nursing, 3Department of Orthodontics, University of Illinois at Chicago College of Dentistry, 4Sleep Center, Department of Medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago College of Medicine, Chicago, IL, USAAbstract: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA affects one in five adult males and is associated with significant comorbidity, cognitive impairment, excessive daytime sleepiness, and reduced quality of life. For over 25 years, the primary treatment has been continuous positive airway pressure, which introduces a column of air that serves as a pneumatic splint for the upper airway, preventing the airway collapse that is the physiologic definition of this syndrome. However, issues with patient tolerance and unacceptable levels of treatment adherence motivated the exploration of other potential treatments. With greater understanding of the physiologic mechanisms associated with OSA, novel interventions have emerged in the last 5 years. The purpose of this article is to describe new treatments for OSA and associated complex sleep apnea. New approaches to complex sleep apnea have included adaptive servoventilation. There is increased literature on the contribution of behavioral interventions to improve adherence with continuous positive airway pressure that have proven quite effective. New non-surgical treatments include oral pressure devices, improved mandibular advancement devices, nasal expiratory positive airway pressure, and newer approaches to positional therapy. Recent innovations in surgical interventions have included laser-assisted uvulopalatoplasty, radiofrequency ablation, palatal implants, and electrical

  14. Better Strength, Better Balance! Partnering to deliver a fall prevention program for older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taing, Darcie; McKay, Kelly

    2017-09-14

    Falls incur significant health and economic costs, particularly among older adults. Physical activity has been found to be the single most important fall prevention behaviour an older adult can do. This manuscript describes Ottawa Public Health's (OPH) experience implementing the Better Strength, Better Balance! (BSBB) program, a fall prevention exercise program for older adults, through an innovative partnership with the local Recreation, Cultural & Facility Services (RCFS) Department. BSBB aims to reach 1300 community-dwelling adults (aged 65 years and older) per year through approximately 86-130 exercise programs. Designed as a universal program, BSBB addresses participation barriers such as transportation, cost and location. BSBB was enabled with funding from the Champlain Local Health Integration Network, and coincided with the implementation of an Older Adult Plan for the City of Ottawa. BSBB is a beginner-level, fall prevention exercise and education program that takes place twice a week, over 12 weeks. Certified RCFS instructors delivered the exercise components of the program and OPH staff incorporated fall prevention messaging and conducted the evaluation. The formative evaluation indicated that participants experienced improved strength and balance, decreased fear of falling and the intent to adopt new fall prevention behaviours following the program. The partnership between OPH and RCFS allowed both partners to leverage their unique and mutual strengths to continually improve the program. Improving access to strength and balance programming is an important public health strategy to reduce falls. The recreation sector is an ideal partner to help public health in this pursuit.

  15. Therapeutic Climate Within a Treatment Program for Categorical Deniers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ware, Jayson

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether the therapeutic climate within a sex offender "deniers" program, where denial was not challenged, would be equivalent to the therapeutic climate within a conventional program where sex offenders were admitting responsibility. Using a sample of 77 sex offenders, therapeutic alliance and group climate were measured early and late in treatment. As expected, therapeutic alliance was more difficult to attain with deniers early in treatment, particularly therapeutic bond; however, by the end of the treatment, there were no significant differences in therapeutic alliance. There did not appear to be significant differences in group climate early or late in treatment except for the deniers reporting significantly lower levels of open expression of anger and disagreement within the group and, in contrast to the admitters, making significant improvements in group climate over time. Implications for the treatment of categorical deniers and further research suggestions are discussed.

  16. Social Relationships of Dually Diagnosed Homeless Adults Following Enrollment in Housing First or Traditional Treatment Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henwood, Benjamin F; Stefancic, Ana; Petering, Robin; Schreiber, Sarah; Abrams, Courtney; Padgett, Deborah K

    2015-09-01

    Strong and effective social support is a critical element of mental health recovery, yet social support is often lacking for adults experiencing homelessness. This study examines differences in the social networks of participants newly enrolled in programs that use either a Housing First (HF) approach (i.e., provides immediate access to permanent housing with ongoing consumer-driven support services) or a treatment first (TF) approach (i.e., traditional clinician-driven staircse model that requires temporary or transitional housing and treatment placements before accessing permanent housing). We use a mixed-methods social network analysis approach to assess group differences of 75 individuals based on program type (HF or TF) and program retention. Quantitative results show that compared with TF, HF participants have a greater proportion of staff members in their network. TF participants are more likely than HF participants to maintain mixed-quality relationships (i.e., relationships with elements of support and conflict). As compared with participants who remain in a program, those who disengage from programs have a greater proportion of mixed relationships and relationships that grow distant. Qualitative analyses suggest that HF participants regard housing as providing a stable foundation from which to reconnect or restore broken relationships. However, HF participants are guarded about close relationships for fear of being exploited due to their newly acquired apartments. TF participants report that they are less inclined to develop new relationships with peers or staff members due to the time-limited nature of the TF programs. These findings suggest that HF participants are not more socially isolated than those in traditional care. Implications for practice, policy and future research are discussed.

  17. In Defense of Offering Educational Programs for Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrotra, Chandra M.

    2003-01-01

    Older adults participate in education to fulfil coping, expressive, contributive, influence, and transcendence needs. Learning can promote sustained mental functioning and increase self-efficacy and social support. (Contains 15 references.) (SK)

  18. Assessing services with communicatively impaired bilingual adults in culturally and linguistically diverse neurorehabilitation programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centeno, José G

    2015-01-01

    The combined effect of the steady increase in cultural and linguistic diversity and epidemiological factors in minority populations is estimated to continue having an impact on adult neurorehabilitation programs in the country, particularly in the number of bilingual individuals receiving clinical services. No comprehensive assessment of the present professional and clinical realities in service delivery to communicatively impaired adults in culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) neurorehabilitation contexts has been conducted. The current survey research was undertaken to examine current professional training, clinical practices, and challenges in the services rendered to the steadily increasing numbers of communicatively disordered adults in CLD neurorehabilitation programs with a special focus on bilingual persons. A 36-question, 6-section survey was administered to health care-based SLPs working with adults to examine multiple factors regarding work setting and caseload, professional training, clinical tools and procedures, service delivery issues, and suggestions to improve clinical work with bilingual adults in CLD neurorehabilitation environments. Results support that SLPs presently make sensible decisions to serve communicatively disordered bilingual adults with neuropathologies despite training gaps and scant clinical resources. Responses additionally highlight critical areas to improve professional preparation and available resources. Results are discussed in terms of strengths and weaknesses as well as their implications to professional education and target research areas in order to minimize present gaps in service delivery with bilingual speakers in CLD adult neurorehabilitation programs. As a result of this activity, the reader will be able to: (1) Discuss the demographic and epidemiological factors that suggest a continued increase in the number of communicatively impaired bilingual adults in CLD neurorehabilitation programs. (2) Describe

  19. Working memory intervention programs for adults: A systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Netto, Tânia Maria; Greca, Denise Vieira; Zimmermann, Nicolle; Oliveira, Camila; Fonseca, Rochele Paz; Landeira-Fernandez, J.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract This systematic review aimed to identify the designs, procedures, and results of empirical studies that performed neuropsychological interventions on WM in adults. Methods: A PubMed and LILACS literature search was conducted using the keywords working memory AND (training OR rehabilitation OR intervention) AND adult. Results: Of the seven studies found, three were randomized controlled trials, two were case reports, one was a clinical trial, and one was an evaluation study. With re...

  20. Should the vaccine injury compensation program be expanded to cover adults?

    OpenAIRE

    Lloyd-Puryear, M. A.; Ball, L K; Benor, D

    1998-01-01

    In 1996, the National Vaccine Advisory Committee (NVAC) asked for a review of the pros and cons of including adult influenza and pneumococcal vaccines in the Vaccine Injury Compensation Program (VICP). The authors, as staff to the subcommittees charged with undertaking this assessment, looked at the following questions: (a) Would inclusion in VICP of these two vaccines, used primarily for adults, increase adult vaccination levels? (b) Is this Federal involvement warranted based on the liabili...

  1. Obstructive sleep apnea and weight loss treatment outcome among adults with metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whited, Matthew C; Olendzki, Effie; Ma, Yunsheng; Waring, Molly E; Schneider, Kristin L; Appelhans, Bradley M; Busch, Andrew M; Chesebro, James; Pagoto, Sherry L

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether adults with obesity and metabolic syndrome who screen as high risk for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) lose less weight as part of a weight loss intervention than those who screen as low risk. We conducted a secondary analysis of a randomized trial comparing 2 weight loss interventions consisting of dietary counseling for adults with obesity and metabolic syndrome. Participants were screened for sleep apnea using a validated screening questionnaire. Percent weight loss was calculated from weight measured at baseline and intervention end (12 months). Weight loss of 5% or greater was considered clinically significant. Multivariate linear and logistic regression models estimated the association between OSA screening status (high vs. low risk) and percent weight loss and clinically significant weight loss, adjusting for relevant covariates including body mass index and sleep duration. Nearly half of participants (45.8%) screened as high risk for OSA. Participants who screened as high risk for OSA lost less weight (1.2% ± 4.2% vs. 4.2% ± 5.3%) and were less likely to lose 5% or greater (24.4% vs. 75.6%) than participants without OSA. Among adults with obesity and metabolic syndrome, those at high risk for OSA lost less weight in response to a dietary counseling intervention than adults with low risk of OSA. Routine OSA screening should be considered as part of weight loss treatment programs. Additional research is needed to determine how to tailor weight loss treatment for those with high risk for OSA. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  2. An Appraisal of Practices of Adult Evening Programs of Community Colleges in Washington State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Louis

    This study assessed the practices of the adult evening programs of community colleges in Washington State. From a survey of the literature, a list was made of practices recommended by writers in the field of adult education and was used in developing an appraisal instrument, which was then refined by a trial group of respondents. The refined…

  3. Evaluation of a Peer-Led, Low-Intensity Physical Activity Program for Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Danilea; Teufel, James; Brown, Stephen L.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Physical inactivity is a primary contributor to decreasing functional physical fitness and increasing chronic disease in older adults. Purpose: This study assessed the health-related benefits of ExerStart for Lay Leaders, a 20-week, community based, peer-led, low-impact exercise program for older adults. ExerStart focuses on aerobic…

  4. Relationship between the Self-Efficacy and Self-Directed Learning of Adults in Undergraduate Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langshaw, Shelly J.

    2017-01-01

    In the current adult education environment, self-directed learning (SDL) is becoming a necessary learning characteristic and an academic process of learning to allow adult learners to complete programs and further enhance lifelong learning. The purpose of this quantitative study was to examine the relationship between self-efficacy and SDL in…

  5. Entry correlates and motivations of older adults participating in organized exercise programs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stiggelbout, M.; Hopman-Rock, M.; Mechelen, W. van

    2008-01-01

    This study reports entry correlates and motivations of older adults participating in organized exercise programs in the Netherlands, as determined in a descriptive explorative study (N = 2,350, response rate 86%). Participants were community-dwelling older adults (50+ years) who enrolled and started

  6. Use of the Internet to Obtain Drugs without a Prescription Among Treatment-involved Adolescents and Young Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Festinger, David S; Dugosh, Karen L; Clements, Nicolle; Flynn, Anna B; Falco, Mathea; McLellan, A Thomas; Arria, Amelia M

    2016-01-01

    Nonmedical use of prescription drugs is common and poses risks such as injury, overdose, and development of abuse and dependence. Internet pharmacies offer prescription drugs without a prescription, creating a source of illicit drugs accessible to anyone with an Internet connection. We examined this issue in a convenience sample of 1,860 adolescents and young adults from 24 residential and outpatient treatment programs. Few individuals obtained drugs from the Internet (n = 26, 2.3%). Pain relievers were the most frequently purchased type of drug. The majority of adolescents and young adult online purchasers made the purchases from their own or a friend's house.

  7. Use of the Internet to Obtain Drugs without a Prescription Among Treatment-involved Adolescents and Young Adults*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Festinger, David S.; Dugosh, Karen L.; Clements, Nicolle; Flynn, Anna B.; Falco, Mathea; McLellan, A. Thomas; Arria, Amelia M.

    2016-01-01

    Nonmedical use of prescription drugs is common and poses risks such as injury, overdose, and development of abuse and dependence. Internet pharmacies offer prescription drugs without a prescription, creating a source of illicit drugs accessible to anyone with an Internet connection. We examined this issue in a convenience sample of 1,860 adolescents and young adults from 24 residential and outpatient treatment programs. Few individuals obtained drugs from the Internet (n = 26, 2.3%). Pain relievers were the most frequently purchased type of drug. The majority of adolescents and young adult online purchasers made the purchases from their own or a friend’s house. PMID:28194089

  8. Assessing an Intergenerational Horticulture Therapy Program for Elderly Adults and Preschool Children

    OpenAIRE

    Predny, Mary Lorraine

    1999-01-01

    ASSESSING AN INTERGENERATIONAL HORTICULTURE THERAPY PROGRAM FOR ELDERLY ADULTS AND PRESCHOOL CHILDREN by Mary Lorraine Predny Dr. Diane Relf, Chair Horticulture Department ABSTRACT The goal of this research project was to determine if introducing intergenerational interactions would supplement or detract from the use of horticulture as a therapeutic tool when working with elderly adults and preschool children. The program was set up to compare ind...

  9. Treatment of Young Adults with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kansagra, Ankit; Litzow, Mark

    2017-06-01

    Young adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia are a distinctive category of patients, with substantial difference in disease biology and response to therapy; hence, they pose unique challenges and issues beyond those faced by children and older adults. Despite inferior survival compared to children, there is growing evidence to suggest that young adults have improved outcomes when treated with pediatric-based approaches. With better supportive care and toxicity management and multidisciplinary team and approach, we have made great improvement in outcomes of young adults with ALL. However, despite significant progress, patients with persistence of minimal residual disease have a poor prognosis. This review discusses current controversies in the management of young adults with ALL, outcomes following pediatric and adult protocols, and the role of allogeneic stem cell transplantation. We also explore recent advances in disease monitoring and highlight our approach to incorporation of novel therapies in the management of young adults with ALL.

  10. Medication-Assisted Treatment For Opioid Addiction in Opioid Treatment Programs. Treatment Improvement Protocol (TIP) Series 43

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinkler, Emily; Vallejos Bartlett, Catalina; Brooks, Margaret; Gilbert, Johnatnan Max; Henderson, Randi; Shuman, Deborah, J.

    2005-01-01

    TIP 43 provides best-practice guidelines for medication-assisted treatment of opioid addiction in opioid treatment programs (OTPs). The primary intended audience for this volume is substance abuse treatment providers and administrators who work in OTPs. Recommendations in the TIP are based on both an analysis of current research and determinations…

  11. Purpose in Life Predicts Treatment Outcome Among Adult Cocaine Abusers in Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Rosemarie A.; MacKinnon, Selene; Johnson, Jennifer; Rohsenow, Damaris J.

    2010-01-01

    A sense of purpose in life has been positively associated with mental health and well-being and has been negatively associated with alcohol use in correlational and longitudinal studies, but has not been studied as a predictor of cocaine treatment outcome. This study examined pre-treatment purpose in life as a predictor of response to a 30-day residential substance use treatment program among 154 participants with cocaine dependence. Purpose in life was unrelated to cocaine or alcohol use during the 6 months pretreatment. After controlling for age, baseline use, and depressive symptoms, purpose in life significantly (p purpose in life may be an important aspect of treatment among cocaine dependent patients. PMID:21129893

  12. Treatment of femoral neck fractures in young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ly, Thuan V; Swiontkowski, Marc F

    2009-01-01

    Femoral neck fractures in physiologically young adults, which often result from high-energy trauma, are less common than intracapsular femoral neck fractures in elderly patients. They are associated with higher incidences of femoral head osteonecrosis and nonunion. Understanding the multiple factors that play a significant role in preventing these complications will contribute to a good outcome. Although achieving an anatomic reduction and stable internal fixation are imperative, other treatment variables, such as time to surgery, the role of capsulotomy, and the method of fixation remain debatable. Open reduction and internal fixation through a Watson-Jones exposure is the recommended approach. Definitive fixation can be accomplished with three cannulated or noncannulated cancellous screws. Capsulotomy in femoral neck fractures remains a controversial issue, and the practice varies by institution, region, and country. The timing of the open reduction and internal fixation is controversial. Until conclusive data are available through prospective, controlled studies, performing a capsulotomy followed by open reduction and internal fixation on an urgent basis is recommended. The goals of treating femoral neck fractures should include early diagnosis, early surgery, anatomic reduction, capsular decompression, and stable internal fixation.

  13. Electronic cigarettes in adults in outpatient substance use treatment: Awareness, perceptions, use, and reasons for use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Erica N; Harrell, Paul T; Hendricks, Peter S; O'Grady, Kevin E; Pickworth, Wallace B; Vocci, Frank J

    2015-04-01

    Most studies on e-cigarettes have come from population-based surveys. The current research aimed to provide initial data on e-cigarette awareness, perceptions, use, and reasons for use among adults seeking substance use treatment. A survey was conducted among 198 participants ≥18 years old in a community-based outpatient substance use treatment program. Of the 198 participants, 69% currently smoked cigarettes, 92% were aware of e-cigarettes, and 58% had ever used e-cigarettes. The proportion of the number of participants who had ever used e-cigarettes to the number who currently smoked (89.7%) appeared higher than the corresponding proportion in the 2012-13 National Adult Tobacco Survey (78.3%). Almost half of the sample who reported ever using e-cigarettes endorsed quitting or reducing smoking as a reason for use, and 32% endorsed reasons for use relating to curiosity/experimentation. A greater likelihood of e-cigarette ever-use was significantly associated with younger age (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 0.94, 95%confidence interval [CI] = 0.90, 0.98) and perceptions related to using e-cigarettes in public places where smoking cigarettes is not allowed (AOR = 2.96, 95%CI = 1.18, 7.42) but was not associated with primary drug of choice. E-cigarette use in adults seeking substance use treatment appears higher than it is in the US general population of smokers. The high frequency of use may be due to curiosity/experimentation or attempts to quit or reduce smoking. Future research may consider how e-cigarettes interact with other substance use and affect high rates of nicotine and tobacco use in this population. © American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry.

  14. Distinct functional programming of human fetal and adult monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krow-Lucal, Elisabeth R; Kim, Charles C; Burt, Trevor D; McCune, Joseph M

    2014-03-20

    Preterm birth affects 1 out of 9 infants in the United States and is the leading cause of long-term neurologic handicap and infant mortality, accounting for 35% of all infant deaths in 2008. Although cytokines including interferon-γ (IFN-γ), interleukin-10 (IL-10), IL-6, and IL-1 are produced in response to in utero infection and are strongly associated with preterm labor, little is known about how human fetal immune cells respond to these cytokines. We demonstrate that fetal and adult CD14(+)CD16(-) classical monocytes are distinct in terms of basal transcriptional profiles and in phosphorylation of signal transducers and activators of transcription (STATs) in response to cytokines. Fetal monocytes phosphorylate canonical and noncanonical STATs and respond more strongly to IFN-γ, IL-6, and IL-4 than adult monocytes. We demonstrate a higher ratio of SOCS3 to IL-6 receptor in adult monocytes than in fetal monocytes, potentially explaining differences in STAT phosphorylation. Additionally, IFN-γ signaling results in upregulation of antigen presentation and costimulatory machinery in adult, but not fetal, monocytes. These findings represent the first evidence that primary human fetal and adult monocytes are functionally distinct, potentially explaining how these cells respond differentially to cytokines implicated in development, in utero infections, and the pathogenesis of preterm labor.

  15. Predictors of Adult Education Program Satisfaction in Urban Community-Dwelling Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Takashi; López, Erick B.; Keene, Jennifer R.; Kinney, Jennifer M.

    2015-01-01

    Lifelong learning is receiving greater attention due to population aging in modern societies. Lifelong learning benefits individuals by supporting their physical, psychological, social, and economic well-being. However, older adults generally have lower motivation for learning than younger adults, and facilitating long-term participation in…

  16. Does a Wii-based exercise program enhance balance control of independently functioning older adults? A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laufer Y

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Yocheved Laufer, Gali Dar, Einat Kodesh Physical Therapy Department, Faculty of Social Welfare and Health Sciences, University of Haifa, Haifa, Israel Background: Exercise programs that challenge an individual’s balance have been shown to reduce the risk of falls among older adults. Virtual reality computer-based technology that provides the user with opportunities to interact with virtual objects is used extensively for entertainment. There is a growing interest in the potential of virtual reality-based interventions for balance training in older adults. This work comprises a systematic review of the literature to determine the effects of intervention programs utilizing the Nintendo Wii console on balance control and functional performance in independently functioning older adults.Methods: Studies were obtained by searching the following databases: PubMed, CINAHL, PEDro, EMBASE, SPORTdiscus, and Google Scholar, followed by a hand search of bibliographic references of the included studies. Included were randomized controlled trials written in English in which Nintendo Wii Fit was used to enhance standing balance performance in older adults and compared with an alternative exercise treatment, placebo, or no treatment.Results: Seven relevant studies were retrieved. The four studies examining the effect of Wii-based exercise compared with no exercise reported positive effects on at least one outcome measure related to balance performance in older adults. Studies comparing Wii-based training with alternative exercise programs generally indicated that the balance improvements achieved by Wii-based training are comparable with those achieved by other exercise programs.Conclusion: The review indicates that Wii-based exercise programs may serve as an alternative to more conventional forms of exercise aimed at improving balance control. However, due to the great variability between studies in terms of the intervention protocols and outcome measures, as

  17. Social Skills Training for Depressed, Visually Impaired Older Adults: A Treatment Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donohue, Brad; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Describes a social skills training package for the treatment of depressed, visually impaired older adults. The treatment focuses on increasing the frequency and level of assertiveness with which visually impaired older adults interact with one another. Employs standardized assessment measures to evaluate therapeutic progress. (JPS)

  18. Antiretroviral treatment of adult HIV infection: 2014 recommendations of the International Antiviral Society-USA Panel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gunthard, H.F.; Aberg, J.A.; Eron, J.J.; Hoy, J.F.; Telenti, A.; Benson, C.A.; Burger, D.M.; Cahn, P.; Gallant, J.E.; Glesby, M.J.; Reiss, P.; Saag, M.S.; Thomas, D.L.; Jacobsen, D.M.; Volberding, P.A.

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE: New data and antiretroviral regimens expand treatment choices in resource-rich settings and warrant an update of recommendations to treat adults infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). OBJECTIVE: To provide updated treatment recommendations for adults with HIV, emphasizing when

  19. Atraumatic Restorative Treatment (ART) in pediatric dentistry residency programs: a survey of program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kateeb, Elham; Warren, John; Damiano, Peter; Momany, Elizabeth; Kanellis, Michael; Weber-Gasparoni, Karin; Ansley, Tim

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the extent of clinical training on atraumatic restorative treatment (ART) among pediatric dentistry residency programs and assess program directors' attitudes toward ART. All U.S. Pediatric Dentistry residency programs' directors were asked to complete a web-based survey. Sixty-one of the 76 directors (80 percent) completed the survey, with no significant response bias. Eighty-nine percent of the responding programs provided clinical instruction on ART. Of these, 30 percent provided ART training often/very often. ART was used mostly in single-surface cavities (43 percent) and as an interim treatment in primary teeth (57 percent). Factors associated with ART clinical training included not placing amalgams in primary teeth (Ppediatric dentistry residency programs in the United States. Residency directors' attitudes were highly predictive of the amount of clinical training provided, suggesting that directors need to be better informed about the use of ART.

  20. A standalone Internet cognitive behavior therapy treatment for social anxiety in adults who stutter: CBTpsych.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helgadóttir, Fjóla Dögg; Menzies, Ross G; Onslow, Mark; Packman, Ann; O'Brian, Sue

    2014-09-01

    Social anxiety is common for those who stutter and efficacious cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) for them appears viable. However, there are difficulties with provision of CBT services for anxiety among those who stutter. Standalone Internet CBT treatment is a potential solution to those problems. CBTpsych is a fully automated, online social anxiety intervention for those who stutter. This report is a Phase I trial of CBTpsych. Fourteen participants were allowed 5 months to complete seven sections of CBTpsych. Pre-treatment and post-treatment assessments tested for social anxiety, common unhelpful thoughts related to stuttering, quality of life and stuttering frequency. Significant post-treatment improvements in social anxiety, unhelpful thoughts, and quality of life were reported. Five of seven participants diagnosed with social anxiety lost those diagnoses at post-treatment. The two participants who did not lose social anxiety diagnoses did not complete all the CBTpsych modules. CBTpsych did not improve stuttering frequency. Eleven of the fourteen participants who began treatment completed Section 4 or more of the CBTpsych intervention. CBTpsych provides a potential means to provide CBT treatment for social anxiety associated with stuttering, to any client without cost, regardless of location. Further clinical trials are warranted. At the end of this activity the reader will be able to: (a) describe that social anxiety is common in those who stutter; (b) discuss the origin of social anxiety and the associated link with bullying; (c) summarize the problems in provision of effective evidence based cognitive behavior therapy for adults who stutter; (d) describe a scalable computerized treatment designed to tackle the service provision gap; (e) describe the unhelpful thoughts associated with stuttering that this fully automated computer program was able to tackle; (f) list the positive outcomes for individuals who stuttered that participated in this trial such as the

  1. Facilitating a Reading Anxiety Treatment Program for Preservice Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Ruth M.

    1998-01-01

    Examines the use of systematic desensitization in a reading anxiety treatment program designed for preservice teachers. States that reading anxiety creates in teachers non-productive attitudes which can, and should, be altered to advance the literacy development of students. Measures reading anxiety of 23 preservice teachers before, during, and…

  2. Dropout of a multidisciplinary treatment program for women with fibromyalgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Rehder Gonçalves

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the dropout of a multidisciplinary treatment program in fibromyalgia (FM. Methods: An observational study conducted during the period of April 2000 to December 2005, including 133 women with fibromyalgia, participating in a multidisciplinary treatment program. Those who had left the treatment for two weeks or more were classified as inactive and contacted by telephone to record the reasons for their noncompliance, which were divided into four groups: 1 Family; 2 Occupations; 3 Medical; 4 Other Reasons. Results: When collecting data, 92 (69.4% women were considered inactive. There was no significant difference between noncompliance before and after six months of treatment. Of the total number of inactive women, 54 (40.8% participants left for medical reasons, 30 (22.6% for other reasons, 26 (19.4% for family reasons and 23 (17.2% due to occupation. There was no statistical difference between the motives of dropout according to the length of stay in the program (p> 0.05. Conclusion: We conclude that the multidisciplinary program for women with fibromyalgia had high levels of noncompliance, half of them occurred in the first six months. Among the main reasons reported for dropout, the medical reasons were more frequent.

  3. Drones in Extension Programming: Implementation of Adult and Youth Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Koff, Jason P.

    2017-01-01

    The use of unmanned aircraft systems (UASs), or consumer drones, in agriculture has the potential to revolutionize the way certain farm practices are conducted and the way science, technology, engineering, and math principles can be taught. Currently, there is need for UAS training for both adults and youths, and that need will increase with the…

  4. Adult Learning Strategies in an Onsite Training Program in Tunisia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayachi, Zeineb

    2015-01-01

    The new market place has dictated on adults the use of English as it is the first international language used in business. However, learning a foreign language becomes more and more complicated as the learner gets older, is in a mature command of L1 and L2, and does not have enough time to learn due to professional responsibilities. Contrary to…

  5. Fetal Programming of Adult Disease: Implications for Prenatal Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    The obesity epidemic, including a marked increase in the prevalence of obesity among pregnant women, represents a critical public health problem in the United States and throughout the world. Over the past two decades, it has been increasingly recognized that the risk of adult ...

  6. The integration of an educational program into a treatment facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuckit, M A; Berger, F

    1989-02-01

    This paper reviews the integration of an active teaching program into a busy treatment facility. All first and second year medical students at the University of California, San Diego take part in a series of didactic lectures and small group discussions, while third and fourth year students have the opportunity of joining a treatment team for 4 to 6 weeks. All psychiatric residents spend a minimum of 8 weeks working on the unit, and one fourth year resident is chosen to work with the staff for a year. The interactions between treatment teams and students in various stages of development help maximize enthusiasm and the commitment to the best patient care possible.

  7. Program characteristics for successful treatment of adolescent drug abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, A S; Glickman, N W

    1986-11-01

    The relationship to treatment outcome, as measured by reduction in drug use, of specific characteristics and elements of 30 drug-free outpatient programs for adolescents is reported. Admission and discharge data were obtained from National Institute on Drug Abuse-Client Oriented Data Acquisition Process on 5789 adolescents in the 30 programs. A partial cross-validation study was conducted by analyzing separately for two annual client subsamples. The program, not the individual clients, was the unit of analysis. While controlling for differences between programs on their client populations, multiple regression analysis indicated that the following characteristics of programs were found to predict the outcome criterion variable, to a statistically significant degree: treat a large number of adolescent clients; have a special school for school dropouts; have a relatively large budget; employ counselors or therapists who have at least 2 years' experience in working with adolescent drug abusers; provide special services such as vocational counseling, recreational services, and birth control services; use such therapy methods as crisis intervention, gestalt therapy, music/art therapy, and group confrontation; and be perceived by the clients as allowing and encouraging free expression and spontaneous action by clients. There was a high degree of replication of these findings across the two annual subsamples of clients; and the amount of variance in the treatment outcome criterion variable accounted for by the above-listed program characteristics was quite impressive.

  8. Challenges and successes of a multidisciplinary pediatric obesity treatment program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Stephanie M; Palmer, Wendy; Welsh, Jean A; Vos, Miriam B

    2014-12-01

    Despite the well-documented need for multidisciplinary pediatric obesity treatment programs, few programs exist and best practices are not clearly defined. We describe the design and initial quality-related outcomes of the Strong4Life multidisciplinary pediatric obesity treatment program along with some challenges and solutions implemented over the first 2 years. The purpose of this report is to inform others interested in designing similar programs. The Strong4Life Clinic obesity program was designed to provide children with the medical care, as well as the behavior change guidance and support needed to reverse their obesity and/or minimize the related health risks. This low-intensity program is designed to provide approximately 6 hours of care over 12 months from a medical provider, psychologist, registered dietitian nutritionist, exercise physiologist, and nurse. Between August 2011 and February 2014, the Strong4Life clinic served 781 high-risk (mean sex- and age-adjusted body mass index [BMI] percentile 98.8) and racially/ethnically diverse (45% non-Hispanic black and 24% Hispanic) patients. Of the 781 patients seen, 66% returned for at least 1 visit. Nearly all returning Strong4Life patients stabilized or improved their BMI (90% of those who participated 6 months, but longer follow-up and assessment of comorbidities are needed. © 2014 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  9. Access to Employee Wellness Programs and Use of Preventive Care Services Among U.S. Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isehunwa, Oluwaseyi O; Carlton, Erik L; Wang, Yang; Jiang, Yu; Kedia, Satish; Chang, Cyril F; Fijabi, Daniel; Bhuyan, Soumitra S

    2017-12-01

    There is little research at the national level on access to employee wellness programs and the use of preventive care services. This study examined the use of seven preventive care services among U.S working adults with access to employee wellness programs. The study population comprised 17,699 working adults aged ≥18 years, obtained from the 2015 National Health Interview Survey. Multivariate logistic regression models examined the relationship between access to employee wellness programs and use of seven preventive care services: influenza vaccination, blood pressure check, diabetes check, cholesterol check, Pap smear test, mammogram, and colon cancer screening. Data analysis began in Fall 2016. Overall, 46.6% of working adults reported having access to employee wellness programs in 2015. Working adults with access to employee wellness programs had higher odds of receiving influenza vaccination (OR=1.57, 95% CI=1.43, 1.72, paccess to employee wellness programs and the use of Pap smear test and colon cancer screening services. Using a nationally representative sample of individuals, this study found a positive association between access to employee wellness programs and the use of preventive care services. The results support favorable policies to encourage implementing wellness programs in all worksites, especially those with <50 employees. Copyright © 2017 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Investigating Adult Literacy Programs through Community Engagement Research: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Jaclyn Michelle

    2014-01-01

    This article presents findings from a case study of an adult literacy program. The author conducted this IRB-approved study as part of a three-year, research-based, community-engagement project that partnered the literacy program with a writing center at a large public research university. The author argues that the participatory methods afforded…

  11. Mission Intentionality and Operational Integrity: The Essential Role of Faculty in Adult Degree Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Anthony L.

    2012-01-01

    Eastern University has moved from a distributed model to a centralized model for administration of its adult degree programs. This move involved numerous factors and motivations but one central component in the ultimate success of that move was a significant change in the role of faculty assigned to the program. Once regarded as rather ancillary…

  12. AN ANALYSIS OF PARTICIPANTS IN A LONG-TERM ADULT EDUCATION PROGRAM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    APPLEBAUM, LEON; ROBERTS, HIGDON C., JR.

    THE STUDY INVESTIGATED PERSONAL CHARACTERISTICS AND SOCIAL FACTORS OF SUCCESSFUL PARTICIPANTS AND DROPOUTS IN THE UNION LEADERSHIP PROGRAM (ULP), A THREE-YEAR ADULT EDUCATION PROGRAM SPONSORED BY THE LABOR EDUCATION AND RESEARCH SERVICE OF THE OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY. THE ULP MEETS 24 WEEKS PER YEAR, ONE NIGHT PER WEEK, IN 15 CITIES IN OHIO, AND HAD…

  13. PMSP: A Program To Develop Perceptive-Motor Skills in Adolescents and Adults with Mental Retardation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallisera, Maria

    This monograph describes the Perceptive Motor Skills Program (PMSP) being used with adolescents and adults having mental retardation in Catalonia, Spain. The program is based on the following principles: chronologically age appropriate activities; use of daily living tools; multiple objectives and working materials; and balance between…

  14. Liberal Studies Programs for the Adult College Student--Is There Innovation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swift, John S., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Special liberal studies baccalaureate programming for adults is discussed. Such programs may provide access through open admissions, have special seminar courses, recognize and grant credit for life experience, provide special counseling, schedule classes in the evening, and make available other desired options and services. (Author/MLW)

  15. Factors Impacting Adult Learner Achievement in a Technology Certificate Program on Computer Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delialioglu, Omer; Cakir, Hasan; Bichelmeyer, Barbara A.; Dennis, Alan R.; Duffy, Thomas M.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates the factors impacting the achievement of adult learners in a technology certificate program on computer networks. We studied 2442 participants in 256 institutions. The participants were older than age 18 and were enrolled in the Cisco Certified Network Associate (CCNA) technology training program as "non-degree" or…

  16. Reframing Resilience: Pilot Evaluation of a Program to Promote Resilience in Marginalized Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fullen, Matthew C.; Gorby, Sean R.

    2016-01-01

    Resilience has been described as a paradigm for aging that is more inclusive than models that focus on physiological and functional abilities. We evaluated a novel program, Resilient Aging, designed to influence marginalized older adults' perceptions of their resilience, self-efficacy, and wellness. The multiweek group program incorporated an…

  17. A Stochastic Programming Model for Fuel Treatment Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohannad Kabli

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This work considers a two-stage stochastic integer programming (SIP approach for optimizing fuel treatment planning under uncertainty in weather and fire occurrence for rural forests. Given a set of areas for potentially performing fuel treatment, the problem is to decide the best treatment option for each area under uncertainty in future weather and fire occurrence. A two-stage SIP model is devised whose objective is to minimize the here-and-now cost of fuel treatment in the first-stage, plus the expected future costs due to uncertain impact from potential fires in the second-stage calculated as ecosystem services losses. The model considers four fuel treatment options: no treatment, mechanical thinning, prescribed fire, and grazing. Several constraints such as budgetary and labor constraints are included in the model and a standard fire behavior model is used to estimate some of the parameters of the model such as fuel levels at the beginning of the fire season. The SIP model was applied to data for a study area in East Texas with 15 treatment areas under different weather scenarios. The results of the study show, for example, that unless the expected ecosystem services values for an area outweigh fuel treatment costs, no treatment is the best choice for the area. Thus the valuation of the area together with the probability of fire occurrence and behavior strongly drive fuel treatment choices.

  18. Osteoporosis knowledge translation for young adults: new directions for prevention programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Alyson

    2017-08-01

    Osteoporosis prevention is heavily reliant on education programs, which are most effective when tailored to their intended audience. Most osteoporosis prevention education is designed for older adults, making application of these programs to younger adults difficult. Designing programs for young adults requires understanding the information-seeking practices of young adults, so that knowledge about osteoporosis can be effectively translated. Individual interviews were conducted with 60 men and women-multiethnic, Canadian young adults-to explore both the sources and types of information they search for when seeking information on nutrition or bone health. The results of this study raised themes related to the sources participants use, to their interests and to ways of engaging young adults. Prevention programs should make use of traditional sources, such as peers, family members and medical professionals, as well as emerging technologies, such as social media. Choice of sources was related to the perceived authority of and trust associated with the source. Messaging should relate to young adult interests, such as fitness and food-topics on which young adults are already seeking information-rather than being embedded within specific osteoporosis awareness materials. Engaging young adults means using relatable messages that are short and encourage small changes. Small gender-based differences were found in the information-seeking interests of participants. Differences related to age were not examined. Creating short, action-oriented messages that are designed to encourage small changes in behaviour and are packaged with information that young adults are actively seeking is more likely to result in active engagement in prevention behaviours.

  19. Measuring Parental Treatment Adherence in a Multimodal Treatment Program for Children with ADHD: A Preliminary Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, Craig; Reddy, Linda A.

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluated the clinical significance of measuring between session parental adherence on child and parent outcomes for 51 children (age 4 to 8.5 years) with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in a multimodal group training program. Three group treatment conditions: (a) child-only treatment (C1), (c) child and parent training…

  20. International Phase II clinical trial of CBTPsych: A standalone Internet social anxiety treatment for adults who stutter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzies, Ross; O'Brian, Sue; Lowe, Robyn; Packman, Ann; Onslow, Mark

    2016-06-01

    CBTPsych is an individualized, fully automated, standalone Internet treatment program that requires no clinical contact or support. It is designed specifically for those who stutter. Two preliminary trials demonstrated that it may be efficacious for treating the social anxiety commonly associated with stuttering. However, both trials involved pre- and post-treatment assessment at a speech clinic. This contact may have increased compliance, commitment and adherence with the program. The present study sought to establish the effectiveness of CBTPsych in a large international trial with no contact of any kind from researchers or clinicians. Participants were 267 adults with a reported history of stuttering who were given a maximum of 5 months access to CBTPsych. Pre- and post-treatment functioning was assessed within the online program with a range of psychometric measures. Forty-nine participants (18.4%) completed all seven modules of CBTPsych and completed the post-treatment online assessments. That compliance rate was far superior to similar community trials of self-directed Internet mental health programs. Completion of the program was associated with large, statistically and clinically significant reductions for all measures. The reductions were similar to those obtained in earlier trials of CBTPsych, and those obtained in trials of in-clinic CBT with an expert clinician. CBTPsych is a promising individualized treatment for social anxiety for a proportion of adults who stutter, which requires no health care costs in terms of clinician contact or support. The reader will be able to: (a) discuss the reasons for investigating CBTPsych without any clinical contact; (b) describe the main components of the CBTPsych treatment; (c) summarize the results of this clinical trial; (d) describe how the results might affect clinical practice, if at all. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Preliminary Results of the Louisiana Sex Offender Treatment Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee A. Underwood

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to offer preliminary support for the Louisiana Sex Offender Treatment Program (LSOTP in addressing the needs of juvenile sex offenders. Research objectives were (1 to offer statistical evidence for reductions in anxiety, depression, cognitive distortion and negative attitudes towards women comparing a group of 21 adolescents, 12 of whom received services as usual and nine of whom participated in the LSOTP. A controlled experimental evaluation design was utilized. The juvenile sex offenders were randomly assigned to the experimental group for 12 weeks receiving treatment services and a control group receiving care “as usual” in a residential group care program. Participants in the experimental group experienced statistically significant decreases in cognitive distortions related specifically to rape and molestation.The results of this study offer preliminary support of the LSOTP as a best practices alternative to other treatment modalities.

  2. Purpose in life predicts treatment outcome among adult cocaine abusers in treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Rosemarie A; MacKinnon, Selene; Johnson, Jennifer; Rohsenow, Damaris J

    2011-03-01

    A sense of purpose in life has been positively associated with mental health and well-being and has been negatively associated with alcohol use in correlational and longitudinal studies but has not been studied as a predictor of cocaine treatment outcome. This study examined pretreatment purpose in life as a predictor of response to a 30-day residential substance use treatment program among 154 participants with cocaine dependence. Purpose in life was unrelated to cocaine or alcohol use during the 6 months pretreatment. After controlling for age, baseline use, and depressive symptoms, purpose in life significantly (p purpose in life may be an important aspect of treatment among cocaine-dependent patients. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Intergenerational Service Learning Program Improves Aging Knowledge and Expectations and Reduces Ageism in Younger Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah L. Francis

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses a study which evaluated the effects of an intergenerational service-learning exergaming program for older adults on younger adults’ aging knowledge, expectations, and perceptions. Eighteen college students (ages 19-26 years served as trainers for an 8-week exergaming physical activity program for older adults (12 contact hours. Questionnaires assessing aging knowledge, ageist attitudes and aging expectations were completed at Weeks 1, 8, and 25 (follow-up; program evaluations were completed at Weeks 8 and 25. Significant improvement from Week 1 to Week 25 was found for: Aging knowledge scores (p

  4. Development of the SIT, an Instrument to Evaluate the Transfer Effects of Adult Education Programs for Social Inclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Greef, Maurice; Segers, Mien; Verte, Dominique

    2010-01-01

    To date, hardly any evidence is available on the quality of adult education programs for vulnerable adults. Evaluation instruments or models mostly focussed on regular education and less on programs of adult education aiming to enhance social inclusion. This study presents a first exploration of the construct validity of a newly developed…

  5. Impact of a Home Leisure Educational Program for Older Adults Who Have Had a Stroke (Home Leisure Educational Program).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nour, Kareen; Desrosiers, Johanne; Gauthier, Pierre; Carbonneau, Helene

    2002-01-01

    Examined the effectiveness of leisure education for older adults having difficulty adjusting psychologically after a stroke. Participants received either an experimental home leisure education program (intervention group) or a friendly home visit (control group) after discharge from rehabilitation. The intervention group performed significantly…

  6. A Process Evaluation of the Friendships and Dating Program for Adults with Developmental Disabilities: Measuring the Fidelity of Program Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Karen M.; Windsor, Richard; Atkinson, Julie P.

    2012-01-01

    Adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities are frequently abused in dating and partnered relationships. The Friendships and Dating Program (FDP) was developed to prevent violence in dating and partnered relationships and to teach social skills needed to develop healthy, meaningful relationships among this population. A pilot study…

  7. SELECTION OF CHEMICAL TREATMENT PROGRAM FOR OILY WASTEWATER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Díaz

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available When selecting a chemical treatment program for wastewater to achieve an effective flocculation and coagulation is crucial to understand how individual colloids interact. The coagulation process requires a rapid mixing while flocculation process needs a slow mixing. The behavior of colloids in water is strongly influenced by the electrokinetic charge, where each colloidal particle carries its own charge, which in its nature is usually negative. Polymers, which are long chains of high molecular weight and high charge, when added to water begin to form longer chains, allowing removing numerous particles of suspended matter. A study of physico-chemical treatment by addition of coagulant and flocculant was carried out in order to determine a chemical program for oily wastewater coming from the gravity separation process in a crude oil refinery. The tests were carried out in a Jar Test equipment, where commercial products: aluminum polychloride (PAC, aluminum sulfate and Sintec D50 were evaluated with five different flocculants. The selected chemical program was evaluated with fluids at three temperatures to know its sensitivity to this parameter and the mixing energy in the coagulation and flocculation. The chemical program and operational characteristics for physico-chemical treatment with PAC were determined, obtaining a removal of more than 93% for suspended matter and 96% for total hydrocarbons for the selected coagulant / flocculant combination.

  8. Chronic disease and recent addiction treatment utilization among alcohol and drug dependent adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samet Jeffrey

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic medical diseases require regular and longitudinal care and self-management for effective treatment. When chronic diseases include substance use disorders, care and treatment of both the medical and addiction disorders may affect access to care and the ability to focus on both conditions. The objective of this paper is to evaluate the association between the presence of chronic medical disease and recent addiction treatment utilization among adults with substance dependence. Methods Cross-sectional secondary data analysis of self-reported baseline data from alcohol and/or drug-dependent adults enrolled in a randomized clinical trial of a disease management program for substance dependence in primary care. The main independent variable was chronic medical disease status, categorized using the Katz Comorbidity Score as none, single condition of lower severity, or higher severity (multiple conditions or single higher severity condition, based on comorbidity scores determined from self-report. Asthma was also examined in secondary analyses. The primary outcome was any self-reported addiction treatment utilization (excluding detoxification in the 3 months prior to study entry, including receipt of any addiction-focused counseling or addiction medication from any healthcare provider. Logistic regression models were adjusted for sociodemographics, type of substance dependence, recruitment site, current smoking, and recent anxiety severity. Results Of 563 subjects, 184 (33% reported any chronic disease (20% low severity; 13% higher severity and 111 (20% reported asthma; 157 (28% reported any addiction treatment utilization in the past 3 months. In multivariate regression analyses, no significant effect was detected for chronic disease on addiction treatment utilization (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 0.88 lower severity vs. none, 95% confidence interval (CI: 0.60, 1.28; AOR 1.29 higher severity vs. none, 95% CI: 0.89, 1.88 nor for

  9. Osteoporosis knowledge translation for young adults: new directions for prevention programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alyson Holland

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Osteoporosis prevention is heavily reliant on education programs, which are most effective when tailored to their intended audience. Most osteoporosis prevention education is designed for older adults, making application of these programs to younger adults difficult. Designing programs for young adults requires understanding the information-seeking practices of young adults, so that knowledge about osteoporosis can be effectively translated. Methods: Individual interviews were conducted with 60 men and women—multiethnic, Canadian young adults—to explore both the sources and types of information they search for when seeking information on nutrition or bone health. Results: The results of this study raised themes related to the sources participants use, to their interests and to ways of engaging young adults. Prevention programs should make use of traditional sources, such as peers, family members and medical professionals, as well as emerging technologies, such as social media. Choice of sources was related to the perceived authority of and trust associated with the source. Messaging should relate to young adult interests, such as fitness and food—topics on which young adults are already seeking information—rather than being embedded within specific osteoporosis awareness materials. Engaging young adults means using relatable messages that are short and encourage small changes. Small gender-based differences were found in the information-seeking interests of participants. Differences related to age were not examined. Conclusion: Creating short, action-oriented messages that are designed to encourage small changes in behaviour and are packaged with information that young adults are actively seeking is more likely to result in active engagement in prevention behaviours.

  10. Self-Reported Reasons for Not Receiving Mental Health Treatment in Adults With Serious Suicidal Thoughts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuramoto-Crawford, S Janet; Han, Beth; McKeon, Richard T

    2017-06-01

    This study examined self-reported reasons for not receiving mental health treatment among adults with past-year serious suicidal thoughts and their sociodemographic characteristics associated with these reasons. Using the 2008-2013 National Surveys on Drug Use and Health, we examined 8,400 respondents aged 18 years or older who had past-year serious thoughts of suicide and did not receive mental health treatment that year. Logistic regression analyses were conducted to estimate the associations between sociodemographic characteristics and self-reported reasons for not receiving mental health treatment among these suicidal adults. Among adults with serious suicidal thoughts who did not receive mental health treatment in the past year, three-fourths did not feel the need for treatment. Of the one-fourth of those who felt the need for treatment, the main reason for not receiving treatment was financial (58.4%), followed by logistical reasons such as not knowing where to go (36.1%). A greater proportion of suicidal adults than nonsuicidal adults perceived more than 1 barrier to treatment (43.8% vs 34.3%). Among suicidal adults who did not receive mental health treatment that year, the odds of not feeling the need for mental health treatment were higher in men (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 1.68; 95% CI, 1.42-1.99), adults aged 50 years or older (AOR = 3.02; 95% CI, 2.02-4.51), racial and ethnic minorities (AORs = 1.59-2.13), publicly insured (AOR = 1.54; 95% CI, 1.14-2.07), and nonmetropolitan residents (AOR = 1.50; 95% CI, 1.20-1.88). Most suicidal adults did not feel the need for mental health treatment. Of those who felt the need, multiple barriers were identified. A multifaceted approach to address these barriers is needed to promote receipt of mental health treatment among this vulnerable population.

  11. Adolescent and Young Adult Cancer Survivorship Educational Programming: A Qualitative Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollmer Dahlke, Deborah; Fair, Kayla; Hong, Yan Alicia; Kellstedt, Debra; Ory, Marcia G

    2017-02-10

    This program evaluation considers the need for increased professional and patient education for adolescent and young adult (AYA) cancer survivorship. Due to the high incidence of late effects of cancer treatment among AYA cancer survivors, knowledge sharing and communications are needed throughout the transition from cancer care into community care. AYA survivors are likely to need developmentally appropriate psychosocial care as well as extensive follow-on surveillance by physicians who are educated and aware of the likely chronic conditions and late effects that may occur in these patients. The objective of this study was to evaluate the outcomes of the After Cancer Care Ends, Survivorship Starts for Adolescent and Young Adults (ACCESS AYA) programming. The intent of the ACCESS AYA program was to build health literacy around AYA survivorship issues and to stimulate improved communications between survivors and health care providers. This paper addresses the central research question of "How did the ACCESS AYA program increase health literacy, communications, and understanding among AYA survivors and providers?" The primarily qualitative evaluation included a brief introductory survey of participant awareness and effectiveness of the ACCESS AYA project serving as a recruitment tool. Survey respondents were invited to participate in in-depth interviews based on interview guides tailored to the different stakeholder groups. The evaluation used the Atlas Ti qualitative database and software for coding and key word analyses. Interrater reliability analyses were assessed using Cohen kappa analysis with Stata 12.1 (StataCorp LLC) software. The key themes, which included survivor wellbeing, health care professional education, cancer advocates role and education, hospital and community-based resources, and the role of societal support, are presented in a concept map. The interrater reliability scores (ranging from 1 to minus 1) were .893 for first cycle coding and .784

  12. Disparities in Treatment of Older Adults with Suicide Risk in the Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias, Sarah A; Boudreaux, Edwin D; Segal, Daniel L; Miller, Ivan; Camargo, Carlos A; Betz, Marian E

    2017-10-01

    We described characteristics and treatment received for older (≥60 years) vs younger (adult emergency department (ED) patients with suicide risk. Retrospective chart review. An ED with universal screening for suicide risk. Eligible charts included a random sample of adults (≥18 years) who screened positive for suicidal ideation (SI) in past 2 weeks and/or a suicide attempt (SA) within the past 6 months. Visit dates were from May 2014 to September 2016. A total of 800 charts were reviewed, with oversampling of older adults. Of the 200 older adults sampled, fewer older adults compared to younger adults (n = 600) had a chief complaint involving psychiatric behavior (53% vs 70%) or self-harm behavior (26% vs 36%). Although a higher number of older adults (93%) had documentation of current SI compared to younger adults (79%), fewer older adults (17%) reported SA in the past 2 weeks compared to younger adults (23%). Of those with a positive suicide screen who were discharged home, less than half of older adults received a mental health evaluation during their visit (42%, 95% CI 34-52) compared to 66% (95% CI 61-70) of younger adults who met the same criteria. Similarly, fewer older, than younger, adult patients with current SI/SA received referral resources (34%; 95% CI 26-43; vs 60%; 95% CI 55-65). Significantly fewer suicidal older adult patients who were discharged home received a mental health evaluation when compared to similar younger adults. These findings highlight an important area for improvement in the treatment of older adults at risk for suicide. © 2017, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2017, The American Geriatrics Society.

  13. Treatment for Adults (with Cleft Lip and Palate)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... throat, hearing, dentistry, speech, oral surgery, nursing, and psychology among others. You can obtain the names of ... of the cleft team, particularly the psychologist and social worker. Interaction with other adults with clefts, through ...

  14. Effects of a nurse-managed program on hepatitis A and B vaccine completion among homeless adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyamathi, Adeline; Liu, Yihang; Marfisee, Mary; Shoptaw, Steven; Gregerson, Paul; Saab, Sammy; Leake, Barbara; Tyler, Darlene; Gelberg, Lillian

    2009-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection constitutes a major health problem for homeless persons. Ability to complete an HBV vaccination series is complicated by the need to prioritize competing needs, such as addiction issues, safe places to sleep, and food, over health concerns. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effectiveness of a nurse-case-managed intervention compared with that of two standard programs on completion of the combined hepatitis A virus (HAV) and HBV vaccine series among homeless adults and to assess sociodemographic factors and risk behaviors related to the vaccine completion. A randomized, three-group, prospective, quasi-experimental design was conducted with 865 homeless adults residing in homeless shelters, drug rehabilitation sites, and outdoor areas in the Skid Row area of Los Angeles. The programs included (a) nurse-case-managed sessions plus targeted hepatitis education, incentives, and tracking (NCMIT); (b) standard targeted hepatitis education plus incentives and tracking (SIT); and (c) standard targeted hepatitis education and incentives only (SI). Sixty-eight percent of the NCMIT participants completed the three-series vaccine at 6 months, compared with 61% of SIT participants and 54% of SI participants. NCMIT participants had almost 2 times greater odds of completing vaccination than those of participants in the SI program. Completers were more likely to be older, to be female, to report fair or poor health, and not to have participated in a self-help drug treatment program. Newly homeless White adults were significantly less likely than were African Americans to complete the vaccine series. The use of vaccination programs incorporating nurse case management and tracking is critical in supporting adherence to completion of a 6-month HAV/HBV vaccine. The finding that White homeless persons were the least likely to complete the vaccine series suggests that programs tailored to address their unique cultural issues are needed.

  15. The Adult Roles Models Program: Feasibility, Acceptability, and Initial Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colarossi, Lisa; Silver, Ellen Johnson; Dean, Randa; Perez, Amanda; Rivera, Angelic

    2014-04-01

    We present the feasibility and acceptability of a parent sexuality education program led by peer educators in community settings. We also report the results of an outcome evaluation with 71 parents who were randomized to the intervention or a control group, and surveyed one month prior to and six months after the 4-week intervention. The program was highly feasible and acceptable to participants, and the curriculum was implemented with a high level of fidelity and facilitator quality. Pilot data show promising outcomes for increasing parental knowledge, communication, and monitoring of their adolescent children.

  16. Lifestyle interventions for the treatment of urinary incontinence in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imamura, Mari; Williams, Kate; Wells, Mandy; McGrother, Catherine

    2015-12-02

    Low cost, non-invasive alterations in lifestyle are frequently recommended by healthcare professionals or those presenting with incontinence. However, such recommendations are rarely based on good evidence. The objective of the review was to determine the effectiveness of specific lifestyle interventions (i.e. weight loss; dietary changes; fluid intake; reduction in caffeinated, carbonated and alcoholic drinks; avoidance of constipation; stopping smoking; and physical activity) in the management of adult urinary incontinence. We searched the Cochrane Incontinence Group Specialised Register, which contains trials identified from the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE and MEDLINE in process, and handsearching of journals and conference proceedings (searched 3 July 2013), and the reference lists of relevant articles. We incorporated the results of these searches fully in the review. We undertook an updated search of the Specialised Register, which now includes searches of ClinicalTrials.gov and WHO ICTRP, on 27 October 2014; potentially eligible studies from this search are currently awaiting classification. Randomised and quasi-randomised studies of community-based lifestyle interventions compared with no treatment, other conservative therapies, or pharmacological interventions for the treatment of urinary incontinence in adults. Two authors independently assessed study quality and extracted data. We collected information on adverse effects from the trials. Data were combined in a meta-analysis when appropriate. We assessed the quality of the evidence using the GRADE approach. We included 11 trials in the review, involving a total of 5974 participants.Four trials involving 4701 women compared weight loss programmes with a control intervention. Low quality evidence from one trial suggested that more women following weight loss programmes reported improvement in symptoms of incontinence at six months (163/214 (76%) versus 49/90 (54

  17. Nonparticipation of Mayan Adults in Rural Literacy Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutz, German; Chandler, Paul

    1999-01-01

    Interviews with five Mayans in Guatemalan villages identified deterrents to participation in literacy programs at four levels: (1) individual (personal history, self-perception); (2) family (values, machismo); (3) community (ethnic identity, economic system); and (4) national (funding, policies, culturally inappropriate formats). (SK)

  18. Implementation of a new social skills training program for adults with intellectual disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Sequera Fernández

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study has the purpose to develop and apply a new training program in order to promote the use of social skills in a group of adults with intellectual disabilities. It contains a quasi-experimental methodological design to prove the program effectiveness. The sample used consists of 21 adults with intellectual disabilities, users of an occupational therapy day entity (10 persons participated in the program and 11 did not. The social skills were evaluated using an adjusted version of the Social Skills Scale Model of Gismero (2010. The outcomes of this study show a significant improvement in the overall score of the group included in the program in comparison with the rest of the group. Likewise, the group under the program obtained an increase in the scores within 5 out of 6 subscales evaluated. The identified improvements are key elements for the individual development of this group. The implications of the results are discussed.

  19. Development of a Wheelchair Skills Home Program for Older Adults Using a Participatory Action Design Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward M. Giesbrecht

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Restricted mobility is the most common impairment among older adults and a manual wheelchair is often prescribed to address these limitations. However, limited access to rehabilitation services results in older adults typically receiving little or no mobility training when they receive a wheelchair. As an alternative and novel approach, we developed a therapist-monitored wheelchair skills home training program delivered via a computer tablet. To optimize efficacy and adherence, principles of self-efficacy and adult learning theory were foundational in the program design. A participatory action design approach was used to engage older adult wheelchair users, care providers, and prescribing clinicians in an iterative design and development process. A series of prototypes were fabricated and revised, based on feedback from eight stakeholder focus groups, until a final version was ready for evaluation in a clinical trial. Stakeholder contributions affirmed and enhanced the foundational theoretical principles and provided validation of the final product for the target population.

  20. Development of a Wheelchair Skills Home Program for Older Adults Using a Participatory Action Design Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giesbrecht, Edward M.; Miller, William C.; Mitchell, Ian M.; Woodgate, Roberta L.

    2014-01-01

    Restricted mobility is the most common impairment among older adults and a manual wheelchair is often prescribed to address these limitations. However, limited access to rehabilitation services results in older adults typically receiving little or no mobility training when they receive a wheelchair. As an alternative and novel approach, we developed a therapist-monitored wheelchair skills home training program delivered via a computer tablet. To optimize efficacy and adherence, principles of self-efficacy and adult learning theory were foundational in the program design. A participatory action design approach was used to engage older adult wheelchair users, care providers, and prescribing clinicians in an iterative design and development process. A series of prototypes were fabricated and revised, based on feedback from eight stakeholder focus groups, until a final version was ready for evaluation in a clinical trial. Stakeholder contributions affirmed and enhanced the foundational theoretical principles and provided validation of the final product for the target population. PMID:25276768

  1. A Randomized Controlled Trial to Improve Social Skills in Young Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder: The UCLA PEERS(®) Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laugeson, Elizabeth A; Gantman, Alexander; Kapp, Steven K; Orenski, Kaely; Ellingsen, Ruth

    2015-12-01

    Research suggests that impaired social skills are often the most significant challenge for those with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), yet few evidence-based social skills interventions exist for adults on the spectrum. This replication trial tested the effectiveness of PEERS, a caregiver-assisted social skills program for high-functioning young adults with ASD. Using a randomized controlled design, 22 young adults 18-24 years of age were randomly assigned to a treatment (n = 12) or delayed treatment control (n = 10) group. Results revealed that the treatment group improved significantly in overall social skills, frequency of social engagement, and social skills knowledge, and significantly reduced ASD symptoms related to social responsiveness following PEERS. Most treatment gains were maintained at a 16-week follow-up assessment with new improvements observed.

  2. A Survey of Writing Instruction in Adult ESL Programs: Are Teaching Practices Meeting Adult Learner Needs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Rebeca; Peyton, Joy Kreeft; Schaetzel, Kirsten

    2017-01-01

    Recent legislation and education standards focus on the importance of developing students' academic and professional writing skills. Research on the teaching of writing has articulated the types of texts and features of writing that students need to produce to succeed. At the same time, studies of writing in adult education have found that limited…

  3. An exploration of young adults' progress in treatment for dissociative disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myrick, Amie C; Brand, Bethany L; McNary, Scot W; Classen, Catherine C; Lanius, Ruth; Loewenstein, Richard J; Pain, Clare; Putnam, Frank W

    2012-01-01

    Although treatment outcome research on dissociative disorders (DD) is increasing, an examination of treatment progress in young adults with these disorders remains noticeably absent from the literature. Many studies of DD patients report mean ages over 35. The present study examined the response to treatment of a subsample of young adults ages 18-30 with dissociative identity disorder and dissociative disorder not otherwise specified who participated in a naturalistic, longitudinal study of DD treatment outcome. Over 30 months, these patients demonstrated decreases in destructive behaviors and symptomatology as well as improved adaptive capacities. Compared to the older adult participants in the study, the young adults were more impaired initially. However, these younger patients improved at a rapid pace, such that their clinical presentations were similar to or more improved than those of the older adults at the 30-month follow-up. This brief report suggests not only that young adult DD patients can benefit from a trauma-focused, phasic treatment approach but that their treatment may progress at a faster pace than that of older adults with DD.

  4. Antiretroviral treatment knowledge and stigma--implications for programs and HIV treatment interventions in rural Tanzanian populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abela Mpobela Agnarson

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To analyse antiretroviral treatment (ART knowledge and HIV- and ART-related stigma among the adult population in a rural Tanzanian community. DESIGN: Population-based cross-sectional survey of 694 adults (15-49 years of age. METHODS: Latent class analysis (LCA categorized respondents' levels of ART knowledge and of ART-related stigma. Multinomial logistic regression assessed the association between the levels of ART knowledge and HIV- and ART-related stigma, while controlling for the effects of age, gender, education, marital status and occupation. RESULTS: More than one-third of men and women in the study reported that they had never heard of ART. Among those who had heard of ART, 24% were east informed about ART, 8% moderately informed, and 68% highly informed. Regarding ART-related stigma, 28% were least stigmatizing, 41% moderately stigmatizing, and 31% highly stigmatizing toward persons taking ART. Respondents that had at least primary education were more likely to have high levels of knowledge about ART (OR 3.09, 95% CI 1.61-5.94. Participants highly informed about ART held less HIV- and ART-related stigma towards ART patients (OR 0.26, 95% CI 0.09-0.74. CONCLUSION: The lack of ART knowledge is broad, and there is a strong association between ART knowledge and individual education level. These are relevant findings for both HIV prevention and HIV treatment program interventions that address ART-related stigma across the entire spectrum of the community.

  5. Radically open-dialectical behavior therapy for adult anorexia nervosa: feasibility and outcomes from an inpatient program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Thomas R; Gray, Katie L H; Hempel, Roelie J; Titley, Marian; Chen, Eunice Y; O'Mahen, Heather A

    2013-11-07

    Anorexia Nervosa (AN) is a highly life-threatening disorder that is extremely difficult to treat. There is evidence that family-based therapies are effective for adolescent AN, but no treatment has been proven to be clearly effective for adult AN. The methodological challenges associated with studying the disorder have resulted in recommendations that new treatments undergo preliminary testing prior to being evaluated in a randomized clinical trial. The aim of this study was to provide preliminary evidence on the effectiveness of a treatment program based on a novel adaptation of Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) for adult Anorexia Nervosa (Radically Open-DBT; RO-DBT) that conceptualizes AN as a disorder of overcontrol. Forty-seven individuals diagnosed with Anorexia Nervosa-restrictive type (AN-R; mean admission body mass index = 14.43) received the adapted DBT inpatient program (mean length of treatment = 21.7 weeks). Seventy-two percent completed the treatment program demonstrating substantial increases in body mass index (BMI; mean change in BMI = 3.57) corresponding to a large effect size (d = 1.91). Thirty-five percent of treatment completers were in full remission, and an additional 55% were in partial remission resulting in an overall response rate of 90%. These same individuals demonstrated significant and large improvements in eating-disorder related psychopathology symptoms (d = 1.17), eating disorder-related quality of life (d = 1.03), and reductions in psychological distress (d = 1.34). RO-DBT was associated with significant improvements in weight gain, reductions in eating disorder symptoms, decreases in eating-disorder related psychopathology and increases in eating disorder-related quality of life in a severely underweight sample. These findings provide preliminary support for RO-DBT in treating AN-R suggesting the importance of further evaluation examining long-term outcomes using randomized controlled trial

  6. Regeneration, Plasticity, and Induced Molecular Programs in Adult Zebrafish Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Ilyas Cosacak

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Regenerative capacity of the brain is a variable trait within animals. Aquatic vertebrates such as zebrafish have widespread ability to renew their brains upon damage, while mammals have—if not none—very limited overall regenerative competence. Underlying cause of such a disparity is not fully evident; however, one of the reasons could be activation of peculiar molecular programs, which might have specific roles after injury or damage, by the organisms that regenerate. If this hypothesis is correct, then there must be genes and pathways that (a are expressed only after injury or damage in tissues, (b are biologically and functionally relevant to restoration of neural tissue, and (c are not detected in regenerating organisms. Presence of such programs might circumvent the initial detrimental effects of the damage and subsequently set up the stage for tissue redevelopment to take place by modulating the plasticity of the neural stem/progenitor cells. Additionally, if transferable, those “molecular mechanisms of regeneration” could open up new avenues for regenerative therapies of humans in clinical settings. This review focuses on the recent studies addressing injury/damage-induced molecular programs in zebrafish brain, underscoring the possibility of the presence of genes that could be used as biomarkers of neural plasticity and regeneration.

  7. Depression Treatment Non-adherence and its Psychosocial Predictors: Differences between Young and Older Adults?

    OpenAIRE

    Stein-Shvachman, Ifat; Karpas, Dikla Segel; Werner, Perla

    2013-01-01

    Depression is a common disease among young and older adults. Although it can be treated, non-adherence is very common among individuals of different ages. The aim of the present paper is to review and summarize research findings regarding depression among young and older adults, with a special focus on the phenomenon of treatment non-adherence among young and older adults with depression. The first section of the review focuses on describing the characteristics of depression in young and olde...

  8. Low load, high repetition resistance training program increases bone mineral density in untrained adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Bailey A; Hastings, Bryce; Gottschall, Jinger S

    2017-01-01

    High load, low repetition resistance training increases BMD in untrained adults; however, many older and untrained adults cannot maintain this type of strenuous program. Our goal was to evaluate whether a low load, high repetition resistance training program would increase BMD in untrained adults. Twenty sedentary, but otherwise healthy, adults (6 men and 14 women, age 28-63 yrs) completed a 27-week group exercise program. The participants were randomly assigned to one of two strength groups: one group completed full body, low load, high repetition weight training classes (S-WEIGHT), while the other group completed core focused fusion classes (S-CORE). Both groups also completed indoor cycling classes for cardiovascular conditioning. After a 3-week familiarization period, all participants completed a 12-week block of 5 fitness classes per week (3 cycling + 2 strength) and concluded with another 12-week block of 6 classes per week (3 cycling + 3 strength). We completed iDXA scans at baseline (week 3) and final (week 28). Compared to baseline, BMD significantly increased for S-WEIGHT in the arms (+4%, Pload, high repetition resistance training program may be an effective method to improve bone mass in adults.

  9. Psychological Support for Young Adults with Down Syndrome: Dohsa-Hou Program for Maladaptive Behaviors and Internalizing Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haruo Fujino

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Psychological and psychiatric dysfunction is a major problem in a substantial proportion of young adults with Down syndrome. Some patients develop psychiatric issues, such as depressive, obsessive-compulsive, or psychotic-like disorders, in their late adolescence or young adulthood. Furthermore, these individuals may experience moderate to severe emotional and psychological distress. Development of a psychosocial treatment to address these issues is needed in addition to psychotropic medication. The current study reports two cases of young adults with Down syndrome, who presented psychiatric symptoms and marked disruption in their daily lives. These individuals participated in a Dohsa-hou treatment program. Following treatment, adaptive levels, maladaptive behaviors, and internalizing problems were evaluated by the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales-II. Participants showed improvement in maladaptive behaviors and internalizing problems; however, improvement in these areas may be influenced by baseline severity of the problems. This case report suggests that Dohsa-hou could be an effective therapeutic approach for maladaptive and internalizing problems in adults with Down syndrome.

  10. EFFICACY OF A STRUCTURED GROUP PROGRAM IN COPYING STRATEGIES FOR POSTTRAUMATIC STRESS DISORDER IN ADULTS AND ADOLESCENTS IN DISPLACEMENT SITUATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARÍA CLARA RODRÍGUEZ DÍAZ

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, an analysis is made on the efficacy of a structured group program in emotional, cognitiveand social coping skills for the treatment of a sample of adults and adolescents that developedposttraumatic stress disorder after a forced displacement situation. The participants completed a 10-session intervention including pre and post assessments about the severity level of the symptoms usingthe PSD scale (Foa, 1995 and an additional measure one month after. The results showed significantimprovements in symptoms in both groups and in each one of the possible comparisons. Recoveryshows that the decrease in the severity level of symptoms affects the functioning level positively.

  11. The Remodeling Process: A Grounded Theory Study of Perceptions of Treatment among Adult Male Incest Offenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheela, Rochelle A.

    1992-01-01

    Conducted grounded theory study to explore incest offender perceptions of treatment to generate explanatory theory of sexual abuse treatment process. Findings from theoretical sampling of 20 adult male incest offenders revealed that offenders felt remodeling process occurred as they faced discovery of their abuse and went through treatment.…

  12. Operative versus nonoperative treatment of displaced midshaft clavicle fractures in adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehn, Carl-Henrik; Kirkegaard, Martin; Viberg, Bjarke

    2013-01-01

    Intervention studies of clavicle fracture treatment are numerous, but only a few high quality studies prospectively compare operative and nonoperative treatment. The objective of this study was to review evidence from randomized controlled trials on operative versus nonoperative treatment...... of displaced midshaft clavicle fractures in adults with focus on fracture healing, complications and functional outcome....

  13. Treatment of PTSD in Older Adults: Do Cognitive-Behavioral Interventions Remain Viable?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clapp, Joshua D.; Beck, J. Gayle

    2012-01-01

    The literature examining trauma among older adults is growing, but little is known about the efficacy of empirically supported interventions for PTSD within this population. Clinical writing on this topic often implies that cognitive-behavioral treatments may be ineffective or inappropriate for older adults with PTSD given physical and/or…

  14. AGS Position Statement: Making Medical Treatment Decisions for Unbefriended Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Timothy W; Widera, Eric; Rosenberg, Lisa; Rubin, Craig D; Naik, Aanand D; Braun, Ursula; Torke, Alexia; Li, Ina; Vitale, Caroline; Shega, Joseph

    2016-11-22

    In this position statement, we define unbefriended older adults as patients who: (1) lack decisional capacity to provide informed consent to the medical treatment at hand; (2) have not executed an advance directive that addresses the medical treatment at hand and lack capacity to do so; and (3) lack family, friends or a legally authorized surrogate to assist in the medical decision-making process. Given the vulnerable nature of this population, clinicians, health care teams, ethics committees and other stakeholders working with unbefriended older adults must be diligent when formulating treatment decisions on their behalf. The process of arriving at a treatment decision for an unbefriended older adult should be conducted according to standards of procedural fairness and include capacity assessment, a search for potentially unidentified surrogate decision makers (including non-traditional surrogates) and a team-based effort to ascertain the unbefriended older adult's preferences by synthesizing all available evidence. A concerted national effort is needed to help reduce the significant state-to-state variability in legal approaches to unbefriended patients. Proactive efforts are also needed to identify older adults, including "adult orphans," at risk for becoming unbefriended and to develop alternative approaches to medical decision making for unbefriended older adults. This document updates the 1996 AGS position statement on unbefriended older adults. © 2016, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2016, The American Geriatrics Society.

  15. Neuro-linguistic programming and application in treatment of phobias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karunaratne, Mahishika

    2010-11-01

    Phobias are a prevalent and often debilitating mental health problem all over the world. This article aims to explore what is known about the use of Neuro-linguistic Programming (NLP) as a treatment for this condition. Whilst there is abundant experiential evidence from NLP practitioners attesting to the efficacy of this method as a treatment for phobias, experimental research in this area is somewhat limited. This paper reviews evidence available in literature produced in the UK and US and reveals that NLP is a successful treatment for phobias as well as being particularly efficient due to the relatively brief time period it takes to effect an improvement. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Treatment of adult short bowel syndrome patients with teduglutide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørholk, Lærke Marijke; Holst, Jens Juul; Jeppesen, Palle Bekker

    2012-01-01

    to parenteral support may cause impairment of the quality of life of SBS-IF patients. Conventional treatments include dietary manipulations, oral rehydration solutions, antidiarrheal and antisecretory treatments. However, the evidence base for these interventions is limited, and treatments improving structural...

  17. The Effectiveness of Group Treatment for Female Adult Incest Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Donalee; Reyes, Sonia; Brown, Brienne; Gonzenbach, Meredith

    2013-01-01

    Very few clinicians receive training in the treatment of sexual abuse, yet during their careers many will encounter victims of sexual abuse. This article discusses the incidence of child sexual abuse, defines incest, and discusses treatment options. A review of group treatment is explored, with results being documented providing support for the…

  18. Description of an intensive residential aphasia treatment program: rationale, clinical processes, and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winans-Mitrik, Ronda L; Hula, William D; Dickey, Michael W; Schumacher, James G; Swoyer, Brooke; Doyle, Patrick J

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the rationale, clinical processes, and outcomes of an intensive comprehensive aphasia program (ICAP). Seventy-three community-dwelling adults with aphasia completed a residentially based ICAP. Participants received 5 hr of daily 1:1 evidence-based cognitive-linguistically oriented aphasia therapy, supplemented with weekly socially oriented and therapeutic group activities over a 23-day treatment course. Standardized measures of aphasia severity and communicative functioning were obtained at baseline, program entry, program exit, and follow-up. Results were analyzed using a Bayesian latent growth curve model with 2 factors representing (a) the initial level and (b) change over time, respectively, for each outcome measure. Model parameter estimates showed reliable improvement on all outcome measures between the initial and final assessments. Improvement during the treatment interval was greater than change observed across the baseline interval, and gains were maintained at follow-up on all measures. The rationale, clinical processes, and outcomes of a residentially based ICAP have been described. ICAPs differ with respect to treatments delivered, dosing parameters, and outcomes measured. Specifying the defining components of complex interventions, establishing their feasibility, and describing their outcomes are necessary to guide the development of controlled clinical trials.

  19. Treatment of Depression and Suicide in Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhar, Sunil S.; Brown, Gregory K.

    2012-01-01

    This article describes a cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) intervention for suicide prevention in older adults. Although many studies have found that CBT interventions are efficacious for reducing depressive symptoms in the elderly, researchers have yet to evaluate the efficacy of such interventions for preventing suicide or reducing suicide risk…

  20. Adult-Child Incest: A Review of Research and Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vander Mey, Brenda J.; Neff, Ronald L.

    1982-01-01

    Reviews the literature which addressses adult-child incest as a form of child abuse. Highlights incest as a class phenomenon; characteristics of perpetrators, victims, and the other parent; dynamics of the incest family; effects of incest on the victim; treating and preventing incest; and legal requirements regarding incest reporting. (Author)

  1. Antibiotic treatment and the diagnosis of Streptococcus pneumoniae in lower respiratory tract infections in adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsgaard, Jens; Møller, Jens Kjølseth; Kilian, Mogens

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To analyze the possible influence of antibiotic treatment on the results of different diagnostic tests for the diagnosis of lower respiratory tract infections with Streptococcus pneumoniae. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A prospective cohort of 159 unselected adult immunocompetent patients...

  2. A cross-validation Delphi method approach to the diagnosis and treatment of personality disorders in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosowsky, Erlene; Young, Alexander S; Malloy, Mary C; van Alphen, S P J; Ellison, James M

    2016-12-14

    The Delphi method is a consensus-building technique using expert opinion to formulate a shared framework for understanding a topic with limited empirical support. This cross-validation study replicates one completed in the Netherlands and Belgium, and explores US experts' views on the diagnosis and treatment of older adults with personality disorders (PD). Twenty-one geriatric PD experts participated in a Delphi survey addressing diagnosis and treatment of older adults with PD. The European survey was translated and administered electronically. First-round consensus was reached for 16 out of 18 items relevant to diagnosis and specific mental health programs for personality disorders in older adults. Experts agreed on the usefulness of establishing criteria for specific types of treatments. The majority of psychologists did not initially agree on the usefulness of pharmacotherapy. Expert consensus was reached following two subsequent rounds after clarification addressing medication use. Study results suggest consensus among regarding psychosocial treatments. Limited acceptance amongst US psychologists about the suitability of pharmacotherapy for late-life PDs contrasted with the views expressed by experts surveyed in Netherlands and Belgium studies.

  3. Implementation of the Australian HPV vaccination program for adult women: qualitative key informant interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leask, Julie; Jackson, Cath; Trevena, Lyndal; McCaffery, Kirsten; Brotherton, Julia

    2009-09-04

    This study sought to evaluate the early implementation of Australia's national HPV vaccination program for adult women aged 18-26 years. We conducted qualitative in-depth interviews with 24 program managers and primary care providers in key roles of implementation across the country. While participants had generally positive beliefs about the vaccine, some questioned the cost-effectiveness for women aged 18-26 years. A short timeframe for implementing a unique and complex program raised particular challenges including ensuring providers and consumers received timely access to information. Media attention helped and hindered implementation. Existing primary care systems and close coordination between players helped overcome these issues. Although challenging, delivery of HPV vaccination to adult women is achievable and the Australian experience provides useful information for countries commencing HPV vaccination programs in this population.

  4. Diagnosis and Treatment of Bipolar Disorders in Adults: A Review of the Evidence on Pharmacologic Treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jann, Michael W.

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients with bipolar disorder are exceptionally challenging to manage because of the dynamic, chronic, and fluctuating nature of their disease. Typically, the symptoms of bipolar disorder first appear in adolescence or early adulthood, and are repeated over the patient's lifetime, expressed as unpredictable recurrences of hypomanic/manic or depressive episodes. The lifetime prevalence of bipolar disorder in adults is reported to be approximately 4%, and its management was estimated to cost the US healthcare system in 2009 $150 billion in combined direct and indirect costs. Objective To review the published literature and describe the personal and societal burdens associated with bipolar disorder, the impact of delays in accurate diagnosis, and the evidence for the clinical effectiveness of available pharmacologic therapies. Methods The studies in this comprehensive review were selected for inclusion based on clinical relevance, importance, and robustness of data related to diagnosis and treatment of bipolar disorder. The search terms that were initially used on MEDLINE/PubMed and Google Scholar were restricted to 1994 through 2014 and included “bipolar disorder,” “mania,” “bipolar depression,” “mood stabilizer,” “atypical antipsychotics,” and “antidepressants.” High-quality, recent reviews of major relevant topics were included to supplement the primary studies. Discussion Substantial challenges facing patients with bipolar disorder, in addition to their severe mood symptoms, include frequent incidence of psychiatric (eg, anxiety disorders, alcohol or drug dependence) and general medical comorbidities (eg, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, obesity, migraine, and hepatitis C virus infection). It has been reported that more than 75% of patients take their medication less than 75% of the time, and the rate of suicide (0.4%) among patients with bipolar disorder is more than 20 times greater than in the general US population. Mood

  5. Therapeutic lifestyle change and Adult Treatment Panel III: evidence then and now.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Neil J; Van Horn, Linda

    2002-11-01

    The Third Report of the National Cholesterol Education Program's Adult Treatment Panel (ATP III) has an extensive section on nonpharmacologic therapy for those with abnormal blood lipids. ATP III focused on the high-saturated fat atherogenic diet, obesity, and sedentary lifestyle and recommended a program of therapeutic lifestyle change (TLC). This review discusses several issues, including 1) why ATP III changed from the Step I and Step II diets to TLC; 2) the benefits of keeping trans fatty acid intake low and the addition of viscous fiber and plant stanol/sterol esters to reduce low-density lipoprotein cholesterol beyond that seen with the Step II diet; 3) the de-emphasis on total fat and a sharper focus on the kinds of fat ingested in the new guidelines; 4) the endorsement of regular physical activity and weight loss as important first steps in reversing the unwanted metabolic effects of the metabolic syndrome; and 5) the emphasis of health-promoting aspects of the diet that include, among other things, fish and omega-3 fatty acids. At all stages of TLC, ATP III encourages the referral to registered dietitians or other qualified nutritionists for medical nutrition therapy. TLC and the ATP III guidelines should provide guidance to practitioners who wish to get low-density lipoprotein cholesterol to goal (whether or not drugs are used), prevent or treat the metabolic syndrome, and improve the overall health of the patient.

  6. Open-Access Physical Activity Programs for Older Adults: A Pragmatic and Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balis, Laura E; Strayer, Thomas; Ramalingam, NithyaPriya; Wilson, Meghan; Harden, Samantha M

    2018-01-10

    Open-access, community-based programs are recommended to assist older adults in meeting physical activity guidelines, but the characteristics, impact, and scalability of these programs is less understood. The Land-Grant University Cooperative Extension System, an organization providing education through county-based educators, functions as a delivery system for these programs. A systematic review was conducted to determine characteristics of effective older adult physical activity programs and the extent to which programs delivered in Extension employ these characteristics. A systematic review of peer-reviewed and grey literature was conducted from August 2016 to February 2017. The review was limited to open-access (available to all), community-based physical activity interventions for older adults (≥65 years of age). The peer-reviewed literature search was conducted in PubMed and EBSCOhost; the grey literature search for Extension interventions was conducted through Extension websites, Land-Grant Impacts, and the Journal of Extension. Sixteen peer-reviewed studies and 17 grey literature sources met inclusion criteria and were analyzed. Peer-reviewed and Extension programs were similar in their limited use of behavioral theories and group-based strategies. Compared to Extension programs, those in the peer-reviewed literature were more likely to use a combination of physical activity components and be delivered by trained professionals. The results indicate notable differences between peer-reviewed literature and Extension programs and present an opportunity for Extension programs to more effectively use evidence-based program characteristics, including behavioral theories and group dynamics, a combination of physical activity components, and educator/agent-trained delivery agents.

  7. Validation of Evidence-Based Fall Prevention Programs for Adults with Intellectual and/or Developmental Disorders (FallPAIDD): A Modified Otago Exercise Program

    OpenAIRE

    Mindy Renfro; Donna Bernhardt Bainbridge; Matthew Lee Smith; Matthew Lee Smith

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Evidence-based fall prevention (EBFP) programs significantly decrease fall risk, falls, and fall-related injuries in community-dwelling older adults. To date, EBFP programs are only validated for use among people with normal cognition and, therefore, are not evidence-based for adults with intellectual and/or developmental disorders (IDD) such as Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias (ADRD), cerebral vascular accident (CVA), or traumatic brain injury (TBI). BACKGROUND: Adults...

  8. Validation of Evidence-Based Fall Prevention Programs for Adults with Intellectual and/or Developmental Disorders: A Modified Otago Exercise Program

    OpenAIRE

    Renfro, Mindy; Bainbridge, Donna B.; Smith, Matthew Lee

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Evidence-based fall prevention (EBFP) programs significantly decrease fall risk, falls, and fall-related injuries in community-dwelling older adults. To date, EBFP programs are only validated for use among people with normal cognition and, therefore, are not evidence-based for adults with intellectual and/or developmental disorders (IDD) such as Alzheimer?s disease and related dementias, cerebral vascular accident, or traumatic brain injury. Background Adults with IDD experience ...

  9. Treatment use, perceived need, and barriers to seeking treatment for substance abuse and mental health problems among older adults compared to younger adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Namkee G; DiNitto, Diana M; Marti, C Nathan

    2014-12-01

    This study examined age group differences in and correlates of treatment use and perceived treatment need for substance use disorders (SUD) and mental health (MH) problems as well as self-reported barriers to treatment among people 65+ years old vs. 26-34, 35-49, and 50-64 years old. Data are from the 2008 to 2012 National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) (N = 96,966). Age group differences were examined using descriptive bivariate analyses and binary logistic regression analyses. The 65+ age group was least likely to use treatment and perceive treatment need, but the 50-64 age group was more similar to the younger age groups than the 65+ age group. Controlling for age, other predisposing, and enabling factors, alcohol and illicit drug dependence and comorbid SUD and MH problems increased the odds of SUD treatment use. Of MH problems, anxiety disorder had the largest odds for MH treatment use. Bivariate analyses showed that lack of readiness to stop using and cost/limited insurance were the most frequent barriers to SUD and MH treatment, respectively, among older adults, and they were less likely than younger age groups to report stigma/confidentiality concerns for MH treatment. Older adults will become a larger portion of the total U.S. population with SUD and/or MH problems. Healthcare providers should be alert to the need to help older adults with SUD and/or MH problems obtain treatment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Brachial plexus injury in adults: Diagnosis and surgical treatment strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukund R Thatte

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Adult post traumatic Brachial plexus injury is unfortunately a rather common injury in young adults. In India the most common scenario is of a young man injured in a motorcycle accident. Exact incidence figures are not available but of the injuries presenting to us about 90% invole the above combination This article reviews peer-reviewed publications including clinical papers, review articles and Meta analysis of the subject. In addition, the authors′ experience of several hundred cases over the last 15 years has been added and has influenced the ultimate text. Results have been discussed and analysed to get an idea of factors influencing final recovery. It appears that time from injury and number of roots involved are most crucial.

  11. Adult Wilms' tumor; Role of combined modality treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehta, M.P.; Langeland, P.; Bertelrud, K. (Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (USA). Clinical Cancer Center)

    1989-01-01

    Adults Wilms' tumor, unlike its pediatric counterpart, is extremely rare and highly lethal. Less than 200 cases have been reported in the world literature and a large proportion of these may not have been true Wilms' tumors. We report 3 cases seen at our institution who were treated with a multimodality approach, all three remaining alive without evidence of active disease at 6 years, 2.25 years and 8 months respectively from diagnosis. We also review results of multimodality management, emphasizing the poor outcome of stage III and IV tumors in spite of multiagent chemotherapy. Alternative drugs, such as cisplatinum may have a role in management. Finally, we propose that prophylactic pulmonary irradiation may have a place in advanced stages of adult Wilms' tumor. (orig.).

  12. Brachial plexus injury in adults: Diagnosis and surgical treatment strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thatte, Mukund R.; Babhulkar, Sonali; Hiremath, Amita

    2013-01-01

    Adult post traumatic Brachial plexus injury is unfortunately a rather common injury in young adults. In India the most common scenario is of a young man injured in a motorcycle accident. Exact incidence figures are not available but of the injuries presenting to us about 90% invole the above combination This article reviews peer-reviewed publications including clinical papers, review articles and Meta analysis of the subject. In addition, the authors′ experience of several hundred cases over the last 15 years has been added and has influenced the ultimate text. Results have been discussed and analysed to get an idea of factors influencing final recovery. It appears that time from injury and number of roots involved are most crucial. PMID:23661959

  13. Older Adults Accessing HIV Care and Treatment and Adherence in the IeDEA Central Africa Cohort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamie Newman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Very little is known about older adults accessing HIV care in sub-Saharan Africa. Materials and Methods. Data were obtained from 18,839 HIV-positive adults at 10 treatment programs in Burundi, Cameroon, and the Democratic Republic of Congo. We compared characteristics of those aged 50+ with those aged 18–49 using chi-square tests. Logistic regression was used to determine if age was associated with medication adherence. Results. 15% of adults were 50+ years. Those aged 50+ were more evenly distributed between women and men (56% versus 44% as compared to those aged 18–49 (71% versus 29% and were more likely to be hypertensive (8% versus 3% (P<0.05. Those aged 50+ were more likely to be adherent to their medications than those aged 18–49 (P<0.001. Adults who were not heavy drinkers reported better adherence as compared to those who reported drinking three or more alcoholic beverages per day (P<0.001. Conclusions. Older adults differed from their younger counterparts in terms of medication adherence, sociodemographic, behavioral, and clinical characteristics.

  14. You Are (Not) Welcome Here: The Climate for LGBT Students in an Adult Literacy Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grissett, Judy Orton; Kaufmann, Jodi; Greenberg, Daphne; Hilton, Krista

    2016-01-01

    Although prior research has indicated a relationship between educational climate and educational outcomes, there is a lack of research in this area in adult literacy programs. The purpose of this qualitative case study was to assess the actual and perceived educational climate for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transsexual (LGBT) students at an adult…

  15. Caregivers' Perceptions of a Consumer-Directed Care Program for Adults with Developmental Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinton, Linda

    2010-01-01

    This article examines results from a consumer and caregiver-directed care pilot program for families with adults with developmental disabilities. Surveys were administered to 50 caregivers and three project coordinators, and focus groups were conducted with 44 individuals, including caregivers, consumers, and support coordinators. Significant pre-…

  16. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Koru: A Mindfulness Program for College Students and Other Emerging Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greeson, Jeffrey M.; Juberg, Michael K.; Maytan, Margaret; James, Kiera; Rogers, Holly

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of Koru, a mindfulness training program for college students and other emerging adults. Participants: Ninety students (66% female, 62% white, 71% graduate students) participated between Fall 2012 and Spring 2013. Methods: Randomized controlled trial. It was hypothesized that Koru, compared with a wait-list…

  17. Motivational Orientations of Non-Traditional Adult Students to Enroll in a Degree-Seeking Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francois, Emmanuel Jean

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to investigate the motivational orientations of non-traditional adult students to enroll in a degree-seeking program based on their academic goal. The Education Participation Scale (EPS) was used to measure the motivational orientations of participants. Professional advancement, cognitive interest, and educational…

  18. Utilization of Adult and Non-Formal Education Programs in Combating Rural Poverty in Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihejirika, John Chinedu

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to examine the concept of poverty and its causes in Nigeria and to analyze how adult and non-formal education programs can be utilized to reduce rural poverty in Nigeria. In spite of Nigeria's affluence in human and material resources, it is classified among countries with high level of poverty. Incidentally, the…

  19. The Effect of a Program of Physical Exercise on Depression in Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Jeanine; And Others

    1982-01-01

    A study into the effects of physical exercise on levels of depression in older adults showed that greater physical activity is a factor in improving emotional and physical well-being. Findings indicate that there is significant improvement in the emotional states of those older individuals who participated in the physical exercise program. (JN)

  20. Effect of Eight-Week Exercise Program on Social Physique Anxiety Conditions in Adult Males

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akyüz, Öznur

    2017-01-01

    Physiological changes occurring with physical activity have played role in appearance of a different field of study. Thus, examination of the effect of eight-week exercise program on SPA in adult males forms the purpose of the study. 20 sedentary males aged 18-25 voluntarily participated in the research. Volunteers were applied resistance exercise…

  1. The Child and Adult Care Food Program and the Nutrition of Preschoolers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korenman, Sanders; Abner, Kristin S.; Kaestner, Robert; Gordon, Rachel A.

    2013-01-01

    Children spend a considerable amount of time in preschools and child care centers. As a result, these settings may have an influence on their diet, weight, and food security, and are potentially important contexts for interventions to address nutritional health. The Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) is one such intervention. No national…

  2. An Evaluation of the Adults and Children Together (ACT) against Violence Parents Raising Safe Kids Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portwood, Sharon G.; Lambert, Richard G.; Abrams, Lyndon P.; Nelson, Ellissa Brooks

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of the Adults and Children Together (ACT) Against Violence Parents Raising Safe Kids program, developed by the American Psychological Association in collaboration with the National Association for the Education of Young Children, as an economical primary prevention intervention for child maltreatment. Using…

  3. Frail older adults' experiences with a proactive, nurse-led primary care program: a qualitative study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bleijenberg, N.; Boeije, H.R.; Onderwater, A.T.; Schuurmans, M.J.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to explore frail older adults' perceptions and experiences with a proactive, integrated nurse-led primary care program. A qualitative study nested within a randomized trial in primary care was conducted. In total, 11 semistructured interviews were conducted in a

  4. Constructing Adult Literacies at a Local Literacy Tutor-Training Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roderick, Ryan

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates how literacy was constructed at an adult literacy organization's volunteer tutor-training program. By drawing on qualitative analysis of training texts used during training, such as training evaluations, and data gathered from interviews with experienced tutors, it is possible to identify the assumptions about literacy…

  5. African American Men, Identity, and Participation in Adult Basic Education and Literacy Programs. Research Brief #6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drayton, Brendaly; Prins, Esther

    2011-01-01

    Although the national graduation rate for African American males is only 47% (Schott Foundation for Public Education, 2010), few studies have explored their experiences in adult basic and literacy education (ABEL) programs. This study draws on prior research to explore the relationship between literacy and identity and its potential for…

  6. STAFF DEVELOPMENT WORKSHOP ON ADULT TRAINING PROGRAMS, REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS (OTTAWA, APRIL 18-19, 1966).

    Science.gov (United States)

    TURNER, W.S.

    REPORTS AND RECOMMENDATIONS FROM A STAFF DEVELOPMENT CONFERENCE ON ADULT TRAINING PROGRAMS HELD IN OTTAWA, CANADA, 1966 ARE REPORTED. PARTICIPANTS INCLUDED TRADE AND OCCUPATIONAL INSTRUCTORS, BASIC EDUCATION INSTRUCTORS, AND TRAINERS IN INDUSTRY AND TECHNOLOGY INSTITUTES. THE FOLLOWING TOPICS WERE DISCUSSED--THE ROLE OF GOVERNMENT, INDUSTRY,…

  7. Motivational Factors and Predictors for Attending a Continuing Education Program for Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cachioni, Meire; Nascimento Ordonez, Tiago; Lima da Silva, Thais Bento; Tavares Batistoni, Samila Sathler; Sanches Yassuda, Mônica; Caldeira Melo, Ruth; Rodrigues da Costa Domingues, Marisa Accioly; Lopes, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    The objectives were to describe the stated motives of participants who enrolled in a program at the Open University for the Elderly (UnATI, in Portuguese), identify correlations between the stated motives and sociodemographic data, and find a set of predictors related to the listed motives. A total of 306 middle-aged and elderly adults aged 50 or…

  8. Professional Development to Work with Low-Educated Adult ESL Learners: Searching beyond the Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCluskey, Corrie

    2012-01-01

    After following career interests that included anthropology and the visual arts, the author realized that working with adult immigrants with limited formal education and literacy skills was her path and her passion. Since few programs in the TESOL field focused on these learners, the author sought out instruction in nontraditional spaces to…

  9. Adherence to a Physical Activity Program by Older Adults in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Doralice Lange; Vendruscolo, Rosecler

    2010-01-01

    This paper discusses the results of a qualitative research project in which we investigated adherence factors to a physical activity (PA) program for older adults in Brazil named "Sem Fronteiras: Atividades Corporais Para Adultos Maduros e Idosos", which translated into English means "Without Borders: Physical Activities for Mature…

  10. The Professional Mentor Program Plus: An Academic Success and Retention Tool for Adult Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Chaunda L.; Homant, Robert J.

    2008-01-01

    To promote the academic success of and to retain adult students of color, the Academic Services Unit at the University of Detroit Mercy (UDM), an urban Catholic university, in Detroit Michigan, has designed and implemented the Professional Mentor Program Plus, funded by the State of Michigan's King-Chavez-Parks (KCP) higher education initiative,…

  11. Developing Positive Young Adults: Lessons from Two Decades of YouthBuild Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Ronald F.; Snipes, Jason; Hossain, Farhana; Manno, Michelle S.

    2015-01-01

    Youth development is a cornerstone of the YouthBuild program, which provides job skills training, academic support, counseling, and leadership opportunities to low-income, out-of-school young adults. This report presents findings from two separate research efforts that shed light on the process of youth transformation and identity development in…

  12. Adult Literacy Education Program Administrators' Perceptions of Occupational Stress and Coping Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelmann, Stephanie

    2014-01-01

    Job performance may be adversely affected by stress. Job stress is a primary contributor to serious physical and emotional health consequences. This quantitative study examined adult literacy program administrator perceptions of occupational stress and coping mechanisms related to job satisfaction, job efficacy, career longevity, and overall…

  13. Treatment of insomnia in adults and children: a practice-friendly review of research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Daniel J; Roane, Brandy M

    2010-11-01

    Chronic insomnia affects nearly 16% of adults and up to 25% of children. Many clinicians are unfamiliar with the research and practice of psychological treatments of insomnia and thus do not use them with their patients. The primary goals of this article were to (a) review the research support for psychological treatments of adult and child insomnia, and (b) describe those treatments with the highest level of research support in enough detail to allow practitioners to begin to utilize them with their own patients. The adult psychological treatments with the best research support are stimulus control, progressive muscle relaxation, and multimodal cognitive-behavioral therapy, followed by multimodal behavioral therapy, sleep restriction, biofeedback, and paradoxical intention. The child psychological treatments with the highest level of research support are preventive parent education, unmodified extinction, and extinction with parental presence, followed by graduated extinction, bedtime fading/positive routines, and scheduled awakenings. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Antibiotic Treatment Strategies for Community-Acquired Pneumonia in Adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postma, Douwe F.; Van Werkhoven, Cornelis H.; Van Elden, Leontine J R; Thijsen, Steven F T; Hoepelman, Andy I M; Kluytmans, Jan A J W; Boersma, Wim G.; Compaijen, Clara J.; Van Der Wall, Eva; Prins, Jan M.; Oosterheert, Jan J.; Bonten, Marc J M

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The choice of empirical antibiotic treatment for patients with clinically suspected community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) who are admitted to non-intensive care unit (ICU) hospital wards is complicated by the limited availability of evidence. We compared strategies of empirical treatment

  15. [Treatment of intestinal failure in adults. I. Dietary measures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wanten, G.J.A.; Sauerwein, H.P.; Broek, P. van den; Kristinsson, J.O.

    2007-01-01

    Patients with intestinal failure, predominantly caused by short-bowel syndrome, have impaired quality of life due to the frequent development of complications. Dietary modifications have an established role in the treatment of short-bowel syndrome. Treatment of short-bowel syndrome includes

  16. Barriers to and facilitators of physical activity program use among older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bethancourt, Hilary J; Rosenberg, Dori E; Beatty, Tara; Arterburn, David E

    2014-09-01

    Regular physical activity (PA) is important for maintaining long-term physical, cognitive, and emotional health. However, few older adults engage in routine PA, and even fewer take advantage of programs designed to enhance PA participation. Though most managed Medicare members have free access to the Silver Sneakers and EnhanceFitness PA programs, the vast majority of eligible seniors do not utilize these programs. The goal of this qualitative study was to better understand the barriers to and facilitators of PA and participation in PA programs among older adults. This was a qualitative study using focus group interviews. Focus groups took place at three Group Health clinics in King County, Washington. Fifty-two randomly selected Group Health Medicare members between the ages of 66 to 78 participated. We conducted four focus groups with 13 participants each. Focus group discussions were audio-recorded, transcribed, and analyzed using an inductive thematic approach and a social-ecological framework. Men and women were nearly equally represented among the participants, and the sample was largely white (77%), well-educated (69% college graduates), and relatively physically active. Prominent barriers to PA and PA program participation were physical limitations due to health conditions or aging, lack of professional guidance, and inadequate distribution of information on available and appropriate PA options and programs. Facilitators included the motivation to maintain physical and mental health and access to affordable, convenient, and stimulating PA options. Older adult populations may benefit from greater support and information from their providers and health care systems on how to safely and successfully improve or maintain PA levels through later adulthood. Efforts among health care systems to boost PA among older adults may need to consider patient-centered adjustments to current PA programs, as well as alternative methods for promoting overall active lifestyle

  17. Participation in Older Adult Physical Activity Programs and Risk for Falls Requiring Medical Care, Washington State, 2005–2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Dori E.; Phelan, Elizabeth A.; Fitzpatrick, Annette L.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Physical activity is known to prevent falls; however, use of widely available exercise programs for older adults, including EnhanceFitness and Silver Sneakers, has not been examined in relation to effects on falls among program participants. We aimed to determine whether participation in EnhanceFitness or Silver Sneakers is associated with a reduced risk of falls resulting in medical care. Methods A retrospective cohort study examined a demographically representative sample from a Washington State integrated health system. Health plan members aged 65 or older, including 2,095 EnhanceFitness users, 13,576 Silver Sneakers users, and 55,127 nonusers from 2005 through 2011, were classified as consistent users (used a program ≥2 times in all years they were enrolled in the health plan during the study period); intermittent users (used a program ≥2 times in 1 or more years enrolled but not all years), or nonusers of EnhanceFitness or Silver Sneakers. The main outcome was measured as time-to-first-fall requiring inpatient or out-of-hospital medical treatment based on the International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification, Sixth Edition and E-codes. Results In fully adjusted Cox proportional hazards models, consistent (hazard ratio [HR], 0.74; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.63–0.88) and intermittent (HR, 0.87; 95% CI, 0.8–0.94) EnhanceFitness participation were both associated with a reduced risk of falls resulting in medical care. Intermittent Silver Sneakers participation showed a reduced risk (HR, 0.93; 95% CI, 0.90–0.97). Conclusion Participation in widely available community-based exercise programs geared toward older adults (but not specific to fall prevention) reduced the risk of medical falls. Structured programs that include balance and strength exercise, as EnhanceFitness does, may be effective in reducing fall risk. PMID:26068411

  18. Participation in Older Adult Physical Activity Programs and Risk for Falls Requiring Medical Care, Washington State, 2005-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood-Hickman, Mikael Anne; Rosenberg, Dori E; Phelan, Elizabeth A; Fitzpatrick, Annette L

    2015-06-11

    Physical activity is known to prevent falls; however, use of widely available exercise programs for older adults, including EnhanceFitness and Silver Sneakers, has not been examined in relation to effects on falls among program participants. We aimed to determine whether participation in EnhanceFitness or Silver Sneakers is associated with a reduced risk of falls resulting in medical care. A retrospective cohort study examined a demographically representative sample from a Washington State integrated health system. Health plan members aged 65 or older, including 2,095 EnhanceFitness users, 13,576 Silver Sneakers users, and 55,127 nonusers from 2005 through 2011, were classified as consistent users (used a program ≥2 times in all years they were enrolled in the health plan during the study period); intermittent users (used a program ≥2 times in 1 or more years enrolled but not all years), or nonusers of EnhanceFitness or Silver Sneakers. The main outcome was measured as time-to-first-fall requiring inpatient or out-of-hospital medical treatment based on the International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification, Sixth Edition and E-codes. In fully adjusted Cox proportional hazards models, consistent (hazard ratio [HR], 0.74; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.63-0.88) and intermittent (HR, 0.87; 95% CI, 0.8-0.94) EnhanceFitness participation were both associated with a reduced risk of falls resulting in medical care. Intermittent Silver Sneakers participation showed a reduced risk (HR, 0.93; 95% CI, 0.90-0.97). Participation in widely available community-based exercise programs geared toward older adults (but not specific to fall prevention) reduced the risk of medical falls. Structured programs that include balance and strength exercise, as EnhanceFitness does, may be effective in reducing fall risk.

  19. Parental Criminal Justice Involvement and Children's Involvement With Child Protective Services: Do Adult Drug Treatment Courts Prevent Child Maltreatment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gifford, Elizabeth J; Eldred, Lindsey M; Sloan, Frank A; Evans, Kelly E

    2016-01-01

    In light of evidence showing reduced criminal recidivism and cost savings, adult drug treatment courts have grown in popularity. However, the potential spillover benefits to family members are understudied. To examine: (1) the overlap between parents who were convicted of a substance-related offense and their children's involvement with child protective services (CPS); and (2) whether parental participation in an adult drug treatment court program reduces children's risk for CPS involvement. Administrative data from North Carolina courts, birth records, and social services were linked at the child level. First, children of parents convicted of a substance-related offense were matched to (a) children of parents convicted of a nonsubstance-related offense and (b) those not convicted of any offense. Second, we compared children of parents who completed a DTC program with children of parents who were referred but did not enroll, who enrolled for parental criminal conviction or, alternatively, being referred to a DTC program. Children of parents convicted of a substance-related offense were at greater risk of CPS involvement than children whose parents were not convicted of any charge, but DTC participation did not mitigate this risk. Conclusion/Importance: The role of specialty courts as a strategy for reducing children's risk of maltreatment should be further explored.

  20. General anesthesia for the provision of dental treatment to adults with developmental disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ananthanarayan, C; Sigal, M; Godlewski, W

    1998-01-01

    The management of the behavior of mentally challenged adults when providing required dental care is often a problem, whether in the dental office or in a hospital setting. Our institution has a designated program to provide required dental care to this group of patients. Because of the high incidence of poor cooperation, which may include aggressive antagonistic behavior, many of these patients are scheduled for dental care under general anesthesia with an incomplete preoperative medical assessment. The purpose of this study was to determine the impact and limitations that an incomplete medical assessment may present in the delivery of dental care under general anesthesia to these adults with developmental disability. After approval from the institutional review board, the medical records of 139 patients treated in this program between 1992 and 1994 were reviewed to determine the patient profiles, anesthesia management, and complications. The charts of these patients, who underwent dental and radiographic examination, scaling and prophylaxis, and restoration and extraction of teeth under general anesthesia, were reviewed. There were 149 procedures performed on these patients, some more than once. The mean age was 29.5 yr. Males predominated females by a ratio of 2:1. All had multiple diagnoses, medical problems, and medications. Twenty-three patients had Down's Syndrome, four had schizophrenia disorders, 42 had seizure disorders, 11 had hypothyroidism, seven had heart disease, and 14 had central nervous system and neuromuscular disorders. The remainder had a variety of diagnoses, including rare syndromes. One hundred had intravenous (i.v.), 25 had mask inhalation, and 24 had intramuscular ketamine (Ketalar) induction. Nasotracheal intubation was uneventful in 139 patients, five had difficult visualization of the larynx and intubation. Ten patients experienced intraoperative complications, including nonfatal ventricular arrhythmia, slight fall in blood pressure and

  1. Systematic review of surgical treatment techniques for adult and pediatric patients with pectus excavatum

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    This compares outcome measures of current pectus excavatum (PEx) treatments, namely the Nuss and Ravitch procedures, in pediatric and adult patients. Original investigations that stratified PEx patients based on current treatment and age (pediatric = 0–21; adult 17–99) were considered for inclusion. Outcome measures were: operation duration, analgesia duration, blood loss, length of stay (LOS), outcome ratings, complications, and percentage requiring reoperations. Adult implant patients (18.8%) had higher reoperation rates than adult Nuss or Ravitch patients (5.3% and 3.3% respectively). Adult Nuss patients had longer LOS (7.3 days), more strut/bar displacement (6.1%), and more epidural analgesia (3 days) than adult Ravitch patients (2.9 days, 0%, 0 days). Excluding pectus bar and strut displacements, pediatric and adult Nuss patients tended to have higher complication rates (pediatric - 38%; adult - 21%) compared to pediatric and adult Ravitch patients (12.5%; 8%). Pediatric Ravitch patients clearly had more strut displacements than adult Ravitch patients (0% and 6.4% respectively). These results suggest significantly better results in common PEx surgical repair techniques (i.e. Nuss and Ravitch) than uncommon techniques (i.e. Implants and Robicsek). The results suggest slightly better outcomes in pediatric Nuss procedure patients as compared with all other groups. We recommend that symptomatic pediatric patients with uncomplicated PEx receive the Nuss procedure. We suggest that adult patients receive the Nuss or Ravitch procedure, even though the long-term complication rates of the adult Nuss procedure require more investigation. PMID:24506826

  2. Transition to Community College: The Journey of Adult Basic Education English Learners from Non-Credit to Credit Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csepelyi, Tunde

    2012-01-01

    This phenomenological study examined the transition of a group of adult English language learners from an Adult Basic Education program to a community college. The purpose of the study was to gain a deeper understanding of the driving forces of Adult Basic Education English language learners who had successfully transitioned from a non-credit…

  3. Treatment program for erectile dysfunction in patients with cardiovascular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israilov, Solomon; Baniel, Jack; Shmueli, Joseph; Niv, Eva; Engelstein, Dov; Segenreich, Ephraim; Livne, Pinhas M

    2004-03-15

    The present study assesses the effectiveness of our progressive treatment program for erectile dysfunction in patients with cardiovascular diseases. The study sample included 453 patients aged 36 to 91 years. Therapy in all patients was begun with sildenafil citrate 25 to 100 mg. Those with contraindications, drug adverse effects, or a negative response (erection insufficient for vaginal penetration) were given intracavernous injections of a cocktail of vasoactive drugs (dimix, trimix, or quadmix), followed by the addition of sildenafil citrate to the trimix in case of failure, and then a penile prosthesis. Patients were followed for 2 years; in cases of treatment ineffectiveness during follow-up, drug dosages were increased or a penile prosthesis was suggested. Sildenafil citrate was offered to 417 patients of whom 205 (49.2%) responded positively. The remaining 248 patients received intracavernous injections: 135 (54.4%) had a positive response to the dimix, 85 (75.2%) to the trimix, and 16 (57.1%) to the quadmix. Four of the other 12 patients (0.9%) responded to sildanefil citrate + trimix, and 2 (0.4%) agreed to a penile prosthesis. At the 2-year follow-up of 447 patients, 131 (29.3%) were successfully treated with sildanefil citrate, 92 (20.6%) with dimix, 122 (27.3%) with trimix, 12 (2.7%) with quadmix, and 2 (0.4%) with sildanefil citrate + trimix; 5 patients (1.1%) had a penile implant. Forty-eight patients (10.7%) achieved spontaneous erection, of whom 46 were taking aspirin. Twenty-six patients (5.8%) stopped treatment because of health and family reasons and 9 (2%) had a negative response. Our progressive treatment program for erectile dysfunction has a high success rate in patients with cardiovascular disease: Overall, 98.7% achieved an erection sufficient for vaginal penetration immediately after the trial and 92.2% on follow-up; 10.7% achieved spontaneous erections.

  4. Adult volunteerism in Pennsylvania 4-H natural resources programs for youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Sanford Sherrick

    2001-07-01

    Pennsylvania's 4-H Youth Development Program relies on adult volunteers to reach youth with educational information and opportunities. Finding adults willing to do this volunteer work is challenging. This study looks at the current status of adult volunteerism with natural resources 4-H projects, and seeks to understand potential volunteers. The literature has much to offer in regards to general volunteer trends, management, motivations, and task preferences; however, few studies focus on volunteers in natural resources or environmental education. A telephone survey conducted with county 4-H agents revealed that only 3.2% of Pennsylvania's 4-H volunteers work with natural resources projects in 56 out of 67 counties, and that very few volunteers have any formal background in natural resources. Semi-structured interviews with 41 adult volunteers currently working with natural resources projects explored volunteer demographics, history, program design preferences, and ideas for seeking more volunteers. Findings from the telephone survey and the semi-structured interviews were used to generate a mail survey with large, random samples from three population groups: (1) 4-H Volunteers, (2) 4-H Parents, and (3) Natural Resources Professionals. Confidence with youth and subject matter, and adult willingness to volunteer was explored for each of the groups in relation to background, demographic characteristics, motivational needs, past and present volunteer activity, personal interests, and program design importance. Natural resources subject matter confidence was shown to be the most significant variable determining willingness to volunteer for all three groups. The variables that contributed to subject matter and youth confidence varied for each population. Key variables effecting willingness to volunteer included outdoor activity level, personal interest in natural resources, the need to fulfill feelings of social responsibility, and confidence with youth. Program design

  5. Assisted outpatient treatment in New York: regional differences in New York's assisted outpatient treatment program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Pamela Clark; Keator, Karli J; Steadman, Henry J; Swanson, Jeffrey W; Wilder, Christine M; Swartz, Marvin S

    2010-10-01

    This study sought to describe the implementation of "Kendra's Law" in New York State and examine regional differences in the application of the program. Between February 2007 and April 2008, interviews were conducted with 50 key informants across New York State. Key informants included assisted outpatient treatment (AOT) county coordinators, county directors of community services, judges, attorneys from the Mental Hygiene Legal Service (MHLS), psychiatrists, treatment providers, peer advocates, family members, and other referred individuals. Additional analyses were conducted using AOT program administrative and evaluation databases and client history data. From program inception in 1999 through 2007, a total of 8,752 initial AOT orders and 5,684 renewals were granted. Notable regional differences were found in the use of two distinct models of AOT: AOT First and Enhanced Voluntary Services First. Regional differences were also found in how the AOT program was implemented and administered. Other variations stemmed from the court proceedings themselves, the continuity and interest of the presiding judge, and the attitudes of the MHLS attorneys. Many regional adaptations of the AOT program were found. Many were the result of lack of guidance in implementing Kendra's Law. Policy makers may want to consider whether the law should change to allow for these differences or whether additional support from a central source is warranted to ensure more uniformity in the implementation of AOT and thus the fairness of its application across the state.

  6. Nuclear waste treatment program: Annual report for FY 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brouns, R.A.; Powell, J.A. (comps.)

    1988-09-01

    Two of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) nuclear waste management-related goals are to ensure that waste management is not an obstacle to the further development of light-water reactors and the closure of the nuclear fuel cycle and to fulfill its institutional responsibility for providing safe storage and disposal of existing and future nuclear wastes. As part of its approach to achieving these goals, the Office of Remedial Action and Waste Technology of DOE established what is now called the Nuclear Waste Treatment Program (NWTP) at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory during the second half of FY 1982. To support DOE's attainment of its goals, the NWTP is to provide technology necessary for the design and operation of nuclear waste treatment facilities by commercial enterprises as part of a licensed waste management system and problem-specific treatment approaches, waste form and treatment process adaptations, equipment designs, and trouble-shooting assistance, as required to treat existing wastes. This annual report describes progress during FY 1987 towards meeting these two objectives. 24 refs., 59 figs., 24 tabs.

  7. Reinforcing Productivity in a Job-Skills Training Program for Unemployed Substance-Abusing Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Shrinidhi; Everly, Jeffrey J; Silverman, Kenneth

    2017-05-01

    Chronically unemployed adults may benefit from intensive job-skills training; however, training programs do not always reliably engage participants in mastering skills. This study examined effects of voucher reinforcement for performance on a job-skills training program in the therapeutic workplace. Participants were four unemployed, substance abusing adults who earned monetary vouchers for working on programs targeting typing skills. Participants were exposed to two payment conditions that differed in whether or not pay was dependent on performance in a within-subject reversal design. In the productivity-pay condition, participants earned $8.00 per hour for attending the workplace plus a bonus for performance. In the base-pay condition, participants were paid an hourly wage that was equivalent to the total hourly earnings from the previous productivity-pay condition. Participants completed less work on the typing programs in the base- than the productivity-pay condition, but the amount of time spent in the workroom and the accuracy and rate of typing were not affected by the pay manipulation. All participants reported preferring base pay over productivity pay. Explicit reinforcement of productivity maintains consistent work in training programs, but more aspects of productivity pay need to be refined for effective, efficient, and socially valid implementation with unemployed, substance-abusing adults.

  8. Development and piloting of a treatment foster care program for older youth with psychiatric problems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McMillen, J Curtis; Narendorf, Sarah Carter; Robinson, Debra; Havlicek, Judy; Fedoravicius, Nicole; Bertram, Julie; McNelly, David

    2015-01-01

    .... This paper reports on the development and piloting of a manualized treatment foster care program designed to step down older youth with high psychiatric needs from residential programs to treatment foster care homes...

  9. Perceived Autonomy Support in the NIMH RAISE Early Treatment Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browne, Julia; Penn, David L; Bauer, Daniel J; Meyer-Kalos, Piper; Mueser, Kim T; Robinson, Delbert G; Addington, Jean; Schooler, Nina R; Glynn, Shirley M; Gingerich, Susan; Marcy, Patricia; Kane, John M

    2017-09-01

    This study examined perceived support for autonomy-the extent to which individuals feel empowered and supported to make informed choices-among participants in the Recovery After an Initial Schizophrenia Episode Early Treatment Program (RAISE ETP). The aims of this study were to evaluate whether NAVIGATE, the active treatment studied in RAISE ETP, was associated with greater improvements in perceived autonomy support over the two-year intervention, compared with community care, and to examine associations between perceived autonomy support and quality of life and symptoms over time and across treatment groups. This study examined perceived autonomy support among the 404 individuals with first-episode psychosis who participated in the RAISE ETP trial (NAVIGATE, N=223; community care, N=181). Three-level conditional linear growth modeling was used given the nested data structure. The results indicated that perceived autonomy support increased significantly over time for those in NAVIGATE but not in community care. Once treatment began, higher perceived autonomy support was related to higher quality of life at six, 12, and 18 months in NAVIGATE and at 12, 18, and 24 months in community care. Higher perceived autonomy support was related to improved scores on total symptoms and on excited symptoms regardless of treatment group and time. Overall, perceived autonomy support increased in NAVIGATE but not for those in community care and was related to improved quality of life and symptoms across both treatment groups. Future research should examine the impact of perceived autonomy support on a wider array of outcomes, including engagement, medication adherence, and functioning.

  10. Behavioral treatments for children and adults who stutter: a review

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Blomgren, Michael

    2013-01-01

    .... Multifactorial and operant treatments are designed for young children who stutter. Both of these approaches involve parent training and differ primarily in their focus on reducing demands on the child (multifactorial...

  11. Aortic Stenosis in Adults: natural history, treatment and outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.J. Heuvelman (Helena )

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ This thesis concerns aortic stenosis (AS) in contemporary clinical practice. First, an introduction will be given to provide background information on the normal aortic valve, and thereafter on the incidence, disease spectrum, diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis of

  12. Entry correlates and motivations of older adults participating in organized exercise programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiggelbout, Maarten; Hopman-Rock, Marijke; van Mechelen, Willem

    2008-07-01

    This study reports entry correlates and motivations of older adults participating in organized exercise programs in the Netherlands, as determined in a descriptive explorative study (N = 2,350, response rate 86%). Participants were community-dwelling older adults (50+ years) who enrolled and started in 10 different exercise programs. Entry features were analyzed for differences in age, sex, marital status, education, living situation, body-mass index, lifestyle, and health status. Motivations for entering an exercise program were determined using homogeneity analyses. More Exercise for Seniors (MBvO) attracted relatively older seniors, whereas organized sports mainly attracted younger ones. Walking, MBvO, and gymnastics attracted more women, whereas skating and table tennis were reported to attract more male participants. Badminton and cycling attracted relatively higher educated participants, whereas MBvO attracted relatively lower educated participants. Three distinct motivational constructs were found: relax and enjoy, care and cure, and competition. Public health and recruitment implications of these findings are discussed.

  13. Expansion/Facemask Treatment of an Adult Class III Malocclusion

    OpenAIRE

    Jackson, Gregory W.; Kravitz, Neal D.

    2014-01-01

    The orthodontic treatment of class III malocclusion with a maxillary deficiency is often treated with maxillary protraction with or without expansion. Skeletal and dental changes have been documented which have combined for the protraction of the maxilla and the correction of the class III malocclusion. Concerning the ideal time to treat a developing class III malocclusion, studies have reported that, although early treatment may be the most effective, face mask therapy can provide a viable o...

  14. Pre-hospital treatment of convulsive status epilepticus in adults

    OpenAIRE

    Fei TIAN; Xiang-qun SHI; Ying-ying SU

    2015-01-01

     Convulsive status epilepticus (CSE) is the most serious seizure type in status epilepticus (SE), which may cause irreversible damage of brain and other vital organs without prompt and effective treatment, and result in a high mortality. Therefore, effective pre-hospital drug therapy can ensure the success of treatment for CSE. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2015.11.004

  15. Factors influencing treatment failure in HIV positive adult patients on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: Factors associated with higher odds of treatment failure were severe depression [OR 3.7; p-value 0.002; 95% Cl 1.6-8.5] and discontinuing ART [OR 4.4; p-value 0.02; 95% Cl 1.3-14.7]. Factors associated with lower odds of treatment failure were age >42 [OR 0.3; p-value 0.007; 95% Cl 0.1-0.7], taking ART on time ...

  16. Preferences and Actual Treatment of Older Adults at the End of Life. A Mortality Follow-Back Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pasman, H.R.W.; Kaspers, P.J.; Deeg, D.J.H.; Onwuteaka-Philipsen, B.D.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To compare actual treatments with preferences for starting or forgoing treatment of older adults at the end of life. Design Mortality follow-back study of relatives of deceased older adults. Preferences and actual treatment were studied for each of four treatments: starting or forgoing

  17. Response to a Treatment Summary and Care Plan Among Adult Survivors of Pediatric and Young Adult Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spain, Peter D.; Oeffinger, Kevin C.; Candela, Joanne; McCabe, Mary; Ma, Xiaomei; Tonorezos, Emily S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Survivors of pediatric and young adult cancer are at increased risk for treatment-related problems. Yet, few survivors receive risk-based care. The treatment summary and care plan are recommended to improve understanding of cancer treatment, potential late effects, and recommended screening. It is unknown whether survivors retain, understand, value, and disseminate the document, and whether it causes worry. Methods: We surveyed 111 adult survivors of pediatric and young adult cancer 1 to 6 weeks after receipt of a one-page treatment summary and care plan (response rate, 96%). Participants answered questions regarding retention, understanding, value, dissemination, concern, and preferences. Results: Participants were majority female (58%), college-educated (60%), diagnosed with cancer before age 21 (76%), on average 18 years from diagnosis (range, 2 to 50 years), and treated with radiation and chemotherapy (61%). Median age was 30 years (range, 18 to 65 years). A majority of participants stated that they understood the treatment summary (95%), retained the document (95%), and valued it (92%). A minority reported that the document caused concern (14%) or wanted more information than the form provided (20%). Although the time between receipt of the document and survey was brief, many described dissemination of the document to their personal circle (44%) or an outside provider (10 [33%] of 30 who saw an outside doctor). Conclusion: A one-page treatment summary and care plan was well-received and did not cause report of undue concern. Additional health-related information was requested by some, and dissemination to outside providers could be improved. PMID:22942816

  18. Systematic review of outcomes from home-based primary care programs for homebound older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stall, Nathan; Nowaczynski, Mark; Sinha, Samir K

    2014-12-01

    To describe the effect of home-based primary care for homebound older adults on individual, caregiver, and systems outcomes. A systematic review of home-based primary care interventions for community-dwelling older adults (aged ≥65) using the Cochrane, PubMed, and MEDLINE databases from the earliest available date through March 15, 2014. Studies were included if the house calls visitor was the ongoing primary care provider and if the intervention measured emergency department visits, hospitalizations, hospital beds days of care, long-term care admissions, or long-term care bed days of care. Home-based primary care programs. Homebound community-dwelling older adults (N = 46,154). Emergency department visits, hospitalizations, hospital bed days of care, long-term care admissions, long-term care bed days of care, costs, program design, and individual and caregiver quality of life and satisfaction with care. Of 357 abstracts identified, nine met criteria for review. The nine interventions were all based in North America, with five emerging from the Veterans Affairs system. Eight of nine programs demonstrated substantial effects on at least one inclusion outcome, with seven programs affecting two outcomes. Six interventions shared three core program components: interprofessional care teams, regular interprofessional care meetings, and after-hours support. Specifically designed home-based primary care programs may substantially affect individual, caregiver and systems outcomes. Adherence to the core program components identified in this review could guide the development and spread of these programs. © 2014, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2014, The American Geriatrics Society.

  19. Feasibility of a community-based Functional Power Training program for older adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan QLL

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Queenie Lin Ling Tan,1 Lilian Min Yen Chye,1 Daniella Hui Min Ng,1 Mei Sian Chong,1 Tze Pin Ng,1,2 Shiou Liang Wee1,3 1Frailty Research Program, Geriatric Education and Research Institute (GERI, Singapore; 2Department of Psychological Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore; 3Faculty of Health and Social Sciences, Singapore Institute of Technology, Singapore Purpose: Community-based programs can increase and sustain physical activity participation in older adults, even for those who are physically frail. We studied the feasibility and potential effect of a 12-week structured Functional Power Training (FPT program involving high velocities and low loads for older adults conducted in a common area of their housing estate.Patients and methods: The structured FPT program was conducted in collaboration with a health promotion social enterprise and a community service provider based in a public housing site. We recruited nine inactive residents as participants to the single, group-based, twice-weekly program. Attendance and adverse event(s were recorded throughout the program. The Short Physical Performance Battery, Timed Up and Go (TUG, and 30s Sit-to-Stand tests were used to assess functional outcomes pre- and postprogram. The FRAIL Scale was used to assess their frailty status, and a postprogram experience survey was conducted.Results: Eight subjects (aged 74±10 years completed the program with an average overall attendance of 90.3%, with at least five participants present for each session. Changes in functional outcomes showed a moderate-to-large effect with significant improvement in TUG (p<0.01. In addition, participants either reversed or maintained their frailty status (p<0.01. Overall, the program was perceived to be well structured, engaging, as well as providing physical and psychosocial benefits. No exercise-related adverse events occurred during the program, and participants were keen to recommend this program to others

  20. Open treatment of unilateral mandibular condyle fractures in adults : A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rozeboom, A.; Dubois, L.; Bos, R.; Spijker, R.; de Lange, J.

    2017-01-01

    Since the introduction of rigid internal fixation devices, more and more surgeons favour an open approach to treating condylar fractures of the mandible in adult patients. Different indications for open treatment have been published. Open treatment is associated with surgical complications because

  1. Ten ways to improve the treatment of depression and anxiety in adults

    OpenAIRE

    Dunlop, Boadie W.; Scheinberg, Kelly; Dunlop, Anne L.

    2013-01-01

    Complaints of depression and anxiety are very common among adult patients seeking treatment in primary care settings, and primary care providers prescribe the majority of medications for these conditions. Psychiatrists are often asked to evaluate and manage patients with major depression or anxiety disorders who have not improved after treatment in primary care.

  2. Quality of Life and Medication Adherence of Independently Living Older Adults Enrolled in a Pharmacist-Based Medication Management Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harlow, Christopher; Hanna, Catherine; Eckmann, Lynne; Gokun, Yevgeniya; Zanjani, Faika; Blumenschein, Karen; Divine, Holly

    2017-04-06

    This study sought to understand the medication adherence and quality of life (QOL) of recipients of a pharmacist-based medication management program among independently living older adults. Using a cross-sectional, quasi-experimental study design, we compared older adults enrolled in the program to older adults not enrolled in the program. Data were collected via face-to-face interviews in independent-living facilities and in participants' homes. Independently living older adults who were enrolled in the medication management program (n = 38) were compared to older adults not enrolled in the program (control group (n = 41)). All participants were asked to complete questionnaires on health-related quality of life (QOL, using the SF-36) and medication adherence (using the four-item Morisky scale). The medication management program recipients reported significantly more prescribed medications (p enrolled in a pharmacist-based medication management program had similar QOL and self-reported medication adherence when compared to older adults not enrolled in the program. This study provides initial evidence for the characteristics of older adults receiving a pharmacist-based medication management program, which may contribute to prolonged independent living and positive health outcomes.

  3. Adult growth hormone (GH)-deficient patients demonstrate heterogeneity between childhood onset and adult onset before and during human GH treatment. Adult Growth Hormone Deficiency Study Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Attanasio, A F; Lamberts, S W; Matranga, A M

    1997-01-01

    -deficient adult patients have been compared. The first 6 months comprised randomized, double-blind treatment with GH or placebo, then all patients were GH-treated for a further 12 months. At baseline the height, body weight, body mass index, lean body mass, and waist/hip ratio of AO patients were significantly (P......The onset of adult GH deficiency may be during either adulthood (AO) or childhood (CO), but potential differences have not previously been examined. In this study the baseline and GH therapy (12.5 micrograms/kg per day) data from CO (n = 74; mean age 29 yr) and AO (n = 99; mean age 44 yr) GH...

  4. [Validity and utility of self-perceived need for dental treatment by adults and elderly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, Alex Rodrigues do; Andrade, Fabíola Bof de; César, Cibele Comini

    2015-08-01

    This study aimed to determine the validity of self-rated measures as an indicator of dental treatment needs in adults and the elderly. The sample consisted of individuals that participated in the National Oral Health Survey and the Survey on Oral Health Conditions in Minas Gerais State. Self-rated needs for dental treatment and total prostheses were compared to need based on dental examination, defined as the gold standard. The quality of measures was assessed by sensitivity, specificity, and predictive values. Sensitivity varied from 51% to 90%, and specificity from 56% to 90%. Positive predictive values were 11% to 95% and negative predictive values were 23% to 99%. Self-rated need for dental treatment in adults and for total prostheses in the elderly showed acceptable validity. Meanwhile, self-rated need for dental treatment in the elderly and for total prostheses in adults were not considered useful, due to their low performance.

  5. The Adults in the Making Program: Long-Term Protective Stabilizing Effects on Alcohol Use and Substance Use Problems for Rural African American Emerging Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brody, Gene H.; Yu, Tianyi; Chen, Yi-fu; Kogan, Steven M.; Smith, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This report addresses the long-term efficacy of the Adults in the Making (AIM) prevention program on deterring the escalation of alcohol use and development of substance use problems, particularly among rural African American emerging adults confronting high levels of contextual risk. Method: African American youths (M age, pretest =…

  6. Colour preference between adults and children during a dental treatment session.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oner Ozdas, Didem; Kazak, Magrur

    2017-02-01

    It is evidently shown that colour has physical, psychological and sociological effects on human beings. There are many studies showing the effects of colours on brain activity. Colour preferences may change from childhood to adulthood and are significantly different in various age groups. The aim of this study was to evaluate the adults and children in their preference for mouthrinses in various colours under stress condition during a dental treatment session. 240 adults and 263 children were included in the study. Three transparent cups were filled with water, two of which were coloured green/pink rinsing by dissolving a tablet in the water. Cups were placed near the dental unit. During dental treatment sessions, patients were told to rinse their mouth with whichever cup they preferred. Preferred colour of cup, gender and age of patient, number of sessions were recorded. Data were statistically analysed by SPSS 15.0 programme and chi-square tests. Half of all cases preferred water. In adults, while females statistically significantly preferred water, males chose cups with coloured contents (pcoloured contents in multi-dental treatment sessions, children regularly preferred water (pcolours of cups affected choices made by adults and children. Female adults and children were not interested in trying colourful mouthrinses, while male adults were curious about trying colourful mouthrinses during dental treatment sessions under stress condition. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Physical activity program preferences and perspectives of older adults with and without cognitive impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Terence W H; Doyle, Colleen J; Cyarto, Elizabeth V; Cox, Kay L; Ellis, Kathryn A; Ames, David; Lautenschlager, Nicola T

    2014-06-01

    There is increasing evidence to support the benefits of physical activity on cognition in older adults. This paper describes (i) the attitudes, beliefs and barriers towards physical activity of older adults with and without cognitive impairment and (ii) their opinion of the attributes of the ideal physical activity program. Thematic analysis of focus groups and individual interviews with 50 older adults with no cognitive impairment, subjective memory complaints, mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease was performed. Consistent with previous research in cognitively intact older adults, most participants, irrespective of cognitive status, had a positive attitude towards physical activity and believed it was beneficial both generally and for cognition. There was a preference for physical activity programs to be suggested by advertising and general practitioners (GPs), undertaken in a group setting, and beliefs that they should be tailored to individual's needs and preferences, and should be affordable according to their income. Participants with cognitive impairment cited specific barriers including "memory" and "lack of companion" as well as preferring "accessible" settings and "simple/light/safe" activities. These findings provide useful data, particularly from participants with cognitive impairment, with whom there has been little research to date. This could contribute to efforts to translate the growing research evidence of the benefits of physical activity for brain health into effective community programs. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  8. Effects of Estrogen in Gender-dependent Fetal Programming of Adult Cardiovascular Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zewen; Wang, Lei; Ke, Jun; Xiao, DaLiao

    2018-03-01

    Epidemiological studies and experimental studies have demonstrated that intrauterine adverse environment increases the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in adulthood. However, whether an individual develops a cardiovascular dysfunctional phenotype may depend on genetic background, age, and sex. In this review, we summarize some of the recent experimental animal studies in the developmental programming of adult CVD with an emphasis on sex differences and the potential role of estrogen in mediating sexual dimorphism. Few epidemiological studies report the effect of sex on the developmental programming of CVD. However, numerous experimental animal studies have shown a sex difference in fetal programming of adult cardiovascular dysfunction. Most of the animal studies indicate that male offspring develop cardiovascular dysfunction and CVD in adulthood, whereas adult females appear to be protected. Estrogen is one of the key factors that contributes to the sex difference of adult CVD. Estrogen/its receptor (ER) may interact with the RAS system by changes of DNA methylation patterns at the target gene promoter, serve as an antioxidant to counteract the prenatal insults-induced heightened ROS, and function as an eNOS activator to increase vasodilation, resulting in the protection of female offspring from the development of hypertension and other CVDs. These studies suggest that estrogen/ER may contribute to sex differences in cardiovascular response to an adverse intrauterine environment and play a significant role in modulating the cardiovascular response in adulthood. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  9. Treatment of Chronic Pain for Adults 65 and Over: Analyses of Outcomes and Changes in Psychological Flexibility Following Interdisciplinary Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Whitney; Daly, Aisling; Yu, Lin; McCracken, Lance M

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) for older adults with chronic pain. Secondarily, we examined the associations between changes on processes of psychological flexibility and treatment outcome variables. Participants were 60 adults with chronic pain age 65 and older selected from a larger consecutive sample of 928 adults of any age. All participants had longstanding pain that was associated with significant distress and disability. Participants completed measures of pain, functioning, and depression, and processes of psychological flexibility at baseline, immediately post-treatment, and at a 9-month follow-up. Treatment consisted of a 2- or 4-week residential program based on principles of ACT delivered by an interdisciplinary team. Treatment was designed to increase daily functioning by enhancing key processes of psychological flexibility, including openness, awareness, and committed action. Participants showed significant improvements in functioning and mental health at posttreatment. Participants also showed significant increases in pain acceptance and committed action from pre- to post-treatment. Small effect sizes were observed for most treatment outcome and process variables in the pre-treatment to follow-up intervals; however, these improvements were not statistically significant. In secondary analyses, changes in facets of psychological flexibility were significantly associated with improvements in social functioning and mental health. This study supports the potential effectiveness of ACT for chronic pain among older adults. Future research is needed to determine how to maximize the impact of this treatment, particularly through greater impact on psychological flexibility.

  10. Does Scoliosis-Specific Exercise Treatment in Adolescence Alter Adult Quality of Life?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maciej Płaszewski

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Health-related quality of life in adults, who in adolescence participated in a scoliosis-specific exercise program, was not previously studied. Design. Cross-sectional study, with retrospective data collection. Material and Methods. Homogenous groups of 68 persons (43 women aged 30.10 (25–39 years, with mild or moderate scoliosis, and 76 (38 women able-bodied persons, aged 30.11 (24–38 years, who 16.5 (12–26 years earlier had completed scoliosis-specific exercise or observation regimes, participated. Their respiratory characteristics did not differ from predicted values. The WHOQOL-BREF questionnaire, Oswestry Disability Questionnaire, and pain scale (VAS were applied. Results. The transformed WHOQOL-BREF scores ranged from 54.6 ± 11.19 in the physical domain in the mild scoliotic subgroup to 77.1 ± 16.05 in the social domain in the able-bodied subgroup. The ODQ values did not generally exceed 5.3 ± 7.53. Inter- and intragroup differences were nonsignificant. Age, marital status, education, and gender were significantly associated with the ODQ scores. Significant association between the ODQ and WHOQOL-BREF social relationships domain scores with the participation in exercise treatment was found. Conclusions. Participants with the history of exercise treatment generally did not differ significantly from their peers who were only under observation. This study cannot conclude that scoliosis-specific exercise treatment in adolescence alters quality of life in adulthood.

  11. Combined Periodontal, Orthodontic, and Prosthetic Treatment in an Adult Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Vinicius Sabatoski

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A 41-year-old man had a significant loss of bone and supporting tissues with pathologic migration of several teeth and several missing teeth. He was treated with an interdisciplinary therapeutic protocol that included nonsurgical periodontal therapy based on strict control of supragingival plaque, subgingival periodontal therapy, orthodontic and endodontic treatment, and replacement of restorations. The orthodontic therapy was performed in a severely reduced bone support and the presence of pathological tooth migration after periodontal disease control. The interdisciplinary treatment protocol was the key to achieve a significant improvement in his facial and dental esthetics, masticatory function, and quality of life.

  12. Factors influencing treatment failure in HIV positive adult patients on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: Factors associated with higher odds of treatment failure were severe depression [OR 3.7; p-value 0.002; 95% CI 1.6-8.5] and discontinuing ART [OR 4.4; p-value 0.02; 95% CI 1.3-14.7]. Factors associated with lower odds of treatment failure were age ≥42 [OR 0.3; p-value 0.007; 95% CI 0.1-0.7], taking ART on time ...

  13. Diagnosis and treatment of macrocytic anemias in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagao, Takayo; Hirokawa, Makoto

    2017-10-01

    Anemia is one of the most common health problems in the primary care setting. Macrocytosis in adults is defined as a red blood cell (RBC) mean corpuscular volume (MCV) >100 femtoliter (fL). Macrocytic anemias are generally classified into megaloblastic or nonmegaloblastic anemia. Megaloblastic anemia is caused by deficiency or impaired utilization of vitamin B12 and/or folate, whereas nonmegaloblastic macrocytic anemia is caused by various diseases such as myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), liver dysfunction, alcoholism, hypothyroidism, certain drugs, and by less commonly inherited disorders of DNA synthesis. Macrocytic anemias are treated with cause-specific therapies, and it is crucial to differentiate nonmegaloblastic from megaloblastic anemia. Because MDS and myeloid neoplasms commonly affect the elderly, primary care physicians may encounter more cases of macrocytic anemias in the near future, as the older population increases. When MDS is suspected along with leukocytopenia and/or thrombocytopenia with anemia, a hematology consultation may be appropriate.

  14. Vincristine, Ifosfamide, and Doxorubicin for Initial Treatment of Ewing Sarcoma in Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Michael J; Gopalakrishnan, Vancheswaran; Ravi, Vinod; Livingston, J Andrew; Conley, Anthony P; Araujo, Dejka; Somaiah, Neeta; Zarzour, Maria A; Ratan, Ravin; Wang, Wei-Lien; Patel, Shreyaskumar R; Lazar, Alexander; Ludwig, Joseph A; Benjamin, Robert S

    2017-10-01

    There are no clinical trials specifically addressing chemotherapy for adults with Ewing sarcoma (ES). Five-year event-free survival (EFS) of adults on pediatric studies of ES (44%-47%) is worse than that of children treated with the same therapy (69%). The object of this study was to review the results of therapy with vincristine, ifosfamide, and doxorubicin (VID) in the multidisciplinary treatment of adults with ES at our institution. Charts for adults treated for ES from 1995 to 2011 were retrospectively reviewed. Clinician-reported radiographic tumor response, type of local therapy, pathologic response, and survival data were collected. Seventy-one patients were identified who received VID as initial therapy. The median age was 25 (range: 16-64). Forty-two patients (59%) presented with a localized disease and 29 patients (41%) presented with a distant metastasis. Of all patients treated with VID, 83.6% showed a radiological response. Patients who presented with a localized disease had a 5-year overall survival (OS) of 68% (median not reached), compared with 10.3% (median: 1.9 years) in those who presented with distant metastases. Five-year EFS was 67%. The nine patients with a pelvic primary tumor had inferior 5-year OS (42%) to the 33 with primary tumors at other sites (75%). The 5-year OS of those who had greater than or equal to 95% necrosis after neoadjuvant VID (n = 20; 5-year OS: 84%) was superior to those who had less than 95% necrosis (n = 13; 5-year OS: 53%). In adults with primary ES, VID combined with an adjuvant strategy based on post-treatment percent necrosis has favorable outcomes compared with historical adult controls. Ewing sarcoma (ES) is a rare tumor in adults, and there are no dedicated clinical trials in the adult population. Most therapy is modeled after the published pediatric studies, although the small numbers of adult patients included on those studies did significantly worse than the children. We modeled our treatment on other

  15. Evaluating human papillomavirus vaccination programs in Canada: should provincial healthcare pay for voluntary adult vaccination?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith? Robert J

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recently, provincial health programs in Canada and elsewhere have begun rolling out vaccination against human papillomavirus for girls aged 9–13. While vaccination is voluntary, the cost of vaccination is waived, to encourage parents to have their daughters vaccinated. Adult women who are eligible for the vaccine may still receive it, but at a cost of approximately CAN$400. Given the high efficacy and immunogenicity of the vaccine, the possibility of eradicating targeted types of the virus may be feasible, assuming the vaccination programs are undertaken strategically. Methods We develop a mathematical model to describe the epidemiology of vaccination against human papillomavirus, accounting for a widespread childhood vaccination program that may be supplemented by voluntary adult vaccination. A stability analysis is performed to determine the stability of the disease-free equilibrium. The critical vaccine efficacy and immunogenicity thresholds are derived, and the minimum level of adult vaccination required for eradication of targeted types is determined. Results We demonstrate that eradication of targeted types is indeed feasible, although the burden of coverage for a childhood-only vaccination program may be high. However, if a small, but non-negligible, proportion of eligible adults can be vaccinated, then the possibility of eradication of targeted types becomes much more favourable. We provide a threshold for eradication in general communities and illustrate the results with numerical simulations. We also investigate the effects of suboptimal efficacy and immunogenicity and show that there is a critical efficacy below which eradication of targeted types is not possible. If eradication is possible, then there is a critical immunogenicity such that even 100% childhood vaccination will not eradicate the targeted types of the virus and must be supplemented with voluntary adult vaccination. However, the level of adult

  16. Validity of the Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale (ASRS) as a screener for adult ADHD in treatment seeking substance use disorder patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Glind, Geurt; van den Brink, Wim; Koeter, Maarten W. J.; Carpentier, Pieter-Jan; van Emmerik-van Oortmerssen, Katelijne; Kaye, Sharlene; Skutle, Arvid; Bu, Eli-Torild H.; Franck, Johan; Konstenius, Maija; Moggi, Franz; Dom, Geert; Verspreet, Sofie; Demetrovics, Zsolt; Kapitány-Fövény, Máté; Fatséas, Melina; Auriacombe, Marc; Schillinger, Arild; Seitz, Andrea; Johnson, Brian; Faraone, Stephen V.; Ramos-Quiroga, J. Antoni; Casas, Miguel; Allsop, Steve; Carruthers, Susan; Barta, Csaba; Schoevers, Robert A.; Levin, Frances R.

    2013-01-01

    To detect attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in treatment seeking substance use disorders (SUD) patients, a valid screening instrument is needed. To test the performance of the Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale V 1.1(ASRS) for adult ADHD in an international sample of treatment seeking SUD

  17. Occupational Outcome in Adult ADHD: Impact of Symptom Profile, Comorbid Psychiatric Problems, and Treatment--A Cross-Sectional Study of 414 Clinically Diagnosed Adult ADHD Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halmoy, Anne; Fasmer, Ole Bernt; Gillberg, Christopher; Haavik, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To determine the effects of symptom profile, comorbid psychiatric problems, and treatment on occupational outcome in adult ADHD patients. Method: Adult ADHD patients (N = 414) responded to questionnaires rating past and present symptoms of ADHD, comorbid conditions, treatment history, and work status. Results: Of the patients, 24%…

  18. Structured Exercise Program is Feasible and Improves Functional Capacity among Older Adults in Puerto Rico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osvaldo J Hernandez Soto

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Physical inactivity is a major risk factor affecting overall health and functional capacity among older adults. In this study we evaluated functional capacity in 22 older adults in Puerto Rico (mean age ± standard deviation = 73.3 ± 8.2 years before, during and after eight weeks participation in a structured exercise program. Functional capacity was evaluated using a field test battery (body composition, flexibility, coordination, agility and balance, muscle endurance and cardiorespiratory endurance validated for this population. Also, cardiorespiratory fitness (VO2max and blood lipid levels were evaluated in a sub-sample (n = 7. A repeated measures ANOVA was used to detect changes in functional capacity before, during and after the exercise program. A paired t-test was used to evaluate changes in VO2max and lipids before and after the program. Flexibility improved significantly during the exercise program (51.6 ± 12.2 vs. 57.7 ± 8.1 cm, p=0.04 and this change was sustained at the end of the program (54.4 ± 10.2 cm. At eight weeks into the program, time in the agility and balance test improved by two seconds and muscle endurance improved by five repetitions (p<0.05 for all. No changes were observed in body composition, coordination, VO2max and lipid levels (p>0.05. These results suggest that participation in a structured exercise program for eight weeks can positively impact factors that improve movement capacity in older adults.

  19. Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma Treatment (PDQ®)—Patient Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soft tissue sarcomas can form almost anywhere in the body, but are most common in the head, neck, arms, legs, truck, and abdomen. Find out about risk and genetic factors, symptoms, tests to diagnose, prognosis, staging, and treatment for soft tissue sarcoma.

  20. Sealing occlusal caries lesions in adults referred for restorative treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bakhshandeh, Azam; Qvist, Vibeke; Ekstrand, Kim R

    2012-01-01

    treatment by senior lecturers at School of Dentistry, Copenhagen, Denmark were included. In case the patient had more than one occlusal caries lesion, randomization between sealing and restoration was made; otherwise, the lesion was sealed. In total, 60 resin sealants and 12 composite restorations were made...

  1. Ziprasidone for maintenance treatment of bipolar I disorder in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubovsky, Steven L; Dubovsky, Amelia N

    2011-04-01

    Antipsychotic drugs are increasingly used in the maintenance treatment of bipolar disorder. This review addresses the evidence supporting the use of one of these medications for this indication in order to place available data in perspective for the clinician. The approval of ziprasidone for maintenance treatment of bipolar I disorder was based on two open-label extensions of industry-sponsored 3-week monotherapy trials in mania, involving a total of 189 patients and an industry-sponsored study using sample enrichment of 584 outpatients who had either ziprasidone or a placebo added to lithium or valproate. Patients enrolled in maintenance studies did not have refractory mood disorders or comorbid conditions or risk of dangerousness, and they were able to give sustained consent. Ziprasidone is generally well tolerated, but should be taken with food. Primary interactions of concern are those with other serotonergic medications and other medications that prolong the QT interval. Although antipsychotic drugs are used frequently for maintenance treatment, current guidelines recommend that an attempt be made to withdraw them after acute treatment. The use of these medications as part of a maintenance regimen is most appropriate in cases of persistent psychosis or failure to respond to standard mood stabilizer combinations.

  2. Effect of radio frequency treatments on cowpea weevil adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dried pulses (chickpeas, lentils and dried peas) are valuable export commodities in the US Pacific Northwest. Postharvest infestation by stored product insect pests such as the cowpea weevil may cause importing countries to require phytosanitary treatments before shipment. Typically, chemical fumiga...

  3. Script Training Treatment for Adults with Apraxia of Speech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youmans, Gina; Youmans, Scott R.; Hancock, Adrienne B.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Outcomes of script training for individuals with apraxia of speech (AOS) and mild anomic aphasia were investigated. Script training is a functional treatment that has been successful for individuals with aphasia but has not been applied to individuals with AOS. Principles of motor learning were incorporated into training to promote…

  4. Pattern of Exodontia treatment need of adults attending the Lagos ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: Tooth extraction appears to be the predominant treatment need with the molars being the most frequently extracted tooth type in particular the lower last molar. This would affect masticatory efficiency. Emphasis should be placed on early and regular dental clinic visits through oral health awareness programmes ...

  5. Spanish Guidelines on Treatment of Bronchiectasis in Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-García, Miguel Ángel; Máiz, Luis; Olveira, Casilda; Girón, Rosa Maria; de la Rosa, David; Blanco, Marina; Cantón, Rafael; Vendrell, Montserrat; Polverino, Eva; de Gracia, Javier; Prados, Concepción

    2018-02-01

    In 2008, the Spanish Society of Pulmonology (SEPAR) published the first guidelines in the world on the diagnosis and treatment of bronchiectasis. Almost 10 years later, considerable scientific advances have been made in both the treatment and the evaluation and diagnosis of this disease, and the original guidelines have been updated to include the latest therapies available for bronchiectasis. These new recommendations have been drafted following a strict methodological process designed to ensure quality of content, and are linked to a large amount of online information that includes a wealth of references. The guidelines are focused on the treatment of bronchiectasis from both a multidisciplinary perspective, including specialty areas and the different healthcare levels involved, and a multidimensional perspective, including a comprehensive overview of the specific aspects of the disease. A series of recommendations have been drawn up, based on an in-depth review of the evidence for treatment of the underlying etiology, the bronchial infection in its different forms of presentation using existing therapies, bronchial inflammation, and airflow obstruction. Nutritional aspects, management of secretions, muscle training, management of complications and comorbidities, infection prophylaxis, patient education, home care, surgery, exacerbations, and patient follow-up are addressed. Copyright © 2017 SEPAR. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Coming Together to Calm the Hunger: Group Therapy Program for Adults Diagnosed with Anorexia Nervosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponech, Heather; McBride, Dawn Lorraine

    2012-01-01

    This project provides a comprehensive overview of the research literature on anorexia nervosa in female adults and concludes by offering 14 group therapy lesson plans for anorexia nervosa that therapists may use in their practice. There is a remarkable lack of research on the efficacy of treatment designed for individuals diagnosed with anorexia…

  7. Camperdown Program for Adults Who Stutter: A Student Training Clinic Phase I Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocomazzo, Nadia; Block, Susan; Carey, Brenda; O'Brian, Sue; Onslow, Mark; Packman, Ann; Iverach, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: During speech pathology professional preparation there is a need for adequate student instruction with speech-restructuring treatments for adults. An important part of that clinical educational experience is to participate in a clinical setting that produces outcomes equivalent to those attained during clinical trials. A previous…

  8. Implementation of an Evidence-Based Exercise Program for Older Adults in South Florida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard C. Palmer

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. This study aimed to examine how well an evidence-based physical activity program could be translated for wide scale dissemination and adoption to increase physical activity among community-dwelling older adults. Methods. Between October 2009 and December 2012, reach, fidelity, dosage, ease of implementation, and barriers to translation of EnhanceFitness (EF were assessed. To assess effectiveness, a pretest-posttest design was used to measure increases in functional fitness (chair stands, arm curls, and the up-and-go test. Results. Fourteen community-based agencies offered 126 EF classes in 83 different locations and reached 4,490 older adults. Most participants were female (72%. Thirty-eight percent of participants did not complete the initial 16-week EF program. The 25% who received the recommended dose experienced an increase in upper and lower body strength and mobility. Further, participants reported high satisfaction with the program. Conclusion. EF was successfully implemented in a variety of settings throughout South Florida and reached a large number of older adults. However, challenges were encountered in ensuring that those who participated received a program dose that would lead to beneficial gains in functional fitness.

  9. Control of adult neurogenesis by programmed cell death in the mammalian brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Jae Ryun; Hong, Caroline Jeeyeon; Kim, Joo Yeon; Kim, Eun-Kyoung; Sun, Woong; Yu, Seong-Woon

    2016-04-21

    The presence of neural stem cells (NSCs) and the production of new neurons in the adult brain have received great attention from scientists and the public because of implications to brain plasticity and their potential use for treating currently incurable brain diseases. Adult neurogenesis is controlled at multiple levels, including proliferation, differentiation, migration, and programmed cell death (PCD). Among these, PCD is the last and most prominent process for regulating the final number of mature neurons integrated into neural circuits. PCD can be classified into apoptosis, necrosis, and autophagic cell death and emerging evidence suggests that all three may be important modes of cell death in neural stem/progenitor cells. However, the molecular mechanisms that regulate PCD and thereby impact the intricate balance between self-renewal, proliferation, and differentiation during adult neurogenesis are not well understood. In this comprehensive review, we focus on the extent, mechanism, and biological significance of PCD for the control of adult neurogenesis in the mammalian brain. The role of intrinsic and extrinsic factors in the regulation of PCD at the molecular and systems levels is also discussed. Adult neurogenesis is a dynamic process, and the signals for differentiation, proliferation, and death of neural progenitor/stem cells are closely interrelated. A better understanding of how adult neurogenesis is influenced by PCD will help lead to important insights relevant to brain health and diseases.

  10. [Transcatheter treatment of combined congenital heart anomalies in an adult cyanotic patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalonetsky, Sergey; Khoury, Asaad; Schwartz, Yitzhack; Lorber, Avraham

    2006-09-01

    Contemporary catheterization techniques allow effective percutaneous transcatheter treatment of congenital heart defects as an attractive alternative to open heart surgery. This case report describes transcatheter treatment of congenital pulmonary valve stenosis and secundum atrial septal defect which were diagnosed in a 31 year old woman who presented with cyanosis. This illustrates difficulties in the diagnosis of congenital heart disease in adult patients and demonstrates that transcatheter techniques in the treatment of these congenital anomalies are effective.

  11. Chronic disease and recent addiction treatment utilization among alcohol and drug dependent adults

    OpenAIRE

    Samet Jeffrey; Allensworth-Davies Donald; Cheng Debbie M; Larson Mary Jo; Reif Sharon; Saitz Richard

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Chronic medical diseases require regular and longitudinal care and self-management for effective treatment. When chronic diseases include substance use disorders, care and treatment of both the medical and addiction disorders may affect access to care and the ability to focus on both conditions. The objective of this paper is to evaluate the association between the presence of chronic medical disease and recent addiction treatment utilization among adults with substance de...

  12. Outcome of total parathyroidectomy and autotransplantation as treatment of secondary and tertiary hyperparathyroidism in children and adults.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kievit, A.J.; Tinnemans, J.G.; Idu, M.M.; Groothoff, J.W.; Surachno, S.; Aronson, D.C.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Treatment safety and effectiveness of total parathyroidectomy and autotransplantation for secondary and tertiary hyperparathyroidism have been extensively proven in adults; the evidence for children, however, is scarce. Children and adolescents cannot simply be seen as young adults in

  13. Comparison of treatment effect estimates for pharmacological randomized controlled trials enrolling older adults only and those including adults: a meta-epidemiological study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valérie Seegers

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Older adults are underrepresented in clinical research. To assess therapeutic efficacy in older patients, some randomized controlled trials (RCTs include older adults only. OBJECTIVE: To compare treatment effects between RCTs including older adults only (elderly RCTs and RCTs including all adults (adult RCTs by a meta-epidemiological approach. METHODS: All systematic reviews published in the Cochrane Library (Issue 4, 2011 were screened. Eligible studies were meta-analyses of binary outcomes of pharmacologic treatment including at least one elderly RCT and at least one adult RCT. For each meta-analysis, we compared summary odds ratios for elderly RCTs and adult RCTs by calculating a ratio of odds ratios (ROR. A summary ROR was estimated across all meta-analyses. RESULTS: We selected 55 meta-analyses including 524 RCTs (17% elderly RCTs. The treatment effects differed beyond that expected by chance for 7 (13% meta-analyses, showing more favourable treatment effects in elderly RCTs in 5 cases and in adult RCTs in 2 cases. The summary ROR was 0.91 (95% CI, 0.77-1.08, p = 0.28, with substantial heterogeneity (I(2 = 51% and τ(2 = 0.14. Sensitivity and subgroup analyses by type-of-age RCT (elderly RCTs vs RCTs excluding older adults and vs RCTs of mixed-age adults, type of outcome (mortality or other and type of comparator (placebo or active drug yielded similar results. CONCLUSIONS: The efficacy of pharmacologic treatments did not significantly differ, on average, between RCTs including older adults only and RCTs of all adults. However, clinically important discrepancies may occur and should be considered when generalizing evidence from all adults to older adults.

  14. Help-Seeking Stigma and Mental Health Treatment Seeking Among Young Adult Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulesza, Magdalena; Corrigan, Patrick; Marshall, Grant

    2015-01-01

    Veterans underutilize mental health services. We investigated the association between treatment seeking stigma and utilization of mental health services in a sample of 812 young adult veterans. Higher perceived public stigma of treatment seeking was significantly related to lower treatment utilization. Although many veterans were concerned about negative perceptions if they were to seek treatment, a much smaller number of them endorsed that they would judge a fellow veteran negatively in similar situation. Targeting perceived public stigma of treatment seeking, through perceived norms interventions, might help in narrowing the gap between the need and receipt of help among veterans. PMID:26664795

  15. Results from a Multi-Modal Program Evaluation of a Four Year Statewide Juvenile Sex Offender Treatment and Reentry Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underwood, Lee A.; Dailey, Frances L. L.; Merino, Carrie; Crump, Yolanda

    2015-01-01

    The results of the Program Evaluation show the OJJ Statewide Sex Offender Treatment program is exceptionally productive in meeting over 90% of its established performance markers. These markers included successful screening and assessment of risk and psychosocial needs, completion of initial and master treatment plans, establishment of sex…

  16. Surgical treatment of isthmic spondylolisthesis with radicular pain in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, J A; Bajracharya, A R

    2007-01-01

    A common consensus has not yet been reached on surgical management of isthmic Spondylolisthesis especially regarding the optimal surgical procedure. This prospective study was carried to see the outcome of Posterolateral fusion with instrumentation without decompression. Eight consecutive patients, aged between 43 to 55 years, underwent primary surgery for isolated L4, L5 lumbar isthmic Spondylolisthesis of less than grade II that presented with radicular pain and exhibited instability on dynamic radiograph. The surgical procedure consisted of instrumentation with pedicle screws and rods (Moss Miami System) and posterolateral fusion in situ by placement of autogeneous bone graft, harvested from posterior iliac crest. Postoperatively Clinical and Radiological status were assessed and were graded according to Stauffer and Coventry method. The patients were followed up for one to three years. Radiological evidence of fusion was clearly evident by six months in all cases. Symptomatically all were relieved of radicular pain completely. One patient had recurrent backache due to causes unrelated to the illness of surgical procedure requiring occasional analgesic. No serious complication was encountered. This lead to conclusion that in adults of our population with low grade isthmic spondylolisthesis and radicular pain Instrumentation with Posterolateral fusion without decompression was sufficient to relieve symptoms.

  17. Substance use and treatment of substance use disorders in a community sample of transgender adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keuroghlian, Alex S; Reisner, Sari L; White, Jaclyn M; Weiss, Roger D

    2015-07-01

    Transgender people have elevated substance use prevalence compared with the U.S. general population, however no studies have comprehensively examined the relationship of psychosocial risk factors to substance use and substance use disorder (SUD) treatment among both male-to-female (MTF) and female-to-male (FTM) transgender adults. Secondary data analysis of a 2013 community-based survey of transgender adults in Massachusetts (N=452) was conducted. Adjusted multivariable logistic regression models were fit to examine the relationship of four risk factor domains with SUD treatment history and recent substance use: (1) demographics; (2) gender-related characteristics; (3) mental health; (4) socio-structural factors. Adjusted Odds Ratios (aOR) and 95% Confidence Intervals (95% CI) were estimated. Ten percent of the sample reported lifetime SUD treatment. Factors associated with significant increase in odds of lifetime SUD treatment alongside recent substance use (all ptransgender adults are associated with demographic, gender-related, mental health, and socio-structural risk factors. Studies are warranted that identify SUD treatment barriers, and integrate SUD treatment with psychosocial and structural interventions for a diverse spectrum of transgender adults. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Prior Experiences of Behavioral Health Treatment among Uninsured Young Adults Served in a Psychiatric Crisis Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narendorf, Sarah Carter; Wagner, Richard; Fedoravicius, Nicole; Washburn, Micki

    2017-10-01

    This study qualitatively explored the past treatment experiences of uninsured young adults who sought public emergency psychiatric care. Qualitative interviews were conducted with a racially diverse sample of 55 young adults (ages 18-25) using a semi-structured interview guide, and analyzed using a team-based open coding approach. Findings emerged in three broad areas-provider-related factors, treatment-related factors, and environmental factors. Young adults talked about the importance of providers respecting and listening to them, the perceived advantages and disadvantages of therapy and medication treatment, and aspects of the environment that resulted in positive and negative experiences, particularly in inpatient settings. Providers need to convey respect and caring that transcends job duties and provide tangible skills and supports.

  19. Cognitive intervention through a training program for picture book reading in community-dwelling older adults: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Kuraoka, Masataka; Yasunaga, Masashi; Nonaka, Kumiko; Sakurai, Ryota; Takeuchi, Rumi; Murayama, Yoh; Ohba, Hiromi; Fujiwara, Yoshinori

    2014-11-21

    Non-pharmacological interventions are expected to be important strategies for reducing the age-adjusted prevalence of senile dementia, considering that complete medical treatment for cognitive decline has not yet been developed. From the viewpoint of long-term continuity of activity, it is necessary to develop various cognitive stimulating programs. The aim of this study is to examine the effectiveness of a cognitive intervention through a training program for picture book reading for community-dwelling older adults. Fifty-eight Japanese older participants were divided into the intervention and control groups using simple randomization (n =29 vs 29). In the intervention group, participants took part in a program aimed at learning and mastering methods of picture book reading as a form of cognitive training intervention. The control group listened to lectures about elderly health maintenance. Cognitive tests were conducted individually before and after the programs. The rate of memory retention, computed by dividing Logical Memory delayed recall by immediate recall, showed a significant interaction (p < .05) in analysis of covariance. Simple main effects showed that the rate of memory retention of the intervention group improved after the program completion (p < .05). In the participants with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) examined by Japanese version of the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA-J) (n =14 vs 15), significant interactions were seen in Trail Making Test-A (p < .01), Trail Making Test-B (p < .05), Kana pick-out test (p < .05) and the Mini-Mental State Examination (p < .05). The intervention effect was found in delayed verbal memory. This program is also effective for improving attention and executive function in those with MCI. The short-term interventional findings suggest that this program might contribute to preventing a decline in memory and executive function. UMIN000014712 (Date of ICMJE and WHO compliant trial information

  20. Educating adult females for leadership roles in an informal science program for girls

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCreedy, Dale

    The purpose of this study is to gain an understanding of and an evidentiary warrant for, how a community of practice focused on informal science learning, can engage and promote active participation that offers adult female members and the community opportunities for legitimacy and transformation. This study is a qualitative, ethnographic research study that documents how adult female volunteers, historically inexperienced and/or excluded from traditional practices of science, come to engage in science activities through an informal, community-based context that helps them to appreciate science connections in their lives that are ultimately empowering and agentic. I begin to understand the ways in which such informal contexts, often thought to be marginal to dominant educational beliefs and practices, can offer adults outside of the field of science, education, or both, an entree into science learning and teaching that facilitate female's participation in legitimate and empowering ways. Using descriptive analyses, I first identify the characteristics of peripheral and active program participants. Through phenomenological analyses, I then develop an understanding of participation in an informal science program by focusing on three adult female members' unique trajectories of participation leading to core member status. Each draws on different aspects of the program that they find most salient, illustrating how different elements can serve as motivators for participation, and support continuation along the trajectory of participation reflecting personal and political agency. Through a purposeful ethnographic case-study analysis, I then explore one core member's transformation, evidenced by her developing identities as someone who enjoys science, engages in science activities, and, enacts a role as community old timer and door opener to science learning. This study: (1) contributes to the limited knowledge base in fields of informal learning, science education, and

  1. Usability testing by older adults of a computer-mediated health communication program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Carolyn A; Neafsey, Patricia J; Strickler, Zoe

    2009-03-01

    Failure to adhere to an antihypertensive regimen and interactions between antihypertensives and other medicines represent serious health threats to older adults. This study tested the usability of a touch-screen-enabled personal education program (PEP). Findings showed that older adults rated the PEP system usability, system usefulness, and system-use satisfaction at a moderately high level for prototype-1 and at an exceptionally high level for prototype-2. A 201.91% reduction in interface errors and a 31.08% decrease in interface time also were found between the two trials. This participatory usability design was highly successful in tailoring its program interface design to accommodate older users to enhance their health communication and technology use efficacy.

  2. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Koru: A Mindfulness Program for College Students and Other Emerging Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greeson, Jeffrey M.; Juberg, Michael K.; Maytan, Margaret; James, Kiera; Rogers, Holly

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of Koru, a mindfulness training program for college students and other emerging adults. Participants Ninety students (66% female, 62% white, 71% graduate students) participated between Fall 2012 and Spring 2013. Methods Randomized controlled trial. We hypothesized that Koru, compared to a wait-list control group, would reduce perceived stress and sleep problems, and increase mindfulness, self-compassion, and gratitude. Results As hypothesized, results showed significant Group (Koru, wait-list) X Time (pre, post) interactions for improvements in perceived stress (F=4.50, df [1, 76.40], p=.037, d=.45), sleep problems (F= 4.71, df [1,79.49], p=.033, d=.52), mindfulness (F=26.80, df [1, 79.09], pstress, sleep problems, mindfulness, and self-compassion. Conclusions Results support the effectiveness of the Koru program for emerging adults in the university setting. PMID:24499130

  3. An educational video program to increase aging services technology awareness among older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Joyce W; Van Son, Catherine; Dyck, Dennis; Schmitter-Edgecombe, Maureen

    2017-08-01

    Aging services technologies (ASTs), health technology that meets the needs of seniors, are being underutilized due to a lack of awareness. This study evaluated a video-based educational program to increase AST awareness. Two hundred and thirty-one older adults completed AST measures pre- and post-program. Participants endorsed significantly improved AST knowledge and attitude and a lower level of perceived stigma post-program. Hierarchical regression analyses showed that a greater reduction in stigma post-program and a higher number of physical/cognitive needs supported by ASTs at baseline were significant predictors of a greater increase in expressed intention to use ASTs following the video program. Furthermore, individuals living in their own homes, with a lower level of education, fewer physical and/or cognitive needs supported by ASTs at baseline, and greater functional limitations were found to be more likely to report a significant reduction in perceived stigma post-program. Four-week follow-up data from 75 individuals showed stable program gains. Program feedback was positive. The current findings provide support for the utility of the AST videos. The educational materials used in this study can be used clinically or for public health education to increase awareness and adoption of ASTs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Application of orthodontic treatment for the periodontal and restorative goals in adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Kamioka

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available There are increasing number of adult patients who started orthodontic treatment in the last decade. As for the patient with the age of 40 years or older in our clinic, it increases 4 times as much as ten years ago. It seems that orthodontic treatment for the elderly person gradually recognized in our society. At the same time, it is considered as one of the factors that the introduction from a dentist increased to facilitate their dental procedures necessary to control dental disease, restore function, and/or enhance appearance. Therefore, in this lecture, I would like to think about how we can make use of orthodontic treatment for adults to have ideal periodontal and restorative goals. In addition, the benefits and risks of adjunctive orthodontic treatment and comprehensive orthodontic treatment would be discussed with the presenting case reports.

  5. A Secondary Analysis of Sleep Quality Changes in Older Adults From a Randomized Trial of an MBSR Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallegos, Autumn M; Moynihan, Jan; Pigeon, Wilfred R

    2016-08-01

    This secondary analysis examined changes in sleep quality associated with participation in a Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) program among healthy older adults. Data were collected at baseline, 8-weeks post-treatment, and a 6-month follow-up from adults aged ≥ 65 ( N = 200), randomly assigned to MBSR or a waitlist control. Group differences were examined using mixed analysis of covariance with repeated measures on the total Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) score. A small-sized, significant effect was found on overall sleep among MBSR participants with baseline PSQI scores > 5, indicative of a sleep disturbance, F(2, 80) = 4.32, p = .02, ηp2 = .05. A medium-sized, significant effect was found for MBSR participants with baseline PSQI scores ≥ 10, F(2, 28) = 3.13, p = .04, ηp2 = .10. These findings indicate that improved sleep quality for older adults who have higher levels of sleep disturbance may be associated with participation in MBSR.

  6. Organization and Administration of Adult Education Programs: A Guide for Practitioners. Adult Education Special Topics: Theory, Research and Practice in LifeLong Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Steven W.; Biniecki, Susan M. Yelich

    2016-01-01

    Administrators of adult education programs work in dynamic and ever-changing environments. They are continually challenged with a myriad of issues related to program budgeting, marketing, strategic planning, funding, human resources, and other topics. With decades of real world experience in the field, Steven Schmidt and Susan Yelich Biniecki have…

  7. The effects of the empowerment education program in older adults with total hip replacement surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tzu-Ting; Sung, Chia-Chun; Wang, Woan-Shyuan; Wang, Bi-Hwa

    2017-08-01

    To measure the effectiveness of an education empowerment program on primary (self-efficacy and self-care competence) and secondary outcomes (Activities of Daily Life, mobility, depressive mood and quality of life) for older adults with total hip replacement surgery. Degenerative arthritis is a common and serious chronic illness that impacts the quality of life of older adults. As joints continue to degenerate and the hip damaged by arthritis, activities of daily life will be difficult to perform due to severe hip pain and joint stiffness. Therefore, hip replacement surgery should be considered and effective nursing care should be provided to improve the recovery of older adults. A prospective randomized control trial. A trial was conducted from September 2013 - May 2014 in two hospitals in northern Taiwan. 108 participants were random assigned to either the education empowerment group or in the comparison group. The researchers collected baseline data at admission and outcomes on the day of discharge, one month after and three months after the discharge. After the interventions, the education empowerment group participants demonstrated significantly higher self-care competence and self-efficacy and lower depressive inclinations compared with those in the comparison group. Participants in both groups significantly improved on activities of daily life, mobility and quality of life over the course of the interventions. This education empowerment intervention was very effective in enhancing participants' outcomes. Moreover, involving both older adults and their caregivers for the participation this program is recommended for a greater impact. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Mental Health of Adults Treated in Adolescence with Scoliosis-Specific Exercise Program or Observed for Idiopathic Scoliosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maciej Płaszewski

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To examine general mental health in adult males and females, who in adolescence participated in a scoliosis-specific therapeutic exercise program or were under observation due to diagnosis of scoliosis. Design. Registry-based, cross-sectional study with retrospective data collection. Methods. Sixty-eight subjects (43 women aged 30.10 (25–39 years, with mild or moderate scoliosis (11–36° Cobb angle, and 76 (38 women nonscoliotic subjects, aged 30.11 (24–38 years, participated. The time period since the end of the exercise or observation regimes was 16.5 (12-26 years. Beck Depression Inventory (BDI and General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28 scores were analyzed with the χ2 and U tests. Multiple regression analyses for confounders were also performed. Results. Intergroup differences of demographic characteristics were nonsignificant. Scoliosis, gender, participation in the exercise program, employment, and marital status were associated with BDI scores. The presence of scoliosis and participation in the exercise program manifested association with the symptoms. Higher GHQ-28 “somatic symptoms” subscale scores interacted with the education level. Conclusions. Our findings correspond to the reports of a negative impact of the diagnosis of scoliosis and treatment on mental health. The decision to introduce a therapeutic program in children with mild deformities should be made with judgment of potential benefits, risks, and harm.

  9. Motivational Interviewing to prevent dropout from an education and employment program for young adults: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayegh, Caitlin S; Huey, Stanley J; Barnett, Elizabeth; Spruijt-Metz, Donna

    2017-07-01

    This study tested the efficacy of Motivational Interviewing for improving retention at a "second chance" program in the United States for unemployed young adults who had not graduated high school (ages 18-24; 60% male). We investigated how Motivational Interviewing effects might be mediated by change talk (i.e., arguments for change) and moderated by preference for consistency (PFC). Participants (N = 100) were randomly assigned to (1) Motivational Interviewing designed to elicit change talk, (2) placebo counseling designed not to elicit change talk, or (3) no additional treatment. Motivational Interviewing sessions increased change talk, but did not increase program retention or diploma earning. PFC was a significant moderator of Motivational Interviewing's impact on program retention; Motivational Interviewing was most effective at increasing 8 week retention for high PFC participants, and least effective for low PFC participants. These results suggest that Motivational Interviewing could be a useful tool for improving retention in education and employment programs, but clinicians should be attentive to how participant characteristics might enhance or diminish Motivational Interviewing effects. Copyright © 2017 The Foundation for Professionals in Services for Adolescents. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Diagnosis and Treatment of Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semelka, Michael; Wilson, Jonathan; Floyd, Ryan

    2016-09-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea is a common disorder that causes patients to temporarily stop or decrease their breathing repeatedly during sleep. This results in fragmented, nonrestful sleep that can lead to symptoms such as morning headache and daytime sleepiness. Obstructive sleep apnea affects persons of all ages, with an increasing prevalence in those older than 60 years. The exact prevalence is unknown but is estimated to be between 2% and 14%. There are many health conditions associated with obstructive sleep apnea, including hypertension, coronary artery disease, cardiac arrhythmias, and depression. Loud snoring, gasping during sleep, obesity, and enlarged neck circumference are predictive clinical features. Screening questionnaires can be used to assess for sleep apnea, although their accuracy is limited. The diagnostic standard for obstructive sleep apnea is nocturnal polysomnography in a sleep laboratory. Home sleep apnea tests can be performed for certain patients but are generally considered less accurate. Continuous positive airway pressure is the first-line treatment; adherence rates are variable and seem to improve with early patient education and support. Other treatment modalities include weight reduction, oral appliance therapy, and surgery to correct anatomic obstructions, although there is insufficient evidence to support these types of surgeries. Bariatric surgery can improve sleep parameters and symptoms in obese patients with obstructive sleep apnea and can result in remission in many patients.

  11. Antibiotic treatment for Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhoea in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Richard L; Suda, Katie J; Evans, Charlesnika T

    2017-03-03

    Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) is recognized as a frequent cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhoea and colitis. This review is an update of a previously published Cochrane review. The aim of this review is to investigate the efficacy and safety of antibiotic therapy for C. difficile-associated diarrhoea (CDAD), or C. difficile infection (CDI), being synonymous terms. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, CENTRAL and the Cochrane IBD Group Specialized Trials Register from inception to 26 January 2017. We also searched clinicaltrials.gov and clinicaltrialsregister.eu for ongoing trials. Only randomised controlled trials assessing antibiotic treatment for CDI were included in the review. Three authors independently assessed abstracts and full text articles for inclusion and extracted data. The risk of bias was independently rated by two authors. For dichotomous outcomes, we calculated the risk ratio (RR) and corresponding 95% confidence interval (95% CI). We pooled data using a fixed-effect model, except where significant heterogeneity was detected, at which time a random-effects model was used. The following outcomes were sought: sustained symptomatic cure (defined as initial symptomatic response and no recurrence of CDI), sustained bacteriologic cure, adverse reactions to the intervention, death and cost. Twenty-two studies (3215 participants) were included. The majority of studies enrolled patients with mild to moderate CDI who could tolerate oral antibiotics. Sixteen of the included studies excluded patients with severe CDI and few patients with severe CDI were included in the other six studies. Twelve different antibiotics were investigated: vancomycin, metronidazole, fusidic acid, nitazoxanide, teicoplanin, rifampin, rifaximin, bacitracin, cadazolid, LFF517, surotomycin and fidaxomicin. Most of the studies were active comparator studies comparing vancomycin with other antibiotics. One small study compared vancomycin to placebo. There were no other studies that

  12. Actively station: Effects on global cognition of mature adults and healthy elderly program using eletronic games

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago Nascimento Ordonez

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Studies show that aging is accompanied by decline in cognitive functions but also indicate that interventions, such as training on electronic games, can enhance performance and promote maintenance of cognitive abilities in healthy older adults. Objective: To investigate the effects of an electronic game program, called Actively Station, on the performance of global cognition of adults aged over 50 years. Methods: 124 mature and elderly adults enrolled in the "Actively Station" cognitive stimulation program of São Caetano do Sul City, in the State of São Paulo, participated in training for learning of electronic games. Participants were divided into two groups: training group (TG n=102 and control group (CG n=22. Protocol: a sociodemographic questionnaire, the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE, the Addenbrooke's Cognitive Examination Revised (ACE-R, the Memory Complaint Questionnaire (MAC-Q, the scale of frequency of forgetfulness, the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS-15, the Geriatric Anxiety Inventory (GAI, the Global Satisfaction with Life Scale, and two scales on learning in the training. Results: The cognitive performance of the TG improved significantly after the program, particularly in the domains of language and memory, and there was a decrease on the anxiety index and frequency of memory complaints, when compared to the CG. Conclusion: These findings suggest that the acquisition of new knowledge and the use of new stimuli, such as electronic games, can promote improvements in cognition and mood and reduce the frequency of memory complaints.

  13. Typologies of prescription opioid use in a large sample of adults assessed for substance abuse treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Traci C Green

    Full Text Available As a population, non-medical prescription opioid users are not well-defined. We aimed to derive and describe typologies of prescription opioid use and nonmedical use using latent class analysis in an adult population being assessed for substance abuse treatment.Latent class analysis was applied to data from 26,314 unique respondents, aged 18-70, self-reporting past month use of a prescription opioid out of a total of 138,928 cases (18.9% collected by the Addiction Severity Index-Multimedia Version (ASI-MV®, a national database for near real-time prescription opioid abuse surveillance. Data were obtained from November 2005 through December 2009. Substance abuse treatment, criminal justice, and public assistance programs in the United States submitted data to the ASI-MV database (n = 538. Six indicators of the latent classes derived from responses to the ASI-MV, a version of the ASI modified to collect prescription opioid abuse and chronic pain experience. The latent class analysis included respondent home ZIP code random effects to account for nesting of respondents within ZIP code.A four-class adjusted latent class model fit best and defined clinically interpretable and relevant subgroups: Use as prescribed, Prescribed misusers, Medically healthy abusers, and Illicit users. Classes varied on key variables, including race/ethnicity, gender, concurrent substance abuse, duration of prescription opioid abuse, mental health problems, and ASI composite scores. Three of the four classes (81% of respondents exhibited high potential risk for fatal opioid overdose; 18.4% exhibited risk factors for blood-borne infections.Multiple and distinct profiles of prescription opioid use were detected, suggesting a range of use typologies at differing risk for adverse events. Results may help clinicians and policy makers better focus overdose and blood-borne infection prevention efforts and intervention strategies for prescription opioid abuse reduction.

  14. Typologies of prescription opioid use in a large sample of adults assessed for substance abuse treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Traci C; Black, Ryan; Grimes Serrano, Jill M; Budman, Simon H; Butler, Stephen F

    2011-01-01

    As a population, non-medical prescription opioid users are not well-defined. We aimed to derive and describe typologies of prescription opioid use and nonmedical use using latent class analysis in an adult population being assessed for substance abuse treatment. Latent class analysis was applied to data from 26,314 unique respondents, aged 18-70, self-reporting past month use of a prescription opioid out of a total of 138,928 cases (18.9%) collected by the Addiction Severity Index-Multimedia Version (ASI-MV®), a national database for near real-time prescription opioid abuse surveillance. Data were obtained from November 2005 through December 2009. Substance abuse treatment, criminal justice, and public assistance programs in the United States submitted data to the ASI-MV database (n = 538). Six indicators of the latent classes derived from responses to the ASI-MV, a version of the ASI modified to collect prescription opioid abuse and chronic pain experience. The latent class analysis included respondent home ZIP code random effects to account for nesting of respondents within ZIP code. A four-class adjusted latent class model fit best and defined clinically interpretable and relevant subgroups: Use as prescribed, Prescribed misusers, Medically healthy abusers, and Illicit users. Classes varied on key variables, including race/ethnicity, gender, concurrent substance abuse, duration of prescription opioid abuse, mental health problems, and ASI composite scores. Three of the four classes (81% of respondents) exhibited high potential risk for fatal opioid overdose; 18.4% exhibited risk factors for blood-borne infections. Multiple and distinct profiles of prescription opioid use were detected, suggesting a range of use typologies at differing risk for adverse events. Results may help clinicians and policy makers better focus overdose and blood-borne infection prevention efforts and intervention strategies for prescription opioid abuse reduction.

  15. Cognitive Pragmatic Treatment: A Rehabilitative Program for Traumatic Brain Injury Individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabbatore, Ilaria; Sacco, Katiuscia; Angeleri, Romina; Zettin, Marina; Bara, Bruno G; Bosco, Francesca M

    2015-01-01

    To verify the efficacy of Cognitive Pragmatic Treatment (CPT), a new rehabilitation training program for improving communicative-pragmatic abilities. The CPT program consists of 24 group sessions, concerned with improving several communication modalities, theory of mind (ToM), and cognitive components that can affect pragmatic performance, such as awareness and executive functions. A sample of 15 adults with severe traumatic brain injury. Improvements were evaluated before and after training, using the equivalent forms of the Assessment Battery for Communication (ABaCo), a tool for evaluating comprehension and production of a wide range of pragmatic phenomena. A neuropsychological and ToM assessment was also conducted. The patients' performance improved after training, in terms of both comprehension and production, in all the communication modalities assessed by the ABaCo, that is, linguistic, extralinguistic, paralinguistic, and social appropriateness abilities. The follow-up showed that the improvement of patients persists after 3 months from the end of the training. The results suggest that the CPT program is efficacious in improving communicative-pragmatic abilities in individuals with TBI, and that improvements at this level are still detectable even in chronic patients years after the injury.

  16. Treatment of Depression in Adults with Fabry Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Nadia; Gillespie, Scott; Laney, Dawn

    2017-04-18

    Fabry disease (FD) is a genetic X-linked, multisystemic, progressive lysosomal storage disorder (LSD). Depression has emerged as a disease complication, with prevalence estimates ranging from 15 to 62%. This is a pilot study examining the effects of psychological counseling for depression in FD on depression, adaptive functioning (AF), quality of life (QOL), and subjective pain experience. Telecounseling was also piloted, as it has beneficial effects in other chronic diseases which make in-person counseling problematic. Subjects completed 6 months of in-person or telecounseling with the same health psychologist, followed by 6 months without counseling. Self-report measures of depression, AF, QOL, and subjective pain were completed every 3 months. All subjects experienced improvements in depression, which were sustained during the follow-up period. Improvements in depression were correlated with improvements in mental health QOL and subjective pain severity, while improvements in mental health QOL were correlated with improvements in AF. While statistical comparison between counseling modes was not possible with the given sample size, relevant observations were noted. Recommendations for future research include replication of results with a larger sample size and a longer counseling period. The use of video counseling may be beneficial. In conclusion, the present pilot study supports the efficacy of psychological treatment for depression in people with FD, highlighting the importance of having health psychologists housed in LSD treatment centers, rather than specialty psychology/psychiatry settings, to increase participation and decrease potential obstacles to access due to perceived stigma.

  17. Should the vaccine injury compensation program be expanded to cover adults?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd-Puryear, M A; Ball, L K; Benor, D

    1998-01-01

    In 1996, the National Vaccine Advisory Committee (NVAC) asked for a review of the pros and cons of including adult influenza and pneumococcal vaccines in the Vaccine Injury Compensation Program (VICP). The authors, as staff to the subcommittees charged with undertaking this assessment, looked at the following questions: (a) Would inclusion in VICP of these two vaccines, used primarily for adults, increase adult vaccination levels? (b) Is this Federal involvement warranted based on the liability burden for these vaccines? (c) Does the risk of adverse events following vaccinations warrant inclusion of these vaccines? (d) Is there a consensus among stakeholders favoring their inclusion? To address these questions, the authors reviewed information on adult vaccines, including data on l lawsuits filed and reports of injuries, and sought input from interested groups. They found no evidence that the use of influenza and pneumococcal vaccines would increase if they were included in VICP. They found a low liability burden for these vaccines, that serious adverse events were rare, and that no consensus existed among stakeholders. After considering the staff report, NVAC chose, in 1996, not to advise the Department of Health and Human Services to include adult vaccines in VICP.

  18. Dietary intake and dietary quality of low-income adults in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Cindy W; Ding, Eric L; Catalano, Paul J; Villamor, Eduardo; Rimm, Eric B; Willett, Walter C

    2012-11-01

    The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) aims to alleviate hunger among its beneficiaries by providing benefits to purchase nutritious foods. We conducted a comprehensive dietary analysis of low-income adults and examined differences in dietary intake between SNAP participants and nonparticipants. The study population comprised 3835 nonelderly adults with a household income ≤130% of the federal poverty level from the 1999-2008 NHANES. The National Cancer Institute method was used to estimate the distributions of usual intake for dietary outcomes. Relative differences in dietary intake by SNAP participation were estimated with adjustment for sociodemographic characteristics and household food security. Few low-income adults consumed recommended amounts of whole grains, fruit, vegetables, fish, and nuts/seeds/legumes. Conversely, many low-income adults exceeded recommended limits for processed meats, sweets, and bakery desserts and sugar-sweetened beverages. Approximately 13-22% of low-income adults did not meet any food and nutrient guidelines; virtually no adults met all of the guidelines. Compared with nonparticipants, SNAP participants consumed 39% fewer whole grains (95% CI: -57%, -15%), 44% more 100% fruit juice (95% CI: 0%, 107%), 56% more potatoes (95% CI: 18%, 106%), 46% more red meat (95% CI: 4%, 106%), and, in women, 61% more sugar-sweetened beverages (95% CI: 3%, 152%). SNAP participants also had lower dietary quality scores than did nonparticipants, as measured by a modified Alternate Healthy Eating Index. Although the diets of all low-income adults need major improvement, SNAP participants in particular had lower-quality diets than did income-eligible nonparticipants.

  19. Dismantling multicomponent behavioral treatment for insomnia in older adults: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Dana R; Sidani, Souraya; Bootzin, Richard R; Belyea, Michael J

    2012-06-01

    Recently, the use of multicomponent insomnia treatment has increased. This study compares the effect of single component and multicomponent behavioral treatments for insomnia in older adults after intervention and at 3 months and 1 yr posttreatment. A randomized, controlled study. Veterans Affairs medical center. 179 older adults (mean age, 68.9 yr ± 8.0; 115 women [64.2%]) with chronic primary insomnia. Participants were randomly assigned to 6 wk of stimulus control therapy (SCT), sleep restriction therapy (SRT), the 2 therapies combined into a multicomponent intervention (MCI), or a wait-list control group. Primary outcomes were subjective (daily sleep diary) and objective (actigraphy) measures of sleep-onset latency (SOL), wake after sleep onset (WASO), total sleep time (TST), time in bed (TIB), and sleep efficiency (SE). Secondary outcomes were clinical measures including response and remission rates. There were no differences between the single and multicomponent interventions on primary sleep outcomes measured by diary and actigraphy. All treatments produced significant improvement in diary-reported sleep in comparison with the control group. Effect sizes for sleep diary outcomes were medium to large. Treatment gains were maintained at follow-up for diary and actigraph measured SOL, WASO, and SE. The MCI group had the largest proportion of treatment remitters. For older adults with chronic primary insomnia, the findings provide initial evidence that SCT, SRT, and MCI are equally efficacious and produce sustainable treatment gains on diary, actigraphy, and clinical outcomes. From a clinical perspective, MCI may be a preferred treatment due to its higher remission rate. Behavioral Intervention for Insomnia in Older Adults. NCT01154023. URL: http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01154023?term=Behavioral+Intervention+for+Insomnia+in+Older+Adults&rank=1.

  20. Implications from the Air Force/Texas Coronary Atherosclerosis Prevention Study for the Adult Treatment Panel III guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clearfield, Michael; Downs, John R; Lee, Michael; Langendorfer, Alex; McConathy, Walter; Gotto, Antonio M

    2005-12-15

    The Air Force/Texas Coronary Atherosclerosis Prevention Study (AFCAPS/TexCAPS) first reported its results in 1998, before the 2001 publication of the National Cholesterol Education Program-Adult Treatment Panel III guidelines (NCEP-ATP III) and 2004 update. Our objective was to investigate the impact of these guidelines on the AFCAPS/TexCAPS cohort. The main outcome measures were the event rates of first acute major coronary events (AMCEs), which were reduced 39% by lovastatin (95% confidence interval [CI] 21% to 53%, p treatment with a medication is now considered optional. In conclusion, the ability of the ATP III guidelines and its update has markedly improved our ability to define coronary heart disease risk; however, other components of the guidelines, such as non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and the optional low-density lipoprotein cholesterol target goal of <100 mg/dl, still require additional evaluation.

  1. The impact of intergenerational programs on children and older adults: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gualano, Maria Rosaria; Voglino, Gianluca; Bert, Fabrizio; Thomas, Robin; Camussi, Elisa; Siliquini, Roberta

    2017-10-09

    Elderly are at particular risk of social isolation. This condition significantly affects health; on the contrary, social involvement can be extremely advantageous. In this context, intergenerational programs improve interactions between different ages. Then, we conducted a review regarding intergenerational programs, to summarize the effects of these activities on both elderly and children. Our review followed the PRISMA statements. We considered papers reporting data about intergenerational programs involving children (preschool and elementary) and elderly. The final selection obtained 27 sources. Ten studies evaluated children's outcomes outlining the positive impact of intergenerational programs upon children's perception of elderly. The effects on older participants were variegated considering well-being, depression, self-reported health, and self-esteem. Moreover, the retrieved studies outlined the importance of a careful organization and of a specific training for all staff members. The staff involved in similar programs appeared, overall, highly satisfied. The positive impact on children of intergenerational programs is proved at both short- and long-term. Moreover, despite the different outcomes considered and the variable results, these programs resulted overall beneficial on elderly participants. Finally, similar activities resulted feasible even in case of older adults with dementia.

  2. Partnering with education and job and training programs for sustainable tobacco control among Baltimore african american young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Katherine Clegg; Bone, Lee; Clay, Eric A; Owings, Kerry; Thames, Sean; Stillman, Frances

    2009-01-01

    Young adults are generally overlooked in tobacco control initiatives, even though they are critical to sustained success. African American young adults who are not in higher education or working are particularly vulnerable to harmful tobacco use, given high smoking rates and limited access to cessation services. Guided by community-based participatory research (CBPR) principles, we sought to identify program and community-level strategies to reduce tobacco use among African American young adults in Baltimore. We describe the challenges and opportunities for integrating effective tobacco control into community-based education and job training programs for unemployed young adults. As part of a longstanding community-research partnership in Baltimore, we conducted fourteen semistructured key informant interviews with leaders from city government and education and job training programs for young adults. The research design, data collection, analysis, and dissemination all included dialogue between and active contribution by both research and community partners. Interview data were structured into opportunities (mindset for change and desire for bonds with a trusted adult), challenges (culture of fatalism, tobacco as a stress reliever, and culture of tobacco use among young adults), and possible tobacco control solutions (tobacco education designed with and for program staff and participants and integration of tobacco issues into holistic program goals and policies). The emergent themes enhance our understanding of how tobacco is situated in the lives of unemployed young adults and the potential for building sustainable, community-based public health solutions.

  3. Who is the Treatment-Seeking Young Adult with Severe Obesity: A Comprehensive Characterization with Emphasis on Mental Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreber, Helena; Reynisdottir, Signy; Angelin, Bo; Hemmingsson, Erik

    2015-01-01

    To characterize treatment-seeking young adults (16-25 years) with severe obesity, particularly mental health problems. Cross-sectional study of 165 participants (132 women, 33 men) with BMI ≥35 kg/m2 or ≥30 kg/m2 with comorbidities, enrolling in a multidisciplinary obesity treatment program. Data collection at admission of present and life-time health issues including symptomatology of anxiety, depression (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale) and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (Adult ADHD Self-Report scale); self-esteem (Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale), suicide attempts, health-related quality of life (Short Form-36 Health Survey), psychosocial functioning related to obesity (Obesity-related Problems Scale), cardiorespiratory fitness (Astrand's bicycle ergometer test), somatic and psychiatric co-morbidities, cardiometabolic risk factors, and micronutritional status. We used multiple regression analysis to identify variables independently associated with present anxiety and depressive symptomatology. Mean body mass index was 39.2 kg/m2 (SD = 5.2). We found evidence of poor mental health, including present psychiatric diagnoses (29%), symptomatology of anxiety (47%), depression (27%) and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (37%); low self-esteem (42%), attempted suicide (12%), and low quality of life (physical component score = 46, SD = 11.2; mental component score = 36, SD = 13.9, Pdepressive symptomatology (R2 = 0.38, Prelated problems (P = 0.018). The prevalence of type 2 diabetes was 3%, and hypertension 2%. Insulin resistance was present in 82%, lipid abnormality in 62%, and poor cardiorespiratory fitness in 92%. Forty-eight percent had at least one micronutritional deficiency, vitamin D being the most common (35%). A wide range of health issues, including quite severe mental health problems, was prevalent in treatment-seeking young adults with severe obesity. These are likely to constitute a major treatment challenge, including options

  4. Organizational Factors as Predictors of Tobacco Cessation Pharmacotherapy Adoption in Addiction Treatment Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muilenburg, Jessica L.; Laschober, Tanja C.; Eby, Lillian T.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This study investigated three organizational factors (i.e., counseling staff clinical skills, absence of treatment program obstacles, policy-related incentives) as predictors of tobacco cessation pharmacotherapy (TCP) adoption (comprised of the nine available TCP) in addiction treatment programs using the innovation implementation effectiveness framework. Methods Data were obtained in 2010 from a random sample of 1006 addiction treatment program administrators located across the U.S. using structured telephone interviews. Results According to program administrator reports, TCP is adopted in approximately 30% of treatment programs. Negative binomial regression results show that fewer treatment program obstacles and more policy-related incentives are related to greater adoption of TCP. Counter to prediction, clinical skills are unrelated to TCP adoption. Conclusions Our findings suggest that organizational factors, based on established theoretical frameworks, merit further examination as facilitators of the adoption of diverse TCP in addiction treatment programs. PMID:24365803

  5. Centralised treatment of soft tissue sarcomas in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez Romasanta, Luis A; Montero Luis, Angel; Verges Capdevila, Ramona; Mariño Cotelo, Alfonso; Rico Pérez, José M

    2008-02-01

    The clinical research developed in specialised centres and oncologic cooperative groups has permitted various scientific societies to collect recommendations used in the treatment of soft tissue sarcomas (STS) and incorporate them into clinical practice guidelines (CPG). Some studies have been conducted in diverse healthcare ambits to assess the influence of CPG. This revision of the medical literature analyses the impact that healthcare management -centralised or otherwise- and clinical practice in conformity with CPG have on the clinical outcome variables of STS. Eight CPG have been identified, as well as 12 conformity studies or audits. These conformity studies and audits demonstrate that the grade of adaptation of medical interventions with CPG, medical healthcare in reference centres and procedures of referrals to these centres, as well as the process of organising healthcare teams into Sarcoma Committees, have a significant influence on clinical outcome. We can conclude that excellent healthcare of STS implies the adaptation of healthcare practice to CPG, the existence of Reference Centres guided by Sarcoma Committees, and the observance of strict referral procedures within the Healthcare Area.

  6. Treatment of Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis in Adults: Present and Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Gitto

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis has become one of the most common liver-related health problems. This condition has been linked to an unhealthy diet and weight gain, but it can also be observed in nonobese people. The standard of care is represented by the lifestyle intervention. However, because this approach has several limitations, such as a lack of compliance, the use of many drugs has been proposed. The first-line pharmacological choices are vitamin E and pioglitazone, both showing a positive effect on transaminases, fat accumulation, and inflammation. Nevertheless, vitamin E has no proven effect on fibrosis and on long-term morbidity and mortality and pioglitazone has a negative impact on weight. Other drugs have been studied such as metformin, ursodeoxycholic acid, statins, pentoxiphylline, and orlistat with only partially positive results. Among the emerging treatments, telmisartan is particularly interesting as it seems to have an impact on insulin resistance, liver steatosis, inflammation, and fibrosis. However, the pathogenesis of steatohepatitis is highly complex and is determined by different parallel hits; indeed, the association of different drugs that act on various levels has been suggested. In conclusion, lifestyle intervention should be optimised and the associations of different drugs should be tested in large studies with long-term outcomes.

  7. Comprehensive Orthodontic Treatment of Adult Patient with Cleft Lip and Palate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noemí Leiva Villagra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the paper is to present full orthodontic treatment of an operated cleft lip adult patient. Case Report. An 18-year-old patient consulted for severe crowded teeth. He comes from a poor family. At that time he already had four operations (velum, palate, lip, and myringotomy. Treatment included maxillary expansion, tooth extraction, and fixed orthodontic, as well as kinesiology and speech therapy treatment. A multidisciplinary approach allowed us to achieve successfully an excellent result for this patient and gave him a harmonic smile and an optimal function without orthognathic surgery. Two years after treatment, occlusion remains stable.

  8. Comprehensive Orthodontic Treatment of Adult Patient with Cleft Lip and Palate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiva Villagra, Noemí; Muñoz Domon, Miguel; Véliz Méndez, Sebastian

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the paper is to present full orthodontic treatment of an operated cleft lip adult patient. Case Report. An 18-year-old patient consulted for severe crowded teeth. He comes from a poor family. At that time he already had four operations (velum, palate, lip, and myringotomy). Treatment included maxillary expansion, tooth extraction, and fixed orthodontic, as well as kinesiology and speech therapy treatment. A multidisciplinary approach allowed us to achieve successfully an excellent result for this patient and gave him a harmonic smile and an optimal function without orthognathic surgery. Two years after treatment, occlusion remains stable. PMID:25544903

  9. Depression and Suicidal Ideation During Two Psychosocial Treatments in Older Adults with Major Depression and Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiosses, Dimitris N; Rosenberg, Paul B; McGovern, Amanda; Fonzetti, Pasquale; Zaydens, Hana; Alexopoulos, George S

    2015-01-01

    Depression is prevalent in dementia and contributes to poor outcomes for patients and their families. Antidepressants have limited efficacy in older adults with major depression and dementia, and psychosocial interventions are under-investigated. To examine the course, predictors and moderators of depression and suicidal ideation during 12 weeks of home-delivered Problem Adaptation Therapy (PATH) versus Supportive Therapy for Cognitively Impaired Older Adults (ST-CI) in 39 older adults with major depression and dementia. Thirty-nine older adults with major depression, mild or moderate dementia, and disability participated in a randomized controlled trial that compared the efficacy of PATH versus ST-CI. Depression and suicidal ideation were assessed with Cornell Scale for Depression in Dementia Total Score and Suicide Item. PATH participants had significantly greater reduction in depression than ST-CI participants over 12 weeks of treatment. PATH participants with high social support had the greatest reduction in depression. Both treatments had comparable reduction in suicidal ideation. PATH is more effective in reducing depression in older adults with major depression and dementia compared to ST-CI. These results are clinically significant as antidepressants have limited efficacy in this population. Home-delivered psychosocial treatments may reduce suicidal ideation in this population.

  10. The relationship between child maltreatment and substance abuse treatment outcomes among emerging adults and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, Bryan R; Hunter, Brooke D; Smith, Douglas C; Smith, Jane Ellen; Godley, Mark D

    2014-01-01

    Emerging adulthood is the period of greatest risk for problematic substance use. The primary aim of the current study was to examine the relationship between a broad measure of child maltreatment and several key outcomes for a large clinical sample of emerging adults (n = 858) and adolescents (n = 2,697). The secondary aim was to examine the extent to which the relationship between child maltreatment and treatment outcomes differed between emerging adults and adolescents. Multilevel latent growth curve analyses revealed emerging adults and adolescents who experienced child maltreatment reported significantly greater reductions over time on several treatment outcomes (e.g., substance use, substance-related problems, and emotional problems). Overall, analyses did not support differential relationships between child maltreatment and changes over time in these substance use disorder treatment outcomes for emerging adults and adolescents. The one exception was that although emerging adults with child maltreatment did reduce their HIV risk over time, their improvements were not as great as were the improvements in HIV risk reported by adolescents who had experienced child maltreatment. © The Author(s) 2014.

  11. The Relationship Between Child Maltreatment and Substance Abuse Treatment Outcomes Among Emerging Adults and Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, Bryan R.; Hunter, Brooke D.; Smith, Douglas C.; Smith, Jane Ellen; Godley, Mark D.

    2015-01-01

    Emerging adulthood is the period of greatest risk for problematic substance use. The primary aim of the current study was to examine the relationship between a broad measure of child maltreatment and several key outcomes for a large clinical sample of emerging adults (n = 858) and adolescents (n = 2,697). The secondary aim was to examine the extent to which the relationship between child maltreatment and treatment outcomes differed between emerging adults and adolescents. Multilevel latent growth curve analyses revealed emerging adults and adolescents who experienced child maltreatment reported significantly greater reductions over time on several treatment outcomes (e.g., substance use, substance-related problems, and emotional problems). Overall, analyses did not support differential relationships between child maltreatment and changes over time in these substance use disorder treatment outcomes for emerging adults and adolescents. The one exception was that although emerging adults with child maltreatment did reduce their HIV risk over time, their improvements were not as great as were the improvements in HIV risk reported by adolescents who had experienced child maltreatment. PMID:25125233

  12. Subjective-objective sleep discrepancy among older adults: associations with insomnia diagnosis and insomnia treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, Daniel B; Buysse, Daniel J; Germain, Anne; Hall, Martica; Monk, Timothy H

    2015-02-01

    Discrepancy between subjective and objective measures of sleep is associated with insomnia and increasing age. Cognitive behavioural therapy for insomnia improves sleep quality and decreases subjective-objective sleep discrepancy. This study describes differences between older adults with insomnia and controls in sleep discrepancy, and tests the hypothesis that reduced sleep discrepancy following cognitive behavioural therapy for insomnia correlates with the magnitude of symptom improvement reported by older adults with insomnia. Participants were 63 adults >60 years of age with insomnia, and 51 controls. At baseline, participants completed sleep diaries for 7 days while wearing wrist actigraphs. After receiving cognitive behavioural therapy for insomnia, insomnia patients repeated this sleep assessment. Sleep discrepancy variables were calculated by subtracting actigraphic sleep onset latency and wake after sleep onset from respective self-reported estimates, pre- and post-treatment. Mean level and night-to-night variability in sleep discrepancy were investigated. Baseline sleep discrepancies were compared between groups. Pre-post-treatment changes in Insomnia Severity Index score and sleep discrepancy variables were investigated within older adults with insomnia. Sleep discrepancy was significantly greater and more variable across nights in older adults with insomnia than controls, P ≤ 0.001 for all. Treatment with cognitive behavioural therapy for insomnia was associated with significant reduction in the Insomnia Severity Index score that correlated with changes in mean level and night-to-night variability in wake after sleep onset discrepancy, P insomnia. © 2014 European Sleep Research Society.

  13. Cortical Reorganisation during a 30-Week Tinnitus Treatment Program.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine M McMahon

    Full Text Available Subjective tinnitus is characterised by the conscious perception of a phantom sound. Previous studies have shown that individuals with chronic tinnitus have disrupted sound-evoked cortical tonotopic maps, time-shifted evoked auditory responses, and altered oscillatory cortical activity. The main objectives of this study were to: (i compare sound-evoked brain responses and cortical tonotopic maps in individuals with bilateral tinnitus and those without tinnitus; and (ii investigate whether changes in these sound-evoked responses occur with amelioration of the tinnitus percept during a 30-week tinnitus treatment program. Magnetoencephalography (MEG recordings of 12 bilateral tinnitus participants and 10 control normal-hearing subjects reporting no tinnitus were recorded at baseline, using 500 Hz, 1000 Hz, 2000 Hz, and 4000 Hz tones presented monaurally at 70 dBSPL through insert tube phones. For the tinnitus participants, MEG recordings were obtained at 5-, 10-, 20- and 30- week time points during tinnitus treatment. Results for the 500 Hz and 1000 Hz sources (where hearing thresholds were within normal limits for all participants showed that the tinnitus participants had a significantly larger and more anteriorly located source strengths when compared to the non-tinnitus participants. During the 30-week tinnitus treatment, the participants' 500 Hz and 1000 Hz source strengths remained higher than the non-tinnitus participants; however, the source locations shifted towards the direction recorded from the non-tinnitus control group. Further, in the left hemisphere, there was a time-shifted association between the trajectory of change of the individual's objective (source strength and anterior-posterior source location and subjective measures (using tinnitus reaction questionnaire, TRQ. The differences in source strength between the two groups suggest that individuals with tinnitus have enhanced central gain which is not significantly influenced by

  14. Cortical Reorganisation during a 30-Week Tinnitus Treatment Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Catherine M.; Ibrahim, Ronny K.; Mathur, Ankit

    2016-01-01

    Subjective tinnitus is characterised by the conscious perception of a phantom sound. Previous studies have shown that individuals with chronic tinnitus have disrupted sound-evoked cortical tonotopic maps, time-shifted evoked auditory responses, and altered oscillatory cortical activity. The main objectives of this study were to: (i) compare sound-evoked brain responses and cortical tonotopic maps in individuals with bilateral tinnitus and those without tinnitus; and (ii) investigate whether changes in these sound-evoked responses occur with amelioration of the tinnitus percept during a 30-week tinnitus treatment program. Magnetoencephalography (MEG) recordings of 12 bilateral tinnitus participants and 10 control normal-hearing subjects reporting no tinnitus were recorded at baseline, using 500 Hz, 1000 Hz, 2000 Hz, and 4000 Hz tones presented monaurally at 70 dBSPL through insert tube phones. For the tinnitus participants, MEG recordings were obtained at 5-, 10-, 20- and 30- week time points during tinnitus treatment. Results for the 500 Hz and 1000 Hz sources (where hearing thresholds were within normal limits for all participants) showed that the tinnitus participants had a significantly larger and more anteriorly located source strengths when compared to the non-tinnitus participants. During the 30-week tinnitus treatment, the participants’ 500 Hz and 1000 Hz source strengths remained higher than the non-tinnitus participants; however, the source locations shifted towards the direction recorded from the non-tinnitus control group. Further, in the left hemisphere, there was a time-shifted association between the trajectory of change of the individual’s objective (source strength and anterior-posterior source location) and subjective measures (using tinnitus reaction questionnaire, TRQ). The differences in source strength between the two groups suggest that individuals with tinnitus have enhanced central gain which is not significantly influenced by the

  15. Anterior Cingulate Volumetric Alterations in Treatment-Naïve Adults With ADHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makris, Nikos; Seidman, Larry J.; Valera, Eve M.; Biederman, Joseph; Monuteaux, Michael C.; Kennedy, David N.; Caviness, Verne S.; Bush, George; Crum, Katherine; Brown, Ariel B.; Faraone, Stephen V.

    2013-01-01

    Objective We sought to examine preliminary results of brain alterations in anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) in treatment-naïve adults with ADHD. The ACC is a central brain node for the integration of cognitive control and allocation of attention, affect and drive. Thus its anatomical alteration may give rise to impulsivity, hyperactivity and inattention, which are cardinal behavioral manifestations of ADHD. Method Segmentation and parcellation of the ACC was performed on controls (n = 22), treated (n = 13) and treatment-naïve adults with ADHD (n = 13). Results There was a 21% volume reduction in the left ACC of the treatment-naïve group relative to the control group. Also, there was a 23% volume reduction in the right ACC of the treated group relative to the control group. Conclusion These results raise the possibility that in ADHD there are volumetric deficits persistent into adulthood, that are independent of medical treatment. PMID:20008822

  16. Treatment of adult diffuse pityriasis lichenoides chronica with narrowband ultraviolet B: experience and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Guarino, M; Aboin-Gonzalez, S; Ciudad Blanco, C; Velázquez Tarjuelo, D; Lázaro Ochayta, P

    2017-04-01

    Pityriasis lichenoides chronica (PLC) is an infrequent dermatosis of unknown aetiology, wholse evolution and response to treatment differs between children and adults. When PLC is recalcitrant or unresponsive to topical treatment, phototherapy is one of the main treatments used. We carried out a prospective study of adult diffuse PLC treated with narrowband ultraviolet B (NB-UVB). We treated eight patients whose disease showed no response to topical therapy, and obtained a complete response rate of 88% in a mean of 23 sessions (cumulative dose 16.99 J/cm(2) ). However, the relapse rate was 43% in the first 6 months. Our results are similar to those of other published studies but there is much variability between them in the doses applied and the number of sessions needed. Further studies are necessary to devise a protocol for NB-UVB treatment of PLC. © 2017 British Association of Dermatologists.

  17. Treatment of Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Adolescent and Young Adult Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guldane Cengiz Seval

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this review were to discuss standard and investigational treatment strategies for adolescent and young adult with acute myeloid leukemia, excluding acute promyelocytic leukemia. Acute myeloid leukemia (AML in adolescent and young adult patients (AYAs may need a different type of therapy than those currently used in children and older patients. As soon as AML is diagnosed, AYA patient should be offered to participate in well-designed clinical trials. The standard treatment approach for AYAs with AML is remission induction chemotherapy with an anthracycline/cytarabine combination, followed by either consolidation chemotherapy or stem cell transplantation, depending on the ability of the patient to tolerate intensive treatment and cytogenetic features. Presently, continuing progress of novel drugs targeting specific pathways in acute leukemia may bring AML treatment into a new era.

  18. The Effects of a Diet and Exercise Program for Older Adults With Metabolic Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yu-Hua; Chu, Li-Ling; Kao, Chia-Chan; Chen, Tai-Been; Lee, I; Li, Hui-Chi

    2015-09-01

    The prevalence of metabolic syndrome is high among older adults in Taiwan. However, few studies have studied the effect of a combined diet and exercise program on managing metabolic syndrome (MetS) in individuals 65 years and older and living in Taiwan's rural areas. This study tests the effectiveness of a diet and exercise program on the MetS biomarkers in older community residents with MetS. This study used a quasiexperimental study design. All participants were 65 years and older and were diagnosed with MetS. The outcome variables included biomarkers (blood pressure, waist circumference, hip circumference, body mass index, blood sugar, cholesterol, and triglycerides) and demographic characteristics. The participants were distributed into a diet-and-exercise group (n = 163) and a nondiet-and-nonexercise group (n = 138). The outcome variables were examined 3 months after the start of the intervention program. The participants in the diet-and-exercise group had lower values than the nondiet-and-nonexercise group for blood pressure, waist circumference, hip circumference, body mass index, blood sugar, cholesterol, and triglyceride (all ps diet and exercise program is an effective intervention for treating older individuals with MetS. Clear and concise information concerning the effects of diet and exercise in promoting the health of older residents with MetS is helpful to improve the health of the older adults inTaiwan.

  19. Physical activity mediates the relationship between program participation and improved mental health in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becofsky, K; Baruth, M; Wilcox, S

    2016-03-01

    There is an implicit assumption that increased physical activity (PA) levels are responsible for the mental health benefits resulting from participation in PA programs. Other factors associated with participation may in fact be responsible. The purpose of this study was to examine whether changes in PA mediated the effects of two PA programs (Active Choices [AC] and Active Living Every Day [ALED]) on mental health outcomes. Secondary data analyses of quasi-experimental study. A sub-sample of older adults who participated in AC (n = 744) and ALED (n = 853) were included in the current analyses. MacKinnon's product of coefficients was used to test change in PA as a mediator of the relationship between program dose and change in mental health outcomes (depressive symptoms, stress, and number of days with poor mental health). Change in PA explained 19% (AC) and 13% (ALED) of the absolute effects of program dose on depressive symptoms, 18% (AC) and 14% (ALED) of the effects on stress, and 37% (ALED) of the effects on days with poor mental health. Mounting evidence from both epidemiological studies and controlled trials suggests that PA can improve mental health. This study adds that increasing PA levels may improve mental health in older adults in 'real-world' settings. Copyright © 2015 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Cost-Effectiveness of a Community Exercise and Nutrition Program for Older Adults: Texercise Select

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olufolake (Odufuwa Akanni

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The wide-spread dissemination of evidence-based programs that can improve health outcomes among older populations often requires an understanding of factors influencing community adoption of such programs. One such program is Texercise Select, a community-based health promotion program previously shown to improve functional health, physical activity, nutritional habits and quality of the life among older adults. This paper assesses the cost-effectiveness of Texercise Select in the context of supportive environments to facilitate its delivery and statewide sustainability. Participants were surveyed using self-reported instruments distributed at program baseline and conclusion. Program costs were based on actual direct costs of program implementation and included costs of recruitment and outreach, personnel costs and participant incentives. Program effectiveness was measured using quality-adjusted life year (QALY gained, as well as health outcomes, such as healthy days, weekly physical activity and Timed Up-and-Go (TUG test scores. Preference-based EuroQol (EQ-5D scores were estimated from the number of healthy days reported by participants and converted into QALYs. There was a significant increase in the number of healthy days (p < 0.05 over the 12-week program. Cost-effectiveness ratios ranged from $1374 to $1452 per QALY gained. The reported cost-effective ratios are well within the common cost-effectiveness threshold of $50,000 for a gained QALY. Some sociodemographic differences were also observed in program impact and cost. Non-Hispanic whites experienced significant improvements in healthy days from baseline to the follow-up period and had higher cost-effectiveness ratios. Results indicate that the Texercise Select program is a cost-effective strategy for increasing physical activity and improving healthy dietary practices among older adults as compared to similar health promotion interventions. In line with the significant improvement in

  1. Childhood and Adult Trauma Experiences of Incarcerated Persons and Their Relationship to Adult Behavioral Health Problems and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Shi

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Rates of childhood and adult trauma are high among incarcerated persons. In addition to criminality, childhood trauma is associated with the risk for emotional disorders (e.g., depression and anxiety and co-morbid conditions such as alcohol and drug abuse and antisocial behaviors in adulthood. This paper develops rates of childhood and adult trauma and examines the impact of age-of-onset and type-specific trauma on emotional problems and behavior for a sample of incarcerated males (N~4,000. Prevalence estimates for types of trauma were constructed by age at time of trauma, race and types of behavioral health treatment received while incarcerated. HLM models were used to explore the association between childhood and adult trauma and depression, anxiety, substance use, interpersonal problems, and aggression problems (each model estimated separately and controlling for age, gender, race, time incarcerated, and index offense. Rates of physical, sexual, and emotional trauma were higher in childhood than adulthood and ranged from 44.7% (physical trauma in childhood to 4.5% (sexual trauma in adulthood. Trauma exposure was found to be strongly associated with a wide range of behavioral problems and clinical symptoms. Given the sheer numbers of incarcerated men and the strength of these associations, targeted intervention is critical.

  2. Post-traumatic stress disorder in older adults: a systematic review of the psychotherapy treatment literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinnen, Stephanie; Simiola, Vanessa; Cook, Joan M

    2015-01-01

    Older adults represent the fastest growing segment of the US and industrialized populations. However, older adults have generally not been included in randomized clinical trials of psychotherapy for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). This review examined reports of psychological treatment for trauma-related problems, primarily PTSD, in studies with samples of at least 50% adults aged 55 and older using standardized measures. A systematic review of the literature was conducted on psychotherapy for PTSD with older adults using PubMed, Medline, PsychInfo, CINAHL, PILOTS, and Google Scholar. A total of 42 studies were retrieved for full review; 22 were excluded because they did not provide at least one outcome measure or results were not reported by age in the case of mixed-age samples. Of the 20 studies that met review criteria, there were: 13 case studies or series, three uncontrolled pilot studies, two randomized clinical trials, one non-randomized concurrent control study and one post hoc effectiveness study. Significant methodological limitations in the current older adult PTSD treatment outcome literature were found reducing its internal validity and generalizability, including non-randomized research designs, lack of comparison conditions and small sample sizes. Select evidence-based interventions validated in younger and middle-aged populations appear acceptable and efficacious with older adults. There are few treatment studies on subsets of the older adult population including cultural and ethnic minorities, women, the oldest old (over 85), and those who are cognitively impaired. Implications for clinical practice and future research directions are discussed.

  3. Intergenerational effects of parental substance-related convictions and adult drug treatment court participation on children’s school performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gifford, Elizabeth J.; Sloan, Frank A.; Evans, Kelly E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study examined the intergenerational effects of parental conviction of a substance-related charge on children’s academic performance and, conditional on a conviction, whether completion of an adult drug treatment court (DTC) program was associated with improved school performance. Method State administrative data from North Carolina courts, birth records, and school records were linked for 2005–12. Math and reading end-of-grade test scores and absenteeism were examined for 5 groups of children, those with parents who: were not convicted on any criminal charge, were convicted on a substance-related charge and not referred by a court to a DTC, were referred to a DTC but did not enroll, enrolled in a DTC but did not complete, and completed a DTC program. Results Accounting for demographic and socioeconomic factors, the school performance of children whose parents were convicted of a substance-related offense was worse than that of children whose parents were not convicted on any charge. These differences were statistically significant but substantially reduced after controlling for socioeconomic characteristics, e.g., mother’s educational attainment. We found no evidence that parent participation in an adult DTC program led to improved school performance of their children. Conclusion While the children of convicted parents fared worse on average, much—but not all—of this difference was attributed to socioeconomic factors, with the result that parental conviction remained a risk factor for poorer school performance. Even though adult DTCs have been shown to have other benefits, we could detect no intergenerational benefit in improved school performance of their children. PMID:26460705

  4. THE ROLE OF THERAPEUTIC ALLIANCE IN SUBSTANCE USE DISORDER TREATMENT FOR YOUNG ADULTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbanoski, Karen A.; Kelly, John F.; Hoeppner, Bettina B.; Slaymaker, Valerie

    2012-01-01

    The therapeutic alliance is deemed to be integral to psychotherapeutic interventions, yet little is known about the nature of its role in treatment for substance use disorders (SUD), especially among young people. We investigated baseline predictors of the therapeutic alliance measured mid-treatment, and tested whether the alliance influenced during-treatment changes in key process variables (psychological distress, motivation, self-efficacy, coping skills, and commitment to AA/NA) independent of these baseline influences. Young adults in residential treatment (N=303; age 18-24) were assessed at intake, mid-treatment, and discharge. Older age and higher baseline levels of motivation, self-efficacy, coping skills, and commitment to AA/NA predicted a stronger alliance. Independent of these influences, participants who developed a stronger alliance achieved greater reductions in distress during treatment. Findings clarify a role for alliance in promoting during-treatment changes through reducing distress. PMID:22285833

  5. A program of supported education for adult Israeli students with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasson, Rachel; Grinshpoon, Alexander; Lachman, Max; Ponizovsky, Alexander

    2005-01-01

    This report describes a supported education program (SEP), a novel community-based program of rehabilitation for psychiatric patients, started in Israel in 1999. Objectives, target population and activities are described. In addition, initial findings of two program-related studies are presented. One study explored the relationship of psychological distress with students' coping strategies and perceived social support. The second study is a survey of mental health literacy and attitudes of heads of schools for adult education where the SEP was implemented. Studies' findings suggested a "case for action" with the following objectives: to develop interventions to prevent distress among SEP users, and to enhance mental health knowledge and foster positive attitudes among school personnel aimed at decreasing dropout rates and encourage the utilization of the opportunities provided by SEP.

  6. Anterior Cingulate Volumetric Alterations in Treatment-Naive Adults with ADHD: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makris, Nikos; Seidman, Larry J.; Valera, Eve M.; Biederman, Joseph; Monuteaux, Michael C.; Kennedy, David N.; Caviness, Verne S., Jr.; Bush, George; Crum, Katherine; Brown, Ariel B.; Faraone, Stephen V.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: We sought to examine preliminary results of brain alterations in anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) in treatment-naive adults with ADHD. The ACC is a central brain node for the integration of cognitive control and allocation of attention, affect and drive. Thus its anatomical alteration may give rise to impulsivity, hyperactivity and…

  7. Guideline for Screening, Diagnosis and Treatment of ADHD in Adults with Substance Use Disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matthys, Frieda; Stes, Steven; van den Brink, Wim; Joostens, Peter; Mobius, David; Tremmery, Sabine; Sabbe, Bernard

    2014-01-01

    Currently there is no guideline for the screening, diagnosis and treatment of adult attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in patients with a substance use disorder (SUD). The aim was to develop such a guideline, starting out from a systematic review and based on the methodology of the

  8. Psychosocial Treatments for Major Depression and Dysthymia in Older Adults: A Review of the Research Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalaquett, Carlos P.; Stens, Andrea N.

    2006-01-01

    Older adults represent a growing segment of the population with the highest suicide rate and an increasing need of counseling services for major depression and dysthymia. The present study examined the literature with the purpose of identifying research addressing psychosocial treatments of depression in later life. A summary of treatments…

  9. Multipotent adult progenitor cells : their role in wound healing and the treatment of dermal wounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herdrich, B. J.; Lind, R. C.; Liechty, K. W.

    2008-01-01

    The use of cellular therapy in the treatment of dermal wounds is currently an active area of investigation. Multipotent adult progenitor cells (MAPC) are an attractive choice for cytotherapy because they have a large proliferative potential, the ability to differentiate into different cell types and

  10. Approaches to improvement of treatment results of malignant tumors in adolescents and young adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. G. Rumyantsev

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This article provides an overview of clinical and biological features of most common malignant tumors in adolescents and young adults. The most effective pediatric and oncological treatment approaches to described diseases based on own experience are summarized.

  11. [Pristinamycin in the treatment of acute bacterial dermohypodermitis in adults. An open study of 42 patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, P; Risse, L; Bonnetblanc, J M

    1996-01-01

    We recently demonstrated that oral roxithromycin is as effective as intravenous penicillin G in adults with erysipelas. We therefore evaluated the effectiveness of pristinamycin, an antibiotic which is very active on streptococci and Staphylococcus aureus, in non-necrotizing bacterial dermohypodermitis in adults. This prospective open study was conducted in one center and included immunocompetent patients with bacterial dermophypodermitis without signs of toxicity or local manifestations suggesting necrotizing fasciitis. Bacteriology tests included direct immunofluorescence for streptococcus (groups A, C, G) on skin biopsies of the lesion before treatment. Patients were treated with pristinamycin (Pyostacine 500, 3 g/day until 10 days after apyrexia), and evaluated clinically on day 0, 2, 6, 8, and 15. Overall treatment effect was assessed on day 15. The study group included 42 adults (23 woman and 19 men; mean age 64 +/- 3.5 yr). In 39 cases (93%), the bacterial dermohypodermitis was localized on the lower limb. The inflammatory lesion was well delimited, a characteristic feature of erysipelas, in 32 cases (76%). Sample culture, direct immunofluorescence or serology findings demonstrated presence of streptococci in 33 cases (79%). A single treatment with pristinamycin was successful in 36 patients, giving an overall rate of 86%. Drainage of a localized abscess was successful in 5 of 6 patients after initial failure of antibiotic treatment. This prospective study demonstrated the effectiveness of pristinamycin in non-necrotizing bacterial dermohypodermitis in the adult, especially in erysipelas. Overall effectiveness was comparable with that reported for penicillin G or macrolides in erysipelas.

  12. Physical exercise training interventions for children and young adults during and after treatment for childhood cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braam, Katja I.; van der Torre, Patrick; Takken, Tim; Veening, Margreet A.; van Dulmen-den Broeder, Eline; Kaspers, Gertjan J L

    BACKGROUND: A decreased physical fitness has been reported in patients and survivors of childhood cancer. This is influenced by the negative effects of the disease and the treatment of childhood cancer. Exercise training for adult cancer patients has frequently been reported to improve physical

  13. Meta-analysis of psychological treatments for posttraumatic stress disorder in adult survivors of childhood abuse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ehring, Thomas; Welboren, Renate; Morina, Nexhmedin; Wicherts, Jelte M.; Freitag, Janina; Emmelkamp, Paul M. G.

    2014-01-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is highly prevalent in adult survivors of childhood sexual and/or physical abuse. However, intervention studies focusing on this group of patients are underrepresented in earlier meta-analyses on the efficacy of PTSD treatments. The current meta-analysis

  14. Measuring Perceived Barriers to Healthful Eating in Obese, Treatment-Seeking Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsh, Ericka M.; Jeffery, Robert W.; Levy, Rona L.; Langer, Shelby L.; Flood, Andrew P.; Jaeb, Melanie A.; Laqua, Patricia S.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To characterize perceived barriers to healthful eating in a sample of obese, treatment-seeking adults and to examine whether changes in barriers are associated with energy intake and body weight. Design: Observational study based on findings from a randomized, controlled behavioral weight-loss trial. Participants: Participants were 113…

  15. Bypass surgery versus medical treatment for symptomatic moyamoya disease in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Dong-Kyu; Lee, Kwan-Sung; Rha, Hyoung Kyun; Huh, Pil-Woo; Yang, Ji-Ho; Park, Ik Seong; Ahn, Jae-Geun; Sung, Jae Hoon; Han, Young-Min

    2017-09-01

    OBJECTIVE In this study the authors evaluated whether extracranial-intracranial bypass surgery can prevent stroke occurrence and decrease mortality in adult patients with symptomatic moyamoya disease (MMD). METHODS The medical records of 249 consecutive adult patients with symptomatic MMD that was confirmed by digital subtraction angiography between 2002 and 2011 at 8 institutions were retrospectively reviewed. The study outcomes of stroke recurrence as a primary event and death during the 6-year follow-up and perioperative complications within 30 days as secondary events were compared between the bypass and medical treatment groups. RESULTS The bypass group comprised 158 (63.5%) patients, and the medical treatment group comprised 91 (36.5%) patients. For 249 adult patients with MMD, bypass surgery showed an HR of 0.48 (95% CI 0.27-0.86, p = 0.014) for stroke recurrence calculated by Cox regression analysis. However, for the 153 patients with ischemic MMD, the HR of bypass surgery for stroke recurrence was 1.07 (95% CI 0.43-2.66, p = 0.887). For the 96 patients with hemorrhagic MMD, the multivariable adjusted HR of bypass surgery for stroke recurrence was 0.18 (95% CI 0.06-0.49, p = 0.001). For the treatment modality, indirect bypass and direct bypass (or combined bypass) did not show any significant difference for stroke recurrence, perioperative stroke, or mortality (log rank; p = 0.524, p = 0.828, and p = 0.616, respectively). CONCLUSIONS During the treatment of symptomatic MMD in adults, bypass surgery reduces stroke recurrence for the hemorrhagic type, but it does not do so for the ischemic type. The best choice of bypass methods in adult patients with MMD is uncertain. In adult ischemic MMD, a prospective randomized study to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of bypass surgery to prevent recurrent stroke is necessary.

  16. Prevalence and correlates of fear of recurrence among adolescent and young adult versus older adult post-treatment cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shay, L Aubree; Carpentier, Melissa Y; Vernon, Sally W

    2016-11-01

    We sought to (1) assess prevalence of fear of recurrence among cancer survivors diagnosed as adolescent and young adults (AYA; 15-39 years) versus those diagnosed at a later age (40+ years) and (2) identify factors associated with fear of recurrence in each group. We used logistic regression to determine the correlates of fear of recurrence by age group at diagnosis among survivors responding to the 2010 LIVESTRONG survey. Prevalence of fear of recurrence was significantly higher among AYA survivors (85.2 %) than those diagnosed at an older age (79.7 %). Among AYA respondents, being employed and less than 5 years off treatment were positively associated with fear of recurrence while those with thyroid cancer and those who participated in a clinical trial were less likely to experience fear of recurrence. Among older adults, receipt of surgery was associated with fear of recurrence whereas having insurance coverage through Medicare or Medicaid and positive patient-provider communication were negatively associated with fear of recurrence. For both AYA and older adult survivors, changeable factors such as having a more positive cancer care experience may impact fear of recurrence. Our findings highlight the need to identify and understand aspects of the communication process that can be targeted in future interventions with survivors and healthcare providers to ensure that fear of recurrence is being appropriately managed. Factors associated with fear of recurrence differ for AYA and older adult survivors; thus, interventions would likely benefit from tailoring based on age at diagnosis.

  17. Trends in the Prevalence, Awareness, Treatment, and Control of Hypertension Among Young Adults in the United States, 1999 to 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yiyi; Moran, Andrew E

    2017-10-01

    Overall hypertension prevalence has not changed in the United States in recent decades although awareness, treatment, and control improved. However, hypertension epidemiology and its temporal trends may differ in younger adults compared with older adults. Our study included 41 331 participants ≥18 years of age from 8 National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (1999-2014) and estimated temporal trends of hypertension, awareness, treatment, and control among young adults (age, 18-39 years) compared with middle-age (age, 40-59 years) and older adults (age, ≥60 years). In 2013 to 2014, 7.3% of the US young adults had hypertension. During 1999 to 2014, young adults saw larger increases in hypertension awareness, treatment, and control than did older adults. However, all of these components of hypertension control were lower among young adults compared with middle-aged or older adults (74.7% younger versus 81.9% middle versus 88.4% older for awareness; 50.0% versus 70.3% versus 83.0% for treatment; and 40.2% versus 56.7% versus 54.4% for control). Worse hypertension awareness, treatment, and control in young adults overall were mostly driven by worse measures in young adult men compared with young adult women. More frequent healthcare visits by young adult women explained ≈28% of the sex-related difference in awareness, 60% of the difference in treatment, and 52% of the difference in control. These findings suggest that improved access to and engagement in medical care might improve hypertension control in young adults, particularly young adult men, and reduce life-time cardiovascular risk. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  18. A Mind-Body Program for Older Adults With Chronic Low Back Pain: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morone, Natalia E; Greco, Carol M; Moore, Charity G; Rollman, Bruce L; Lane, Bridget; Morrow, Lisa A; Glynn, Nancy W; Weiner, Debra K

    2016-03-01

    Treatment of chronic low back pain (LBP) in older adults is limited by the adverse effects of analgesics. Effective nonpharmacologic treatment options are needed. To determine the effectiveness of a mind-body program at increasing function and reducing pain in older adults with chronic LBP. This single-blind, randomized clinical trial compared a mind-body program (n = 140) with a health education program (n = 142). Community-dwelling older adults residing within the Pittsburgh metropolitan area were recruited from February 14, 2011, to June 30, 2014, with 6-month follow-up completed by April 9, 2015. Eligible participants were 65 years or older with functional limitations owing to their chronic LBP (≥11 points on the Roland and Morris Disability Questionnaire) and chronic pain (duration ≥3 months) of moderate intensity. Data were analyzed from March 1 to July 1, 2015. The intervention and control groups received an 8-week group program followed by 6 monthly sessions. The intervention was modeled on the Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction program; the control program, on the "10 Keys" to Healthy Aging. Follow-up occurred at program completion and 6 months later. The score on the Roland and Morris Disability Questionnaire was the primary outcome and measured functional limitations owing to LBP. Pain (current, mean, and most severe in the past week) was measured with the Numeric Pain Rating Scale. Secondary outcomes included quality of life, pain self-efficacy, and mindfulness. Intent-to-treat analyses were conducted. Of 1160 persons who underwent screening, 282 participants enrolled in the trial (95 men [33.7%] and 187 women [66.3%]; mean [SD] age,74.5 [6.6] years). The baseline mean (SD) Roland and Morris Disability Questionnaire scores for the intervention and control groups were 15.6 (3.0) and 15.4 (3.0), respectively. Compared with the control group, intervention participants improved an additional -1.1 (mean, 12.1 vs 13.1) points at 8 weeks and -0.04 (mean

  19. Effect of the adapted Virtual Reality cognitive training program among Chinese older adults with chronic schizophrenia: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Christopher L F; Ngai, Elena K Y; Leung, Paul K H; Wong, Stephen

    2010-06-01

    To examine the effect of the adapted virtual reality cognitive training program in older adults with chronic schizophrenia. Older adults with chronic schizophrenia were recruited from a long-stay care setting and were randomly assigned into intervention (n = 12) and control group (n = 15). The intervention group received 10-session of VR program that consisted of 2 VR activities using IREX. The control group attended the usual programs in the setting. After the 10-session intervention, older adults with chronic schizophrenia preformed significantly better than control in overall cognitive function (p .000), and in two cognitive subscales: repetition (p .001) and memory (p .040). These participants engaged in the VR activities volitionally. No problem of cybersickness was observed. The results of the current study indicate that engaging in the adapted virtual reality cognitive training program offers the potential for significant gains in cognitive function of the older adults with chronic schizophrenia.

  20. Meta-analysis of psychological treatments for posttraumatic stress disorder in adult survivors of childhood abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehring, Thomas; Welboren, Renate; Morina, Nexhmedin; Wicherts, Jelte M; Freitag, Janina; Emmelkamp, Paul M G

    2014-12-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is highly prevalent in adult survivors of childhood sexual and/or physical abuse. However, intervention studies focusing on this group of patients are underrepresented in earlier meta-analyses on the efficacy of PTSD treatments. The current meta-analysis exclusively focused on studies evaluating the efficacy of psychological interventions for PTSD in adult survivors of childhood abuse. Sixteen randomized controlled trials meeting inclusion criteria could be identified that were subdivided into trauma-focused cognitive behavior therapy (CBT), non-trauma-focused CBT, eye movement desensitization and reprocessing, and other treatments (interpersonal, emotion-focused). Results showed that psychological interventions are efficacious for PTSD in adult survivors of childhood abuse, with an aggregated uncontrolled effect size of g=1.24 (pre- vs. post-treatment), and aggregated controlled effect sizes of g=0.72 (post-treatment, comparison to waitlist control conditions) and g=0.50 (post-treatment, comparison with TAU/placebo control conditions), respectively. Effect sizes remained stable at follow-up. As the heterogeneity between studies was large, we examined the influence of two a priori specified moderator variables on treatment efficacy. Results showed that trauma-focused treatments were more efficacious than non-trauma-focused interventions, and that treatments including individual sessions yielded larger effect sizes than pure group treatments. As a whole, the findings are in line with earlier meta-analyses showing that the best effects can be achieved with individual trauma-focused treatments. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.