WorldWideScience

Sample records for prognostic cloud water

  1. A Linearized Prognostic Cloud Scheme in NASAs Goddard Earth Observing System Data Assimilation Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holdaway, Daniel; Errico, Ronald M.; Gelaro, Ronald; Kim, Jong G.; Mahajan, Rahul

    2015-01-01

    A linearized prognostic cloud scheme has been developed to accompany the linearized convection scheme recently implemented in NASA's Goddard Earth Observing System data assimilation tools. The linearization, developed from the nonlinear cloud scheme, treats cloud variables prognostically so they are subject to linearized advection, diffusion, generation, and evaporation. Four linearized cloud variables are modeled, the ice and water phases of clouds generated by large-scale condensation and, separately, by detraining convection. For each species the scheme models their sources, sublimation, evaporation, and autoconversion. Large-scale, anvil and convective species of precipitation are modeled and evaporated. The cloud scheme exhibits linearity and realistic perturbation growth, except around the generation of clouds through large-scale condensation. Discontinuities and steep gradients are widely used here and severe problems occur in the calculation of cloud fraction. For data assimilation applications this poor behavior is controlled by replacing this part of the scheme with a perturbation model. For observation impacts, where efficiency is less of a concern, a filtering is developed that examines the Jacobian. The replacement scheme is only invoked if Jacobian elements or eigenvalues violate a series of tuned constants. The linearized prognostic cloud scheme is tested by comparing the linear and nonlinear perturbation trajectories for 6-, 12-, and 24-h forecast times. The tangent linear model performs well and perturbations of clouds are well captured for the lead times of interest.

  2. Climate feedbacks in a general circulation model incorporating prognostic clouds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colman, R.; Fraser, J. [Bureau of Meteorology Research Centre, Melbourne, Vic. (Australia); Rotstayn, L. [CSIRO Atmospheric Research, Aspendale (Australia)

    2001-11-01

    This study performs a comprehensive feedback analysis on the Bureau of Meteorology Research Centre General Circulation Model, quantifying all important feedbacks operating under an increase in atmospheric CO{sub 2}. The individual feedbacks are analysed in detail, using an offline radiation perturbation method, looking at long- and shortwave components, latitudinal distributions, cloud impacts, non-linearities under 2xCO{sub 2} and 4xCO{sub 2} warmings and at interannual variability. The water vapour feedback is divided into terms due to moisture height and amount changes. The net cloud feedback is separated into terms due to cloud amount, height, water content, water phase, physical thickness and convective cloud fraction. Globally the most important feedbacks were found to be (from strongest positive to strongest negative) those due to water vapour, clouds, surface albedo, lapse rate and surface temperature. For the longwave (LW) response the most important term of the cloud 'optical property' feedbacks is due to the water content. In the shortwave (SW), both water content and water phase changes are important. Cloud amount and height terms are also important for both LW and SW. Feedbacks due to physical cloud thickness and convective cloud fraction are found to be relatively small. All cloud component feedbacks (other than height) produce conflicting LW/SW feedbacks in the model. Furthermore, the optical property and cloud fraction feedbacks are also of opposite sign. The result is that the net cloud feedback is the (relatively small) product of conflicting physical processes. Non-linearities in the feedbacks are found to be relatively small for all but the surface albedo response and some cloud component contributions. The cloud impact on non-cloud feedbacks is also discussed: greatest impact is on the surface albedo, but impact on water vapour feedback is also significant. The analysis method here proves to be a powerful tool for detailing the

  3. Global cloud liquid water path simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemus, L. [Southern Hemisphere Meteorology, Clayton, Victoria (Australia); Rikus, L. [Bureau of Meteorology Research Centre, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Martin, C.; Platt, R. [CSIRO, Aspendale, Victoria (Australia)

    1997-01-01

    A new parameterization of cloud liquid water and ice content has been included in the Bureau of Meteorology Global Assimilation and Prediction System. The cloud liquid water content is derived from the mean cloud temperatures in the model using an empirical relationship based on observations. The results from perpetual January and July simulations are presented and show that the total cloud water path steadily decreases toward high latitudes, with two relative maxima at midlatitudes and a peak at low latitudes. To validate the scheme, the simulated fields need to be processed to produce liquid water paths that can be directly compared with the corresponding field derived from Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) data. This requires the identification of cloud ice water content within the parameterization and a prescription to account for the treatment of strongly precipitating subgrid-scale cloud. The resultant cloud liquid water paths agree qualitatively with the SSM/I data but show some systematic errors that are attributed to corresponding errors in the model`s simulation of cloud amounts. Given that a more quantitative validation requires substantial improvement in the model`s diagnostic cloud scheme, the comparison with the SSM/I data indicates that the cloud water path, derived from the cloud liquid water content parameterization introduced in this paper, is consistent with the observations and can be usefully incorporated in the prediction system. 40 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Mars water-ice clouds and precipitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteway, J A; Komguem, L; Dickinson, C; Cook, C; Illnicki, M; Seabrook, J; Popovici, V; Duck, T J; Davy, R; Taylor, P A; Pathak, J; Fisher, D; Carswell, A I; Daly, M; Hipkin, V; Zent, A P; Hecht, M H; Wood, S E; Tamppari, L K; Renno, N; Moores, J E; Lemmon, M T; Daerden, F; Smith, P H

    2009-07-03

    The light detection and ranging instrument on the Phoenix mission observed water-ice clouds in the atmosphere of Mars that were similar to cirrus clouds on Earth. Fall streaks in the cloud structure traced the precipitation of ice crystals toward the ground. Measurements of atmospheric dust indicated that the planetary boundary layer (PBL) on Mars was well mixed, up to heights of around 4 kilometers, by the summer daytime turbulence and convection. The water-ice clouds were detected at the top of the PBL and near the ground each night in late summer after the air temperature started decreasing. The interpretation is that water vapor mixed upward by daytime turbulence and convection forms ice crystal clouds at night that precipitate back toward the surface.

  5. Jets and Water Clouds on Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Yuan; Showman, A. P.

    2012-10-01

    Ground-based and spacecraft observations show that Jupiter exhibits multiple banded zonal jet structures. These banded jets correlate with dark and bright clouds, often called "belts" and "zones". The mechanisms that produce these banded zonal jets and clouds are poorly understood. Our previous studies showed that the latent heat released by condensation of water vapor could produce equatorial superrotation along with multiple zonal jets in the mid-to-high latitudes. However, that previous work assumed complete and instant removal of condensate and therefore could not predict the cloud formation. Here we present an improved 3D Jupiter model to investigate some effects of cloud microphysics on large-scale dynamics using a closed water cycle that includes condensation, three-dimensional advection of cloud material by the large-scale circulation, evaporation and sedimentation. We use a dry convective adjustment scheme to adjust the temperature towards a dry adiabat when atmospheric columns become convectively unstable, and the tracers are mixed within the unstable layers accordingly. Other physics parameterizations included in our model are the bottom drag and internal heat flux as well as the choices of either Newtonian heating scheme or gray radiative transfer. Given the poorly understood cloud microphysics, we perform case studies by treating the particle size and condensation/evaporation time scale as free parameters. We find that, in some cases, the active water cycle can produce multiple banded jets and clouds. However, the equatorial jet is generally very weak in all the cases because of insufficient supply of eastward eddy momentum fluxes. These differences may result from differences in the overall vertical stratification, baroclinicity, and moisture distribution in our new models relative to the older ones; we expect to elucidate the dynamical mechanisms in continuing work.

  6. Water clouds in Y dwarfs and exoplanets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morley, Caroline V.; Fortney, Jonathan J. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Marley, Mark S.; Lupu, Roxana; Greene, Tom [NASA Ames Research Center, Naval Air Station, Moffett Field, Mountain View, CA 94035 (United States); Saumon, Didier [Los Alamos National Lab, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Lodders, Katharina, E-mail: cmorley@ucolick.org [Washington University in St Louis, 1 Brookings Drive, St Louis, MO 63130 (United States)

    2014-05-20

    The formation of clouds affects brown dwarf and planetary atmospheres of nearly all effective temperatures. Iron and silicate condense in L dwarf atmospheres and dissipate at the L/T transition. Minor species such as sulfides and salts condense in mid- to late T dwarfs. For brown dwarfs below T {sub eff} ∼ 450 K, water condenses in the upper atmosphere to form ice clouds. Currently, over a dozen objects in this temperature range have been discovered, and few previous theoretical studies have addressed the effect of water clouds on brown dwarf or exoplanetary spectra. Here we present a new grid of models that include the effect of water cloud opacity. We find that they become optically thick in objects below T {sub eff} ∼ 350-375 K. Unlike refractory cloud materials, water-ice particles are significantly nongray absorbers; they predominantly scatter at optical wavelengths through the J band and absorb in the infrared with prominent features, the strongest of which is at 2.8 μm. H{sub 2}O, NH{sub 3}, CH{sub 4}, and H{sub 2} CIA are dominant opacity sources; less abundant species may also be detectable, including the alkalis, H{sub 2}S, and PH{sub 3}. PH{sub 3}, which has been detected in Jupiter, is expected to have a strong signature in the mid-infrared at 4.3 μm in Y dwarfs around T {sub eff} = 450 K; if disequilibrium chemistry increases the abundance of PH{sub 3}, it may be detectable over a wider effective temperature range than models predict. We show results incorporating disequilibrium nitrogen and carbon chemistry and predict signatures of low gravity in planetary mass objects. Finally, we make predictions for the observability of Y dwarfs and planets with existing and future instruments, including the James Webb Space Telescope and Gemini Planet Imager.

  7. Polarized View of Supercooled Liquid Water Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandrov, Mikhail D.; Cairns, Brian; Van Diedenhoven, Bastiaan; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Wasilewski, Andrzej P.; McGill, Matthew J.; Yorks, John E.; Hlavka, Dennis L.; Platnick, Steven E.; Arnold, G. Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Supercooled liquid water (SLW) clouds, where liquid droplets exist at temperatures below 0 C present a well known aviation hazard through aircraft icing, in which SLW accretes on the airframe. SLW clouds are common over the Southern Ocean, and climate-induced changes in their occurrence is thought to constitute a strong cloud feedback on global climate. The two recent NASA field campaigns POlarimeter Definition EXperiment (PODEX, based in Palmdale, California, January-February 2013) and Studies of Emissions and Atmospheric Composition, Clouds and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys (SEAC4RS, based in Houston, Texas in August- September 2013) provided a unique opportunity to observe SLW clouds from the high-altitude airborne platform of NASA's ER-2 aircraft. We present an analysis of measurements made by the Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP) during these experiments accompanied by correlative retrievals from other sensors. The RSP measures both polarized and total reflectance in 9 spectral channels with wavelengths ranging from 410 to 2250 nm. It is a scanning sensor taking samples at 0.8deg intervals within 60deg from nadir in both forward and backward directions. This unique angular resolution allows for characterization of liquid water droplet size using the rainbow structure observed in the polarized reflectances in the scattering angle range between 135deg and 165deg. Simple parametric fitting algorithms applied to the polarized reflectance provide retrievals of the droplet effective radius and variance assuming a prescribed size distribution shape (gamma distribution). In addition to this, we use a non-parametric method, Rainbow Fourier Transform (RFT),which allows retrieval of the droplet size distribution without assuming a size distribution shape. We present an overview of the RSP campaign datasets available from the NASA GISS website, as well as two detailed examples of the retrievals. In these case studies we focus on cloud fields with spatial features

  8. Low-Power, Lightweight Cloud Water Content Sensor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The measurement of cloud water content is of great importance in understanding the formation of clouds, their structure, and their radiative properties which in turn...

  9. Prognostics

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Prognostics has received considerable attention recently as an emerging sub-discipline within SHM. Prognosis is here strictly defined as “predicting the time at...

  10. NAMMA CVI CLOUD CONDENSED WATER CONTENT V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In the NAMMA CVI Cloud Condensed Water Content dataset the counterflow virtual impactor (CVI) was used to measure condensed water content (liquid water or ice in...

  11. Cloud water measurements of glyoxal and methylglyoxal during the Whistler Aerosol and Cloud Study (WACS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herckes, P.; Ervens, B.; Wang, Y.; Eagar, J.; Leaitch, R.; Macdonald, A.; Sjostedt, S.; Abbatt, J.

    2011-12-01

    Glyoxal and methylglyoxal are produced in high yields from both anthropogenic (aromatics) and biogenic (isoprene) precursors. The role of glyoxal and methylglyoxal in secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation in the aqueous phase of cloud water and aerosols has received great attention over the past years. In addition, gas phase oxidation and photolysis of these compounds yield radicals and, thus, impact the oxidant budgets. While the reactivity of methylglyoxal and glyoxal in both the gas and aqueous phases is nearly identical, the much higher solubility of glyoxal leads to its more efficient removal in the presence of clouds. Thus, the amount of cloud water (liquid water content, LWC) and cloud processing time will affect the concentration ratios and thus the reaction rates of oxidation processes in the gas and aqueous phase, respectively. The Whistler Aerosol and Cloud Study (WACS) investigated the interactions between clouds and biogenic aerosol in summer 2010 in Whistler (Canada). During this study, cloud samples were collected at two locations, Whistler peak and a mid mountain station Raven's Nest. Cloud samples were extensively chemically characterized including the measurements of glyoxal and methylglyoxal using liquid chromatography coupled to UV and mass spectrometric detection after derivatization. Concentrations were variable on the order of micromoles, accounting for 1% of the dissolved organic matter in clouds. Glyoxal and methylglyoxal concentrations at both locations are predicted by means of model studies using VOC measurements and liquid water contents as input data. These concentrations and their ratios are compared to those in different regions. It will be discussed how cloud liquid water content, cloud processing time and amount and mixture of precursors (emissions) affect these concentration ratios. Finally, the role of different emission scenarios and the presence of clouds for SOA formation and radical budgets will be briefly assessed.

  12. Warming Ancient Mars with Water Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwick, V. L.; Toon, O. B.

    2017-10-01

    High altitude clouds in the present day Mars atmosphere may form on interplanetary dust particles (IDPs). Paleo fluences of IDPs were likely higher, and similar clouds are expected to influence the Mars paleo-climate.

  13. NAMMA CVI CLOUD CONDENSED WATER CONTENT V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The counterflow virtual impactor (CVI) was used to measure condensed water content (liquid water or ice in particles about 8 microns in diameter and up) and cloud...

  14. CAMEX-4 CVI CLOUD CONDENSED WATER CONTENT V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The counterflow virtual impactor (CVI) was used to measure condensed water content (liquid water or ice in particles about 8 microns in diameter and up) and cloud...

  15. Leaf Water Repellency as an Adaptation to Cloud Forest Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holder, C. D.

    2006-12-01

    Fog persistency and high precipitation totals contribute to the unique ecohydrology of tropical montane cloud forests. The persistence of water droplets on leaf surfaces in cloud forests inhibits photosynthetic carbon exchange because carbon dioxide diffuses slower in water than air. Adaptations that reduce water retention on leaf surfaces may increase photosynthetic capacity of cloud forests. The hypothesis of this study was that 12 cloud forest species from the Sierra de las Minas, Guatemala have a higher degree of leaf water repellency than 12 species from tropical dry forests in Chiquimula, Guatemala and 12 species from foothills-grassland vegetation in Colorado (USA). Leaf water repellency was measured as the contact angle between the leaf surface and the line tangent to the water droplet passing through the point of contact between the droplet and the leaf surface. Leaf water repellency was significantly different between the three study areas; however, leaf water repellency of 12 species in the Sierra de las Minas was lower than 12 species in Chiquimula and 12 species in Colorado. Leaf water repellency of abaxial surfaces of all species in the cloud forest was greater than leaf water repellency of adaxial surfaces. The low values of leaf water repellency in cloud forest species may be influenced by presence of epiphylls or the loss of epicuticular wax on the leaf surfaces because of high precipitation totals and longer leaf life-span. High leaf water repellency in dry climates may be an adaptation to increase hydrological inputs underneath the canopy.

  16. Seasonal and diurnal variability of Mars water-ice clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Philip R.; Zurek, Richard W.; Jaramillo, L. L.

    1988-01-01

    The diurnal and seasonal behavior of cloud opacity and frequency of occurrence was studied using an atlas of cloud occurrences compiled from the Viking IRTM (Infrared Thermal Mapper) data set. It was found that in some areas the behavior of water appeared to repeat in the zonal mean. However, this interpretation is complicated by both poor coverage and the variability of dust and clouds. As a result, the extent and nature of interannual variability remains unclear.

  17. Liquid water content variation with altitude in clouds over Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreea, Boscornea; Sabina, Stefan

    2013-04-01

    Cloud water content is one of the most fundamental measurements in cloud physics. Knowledge of the vertical variability of cloud microphysical characteristics is important for a variety of reasons. The profile of liquid water content (LWC) partially governs the radiative transfer for cloudy atmospheres, LWC profiles improves our understanding of processes acting to form and maintain cloud systems and may lead to improvements in the representation of clouds in numerical models. Presently, in situ airborne measurements provide the most accurate information about cloud microphysical characteristics. This information can be used for verification of both numerical models and cloud remote sensing techniques. The aim of this paper was to analyze the liquid water content (LWC) measurements in clouds, in time of the aircraft flights. The aircraft and its platform ATMOSLAB - Airborne Laboratory for Environmental Atmospheric Research is property of the National Institute for Aerospace Research "Elie Carafoli" (INCAS), Bucharest, Romania. The airborne laboratory equipped for special research missions is based on a Hawker Beechcraft - King Air C90 GTx aircraft and is equipped with a sensors system CAPS - Cloud, Aerosol and Precipitation Spectrometer (30 bins, 0.51-50 m). The processed and analyzed measurements are acquired during 4 flights from Romania (Bucharest, 44°25'57″N 26°06'14″E) to Germany (Berlin 52°30'2″N 13°23'56″E) above the same region of Europe. The flight path was starting from Bucharest to the western part of Romania above Hungary, Austria at a cruse altitude between 6000-8500 m, and after 5 hours reaching Berlin. In total we acquired data during approximately 20 flight hours and we presented the vertical and horizontal LWC variations for different cloud types. The LWC values are similar for each type of cloud to values from literature. The vertical LWC profiles in the atmosphere measured during takeoff and landing of the aircraft have shown their

  18. Low-Power, Lightweight Cloud Water Content Sensor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The water content of clouds, whether in liquid or ice form, is a key variable to be measured when either calibrating remote sensing systems or when calculating the...

  19. Rainfall and cloud water interception in mature and secondary lower montane cloud forests of central Veracruz, Mexico

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holwerda, F; Bruijnzeel, L.A.; Muñoz-Villers, L.E.; Equihua, M.; Asbjornsen, H.

    2010-01-01

    Rainfall and cloud water interception (CWI) were determined for a mature and a 19-year old secondary lower montane cloud forest in central Veracruz, Mexico. Cloud water was measured using a passive fog gauge, and consisted most likely of a mixture of fog and wind-driven drizzle. CWI by the canopy

  20. Effective cloud optical depth and enhancement effects for broken liquid water clouds in Valencia (Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marín, M. J.; Serrano, D.; Utrillas, M. P.; Núñez, M.; Martínez-Lozano, J. A.

    2017-10-01

    Partly cloudy skies with liquid water clouds have been analysed, founding that it is essential to distinguish data if the Sun is obstructed or not by clouds. Both cases can be separated considering simultaneously the Cloud Modification Factor (CMF) and the clearness index (kt). For partly cloudy skies and the Sun obstructed the effective cloud optical depth (τ) has been obtained by the minimization method for overcast skies. This method was previously developed by the authors but, in this case, taking into account partial cloud cover. This study has been conducted for the years 2011-2015 with the multiple scattering model SBDART and irradiance measurements for the UV Erythemal Radiation (UVER) and the broadband ranges. Afterwards a statistical analysis of τ has shown that the maximum value is much lower than for overcast skies and there is more discrepancy between the two spectral ranges regarding the results for overcast skies. In order to validate these results the effective cloud optical depth has been correlated with several transmission factors, giving similar fit parameters to those obtained for overcast skies except for the clearness index in the UVER range. As our method is not applicable for partly cloudy skies with the visible Sun, the enhancement of radiation caused by clouds when the Sun is visible has been studied. Results show that the average enhancement CMF values are the same for both ranges although enhancement is more frequent for low cloud cover in the UVER and medium-high cloud cover in the broadband range and it does not depend on the solar zenith angle.

  1. Thin Liquid Water Clouds: Their Importance and Our Challenge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, David D.; Vogelmann, A. M.; Austin, Richard T.; Barnard, James C.; Cady-Pereira, Karen; Chiu, C.; Clough, Shepard A.; Flynn, Connor J.; Khaiyer, Mandana M.; Liljegren, James C.; Johnson, Karen L.; Lin, B.; Long, Charles N.; Marshak, A.; Matrosov, S. Y.; McFarlane, Sally A.; Miller, Mark A.; Min, Qilong; Minnis, Patrick; O' Hirok, William; Wang, Zhien; Wiscombe, Warren J.

    2007-02-19

    Many of the clouds important to the Earth’s energy balance, from the tropics to the Arctic, are optically thin and contain liquid water. Longwave and shortwave radiative fluxes are very sensitive to small perturbations of the cloud liquid water path (LWP) when the LWP is small (i.e., <100 gm-2) and, thus, the radiative properties of these clouds must be well understood to capture them correctly in climate models. Here we review the importance of these thin clouds to the Earth’s energy balance, and explain the difficulties in observing them. In particular, because these clouds are optically thin, potentially mixed-phase, and often broken (i.e., have large 3-D variability), it is challenging to retrieve their microphysical properties accurately. We describe a retrieval algorithm intercomparison that was conducted to evaluate the issues involved. Seventeen different algorithms participated and their retrieved LWP, optical depth, and effective radii are evaluated using data from several case studies. Surprisingly, evaluation of the simplest case, a single-layer overcast cloud, revealed that huge discrepancies exist among the various techniques, even among different algorithms that are in the same general classification. This suggests that, despite considerable advances that have occurred in the field, much more work must be done, and we discuss fruitful avenues for future research.

  2. Looking for the rainbow on exoplanets covered by liquid and icy water clouds

    OpenAIRE

    Karalidi, T.; Stam, D.M.; Hovenier, J.W.

    2012-01-01

    Aims. Looking for the primary rainbow in starlight that is reflected by exoplanets appears to be a promising method to search for liquid water clouds in exoplanetary atmospheres. Ice water clouds, that consist of water crystals instead of water droplets, could potentially mask the rainbow feature in the planetary signal by covering liquid water clouds. Here, we investigate the strength of the rainbow feature for exoplanets that have liquid and icy water clouds in their atmosphere, and calcula...

  3. Atmospheric Water-Cycle Regimes and Cloud Regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, S.; Fetzer, E. J.; L'Ecuyer, T. S.

    2013-12-01

    The relationship between the atmospheric water vapor budget and cloud properties is investigated by collocated reanalysis fields from Modern Era Retrospective-analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) and the observations from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) satellite instrument. Intensities of surface water exchange (precipitation minus evaporation) are analyzed in the space of 'dynamical regimes', which are defined by combination of large-scale water vapor advection and convergence calculated from the MERRA. The atmospheric water vapor sinks associated with mid-latitude storm systems and precipitation in the west coast of United States are mainly driven by the large-scale dynamical advection, while those associated with tropical deep convection and summertime monsoons are mainly driven by water vapor convergence. Subtropical subsidence area over the eastern ocean basins is dominated by strong water vapor divergence. These dynamical regimes are then connected to the collocated MODIS cloud top pressure and cloud optical thickness. Probability density distributions of these MODIS cloud properties associated with each dynamical regime will be presented.

  4. Cold Water Vapor in the Barnard 5 Molecular Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirstrom, E. S.; Charnley, S. B.; Persson, C. M.; Buckle, J. V.; Cordiner, M. A.; Takakuwa, S.

    2014-01-01

    After more than 30 yr of investigations, the nature of gas-grain interactions at low temperatures remains an unresolved issue in astrochemistry. Water ice is the dominant ice found in cold molecular clouds; however, there is only one region where cold ((is) approximately 10 K) water vapor has been detected-L1544. This study aims to shed light on ice desorption mechanisms under cold cloud conditions by expanding the sample. The clumpy distribution of methanol in dark clouds testifies to transient desorption processes at work-likely to also disrupt water ice mantles. Therefore, the Herschel HIFI instrument was used to search for cold water in a small sample of prominent methanol emission peaks. We report detections of the ground-state transition of o-H2O (J = 110-101) at 556.9360 GHz toward two positions in the cold molecular cloud, Barnard 5. The relative abundances of methanol and water gas support a desorption mechanism which disrupts the outer ice mantle layers, rather than causing complete mantle removal.

  5. Stable water isotopologue ratios in fog and cloud droplets of liquid clouds are not size-dependent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. K. Spiegel

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we present the first observations of stable water isotopologue ratios in cloud droplets of different sizes collected simultaneously. We address the question whether the isotope ratio of droplets in a liquid cloud varies as a function of droplet size. Samples were collected from a ground intercepted cloud (= fog during the Hill Cap Cloud Thuringia 2010 campaign (HCCT-2010 using a three-stage Caltech Active Strand Cloud water Collector (CASCC. An instrument test revealed that no artificial isotopic fractionation occurs during sample collection with the CASCC. Furthermore, we could experimentally confirm the hypothesis that the δ values of cloud droplets of the relevant droplet sizes (μm-range were not significantly different and thus can be assumed to be in isotopic equilibrium immediately with the surrounding water vapor. However, during the dissolution period of the cloud, when the supersaturation inside the cloud decreased and the cloud began to clear, differences in isotope ratios of the different droplet sizes tended to be larger. This is likely to result from the cloud's heterogeneity, implying that larger and smaller cloud droplets have been collected at different moments in time, delivering isotope ratios from different collection times.

  6. Active microorganisms thrive among extremely diverse communities in cloud water.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Amato

    Full Text Available Clouds are key components in Earth's functioning. In addition of acting as obstacles to light radiations and chemical reactors, they are possible atmospheric oases for airborne microorganisms, providing water, nutrients and paths to the ground. Microbial activity was previously detected in clouds, but the microbial community that is active in situ remains unknown. Here, microbial communities in cloud water collected at puy de Dôme Mountain's meteorological station (1465 m altitude, France were fixed upon sampling and examined by high-throughput sequencing from DNA and RNA extracts, so as to identify active species among community members. Communities consisted of ~103-104 bacteria and archaea mL-1 and ~102-103 eukaryote cells mL-1. They appeared extremely rich, with more than 28 000 distinct species detected in bacteria and 2 600 in eukaryotes. Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes largely dominated in bacteria, while eukaryotes were essentially distributed among Fungi, Stramenopiles and Alveolata. Within these complex communities, the active members of cloud microbiota were identified as Alpha- (Sphingomonadales, Rhodospirillales and Rhizobiales, Beta- (Burkholderiales and Gamma-Proteobacteria (Pseudomonadales. These groups of bacteria usually classified as epiphytic are probably the best candidates for interfering with abiotic chemical processes in clouds, and the most prone to successful aerial dispersion.

  7. Biological Ice Nucleation Activity in Cloud Water (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delort, A.

    2013-12-01

    Ice nucleation active (INA) biological particles, in particular microorganisms, were studied in cloud water. Twelve cloud samples were collected over a period of 16 months from the puy de Dôme summit (1465 m, France) using sterile cloud droplet impactors. The samples were characterized through biological (cultures, cell counts) and physico-chemical measurements (pH, ion concentrations, carbon content...), and biological ice nuclei were investigated by droplet-freezing assays from -3°C to -13°C. The concentration of total INA particles within this temperature range typically varied from ~1 to ~100 per mL of cloud water; the concentrations of biological IN were several orders of magnitude higher than the values previously reported for precipitations. At -12°C, at least 76% of the IN were biological in origin, i.e. they were inactivated by heating at 95°C, and at temperatures above -8°C only biological material could induce ice. By culture, 44 Pseudomonas-like strains of bacteria were isolated from cloud water samples; 16% of them were found INA at the temperature of -8°C and they were identified as Pseudomonas syringae, Xanthomonas sp. and Pseudoxanthomonas sp.. Two strains induced freezing at as warm as -2°C, positioning them among the most active ice nucleators described so far. We estimated that, in average, 0.18% and more than 1%.of the bacterial cells present in clouds (~104 mL-1) are INA at the temperatures of -8°C and -12°C, respectively.

  8. Liquid Water Cloud Properties During the Polarimeter Definition Experiment (PODEX)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandrov, Mikhail D.; Cairns, Brian; Wasilewski, Andrzei P.; Ackerman, Andrew S.; McGill, Matthew J.; Yorks, John E.; Hlavka, Dennis L.; Platnick, Steven; Arnold, George; Van Diedenhoven, Bastiaan; hide

    2015-01-01

    We present retrievals of water cloud properties from the measurements made by the Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP) during the Polarimeter Definition Experiment (PODEX) held between January 14 and February 6, 2013. The RSP was onboard the high-altitude NASA ER-2 aircraft based at NASA Dryden Aircraft Operation Facility in Palmdale, California. The retrieved cloud characteristics include cloud optical thickness, effective radius and variance of cloud droplet size distribution derived using a parameter-fitting technique, as well as the complete droplet size distribution function obtained by means of Rainbow Fourier Transform. Multi-modal size distributions are decomposed into several modes and the respective effective radii and variances are computed. The methodology used to produce the retrieval dataset is illustrated on the examples of a marine stratocumulus deck off California coast and stratus/fog over California's Central Valley. In the latter case the observed bimodal droplet size distributions were attributed to two-layer cloud structure. All retrieval data are available online from NASA GISS website.

  9. Hydrodynamics and Water Quality forecasting over a Cloud Computing environment: INDIGO-DataCloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar Gómez, Fernando; de Lucas, Jesús Marco; García, Daniel; Monteoliva, Agustín

    2017-04-01

    Algae Bloom due to eutrophication is an extended problem for water reservoirs and lakes that impacts directly in water quality. It can create a dead zone that lacks enough oxygen to support life and it can also be human harmful, so it must be controlled in water masses for supplying, bathing or other uses. Hydrodynamic and Water Quality modelling can contribute to forecast the status of the water system in order to alert authorities before an algae bloom event occurs. It can be used to predict scenarios and find solutions to reduce the harmful impact of the blooms. High resolution models need to process a big amount of data using a robust enough computing infrastructure. INDIGO-DataCloud (https://www.indigo-datacloud.eu/) is an European Commission funded project that aims at developing a data and computing platform targeting scientific communities, deployable on multiple hardware and provisioned over hybrid (private or public) e-infrastructures. The project addresses the development of solutions for different Case Studies using different Cloud-based alternatives. In the first INDIGO software release, a set of components are ready to manage the deployment of services to perform N number of Delft3D simulations (for calibrating or scenario definition) over a Cloud Computing environment, using the Docker technology: TOSCA requirement description, Docker repository, Orchestrator, AAI (Authorization, Authentication) and OneData (Distributed Storage System). Moreover, the Future Gateway portal based on Liferay, provides an user-friendly interface where the user can configure the simulations. Due to the data approach of INDIGO, the developed solutions can contribute to manage the full data life cycle of a project, thanks to different tools to manage datasets or even metadata. Furthermore, the cloud environment contributes to provide a dynamic, scalable and easy-to-use framework for non-IT experts users. This framework is potentially capable to automatize the processing of

  10. Electrically controlled cloud of bulk nanobubbles in water solutions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander V Postnikov

    Full Text Available Using different experimental techniques we visualize a cloud of gas in water that is produced electrochemically by the alternating polarity process. Liquid enriched with gas does not contain bubbles strongly scattering visible light but its refractive index changes significantly near the electrodes. The change of the refractive index is a collective effect of bulk nanobubbles with a diameter smaller than 200 nm. Any alternative explanation fails to explain the magnitude of the effect. Spatial structure of the cloud is investigated with the optical lever method. Its dynamics is visualised observing optical distortion of the electrode images or using differential interference contrast method. The cloud covers concentric electrodes, in a steady state it is roughly hemispherical with a size two times larger than the size of the electrode structure. When the electrical pulses are switched off the cloud disappears in less than one second. The total concentration of gases can reach very high value estimated as 3.5 × 1020 cm-3 that corresponds to an effective supersaturation of 500 and 150 for hydrogen and oxygen, respectively.

  11. Looking for the rainbow on exoplanets covered by liquid and icy water clouds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karalidi, T.; Stam, D.M.; Hovenier, J.W.

    2012-01-01

    Aims. Looking for the primary rainbow in starlight that is reflected by exoplanets appears to be a promising method to search for liquid water clouds in exoplanetary atmospheres. Ice water clouds, that consist of water crystals instead of water droplets, could potentially mask the rainbow feature in

  12. Observed and simulated temperature dependence of the liquid water path of low clouds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Del Genio, A.D.; Wolf, A.B. [NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies, New York, NY (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Data being acquired at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site can be used to examine the factors determining the temperature dependence of cloud optical thickness. We focus on cloud liquid water and physical thickness variations which can be derived from existing ARM measurements.

  13. Retrieval of liquid water cloud properties from ground-based remote sensing observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knist, C.L.

    2014-01-01

    Accurate ground-based remotely sensed microphysical and optical properties of liquid water clouds are essential references to validate satellite-observed cloud properties and to improve cloud parameterizations in weather and climate models. This requires the evaluation of algorithms for retrieval of

  14. Indications of Water Clouds in the Coldest Known Brown Dwarf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faherty, Jacqueline K.; Tinney, C. G.; Skemer, Andrew; Monson, Andrew J.

    2014-09-01

    We present a deep near-infrared image of the newly discovered brown dwarf WISE J085510.83-071442.5 (W0855) using the FourStar imager at Las Campanas Observatory. Our detection of J3 = 24.8^{+0.53}_{-0.35} (J MKO = 25.0^{+0.53}_{-0.35}) at 2.6σ—or equivalently an upper limit of J3 > 23.8 (J MKO > 24.0) at 5σ makes W0855 the reddest brown dwarf ever categorized (J MKO - W2 = 10.984^{+0.53}_{-0.35} at 2.6σ—or equivalently an upper limit of J MKO - W2 > 9.984 at 5σ) and refines its position on color-magnitude diagrams. Comparing the new photometry with chemical equilibrium model atmosphere predictions, we demonstrate that W0855 is 2.7σ from models using a cloudless atmosphere and well reproduced by partly cloudy models (50%) containing sulfide and water ice clouds. Non-equilibrium chemistry or non-solar metallicity may change predictions, however using currently available model approaches, this is the first candidate outside our own solar system to have direct evidence for water clouds. This Letter includes data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan Telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile.

  15. The effect of cloud liquid water on temperature retrievals from microwave measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernet, Leonie; Navas-Guzmán, Francisco; Kämpfer, Niklaus

    2017-04-01

    Ground-based microwave radiometry provides atmospheric profiles for both clear sky and cloudy weather conditions. The effect of clouds on measurements from microwave radiometers is low compared to other remote sensing techniques but cannot be neglected at certain frequencies. In this study, clouds have been characterized and included in microwave retrievals in order to investigate their effect on tropospheric temperature profiles measured by the TEMPERA microwave radiometer. TEMPERA retrieves atmospheric temperature profiles by measuring emitted radiation of molecular oxygen at around 60 GHz. Because cloud liquid water also absorbs and emits radiation at the used frequency range, it is important to analyse the influence of liquid water on the microwave retrieval. In order to characterize the clouds, data from various instruments have been used, all located at the aerological station of MeteoSwiss at Payerne (Switzerland). Cloud base altitudes were detected using ceilometer measurements while the integrated liquid water (ILW) was measured by a HATPRO radiometer. Additional cloud information was obtained from a co-located sky camera and using an automatic partial cloud amount detection algorithm (APCADA). All this information has been used to characterize the clouds by means of a Liquid Water Content (LWC) profile. Different LWC profiles (shapes and values) have been tested to find the best cloud characterization depending on cloud type, altitude and ILW. Temperature profiles have been obtained incorporating this liquid water profile in the inversion algorithm and they have been evaluated against retrievals without considering clouds, in order to assess the liquid water effect on microwave measurements. The results have been compared with the temperature profiles from radiosondes which are regularly launched twice a day at the aerological station. Two years of data have been analyzed and almost 300 non-precipitating cloud cases were studied. The statistical analysis

  16. Estimates of cloud water deposition at mountain acid deposition program sites in the Appalachian Mountains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ralph E. Baumgardner, Jr.; Selma S. Isil; Thomas F. Lavery; Christopher M. Rogers; Volker A. Mohnen [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (USA)

    2003-03-01

    Cloud water deposition was estimated at three high-elevation sites in the Appalachian Mountains of the eastern United States (Whiteface Mountain, NY; Whitetop Mountain, VA; and Clingman s Dome, TN) from 1994 through 1999 as part of the Mountain Acid Deposition Program (MADPro). This paper provides a summary of cloud water chemistry, cloud liquid water content, cloud frequency, estimates of cloud water deposition of sulfur and nitrogen species, and estimates of total deposition of sulfur and nitrogen at these sites. Other cloud studies in the Appalachians and their comparison to MADPro are also summarized. Whiteface Mountain exhibited the lowest mean and median concentrations of sulfur and nitrogen ions in cloud water, while Clingman s Dome exhibited the highest mean and median concentrations. This geographic gradient is partly an effect of the different meteorological conditions experienced at northern versus southern sites in addition to the difference in pollution content of air masses reaching the sites. All sites measured seasonal cloud water deposition rates of SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} greater than 50 kg/ha and NO{sub 3}{sup -} rates of greater than 25 kg/ha. These high-elevation sites experienced additional deposition loading of SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} and NO{sub 3}{sup -} on the order of 6 20 times greater compared with lower elevation Clean Air Status and Trends Network (CASTNet) sites. Approximately 80 90% of this extra loading is from cloud deposition. 56 refs., 3 figs., 8 tabs., 1 app.

  17. The effect of cloud liquid water on tropospheric temperature retrievals from microwave measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernet, Leonie; Navas-Guzmán, Francisco; Kämpfer, Niklaus

    2017-11-01

    Microwave radiometry is a suitable technique to measure atmospheric temperature profiles with high temporal resolution during clear sky and cloudy conditions. In this study, we included cloud models in the inversion algorithm of the microwave radiometer TEMPERA (TEMPErature RAdiometer) to determine the effect of cloud liquid water on the temperature retrievals. The cloud models were built based on measurements of cloud base altitude and integrated liquid water (ILW), all performed at the aerological station (MeteoSwiss) in Payerne (Switzerland). Cloud base altitudes were detected using ceilometer measurements while the ILW was measured by a HATPRO (Humidity And Temperature PROfiler) radiometer. To assess the quality of the TEMPERA retrieval when clouds were considered, the resulting temperature profiles were compared to 2 years of radiosonde measurements. The TEMPERA instrument measures radiation at 12 channels in the frequency range from 51 to 57 GHz, corresponding to the left wing of the oxygen emission line complex. When the full spectral information with all the 12 frequency channels was used, we found a marked improvement in the temperature retrievals after including a cloud model. The chosen cloud model influenced the resulting temperature profile, especially for high clouds and clouds with a large amount of liquid water. Using all 12 channels, however, presented large deviations between different cases, suggesting that additional uncertainties exist in the lower, more transparent channels. Using less spectral information with the higher, more opaque channels only also improved the temperature profiles when clouds where included, but the influence of the chosen cloud model was less important. We conclude that tropospheric temperature profiles can be optimized by considering clouds in the microwave retrieval, and that the choice of the cloud model has a direct impact on the resulting temperature profile.

  18. Discrimination of water, ice and aerosols by light polarisation in the CLOUD experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichman, L.; Fuchs, C.; Järvinen, E.; Ignatius, K.; Höppel, N. F.; Dias, A.; Heinritzi, M.; Simon, M.; Tröstl, J.; Wagner, A. C.; Wagner, R.; Williamson, C.; Yan, C.; Bianchi, F.; Connolly, P. J.; Dorsey, J. R.; Duplissy, J.; Ehrhart, S.; Frege, C.; Gordon, H.; Hoyle, C. R.; Kristensen, T. B.; Steiner, G.; Donahue, N. M.; Flagan, R.; Gallagher, M. W.; Kirkby, J.; Möhler, O.; Saathoff, H.; Schnaiter, M.; Stratmann, F.; Tomé, A.

    2015-11-01

    Cloud microphysical processes involving the ice phase in tropospheric clouds are among the major uncertainties in cloud formation, weather and General Circulation Models (GCMs). The simultaneous detection of aerosol particles, liquid droplets, and ice crystals, especially in the small cloud-particle size range below 50 μm, remains challenging in mixed phase, often unstable ice-water phase environments. The Cloud Aerosol Spectrometer with Polarisation (CASPOL) is an airborne instrument that has the ability to detect such small cloud particles and measure their effects on the backscatter polarisation state. Here we operate the versatile Cosmics-Leaving-OUtdoor-Droplets (CLOUD) chamber facility at the European Organisation for Nuclear Research (CERN) to produce controlled mixed phase and other clouds by adiabatic expansions in an ultraclean environment, and use the CASPOL to discriminate between different aerosols, water and ice particles. In this paper, optical property measurements of mixed phase clouds and viscous Secondary Organic Aerosol (SOA) are presented. We report observations of significant liquid - viscous SOA particle polarisation transitions under dry conditions using CASPOL. Cluster analysis techniques were subsequently used to classify different types of particles according to their polarisation ratios during phase transition. A classification map is presented for water droplets, organic aerosol (e.g., SOA and oxalic acid), crystalline substances such as ammonium sulphate, and volcanic ash. Finally, we discuss the benefits and limitations of this classification approach for atmospherically relevant concentration and mixtures with respect to the CLOUD 8-9 campaigns and its potential contribution to Tropical Troposphere Layer (TTL) analysis.

  19. Thermodynamic constraint on the cloud liquid water feedback in climate models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betts, Alan K.; HARSHVARDHAN

    1987-01-01

    The cloud liquid water feedback in climate models consists of the increase (decrease) in optical depth of clouds resulting from higher (lower) liquid water contents that might accompany tropospheric warming (cooling). The change in cloud liquid water with temperature is shown to depend on the rate of change of the slope of the moist adiabat with respect to temperature, and it is a strong function of temperature. The value of this rate of change in the tropics is about half that in mid and high latitudes and is much less than the value obtained by assuming that liquid water scales with the saturation mixing ratio.

  20. Development of EarthCARE/MSI ice and water cloud properties products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, S.; Nagao, T. M.; Ishida, H.; Letu, H.; Hashimoto, M.; Nakajima, T. Y.

    2015-12-01

    Clouds and aerosols are the major uncertainty in the understanding of the Earth's climate system. An improvement of understanding and better modeling of the relationship of clouds, aerosols and radiation are therefore prominent part in climate research and weather prediction. It is important to obtain the global data of clouds and aerosols occurrence, structure and physical properties that are derived from measurements of solar and thermal radiation. EarthCARE (Earth Clouds, Aerosols and Radiation Explorer) is one of the future earth observation mission of ESA and JAXA. The satellite will carry four instruments for observation of clouds and aerosols; Atmospheric Lidar (ATLID), Cloud Profiling Rader (CPR), Multi-Spectral Imager (MSI), and Broad-Band Radiometer (BBR). This mission aims at understanding of the role that clouds and aerosols play in reflecting incident solar radiation back into space and trapping infrared radiation emitted from Earth's surface. These observations are needed to improve the precision of climate variability prediction. MSI provides across-track information on cloud with channels in the visible, near infrared, shortwave and thermal infrared. Water cloud optical properties are derived in using EarthCARE/MSI standard product based on CLAUDIA [Ishida and Nakajima, 2009] and CAPCOM [Nakajima and Nakajima, 1995; Kawamoto et al., 2001]. Research product based on MWP method [M. Hashimoto, 2015. PhD Thesis] is advanced to obtain the ice cloud optical properties. In this presentation, development of the products and retrieved cloud properties will be introduced.

  1. Aqueous Processing of Atmospheric Organic Particles in Cloud Water Collected via Aircraft Sampling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boone, Eric J.; Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Julia; Wirth, Christopher; Shepson, Paul B.; Stirm, Brian H.; Pratt, Kerri A.

    2015-07-21

    Cloud water and below-cloud atmospheric particle samples were collected onboard a research aircraft during the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) over a forested region of Alabama in June 2013. The organic molecular composition of the samples was studied to gain insights into the aqueous-phase processing of organic compounds within cloud droplets. High resolution mass spectrometry with nanospray desorption electrospray ionization and direct infusion electrospray ionization were utilized to compare the organic composition of the particle and cloud water samples, respectively. Isoprene and monoterpene-derived organosulfates and oligomers were identified in both the particles and cloud water, showing the significant influence of biogenic volatile organic compound oxidation above the forested region. While the average O:C ratios of the organic compounds were similar between the atmospheric particle and cloud water samples, the chemical composition of these samples was quite different. Specifically, hydrolysis of organosulfates and formation of nitrogen-containing compounds were observed for the cloud water when compared to the atmospheric particle samples, demonstrating that cloud processing changes the composition of organic aerosol.

  2. Dynamics of Particle Clouds in Ambient Currents with Application to Open-Water Sediment Disposal

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    Dynamics of Particle Clouds in Ambient Currents with Application to Open-Water Sediment Disposal by Robert James Gensheimer III B.S. Ocean...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Dynamics Of Particle Clouds In Ambient Currents With Application To Open-Water Sediment Disposal 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER... Ambient Currents with Application to Open-Water Sediment Disposal by Robert James Gensheimer III Submitted to the Department of Civil and

  3. Flux and polarisation spectra of water clouds on exoplanets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karalidi, T.; Stam, D.M.; Hovenier, J.W.

    2011-01-01

    Context. A crucial factor for a planet’s habitability is its climate. Clouds play an important role in planetary climates. Detecting and characterising clouds on an exoplanet is therefore crucial when addressing this planet’s habitability. Aims. We present calculated flux and polarisation spectra of

  4. Cloud Liquid Water, Mean Droplet Radius and Number Density Measurements Using a Raman Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteman, David N.; Melfi, S. Harvey

    1999-01-01

    A new technique for measuring cloud liquid water, mean droplet radius and droplet number density is outlined. The technique is based on simultaneously measuring Raman and Mie scattering from cloud liquid droplets using a Raman lidar. Laboratory experiments on liquid micro-spheres have shown that the intensity of Raman scattering is proportional to the amount of liquid present in the spheres. This fact is used as a constraint on calculated Mie intensity assuming a gamma function particle size distribution. The resulting retrieval technique is shown to give stable solutions with no false minima. It is tested using Raman lidar data where the liquid water signal was seen as an enhancement to the water vapor signal. The general relationship of retrieved average radius and number density is consistent with traditional cloud physics models. Sensitivity to the assumed maximum cloud liquid water amount and the water vapor mixing ratio calibration are tested. Improvements to the technique are suggested.

  5. Modeling of cloud liquid water structure and the associated radiation field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiscombe, W. [Goddard Space Flight Center, NASA, Greenbelt, MD (United States)

    1995-09-01

    A 0.5{degrees}C global warming should result from every 1% decrease in global albedo. It is therefore necessary to accurately quantify the cloud radiation interaction. Most radiation calculations are one-dimensional and attempt to deal with horizontal variability using a horizontally-averaged optical depth. This study presents detailed scale-by-scale statistical analysis of the cloud liquid water content (LWC) field. The aim is to use this information to provide radiation calculations with more adequate information about inhomogeneity in cloud fields. The radiation community needs to carefully specify the minimum requirements which GCMs must include in order to treat cloud-radiation interaction correctly. This may involve GCMs predicting not only mean cloud quantities but also cloud variability. 3 figs.

  6. Short-range precipitation forecasts using assimilation of simulated satellite water vapor profiles and column cloud liquid water amounts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaohua; Diak, George R.; Hayden, Cristopher M.; Young, John A.

    1995-01-01

    These observing system simulation experiments investigate the assimilation of satellite-observed water vapor and cloud liquid water data in the initialization of a limited-area primitive equations model with the goal of improving short-range precipitation forecasts. The assimilation procedure presented includes two aspects: specification of an initial cloud liquid water vertical distribution and diabatic initialization. The satellite data is simulated for the next generation of polar-orbiting satellite instruments, the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU) and the High-Resolution Infrared Sounder (HIRS), which are scheduled to be launched on the NOAA-K satellite in the mid-1990s. Based on cloud-top height and total column cloud liquid water amounts simulated for satellite data a diagnostic method is used to specify an initial cloud water vertical distribution and to modify the initial moisture distribution in cloudy areas. Using a diabatic initialization procedure, the associated latent heating profiles are directly assimilated into the numerical model. The initial heating is estimated by time averaging the latent heat release from convective and large-scale condensation during the early forecast stage after insertion of satellite-observed temperature, water vapor, and cloud water formation. The assimilation of satellite-observed moisture and cloud water, together withy three-mode diabatic initialization, significantly alleviates the model precipitation spinup problem, especially in the first 3 h of the forecast. Experimental forecasts indicate that the impact of satellite-observed temperature and water vapor profiles and cloud water alone in the initialization procedure shortens the spinup time for precipitation rates by 1-2 h and for regeneration of the areal coverage by 3 h. The diabatic initialization further reduces the precipitation spinup time (compared to adiabatic initialization) by 1 h.

  7. Water ice clouds on Mars: Exploring processes through modeling and laboratory work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago-Materese, Delia Liza

    Water ice clouds on Mars are an important component of the hydrologic cycle as well as the overall climate system of the planet. The goal of this research is to better understand water ice cloud formation and behavior on Mars. We use modeling and laboratory experiments to explore different processes related to water ice cloud formation and evolution. The first goal of this work is to examine how well the Martian water cycle is simulated by the NASA Ames Mars General Circulation Model. The simulation predicts atmospheric water vapor amounts approximately half of those observed, globally. We identify water ice clouds as being a major contributor to this discrepancy. The model closely reproduces the convective aphelion cloud belt at the equator, but deviates substantially from observations over the North Polar Cap region. Modifying the nucleation scheme within the cloud microphysical model brings model results closer to observations and affects the surface radiative balance, which affects the annual cycle of sublimation and deposition of water ice at the residual North Polar Cap. The most realistic global water vapor and cloud patterns come from limiting the nucleation rate of particles at the poles. Our simulations show that the North Polar Cap region exhibits atmospheric dynamics where stratiform clouds form. We hypothesize that the modified nucleation scheme compensates for biases in the radiative properties of the stratiform clouds expected over the North Polar Cap. More broadly, this study illustrates the strong sensitivity of the Martian global water cycle to clouds over the North Polar Cap region. The second goal of this work is to assess the ability of various salts to serve as water ice cloud condensation nuclei under Martian conditions. We use a vacuum chamber to simulate the cold, lower pressure atmospheric conditions on Mars and find the critical saturation ratios at which the substrates nucleate water ice. We find no significant difference between sodium

  8. Chemical Speciation of Water Soluble Ions and Metals of Cloud and Rain Water During the Puerto Rico African Dust and Clouds Study (PRADACS) Campaigns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, E.; Valle Diaz, C. J.; Lee, T.; Collett, J. L.; Fitzgerald, E.; Cuadra-Rodriguez, L. A.; Prather, K. A.; Sánchez, M.; McDowell, W. H.; Mayol-Bracero, O. L.

    2013-05-01

    The underlying physico-chemical processes of dust particles interactions are poorly understood; even less understood is how aging impacts cloud properties and climate as the particles travel from Africa to the Caribbean region. Caribbean landmasses have tropical montane cloud forests (TMCFs) that are tightly coupled to the atmospheric hydrologic cycle. TMCFs are ecosystems to study the effects African Dust (AD) on cloud formation and precipitation as these are very sensitive ecosystems that respond to small changes in climate. As part of the Puerto Rico African Dust and Clouds Study (PRADACS), chemical analyses were performed on cloud and rain water samples collected at Pico del Este (PE) station in Luquillo, PR (1051 masl) during campaigns held from 2010 to 2012. At PE, two cloud collectors (i.e., single stage (Aluminum version), a 2-stage (Teflon version) Caltech Active Strand Cloudwater Collector (CASCC)), a rainwater collector, and anAerosol Time-Of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (ATOFMS) were operated. Chemical analyses performed on collected samples include pH, conductivity, ion chromatography (IC), and inductive coupled plasma (ICP). Results from these campaigns showed that on days that had air masses with the influence of AD, cloud water samples had higher conductivity and pH values on average (up to 5.7 and 180μS/cm, respectively) than those with air masses without AD influence. An increase in the concentrations of water-soluble ions like non-sea salt calcium and magnesium, and metals like magnesium, calcium and aluminum was observed and the appearance of iron was seen on ICP analyses. The ATOFMS, showed an increase on the amount of particles during AD influence with composition of aluminum, silicates, potassium, iron and titanium aerosols. The increase on the aforementioned species was constant in the three years of sampling, which give us confidence in the identification of the chemical species that are present during the influence of AD.

  9. New Mexico cloud super cooled liquid water survey final report 2009.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beavis, Nick; Roskovensky, John K.; Ivey, Mark D.

    2010-02-01

    Los Alamos and Sandia National Laboratories are partners in an effort to survey the super-cooled liquid water in clouds over the state of New Mexico in a project sponsored by the New Mexico Small Business Assistance Program. This report summarizes the scientific work performed at Sandia National Laboratories during the 2009. In this second year of the project a practical methodology for estimating cloud super-cooled liquid water was created. This was accomplished through the analysis of certain MODIS sensor satellite derived cloud products and vetted parameterizations techniques. A software code was developed to analyze multiple cases automatically. The eighty-one storm events identified in the previous year effort from 2006-2007 were again the focus. Six derived MODIS products were obtained first through careful MODIS image evaluation. Both cloud and clear-sky properties from this dataset were determined over New Mexico. Sensitivity studies were performed that identified the parameters which most influenced the estimation of cloud super-cooled liquid water. Limited validation was undertaken to ensure the soundness of the cloud super-cooled estimates. Finally, a path forward was formulized to insure the successful completion of the initial scientific goals which include analyzing different of annual datasets, validation of the developed algorithm, and the creation of a user-friendly and interactive tool for estimating cloud super-cooled liquid water.

  10. Characterization of cumulus cloud fields using trajectories in the center of gravity versus water mass phase space: 1. Cloud tracking and phase space description: CENTER OF GRAVITY VERSUS WATER MASS 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heiblum, Reuven H. [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot Israel; Altaratz, Orit [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot Israel; Koren, Ilan [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot Israel; Feingold, Graham [Chemical Sciences Division, NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory, Boulder Colorado USA; Kostinski, Alexander B. [Department of Physics, Michigan Technological University, Houghton Michigan USA; Khain, Alexander P. [The Institute of Earth Sciences, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem Israel; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail [Atmosphere Science and Global Change Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Fredj, Erick [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot Israel; Dagan, Guy [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot Israel; Pinto, Lital [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot Israel; Yaish, Ricki [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot Israel; Chen, Qian [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot Israel

    2016-06-07

    We study the evolution of warm convective cloud fields using large eddy simulations of continental and trade cumulus. Individual clouds are tracked a posteriori from formation to dissipation using a 3D cloud tracking algorithm and results are presented in the phase- space of center of gravity altitude versus cloud liquid water mass (CvM space). The CvM space is shown to contain rich information on cloud field characteristics, cloud morphology, and common cloud development pathways, together facilitating a comprehensive understanding of the cloud field. In this part we show how the meteorological (thermodynamic) conditions that determine the cloud properties are projected on the CvM phase space and how changes in the initial conditions affect the clouds' trajectories in this space. This part sets the stage for a detailed microphysical analysis that will be shown in part II.

  11. Instrumental neutron activation analysis data for cloud-water particulate samples, Mount Bamboo, Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Neng-Huei; Sheu, Guey-Rong; Wetherbee, Gregory A.; Debey, Timothy M.

    2013-01-01

    Cloud water was sampled on Mount Bamboo in northern Taiwan during March 22-24, 2002. Cloud-water samples were filtered using 0.45-micron filters to remove particulate material from the water samples. Filtered particulates were analyzed by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) at the U.S. Geological Survey National Reactor Facility in Denver, Colorado, in February 2012. INAA elemental composition data for the particulate materials are presented. These data complement analyses of the aqueous portion of the cloud-water samples, which were performed earlier by the Department of Atmospheric Sciences, National Central University, Taiwan. The data are intended for evaluation of atmospheric transport processes and air-pollution sources in Southeast Asia.

  12. Canopy water balance of windward and leeward Hawaiian cloud forests on Haleakalā, Maui, Hawai'i

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giambelluca, Thomas W.; DeLay, John K.; Nullet, Michael A.; Scholl, Martha A.; Gingerich, Stephen B.

    2011-01-01

    The contribution of intercepted cloud water to precipitation at windward and leeward cloud forest sites on the slopes of Haleakalā, Maui was assessed using two approaches. Canopy water balance estimates based on meteorological monitoring were compared with interpretations of fog screen measurements collected over a 2-year period at each location. The annual incident rainfall was 973 mm at the leeward site (Auwahi) and 2550 mm at the windward site (Waikamoi). At the leeward, dry forest site, throughfall was less than rainfall (87%), and, at the windward, wet forest site, throughfall exceeded rainfall (122%). Cloud water interception estimated from canopy water balance was 166 mm year−1 at Auwahi and 1212 mm year−1 at Waikamoi. Annual fog screen measurements of cloud water flux, corrected for wind-blown rainfall, were 132 and 3017 mm for the dry and wet sites respectively. Event totals of cloud water flux based on fog screen measurements were poorly correlated with event cloud water interception totals derived from the canopy water balance. Hence, the use of fixed planar fog screens to estimate cloud water interception is not recommended. At the wet windward site, cloud water interception made up 32% of the total precipitation, adding to the already substantial amount of rainfall. At the leeward dry site, cloud water interception was 15% of the total precipitation. Vegetation at the dry site, where trees are more exposed and isolated, was more efficient at intercepting the available cloud water than at the rainy site, but events were less frequent, shorter in duration and lower in intensity. A large proportion of intercepted cloud water, 74% and 83%, respectively for the two sites, was estimated to become throughfall, thus adding significantly to soil water at both sites

  13. Organic Carbon in Cloud Water and Aerosols from a Tropical Marine Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gioda, A.; Mayol-Bracero, O. L.; Rodriguez, G. J.; Figueroa, G. S.; Morales-de Jesus, R. J.; Collett, J.; Decesari, S.; Facchini, M. C.; Finessi, E.

    2006-12-01

    Chemical characterization was performed on cloud water and aerosol samples collected as part of the Rain In Cumulus over the Ocean Experiment (RICO) experiment, in a new intensive field campaign that took place in Puerto Rico from July to August 2006. The main objective of this study is to seek a better understanding of the impact of tropical marine aerosol on clouds and climate, with particular interest in the organic fraction. Cloud water samples were collected at the East Peak (EP) mountain site (1051 m.a.s.l), using a single-stage Caltech Active Strand Cloudwater Collector. Aerosol samples were collected in our reference site, Cabezas de San Juan (CSJ), using stacked-filter units with Teflon and quartz filters. Meteorological data were collected at both sites. pH measurements were performed in cloud water samples immediately after collection and before analyses. The analyses performed on both cloud and aerosol samples were total organic carbon (TOC analyzer, Shimadzu 5500) and thermal/optical analyses (EC/OC Analyzer, Sunset Lab.). Preliminary results showed an average pH of 5.8 for the cloud water samples. Concentrations of total organic carbon (TOC) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in cloud water samples were 1.8 ppmC and 0.3 ppmC, respectively. Particulate matter was visible in the cloud water samples and the content of total carbon (TC) obtained after filtration was on average 1 ug per mL. Back trajectories calculated with the NOAA HYSPLIT (HYbrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory) transport and dispersion model showed that the origin of the air masses was predominantly from the northeast (Atlantic Ocean and the northwest African coast). A more complete set of results that will include ion chromatography and total nitrogen analyses for aerosol and cloud water samples, the comparisons between the two sampling sites, more information about the concentrations of the carbonaceous species of interest (i.e., elemental carbon, total carbon, TOC

  14. Online Monitoring and Controlling Water Plant System Based on IoT Cloud Computing and Arduino

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Najim Abdullah

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Water is basis of the existence of life on earth and its invaluable because it’s an essential requirement for all the human beings but, presently water preparation and processing systems are suffering from different problems such as real-time operations problems, loss of large amounts of water in the liquidation and distribution operations, less amount of water sources, i.e. The increase in water problems coincides with the increase in population numbers and residential areas such as (water distribution, consumption, Interrupted water sources problems as well as water quality. Therefore, to eliminate these problems and make more efficient water systems, effective and reliable there is necessity for accurate monitoring and proper controlling system. In this paper, we are focusing on the design of water system in real-time and on the continuous monitoring of water based on IoT cloud computing and Arduino microcontroller. Water system with proper control algorithm and continuous monitoring any place and any time makes a stable distribution so that, we can have a record of height of water in tanks and we can change the devices status in the plant. Internet of things is a network of physical connected objects equipped with software, electronics circuits, sensors, and network connection part which allow monitoring and controlling anywhere around the world. Through using cloud computing proved by free severs, the water system’s data continuously is uploaded to cloud allowing the real time monitoring operation by the use of sensors and microcontroller (Arduino as Minicomputer to control and monitor the system operation from cloud with efficient (client to server connection.

  15. Relating tropical ocean clouds to moist processes using water vapor isotope measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Lee

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We examine the co-variations of tropospheric water vapor, its isotopic composition and cloud types and relate these distributions to tropospheric mixing and distillation models using satellite observations from the Aura Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES over the summertime tropical ocean. Interpretation of these process distributions must take into account the sensitivity of the TES isotope and water vapor measurements to variations in cloud, water, and temperature amount. Consequently, comparisons are made between cloud-types based on the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISSCP classification; these are clear sky, non-precipitating (e.g., cumulus, boundary layer (e.g., stratocumulus, and precipitating clouds (e.g. regions of deep convection. In general, we find that the free tropospheric vapor over tropical oceans does not strictly follow a Rayleigh model in which air parcels become dry and isotopically depleted through condensation. Instead, mixing processes related to convection as well as subsidence, and re-evaporation of rainfall associated with organized deep convection all play significant roles in controlling the water vapor distribution. The relative role of these moisture processes are examined for different tropical oceanic regions.

  16. Water Ice Clouds and Dust in the Martian Atmosphere Observed by Mars Climate Sounder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Jennifer L.; Kass, David; Heavens, Nicholas; Kleinbohl, Armin

    2011-01-01

    The water ice clouds are primarily controlled by the temperature structure and form at the water condensation level. Clouds in all regions presented show day/night differences. Cloud altitude varies between night and day in the SPH and tropics: (1) NPH water ice opacity is greater at night than day at some seasons (2) The diurnal thermal tide controls the daily variability. (3) Strong day/night changes indicate that the amount of gas in the atmosphere varies significantly. See significant mixtures of dust and ice at the same altitude planet-wide (1) Points to a complex radiative and thermal balance between dust heating (in the visible) and ice heating or cooling in the infrared. Aerosol layering: (1) Early seasons reveal a zonally banded spatial distribution (2) Some localized longitudinal structure of aerosol layers (3) Later seasons show no consistent large scale organization

  17. Characterization of Cloud Water and Drop Residual Particle Properties in Northeastern Pacific Ocean Stratocumulus Clouds: Airborne Measurements during the E-PEACE 2012 Field Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorooshian, A.; Wang, Z.; Coggon, M.; Craven, J. S.; Metcalf, A. R.; Lin, J. J.; Nenes, A.; Jonsson, H.; Flagan, R. C.; Seinfeld, J.

    2012-12-01

    During the July-August 2012 Eastern Pacific Emitted Aerosol Cloud Experiment (E-PEACE), the Center for Interdisciplinary Remotely-Piloted Aircraft Studies (CIRPAS) Twin Otter carried out thirty flights off the California coast with a payload focused on detailed characterization of aerosol and cloud properties. A counter-flow virtual impactor (CVI) inlet was used in cloud to study the physical and chemical properties of drop residual particles in the climatically-important stratocumulus cloud deck over the northeastern Pacific Ocean. A total of 82 cloud water samples were also collected and examined with ion chromatography (17 anion species) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (> 50 elements). The pH of the cloud water samples ranged widely between 2.92 and 7.58. This work focuses on inter-relationships between the chemical signatures of cloud water and drop residual particles, in addition to the influence of numerous regional sources on these measurements. Of interest will be to look critically at the influence of biogenic oceanic sources, shipping traffic, and entrainment of free tropospheric aerosol.

  18. Water Ice Clouds in the Martian Atmosphere: A View from MGS TES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, A. S.; Tamppari, L. K.; Christensen, P. R.; Smith, M. D.; Bass, Deborah; Qu, Zheng; Pearl, J. C.

    2005-01-01

    We use the method of Tamppari et al. to map water ice clouds in the Martian atmosphere. This technique was originally developed to analyze the broadband Viking IRTM channels and we have now applied it to the TES data. To do this, the TES spectra are convolved to the IRTM bandshapes and spatial resolutions, enabling use of the same processing techniques as were used in Tamppari et al.. This retrieval technique relies on using the temperature difference recorded in the 20 micron and 11 micron IRTM bands (or IRTM convolved TES bands) to map cold water ice clouds above the warmer Martian surface. Careful removal of surface contributions to the observed radiance is therefore necessary, and we have used both older Viking-derived basemaps of the surface emissivity and albedo, and new MGS derived basemaps in order the explore any possible differences on cloud retrieval due to differences in surface contribution removal. These results will be presented in our poster. Our previous work has concentrated primarily on comparing MGS TES to Viking data; that work saw that large-scale cloud features, such as the aphelion cloud belt, are quite repeatable from year to year, though small scale behavior shows some variation. Comparison of Viking and MGS era cloud maps will be presented in our poster. In the current stage of our study, we have concentrated our efforts on close analysis of water ice cloud behavior in the northern summer of the three MGS mapping years on relatively small spatial scales, and present our results below. Additional information is included in the original extended abstract.

  19. Cloud Formation and Water Transport on Mars after Major Outflow Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago, D. L.; Colaprete, A.; Kreslavsky, M.; Kahre, M. A.; Asphaug, E.

    2012-01-01

    The triggering of a robust water cycle on Mars might have been caused by the gigantic flooding events evidenced by outflow channels. We use the Ames Mars General Circulation Model (MGCM) to test this hypothesis, studying how these presumably abrupt eruptions of water might have affected the climate of Mars in the past. We model where the water ultimately went as part of a transient atmospheric water cycle, to answer questions including: (1) Can sudden introductions of large amounts of water on the Martian surface lead to a new equilibrated water cycle? (2) What are the roles of water vapor and water ice clouds to sudden changes in the water cycle on Mars? (3) How are radiative feedbacks involved with this? (4) What is the ultimate fate of the outflow water? (5) Can we tie certain geological features to outflow water redistributed by the atmosphere?

  20. Volcano and Ship Tracks Indicate Excessive Aerosol-Induced Cloud Water Increases in a Climate Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toll, Velle; Christensen, Matthew; Gassó, Santiago; Bellouin, Nicolas

    2017-12-01

    Aerosol-cloud interaction is the most uncertain mechanism of anthropogenic radiative forcing of Earth's climate, and aerosol-induced cloud water changes are particularly poorly constrained in climate models. By combining satellite retrievals of volcano and ship tracks in stratocumulus clouds, we compile a unique observational data set and confirm that liquid water path (LWP) responses to aerosols are bidirectional, and on average the increases in LWP are closely compensated by the decreases. Moreover, the meteorological parameters controlling the LWP responses are strikingly similar between the volcano and ship tracks. In stark contrast to observations, there are substantial unidirectional increases in LWP in the Hadley Centre climate model, because the model accounts only for the decreased precipitation efficiency and not for the enhanced entrainment drying. If the LWP increases in the model were compensated by the decreases as the observations suggest, its indirect aerosol radiative forcing in stratocumulus regions would decrease by 45%.

  1. Responses of Cloud Type Distributions to the Large-Scale Dynamical Circulation: Water Budget-Related Dynamical Phase Space and Dynamical Regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Sun; Del Genio, Anthony; Wang, Tao; Kahn, Brian; Fetzer, Eric J.; L'Ecuyer, Tristan S.

    2015-01-01

    Goals: Water budget-related dynamical phase space; Connect large-scale dynamical conditions to atmospheric water budget (including precipitation); Connect atmospheric water budget to cloud type distributions.

  2. Trace Metals in Cloud Water Sampled at the Puy De Dôme Station

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelica Bianco

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Concentrations of 33 metal elements were determined by ICP-MS (Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry analysis for 24 cloud water samples (corresponding to 10 cloud events collected at the puy de Dôme station. Clouds present contrasted chemical composition with mainly marine and continental characteristics; for some cloud events, a further anthropogenic source can be superimposed on the background level. In this context, measurements of trace metals may help to evaluate the impact of anthropogenic and natural sources on the cloud and to better discriminate the origin of the air masses. The metal concentrations in the samples are low (between 16.4 µg L−1 and 1.46 mg L−1. This could be explained by the remoteness of the puy de Dôme site from local sources. Trace metals are then used to confirm and refine a previous sample classification. A principal component analysis (PCA using the pH value and the concentrations of Cl−, NO3−, SO42−, Na+ and NH4+ is performed considering 24 cloud samples. This first analysis shows that 18 samples are of marine origin and 6 samples are classified as continental. The same statistical approach is used adding trace metal concentration. Zn and Mg elements are the most abundant trace metals for all clouds. A higher concentration of Cd is mainly associated to clouds from marine origins. Cu, As, Tl and Sb elements are rather found in the continental samples than in the marine ones. Mg, V, Mn and Rb elements mainly found in soil particles are also more concentrated in the samples from continental air mass. This new PCA including trace metal confirms the classification between marine and continental air masses but also indicates that one sample presenting low pH and high concentrations of SO42−, Fe, Pb and Cu could be rather attributed to a polluted event.

  3. Synoptic Traveling Weather Systems on Mars: Effects of Radiatively-Active Water Ice Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollingsworth, Jeffery L.; Kahre, Melinda A.; Haberle, Robert; Atsuki Urata, Richard

    2016-10-01

    Atmospheric aerosols on Mars are critical in determining the nature of its thermal structure, its large-scale circulation, and hence the overall climate of the planet. We conduct multi-annual simulations with the latest version of the NASA Ames Mars global climate model (GCM), gcm2.3+, that includes a modernized radiative-transfer package and complex water-ice cloud microphysics package which permit radiative effects and interactions of suspended atmospheric aerosols (e.g., water ice clouds, water vapor, dust, and mutual interactions) to influence the net diabatic heating. Results indicate that radiatively active water ice clouds profoundly affect the seasonal and annual mean climate. The mean thermal structure and balanced circulation patterns are strongly modified near the surface and aloft. Warming of the subtropical atmosphere at altitude and cooling of the high latitude atmosphere at low levels takes place, which increases the mean pole-to-equator temperature contrast (i.e., "baroclinicity"). With radiatively active water ice clouds (RAC) compared to radiatively inert water ice clouds (nonRAC), significant changes in the intensity of the mean state and forced stationary Rossby modes occur, both of which affect the vigor and intensity of traveling, synoptic period weather systems. Such weather systems not only act as key agents in the transport of heat and momentum beyond the extent of the Hadley circulation, but also the transport of trace species such as water vapor, water ice-clouds, dust and others. The northern hemisphere (NH) forced Rossby waves and resultant wave train are augmented in the RAC case: the modes are more intense and the wave train is shifted equatorward. Significant changes also occur within the subtropics and tropics. The Rossby wave train sets up, combined with the traveling synoptic-period weather systems (i.e., cyclones and anticyclones), the geographic extent of storm zones (or storm tracks) within the NH. A variety of circulation

  4. Synoptic Traveling Weather Systems on Mars: Effects of Radiatively-Active Water Ice Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollingsworth, Jeffery; Kahre, Melinda; Haberle, Robert; Urata, Richard

    2017-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosols on Mars are critical in determining the nature of its thermal structure, its large-scale circulation, and hence the overall climate of the planet. We conduct multi-annual simulations with the latest version of the NASA Ames Mars global climate model (GCM), gcm2.3+, that includes a modernized radiative-transfer package and complex water-ice cloud microphysics package which permit radiative effects and interactions of suspended atmospheric aerosols (e.g., water ice clouds, water vapor, dust, and mutual interactions) to influence the net diabatic heating. Results indicate that radiatively active water ice clouds profoundly affect the seasonal and annual mean climate. The mean thermal structure and balanced circulation patterns are strongly modified near the surface and aloft. Warming of the subtropical atmosphere at altitude and cooling of the high latitude atmosphere at low levels takes place, which increases the mean pole-to-equator temperature contrast (i.e., "baroclinicity"). With radiatively active water ice clouds (RAC) compared to radiatively inert water ice clouds (nonRAC), significant changes in the intensity of the mean state and forced stationary Rossby modes occur, both of which affect the vigor and intensity of traveling, synoptic period weather systems.Such weather systems not only act as key agents in the transport of heat and momentum beyond the extent of the Hadley circulation, but also the transport of trace species such as water vapor, water ice-clouds, dust and others. The northern hemisphere (NH) forced Rossby waves and resultant wave train are augmented in the RAC case: the modes are more intense and the wave train is shifted equatorward. Significant changes also occur within the subtropics and tropics. The Rossby wave train sets up, combined with the traveling synoptic period weather systems (i.e., cyclones and anticyclones), the geographic extent of storm zones (or storm tracks) within the NH. A variety of circulation

  5. A 10-Year Cloud Fraction Climatology of Liquid Water Clouds over Bern Observed by a Ground-Based Microwave Radiometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Cossu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Cloud fraction (CF is known as the dominant modulator of Earth’s radiative fluxes. Ground-based CF observations are useful to characterize the cloudiness of a specific site and are valuable for comparison with satellite observations and numerical models. We present for the first time CF statistics (relative to liquid clouds only for Bern, Switzerland, derived from the observations of a ground-based microwave radiometer. CF is derived with a new method involving the analysis of the integrated liquid water distribution measured by the radiometer. The 10-year analyzed period (2004–2013 allowed us to compute a CF climatology for Bern, showing a maximum CF of 60.9% in winter and a minimum CF of 42.0% in summer. The CF monthly anomalies are identified with respect to the climatological mean values, and they are confirmed through MeteoSwiss yearly climatological bulletins. The CF monthly mean variations are similar to the observations taken at another Swiss location, Payerne, suggesting a large-scale correlation between different sites on the Swiss Plateau. A CF diurnal cycle is also computed, and large intraseasonal variations are found. The overall mean CF diurnal cycle, however, shows a typical sinusoidal cycle, with higher values in the morning and lower values in the afternoon.

  6. Water balances of old-growth and regenerating montane cloud forests in central Veracruz, Mexico

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muñoz-Villers, L.E.; Holwerda, F.; Gomez, M.; Equihua, M.; Asbjornsen, H.; Bruijnzeel, L.A.; Marin-Castro, B.E.; Tobon, C.

    2012-01-01

    This paper compares the water budgets of two adjacent micro-catchments covered by mature (MAT) and 20-year-old secondary (SEC) lower montane cloud forests, respectively, in central Veracruz, Mexico over a 2-year period. Rainfall (P) and streamflow (Q) were measured continuously, whereas dry canopy

  7. The Coupled Mars Dust and Water Cycles: Understanding How Clouds Affect the Vertical Distribution and Meridional Transport of Dust and Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahre, M. A.

    2015-01-01

    The dust and water cycles are crucial to the current Martian climate, and they are coupled through cloud formation. Dust strongly impacts the thermal structure of the atmosphere and thus greatly affects atmospheric circulation, while clouds provide radiative forcing and control the hemispheric exchange of water through the modification of the vertical distributions of water and dust. Recent improvements in the quality and sophistication of both observations and climate models allow for a more comprehensive understanding of how the interaction between the dust and water cycles (through cloud formation) affects the dust and water cycles individually. We focus here on the effects of clouds on the vertical distribution of dust and water, and how those vertical distributions control the net meridional transport of water. For this study, we utilize observations of temperature, dust and water ice from the Mars Climate Sounder (MCS) on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) combined with the NASA ARC Mars Global Climate Model (MGCM). We demonstrate that the magnitude and nature of the net meridional transport of water between the northern and southern hemispheres during NH summer is sensitive to the vertical structure of the simulated aphelion cloud belt. We further examine how clouds influence the atmospheric thermal structure and thus the vertical structure of the cloud belt. Our goal is to identify and understand the importance of radiative/dynamic feedbacks due to the physical processes involved with cloud formation and evolution on the current climate of Mars.

  8. The Mars Dust and Water Cycles: Investigating the Influence of Clouds on the Vertical Distribution and Meridional Transport of Dust and Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahre, M. A.; Haberle, R. M.; Hollingsworth, J. L.; Brecht, A. S.; Urata, R.

    2015-01-01

    The dust and water cycles are critical to the current Martian climate, and they interact with each other through cloud formation. Dust modulates the thermal structure of the atmosphere and thus greatly influences atmospheric circulation. Clouds provide radiative forcing and control the net hemispheric transport of water through the alteration of the vertical distributions of water and dust. Recent advancements in the quality and sophistication of both climate models and observations enable an increased understanding of how the coupling between the dust and water cycles (through cloud formation) impacts the dust and water cycles. We focus here on the effects of clouds on the vertical distributions of dust and water and how those vertical distributions control the net meridional transport of water. We utilize observations of temperature, dust and water ice from the Mars Climate Sounder (MCS) on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) and the NASA ARC Mars Global Climate Model (MGCM) to show that the magnitude and nature of the hemispheric exchange of water during NH summer is sensitive to the vertical structure of the simulated aphelion cloud belt. Further, we investigate how clouds influence atmospheric temperatures and thus the vertical structure of the cloud belt. Our goal is to isolate and understand the importance of radiative/dynamic feedbacks due to the physical processes involved with cloud formation and evolution on the current climate of Mars.

  9. Water-soluble material on aerosols collected within volcanic eruption clouds ( Fuego, Pacaya, Santiaguito, Guatamala).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, D.B.; Zielinski, R.A.; Rose, W.I.; Huebert, B.J.

    1982-01-01

    In Feb. and March of 1978, filter samplers mounted on an aircraft were used to collect the aerosol fraction of the eruption clouds from three active Guatemalan volcanoes (Fuego, Pacaya, and Santiaguito). The elements dissolved in the aqueous extracts represent components of water-soluble material either formed directly in the eruption cloud or derived from interaction of ash particles and aerosol components of the plume. Calculations of enrichment factors, based upon concentration ratios, showed the elements most enriched in the extracts relative to bulk ash composition were Cd, Cu, V, F, Cl, Zn, and Pb.-from Authors

  10. Venus cloud structure and water vapor abundance from Mariner 10 observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, F. W.

    1976-01-01

    Observations of the Venus atmosphere with the infrared radiometer on Mariner 10 have been analyzed by Taylor (1975) in terms of the vertical distribution of opacity at wavelengths near 11 microns and 45 microns in the thermal infrared. In this paper, we discuss models of the Venus atmosphere which are consistent with the inferred opacity structure. Either a two-layer cloud structure, or a single cloud deck overlaid by a layer containing approximately 40 precipitable microns of water vapor, would have the required limb-darkening characteristics at the wavelengths of observation.

  11. Fungal spores as potential ice nuclei in fog/cloud water and snow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Heidi; Goncalves, Fabio L. T.; Schueller, Elisabeth; Puxbaum, Hans

    2010-05-01

    INTRODUCTION: In discussions about climate change and precipitation frequency biological ice nucleation has become an issue. While bacterial ice nucleation (IN) is already well characterized and even utilized in industrial processes such as the production of artificial snow or to improve freezing processes in food industry, less is known about the IN potential of fungal spores which are also ubiquitous in the atmosphere. A recent study performed at a mountain top in the Rocky Mountains suggests that fungal spores and/or pollen might play a role in increased IN abundance during periods of cloud cover (Bowers et al. 2009). In the present work concentrations of fungal spores in fog/cloud water and snow were determined. EXPERIMENTAL: Fog samples were taken with an active fog sampler in 2008 in a traffic dominated area and in a national park in São Paulo, Brazil. The number concentrations of fungal spores were determined by microscopic by direct enumeration by epifluorescence microscopy after staining with SYBR Gold nucleic acid gel stain (Bauer et al. 2008). RESULTS: In the fog water collected in the polluted area at a junction of two highly frequented highways around 22,000 fungal spores mL-1 were counted. Fog in the national park contained 35,000 spores mL-1. These results were compared with cloud water and snow samples from Mt. Rax, situated at the eastern rim of the Austrian Alps. Clouds contained on average 5,900 fungal spores mL-1 cloud water (1,300 - 11,000) or 2,200 spores m-3 (304 - 5,000). In freshly fallen snow spore concentrations were lower than in cloud water, around 1,000 fungal spores mL-1 were counted (Bauer et al. 2002). In both sets of samples representatives of the ice nucleating genus Fusarium could be observed. REFERENCES: Bauer, H., Kasper-Giebl, A., Löflund, M., Giebl, H., Hitzenberger, R., Zibuschka, F., Puxbaum, H. (2002). The contribution of bacteria and fungal spores to the organic carbon content of cloud water, precipitation and aerosols

  12. Satellite retrieval of the liquid water fraction in tropical clouds between −20 and −38 °C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. L. Mitchell

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This study describes a satellite remote sensing method for directly retrieving the liquid water fraction in mixed phase clouds, and appears unique in this respect. The method uses MODIS split-window channels for retrieving the liquid fraction from cold clouds where the liquid water fraction is less than 50% of the total condensate. This makes use of the observation that clouds only containing ice exhibit effective 12-to-11 μm absorption optical thickness ratios (βeff that are quasi-constant with retrieved cloud temperature T. This observation was made possible by using two CO2 channels to retrieve T and then using the 12 and 11 μm channels to retrieve emissivities and βeff. Thus for T < −40 °C, βeff is constant, but for T > −40 °C, βeff slowly increases due to the presence of liquid water, revealing mean liquid fractions of ~ 10% around −22 °C from tropical clouds identified as cirrus by the cloud mask. However, the uncertainties for these retrievals are large, and extensive in situ measurements are needed to refine and validate these retrievals. Such liquid levels are shown to reduce the cloud effective diameter De such that cloud optical thickness will increase by more than 50% for a given water path, relative to De corresponding to pure ice clouds. Such retrieval information is needed for validation of the cloud microphysics in climate models. Since low levels of liquid water can dominate cloud optical properties, tropical clouds between −25 and −20 °C may be susceptible to the first aerosol indirect effect.

  13. Cloud-enabled microscopy and droplet microfluidic platform for specific detection of Escherichia coli in water.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Golberg

    Full Text Available We report an all-in-one platform - ScanDrop - for the rapid and specific capture, detection, and identification of bacteria in drinking water. The ScanDrop platform integrates droplet microfluidics, a portable imaging system, and cloud-based control software and data storage. The cloud-based control software and data storage enables robotic image acquisition, remote image processing, and rapid data sharing. These features form a "cloud" network for water quality monitoring. We have demonstrated the capability of ScanDrop to perform water quality monitoring via the detection of an indicator coliform bacterium, Escherichia coli, in drinking water contaminated with feces. Magnetic beads conjugated with antibodies to E. coli antigen were used to selectively capture and isolate specific bacteria from water samples. The bead-captured bacteria were co-encapsulated in pico-liter droplets with fluorescently-labeled anti-E. coli antibodies, and imaged with an automated custom designed fluorescence microscope. The entire water quality diagnostic process required 8 hours from sample collection to online-accessible results compared with 2-4 days for other currently available standard detection methods.

  14. Investigation of diverse bacteria in cloud water at Mt. Tai, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Caihong; Wei, Min; Chen, Jianmin; Sui, Xiao; Zhu, Chao; Li, Jiarong; Zheng, Lulu; Sui, Guodong; Li, Weijun; Wang, Wenxing; Zhang, Qingzhu; Mellouki, Abdelwahid

    2017-02-15

    Bacteria are abundant in atmospheric water phase with the potential to influence atmospheric processes and human health, yet relatively little information is known about the bacterial characteristics at high altitudes. Here we investigated the bacterial community by high throughput sequencing in 24 cloud water samples collected from September 26 to October 31, at the summit of Mt. Tai (36°15' N, 117°06' E, 1534m a.s.l) in China. Diverse bacterial population were identified and the gram-negative bacteria contributed the majority of total bacteria including Proteobacteria (81.6%) and Bacteroidetes (3.9%), followed by gram-positive bacteria Firmicutes (7.1%) and Actinobacteria (2.3%). These gram-negative taxa mainly inhabited in leaf-surface and cold environments. Meanwhile bacteria involved in the cloud condensation nuclei and ice nuclei formation were observed such as Sphingomonas (6.7%), Pseudomonas (4.1%), and Bacillus (1.1%). In addition, Sphingmonas was more active than that in daytime and participated in the cloud chemistry process. Meanwhile O 3 and SO 2 critically contributed to the variation of bacterial community. It is the first report on the bacterial community structure of cloud water over Asian area. Our results can serve as an important reference for environmental scientists, and biologists. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Water ice cloud property retrievals at Mars with OMEGA:Spatial distribution and column mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Kevin S.; Madeleine, Jean-Baptiste; Szantai, Andre; Audouard, Joachim; Geminale, Anna; Altieri, Francesca; Bellucci, Giancarlo; Montabone, Luca; Wolff, Michael J.; Forget, Francois

    2017-04-01

    Spectral images of Mars recorded by OMEGA (Observatoire pour la Minéralogie, l'Eau, les Glaces et l'Activité) on Mars Express can be used to deduce the mean effective radius (r_eff) and optical depth (τ_i) of water ice particles in clouds. Using new data sets for a priori surface temperature, vertical profiles of atmospheric temperature, dust opacity, and multi-spectral surface albedo, we have analyzed over 40 OMEGA image cubes over the Tharsis, Arabia, and Syrtis Major quadrangles, and mapped the spatial distribution of r_eff, τ_i, and water ice column mass. We also explored the parameter space of r_eff and τ_i, which are inversely proportional, and the ice cloud index (ICI), which is the ratio of the reflectance at 3.4 and 3.52 μm, and indicates the thickness of water ice clouds. We found that the ICI, trivial to calculate for OMEGA image cubes, can be a proxy for column mass, which is very expensive to compute, requiring accurate retrievals of surface albedo, r_eff, and τ_i. Observing the spatial distribution, we find that within each cloud system, r_eff varies about a mean of 2.1 μm, that τi is closely related to r_eff, and that the values allowed for τ_i, given r_eff, are related to the ICI. We also observe areas where our retrieval detects very thin clouds made of very large particles (mean of 12.5 μm), which are still under investigation.

  16. Detection of supercooled liquid water-topped mixed-phase clouds >from shortwave-infrared satellite observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    NOH, Y. J.; Miller, S. D.; Heidinger, A. K.

    2015-12-01

    Many studies have demonstrated the utility of multispectral information from satellite passive radiometers for detecting and retrieving the properties of cloud globally, which conventionally utilizes shortwave- and thermal-infrared bands. However, the satellite-derived cloud information comes mainly from cloud top or represents a vertically integrated property. This can produce a large bias in determining cloud phase characteristics, in particular for mixed-phase clouds which are often observed to have supercooled liquid water at cloud top but a predominantly ice phase residing below. The current satellite retrieval algorithms may report these clouds simply as supercooled liquid without any further information regarding the presence of a sub-cloud-top ice phase. More accurate characterization of these clouds is very important for climate models and aviation applications. In this study, we present a physical basis and preliminary results for the algorithm development of supercooled liquid-topped mixed-phase cloud detection using satellite radiometer observations. The detection algorithm is based on differential absorption properties between liquid and ice particles in the shortwave-infrared bands. Solar reflectance data in narrow bands at 1.6 μm and 2.25 μm are used to optically probe below clouds for distinction between supercooled liquid-topped clouds with and without an underlying mixed phase component. Varying solar/sensor geometry and cloud optical properties are also considered. The spectral band combination utilized for the algorithm is currently available on Suomi NPP Visible/Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS), Himawari-8 Advanced Himawari Imager (AHI), and the future GOES-R Advance Baseline Imager (ABI). When tested on simulated cloud fields from WRF model and synthetic ABI data, favorable results were shown with reasonable threat scores (0.6-0.8) and false alarm rates (0.1-0.2). An ARM/NSA case study applied to VIIRS data also indicated promising

  17. Effect of the secondary organic aerosol coatings on black carbon water uptake, cloud condensation nuclei activity, and particle collapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ability of black carbon aerosols to absorb water and act as a cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) directly controls their lifetime in the atmosphere as well as their impact on cloud formation, thus impacting the earth’s climate. Black carbon emitted from most combustion pro...

  18. Understanding the drivers of marine liquid-water cloud occurrence and properties with global observations using neural networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Andersen

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The role of aerosols, clouds and their interactions with radiation remain among the largest unknowns in the climate system. Even though the processes involved are complex, aerosol–cloud interactions are often analyzed by means of bivariate relationships. In this study, 15 years (2001–2015 of monthly satellite-retrieved near-global aerosol products are combined with reanalysis data of various meteorological parameters to predict satellite-derived marine liquid-water cloud occurrence and properties by means of region-specific artificial neural networks. The statistical models used are shown to be capable of predicting clouds, especially in regions of high cloud variability. On this monthly scale, lower-tropospheric stability is shown to be the main determinant of cloud fraction and droplet size, especially in stratocumulus regions, while boundary layer height controls the liquid-water amount and thus the optical thickness of clouds. While aerosols show the expected impact on clouds, at this scale they are less relevant than some meteorological factors. Global patterns of the derived sensitivities point to regional characteristics of aerosol and cloud processes.

  19. The Seasonal Behavior of Water Ice Clouds in the Tharsis and Valles Marineris Regions of Mars: Mars Orbiter Camera Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, J. L.; Bonev, B. P.; James, P. B.; Shan, K. J.; Cantor, B. A.; Caplinger, M. A.

    2003-01-01

    The Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) was used to obtain global maps of the Martian surface. The maps used were acquired between March 15, 1999 (LS = 110 ) and July 31, 2001 (L(sub s) = 110), corresponding to approximately one and a quarter martian years. In this work we focused on water ice clouds associated with the surface features of Olympus Mons, Ascraeus Mons, Pavonis Mons, Arsia Mons, Alba Patera, and the Valles Marineris canyon system. Using these data, we have made three types of quantitative measurements to characterize the cloud activity: 1) cloud area and location, 2) cloud height, and 3) cloud optical depth. We have also searched for short period variations in the cloud areas.

  20. Detecting High Ice Water Content Cloud Regions Using Airborne and Satellite Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kheyrollah Pour, H.; Korolev, A.; Barker, H.; Wolde, M.; Heckman, I.; Duguay, C. R.

    2016-12-01

    Tropical mesoscale convective systems (MCS) have significant impacts on local and global hydrological cycles and radiation budgets. Moreover, high ice water content (HIWC) found inside MCS clouds at altitudes above 7 km have been identified as hazardous for aviation safety. The environment inside HIWC cloud regions may cause icing of aircraft engines resulting in uncontrolled engine power loss or damage. This phenomenon is known as ice crystal icing (ICI). International aviation regulatory agencies are now attempting to define techniques that enable prediction and detection of potential ICI environments. Such techniques range from on-board HIWC detection to nowcasting of ice crystal weather using satellite data and numerical weather prediction models. The most practical way to monitor continuously for areas of HIWC is by remote sensing with passive radiometers on geostationary satellites. Establishing correlations between HIWC cloud regions and radiances is, however, a challenging problem. This is because regions of HIWC can occur several kilometers below cloud top, while passive satellite radiometers response mainly to the upper kilometers of MCS clouds. The High Altitude Ice Crystals - High Ice Water Content (HAIC-HIWC) field campaigns in Cayenne, French Guiana collected a rich dataset from aboard the Canadian NRC Convair-580 that was equipped with a suite of in-situ microphysical instruments and Dopplerized W- and X-band radars with vertically- and horizontally-directed antenna. This paper aims to describe an algorithm that has been developed to establish relationships between satellite radiances and locations of HIWC regions identified from in-situ measurements of microphysical properties, Doppler velocities, and vertical and horizontal radar reflectivity.

  1. Impacts of cloud immersion on microclimate, photosynthesis and water relations of fraser fir in a temperate mountain cloud forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith Reinhardt; William K. Smith

    2010-01-01

    The red spruce-Fraser fir ecosystem (Picea rubens Sarg.-Abies fraseri [Pursh] Poir.) of the southern Appalachian mountains is a temperate zone cloud forest immersed in clouds for 30 to 40 percent of a typical summer day, and experiencing immersion on about 65 percent of all days annually. We compared the microclimate,...

  2. Size-resolved Chemical Composition of Cloud and Rain Water Collected during the Puerto Rico African Dust and Clouds Study (PRADACS) Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, E.; Valle Diaz, C. J.; Zurcher, F.; Lee, T.; Collett, J. L.; Fitzgerald, E.; Cuadra, L.; Prather, K. A.; Mayol-Bracero, O. L.

    2011-12-01

    The underlying physico-chemical processes of dust-aerosol interactions are poorly understood; even less understood is how aging impacts cloud properties and climate as the particles travel from Africa to the Caribbean region. Caribbean landmasses have tropical montane cloud forests (TMCFs) that are tightly coupled to the atmospheric hydrologic cycle. Small-scale shifts in temperature and precipitation could have serious ecological consequences. Therefore, this makes TMCFs an interesting ecosystem to see the effects African Dust (AD) might have on cloud formation and precipitation. As part of the Puerto Rico African Dust and Clouds Study (PRADACS) cloud and rain water samples for subsequent chemical analysis were collected at Pico del Este (PE) station in Luquillo, PR (1051 masl) during summer 2011. At PE, two cloud collectors (i.e., single stage (Aluminum version) and 2-stage (Teflon version) Caltech Active Strand Cloudwater Collector (CASCC)), and a rainwater collector were operated. Measurements such as the liquid water content (LWC), pH, conductivity., and composition of single particles using an aerosol time of flight mass spectrometer (ATOFMS) were performed. Preliminary results showed that days with the influence of African dust (AD), had LWC values that ranged from 300 to 500 mg/m3, pH values up to 5.7,, and conductivity up to 180 μS/cm. The ATOFMS showed titanium and iron ions, suggesting the presence of AD as well as, occasionally, sulfate and nitrate ions suggesting the influence of anthropogenic pollution. Results on the chemical composition and the physical properties of cloud, rainwater, and aerosol for the inorganic as well as the organic fraction and how these properties change for the different air masses observed will also be presented.

  3. Solar radiation absorption in the atmosphere due to water and ice clouds: Sensitivity experiments with plane-parallel clouds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gautier, C. [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States)

    1995-09-01

    One cloud radiation issue that has been troublesome for several decades is the absorption of solar radiation by clouds. Many hypotheses have been proposed to explain the discrepancies between observations and modeling results. A good review of these often-competing hypotheses has been provided by Stephens and Tsay. They characterize the available hypotheses as failing into three categories: (1) those linked to cloud microphysical and consequent optical properties; (2) those linked to the geometry and heterogeneity of clouds; and (3) those linked to atmospheric absorption.Current modeling practice is seriously inconsistent with new observational inferences concerning absorption of solar radiation in the atmosphere. The author and her colleagues contend that an emphasis on R may, therefore, not be the optimal way of addressing the cloud solar absorption issue. 4 refs., 1 fig.

  4. Characteristics of bacterial community in cloud water at Mt Tai: similarity and disparity under polluted and non-polluted cloud episodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Min; Xu, Caihong; Chen, Jianmin; Zhu, Chao; Li, Jiarong; Lv, Ganglin

    2017-04-01

    Bacteria are widely distributed in atmospheric aerosols and are indispensable components of clouds, playing an important role in the atmospheric hydrological cycle. However, limited information is available about the bacterial community structure and function, especially for the increasing air pollution in the North China Plain. Here, we present a comprehensive characterization of bacterial community composition, function, variation, and environmental influence for cloud water collected at Mt Tai from 24 July to 23 August 2014. Using Miseq 16S rRNA gene sequencing, the highly diverse bacterial community in cloud water and the predominant phyla of Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Cyanobacteria, and Firmicutes were investigated. Bacteria that survive at low temperature, radiation, and poor nutrient conditions were found in cloud water, suggesting adaption to an extreme environment. The bacterial gene functions predicted from the 16S rRNA gene using the Phylogenetic Investigation of Communities by Reconstruction of Unobserved States (PICRUSt) suggested that the pathways related to metabolism and disease infections were significantly correlated with the predominant genera. The abundant genera Acinetobacter, Stenotrophomonas, Pseudomonas, and Empedobacter originated from a wide range of habitats including cloud condensation nuclei and ice nuclei active species, opportunistic pathogens, and functional species, demonstrating the importance of ecology and health in cloud water. Cluster analysis including hierarchical cluster (Hcluster) and principal coordinate analysis (PCoA) indicated a significant disparity between polluted and non-polluted samples. Linear discriminant analysis effect size (LEfSe) demonstrated that potential pathogens were enriched in the polluted cloud samples, whereas the diverse ecological function groups were significant in the non-polluted samples. Discrepant community structure determined by redundancy analysis (RDA) indicated that the major ions in

  5. MODIS/Terra Aerosol, Cloud and Water Vapor Subset 5-Min L2 Swath 5km and 10km V005

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — MODATML2 contains a selection of the most useful atmosphere Level 2 aerosol, cloud and water vapor parameters at 5 and 10km spatial resolution. Native 1km cloud,...

  6. Analysis of geostationary satellite-derived cloud parameters associated with environments with high ice water content

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Laat, Adrianus; Defer, Eric; Delanoë, Julien; Dezitter, Fabien; Gounou, Amanda; Grandin, Alice; Guignard, Anthony; Fokke Meirink, Jan; Moisselin, Jean-Marc; Parol, Frédéric

    2017-04-01

    We present an evaluation of the ability of passive broadband geostationary satellite measurements to detect high ice water content (IWC > 1 g m-3) as part of the European High Altitude Ice Crystals (HAIC) project for detection of upper-atmospheric high IWC, which can be a hazard for aviation. We developed a high IWC mask based on measurements of cloud properties using the Cloud Physical Properties (CPP) algorithm applied to the geostationary Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI). Evaluation of the high IWC mask with satellite measurements of active remote sensors of cloud properties (CLOUDSAT/CALIPSO combined in the DARDAR (raDAR-liDAR) product) reveals that the high IWC mask is capable of detecting high IWC values > 1 g m-3 in the DARDAR profiles with a probability of detection of 60-80 %. The best CPP predictors of high IWC were the condensed water path, cloud optical thickness, cloud phase, and cloud top height. The evaluation of the high IWC mask against DARDAR provided indications that the MSG-CPP high IWC mask is more sensitive to cloud ice or cloud water in the upper part of the cloud, which is relevant for aviation purposes. Biases in the CPP results were also identified, in particular a solar zenith angle (SZA) dependence that reduces the performance of the high IWC mask for SZAs > 60°. Verification statistics show that for the detection of high IWC a trade-off has to be made between better detection of high IWC scenes and more false detections, i.e., scenes identified by the high IWC mask that do not contain IWC > 1 g m-3. However, the large majority of these detections still contain IWC values between 0.1 and 1 g m-3. Comparison of the high IWC mask against results from the Rapidly Developing Thunderstorm (RDT) algorithm applied to the same geostationary SEVIRI data showed that there are similarities and differences with the high IWC mask: the RDT algorithm is very capable of detecting young

  7. Quantifying the Role of Cloud Water in the Hydrology of Two Montane Forest Sites on East Maui, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholl, M. A.; Gingerich, S. B.; Giambelluca, T. W.; Nullet, M. A.; Loope, L. L.

    2003-12-01

    East Maui (Haleakala volcano) rises 3054 m above the ocean, and clouds intercepting the mountain slopes are an integral part of the climate. To what extent do the trees and shrubs on the mountainsides extract cloud water that contributes to soil moisture, groundwater recharge, and stream flow in the watersheds? Two sites, on the windward and leeward sides of the mountain, were instrumented to study this process. Weather stations at each site measured climate parameters, and stable isotopes of fog, rain, soil water, stream flow and tree sap were measured monthly to track the proportion of cloud water in the forest hydrologic system. When clouds envelop a forest, the precipitation ranges from light mist to rain, leading to difficulties in measuring cloud water as opposed to rainfall. Deposition of cloud water depends on wind speed, droplet size, surface area of the vegetation, and many other factors. Cloud water deposition was measured on a continual basis using a vertical screen collector, which did not exclude rainfall. The fog isotope collectors did exclude vertically falling rain, and cumulative monthly fog volumes were compared with volumes from isotope rain collectors. Throughfall collectors provided information on the efficiency of the vegetation in collecting cloud water (fog drip). At the windward site, fog screen/ rain gage volume ratios normalized to collection area ranged from 0.74-4.9, with a median value of 1.5. The median fog/ rain ratio from the isotope collectors (normalized to surface area) was 0.35. The screen collector cannot be directly extrapolated to forest canopy, but the data suggest substantial impaction of cloud water on vegetation surfaces exposed to the wind. Isotopic composition of stream water reflected recent precipitation, including cloud water, while the soil water had a larger proportion of precipitation from large rainstorms. Metrosideros polymorpha tree sap isotopic composition was sometimes identical to fog drip, almost never

  8. Introduction of prognostic rain in ECHAM5: design and single column model simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Posselt

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Prognostic equations for the rain mass mixing ratio and the rain drop number concentration are introduced into the large-scale cloud microphysics parameterization of the ECHAM5 general circulation model (ECHAM5-PROG. To this end, a rain flux from one level to the next with the appropriate fall speed is introduced. This maintains rain water in the atmosphere to be available for the next time step. Rain formation in ECHAM5-PROG is, therefore, less dependent on the autoconversion rate than the standard ECHAM5 but shifts the emphasis towards the accretion rates in accordance with observations. ECHAM5-PROG is tested and evaluated with Single Column Model (SCM simulations for two cases: the marine stratocumulus study EPIC (October 2001 and the continental mid-latitude ARM Cloud IOP (shallow frontal cloud case – March 2000. In case of heavy precipitation events, the prognostic equations for rain hardly affect the amount and timing of precipitation at the surface in different SCM simulations because heavy rain depends mainly on the large-scale forcing. In case of thin, drizzling clouds (i.e., stratocumulus, surface precipitation is sensitive to the number of sub-time steps used in the prognostic rain scheme. Cloud microphysical quantities, such as cloud liquid and rain water within the atmosphere, are sensitive to the number of sub-time steps in both considered cases. This results from the decreasing autoconversion rate and increasing accretion rate.

  9. Impact of Cloud Vertical and Horizontal Inhomogeneity on Multi-Spectral Retrieval of Liquid Water Cloud Properties: A Study for the GCOM-C/SGLI Cloud Product by Using A-Train and Landsat-8 Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagao, T. M.; Letu, H.; Nakajima, T. Y.

    2014-12-01

    Cloud droplet effective radius (re) and optical thickness (τc) of liquid water cloud retrieved from multi-spectral measurement of satellite-borne sensors such as the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) are important parameters for understanding of cloud microphysics and droplet growth process. Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) is scheduling to launch a new earth observation satellite, the Global Change Observation Mission - Climate (GCOM-C), in Japan fiscal year 2016. The GCOC-C consists the Second Generation Global Imager (SGLI) instrument, which is a radiometer providing near-ultraviolet-to-thermal-infrared multi-spectral measurements at 250m-1km resolution with 1150-1400km swath. Motivated by the importance of re and τc retrievals, the GCOM-C/SGLI cloud product also provides them. However, it is pointed out by previous studies that multi-spectral-retrieved re and τc are impacted by cloud vertical and horizontal inhomogeneity. This study investigates the impacts by using A-Train and Landsat-8 data. First, we interpret three re retrievals from 1.6, 2.1, and 3.7µm-band measurements (re,1.6, re,2.1, and re,3.7) in terms of cloud vertical inhomogeneity by using synergistic measurements from the CloudSat/CPR and Aqua/MODIS. For this interpretation, we use an approach called Contoured Frequency by Optical Depth Diagram (CFODD), which is a joint frequency diagram of CloudSat/CPR radar reflectivity profile as a function of in-cloud optical depth profile as classified according to retrieved re (Nakajima et al., 2010; Suzuki et al., 2010). The CFODD approach visualizes the linkage of re,1.6, re,2.1, and re,3.7 to cloud droplet vertical profile. Second, we simulate the biases in re and τc retrievals at 1km resolution from the MODIS and SGLI induced by cloud horizontal inhomogeneity by using high-spatial resolution measurements of Landsat-8. And then we suggest two inversion models which estimate the biases in re and τc retrievals by using co

  10. A Compact, Backscattering Deplolarization Cloud Spectrometer for Ice and Water Discrimination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomson, David

    2014-05-15

    This project was to develop a compact optical particle spectrometer, small enough for operation on UAVS, that measures the optical diameter of cloud hydrometeors and differentiates their water phase (liquid or solid). To reach this goal, a work plan was laid out that would complete three objectives: 1) Evaluation of designs for an optical particle spectrometer that measures the component of light backscattered at two polarization angles. 2) Testing of selected designs on an optical bench. 3) Construction and preliminary testing of a prototype instrument based on the selected, optimum design. A protoype instrument was developed and tested in an icing wind tunnel where the results showed good measurement of cloud droplets and ice particles.

  11. Impacts of cloud water droplets on the OH production rate from peroxide photolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins-Costa, M T C; Anglada, J M; Francisco, J S; Ruiz-López, Manuel F

    2017-12-06

    Understanding the difference between observed and modeled concentrations of HOx radicals in the troposphere is a current major issue in atmospheric chemistry. It is widely believed that existing atmospheric models miss a source of such radicals and several potential new sources have been proposed. In recent years, interest has increased on the role played by cloud droplets and organic aerosols. Computer modeling of ozone photolysis, for instance, has shown that atmospheric aqueous interfaces accelerate the associated OH production rate by as much as 3-4 orders of magnitude. Since methylhydroperoxide is a main source and sink of HOx radicals, especially at low NOx concentrations, it is fundamental to assess what is the influence of clouds on its chemistry and photochemistry. In this study, computer simulations for the photolysis of methylhydroperoxide at the air-water interface have been carried out showing that the OH production rate is severely enhanced, reaching a comparable level to ozone photolysis.

  12. Energy and water vapor transport across a simplified cloud-clear air interface

    CERN Document Server

    Gallana, Luca; De Santi, Francesca; Iovieno, Michele; Tordella, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    We consider a simplified physics of the could interface where condensation, evaporation and radiation are neglected and momentum, thermal energy and water vapor transport is represented in terms of the Boussinesq model coupled to a passive scalar transport equation for the vapor. The interface is modeled as a layer separating two isotropic turbulent regions with different kinetic energy and vapor concentration. In particular, we focus on the small scale part of the inertial range as well as on the dissipative range of scales which are important to the micro-physics of warm clouds. We have numerically investigated stably stratified interfaces by locally perturbing at an initial instant the standard temperature lapse rate at the cloud interface and then observing the temporal evolution of the system. When the buoyancy term becomes of the same order of the inertial one, we observe a spatial redistribution of the kinetic energy which produce a concomitant pit of kinetic energy within the mixing layer. In this sit...

  13. Water Ice Clouds in the Martian Atmosphere: A Comparison of Two Methods and Eras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, A. S.; Tamppari, L. K.; Christensen, P. R.; Smith, M. D.; Bass, Deborah; Pearl, J. C.

    2003-01-01

    Similar cloud features are seen in maps generated with each method with no obvious outliers. The temperature differencing method appears to possibly be somewhat more sensitive to weaker water ice signatures. We have also generated correlation plots comparing the two methods. At strong delta-T signals, the correlation between the two methods is quite good, and therefore extraction of opacities from earlier Viking data may be possible for these stronger detection levels. Weaker detections do not, however, show such a good correlation. We are currently analyzing why the correlation becomes poor at weak signal levels, though it may be due to the fact that the differencing method may be more sensitive to thin cloud hazes. Results of this ongoing analysis will be presented. A comparison of the Viking and Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) eras are also presented.

  14. Water Ice Clouds in the Martian Atmosphere: A Comparison of Two Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, A. S.; Tamppari, L. K.; Christensen, P. R.; Smith, M. D.; Bass, Deborah; Pearl, J. C.

    2003-01-01

    To date, the only two data sets offer the potential to examine year-to-year changes in cloud features over an entire Martian year: the Viking Infrared Thermal Mapper (IRTM) data set and the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) data set. We have examined the TES data in the same way in which we examined the Viking IRTM data. This provides water-ice cloud information separated in time by 12 Martian years. Since the data are analyzed with the same method, we obtain a very accurate 'apples to apples' comparison, and can generate a historical record of the subtleties of this annual event. Consequently, it is desirable to compare their results to ours to see what differences exist.

  15. Cloud point extraction, preconcentration and spectrophotometric determination of nickel in water samples using dimethylglyoxime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morteza Bahram

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A new and simple method for the preconcentration and spectrophotometric determination of trace amounts of nickel was developed by cloud point extraction (CPE. In the proposed work, dimethylglyoxime (DMG was used as the chelating agent and Triton X-114 was selected as a non-ionic surfactant for CPE. The parameters affecting the cloud point extraction including the pH of sample solution, concentration of the chelating agent and surfactant, equilibration temperature and time were optimized. Under the optimum conditions, the calibration graph was linear in the range of 10-150 ng mL-1 with a detection limit of 4 ng mL-1. The relative standard deviation for 9 replicates of 100 ng mL-1 Ni(II was 1.04%. The interference effect of some anions and cations was studied. The method was applied to the determination of Ni(II in water samples with satisfactory results.

  16. The effect of solar zenith angle on MODIS cloud optical and microphysical retrievals within marine liquid water clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. P. Grosvenor

    2014-07-01

    better predictor of τ biases at high θ0 than σCTT. For a given θ0, large decreases in re were observed as the cloud top heterogeneity changed from low to high values, although it is possible that physical changes to the clouds associated with cloud heterogeneity variation may account for some of this. However, for a given cloud top heterogeneity we find that the value of θ0 affects the sign and magnitude of the relative differences between re1.6, re2.1 and re3.7, which has implications for attempts to retrieve vertical cloud information using the different MODIS bands. The relatively larger decrease in re3.7 and the lack of change of re1.6 with both θ0 and cloud top heterogeneity suggest that re3.7 is more prone to retrieval biases due to high θ0 than the other bands. We discuss some possible reasons for this. Our results have important implications for individual MODIS swaths at high θ0, which may be used for case studies for example. θ0 values > 65° can occur at latitudes as low as 28° in mid-winter and for higher latitudes the problem will be more acute. Also, Level-3 daily averaged MODIS cloud property data consist of the averages of several overpasses for the high latitudes, which will occur at a range of θ0 values. Thus, some biased data are likely to be included. It is also likely that some of the θ0 effects described here would apply to τ and re retrievals from satellite instruments that use visible light at similar wavelengths along with forward retrieval models that assume plane parallel clouds, such as the GOES imagers, SEVIRI, etc.

  17. A fate for organic acids, formaldehyde and methanol in cloud water: their biotransformation by micro-organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Amato

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available The interactions between microbial and chemical contents of cloud water were investigated. First, we observe that the bulk cloud water solution provides a substantial environment where bacteria can develop significantly. Then, a total number of 60 microbial strains originating from seven distinct samples of cloud water and affiliated to various taxonomic groups were examined for their ability to degrade some of the main atmospheric carboxylic compounds: formate, acetate, lactate, succinate, as well as formaldehyde and methanol. Biodegradation tests show that all these compounds can be transformed when used as single carbonaceous substrates, with activities depending on both the strain and the compound. The highest capacities of biodegradation are observed towards formaldehyde, formate and acetate, which are also the more concentrated compounds typically measured in cloud water. Hence, analyses by 1H NMR permitted to establish for instance that compounds like pyruvate or fumarate can be produced and released in the media in relation to the transformation of lactate or succinate. In addition, utilization of 13C labelled formaldehyde showed that it can be transformed through many metabolic pathways, similar to those induced by photochemistry and leading to the production of formate and/or methanol. These results suggest that microorganisms of cloud water can have various behaviours towards the chemical compounds present in the atmosphere: they can represent either a sink or source for organic carbon, and may have to be considered as actors of cloud chemistry.

  18. Characterization of cumulus cloud fields using trajectories in the center of gravity versus water mass phase space: 2. Aerosol effects on warm convective clouds: Center of Gravity Versus Water Mass 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heiblum, Reuven H. [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot Israel; Altaratz, Orit [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot Israel; Koren, Ilan [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot Israel; Feingold, Graham [Chemical Sciences Division, NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory (ESRL), Boulder Colorado USA; Kostinski, Alexander B. [Department of Physics, Michigan Technological University, Houghton Michigan USA; Khain, Alexander P. [Institute of Earth Sciences, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem Israel; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail [Atmosphere Science and Global Change Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Fredj, Erick [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot Israel; Dagan, Guy [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot Israel; Pinto, Lital [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot Israel; Yaish, Ricki [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot Israel; Chen, Qian [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot Israel

    2016-06-07

    In Part I of this work a 3D cloud tracking algorithm and phase-space of center of gravity altitude versus cloud liquid water mass (CvM space) were introduced and described in detail. We showed how new physical insight can be gained by following cloud trajectories in the CvM space. Here, this approach is used to investigate aerosol effects on cloud fields of warm cumuli. We show a clear effect of the aerosol loading on the shape and size of CvM clusters. We also find fundamental differences in the CvM space between simulations using bin versus bulk microphysical schemes, with the bin scheme precipitation expressing much higher sensitivity to changes in aerosol concentrations. Using the bin microphysical scheme, we find that the increase in cloud center of gravity altitude with increase in aerosol concentrations occurs for a wide range of cloud sizes. This is attributed to reduced sedimentation, increased buoyancy and vertical velocities, and increased environmental instability, all of which are tightly coupled to inhibition of precipitation processes and subsequent feedbacks of clouds on their environment. Many of the physical processes shown here are consistent with processes typically associated with cloud invigoration.

  19. Microwave and Millimeter-Wave Radiometric Studies of Temperature, Water Vapor and Clouds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westwater, Edgeworth

    2011-05-06

    The importance of accurate measurements of column amounts of water vapor and cloud liquid has been well documented by scientists within the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program. At the North Slope of Alaska (NSA), both microwave radiometers (MWR) and the MWRProfiler (MWRP), been used operationally by ARM for passive retrievals of the quantities: Precipitable Water Vapor (PWV) and Liquid Water Path (LWP). However, it has been convincingly shown that these instruments are inadequate to measure low amounts of PWV and LWP. In the case of water vapor, this is especially important during the Arctic winter, when PWV is frequently less than 2 mm. For low amounts of LWP (< 50 g/m{sup 2}), the MWR and MWRP retrievals have an accuracy that is also not acceptable. To address some of these needs, in March-April 2004, NOAA and ARM conducted the NSA Arctic Winter Radiometric Experiment - Water Vapor Intensive Operational Period at the ARM NSA/Adjacent Arctic Ocean (NSA/AAO) site. After this experiment, the radiometer group at NOAA moved to the Center for Environmental Technology (CET) of the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering of the University of Colorado at Boulder. During this 2004 experiment, a total of 220 radiosondes were launched, and radiometric data from 22.235 to 380 GHz were obtained. Primary instruments included the ARM MWR and MWRP, a Global Positioning System (GPS), as well as the CET Ground-based Scanning Radiometer (GSR). We have analyzed data from these instruments to answer several questions of importance to ARM, including: (a) techniques for improved water vapor measurements; (b) improved calibration techniques during cloudy conditions; (c) the spectral response of radiometers to a variety of conditions: clear, liquid, ice, and mixed phase clouds; and (d) forward modeling of microwave and millimeter wave brightness temperatures from 22 to 380 GHz. Many of these results have been published in the open literature. During the third year of

  20. Long-term changes in the water quality of rainfall, cloud water and stream water for moorland, forested and clear-felled catchments at Plynlimon, mid-Wales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Neal

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Long term changes in the water quality of rainfall, cloud water and stream waters draining acidic and acid sensitive moorland and forested catchments at Plynlimon, mid-Wales, are examined for the period 1983 to 2001. Atmospheric inputs of chloride and sulphate are influenced by the relative inputs of clean maritime and polluted land based air masses. There is no systematic increase or decrease over time for chloride and non-sea-salt sulphate. Rather, there is a decadal scale process possibly representative of the influence of the North Atlantic Oscillation that affects the maritime and pollution climate of the Atlantic seaboard of the UK. Over 17 years of study, there may be a small decrease in non-sea-salt sulphate of about 10 μeq l-1 and a small improvement in acid neutralising capacity of about 20 to 30 μeq l-1 in rainfall. There is a clear improvement in cloud water chemistry with respect to pollutant components (ammonium, nitrate, non-sea-salt sulphate and acidity (acid neutralising capacity improved by about 300 μeq l-1 through the study period. Many of the changes in cloud water chemistry are similar to rainfall over the same period except the magnitude of change is larger for the cloud water. Within the streams, there is some evidence for reductions in acidity as reflected by acid neutralising capacity becoming less negative. For one stream, deforestation occurred during the sampling period and this led to large increases in nitrate and smaller increases in aluminium midway through the study period. However, the climate and hydrological variability largely masked out other changes. The current analysis provides only a start to identifying trends for such a complex and variable environmental system. The need for strong statistical tools is emphasised to resolve issues of: (a hydrological induced water quality variability, (b changing soil and groundwater "endmember" chemistry contribution to the stream and (c the non-linear patterns of

  1. Ammonia, Water Clouds and Methane Abundances of Giant Exoplanets and Opportunities for Super-Earth Exoplanets

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Renyu

    2014-01-01

    Future direct-imaging exoplanet missions such as WFIRST/AFTA, Exo-C, and Exo-S will measure the reflectivity of exoplanets at visible wavelengths. The exoplanets to be observed will be located further away from their parent stars than is Earth from the Sun. These "cold" exoplanets have atmospheric environments conducive for the formation of water and/or ammonia clouds, like Jupiter in the Solar System. We study the science return from direct-imaging exoplanet missions, focusing on the exoplan...

  2. Water balances of old-growth and regenerating montane cloud forests in central Veracruz, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Villers, L. E.; Holwerda, F.; Gómez-Cárdenas, M.; Equihua, M.; Asbjornsen, H.; Bruijnzeel, L. A.; Marín-Castro, B. E.; Tobón, C.

    2012-09-01

    SummaryThis paper compares the water budgets of two adjacent micro-catchments covered by mature (MAT) and 20-year-old secondary (SEC) lower montane cloud forests, respectively, in central Veracruz, Mexico over a 2-year period. Rainfall (P) and streamflow (Q) were measured continuously, whereas dry canopy evaporation (transpiration Et), wet canopy evaporation (rainfall interception I), and cloud water interception (CWI) were quantified using a combination of field measurements and modeling. Mean annual P was 3467 mm, of which typically 80% fell during the wet season (May-October). Fog interception occurred exclusively during the dry season (November-April), and was ⩽2% of annual P for both forests. Rainfall interception loss was dominated by post-event evaporation of intercepted water rather than by within-event evaporation. Therefore, the higher overall I (i.e. including CWI) by the MAT (16% of P vs. 8% for the SEC) reflects a higher canopy storage capacity, related in turn to higher leaf area index and greater epiphyte biomass. Annual Et totals derived from sapflow measurements were nearly equal for the MAT and SEC (˜790 mm each). Total annual water yield calculated as P minus (Et + I) was somewhat higher for the SEC (2441 mm) than for the MAT (2077 mm), and mainly reflects the difference in I. Mean annual Q was also higher for the SEC (1527 mm) than for the MAT (1338 mm), and consisted mostly of baseflow (˜90%). Baseflow recession rates were nearly equal between the two forests, as were stormflow coefficients (4% and 5% for MAT and SEC, respectively). The very low runoff response to rainfall is attributed to the high infiltration and water retention capacities of the volcanic soils throughout the ˜2 m deep profile. The water budget results indicate that ˜875 and 700 mm year-1 leave the SEC and MAT as deep groundwater leakage, which is considered plausible given the fractured geology in the study area. It is concluded that 20 years of natural regeneration

  3. Cloud optical thickness and liquid water path – does the k coefficient vary with droplet concentration?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Geoffroy

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Cloud radiative transfer calculations in general circulation models involve a link between cloud microphysical and optical properties. Indeed, the liquid water content expresses as a function of the mean volume droplet radius, while the light extinction is a function of their mean surface radius. There is a small difference between these two parameters because of the droplet spectrum width. This issue has been addressed by introducing an empirical multiplying correction factor to the droplet concentration. Analysis of in situ sampled data, however, revealed that the correction factor decreases when the concentration increases, hence partially mitigating the aerosol indirect effect. Five field experiments are reanalyzed here, in which standard and upgraded versions of the droplet spectrometer were used to document shallow cumulus and stratocumulus topped boundary layers. They suggest that the standard probe noticeably underestimates the correction factor compared to the upgraded versions. The analysis is further refined to demonstrate that the value of the correction factor derived by averaging values calculated locally along the flight path overestimates the value derived from liquid water path and optical thickness of a cloudy column, and that there is no detectable relationship between the correction factor and the droplet concentration. It is also shown that the droplet concentration dilution by entrainment-mixing after CCN activation is significantly stronger in shallow cumuli than in stratocumulus layers. These various effects are finally combined to produce the today best estimate of the correction factor to use in general circulation models.

  4. Cloud/Fog Computing System Architecture and Key Technologies for South-North Water Transfer Project Safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaoling Fan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In view of the real-time and distributed features of Internet of Things (IoT safety system in water conservancy engineering, this study proposed a new safety system architecture for water conservancy engineering based on cloud/fog computing and put forward a method of data reliability detection for the false alarm caused by false abnormal data from the bottom sensors. Designed for the South-North Water Transfer Project (SNWTP, the architecture integrated project safety, water quality safety, and human safety. Using IoT devices, fog computing layer was constructed between cloud server and safety detection devices in water conservancy projects. Technologies such as real-time sensing, intelligent processing, and information interconnection were developed. Therefore, accurate forecasting, accurate positioning, and efficient management were implemented as required by safety prevention of the SNWTP, and safety protection of water conservancy projects was effectively improved, and intelligential water conservancy engineering was developed.

  5. Lattice Boltzmann simulation of water isotope fractionation during ice crystal growth in clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Guoping; DePaolo, Donald J.

    2016-05-01

    We describe a lattice Boltzmann (LB) method for simulating water isotope fractionation during diffusion-limited ice crystal growth by vapor deposition from water-oversaturated air. These conditions apply to the growth of snow crystals in clouds where the vapor composition is controlled by the presence of both ice crystals and water droplets. Modeling of water condensation with the LB method has the advantage of allowing concentration fields to evolve based on local conditions so that the controls on grain shapes of the condensed phase can be studied simultaneously with the controls on isotopic composition and growth rate. Water isotope fractionation during snow crystal growth involves kinetic effects due to diffusion of water vapor in air, which requires careful consideration of the boundary conditions at the ice-vapor interface. The boundary condition is relatively simple for water isotopes because the molecular exchange rate for water at the interface is large compared to the crystal growth rate. Our results for the bulk crystal isotopic composition are consistent with simpler models using analytical solutions for radial geometry. However, the model results are sufficiently different for oxygen isotopes that they could affect the interpretation of D-excess values of snow and ice. The extent of vapor oversaturation plays a major role in determining the water isotope fractionation as well as the degree of dendritic growth. Departures from isotopic equilibrium increase at colder temperatures as diffusivity decreases. Dendritic crystals are isotopically heterogeneous. Isotopic variations within individual snow crystals could yield information on the microphysics of ice condensation as well as on the accommodation or sticking coefficient of water associated with vapor deposition. Our results are ultimately a first step in implementing LB models for kinetically controlled condensation or precipitation reactions, but needs to be extended also to cases where the

  6. Cloud Water Path Over China: An Analysis Using ISCCP Data During 1984- 2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, X.; Guo, X.; Zhu, J.

    2006-12-01

    Analysis of cloud water path (CWP) data over China available by the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) is performed for the period 1984-2004. The climatology, trends, and variability of CWP are examined. The climatological distribution and variation of CWP are dependent on the circulation, especially the monsoon circulation, topography and atmospheric moisture. Influenced by the Asia monsoon, China's CWP exhibits very large seasonal variations. All-China average shows the maximum CWP in June and the minimum CWP in October. Under the influences of the Tibetan Plateau and the westerly flow, the largest CWP is found in winter and early spring in the southeastern China. Linear regression analysis is used to characterize seasonal and annual trends in CWP. Increasing trends in CWP are observed over much of China. The northwestern China, especially over the Tibetan Plateau, and the Inner Mongolia show significant increases of CWP. The largest increase in CWP is in winter and the increasing trend is weakest in spring. These increases in CWP are primarily dependent on the enhanced updraft deduced by the variation of circulation, including the weakening of the summer monsoon system. According to the EOF analysis, step-like increase in CWP is also found (EOF1) during 1984-2004 and the variation of CWP is statistically significant correlated with the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) in EOF2. Interannual variation and trends in CWP and water vapor are closely correlated in China, confirming the enhanced hydrological cycle under the background of global warming. The correlations among CWP, water vapor and precipitation in the southeastern and the northwestern China are investigated. In summertime the higher correlation are found between CWP and precipitation than that between water vapor and precipitation in the both regions.

  7. Comparison of the SAWNUC model with CLOUD measurements of sulphuric acid-water nucleation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrhart, Sebastian; Ickes, Luisa; Almeida, Joao; Amorim, Antonio; Barmet, Peter; Bianchi, Federico; Dommen, Josef; Dunne, Eimear M; Duplissy, Jonathan; Franchin, Alessandro; Kangasluoma, Juha; Kirkby, Jasper; Kürten, Andreas; Kupc, Agnieszka; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Nieminen, Tuomo; Riccobono, Francesco; Rondo, Linda; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Steiner, Gerhard; Tomé, António; Wimmer, Daniela; Baltensperger, Urs; Wagner, Paul E; Curtius, Joachim

    2016-10-27

    Binary nucleation of sulphuric acid-water particles is expected to be an important process in the free troposphere at low temperatures. SAWNUC (Sulphuric Acid Water Nucleation) is a model of binary nucleation that is based on laboratory measurements of the binding energies of sulphuric acid and water in charged and neutral clusters. Predictions of SAWNUC are compared for the first time comprehensively with experimental binary nucleation data from the CLOUD chamber at European Organization for Nuclear Research. The experimental measurements span a temperature range of 208-292 K, sulphuric acid concentrations from 1·10(6) to 1·10(9) cm(-3), and distinguish between ion-induced and neutral nucleation. Good agreement, within a factor of 5, is found between the experimental and modeled formation rates for ion-induced nucleation at 278 K and below and for neutral nucleation at 208 and 223 K. Differences at warm temperatures are attributed to ammonia contamination which was indicated by the presence of ammonia-sulphuric acid clusters, detected by an Atmospheric Pressure Interface Time of Flight (APi-TOF) mass spectrometer. APi-TOF measurements of the sulphuric acid ion cluster distributions ( (H2SO4)i·HSO4- with i = 0, 1, ..., 10) show qualitative agreement with the SAWNUC ion cluster distributions. Remaining differences between the measured and modeled distributions are most likely due to fragmentation in the APi-TOF. The CLOUD results are in good agreement with previously measured cluster binding energies and show the SAWNUC model to be a good representation of ion-induced and neutral binary nucleation of sulphuric acid-water clusters in the middle and upper troposphere.

  8. Combined retrieval of Arctic liquid water cloud and surface snow properties using airborne spectral solar remote sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ehrlich

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The passive solar remote sensing of cloud properties over highly reflecting ground is challenging, mostly due to the low contrast between the cloud reflectivity and that of the underlying surfaces (sea ice and snow. Uncertainties in the retrieved cloud optical thickness τ and cloud droplet effective radius reff, C may arise from uncertainties in the assumed spectral surface albedo, which is mainly determined by the generally unknown effective snow grain size reff, S. Therefore, in a first step the effects of the assumed snow grain size are systematically quantified for the conventional bispectral retrieval technique of τ and reff, C for liquid water clouds. In general, the impact of uncertainties of reff, S is largest for small snow grain sizes. While the uncertainties of retrieved τ are independent of the cloud optical thickness and solar zenith angle, the bias of retrieved reff, C increases for optically thin clouds and high Sun. The largest deviations between the retrieved and true original values are found with 83 % for τ and 62 % for reff, C.In the second part of the paper a retrieval method is presented that simultaneously derives all three parameters (τ, reff, C, reff, S and therefore accounts for changes in the snow grain size. Ratios of spectral cloud reflectivity measurements at the three wavelengths λ1 = 1040 nm (sensitive to reff, S, λ2 = 1650 nm (sensitive to τ, and λ3 = 2100 nm (sensitive to reff, C are combined in a trispectral retrieval algorithm. In a feasibility study, spectral cloud reflectivity measurements collected by the Spectral Modular Airborne Radiation measurement sysTem (SMART during the research campaign Vertical Distribution of Ice in Arctic Mixed-Phase Clouds (VERDI, April/May 2012 were used to test the retrieval procedure. Two cases of observations above the Canadian Beaufort Sea, one with dense snow-covered sea ice and another with a distinct snow-covered sea ice

  9. Combined retrieval of Arctic liquid water cloud and surface snow properties using airborne spectral solar remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrlich, André; Bierwirth, Eike; Istomina, Larysa; Wendisch, Manfred

    2017-09-01

    The passive solar remote sensing of cloud properties over highly reflecting ground is challenging, mostly due to the low contrast between the cloud reflectivity and that of the underlying surfaces (sea ice and snow). Uncertainties in the retrieved cloud optical thickness τ and cloud droplet effective radius reff, C may arise from uncertainties in the assumed spectral surface albedo, which is mainly determined by the generally unknown effective snow grain size reff, S. Therefore, in a first step the effects of the assumed snow grain size are systematically quantified for the conventional bispectral retrieval technique of τ and reff, C for liquid water clouds. In general, the impact of uncertainties of reff, S is largest for small snow grain sizes. While the uncertainties of retrieved τ are independent of the cloud optical thickness and solar zenith angle, the bias of retrieved reff, C increases for optically thin clouds and high Sun. The largest deviations between the retrieved and true original values are found with 83 % for τ and 62 % for reff, C. In the second part of the paper a retrieval method is presented that simultaneously derives all three parameters (τ, reff, C, reff, S) and therefore accounts for changes in the snow grain size. Ratios of spectral cloud reflectivity measurements at the three wavelengths λ1 = 1040 nm (sensitive to reff, S), λ2 = 1650 nm (sensitive to τ), and λ3 = 2100 nm (sensitive to reff, C) are combined in a trispectral retrieval algorithm. In a feasibility study, spectral cloud reflectivity measurements collected by the Spectral Modular Airborne Radiation measurement sysTem (SMART) during the research campaign Vertical Distribution of Ice in Arctic Mixed-Phase Clouds (VERDI, April/May 2012) were used to test the retrieval procedure. Two cases of observations above the Canadian Beaufort Sea, one with dense snow-covered sea ice and another with a distinct snow-covered sea ice edge are analysed. The retrieved values of τ, reff

  10. Impact of emissions from shipping, land, and the ocean on stratocumulus cloud water elemental composition during the 2011 E-PEACE field campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Z.; Sorooshian, A.; Prabhakar, G.; Coggon, M. M.; Jonsson, H. H.

    2014-06-01

    This study reports on cloud water chemical and pH measurements off the California coast during the July-August 2011 Eastern Pacific Emitted Aerosol Cloud Experiment (E-PEACE). Eighty two cloud water samples were collected by a slotted-rod cloud water collector protruding above the Center for Interdisciplinary Remotely-Piloted Aircraft Studies (CIRPAS) Twin Otter in boundary layer stratocumulus clouds impacted to varying degrees by ocean-derived emissions, ship exhaust, and land emissions. Cloud water pH ranged between 2.92 and 7.58, with an average of 4.46. Peak pH values were observed north of San Francisco, simultaneous with the highest concentrations of Si, B, and Cs, and air masses originating over land. The lowest pH values were observed south of San Francisco due to ship emissions resulting in the highest concentrations of sulfate, nitrate, V, Fe, Al, P, Cd, Ti, Sb, P, and Mn. Many of these species act as important agents in aqueous-phase reactions in cloud drops and are critical ocean micronutrients after subsequent wet deposition in an ocean system that can be nutrient-limited. E-PEACE measurements suggest that conditions in the California coastal zone region can promote the conversion of micronutrients to more soluble forms, if they are not already, due to acidic cloud water conditions, the ubiquity of important organic agents such as oxalic acid, and the persistence of stratocumulus clouds to allow for continuous cloud processing.

  11. Energy and water vapor transport across a simplified cloud-clear air interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallana, L.; Di Savino, S.; De Santi, F.; Iovieno, M.; Tordella, D.

    2014-11-01

    We consider a simplified physics of the could interface where condensation, evaporation and radiation are neglected and momentum, thermal energy and water vapor transport is represented in terms of the Boussinesq model coupled to a passive scalar transport equation for the vapor. The interface is modeled as a layer separating two isotropic turbulent regions with different kinetic energy and vapor concentration. In particular, we focus on the small scale part of the inertial range of the atmospheric boundary layer as well as on the dissipative range of scales which are important to the micro-physics of warm clouds. We have numerically investigated stably stratified interfaces by locally perturbing at an initial instant the standard temperature lapse rate at the cloud interface and then observing the temporal evolution of the system. When the buoyancy term becomes of the same order of the inertial one, we observe a spatial redistribution of the kinetic energy which produce a concomitant pit of kinetic energy within the mixing layer. In this situation, the mixing layer contains two interfacial regions with opposite kinetic energy gradient, which in turn produces two intermittent sublayers in the velocity fluctuations field. This changes the structure of the field with respect to the corresponding non-stratified shearless mixing: the communication between the two turbulent region is weak, and the growth of the mixing layer stops. These results are discussed with respect to Large Eddy Simulations data for the Planetary Boundary Layers.

  12. Semi-empirical lake level (SELL) model for mapping lake water depths from partially clouded satellite data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velpuri, N.; Senay, G. B.

    2011-12-01

    Information on the variability in surface water is critical to understand the impact of climate change and global water cycle. Surface water features such as lakes, or reservoirs can affect local weather and regional climate. Hence, there is a widespread demand for accurate and quantitative global observations of surface water variability. Satellite imagery provides a direct way to monitor variations in surface water. However, estimating accurate surface area from satellite imagery can be a problem due to clouds. Hence, the use of optical imagery for operational implementation has been a challenge for monitoring variations in surface water. In this research, a semi-empirical lake level (SELL) model is developed to derive lake/reservoir water levels from partially covered satellite imagery. SRTM elevation combined with bathymetry was used to derive the relationships between lake depth vs. surface area and shore line (L). Using these relationships, lake level/depth (D) was estimated from the surface area (A) and/or shore line (L) delineated from Landsat and MODIS data. The SELL model was applied on Lake Turkana, one of the rift valley lakes in East Africa. First, Lake Turkana water levels were delineated using cloud-free or partially clouded Landsat and MODIS imagery over 1993-2009 and 2002-2009 time periods respectively. Historic lake depths were derived using 1972-1992 Landsat imagery. Lake depths delineated using this approach were validated using TOPEX/Poseidon/Jason satellite altimetry data. It was found that lake depths derived using SELL model matched reasonably well with the satellite altimetry data. The approach presented in this research can be used to (a) simulate lake water level variations in data scarce regions (b) increase the frequency of observation in regions where cloud cover is a problem (c) operationally monitor lake water levels in ungauged basins (d) derive historic lake level information using satellite data.

  13. An energy balance model exploration of the impacts of interactions between surface albedo, water vapour and clouds on polar amplification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sodergren, Helena; McDonald, Adrian; Bodeker, Greg

    2017-04-01

    The interactions between surface albedo, water vapour and clouds, and how these interactions change with carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations in the atmosphere, are examined with a newly developed energy balance model. A particular focus is the non-linear interactions of these climate system attributes on polar amplification. Polar amplification is defined here as the ratio of the annual rate of surface warming over the polar regions (latitudes poleward of 60o) to the surface warming over equatorial regions (latitudes equatorward of 30o), and is termed the polar amplification factor. Changes in surface albedo plays a major role in polar amplification as might be expected, due to its amplifying effects of CO2 -induced warming of the polar regions, and relatively small warming effects in the equatorial regions. When considered in isolation from the other climate system components, i.e. when water vapour and cloud cover are prescribed, changes in surface albedo result in a polar amplification factor of 4.83 for a doubling of CO2, compared to 5.54 for the full feedback simulation, i.e. the simulation where all three components are allowed to simultaneously change with temperature. In our simple model framework, changes in surface albedo are responsible for 43% of the polar warming from the full feedback run, and 49% of the equatorial warming. The polar amplification for the simulation with isolated climate feedback from cloud cover variations is smaller than the simulation with isolated surface albedo feedback, mainly due to a weaker warming in the polar regions. The polar amplification factor for the isolated cloud cover feedback simulation is 3.73, contributing 30% of the warming in the polar regions to the full feedback simulation and 45% in the equatorial regions. The amplifying effect from changing surface albedo on polar warming and polar amplification is enhanced when surface albedo interacts with cloud cover or water vapour. The polar amplification factor is

  14. Tropical montane cloud forests in the Orinoco river basin: the role of soil organic layers in water storage and release

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramirez Correal, B.H.; Ploeg, van der M.J.; Teuling, Adriaan; Ganzeveld, L.N.; Leemans, H.B.J.

    2017-01-01

    The Tropical Montane Cloud Forest (TMCF) is a hydrologically unique and highly vulnerable ecosystem to changes in land-use and climate. Assessing the impacts of these changes needs to consider soil-water dynamics. In particular, the organic layer and its functioning requires attention because its

  15. Comparison of the SAWNUC model with CLOUD measurements of sulphuric acid-water nucleation

    CERN Document Server

    Ehrhart, Sebastian; Almeida, Joao; Amorim, Antonio; Barmet, Peter; Bianchi, Federico; Dommen, Josef; Dunne, Eimear M; Duplissy, Jonathan; Franchin, Alessandro; Kangasluoma, Juha; Kirkby, Jasper; Kürten, Andreas; Kupc, Agnieszka; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Nieminen, Tuomo; Riccobono, Francesco; Rondo, Linda; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Steiner, Gerhard; Tomé, António; Wimmer, Daniela; Baltensperger, Urs; Wagner, Paul E; Curtius, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Binary nucleation of sulphuric acid-water particles is expected to be an important process in the free troposphere at low temperatures. SAWNUC (Sulphuric Acid Water Nucleation) is a model of binary nucleation that is based on laboratory measurements of the binding energies of sulphuric acid and water in charged and neutral clusters. Predictions of SAWNUC are compared for the first time comprehensively with experimental binary nucleation data from the CLOUD chamber at European Organization for Nuclear Research. The experimental measurements span a temperature range of 208–292 K, sulphuric acid concentrations from 1·106 to 1·109 cm−3, and distinguish between ion-induced and neutral nucleation. Good agreement, within a factor of 5, is found between the experimental and modeled formation rates for ion-induced nucleation at 278 K and below and for neutral nucleation at 208 and 223 K. Differences at warm temperatures are attributed to ammonia contamination which was indicated by the presence of ammonia-sulphu...

  16. Water relations and microclimate around the upper limit of a cloud forest in Maui, Hawai'i.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotsch, Sybil G; Crausbay, Shelley D; Giambelluca, Thomas W; Weintraub, Alexis E; Longman, Ryan J; Asbjornsen, Heidi; Hotchkiss, Sara C; Dawson, Todd E

    2014-07-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the effects of atmospheric demand on both plant water relations and daily whole-tree water balance across the upper limit of a cloud forest at the mean base height of the trade wind inversion in the tropical trade wind belt. We measured the microclimate and water relations (sap flow, water potential, stomatal conductance, pressure-volume relations) of Metrosideros polymorpha Gaudich. var. polymorpha in three habitats bracketing the cloud forest's upper limit in Hawai'i to understand the role of water relations in determining ecotone position. The subalpine shrubland site, located 100 m above the cloud forest boundary, had the highest vapor pressure deficit, the least amount of rainfall and the highest levels of nighttime transpiration (EN) of all three sites. In the shrubland site, on average, 29% of daily whole-tree transpiration occurred at night, while on the driest day of the study 50% of total daily transpiration occurred at night. While EN occurred in the cloud forest habitat, the proportion of total daily transpiration that occurred at night was much lower (4%). The average leaf water potential (Ψleaf) was above the water potential at the turgor loss point (ΨTLP) on both sides of the ecotone due to strong stomatal regulation. While stomatal closure maintained a high Ψleaf, the minimum leaf water potential (Ψleafmin) was close to ΨTLP, indicating that drier conditions may cause drought stress in these habitats and may be an important driver of current landscape patterns in stand density. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. The potential influence of Asian and African mineral dust on ice, mixed-phase and liquid water clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Wiacek

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available This modelling study explores the availability of mineral dust particles as ice nuclei for interactions with ice, mixed-phase and liquid water clouds, also tracking the particles' history of cloud-processing. We performed 61 320 one-week forward trajectory calculations originating near the surface of major dust emitting regions in Africa and Asia using high-resolution meteorological analysis fields for the year 2007. Dust-bearing trajectories were assumed to be those coinciding with known dust emission seasons, without explicitly modelling dust emission and deposition processes. We found that dust emissions from Asian deserts lead to a higher potential for interactions with high ice clouds, despite being the climatologically much smaller dust emission source. This is due to Asian regions experiencing significantly more ascent than African regions, with strongest ascent in the Asian Taklimakan desert at ~25%, ~40% and 10% of trajectories ascending to 300 hPa in spring, summer and fall, respectively. The specific humidity at each trajectory's starting point was transported in a Lagrangian manner and relative humidities with respect to water and ice were calculated in 6-h steps downstream, allowing us to estimate the formation of liquid, mixed-phase and ice clouds. Downstream of the investigated dust sources, practically none of the simulated air parcels reached conditions of homogeneous ice nucleation (T≲−40 °C along trajectories that have not experienced water saturation first. By far the largest fraction of cloud forming trajectories entered conditions of mixed-phase clouds, where mineral dust will potentially exert the biggest influence. The majority of trajectories also passed through atmospheric regions supersaturated with respect to ice but subsaturated with respect to water, where so-called "warm ice clouds" (T≳−40 °C theoretically may form prior to supercooled water or mixed-phase clouds. The importance of "warm ice

  18. Environmental monitoring of phenolic pollutants in water by cloud point extraction prior to micellar electrokinetic chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stege, Patricia W; Sombra, Lorena L; Messina, Germán A; Martinez, Luis D; Silva, María F

    2009-05-01

    Many aromatic compounds can be found in the environment as a result of anthropogenic activities and some of them are highly toxic. The need to determine low concentrations of pollutants requires analytical methods with high sensitivity, selectivity, and resolution for application to soil, sediment, water, and other environmental samples. Complex sample preparation involving analyte isolation and enrichment is generally necessary before the final analysis. The present paper outlines a novel, simple, low-cost, and environmentally friendly method for the simultaneous determination of p-nitrophenol (PNP), p-aminophenol (PAP), and hydroquinone (HQ) by micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography after preconcentration by cloud point extraction. Enrichment factors of 180 to 200 were achieved. The limits of detection of the analytes for the preconcentration of 50-ml sample volume were 0.10 microg L(-1) for PNP, 0.20 microg L(-1) for PAP, and 0.16 microg L(-1) for HQ. The optimized procedure was applied to the determination of phenolic pollutants in natural waters from San Luis, Argentina.

  19. Environmental monitoring of phenolic pollutants in water by cloud point extraction prior to micellar electrokinetic chromatography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stege, Patricia W.; Sombra, Lorena L.; Messina, German A.; Martinez, Luis D. [National University of San Luis, CONICET, INQUISAL, Department of Chemistry, San Luis (Argentina); Silva, Maria F. [Universidad Nacional de Cuyo, Departamento de Biomatematica y Fisicoquimica, Facultad de Ciencias Agrarias, Mendoza (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnologicas (CONICET), Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2009-05-15

    Many aromatic compounds can be found in the environment as a result of anthropogenic activities and some of them are highly toxic. The need to determine low concentrations of pollutants requires analytical methods with high sensitivity, selectivity, and resolution for application to soil, sediment, water, and other environmental samples. Complex sample preparation involving analyte isolation and enrichment is generally necessary before the final analysis. The present paper outlines a novel, simple, low-cost, and environmentally friendly method for the simultaneous determination of p-nitrophenol (PNP), p-aminophenol (PAP), and hydroquinone (HQ) by micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography after preconcentration by cloud point extraction. Enrichment factors of 180 to 200 were achieved. The limits of detection of the analytes for the preconcentration of 50-ml sample volume were 0.10{mu}g L{sup -1} for PNP, 0.20 {mu}g L{sup -1} for PAP, and 0.16{mu}g L{sup -1} for HQ. The optimized procedure was applied to the determination of phenolic pollutants in natural waters from San Luis, Argentina. (orig.)

  20. WATER ABSORPTION IN GALACTIC TRANSLUCENT CLOUDS: CONDITIONS AND HISTORY OF THE GAS DERIVED FROM HERSCHEL /HIFI PRISMAS OBSERVATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flagey, N.; Goldsmith, P. F. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Lis, D. C.; Monje, R.; Phillips, T. G. [California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Gerin, M.; De Luca, M.; Godard, B. [LERMA, UMR 8112 du CNRS, Observatoire de Paris, Ecole Normale Superieure, UPMC and UCP (France); Neufeld, D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins Univ. 3400 N. Charles St., Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Sonnentrucker, P. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Goicoechea, J. R., E-mail: nflagey@jpl.nasa.gov [Centro de Astrobiologia (CSIC-INTA), E-28850 Torrejon de Ardoz, Madrid (Spain)

    2013-01-01

    We present Herschel/HIFI observations of the three ground state transitions of H{sub 2}O (556, 1669, and 1113 GHz) and H{sub 2}{sup 18}O (547, 1655, and 1101 GHz)-as well as the first few excited transitions of H{sub 2}O (987, 752, and 1661 GHz)-toward six high-mass star-forming regions, obtained as part of the PRISMAS (PRobing InterStellar Molecules with Absorption line Studies) Guaranteed Time Key Program. Water vapor associated with the translucent clouds in Galactic arms is detected in absorption along every line of sight in all the ground state transitions. The continuum sources all exhibit broad water features in emission in the excited and ground state transitions. Strong absorption features associated with the source are also observed at all frequencies except 752 GHz. We model the background continuum and line emission to infer the optical depth of each translucent cloud along the lines of sight. We derive the column density of H{sub 2}O or H{sub 2}{sup 18}O for the lower energy level of each transition observed. The total column density of water in translucent clouds is usually about a few 10{sup 13} cm{sup -2}. We find that the abundance of water relative to hydrogen nuclei is 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -8} in agreement with models for oxygen chemistry in which high cosmic ray ionization rates are assumed. Relative to molecular hydrogen, the abundance of water is remarkably constant through the Galactic plane with X(H{sub 2}O) =5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -8}, which makes water a good traced of H{sub 2} in translucent clouds. Observations of the excited transitions of H{sub 2}O enable us to constrain the abundance of water in excited levels to be at most 15%, implying that the excitation temperature, T {sub ex}, in the ground state transitions is below 10 K. Further analysis of the column densities derived from the two ortho ground state transitions indicates that T {sub ex} {approx_equal} 5 K and that the density n(H{sub 2}) in the translucent clouds

  1. Investigation of Vortex Clouds and Droplet Sizes in Heated Water Spray Patterns Generated by Axisymmetric Full Cone Nozzles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Y. Naz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The hot water sprays are an important part of many industrial processes, where the detailed knowledge of physical phenomena involved in jet transportation, interaction, secondary breakup, evaporation, and coalescence of droplets is important to reach more efficient processes. The objective of the work was to study the water spray jet breakup dynamics, vortex cloud formation, and droplet size distribution under varying temperature and load pressure. Using a high speed camera, the spray patterns generated by axisymmetric full cone nozzles were visualized as a function water temperature and load pressure. The image analysis confirmed that the spray cone angle and width do not vary significantly with increasing Reynolds and Weber numbers at early injection phases leading to increased macroscopic spray propagation. The formation and decay of semitorus like vortex clouds were also noticed in spray structures generated at near water boiling point temperature. For the nozzle with smallest orifice diameter (1.19 mm, these vortex clouds were very clear at 90°C heating temperature and 1 bar water load pressure. In addition, the sauter mean diameter (SMD of the spray droplets was also measured by using Phase Doppler Anemometry (PDA at different locations downstream of the nozzle exit. It was noticed that SMD varies slightly w.r.t. position when measured at room temperature whereas at higher temperature values, it became almost constant at distance of 55 mm downstream of the nozzle exit.

  2. Introduction of prognostic rain in ECHAM5: design and Single Column Model simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Posselt, R.; Lohmann, U.

    2007-01-01

    International audience; Prognostic equations for the rain mass mixing ratio and the rain drop number concentration are introduced into the large-scale cloud microphysics parameterization of the ECHAM5 general circulation model (ECHAM5-PROG). To this end, a rain flux from one level to the next with the appropriate fall speed is introduced. This maintains rain water in the atmosphere to be available for the next time step. Rain formation in ECHAM5-PROG is, therefore, less dependent on the autoc...

  3. Saturn's Great Storm of 2010-2011: Cloud particles containing ammonia and water ices indicate a deep convective origin. (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sromovsky, L. A.; Baines, K. H.; Fry, P.

    2013-12-01

    Saturn's Great Storm of 2010-2011 was first detected by amateur astronomers in early December 2010 and later found in Cassini Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) images taken on 5 December, when it took the form of a 1000 km wide bright spot. Within a week the head of the storm grew by a factor of ten in width and within a few months created a wake that encircled the planet. This is the sixth Great Saturn Storm in recorded history, all having appeared in the northern hemisphere, and most near northern summer solstice at intervals of roughly 30 years (Sanchez-Lavega et al. 1991, Nature 353, 397-401). That the most recent storm appeared 10 years early proved fortunate because Cassini was still operating in orbit around Saturn and was able to provide unique observations from which we could learn much more about these rare and enormous events. Besides the dramatic dynamical effects displayed at the visible cloud level by high-resolution imaging observations (Sayanagi et al. 2013, Icarus 223, 460-478), dramatic thermal changes also occurred in the stratosphere above the storm (Fletcher et al. 2011, Science 332, 1413), and radio measurements of lightning (Fischer et al., 2011, Nature 475, 75-77) indicated strong convective activity at deeper levels. Numerical models of Saturn's Giant storms (Hueso and Sanchez-Lavega 2004, Icarus 172, 255-271) suggest that they are fueled by water vapor condensation beginning at the 10-12 bar level, some 250 km below the visible cloud tops. That idea is also supported by our detection of water ice near the cloud tops (Sromovsky et al. 2013, Icarus 226, 402-418). From Cassini VIMS spectral imaging taken in February 2011, we learned that the storm's cloud particles are strong absorbers of sunlight at wavelengths from 2.8 to 3.1 microns. Such absorption is not seen on Saturn outside of storm regions, implying a different kind of cloud formation process as well as different cloud composition inside the storm region. We found compelling evidence

  4. Dimethylamine as a major alkyl amine species in particles and cloud water: Observations in semi-arid and coastal regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youn, J.-S.; Crosbie, E.; Maudlin, L. C.; Wang, Z.; Sorooshian, A.

    2015-12-01

    Aerosol and cloud water measurements of dimethylamine (DMA), the most abundant amine in this study, were conducted in semi-arid (Tucson, Arizona) and marine (Nucleation in California Experiment, NiCE; central coast of California) areas. In both regions, DMA exhibits a unimodal aerosol mass size distribution with a dominant peak between 0.18 and 0.56 μm. Particulate DMA concentrations increase as a function of marine biogenic emissions, sulfate, BVOC emissions, and aerosol-phase water. Such data supports biogenic sources of DMA, aminium salt formation, and partitioning of DMA to condensed phases. DMA concentrations exhibit positive correlations with various trace elements and most especially vanadium, which warrants additional investigation. Cloud water DMA levels are enhanced significantly during wildfire periods unlike particulate DMA levels, including in droplet residual particles, due to effective dissolution of DMA into cloud water and probably DMA volatilization after drop evaporation. DMA:NH4+ molar ratios peak between 0.18 and 1.0 μm depending on the site and time of year, suggesting that DMA competes better with NH3 in those sizes in terms of reactive uptake by particles.

  5. Retrievals and Comparisons of Various MODIS-Spectrum Inferred Water Cloud Droplet Effective Radii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu-Lung, Chang; Minnis, Patrick; Lin, Bin; Sunny, Sun-Mack; Khaiyer, Mandana M.

    2007-01-01

    Cloud droplet effective radius retrievals from different Aqua MODIS nearinfrared channels (2.1- micrometer, 3.7- micrometer, and 1.6- micrometer) show considerable differences even among most confident QC pixels. Both Collection 004 and Collection 005 MOD06 show smaller mean effective radii at 3.7- micrometer wavelength than at 2.1- micrometer and 1.6- micrometer wavelengths. Differences in effective radius retrievals between Collection 004 and Collection 005 may be affected by cloud top height/temperature differences, which mainly occur for optically thin clouds. Changes in cloud top height and temperature for thin clouds have different impacts on the effective radius retrievals from 2.1- micrometer, 3.7- micrometer, and 1.6- micrometer channels. Independent retrievals (this study) show, on average, more consistency in the three effective radius retrievals. This study is for Aqua MODIS only.

  6. Selective determination of total vanadium in water samples by cloud point extraction of its ternary complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filik, Hayati; Yanaz, Zeynep; Apak, Reşat

    2008-07-14

    A highly sensitive micelle-mediated extraction methodology for the preconcentration of trace levels of vanadium as a prior step to its determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) has been developed. Vanadium was complexed with 1-(2-pyridylazo)-2-naphthol (PAN) and hydrogen peroxide in acidic medium (0.2 mol L(-1) phosphoric acid) using Triton X-100 as surfactant and quantitatively extracted into a small volume of the surfactant-rich phase after centrifugation. The color reaction of vanadium ions with hydrogen peroxide and PAN in phosphoric acid medium is highly selective. The chemical variables affecting cloud point extraction (CPE) were evaluated and optimized. The R.S.D. for 5 replicate determinations at the 20 microg L(-1)V level was 3.6%. The calibration graph using the preconcentration system for vanadium was linear with a correlation coefficient of 0.99 at levels near the detection limits up to at least 0.6 microg L(-1). The method has good sensitivity and selectivity and was applied to the determination of trace amounts of vanadium in water samples with satisfactory result. The proposed method is a rare application of CPE-atomic spectrometry to vanadium assay, and is superior to most other similar methods, because its useful pH range is in the moderately acidic range achieved with phosphoric acid. At this pH, many potential interferents are not chelated with PAN, and iron(III) as the major interferent is bound in a stable phosphate complex.

  7. Development of a Cloud-Point Extraction Method for Cobalt Determination in Natural Water Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Jamali

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A new, simple, and versatile cloud-point extraction (CPE methodology has been developed for the separation and preconcentration of cobalt. The cobalt ions in the initial aqueous solution were complexed with 4-Benzylpiperidinedithiocarbamate, and Triton X-114 was added as surfactant. Dilution of the surfactant-rich phase with acidified ethanol was performed after phase separation, and the cobalt content was measured by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The main factors affecting CPE procedure, such as pH, concentration of ligand, amount of Triton X-114, equilibrium temperature, and incubation time were investigated and optimized. Under the optimal conditions, the limit of detection (LOD for cobalt was 0.5 μg L-1, with sensitivity enhancement factor (EF of 67. Calibration curve was linear in the range of 2–150 μg L-1, and relative standard deviation was 3.2% (c=100 μg L-1; n=10. The proposed method was applied to the determination of trace cobalt in real water samples with satisfactory analytical results.

  8. The Mars Dust Cycle: Investigating the Effects of Radiatively Active Water Ice Clouds on Surface Stresses and Dust Lifting Potential with the NASA Ames Mars General Circulation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahre, Melinda A.; Hollingsworth, Jeffery

    2012-01-01

    The dust cycle is a critically important component of Mars' current climate system. Dust is present in the atmosphere of Mars year-round but the dust loading varies with season in a generally repeatable manner. Dust has a significant influence on the thermal structure of the atmosphere and thus greatly affects atmospheric circulation. The dust cycle is the most difficult of the three climate cycles (CO2, water, and dust) to model realistically with general circulation models. Until recently, numerical modeling investigations of the dust cycle have typically not included the effects of couplings to the water cycle through cloud formation. In the Martian atmosphere, dust particles likely provide the seed nuclei for heterogeneous nucleation of water ice clouds. As ice coats atmospheric dust grains, the newly formed cloud particles exhibit different physical and radiative characteristics. Thus, the coupling between the dust and water cycles likely affects the distributions of dust, water vapor and water ice, and thus atmospheric heating and cooling and the resulting circulations. We use the NASA Ames Mars GCM to investigate the effects of radiatively active water ice clouds on surface stress and the potential for dust lifting. The model includes a state-of-the-art water ice cloud microphysics package and a radiative transfer scheme that accounts for the radiative effects of CO2 gas, dust, and water ice clouds. We focus on simulations that are radiatively forced by a prescribed dust map, and we compare simulations that do and do not include radiatively active clouds. Preliminary results suggest that the magnitude and spatial patterns of surface stress (and thus dust lifting potential) are substantial influenced by the radiative effects of water ice clouds.

  9. Remote Sensing of Liquid Water and Ice Cloud Optical Thickness and Effective Radius in the Arctic: Application of Airborne Multispectral MAS Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Michael D.; Platnick, Steven; Yang, Ping; Arnold, G. Thomas; Gray, Mark A.; Riedi, Jerome C.; Ackerman, Steven A.; Liou, Kuo-Nan

    2003-01-01

    A multispectral scanning spectrometer was used to obtain measurements of the reflection function and brightness temperature of clouds, sea ice, snow, and tundra surfaces at 50 discrete wavelengths between 0.47 and 14.0 microns. These observations were obtained from the NASA ER-2 aircraft as part of the FIRE Arctic Clouds Experiment, conducted over a 1600 x 500 km region of the north slope of Alaska and surrounding Beaufort and Chukchi Seas between 18 May and 6 June 1998. Multispectral images of the reflection function and brightness temperature in 11 distinct bands of the MODIS Airborne Simulator (MAS) were used to derive a confidence in clear sky (or alternatively the probability of cloud), shadow, and heavy aerosol over five different ecosystems. Based on the results of individual tests run as part of the cloud mask, an algorithm was developed to estimate the phase of the clouds (water, ice, or undetermined phase). Finally, the cloud optical thickness and effective radius were derived for both water and ice clouds that were detected during one flight line on 4 June. This analysis shows that the cloud mask developed for operational use on MODIS, and tested using MAS data in Alaska, is quite capable of distinguishing clouds from bright sea ice surfaces during daytime conditions in the high Arctic. Results of individual tests, however, make it difficult to distinguish ice clouds over snow and sea ice surfaces, so additional tests were added to enhance the confidence in the thermodynamic phase of clouds over the Beaufort Sea. The cloud optical thickness and effective radius retrievals used 3 distinct bands of the MAS, with the newly developed 1.62 and 2.13 micron bands being used quite successfully over snow and sea ice surfaces. These results are contrasted with a MODIS-based algorithm that relies on spectral reflectance at 0.87 and 2.13 micron.

  10. Impacts of the January 2005 solar particle event on noctilucent clouds and water at the polar summer mesopause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Winkler

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The response of noctilucent clouds to the solar particle event in January 2005 is investigated by means of icy particle and ion chemistry simulations. It is shown that the decreasing occurrence rate of noctilucent clouds derived from measurements of the SCIAMACHY/Envisat instrument can be reproduced by one-dimensional model simulations if temperature data from the MLS/Aura instrument are used. The model calculations indicate that the sublimation of noctilucent clouds leads to significant changes of the water distribution in the mesopause region. These model results are compared with H2O measurements from the MLS and the MIPAS/Envisat satellite instruments. The pronounced modelled water enhancement below the icy particle layer and its decrease during the SPE are not observed by the satellite instruments. At altitudes >85 km the satellite measurements show an increase of H2O during the SPE in qualitative agreement with the model predictions. The discrepancies between model H2O and observations at lower altitudes might be attributed to the one-dimensional model approach which in particular neglects inhomogeneities and horizontal transport processes. Additionally, it is revealed that the water depletion due to reactions of proton hydrates during the considered solar particle event has only a minor impact on the icy particles.

  11. An energy balance model exploration of the impacts of interactions between surface albedo, cloud cover and water vapor on polar amplification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Södergren, A. Helena; McDonald, Adrian J.; Bodeker, Gregory E.

    2017-11-01

    We examine the effects of non-linear interactions between surface albedo, water vapor and cloud cover (referred to as climate variables) on amplified warming of the polar regions, using a new energy balance model. Our simulations show that the sum of the contributions to surface temperature changes due to any variable considered in isolation is smaller than the temperature changes from coupled feedback simulations. This non-linearity is strongest when all three climate variables are allowed to interact. Surface albedo appears to be the strongest driver of this non-linear behavior, followed by water vapor and clouds. This is because increases in longwave radiation absorbed by the surface, related to increases in water vapor and clouds, and increases in surface absorbed shortwave radiation caused by a decrease in surface albedo, amplify each other. Furthermore, our results corroborate previous findings that while increases in cloud cover and water vapor, along with the greenhouse effect itself, warm the polar regions, water vapor also significantly warms equatorial regions, which reduces polar amplification. Changes in surface albedo drive large changes in absorption of incoming shortwave radiation, thereby enhancing surface warming. Unlike high latitudes, surface albedo change at low latitudes are more constrained. Interactions between surface albedo, water vapor and clouds drive larger increases in temperatures in the polar regions compared to low latitudes. This is in spite of the fact that, due to a forcing, cloud cover increases at high latitudes and decreases in low latitudes, and that water vapor significantly enhances warming at low latitudes.

  12. Cloud MicroAtlas∗

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We begin by outlining the life cycle of a tall cloud, and then briefly discuss cloud systems. We choose one aspect of this life cycle, namely, the rapid growth of water droplets in ice- free clouds, to then discuss in greater detail. Taking a single vortex to be a building block of turbulence, we demonstrate one mechanism by ...

  13. Life in the Treetops: Drought Tolerance and Water Balance of Canopy Epiphytes in a Tropical Montane Cloud Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotsch, S. G.; Nadkarni, N.; Darby, A.; Dix, M.; Glunk, A.; Davidson, K.; Dawson, T. E.

    2014-12-01

    Tropical montane cloud forests (TMCFs) inhabit regions rich in biodiversity that play an important role in the local and regional water cycle. Canopy plants such as epiphytes and hemiepiphytes are an important component of the biodiversity in the TMCF and therefore play a significant role in the carbon, nutrient and water cycles. With only partial or no access to resources on the ground, canopy plants may be vulnerable to changes in climate that increase canopy temperatures and decrease atmospheric humidity or precipitation inputs. Despite their importance in the TMCF, there is little information regarding drought tolerance and water balance in this community. In this study we quantified variation in functional traits and water relations in 12 species of epiphytes and hemiepiphytes in a Costa Rican TMCF. We also generated pressure-volume curves and xylem vulnerability curves that we used as indicators of drought tolerance. Lastly, we determined the capacity for foliar water uptake in the laboratory and measured whole-plant transpiration in the field. We found that all species had a high turgor loss point (ψTLP), high vulnerability to cavitation (P50), and low bulk elastic modulus (ɛmax, i.e. high cell wall elasticity). These results indicate that capacitance may be high in canopy plants and that stored water may help to maintain high leaf water potentials during dry periods. We also found that all species had the capacity for foliar uptake and that this process contributed substantially to their water status and water balance. On average, foliar uptake contributed to the reabsorption of 70% of the water transpired over a 34-day period at the beginning of the dry season. Our results indicate that canopy plants can mitigate water loss substantially, but they may be vulnerable to changes in the overall precipitation patterns or increases in cloud base heights.

  14. Cloud Droplet Size and Liquid Water Path Retrievals From Zenith Radiance Measurements: Examples From the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program and the Aerosol Robotic Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, J. C.; Marshak, A.; Huang, C.-H.; Varnai, T.; Hogan, R. J.; Giles, D. M.; Holben, B. N.; Knyazikhin, Y.; O'Connor, E. J.; Wiscombe, W. J.

    2012-01-01

    The ground-based Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) and NASA Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) routinely monitor clouds using zenith radiances at visible and near-infrared wavelengths. Using the transmittance calculated from such measurements, we have developed a new retrieval method for cloud effective droplet size and conducted extensive tests for non-precipitating liquid water clouds. The underlying principle is to combine a water-absorbing wavelength (i.e. 1640 nm) with a nonwater-absorbing wavelength for acquiring information on cloud droplet size and optical depth. For simulated stratocumulus clouds with liquid water path less than 300 g/sq m and horizontal resolution of 201m, the retrieval method underestimates the mean effective radius by 0.8 m, with a root-mean-squared error of 1.7 m and a relative deviation of 13 %. For actual observations with a liquid water path less than 450 gm.2 at the ARM Oklahoma site during 2007-2008, our 1.5 min-averaged retrievals are generally larger by around 1 m than those from combined ground-based cloud radar and microwave radiometer at a 5min temporal resolution. We also compared our retrievals to those from combined shortwave flux and microwave observations for relatively homogeneous clouds, showing that the bias between these two retrieval sets is negligible, but the error of 2.6 m and the relative deviation of 22% are larger than those found in our simulation case. Finally, the transmittance-based cloud effective droplet radii agree to better than 11% with satellite observations and have a negative bias of 1 m. Overall, the retrieval method provides reasonable cloud effective radius estimates, which can enhance the cloud products of both ARM and AERONET.

  15. Studies on remote sensing method of particle size and water density distribution in mists and clouds using laser radar techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, H.; Kobayasi, T.; Inaba, H.

    1979-01-01

    A method of remote measurement of the particle size and density distribution of water droplets was developed. In this method, the size of droplets is measured from the Mie scattering parameter which is defined as the total-to-backscattering ratio of the laser beam. The water density distribution is obtained by a combination of the Mie scattering parameter and the extinction coefficient of the laser beam. This method was examined experimentally for the mist generated by an ultrasonic mist generator and applied to clouds containing rain and snow. Compared with the conventional sampling method, the present method has advantages of remote measurement capability and improvement in accuracy.

  16. Lattice Boltzmann Simulation of Water Isotope Fractionation During Growth of Ice Crystals in Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, G.; Depaolo, D.; Kang, Q.; Zhang, D.

    2006-12-01

    The isotopic composition of precipitation, especially that of snow, plays a special role in the global hydrological cycle and in reconstruction of past climates using polar ice cores. The fractionation of the major water isotope species (HHO, HDO, HHO-18) during ice crystal formation is critical to understanding the global distribution of isotopes in precipitation. Ice crystal growth in clouds is traditionally treated with a spherically- symmetric steady state diffusion model, with semi-empirical modifications added to account for ventilation and for complex crystal morphology. Although it is known that crystal growth rate, which depends largely on the degree of vapor over-saturation, determines crystal morphology, there are no existing quantitative models that directly relate morphology to the vapor saturation factor. Since kinetic (vapor phase diffusion-controlled) isotopic fractionation also depends on growth rate, there should be a direct relationship between vapor saturation, crystal morphology, and crystal isotopic composition. We use a 2D Lattice-Boltzmann model to simulate diffusion-controlled ice crystal growth from vapor- oversaturated air. In the model, crystals grow solely according to the diffusive fluxes just above the crystal surfaces, and hence crystal morphology arises from the initial and boundary conditions in the model and does not need to be specified a priori. The input parameters needed are the isotope-dependent vapor deposition rate constant (k) and the water vapor diffusivity in air (D). The values of both k and D can be computed from kinetic theory, and there are also experimentally determined values of D. The deduced values of k are uncertain to the extent that the sticking coefficient (or accommodation coefficient) for ice is uncertain. The ratio D/k is a length that determines the minimum scale of dendritic growth features and allows us to scale the numerical calculations to atmospheric conditions using a dimensionless Damkohler number

  17. Microphysical and radiative effects of aerosols on warm clouds during the Amazon biomass burning season as observed by MODIS: impacts of water vapor and land cover

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. E. Ten Hoeve

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Aerosol, cloud, water vapor, and temperature profile data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS are utilized to examine the impact of aerosols on clouds during the Amazonian biomass burning season in Rondônia, Brazil. It is found that increasing background column water vapor (CWV throughout this transition season between the Amazon dry and wet seasons likely exerts a strong effect on cloud properties. As a result, proper analysis of aerosol-cloud relationships requires that data be stratified by CWV to account better for the influence of background meteorological variation. Many previous studies of aerosol-cloud interactions over Amazonia have ignored the systematic changes to meteorological factors during the transition season, leading to possible misinterpretation of their results. Cloud fraction (CF is shown to increase or remain constant with aerosol optical depth (AOD, depending on the value of CWV, whereas the relationship between cloud optical depth (COD and AOD is quite different. COD increases with AOD until AOD ~ 0.3, which is assumed to be due to the first indirect (microphysical effect. At higher values of AOD, COD is found to decrease with increasing AOD, which may be due to: (1 the inhibition of cloud development by absorbing aerosols (radiative effect/semi-direct effect and/or (2 a possible retrieval artifact in which the measured reflectance in the visible is less than expected from a cloud top either from the darkening of clouds through the addition of carbonaceous biomass burning aerosols within or above clouds or subpixel dark surface contamination in the measured cloud reflectance. If (1 is a contributing mechanism, as we suspect, then an empirically-derived increasing function between cloud drop number and aerosol concentration, assumed in a majority of global climate models, is inaccurate since these models do not include treatment of aerosol absorption in and around clouds. The relationship between

  18. The Survey of Water and Ammonia in the Galactic Center (SWAG): Molecular Cloud Evolution in the Central Molecular Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieger, Nico; Ott, Jürgen; Beuther, Henrik; Walter, Fabian; Kruijssen, J. M. Diederik; Meier, David S.; Mills, Elisabeth A. C.; Contreras, Yanett; Edwards, Phil; Ginsburg, Adam; Henkel, Christian; Henshaw, Jonathan; Jackson, James; Kauffmann, Jens; Longmore, Steven; Martín, Sergio; Morris, Mark R.; Pillai, Thushara; Rickert, Matthew; Rosolowsky, Erik; Shinnaga, Hiroko; Walsh, Andrew; Yusef-Zadeh, Farhad; Zhang, Qizhou

    2017-11-01

    The Survey of Water and Ammonia in the Galactic Center (SWAG) covers the Central Molecular Zone (CMZ) of the Milky Way at frequencies between 21.2 and 25.4 GHz obtained at the Australia Telescope Compact Array at ˜0.9 pc spatial and ˜2.0 km s-1 spectral resolution. In this paper, we present data on the inner ˜250 pc (1.°4) between Sgr C and Sgr B2. We focus on the hyperfine structure of the metastable ammonia inversion lines (J, K) = (1, 1)-(6, 6) to derive column density, kinematics, opacity, and kinetic gas temperature. In the CMZ molecular clouds, we find typical line widths of 8-16 km s-1 and extended regions of optically thick (τ > 1) emission. Two components in kinetic temperature are detected at 25-50 K and 60-100 K, both being significantly hotter than the dust temperatures throughout the CMZ. We discuss the physical state of the CMZ gas as traced by ammonia in the context of the orbital model by Kruijssen et al. that interprets the observed distribution as a stream of molecular clouds following an open eccentric orbit. This allows us to statistically investigate the time dependencies of gas temperature, column density, and line width. We find heating rates between ˜50 and ˜100 K Myr-1 along the stream orbit. No strong signs of time dependence are found for column density or line width. These quantities are likely dominated by cloud-to-cloud variations. Our results qualitatively match the predictions of the current model of tidal triggering of cloud collapse, orbital kinematics, and the observation of an evolutionary sequence of increasing star formation activity with orbital phase.

  19. Tomographic retrieval of cloud liquid water fields from a single scanning microwave radiometer aboard a moving platform – Part 1: Field trial results from the Wakasa Bay experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Huang

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Tomographic methods offer great potential for retrieving three-dimensional spatial distributions of cloud liquid water from radiometric observations by passive microwave sensors. Fixed tomographic systems require multiple radiometers, while mobile systems can use just a single radiometer. Part 1 (this paper examines the results from a limited cloud tomography trial with a single-radiometer airborne system carried out as part of the 2003 AMSR-E validation campaign over Wakasa Bay of the Sea of Japan. During this trial, the Polarimetric Scanning Radiometer (PSR and Microwave Imaging Radiometer (MIR aboard the NASA P-3 research aircraft provided a useful dataset for testing the cloud tomography method over a system of low-level clouds. We do tomographic retrievals with a constrained inversion algorithm using three configurations: PSR, MIR, and combined PSR and MIR data. The liquid water paths from the PSR retrieval are consistent with those from the MIR retrieval. The retrieved cloud field based on the combined data appears to be physically plausible and consistent with the cloud image obtained by a cloud radar. We find that some vertically-uniform clouds appear at high altitudes in the retrieved field where the radar shows clear sky. This is likely due to the sub-optimal data collection strategy. This sets the stage for Part 2 of this study that aims to define optimal data collection strategies using observation system simulation experiments.

  20. Super-cooled liquid water topped sub-arctic clouds and precipitation - investigation based on combination of ground-based in-situ and remote-sensing observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsikko, Anne; Brus, David; O'Connor, Ewan J.; Filioglou, Maria; Komppula, Mika; Romakkaniemi, Sami

    2017-04-01

    In the high and mid latitudes super-cooled liquid water layers are frequently observed on top of clouds. These layers are difficult to forecast with numerical weather prediction models, even though, they have strong influence on atmospheric radiative properties, cloud microphysical properties, and subsequently, precipitation. This work investigates properties of super-cooled liquid water layer topped sub-arctic clouds and precipitation observed with ground-based in-situ (cloud probes) and remote-sensing (a cloud radar, Doppler and multi-wavelength lidars) instrumentation during two-month long Pallas Cloud Experiment (PaCE 2015) in autumn 2015. Analysis is based on standard Cloudnet scheme supplemented with new retrieval products of the specific clouds and their properties. Combination of two scales of observation provides new information on properties of clouds and precipitation in the sub-arctic Pallas region. Current status of results will be presented during the conference. The authors acknowledge financial support by the Academy of Finland (Centre of Excellence Programme, grant no 272041; and ICINA project, grant no 285068), the ACTRIS2 - European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No 654109, the KONE foundation, and the EU FP7 project BACCHUS (grant no 603445).

  1. submitter Modeling the thermodynamics and kinetics of sulfuric acid-dimethylamine-water nanoparticle growth in the CLOUD chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Ahlm, L; Schobesberger, S; Praplan, A P; Kim, J; Tikkanen, O -P; Lawler, M J; Smith, J N; Tröstl, J; Acosta Navarro, J C; Baltensperger, U; Bianchi, F; Donahue, N M; Duplissy, J; Franchin, A; Jokinen, T; Keskinen, H; Kirkby, J; Kürten, A; Laaksonen, A; Lehtipalo, K; Petäjä, T; Riccobono, F; Rissanen, M P; Rondo, L; Schallhart, S; Simon, M; Winkler, P M; Worsnop, D R; Virtanen, A; Riipinen, I

    2016-01-01

    Dimethylamine (DMA) has a stabilizing effect on sulfuric acid (SA) clusters, and the SA and DMA molecules and clusters likely play important roles in both aerosol particle formation and growth in the atmosphere. We use the monodisperse particle growth model for acid-base chemistry in nanoparticle growth (MABNAG) together with direct and indirect observations from the CLOUD4 and CLOUD7 experiments in the cosmics leaving outdoor droplets (CLOUD) chamber at CERN to investigate the size and composition evolution of freshly formed particles consisting of SA, DMA, and water as they grow to 20 nm in dry diameter. Hygroscopic growth factors are measured using a nano-hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyzer (nano-HTDMA), which combined with simulations of particle water uptake using the thermodynamic extended-aerosol inorganics model (E-AIM) constrain the chemical composition. MABNAG predicts a particle-phase ratio between DMA and SA molecules of 1.1–1.3 for a 2 nm particle and DMA gas-phase mixing ratio...

  2. Empirical orthogonal function analysis of cloud-containing coastal zone color scanner images of northeastern North American coastal waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eslinger, David L.; O'Brien, James J.; Iverson, Richard L.

    1989-01-01

    Empirical-orthogonal-function (EOF) analyses were carried out on 36 images of the Mid-Atlantic Bight and the Gulf of Maine, obtained by the CZCS aboard Nimbus 7 for the time period from February 28 through July 9, 1979, with the purpose of determining pigment concentrations in coastal waters. The EOF procedure was modified so as to include images with significant portions of data missing due to cloud obstruction, making it possible to estimate pigment values in areas beneath clouds. The results of image analyses explained observed variances in pigment concentrations and showed a south-to-north pattern corresponding to an April Mid-Atlantic Bight bloom and a June bloom over Nantucket Shoals and Platts Bank.

  3. Neptune's clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    The bright cirrus-like clouds of Neptune change rapidly, often forming and dissipating over periods of several to tens of hours. In this sequence Voyager 2 observed cloud evolution in the region around the Great Dark Spot (GDS). The surprisingly rapid changes which occur separating each panel shows that in this region Neptune's weather is perhaps as dynamic and variable as that of the Earth. However, the scale is immense by our standards -- the Earth and the GDS are of similar size -- and in Neptune's frigid atmosphere, where temperatures are as low as 55 degrees Kelvin (-360 F), the cirrus clouds are composed of frozen methane rather than Earth's crystals of water ice. The Voyager Mission is conducted by JPL for NASA's Office of Space Science and Applications

  4. The Structure of Ice Nanoclusters and Thin-films of Water Ice: Implications for Icy Grains in Cold Molecular Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delzeit, Lance; Blake, David; Uffindell, Christine; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The cubic to hexagonal phase transformation in water ice (I(sub c) yields I(sub h)) is used to measure the extent to which surface structure and impurities control bulk properties. In pure crystalline (I(sub c)) water ice nanoclusters and in thin-films of impure water ice, I(sub c) yields I(sub h) occurs at lower temperatures than in thin-films of pure water ice. The disordered surface of the 20 nm diameter nanoclusters promotes transformations or reactions which would otherwise be kinetically hindered. Likewise, impurities such as methanol introduce defects into the ice network, thereby allowing sluggish structural transitions to proceed. Such surface-related phenomena play an important role in promoting chemical reactions on interstellar ice grains within cold molecular clouds, where the first organic compounds are formed.

  5. A CloudSat Perspective of the Atmospheric Water Cycle and Precipitation: Recent Progress and Grand Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Graeme L.; Im, Eastwood; Vane, Deborah

    2012-01-01

    Summary Global - mean precipitation - is controlled by Earth's energy balance and is a quantifiable consequence of the water vapor feedback. Predictability rests on the degree to which the water vapor feedback is predictable. Regional scale - to a significant extent, changes are shaped by atmospheric circulation changes but we do not know the extent to which regional scale changes are predictable. The impacts of changes to atmospheric circulation on regional scale water cycle changes can be dramatic. Process - scale - significant biases to the CHARACTER of precipitation (frequency and intensity) is related to how the precipitation process is parameterized in models. Aerosol - We still do not know the extent to which the water cycle is influenced by aerosol but anecdotal evidence is building. The character of precipitation is affected by the way aerosol influence clouds and thus affects the forcing of the climate system through the albedo effect. Observations - we still have a way to go and need to approach the problem in a more integrated way (tie clouds, aerosol and precipitation together and then link to soil moisture, etc). Globally our capabilities seriously lag behind the science and model development.

  6. Foggy days and dry nights determine crown-level water balance in a seasonal tropical Montane cloud forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotsch, Sybil G; Asbjornsen, Heidi; Holwerda, Friso; Goldsmith, Gregory R; Weintraub, Alexis E; Dawson, Todd E

    2014-01-01

    The ecophysiology of tropical montane cloud forest (TMCF) trees is influenced by crown-level microclimate factors including regular mist/fog water inputs, and large variations in evaporative demand, which in turn can significantly impact water balance. We investigated the effect of such microclimatic factors on canopy ecophysiology and branch-level water balance in the dry season of a seasonal TMCF in Veracruz, Mexico, by quantifying both water inputs (via foliar uptake, FU) and outputs (day- and night-time transpiration, NT). Measurements of sap flow, stomatal conductance, leaf water potential and pressure-volume relations were obtained in Quercus lanceifolia, a canopy-dominant tree species. Our results indicate that FU occurred 34% of the time and led to the recovery of 9% (24 ± 9.1 L) of all the dry-season water transpired from individual branches. Capacity for FU was independently verified for seven additional common tree species. NT accounted for approximately 17% (46 L) of dry-season water loss. There was a strong correlation between FU and the duration of leaf wetness events (fog and/or rain), as well as between NT and the night-time vapour pressure deficit. Our results show the clear importance of fog and NT for the canopy water relations of Q. lanceifolia. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Interannual and Diurnal Variability in Water Ice Clouds Observed from MSL Over Two Martian Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloos, J. L.; Moores, J. E.; Whiteway, J. A.; Aggarwal, M.

    2018-01-01

    We update the results of cloud imaging sequences from the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover Curiosity to complete two Mars years of observations (LS=160° of Mars year (MY) 31 to LS=160° of MY 33). Relatively good seasonal coverage is achieved within the study period, with just over 500 observations obtained, averaging one observation every 2-3 sols. Cloud opacity measurements are made using differential photometry and a simplified radiative transfer method. These opacity measurements are used to assess the interannual variability of the aphelion cloud belt (ACB) for MY 32 and 33. Upon accounting for a statistical bias in the data set, the variation is found to be <30% within uncertainty. Diurnal variation of the ACB is also able to be examined in MY 33 owing to an increased number of early morning observations in this year. Although a gap in data around local noon prevents a complete assessment, we find that cloud opacity is moderately increased in the morning hours (07:00-09:00) compared to the late afternoon (15:00-17:00).

  8. A new retrieval method for the ice water content of cirrus using data from the CloudSat and CALIPSO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Honglin; Bu, Lingbing; Kumar, K. Raghavendra; Gao, Haiyang; Huang, Xingyou; Zhang, Wentao

    2017-08-01

    The CloudSat and CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations) are the members of satellite observation system of A-train to achieve the quasi-synchronization observation on the same orbit. With the help of active (CALIOP and CPR) and passive payloads from these two satellites, respectively, unprecedented detailed information of microphysical properties of ice cloud can be retrieved. The ice water content (IWC) is regarded as one of the most important microphysical characteristics of cirrus for its prominent role in cloud radiative forcing. In this paper, we proposed a new joint (Combination) retrieval method using the full advantages of different well established retrieval methods, namely the LIDAR method (for the region Lidar-only), the MWCR method (for the region Radar-only), and Wang method (for the region Lidar-Radar) proposed by Wang et al. (2002). In retrieval of cirrus IWC, empirical formulas of the exponential type were used for both thinner cirrus (detected by Lidar-only), thicker cirrus (detected by radar-only), and the part of cirrus detected by both, respectively. In the present study, the comparison of various methods verified that our proposed new joint method is more comprehensive, rational and reliable. Further, the retrieval information of cirrus is complete and accurate for the region that Lidar cannot penetrate and Radar is insensitive. On the whole, the retrieval results of IWC showed certain differences retrieved from the joint method, Ca&Cl, and ICARE which can be interpreted from the different hypothesis of microphysical characteristics and parameters used in the retrieval method. In addition, our joint method only uses the extinction coefficient and the radar reflectivity factor to calculate the IWC, which is simpler and reduces to some extent the accumulative error. In future studies, we will not only compare the value of IWC but also explore the detailed macrophysical and microphysical characteristics of

  9. Effects of radiation and turbulence on the diabatic heating and water budget of the stratiform region of a tropical cloud cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churchill, Dean D.; Houze, Robert A., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    A twi-dimensional kinematic model has been used to diagnose the thermodynamic, water vapor, and hydrometeor fields of the stratiform clouds associated with a mesoscale tropical cloud cluster. The model incorporates ice- and water-cloud microphysics, visible and infrared radiation, and convective adjustment. It is intended to determine the relative contributions of radiation, mycrophysics, and turbulence to diabatic heating, and the effects that radiation has on the water budget of the cluster in the absence of dynamical interactions. The model has been initialized with thermodynamic fields and wind velocities diagnosed from a GATE tropical squall line. It is found that radiation does not directly affect the water budget of the stratiform region, and any radiative effect on hydrometeors must involve interaction with dynamics.

  10. Simultaneous retrieval of water vapour, temperature and cirrus clouds properties from measurements of far infrared spectral radiance over the Antarctic Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Natale, Gianluca; Palchetti, Luca; Bianchini, Giovanni; Del Guasta, Massimo

    2017-03-01

    The possibility separating the contributions of the atmospheric state and ice clouds by using spectral infrared measurements is a fundamental step to quantifying the cloud effect in climate models. A simultaneous retrieval of cloud and atmospheric parameters from infrared wideband spectra will allow the disentanglement of the spectral interference between these variables. In this paper, we describe the development of a code for the simultaneous retrieval of atmospheric state and ice cloud parameters, and its application to the analysis of the spectral measurements acquired by the Radiation Explorer in the Far Infrared - Prototype for Applications and Development (REFIR-PAD) spectroradiometer, which has been in operation at Concordia Station on the Antarctic Plateau since 2012. The code performs the retrieval with a computational time that is comparable with the instrument acquisition time. Water vapour and temperature profiles and the cloud optical and microphysical properties, such as the generalised effective diameter and the ice water path, are retrieved by exploiting the 230-980 cm-1 spectral band. To simulate atmospheric radiative transfer, the Line-By-Line Radiative Transfer Model (LBLRTM) has been integrated with a specifically developed subroutine based on the δ-Eddington two-stream approximation, whereas the single-scattering properties of cirrus clouds have been derived from a database for hexagonal column habits. In order to detect ice clouds, a backscattering and depolarisation lidar, co-located with REFIR-PAD has been used, allowing us to infer the position and the cloud thickness to be used in the retrieval. A climatology of the vertical profiles of water vapour and temperature has been performed by using the daily radiosounding available at the station at 12:00 UTC. The climatology has been used to build an a priori profile correlation to constrain the fitting procedure. An optimal estimation method with the Levenberg-Marquardt approach has been

  11. Water deuteration and ortho-to-para nuclear spin ratio of H2 in molecular clouds formed via the accumulation of H I gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuya, K.; Aikawa, Y.; Hincelin, U.; Hassel, G. E.; Bergin, E. A.; Vasyunin, A. I.; Herbst, E.

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the water deuteration ratio and ortho-to-para nuclear spin ratio of H2 (OPR(H2)) during the formation and early evolution of a molecular cloud, following the scenario that accretion flows sweep and accumulate H i gas to form molecular clouds. We follow the physical evolution of post-shock materials using a one-dimensional shock model, combined with post-processing gas-ice chemistry simulations. This approach allows us to study the evolution of the OPR(H2) and water deuteration ratio without an arbitrary assumption of the initial molecular abundances, including the initial OPR(H2). When the conversion of hydrogen into H2 is almost complete the OPR(H2) is already much smaller than the statistical value of three because of the spin conversion in the gas phase. As the gas accumulates, the OPR(H2) decreases in a non-equilibrium manner. We find that water ice can be deuterium-poor at the end of its main formation stage in the cloud, compared to water vapor observed in the vicinity of low-mass protostars where water ice is sublimated. If this is the case, the enrichment of deuterium in water should mostly occur at somewhat later evolutionary stages of star formation, i.e., cold prestellar/protostellar cores. The main mechanism to suppress water ice deuteration in the cloud is the cycle of photodissociation and reformation of water ice, which efficiently removes deuterium from water ice chemistry. The removal efficiency depends on the main formation pathway of water ice. The OPR(H2) plays a minor role in water ice deuteration at the main formation stage of water ice. Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  12. Do Reductions in Dry Season Transpiration Allow Shallow Soil Water Uptake to Persist in a Tropical Lower Montane Cloud Forest?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz Villers, L. E.; Holwerda, F.; Alvarado-Barrientos, M. S.; Goldsmith, G. R.; Geissert Kientz, D. R.; González Martínez, T. M.; Dawson, T. E.

    2016-12-01

    Tropical montane cloud forests (TMCF) are ecosystems particularly sensitive to climate change; however, the effects of warmer and drier conditions on TMCF water cycling remain poorly understood. To investigate the plant functional response to reduced water availability, we conducted a study during the mid to late dry season (2014) in the lower limit (1,325 m asl) of the TMCF belt (1200-2500 m asl) in central Veracruz, Mexico. The temporal variation of transpiration rates of dominant upper canopy and mid-story tree species, depth of water uptake, as well as tree water sources were examined using micrometeorological, sapflow and soil moisture measurements, in combination with data on stable isotope (δ18O and δ2H) composition of rain, tree xylem, soil (bulk and low suction-lysimeter) and stream water. The sapflow data suggest that crown conductances decreased as temperature and vapor pressure deficit increased, and soil moisture decreased from the mid to late dry season. Across all samplings (January 21, April 12 and 26), upper canopy species (Quercus spp.) showed more depleted (negative) isotope values compared to mid-story trees (Carpinus tropicalis). Overall, we found that the evaporated soil water pool was the main source for the trees. Furthermore, our MixSIAR Bayesian mixing model results showed that the depth of tree water uptake changed over the course of the dry season. Unexpectedly, a shift in water uptake from deeper (60-120 cm depth) to shallower soil water (0-30 cm) sources was observed, coinciding with the decreases in transpiration rates towards the end of the dry season. A larger reduction in deep soil water contributions was observed for upper canopy trees (from 70±14 to 22±15%) than for mid-story species (from 10±13 to 7±10%). The use of shallow soil water by trees during the dry season seems consistent with the greater root biomass and higher macronutrient concentrations found in the first 10 cm of the soil profiles. These findings are an

  13. Determination of trace inorganic mercury species in water samples by cloud point extraction and UV-vis spectrophotometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulusoy, Halil Ibrahim

    2014-01-01

    A new micelle-mediated extraction method was developed for preconcentration of ultratrace Hg(II) ions prior to spectrophotometric determination. 2-(2'-Thiazolylazo)-p-cresol (TAC) and Ponpe 7.5 were used as the chelating agent and nonionic surfactant, respectively. Hg(II) ions form a hydrophobic complex with TAC in a micelle medium. The main factors affecting cloud point extraction efficiency, such as pH of the medium, concentrations of TAC and Ponpe 7.5, and equilibration temperature and time, were investigated in detail. An overall preconcentration factor of 33.3 was obtained upon preconcentration of a 50 mL sample. The LOD obtained under the optimal conditions was 0.86 microg/L, and the RSD for five replicate measurements of 100 microg/L Hg(II) was 3.12%. The method was successfully applied to the determination of Hg in environmental water samples.

  14. Atmospheric movies acquired at the Mars Science Laboratory landing site: Cloud morphology, frequency and significance to the Gale Crater water cycle and Phoenix mission results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moores, John E.; Lemmon, Mark T.; Rafkin, Scot C. R.; Francis, Raymond; Pla-Garcia, Jorge; de la Torre Juárez, Manuel; Bean, Keri; Kass, David; Haberle, Robert; Newman, Claire; Mischna, Michael; Vasavada, Ashwin; Rennó, Nilton; Bell, Jim; Calef, Fred; Cantor, Bruce; Mcconnochie, Timothy H.; Harri, Ari-Matti; Genzer, Maria; Wong, Michael; Smith, Michael D.; Javier Martín-Torres, F.; Zorzano, María-Paz; Kemppinen, Osku; McCullough, Emily

    2015-05-01

    We report on the first 360 sols (LS 150° to 5°), representing just over half a Martian year, of atmospheric monitoring movies acquired using the NavCam imager from the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Rover Curiosity. Such movies reveal faint clouds that are difficult to discern in single images. The data set acquired was divided into two different classifications depending upon the orientation and intent of the observation. Up to sol 360, 73 Zenith movies and 79 Supra-Horizon movies have been acquired and time-variable features could be discerned in 25 of each. The data set from MSL is compared to similar observations made by the Surface Stereo Imager (SSI) onboard the Phoenix Lander and suggests a much drier environment at Gale Crater (4.6°S) during this season than was observed in Green Valley (68.2°N) as would be expected based on latitude and the global water cycle. The optical depth of the variable component of clouds seen in images with features are up to 0.047 ± 0.009 with a granularity to the features observed which averages 3.8°. MCS also observes clouds during the same period of comparable optical depth at 30 and 50 km that would suggest a cloud spacing of 2.0 to 3.3 km. Multiple motions visible in atmospheric movies support the presence of two distinct layers of clouds. At Gale Crater, these clouds are likely caused by atmospheric waves given the regular spacing of features observed in many Zenith movies and decreased spacing towards the horizon in sunset movies consistent with clouds forming at a constant elevation. Reanalysis of Phoenix data in the light of the NavCam equatorial dataset suggests that clouds may have been more frequent in the earlier portion of the Phoenix mission than was previously thought.

  15. Cloud point extraction for trace inorganic arsenic speciation analysis in water samples by hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Shan, E-mail: ls_tuzi@163.com; Wang, Mei, E-mail: wmei02@163.com; Zhong, Yizhou, E-mail: yizhz@21cn.com; Zhang, Zehua, E-mail: kazuki.0101@aliyun.com; Yang, Bingyi, E-mail: e_yby@163.com

    2015-09-01

    A new cloud point extraction technique was established and used for the determination of trace inorganic arsenic species in water samples combined with hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry (HGAFS). As(III) and As(V) were complexed with ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate and molybdate, respectively. The complexes were quantitatively extracted with the non-ionic surfactant (Triton X-114) by centrifugation. After addition of antifoam, the surfactant-rich phase containing As(III) was diluted with 5% HCl for HGAFS determination. For As(V) determination, 50% HCl was added to the surfactant-rich phase, and the mixture was placed in an ultrasonic bath at 70 °C for 30 min. As(V) was reduced to As(III) with thiourea–ascorbic acid solution, followed by HGAFS. Under the optimum conditions, limits of detection of 0.009 and 0.012 μg/L were obtained for As(III) and As(V), respectively. Concentration factors of 9.3 and 7.9, respectively, were obtained for a 50 mL sample. The precisions were 2.1% for As(III) and 2.3% for As(V). The proposed method was successfully used for the determination of trace As(III) and As(V) in water samples, with satisfactory recoveries. - Highlights: • Cloud point extraction was firstly established to determine trace inorganic arsenic(As) species combining with HGAFS. • Separate As(III) and As(V) determinations improve the accuracy. • Ultrasonic release of complexed As(V) enables complete As(V) reduction to As(III). • Direct HGAFS analysis can be performed.

  16. Aircraft Anomaly Prognostics Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Ridgetop Group will leverage its proven Electromechanical Actuator (EMA) prognostics methodology to develop an advanced model-based actuator prognostic reasoner...

  17. The water and energy exchange of a shaded coffee plantation in the lower montane cloud forest zone of central Veracruz, Mexico

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holwerda, F.; Bruijnzeel, L.A.; Barradas, V.L.; Cervantes, J.

    2013-01-01

    The water and energy fluxes of a shaded coffee plantation in the lower montane cloud forest (LMCF) zone of central Veracruz, Mexico, were measured over a two-year period (September 2006-August 2008) using the eddy covariance method. Complementary measurements of throughfall and stemflow were made to

  18. Achieve a Better Understanding of Cloud and Precipitation Processes for the Promotion of Water Security in Arid and Semi-Arid Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrah, S.; Al Yazidi, O.

    2016-12-01

    The UAE Research Program for Rain Enhancement Science (UAEREP) is an international research initiative designed to advance the science and technology of rain enhancement. It comes from an understanding of the needs of countries suffering from scarcity of fresh water, and its will to support innovation globally. The Program focuses on the following topics: Climate change, Climate modelling, Climatology, Atmospheric physics, Atmospheric dynamics, Weather modification, Cloud physics, Cloud dynamics, Cloud seeding, Weather radars, Dust modelling, Aerosol physics , Aerosol chemistry, Aerosol/cloud interactions, Water resources, Physics, Numerical modelling, Material science, Nanotechnology, Meteorology, Hydrology, Hydrogeology, Rocket technology, Laser technology, Water sustainability, Remote sensing, Environmental sciences... In 2015, three research teams from Japan, Germany and the UAE led by Prof. Masataka Murakami, Volker Wulfmeyer and Linda Zou have been respectively awarded. Together, they are addressing the issue of water security through innovative ideas: algorithms and sensors, land cover modification, and nanotechnologies to accelerate condensation. These three projects are undergoing now with extensive research and progresses. This session will be an opportunity to present their latest results as well as to detail the evolution of research in rain enhancement. In 2016 indeed, the Program saw a remarkable increase in participation, with 91 pre-proposals from 398 scientists, researchers and technologists affiliated to 180 institutes from 45 countries. The projects submitted are now focusing on modelling to predict weather, autonomous vehicles, rocket technology, lasers or new seeding materials… The science of rain enhancement offers considerable potential in terms of research, development and innovation. Though cloud seeding has been pursued since the late 1940s, it has been viewed as a relatively marginal field of interest for scientists. This benign neglect

  19. Cloud water composition during HCCT-2010: Scavenging efficiencies, solute concentrations, and droplet size dependence of inorganic ions and dissolved organic carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Pinxteren, Dominik; Wadinga Fomba, Khanneh; Mertes, Stephan; Müller, Konrad; Spindler, Gerald; Schneider, Johannes; Lee, Taehyoung; Collett, Jeffrey L.; Herrmann, Hartmut

    2016-03-01

    Cloud water samples were taken in September/October 2010 at Mt. Schmücke in a rural, forested area in Germany during the Lagrange-type Hill Cap Cloud Thuringia 2010 (HCCT-2010) cloud experiment. Besides bulk collectors, a three-stage and a five-stage collector were applied and samples were analysed for inorganic ions (SO42-,NO3-, NH4+, Cl-, Na+, Mg2+, Ca2+, K+), H2O2 (aq), S(IV), and dissolved organic carbon (DOC). Campaign volume-weighted mean concentrations were 191, 142, and 39 µmol L-1 for ammonium, nitrate, and sulfate respectively, between 4 and 27 µmol L-1 for minor ions, 5.4 µmol L-1 for H2O2 (aq), 1.9 µmol L-1 for S(IV), and 3.9 mgC L-1 for DOC. The concentrations compare well to more recent European cloud water data from similar sites. On a mass basis, organic material (as DOC × 1.8) contributed 20-40 % (event means) to total solute concentrations and was found to have non-negligible impact on cloud water acidity. Relative standard deviations of major ions were 60-66 % for solute concentrations and 52-80 % for cloud water loadings (CWLs). The similar variability of solute concentrations and CWLs together with the results of back-trajectory analysis and principal component analysis, suggests that concentrations in incoming air masses (i.e. air mass history), rather than cloud liquid water content (LWC), were the main factor controlling bulk solute concentrations for the cloud studied. Droplet effective radius was found to be a somewhat better predictor for cloud water total ionic content (TIC) than LWC, even though no single explanatory variable can fully describe TIC (or solute concentration) variations in a simple functional relation due to the complex processes involved. Bulk concentrations typically agreed within a factor of 2 with co-located measurements of residual particle concentrations sampled by a counterflow virtual impactor (CVI) and analysed by an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS), with the deviations being mainly caused by systematic

  20. Understanding the role of fog in forest hydrology: Stable isotopes as tools for determining input and partitioning of cloud water in montane forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholl, M.; Eugster, W.; Burkard, R.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the hydrology of tropical montane cloud forests (TMCF) has become essential as deforestation of mountain areas proceeds at an increased rate worldwide. Passive and active cloud-water collectors, throughfall and stemflow collectors, visibility or droplet size measurements, and micrometeorological sensors are typically used to measure the fog water inputs to ecosystems. In addition, stable isotopes may be used as a natural tracer for fog and rain. Previous studies have shown that the isotopic signature of fog tends to be more enriched in the heavier isotopes 2H and 18O than that of rain, due to differences in condensation temperature and history. Differences between fog and rain isotopes are largest when rain is from synoptic-scale storms, and fog or orographic cloud water is generated locally. Smaller isotopic differences have been observed between rain and fog on mountains with orographic clouds, but only a few studies have been conducted. Quantifying fog deposition using isotope methods is more difficult in forests receiving mixed precipitation, because of limitations in the ability of sampling equipment to separate fog from rain, and because fog and rain may, under some conditions, have similar isotopic composition. This article describes the various types of fog most relevant to montane cloud forests and the importance of fog water deposition in the hydrologic budget. A brief overview of isotope hydrology provides the background needed to understand isotope applications in cloud forests. A summary of previous work explains isotopic differences between rain and fog in different environments, and how monitoring the isotopic signature of surface water, soil water and tree xylem water can yield estimates of the contribution of fog water to streamflow, groundwater recharge and transpiration. Next, instrumentation to measure fog and rain, and methods to determine isotopic concentrations in plant and soil water are discussed. The article concludes with

  1. The July 2016 Study of the water VApour in the polar AtmosPhere (SVAAP) campaign at Thule, Greenland: surface radiation budget and role of clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meloni, Daniela; Di Iorio, Tatiana; di Sarra, Alcide; Iaccarino, Antonio; Pace, Giandomenico; Mevi, Gabriele; Muscari, Giovanni; Cacciani, Marco; Gröbner, Julian

    2017-04-01

    The Study of the water VApour in the polar AtmosPhere (SVAAP) project, funded by the Italian Programme for Antarctic Research, is aimed at investigating the surface radiation budget (SRB), the variability of atmospheric water vapour, and the long-term variations in stratospheric composition and structure at Thule, Greenland, in the framework of the international Network for Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC). Thule High Arctic Atmospheric Observatory (THAAO, 76.5° N, 68.8° W) is devoted to study climate change and has been operational since 1990, with the contribution of different international institutions: DMI, NCAR, ENEA, INGV, Universities of Roma and Firenze (http://www.thuleatmos-it.it). As part of SVAAP an intensive field campaign was held at Thule from 5 to 28 July 2016. The campaign was also aimed at supporting the installation of VESPA-22, a new microwave radiometer for water vapour profiling in the upper atmosphere and integrated water vapour (IWV), and offered the possibility to study the cloud physical and optical properties and their impact on the SRB. Measurements of downward shortwave (SW) and longwave (LW) irradiance were already available since 2009. Additional observations were added to obtain the SRB and to characterize the atmospheric state: upward SW and LW irradiance, upwelling and downwelling photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), downward irradiance in the 8-14 µm infrared window, temperature and relative humidity tropospheric profiles, IWV, liquid water path (LWP), lidar tropospheric backscattering profiles, sky brightness temperature (BT) in the 9.6-11.5 µm spectral range, visible and infrared sky images, surface meteorological parameters. Moreover, 23 radiosonde were launched during the campaign. Data from the period 14-28 July are presented in this study. The first part of the campaign was characterized by stable cloud-free conditions, while alternation of cloudy and cloud-free sky occurred after 18 July. The

  2. Water Treatment using Discharge Generated in Cavitation Field with Micro Bubble Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihara, Satoshi; Hirohata, Taiki; Kominato, Yuichi; Yamabe, Chobei; Ike, Hideaki; Hakiai, Kazunori; Hirabayashi, Kazuya; Tamagawa, Masaaki

    New method of water treatment for wastewater using discharge in water cavitation field, in which numerous micro bubbles were generated by high-speed water flow, was proposed in this paper. Indigo carmine solution, which is a type of dye, with a concentration of 9mg/Liter was used as a specimen for demonstration of water treatment. The total volume of solution and average speed of solution in the cavitation field was 20 Liter and about 7.4 m/s, respectively. A reduction ratio of absorbance of 96% was obtained in 50 min of treatment time at an electrode distance of 2 mm and a discharge power of 16 W. Also it was found that the efficiency of decolorization was improved by changing the electrode location.

  3. On the Formation of Interstellar Water Ice: Constraints from a Search for Hydrogen Peroxide Ice in Molecular Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R. G.; Charnely, S. B.; Pendleton, Y. J.; Wright, C. M.; Maldoni, M. M.; Robinson, G.

    2011-01-01

    Recent surface chemistry experiments have shown that the hydrogenation of molecular oxygen on interstellar dust grains is a plausible formation mechanism, via hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), for the production of water (H2O) ice mantles in the dense interstellar medium. Theoretical chemistry models also predict the formation of a significant abundance of H2O2 ice in grain mantles by this route. At their upper limits, the predicted and experimental abundances are sufficiently high that H2O2 should be detectable in molecular cloud ice spectra. To investigate this further, laboratory spectra have been obtained for H2O2/H2O ice films between 2.5 and 200 micron, from 10 to 180 K, containing 3%, 30%, and 97% H2O2 ice. Integrated absorbances for all the absorption features in low-temperature H2O2 ice have been derived from these spectra. For identifying H2O2 ice, the key results are the presence of unique features near 3.5, 7.0, and 11.3 micron. Comparing the laboratory spectra with the spectra of a group of 24 protostars and field stars, all of which have strong H2O ice absorption bands, no absorption features are found that can definitely be identified with H2O2 ice. In the absence of definite H2O2 features, the H2O2 abundance is constrained by its possible contribution to the weak absorption feature near 3.47 micron found on the long-wavelength wing of the 3 micron H2O ice band. This gives an average upper limit for H2O2, as a percentage of H2O, of 9% +/- 4%. This is a strong constraint on parameters for surface chemistry experiments and dense cloud chemistry models.

  4. Cloud Computing

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Cloud computing; services on a cloud; cloud types; computing utility; risks in using cloud computing. Author Affiliations. V Rajaraman1. Supercomputer Education and Research Centre, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012, India. Resonance – Journal of Science Education. Current Issue : Vol. 22, Issue 11. Current ...

  5. Aerosol Impacts on California Winter Clouds and Precipitation during CalWater 2011: Local Pollution versus Long-Range Transported Dust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Jiwen; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; DeMott, Paul J.; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Singh, Balwinder; Rosenfeld, Daniel; Tomlinson, Jason M.; White, Allen B.; Prather, Kimberly; Minnis, Patrick; Ayers, J. K.; Min, Qilong

    2014-01-03

    Mineral dust aerosols often observed over California in winter and spring, associated with long-range transport from Asia and Sahara, have been linked to enhanced precipitation based on observations. Local anthropogenic pollution, on the other hand, was shown in previous observational and modeling studies to reduce precipitation. Here we incorporate recent developments in ice nucleation parameterizations to link aerosols with ice crystal formation in a spectral-bin cloud microphysical model coupled with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, to examine the relative and combined impacts of dust and local pollution particles on cloud properties and precipitation type and intensity. Simulations are carried out for two cloud cases with contrasting meteorology and cloud dynamics that occurred on February 16 (FEB16) and March 02 (MAR02) from the CalWater 2011 field campaign. In both cases, observations show the presence of dust and biological particles in a relative pristine environment. The simulated cloud microphysical properties and precipitation show reasonable agreement with aircraft and surface measurements. Model sensitivity experiments indicate that in the pristine environment, the dust and biological aerosol layers increase the accumulated precipitation by 10-20% from the Central Valley to the Sierra Nevada Mountains for both FEB16 and MAR02 due to a ~40% increase in snow formation, validating the observational hypothesis. Model results show that local pollution increases precipitation over the windward slope of the mountains by few percent due to increased snow formation when dust is present but reduces precipitation by 5-8% if dust is removed on FEB16. The effects of local pollution on cloud microphysics and precipitation strongly depend on meteorology including the strength of the Sierra Barrier Jet, and cloud dynamics. This study further underscores the importance of the interactions between local pollution, dust, and environmental conditions for

  6. Stabilization of model beverage cloud emulsions using protein-polysaccharide electrostatic complexes formed at the oil-water interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harnsilawat, Thepkunya; Pongsawatmanit, Rungnaphar; McClements, David J

    2006-07-26

    The potential of utilizing interfacial complexes, formed through the electrostatic interactions of proteins and polysaccharides at oil-water interfaces, to stabilize model beverage cloud emulsions has been examined. These interfacial complexes were formed by mixing charged polysaccharides with oil-in-water emulsions containing oppositely charged protein-coated oil droplets. Model beverage emulsions were prepared that consisted of 0.1 wt % corn oil droplets coated by beta-lactoglobulin (beta-Lg), beta-Lg/alginate, beta-Lg/iota-carrageenan, or beta-Lg/gum arabic interfacial layers (pH 3 or 4). Stable emulsions were formed when the polysaccharide concentration was sufficient to saturate the protein-coated droplets. The emulsions were subjected to variations in pH (from 3 to 7), ionic strength (from 0 to 250 mM NaCl), and thermal processing (from 30 or 90 degrees C), and the influence on their stability was determined. The emulsions containing alginate and carrageenan had the best stability to ionic strength and thermal processing. This study shows that the controlled formation of protein-polysaccharide complexes at droplet surfaces may be used to produce stable beverage emulsions, which may have important implications for industrial applications.

  7. Role of clouds, aerosols, and aerosol-cloud interaction in 20th century simulations with GISS ModelE2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazarenko, L.; Rind, D. H.; Bauer, S.; Del Genio, A. D.

    2015-12-01

    Simulations of aerosols, clouds and their interaction contribute to the major source of uncertainty in predicting the changing Earth's energy and in estimating future climate. Anthropogenic contribution of aerosols affects the properties of clouds through aerosol indirect effects. Three different versions of NASA GISS global climate model are presented for simulation of the twentieth century climate change. All versions have fully interactive tracers of aerosols and chemistry in both the troposphere and stratosphere. All chemical species are simulated prognostically consistent with atmospheric physics in the model and the emissions of short-lived precursors [Shindell et al., 2006]. One version does not include the aerosol indirect effect on clouds. The other two versions include a parameterization of the interactive first indirect aerosol effect on clouds following Menon et al. [2010]. One of these two models has the Multiconfiguration Aerosol Tracker of Mixing state (MATRIX) that permits detailed treatment of aerosol mixing state, size, and aerosol-cloud activation. The main purpose of this study is evaluation of aerosol-clouds interactions and feedbacks, as well as cloud and aerosol radiative forcings, for the twentieth century climate under different assumptions and parameterizations for aerosol, clouds and their interactions in the climate models. The change of global surface air temperature based on linear trend ranges from +0.8°C to +1.2°C between 1850 and 2012. Water cloud optical thickness increases with increasing temperature in all versions with the largest increase in models with interactive indirect effect of aerosols on clouds, which leads to the total (shortwave and longwave) cloud radiative cooling trend at the top of the atmosphere. Menon, S., D. Koch, G. Beig, S. Sahu, J. Fasullo, and D. Orlikowski (2010), Black carbon aerosols and the third polar ice cap, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 10,4559-4571, doi:10.5194/acp-10-4559-2010. Shindell, D., G. Faluvegi

  8. Cosmic rays, clouds, and climate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marsh, N.; Svensmark, Henrik

    2000-01-01

    A correlation between a global average of low cloud cover and the flux of cosmic rays incident in the atmosphere has been observed during the last solar cycle. The ionising potential of Earth bound cosmic rays are modulated by the state of the heliosphere, while clouds play an important role...... between cosmic ray flux and low cloud top temperature. The temperature of a cloud depends on the radiation properties determined by its droplet distribution. Low clouds are warm (> 273 K) and therefore consist of liquid water droplets. At typical atmospheric supersaturations (similar to1%) a liquid cloud...... drop will only form in the presence of an aerosol, which acts as a condensation site. The droplet distribution of a cloud will then depend on the number of aerosols activated as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and the level of super saturation. Based on observational evidence it is argued...

  9. Cloud condensation nucleus (CCN behavior of organic aerosol particles generated by atomization of water and methanol solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. A. Rissman

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Cloud condensation nucleus (CCN experiments were carried out for malonic acid, succinic acid, oxalacetic acid, DL-malic acid, glutaric acid, DL-glutamic acid monohydrate, and adipic acid, using both water and methanol as atomization solvents, at three operating supersaturations (0.11%, 0.21%, and 0.32% in the Caltech three-column CCN instrument (CCNC3. Predictions of CCN behavior for five of these compounds were made using the Aerosol Diameter Dependent Equilibrium Model (ADDEM. The experiments presented here expose important considerations associated with the laboratory measurement of the CCN behavior of organic compounds. Choice of atomization solvent results in significant differences in CCN activation for some of the compounds studied, which could result from residual solvent, particle morphology differences, and chemical reactions between the particle and gas phases. Also, significant changes in aerosol size distribution occurred after classification in a differential mobility analyzer (DMA for malonic acid and glutaric acid, preventing confident interpretation of experimental data for these two compounds. Filter analysis of adipic acid atomized from methanol solution indicates that gas-particle phase reactions may have taken place after atomization and before methanol was removed from the sample gas stream. Careful consideration of these experimental issues is necessary for successful design and interpretation of laboratory CCN measurements.

  10. Cloud Governance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berthing, Hans Henrik

    Denne præsentation beskriver fordele og værdier ved anvendelse af Cloud Computing. Endvidere inddrager resultater fra en række internationale analyser fra ISACA om Cloud Computing.......Denne præsentation beskriver fordele og værdier ved anvendelse af Cloud Computing. Endvidere inddrager resultater fra en række internationale analyser fra ISACA om Cloud Computing....

  11. Cloud optics

    CERN Document Server

    Kokhanovsky, A

    2006-01-01

    Clouds affect the climate of the Earth, and they are an important factor in the weather. Therefore, their radiative properties must be understood in great detail. This book summarizes current knowledge on cloud optical properties, for example their ability to absorb, transmit, and reflect light, which depends on the clouds' geometrical and microphysical characteristics such as sizes of droplets and crystals, their shapes, and structures. In addition, problems related to the image transfer through clouds and cloud remote sensing are addressed in this book in great detail. This book can be an im

  12. Liquid and ice water content in clouds and their variability with temperature in Africa based on ERA-Interim, JRA-55, MERRA and ISCCP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntwali, Didier; Mugisha, Emmy; Vuguziga, Floribert; Kakpa, Didier

    2017-02-01

    This study presents seasonal vertical structure from 1000 to 100 hPa of liquid water content (LWC) and ice water content (IWC) and investigates their variability with temperature in Africa from climatological perspective. Both LWC and IWC may increase or decrease with temperature by season and by region. We compared vertical distribution of LWC and IWC from ERA-Interim, JRA-55 and MERRA reanalysis to the distribution of cloud types from ISCCP and we found that cloud type with highest liquid content is Stratocumulus (Sc) in JJA for both East of Africa (13.3 %) and West of Africa (19.3 %) while Cumulus (Cu) in MAM for both South of Africa (8.6 %) and North of Africa (13.5 %). Cirrus (Ci) is the most frequent cloud with ice with 24.6 % presence in East Africa, 20.4 % in West Africa, 7.2 % in North Africa during MAM and 21.3 % in South Africa during SON. The LWC exists below 400 hPa for both ERA-I and JRA-55, whereas below 200 hPa based on MERRA in all regions of Africa. The IWC exists above 600 hPa for both East and West Africa, above 800 hPa in South Africa and above 900 hPa in North Africa for both ERA-I and JRA-55, whereas above 500 hPa in both East and West of Africa, above 800 hPa in South of Africa and above 850 hPa in North of Africa based on MERRA. The ERA-I, JRA-55 and MERRA are in agreement in low and mid troposphere while in upper troposphere only ERA-I and JRA-55 are in agreement. The MERRA disagrees with ERA-I and JRA-55 in the upper troposphere. The difference of LWC and IWC seasonal vertical distribution in Africa is due to different climatic features between tropic regions and subtropic regions. All three reanalyses show the LWC and IWC between -22.7 and 1.6 °C over Africa. The coexistence temperature between LWC and IWC may be useful to estimate the temperature at which there are the supercooled liquid water and mixed clouds. The ERA-I and JRA-55 may be good proxies in precipitation and cloud monitoring in regions with a lack of in situ observations

  13. Effects of Aerosol on Cloud Liquid Water Path: Statistical Method a Potential Source for Divergence in Past Observation Based Correlative Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ousmane Sy Savane

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Studies show a divergence in correlation between aerosol and cloud proxies, which has been thought of in the past as the results of varying physical mechanisms. Though modeling studies have supported this idea, from an observational standpoint it is difficult to attribute with confidence the correlations to specific physical mechanisms. We explore a methodology to assess the correlation between cloud water path and aerosol optical depth using Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS Aqua retrieved aerosol and cloud properties for absorbing and non-absorbing aerosol types over land and over the Atlantic Ocean for various meteorological conditions. The data covers a three-month period, June through August, during which different aerosol types are predominant in specific regions. Our approach eliminates outliers; sorts the data into aerosol bins; and the mean Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD value for each bin and the corresponding mean Cloud Water Path (CWP value are determined. The mean CWP is plotted against the mean AOD. The response curve for all aerosol types shows a peak CWP value corresponding to an aerosol loading value AODpeak. The peak is used to divide the total range of aerosol loading into two sub ranges. For AOD value below AODpeak, mean CWP and mean AOD are positively correlated. The correlation between mean CWP and mean AOD is negative for aerosol loading above AODpeak. Irrespective of aerosol type, atmospheric water vapor content and lower tropospheric static stability, the peak observed for each aerosol type seems to describe a universal feature that calls for further investigation. It has been observed for a variety of geographical locations and different seasons.

  14. HD 209458b in new light: evidence of nitrogen chemistry, patchy clouds and sub-solar water

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Ryan J.; Madhusudhan, Nikku

    2017-08-01

    Interpretations of exoplanetary transmission spectra have been undermined by apparent obscuration due to clouds/hazes. Debate rages on whether weak H2O features seen in exoplanet spectra are due to clouds or inherently depleted oxygen. Assertions of solar H2O abundances have relied on making a priori model assumptions, for example, chemical/radiative equilibrium. In this work, we attempt to address this problem with a new retrieval paradigm for transmission spectra. We introduce poseidon, a two-dimensional atmospheric retrieval algorithm including generalized inhomogeneous clouds. We demonstrate that this prescription allows one to break vital degeneracies between clouds and prominent molecular abundances. We apply poseidon to the best transmission spectrum presently available, for the hot Jupiter HD 209458b, uncovering new insights into its atmosphere at the day-night terminator. We extensively explore the parameter space with an unprecedented 108 models, spanning the continuum from fully cloudy to cloud-free atmospheres, in a fully Bayesian retrieval framework. We report the first detection of nitrogen chemistry (NH3 and/or HCN) in an exoplanet atmosphere at 3.7-7.7σ confidence, non-uniform cloud coverage at 4.5-5.4σ, high-altitude hazes at >3σ and sub-solar H2O at ≳3-5σ, depending on the assumed cloud distribution. We detect NH3 at 3.3σ, and 4.9σ for fully cloudy and cloud-free scenarios, respectively. For the model with the highest Bayesian evidence, we constrain H2O at 5-15 ppm (0.01-0.03) × solar and NH3 at 0.01-2.7 ppm, strongly suggesting disequilibrium chemistry and cautioning against equilibrium assumptions. Our results herald a new promise for retrieving cloudy atmospheres using high-precision Hubble Space Telescope and James Webb Space Telescope spectra.

  15. NMR structural study of fructans produced by Bacillus sp. 3B6, bacterium isolated in cloud water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matulová, Mária; Husárová, Slavomíra; Capek, Peter; Sancelme, Martine; Delort, Anne-Marie

    2011-03-01

    Bacillus sp. 3B6, bacterium isolated from cloud water, was incubated on sucrose for exopolysaccharide production. Dialysis of the obtained mixture (MWCO 500) afforded dialyzate (DIM) and retentate (RIM). Both were separated by size exclusion chromatography. RIM afforded eight fractions: levan exopolysaccharide (EPS), fructooligosaccharides (FOSs) of levan and inulin types with different degrees of polymerization (dp 2-7) and monosaccharides fructose:glucose=9:1. Levan was composed of two components with molecular mass ~3500 and ~100kDa in the ratio 2.3:1. Disaccharide fraction contained difructose anhydride DFA IV. 1-Kestose, 6-kestose, and neokestose were identified as trisaccharides in the ratio 2:1:3. Fractions with dp 4-7 were mixtures of FOSs of levan (2,6-βFruf) and inulin (1,2-βFruf) type. DIM separation afforded two dominant fractions: monosaccharides with fructose: glucose ratio 1:3; disaccharide fraction contained sucrose only. DIM trisaccharide fraction contained 1-kestose, 6-kestose, and neokestose in the ratio1.5:1:2, penta and hexasaccharide fractions contained FOSs of levan type (2,6-βFruf) containing α-glucose. In the pentasaccharide fraction also the presence of a homopentasaccharide composed of 2,6-linked βFruf units only was identified. Nystose, inulin (1,2-βFruf) type, was identified as DIM tetrasaccharide. Identification of levan 2,6-βFruf and inulin 1,2-βFruf type oligosaccharides in the incubation medium suggests both levansucrase and inulosucrase enzymes activity in Bacillus sp. 3B6. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. [Determination of lead in water samples by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry after cloud point extraction with dithizone].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Shan-Mei; Chen, Jian-Rong; Shen, Yu-Qin

    2006-05-01

    Cloud point extraction was used for the preconcentration of lead after the formation of a complex with dithizone in the presence of surfactant Triton X-114, and then the lead was determined by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. The conditions affecting the separation and detection process were optimized. Separation of the two phases was accomplished by centrifugation for 15 min at 4 000 rpm. Upon cooling in an ice-bath, the surfactant-rich phase became viscous. The aqueous phase could then be separated by inverting the tubes. Later, a solution of methanol containing 0.1 mol x L(-1) of HNO3 was added to the surfactant-rich phase up to 0.5 mL. The samples were determined by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry with NH4H2PO4 and Mg(NO3)2 as a chemical modifier. At pH 8.0, the preconcentration of only 10 mL sample in the presence of 0.05% Triton X-114 and 20 micromol x L(-1) dithizone permitted the detection of 0.089 microg x L(-1) lead. The enhancement factors were 19.1 times for lead. The calibration graph using the preconcentration system for lead was linear with a correlation coefficient of 0.998 from levels near the detection limits up to at least 30 microg x L(-1). The regression equation was A = 0.026 1c (microg x L(-1)) + 0.010 6. The proposed method has been applied to the determination of lead in water samples.

  17. Upper tropospheric water vapour and its interaction with cirrus clouds as seen from IAGOS long-term routine in-situ observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petzold, Andreas; Krämer, Martina; Neis, Patrick; Rolf, Christian; Rohs, Susanne; Berkes, Florian; Smit, Herman G. J.; Gallagher, Martin; Beswick, Karl; Lloyd, Gary; Baumgardner, Darrel; Spichtinger, Peter; Nédélec, Philippe; Ebert, Volker; Buchholz, Bernhard; Riese, Martin; Wahner, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    IAGOS (In-service Aircraft for a Global Observing System) performs long-term routine in-situ observations of atmospheric chemical composition (ozone, CO, NOx, NOy, CO2, CH4), water vapour, aerosols, clouds and temperature on a global scale by operating compact instruments on board of passenger aircraft. The unique characteristics of the IAGOS data set originate from the global-scale sampling on air traffic routes with similar instrumentation such that the observations are truly comparable and well suited for atmospheric research on a statistical basis. Here, we present the analysis of 15 months of simultaneous observations of relative humidity with respect to ice (RHice) and ice crystal number concentration in cirrus (Nice) from July 2014 to October 2015. The joint data set of 360 hours of RHice - Nice observations in the global upper troposphere and tropopause region is analysed with respect to the in-cloud distribution of RHice and related cirrus properties. The majority of the observed cirrus is thin with Nice < 0.1 cm-3. The respective fractions of all cloud observations range from 90% over the mid-latitude North Atlantic Ocean and the Eurasian continent to 67% over the subtropical and tropical Pacific Ocean. The in-cloud RHice distributions do not depend on the geographical region of sampling. Types of cirrus origin (in situ origin, liquid origin) are inferred for different Nice regimes and geographical regions. Most important, we found that in-cloud RHice shows a strong correlation to Nice with slightly supersaturated dynamic equilibrium RHice associated to higher Nice values in stronger updrafts.

  18. Water vapor motion signal extraction from FY-2E longwave infrared window images for cloud-free regions: The temporal difference technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lu; Wang, Zhenhui; Chu, Yanli; Zhao, Hang; Tang, Min

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study is to calculate the low-level atmospheric motion vectors (AMVs) in clear areas with FY-2E IR2 window (11.59-12.79 μm) channel imagery, where the traditional cloud motion wind technique fails. A new tracer selection procedure, which we call the temporal difference technique, is demonstrated in this paper. This technique makes it possible to infer low-level wind by tracking features in the moisture pattern that appear as brightness temperature ( T B) differences between consecutive sequences of 30-min-interval FY-2E IR2 images over cloud-free regions. The T B difference corresponding to a 10% change in water vapor density is computed with the Moderate Resolution Atmospheric Transmission (MODTRAN4) radiative transfer model. The total contribution from each of the 10 layers is analyzed under four typical atmospheric conditions: tropical, midlatitude summer, U.S. standard, and midlatitude winter. The peak level of the water vapor weighting function for the four typical atmospheres is assigned as a specific height to the T B "wind". This technique is valid over cloud-free ocean areas. The proposed algorithm exhibits encouraging statistical results in terms of vector difference (VD), speed bias (BIAS), mean vector difference (MVD), standard deviation (SD), and root-mean-square error (RMSE), when compared with the wind field of NCEP reanalysis data and rawinsonde observations.

  19. Effect of surface albedo, water vapour, and atmospheric aerosols on the cloud-free shortwave radiative budget in the Arctic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Biagio, C. [ENEA, Laboratory for Earth Observations and Analyses, Rome (Italy); University of Siena, Department of Earth Science, Siena (Italy); Di Sarra, A. [ENEA, Laboratory for Earth Observations and Analyses, Rome (Italy); Eriksen, P. [Danish Climate Centre, DMI, Danish Meteorological Institute, Copenhagen (Denmark); Ascanius, S.E. [DMI, Danish Meteorological Institute, Qaanaaq (Greenland); Muscari, G. [INGV, Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Rome (Italy); Holben, B. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States)

    2012-08-15

    This study is based on ground-based measurements of downward surface shortwave irradiance (SW), columnar water vapour (wv), and aerosol optical depth ({tau}) obtained at Thule Air Base (Greenland) in 2007-2010, together with MODIS observations of the surface shortwave albedo (A). Radiative transfer model calculations are used in combination with measurements to separate the radiative effect of A ({Delta}SW{sub A}), wv ({Delta}SW{sub wv}), and aerosols ({Delta}SW{sub {tau}}) in modulating SW in cloud-free conditions. The shortwave radiation at the surface is mainly affected by water vapour absorption, which produces a reduction of SW as low as -100 Wm{sup -2} (-18%). The seasonal change of A produces an increase of SW by up to +25 Wm{sup -2} (+4.5%). The annual mean radiative effect is estimated to be -(21-22) Wm{sup -2} for wv, and +(2-3) Wm{sup -2} for A. An increase by +0.065 cm in the annual mean wv, to which corresponds an absolute increase in {Delta}SW{sub wv} by 0.93 Wm{sup -2} (4.3%), has been observed to occur between 2007 and 2010. In the same period, the annual mean A has decreased by -0.027, with a corresponding decrease in {Delta}SW{sub A} by 0.41 Wm{sup -2} (-14.9%). Atmospheric aerosols produce a reduction of SW as low as -32 Wm{sup -2} (-6.7%). The instantaneous aerosol radiative forcing (RF{sub {tau}}) reaches values of -28 Wm{sup -2} and shows a strong dependency on surface albedo. The derived radiative forcing efficiency (FE{sub {tau}}) for solar zenith angles between 55 and 70 is estimated to be (-120.6 {+-} 4.3) for 0.1 < A < 0.2, and (-41.2 {+-} 1.6) Wm{sup -2} for 0.5 < A < 0.6. (orig.)

  20. Cloud point extraction-flame atomic absorption spectrometry for pre-concentration and determination of trace amounts of silver ions in water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiupei; Jia, Zhihui; Yang, Xiaocui; Li, Gu; Liao, Xiangjun

    2017-03-01

    A cloud point extraction (CPE) method was used as a pre-concentration strategy prior to the determination of trace levels of silver in water by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) The pre-concentration is based on the clouding phenomena of non-ionic surfactant, triton X-114, with Ag (I)/diethyldithiocarbamate (DDTC) complexes in which the latter is soluble in a micellar phase composed by the former. When the temperature increases above its cloud point, the Ag (I)/DDTC complexes are extracted into the surfactant-rich phase. The factors affecting the extraction efficiency including pH of the aqueous solution, concentration of the DDTC, amount of the surfactant, incubation temperature and time were investigated and optimized. Under the optimal experimental conditions, no interference was observed for the determination of 100 ng·mL-1 Ag+ in the presence of various cations below their maximum concentrations allowed in this method, for instance, 50 μg·mL-1 for both Zn2+ and Cu2+, 80 μg·mL-1 for Pb2+, 1000 μg·mL-1 for Mn2+, and 100 μg·mL-1 for both Cd2+ and Ni2+. The calibration curve was linear in the range of 1-500 ng·mL-1 with a limit of detection (LOD) at 0.3 ng·mL-1. The developed method was successfully applied for the determination of trace levels of silver in water samples such as river water and tap water.

  1. Cloud point extraction-flame atomic absorption spectrometry for pre-concentration and determination of trace amounts of silver ions in water samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiupei Yang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available A cloud point extraction (CPE method was used as a pre-concentration strategy prior to the determination of trace levels of silver in water by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS The pre-concentration is based on the clouding phenomena of non-ionic surfactant, triton X-114, with Ag (I/diethyldithiocarbamate (DDTC complexes in which the latter is soluble in a micellar phase composed by the former. When the temperature increases above its cloud point, the Ag (I/DDTC complexes are extracted into the surfactant-rich phase. The factors affecting the extraction efficiency including pH of the aqueous solution, concentration of the DDTC, amount of the surfactant, incubation temperature and time were investigated and optimized. Under the optimal experimental conditions, no interference was observed for the determination of 100 ng·mL−1 Ag+ in the presence of various cations below their maximum concentrations allowed in this method, for instance, 50 μg·mL−1 for both Zn2+ and Cu2+, 80 μg·mL−1 for Pb2+, 1000 μg·mL−1 for Mn2+, and 100 μg·mL−1 for both Cd2+ and Ni2+. The calibration curve was linear in the range of 1–500 ng·mL−1 with a limit of detection (LOD at 0.3 ng·mL−1. The developed method was successfully applied for the determination of trace levels of silver in water samples such as river water and tap water.

  2. Mars - Water Ice Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Mars Surveyor Operations Project operates the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft with its industrial partner, Lockheed Martin Astronautics, from facilities in Pasadena, CA and Denver, CO.

  3. Marine Cloud Brightening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Latham, John; Bower, Keith; Choularton, Tom; Coe, H.; Connolly, P.; Cooper, Gary; Craft, Tim; Foster, Jack; Gadian, Alan; Galbraith, Lee; Iacovides, Hector; Johnston, David; Launder, Brian; Leslie, Brian; Meyer, John; Neukermans, Armand; Ormond, Bob; Parkes, Ben; Rasch, Philip J.; Rush, John; Salter, Stephen; Stevenson, Tom; Wang, Hailong; Wang, Qin; Wood, Robert

    2012-09-07

    The idea behind the marine cloud-brightening (MCB) geoengineering technique is that seeding marine stratocumulus clouds with copious quantities of roughly monodisperse sub-micrometre sea water particles might significantly enhance the cloud droplet number concentration, and thereby the cloud albedo and possibly longevity. This would produce a cooling, which general circulation model (GCM) computations suggest could - subject to satisfactory resolution of technical and scientific problems identified herein - have the capacity to balance global warming up to the carbon dioxide-doubling point. We describe herein an account of our recent research on a number of critical issues associated with MCB. This involves (i) GCM studies, which are our primary tools for evaluating globally the effectiveness of MCB, and assessing its climate impacts on rainfall amounts and distribution, and also polar sea-ice cover and thickness; (ii) high-resolution modelling of the effects of seeding on marine stratocumulus, which are required to understand the complex array of interacting processes involved in cloud brightening; (iii) microphysical modelling sensitivity studies, examining the influence of seeding amount, seedparticle salt-mass, air-mass characteristics, updraught speed and other parameters on cloud-albedo change; (iv) sea water spray-production techniques; (v) computational fluid dynamics studies of possible large-scale periodicities in Flettner rotors; and (vi) the planning of a three-stage limited-area field research experiment, with the primary objectives of technology testing and determining to what extent, if any, cloud albedo might be enhanced by seeding marine stratocumulus clouds on a spatial scale of around 100 km. We stress that there would be no justification for deployment of MCB unless it was clearly established that no significant adverse consequences would result. There would also need to be an international agreement firmly in favour of such action.

  4. Cloud Computing

    CERN Document Server

    Antonopoulos, Nick

    2010-01-01

    Cloud computing has recently emerged as a subject of substantial industrial and academic interest, though its meaning and scope is hotly debated. For some researchers, clouds are a natural evolution towards the full commercialisation of grid systems, while others dismiss the term as a mere re-branding of existing pay-per-use technologies. From either perspective, 'cloud' is now the label of choice for accountable pay-per-use access to third party applications and computational resources on a massive scale. Clouds support patterns of less predictable resource use for applications and services a

  5. Flame atomic absorption spectrometric determination of trace quantities of cadmium in water samples after cloud point extraction in Triton X-114 without added chelating agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afkhami, Abbas [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Bu-Ali Sina University, Hamadan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)]. E-mail: afkhami@basu.ac.ir; Madrakian, Tayyebeh [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Bu-Ali Sina University, Hamadan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Siampour, Hajar [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Bu-Ali Sina University, Hamadan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2006-11-16

    A new micell-mediated phase separation method for preconcentration of ultra-trace quantities of cadmium as a prior step to its determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry has been developed. The method is based on the cloud point extraction (CPE) of cadmium in iodide media with Triton X-114 in the absence of any chelating agent. The optimal extraction and reaction conditions (e.g., acid concentration, iodide concentration, effect of time) were studied, and the analytical characteristics of the method (e.g., limit of detection, linear range, preconcentration, and improvement factors) were obtained. Linearity was obeyed in the range of 3-300 ng mL{sup -1} of cadmium. The detection limit of the method is 1.0 ng mL{sup -1} of cadmium. The interference effect of some anions and cations was also tested. The method was applied to the determination of cadmium in tap water, waste water, and sea water samples.

  6. Flame atomic absorption spectrometric determination of trace quantities of cadmium in water samples after cloud point extraction in Triton X-114 without added chelating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afkhami, Abbas; Madrakian, Tayyebeh; Siampour, Hajar

    2006-11-16

    A new micell-mediated phase separation method for preconcentration of ultra-trace quantities of cadmium as a prior step to its determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry has been developed. The method is based on the cloud point extraction (CPE) of cadmium in iodide media with Triton X-114 in the absence of any chelating agent. The optimal extraction and reaction conditions (e.g., acid concentration, iodide concentration, effect of time) were studied, and the analytical characteristics of the method (e.g., limit of detection, linear range, preconcentration, and improvement factors) were obtained. Linearity was obeyed in the range of 3-300 ng mL(-1) of cadmium. The detection limit of the method is 1.0 ng mL(-1) of cadmium. The interference effect of some anions and cations was also tested. The method was applied to the determination of cadmium in tap water, waste water, and sea water samples.

  7. Cloud Cover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffhauser, Dian

    2012-01-01

    This article features a major statewide initiative in North Carolina that is showing how a consortium model can minimize risks for districts and help them exploit the advantages of cloud computing. Edgecombe County Public Schools in Tarboro, North Carolina, intends to exploit a major cloud initiative being refined in the state and involving every…

  8. Cloud radiative effect, cloud fraction and cloud type at two stations in Switzerland using hemispherical sky cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aebi, Christine; Gröbner, Julian; Kämpfer, Niklaus; Vuilleumier, Laurent

    2017-11-01

    The current study analyses the cloud radiative effect during the daytime depending on cloud fraction and cloud type at two stations in Switzerland over a time period of 3 to 5 years. Information on fractional cloud coverage and cloud type is retrieved from images taken by visible all-sky cameras. Cloud-base height (CBH) data are retrieved from a ceilometer and integrated water vapour (IWV) data from GPS measurements. The longwave cloud radiative effect (LCE) for low-level clouds and a cloud coverage of 8 oktas has a median value between 59 and 72 Wm-2. For mid- and high-level clouds the LCE is significantly lower. It is shown that the fractional cloud coverage, the CBH and IWV all have an influence on the magnitude of the LCE. These observed dependences have also been modelled with the radiative transfer model MODTRAN5. The relative values of the shortwave cloud radiative effect (SCErel) for low-level clouds and a cloud coverage of 8 oktas are between -90 and -62 %. Also here the higher the cloud is, the less negative the SCErel values are. In cases in which the measured direct radiation value is below the threshold of 120 Wm-2 (occulted sun) the SCErel decreases substantially, while cases in which the measured direct radiation value is larger than 120 Wm-2 (visible sun) lead to a SCErel of around 0 %. In 14 and 10 % of the cases in Davos and Payerne respectively a cloud enhancement has been observed with a maximum in the cloud class cirrocumulus-altocumulus at both stations. The calculated median total cloud radiative effect (TCE) values are negative for almost all cloud classes and cloud coverages.

  9. Prognostic Performance Metrics

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This chapter presents several performance metrics for offline evaluation of prognostics algorithms. A brief overview of different methods employed for performance...

  10. Prognostics for Microgrid Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Abhinav

    2012-01-01

    Prognostics is the science of predicting future performance and potential failures based on targeted condition monitoring. Moving away from the traditional reliability centric view, prognostics aims at detecting and quantifying the time to impending failures. This advance warning provides the opportunity to take actions that can preserve uptime, reduce cost of damage, or extend the life of the component. The talk will focus on the concepts and basics of prognostics from the viewpoint of condition-based systems health management. Differences with other techniques used in systems health management and philosophies of prognostics used in other domains will be shown. Examples relevant to micro grid systems and subsystems will be used to illustrate various types of prediction scenarios and the resources it take to set up a desired prognostic system. Specifically, the implementation results for power storage and power semiconductor components will demonstrate specific solution approaches of prognostics. The role of constituent elements of prognostics, such as model, prediction algorithms, failure threshold, run-to-failure data, requirements and specifications, and post-prognostic reasoning will be explained. A discussion on performance evaluation and performance metrics will conclude the technical discussion followed by general comments on open research problems and challenges in prognostics.

  11. Screaming Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fikke, Svein; Egill Kristjánsson, Jón; Nordli, Øyvind

    2017-04-01

    "Mother-of-pearl clouds" appear irregularly in the winter stratosphere at high northern latitudes, about 20-30 km above the surface of the Earth. The size range of the cloud particles is near that of visible light, which explains their extraordinary beautiful colours. We argue that the Norwegian painter Edvard Munch could well have been terrified when the sky all of a sudden turned "bloodish red" after sunset, when darkness was expected. Hence, there is a high probability that it was an event of mother-of-pearl clouds which was the background for Munch's experience in nature, and for his iconic Scream. Currently, the leading hypothesis for explaining the dramatic colours of the sky in Munch's famous painting is that the artist was captivated by colourful sunsets following the enormous Krakatoa eruption in 1883. After carefully considering the historical accounts of some of Munch's contemporaries, especially the physicist Carl Störmer, we suggest an alternative hypothesis, namely that Munch was inspired by spectacular occurrences of mother-of-pearl clouds. Such clouds, which have a wave-like structure akin to that seen in the Scream were first observed and described only a few years before the first version of this motive was released in 1892. Unlike clouds related to conventional weather systems in the troposphere, mother-of-pearl clouds appear in the stratosphere, where significantly different physical conditions prevail. This result in droplet sizes within the range of visible light, creating the spectacular colour patterns these clouds are famous for. Carl Störmer observed such clouds, and described them in minute details at the age of 16, but already with a profound interest in science. He later noted that "..these mother-of-pearl clouds was a vision of indescribable beauty!" The authors find it logical that the same vision could appear scaring in the sensible mind of a young artist unknown to such phenomena.

  12. Hydration and Hydrogen Bond Network of Water during the Coil-to-Globule Transition in Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) Aqueous Solution at Cloud Point Temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraga, Keiichiro; Naito, Hirotaka; Suzuki, Tetsuhito; Kondo, Naoshi; Ogawa, Yuichi

    2015-04-30

    Aqueous solutions of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide), P-NIPAAm, exhibit a noticeable temperature responsive change in molecular conformation at a cloud point temperature (Tcp). As the temperature rises above Tcp, the extended coil-like P-NIPAAm structure changes into a swollen globule-like conformation as hydration levels decrease and hydrophobic interactions increase. Though water plays an important role in this coil-to-globule transition of P-NIPAAm, the behavior of water molecules and the associated hydrogen-bond (HB) network of the surrounding bulk water are still veiled in uncertainty. In this study, we elucidate changes in the hydration state and the dynamical structure of the water HB network of P-NIPAAm aqueous solutions during the coil-to-globule transition by analyzing the complex dielectric constant in the terahertz region (0.25-12 THz), where bulk water reorientations and intermolecular vibrations of water can be selectively probed. The structural properties of the water HB network were examined in terms of the population of the non-HB water molecules (not directly engaged in the HB network or hydrated to P-NIPAAm) and the tetrahedral coordination of the water molecules engaged in the HB network. We found the hydration number below Tcp (≈10) was decreased to approximately 6.5 as temperature increased, in line with previous studies. The HB network of bulk water becomes more structured as the coil-to-globule phase transition takes place, via decreases in non-HB water and reduction in the orderliness of the tetrahedral HB architecture. Together these results indicate that the coil-to-globule transition is associated with a shift to hydrophobic-dominated interactions that drive thermoresponsive structural changes in the surrounding water molecules.

  13. Cloud Computing Security: A Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Issa M. Khalil

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Cloud computing is an emerging technology paradigm that migrates current technological and computing concepts into utility-like solutions similar to electricity and water systems. Clouds bring out a wide range of benefits including configurable computing resources, economic savings, and service flexibility. However, security and privacy concerns are shown to be the primary obstacles to a wide adoption of clouds. The new concepts that clouds introduce, such as multi-tenancy, resource sharing and outsourcing, create new challenges to the security community. Addressing these challenges requires, in addition to the ability to cultivate and tune the security measures developed for traditional computing systems, proposing new security policies, models, and protocols to address the unique cloud security challenges. In this work, we provide a comprehensive study of cloud computing security and privacy concerns. We identify cloud vulnerabilities, classify known security threats and attacks, and present the state-of-the-art practices to control the vulnerabilities, neutralize the threats, and calibrate the attacks. Additionally, we investigate and identify the limitations of the current solutions and provide insights of the future security perspectives. Finally, we provide a cloud security framework in which we present the various lines of defense and identify the dependency levels among them. We identify 28 cloud security threats which we classify into five categories. We also present nine general cloud attacks along with various attack incidents, and provide effectiveness analysis of the proposed countermeasures.

  14. Marine cloud brightening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latham, John; Bower, Keith; Choularton, Tom; Coe, Hugh; Connolly, Paul; Cooper, Gary; Craft, Tim; Foster, Jack; Gadian, Alan; Galbraith, Lee; Iacovides, Hector; Johnston, David; Launder, Brian; Leslie, Brian; Meyer, John; Neukermans, Armand; Ormond, Bob; Parkes, Ben; Rasch, Phillip; Rush, John; Salter, Stephen; Stevenson, Tom; Wang, Hailong; Wang, Qin; Wood, Rob

    2012-01-01

    The idea behind the marine cloud-brightening (MCB) geoengineering technique is that seeding marine stratocumulus clouds with copious quantities of roughly monodisperse sub-micrometre sea water particles might significantly enhance the cloud droplet number concentration, and thereby the cloud albedo and possibly longevity. This would produce a cooling, which general circulation model (GCM) computations suggest could—subject to satisfactory resolution of technical and scientific problems identified herein—have the capacity to balance global warming up to the carbon dioxide-doubling point. We describe herein an account of our recent research on a number of critical issues associated with MCB. This involves (i) GCM studies, which are our primary tools for evaluating globally the effectiveness of MCB, and assessing its climate impacts on rainfall amounts and distribution, and also polar sea-ice cover and thickness; (ii) high-resolution modelling of the effects of seeding on marine stratocumulus, which are required to understand the complex array of interacting processes involved in cloud brightening; (iii) microphysical modelling sensitivity studies, examining the influence of seeding amount, seed-particle salt-mass, air-mass characteristics, updraught speed and other parameters on cloud–albedo change; (iv) sea water spray-production techniques; (v) computational fluid dynamics studies of possible large-scale periodicities in Flettner rotors; and (vi) the planning of a three-stage limited-area field research experiment, with the primary objectives of technology testing and determining to what extent, if any, cloud albedo might be enhanced by seeding marine stratocumulus clouds on a spatial scale of around 100×100 km. We stress that there would be no justification for deployment of MCB unless it was clearly established that no significant adverse consequences would result. There would also need to be an international agreement firmly in favour of such action

  15. Cloud immersion alters microclimate, photosynthesis and water relations in Rhododendron catawbiense and Abies fraseri seedlings in the southern Appalachian Mountains, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel M. Johnson; William K. Smith

    2008-01-01

    The high altitude spruce-fir (Abies fraseri (Pursh) Poiret.-Picea rubens Sarg.) forests of the southern Appalachian Mountains, USA, experience frequent cloud immersion. Recent studies indicate that cloud bases may have risen over the past 30 years, resulting in less frequent forest cloud immersion, and that further increases in cloud base height are...

  16. Ultrasound-assisted cloud point extraction for speciation and indirect spectrophotometric determination of chromium(III) and (VI) in water samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemi, Mahdi; Daryanavard, Seyed Mosayeb

    Ultrasound-assisted cloud point extraction (UACPE) procedure was developed for speciation and indirect spectrophotometric determination of chromium(III) and (VI) in environmental water samples. The method is based on the reduction of Cr(VI) by iodide in acidic media and subsequently formation of I3- anion. The I3- formed can further react with cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and induce its clouding due to formation of an ion-association complex. The formed complex was separated from solution and dissolved in ethanol for spectrophotometric measurement. Cerium(IV) ammonium sulphate was chosen as an oxidizing reagent for pre-oxidation step of Cr(III) to Cr(VI) species before the addition of iodide to the system, up to chromium in trivalent can be determined by the procedure. Experimental parameters for both spectrophotometric reaction and extraction procedure have been optimized. Under optimized conditions Cr(VI) can be determined in the range 20-400 ng mL-1 (R2 = 0.999). Detection limit, preconcentration factor and relative standard deviation were 12 ng mL-1, 20.0 and 2.2% (n = 5), respectively with 10 mL sample volumes. The proposed method has been successfully applied for determination of chromium(V) in spiked water, synthetic seawater and electroplating wastewater samples with average recoveries of 100.1, 99.4 and 99.1%, respectively.

  17. A study of the effect of overshooting deep convection on the water content of the TTL and lower stratosphere from Cloud Resolving Model simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. P. Grosvenor

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Simulations of overshooting, tropical deep convection using a Cloud Resolving Model with bulk microphysics are presented in order to examine the effect on the water content of the TTL (Tropical Tropopause Layer and lower stratosphere. This case study is a subproject of the HIBISCUS (Impact of tropical convection on the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere at global scale campaign, which took place in Bauru, Brazil (22° S, 49° W, from the end of January to early March 2004.

    Comparisons between 2-D and 3-D simulations suggest that the use of 3-D dynamics is vital in order to capture the mixing between the overshoot and the stratospheric air, which caused evaporation of ice and resulted in an overall moistening of the lower stratosphere. In contrast, a dehydrating effect was predicted by the 2-D simulation due to the extra time, allowed by the lack of mixing, for the ice transported to the region to precipitate out of the overshoot air.

    Three different strengths of convection are simulated in 3-D by applying successively lower heating rates (used to initiate the convection in the boundary layer. Moistening is produced in all cases, indicating that convective vigour is not a factor in whether moistening or dehydration is produced by clouds that penetrate the tropopause, since the weakest case only just did so. An estimate of the moistening effect of these clouds on an air parcel traversing a convective region is made based on the domain mean simulated moistening and the frequency of convective events observed by the IPMet (Instituto de Pesquisas Meteorológicas, Universidade Estadual Paulista radar (S-band type at 2.8 Ghz to have the same 10 dBZ echo top height as those simulated. These suggest a fairly significant mean moistening of 0.26, 0.13 and 0.05 ppmv in the strongest, medium and weakest cases, respectively, for heights between 16 and 17 km. Since the cold point and WMO (World Meteorological Organization tropopause in

  18. GPU Accelerated Prognostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorospe, George E., Jr.; Daigle, Matthew J.; Sankararaman, Shankar; Kulkarni, Chetan S.; Ng, Eley

    2017-01-01

    Prognostic methods enable operators and maintainers to predict the future performance for critical systems. However, these methods can be computationally expensive and may need to be performed each time new information about the system becomes available. In light of these computational requirements, we have investigated the application of graphics processing units (GPUs) as a computational platform for real-time prognostics. Recent advances in GPU technology have reduced cost and increased the computational capability of these highly parallel processing units, making them more attractive for the deployment of prognostic software. We present a survey of model-based prognostic algorithms with considerations for leveraging the parallel architecture of the GPU and a case study of GPU-accelerated battery prognostics with computational performance results.

  19. Determination of gold nanoparticles in environmental water samples by second-order optical scattering using dithiotreitol-functionalized CdS quantum dots after cloud point extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandyla, Spyridoula P.; Tsogas, George Z.; Vlessidis, Athanasios G.; Giokas, Dimosthenis L., E-mail: dgiokas@cc.uoi.gr

    2017-02-05

    Highlights: • A new method has been developed to determine gold nanoparticles in water samples. • Extraction was achieved by cloud point extraction. • A nano-hybrid assembly between AuNPs and dithiol-coated quantum dots was formulated. • Detection was accomplished at pico-molar levels by second-order light scattering. • The method was selective against ionic gold and other nanoparticle species. - Abstract: This work presents a new method for the sensitive and selective determination of gold nanoparticles in water samples. The method combines a sample preparation and enrichment step based on cloud point extraction with a new detection motif that relies on the optical incoherent light scattering of a nano-hybrid assembly that is formed by hydrogen bond interactions between gold nanoparticles and dithiotreitol-functionalized CdS quantum dots. The experimental parameters affecting the extraction and detection of gold nanoparticles were optimized and evaluated to the analysis of gold nanoparticles of variable size and surface coating. The selectivity of the method against gold ions and other nanoparticle species was also evaluated under different conditions reminiscent to those usually found in natural water samples. The developed method was applied to the analysis of gold nanoparticles in natural waters and wastewater with satisfactory results in terms of sensitivity (detection limit at the low pmol L{sup −1} levels), recoveries (>80%) and reproducibility (<9%). Compared to other methods employing molecular spectrometry for metal nanoparticle analysis, the developed method offers improved sensitivity and it is easy-to-operate thus providing an additional tool for the monitoring and the assessment of nanoparticles toxicity and hazards in the environment.

  20. Cirrus Cloud Optical and Microphysical Property Retrievals from eMAS During SEAC4RS Using Bi-Spectral Reflectance Measurements Within the 1.88 micron Water Vapor Absorption Band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, K.; Platnick, S.; Arnold, G. T.; Holz, R. E.; Veglio, P.; Yorks, J.; Wang, C.

    2016-01-01

    Previous bi-spectral imager retrievals of cloud optical thickness (COT) and effective particle radius (CER) based on the Nakajima and King (1990) approach, such as those of the operational MODIS cloud optical property retrieval product (MOD06), have typically paired a non-absorbing visible or near-infrared wavelength, sensitive to COT, with an absorbing shortwave or midwave infrared wavelength sensitive to CER. However, in practice it is only necessary to select two spectral channels that exhibit a strong contrast in cloud particle absorption. Here it is shown, using eMAS observations obtained during NASAs SEAC4RS field campaign, that selecting two absorbing wavelength channels within the broader 1.88 micron water vapor absorption band, namely the 1.83 and 1.93 micron channels that have sufficient differences in ice crystal single scattering albedo, can yield COT and CER retrievals for thin to moderately thick single-layer cirrus that are reasonably consistent with other solar and IR imager-based and lidar-based retrievals. A distinct advantage of this channel selection for cirrus cloud retrievals is that the below cloud water vapor absorption minimizes the surface contribution to measured cloudy TOA reflectance, in particular compared to the solar window channels used in heritage retrievals such as MOD06. This reduces retrieval uncertainty resulting from errors in the surface reflectance assumption, as well as reduces the frequency of retrieval failures for thin cirrus clouds.

  1. MAD-VenLA: a microphysical modal representation of clouds for the IPSL Venus GCM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilbon, Sabrina; Määttänen, Anni; Burgalat, Jérémie; Montmessin, Franck; Stolzenbach, Aurélien; Bekki, Slimane

    2016-10-01

    Venus is enshrouded by 20km-thick clouds, which are composed of sulfuric acid-water solution droplets. Clouds play a crucial role on the climate of the planet. Our goal is to study the formation and evolution of Venusian clouds with microphysical models. The goal of this work is to develop the first full 3D microphysical model of Venus coupled with the IPSL Venus GCM and the photochemical model included (Lebonnois et al. 2010, Stolzenbach et al. 2016).Two particle size distribution representations are generally used in cloud modeling: sectional and modal. The term 'sectional' means that the continuous particle size distribution is divided into a discrete set of size intervals called bins. In the modal approach, the particle size distribution is approximated by a continuous parametric function, typically a log-normal, and prognostic variables are distribution or distribution-integrated parameters (Seigneur et al. 1986, Burgalat et al. 2014). These two representations need to be compared to choose the optimal trade-off between precision and computational efficiency. At high radius resolution, sectional models are computationally too demanding to be integrated in GCMs. That is why, in other GCMs, such as the IPSL Titan GCM, the modal scheme is used (Burgalat et al. 2014).The Venus Liquid Aerosol cloud model (VenLA) and the Modal Dynamics of Venusian Liquid Aerosol cloud model (MAD-VenLA) are respectively the sectional and the modal model discussed here and used for defining the microphysical cloud module to be integrated in the IPSL Venus GCM. We will compare the two models with the key microphysical processes in 0D setting: homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation, condensation/evaporation and coagulation. Then, MAD-VenLA will be coupled with the IPSL VGCM. The first results of the complete VGCM with microphysics coupled with chemistry will be presented.

  2. Cloud Detection and Cloud Top Height Determination using the Hyperspectral Imaging Spectrometer specMACS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höppler, Lucas; Gödde, Felix; Kölling, Tobias; Zinner, Tobias; Mayer, Bernhard; Groß, Silke; Gutleben, Manuel

    2017-04-01

    Diabatic heat released by clouds sometimes causes numerical weather forecast failures. Climate model predictions depend on radiative effects of tropical clouds in the trade winds. Both climate and global weather forecast models, therefore, need to be improved with respect to a proper representation of cloud microphysical and macrophysical properties. For this purpose, parameters describing the cloud geometry such as cloud fraction, cloud size and cloud top heights are important. These parameters are also important ingredients to accurately validate the results of previous and upcoming studies with cloud resolving models. A hyperspectral imaging spectrometer (specMACS) was operated aboard the research plane HALO in the NARVAL II and NAWDEX experiments. By combining the reflected radiance of the clouds and the signal of the water vapor absorption bands in the infrared part of the solar spectrum, an effective cloud mask was developed which is prerequisite for any further analysis. The method allows detecting clouds even over the bright sunglint. As a next step, cloud top heights are determined by comparing the measured radiance within and outside of the oxygen A-band with radiative transfer model calculations. Subsequently, the calculated cloud top heights are compared to LIDAR measurements. While this method works well for plane-parallel, homogeneous clouds, 3D radiative transfer effects cause artifacts at cloud edges and in cloud free areas which can lead to strongly miscalculated cloud top heights. These effects will be assessed and also evaluated. Deriving quantities such as cloud fraction, cloud size, and cloud structure is the basis for calculating cloud heating and cooling rates in upcoming studies.

  3. The CREW intercomparison of SEVIRI cloud retrievals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamann, U.; Walther, A.; Bennartz, R.; Thoss, A.; Meirink, J. M.; Roebeling, R.

    2012-12-01

    About 70% of the earth's surface is covered with clouds. They strongly influence the radiation balance and the water cycle of the earth. Hence the detailed monitoring of cloud properties - such as cloud fraction, cloud top temperature, cloud particle size, and cloud water path - is important to understand the role of clouds in the weather and the climate system. The remote sensing with passive sensors is an essential mean for the global observation of the cloud parameters, but is nevertheless challenging. This presentation focuses on the inter-comparison and validation of cloud physical properties retrievals from the Spinning Enhanced Visible and InfraRed Imager (SEVIRI) onboard METEOSAT. For this study we use retrievals from 12 state-of-art algorithms (Eumetsat, KNMI, NASA Langley, NASA Goddard, University Madison/Wisconsin, DWD, DLR, Meteo-France, KMI, FU Berlin, UK MetOffice) that are made available through the common database of the CREW (Cloud Retrieval Evaluation Working) group. Cloud detection, cloud top phase, height, and temperature, as well as optical properties and water path are validated with CLOUDSAT, CALIPSO, MISR, and AMSR-E measurements. Special emphasis is given to challenging retrieval conditions. Semi-transparent clouds over the earth's surface or another cloud layer modify the measured brightness temperature and increase the retrieval uncertainty. The consideration of the three-dimensional radiative effects is especially important for large viewing angles and broken cloud fields. Aerosols might be misclassified as cloud and may increase the retrieval uncertainty, too. Due to the availability of the high number of sophisticated retrieval datasets, the advantages of different retrieval approaches can be examined and suggestions for future retrieval developments can be made. We like to thank Eumetsat for sponsoring the CREW project including this work.nstitutes that participate in the CREW project.

  4. Size-resolved aerosol water uptake and cloud condensation nuclei measurements as measured above a Southeast Asian rainforest during OP3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Irwin

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The influence of the properties of fine particles on the formation of clouds and precipitation in the tropical atmosphere is of primary importance to their impacts on radiative forcing and the hydrological cycle. Measurements of aerosol number size distribution, hygroscopicity in both sub- and supersaturated regimes and composition were taken between March and July 2008 in the tropical rainforest in Borneo, Malaysia, marking the first study of this type in an Asian tropical rainforest. Hygroscopic growth factors (GF at 90 % relative humidity (RH for the dry diameter range D0 = 32–258 nm, supersaturated water uptake behaviour for the dry diameter range D0 = 45–300 nm and aerosol chemical composition were simultaneously measured using a Hygroscopicity Tandem Differential Mobility Analyser (HTDMA, a Droplet Measurement Technologies Cloud Condensation Nuclei counter (CCNc and an Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS respectively.

    The hygroscopicity parameter κ was derived from both CCNc and HTDMA measurements, with the resulting values of κ ranging from 0.05–0.37, and 0.17–0.37, respectively. Although the total range of κ values is in good agreement, there are inconsistencies between CCNc and HTDMA derived κ values at different dry diameters. Results from a study with similar methodology performed in the Amazon rainforest report values for κ within a similar range to those reported in this work, indicating that the aerosol as measured from both sites shows similar hygroscopic properties. However, the derived number of cloud condensation nuclei (NCCN were much higher in the present experiment than the Amazon, resulting in part from the increased total particle number concentrations observed in the Bornean rainforest. This contrast between the two environments may be of substantial importance in describing the impacts of particles in the tropical atmosphere.

  5. Ion-pair cloud-point extraction: a new method for the determination of water-soluble vitamins in plasma and urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heydari, Rouhollah; Elyasi, Najmeh S

    2014-10-01

    A novel, simple, and effective ion-pair cloud-point extraction coupled with a gradient high-performance liquid chromatography method was developed for determination of thiamine (vitamin B1 ), niacinamide (vitamin B3 ), pyridoxine (vitamin B6 ), and riboflavin (vitamin B2 ) in plasma and urine samples. The extraction and separation of vitamins were achieved based on an ion-pair formation approach between these ionizable analytes and 1-heptanesulfonic acid sodium salt as an ion-pairing agent. Influential variables on the ion-pair cloud-point extraction efficiency, such as the ion-pairing agent concentration, ionic strength, pH, volume of Triton X-100, extraction temperature, and incubation time have been fully evaluated and optimized. Water-soluble vitamins were successfully extracted by 1-heptanesulfonic acid sodium salt (0.2% w/v) as ion-pairing agent with Triton X-100 (4% w/v) as surfactant phase at 50°C for 10 min. The calibration curves showed good linearity (r(2) > 0.9916) and precision in the concentration ranges of 1-50 μg/mL for thiamine and niacinamide, 5-100 μg/mL for pyridoxine, and 0.5-20 μg/mL for riboflavin. The recoveries were in the range of 78.0-88.0% with relative standard deviations ranging from 6.2 to 8.2%. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Prognostics of Power MOSFET

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This paper demonstrates how to apply prognostics to power MOSFETs (metal oxide field effect transistor). The methodology uses thermal cycling to age devices and...

  7. Climate Response to Warm Cloud-Aerosol Interactions: Comparisons With Direct Aerosol and Long-Lived Greenhouse Gas Impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaswamy, V.; Ming, Y.

    2006-12-01

    We employ the NOAA/ GFDL global atmospheric model coupled to a mixed-layer ocean to investigate the mechanisms and quantitative aspects underlying the radiative perturbations and climate response arising due to cloud-aerosol interactions in low-lying clouds. The aerosol species considered include sulfate, sea-salt and carbonaceous species, whose space-time distributions are determined offline by the MOZART 2 chemistry- transport model based on emissions data. The model's prognostic cloud scheme of liquid water and amount is expanded to include cloud droplet concentration in a way that importantly allows them to be computed using the same large-scale and convective updraft velocity field. The equilibrium response of the model's global climate system to the change in aerosols from pre- industrial to present-day is evaluated, in terms of the forcing applied and the role of the large- and cloud-scale feedback mechanisms. The cloud characteristics simulated are compared against observations, while the model's response is compared with that obtained from using a diagnostic aerosol-cloud relationship to highlight the significance of specific cloud microphysical processes. The spatial distributions of the thermal and hydrologic responses are also compared with those resulting from simulations performed for the pre-industrial to present-day direct aerosol effect. The temperature responses in the low and high latitudes, including changes in the large-scale precipitation pattern, are contrasted with those due to the well-mixed greenhouse gases. The forcing-response relationship is examined for the radiative perturbations investigated, with surface radiative forcing included in these considerations. We finally investigate the concept of linear additivity of the responses in various climate variables for the set of radiative perturbations considered above, extending from the global- and zonal-mean to continental scales.

  8. Mobile Clouds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fitzek, Frank; Katz, Marcos

    networks, creating a vast fertile ground for novel developments in both research and practical applications Considers research directions, emerging trends and visions This book is an excellent resource for wireless/networking researchers in industry and academia, students and mobile phone programmers...... users in very different ways and for various purposes. The book provides many stimulating examples of resource-sharing applications. Enabling technologies for mobile clouds are also discussed, highlighting the key role of network coding. Mobile clouds have the potential to enhance communications...... examples of mobile clouds applications, based on both existing commercial initiatives as well as proof-of-concept test-beds. Visions and prospects are also discussed, paving the way for further development. As mobile networks and social networks become more and more reliant on each other, the concept...

  9. Remote sensing data assimilation for a prognostic phenology model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thornton, Peter E [ORNL; Stockli, Reto [Colorado State University, Fort Collins

    2008-01-01

    Predicting the global carbon and water cycle requires a realistic representation of vegetation phenology in climate models. However most prognostic phenology models are not yet suited for global applications, and diagnostic satellite data can be uncertain and lack predictive power. We present a framework for data assimilation of Fraction of Photosynthetically Active Radiation absorbed by vegetation (FPAR) and Leaf Area Index (LAI) from the MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) to constrain empirical temperature, light, moisture and structural vegetation parameters of a prognostic phenology model. We find that data assimilation better constrains structural vegetation parameters than climate control parameters. Improvements are largest for drought-deciduous ecosystems where correlation of predicted versus satellite-observed FPAR and LAI increases from negative to 0.7-0.8. Data assimilation effectively overcomes the cloud- and aerosol-related deficiencies of satellite data sets in tropical areas. Validation with a 49-year-long phenology data set reveals that the temperature-driven start of season (SOS) is light limited in warm years. The model has substantial skill (R = 0.73) to reproduce SOS inter-annual and decadal variability. Predicted SOS shows a higher inter-annual variability with a negative bias of 5-20 days compared to species-level SOS. It is however accurate to within 1-2 days compared to SOS derived from net ecosystem exchange (NEE) measurements at a FLUXNET tower. The model only has weak skill to predict end of season (EOS). Use of remote sensing data assimilation for phenology model development is encouraged but validation should be extended with phenology data sets covering mediterranean, tropical and arctic ecosystems.

  10. Palliative medicine review: prognostication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glare, Paul A; Sinclair, Christian T

    2008-01-01

    Prognostication, along with diagnosis and treatment, is a traditional core clinical skill of the physician. Many patients and families receiving palliative care want information about life expectancy to help plan realistically for their futures. Although underappreciated, prognosis is, or at least should be, part of every clinical decision. Despite this crucial role, expertise in the art and science of prognostication diminished during the twentieth century, due largely to the ascendancy of accurate diagnostic tests and effective therapies. Consequently, "Doctor, how long do I have?" is a question most physicians find unprepared to answer effectively. As we focus on palliative care in the twenty-first century, prognostication will need to be restored as a core clinical proficiency. The discipline of palliative medicine can provide leadership in this direction. This paper begins by discussing a framework for understanding prognosis and how its different domains might be applied to all patients with life limiting illness, although the main focus of the paper is predicting survival in patients with cancer. Examples of prognostic tools are provided, although the subjective assessment of prognosis remains important in the terminally ill. Other issues addressed include: the importance of prognostication in terms of clinical decision-making, discharge planning, and care planning; the impact of prognosis on hospice referrals and patient/family satisfaction; and physicians' willingness to prognosticate.

  11. The 1997 El Niño impact on clouds, water vapour, aerosols and reactive trace gases in the troposphere, as measured by the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Loyola

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The El Niño event of 1997/1998 caused dry conditions over the Indonesian area that were followed by large scale forest and savannah fires over Kalimantan, Sumatra, Java, and parts of Irian Jaya. Biomass burning was most intense between August and October 1997, and large amounts of ozone precursors, such as nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide and hydrocarbons were emitted into the atmosphere. In this work, we use satellite measurements from the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME sensor to study the teleconnections between the El Niño event of 1997 and the Indonesian fires, clouds, water vapour, aerosols and reactive trace gases (nitrogen dioxide, formaldehyde and ozone in the troposphere.

  12. Cloud immersion alters microclimate, photosynthesis and water relations in Rhododendron catawbiense and Abies fraseri seedlings in the southern Appalachian Mountains, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel M. Johnson; William K. Smith

    2008-01-01

    The high altitude spruce-fir (Abies fraseri (Pursh) Poiret.-Picea rubens Sarg.) forests of the southern Appalachian Mountains, USA, experience frequent cloud immersion. Recent studies indicate that cloud bases may have risen over the past 30 years, resulting in less frequent forest cloud immersion, and that further increases in...

  13. Cloud Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-29

    campaigning to make it true. Richard   Stallman , founder of the GNU project and the Free  Software Foundation, quoted in The Guardian, September 29,  2008... Richard   Stallman , known for his advocacy of “free software”, thinks cloud computing is  a trap for users—if applications and data are managed “in the cloud

  14. Estimation of Paddy Rice Variables with a Modified Water Cloud Model and Improved Polarimetric Decomposition Using Multi-Temporal RADARSAT-2 Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi Yang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Rice growth monitoring is very important as rice is one of the staple crops of the world. Rice variables as quantitative indicators of rice growth are critical for farming management and yield estimation, and synthetic aperture radar (SAR has great advantages for monitoring rice variables due to its all-weather observation capability. In this study, eight temporal RADARSAT-2 full-polarimetric SAR images were acquired during rice growth cycle and a modified water cloud model (MWCM was proposed, in which the heterogeneity of the rice canopy in the horizontal direction and its phenological changes were considered when the double-bounce scattering between the rice canopy and the underlying surface was firstly considered as well. Then, three scattering components from an improved polarimetric decomposition were coupled with the MWCM, instead of the backscattering coefficients. Using a genetic algorithm, eight rice variables were estimated, such as the leaf area index (LAI, rice height (h, and the fresh and dry biomass of ears (Fe and De. The accuracy validation showed the MWCM was suitable for the estimation of rice variables during the whole growth season. The validation results showed that the MWCM could predict the temporal behaviors of the rice variables well during the growth cycle (R2 > 0.8. Compared with the original water cloud model (WCM, the relative errors of rice variables with the MWCM were much smaller, especially in the vegetation phase (approximately 15% smaller. Finally, it was discussed that the MWCM could be used, theoretically, for extensive applications since the empirical coefficients in the MWCM were determined in general cases, but more applications of the MWCM are necessary in future work.

  15. Evolution of the Large Scale Circulation, Cloud Structure and Regional Water Cycle Associated with the South China Sea Monsoon During May-June, 1998

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, William K.-M.; Li, Xiao-Fan

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, changes in the large-scale circulation, cloud structures and regional water cycle associated with the evolution of the South China Sea (SCS) monsoon in May-June 1998 were investigated using data from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) and field data from the South China Sea Monsoon Experiment (SCSMEX). Results showed that both tropical and extratropical processes strongly influenced the onset and evolution of the SCS monsoon. Prior to the onset of the SCS monsoon, enhanced convective activities associated with the Madden and Julian Oscillation were detected over the Indian Ocean, and the SCS was under the influence of the West Pacific Anticyclone (WPA) with prevailing low level easterlies and suppressed convection. Establishment of low-level westerlies across Indo-China, following the development of a Bay of Bengal depression played an important role in building up convective available potential energy over the SCS. The onset of SCS monsoon appeared to be triggered by the equatorward penetration of extratropical frontal system, which was established over the coastal region of southern China and Taiwan in early May. Convective activities over the SCS were found to vary inversely with those over the Yangtze River Valley (YRV). Analysis of TRMM microwave and precipitation radar data revealed that during the onset phase, convection over the northern SCS consisted of squall-type rain cell embedded in meso-scale complexes similar to extratropical systems. The radar Z-factor intensity indicated that SCS clouds possessed a bimodal distribution, with a pronounced signal (less than 30dBz) at a height of 2-3 km, and another one (less than 25 dBz) at the 8-10 km level, separated by a well-defined melting level indicated by a bright band at around 5-km level. The stratiform-to-convective cloud ratio was approximately 1:1 in the pre-onset phase, but increased to 5:1 in the active phase. Regional water budget calculations indicated that during the

  16. High-Altitude Cirrus Clouds and Climate

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2002-12-03

    Dec 3, 2002 ... At very low temperatures (~-70°C) prevailing near the tropical tropopause, aerosols and water vapour coagulate or get frozen into ice-cloud particles. When the cirrus clouds melt, water vapour and aerosols separate out, leaving large relative humidity and high aerosol content in the upper troposphere.

  17. Weather Modification by Cloud Seeding

    OpenAIRE

    Dennis, Arnett S.

    1980-01-01

    It is an understatement to say that people are confused about cloud seeding. While it has been called "the crime of the century" and outlawed in Pennsylvania, the governments of the dry, western part of the United States continue to spend tax revenues on cloud seeding to increase water supplies. During the past five years, I have talked with officials responsible for decisions regarding cloud seeding programs in about 15 states of the U.S.A., in a dozen other countries, and in the World Meteo...

  18. Microphysics and Southern Ocean Cloud Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, Daniel T.

    Global climate models (GCMs) change their cloud properties in the Southern Ocean (SO) with warming in a qualitatively consistent fashion. Cloud albedo increases in the mid-latitudes and cloud fraction decreases in the subtropics. This creates a distinctive 'dipole' structure in the SW cloud feedback. However, the shape of the dipole varies from model to model. In this thesis we discuss the microphysical mechanisms underlying the SW cloud feedback over the mid-latitude SO. We will focus on the negative lobe of the dipole. The negative SW cloud feedback in the mid-latitudes is created by transitions from ice to liquid in models. If ice transitions to liquid in mixed-phase clouds the cloud albedo increases because ice crystals are larger than liquid droplets and therefore more reflective for a constant mass of water. Decreases in precipitation efficiency further enhance this effect by decreasing sinks of cloud water. This transition is dependent on the mixed-phase cloud parameterization. Parameterizations vary wildly between models and GCMs disagree by up to 35 K on the temperature where ice and liquid are equally prevalent. This results in a wide spread in the model predictions of the increase in liquid water path (LWP, where the path is the vertically integrated mass of water) with warming that drives the negative optical depth cloud feedback. It is found that this disagreement also results in a wide array of climate mean-states as models that create liquid at lower temperatures have a higher mean-state LWP, lower ice water path (IWP), and higher condensed (ice and liquid) water path (CWP). This presents a problem in climate models. GCMs need to have a reasonable planetary albedo in their climate mean-state. We show evidence that GCMs have tuned cloud fraction to compensate for the variation in mid-latitude cloud albedo driven by the mixed-phase cloud parameterization. This tuning results in mid-latitude clouds that are both too few and too bright as well as a

  19. Dual cloud point extraction coupled with hydrodynamic-electrokinetic two-step injection followed by micellar electrokinetic chromatography for simultaneous determination of trace phenolic estrogens in water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Yingying; Li, Jinhua; Liu, Junshen; Lu, Wenhui; Ma, Jiping; Chen, Lingxin

    2013-07-01

    A dual cloud point extraction (dCPE) off-line enrichment procedure coupled with a hydrodynamic-electrokinetic two-step injection online enrichment technique was successfully developed for simultaneous preconcentration of trace phenolic estrogens (hexestrol, dienestrol, and diethylstilbestrol) in water samples followed by micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC) analysis. Several parameters affecting the extraction and online injection conditions were optimized. Under optimal dCPE-two-step injection-MEKC conditions, detection limits of 7.9-8.9 ng/mL and good linearity in the range from 0.05 to 5 μg/mL with correlation coefficients R(2) ≥ 0.9990 were achieved. Satisfactory recoveries ranging from 83 to 108% were obtained with lake and tap water spiked at 0.1 and 0.5 μg/mL, respectively, with relative standard deviations (n = 6) of 1.3-3.1%. This method was demonstrated to be convenient, rapid, cost-effective, and environmentally benign, and could be used as an alternative to existing methods for analyzing trace residues of phenolic estrogens in water samples.

  20. Cloud computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wink, Diane M

    2012-01-01

    In this bimonthly series, the author examines how nurse educators can use Internet and Web-based technologies such as search, communication, and collaborative writing tools; social networking and social bookmarking sites; virtual worlds; and Web-based teaching and learning programs. This article describes how cloud computing can be used in nursing education.

  1. Cloud Computing

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    2014-03-01

    Mar 1, 2014 ... group of computers connected to the Internet in a cloud-like boundary (Box 1)). In essence computing is transitioning from an era of users owning computers to one in which users do not own computers but have access to computing hardware and software maintained by providers. Users access the ...

  2. Cloud Computing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh, Simon

    2013-01-01

    with technological changes, the paradigmatic pendulum has swung between increased centralization on one side and a focus on distributed computing that pushes IT power out to end users on the other. With the introduction of outsourcing and cloud computing, centralization in large data centers is again dominating...

  3. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and select aldehydes in cloud and fog water: the role of the aqueous phase in impacting trace gas budgets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ervens, B.; Wang, Y.; Eagar, J.; Leaitch, W. R.; Macdonald, A. M.; Valsaraj, K. T.; Herckes, P.

    2013-05-01

    Cloud and fog droplets efficiently scavenge and process water-soluble compounds and, thus, modify the chemical composition of the gas and particle phases. The concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in the aqueous phase reach concentrations on the order of ~ 10 mgC L-1 which is typically on the same order of magnitude as the sum of inorganic anions. Aldehydes and carboxylic acids typically comprise a large fraction of DOC because of their high solubility. The dissolution of species in the aqueous phase can lead to (i) the removal of species from the gas phase preventing their processing by gas phase reactions (e.g., photolysis of aldehydes) and (ii) the formation of unique products that do not have any efficient gas phase sources (e.g., dicarboxylic acids). We present measurements of DOC and select aldehydes in fog water at high elevation and intercepted clouds at a biogenically-impacted location (Whistler, Canada) and in fog water in a more polluted area (Davis, CA). Concentrations of formaldehyde, glyoxal and methylglyoxal were in the micromolar range and comprised ≤ 2% each individually of the DOC. Comparison of the DOC and aldehyde concentrations to those at other locations shows good agreement and reveals highest levels for both in anthropogenically impacted regions. Based on this overview, we conclude that the fraction of organic carbon (dissolved and insoluble inclusions) in the aqueous phase of clouds or fogs, respectively, comprises 2-~ 40% of total organic carbon. Higher values are observed to be associated with aged air masses where organics are expected to be more highly oxidised and, thus, more soluble. Accordingly, the aqueous/gas partitioning ratio expressed here as an effective Henry's law constant for DOC (KH*DOC) increases by an order of magnitude from 7 × 103 M atm-1 to 7 × 104 M atm-1 during the ageing of air masses. The measurements are accompanied by photochemical box model simulations. These simulations are used to contrast two

  4. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC and select aldehydes in cloud and fog water: the role of the aqueous phase in impacting trace gas budgets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Ervens

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Cloud and fog droplets efficiently scavenge and process water-soluble compounds and, thus, modify the chemical composition of the gas and particle phases. The concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC in the aqueous phase reach concentrations on the order of ~ 10 mgC L−1 which is typically on the same order of magnitude as the sum of inorganic anions. Aldehydes and carboxylic acids typically comprise a large fraction of DOC because of their high solubility. The dissolution of species in the aqueous phase can lead to (i the removal of species from the gas phase preventing their processing by gas phase reactions (e.g., photolysis of aldehydes and (ii the formation of unique products that do not have any efficient gas phase sources (e.g., dicarboxylic acids. We present measurements of DOC and select aldehydes in fog water at high elevation and intercepted clouds at a biogenically-impacted location (Whistler, Canada and in fog water in a more polluted area (Davis, CA. Concentrations of formaldehyde, glyoxal and methylglyoxal were in the micromolar range and comprised ≤ 2% each individually of the DOC. Comparison of the DOC and aldehyde concentrations to those at other locations shows good agreement and reveals highest levels for both in anthropogenically impacted regions. Based on this overview, we conclude that the fraction of organic carbon (dissolved and insoluble inclusions in the aqueous phase of clouds or fogs, respectively, comprises 2–~ 40% of total organic carbon. Higher values are observed to be associated with aged air masses where organics are expected to be more highly oxidised and, thus, more soluble. Accordingly, the aqueous/gas partitioning ratio expressed here as an effective Henry's law constant for DOC (KH*DOC increases by an order of magnitude from 7 × 103 M atm−1 to 7 × 104 M atm−1 during the ageing of air masses. The measurements are accompanied by photochemical box model simulations. These simulations are

  5. A new single-moment microphysics scheme for cloud-resolving models using observed dependence of ice concentration on temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khairoutdinov, M.

    2015-12-01

    The representation of microphysics, especially ice microphysics, remains one of the major uncertainties in cloud-resolving models (CRMs). Most of the cloud schemes use the so-called bulk microphysics approach, in which a few moments of such distributions are used as the prognostic variables. The System for Atmospheric Modeling (SAM) is the CRM that employs two such schemes. The single-moment scheme, which uses only mass for each of the water phases, and the two-moment scheme, which adds the particle concentration for each of the hydrometeor category. Of the two, the single-moment scheme is much more computationally efficient as it uses only two prognostic microphysics variables compared to ten variables used by the two-moment scheme. The efficiency comes from a rather considerable oversimplification of the microphysical processes. For instance, only a sum of the liquid and icy cloud water is predicted with the temperature used to diagnose the mixing ratios of different hydrometeors. The main motivation for using such simplified microphysics has been computational efficiency, especially in the applications of SAM as the super-parameterization in global climate models. Recently, we have extended the single-moment microphysics by adding only one additional prognostic variable, which has, nevertheless, allowed us to separate the cloud ice from liquid water. We made use of some of the recent observations of ice microphysics collected at various parts of the world to parameterize several aspects of ice microphysics that have not been explicitly represented before in our sing-moment scheme. For example, we use the observed broad dependence of ice concentration on temperature to diagnose the ice concentration in addition to prognostic mass. Also, there is no artificial separation between the pristine ice and snow, often used by bulk models. Instead we prescribed the ice size spectrum as the gamma distribution, with the distribution shape parameter controlled by the

  6. Broken Cloud Field Longwave-Scattering Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takara, E. E.; Ellingson, R. G.

    2000-05-01

    Throughout most of the shortwave spectrum, atmospheric gases do not absorb the abundant amount of incoming solar radiation. The shortwave-scattering albedo of clouds is very large. The combination of large amounts of incoming solar radiation, low gaseous absorptivity, and large cloud-scattering albedo enables clouds at one level of the atmosphere to affect the shortwave radiative transfer at all other atmospheric levels. Absorption by atmospheric gases is much stronger in the longwave. This localizes the effects of clouds in the longwave. Since longwave absorption is weakest in the window region (8-12 m), cloud effects there will have the greatest chance of propagating to other levels of the atmosphere. In partially overcast conditions, individual cloud geometry and optical properties are important factors. Longwave calculations of most GCMs ignore individual cloud geometry. For liquid water clouds, the optical properties of clouds are also ignored.Previous work in the window region by Takara and Ellingson considered opaque clouds with no absorption or emission by atmospheric gases. Under those conditions, the effect of cloud scattering was comparable to cloud geometry. In this work, the comparison of longwave scattering and geometric effects in the window region is improved by including partially transparent clouds and adding absorption and emission by atmospheric gases. The results show that for optically thick water clouds, it is sufficient to model the geometry; scattering can be neglected. The window region errors are less than 5 W m2 for fluxes and 0.05 K day1 for heating rates. The flat-plate approximation worked for ice clouds; the window region flux errors are less than 3 W m2 with heating rate errors less than 0.05 K day1.

  7. Parameterization of clouds and radiation in climate models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roeckner, E. [Max Planck Institute for Meterology, Hamburg (Germany)

    1995-09-01

    Clouds are a very important, yet poorly modeled element in the climate system. There are many potential cloud feedbacks, including those related to cloud cover, height, water content, phase change, and droplet concentration and size distribution. As a prerequisite to studying the cloud feedback issue, this research reports on the simulation and validation of cloud radiative forcing under present climate conditions using the ECHAM general circulation model and ERBE top-of-atmosphere radiative fluxes.

  8. Stratocumulus over SouthEast Pacific: Idealized 2D simulations with the Lagrangian Cloud Model

    OpenAIRE

    M. Andrejczuk; Gadian, A.; Blyth, A.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper a LES model with Lagrangian representation of microphysics is used to simulate stratucumulus clouds in idealized 2D set-up based on the VOCALS observations. The general features of the cloud simulated by the model, such as cloud water mixing ratio and cloud droplet number profile agree well with the observations. The model can capture observed relation between aerosol distribution and concentration measured below the cloud and cloud droplet number. Averaged over the whole cloud ...

  9. Influence of summer marine fog and low cloud stratus on water relations of evergreen woody shrubs (Arctostaphylos: Ericaceae) in the chaparral of central California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasey, Michael C; Loik, Michael E; Parker, V Thomas

    2012-10-01

    Mediterranean-type climate (MTC) regions around the world are notable for cool, wet winters and hot, dry summers. A dominant vegetation type in all five MTC regions is evergreen, sclerophyllous shrubland, called chaparral in California. The extreme summer dry season in California is moderated by a persistent low-elevation layer of marine fog and cloud cover along the margin of the Pacific coast. We tested whether late dry season water potentials (Ψ(min)) of chaparral shrubs, such as Arctostaphylos species in central California, are influenced by this coast-to-interior climate gradient. Lowland coastal (maritime) shrubs were found to have significantly less negative Ψ(min) than upland interior shrubs (interior), and stable isotope (δ(13)C) values exhibited greater water use efficiency in the interior. Post-fire resprouter shrubs (resprouters) had significantly less negative Ψ(min) than co-occurring obligate seeder shrubs (seeders) in interior and transitional chaparral, possibly because resprouters have deeper root systems with better access to subsurface water than shallow-rooted seeders. Unexpectedly, maritime resprouters and seeders did not differ significantly in their Ψ(min), possibly reflecting more favorable water availability for shrubs influenced by the summer marine layer. Microclimate and soil data also suggest that maritime habitats have more favorable water availability than the interior. While maritime seeders constitute the majority of local Arctostaphylos endemics, they exhibited significantly greater vulnerability to xylem cavitation than interior seeders. Because rare seeders in maritime chaparral are more vulnerable to xylem cavitation than interior seeders, the potential breakdown of the summer marine layer along the coast is of potential conservation concern.

  10. Call for Papers Special Issue on Cloud Computing and Big Data Applications

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2017-01-01

    ... researchthataddressesthe challengesin thebroad areasofCloud Com puting and Big Data. Cloud Computing deliverscomputationalresourceson—demand as servicesthatare comm oditized and delivered comfortably analogous totraditionalutilitiessuch aselectricity,gas,water,andtelephony.Cloud serviceoferingsforcompute,storage,andcommun...

  11. Multilayer cloud detection and retrieval of cloud physical and optical properties from thermal infrared measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwabuchi, H.; Tokoro, Y.; Saito, M.; Putri, N. S.; Katagiri, S.; Sekiguchi, M.

    2015-12-01

    Recent studies using active remote sensing have revealed significant occurrence of multi-layer cloud. Detection of multi-layer cloud is important in passive remote sensing for quality assessment of cloud property retrieval and identification of uncertain retrievals. An algorithm using several thermal infrared (TIR) bands at 6-13.5 micron wavelengths to detect multilayer cloud and retrieve cloud physical and optical properties including cloud thermodynamic phase is developed. This significantly extends applicability of passive remote sensing and improves accuracy of cloud property retrieval. The method uses the split window bands as well as the carbon dioxide and water vapor absorption bands. The forward model uses the two-stream approximation to solve radiative transfer with gaseous absorption treated by the correlated-k distribution method. Brightness temperature errors are evaluated by model-to-model and model-to-measurement comparisons. Top pressure of lower cloud in multi-layer cloud column can be retrieved if the upper cloud optical thickness is less than 6. The optimal estimation method is used to simultaneously infer several cloud properties including water path, effective particle radius and cloud-top pressure. The method is applied to the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) using 10 TIR bands and compared to MODIS operational product and active remote sensing measurements, showing promising results. The TIR method well detects optically thin clouds and retrieve their properties with relatively high accuracy. Particularly, cloud-top of optically thin cloud is estimated well. Multi-layer cloud detection works usually, while the TIR measurements miss very thin cloud that appears near the tropopause. The algorithm will be applied to frequent observation data from a new Japanese geostationary satellite, Himawari-8.

  12. Marine Aerosols and Clouds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Sarah D; Thornton, Daniel C O

    2017-10-13

    The role of marine bioaerosols in cloud formation and climate is currently so uncertain that even the sign of the climate forcing is unclear. Marine aerosols form through direct emissions and through the conversion of gasphase emissions to aerosols in the atmosphere. The composition and size of aerosols determine how effective they are in catalyzing the formation of water droplets and ice crystals in clouds by acting as cloud condensation nuclei and ice nucleating particles, respectively. Marine organic aerosols may be sourced both from recent regional phytoplankton blooms that add labile organic matter to the surface ocean and from long-term global processes, such as the upwelling of old refractory dissolved organic matter from the deep ocean. Understanding the formation of marine aerosols and their propensity to catalyze cloud formation processes are challenges that must be addressed given the major uncertainties associated with aerosols in climate models. Expected final online publication date for the Annual Review of Marine Science Volume 10 is January 3, 2018. Please see http://www.annualreviews.org/page/journal/pubdates for revised estimates.

  13. Airborne Observations of Mixed Phase Clouds in the Southern Rockies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorsi, S. W.; Avallone, L. M.

    2011-12-01

    Conducted over mountainous regions of Northern Colorado and Southern Wyoming during the 2010-2011 winter, the Colorado Airborne Multi-Phase Cloud Study (CAMPS) was designed to investigate the complex processes within mid-latitude, orographic, mixed-phase clouds. Over the course of 29 flights, instruments aboard the Wyoming King Air research aircraft made observations of cloud properties within diverse wintertime clouds, including many orographic mixed phase clouds. The aircraft carried a suite of in-situ cloud probes, including PMS-FSSP optical particle counter, PMS-2DC and -2DP cloud particle and precipitation imagers, Gerber PVM-100 optical and DMT LWC-100 hotwire liquid content probes, and a Rosemont icing detector. In addition, the research aircraft carried the University of Colorado closed-path laser hygrometer (CLH), which measures total water concentration by sampling the outside airstream, vaporizing condensed water particles in the sample, and observing infrared absorption in water vapor spectrum. The combination of the total water measurement from the CLH and the condensed particle measurements from the optical and hotwire cloud probes provides an opportunity to estimate the relative concentrations of cloud particles by phase. Using this host of cloud probes and the total water measurement, we develop a method for retrieving in-situ cloud water phase and concentration. We present results of this retrieval for several regions of mixed phase cloud, and describe the observed structure and evolution of these clouds.

  14. Evaluating stratiform cloud base charge remotely

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, R. Giles; Nicoll, Keri A.; Aplin, Karen L.

    2017-06-01

    Stratiform clouds acquire charge at their upper and lower horizontal boundaries due to vertical current flow in the global electric circuit. Cloud charge is expected to influence microphysical processes, but understanding is restricted by the infrequent in situ measurements available. For stratiform cloud bases below 1 km in altitude, the cloud base charge modifies the surface electric field beneath, allowing a new method of remote determination. Combining continuous cloud height data during 2015-2016 from a laser ceilometer with electric field mill data, cloud base charge is derived using a horizontal charged disk model. The median daily cloud base charge density found was -0.86 nC m-2 from 43 days' data. This is consistent with a uniformly charged region 40 m thick at the cloud base, now confirming that negative cloud base charge is a common feature of terrestrial layer clouds. This technique can also be applied to planetary atmospheres and volcanic plumes.Plain Language SummaryThe idea that clouds in the atmosphere can charge electrically has been appreciated since the time of Benjamin Franklin, but it is less widely recognized that it is not just thunderclouds which contain electric charge. For example, water droplets in simple layer clouds, that are abundant and often responsible for an overcast day, carry electric charges. The droplet charging arises at the upper and lower edges of the layer cloud. This occurs because the small droplets at the edges draw charge from the air outside the cloud. Understanding how strongly layer clouds charge is important in evaluating electrical effects on the development of such clouds, for example, how thick the cloud becomes and whether it generates rain. Previously, cloud charge measurement has required direct measurements within the cloud using weather balloons or aircraft. This work has monitored the lower cloud charge continuously using instruments placed at the surface beneath. From measurements made over 2 years, the

  15. On the relationship of polar mesospheric cloud ice water content, particle radius and mesospheric temperature and its use in multi-dimensional models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. J. Jensen

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The distribution of ice layers in the polar summer mesosphere (called polar mesospheric clouds or PMCs is sensitive to background atmospheric conditions and therefore affected by global-scale dynamics. To investigate this coupling it is necessary to simulate the global distribution of PMCs within a 3-dimensional (3-D model that couples large-scale dynamics with cloud microphysics. However, modeling PMC microphysics within 3-D global chemistry climate models (GCCM is a challenge due to the high computational cost associated with particle following (Lagrangian or sectional microphysical calculations. By characterizing the relationship between the PMC effective radius, ice water content (iwc, and local temperature (T from an ensemble of simulations from the sectional microphysical model, the Community Aerosol and Radiation Model for Atmospheres (CARMA, we determined that these variables can be described by a robust empirical formula. The characterized relationship allows an estimate of an altitude distribution of PMC effective radius in terms of local temperature and iwc. For our purposes we use this formula to predict an effective radius as part of a bulk parameterization of PMC microphysics in a 3-D GCCM to simulate growth, sublimation and sedimentation of ice particles without keeping track of the time history of each ice particle size or particle size bin. This allows cost effective decadal scale PMC simulations in a 3-D GCCM to be performed. This approach produces realistic PMC simulations including estimates of the optical properties of PMCs. We validate the relationship with PMC data from the Solar Occultation for Ice Experiment (SOFIE.

  16. A comparative analysis of extended water cloud model and backscatter modelling for above-ground biomass assessment in Corbett Tiger Reserve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Yogesh; Singh, Sarnam; Chatterjee, R. S.; Trivedi, Mukul

    2016-04-01

    Forest biomass acts as a backbone in regulating the climate by storing carbon within itself. Thus the assessment of forest biomass is crucial in understanding the dynamics of the environment. Traditionally the destructive methods were adopted for the assessment of biomass which were further advanced to the non-destructive methods. The allometric equations developed by destructive methods were further used in non-destructive methods for the assessment, but they were mostly applied for woody/commercial timber species. However now days Remote Sensing data are primarily used for the biomass geospatial pattern assessment. The Optical Remote Sensing data (Landsat8, LISS III, etc.) are being used very successfully for the estimation of above ground biomass (AGB). However optical data is not suitable for all atmospheric/environmental conditions, because it can't penetrate through clouds and haze. Thus Radar data is one of the alternate possible ways to acquire data in all-weather conditions irrespective of weather and light. The paper examines the potential of ALOS PALSAR L-band dual polarisation data for the estimation of AGB in the Corbett Tiger Reserve (CTR) covering an area of 889 km2. The main focus of this study is to explore the accuracy of Polarimetric Scattering Model (Extended Water Cloud Model (EWCM) with respect to Backscatter model in the assessment of AGB. The parameters of the EWCM were estimated using the decomposition components (Raney Decomposition) and the plot level information. The above ground biomass in the CTR ranges from 9.6 t/ha to 322.6 t/ha.

  17. On the observation of unusual high concentration of small chain-like aggregate ice crystals and large ice water contents near the top of a deep convective cloud during the CIRCLE-2 experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-F. Gayet

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available During the CIRCLE-2 experiment carried out over Western Europe in May 2007, combined in situ and remote sensing observations allowed to describe microphysical and optical properties near-top of an overshooting convective cloud (11 080 m/−58 °C. The airborne measurements were performed with the DLR Falcon aircraft specially equipped with a unique set of instruments for the extensive in situ cloud measurements of microphysical and optical properties (Polar Nephelometer, FSSP-300, Cloud Particle Imager and PMS 2-D-C and nadir looking remote sensing observations (DLR WALES Lidar. Quasi-simultaneous space observations from MSG/SEVIRI, CALIPSO/CALIOP-WFC-IIR and CloudSat/CPR combined with airborne RASTA radar reflectivity from the French Falcon aircraft flying above the DLR Falcon depict very well convective cells which overshoot by up to 600 m the tropopause level. Unusual high values of the concentration of small ice particles, extinction, ice water content (up to 70 cm−3, 30 km−1 and 0.5 g m−3, respectively are experienced. The mean effective diameter and the maximum particle size are 43 μm and about 300 μm, respectively. This very dense cloud causes a strong attenuation of the WALES and CALIOP lidar returns. The SEVIRI retrieved parameters confirm the occurrence of small ice crystals at the top of the convective cell. Smooth and featureless phase functions with asymmetry factors of 0.776 indicate fairly uniform optical properties. Due to small ice crystals the power-law relationship between ice water content (IWC and radar reflectivity appears to be very different from those usually found in cirrus and anvil clouds. For a given equivalent reflectivity factor, IWCs are significantly larger for the overshooting cell than for the cirrus. Assuming the same prevalent microphysical properties over the depth of the overshooting cell, RASTA reflectivity profiles scaled into ice water content show that retrieved

  18. Cloud management and security

    CERN Document Server

    Abbadi, Imad M

    2014-01-01

    Written by an expert with over 15 years' experience in the field, this book establishes the foundations of Cloud computing, building an in-depth and diverse understanding of the technologies behind Cloud computing. In this book, the author begins with an introduction to Cloud computing, presenting fundamental concepts such as analyzing Cloud definitions, Cloud evolution, Cloud services, Cloud deployment types and highlighting the main challenges. Following on from the introduction, the book is divided into three parts: Cloud management, Cloud security, and practical examples. Part one presents the main components constituting the Cloud and federated Cloud infrastructure(e.g., interactions and deployment), discusses management platforms (resources and services), identifies and analyzes the main properties of the Cloud infrastructure, and presents Cloud automated management services: virtual and application resource management services. Part two analyzes the problem of establishing trustworthy Cloud, discuss...

  19. Cloud time

    CERN Document Server

    Lockwood, Dean

    2012-01-01

    The ‘Cloud’, hailed as a new digital commons, a utopia of collaborative expression and constant connection, actually constitutes a strategy of vitalist post-hegemonic power, which moves to dominate immanently and intensively, organizing our affective political involvements, instituting new modes of enclosure, and, crucially, colonizing the future through a new temporality of control. The virtual is often claimed as a realm of invention through which capitalism might be cracked, but it is precisely here that power now thrives. Cloud time, in service of security and profit, assumes all is knowable. We bear witness to the collapse of both past and future virtuals into a present dedicated to the exploitation of the spectres of both.

  20. Technical Note: VUV photodesorption rates from water ice in the 120–150 K temperature range – significance for Noctilucent Clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Yu. Kulikov

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Laboratory studies have been carried out with the aim to improve our understanding of physicochemical processes which take place at the water ice/air interface initiated by solar irradiation with a wavelength of 121.6 nm. It was intended to mimic the processes of ice particles characteristic of Noctilucent Clouds (NLCs. The experimental set-up used includes a high-vacuum chamber, a gas handling system, a cryostat with temperature controller, an FTIR spectrometer, a vacuum ultraviolet hydrogen lamp, and a microwave generator. We report the first results of measurements of the absolute photodesorption rate (loss of substance due to the escape of photoproducts into gas phase from thin (20–100 nm water ice samples kept in the temperature range of 120–150 K. The obtained results show that a flow of photoproducts into the gas phase is considerably lower than presumed in the recent study by Murray and Plane (2005. The experiments indicate that almost all photoproducts remain in the solid phase, and the principal chemical reaction between them is the recombination reaction H + OH → H2O which is evidently very fast. This means that direct photolysis of mesospheric ice particles seems to have no significant impact on the gas phase chemistry of the upper mesosphere.

  1. Simultaneous speciation of inorganic selenium and antimony in water samples by electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry following selective cloud point extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yingjie; Hu, Bin; He, Man; Xiang, Guoqiang

    2008-02-01

    A new method was developed for the simultaneous speciation of inorganic selenium and antimony in water by electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ETV-ICP-MS) following selective cloud point extraction (CPE). The method is based on the fact that Se(IV) and Sb(III) could form complexes with diethyldithiocarbamate (DDTC) at pH 6.00, and the complexes were quantitatively extracted into the non-ionic surfactant-rich phase of octylphenoxypolyethoxyethanol (Triton X-114), whereas the Se(VI) and Sb(V) remained as free species in aqueous solutions. Sb(III) and Se(IV) in concentrate were determined by ETV-ICP-MS after proper disposal. The total Se and total Sb were determined by the same protocol after Se(VI) and Sb(V) were reduced by l-cysteine, and Se(VI) and Sb(V) concentrations were obtained by respectively subtracting Se(IV) and Sb(III) from the total Se and the total Sb. Under the optimized conditions, the limits of detection (LODs) were 0.05 microg L(-1) for Se(IV) and 0.03 microg L(-1) for Sb(III), the relative standard deviations (RSDs) were 3.5% for Se(IV) and 4.2% for Sb(III) (C=1.00 microg L(-1), n=5). The proposed method was applied to the speciation of inorganic selenium and antimony in different water samples with satisfactory results.

  2. Soft Clouding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Morten; Markussen, Thomas; Wetton, Barnabas

    2012-01-01

    Soft Clouding is a blended concept, which describes the aim of a collaborative and transdisciplinary project. The concept is a metaphor implying a blend of cognitive, embodied interaction and semantic web. Furthermore, it is a metaphor describing our attempt of curating a new semantics of sound...... brought together in one transdisciplinary process of curating a semantics of sound: Technological, Humanistic /Curatorial, and Design / Action-based practice....

  3. Soft Clouding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Morten; Markussen, Thomas; Wetton, Barnabas

    2012-01-01

    Soft Clouding is a blended concept, which describes the aim of a collaborative and transdisciplinary project. The concept is a metaphor implying a blend of cognitive, embodied interaction and semantic web. Furthermore, it is a metaphor describing our attempt of curating a new semantics of sound a...... brought together in one transdisciplinary process of curating a semantics of sound: Technological, Humanistic /Curatorial, and Design / Action-based practice....

  4. Prognostics of Power MOSFET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celaya, Jose Ramon; Saxena, Abhinav; Vashchenko, Vladislay; Saha, Sankalita; Goebel, Kai Frank

    2011-01-01

    This paper demonstrates how to apply prognostics to power MOSFETs (metal oxide field effect transistor). The methodology uses thermal cycling to age devices and Gaussian process regression to perform prognostics. The approach is validated with experiments on 100V power MOSFETs. The failure mechanism for the stress conditions is determined to be die-attachment degradation. Change in ON-state resistance is used as a precursor of failure due to its dependence on junction temperature. The experimental data is augmented with a finite element analysis simulation that is based on a two-transistor model. The simulation assists in the interpretation of the degradation phenomena and SOA (safe operation area) change.

  5. Final Technical Report for "Ice nuclei relation to aerosol properties: Data analysis and model parameterization for IN in mixed-phase clouds" (DOE/SC00002354)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prenni, Anthony [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States); Kreidenweis, Sonia M. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States)

    2012-09-28

    Clouds play an important role in weather and climate. In addition to their key role in the hydrologic cycle, clouds scatter incoming solar radiation and trap infrared radiation from the surface and lower atmosphere. Despite their importance, feedbacks involving clouds remain as one of the largest sources of uncertainty in climate models. To better simulate cloud processes requires better characterization of cloud microphysical processes, which can affect the spatial extent, optical depth and lifetime of clouds. To this end, we developed a new parameterization to be used in numerical models that describes the variation of ice nuclei (IN) number concentrations active to form ice crystals in mixed-phase (water droplets and ice crystals co-existing) cloud conditions as these depend on existing aerosol properties and temperature. The parameterization is based on data collected using the Colorado State University continuous flow diffusion chamber in aircraft and ground-based campaigns over a 14-year period, including data from the DOE-supported Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. The resulting relationship is shown to more accurately represent the variability of ice nuclei distributions in the atmosphere compared to currently used parameterizations based on temperature alone. When implemented in one global climate model, the new parameterization predicted more realistic annually averaged cloud water and ice distributions, and cloud radiative properties, especially for sensitive higher latitude mixed-phase cloud regions. As a test of the new global IN scheme, it was compared to independent data collected during the 2008 DOE-sponsored Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC). Good agreement with this new data set suggests the broad applicability of the new scheme for describing general (non-chemically specific) aerosol influences on IN number concentrations feeding mixed-phase Arctic stratus clouds. Finally, the parameterization was implemented into a regional

  6. Essentials of cloud computing

    CERN Document Server

    Chandrasekaran, K

    2014-01-01

    ForewordPrefaceComputing ParadigmsLearning ObjectivesPreambleHigh-Performance ComputingParallel ComputingDistributed ComputingCluster ComputingGrid ComputingCloud ComputingBiocomputingMobile ComputingQuantum ComputingOptical ComputingNanocomputingNetwork ComputingSummaryReview PointsReview QuestionsFurther ReadingCloud Computing FundamentalsLearning ObjectivesPreambleMotivation for Cloud ComputingThe Need for Cloud ComputingDefining Cloud ComputingNIST Definition of Cloud ComputingCloud Computing Is a ServiceCloud Computing Is a Platform5-4-3 Principles of Cloud computingFive Essential Charact

  7. Kinetic multi-layer model of gas-particle interactions in aerosols and clouds (KM-GAP: linking condensation, evaporation and chemical reactions of organics, oxidants and water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Shiraiwa

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available We present a novel kinetic multi-layer model for gas-particle interactions in aerosols and clouds (KM-GAP that treats explicitly all steps of mass transport and chemical reaction of semi-volatile species partitioning between gas phase, particle surface and particle bulk. KM-GAP is based on the PRA model framework (Pöschl-Rudich-Ammann, 2007, and it includes gas phase diffusion, reversible adsorption, surface reactions, bulk diffusion and reaction, as well as condensation, evaporation and heat transfer. The size change of atmospheric particles and the temporal evolution and spatial profile of the concentration of individual chemical species can be modeled along with gas uptake and accommodation coefficients. Depending on the complexity of the investigated system and the computational constraints, unlimited numbers of semi-volatile species, chemical reactions, and physical processes can be treated, and the model shall help to bridge gaps in the understanding and quantification of multiphase chemistry and microphysics in atmospheric aerosols and clouds.

    In this study we demonstrate how KM-GAP can be used to analyze, interpret and design experimental investigations of changes in particle size and chemical composition in response to condensation, evaporation, and chemical reaction. For the condensational growth of water droplets, our kinetic model results provide a direct link between laboratory observations and molecular dynamic simulations, confirming that the accommodation coefficient of water at ~270 K is close to unity (Winkler et al., 2006. Literature data on the evaporation of dioctyl phthalate as a function of particle size and time can be reproduced, and the model results suggest that changes in the experimental conditions like aerosol particle concentration and chamber geometry may influence the evaporation kinetics and can be optimized for efficient probing of specific physical effects and parameters. With regard to oxidative

  8. Prognostic factors in oligodendrogliomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westergaard, L; Gjerris, F; Klinken, L

    1997-01-01

    An outcome analysis was performed on 96 patients with pure cerebral oligodendrogliomas operated in the 30-year period 1962 to 1991. The most important predictive prognostic factors were youth and no neurological deficit, demonstrated as a median survival for the group younger than 20 years of 17...

  9. Toward Closing the Water Cycle over the ARM/CART Region: Implementation of Stable Water Isotope Physics in MM5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemball-Cook, S. R.; Miller, N. L.; DePaolo, D. J.

    2001-12-01

    To date, atmospheric water isotope modeling has been performed on a global scale. The development of a stable water isotope scheme in a mesoscale model will lead to a simulated spatial distribution that will improve our understanding of present day climate variability, as well as historical climate patterns. The purpose of this study was to add water isotope tracers to the regional atmospheric model MM5 (NCAR's Mesoscale Model 5) in order to link existing global and basin-scale isotope models, and to work toward an improved knowledge of the water budget over the ARM site. In order to include isotopic processes in MM5, eight new prognostic variables were added to the model's dynamical core. These are the isotopic mixing ratios for water vapor, cloud liquid water, cloud ice, and rain for the stable isotopes O18 and deuterium. The isotopes are treated in a manner similar to the natural water vapor, cloud liquid water, etc. in terms of diffusion, advection, nudging, and filtering. Isotope fractionation and diffusion are handled using the approach of Gedzelman and Arnold (1994). Processes treated in this model are fractionation during deposition of water vapor onto cloud ice and condensation of water vapor onto cloud water, and also diffusive exchange of isotopes between vapor and falling rain drops. The bulk flux model of Hoffman et al. (1998) is used here as a first order approximation for isotopic evaporative processes. For the runs to be discussed here, lateral boundary conditions were generated by the Melbourne University General Circulation Model. This GCM runs at a resolution of R21, and predicts values of the O18 and deuterium mixing ratios at each grid point. Results of preliminary model runs will be discussed.

  10. Cirrus clouds. I - A cirrus cloud model. II - Numerical experiments on the formation and maintenance of cirrus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starr, D. OC.; Cox, S. K.

    1985-01-01

    A simplified cirrus cloud model is presented which may be used to investigate the role of various physical processes in the life cycle of a cirrus cloud. The model is a two-dimensional, time-dependent, Eulerian numerical model where the focus is on cloud-scale processes. Parametrizations are developed to account for phase changes of water, radiative processes, and the effects of microphysical structure on the vertical flux of ice water. The results of a simulation of a thin cirrostratus cloud are given. The results of numerical experiments performed with the model are described in order to demonstrate the important role of cloud-scale processes in determining the cloud properties maintained in response to larger scale forcing. The effects of microphysical composition and radiative processes are considered, as well as their interaction with thermodynamic and dynamic processes within the cloud. It is shown that cirrus clouds operate in an entirely different manner than liquid phase stratiform clouds.

  11. The response of clouds and aerosols to cosmic ray decreases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensmark, J.; Enghoff, Martin Andreas Bødker; Shaviv, N. J.

    2016-01-01

    in physical and micro-physical cloud parameters to FDs. The test is subsequently applied to one ground based and three satellite based datasets. Responses (> 95%) to FDs are found in the following parameters of the analyzed datasets. AERONET: Ångström exponent (cloud condensation nuclei changes), SSM....../I: liquid water content, ISCCP: total, high and middle, IR detected clouds over the oceans, MODIS: cloud effective emissivity, cloud optical thickness, liquid water, cloud fraction, liquid water path, liquid cloud effective radius. Moreover, the responses in MODIS are found to correlate positively...... with the strength of the FDs, and the signs and magnitudes of the responses agree with model based expectations. The effect is mainly seen in liquid clouds. An impact through changes in UV driven photo chemistry is shown to be negligible and an impact via UV absorption in the stratosphere is found to have no effect...

  12. Spectral Dependence of MODIS Cloud Droplet Effective Radius Retrievals for Marine Boundary Layer Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhibo; Platnick, Steven E.; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Cho, Hyoun-Myoung

    2014-01-01

    Low-level warm marine boundary layer (MBL) clouds cover large regions of Earth's surface. They have a significant role in Earth's radiative energy balance and hydrological cycle. Despite the fundamental role of low-level warm water clouds in climate, our understanding of these clouds is still limited. In particular, connections between their properties (e.g. cloud fraction, cloud water path, and cloud droplet size) and environmental factors such as aerosol loading and meteorological conditions continue to be uncertain or unknown. Modeling these clouds in climate models remains a challenging problem. As a result, the influence of aerosols on these clouds in the past and future, and the potential impacts of these clouds on global warming remain open questions leading to substantial uncertainty in climate projections. To improve our understanding of these clouds, we need continuous observations of cloud properties on both a global scale and over a long enough timescale for climate studies. At present, satellite-based remote sensing is the only means of providing such observations.

  13. Optimization of a cloud point extraction procedure with response surface methodology for the quantification of dissolved iron in produced water from the petroleum industry using FAAS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gondim, Tamyris A; Guedes, Jhonyson A C; Ribeiro, Livia P D; Lopes, Gisele S; Matos, Wladiana O

    2017-01-30

    The characterization of inorganic elements in the produced water (PW) samples is a difficult task because of the complexity of the matrix. This work deals with a study of a methodology for dissolved Fe quantification in PW from oil industry by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) after cloud point extraction (CPE). The procedure is based on the CPE using PAN as complexing agent and Triton X-114 as surfactant. The best conditions for Fe extraction parameters were studied using a Box-Behnken design. The proposed method presented a LOQ of 0.010μgmL-1 and LOD of 0.003μgmL-1. The precision of the method was evaluated in terms of repeatability, obtaining a coefficient of variation of 2.54%. The accuracy of the method was assessed by recovery experiments of Fe spiked that presented recovery of 103.28%. The method was applied with satisfactory performance to determine Fe by FAAS in PW samples. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Blue skies for CLOUD

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Through the recently approved CLOUD experiment, CERN will soon be contributing to climate research. Tests are being performed on the first prototype of CLOUD, an experiment designed to assess cosmic radiation influence on cloud formation.

  15. Ultrathin Tropical Tropopause Clouds (UTTCs: I. Cloud morphology and occurrence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Th. Peter

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Subvisible cirrus clouds (SVCs may contribute to dehydration close to the tropical tropopause. The higher and colder SVCs and the larger their ice crystals, the more likely they represent the last efficient point of contact of the gas phase with the ice phase and, hence, the last dehydrating step, before the air enters the stratosphere. The first simultaneous in situ and remote sensing measurements of SVCs were taken during the APE-THESEO campaign in the western Indian ocean in February/March 1999. The observed clouds, termed Ultrathin Tropical Tropopause Clouds (UTTCs, belong to the geometrically and optically thinnest large-scale clouds in the Earth's atmosphere. Individual UTTCs may exist for many hours as an only 200--300 m thick cloud layer just a few hundred meters below the tropical cold point tropopause, covering up to 105 km2. With temperatures as low as 181 K these clouds are prime representatives for defining the water mixing ratio of air entering the lower stratosphere.

  16. Significance analysis of prognostic signatures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew H Beck

    Full Text Available A major goal in translational cancer research is to identify biological signatures driving cancer progression and metastasis. A common technique applied in genomics research is to cluster patients using gene expression data from a candidate prognostic gene set, and if the resulting clusters show statistically significant outcome stratification, to associate the gene set with prognosis, suggesting its biological and clinical importance. Recent work has questioned the validity of this approach by showing in several breast cancer data sets that "random" gene sets tend to cluster patients into prognostically variable subgroups. This work suggests that new rigorous statistical methods are needed to identify biologically informative prognostic gene sets. To address this problem, we developed Significance Analysis of Prognostic Signatures (SAPS which integrates standard prognostic tests with a new prognostic significance test based on stratifying patients into prognostic subtypes with random gene sets. SAPS ensures that a significant gene set is not only able to stratify patients into prognostically variable groups, but is also enriched for genes showing strong univariate associations with patient prognosis, and performs significantly better than random gene sets. We use SAPS to perform a large meta-analysis (the largest completed to date of prognostic pathways in breast and ovarian cancer and their molecular subtypes. Our analyses show that only a small subset of the gene sets found statistically significant using standard measures achieve significance by SAPS. We identify new prognostic signatures in breast and ovarian cancer and their corresponding molecular subtypes, and we show that prognostic signatures in ER negative breast cancer are more similar to prognostic signatures in ovarian cancer than to prognostic signatures in ER positive breast cancer. SAPS is a powerful new method for deriving robust prognostic biological signatures from clinically

  17. Vertical overlap of probability density functions of cloud and precipitation hydrometeors: CLOUD AND PRECIPITATION PDF OVERLAP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ovchinnikov, Mikhail [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Lim, Kyo-Sun Sunny [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon Republic of Korea; Larson, Vincent E. [Department of Mathematical Sciences, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee Wisconsin USA; Wong, May [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder Colorado USA; Thayer-Calder, Katherine [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder Colorado USA; Ghan, Steven J. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA

    2016-11-05

    Coarse-resolution climate models increasingly rely on probability density functions (PDFs) to represent subgrid-scale variability of prognostic variables. While PDFs characterize the horizontal variability, a separate treatment is needed to account for the vertical structure of clouds and precipitation. When sub-columns are drawn from these PDFs for microphysics or radiation parameterizations, appropriate vertical correlations must be enforced via PDF overlap specifications. This study evaluates the representation of PDF overlap in the Subgrid Importance Latin Hypercube Sampler (SILHS) employed in the assumed PDF turbulence and cloud scheme called the Cloud Layers Unified By Binormals (CLUBB). PDF overlap in CLUBB-SILHS simulations of continental and tropical oceanic deep convection is compared with overlap of PDF of various microphysics variables in cloud-resolving model (CRM) simulations of the same cases that explicitly predict the 3D structure of cloud and precipitation fields. CRM results show that PDF overlap varies significantly between different hydrometeor types, as well as between PDFs of mass and number mixing ratios for each species, - a distinction that the current SILHS implementation does not make. In CRM simulations that explicitly resolve cloud and precipitation structures, faster falling species, such as rain and graupel, exhibit significantly higher coherence in their vertical distributions than slow falling cloud liquid and ice. These results suggest that to improve the overlap treatment in the sub-column generator, the PDF correlations need to depend on hydrometeor properties, such as fall speeds, in addition to the currently implemented dependency on the turbulent convective length scale.

  18. Spatial Correlations of Anomalies of Tropospheric Temperature and Water Vapor, Cloud Cover, and OLR with the El Nino Index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susskind, Joel; Iredell, Lena; Lee, Jae N.

    2014-01-01

    In this presentation, we will show AIRS Version-6 area weighted anomaly time series over the time period September 2002 through August 2014 of atmospheric temperature and water vapor profiles as a function of height. These anomaly time series show very different behaviors in the stratosphere and in the troposphere. Tropical mean stratospheric temperature anomaly time series are very strongly influenced by the Quasi-Biennial Oscillation (QBO) with large anomalies that propagate downward from 1 mb to 100 mb with a period of about two years. AIRS stratospheric temperature anomalies are in good agreement with those obtained by MLS over a common period. Tropical mean tropospheric temperature profile anomalies appear to be totally disconnected from those of the stratosphere and closely follow El Nino La Nina activity.

  19. Silicon Photonics Cloud (SiCloud)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    DeVore, P. T. S.; Jiang, Y.; Lynch, M.

    2015-01-01

    Silicon Photonics Cloud (SiCloud.org) is the first silicon photonics interactive web tool. Here we report new features of this tool including mode propagation parameters and mode distribution galleries for user specified waveguide dimensions and wavelengths.......Silicon Photonics Cloud (SiCloud.org) is the first silicon photonics interactive web tool. Here we report new features of this tool including mode propagation parameters and mode distribution galleries for user specified waveguide dimensions and wavelengths....

  20. Automatic Cloud Bursting under FermiCloud

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Hao [Fermilab; Shangping, Ren [IIT; Garzoglio, Gabriele [Fermilab; Timm, Steven [Fermilab; Bernabeu, Gerard [Fermilab; Kim, Hyun Woo; Chadwick, Keith; Jang, Haengjin [KISTI, Daejeon; Noh, Seo-Young [KISTI, Daejeon

    2013-01-01

    Cloud computing is changing the infrastructure upon which scientific computing depends from supercomputers and distributed computing clusters to a more elastic cloud-based structure. The service-oriented focus and elasticity of clouds can not only facilitate technology needs of emerging business but also shorten response time and reduce operational costs of traditional scientific applications. Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) is currently in the process of building its own private cloud, FermiCloud, which allows the existing grid infrastructure to use dynamically provisioned resources on FermiCloud to accommodate increased but dynamic computation demand from scientists in the domains of High Energy Physics (HEP) and other research areas. Cloud infrastructure also allows to increase a private cloud’s resource capacity through “bursting” by borrowing or renting resources from other community or commercial clouds when needed. This paper introduces a joint project on building a cloud federation to support HEP applications between Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory and Korea Institution of Science and Technology Information, with technical contributions from the Illinois Institute of Technology. In particular, this paper presents two recent accomplishments of the joint project: (a) cloud bursting automation and (b) load balancer. Automatic cloud bursting allows computer resources to be dynamically reconfigured to meet users’ demands. The load balance algorithm which the cloud bursting depends on decides when and where new resources need to be allocated. Our preliminary prototyping and experiments have shown promising success, yet, they also have opened new challenges to be studied

  1. Martian Clouds Data Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Steven

    The major topics covered were a discussion of the structure of relational data base systems and features of the Britton Lee Relational Data Base Management System (RDBMS); a discussion of the workshop's objectives, approach, and research scenarios; and an overview of the Atmospheres Node User's Guide, which details the datasets stored on the Britton Lee, the structure of the query and data analysis system, and examples of the exact menu screens encountered. Also discussed were experience with the system, review of the system performance, and a strategy to produce queries and performance data retrievals of mutual interest. The goals were defined as examining correlations between cloud occurrence, water vapor abundance, and surface properties.

  2. Contrasting ice microphysical properties of wintertime frontal clouds and summertime convective clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, W.; McFarquhar, G. M.

    2015-12-01

    The microphysical and optical properties of ice clouds were derived from measurements collected during the Colorado Airborne Multi-phase Cloud Study (CAMPS) and the Storm Peak Laboratory Cloud Property Validation Experiment (STORMVEX) conducted in the winter of 2010-2011 over the Rocky Mountains and during the Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) conducted in the summer of 2011 over Oklahoma. A two-dimensional cloud (2DC) probe, two-dimensional precipitation (2DP) probe and Fast 2DC probe were installed on the University of Wyoming King Air aircraft during CAMPS and a Cloud Imaging Probe (CIP) and Precipitation Imaging Probe were operated on the ground at the Storm Peak Laboratory during STORMVEX. A 2DC, CIP and a high volume precipitation spectrometer were installed in the University of North Dakota Citation aircraft during MC3E. The distributions of particle habits, number distribution functions, total number concentrations, ice water contents, precipitation rates, extinction and effective radius from four cases of wintertime frontal clouds sampled during CAMPS/STORMVEX and from four cases of the stratiform region of summer convective systems from MC3E are compared. It is found that there is higher percentage of pristine ice particles, such as dendrites and columns, in the wintertime frontal clouds than in the summertime convective clouds, where the dominant habits are rimed particles. The number distribution functions are generally broader in the summertime clouds than in the wintertime frontal clouds. In addition, the number concentrations and ice water contents are generally lower in the wintertime frontal clouds than in the summertime convective clouds when comparing the same temperature ranges. Implications about the potential microphysical processes that are acting in these two types of ice clouds are discussed. The results in this study are also compared with previous studies using data from other field campaigns.

  3. A boundary-layer cloud study using Southern Great Plains Cloud and radiation testbed (CART) data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albrecht, B.; Mace, G.; Dong, X.; Syrett, W. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)] [and others

    1996-04-01

    Boundary layer clouds-stratus and fairweather cumulus - are closely coupled involves the radiative impact of the clouds on the surface energy budget and the strong dependence of cloud formation and maintenance on the turbulent fluxes of heat and moisture in the boundary layer. The continuous data collection at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site provides a unique opportunity to study components of the coupling processes associated with boundary layer clouds and to provide descriptions of cloud and boundary layer structure that can be used to test parameterizations used in climate models. But before the CART data can be used for process studies and parameterization testing, it is necessary to evaluate and validate data and to develop techniques for effectively combining the data to provide meaningful descriptions of cloud and boundary layer characteristics. In this study we use measurements made during an intensive observing period we consider a case where low-level stratus were observed at the site for about 18 hours. This case is being used to examine the temporal evolution of cloud base, cloud top, cloud liquid water content, surface radiative fluxes, and boundary layer structure. A method for inferring cloud microphysics from these parameters is currently being evaluated.

  4. Prediction of cloud droplet number in a general circulation model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghan, S.J.; Leung, L.R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-04-01

    We have applied the Colorado State University Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS) bulk cloud microphysics parameterization to the treatment of stratiform clouds in the National Center for Atmospheric Research Community Climate Model (CCM2). The RAMS predicts mass concentrations of cloud water, cloud ice, rain and snow, and number concnetration of ice. We have introduced the droplet number conservation equation to predict droplet number and it`s dependence on aerosols.

  5. Clouds and Hazes in Exoplanets and Brown Dwarfs

    OpenAIRE

    Morley, Caroline Victoria

    2016-01-01

    The formation of clouds significantly alters the spectra of cool substellar atmospheres from terrestrial planets to brown dwarfs. In cool planets like Earth and Jupiter, volatile species like water and ammonia condense to form ice clouds. In hot planets and brown dwarfs, iron and silicates instead condense, forming dusty clouds. Irradiated methane-rich planets may have substantial hydrocarbon hazes. During my dissertation, I have studied the impact of clouds and hazes in a variety of substell...

  6. Macrophysical cloud properties simulated by two-moment microphysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baba, Y.

    2016-12-01

    Cloud-resolving model (CRM) is becoming useful tool for climate. Recently, two-moment cloud microphysics which additionally predicts number concentration of water species and thus realizes more flexible representation for cloud properties has been widely used in CRM. The two-moment representation is also suitable for long-range CRM simulation, since cloud-radiation interaction is affected by number concentration of cloud droplet through aerosol indirect effects. In spite of the advancement in microphysical modeling, cloud properties simulated by CRM is dependent on microphysical parameterization and the resulting properties remains unknown until model's sensitivity has been confirmed. In order to clarify dependence of microphysical parametezation on cloud macrophysical outcome, especially focusing on two-moment representation of cloud microphysics, sensitivity experiments were performed in two idealized experiments, i.e., squall line and radiative convective quasi-equilibrium. The former experiment showed that predicting number concentration of large ice water species was necessary for simulating more realistic precipitation trends. A distinct difference between strong convective and weak stratiform precipitations in squall line was found to be dependent on the microphysical parameterization. The latter experiments showed a consistent trends with that of the former experiment, i.e., prediction of number concentration of large ice water species affects long-range, macrophysical cloud properties such as resulting heat and water budget in cloud-radiation interaction, and the budgets were greatly controlled by the behaviors of large ice water species. The vertical profiles of cloud mass flux were different and it was found to be derived from production rate of ice water species which was affected by number concentration of ice water species. The present results indicate that macrophysics of cloud properties depend on behaviors of ice water species rather than liquid

  7. Secure Cloud Architecture

    OpenAIRE

    Kashif Munir; Sellapan Palaniappan

    2013-01-01

    Cloud computing is set of resources and services offered through the Internet. Cloud services are delivered from data centers located throughout the world. Cloud computing facilitates its consumers by providing virtual resources via internet. The biggest challenge in cloud computing is the security and privacy problems caused by its multi-tenancy nature and the outsourcing of infrastructure, sensitive data and critical applications. Enterpri...

  8. The effects of aerosols on precipitation and dimensions of subtropical clouds: a sensitivity study using a numerical cloud model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Teller

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerical experiments were carried out using the Tel-Aviv University 2-D cloud model to investigate the effects of increased concentrations of Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN, giant CCN (GCCN and Ice Nuclei (IN on the development of precipitation and cloud structure in mixed-phase sub-tropical convective clouds. In order to differentiate between the contribution of the aerosols and the meteorology, all simulations were conducted with the same meteorological conditions. The results show that under the same meteorological conditions, polluted clouds (with high CCN concentrations produce less precipitation than clean clouds (with low CCN concentrations, the initiation of precipitation is delayed and the lifetimes of the clouds are longer. GCCN enhance the total precipitation on the ground in polluted clouds but they have no noticeable effect on cleaner clouds. The increased rainfall due to GCCN is mainly a result of the increased graupel mass in the cloud, but it only partially offsets the decrease in rainfall due to pollution (increased CCN. The addition of more effective IN, such as mineral dust particles, reduces the total amount of precipitation on the ground. This reduction is more pronounced in clean clouds than in polluted ones. Polluted clouds reach higher altitudes and are wider than clean clouds and both produce wider clouds (anvils when more IN are introduced. Since under the same vertical sounding the polluted clouds produce less rain, more water vapor is left aloft after the rain stops. In our simulations about 3.5 times more water evaporates after the rain stops from the polluted cloud as compared to the clean cloud. The implication is that much more water vapor is transported from lower levels to the mid troposphere under polluted conditions, something that should be considered in climate models.

  9. Robots and sensor clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Shakshuki, Elhadi

    2016-01-01

    This book comprises four chapters that address some of the latest research in clouds robotics and sensor clouds. The first part of the book includes two chapters on cloud robotics. The first chapter introduces a novel resource allocation framework for cloud robotics and proposes a Stackelberg game model and the corresponding task oriented pricing mechanism for resource allocation. In the second chapter, the authors apply Cloud Computing for building a Cloud-Based 3D Point Cloud extractor for stereo images. Their objective is to have a dynamically scalable and applicable to near real-time scenarios.  .

  10. Cloud Robotics Platforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Busra Koken

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cloud robotics is a rapidly evolving field that allows robots to offload computation-intensive and storage-intensive jobs into the cloud. Robots are limited in terms of computational capacity, memory and storage. Cloud provides unlimited computation power, memory, storage and especially collaboration opportunity. Cloud-enabled robots are divided into two categories as standalone and networked robots. This article surveys cloud robotic platforms, standalone and networked robotic works such as grasping, simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM and monitoring.

  11. The CLOUD experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2006-01-01

    The Cosmics Leaving Outdoor Droplets (CLOUD) experiment as shown by Jasper Kirkby (spokesperson). Kirkby shows a sketch to illustrate the possible link between galactic cosmic rays and cloud formations. The CLOUD experiment uses beams from the PS accelerator at CERN to simulate the effect of cosmic rays on cloud formations in the Earth's atmosphere. It is thought that cosmic ray intensity is linked to the amount of low cloud cover due to the formation of aerosols, which induce condensation.

  12. Prognostic factors in oligodendrogliomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westergaard, L; Gjerris, F; Klinken, L

    1997-01-01

    .5 years and for the group older than 60 years of 13 months. The group without neurological deficits had a 5-years survival of 43 per cent while the group with deficits had a 5-years survival of 5 per cent. The 5-years survival for oligodendroglioma of grade II was 46 per cent and for grade III 10 per cent......An outcome analysis was performed on 96 patients with pure cerebral oligodendrogliomas operated in the 30-year period 1962 to 1991. The most important predictive prognostic factors were youth and no neurological deficit, demonstrated as a median survival for the group younger than 20 years of 17...

  13. Cosmic rays, cloud condensation nuclei and clouds – a reassessment using MODIS data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. E. Kristjánsson

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The response of clouds to sudden decreases in the flux of galactic cosmic rays (GCR – Forbush decrease events – has been investigated using cloud products from the space-borne MODIS instrument, which has been in operation since 2000. By focusing on pristine Southern Hemisphere ocean regions we examine areas where we believe that a cosmic ray signal should be easier to detect than elsewhere. While previous studies have mainly considered cloud cover, the high spatial and spectral resolution of MODIS allows for a more thorough study of microphysical parameters such as cloud droplet size, cloud water content and cloud optical depth, in addition to cloud cover. Averaging the results from the 22 Forbush decrease events that were considered, no statistically significant correlations were found between any of the four cloud parameters and GCR, when autocorrelations were taken into account. Splitting the area of study into six domains, all of them have a negative correlation between GCR and cloud droplet size, in agreement with a cosmic ray – cloud coupling, but in only one of the domains (eastern Atlantic Ocean was the correlation statistically significant. Conversely, cloud optical depth is mostly negatively correlated with GCR, and in the eastern Atlantic Ocean domain that correlation is statistically significant. For cloud cover and liquid water path, the correlations with GCR are weaker, with large variations between the different domains. When only the six Forbush decrease events with the largest amplitude (more than 10% decrease were studied, the correlations fit the hypothesis slightly better, with 16 out of 24 correlations having the expected sign, although many of the correlations are quite weak. Introducing a time lag of a few days for clouds to respond to the cosmic ray signal the correlations tend to become weaker and even to change sign.

  14. Process-model simulations of cloud albedo enhancement by aerosols in the Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravitz, Ben; Wang, Hailong; Rasch, Philip J.; Morrison, Hugh; Solomon, Amy B.

    2014-01-01

    A cloud-resolving model is used to simulate the effectiveness of Arctic marine cloud brightening via injection of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), either through geoengineering or other increased sources of Arctic aerosols. An updated cloud microphysical scheme is employed, with prognostic CCN and cloud particle numbers in both liquid and mixed-phase marine low clouds. Injection of CCN into the marine boundary layer can delay the collapse of the boundary layer and increase low-cloud albedo. Albedo increases are stronger for pure liquid clouds than mixed-phase clouds. Liquid precipitation can be suppressed by CCN injection, whereas ice precipitation (snow) is affected less; thus, the effectiveness of brightening mixed-phase clouds is lower than for liquid-only clouds. CCN injection into a clean regime results in a greater albedo increase than injection into a polluted regime, consistent with current knowledge about aerosol–cloud interactions. Unlike previous studies investigating warm clouds, dynamical changes in circulation owing to precipitation changes are small. According to these results, which are dependent upon the representation of ice nucleation processes in the employed microphysical scheme, Arctic geoengineering is unlikely to be effective as the sole means of altering the global radiation budget but could have substantial local radiative effects. PMID:25404677

  15. Process-model simulations of cloud albedo enhancement by aerosols in the Arctic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravitz, Ben; Wang, Hailong; Rasch, Philip J; Morrison, Hugh; Solomon, Amy B

    2014-12-28

    A cloud-resolving model is used to simulate the effectiveness of Arctic marine cloud brightening via injection of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), either through geoengineering or other increased sources of Arctic aerosols. An updated cloud microphysical scheme is employed, with prognostic CCN and cloud particle numbers in both liquid and mixed-phase marine low clouds. Injection of CCN into the marine boundary layer can delay the collapse of the boundary layer and increase low-cloud albedo. Albedo increases are stronger for pure liquid clouds than mixed-phase clouds. Liquid precipitation can be suppressed by CCN injection, whereas ice precipitation (snow) is affected less; thus, the effectiveness of brightening mixed-phase clouds is lower than for liquid-only clouds. CCN injection into a clean regime results in a greater albedo increase than injection into a polluted regime, consistent with current knowledge about aerosol-cloud interactions. Unlike previous studies investigating warm clouds, dynamical changes in circulation owing to precipitation changes are small. According to these results, which are dependent upon the representation of ice nucleation processes in the employed microphysical scheme, Arctic geoengineering is unlikely to be effective as the sole means of altering the global radiation budget but could have substantial local radiative effects. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  16. Prognostic factors in lupus nephritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faurschou, Mikkel; Starklint, Henrik; Halberg, Poul

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate the prognostic significance of clinical and renal biopsy findings in an unselected cohort of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and nephritis.......To evaluate the prognostic significance of clinical and renal biopsy findings in an unselected cohort of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and nephritis....

  17. Requirements Specifications for Prognostics: An Overview

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — With recent advancements in prognostics methodologies there has been a significant interest in maturing Prognostics and Health Management (PHM) to increase its...

  18. On Applying the Prognostic Performance Metrics

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Prognostics performance evaluation has gained significant attention in the past few years. *As prognostics technology matures and more sophisticated methods for...

  19. Metrics for Offline Evaluation of Prognostic Performance

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Prognostic performance evaluation has gained significant attention in the past few years.*Currently, prognostics concepts lack standard definitions and suffer from...

  20. Parameterizing Size Distribution in Ice Clouds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeSlover, Daniel; Mitchell, David L.

    2009-09-25

    PARAMETERIZING SIZE DISTRIBUTIONS IN ICE CLOUDS David L. Mitchell and Daniel H. DeSlover ABSTRACT An outstanding problem that contributes considerable uncertainty to Global Climate Model (GCM) predictions of future climate is the characterization of ice particle sizes in cirrus clouds. Recent parameterizations of ice cloud effective diameter differ by a factor of three, which, for overcast conditions, often translate to changes in outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) of 55 W m-2 or more. Much of this uncertainty in cirrus particle sizes is related to the problem of ice particle shattering during in situ sampling of the ice particle size distribution (PSD). Ice particles often shatter into many smaller ice fragments upon collision with the rim of the probe inlet tube. These small ice artifacts are counted as real ice crystals, resulting in anomalously high concentrations of small ice crystals (D < 100 µm) and underestimates of the mean and effective size of the PSD. Half of the cirrus cloud optical depth calculated from these in situ measurements can be due to this shattering phenomenon. Another challenge is the determination of ice and liquid water amounts in mixed phase clouds. Mixed phase clouds in the Arctic contain mostly liquid water, and the presence of ice is important for determining their lifecycle. Colder high clouds between -20 and -36 oC may also be mixed phase but in this case their condensate is mostly ice with low levels of liquid water. Rather than affecting their lifecycle, the presence of liquid dramatically affects the cloud optical properties, which affects cloud-climate feedback processes in GCMs. This project has made advancements in solving both of these problems. Regarding the first problem, PSD in ice clouds are uncertain due to the inability to reliably measure the concentrations of the smallest crystals (D < 100 µm), known as the “small mode”. Rather than using in situ probe measurements aboard aircraft, we employed a treatment of ice

  1. Using SEVIRI radiances to retrieve cloud optical properties of convective cloud systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Jennifer; Fischer, Jürgen; Hünerbein, Anja; Deneke, Hartwig; Macke, Andreas

    2013-05-01

    In this case study the development of cloud properties (cloud optical depth, effective radius and cloud top height) during the life-cycle of a convective cloud system over Europe was analyzed. To retrieve the properties we developed a retrieval scheme based on the radiative transfer code MOMO and an optimal estimation procedure. Input data are the visible to short-wavelength infrared channels from SEVIRI. In contrast to many other retrieval schemes we used 4 channels simultaneously. Especially the 3,9μm channel provides additional information due to the fact that it measures solar reflectance and thermal emission and allows the inclusion of cloud top height into the retrieval. By using a time series of SEVIRI measurements we want to provide and examine the microphysical development of the cloud over life-time. We monitored the growth of the system and found the most active parts of the convection with the highest water content and optical depth in those regions where the cloud top height is largest, too. The effective radius of the cloud particles is largest in older regions of the cloud system, where the cloud is already decaying.

  2. Improving Climate Projections by Understanding How Cloud Phase affects Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesana, Gregory; Storelvmo, Trude

    2017-01-01

    Whether a cloud is predominantly water or ice strongly influences interactions between clouds and radiation coming down from the Sun or up from the Earth. Being able to simulate cloud phase transitions accurately in climate models based on observational data sets is critical in order to improve confidence in climate projections, because this uncertainty contributes greatly to the overall uncertainty associated with cloud-climate feedbacks. Ultimately, it translates into uncertainties in Earth's sensitivity to higher CO2 levels. While a lot of effort has recently been made toward constraining cloud phase in climate models, more remains to be done to document the radiative properties of clouds according to their phase. Here we discuss the added value of a new satellite data set that advances the field by providing estimates of the cloud radiative effect as a function of cloud phase and the implications for climate projections.

  3. Scattering by Atmospheric Particles: From Aerosols to Clouds with the Point-Spread Function ... using Water, Milk, Plastic Cups, and a Laser Pointer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, A. B.

    2015-12-01

    Planetary atmospheres are made primarily of molecules, and their optical properties are well known. They scatter sunlight across the spectrum, but far more potently at shorter wavelengths. Consequently, they redden the Sun as it sets and, at the same time, endow the daytime sky with its characteristic blue hue. There are also microscopic atmospheric particulates that are equally omnipresent because small enough (up to ~10s of microns) to remain lofted for long periods of time. However, in contrast with molecules of the major gases, their concentrations are highly variable in space and time. Their optical properties are also far more interesting. These airborne particles are either solid---hence the word "aerosols"---or liquid, most notably in the form of cloud droplets. Needless to say that both aerosols and clouds have major impacts on the balance of the Earth's climate system. Harder to understand, but nonetheless true, is that their climate impacts are much harder to assess by Earth system modelers than those of greenhouse gases such as CO2. That makes them prime targets of study by multiple approaches, including ground- and space-based remote sensing. To characterize aerosols and clouds quantitatively by optical remote sensing methods, either passive (sunlight-based) or active (laser-based), we need predictive capability for the signals recorded by sensors, whether ground-based, airborne, or carried by satellites. This in turn draws on the physical theory of "radiative transfer" that describes how the light propagates and scatters in the molecular-and-particulate atmosphere. This is a challenge for remote sensing scientists. I will show why by simulating with simple means the point spread function or "PSF" of scattering particulate atmospheres with varying opacity, thus covering tabletop analogs of the pristine air, the background aerosol, all the way to optically thick cloudy airmasses. I will also show PSF measurements of real clouds over New Mexico and

  4. Hybrid cloud for dummies

    CERN Document Server

    Hurwitz, Judith; Halper, Fern; Kirsch, Dan

    2012-01-01

    Understand the cloud and implement a cloud strategy for your business Cloud computing enables companies to save money by leasing storage space and accessing technology services through the Internet instead of buying and maintaining equipment and support services. Because it has its own unique set of challenges, cloud computing requires careful explanation. This easy-to-follow guide shows IT managers and support staff just what cloud computing is, how to deliver and manage cloud computing services, how to choose a service provider, and how to go about implementation. It also covers security and

  5. Secure cloud computing

    CERN Document Server

    Jajodia, Sushil; Samarati, Pierangela; Singhal, Anoop; Swarup, Vipin; Wang, Cliff

    2014-01-01

    This book presents a range of cloud computing security challenges and promising solution paths. The first two chapters focus on practical considerations of cloud computing. In Chapter 1, Chandramouli, Iorga, and Chokani describe the evolution of cloud computing and the current state of practice, followed by the challenges of cryptographic key management in the cloud. In Chapter 2, Chen and Sion present a dollar cost model of cloud computing and explore the economic viability of cloud computing with and without security mechanisms involving cryptographic mechanisms. The next two chapters addres

  6. Cloud property datasets retrieved from AVHRR, MODIS, AATSR and MERIS in the framework of the Cloud_cci project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stengel, Martin; Stapelberg, Stefan; Sus, Oliver; Schlundt, Cornelia; Poulsen, Caroline; Thomas, Gareth; Christensen, Matthew; Carbajal Henken, Cintia; Preusker, Rene; Fischer, Jürgen; Devasthale, Abhay; Willén, Ulrika; Karlsson, Karl-Göran; McGarragh, Gregory R.; Proud, Simon; Povey, Adam C.; Grainger, Roy G.; Fokke Meirink, Jan; Feofilov, Artem; Bennartz, Ralf; Bojanowski, Jedrzej S.; Hollmann, Rainer

    2017-11-01

    New cloud property datasets based on measurements from the passive imaging satellite sensors AVHRR, MODIS, ATSR2, AATSR and MERIS are presented. Two retrieval systems were developed that include components for cloud detection and cloud typing followed by cloud property retrievals based on the optimal estimation (OE) technique. The OE-based retrievals are applied to simultaneously retrieve cloud-top pressure, cloud particle effective radius and cloud optical thickness using measurements at visible, near-infrared and thermal infrared wavelengths, which ensures spectral consistency. The retrieved cloud properties are further processed to derive cloud-top height, cloud-top temperature, cloud liquid water path, cloud ice water path and spectral cloud albedo. The Cloud_cci products are pixel-based retrievals, daily composites of those on a global equal-angle latitude-longitude grid, and monthly cloud properties such as averages, standard deviations and histograms, also on a global grid. All products include rigorous propagation of the retrieval and sampling uncertainties. Grouping the orbital properties of the sensor families, six datasets have been defined, which are named AVHRR-AM, AVHRR-PM, MODIS-Terra, MODIS-Aqua, ATSR2-AATSR and MERIS+AATSR, each comprising a specific subset of all available sensors. The individual characteristics of the datasets are presented together with a summary of the retrieval systems and measurement records on which the dataset generation were based. Example validation results are given, based on comparisons to well-established reference observations, which demonstrate the good quality of the data. In particular the ensured spectral consistency and the rigorous uncertainty propagation through all processing levels can be considered as new features of the Cloud_cci datasets compared to existing datasets. In addition, the consistency among the individual datasets allows for a potential combination of them as well as facilitates studies on the

  7. Diagnostic and Prognostic Models for Generator Step-Up Transformers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vivek Agarwal; Nancy J. Lybeck; Binh T. Pham

    2014-09-01

    In 2014, the online monitoring (OLM) of active components project under the Light Water Reactor Sustainability program at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) focused on diagnostic and prognostic capabilities for generator step-up transformers. INL worked with subject matter experts from the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) to augment and revise the GSU fault signatures previously implemented in the Electric Power Research Institute’s (EPRI’s) Fleet-Wide Prognostic and Health Management (FW-PHM) Suite software. Two prognostic models were identified and implemented for GSUs in the FW-PHM Suite software. INL and EPRI demonstrated the use of prognostic capabilities for GSUs. The complete set of fault signatures developed for GSUs in the Asset Fault Signature Database of the FW-PHM Suite for GSUs is presented in this report. Two prognostic models are described for paper insulation: the Chendong model for degree of polymerization, and an IEEE model that uses a loading profile to calculates life consumption based on hot spot winding temperatures. Both models are life consumption models, which are examples of type II prognostic models. Use of the models in the FW-PHM Suite was successfully demonstrated at the 2014 August Utility Working Group Meeting, Idaho Falls, Idaho, to representatives from different utilities, EPRI, and the Halden Research Project.

  8. Raman lidar measurements of water vapor and aerosols during the atmospheric radiation measurement (ARM) remote clouds sensing (RCS) intensive observation period (IOP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melfi, S.H.; Starr, D.O`C.; Whiteman, D. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States)] [and others

    1996-04-01

    The first Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) remote Cloud Study (RCS) Intensive Operations Period (IOP) was held during April 1994 at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. This experiment was conducted to evaluate and calibrate state-of-the-art, ground based remote sensing instruments and to use the data acquired by these instruments to validate retrieval algorithms developed under the ARM program.

  9. Validation of automated cloud top phase algorithms: distinguishing between cirrus clouds and snow in a priori analyses of AVHRR imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchison, Keith D.; Etherton, Brian J.; Topping, Phillip C.

    1997-06-01

    Quantitative assessments the performance of automated cloud analysis algorithms require the creation of highly accurate, manual cloud, no cloud (CNC) images from multispectral meteorological satellite data. In general, the methodology to create these analyses for the evaluation of cloud detection algorithms is relatively straightforward, although the task becomes more complicated when little spectral signature is evident between a cloud and its background, as appears to be the case in advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR) imagery when thin cirrus is present over snow-covered surfaces. In addition, complex procedures are needed to help the analyst distinguish between water and ice cloud tops to construct the manual cloud top phase analyses and to ensure that inaccuracies in automated cloud detection are not propagated into the results of the cloud classification algorithm. Procedures are described that enhance the researcher's ability to (1) distinguish between thin cirrus clouds and snow-covered surfaces in daytime AVHRR imagery, (2) construct accurate cloud top phase manual analyses, and (3) quantitatively validate the performance of both automated cloud detection and cloud top phase classification algorithms. The methodology uses all AVHRR spectral bands, including a band derived from the daytime 3.7-micrometers channel, which has proven most valuable for discriminating between thin cirrus clouds and snow. It is concluded that while the 1.6-micrometers band is needed to distinguish between snow and water clouds in daytime data, the 3.7-micrometers channel remains essential during the daytime to differentiate between thin ice clouds and snow.Unfortunately this capability that may be lost if the 3.7-micrometers data switches to a nighttime-only transmission with the launch of future National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration satellites.

  10. Cloud microphysics and surface properties in climate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stamnes, K. [Univ. of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Cloud optical thickness is determined from ground-based measurements of broadband incoming solar irradiance using a radiation model in which the cloud optical depth is adjusted until computed irradiance agrees with the measured value. From spectral measurements it would be feasible to determine both optical thickness and mean drop size, which apart from cloud structure and morphology, are the most important climatic parameters of clouds. A radiative convective model is used to study the sensitivity of climate to cloud liquid water amount and cloud drop size. This is illustrated in Figure 21.1 which shows that for medium thick clouds a 10 % increase in drop size yields a surface warming of 1.5{degrees}C, which is the same as that due to a doubling of carbon dioxide. For thick clouds, a 5% decrease in drop size is sufficient to offset the warming due to doubling of carbon dioxide. A radiative transfer model for the coupled atmosphere/sea ice/ocean system is used to study the partitioning of radiative energy between the three strata, and the potential for testing such a model in terms of planned experiments in the Arctic is discussed.

  11. Cloud Computing for radiologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharat, Amit T; Safvi, Amjad; Thind, Ss; Singh, Amarjit

    2012-07-01

    Cloud computing is a concept wherein a computer grid is created using the Internet with the sole purpose of utilizing shared resources such as computer software, hardware, on a pay-per-use model. Using Cloud computing, radiology users can efficiently manage multimodality imaging units by using the latest software and hardware without paying huge upfront costs. Cloud computing systems usually work on public, private, hybrid, or community models. Using the various components of a Cloud, such as applications, client, infrastructure, storage, services, and processing power, Cloud computing can help imaging units rapidly scale and descale operations and avoid huge spending on maintenance of costly applications and storage. Cloud computing allows flexibility in imaging. It sets free radiology from the confines of a hospital and creates a virtual mobile office. The downsides to Cloud computing involve security and privacy issues which need to be addressed to ensure the success of Cloud computing in the future.

  12. Cloud computing for radiologists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit T Kharat

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cloud computing is a concept wherein a computer grid is created using the Internet with the sole purpose of utilizing shared resources such as computer software, hardware, on a pay-per-use model. Using Cloud computing, radiology users can efficiently manage multimodality imaging units by using the latest software and hardware without paying huge upfront costs. Cloud computing systems usually work on public, private, hybrid, or community models. Using the various components of a Cloud, such as applications, client, infrastructure, storage, services, and processing power, Cloud computing can help imaging units rapidly scale and descale operations and avoid huge spending on maintenance of costly applications and storage. Cloud computing allows flexibility in imaging. It sets free radiology from the confines of a hospital and creates a virtual mobile office. The downsides to Cloud computing involve security and privacy issues which need to be addressed to ensure the success of Cloud computing in the future.

  13. Moving towards Cloud Security

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edit Szilvia Rubóczki

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cloud computing hosts and delivers many different services via Internet. There are a lot of reasons why people opt for using cloud resources. Cloud development is increasing fast while a lot of related services drop behind, for example the mass awareness of cloud security. However the new generation upload videos and pictures without reason to a cloud storage, but only few know about data privacy, data management and the proprietary of stored data in the cloud. In an enterprise environment the users have to know the rule of cloud usage, however they have little knowledge about traditional IT security. It is important to measure the level of their knowledge, and evolve the training system to develop the security awareness. The article proves the importance of suggesting new metrics and algorithms for measuring security awareness of corporate users and employees to include the requirements of emerging cloud security.

  14. In the clouds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Russchenberg, H.; Wassink, J.

    2012-01-01

    Clouds always used to be the least understood element of the weather system, but that is rapidly changing . Computer clouds increasingly correspond with those in the sky, which promises weather forecasts at street level and more accurate climate scenarios.

  15. Cloud Computing for radiologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharat, Amit T; Safvi, Amjad; Thind, SS; Singh, Amarjit

    2012-01-01

    Cloud computing is a concept wherein a computer grid is created using the Internet with the sole purpose of utilizing shared resources such as computer software, hardware, on a pay-per-use model. Using Cloud computing, radiology users can efficiently manage multimodality imaging units by using the latest software and hardware without paying huge upfront costs. Cloud computing systems usually work on public, private, hybrid, or community models. Using the various components of a Cloud, such as applications, client, infrastructure, storage, services, and processing power, Cloud computing can help imaging units rapidly scale and descale operations and avoid huge spending on maintenance of costly applications and storage. Cloud computing allows flexibility in imaging. It sets free radiology from the confines of a hospital and creates a virtual mobile office. The downsides to Cloud computing involve security and privacy issues which need to be addressed to ensure the success of Cloud computing in the future. PMID:23599560

  16. Effects of cosmic ray decreases on cloud microphysics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensmark, J.; Enghoff, M. B.; Svensmark, H.

    2012-01-01

    the minimum in atmospheric ionization and less significant responses for effective radius and cloud condensation nuclei (equations for atmospheric parameters. Furthermore principal components analysis gives a total significance......Using cloud data from MODIS we investigate the response of cloud microphysics to sudden decreases in galactic cosmic radiation – Forbush decreases – and find responses in effective emissivity, cloud fraction, liquid water content, and optical thickness above the 2–3 sigma level 6–9 days after...... ionization. These results support the suggestion that ions play a significant role in the life-cycle of clouds....

  17. Final Report to the U.S. Department of Energy for studies of Evaluation of Turbulence Parameterizations for Cloud-Resolving Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Randall, David A. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States). Dept. of Atmospheric Science; Cheng, Anning [Science Systems and Applications, Inc. (SSAI), Lanham, MD (United States); NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA (United States); Ghan, Steve [Science Systems and Applications, Inc. (SSAI), Lanham, MD (United States); NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA (United States); Khairoutdinov, Marat [Science Systems and Applications, Inc. (SSAI), Lanham, MD (United States); NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA (United States); Larson, Vince [Science Systems and Applications, Inc. (SSAI), Lanham, MD (United States); NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA (United States); Moeng, Chin-Hoh [Science Systems and Applications, Inc. (SSAI), Lanham, MD (United States); NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA (United States)

    2015-07-27

    The intermediately-prognostic higher-order turbulence closure (IPHOC) introduces a joint double-Gaussian distribution of liquid water potential temperature (θl ), total water mixing ratio (qt ), and vertical velocity (w ) to represent any skewed turbulence circulations .The distribution is inferred from the first-, second-, and third-order moments of the variables given above, and is used to diagnose cloud fraction and grid-mean liquid water mixing ratio, as well as the buoyancy and fourth-order terms in the equations describing the evolution of the second- and third-order moments. Only three third-order moments (those of θl , qt , and w ) are predicted in the IPHOC.

  18. Improving Boundary-layer Turbulence and Cloud Processes in CAM with a Higher-order Turbulence Closure Scheme and ASR Measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Kuan-Man [NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA (United States); Cheng, Anning [NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA (United States); Science Systems and Applications, Inc., Hampton, VA (United States)

    2015-11-24

    The intermediately-prognostic higher-order turbulence closure (IPHOC) introduces a joint double-Gaussian distribution of liquid water potential temperature (θl ), total water mixing ratio (qt), and vertical velocity (w) to represent any skewed turbulence circulation. The distribution is inferred from the first-, second-, and third-order moments of the variables given above, and is used to diagnose cloud fraction and gridmean liquid water mixing ratio, as well as the buoyancy term and fourth-order terms in the equations describing the evolution of the second- and third-order moments. Only three third-order moments, i.e., the triple moments of θl, qt, and w, are predicted in IPHOC.

  19. Cloud computing strategies

    CERN Document Server

    Chorafas, Dimitris N

    2011-01-01

    A guide to managing cloud projects, Cloud Computing Strategies provides the understanding required to evaluate the technology and determine how it can be best applied to improve business and enhance your overall corporate strategy. Based on extensive research, it examines the opportunities and challenges that loom in the cloud. It explains exactly what cloud computing is, what it has to offer, and calls attention to the important issues management needs to consider before passing the point of no return regarding financial commitments.

  20. Cloud Computing: a Prologue

    OpenAIRE

    Ullah, Sultan; Xuefeng, Zheng

    2013-01-01

    An emerging internet based super computing model is represented by cloud computing. Cloud computing is the convergence and evolution of several concepts from virtualization, distributed storage, grid, and automation management to enable a more flexible approach for deploying and scaling applications. However, cloud computing moves the application software and databases to the large data centers, where the management of the data and services may not be fully trustworthy. The concept of cloud c...

  1. Governmental Cloud - Part of Cloud Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian IVANUS

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Large IT (Information Technology companies propose cloud government's (G-Cloud development model through investment from the private sector, which will facilitate the access of users from public sector to the new generation IT services. Through the G-Cloud private operators that operate governmental cloud infrastructure by adding specific SaaS (Software as a Service functionalities, proposed model by big companies, supports public institutions in optimizing costs and increased operational efficiency, bringing tangible benefits in relation with citizens and thus with the whole society. These optimizations are achieved by moving the initial investment to the private sector, through type subscription model cost by eliminating dependency on human factors (technical and by providing a low cost [1]. This paper aims to bring to the attention of specialists, some aspects of Governmental Cloud from the European Union (EU countries to be understood and implemented in Romania.

  2. On CLOUD nine

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    The team from the CLOUD experiment - the world’s first experiment using a high-energy particle accelerator to study the climate - were on cloud nine after the arrival of their new three-metre diameter cloud chamber. This marks the end of three years’ R&D and design, and the start of preparations for data taking later this year.

  3. Cloud Computing Explained

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metz, Rosalyn

    2010-01-01

    While many talk about the cloud, few actually understand it. Three organizations' definitions come to the forefront when defining the cloud: Gartner, Forrester, and the National Institutes of Standards and Technology (NIST). Although both Gartner and Forrester provide definitions of cloud computing, the NIST definition is concise and uses…

  4. Greening the Cloud

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Hoed, Robert; Hoekstra, Eric; Procaccianti, G.; Lago, P.; Grosso, Paola; Taal, Arie; Grosskop, Kay; van Bergen, Esther

    The cloud has become an essential part of our daily lives. We use it to store our documents (Dropbox), to stream our music and lms (Spotify and Net ix) and without giving it any thought, we use it to work on documents in the cloud (Google Docs). The cloud forms a massive storage and processing

  5. Clearing clouds of uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelinka, Mark D.; Randall, David A.; Webb, Mark J.; Klein, Stephen A.

    2017-10-01

    Since 1990, the wide range in model-based estimates of equilibrium climate warming has been attributed to disparate cloud responses to warming. However, major progress in our ability to understand, observe, and simulate clouds has led to the conclusion that global cloud feedback is likely positive.

  6. Albedo and transmittance of inhomogeneous stratus clouds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuev, V.E.; Kasyanov, E.I.; Titov, G.A. [Institute of Atmospheric Optics, Tomsk (Russian Federation)] [and others

    1996-04-01

    A highly important topic is the study of the relationship between the statistical parameters of optical and radiative charactertistics of inhomogeneous stratus clouds. This is important because the radiation codes of general circulation models need improvement, and it is important for geophysical information. A cascade model has been developed at the Goddard Space Flight Center to treat stratocumulus clouds with the simplest geometry and horizontal fluctuations of the liquid water path (optical thickness). The model evaluates the strength with which the stochastic geometry of clouds influences the statistical characteristics of albedo and the trnasmittance of solar radiation.

  7. Parameterization of bulk condensation in numerical cloud models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogan, Yefim L.; Martin, William J.

    1994-01-01

    The accuracy of the moist saturation adjustment scheme has been evaluated using a three-dimensional explicit microphysical cloud model. It was found that the error in saturation adjustment depends strongly on the Cloud Condensation Nucleii (CCN) concentration in the ambient atmosphere. The scheme provides rather accurate results in the case where a sufficiently large number of CCN (on the order of several hundred per cubic centimeter) is available. However, under conditions typical of marine stratocumulus cloud layers with low CCN concentration, the error in the amounts of condensed water vapor and released latent heat may be as large as 40%-50%. A revision of the saturation adjustment scheme is devised that employs the CCN concentration, dynamical supersaturation, and cloud water content as additional variables in the calculation of the condensation rate. The revised condensation model reduced the error in maximum updraft and cloud water content in the climatically significant case of marine stratocumulus cloud layers by an order of magnitude.

  8. Observing relationships between lightning and cloud profiles by means of a satellite-borne cloud radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buiat, Martina; Porcù, Federico; Dietrich, Stefano

    2017-01-01

    Cloud electrification and related lightning activity in thunderstorms have their origin in the charge separation and resulting distribution of charged iced particles within the cloud. So far, the ice distribution within convective clouds has been investigated mainly by means of ground-based meteorological radars. In this paper we show how the products from Cloud Profiling Radar (CPR) on board CloudSat, a polar satellite of NASA's Earth System Science Pathfinder (ESSP), can be used to obtain information from space on the vertical distribution of ice particles and ice content and relate them to the lightning activity. The analysis has been carried out, focusing on 12 convective events over Italy that crossed CloudSat overpasses during significant lightning activity. The CPR products considered here are the vertical profiles of cloud ice water content (IWC) and the effective radius (ER) of ice particles, which are compared with the number of strokes as measured by a ground lightning network (LINET). Results show a strong correlation between the number of strokes and the vertical distribution of ice particles as depicted by the 94 GHz CPR products: in particular, cloud upper and middle levels, high IWC content and relatively high ER seem to be favourable contributory causes for CG (cloud to ground) stroke occurrence.

  9. Impacts of Different Aerosol Types on Convective Cloud as Observed by CALIPSO/CloudSat Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, J. H.; Huang, L.; Su, H.

    2016-12-01

    A major uncertainty in the study of aerosol effects on climate is how different types of aerosol affect the properties of different types of clouds. This study takes full advantage of collocated measurements over the globe from CloudSat/CALIPSO and other A-Train satellites to characterize the influence of various aerosol types on convective clouds. The occurrence frequency of six different types of aerosol (i.e., clean marine, dust, polluted continental, clean continental, polluted dust, and smoke) in each target region, as well as their probability density function, vertical and seasonal variations are determined using CALIPSO observations. The effects of different aerosol types on cloud vertical structure, cloud water content and cloud particle effective radius are investigated using collocated CloudSat and CALIPSO profile data. The influence of meteorological conditions on clouds is distinguished from aerosol effects using multi-variable composite analysis. The results will improve our understanding of the aerosol-cloud-climate interactions and potentially help to reduce uncertainties in climate change predictions.

  10. Towards Prognostics for Electronics Components

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Electronics components have an increasingly critical role in avionics systems and in the development of future aircraft systems. Prognostics of such components is...

  11. Standardizing Research Methods for Prognostics

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Prognostics and health management (PHM) is a maturing system engineering discipline. As with most maturing disciplines, PHM does not yet have a universally accepted...

  12. Study of cloud properties using airborne and satellite measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boscornea, Andreea; Stefan, Sabina; Vajaiac, Sorin Nicolae

    2014-08-01

    The present study investigates cloud microphysics properties using aircraft and satellite measurements. Cloud properties were drawn from data acquired both from in situ measurements with state of the art airborne instrumentation and from satellite products of the MODIS06 System. The used aircraft was ATMOSLAB - Airborne Laboratory for Environmental Atmospheric Research, property of the National Institute for Aerospace Research "Elie Carafoli" (INCAS), Bucharest, Romania, which is specially equipped for this kind of research. The main tool of the airborne laboratory is a Cloud, Aerosol and Precipitation Spectrometer - CAPS (30 bins, 0.51- 50 μm). The data was recorded during two flights during the winter 2013-2014, over a flat region in the south-eastern part of Romania (between Bucharest and Constanta). The analysis of cloud particle size variations and cloud liquid water content provided by CAPS can explain cloud processes, and can also indicate the extent of aerosols effects on clouds. The results, such as cloud coverage and/or cloud types, microphysical parameters of aerosols on the one side and the cloud microphysics parameters obtained from aircraft flights on the other side, was used to illustrate the importance of microphysics cloud properties for including the radiative effects of clouds in the regional climate models.

  13. A Cloud Microphysics Model for the Gas Giant Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palotai, Csaba J.; Le Beau, Raymond P.; Shankar, Ramanakumar; Flom, Abigail; Lashley, Jacob; McCabe, Tyler

    2016-10-01

    Recent studies have significantly increased the quality and the number of observed meteorological features on the jovian planets, revealing banded cloud structures and discrete features. Our current understanding of the formation and decay of those clouds also defines the conceptual modes about the underlying atmospheric dynamics. The full interpretation of the new observational data set and the related theories requires modeling these features in a general circulation model (GCM). Here, we present details of our bulk cloud microphysics model that was designed to simulate clouds in the Explicit Planetary Hybrid-Isentropic Coordinate (EPIC) GCM for the jovian planets. The cloud module includes hydrological cycles for each condensable species that consist of interactive vapor, cloud and precipitation phases and it also accounts for latent heating and cooling throughout the transfer processes (Palotai and Dowling, 2008. Icarus, 194, 303-326). Previously, the self-organizing clouds in our simulations successfully reproduced the vertical and horizontal ammonia cloud structure in the vicinity of Jupiter's Great Red Spot and Oval BA (Palotai et al. 2014, Icarus, 232, 141-156). In our recent work, we extended this model to include water clouds on Jupiter and Saturn, ammonia clouds on Saturn, and methane clouds on Uranus and Neptune. Details of our cloud parameterization scheme, our initial results and their comparison with observations will be shown. The latest version of EPIC model is available as open source software from NASA's PDS Atmospheres Node.

  14. Cloud Computing Quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anamaria Şiclovan

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Cloud computing was and it will be a new way of providing Internet services and computers. This calculation approach is based on many existing services, such as the Internet, grid computing, Web services. Cloud computing as a system aims to provide on demand services more acceptable as price and infrastructure. It is exactly the transition from computer to a service offered to the consumers as a product delivered online. This paper is meant to describe the quality of cloud computing services, analyzing the advantages and characteristics offered by it. It is a theoretical paper.Keywords: Cloud computing, QoS, quality of cloud computing

  15. CLOUD STORAGE SERVICES

    OpenAIRE

    YAN, CHENG

    2017-01-01

    Cloud computing is a hot topic in recent research and applications. Because it is widely used in various fields. Up to now, Google, Microsoft, IBM, Amazon and other famous co partnership have proposed their cloud computing application. Look upon cloud computing as one of the most important strategy in the future. Cloud storage is the lower layer of cloud computing system which supports the service of the other layers above it. At the same time, it is an effective way to store and manage heavy...

  16. Barbados Cloud Observatory: The detection of weak Radar reflectivity signals below shallow cumulus clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingebiel, Marcus; Hirsch, Lutz; Stevens, Bjorn

    2017-04-01

    The Barbados Cloud Observatory (BCO) is located on the east coast of the island of Barbados (13° 09' N, 59° 25' W), where it is exposed to the relatively undisturbed easterly trade winds. The position of the BCO is well suited for studies of shallow cumulus clouds, which have a significant impact on Earth's radiation budget and on the energy and water cycles. In the presented study, measurements from a K-band cloud radar, with an exceptional sensitivity, and a ceilometer are used to analyze the lower environment of shallow cumulus clouds. Below their nominal base, which is well defined by the determination of the lifting condensation level and the ceilometer measurements, the cloud radar detects a weak reflectivity signal. This signal is observable down to 250 m below the cloud base and shows an intensity between -50 dBZ and -65 dBZ. Artifacts, caused by the radar instrument itself (e.g. Bragg-Scattering) or by objects other than hydrometeors, cannot produce this weak reflectivity signal. We suggest that small raindrops (400 µm diameter or larger) develop inside the upper part of the cloud and fall into the region below the cloud, where they cause the weak radar reflectivity signal. These drops must have a very low number concentration (1 drop/100 m3) since they are not visible to the human eye. Radiosonde data and satellite images indicate that the occurrence of the weak radar reflectivity signal is connected to the humidity conditions in higher altitudes (up to 2500 m). A high relative humidity at this altitude allows for a larger vertical extension of a cloud and thus makes it easier for raindrops to develop inside the cloud and then fall below cloud base. This phenomenon is interesting, because the appearance of droplets with a low number concentration below shallow cumulus clouds could be a precursor of surface precipitation.

  17. How might Australian rainforest cloud interception respond to climate change?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Jim; McJannet, Dave

    2013-02-01

    SummaryThe lower and upper montane rainforests in northern Queensland receive significant amounts of cloud interception that affect both in situ canopy wetness and downstream runoff. Cloud interception contributes 5-30% of the annual water input to the canopy and this increases to 40-70% of the monthly water input during the dry season. This occult water is therefore an important input to the canopy, sustaining the epiphytes, mosses and other species that depend on wet canopy conditions. The potential effect of climate change on cloud interception was examined using the relationship between cloud interception and cloud frequency derived from measurements made at four different rainforest locations. Any given change in cloud frequency produces a greater change in cloud interception and this 'amplification' increases from 1.1 to 1.7 as cloud frequency increases from 5% to 70%. This means that any changes in cloud frequency will have the greatest relative effects at the higher altitude sites where cloud interception is greatest. As cloud frequency is also a major factor affecting canopy wetness, any given change in cloud frequency will therefore have a greater impact on canopy wetness at the higher altitude sites. These changes in wetness duration will augment those due to changes in rainfall and may have important implications for the fauna and flora that depend on wet canopy conditions. We also found that the Australian rainforests may be more efficient (by ˜50% on average) in intercepting cloud water than American coniferous forests, which may be due to differences in canopy structure and exposure at the different sites.

  18. The Exoplanet Cloud Atlas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Peter; Marley, Mark S.; Morley, Caroline; Fortney, Jonathan J.

    2017-10-01

    Clouds have been readily inferred from observations of exoplanet atmospheres, and there exists great variability in cloudiness between planets, such that no clear trend in exoplanet cloudiness has so far been discerned. Equilibrium condensation calculations suggest a myriad of species - salts, sulfides, silicates, and metals - could condense in exoplanet atmospheres, but how they behave as clouds is uncertain. The behavior of clouds - their formation, evolution, and equilibrium size distribution - is controlled by cloud microphysics, which includes processes such as nucleation, condensation, and evaporation. In this work, we explore the cloudy exoplanet phase space by using a cloud microphysics model to simulate a suite of cloud species ranging from cooler condensates such as KCl/ZnS, to hotter condensates like perovskite and corundum. We investigate how the cloudiness and cloud particle sizes of exoplanets change due to variations in temperature, metallicity, gravity, and cloud formation mechanisms, and how these changes may be reflected in current and future observations. In particular, we will evaluate where in phase space could cloud spectral features be observable using JWST MIRI at long wavelengths, which will be dependent on the cloud particle size distribution and cloud species.

  19. CLOUD COMPUTING SECURITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ştefan IOVAN

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Cloud computing reprentes the software applications offered as a service online, but also the software and hardware components from the data center.In the case of wide offerd services for any type of client, we are dealing with a public cloud. In the other case, in wich a cloud is exclusively available for an organization and is not available to the open public, this is consider a private cloud [1]. There is also a third type, called hibrid in which case an user or an organization might use both services available in the public and private cloud. One of the main challenges of cloud computing are to build the trust and ofer information privacy in every aspect of service offerd by cloud computingle. The variety of existing standards, just like the lack of clarity in sustenability certificationis not a real help in building trust. Also appear some questions marks regarding the efficiency of traditionsecurity means that are applied in the cloud domain. Beside the economic and technology advantages offered by cloud, also are some advantages in security area if the information is migrated to cloud. Shared resources available in cloud includes the survey, use of the "best practices" and technology for advance security level, above all the solutions offered by the majority of medium and small businesses, big companies and even some guvermental organizations [2].

  20. Determination of trace amounts of copper in river and sea water samples by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) after cloud-point preconcentration

    OpenAIRE

    Goudarzi,Nasser

    2007-01-01

    A new preconcentration method was proposed using the cloud point approach for copper determination. The reagent 1,5-diphenyl-benzoin (Cupron) was used as a complexing agent and Triton X-114 was added as a surfactant. After phase separation, dilution of the surfactant-rich phase was carried out using acidified methanol and the copper content was subsequently measured by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. After optimization of the complexation and extraction conditions, the enrichment factor...

  1. Large ice particles associated with small ice water content observed by AIM CIPS imagery of polar mesospheric clouds: Evidence for microphysical coupling with small-scale dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusch, D.; Thomas, G.; Merkel, A.; Olivero, J.; Chandran, A.; Lumpe, J.; Carstans, J.; Randall, C.; Bailey, S.; Russell, J.

    2017-09-01

    Observations by the Cloud Imaging and Particle Size (CIPS) instrument on the Aeronomy of Ice in the Mesosphere (AIM) satellite have demonstrated the existence of Polar Mesospheric Cloud (PMC) regions populated by particles whose mean sizes range between 60 and 100 nm (radii of equivalent volume spheres). It is known from numerous satellite experiments that typical mean PMC particle sizes are of the order of 40-50 nm. Determination of particle size by CIPS is accomplished by measuring the scattering of solar radiation at various scattering angles at a spatial resolution of 25 km2. In this size range we find a robust anti-correlation between mean particle size and albedo. These very-large particle-low-ice (VLP-LI) clouds occur over spatially coherent areas. The surprising result is that VLP-LI are frequently present either in the troughs of gravity wave-like features or at the edges of PMC voids. We postulate that an association with gravity waves exists in the low-temperature summertime mesopause region, and illustrate the mechanism by a gravity wave simulation through use of the 2D Community Aerosol and Radiation Model for Atmospheres (CARMA). The model results are consistent with a VLP-LI population in the cold troughs of monochromatic gravity waves. In addition, we find such events in Whole Earth Community Climate Model/CARMA simulations, suggesting the possible importance of sporadic downward winds in heating the upper cloud regions. This newly-discovered association enhances our understanding of the interaction of ice microphysics with dynamical processes in the upper mesosphere.

  2. Prognostic biomarkers in osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attur, Mukundan; Krasnokutsky-Samuels, Svetlana; Samuels, Jonathan; Abramson, Steven B.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of review Identification of patients at risk for incident disease or disease progression in osteoarthritis remains challenging, as radiography is an insensitive reflection of molecular changes that presage cartilage and bone abnormalities. Thus there is a widely appreciated need for biochemical and imaging biomarkers. We describe recent developments with such biomarkers to identify osteoarthritis patients who are at risk for disease progression. Recent findings The biochemical markers currently under evaluation include anabolic, catabolic, and inflammatory molecules representing diverse biological pathways. A few promising cartilage and bone degradation and synthesis biomarkers are in various stages of development, awaiting further validation in larger populations. A number of studies have shown elevated expression levels of inflammatory biomarkers, both locally (synovial fluid) and systemically (serum and plasma). These chemical biomarkers are under evaluation in combination with imaging biomarkers to predict early onset and the burden of disease. Summary Prognostic biomarkers may be used in clinical knee osteoarthritis to identify subgroups in whom the disease progresses at different rates. This could facilitate our understanding of the pathogenesis and allow us to differentiate phenotypes within a heterogeneous knee osteoarthritis population. Ultimately, such findings may help facilitate the development of disease-modifying osteoarthritis drugs (DMOADs). PMID:23169101

  3. Improvements in Night-Time Low Cloud Detection and MODIS-Style Cloud Optical Properties from MSG SEVIRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wind, Galina (Gala); Platnick, Steven; Riedi, Jerome

    2011-01-01

    The MODIS cloud optical properties algorithm (MOD06IMYD06 for Terra and Aqua MODIS, respectively) slated for production in Data Collection 6 has been adapted to execute using available channels on MSG SEVIRI. Available MODIS-style retrievals include IR Window-derived cloud top properties, using the new Collection 6 cloud top properties algorithm, cloud optical thickness from VISINIR bands, cloud effective radius from 1.6 and 3.7Jlm and cloud ice/water path. We also provide pixel-level uncertainty estimate for successful retrievals. It was found that at nighttime the SEVIRI cloud mask tends to report unnaturally low cloud fraction for marine stratocumulus clouds. A correction algorithm that improves detection of such clouds has been developed. We will discuss the improvements to nighttime low cloud detection for SEVIRI and show examples and comparisons with MODIS and CALIPSO. We will also show examples of MODIS-style pixel-level (Level-2) cloud retrievals for SEVIRI with comparisons to MODIS.

  4. Explicit simulation of electrified clouds: From idealized to real case studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinty, J.-P.; Barthe, C.; Defer, E.; Richard, E.; Chong, M.

    2013-04-01

    Original results obtained with the revised version of the explicit cloud electrification module developed in the French mesoscale model MesoNH are presented. The module includes three ingredients: (i) a prognostic budget equation of the electric charges carried by each type of hydrometeor and by the positive and negative ions, (ii) a computation of the electric field by inverting the Gauss equation and (iii) a statistical algorithm to produce intra-cloud and cloud-to-ground discharges. Electric charges are generated by non-inductive (NI) processes involving ice particles that collide in the presence of supercooled water. The geometry of the lightning flashes obeys a fractal law that characterizes the densely branched flash structures with a marked horizontal extent in electrically charged regions of the clouds. For the first time, the electrical module of MesoNH is used to simulate the electrical aspects of a heavy precipitation event over the Cevennes area in the South of France. MesoNH is initialized with “AROME” analyses of Meteo-France for the 6-8 September 2010 event that produced locally 250 to 300 mm of precipitation over the Cevennes ridge. A 54 hour simulation starting 6 September 2010 at 00 UTC and without electricity, is performed at 1 km resolution over a 384 × 384 km2 area in order to check the ability of the model to reproduce the very fine scale structure of the rainfall. MesoNH is then restarted on 7 September 2010 at noon for a 6 hour simulation involving the full electrical module. Several aspects of the electrical state of the clouds could be simulated at this scale: the cloud charge structure, the electric field and the lightning flash characteristics. Finally a map of flash density is compared to observations taken from two conventional detection networks (LInet and ATDnet). Both networks suggest that the model produces ten times too many flashes but arguments are put forward to explain this discrepancy, e.g., filtering the less energetic

  5. On the Effect of Dust Particles on Global Cloud Condensation Nuclei and Cloud Droplet Number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karydis, V. A.; Kumar, P.; Barahona, D.; Sokolik, I. N.; Nenes, A.

    2011-01-01

    Aerosol-cloud interaction studies to date consider aerosol with a substantial fraction of soluble material as the sole source of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). Emerging evidence suggests that mineral dust can act as good CCN through water adsorption onto the surface of particles. This study provides a first assessment of the contribution of insoluble dust to global CCN and cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC). Simulations are carried out with the NASA Global Modeling Initiative chemical transport model with an online aerosol simulation, considering emissions from fossil fuel, biomass burning, marine, and dust sources. CDNC is calculated online and explicitly considers the competition of soluble and insoluble CCN for water vapor. The predicted annual average contribution of insoluble mineral dust to CCN and CDNC in cloud-forming areas is up to 40 and 23.8%, respectively. Sensitivity tests suggest that uncertainties in dust size distribution and water adsorption parameters modulate the contribution of mineral dust to CDNC by 23 and 56%, respectively. Coating of dust by hygroscopic salts during the atmospheric aging causes a twofold enhancement of the dust contribution to CCN; the aged dust, however, can substantially deplete in-cloud supersaturation during the initial stages of cloud formation and can eventually reduce CDNC. Considering the hydrophilicity from adsorption and hygroscopicity from solute is required to comprehensively capture the dust-warm cloud interactions. The framework presented here addresses this need and can be easily integrated in atmospheric models.

  6. Aura MLS Cloud Measurements: First-Year Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jonathan H.; Wu, Dong L.

    2005-01-01

    Aura MLS provides the first vertical upper tropospheric cloud profiling from space, enabling global survey of the vertical structure of cloud systems, with seasonal and geographical variations, needed to evaluate the way clouds are parameterized in global models, thereby contributing to the understanding of cloud-climate feedbacks, and improved weather and climate predictions. The vertical structure of cloud systems is fundamentally important for understanding how clouds affect both their regional and large-scale atmospheric and radiative environments. The regional cloud profiles provide a critical tests of important parameterizations that enable the calculation of radiative flux profiles and heating rates throughout the atmospheric column, which in turn also regulates the water and energy cycles in the upper troposphere

  7. Physical attributes of some clouds amid a forest ecosystem's trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeFelice, Thomas P.

    2002-01-01

    Cloud or fog water collected by forest canopies of any elevation could represent significant sources of required moisture and nutrients for forest ecosystems, human consumption, and as an alternative source of water for agriculture and domestic use. The physical characteristics of fogs and other clouds have been well studied, and this information can be useful to water balance or canopy–cloud interaction model verification and to calibration or training of satellite-borne sensors to recognize atmospheric attributes, such as optical thickness, albedo, and cloud properties. These studies have taken place above-canopy or within canopy clearings and rarely amid the canopy. Simultaneous physical and chemical characteristics of clouds amid and above the trees of a mountain forest, located about 3.3 km southwest of Mt. Mitchell, NC, were collected between 13 and 22 June 1993. This paper summarizes the physical characteristics of the cloud portions amid the trees. The characteristic cloud amid the trees (including cloud and precipitation periods) contained 250 droplet/cm3 with a mean diameter of 9.5 μm and liquid water content (LWC) of 0.11 g m−3. The cloud droplets exhibited a bimodal distribution with modes at about 2 and 8 μm and a mean diameter near 5 μm during precipitation-free periods, whereas the concurrent above-canopy cloud droplets had a unimodal distribution with a mode near 6 μm and a mean diameter of 6 μm. The horizontal cloud water flux is nonlinearly related to the rate of collection onto that surface amid the trees, especially for the Atmospheric Sciences Research Center (ASRC) sampling device, whereas it is linear when the forward scattering spectrometer probe (FSSP) are is used. These findings suggest that statements about the effects clouds have on surfaces they encounter, which are based on above-canopy or canopy-clearing data, can be misleading, if not erroneous.

  8. Cloud geographies : computing, data, sovereignty.

    OpenAIRE

    Amoore, L.

    2016-01-01

    The architecture of cloud computing is becoming ever more closely intertwined with geopolitics – from the sharing of intelligence data, to border controls, immigration decisions, and drone strikes. Developing an analogy with the cloud chamber of early twentieth century particle physics, this paper explores the geography of the cloud in cloud computing. It addresses the geographical character of cloud computing across two distinct paradigms. The first, ‘Cloud I’ or a geography of cloud forms, ...

  9. Research on Key Technologies of Cloud Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shufen; Yan, Hongcan; Chen, Xuebin

    With the development of multi-core processors, virtualization, distributed storage, broadband Internet and automatic management, a new type of computing mode named cloud computing is produced. It distributes computation task on the resource pool which consists of massive computers, so the application systems can obtain the computing power, the storage space and software service according to its demand. It can concentrate all the computing resources and manage them automatically by the software without intervene. This makes application offers not to annoy for tedious details and more absorbed in his business. It will be advantageous to innovation and reduce cost. It's the ultimate goal of cloud computing to provide calculation, services and applications as a public facility for the public, So that people can use the computer resources just like using water, electricity, gas and telephone. Currently, the understanding of cloud computing is developing and changing constantly, cloud computing still has no unanimous definition. This paper describes three main service forms of cloud computing: SAAS, PAAS, IAAS, compared the definition of cloud computing which is given by Google, Amazon, IBM and other companies, summarized the basic characteristics of cloud computing, and emphasized on the key technologies such as data storage, data management, virtualization and programming model.

  10. Cirrus cloud iridescence: a rare case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sassen, Kenneth

    2003-01-01

    On the evening of 25 November 1998, a cirrus cloud revealing the pastel colors of the iridescence phenomenon was photographed and studied by a polarization lidar system at the University of Utah Facility for Atmospheric Remote Sensing (FARS). The diffraction of sunlight falling on relatively minute cloud particles, which display spatial gradients in size, is the cause of iridescence. According to the 14-year study of midlatitude cirrus clouds at FARS, cirrus rarely produce even poor iridescent patches, making this particularly long-lived and vivid occurrence unique. In this unusually high (13.2-14.4-km) and cold (-69.7 ° to -75.5°) tropopause-topped cirrus cloud, iridescence was noted from ~6.0° to ~13.5° from the Sun. On the basis of simple diffraction theory, this indicates the presence of particles of 2.5-5.5-μm effective diameter. The linear depolarization ratios of δ = 0.5 measured by the lidar verify that the cloud particles were nonspherical ice crystals. The demonstration that ice clouds can generate iridescence has led to the conclusion that iridescence is rarely seen in midlatitude cirrus clouds because populations of such small particles do not exist for long in the presence of the relatively high water-vapor supersaturations needed for ice-particle nucleation.

  11. Impacts of Aerosol, Surface and Meteorological Conditions on Polar Cloud Properties: Use of In-Situ Cloud Probe Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarquhar, Greg; Wu, Wei; Maahn, Maximilian

    2017-04-01

    Over the Southern Oceans, models from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project 5 (CMIP5) almost universally underestimate sunlight reflected by near surface cloud in the Austral summer compared to Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) data. These and other biases in radiative fluxes over the Arctic are believed to be associated with the poorly modeled properties of low-level clouds that are frequently composed of supercooled water. Because changes in cloud macrophysical (heights, coverage) and microphysical (sizes, shapes and phases of particles) can alter the radiative impact of clouds, it is important to understand the processes that control cloud properties. In this presentation, in-situ microphysical observations obtained in prior arctic field campaigns (e.g., the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign ISDAC, the Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment M-PACE, and the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Carbon Measurements Program-V ACME-V) are discussed. Strategies for comparing data collected in campaigns with different probes and processed with varying algorithms are introduced, along with procedures for using cloud probe data to refine assumptions about cloud properties in model schemes (e.g., size distributions, mass-dimension, and velocity-dimension relations) that affect rates at which mass and number are transferred between hydrometeor categories and hence estimates of latent and radiative heating, which feeds back on dynamics and hence cloud properties. Such observations from past arctic field experiments have enhanced our understanding of aerosol-cloud interactions acting in single-layer mixed phase clouds that are ubiquitous in the Arctic. But, it is still unknown what controls the amount of supercooled water in polar clouds (especially in frequently occurring complex multi-layer clouds), how probability distributions of cloud properties vary with aerosol loading and composition in different surface and meteorological conditions, and how

  12. Surface tension and quasi-emulsion of cavitation bubble cloud.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Lixin; Chen, Xiaoguang; Zhu, Gang; Xu, Weilin; Lin, Weijun; Wu, Pengfei; Li, Chao; Xu, Delong; Yan, Jiuchun

    2017-03-01

    A quasi-emulsion phenomenon of cavitation structure in a thin liquid layer (the thin liquid layer is trapped between a radiating surface and a hard reflector) is investigated experimentally with high-speed photography. The transformation from cloud-in-water (c/w) emulsion to water-in-cloud (w/c) emulsion is related to the increase of cavitation bubble cloud. The acoustic field in the thin liquid layer is analyzed. It is found that the liquid region has higher acoustic pressure than the cloud region. The bubbles are pushed from liquid region to cloud region by the primary Bjerknes forces. The rate of change of CSF increased with the increase of CSF. The cavitation bubbles on the surface of cavitation cloud are attracted by the cavitation bubbles inside the cloud due to secondary Bjerknes forces. The existence of surface tension on the interface of liquid region and cloud region is proved. The formation mechanism of disc-shaped liquid region and cloud region are analysed by surface tension and incompressibility of cavitation bubble cloud. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. MAGIC Cloud Properties from Zenith Radiance Data Final Campaign Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiu, J. -Y.C. [Univ. of Reading (United Kingdom); Gregory, L. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Wagener, R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Cloud droplet size and optical depth are the most fundamental properties for understanding cloud formation, dissipation and interactions with aerosol and drizzle. They are also a crucial determinant of Earth’s radiative and water-energy balances. However, these properties are poorly predicted in climate models. As a result, the response of clouds to climate change is one of the major sources of uncertainty in climate prediction.

  14. Airborne remote sensing of cloud optical thickness, effective radius, thermodynamic phase and cloud droplet number concentration with SMART-HALO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Kevin; Ehrlich, André; Wendisch, Manfred; Crewell, Susanne; Jacob, Marek

    2017-04-01

    Solar spectral measurements of upward and downward irradiance and upward radiance in the wavelength range from 0.3 µm to 2.2 µm by the Spectral Modular Airborne Radiation measurement system (SMART) on board the High Altitude and Long Range Research Aircraft (HALO) were performed during two campaigns dedicated to investigate cloud properties in different cloud regimes. During NARVAL-II shallow convection in the trade-wind region and deep convection along the ITCZ were investigated over the Atlantic Ocean in August 2016. The NAWDEX campaign focused on clouds along warm-conveyor belts in the North Atlantic and the Norwegian Sea in September and October 2016. Applying an iterative retrieval the Liquid Water Path was derived from measurements of the reflected radiation from cloud top at a wavelength of 0.8 µm sensitive to the optical thickness and 1.2 µm, 1.6 µm, and 2.1 µm sensitive to the effective radius with different vertical weighting functions. Using ratios of upward radiance instead of absolute values reduces retrieval uncertainties noticeably. The thermodynamic phase at cloud top was determined by measuring the spectral slopes in the wavelength range between 1.0 µm and 2.2 µm. The statistical cloud situation / frequency of occurrence along the flight track was determined by a cloud discrimination scheme using the different spectral behavior of liquid water clouds and sea surface at wavelengths of 0.8 µm, 1.1 µm and 1.3 µm. All derived cloud properties were used to investigate the spectral cloud top albedo measured simultaneously by SMART-HALO. A statistical analysis of how strong the different cloud properties affect the cloud albedo will be presented. In conjunction with measurements of the Liquid Water Path by the HALO Microwave Package (HAMP) a first estimate of the cloud droplet number concentration for selected flight sections over non-precipitating liquid trade-wind cumulus was achieved.

  15. Ten Years of Cloud Optical and Microphysical Retrievals from MODIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platnick, Steven; King, Michael D.; Wind, Galina; Hubanks, Paul; Arnold, G. Thomas; Amarasinghe, Nandana

    2010-01-01

    The MODIS cloud optical properties algorithm (MOD06/MYD06 for Terra and Aqua MODIS, respectively) has undergone extensive improvements and enhancements since the launch of Terra. These changes have included: improvements in the cloud thermodynamic phase algorithm; substantial changes in the ice cloud light scattering look up tables (LUTs); a clear-sky restoral algorithm for flagging heavy aerosol and sunglint; greatly improved spectral surface albedo maps, including the spectral albedo of snow by ecosystem; inclusion of pixel-level uncertainty estimates for cloud optical thickness, effective radius, and water path derived for three error sources that includes the sensitivity of the retrievals to solar and viewing geometries. To improve overall retrieval quality, we have also implemented cloud edge removal and partly cloudy detection (using MOD35 cloud mask 250m tests), added a supplementary cloud optical thickness and effective radius algorithm over snow and sea ice surfaces and over the ocean, which enables comparison with the "standard" 2.1 11m effective radius retrieval, and added a multi-layer cloud detection algorithm. We will discuss the status of the MOD06 algorithm and show examples of pixellevel (Level-2) cloud retrievals for selected data granules, as well as gridded (Level-3) statistics, notably monthly means and histograms (lD and 2D, with the latter giving correlations between cloud optical thickness and effective radius, and other cloud product pairs).

  16. Cloud Robotics Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gyula Mester

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cloud Robotics was born from the merger of service robotics and cloud technologies. It allows robots to benefit from the powerful computational, storage, and communications resources of modern data centres. Cloud robotics allows robots to take advantage of the rapid increase in data transfer rates to offload tasks without hard real time requirements. Cloud Robotics has rapidly gained momentum with initiatives by companies such as Google, Willow Garage and Gostai as well as more than a dozen active research projects around the world. The presentation summarizes the main idea, the definition, the cloud model composed of essential characteristics, service models and deployment models, planning task execution and beyond. Finally some cloud robotics projects are discussed.

  17. Encyclopedia of cloud computing

    CERN Document Server

    Bojanova, Irena

    2016-01-01

    The Encyclopedia of Cloud Computing provides IT professionals, educators, researchers and students with a compendium of cloud computing knowledge. Authored by a spectrum of subject matter experts in industry and academia, this unique publication, in a single volume, covers a wide range of cloud computing topics, including technological trends and developments, research opportunities, best practices, standards, and cloud adoption. Providing multiple perspectives, it also addresses questions that stakeholders might have in the context of development, operation, management, and use of clouds. Furthermore, it examines cloud computing's impact now and in the future. The encyclopedia presents 56 chapters logically organized into 10 sections. Each chapter covers a major topic/area with cross-references to other chapters and contains tables, illustrations, side-bars as appropriate. Furthermore, each chapter presents its summary at the beginning and backend material, references and additional resources for further i...

  18. Lapse rate characteristics in ice clouds inferred from GPS RO and CloudSat observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, S.; Zou, X.

    2017-11-01

    GPS Radio Occultation (RO) cloudy profiles during a seven-year period from 2007 to 2013 over the globe are firstly selected and grouped into four types of ice clouds (e.g., nimbostratus, deep convective, cirrus, altostratus) based on collocated CloudSat data. Vertical temperature profiles within ice clouds below - 20 °C are then retrieved from GPS RO refractivity observations, in which the vertical profiles of ice water content required by the forward model of refractivity are obtained from CloudSat retrievals of ice water content. Vertical distributions of relative humidity and lapse rate within clouds are finally examined in terms of their occurrences, mean values and standard deviations. It is found that ice clouds have preferred values of relative humidity and lapse rate depending on cloud types and altitudes. Most altostratus ice clouds are located between 4 and 8 km with relative humidity between 55 and 75%. The cirrus clouds have a relative humidity around 60% and are located mostly above 6 km to as high as 13 km. Difference from cirrus and altostratus ice clouds, nimbostratus ice clouds that occur mostly in polar regions are found at all altitudes below 10 km with a relative humidity decreasing linearly from about 90% near the surface to about 60% around 6 km. Within deep convective ice clouds, the relative humidity also decreases linearly from about 100% around 2.5 km to about 60% around 9 km. The lapse rate slightly increases with altitude and its value ranges between 5 and 8 °C km- 1 within nimbostratus, deep convective and altostratus ice clouds. The lapse rate within cirrus clouds varies from 6 °C km- 1 to 9 °C km- 1. Vertical variations of the lapse rate derived from GPS RO cloudy retrievals compared favorably to those derived from radiosonde profiles. Both showed that the mean lapse rate increases with altitude from about 5 °C km- 1 around 3 km to about 7 °C km- 1 around 7 km, and the standard deviations are much smaller than the mean lapse

  19. A Condensation-coalescence Cloud Model for Exoplanetary Atmospheres: Formulation and Test Applications to Terrestrial and Jovian Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Kazumasa; Okuzumi, Satoshi

    2017-02-01

    A number of transiting exoplanets have featureless transmission spectra that might suggest the presence of clouds at high altitudes. A realistic cloud model is necessary to understand the atmospheric conditions under which such high-altitude clouds can form. In this study, we present a new cloud model that takes into account the microphysics of both condensation and coalescence. Our model provides the vertical profiles of the size and density of cloud and rain particles in an updraft for a given set of physical parameters, including the updraft velocity and the number density of cloud condensation nuclei (CCNs). We test our model by comparing with observations of trade-wind cumuli on Earth and ammonia ice clouds in Jupiter. For trade-wind cumuli, the model including both condensation and coalescence gives predictions that are consistent with observations, while the model including only condensation overestimates the mass density of cloud droplets by up to an order of magnitude. For Jovian ammonia clouds, the condensation-coalescence model simultaneously reproduces the effective particle radius, cloud optical thickness, and cloud geometric thickness inferred from Voyager observations if the updraft velocity and CCN number density are taken to be consistent with the results of moist convection simulations and Galileo probe measurements, respectively. These results suggest that the coalescence of condensate particles is important not only in terrestrial water clouds but also in Jovian ice clouds. Our model will be useful to understand how the dynamics, compositions, and nucleation processes in exoplanetary atmospheres affect the vertical extent and optical thickness of exoplanetary clouds via cloud microphysics.

  20. Remote sensing of cloud sides of deep convection: towards a three-dimensional retrieval of cloud particle size profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Zinner

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The cloud scanner sensor is a central part of a recently proposed satellite remote sensing concept – the three-dimensional (3-D cloud and aerosol interaction mission (CLAIM-3D combining measurements of aerosol characteristics in the vicinity of clouds and profiles of cloud microphysical characteristics. Such a set of collocated measurements will allow new insights in the complex field of cloud-aerosol interactions affecting directly the development of clouds and precipitation, especially in convection. The cloud scanner measures radiance reflected or emitted by cloud sides at several wavelengths to derive a profile of cloud particle size and thermodynamic phase. For the retrieval of effective size a Bayesian approach was adopted and introduced in a preceding paper.

    In this paper the potential of the approach, which has to account for the complex three-dimensional nature of cloud geometry and radiative transfer, is tested in realistic cloud observing situations. In a fully simulated environment realistic cloud resolving modelling provides complex 3-D structures of ice, water, and mixed phase clouds, from the early stage of convective development to mature deep convection. A three-dimensional Monte Carlo radiative transfer is used to realistically simulate the aspired observations.

    A large number of cloud data sets and related simulated observations provide the database for an experimental Bayesian retrieval. An independent simulation of an additional cloud field serves as a synthetic test bed for the demonstration of the capabilities of the developed retrieval techniques. For this test case only a minimal overall bias in the order of 1% as well as pixel-based uncertainties in the order of 1 μm for droplets and 8 μm for ice particles were found for measurements at a high spatial resolution of 250 m.

  1. Considerations for Cloud Security Operations

    OpenAIRE

    Cusick, James

    2016-01-01

    Information Security in Cloud Computing environments is explored. Cloud Computing is presented, security needs are discussed, and mitigation approaches are listed. Topics covered include Information Security, Cloud Computing, Private Cloud, Public Cloud, SaaS, PaaS, IaaS, ISO 27001, OWASP, Secure SDLC.

  2. CLOUD Experiment - How it works -

    CERN Multimedia

    Jasper Kirkby

    2016-01-01

    A brief tour of the CLOUD experiment at CERN, and its scientific aims. CLOUD uses a special cloud chamber to study the possible link between galactic cosmic rays and cloud formation. The results should contribute much to our fundamental understanding of aerosols and clouds, and their affect on climate.

  3. Marine cloud brightening - as effective without clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlm, Lars; Jones, Andy; Stjern, Camilla W.; Muri, Helene; Kravitz, Ben; Egill Kristjánsson, Jón

    2017-11-01

    Marine cloud brightening through sea spray injection has been proposed as a climate engineering method for avoiding the most severe consequences of global warming. A limitation of most of the previous modelling studies on marine cloud brightening is that they have either considered individual models or only investigated the effects of a specific increase in the number of cloud droplets. Here we present results from coordinated simulations with three Earth system models (ESMs) participating in the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP) G4sea-salt experiment. Injection rates of accumulation-mode sea spray aerosol particles over ocean between 30° N and 30° S are set in each model to generate a global-mean effective radiative forcing (ERF) of -2.0 W m-2 at the top of the atmosphere. We find that the injection increases the cloud droplet number concentration in lower layers, reduces the cloud-top effective droplet radius, and increases the cloud optical depth over the injection area. We also find, however, that the global-mean clear-sky ERF by the injected particles is as large as the corresponding total ERF in all three ESMs, indicating a large potential of the aerosol direct effect in regions of low cloudiness. The largest enhancement in ERF due to the presence of clouds occur as expected in the subtropical stratocumulus regions off the west coasts of the American and African continents. However, outside these regions, the ERF is in general equally large in cloudy and clear-sky conditions. These findings suggest a more important role of the aerosol direct effect in sea spray climate engineering than previously thought.

  4. Cloud property datasets retrieved from AVHRR, MODIS, AATSR and MERIS in the framework of the Cloud_cci project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Stengel

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available New cloud property datasets based on measurements from the passive imaging satellite sensors AVHRR, MODIS, ATSR2, AATSR and MERIS are presented. Two retrieval systems were developed that include components for cloud detection and cloud typing followed by cloud property retrievals based on the optimal estimation (OE technique. The OE-based retrievals are applied to simultaneously retrieve cloud-top pressure, cloud particle effective radius and cloud optical thickness using measurements at visible, near-infrared and thermal infrared wavelengths, which ensures spectral consistency. The retrieved cloud properties are further processed to derive cloud-top height, cloud-top temperature, cloud liquid water path, cloud ice water path and spectral cloud albedo. The Cloud_cci products are pixel-based retrievals, daily composites of those on a global equal-angle latitude–longitude grid, and monthly cloud properties such as averages, standard deviations and histograms, also on a global grid. All products include rigorous propagation of the retrieval and sampling uncertainties. Grouping the orbital properties of the sensor families, six datasets have been defined, which are named AVHRR-AM, AVHRR-PM, MODIS-Terra, MODIS-Aqua, ATSR2-AATSR and MERIS+AATSR, each comprising a specific subset of all available sensors. The individual characteristics of the datasets are presented together with a summary of the retrieval systems and measurement records on which the dataset generation were based. Example validation results are given, based on comparisons to well-established reference observations, which demonstrate the good quality of the data. In particular the ensured spectral consistency and the rigorous uncertainty propagation through all processing levels can be considered as new features of the Cloud_cci datasets compared to existing datasets. In addition, the consistency among the individual datasets allows for a potential combination of them as well as

  5. Cloud Computing: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Ling; Luo, Zhiguo; Du, Yujian; Guo, Leitao

    In order to support the maximum number of user and elastic service with the minimum resource, the Internet service provider invented the cloud computing. within a few years, emerging cloud computing has became the hottest technology. From the publication of core papers by Google since 2003 to the commercialization of Amazon EC2 in 2006, and to the service offering of AT&T Synaptic Hosting, the cloud computing has been evolved from internal IT system to public service, from cost-saving tools to revenue generator, and from ISP to telecom. This paper introduces the concept, history, pros and cons of cloud computing as well as the value chain and standardization effort.

  6. CLOUD TECHNOLOGY IN EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander N. Dukkardt

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This article is devoted to the review of main features of cloud computing that can be used in education. Particular attention is paid to those learning and supportive tasks, that can be greatly improved in the case of the using of cloud services. Several ways to implement this approach are proposed, based on widely accepted models of providing cloud services. Nevertheless, the authors have not ignored currently existing problems of cloud technologies , identifying the most dangerous risks and their impact on the core business processes of the university. 

  7. JINR cloud infrastructure evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranov, A. V.; Balashov, N. A.; Kutovskiy, N. A.; Semenov, R. N.

    2016-09-01

    To fulfil JINR commitments in different national and international projects related to the use of modern information technologies such as cloud and grid computing as well as to provide a modern tool for JINR users for their scientific research a cloud infrastructure was deployed at Laboratory of Information Technologies of Joint Institute for Nuclear Research. OpenNebula software was chosen as a cloud platform. Initially it was set up in simple configuration with single front-end host and a few cloud nodes. Some custom development was done to tune JINR cloud installation to fit local needs: web form in the cloud web-interface for resources request, a menu item with cloud utilization statistics, user authentication via Kerberos, custom driver for OpenVZ containers. Because of high demand in that cloud service and its resources over-utilization it was re-designed to cover increasing users' needs in capacity, availability and reliability. Recently a new cloud instance has been deployed in high-availability configuration with distributed network file system and additional computing power.

  8. Geodesics on Point Clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongchuan Yu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a novel framework to compute geodesics on implicit surfaces and point clouds. Our framework consists of three parts, particle based approximate geodesics on implicit surfaces, Cartesian grid based approximate geodesics on point clouds, and geodesic correction. The first two parts can effectively generate approximate geodesics on implicit surfaces and point clouds, respectively. By introducing the geodesic curvature flow, the third part produces smooth and accurate geodesic solutions. Differing from most of the existing methods, our algorithms can converge to a given tolerance. The presented computational framework is suitable for arbitrary implicit hypersurfaces or point clouds with high genus or high curvature.

  9. Recent Ice Ages on Mars: The role of radiatively active clouds and cloud microphysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madeleine, J.-B.; Head, J. W.; Forget, F.; Navarro, T.; Millour, E.; Spiga, A.; Colaïtis, A.; Määttänen, A.; Montmessin, F.; Dickson, J. L.

    2014-07-01

    Global climate models (GCMs) have been successfully employed to explain the origin of many glacial deposits on Mars. However, the latitude-dependent mantle (LDM), a dust-ice mantling deposit that is thought to represent a recent "Ice Age," remains poorly explained by GCMs. We reexamine this question by considering the effect of radiatively active water-ice clouds (RACs) and cloud microphysics. We find that when obliquity is set to 35°, as often occurred in the past 2 million years, warming of the atmosphere and polar caps by clouds modifies the water cycle and leads to the formation of a several centimeter-thick ice mantle poleward of 30° in each hemisphere during winter. This mantle can be preserved over the summer if increased atmospheric dust content obscures the surface and provides dust nuclei to low-altitude clouds. We outline a scenario for its deposition and preservation that compares favorably with the characteristics of the LDM.

  10. Determination of cadmium(II), cobalt(II), nickel(II), lead(II), zinc(II), and copper(II) in water samples using dual-cloud point extraction and inductively coupled plasma emission spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Lingling; Zhong, Shuxian; Fang, Keming; Qian, Zhaosheng [College of Chemistry and Life Sciences, Zhejiang Normal University, Jinhua 321004 (China); Chen, Jianrong, E-mail: cjr@zjnu.cn [College of Chemistry and Life Sciences, Zhejiang Normal University, Jinhua 321004 (China); College of Geography and Environmental Sciences, Zhejiang Normal University, Jinhua 321004 (China)

    2012-11-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A dual-cloud point extraction (d-CPE) procedure was firstly developed for simultaneous pre-concentration and separation of trace metal ions combining with ICP-OES. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The developed d-CPE can significantly eliminate the surfactant of Triton X-114 and successfully extend to the determination of water samples with good performance. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The designed method is simple, high efficient, low cost, and in accordance with the green chemistry concept. - Abstract: A dual-cloud point extraction (d-CPE) procedure has been developed for simultaneous pre-concentration and separation of heavy metal ions (Cd{sup 2+}, Co{sup 2+}, Ni{sup 2+}, Pb{sup 2+}, Zn{sup 2+}, and Cu{sup 2+} ion) in water samples by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). The procedure is based on forming complexes of metal ion with 8-hydroxyquinoline (8-HQ) into the as-formed Triton X-114 surfactant rich phase. Instead of direct injection or analysis, the surfactant rich phase containing the complexes was treated by nitric acid, and the detected ions were back extracted again into aqueous phase at the second cloud point extraction stage, and finally determined by ICP-OES. Under the optimum conditions (pH = 7.0, Triton X-114 = 0.05% (w/v), 8-HQ = 2.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} mol L{sup -1}, HNO{sub 3} = 0.8 mol L{sup -1}), the detection limits for Cd{sup 2+}, Co{sup 2+}, Ni{sup 2+}, Pb{sup 2+}, Zn{sup 2+}, and Cu{sup 2+} ions were 0.01, 0.04, 0.01, 0.34, 0.05, and 0.04 {mu}g L{sup -1}, respectively. Relative standard deviation (RSD) values for 10 replicates at 100 {mu}g L{sup -1} were lower than 6.0%. The proposed method could be successfully applied to the determination of Cd{sup 2+}, Co{sup 2+}, Ni{sup 2+}, Pb{sup 2+}, Zn{sup 2+}, and Cu{sup 2+} ion in water samples.

  11. Coupling the Mars Dust and Water Cycles: Investigating the Role of Clouds in Controlling the Vertical Distribution of Dust During N. H. Summer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahre, M. A.; Haberle, R. M.; Hollingsworth, J. L.; Wilson, R. J.

    2014-01-01

    The dust cycle is critically important for the current climate of Mars. The radiative effects of dust impact the thermal and dynamical state of the atmosphere (Gierasch and Goody, 1968; Haberle et al., 1982; Zurek et al., 1992). Although dust is present in the Martian atmosphere throughout the year, the level of dustiness varies with season. The atmosphere is generally the dustiest during northern fall and winter and the least dusty during northern spring and summer (Smith, 2004). Dust particles are lifted into the atmosphere by dust storms that range in size from meters to thousands of kilometers across (Cantor et al., 2001). During some years, regional storms combine to produce hemispheric or planet encircling dust clouds that obscure the surface and raise atmospheric temperatures by as much as 40 K (Smith et al., 2002). Key recent observations of the vertical distribution of dust indicate that elevated layers of dust exist in the tropics and sub-tropics throughout much of the year (Heavens et al., 2011). These observations have brought particular focus on the processes that control the vertical distribution of dust in the Martian atmosphere. The goal of this work is to further our understanding of how clouds in particular control the vertical distribution of dust, particularly during N. H. spring and summer

  12. Determination of Ultra-trace Rhodium in Water Samples by Graphite Furnace Atomic Absorption Spectrometry after Cloud Point Extraction Using 2-(5-Iodo-2-Pyridylazo)-5-Dimethylaminoaniline as a Chelating Agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Quan; Huo, Yanyan; Wu, Jiangyan; He, Yaping; Yang, Xiaohui; Yang, Longhu

    2017-03-24

    A highly sensitive method based on cloud point extraction (CPE) separation/preconcentration and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) detection has been developed for the determination of ultra-trace amounts of rhodium in water samples. A new reagent, 2-(5-iodo-2-pyridylazo)-5-dimethylaminoaniline (5-I-PADMA), was used as the chelating agent and the nonionic surfactant TritonX-114 was chosen as extractant. In a HAc-NaAc buffer solution at pH 5.5, Rh(III) reacts with 5-I-PADMA to form a stable chelate by heating in a boiling water bath for 10 min. Subsequently, the chelate is extracted into the surfactant phase and separated from bulk water. The factors affecting CPE were investigated. Under the optimized conditions, the calibration graph was linear in the range of 0.1-6.0 ng/mL, the detection limit was 0.023 ng/mL for rhodium and relative standard deviation was 3.67% (c = 1.0 ng/mL, n = 11).The method has been applied to the determination of trace rhodium in water samples with satisfactory results.

  13. Recent Ice Ages on Mars: The role of radiatively active clouds and cloud microphysics

    OpenAIRE

    Madeleine, J.-B.; Head, J. W.; Forget, F.; Navarro, T.; Millour, E.; Spiga, A.; Colaïtis, A.; Määttänen, A.; Montmessin, F.; Dickson, J. L.

    2014-01-01

    International audience; Global Climate Models (GCMs) have been successfully employed to explain the origin of many glacial deposits on Mars. However, the Latitude Dependent Mantle (LDM), a dust-ice mantling deposit that is thought to represent a recent "Ice Age", remains poorly explained by GCMs. We reexamine this question by considering the effect of radiatively active water-ice clouds (RACs) and cloud microphysics. We find that when obliquity is set to 35°, as often occurred in the past 2 m...

  14. A Generic Software Architecture For Prognostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teubert, Christopher; Daigle, Matthew J.; Sankararaman, Shankar; Goebel, Kai; Watkins, Jason

    2017-01-01

    Prognostics is a systems engineering discipline focused on predicting end-of-life of components and systems. As a relatively new and emerging technology, there are few fielded implementations of prognostics, due in part to practitioners perceiving a large hurdle in developing the models, algorithms, architecture, and integration pieces. As a result, no open software frameworks for applying prognostics currently exist. This paper introduces the Generic Software Architecture for Prognostics (GSAP), an open-source, cross-platform, object-oriented software framework and support library for creating prognostics applications. GSAP was designed to make prognostics more accessible and enable faster adoption and implementation by industry, by reducing the effort and investment required to develop, test, and deploy prognostics. This paper describes the requirements, design, and testing of GSAP. Additionally, a detailed case study involving battery prognostics demonstrates its use.

  15. Distributed Prognostics Based on Structural Model Decomposition

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Within systems health management, prognostics focuses on predicting the remaining useful life of a system. In the model-based prognostics paradigm, physics-based...

  16. NASA Glenn Icing Research Tunnel: Upgrade and Cloud Calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanZante, Judith Foss; Ide, Robert F.; Steen, Laura E.

    2012-01-01

    In 2011, NASA Glenn s Icing Research Tunnel underwent a major modification to it s refrigeration plant and heat exchanger. This paper presents the results of the subsequent full cloud calibration. Details of the calibration procedure and results are presented herein. The steps include developing a nozzle transfer map, establishing a uniform cloud, conducting a drop sizing calibration and finally a liquid water content calibration. The goal of the calibration is to develop a uniform cloud, and to build a transfer map from the inputs of air speed, spray bar atomizing air pressure and water pressure to the output of median volumetric droplet diameter and liquid water content.

  17. Interplay of gas and ice during cloud evolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hocuk, S.; Cazaux, S.

    During the evolution of diffuse clouds to molecular clouds, gas-phase molecules freeze out on surfaces of small dust particles to form ices. On dust surfaces, water is the main constituent of the icy mantle in which a complex chemistry is taking place. We aim to study the formation pathways and the

  18. The role of clouds in climate model bias and sensitivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lacagnina, C.

    2014-01-01

    Clouds are prominent in the climate system, since they play a major role in the way energy and water are cycled through the atmosphere. One of the most relevant impacts of the clouds on the earth's climate is their interaction with the radiative fluxes. Changes in this interaction in response to an

  19. VMware vCloud security

    CERN Document Server

    Sarkar, Prasenjit

    2013-01-01

    VMware vCloud Security provides the reader with in depth knowledge and practical exercises sufficient to implement a secured private cloud using VMware vCloud Director and vCloud Networking and Security.This book is primarily for technical professionals with system administration and security administration skills with significant VMware vCloud experience who want to learn about advanced concepts of vCloud security and compliance.

  20. CLOUD SERVICES IN EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z.S. Seydametova

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available We present the on-line services based on cloud computing, provided by Google to educational institutions. We describe the own experience of the implementing the Google Apps Education Edition in the educational process. We analyzed and compared the other universities experience of using cloud technologies.

  1. Greening the cloud

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Hoed, Robert; Hoekstra, Eric; Procaccianti, Giuseppe; Lago, Patricia; Grosso, Paolo; Taal, Arie; Grosskop, Kay; van Bergen, Esther

    The cloud has become an essential part of our daily lives. We use it to store our documents (Dropbox), to stream our music and films (Spotify and Netflix) and without giving it any thought, we use it to work on documents in the cloud (Google Docs).

  2. Cloud Particles Evolution Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Many evolutionary algorithms have been paid attention to by the researchers and have been applied to solve optimization problems. This paper presents a new optimization method called cloud particles evolution algorithm (CPEA to solve optimization problems based on cloud formation process and phase transformation of natural substance. The cloud is assumed to have three states in the proposed algorithm. Gaseous state represents the global exploration. Liquid state represents the intermediate process from the global exploration to the local exploitation. Solid state represents the local exploitation. The cloud is composed of descript and independent particles in this algorithm. The cloud particles use phase transformation of three states to realize the global exploration and the local exploitation in the optimization process. Moreover, the cloud particles not only realize the survival of the fittest through competition mechanism but also ensure the diversity of the cloud particles by reciprocity mechanism. The effectiveness of the algorithm is validated upon different benchmark problems. The proposed algorithm is compared with a number of other well-known optimization algorithms, and the experimental results show that cloud particles evolution algorithm has a higher efficiency than some other algorithms.

  3. Weather Fundamentals: Clouds. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998

    The videos in this educational series, for grades 4-7, help students understand the science behind weather phenomena through dramatic live-action footage, vivid animated graphics, detailed weather maps, and hands-on experiments. This episode (23 minutes) discusses how clouds form, the different types of clouds, and the important role they play in…

  4. Cloud security in vogelvlucht

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pieters, Wolter

    2011-01-01

    Cloud computing is dé hype in IT op het moment, en hoewel veel aspecten niet nieuw zijn, leidt het concept wel tot de noodzaak voor nieuwe vormen van beveiliging. Het idee van cloud computing biedt echter ook juist kansen om hierover na te denken: wat is de rol van informatiebeveiliging in een

  5. Spatial and Temporal Distribution of Clouds Observed by MODIS Onboard the Terra and Aqua Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Michael D.; Platnick, Steven; Menzel, W. Paul; Ackerman, Steven A.; Hubanks, Paul A.

    2012-01-01

    The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) was developed by NASA and launched aboard the Terra spacecraft on December 18, 1999 and Aqua spacecraft on May 4, 2002. A comprehensive set of remote sensing algorithms for the retrieval of cloud physical and optical properties have enabled over twelve years of continuous observations of cloud properties from Terra and over nine years from Aqua. The archived products from these algorithms include 1 km pixel-level (Level-2) and global gridded Level-3 products. In addition to an extensive cloud mask, products include cloud-top properties (temperature, pressure, effective emissivity), cloud thermodynamic phase, cloud optical and microphysical parameters (optical thickness, effective particle radius, water path), as well as derived statistics. Results include the latitudinal distribution of cloud optical and radiative properties for both liquid water and ice clouds, as well as latitudinal distributions of cloud top pressure and cloud top temperature. MODIS finds the cloud fraction, as derived by the cloud mask, is nearly identical during the day and night, with only modest diurnal variation. Globally, the cloud fraction derived by the MODIS cloud mask is approx.67%, with somewhat more clouds over land during the afternoon and less clouds over ocean in the afternoon, with very little difference in global cloud cover between Terra and Aqua. Overall, cloud fraction over land is approx.55%, with a distinctive seasonal cycle, whereas the ocean cloudiness is much higher, around 72%, with much reduced seasonal variation. Cloud top pressure and temperature have distinct spatial and temporal patterns, and clearly reflect our understanding of the global cloud distribution. High clouds are especially prevalent over the northern hemisphere continents between 30 and 50 . Aqua and Terra have comparable zonal cloud top pressures, with Aqua having somewhat higher clouds (cloud top pressures lower by 100 hPa) over land due to

  6. Thin ice clouds in the Arctic: cloud optical depth and particle size retrieved from ground-based thermal infrared radiometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Blanchard

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Multiband downwelling thermal measurements of zenith sky radiance, along with cloud boundary heights, were used in a retrieval algorithm to estimate cloud optical depth and effective particle diameter of thin ice clouds in the Canadian High Arctic. Ground-based thermal infrared (IR radiances for 150 semitransparent ice clouds cases were acquired at the Polar Environment Atmospheric Research Laboratory (PEARL in Eureka, Nunavut, Canada (80° N, 86° W. We analyzed and quantified the sensitivity of downwelling thermal radiance to several cloud parameters including optical depth, effective particle diameter and shape, water vapor content, cloud geometric thickness and cloud base altitude. A lookup table retrieval method was used to successfully extract, through an optimal estimation method, cloud optical depth up to a maximum value of 2.6 and to separate thin ice clouds into two classes: (1 TIC1 clouds characterized by small crystals (effective particle diameter  ≤  30 µm, and (2 TIC2 clouds characterized by large ice crystals (effective particle diameter  >  30 µm. The retrieval technique was validated using data from the Arctic High Spectral Resolution Lidar (AHSRL and Millimeter Wave Cloud Radar (MMCR. Inversions were performed over three polar winters and results showed a significant correlation (R2 =  0.95 for cloud optical depth retrievals and an overall accuracy of 83 % for the classification of TIC1 and TIC2 clouds. A partial validation relative to an algorithm based on high spectral resolution downwelling IR radiance measurements between 8 and 21 µm was also performed. It confirms the robustness of the optical depth retrieval and the fact that the broadband thermal radiometer retrieval was sensitive to small particle (TIC1 sizes.

  7. Cloud computing basics

    CERN Document Server

    Srinivasan, S

    2014-01-01

    Cloud Computing Basics covers the main aspects of this fast moving technology so that both practitioners and students will be able to understand cloud computing. The author highlights the key aspects of this technology that a potential user might want to investigate before deciding to adopt this service. This book explains how cloud services can be used to augment existing services such as storage, backup and recovery. Addressing the details on how cloud security works and what the users must be prepared for when they move their data to the cloud. Also this book discusses how businesses could prepare for compliance with the laws as well as industry standards such as the Payment Card Industry.

  8. Solar variability and clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Kirkby, Jasper

    2000-01-01

    Satellite observations have revealed a surprising imprint of the 11- year solar cycle on global low cloud cover. The cloud data suggest a correlation with the intensity of Galactic cosmic rays. If this apparent connection between cosmic rays and clouds is real, variations of the cosmic ray flux caused by long-term changes in the solar wind could have a significant influence on the global energy radiation budget and the climate. However a direct link between cosmic rays and clouds has not been unambiguously established and, moreover, the microphysical mechanism is poorly understood. New experiments are being planned to find out whether cosmic rays can affect cloud formation, and if so how. (37 refs).

  9. GRIP CLOUD MICROPHYSICS V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GRIP Cloud Microphysics dataset was collected during the GRIP campaign from three probes: the Cloud, Aerosol, and Precipitation Spectrometer (CAPS), the...

  10. Relationship between cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction and cloud albedo, and new surface-based approach for determining cloud albedo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Liu

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on three interconnected topics: (1 quantitative relationship between surface shortwave cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction, and cloud albedo; (2 surface-based approach for measuring cloud albedo; (3 multiscale (diurnal, annual and inter-annual variations and covariations of surface shortwave cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction, and cloud albedo. An analytical expression is first derived to quantify the relationship between cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction, and cloud albedo. The analytical expression is then used to deduce a new approach for inferring cloud albedo from concurrent surface-based measurements of downwelling surface shortwave radiation and cloud fraction. High-resolution decade-long data on cloud albedos are obtained by use of this surface-based approach over the US Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiaton Measurement (ARM Program at the Great Southern Plains (SGP site. The surface-based cloud albedos are further compared against those derived from the coincident GOES satellite measurements. The three long-term (1997–2009 sets of hourly data on shortwave cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction and cloud albedo collected over the SGP site are analyzed to explore the multiscale (diurnal, annual and inter-annual variations and covariations. The analytical formulation is useful for diagnosing deficiencies of cloud-radiation parameterizations in climate models.

  11. Impact of Cloud Model Microphysics on Passive Microwave Retrievals of Cloud Properties. Part I: Model Comparison Using EOF Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biggerstaff, Michael I.; Seo, Eun-Kyoung; Hristova-Veleva, Svetla M.; Kim, Kwang-Yul

    2006-07-01

    The impact of model microphysics on the relationships among hydrometeor profiles, latent heating, and derived satellite microwave brightness temperatures TB have been examined using a nonhydrostatic, adaptive-grid cloud model to simulate a mesoscale convective system over water. Two microphysical schemes (each employing three-ice bulk parameterizations) were tested for two different assumptions in the number of ice crystals assumed to be activated at 0°C to produce simulations with differing amounts of supercooled cloud water. The model output was examined using empirical orthogonal function (EOF) analysis, which provided a quantitative framework in which to compare the simulations. Differences in the structure of the vertical anomaly patterns were related to physical processes and attributed to different approaches in cloud microphysical parameterizations in the two schemes. Correlations between the first EOF coefficients of cloud properties and TB at frequencies associated with the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Microwave Imager (TMI) showed additional differences between the two parameterization schemes that affected the relationship between hydrometeors and TB. Classified in terms of TB, the microphysical schemes produced significantly different mean vertical profiles of cloud water, cloud ice, snow, vertical velocity, and latent heating. The impact of supercooled cloud water on the 85-GHz TB led to a 15% variation in mean convective rain mass at the surface. The variability in mean profiles produced by the four simulations indicates that the retrievals of cloud properties, especially latent heating, based on TMI frequencies are dependent on the particular microphysical parameterizations used to construct the retrieval database.

  12. Controlled Hurricane Weakening Via Marine Cloud Brightening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latham, J.; Parkes, B.; Gadian, A.; Salter, S.

    2012-04-01

    The basic idea under examination herein is to cool ocean surface waters in regions in which the genesis and early development of hurricanes occurs. This would be achieved by seeding - with copious quantities of seawater cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) - low-level maritime stratocumulus clouds covering either these regions, or ones from which ocean currents flow to them. As a consequence, the cloud droplet number concentration within the clouds increases, thereby enhancing their reflectivity for incoming sunlight, and possibly their longevity. This approach is therefore a more localised application of the Marine Cloud Brightening geoengineering, global cooling technique (MCB). Herein we demonstrate, by utilising a climate ocean/atmosphere coupled HadGEM1 model, that - subject to defined caveats - judicious seeding of maritime stratocumulus clouds could substantially reduce sea surface temperatures (SSTs) in oceanic regions where hurricanes often develop. Thus the seeding might reduce hurricane intensity. The extent to which the magnitude of this effect could be controlled is yet to be determined. Rough calculations based on observationally-based relationships between SST and maximum wind-speed together with the SST-reduction values emanating from our computations, suggest that cooling produced by MCB may be able to achieve a 1-category reduction of hurricane intensity, and prevent the formation of a significant number of hurricanes.

  13. Robust relations between CCN and the vertical evolution of cloud drop size distribution in deep convective clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. O. Andreae

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available In-situ measurements in convective clouds (up to the freezing level over the Amazon basin show that smoke from deforestation fires prevents clouds from precipitating until they acquire a vertical development of at least 4 km, compared to only 1–2 km in clean clouds. The average cloud depth required for the onset of warm rain increased by ~350 m for each additional 100 cloud condensation nuclei per cm3 at a super-saturation of 0.5% (CCN0.5%. In polluted clouds, the diameter of modal liquid water content grows much slower with cloud depth (at least by a factor of ~2, due to the large number of droplets that compete for available water and to the suppressed coalescence processes. Contrary to what other studies have suggested, we did not observe this effect to reach saturation at 3000 or more accumulation mode particles per cm3. The CCN0.5% concentration was found to be a very good predictor for the cloud depth required for the onset of warm precipitation and other microphysical factors, leaving only a secondary role for the updraft velocities in determining the cloud drop size distributions.

    The effective radius of the cloud droplets (re was found to be a quite robust parameter for a given environment and cloud depth, showing only a small effect of partial droplet evaporation from the cloud's mixing with its drier environment. This supports one of the basic assumptions of satellite analysis of cloud microphysical processes: the ability to look at different cloud top heights in the same region and regard their re as if they had been measured inside one well developed cloud. The dependence of re on the adiabatic fraction decreased higher in the clouds, especially for cleaner conditions, and disappeared at re≥~10 μm. We propose that droplet coalescence, which is at its peak when warm rain is formed in the cloud at

  14. Impact of cloud microphysics and cumulus parameterization on ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The simulated rain water and cloud water mixing ratio were maximum at the position where the vertical velocity and reflectivity has also been maximum. The production of rain water mixing ratio depends on MP schemes as well as CP schemes. Rainfall depends on rain water mixing ratio between 950 and 500 hPa.

  15. An Examination of the Nature of Global MODIS Cloud Regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oreopoulos, Lazaros; Cho, Nayeong; Lee, Dongmin; Kato, Seiji; Huffman, George J.

    2014-01-01

    We introduce global cloud regimes (previously also referred to as "weather states") derived from cloud retrievals that use measurements by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument aboard the Aqua and Terra satellites. The regimes are obtained by applying clustering analysis on joint histograms of retrieved cloud top pressure and cloud optical thickness. By employing a compositing approach on data sets from satellites and other sources, we examine regime structural and thermodynamical characteristics. We establish that the MODIS cloud regimes tend to form in distinct dynamical and thermodynamical environments and have diverse profiles of cloud fraction and water content. When compositing radiative fluxes from the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System instrument and surface precipitation from the Global Precipitation Climatology Project, we find that regimes with a radiative warming effect on the atmosphere also produce the largest implied latent heat. Taken as a whole, the results of the study corroborate the usefulness of the cloud regime concept, reaffirm the fundamental nature of the regimes as appropriate building blocks for cloud system classification, clarify their association with standard cloud types, and underscore their distinct radiative and hydrological signatures.

  16. Submm-Wave Radiometry for Cloud/Humidity/Precipitation Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dong L.

    2011-01-01

    Although active sensors can provide cloud profiles at good vertical resolution, clouds are often coupled with dynamics to form fast and organized structures. Lack of understanding of these organized systems leads to great challenge for numerical models. The deficiency is partly reflected, for example, in poorly modeled intraseasonal variations (e.g., MJD). Remote sensing clouds in the middle and upper troposphere has been challenging from space. Vis/IR sensors are sensitive to the topmost cloud layers whereas low-frequency MW techniques are sensitivity to liquid and precipitation at the bottom of cloud layers. The middle-level clouds, mostly in the ice phase, require a sensor that has moderate penetration and sensitivity to cloud scattering, in order to measure cloud water content. Sensors at submm wavelengths provide promising sensitivity and coverage with the spatial resolution needed to measure cloud water content floating in the upper air. In addition, submm-wave sensors are able to provide better measurements of upper-tropospheric humidity than traditional microwave instruments.

  17. Beam Measurements of a CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets) Chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Kirkby, Jasper

    2001-01-01

    A striking correlation has recently been observed between global cloud cover and the flux of incident cosmic rays. The effect of natural variations in the cosmic ray flux is large, causing estimated changes in the Earth's energy radiation balance that are comparable to those attributed to greenhouse gases from the burning of fossil fuels since the Industrial Revolution. However a direct link between cosmic rays and cloud formation has not been unambiguously established. We therefore propose to experimentally measure cloud (water droplet) formation under controlled conditions in a test beam at CERN with a CLOUD chamber, duplicating the conditions prevailing in the troposphere. These data, which have never been previously obtained, will allow a detailed understanding of the possible effects of cosmic rays on clouds and confirm, or otherwise, a direct link between cosmic rays, global cloud cover and the Earth's climate. The measurements will, in turn, allow more reliable calculations to be made of the residual e...

  18. Observation of Microhollows Produced by Bubble Cloud Cavitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamakoshi, Yoshiki; Miwa, Takashi

    2012-07-01

    When an ultrasonic wave with sound pressure less than the threshold level of bubble destruction irradiates microbubbles, the microbubbles aggregate by an acoustic radiation force and form bubble clouds. The cavitation of bubble clouds produces a large number of microhollows (microdips) on the flow channel wall. In this study, microhollow production by bubble cloud cavitation is evaluated using a blood vessel phantom made of N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPA) gel. Microbubble dynamics in bubble cloud cavitation is observed by a microscope with a short pulse light emitted diode (LED) light source. Microhollows produced on the flow channel wall are evaluated by a confocal laser microscope with a water immersion objective. It is observed that a mass of low-density bubbles (bubble mist) is formed by bubble cloud cavitation. The spatial correlation between the bubble mist and the microhollows shows the importance of the bubble mist in microhollow production by bubble cloud cavitation.

  19. Cytogenetic Prognostication Within Medulloblastoma Subgroups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, David J.H.; Northcott, Paul A.; Remke, Marc; Korshunov, Andrey; Ramaswamy, Vijay; Kool, Marcel; Luu, Betty; Yao, Yuan; Wang, Xin; Dubuc, Adrian M.; Garzia, Livia; Peacock, John; Mack, Stephen C.; Wu, Xiaochong; Rolider, Adi; Morrissy, A. Sorana; Cavalli, Florence M.G.; Jones, David T.W.; Zitterbart, Karel; Faria, Claudia C.; Schüller, Ulrich; Kren, Leos; Kumabe, Toshihiro; Tominaga, Teiji; Shin Ra, Young; Garami, Miklós; Hauser, Peter; Chan, Jennifer A.; Robinson, Shenandoah; Bognár, László; Klekner, Almos; Saad, Ali G.; Liau, Linda M.; Albrecht, Steffen; Fontebasso, Adam; Cinalli, Giuseppe; De Antonellis, Pasqualino; Zollo, Massimo; Cooper, Michael K.; Thompson, Reid C.; Bailey, Simon; Lindsey, Janet C.; Di Rocco, Concezio; Massimi, Luca; Michiels, Erna M.C.; Scherer, Stephen W.; Phillips, Joanna J.; Gupta, Nalin; Fan, Xing; Muraszko, Karin M.; Vibhakar, Rajeev; Eberhart, Charles G.; Fouladi, Maryam; Lach, Boleslaw; Jung, Shin; Wechsler-Reya, Robert J.; Fèvre-Montange, Michelle; Jouvet, Anne; Jabado, Nada; Pollack, Ian F.; Weiss, William A.; Lee, Ji-Yeoun; Cho, Byung-Kyu; Kim, Seung-Ki; Wang, Kyu-Chang; Leonard, Jeffrey R.; Rubin, Joshua B.; de Torres, Carmen; Lavarino, Cinzia; Mora, Jaume; Cho, Yoon-Jae; Tabori, Uri; Olson, James M.; Gajjar, Amar; Packer, Roger J.; Rutkowski, Stefan; Pomeroy, Scott L.; French, Pim J.; Kloosterhof, Nanne K.; Kros, Johan M.; Van Meir, Erwin G.; Clifford, Steven C.; Bourdeaut, Franck; Delattre, Olivier; Doz, François F.; Hawkins, Cynthia E.; Malkin, David; Grajkowska, Wieslawa A.; Perek-Polnik, Marta; Bouffet, Eric; Rutka, James T.; Pfister, Stefan M.; Taylor, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Medulloblastoma comprises four distinct molecular subgroups: WNT, SHH, Group 3, and Group 4. Current medulloblastoma protocols stratify patients based on clinical features: patient age, metastatic stage, extent of resection, and histologic variant. Stark prognostic and genetic differences among the four subgroups suggest that subgroup-specific molecular biomarkers could improve patient prognostication. Patients and Methods Molecular biomarkers were identified from a discovery set of 673 medulloblastomas from 43 cities around the world. Combined risk stratification models were designed based on clinical and cytogenetic biomarkers identified by multivariable Cox proportional hazards analyses. Identified biomarkers were tested using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) on a nonoverlapping medulloblastoma tissue microarray (n = 453), with subsequent validation of the risk stratification models. Results Subgroup information improves the predictive accuracy of a multivariable survival model compared with clinical biomarkers alone. Most previously published cytogenetic biomarkers are only prognostic within a single medulloblastoma subgroup. Profiling six FISH biomarkers (GLI2, MYC, chromosome 11 [chr11], chr14, 17p, and 17q) on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues, we can reliably and reproducibly identify very low-risk and very high-risk patients within SHH, Group 3, and Group 4 medulloblastomas. Conclusion Combining subgroup and cytogenetic biomarkers with established clinical biomarkers substantially improves patient prognostication, even in the context of heterogeneous clinical therapies. The prognostic significance of most molecular biomarkers is restricted to a specific subgroup. We have identified a small panel of cytogenetic biomarkers that reliably identifies very high-risk and very low-risk groups of patients, making it an excellent tool for selecting patients for therapy intensification and therapy de-escalation in future clinical trials. PMID

  20. Mechanisms behind low-cloud optical depth response to temperature in ARM site observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terai, Christopher; Zhang, Yunyan; Klein, Stephen; Zelinka, Mark

    2017-04-01

    Most state-of-the-art climate models predict the cloud optical depth increases with warming in the mid- and high-latitudes. Proposed mechanisms exist in the literature to support this increase in cloud optical depth, and the cloud processes driving the negative cloud feedback have been identified in several climate models. However, recent studies find that this negative cloud feedback in the mid- and high-latitudes is likely overestimated in climate models. For example, an analysis of satellite retrievals suggests that the optical depth of low-level clouds decreases with warming. Less attention has been placed on understanding the cloud processes that drive cloud optical depth changes in observations. In this study, we use ground-based observations from three mid- and high-latitude sites, managed by the U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program, to determine the mechanisms that drive cloud changes at those sites. We test whether there is evidence in the observations that support three mechanisms that have been proposed to drive a cloud optical depth response to warming. We test a) whether cloud liquid water content increases with warming following changes in the adiabatic lapse rate of the saturated water vapor, as determined by the Clausius-Clapeyron relationship, b) whether the change in phase-partitioning of clouds due to warming increase the optical depth by changing the cloud optical and microphysical properties and processes, and c) whether warming leads to a thinning of clouds by enhancing the drying efficiency of cloud top mixing. We find that although increases in cloud liquid content with warming is consistent with the Clausius-Clapeyron relationship at the one oceanic site, they do not hold over the two continental sites. We also find that the liquid-ice partitioning of total cloud water differs between sites and find evidence that increasing ice fraction leads to clouds with lower LWP. We also test whether the

  1. Analyzing cloud base at local and regional scales to understand tropical montane cloud forest vulnerability to climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Beusekom, Ashley E.; González, Grizelle; Scholl, Martha A.

    2017-06-01

    The degree to which cloud immersion provides water in addition to rainfall, suppresses transpiration, and sustains tropical montane cloud forests (TMCFs) during rainless periods is not well understood. Climate and land use changes represent a threat to these forests if cloud base altitude rises as a result of regional warming or deforestation. To establish a baseline for quantifying future changes in cloud base, we installed a ceilometer at 100 m altitude in the forest upwind of the TMCF that occupies an altitude range from ˜ 600 m to the peaks at 1100 m in the Luquillo Mountains of eastern Puerto Rico. Airport Automated Surface Observing System (ASOS) ceilometer data, radiosonde data, and Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) satellite data were obtained to investigate seasonal cloud base dynamics, altitude of the trade-wind inversion (TWI), and typical cloud thickness for the surrounding Caribbean region. Cloud base is rarely quantified near mountains, so these results represent a first look at seasonal and diurnal cloud base dynamics for the TMCF. From May 2013 to August 2016, cloud base was lowest during the midsummer dry season, and cloud bases were lower than the mountaintops as often in the winter dry season as in the wet seasons. The lowest cloud bases most frequently occurred at higher elevation than 600 m, from 740 to 964 m. The Luquillo forest low cloud base altitudes were higher than six other sites in the Caribbean by ˜ 200-600 m, highlighting the importance of site selection to measure topographic influence on cloud height. Proximity to the oceanic cloud system where shallow cumulus clouds are seasonally invariant in altitude and cover, along with local trade-wind orographic lifting and cloud formation, may explain the dry season low clouds. The results indicate that climate change threats to low-elevation TMCFs are not limited to the dry season; changes in synoptic-scale weather patterns that increase frequency

  2. Analyzing cloud base at local and regional scales to understand tropical montane cloud forest vulnerability to climate change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. E. Van Beusekom

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The degree to which cloud immersion provides water in addition to rainfall, suppresses transpiration, and sustains tropical montane cloud forests (TMCFs during rainless periods is not well understood. Climate and land use changes represent a threat to these forests if cloud base altitude rises as a result of regional warming or deforestation. To establish a baseline for quantifying future changes in cloud base, we installed a ceilometer at 100 m altitude in the forest upwind of the TMCF that occupies an altitude range from ∼ 600 m to the peaks at 1100 m in the Luquillo Mountains of eastern Puerto Rico. Airport Automated Surface Observing System (ASOS ceilometer data, radiosonde data, and Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO satellite data were obtained to investigate seasonal cloud base dynamics, altitude of the trade-wind inversion (TWI, and typical cloud thickness for the surrounding Caribbean region. Cloud base is rarely quantified near mountains, so these results represent a first look at seasonal and diurnal cloud base dynamics for the TMCF. From May 2013 to August 2016, cloud base was lowest during the midsummer dry season, and cloud bases were lower than the mountaintops as often in the winter dry season as in the wet seasons. The lowest cloud bases most frequently occurred at higher elevation than 600 m, from 740 to 964 m. The Luquillo forest low cloud base altitudes were higher than six other sites in the Caribbean by ∼ 200–600 m, highlighting the importance of site selection to measure topographic influence on cloud height. Proximity to the oceanic cloud system where shallow cumulus clouds are seasonally invariant in altitude and cover, along with local trade-wind orographic lifting and cloud formation, may explain the dry season low clouds. The results indicate that climate change threats to low-elevation TMCFs are not limited to the dry season; changes in synoptic

  3. Analyzing cloud base at local and regional scales to understand tropical montane cloud forest vulnerability to climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Beusekom, Ashley E.; González, Grizelle; Scholl, Martha A.

    2017-01-01

    The degree to which cloud immersion provides water in addition to rainfall, suppresses transpiration, and sustains tropical montane cloud forests (TMCFs) during rainless periods is not well understood. Climate and land use changes represent a threat to these forests if cloud base altitude rises as a result of regional warming or deforestation. To establish a baseline for quantifying future changes in cloud base, we installed a ceilometer at 100 m altitude in the forest upwind of the TMCF that occupies an altitude range from ∼ 600 m to the peaks at 1100 m in the Luquillo Mountains of eastern Puerto Rico. Airport Automated Surface Observing System (ASOS) ceilometer data, radiosonde data, and Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) satellite data were obtained to investigate seasonal cloud base dynamics, altitude of the trade-wind inversion (TWI), and typical cloud thickness for the surrounding Caribbean region. Cloud base is rarely quantified near mountains, so these results represent a first look at seasonal and diurnal cloud base dynamics for the TMCF. From May 2013 to August 2016, cloud base was lowest during the midsummer dry season, and cloud bases were lower than the mountaintops as often in the winter dry season as in the wet seasons. The lowest cloud bases most frequently occurred at higher elevation than 600 m, from 740 to 964 m. The Luquillo forest low cloud base altitudes were higher than six other sites in the Caribbean by ∼ 200–600 m, highlighting the importance of site selection to measure topographic influence on cloud height. Proximity to the oceanic cloud system where shallow cumulus clouds are seasonally invariant in altitude and cover, along with local trade-wind orographic lifting and cloud formation, may explain the dry season low clouds. The results indicate that climate change threats to low-elevation TMCFs are not limited to the dry season; changes in synoptic-scale weather patterns

  4. Cloud and Radiation Studies during SAFARI 2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platnick, Steven; King, M. D.; Hobbs, P. V.; Osborne, S.; Piketh, S.; Bruintjes, R.; Lau, William K. M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Though the emphasis of the Southern Africa Regional Science Initiative 2000 (SAFARI-2000) dry season campaign was largely on emission sources and transport, the assemblage of aircraft (including the high altitude NASA ER-2 remote sensing platform and the University of Washington CV-580, UK MRF C130, and South African Weather Bureau JRA in situ aircrafts) provided a unique opportunity for cloud studies. Therefore, as part of the SAFARI initiative, investigations were undertaken to assess regional aerosol-cloud interactions and cloud remote sensing algorithms. In particular, the latter part of the experiment concentrated on marine boundary layer stratocumulus clouds off the southwest coast of Africa. Associated with cold water upwelling along the Benguela current, the Namibian stratocumulus regime has received limited attention but appears to be unique for several reasons. During the dry season, outflow of continental fires and industrial pollution over this area can be extreme. From below, upwelling provides a rich nutrient source for phytoplankton (a source of atmospheric sulphur through DMS production as well as from decay processes). The impact of these natural and anthropogenic sources on the microphysical and optical properties of the stratocumulus is unknown. Continental and Indian Ocean cloud systems of opportunity were also studied during the campaign. Aircraft flights were coordinated with NASA Terra Satellite overpasses for synergy with the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and other Terra instruments. An operational MODIS algorithm for the retrieval of cloud optical and physical properties (including optical thickness, effective particle radius, and water path) has been developed. Pixel-level MODIS retrievals (11 km spatial resolution at nadir) and gridded statistics of clouds in th SAFARI region will be presented. In addition, the MODIS Airborne Simulator flown on the ER-2 provided high spatial resolution retrievals (50 m at nadir

  5. Mars topographic clouds: MAVEN/IUVS observations and LMD MGCM predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Nicholas M.; Connour, Kyle; Forget, Francois; Deighan, Justin; Jain, Sonal; Vals, Margaux; Wolff, Michael J.; Chaffin, Michael S.; Crismani, Matteo; Stewart, A. Ian F.; McClintock, William E.; Holsclaw, Greg; Lefevre, Franck; Montmessin, Franck; Stiepen, Arnaud; Stevens, Michael H.; Evans, J. Scott; Yelle, Roger; Lo, Daniel; Clarke, John T.; Jakosky, Bruce

    2017-10-01

    The Imaging Ultraviolet Spectrograph (IUVS) instrument on the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) spacecraft takes mid-UV spectral images of the Martian atmosphere. From these apoapse disk images, information about clouds and aerosols can be retrieved and comprise the only MAVEN observations of topographic clouds and cloud morphologies. Measuring local time variability of large-scale recurring cloud features is made possible with MAVEN’s ~4.5-hour elliptical orbit, something not possible with sun-synchronous orbits. We have run the LMD MGCM (Mars global circulation model) at 1° x 1° resolution to simulate water ice cloud formation with inputs consistent with observing parameters and Mars seasons. Topographic clouds are observed to form daily during the late mornings of northern hemisphere spring and this phenomenon recurs until late summer (Ls = 160°), after which topographic clouds wane in thickness. By northern fall, most topographic clouds cease to form except over Arsia Mons and Pavonis Mons, where clouds can still be observed. Our data show moderate cloud formation over these regions as late as Ls = 220°, something difficult for the model to replicate. Previous studies have shown that models have trouble simulating equatorial cloud thickness in combination with a realistic amount of water vapor and not-too-thick polar water ice clouds, implying aspects of the water cycle are not fully understood. We present data/model comparisons as well as further refinements on parameter inputs based on IUVS observations.

  6. A Comparison between Airborne and Mountaintop Cloud Microphysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, R.; Lowenthal, D. H.; Hallar, A. G.; McCubbin, I.; Avallone, L. M.; Mace, G. G.; Wang, Z.

    2014-12-01

    Complex terrain has a large impact on cloud dynamics and microphysics. Several studies have examined the microphysical details of orographically-enhanced clouds from either an aircraft or from a mountain top location. However, further research is needed to characterize the relationships between mountain top and airborne microphysical properties. During the winter of 2011, an airborne study, the Colorado Airborne Mixed-Phase Cloud Study (CAMPS), and a ground-based field campaign, the Storm Peak Lab (SPL) Cloud Property Validation Experiment (StormVEx) were conducted in the Park Range of the Colorado Rockies. The CAMPS study utilized the University of Wyoming King Air (UWKA) to provide airborne cloud microphysical and meteorological data on 29 flights totaling 98 flight hours over the Park Range from December 15, 2010 to February 28, 2011. The UWKA was equipped with instruments that measured both cloud droplet and ice crystal size distributions, liquid water content, total water content (vapor, liquid, and ice), and 3-dimensional wind speed and direction. The Wyoming Cloud Radar and Lidar were also deployed during the campaign. These measurements are used to characterize cloud structure upwind and above the Park Range. StormVEx measured cloud droplet, ice crystal, and aerosol size distributions at SPL, located on the west summit of Mt. Werner at 3220m MSL. The observations from SPL are used to determine mountain top cloud microphysical properties at elevations lower than the UWKA was able to sample in-situ. Comparisons showed that cloud microphysics aloft and at the surface were consistent with respect to snow growth processes while small crystal concentrations were routinely higher at the surface, suggesting ice nucleation near cloud base. The effects of aerosol concentrations and upwind stability on mountain top and downwind microphysics are considered.

  7. Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... www.girlshealth.gov/ Home Nutrition Nutrition basics Water Water Did you know that water makes up more ... to drink more water Other drinks How much water do you need? top Water is very important, ...

  8. Making and Breaking Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-10-01

    Molecular clouds which youre likely familiar with from stunning popular astronomy imagery lead complicated, tumultuous lives. A recent study has now found that these features must be rapidly built and destroyed.Star-Forming CollapseA Hubble view of a molecular cloud, roughly two light-years long, that has broken off of the Carina Nebula. [NASA/ESA, N. Smith (University of California, Berkeley)/The Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA)]Molecular gas can be found throughout our galaxy in the form of eminently photogenic clouds (as featured throughout this post). Dense, cold molecular gas makes up more than 20% of the Milky Ways total gas mass, and gravitational instabilities within these clouds lead them to collapse under their own weight, resulting in the formation of our galaxys stars.How does this collapse occur? The simplest explanation is that the clouds simply collapse in free fall, with no source of support to counter their contraction. But if all the molecular gas we observe collapsed on free-fall timescales, star formation in our galaxy would churn a rate thats at least an order of magnitude higher than the observed 12 solar masses per year in the Milky Way.Destruction by FeedbackAstronomers have theorized that there may be some mechanism that supports these clouds against gravity, slowing their collapse. But both theoretical studies and observations of the clouds have ruled out most of these potential mechanisms, and mounting evidence supports the original interpretation that molecular clouds are simply gravitationally collapsing.A sub-mm image from ESOs APEX telescope of part of the Taurus molecular cloud, roughly ten light-years long, superimposed on a visible-light image of the region. [ESO/APEX (MPIfR/ESO/OSO)/A. Hacar et al./Digitized Sky Survey 2. Acknowledgment: Davide De Martin]If this is indeed the case, then one explanation for our low observed star formation rate could be that molecular clouds are rapidly destroyed by feedback from the very stars

  9. The interpretation of remotely sensed cloud properties from a model parameterization perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    The goals of ISCCP and FIRE are, broadly speaking, to provide methods for the retrieval of cloud properties from satellites, and to improve cloud radiation models and the parameterization of clouds in GCMs. This study suggests a direction for GCM cloud parameterizations based on analysis of Landsat and ISCCP satellite data. For low level single layer clouds it is found that the mean retrieved liquid water pathe in cloudy pixels is essentially invariant to the cloud fraction, at least in the range 0.2 - 0.8. This result is very important since it allows the cloud fraction to be estimated if the mean liquid water path of cloud in a general circulation model gridcell is known. 3 figs.

  10. Cloud Computing Law

    CERN Document Server

    Millard, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    This book is about the legal implications of cloud computing. In essence, ‘the cloud’ is a way of delivering computing resources as a utility service via the internet. It is evolving very rapidly with substantial investments being made in infrastructure, platforms and applications, all delivered ‘as a service’. The demand for cloud resources is enormous, driven by such developments as the deployment on a vast scale of mobile apps and the rapid emergence of ‘Big Data’. Part I of this book explains what cloud computing is and how it works. Part II analyses contractual relationships between cloud service providers and their customers, as well as the complex roles of intermediaries. Drawing on primary research conducted by the Cloud Legal Project at Queen Mary University of London, cloud contracts are analysed in detail, including the appropriateness and enforceability of ‘take it or leave it’ terms of service, as well as the scope for negotiating cloud deals. Specific arrangements for public sect...

  11. Cloud Computing: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Libor Sarga

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available As cloud computing is gaining acclaim as a cost-effective alternative to acquiring processing resources for corporations, scientific applications and individuals, various challenges are rapidly coming to the fore. While academia struggles to procure a concise definition, corporations are more interested in competitive advantages it may generate and individuals view it as a way of speeding up data access times or a convenient backup solution. Properties of the cloud architecture largely preclude usage of existing practices while achieving end-users’ and companies’ compliance requires considering multiple infrastructural as well as commercial factors, such as sustainability in case of cloud-side interruptions, identity management and off-site corporate data handling policies. The article overviews recent attempts at formal definitions of cloud computing, summarizes and critically evaluates proposed delimitations, and specifies challenges associated with its further proliferation. Based on the conclusions, future directions in the field of cloud computing are also briefly hypothesized to include deeper focus on community clouds and bolstering innovative cloud-enabled platforms and devices such as tablets, smart phones, as well as entertainment applications.

  12. Community Cloud Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinos, Alexandros; Briscoe, Gerard

    Cloud Computing is rising fast, with its data centres growing at an unprecedented rate. However, this has come with concerns over privacy, efficiency at the expense of resilience, and environmental sustainability, because of the dependence on Cloud vendors such as Google, Amazon and Microsoft. Our response is an alternative model for the Cloud conceptualisation, providing a paradigm for Clouds in the community, utilising networked personal computers for liberation from the centralised vendor model. Community Cloud Computing (C3) offers an alternative architecture, created by combing the Cloud with paradigms from Grid Computing, principles from Digital Ecosystems, and sustainability from Green Computing, while remaining true to the original vision of the Internet. It is more technically challenging than Cloud Computing, having to deal with distributed computing issues, including heterogeneous nodes, varying quality of service, and additional security constraints. However, these are not insurmountable challenges, and with the need to retain control over our digital lives and the potential environmental consequences, it is a challenge we must pursue.

  13. Trusted cloud computing

    CERN Document Server

    Krcmar, Helmut; Rumpe, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    This book documents the scientific results of the projects related to the Trusted Cloud Program, covering fundamental aspects of trust, security, and quality of service for cloud-based services and applications. These results aim to allow trustworthy IT applications in the cloud by providing a reliable and secure technical and legal framework. In this domain, business models, legislative circumstances, technical possibilities, and realizable security are closely interwoven and thus are addressed jointly. The book is organized in four parts on "Security and Privacy", "Software Engineering and

  14. Fractal Quasar Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottorff, Mark; Ferland, Gary

    2001-03-01

    This paper examines whether a fractal cloud geometry can reproduce the emission-line spectra of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). The nature of the emitting clouds is unknown, but many current models invoke various types of magnetohydrodynamic confinement. Recent studies have argued that a fractal distribution of clouds, in which subsets of clouds occur in self-similar hierarchies, is a consequence of such confinement. Whatever the confinement mechanism, fractal cloud geometries are found in nature and may be present in AGNs too. We first outline how a fractal geometry can apply at the center of a luminous quasar. Scaling laws are derived that establish the number of hierarchies, typical sizes, column densities, and densities. Photoionization simulations are used to predict the integrated spectrum from the ensemble. Direct comparison with observations establishes all model parameters so that the final predictions are fully constrained. Theory suggests that denser clouds might form in regions of higher turbulence and that larger turbulence results in a wider dispersion of physical gas densities. An increase in turbulence is expected deeper within the gravitational potential of the black hole, resulting in a density gradient. We mimic this density gradient by employing two sets of clouds with identical fractal structuring but different densities. The low-density clouds have a lower column density and large covering factor similar to the warm absorber. The high-density clouds have high column density and smaller covering factor similar to the broad-line region (BLR). A fractal geometry can simultaneously reproduce the covering factor, density, column density, BLR emission-line strengths, and BLR line ratios as inferred from observation. Absorption properties of the model are consistent with the integrated line-of-sight column density as determined from observations of X-ray absorption, and when scaled to a Seyfert galaxy, the model is consistent with the number of

  15. MLS/Aura Level 2 Cloud Ice Product V004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ML2IWC is the EOS Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) standard product for cloud ice water content derived from radiances measured by the 240 GHz radiometer. The...

  16. MLS/Aura L2 Cloud Ice Product V002

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ML2IWC is the EOS Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) standard product for cloud ice water content derived from radiances measured by the 240 GHz radiometer. The...

  17. Cosmic ray decreases affect atmospheric aerosols and clouds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensmark, Henrik; Bondo, Torsten; Svensmark, J.

    2009-01-01

    Close passages of coronal mass ejections from the sun are signaled at the Earth's surface by Forbush decreases in cosmic ray counts. We find that low clouds contain less liquid water following Forbush decreases, and for the most influential events the liquid water in the oceanic atmosphere can...... diminish by as much as 7%. Cloud water content as gauged by the Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) reaches a minimum ≈7 days after the Forbush minimum in cosmic rays, and so does the fraction of low clouds seen by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and in the International......, and liquid-water clouds appears to exist on a global scale....

  18. MLS/Aura L2 Cloud Ice Product V003

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ML2IWC is the EOS Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) standard product for cloud ice water content derived from radiances measured by the 240 GHz radiometer. The...

  19. Simulation of the Upper Clouds and Hazes of Venus Using a Microphysical Cloud Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGouldrick, K.

    2012-12-01

    Several different microphysical and chemical models of the clouds of Venus have been developed in attempts to reproduce the in situ observations of the Venus clouds made by Pioneer Venus, Venera, and Vega descent probes (Turco et al., 1983 (Icarus 53:18-25), James et al, 1997 (Icarus 129:147-171), Imamura and Hashimoto, 2001 (J. Atm. Sci. 58:3597-3612), and McGouldrick and Toon, 2007 (Icarus 191:1-24)). The model of McGouldrick and Toon has successfully reproduced observations within the condensational middle and lower cloud decks of Venus (between about 48 and 57 km altitude, experiencing conditions similar to Earth's troposphere) and it now being extended to also simulate the microphysics occurring in the upper cloud deck (between altitudes of about 57 km and 70 km, experiencing conditions similar to Earth's stratosphere). In the upper clouds, aerosols composed of a solution of sulfuric acid in water are generated from the reservoir of available water vapor and sulfuric acid vapor that is photochemically produced. The manner of particle creation (e.g., activation of cloud condensation nuclei, or homogeneous or heterogeneous nucleation) is still incompletely understood, and the atmospheric environment has been measured to be not inconsistent with frozen aerosol particles (either sulfuric acid monohydrate or water ice). The material phase, viscosity, and surface tension of the aerosols (which are strongly dependent up on the local temperature and water vapor concentration) can affect the coagulation efficiencies of the aerosol, leading to variations in the size distributions, and other microphysical and radiative properties. Here, I present recent work exploring the effects of nucleation rates and coalescence efficiencies on the simulated Venus upper clouds.

  20. Taxonomy of cloud computing services

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoefer, C.N.; Karagiannis, Georgios

    2010-01-01

    Cloud computing is a highly discussed topic, and many big players of the software industry are entering the development of cloud services. Several companies want to explore the possibilities and benefits of cloud computing, but with the amount of cloud computing services increasing quickly, the need

  1. Automated detection of cloud and cloud-shadow in single-date Landsat imagery using neural networks and spatial post-processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, Michael J. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Hayes, Daniel J [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Use of Landsat data to answer ecological questions is contingent on the effective removal of cloud and cloud shadow from satellite images. We develop a novel algorithm to identify and classify clouds and cloud shadow, \\textsc{sparcs}: Spacial Procedures for Automated Removal of Cloud and Shadow. The method uses neural networks to determine cloud, cloud-shadow, water, snow/ice, and clear-sky membership of each pixel in a Landsat scene, and then applies a set of procedures to enforce spatial rules. In a comparison to FMask, a high-quality cloud and cloud-shadow classification algorithm currently available, \\textsc{sparcs} performs favorably, with similar omission errors for clouds (0.8% and 0.9%, respectively), substantially lower omission error for cloud-shadow (8.3% and 1.1%), and fewer errors of commission (7.8% and 5.0%). Additionally, textsc{sparcs} provides a measure of uncertainty in its classification that can be exploited by other processes that use the cloud and cloud-shadow detection. To illustrate this, we present an application that constructs obstruction-free composites of images acquired on different dates in support of algorithms detecting vegetation change.

  2. Automated Detection of Cloud and Cloud Shadow in Single-Date Landsat Imagery Using Neural Networks and Spatial Post-Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Joseph Hughes

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The use of Landsat data to answer ecological questions is greatly increased by the effective removal of cloud and cloud shadow from satellite images. We develop a novel algorithm to identify and classify clouds and cloud shadow, SPARCS: Spatial Procedures for Automated Removal of Cloud and Shadow. The method uses a neural network approach to determine cloud, cloud shadow, water, snow/ice and clear sky classification memberships of each pixel in a Landsat scene. It then applies a series of spatial procedures to resolve pixels with ambiguous membership by using information, such as the membership values of neighboring pixels and an estimate of cloud shadow locations from cloud and solar geometry. In a comparison with FMask, a high-quality cloud and cloud shadow classification algorithm currently available, SPARCS performs favorably, with substantially lower omission errors for cloud shadow (8.0% and 3.2%, only slightly higher omission errors for clouds (0.9% and 1.3%, respectively and fewer errors of commission (2.6% and 0.3%. Additionally, SPARCS provides a measure of uncertainty in its classification that can be exploited by other algorithms that require clear sky pixels. To illustrate this, we present an application that constructs obstruction-free composites of images acquired on different dates in support of a method for vegetation change detection.

  3. The ESA Cloud_cci project: generation of multi-decadal consistent global data sets for GCOS cloud property ECVs using an optimal estimation approch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlundt, Cornelia; Sus, Oliver; Stapelberg, Stefan; Stengel, Martin; Hollmann, Rainer; Poulsen, Caroline

    2015-04-01

    In 2010 the ESA Climate Change Initiative (CCI) Cloud project was started along with 12 other CCI projects covering atmospheric, oceanic and terrestrial ECV data products. The main goal is the generation of satellite-based climate data records that meet the challenging requirements of the Global Climate Observing System (GCOS). The objective target within the ESA Cloud_cci project is the investigation of synergetic capabilities of past, existing and upcoming European and American satellite missions and thus, the generation of long-term coherent cloud property datasets covering 33 years. The cloud properties considered are cloud mask, cloud top estimates, cloud optical thickness, cloud effective radius and post processed parameters such as cloud liquid and ice water path. In this presentation we will discuss the benefit of using an optimal estimation retrieval framework, which provides consistence among the retrieved cloud variables and pixel-based uncertainty estimates based on different passive instruments such as AVHRR, MODIS and AATSR. We will summarize the results of the first phase of the project along with further developments and improvements in the retrieval scheme and hence the quality of the cloud products carried out in the second phase of the project. Moreover, we will show exemplary results of comprehensive validation with other well established satellite data records, surface observations and cloud climatologies (e.g., PATMOS-X, ISCCP, CLARA-A2, MODIS collection 6). These inter-comparison results will show the strengths and weaknesses of the Cloud_cci datasets.

  4. Cloud Computing (2/2)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2012-01-01

    Cloud computing, the recent years buzzword for distributed computing, continues to attract and keep the interest of both the computing and business world. These lectures aim at explaining "What is Cloud Computing?" identifying and analyzing it's characteristics, models, and applications. The lectures will explore different "Cloud definitions" given by different authors and use them to introduce the particular concepts. The main cloud models (SaaS, PaaS, IaaS), cloud types (public, private, hybrid), cloud standards and security concerns will be presented. The borders between Cloud Computing and Grid Computing, Server Virtualization, Utility Computing will be discussed and analyzed.

  5. Cloud Computing (1/2)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2012-01-01

    Cloud computing, the recent years buzzword for distributed computing, continues to attract and keep the interest of both the computing and business world. These lectures aim at explaining "What is Cloud Computing?" identifying and analyzing it's characteristics, models, and applications. The lectures will explore different "Cloud definitions" given by different authors and use them to introduce the particular concepts. The main cloud models (SaaS, PaaS, IaaS), cloud types (public, private, hybrid), cloud standards and security concerns will be presented. The borders between Cloud Computing and Grid Computing, Server Virtualization, Utility Computing will be discussed and analyzed.

  6. IBM SmartCloud essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Schouten, Edwin

    2013-01-01

    A practical, user-friendly guide that provides an introduction to cloud computing using IBM SmartCloud, along with a thorough understanding of resource management in a cloud environment.This book is great for anyone who wants to get a grasp of what cloud computing is and what IBM SmartCloud has to offer. If you are an IT specialist, IT architect, system administrator, or a developer who wants to thoroughly understand the cloud computing resource model, this book is ideal for you. No prior knowledge of cloud computing is expected.

  7. Simultaneous observations of aerosol-cloud-albedo interactions with three stacked unmanned aerial vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, G C; Ramana, M V; Corrigan, C; Kim, D; Ramanathan, V

    2008-05-27

    Aerosol impacts on climate change are still poorly understood, in part, because the few observations and methods for detecting their effects are not well established. For the first time, the enhancement in cloud albedo is directly measured on a cloud-by-cloud basis and linked to increasing aerosol concentrations by using multiple autonomous unmanned aerial vehicles to simultaneously observe the cloud microphysics, vertical aerosol distribution, and associated solar radiative fluxes. In the presence of long-range transport of dust and anthropogenic pollution, the trade cumuli have higher droplet concentrations and are on average brighter. Our observations suggest a higher sensitivity of radiative forcing by trade cumuli to increases in cloud droplet concentrations than previously reported owing to a constrained droplet radius such that increases in droplet concentrations also increase cloud liquid water content. This aerosol-cloud forcing efficiency is as much as -60 W m(-2) per 100% percent cloud fraction for a doubling of droplet concentrations and associated increase of liquid water content. Finally, we develop a strategy for detecting aerosol-cloud interactions based on a nondimensional scaling analysis that relates the contribution of single clouds to albedo measurements and illustrates the significance of characterizing cloud morphology in resolving radiometric measurements. This study demonstrates that aerosol-cloud-albedo interactions can be directly observed by simultaneous observations below, in, and above the clouds.

  8. Vertical profiles of droplet effective radius in shallow convective clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Zhang

    2011-05-01

    >fad becomes smaller, representing a higher degree of mixing, and re becomes smaller (~10 % and more variable. However, for the clean case, smaller fad corresponds to larger re (and larger re variability, reflecting the additional influence of droplet collision-coalescence and sedimentation on re. Finally, profiles of the vertically inhomogeneous clouds as simulated by the LES and those of the vertically homogeneous clouds are used as input to a radiative transfer model to study the effect of cloud vertical inhomogeneity on shortwave radiative forcing. For clouds that have the same liquid water path, re of a vertically homogeneous cloud must be about 76–90 % of the cloud-top re of the vertically inhomogeneous cloud in order for the two clouds to have the same shortwave radiative forcing.

  9. Global patterns in cloud forms on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, R. G.; Gierasch, P. J.; Popp, B. D.; Yerdon, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    Mariner 9 images and all Viking orbiter images through July 1979 were searched for cloud forms. A computer-accessible catalog was assembled, consisting of a classification of cloud type (lee wave, for example) and properties (directionality, wavelength, for example). Lee wave directionality shows a pattern and seasonal variation at high latitudes which is consistent with predictions of theoretical modeling. Fog and haze occurrence shows no obvious correlation with water abundance or any other simple causal factor. Lee waves are rare at equatorial latitudes. Plumes (probably dust) occur preferentially at locations where strong boundary layer convection is expected.

  10. Analytic prognostic for petrochemical pipelines

    CERN Document Server

    Jaoude, Abdo Abou; El-Tawil, Khaled; Noura, Hassan; Ouladsine, Mustapha

    2012-01-01

    Pipelines tubes are part of vital mechanical systems largely used in petrochemical industries. They serve to transport natural gases or liquids. They are cylindrical tubes and are submitted to the risks of corrosion due to high PH concentrations of the transported liquids in addition to fatigue cracks due to the alternation of pressure-depression of gas along the time, initiating therefore in the tubes body micro-cracks that can propagate abruptly to lead to failure. The development of the prognostic process for such systems increases largely their performance and their availability, as well decreases the global cost of their missions. Therefore, this paper deals with a new prognostic approach to improve the performance of these pipelines. Only the first mode of crack, that is, the opening mode, is considered.

  11. Prognostic stratification of ulcerated melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bønnelykke-Behrndtz, Marie L; Schmidt, Henrik; Christensen, Ib J

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: For patients with melanoma, ulceration is an important prognostic marker and interestingly also a predictive marker for the response of adjuvant interferon. A consensual definition and accurate assessment of ulceration are therefore crucial for proper staging and clinical management. We...... stratification of ulcerated lesions. METHODS: From H&E-stained sections, the status (presence vs absence), extent (percentage of the total tumor length), and type (infiltrative vs attenuative) of ulceration and epidermal involvement were evaluated from 385 patients with cutaneous melanoma. RESULTS: The presence...... of ulceration (hazard ratio [HR], 1.83), an attenuative type of ulceration (HR, 3.02), and excessive ulceration (HR, 3.57) were independent predictors of poor melanoma-specific survival. Further subdivision of minimal/moderate ulceration showed independent prognostic value only for lesions with epidermal...

  12. CloudETL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Xiufeng; Thomsen, Christian; Pedersen, Torben Bach

    2014-01-01

    Extract-Transform-Load (ETL) programs process data into data warehouses (DWs). Rapidly growing data volumes demand systems that scale out. Recently, much attention has been given to MapReduce for parallel handling of massive data sets in cloud environments. Hive is the most widely used RDBMS...... the powerful Pig platform for data processing on MapReduce does not support such dimensional ETL processing. To remedy this, we present the ETL framework CloudETL which uses Hadoop to parallelize ETL execution and to process data into Hive. The user defines the ETL process by means of high-level constructs...... and transformations and does not have to worry about technical MapReduce details. CloudETL supports different dimensional concepts such as star schemas and SCDs. We present how CloudETL works and uses different performance optimizations including a purpose-specific data placement policy to co-locate data. Further, we...

  13. Entangled Cloud Storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ateniese, Giuseppe; Dagdelen, Özgür; Damgård, Ivan Bjerre

    2012-01-01

    Entangled cloud storage enables a set of clients {P_i} to “entangle” their files {f_i} into a single clew c to be stored by a (potentially malicious) cloud provider S. The entanglement makes it impossible to modify or delete significant part of the clew without affecting all files in c. A clew...... keeps the files in it private but still lets each client P_i recover his own data by interacting with S; no cooperation from other clients is needed. At the same time, the cloud provider is discouraged from altering or overwriting any significant part of c as this will imply that none of the clients can...... recover their files. We provide theoretical foundations for entangled cloud storage, introducing the notion of an entangled encoding scheme that guarantees strong security requirements capturing the properties above. We also give a concrete construction based on privacy-preserving polynomial interpolation...

  14. Green symbiotic cloud communications

    CERN Document Server

    Mustafa, H D; Desai, Uday B; Baveja, Brij Mohan

    2017-01-01

    This book intends to change the perception of modern day telecommunications. Communication systems, usually perceived as “dumb pipes”, carrying information / data from one point to another, are evolved into intelligently communicating smart systems. The book introduces a new field of cloud communications. The concept, theory, and architecture of this new field of cloud communications are discussed. The book lays down nine design postulates that form the basis of the development of a first of its kind cloud communication paradigm entitled Green Symbiotic Cloud Communications or GSCC. The proposed design postulates are formulated in a generic way to form the backbone for development of systems and technologies of the future. The book can be used to develop courses that serve as an essential part of graduate curriculum in computer science and electrical engineering. Such courses can be independent or part of high-level research courses. The book will also be of interest to a wide range of readers including b...

  15. Maps for electron clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ubaldo Iriso

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available The electron cloud effect has been studied by means of detailed simulation codes that typically track the particles' evolution under the influence of the corresponding electromagnetic forces and fields. In this paper we show that, for the RHIC case, the electron cloud can be treated from an abstract point of view as a bunch to bunch evolution using simple maps. Secondly, we show how this treatment yields a useful conclusion, which is otherwise difficult to obtain: for a fixed number of bunches and total beam current in RHIC, it is possible to determine the best way to distribute the bunch pattern around the ring to minimize the electron cloud formation. This application is an example of how maps become a useful tool for exploring the electron cloud evolution in parameter space.

  16. SAP on the cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Missbach, Michael; Gardiner, Cameron; Anderson, George; Tempes, Mark

    2013-01-01

    This book explores the many facets of building and operating an SAP infrastructure exploiting Cloud technologies, describing and discussing the latest challenges and suitable solutions, and outlining future trends. Includes practice-oriented case studies.

  17. Sound, infrasound, and sonic boom absorption by atmospheric clouds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baudoin, Michaël; Coulouvrat, François; Thomas, Jean-Louis

    2011-09-01

    This study quantifies the influence of atmospheric clouds on propagation of sound and infrasound, based on an existing model [Gubaidulin and Nigmatulin, Int. J. Multiphase Flow 26, 207-228 (2000)]. Clouds are considered as a dilute and polydisperse suspension of liquid water droplets within a mixture of dry air and water vapor, both considered as perfect gases. The model is limited to low and medium altitude clouds, with a small ice content. Four physical mechanisms are taken into account: viscoinertial effects, heat transfer, water phase changes (evaporation and condensation), and vapor diffusion. Physical properties of atmospheric clouds (altitude, thickness, water content and droplet size distribution) are collected, along with values of the thermodynamical coefficients. Different types of clouds have been selected. Quantitative evaluation shows that, for low audible and infrasound frequencies, absorption within clouds is several orders of magnitude larger than classical absorption. The importance of phase changes and vapor diffusion is outlined. Finally, numerical simulations for nonlinear propagation of sonic booms indicate that, for thick clouds, attenuation can lead to a very large decay of the boom at the ground level. © 2011 Acoustical Society of America

  18. Diagnosing Aircraft Icing Potential from Satellite Cloud Retrievals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, William L., Jr.; Minnis, Patrick; Fleeger, Cecilia; Spangenberg, Douglas

    2013-01-01

    The threat for aircraft icing in clouds is a significant hazard that routinely impacts aviation operations. Accurate diagnoses and forecasts of aircraft icing conditions requires identifying the location and vertical distribution of clouds with super-cooled liquid water (SLW) droplets, as well as the characteristics of the droplet size distribution. Traditional forecasting methods rely on guidance from numerical models and conventional observations, neither of which currently resolve cloud properties adequately on the optimal scales needed for aviation. Satellite imagers provide measurements over large areas with high spatial resolution that can be interpreted to identify the locations and characteristics of clouds, including features associated with adverse weather and storms. This paper describes new techniques for interpreting cloud products derived from satellite data to infer the flight icing threat to aircraft. For unobscured low clouds, the icing threat is determined using empirical relationships developed from correlations between satellite imager retrievals of liquid water path and droplet size with icing conditions reported by pilots (PIREPS). For deep ice over water cloud systems, ice and liquid water content (IWC and LWC) profiles are derived by using the imager cloud properties to constrain climatological information on cloud vertical structure and water phase obtained apriori from radar and lidar observations, and from cloud model analyses. Retrievals of the SLW content embedded within overlapping clouds are mapped to the icing threat using guidance from an airfoil modeling study. Compared to PIREPS and ground-based icing remote sensing datasets, the satellite icing detection and intensity accuracies are approximately 90% and 70%, respectively, and found to be similar for both low level and deep ice over water cloud systems. The satellite-derived icing boundaries capture the reported altitudes over 90% of the time. Satellite analyses corresponding to

  19. Turbulent Motions in Molecular Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegatti Franco, G. A.; Tarsia, R. D.; Quiroga, R. J.

    1986-02-01

    We have studied the behavior of the inner motions of OH, H2CO and CO molecular clouds. This study shows the existence of two main components of these clouds: the narrow one, associated to dense small clouds and a wide one "representing" the large diffuse clouds seen in neutral hidrogen.The large clouds are the "vortex" and intermediate state between turbulent and hydrodynamic motions in the alaxy.

  20. Internal standardization for the determination of cadmium, cobalt, chromium and manganese in saline produced water from petroleum industry by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry after cloud point extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezerra, Marcos Almeida; Mitihiro do Nascimento Maêda, Sérgio; Oliveira, Eliane Padua; de Fátima Batista de Carvalho, Maria; Santelli, Ricardo Erthal

    2007-09-01

    In the present paper a procedure is proposed for the determination of traces of Cd, Co, Mn and Cr in petroleum industry produced water by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry. The procedure is based on cloud point extraction of these metals, as their dithizonate complexes, into the surfactant-rich phase of octylphenoxypolyethoxyethanol surfactant (Triton X-114). Extractions were carried out in solutions with salinities between 10‰ and 70‰. Since residual salinity in the surfactant-rich phase caused differences in its transport to the plasma, yttrium was used as an internal standard to correct for this effect. The simultaneous metal extraction procedure was optimized by response surface methodology using a Doehlert design and desirability function. Enhancement factors of 21, 21, 9 and 19, along with limits of quantification of 0.093, 0.20, 0.73 and 1.2 μg L - 1 , and precision expressed as relative standard deviation ( n = 8, 20.0 μg L - 1 ) of 5.8, 1.2, 1.7 and 5.7% were obtained for Cd, Co, Mn and Cr, respectively. The accuracy was evaluated by spike recovery tests on the high salinity water samples with salinity of 40 and 63‰.

  1. CLOUD COMPUTING TECHNOLOGY TRENDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian IVANUS

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Cloud computing has been a tremendous innovation, through which applications became available online, accessible through an Internet connection and using any computing device (computer, smartphone or tablet. According to one of the most recent studies conducted in 2012 by Everest Group and Cloud Connect, 57% of companies said they already use SaaS application (Software as a Service, and 38% reported using standard tools PaaS (Platform as a Service. However, in the most cases, the users of these solutions highlighted the fact that one of the main obstacles in the development of this technology is the fact that, in cloud, the application is not available without an Internet connection. The new challenge of the cloud system has become now the offline, specifically accessing SaaS applications without being connected to the Internet. This topic is directly related to user productivity within companies as productivity growth is one of the key promises of cloud computing system applications transformation. The aim of this paper is the presentation of some important aspects related to the offline cloud system and regulatory trends in the European Union (EU.

  2. Drizzle formation in stratocumulus clouds: effects of turbulent mixing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Magaritz-Ronen

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The mechanism of drizzle formation in shallow stratocumulus clouds and the effect of turbulent mixing on this process are investigated. A Lagrangian–Eularian model of the cloud-topped boundary layer is used to simulate the cloud measured during flight RF07 of the DYCOMS-II field experiment. The model contains ~ 2000 air parcels that are advected in a turbulence-like velocity field. In the model all microphysical processes are described for each Lagrangian air volume, and turbulent mixing between the parcels is also taken into account. It was found that the first large drops form in air volumes that are closest to adiabatic and characterized by high humidity, extended residence near cloud top, and maximum values of liquid water content, allowing the formation of drops as a result of efficient collisions. The first large drops form near cloud top and initiate drizzle formation in the cloud. Drizzle is developed only when turbulent mixing of parcels is included in the model. Without mixing, the cloud structure is extremely inhomogeneous and the few large drops that do form in the cloud evaporate during their sedimentation. It was found that turbulent mixing can delay the process of drizzle initiation but is essential for the further development of drizzle in the cloud.

  3. Determining stages of cirrus evolution: a cloud classification scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbanek, Benedikt; Groß, Silke; Schäfler, Andreas; Wirth, Martin

    2017-05-01

    Cirrus clouds impose high uncertainties on climate prediction, as knowledge on important processes is still incomplete. For instance it remains unclear how cloud microphysical and radiative properties change as the cirrus evolves. Recent studies classify cirrus clouds into categories including in situ, orographic, convective and liquid origin clouds and investigate their specific impact. Following this line, we present a novel scheme for the classification of cirrus clouds that addresses the need to determine specific stages of cirrus evolution. Our classification scheme is based on airborne Differential Absorption and High Spectral Resolution Lidar measurements of atmospheric water vapor, aerosol depolarization, and backscatter, together with model temperature fields and simplified parameterizations of freezing onset conditions. It identifies regions of supersaturation with respect to ice (ice-supersaturated regions, ISSRs), heterogeneous and homogeneous nucleation, depositional growth, and ice sublimation and sedimentation with high spatial resolution. Thus, all relevant stages of cirrus evolution can be classified and characterized. In a case study of a gravity lee-wave-influenced cirrus cloud, encountered during the ML-CIRRUS flight campaign, the applicability of our classification is demonstrated. Revealing the structure of cirrus clouds, this valuable tool might help to examine the influence of evolution stages on the cloud's net radiative effect and to investigate the specific variability of optical and microphysical cloud properties in upcoming research.

  4. Sensitivities of Amazonian clouds to aerosols and updraft speed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecchini, Micael A.; Machado, Luiz A. T.; Andreae, Meinrat O.; Martin, Scot T.; Albrecht, Rachel I.; Artaxo, Paulo; Barbosa, Henrique M. J.; Borrmann, Stephan; Fütterer, Daniel; Jurkat, Tina; Mahnke, Christoph; Minikin, Andreas; Molleker, Sergej; Pöhlker, Mira L.; Pöschl, Ulrich; Rosenfeld, Daniel; Voigt, Christiane; Weinzierl, Bernadett; Wendisch, Manfred

    2017-08-01

    The effects of aerosol particles and updraft speed on warm-phase cloud microphysical properties are studied in the Amazon region as part of the ACRIDICON-CHUVA experiment. Here we expand the sensitivity analysis usually found in the literature by concomitantly considering cloud evolution, putting the sensitivity quantifications into perspective in relation to in-cloud processing, and by considering the effects on droplet size distribution (DSD) shape. Our in situ aircraft measurements over the Amazon Basin cover a wide range of particle concentration and thermodynamic conditions, from the pristine regions over coastal and forested areas to the southern Amazon, which is highly polluted from biomass burning. The quantitative results show that particle concentration is the primary driver for the vertical profiles of effective diameter and droplet concentration in the warm phase of Amazonian convective clouds, while updraft speeds have a modulating role in the latter and in total condensed water. The cloud microphysical properties were found to be highly variable with altitude above cloud base, which we used as a proxy for cloud evolution since it is a measure of the time droplets that were subject to cloud processing. We show that DSD shape is crucial in understanding cloud sensitivities. The aerosol effect on DSD shape was found to vary with altitude, which can help models to better constrain the indirect aerosol effect on climate.

  5. Characteristics of mid-level clouds over West Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgeois, Elsa; Bouniol, Dominique; Couvreux, Fleur; Guichard, Françoise; Marsham, John; Garcia-Carreras, Luis; Birch, Cathryn; Parker, Doug

    2017-04-01

    Clouds have a major impact on the distribution of water and energy fluxes within the atmosphere. They also represent one of the main sources of uncertainties in global climate models as a result of the difficulty to parametrize cloud processes. However, in West Africa, the cloud type, occurrence and radiative effects have not been extensively documented. This region is characterized by a strong seasonality with precipitation occurring in the Sahel from June to September (monsoon season). This period also coincides with the annual maximum of the cloud cover. Taking advantage of the one-year ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) deployment in 2006 in Niamey (Niger), Bouniol et al (2012) documented the distinct cloud types and showed the frequent occurrence of mid-level clouds (around 6 km height) and their substantial impact on the surface short-wave and long-wave radiative fluxes. Furthermore, in a process-oriented evaluation of climate models, Roehrig et al (2013) showed that these mid-level clouds are poorly represented in numerical models. The aim of this work is to document the macro- and microphysical properties of mid-level clouds and the environment in which such clouds occur across West Africa. To document those clouds, we extensively make use of observations from lidar and cloud radar either deployed at ground-based sites (Niamey and Bordj Badji Mokhtar (Sahara)) or on-board the A-Train constellation (CloudSat/CALIPSO). These datasets reveal the temporal and spatial occurrence of those clouds. They are found throughout the year with a predominance around the monsoon season and are preferentially observed in the Southern and Western part of West Africa which could be linked to the dynamics of the Saharan heat low. Those clouds are usually quite thin (most of them are less than 1000m deep). A clustering method applied to this data allows us to identify three different types of clouds : one with low bases, one with high bases and another with large thicknesses. The first

  6. Evaluation of Cloud Physical Properties of ECMWF Analysis and Re-Analysis (ERA-40 and ERA Interim) against CERES Tropical Deep Convective Cloud Object Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kuan-Man

    2008-01-01

    This study presents an approach that converts the vertical profiles of grid-averaged cloud properties from large-scale models to probability density functions (pdfs) of subgrid-cell cloud physical properties measured at satellite footprints. Cloud physical and radiative properties, rather than just cloud and precipitation occurrences, of assimilated cloud systems by the European Center for Medium-range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) operational analysis (EOA) and ECMWF Re-Analyses (ERA-40 and ERA Interim) are validated against those obtained from Earth Observing System satellite cloud object data for January-August 1998 and March 2000 periods. These properties include ice water path (IWP), cloud-top height and temperature, cloud optical depth and solar and infrared radiative fluxes. Each cloud object, a contiguous region with similar cloud physical properties, is temporally and spatially matched with EOA and ERA-40 data. Results indicate that most pdfs of EOA and ERA-40 cloud physical and radiative properties agree with those of satellite observations of the tropical deep convective cloud-object type for the January-August 1998 period. There are, however, significant discrepancies in selected ranges of the cloud property pdfs such as the upper range of EOA cloud top height. A major discrepancy is that the dependence of the pdfs on the cloud object size for both EOA and ERA-40 is not as strong as in the observations. Modifications to the cloud parameterization in ECMWF that occurred in October 1999 eliminate the clouds near the tropopause but shift power of the pdf to lower cloud-top heights and greatly reduce the ranges of IWP and cloud optical depth pdfs. These features persist in ERA-40 due to the use of the same cloud parameterizations. The downgrade of data assimilation technique and the lack of snow water content information in ERA-40, not the coarser horizontal grid resolution, are also responsible for the disagreements with observed pdfs of cloud physical

  7. Strong Constraints on Aerosol-Cloud Interactions from Volcanic Eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malavelle, Florent F.; Haywood, Jim M.; Jones, Andy; Gettelman, Andrew; Clarisse, Lieven; Bauduin, Sophie; Allan, Richard P.; Karset, Inger Helene H.; Kristjansson, Jon Egill; Oreopoulos, Lazaros; hide

    2017-01-01

    Aerosols have a potentially large effect on climate, particularly through their interactions with clouds, but the magnitude of this effect is highly uncertain. Large volcanic eruptions produce sulfur dioxide, which in turn produces aerosols; these eruptions thus represent a natural experiment through which to quantify aerosol-cloud interactions. Here we show that the massive 2014-2015 fissure eruption in Holuhraun, Iceland, reduced the size of liquid cloud droplets - consistent with expectations - but had no discernible effect on other cloud properties. The reduction in droplet size led to cloud brightening and global-mean radiative forcing of around minus 0.2 watts per square metre for September to October 2014. Changes in cloud amount or cloud liquid water path, however, were undetectable, indicating that these indirect effects, and cloud systems in general, are well buffered against aerosol changes. This result will reduce uncertainties in future climate projections, because we are now able to reject results from climate models with an excessive liquid-water-path response.

  8. Strong constraints on aerosol-cloud interactions from volcanic eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malavelle, Florent F.; Haywood, Jim M.; Jones, Andy; Gettelman, Andrew; Clarisse, Lieven; Bauduin, Sophie; Allan, Richard P.; Karset, Inger Helene H.; Kristjánsson, Jón Egill; Oreopoulos, Lazaros; Cho, Nayeong; Lee, Dongmin; Bellouin, Nicolas; Boucher, Olivier; Grosvenor, Daniel P.; Carslaw, Ken S.; Dhomse, Sandip; Mann, Graham W.; Schmidt, Anja; Coe, Hugh; Hartley, Margaret E.; Dalvi, Mohit; Hill, Adrian A.; Johnson, Ben T.; Johnson, Colin E.; Knight, Jeff R.; O'Connor, Fiona M.; Partridge, Daniel G.; Stier, Philip; Myhre, Gunnar; Platnick, Steven; Stephens, Graeme L.; Takahashi, Hanii; Thordarson, Thorvaldur

    2017-06-01

    Aerosols have a potentially large effect on climate, particularly through their interactions with clouds, but the magnitude of this effect is highly uncertain. Large volcanic eruptions produce sulfur dioxide, which in turn produces aerosols; these eruptions thus represent a natural experiment through which to quantify aerosol-cloud interactions. Here we show that the massive 2014-2015 fissure eruption in Holuhraun, Iceland, reduced the size of liquid cloud droplets—consistent with expectations—but had no discernible effect on other cloud properties. The reduction in droplet size led to cloud brightening and global-mean radiative forcing of around -0.2 watts per square metre for September to October 2014. Changes in cloud amount or cloud liquid water path, however, were undetectable, indicating that these indirect effects, and cloud systems in general, are well buffered against aerosol changes. This result will reduce uncertainties in future climate projections, because we are now able to reject results from climate models with an excessive liquid-water-path response.

  9. Formation of Massive Molecular Cloud Cores by Cloud-Cloud Collision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Fukui, Yasuo

    2013-09-01

    Recent observations of molecular clouds around rich massive star clusters including NGC 3603, Westerlund 2, and M20 revealed that the formation of massive stars could be triggered by a cloud-cloud collision. By using three-dimensional, isothermal, magnetohydrodynamics simulations with the effect of self-gravity, we demonstrate that massive, gravitationally unstable, molecular cloud cores are formed behind the strong shock waves induced by cloud-cloud collision. We find that the massive molecular cloud cores have large effective Jeans mass owing to the enhancement of the magnetic field strength by shock compression and turbulence in the compressed layer. Our results predict that massive molecular cloud cores formed by the cloud-cloud collision are filamentary and threaded by magnetic fields perpendicular to the filament.

  10. Metastable Phases in Ice Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Fabian; Baloh, Philipp; Kubel, Frank; Hoelzel, Markus; Parker, Stewart; Grothe, Hinrich

    2014-05-01

    Polar Stratospheric Clouds and Cirrus Clouds contain both, pure water ice and phases of nitric acid hydrates. Preferentially for the latter, the thermodynamically stable phases have intensively been investigated in the past (e.g. nitric acid trihydrate, beta-NAT). As shown by Peter et al. [1] the water activity inside clouds is higher than expected, which might be explained by the presence of metastable stable phases (e.g. cubic ice). However, also metastable nitric acid hydrates might be important due to the inherent non-equilibrium freezing conditions in the upper atmosphere. The delta ice theory of Gao et al. [2] presents a model approach to solve this problem by involving both metastable ice and NAT as well. So it is of high interest to investigate the metastable phase of NAT (i.e. alpha-NAT), the structure of which was unknown up to the presence. In our laboratory a production procedure for metastable alpha-NAT has been developed, which gives access to neutron diffraction and X-ray diffraction measurements, where sample quantities of several Gramm are required. The diffraction techniques were used to solve the unknown crystalline structure of metastable alpha-NAT, which in turn allows the calculation of the vibrational spectra, which have also been recorded by us in the past. Rerefences [1] Peter, T., C. Marcolli, P. Spichtinger, T. Corti, M. B. Baker, and T. Koop. When dry air is too humid. Science, 314:1399-1402, 2006. [2] Gao, R., P. Popp, D. Fahey, T. Marcy, R. L. Herman, E. Weinstock, D. Baumgardener, T. Garrett, K. Rosenlof, T. Thompson, T. P. Bui, B. Ridley, S. C. Wofsy, O. B. Toon, M. Tolbert, B. Kärcher, Th. Peter, P. K. Hudson, A. Weinheimer, and A. Heymsfield. Evidence That Nitric Acid Increases Relative Humidity in Low-Temperature Cirrus Clouds, Science, 303:516-520, 2004. [3] Tizek, H., E. Knözinger, and H. Grothe. Formation and phase distribution of nitric acid hydrates in the mole fraction range xHNO3<0.25: A combined XRD and IR study, PCCP, 6

  11. a Test to Prove Cloud Whitening THEORY!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buttram, J. W.

    2011-12-01

    Climate science researchers believe our planet can possibly tolerate twice the present carbon dioxide levels with no upwards temperature change, IF we could increase the amount of energy reflected back out into space by about 2.0%. (c)Cloudtec basically alters a blend of seawater and applies heat derived from magma to it at a temperature exceeding 2,000 degrees F. The interaction of seawater and magma displaces the oxygen, causing the volume of water to vaporize and expand over 4,000 times - transforming billions of tons of seawater into thousands of cubic miles of white, maritime, stratocumulus clouds to reflect the incident Sun's rays back out into space. A 6 month test to prove Cloud Whitening Theory will cost 6 million dollars. (No profit added.) This study will enable everyone on the planet with a computer the transparency to use satellite imagery and check out for themselves - if and when Cloud Whitening is occurring. If Cloud Whitening Theory is validated, (c)Cloudtec's innovation can strategically create the clouds we need to reflect the Sun's rays back out into space and help neutralize the projected 3.6 degrees F rise in temperature. Based on reasonable calculations of anthropogenic global warming: this one move alone would be comparable to slashing global carbon dioxide emissions by over 60% over the next 40 years.

  12. Fast cloud parameter retrievals of MIPAS/Envisat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Spang

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The infrared limb spectra of the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS on board the Envisat satellite include detailed information on tropospheric clouds and polar stratospheric clouds (PSC. However, no consolidated cloud product is available for the scientific community. Here we describe a fast prototype processor for cloud parameter retrieval from MIPAS (MIPclouds. Retrieval of parameters such as cloud top height, temperature, and extinction are implemented, as well as retrieval of microphysical parameters, e.g. effective radius and the integrated quantities over the limb path (surface area density and volume density. MIPclouds classifies clouds as either liquid or ice cloud in the upper troposphere and polar stratospheric clouds types in the stratosphere based on statistical combinations of colour ratios and brightness temperature differences.

    Comparison of limb measurements of clouds with model results or cloud parameters from nadir looking instruments is often difficult due to different observation geometries. We therefore introduce a new concept, the limb-integrated surface area density path (ADP. By means of validation and radiative transfer calculations of realistic 2-D cloud fields as input for a blind test retrieval (BTR, we demonstrate that ADP is an extremely valuable parameter for future comparison with model data of ice water content, when applying limb integration (ray tracing through the model fields. In addition, ADP is used for a more objective definition of detection thresholds of the applied detection methods. Based on BTR, a detection threshold of ADP = 107 μm2 cm−2 and an ice water content of 10−5 g m−3 is estimated, depending on the horizontal and vertical extent of the cloud.

    Intensive validation of the cloud detection methods shows that the limb-sounding MIPAS instrument has a sensitivity in detecting stratospheric

  13. NASA Glenn Icing Research Tunnel: 2014 Cloud Calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanZante, Judith Foss; Ide, Robert F.; Steen, Laura; Acosta, Waldo J.

    2014-01-01

    The results of the December 2013 to February 2014 Icing Research Tunnel full icing cloud calibration are being presented to the SAE AC-9C committee, as represented in the 2014 cloud calibration report. The calibration steps included establishing a uniform cloud and conducting drop size and liquid water content calibrations. The goal of the calibration was to develop a uniform cloud, and to generate a transfer function from the inputs of air speed, spray bar atomizing air pressure and water pressure to the outputs of median volumetric drop diameter and liquid water content. This was done for both 14 CFR Parts 25 and 29, Appendix C (typical icing) and soon-to-be released Appendix O (supercooled large drop) conditions.

  14. Sensitivity of three tree ferns during their first phase of life to the variation of solar radiation and water availability in a Mexican cloud forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riaño, Karolina; Briones, Oscar

    2015-09-01

    Regeneration niche differentiation promotes species coexistence and diversity; however, the ecological implications for the initial life phases of the majority of pteridophytes are unknown. We analyzed the sensitivity of gametophytes and juvenile sporophytes of the tree ferns Alsophila firma, Cyathea divergens, and Lophosoria quadripinnata to variation in light and water availability. We evaluated gametophyte desiccation tolerance using saturated salt solutions and gametophyte solar radiation tolerance by direct exposure. We also transplanted juvenile sporophytes in environments with 7% and 23% canopy openness and two watering levels. The response of photosynthetic efficiency and water content suggest that the gametophytes of the three species require high relative humidity, tolerate direct solar radiation for up to 30 min and that the response is not species-dependent. Sporophyte size and gas exchange were greater in the more open site, but decreased watering had a lesser effect on these variables in the more closed site. Relative growth rate correlated with the net assimilation rate and leaf weight ratio. Juvenile sporophytes of A. firma were more shade tolerant, while those of C. divergens and L. quadripinnata acclimatized to both environments. Specialization to humid habitats in the tree fern gametophyte restricts the species to humid forests, while differences in the plasticity of the sporophyte facilitate coexistence of the species. © 2015 Botanical Society of America.

  15. Cloud networking understanding cloud-based data center networks

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Gary

    2014-01-01

    Cloud Networking: Understanding Cloud-Based Data Center Networks explains the evolution of established networking technologies into distributed, cloud-based networks. Starting with an overview of cloud technologies, the book explains how cloud data center networks leverage distributed systems for network virtualization, storage networking, and software-defined networking. The author offers insider perspective to key components that make a cloud network possible such as switch fabric technology and data center networking standards. The final chapters look ahead to developments in architectures

  16. Strategies for cloud-top phase determination: differentiation between thin cirrus clouds and snow in manual (ground truth) analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchison, Keith D.; Etherton, Brian J.; Topping, Phillip C.

    1996-12-01

    Quantitative assessments on the performance of automated cloud analysis algorithms require the creation of highly accurate, manual cloud, no cloud (CNC) images from multispectral meteorological satellite data. In general, the methodology to create ground truth analyses for the evaluation of cloud detection algorithms is relatively straightforward. However, when focus shifts toward quantifying the performance of automated cloud classification algorithms, the task of creating ground truth images becomes much more complicated since these CNC analyses must differentiate between water and ice cloud tops while ensuring that inaccuracies in automated cloud detection are not propagated into the results of the cloud classification algorithm. The process of creating these ground truth CNC analyses may become particularly difficult when little or no spectral signature is evident between a cloud and its background, as appears to be the case when thin cirrus is present over snow-covered surfaces. In this paper, procedures are described that enhance the researcher's ability to manually interpret and differentiate between thin cirrus clouds and snow-covered surfaces in daytime AVHRR imagery. The methodology uses data in up to six AVHRR spectral bands, including an additional band derived from the daytime 3.7 micron channel, which has proven invaluable for the manual discrimination between thin cirrus clouds and snow. It is concluded that while the 1.6 micron channel remains essential to differentiate between thin ice clouds and snow. However, this capability that may be lost if the 3.7 micron data switches to a nighttime-only transmission with the launch of future NOAA satellites.

  17. Intercomparisons of marine boundary layer cloud properties from the ARM CAP-MBL campaign and two MODIS cloud products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhibo; Dong, Xiquan; Xi, Baike; Song, Hua; Ma, Po-Lun; Ghan, Steven J.; Platnick, Steven; Minnis, Patrick

    2017-02-01

    From April 2009 to December 2010, the Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program carried out an observational field campaign on Graciosa Island, targeting the marine boundary layer (MBL) clouds over the Azores region. In this paper, we present an intercomparison of the MBL cloud properties, namely, cloud liquid water path (LWP), cloud optical thickness (COT), and cloud-droplet effective radius (CER), among retrievals from the ARM mobile facility and two Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) cloud products (Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC)-MODIS and Clouds and Earth's Radiant Energy System-MODIS). A total of 63 daytime single-layer MBL cloud cases are selected for intercomparison. Comparison of collocated retrievals indicates that the two MODIS cloud products agree well on both COT and CER retrievals, with the correlation coefficient R > 0.95, despite their significant difference in spatial sampling. In both MODIS products, the CER retrievals based on the 2.1 µm band (CER2.1) are significantly larger than those based on the 3.7 µm band (CER3.7). The GSFC-MODIS cloud product is collocated and compared with ground-based ARM observations at several temporal-spatial scales. In general, the correlation increases with more precise collocation. For the 63 selected MBL cloud cases, the GSFC-MODIS LWP and COT retrievals agree reasonably well with the ground-based observations with no apparent bias and correlation coefficient R around 0.85 and 0.70, respectively. However, GSFC-MODIS CER3.7 and CER2.1 retrievals have a lower correlation (R 0.5) with the ground-based retrievals. For the 63 selected cases, they are on average larger than ground observations by about 1.5 µm and 3.0 µm, respectively. Taking into account that the MODIS CER retrievals are only sensitive to cloud top reduces the bias only by 0.5 µm.

  18. Generic Software Architecture for Prognostics (GSAP) User Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teubert, Christopher Allen; Daigle, Matthew John; Watkins, Jason; Sankararaman, Shankar; Goebel, Kai

    2016-01-01

    The Generic Software Architecture for Prognostics (GSAP) is a framework for applying prognostics. It makes applying prognostics easier by implementing many of the common elements across prognostic applications. The standard interface enables reuse of prognostic algorithms and models across systems using the GSAP framework.

  19. Snow precipitation on Mars driven by cloud-induced night-time convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiga, Aymeric; Hinson, David P.; Madeleine, Jean-Baptiste; Navarro, Thomas; Millour, Ehouarn; Forget, François; Montmessin, Franck

    2017-09-01

    Although it contains less water vapour than Earth's atmosphere, the Martian atmosphere hosts clouds. These clouds, composed of water-ice particles, influence the global transport of water vapour and the seasonal variations of ice deposits. However, the influence of water-ice clouds on local weather is unclear: it is thought that Martian clouds are devoid of moist convective motions, and snow precipitation occurs only by the slow sedimentation of individual particles. Here we present numerical simulations of the meteorology in Martian cloudy regions that demonstrate that localized convective snowstorms can occur on Mars. We show that such snowstorms--or ice microbursts--can explain deep night-time mixing layers detected from orbit and precipitation signatures detected below water-ice clouds by the Phoenix lander. In our simulations, convective snowstorms occur only during the Martian night, and result from atmospheric instability due to radiative cooling of water-ice cloud particles. This triggers strong convective plumes within and below clouds, with fast snow precipitation resulting from the vigorous descending currents. Night-time convection in Martian water-ice clouds and the associated snow precipitation lead to transport of water both above and below the mixing layers, and thus would affect Mars' water cycle past and present, especially under the high-obliquity conditions associated with a more intense water cycle.

  20. Cloud GIS Based Watershed Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bediroğlu, G.; Colak, H. E.

    2017-11-01

    In this study, we generated a Cloud GIS based watershed management system with using Cloud Computing architecture. Cloud GIS is used as SAAS (Software as a Service) and DAAS (Data as a Service). We applied GIS analysis on cloud in terms of testing SAAS and deployed GIS datasets on cloud in terms of DAAS. We used Hybrid cloud computing model in manner of using ready web based mapping services hosted on cloud (World Topology, Satellite Imageries). We uploaded to system after creating geodatabases including Hydrology (Rivers, Lakes), Soil Maps, Climate Maps, Rain Maps, Geology and Land Use. Watershed of study area has been determined on cloud using ready-hosted topology maps. After uploading all the datasets to systems, we have applied various GIS analysis and queries. Results shown that Cloud GIS technology brings velocity and efficiency for watershed management studies. Besides this, system can be easily implemented for similar land analysis and management studies.

  1. Security Problems in Cloud Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rola Motawie

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Cloud is a pool of computing resources which are distributed among cloud users. Cloud computing has many benefits like scalability, flexibility, cost savings, reliability, maintenance and mobile accessibility. Since cloud-computing technology is growing day by day, it comes with many security problems. Securing the data in the cloud environment is most critical challenges which act as a barrier when implementing the cloud. There are many new concepts that cloud introduces, such as resource sharing, multi-tenancy, and outsourcing, create new challenges for the security community. In this work, we provide a comparable study of cloud computing privacy and security concerns. We identify and classify known security threats, cloud vulnerabilities, and attacks.

  2. Isolating the Liquid Cloud Response to Recent Arctic Sea Ice Variability Using Spaceborne Lidar Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, A. L.; Kay, J. E.; Chepfer, H.; Guzman, R.; Yettella, V.

    2018-01-01

    While the radiative influence of clouds on Arctic sea ice is known, the influence of sea ice cover on Arctic clouds is challenging to detect, separate from atmospheric circulation, and attribute to human activities. Providing observational constraints on the two-way relationship between sea ice cover and Arctic clouds is important for predicting the rate of future sea ice loss. Here we use 8 years of CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations) spaceborne lidar observations from 2008 to 2015 to analyze Arctic cloud profiles over sea ice and over open water. Using a novel surface mask to restrict our analysis to where sea ice concentration varies, we isolate the influence of sea ice cover on Arctic Ocean clouds. The study focuses on clouds containing liquid water because liquid-containing clouds are the most important cloud type for radiative fluxes and therefore for sea ice melt and growth. Summer is the only season with no observed cloud response to sea ice cover variability: liquid cloud profiles are nearly identical over sea ice and over open water. These results suggest that shortwave summer cloud feedbacks do not slow long-term summer sea ice loss. In contrast, more liquid clouds are observed over open water than over sea ice in the winter, spring, and fall in the 8 year mean and in each individual year. Observed fall sea ice loss cannot be explained by natural variability alone, which suggests that observed increases in fall Arctic cloud cover over newly open water are linked to human activities.

  3. Metrics for Evaluating Performance of Prognostic Techniques

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Prognostics is an emerging concept in condition basedmaintenance(CBM)ofcriticalsystems.Alongwith developing the fundamentals of being able to confidently predict...

  4. Health Monitoring and Prognostics for Computer Servers

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Abstract Prognostics solutions for mission critical systems require a comprehensive methodology for proactively detecting and isolating failures, recommending and...

  5. Embedded Diagnostics & Prognostics Wireless Sensing Platforms

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ousachi, Mark; Scott, Andrew; Yee, David; Hosmer, Thomas; Daniszewski, Dave

    2004-01-01

    An embedded diagnostics and prognostics architecture affects several aspects associated with military ground vehicles such as improved safety, reduction in maintenance times, weapon system readiness...

  6. A DISTRIBUTED PROGNOSTIC HEALTH MANAGEMENT ARCHITECTURE

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This paper introduces a generic distributed prognostic health management (PHM) architecture with specific application to the electrical power systems domain. Current...

  7. Simulating Degradation Data for Prognostic Algorithm Development

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — PHM08 Challenge Dataset is now publicly available at the NASA Prognostics Respository + Download INTRODUCTION - WHY SIMULATE DEGRADATION DATA? Of various challenges...

  8. A Survey of Artificial Intelligence for Prognostics

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Integrated Systems Health Management includes as key elements fault detection, fault diagnostics, and failure prognostics. Whereas fault detection and diagnostics...

  9. Clinical and Histopathological Prognostic Factors in Chondrosarcomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bjarne Lund

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. In an attempt to identify clinical and histopathological factors of prognostic importance in chondrosarcomas, 115 cases of malignant and borderline chondromatous tumours were reviewed.

  10. CCN Properties of Organic Aerosol Collected Below and within Marine Stratocumulus Clouds near Monterey, California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akua Asa-Awuku

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The composition of aerosol from cloud droplets differs from that below cloud. Its implications for the Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN activity are the focus of this study. Water-soluble organic matter from below cloud, and cloud droplet residuals off the coast of Monterey, California were collected; offline chemical composition, CCN activity and surface tension measurements coupled with Köhler Theory Analysis are used to infer the molar volume and surfactant characteristics of organics in both samples. Based on the surface tension depression of the samples, it is unlikely that the aerosol contains strong surfactants. The activation kinetics for all samples examined are consistent with rapid (NH42SO4 calibration aerosol. This is consistent with our current understanding of droplet kinetics for ambient CCN. However, the carbonaceous material in cloud drop residuals is far more hygroscopic than in sub-cloud aerosol, suggestive of the impact of cloud chemistry on the hygroscopic properties of organic matter.

  11. Satellite remote sensing of dust aerosol indirect effects on ice cloud formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Steve Szu-Cheng; Liou, Kuo-Nan; Wang, Xingjuan; Hansell, Richard; Lefevre, Randy; Cocks, Stephen

    2009-01-20

    We undertook a new approach to investigate the aerosol indirect effect of the first kind on ice cloud formation by using available data products from the Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) and obtained physical understanding about the interaction between aerosols and ice clouds. Our analysis focused on the examination of the variability in the correlation between ice cloud parameters (optical depth, effective particle size, cloud water path, and cloud particle number concentration) and aerosol optical depth and number concentration that were inferred from available satellite cloud and aerosol data products. Correlation results for a number of selected scenes containing dust and ice clouds are presented, and dust aerosol indirect effects on ice clouds are directly demonstrated from satellite observations.

  12. An operational procedure for precipitable and cloud liquid water estimate in non-raining conditions over sea Study on the assessment of the nonlinear physical inversion algorithm

    CERN Document Server

    Nativi, S; Mazzetti, P

    2004-01-01

    In a previous work, an operative procedure to estimate precipitable and liquid water in non-raining conditions over sea was developed and assessed. The procedure is based on a fast non-linear physical inversion scheme and a forward model; it is valid for most of satellite microwave radiometers and it also estimates water effective profiles. This paper presents two improvements of the procedure: first, a refinement to provide modularity of the software components and portability across different computation system architectures; second, the adoption of the CERN MINUIT minimisation package, which addresses the problem of global minimisation but is computationally more demanding. Together with the increased computational performance that allowed to impose stricter requirements on the quality of fit, these refinements improved fitting precision and reliability, and allowed to relax the requirements on the initial guesses for the model parameters. The re-analysis of the same data-set considered in the previous pap...

  13. A Lagrangian Study of Southeast Pacific Boundary Layer Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Painter, Gallia

    Low clouds lie at the heart of climate feedback uncertainties. The representation of clouds in global climate models relies on parameterization of many sub-grid scale processes that are crucial to understanding cloud responses to climate; low clouds in particular exist as a result of tightly coupled microphysical, mesoscale, and synoptic mechanisms. The influence of anthropogenic aerosols on cloud properties could have important ramifications for our understanding of how clouds respond to a changing climate. The VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study Regional Experiment (VOCALS REx) sampled the persistent stratocumulus cloud deck located off the coast of Peru and Chile in the southeastern Pacific ocean. Several cloud features found in the stratocumulus deck during VOCALS exhibit signs of interesting aerosol-cloud interactions, including pockets of open cells (POCs). POCs are regions of open-cellular convection surrounded by closed cell stratocumulus, exhibiting not only a marked transition in mesoscale organization and cloud morphology, but also sharp microphysical gradients (especially in droplet concentration) across the boundary between open-cellular and closed cellular convection. In addition, precipitation is often higher at the POC boundaries, hinting at the importance of precipitation in driving their formation. In order to evaluate the microphysical characteristics of POCs prior cloud breakup, we use Lagrangian trajectories coupled with geostationary satellite imagery and cloud retrievals, as well as observational data from VOCALS REx and model data. In three of our case studies, we found regions of anomalously low droplet concentration 18-24 hours prior to POC formation (coupled with liquid water path similar to or higher than surrounding cloud), supporting a precipitation driven mechanism for POC formation. Another group of features with interesting aerosol-cloud interactions observed during VOCALS were mesoscale hook-like features of high droplet

  14. Mitochondrial activity in fern spores of Cyathea costaricensis as an indicator of the impact of land use and water quality in rivers running through cloud forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Romero, Alexis Joseph; Rico-Sánchez, Axel Eduardo; Catalá, Myriam; Sedeño-Díaz, Jacinto Elías; López-López, Eugenia

    2017-12-01

    Early-warning biomarkers, such as mitochondrial activity, have become a key tool in ecosystem assessment. This study aims to evaluate the response of mitochondrial activity in spores of the autochthonous fern Cyathea costaricensis as a bioassessment tool concurrently with land use and physicochemical evaluation in 11 sites along Bobos River, Veracruz, Mexico, to assess river water quality. Bobos River is located in the Nautla basin, northeastern Veracruz (Mexico); the upper river runs through a protected natural area (Filobobos River and adjacent areas). The study involved three monitoring periods: February, June and September 2014. In each study site, physicochemical water quality parameters were recorded to calculate the Water Quality Index (WQI); also, study sites were characterized in terms of land use. Water samples were collected to perform bioassays where spores of C. costaricensis were exposed to samples to assess mitochondrial activity; a positive control exposure test was run under controlled conditions to maximize mitochondrial activity. A Principal Component Analysis was performed to correlate land-use attributes with environmental variables and mitochondrial activity. Three river sections were identified: the upper portion was characterized by the dominance of native vegetation, the highest WQI (in September), and the lowest mitochondrial activity (63.87%-77.47%), related to the geological nature of the basin and high hardness levels. Mitochondrial activity peaked in September (98.32% ± 9.01), likely resulting from nutrient enrichment in the rainy season, and was lowest in February (74.54% ± 1.60) (p human impacts. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Trust management in cloud services

    CERN Document Server

    Noor, Talal H; Bouguettaya, Athman

    2014-01-01

    This book describes the design and implementation of Cloud Armor, a novel approach for credibility-based trust management and automatic discovery of cloud services in distributed and highly dynamic environments. This book also helps cloud users to understand the difficulties of establishing trust in cloud computing and the best criteria for selecting a service cloud. The techniques have been validated by a prototype system implementation and experimental studies using a collection of real world trust feedbacks on cloud services.The authors present the design and implementation of a novel pro

  16. Cloud-radiation interactions and their parameterization in climate models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-11-01

    This report contains papers from the International Workshop on Cloud-Radiation Interactions and Their Parameterization in Climate Models met on 18--20 October 1993 in Camp Springs, Maryland, USA. It was organized by the Joint Working Group on Clouds and Radiation of the International Association of Meteorology and Atmospheric Sciences. Recommendations were grouped into three broad areas: (1) general circulation models (GCMs), (2) satellite studies, and (3) process studies. Each of the panels developed recommendations on the. themes of the workshop. Explicitly or implicitly, each panel independently recommended observations of basic cloud microphysical properties (water content, phase, size) on the scales resolved by GCMs. Such observations are necessary to validate cloud parameterizations in GCMs, to use satellite data to infer radiative forcing in the atmosphere and at the earth`s surface, and to refine the process models which are used to develop advanced cloud parameterizations.

  17. Using polarimetry to retrieve the cloud coverage of Earth-like exoplanets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, L.; Stam, D. M.

    2017-11-01

    Context. Clouds have already been detected in exoplanetary atmospheres. They play crucial roles in a planet's atmosphere and climate and can also create ambiguities in the determination of atmospheric parameters such as trace gas mixing ratios. Knowledge of cloud properties is required when assessing the habitability of a planet. Aims: We aim to show that various types of cloud cover such as polar cusps, subsolar clouds, and patchy clouds on Earth-like exoplanets can be distinguished from each other using the polarization and flux of light that is reflected by the planet. Methods: We have computed the flux and polarization of reflected starlight for different types of (liquid water) cloud covers on Earth-like model planets using the adding-doubling method, that fully includes multiple scattering and polarization. Variations in cloud-top altitudes and planet-wide cloud cover percentages were taken into account. Results: We find that the different types of cloud cover (polar cusps, subsolar clouds, and patchy clouds) can be distinguished from each other and that the percentage of cloud cover can be estimated within 10%. Conclusions: Using our proposed observational strategy, one should be able to determine basic orbital parameters of a planet such as orbital inclination and estimate cloud coverage with reduced ambiguities from the planet's polarization signals along its orbit.

  18. Prognostic Factors in Hodgkin's Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Specht

    1996-01-01

    Prognostic factors in Hodgkin's disease (HD) are reviewed. The Ann Arbor staging classification remains the basis for evaluation of patients with HD. However, subgroups of patients with differing prognoses exist within the individual stages. In pathological stages I and II, the number of involved...... of extent of disease such as erythrocyte sedimentation rate, anemia, and serum albumin. In advanced disease the number of involved nodal and extranodal regions, the total tumor burden, B symptoms, age, gender, histology, and a number of hematologic and biochemical indicators are significant. Research...

  19. Transition to the Cloud

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedman, Jonas; Xiao, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    The rising of cloud computing has dramatically changed the way software companies provide and distribute their IT product and related services over the last decades. Today, most software is bought offthe-shelf and distributed over the Internet. This transition is greatly influencing how software...... companies operate. In this paper, we present a case study of an ERP vendor for SMB (small and mediumsize business) in making a transition towards a cloud-based business model. Through the theoretical lens of ecosystem, we are able to analyze the evolution of the vendor and its business network as a whole......, and find that the relationship between vendor and Value-added-Reseller (VAR) is greatly affected. We conclude by presenting critical issues and challenges for managing such cloud transition....

  20. Secure Data Sharing in Cloud Computing using Hybrid cloud

    OpenAIRE

    Er. Inderdeep Singh; Er. Surinder Kaur

    2015-01-01

    Cloud computing is fast growing technology that enables the users to store and access their data remotely. Using cloud services users can enjoy the benefits of on-demand cloud applications and data with limited local infrastructure available with them. While accessing the data from cloud, different users may have relationship among them depending on some attributes, and thus sharing of data along with user privacy and data security becomes important to get effective results. Most of the resea...

  1. Development of a simple, sensitive and inexpensive ion-pairing cloud point extraction approach for the determination of trace inorganic arsenic species in spring water, beverage and rice samples by UV-Vis spectrophotometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürkan, Ramazan; Kır, Ufuk; Altunay, Nail

    2015-08-01

    The determination of inorganic arsenic species in water, beverages and foods become crucial in recent years, because arsenic species are considered carcinogenic and found at high concentrations in the samples. This communication describes a new cloud-point extraction (CPE) method for the determination of low quantity of arsenic species in the samples, purchased from the local market by UV-Visible Spectrophotometer (UV-Vis). The method is based on selective ternary complex of As(V) with acridine orange (AOH(+)) being a versatile fluorescence cationic dye in presence of tartaric acid and polyethylene glycol tert-octylphenyl ether (Triton X-114) at pH 5.0. Under the optimized conditions, a preconcentration factor of 65 and detection limit (3S blank/m) of 1.14 μg L(-1) was obtained from the calibration curve constructed in the range of 4-450 μg L(-1) with a correlation coefficient of 0.9932 for As(V). The method is validated by the analysis of certified reference materials (CRMs). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Storm and cloud dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Cotton, William R

    1992-01-01

    This book focuses on the dynamics of clouds and of precipitating mesoscale meteorological systems. Clouds and precipitating mesoscale systems represent some of the most important and scientifically exciting weather systems in the world. These are the systems that produce torrential rains, severe winds including downburst and tornadoes, hail, thunder and lightning, and major snow storms. Forecasting such storms represents a major challenge since they are too small to be adequately resolved by conventional observing networks and numerical prediction models.Key Features* Key Highlight

  3. Cloud blueprints for integrating and managing cloud federations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Papazoglou, M.; Heisel, M.

    2012-01-01

    Contemporary cloud technologies face insurmountable obstacles. They follow a pull-based, producer-centric trajectory to development where cloud consumers have to ‘squeeze and bolt’ applications onto cloud APIs. They also introduce a monolithic SaaS/PaaS/IaaS stack where a one-size-fits-all mentality

  4. Cloud Computing in Nigeria: The Cloud Ecosystem Perspective ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The cloud ecosystem describes the complex system of interdependent components that work together to enable cloud services provided to user. This paper presents a critical analysis of the benefits and challenges posed by the adoption and usage of cloud computing. Also presented is the relationship between important ...

  5. Cloud Based Applications and Platforms (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodt-Giles, D.

    2014-05-15

    Presentation to the Cloud Computing East 2014 Conference, where we are highlighting our cloud computing strategy, describing the platforms on the cloud (including Smartgrid.gov), and defining our process for implementing cloud based applications.

  6. High-Precision Laboratory Measurements Supporting Retrieval of Water Vapor, Gaseous Ammonia, and Aqueous Ammonia Clouds with the Juno Microwave Radiometer (MWR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffes, Paul G.; Hanley, Thomas R.; Karpowicz, Bryan M.; Devaraj, Kiruthika; Noorizadeh, Sahand; Duong, Danny; Chinsomboon, Garrett; Bellotti, Amadeo; Janssen, Michael A.; Bolton, Scott J.

    2017-11-01

    The NASA Juno mission includes a six-channel microwave radiometer system (MWR) operating in the 1.3-50 cm wavelength range in order to retrieve abundances of ammonia and water vapor from the microwave signature of Jupiter (see Janssen et al. 2016). In order to plan observations and accurately interpret data from such observations, over 6000 laboratory measurements of the microwave absorption properties of gaseous ammonia, water vapor, and aqueous ammonia solution have been conducted under simulated Jovian conditions using new laboratory systems capable of high-precision measurement under the extreme conditions of the deep atmosphere of Jupiter (up to 100 bars pressure and 505 K temperature). This is one of the most extensive laboratory measurement campaigns ever conducted in support of a microwave remote sensing instrument. New, more precise models for the microwave absorption from these constituents have and are being developed from these measurements. Application of these absorption properties to radiative transfer models for the six wavelengths involved will provide a valuable planning tool for observations, and will also make possible accurate retrievals of the abundance of these constituents during and after observations are conducted.

  7. Classification of Arctic, midlatitude and tropical clouds in the mixed-phase temperature regime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Costa

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The degree of glaciation of mixed-phase clouds constitutes one of the largest uncertainties in climate prediction. In order to better understand cloud glaciation, cloud spectrometer observations are presented in this paper, which were made in the mixed-phase temperature regime between 0 and −38 °C (273 to 235 K, where cloud particles can either be frozen or liquid. The extensive data set covers four airborne field campaigns providing a total of 139 000 1 Hz data points (38.6 h within clouds over Arctic, midlatitude and tropical regions. We develop algorithms, combining the information on number concentration, size and asphericity of the observed cloud particles to classify four cloud types: liquid clouds, clouds in which liquid droplets and ice crystals coexist, fully glaciated clouds after the Wegener–Bergeron–Findeisen process and clouds where secondary ice formation occurred. We quantify the occurrence of these cloud groups depending on the geographical region and temperature and find that liquid clouds dominate our measurements during the Arctic spring, while clouds dominated by the Wegener–Bergeron–Findeisen process are most common in midlatitude spring. The coexistence of liquid water and ice crystals is found over the whole mixed-phase temperature range in tropical convective towers in the dry season. Secondary ice is found at midlatitudes at −5 to −10 °C (268 to 263 K and at higher altitudes, i.e. lower temperatures in the tropics. The distribution of the cloud types with decreasing temperature is shown to be consistent with the theory of evolution of mixed-phase clouds. With this study, we aim to contribute to a large statistical database on cloud types in the mixed-phase temperature regime.

  8. Securing virtual and cloud environments

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Carroll, M

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available targets such as reduced costs, scalability, flexibility, capacity utilisation, higher efficiencies and mobility. Many of these benefits are achieved through the utilisation of technologies such as cloud computing and virtualisation. In many instances cloud...

  9. Prognostic radiographic aspects of spondylolisthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saraste, H.; Brostroem, L.A.; Aparisi, T.

    1984-01-01

    A series of 202 patients (133 men, 69 women) with lumbar spondylolysis were examined radiographically on two occasions, first at the time of diagnosis and later at a follow-up, after an observation period of 20 years or more. The films from patients in groups without and with moderate and severe olisthesis were evaluated with respect to variables describing lumbosacral lordosis, wedging of the spondylolytic vertebra, lengths of the transverse processes and iliolumbar ligaments, disk height, progression of slipping, and influence on measured olisthesis of lumbar spine flexion and extension at the radiographic examination. The evaluation was made with special attention to possible signs which could be predictive for the prognosis of vertebral slipping. Progression of slipping did not differ between patients diagnosed as adults or adolescents. Reduction of disk height was correlated to the degree of slipping present at the initial examination and to the progression of olisthesis. Flexion and extension of the lumbar spine did not modify the degree of olisthesis. Data concerning the lengths of the transverse processes and the iliolumbar ligaments, and lumbar lordosis, cannot be used for prognostic purposes. The lumbar index reflecting the degree of wedge deformity of the spondylolytic vertebra was shown to be the only variable of prognostic value for the development of vertebral slipping.

  10. Aerosol-cloud interaction inferred from MODIS satellite data and global aerosol models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Myhre

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available We have used the MODIS satellite data and two global aerosol models to investigate the relationships between aerosol optical depth (AOD and cloud parameters that may be affected by the aerosol concentration. The relationships that are studied are mainly between AOD, on the one hand, and cloud cover, cloud liquid water path, and water vapour, on the other. Additionally, cloud droplet effective radius, cloud optical depth, cloud top pressure and aerosol Ångström exponent, have been analysed in a few cases. In the MODIS data we found, as in earlier studies, an enhancement in the cloud cover with increasing AOD. We find it likely that most of the strong increase in cloud cover with AOD, at least for AOD<0.2, is a result of aerosol-cloud interactions and a prolonged cloud lifetime. Large and mesoscale weather systems seem not to be a cause for the increase in cloud cover with AOD in this range. Sensitivity simulations show that when water uptake of the aerosols is not taken into account in the models the modelled cloud cover mostly decreases with AOD. Part of the relationship found in the MODIS data for AOD>0.2 can be explained by larger water uptake close to the clouds since relative humidity is higher in regions with higher cloud cover. The efficiency of the hygroscopic growth depends on aerosol type, the hygroscopic nature of the aerosol, the relative humidity, and to some extent the cloud screening. By analysing the Ångström exponent we find that the hygroscopic growth of the aerosol is not likely to be a main contributor to the cloud cover increase with AOD. Since the largest increase in cloud cover with AOD is for low AOD (~0.2 and thus also for low cloud cover, we argue that cloud contamination is not likely to play a large role. However, interpretation of the complex relationships between AOD and cloud parameters should be made with great care and further work is clearly needed.

  11. FAME-C: cloud property retrieval using synergistic AATSR and MERIS observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. K. Carbajal Henken

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available A newly developed daytime cloud property retrieval algorithm, FAME-C (Freie Universität Berlin AATSR MERIS Cloud, is presented. Synergistic observations from the Advanced Along-Track Scanning Radiometer (AATSR and the Medium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MERIS, both mounted on the polar-orbiting Environmental Satellite (Envisat, are used for cloud screening. For cloudy pixels two main steps are carried out in a sequential form. First, a cloud optical and microphysical property retrieval is performed using an AATSR near-infrared and visible channel. Cloud phase, cloud optical thickness, and effective radius are retrieved, and subsequently cloud water path is computed. Second, two cloud top height products are retrieved based on independent techniques. For cloud top temperature, measurements in the AATSR infrared channels are used, while for cloud top pressure, measurements in the MERIS oxygen-A absorption channel are used. Results from the cloud optical and microphysical property retrieval serve as input for the two cloud top height retrievals. Introduced here are the AATSR and MERIS forward models and auxiliary data needed in FAME-C. Also, the optimal estimation method, which provides uncertainty estimates of the retrieved property on a pixel basis, is presented. Within the frame of the European Space Agency (ESA Climate Change Initiative (CCI project, the first global cloud property retrievals have been conducted for the years 2007–2009. For this time period, verification efforts are presented, comparing, for four selected regions around the globe, FAME-C cloud optical and microphysical properties to cloud optical and microphysical properties derived from measurements of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS on the Terra satellite. The results show a reasonable agreement between the cloud optical and microphysical property retrievals. Biases are generally smallest for marine stratocumulus clouds: −0.28, 0.41 μm and

  12. Improving Estimates of Cloud Radiative Forcing over Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, W.; Zender, C. S.

    2014-12-01

    Multiple driving mechanisms conspire to increase melt extent and extreme melt events frequency in the Arctic: changing heat transport, shortwave radiation (SW), and longwave radiation (LW). Cloud Radiative Forcing (CRF) of Greenland's surface is amplified by a dry atmosphere and by albedo feedback, making its contribution to surface melt even more variable in time and space. Unfortunately accurate cloud observations and thus CRF estimates are hindered by Greenland's remoteness, harsh conditions, and low contrast between surface and cloud reflectance. In this study, cloud observations from satellites and reanalyses are ingested into and evaluated within a column radiative transfer model. An improved CRF dataset is obtained by correcting systematic discrepancies derived from sensitivity experiments. First, we compare the surface radiation budgets from the Column Radiation Model (CRM) driven by different cloud datasets, with surface observations from Greenland Climate Network (GC-Net). In clear skies, CRM-estimated surface radiation driven by water vapor profiles from both AIRS and MODIS during May-Sept 2010-2012 are similar, stable, and reliable. For example, although AIRS water vapor path exceeds MODIS by 1.4 kg/m2 on a daily average, the overall absolute difference in downwelling SW is CRM estimates are within 20 W/m2 range of GC-Net downwelling SW. After calibrating CRM in clear skies, the remaining differences between CRM and observed surface radiation are primarily attributable to differences in cloud observations. We estimate CRF using cloud products from MODIS and from MERRA. The SW radiative forcing of thin clouds is mainly controlled by cloud water path (CWP). As CWP increases from near 0 to 200 g/m2, the net surface SW drops from over 100 W/m2 to 30 W/m2 almost linearly, beyond which it becomes relatively insensitive to CWP. The LW is dominated by cloud height. For clouds at all altitudes, the lower the clouds, the greater the LW forcing. By applying

  13. Accelerated Global Warming by Black Carbon due to its Burnoff of Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, M. Z.

    2012-12-01

    This study examines the impact of black carbon (BC) on global and Arctic climate primarily through its impacts on clouds. BC influences clouds in three major ways: (1) through cloud absorption effects (CAEs) I and II, which are the effects on cloud heating of absorbing inclusions in cloud particles and of absorbing aerosol particles interstitially between cloud particles at the cloud's actual relative humidity (RH), respectively; (2) through the semi-direct effect, which is the change in cloudiness due to the decrease in near-cloud RH and increase in atmospheric stability caused by absorbing aerosol particles below, within, or above a cloud; and (3) through indirect effects, which are the increase in cloud reflectivity (first indirect effect) and decrease in precipitation thus increase in cloud liquid water content and lifetime (second indirect effects) due to the addition of anthropogenic aerosol particles to an evolving cloud. Simulations with the 3-D model GATOR-GCMOM were first run to calculate the hydrometeor mass absorption coefficient (HMAC) due to BC inclusions within cloud particles. The globally-averaged HMAC was ~17.7 (10.6-19) m2/g, ~9.3% higher than the globally-averaged mass-absorption coefficient of aged, externally- plus internally-mixed aerosol BC, which itself was ~2.4 (2-2.9) times higher than that of externally-mixed BC. Aerosol absorption optical depths were compared globally with OMI and AERONET data. Further simulations were run that found that BC inclusions in cloud drops (CAE I) can triple a cloud's heating rate. Interstitial BC at the RH of the cloud (CAE II) can increase the heating rate by ~30% compared with aged BC in the clear sky. These results suggested a greater potential for BC inclusions to burn off clouds than previously recognized since previous global studies had not considered the absorption of BC interstitially between drops at the RH of the cloud or solved radiative transfer through a cloud while the cloud was shrinking

  14. Cloud Feedbacks on Greenhouse Warming in a Multi-Scale Modeling Framework with a Higher-Order Turbulence Closure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Anning; Xu, Kuan-Man

    2015-01-01

    Five-year simulation experiments with a multi-scale modeling Framework (MMF) with a advanced intermediately prognostic higher-order turbulence closure (IPHOC) in its cloud resolving model (CRM) component, also known as SPCAM-IPHOC (super parameterized Community Atmospheric Model), are performed to understand the fast tropical (30S-30N) cloud response to an instantaneous doubling of CO2 concentration with SST held fixed at present-day values. SPCAM-IPHOC has substantially improved the low-level representation compared with SPCAM. It is expected that the cloud responses to greenhouse warming in SPCAM-IPHOC is more realistic. The change of rising motion, surface precipitation, cloud cover, and shortwave and longwave cloud radiative forcing in SPCAM-IPHOC from the greenhouse warming will be presented in the presentation.

  15. Aggressive fibromatosis - impact of prognostic variables on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Journal of Surgery ... To determine the impact of prognostic variables on local control in patients with aggressive fibromatosis treated with or without radiation. Materials and methods. ... The addition of radiation therapy to surgery as well as other known prognostic parameters did not impact on local control.

  16. Green Cloud on the Horizon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Mufajjul

    This paper proposes a Green Cloud model for mobile Cloud computing. The proposed model leverage on the current trend of IaaS (Infrastructure as a Service), PaaS (Platform as a Service) and SaaS (Software as a Service), and look at new paradigm called "Network as a Service" (NaaS). The Green Cloud model proposes various Telco's revenue generating streams and services with the CaaS (Cloud as a Service) for the near future.

  17. Cloud computing basics for librarians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoy, Matthew B

    2012-01-01

    "Cloud computing" is the name for the recent trend of moving software and computing resources to an online, shared-service model. This article briefly defines cloud computing, discusses different models, explores the advantages and disadvantages, and describes some of the ways cloud computing can be used in libraries. Examples of cloud services are included at the end of the article. Copyright © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC

  18. 'Coronae' of rotating interstellar clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosner, R.; Hartquist, T. W.

    1979-01-01

    This letter considers differential rotation of cool interstellar clouds in the presence of internal magnetic fields, and shows that because of the relative ineffectiveness of field dissipation within the clouds, magnetized gas experiences buoyant forces. The resulting field loops emerge from the cloud and dissipate their energy by field reconnection. The consequent heating is sufficient to produce relatively hot (T approximately 10,000 K) 'coronae' about the clouds.

  19. The Ethics of Cloud Computing

    OpenAIRE

    de Bruin, Boudewijn; Floridi, Luciano

    2016-01-01

    Cloud computing is rapidly gaining traction in business. It offers businesses online services on demand (such as Gmail, iCloud and Salesforce) and allows them to cut costs on hardware and IT support. This is the first paper in business ethics dealing with this new technology. It analyzes the informational duties of hosting companies that own and operate cloud computing datacentres (e.g., Amazon). It considers the cloud services providers leasing ‘space in the cloud’ from hosting companies (e....

  20. Future SDP through Cloud Architectures

    OpenAIRE

    Andriopoulou, Foteini; Lymberopoulos, Dimitrios,

    2012-01-01

    Part 1: Second Artificial Intelligen