WorldWideScience

Sample records for prognostic cfd models

  1. CFD Model Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Data associated with the development of the CFD model for spore deposition in respiratory systems of rabbits and humans. This dataset is associated with the...

  2. SDI CFD MODELING ANALYSIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S.

    2011-05-05

    The Savannah River Remediation (SRR) Organization requested that Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) develop a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) method to mix and blend the miscible contents of the blend tanks to ensure the contents are properly blended before they are transferred from the blend tank; such as, Tank 50H, to the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) feed tank. The work described here consists of two modeling areas. They are the mixing modeling analysis during miscible liquid blending operation, and the flow pattern analysis during transfer operation of the blended liquid. The transient CFD governing equations consisting of three momentum equations, one mass balance, two turbulence transport equations for kinetic energy and dissipation rate, and one species transport were solved by an iterative technique until the species concentrations of tank fluid were in equilibrium. The steady-state flow solutions for the entire tank fluid were used for flow pattern analysis, for velocity scaling analysis, and the initial conditions for transient blending calculations. A series of the modeling calculations were performed to estimate the blending times for various jet flow conditions, and to investigate the impact of the cooling coils on the blending time of the tank contents. The modeling results were benchmarked against the pilot scale test results. All of the flow and mixing models were performed with the nozzles installed at the mid-elevation, and parallel to the tank wall. From the CFD modeling calculations, the main results are summarized as follows: (1) The benchmark analyses for the CFD flow velocity and blending models demonstrate their consistency with Engineering Development Laboratory (EDL) and literature test results in terms of local velocity measurements and experimental observations. Thus, an application of the established criterion to SRS full scale tank will provide a better, physically-based estimate of the required mixing time, and

  3. SLURRY FLOW MODELLING BY CFD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.C. Ghanta

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available An attempt has been made in the present study to develop a generalized slurry flow model using CFD and utilize the model to predict concentration profile. The purpose of the CFD model is to gain better insight into the solid liquid slur¬ry flow in pipelines. Initially a three-dimensional model problem was developed to understand the influence of the particle drag coefficient on the solid concen¬tration profile. The preliminary simulations highlighted the need for correct mo¬delling of the inter phase drag force. The various drag correlations available in the literature were incorporated into a two-fluid model (Euler-Euler along with the standard k- turbulence model with mixture properties to simulate the tur¬bulent solid-liquid flow in a pipeline. The computational model was mapped on to a commercial CFD solver FLUENT6.2 (of Fluent Inc., USA. To push the en¬velope of applicability of the simulation, recent data from Kaushal (2005 (with solid concentration up to 50% was selected to validate the three dimensional simulations. The experimental data consisted of water-glass bead slurry at 125 and 440-micron particle with different flow velocity (from 1 to 5 m/s and overall concentration up to 10 to 50% by volume. The predicted pressure drop and concentration profile were validated by experimental data and showed excel-lent agreement. Interesting findings came out from the parametric study of ve-locity and concentration profiles. The computational model and results discus¬sed in this work would be useful for extending the applications of CFD models for simulating large slurry pipelines.

  4. TANK48 CFD MODELING ANALYSIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S.

    2011-05-17

    The process of recovering the waste in storage tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS) typically requires mixing the contents of the tank to ensure uniformity of the discharge stream. Mixing is accomplished with one to four dual-nozzle slurry pumps located within the tank liquid. For the work, a Tank 48 simulation model with a maximum of four slurry pumps in operation has been developed to estimate flow patterns for efficient solid mixing. The modeling calculations were performed by using two modeling approaches. One approach is a single-phase Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model to evaluate the flow patterns and qualitative mixing behaviors for a range of different modeling conditions since the model was previously benchmarked against the test results. The other is a two-phase CFD model to estimate solid concentrations in a quantitative way by solving the Eulerian governing equations for the continuous fluid and discrete solid phases over the entire fluid domain of Tank 48. The two-phase results should be considered as the preliminary scoping calculations since the model was not validated against the test results yet. A series of sensitivity calculations for different numbers of pumps and operating conditions has been performed to provide operational guidance for solids suspension and mixing in the tank. In the analysis, the pump was assumed to be stationary. Major solid obstructions including the pump housing, the pump columns, and the 82 inch central support column were included. The steady state and three-dimensional analyses with a two-equation turbulence model were performed with FLUENT{trademark} for the single-phase approach and CFX for the two-phase approach. Recommended operational guidance was developed assuming that local fluid velocity can be used as a measure of sludge suspension and spatial mixing under single-phase tank model. For quantitative analysis, a two-phase fluid-solid model was developed for the same modeling conditions as the single

  5. CFD Modeling of Launch Vehicle Aerodynamic Heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashakkor, Scott B.; Canabal, Francisco; Mishtawy, Jason E.

    2011-01-01

    The Loci-CHEM 3.2 Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code is being used to predict Ares-I launch vehicle aerodynamic heating. CFD has been used to predict both ascent and stage reentry environments and has been validated against wind tunnel tests and the Ares I-X developmental flight test. Most of the CFD predictions agreed with measurements. On regions where mismatches occurred, the CFD predictions tended to be higher than measured data. These higher predictions usually occurred in complex regions, where the CFD models (mainly turbulence) contain less accurate approximations. In some instances, the errors causing the over-predictions would cause locations downstream to be affected even though the physics were still being modeled properly by CHEM. This is easily seen when comparing to the 103-AH data. In the areas where predictions were low, higher grid resolution often brought the results closer to the data. Other disagreements are attributed to Ares I-X hardware not being present in the grid, as a result of computational resources limitations. The satisfactory predictions from CHEM provide confidence that future designs and predictions from the CFD code will provide an accurate approximation of the correct values for use in design and other applications

  6. Efficient Turbulence Modeling for CFD Wake Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Laan, Paul

    Wind turbine wakes can cause 10-20% annual energy losses in wind farms, and wake turbulence can decrease the lifetime of wind turbine blades. One way of estimating these effects is the use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to simulate wind turbines wakes in the atmospheric boundary layer. Since...... wind farm, the simulated results cannot be compared directly with wind farm measurements that have a high uncertainty in the measured reference wind direction. When this uncertainty is used to post-process the CFD results, a fairer comparison with measurements is achieved....... this flow is in the high Reynolds number regime, it is mainly dictated by turbulence. As a result, the turbulence modeling in CFD dominates the wake characteristics, especially in Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS). The present work is dedicated to study and develop RANS-based turbulence models...

  7. Modelling Complex Inlet Geometries in CFD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovgaard, M.; Nielsen, Peter V.

    field. In order to apply CFD for this purpose it is essential to be able to model the inlet conditions precisely and effectively, in a way which is comprehensible to the manufacturer of inlet devices and in a way which can be coped with by the computer. In this paper a universal method is presented...

  8. Tip studies using CFD and comparison with tip loss models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Martin Otto Laver; Johansen, J.

    2004-01-01

    The flow past a rotating LM8.2 blade equipped with two different tips are computed using CFD. The different tip flows are analysed and a comparison with two different tip loss models is made. Keywords: tip flow, aerodynamics, CFD......The flow past a rotating LM8.2 blade equipped with two different tips are computed using CFD. The different tip flows are analysed and a comparison with two different tip loss models is made. Keywords: tip flow, aerodynamics, CFD...

  9. Integration of thermophysiological body model in CFD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichurov, George; Stankov, Peter

    2013-09-01

    A two-node mathematical model of the human thermophysiological system has been integrated into a Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) simulation of the airflow in a room. Temperature inputs from the CFD are used by the model to evaluate the dry and latent heat flux from the body surface and output them as boundary conditions. This is an iterative process and convergence is ensured by under-relaxation of the latent heat flux. The model also considers the dry and latent heat resistance of clothing. Numerical predictions of the body heat loss and airflow are compared against physical measurements in a climate chamber. Good agreement was observed when using the low Reynolds number turbulence model. The integrated simulation performs well under wide set of conditions, predicting body core and skin temperature, blood flow, skin wittedness, as well as the transfer of heat and moisture released by the body into the room.

  10. CFD modeling of dense medium cyclone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajamani, R.K.; Delgadillo, J.; Kodukula, U.B.; Alkac, D. [University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2010-07-01

    A number of empirical models are in existence for the dense medium cyclone (DMC) and in recent years this subject has been broached with computational fluid dynamics (CFD). The dense medium presents a centrifugal field within the cyclone body. The coal particles separate in this field due to various forces acting on them. Hence, CFD is ideally suited for the modeling of the DMC. The Large Eddy Simulation (LES) method for resolving the turbulence was used in the CFD simulation of a 76mm dense medium cyclone. In particular, the magnetite was modeled as three granular fluids. In the simulation the diameter of the vortex finder and spigot are varied to compare with the experimental data of P. A. Verghese and T. C. Rao. The results obtained using LES turbulence model is found to be accurate in terms of the cut density and the slope of the distribution curves. Thus, the three granular fluid modeling of the magnetite stream is a computationally simpler method for the analysis of DMC.

  11. CFD modeling of pharmaceutical isolators with experimental verification of airflow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayan, N; Akay, H U; Walsh, M R; Bell, W V; Troyer, G L; Dukes, R E; Mohan, P

    2007-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models have been developed to predict the airflow in a transfer isolator using a commercial CFD code. In order to assess the ability of the CFD approach in predicting the flow inside an isolator, hot wire anemometry measurements and a novel experimental flow visualization technique consisting of helium-filled glycerin bubbles were used. The results obtained have been shown to agree well with the experiments and show that CFD can be used to model barrier systems and isolators with practical fidelity. This indicates that CFD can and should be used to support the design, testing, and operation of barrier systems and isolators.

  12. Linearised CFD Models for Wakes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ott, Søren; Berg, Jacob; Nielsen, Morten

    This report describes the development of a fast and reasonably accurate model for the prediction of energy production in oshore wind farms taking wake eects into account. The model has been implemented as a windows application called Fuga which can run in batch mode or as a graphical user interfa...

  13. Application of Simple CFD Models in Smoke Ventilation Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brohus, Henrik; Nielsen, Peter Vilhelm; la Cour-Harbo, Hans

    2004-01-01

    is used for the examination. The CFD model is compared with benchmark tests and results from a special application fire simulation CFD code. Apart from benchmark tests two practical applications are examined in shape of modelling a fire in a theatre and a double façade, respectively. The simple CFD model...... uses a standard k-ε turbulence model. Simulations comprise both steady-state and dynamic approaches. Several boundary conditions are tested. Finally, the paper discusses the prospects of simple CFD models in smoke ventilation design including the inherent limitations.......The paper examines the possibilities of using simple CFD models in practical smoke ventilation design. The aim is to assess if it is possible with a reasonable accuracy to predict the behaviour of smoke transport in case of a fire. A CFD code mainly applicable for “ordinary” ventilation design...

  14. Linearised CFD models for wakes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ott, S.; Berg, J.; Nielsen, Morten

    2011-12-15

    This report describes the development of a fast and reasonably accurate model for the prediction of energy production in offshore wind farms taking wake effects into account. The model has been implemented as a windows application called Fuga which can run in batch mode or as a graphical user interface. Fuga is briefly described. The model is based on a linearization technique which is described in some detail, and linearized, governing equations are derived and written in a standard form based on a mixed-spectral formulation. A new solution method is used to solve the equations which involves intensive use of look-up tables for storage of intermediate results. Due to the linearity of the model, multiple wakes from many turbines can be constructed from the wake of a single, solitary turbine. These are in turn constructed from Fourier components by a fast Fourier integral transform of results derived from generic look-up tables. Three different models, based on three different closures, are examined: 1) the 'simple closure' using an unperturbed eddy viscosity kucentre dotz. 2) the mixing length closure. 3) the E-epsilon closure. Model results are evaluated against offshore wind farm production data from Horns Rev I and the Nysted wind farm, and a comparison with direct wake measurements in an onshore turbine (Nibe B) is also made. A very satisfactory agreement with data is found for the simple closure. The exception is the near wake, just behind the rotor, where all three linearized models fail. The mixing length closure underestimates wake effects in all cases. The E-epsilon closure overestimates wake losses in the offshore farms while it predicts a too shallow and too wide the wake in the onshore case. The simple closure performs distinctly better than the other two. Wind speed data from the the Horns rev met masts are used to further validate Fuga results with the 'simple' closure. Finally, Roedsand 1 and 2 are used as an example to illustrate

  15. Wind modelling over complex terrain using CFD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila, Matias; Owen, Herbert; Folch, Arnau; Prieto, Luis; Cosculluela, Luis

    2015-04-01

    The present work deals with the numerical CFD modelling of onshore wind farms in the context of High Performance Computing (HPC). The CFD model involves the numerical solution of the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations together with a κ-ɛ turbulence model and the energy equation, specially designed for Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL) flows. The aim is to predict the wind velocity distribution over complex terrain, using a model that includes meteorological data assimilation, thermal coupling, forested canopy and Coriolis effects. The modelling strategy involves automatic mesh generation, terrain data assimilation and generation of boundary conditions for the inflow wind flow distribution up to the geostrophic height. The CFD model has been implemented in Alya, a HPC multi physics parallel solver able to run with thousands of processors with an optimal scalability, developed in Barcelona Supercomputing Center. The implemented thermal stability and canopy physical model was developed by Sogachev in 2012. The k-ɛ equations are of non-linear convection diffusion reaction type. The implemented numerical scheme consists on a stabilized finite element formulation based on the variational multiscale method, that is known to be stable for this kind of turbulence equations. We present a numerical formulation that stresses on the robustness of the solution method, tackling common problems that produce instability. The iterative strategy and linearization scheme is discussed. It intends to avoid the possibility of having negative values of diffusion during the iterative process, which may lead to divergence of the scheme. These problems are addressed by acting on the coefficients of the reaction and diffusion terms and on the turbulent variables themselves. The k-ɛ equations are highly nonlinear. Complex terrain induces transient flow instabilities that may preclude the convergence of computer flow simulations based on steady state formulation of the

  16. CFD modeling of the IRIS pressurizer dynamic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanz, Ronny R.; Montesinos, Maria E.; Garcia, Carlos; Bueno, Elizabeth D.; Mazaira, Leorlen R., E-mail: rsanz@instec.cu, E-mail: mmontesi@instec.cu, E-mail: cgh@instec.cu, E-mail: leored1984@gmail.com [Instituto Superior de Tecnologias y Ciencias Aplicadas (InSTEC), La Habana (Cuba); Bezerra, Jair L.; Lira, Carlos A.B. Oliveira, E-mail: jair.lima@ufpe.br, E-mail: cabol@ufpe.br [Universida Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Energia Nuclear

    2015-07-01

    Integral layout of nuclear reactor IRIS makes possible the elimination of the spray system, which is usually used to mitigate in-surge transient and also help to Boron homogenization. The study of transients with deficiencies in the Boron homogenization in this technology is very important, because they can cause disturbances in the reactor power and insert a strong reactivity in the core. The detailed knowledge of the behavior of multiphase multicomponent flows is challenging due to the complex phenomena and interactions at the interface. In this context, the CFD modeling is employed in the design of equipment in the nuclear industry as it allows predicting accidents or predicting their performance in dissimilar applications. The aim of the present research is to model the IRIS pressurizer's dynamic using the commercial CFD code CFX. A symmetric tri dimensional model equivalent to 1/8 of the total geometry was adopted to reduce mesh size and minimize processing time. The model considers the coexistence of four phases and also takes into account the heat losses. The relationships for interfacial mass, energy, and momentum transport are programmed and incorporated into CFX. Moreover, two subdomains and several additional variables are defined to monitoring the boron dilution sequences and condensation-evaporation rates in different control volumes. For transient states a non - equilibrium stratification in the pressurizer is considered. This paper discusses the model developed and the behavior of the system for representative transients sequences. The results of analyzed transients of IRIS can be applied to the design of pressurizer internal structures and components. (author)

  17. Modelling of Air Flow trough a Slatted Floor by CFD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svidt, Kjeld; Bjerg, Bjarne; Morsing, Svend

    In this paper two different CFD-approaches are investigated to model the airflow through a slatted floor. Experiments are carried out in a full-scale test room. The computer simulations are carried out with the CFD-code FLOVENT, which solves the time-averaged Navier-Stokes equations by use of the k...

  18. Qualification of CFD-models for multiphase flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucas, Dirk [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany)

    2016-05-15

    While Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is already an accepted industrial tool for single phase flows it is not yet mature for two-phase flows. For this reason the qualification of CFD for reactor safety relevant applications which involve multiphase flows is a present topic of research. At the CFD division of Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) hereby beside an application-oriented model development and validation also more generic investigations are done. Thus, the baseline model strategy aims on the consolidation of the CFD-modelling for multiphase to enable reliable predictions for well-defined flow pattern in future. In addition the recently developed GENTOP-concept broadens the range of applicability of CFD. Different flow morphologies including transitions between them can be considered in frame of this concept.

  19. CFD modeling of passive autocatalytic recombiners*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orszulik Magdalena

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study deals with numerical modeling of passive autocatalytic hydrogen recombiners (PARs. Such devices are installed within containments of many nuclear reactors in order to remove hydrogen and convert it to steam. The main purpose of this work is to develop a numerical model of passive autocatalytic recombiner (PAR using the commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD software ANSYS-FLUENT and tuning the model using experimental results. The REKO 3 experiment was used for this purpose. Experiment was made in the Institute for Safety Research and Reactor Technology in Julich (Germany. It has been performed for different hydrogen concentrations, different flow rates, the presence of steam, and different initial temperatures of the inlet mixture. The model of this experimental recombiner was elaborated within the framework of this work. The influence of mesh, gas thermal conductivity coefficient, mass diffusivity coefficients, and turbulence model was investigated. The best results with a good agreement with REKO 3 data were received for k-ɛ model of turbulence, gas thermal conductivity dependent on the temperature and mass diffusivity coefficients taken from CHEMKIN program. The validated model of the PAR was next implemented into simple two-dimensional simulations of hydrogen behavior within a subcompartment of a containment building.

  20. Modeling Subgrid Scale Droplet Deposition in Multiphase-CFD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agostinelli, Giulia; Baglietto, Emilio

    2017-11-01

    The development of first-principle-based constitutive equations for the Eulerian-Eulerian CFD modeling of annular flow is a major priority to extend the applicability of multiphase CFD (M-CFD) across all two-phase flow regimes. Two key mechanisms need to be incorporated in the M-CFD framework, the entrainment of droplets from the liquid film, and their deposition. Here we focus first on the aspect of deposition leveraging a separate effects approach. Current two-field methods in M-CFD do not include appropriate local closures to describe the deposition of droplets in annular flow conditions. As many integral correlations for deposition have been proposed for lumped parameters methods applications, few attempts exist in literature to extend their applicability to CFD simulations. The integral nature of the approach limits its applicability to fully developed flow conditions, without geometrical or flow variations, therefore negating the scope of CFD application. A new approach is proposed here that leverages local quantities to predict the subgrid-scale deposition rate. The methodology is first tested into a three-field approach CFD model.

  1. FDA Benchmark Medical Device Flow Models for CFD Validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinauskas, Richard A; Hariharan, Prasanna; Day, Steven W; Herbertson, Luke H; Buesen, Martin; Steinseifer, Ulrich; Aycock, Kenneth I; Good, Bryan C; Deutsch, Steven; Manning, Keefe B; Craven, Brent A

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is increasingly being used to develop blood-contacting medical devices. However, the lack of standardized methods for validating CFD simulations and blood damage predictions limits its use in the safety evaluation of devices. Through a U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) initiative, two benchmark models of typical device flow geometries (nozzle and centrifugal blood pump) were tested in multiple laboratories to provide experimental velocities, pressures, and hemolysis data to support CFD validation. In addition, computational simulations were performed by more than 20 independent groups to assess current CFD techniques. The primary goal of this article is to summarize the FDA initiative and to report recent findings from the benchmark blood pump model study. Discrepancies between CFD predicted velocities and those measured using particle image velocimetry most often occurred in regions of flow separation (e.g., downstream of the nozzle throat, and in the pump exit diffuser). For the six pump test conditions, 57% of the CFD predictions of pressure head were within one standard deviation of the mean measured values. Notably, only 37% of all CFD submissions contained hemolysis predictions. This project aided in the development of an FDA Guidance Document on factors to consider when reporting computational studies in medical device regulatory submissions. There is an accompanying podcast available for this article. Please visit the journal's Web site (www.asaiojournal.com) to listen.

  2. Distributed Prognostics Based on Structural Model Decomposition

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Within systems health management, prognostics focuses on predicting the remaining useful life of a system. In the model-based prognostics paradigm, physics-based...

  3. The Ranque-Hilsch effect: CFD modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bezprozvannykh, V.; Mottl, H. [DYCOR Technologies, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada)]. E-mail: vlad.bez@dycor.com; hank.mottl@dycor.com

    2003-07-01

    The phenomenon of noticeable temperature distribution in confined steady rotating gas flows is referred as Ranque-Hilsch effect. The simple counter-flow Ranque-Hilsch tube consists of a long hollow cylinder with tangential nozzles at one end for injecting compressed gas. Rotating gas escapes the tube through two outlets - a central orifice diaphragm placed near the injection nozzle plane (cold stream) and a ring-shaped peripheral outlet placed at the opposite end of the tube (hot stream). The flow is essentially three-dimensional, turbulent, compressible, and spinning such that any theoretical simplifications are questionable, if at all possible. Fluent suite of software was applied at Dycor Technologies, Canada to the task of numerical simulation of the Ranque-Hilsch effect that is part of Dycor's program of fundamental and applied research. The behavior of two types of fluids in the Ranque-Hilsch tube was investigated - air and water. Three-dimensional continuity, momentum, and energy equations were solved for incompressible and compressible flows for water and air cases correspondingly. The Reynolds stress turbulence model was originally applied to close the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations. The visualization of the velocity and temperature fields inside the vortex tube helped to understand the details of fluid flow. It was shown that CFD approach is applicable for simulating Ranque-Hilsch effect. It was found that various levels of complexity in turbulence modeling are suitable for vortex tube analysis. No vortex effect was observed for incompressible flow. The dependence of vortex tube cooling ability on initial gas pressure was investigated. Numerical simulation data are consistent with available experimental results. (author)

  4. A new CFD modeling method for flow blockage accident investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Wenyuan, E-mail: fanwy@mail.ustc.edu.cn; Peng, Changhong, E-mail: pengch@ustc.edu.cn; Chen, Yangli, E-mail: chenyl@mail.ustc.edu.cn; Guo, Yun, E-mail: guoyun79@ustc.edu.cn

    2016-07-15

    Highlights: • Porous-jump treatment is applied to CFD simulation on flow blockages. • Porous-jump treatment predicts consistent results with direct CFD treatment. • Relap5 predicts abnormal flow rate profiles in MTR SFA blockage scenario. • Relap5 fails to simulate annular heat flux in blockage case of annular assembly. • Porous-jump treatment provides reasonable and generalized CFD results. - Abstract: Inlet flow blockages in both flat and annular plate-type fuel assemblies are simulated by (Computational Fluid Dynamics) CFD and system analysis methods, with blockage ratio ranging from 60 to 90%. For all the blockage scenarios, mass flow rate of the blocked channel drops dramatically as blockage ratio increases, while mass flow rates of non-blocked channels are almost steady. As a result of over-simplifications, the system code fails to capture details of mass flow rate profiles of non-blocked channels and power redistribution of fuel plates. In order to acquire generalized CFD results, a new blockage modeling method is developed by using the porous-jump condition. For comparisons, direct CFD simulations are conducted toward postulated blockages. For the porous-jump treatment, conservative flow and heat transfer conditions are predicted for the blocked channel, while consistent predictions are obtained for non-blocked channels. Besides, flow fields in the blocked channel, asymmetric power redistributions of fuel plates, and complex heat transfer phenomena in annular fuel assembly are obtained and discussed. The present study indicates that the porous-jump condition is a reasonable blockage modeling method, which predicts generalized CFD results for flow blockages.

  5. CFD modelling of moisture interactions between air and constructions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Lone Hedegaard; Woloszyn, Monika; Hohota, Raluca

    2005-01-01

    There is a strong demand for accurate moisture modelling since moisture poses a risk for both the constructions and the indoor climate. Thus, in this investigation there is special focus on moisture modelling. The paper describes a new model based on a CFD tool that is enhanced to include both...

  6. CFD model of a spinning pipe gas lens

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Snedden, Glen C

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available stream_source_info Snedden_2006.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 3131 Content-Encoding UTF-8 stream_name Snedden_2006.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8 CFD MODEL OF A SPINNING PIPE GAS... result back into SLM to create conjugate phase, • Propagate conjugate phased beam through medium. Control Loop Page 16 © CSIR 2006 www.csir.co.za Conclusion • CFD model of gas lens • Shows Rosby waves and Rayleigh...

  7. Development of CFD-based icing model for wind turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Marie Cecilie; Martinez, Benjamin; Yin, Chungen

    2015-01-01

    Operation of wind turbines in cold climate areas is challenged by icing-induced problems, such as loss of production, safety issues and blade fatique. Production losses are especially a big issue in Sweden, and due to difficulties with on-site measurements, simulations are often used to get...... an understanding and to predict icing events. In this paper a case study of modeling icing using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is proposed. The case study aims to form the basic of a general CFD model for icing on wind turbine blade sections....

  8. Sieve Tray Efficiency using CFD Modeling and Simulation | Gesit ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this work, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models are developed and used to predict sieve tray hydrodynamics and mass transfer. The models consider the three-dimensional two-phase flow of vapor (or gas) and liquid in which each phase is treated as an interpenetrating continuum having separate transport ...

  9. MODELLING MANTLE TANKS FOR SDHW SYSTEMS USING PIV AND CFD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shah, Louise Jivan; Morrison, G.L.; Behnia, Masud

    1999-01-01

    Characteristics of vertical mantle heat exchanger tanks for SDHW systems have been investigated experimentally and theoretically using particle image velocimetry (PIV) and CFD modelling. A glass model of a mantle heat exchanger tank was constructed so that the flow distribution in the mantle coul...

  10. CFD Modeling of a Multiphase Gravity Separator Vessel

    KAUST Repository

    Narayan, Gautham

    2017-05-23

    The poster highlights a CFD study that incorporates a combined Eulerian multi-fluid multiphase and a Population Balance Model (PBM) to study the flow inside a typical multiphase gravity separator vessel (GSV) found in oil and gas industry. The simulations were performed using Ansys Fluent CFD package running on KAUST supercomputer, Shaheen. Also, a highlight of a scalability study is presented. The effect of I/O bottlenecks and using Hierarchical Data Format (HDF5) for collective and independent parallel reading of case file is presented. This work is an outcome of a research collaboration on an Aramco project on Shaheen.

  11. Concordance for prognostic models with competing risks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolbers, Marcel; Blanche, Paul; Koller, Michael T

    2014-01-01

    The concordance probability is a widely used measure to assess discrimination of prognostic models with binary and survival endpoints. We formally define the concordance probability for a prognostic model of the absolute risk of an event of interest in the presence of competing risks and relate i...... of the working model. We further illustrate the methods by computing the concordance probability for a prognostic model of coronary heart disease (CHD) events in the presence of the competing risk of non-CHD death.......The concordance probability is a widely used measure to assess discrimination of prognostic models with binary and survival endpoints. We formally define the concordance probability for a prognostic model of the absolute risk of an event of interest in the presence of competing risks and relate...

  12. Model-Based Prognostics of Hybrid Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daigle, Matthew; Roychoudhury, Indranil; Bregon, Anibal

    2015-01-01

    Model-based prognostics has become a popular approach to solving the prognostics problem. However, almost all work has focused on prognostics of systems with continuous dynamics. In this paper, we extend the model-based prognostics framework to hybrid systems models that combine both continuous and discrete dynamics. In general, most systems are hybrid in nature, including those that combine physical processes with software. We generalize the model-based prognostics formulation to hybrid systems, and describe the challenges involved. We present a general approach for modeling hybrid systems, and overview methods for solving estimation and prediction in hybrid systems. As a case study, we consider the problem of conflict (i.e., loss of separation) prediction in the National Airspace System, in which the aircraft models are hybrid dynamical systems.

  13. Modelling Test of Autothermal Gasification Process Using CFD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janoszek, Tomasz; Stańczyk, Krzysztof; Smoliński, Adam

    2017-06-01

    There are many complex physical and chemical processes, which take place among the most notable are the chemical reactions, mass and energy transport, and phase transitions. The process itself takes place in a block of coal, which properties are variable and not always easy to determine in the whole volume. The complexity of the phenomena results in the need for a construction of a complex model in order to study the process on the basis of simulation. In the present study attempts to develop a numerical model of the fixed bed coal gasification process in homogeneous solid block with a given geometry were mode. On the basis of analysis and description of the underground coal gasification simulated in the ex-situ experiment, a numerical model of the coal gasification process was developed. The model was implemented with the use of computational fluid dynamic CFD methods. Simulations were conducted using commercial numerical CFD code and the results were verified with the experimental data.

  14. CFD and FEM Model of an Underwater Vehicle Propeller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chruściel Tadeusz

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Within the framework of the project for design and optimization of the Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV, research on its propulsion has been carried out. Te entire project was supported by CFD and FEM calculations taking into account the characteristics of the underwater vehicle. One of the tasks was to optimize the semi-open duct for horizontal propellers, which provided propulsion and controllability in horizontal plane. In order to create a measurable model of this task it was necessary to analyze numerical methodology of propeller design, along with the structure of a propellers with nozzles and contra-rotating propellers. It was confronted with theoretical solutions which included running of the analyzed propeller near an underwater vehicle. Also preliminary qualitative analyses of a simplified system with contra-rotating propellers and a semi-open duct were carried out. Te obtained results enabled to make a decision about the ROVs duct form. Te rapid prototyping SLS (Selective Laser Sintering method was used to fabricate a physical model of the propeller. As a consequence of this, it was necessary to verify the FEM model of the propeller, which based on the load obtained from the CFD model. Te article contains characteristics of the examined ROV, a theoretical basis of propeller design for the analyzed cases, and the results of CFD and FEM simulations.

  15. A CFD model for pollutant dispersion in rivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Modenesi K.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies have shown that humankind will experience a water shortage in the coming decades. It is therefore paramount to develop new techniques and models with a view to minimizing the impact of pollution. It is important to predict the environmental impact of new emissions in rivers, especially during periods of drought. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD has proved to be an invaluable tool to develop models able to analyze in detail particle dispersion in rivers. However, since these models generate grids with thousands (even millions of points to evaluate velocities and concentrations, they still require powerful machines. In this context, this work contributes by presenting a new three-dimensional model based on CFD techniques specifically developed to be fast, providing a significant improvement in performance. It is able to generate predictions in a couple of hours for a one-thousand-meter long section of river using Pentium IV computers. Commercial CFD packages would require weeks to solve the same problem. Another innovation inb this work is that a half channel with a constant elliptical cross section represents the river, so the Navier Stokes equations were derived for the elliptical system. Experimental data were obtained from REPLAN (PETROBRAS refining unit on the Atibaia River in São Paulo, Brazil. The results show good agreement with experimental data.

  16. Modeling and verification of hemispherical solar still using ANSYS CFD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panchal, Hitesh N. [KSV University, Gujarat Power Engineering and Research Institute, Mehsana (India); Shah, P.K. [Silver Oak College of Engineering and Technology, Ahmedabad, Gujarat (India)

    2013-07-01

    In every efficient solar still design, water temperature, vapor temperature and distillate output, and difference between water temperature and inner glass cover temperatures are very important. Here, two dimensional three phase model of hemispherical solar still is made for evaporation as well as condensation process in ANSYS CFD. Simulation results like water temperature, vapor temperature, distillate output compared with actual experimental results of climate conditions of Mehsana (latitude of 23° 59’ and longitude of 72° 38) of hemispherical solar still. Water temperature and distillate output were good agreement with actual experimental results. Study shows that ANSYS-CFD is very powerful as well as efficient tool for design, comparison purpose of hemispherical solar still.

  17. An integrative CFD model of lamprey swimming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Chia-Yu; McMillen, Tyler; Fauci, Lisa

    2008-11-01

    Swimming due to sinusoidal body undulations is observed across the full spectrum of swimming organisms, from microscopic flagella to fish. These undulations are achieved due to internal force-generating mechanisms, which, in the case of lamprey are due to a wave of neural activation from head to tail which gives rise to a wave of muscle activation. These active forces are also mediated by passive structural forces. Here we present recent results on a computational model of a swimming lamprey that couples activation of discrete muscle segments, passive elastic forces, and a surrounding viscous, incompressible fluid. The fluid dynamics is modeled by the Navier-Stokes equations at appropriate Reynolds numbers, where the resulting flow field and vortex shedding may be measured.

  18. Prognostic modeling in pediatric acute liver failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Vandana; Dhawan, Anil

    2016-10-01

    Liver transplantation (LT) is the only proven treatment for pediatric acute liver failure (PALF). However, over a period of time, spontaneous native liver survival is increasingly reported, making us wonder if we are overtransplanting children with acute liver failure (ALF). An effective prognostic model for PALF would help direct appropriate organ allocation. Only patients who would die would undergo LT, and those who would spontaneously recover would avoid unnecessary LT. Deriving and validating such a model for PALF, however, encompasses numerous challenges. In particular, the heterogeneity of age and etiology in PALF, as well as a lack of understanding of the natural history of the disease, contributed by the availability of LT has led to difficulties in prognostic model development. Several prognostic laboratory variables have been identified, and the incorporation of these variables into scoring systems has been attempted. A reliable targeted prognostic model for ALF in Wilson's disease has been established and externally validated. The roles of physiological, immunological, and metabolomic parameters in prognosis are being investigated. This review discusses the challenges with prognostic modeling in PALF and describes predictive methods that are currently available and in development for the future. Liver Transplantation 22 1418-1430 2016 AASLD. © 2016 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  19. Cavitation modeling for steady-state CFD simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanimann, L.; Mangani, L.; Casartelli, E.; Widmer, M.

    2016-11-01

    Cavitation in hydraulic turbomachines is an important phenomenon to be considered for performance predictions. Correct analysis of the cavitation onset and its effect on the flow field while diminishing the pressure level need therefore to be investigated. Even if cavitation often appears as an unsteady phenomenon, the capability to compute it in a steady state formulation for the design and assessment phase in the product development process is very useful for the engineer. In the present paper the development and corresponding application of a steady state CFD solver is presented, based on the open source toolbox OpenFOAM®. In the first part a review of different cavitation models is presented. Adopting the mixture-type cavitation approach, various models are investigated and developed in a steady state CFD RANS solver. Particular attention is given to the coupling between cavitation and turbulence models as well as on the underlying numerical procedure, especially the integration in the pressure- correction step of pressure-based solvers, which plays an important role in the stability of the procedure. The performance of the proposed model is initially assessed on simple cases available in the open literature. In a second step results for different applications are presented, ranging from airfoils to pumps.

  20. Towards a CFD-based mechanistic deposit formation model for straw-fired boilers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kær, Søren Knudsen; Rosendahl, Lasse Aistrup; Baxter, L.L.

    2006-01-01

    This paper discusses the application of FLUENTe in the analysis of grate-fired biomass boilers. A short description of the concept used to model fuel conversion on the grate and the coupling to the CFD code is offered. The development and implementation of a CFD-based deposition model is presente...

  1. Integrating computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models with GIS: an evaluation on data conversion formats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, David W.; Camelli, Fernando; Sonwalkar, Mukul

    2007-06-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models are powerful computational tools to simulate urban-landscape scale atmospheric dispersion events. They are proven to be very useful for security management and emergency response. Essential inputs to CFD models include landscape characteristics, which are often captured by various GIS data layers. While it is logical to couple GIS and CFD models to take advantage of available GIS data and the visualization and cartographic rendering capabilities of GIS, the integration of the two tools have been minimal. In this paper, we took the first step to evaluate the use of GIS data in CFD modeling. Specifically, we explore how efficient is to use GIS data in CFD models and how sensitive the CFD results are to different GIS data formats. Using campus topography and building data, and the FEFLO-URBAN CFD model, we performed atmospheric release simulations using topographic data in contour and raster formats. We found that using raster format was quite efficient and contour data required significant effort. Though the simulation outputs from the two data formats were not identical, their overall outcomes were similar and did not post alarming discrepancies. We concluded that using GIS data have tremendous potential for CFD modeling.

  2. Model test and CFD calculation of a cavitating bulb turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Necker, J; Aschenbrenner, T, E-mail: joerg.necker@voith.co [Voith Hydro Holding GmbH and Co. KG Alexanderstrasse 11, 89522 Heidenheim (Germany)

    2010-08-15

    The flow in a horizontal shaft bulb turbine is calculated as a two-phase flow with a commercial Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD-)-code including cavitation model. The results are compared with experimental results achieved at a closed loop test rig for model turbines. On the model test rig, for a certain operating point (i.e. volume flow, net head, blade angle, guide vane opening) the pressure behind the turbine is lowered (i.e. the Thoma-coefficient {sigma} is lowered) and the efficiency of the turbine is recorded. The measured values can be depicted in a so-called {sigma}-break curve or {eta}- {sigma}-diagram. Usually, the efficiency is independent of the Thoma-coefficient up to a certain value. When lowering the Thoma-coefficient below this value the efficiency will drop rapidly. Visual observations of the different cavitation conditions complete the experiment. In analogy, several calculations are done for different Thoma-coefficients {sigma}and the corresponding hydraulic losses of the runner are evaluated quantitatively. For a low {sigma}-value showing in the experiment significant efficiency loss, the the change of volume flow in the experiment was simulated. Besides, the fraction of water vapour as an indication of the size of the cavitation cavity is analyzed qualitatively. The experimentally and the numerically obtained results are compared and show a good agreement. Especially the drop in efficiency can be calculated with satisfying accuracy. This drop in efficiency is of high practical importance since it is one criterion to determine the admissible cavitation in a bulb-turbine. The visual impression of the cavitation in the CFD-analysis is well in accordance with the observed cavitation bubbles recorded on sketches and/or photographs.

  3. New weighted sum of gray gases model applicable to Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) modeling of oxy-fuel combustion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yin, Chungen; Johansen, Lars Christian Riis; Rosendahl, Lasse

    2010-01-01

    gases model (WSGGM) is derived, which is applicable to computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling of both air-fuel and oxy-fuel combustion. First, a computer code is developed to evaluate the emissivity of any gas mixture at any condition by using the exponential wide band model (EWBM...... into CFD simulations of combustion systems is given. Finally, as a demonstration, the new model is implemented into CFD modeling of two furnaces of very different beam lengths, respectively. The CFD results are compared with those based on the widely used WSGGM in literature, from which some useful...

  4. CFD modeling and experience of waste-to-energy plant burning waste wood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rajh, B.; Yin, Chungen; Samec, N.

    2013-01-01

    of waste wood combustion in a 13 MW grate-fired boiler in a WtE plant is presented. As a validation effort, the temperature profiles at a number of ports in the furnace are measured and the experimental results are compared with the CFD predictions. In the simulation, a 1D model is developed to simulate...... the conversion of the waste wood in the fuel bed on the grate, which provides the appropriate inlet boundary condition for the freeboard 3D CFD simulation. The CFD analysis reveals the detailed mixing and combustion characteristics in the waste wood-fired furnace, pinpointing how to improve the design......Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is being increasingly used in industry for in-depth understanding of the fundamental mixing, combustion, heat transfer and pollutant formation in combustion processes and for design and optimization of Waste-to-Energy (WtE) plants. In this paper, CFD modeling...

  5. A Model-based Prognostics Approach Applied to Pneumatic Valves

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Within the area of systems health management, the task of prognostics centers on predicting when components will fail. Model-based prognostics exploits domain...

  6. A Model-Based Prognostics Approach Applied to Pneumatic Valves

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Within the area of systems health management, the task of prognostics centers on predicting when components will fail. Model-based prognostics exploits domain...

  7. A coupled DEM-CFD method for impulse wave modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Tao; Utili, Stefano; Crosta, GiovanBattista

    2015-04-01

    Rockslides can be characterized by a rapid evolution, up to a possible transition into a rock avalanche, which can be associated with an almost instantaneous collapse and spreading. Different examples are available in the literature, but the Vajont rockslide is quite unique for its morphological and geological characteristics, as well as for the type of evolution and the availability of long term monitoring data. This study advocates the use of a DEM-CFD framework for the modelling of the generation of hydrodynamic waves due to the impact of a rapid moving rockslide or rock-debris avalanche. 3D DEM analyses in plane strain by a coupled DEM-CFD code were performed to simulate the rockslide from its onset to the impact with still water and the subsequent wave generation (Zhao et al., 2014). The physical response predicted is in broad agreement with the available observations. The numerical results are compared to those published in the literature and especially to Crosta et al. (2014). According to our results, the maximum computed run up amounts to ca. 120 m and 170 m for the eastern and western lobe cross sections, respectively. These values are reasonably similar to those recorded during the event (i.e. ca. 130 m and 190 m respectively). In these simulations, the slope mass is considered permeable, such that the toe region of the slope can move submerged in the reservoir and the impulse water wave can also flow back into the slope mass. However, the upscaling of the grains size in the DEM model leads to an unrealistically high hydraulic conductivity of the model, such that only a small amount of water is splashed onto the northern bank of the Vajont valley. The use of high fluid viscosity and coarse grain model has shown the possibility to model more realistically both the slope and wave motions. However, more detailed slope and fluid properties, and the need for computational efficiency should be considered in future research work. This aspect has also been

  8. Assessment of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Models for Shock Boundary-Layer Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBonis, James R.; Oberkampf, William L.; Wolf, Richard T.; Orkwis, Paul D.; Turner, Mark G.; Babinsky, Holger

    2011-01-01

    A workshop on the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) prediction of shock boundary-layer interactions (SBLIs) was held at the 48th AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting. As part of the workshop numerous CFD analysts submitted solutions to four experimentally measured SBLIs. This paper describes the assessment of the CFD predictions. The assessment includes an uncertainty analysis of the experimental data, the definition of an error metric and the application of that metric to the CFD solutions. The CFD solutions provided very similar levels of error and in general it was difficult to discern clear trends in the data. For the Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes methods the choice of turbulence model appeared to be the largest factor in solution accuracy. Large-eddy simulation methods produced error levels similar to RANS methods but provided superior predictions of normal stresses.

  9. Modelling of a CFD Microscale Model and Its Application in Wind Energy Resource Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Jie-shun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The prediction of a wind farm near the wind turbines has a significant effect on the safety as well as economy of wind power generation. To assess the wind resource distribution within a complex terrain, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD based wind farm forecast microscale model is developed. The model uses the Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS model to characterize the turbulence. By using the results of Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF mesoscale weather forecast model as the input of the CFD model, a coupled model of CFD-WRF is established. A special method is used for the treatment of the information interchange on the lateral boundary between two models. This established coupled model is applied in predicting the wind farm near a wind turbine in Hong Gang-zi, Jilin, China. The results from this simulation are compared to real measured data. On this basis, the accuracy and efficiency of turbulence characterization schemes are discussed. It indicates that this coupling system is easy to implement and can make these two separate models work in parallel. The CFD model coupled with WRF has the advantage of high accuracy and fast speed, which makes it valid for the wind power generation.

  10. Physicians' perceptions of the value of prognostic models: the benefits and risks of prognostic confidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallen, Sarah A M; Hootsmans, Norbert A M; Blaisdell, Laura; Gutheil, Caitlin M; Han, Paul K J

    2015-12-01

    The communication of prognosis in end-of-life (EOL) care is a challenging task that is limited by prognostic uncertainty and physicians' lack of confidence in their prognostic estimates. Clinical prediction models (CPMs) are increasingly common evidence-based tools that may mitigate these problems and facilitate the communication and use of prognostic information in EOL care; however, little is known about physicians' perceptions of the value of these tools. To explore physicians' perceptions of the value of CPMs in EOL care. Qualitative study using semi-structured individual interviews which were analysed using a constant comparative method. Convenience sample of 17 attending physicians representing five different medical specialties at a single large tertiary care medical centre. Physicians perceived CPMs as having three main benefits in EOL care: (i) enhancing their prognostic confidence; (ii) increasing their prognostic authority; and (iii) enabling patient persuasion in circumstances of low prognostic and therapeutic uncertainty. However, physicians also perceived CPMs as having potential risks, which include producing emotional distress in patients and promoting prognostic overconfidence in EOL care. Physicians perceive CPMs as a potentially valuable means of increasing their prognostic confidence, communication and explicit use of prognostic information in EOL care. However, physicians' perceptions of CPMs also indicate a need to establish broad and consistent implementation processes to engage patients in shared decision making in EOL care, to effectively communicate uncertainty in prognostic information and to help both patients and physicians manage uncertainty in EOL care decisions. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. CFD Modeling of Free-Piston Stirling Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Mounir B.; Zhang, Zhi-Guo; Tew, Roy C., Jr.; Gedeon, David; Simon, Terrence W.

    2001-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is funding Cleveland State University (CSU) to develop a reliable Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code that can predict engine performance with the goal of significant improvements in accuracy when compared to one-dimensional (1-D) design code predictions. The funding also includes conducting code validation experiments at both the University of Minnesota (UMN) and CSU. In this paper a brief description of the work-in-progress is provided in the two areas (CFD and Experiments). Also, previous test results are compared with computational data obtained using (1) a 2-D CFD code obtained from Dr. Georg Scheuerer and further developed at CSU and (2) a multidimensional commercial code CFD-ACE+. The test data and computational results are for (1) a gas spring and (2) a single piston/cylinder with attached annular heat exchanger. The comparisons among the codes are discussed. The paper also discusses plans for conducting code validation experiments at CSU and UMN.

  12. The MEXICO rotor aerodynamic loads prediction : ZigZag tape effects and laminar-turbulent transition modeling in CFD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Y.; van Zuijlen, A.H.; van Bussel, G.J.W.

    2017-01-01

    This paper aims to provide an explanation for the overprediction of aerodynamic loads by CFD compared to experiments for the MEXICO wind turbine rotor and improve the CFD prediction by considering laminar-turbulent transition modeling. Large deviations between CFD results and experimental

  13. Development and Verification of CFD Models for Modeling Wind Conditions on Forested Wind Turbine Sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Morten Q.; Mortensen, Kasper; Nielsen, Daniel E.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a proposed CFD model to simulate the wind conditions on a forested site. The model introduces porous subdomains representing the forests in the terrain. Obtained simulation values are compared to field measurements in- and outside a forest. Initial results are very promising...

  14. Validation of NEPTUNE-CFD Two-Phase Flow Models Using Experimental Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Pérez Mañes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the validation of the two-phase flow models of the CFD code NEPTUNEC-CFD using experimental data provided by the OECD BWR BFBT and PSBT Benchmark. Since the two-phase models of CFD codes are extensively being improved, the validation is a key step for the acceptability of such codes. The validation work is performed in the frame of the European NURISP Project and it was focused on the steady state and transient void fraction tests. The influence of different NEPTUNE-CFD model parameters on the void fraction prediction is investigated and discussed in detail. Due to the coupling of heat conduction solver SYRTHES with NEPTUNE-CFD, the description of the coupled fluid dynamics and heat transfer between the fuel rod and the fluid is improved significantly. The averaged void fraction predicted by NEPTUNE-CFD for selected PSBT and BFBT tests is in good agreement with the experimental data. Finally, areas for future improvements of the NEPTUNE-CFD code were identified, too.

  15. Development of CFD Approaches for Modeling Advanced Concepts of Nuclear Thermal Propulsion Test Facilities Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The project will be developing a CFD approach that can handle the additional complexities needed in a NTP testing facility when modeling the combustion processes in...

  16. Towards a generic, reliable CFD modelling methodology for waste-fired grate boilers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rajh, Boštjan; Yin, Chungen; Samec, Niko

    the appropriate inlet boundary condition for the freeboard 3D CFD simulation. Additionally, a refined WSGGM (weighted sum of gray gases model) of greater accuracy, completeness and applicability is proposed and implemented into the CFD model via user defined functions (UDF) to better address the impacts......Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is increasingly used in industry for detailed understanding of the combustion process and for appropriate design and optimization of Waste–to–Energy (WtE) plants. In this paper, CFD modelling of waste wood combustion in a 13 MW grate-fired boiler in a WtE plant...... is presented. To reduce the risk of slagging, optimize the temperature control and enhance turbulent mixing, part of the flue gas is recycled into the grate boiler. In the simulation, a 1D in–house bed model is developed to simulate the conversion of the waste wood in the fuel bed on the grate, which provides...

  17. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) using porous media modeling predicts recurrence after coiling of cerebral aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umeda, Yasuyuki; Ishida, Fujimaro; Tsuji, Masanori; Furukawa, Kazuhiro; Shiba, Masato; Yasuda, Ryuta; Toma, Naoki; Sakaida, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Hidenori

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to predict recurrence after coil embolization of unruptured cerebral aneurysms with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) using porous media modeling (porous media CFD). A total of 37 unruptured cerebral aneurysms treated with coiling were analyzed using follow-up angiograms, simulated CFD prior to coiling (control CFD), and porous media CFD. Coiled aneurysms were classified into stable or recurrence groups according to follow-up angiogram findings. Morphological parameters, coil packing density, and hemodynamic variables were evaluated for their correlations with aneurysmal recurrence. We also calculated residual flow volumes (RFVs), a novel hemodynamic parameter used to quantify the residual aneurysm volume after simulated coiling, which has a mean fluid domain > 1.0 cm/s. Follow-up angiograms showed 24 aneurysms in the stable group and 13 in the recurrence group. Mann-Whitney U test demonstrated that maximum size, dome volume, neck width, neck area, and coil packing density were significantly different between the two groups (P CFD and larger RFVs in the porous media CFD. Multivariate logistic regression analyses demonstrated that RFV was the only independently significant factor (odds ratio, 1.06; 95% confidence interval, 1.01-1.11; P = 0.016). The study findings suggest that RFV collected under porous media modeling predicts the recurrence of coiled aneurysms.

  18. iCFD: Interpreted Computational Fluid Dynamics – Degeneration of CFD to one-dimensional advection-dispersion models using statistical experimental design – The secondary clarifier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guyonvarch, Estelle; Ramin, Elham; Kulahci, Murat

    2015-01-01

    The present study aims at using statistically designed computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations as numerical experiments for the identification of one-dimensional (1-D) advection-dispersion models – computationally light tools, used e.g., as sub-models in systems analysis. The objective is ...... range of flow and design conditions. iCFD tools could play a crucial role in reliably predicting systems' performance under normal and shock events....

  19. Assessment of CFD Modeling Capability for Hypersonic Shock Wave Boundary Layer Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-30

    RUTGERS UNIVERSITY Final Technical Report ONR Grant N00014-14-1-0827 Assessment of CFD Modeling Capability for Hypersonic Shock Wave Boundary...Layer Interactions 30 November 2015 Doyle Knight Dept Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey 98 Brett...30 September 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Assessment of CFD Modeling Capability for Hypersonic Shock Wave Boundary Layer Interactions 5a. CONTRACT

  20. CFD Modeling of LNG Spill: Humidity Effect on Vapor Dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannissi, S. G.; Venetsanos, A. G.; Markatos, N.

    2015-09-01

    The risks entailed by an accidental spill of Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) should be indentified and evaluated, in order to design measures for prevention and mitigation in LNG terminals. For this purpose, simulations are considered a useful tool to study LNG spills and to understand the mechanisms that influence the vapor dispersion. In the present study, the ADREA-HF CFD code is employed to simulate the TEEX1 experiment. The experiment was carried out at the Brayton Fire Training Field, which is affiliated with the Texas A&M University system and involves LNG release and dispersion over water surface in open- obstructed environment. In the simulation the source was modeled as a two-phase jet enabling the prediction of both the vapor dispersion and the liquid pool spreading. The conservation equations for the mixture are solved along with the mass fraction for natural gas. Due to the low prevailing temperatures during the spill ambient humidity condenses and this might affect the vapor dispersion. This effect was examined in this work by solving an additional conservation equation for the water mass fraction. Two different models were tested: the hydrodynamic equilibrium model which assumes kinetic equilibrium between the phases and the non hydrodynamic equilibrium model, in order to assess the effect of slip velocity on the prediction. The slip velocity is defined as the difference between the liquid phase and the vapor phase and is calculated using the algebraic slip model. Constant droplet diameter of three different sizes and a lognormal distribution of the droplet diameter were applied and the results are discussed and compared with the measurements.

  1. Dispersed Two-Phase Flow Modelling for Nuclear Safety in the NEPTUNE_CFD Code

    OpenAIRE

    Mimouni, Stephane; Benguigui, William; Fleau, Solène; Foissac, Arnaud; Guingo , Mathieu; Hassanaly, Mickael; Lavieville, Jérôme; Malet, Jeanne; Méchitoua, Namane; Mérigoux, Nicolas; Vincent, Stéphane

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to give an overview of the capabilities of Eulerian bifluid approach to meet the needs of studies for nuclear safety regarding hydrogen risk, boiling crisis, and pipes and valves maintenance. The Eulerian bifluid approach has been implemented in a CFD code named NEPTUNE_CFD. NEPTUNE_CFD is a three-dimensional multifluid code developed especially for nuclear reactor applications by EDF, CEA, AREVA, and IRSN. The first set of models is dedicated to wall vapor cond...

  2. CFD Modeling and Experimental Validation of a Solar Still

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmood Tahir

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Earth is the densest planet of the solar system with total area of 510.072 million square Km. Over 71.68% of this area is covered with water leaving a scant area of 28.32% for human to inhabit. The fresh water accounts for only 2.5% of the total volume and the rest is the brackish water. Presently, the world is facing chief problem of lack of potable water. This issue can be addressed by converting brackish water into potable through a solar distillation process and solar still is specially assigned for this purpose. Efficiency of a solar still explicitly depends on its design parameters, such as wall material, chamber depth, width and slope of the zcondensing surface. This study was aimed at investigating the solar still parameters using CFD modeling and experimental validation. The simulation data of ANSYS-FLUENT was compared with actual experimental data. A close agreement among the simulated and experimental results was seen in the presented work. It reveals that ANSYS-FLUENT is a potent tool to analyse the efficiency of the new designs of the solar distillation systems.

  3. CFD Models of a Serpentine Inlet, Fan, and Nozzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chima, R. V.; Arend, D. J.; Castner, R. S.; Slater, J. W.; Truax, P. P.

    2010-01-01

    Several computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes were used to analyze the Versatile Integrated Inlet Propulsion Aerodynamics Rig (VIIPAR) located at NASA Glenn Research Center. The rig consists of a serpentine inlet, a rake assembly, inlet guide vanes, a 12-in. diameter tip-turbine driven fan stage, exit rakes or probes, and an exhaust nozzle with a translating centerbody. The analyses were done to develop computational capabilities for modeling inlet/fan interaction and to help interpret experimental data. Three-dimensional Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) calculations of the fan stage were used to predict the operating line of the stage, the effects of leakage from the turbine stream, and the effects of inlet guide vane (IGV) setting angle. Coupled axisymmetric calculations of a bellmouth, fan, and nozzle were used to develop techniques for coupling codes together and to investigate possible effects of the nozzle on the fan. RANS calculations of the serpentine inlet were coupled to Euler calculations of the fan to investigate the complete inlet/fan system. Computed wall static pressures along the inlet centerline agreed reasonably well with experimental data but computed total pressures at the aerodynamic interface plane (AIP) showed significant differences from the data. Inlet distortion was shown to reduce the fan corrected flow and pressure ratio, and was not completely eliminated by passage through the fan

  4. Modeling near-road air quality using a computational fluid dynamics model, CFD-VIT-RIT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y Jason; Zhang, K Max

    2009-10-15

    It is well recognized that dilution is an important mechanism governing the near-road air pollutant concentrations. In this paper, we aim to advance our understanding of turbulent mixing mechanisms on and near roadways using computation fluid dynamics. Turbulent mixing mechanisms can be classified into three categories according to their origins: vehicle-induced turbulence (VIT), road-induced turbulence (RIT), and atmospheric boundary layer turbulence. RIT includes the turbulence generated by road embankment, road surface thermal effects, and roadside structures. Both VIT and RIT are affected by the roadway designs. We incorporate the detailed treatment of VIT and RIT into the CFD (namely CFD-VIT-RIT) and apply the model in simulating the spatial gradients of carbon monoxide near two major highways with different traffic mix and roadway configurations. The modeling results are compared to the field measurements and those from CALINE4 and CFD without considering VIT and RIT. We demonstrate that the incorporation of VIT and RIT considerably improves the modeling predictions, especially on vertical gradients and seasonal variations of carbon monoxide. Our study implies that roadway design can significantly influence the near-road air pollution. Thus we recommend that mitigating near-road air pollution through roadway designs be considered in the air quality and transportation management In addition, thanks to the rigorous representation of turbulent mixing mechanisms, CFD-VIT-RIT can become valuable tools in the roadway designs process.

  5. Summary of best guidelines and validation of CFD modeling in livestock buildings to ensure prediction quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rong, Li; Nielsen, Peter V.; Bjerg, Bjarne

    2016-01-01

    scale pig barns was simulated to show the procedures of validating a CFD simulation in livestock buildings. After summarizing the guideline and/or best practice for CFD modeling, the authors addressed the issues related to numerical methods and the governing equations, which were limited to RANS models......, simulating domain etc. This information is particularly important for the readers to evaluate the quality of the CFD simulation results.......Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is increasingly used to study airflow around and in livestock buildings, to develop technologies to mitigate emissions and to predict the contaminant dispersion from livestock buildings. In this paper, an example of air flow distribution in a room with two full...

  6. CFD modelling of hydrogen stratification in enclosures: Model validation and application to PAR performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoyes, J.R., E-mail: james.hoyes@hsl.gsi.gov.uk; Ivings, M.J.

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • The ability of CFD to predict hydrogen stratification phenomena is investigated. • Contrary to expectation, simulations on tetrahedral meshes under-predict mixing. • Simulations on structured meshes give good agreement with experimental data. • CFD model used to investigate the effects of stratification on PAR performance. • Results show stratification can have a significant effect on PAR performance. - Abstract: Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) models are maturing into useful tools for supporting safety analyses. This paper investigates the capabilities of CFD models for predicting hydrogen stratification in a containment vessel using data from the NEA/OECD SETH2 MISTRA experiments. Further simulations are then carried out to illustrate the qualitative effects of hydrogen stratification on the performance of Passive Autocatalytic Recombiner (PAR) units. The MISTRA experiments have well-defined initial and boundary conditions which makes them well suited for use in a validation study. Results are presented for the sensitivity to mesh resolution and mesh type. Whilst the predictions are shown to be largely insensitive to the mesh resolution they are surprisingly sensitive to the mesh type. In particular, tetrahedral meshes are found to induce small unphysical convection currents that result in molecular diffusion and turbulent mixing being under-predicted. This behaviour is not unique to the CFD model used here (ANSYS CFX) and furthermore, it may affect simulations run on other non-aligned meshes (meshes that are not aligned perpendicular to gravity), including non-aligned structured meshes. Following existing best practice guidelines can help to identify potential unphysical predictions, but as an additional precaution consideration should be given to using gravity-aligned meshes for modelling stratified flows. CFD simulations of hydrogen recombination in the Becker Technologies THAI facility are presented with high and low PAR positions

  7. Investigation of Microclimate by CFD Modeling of Moisture Interactions between Air and Constructions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Lone Hedegaard; Woloszyn, Monika; Rode, Carsten

    2007-01-01

    There is a strong demand for accurate moisture modeling since moisture poses a risk for both the constructions and the indoor climate. This investigation has special focus on moisture modeling. The paper describes a new model based on a CFD tool enhanced to include both detailed modeling of airfl......There is a strong demand for accurate moisture modeling since moisture poses a risk for both the constructions and the indoor climate. This investigation has special focus on moisture modeling. The paper describes a new model based on a CFD tool enhanced to include both detailed modeling...

  8. Lime Kiln Modeling. CFD and One-dimensional simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svedin, Kristoffer; Ivarsson, Christofer; Lundborg, Rickard

    2009-03-15

    The incentives for burning alternative fuels in lime kilns are growing. An increasing demand on thorough investigations of alternative fuel impact on lime kiln performance have been recognized, and the purpose of this project has been to develop a lime kiln CFD model with the possibility to fire fuel oil and lignin. The second part of the project consists of three technical studies. Simulated data from a one-dimensional steady state program has been used to support theories on the impact of biofuels and lime mud dryness. The CFD simulations was carried out in the commercial code FLUENT. Due to difficulties with the convergence of the model the calcination reaction is not included. The model shows essential differences between the two fuels. Lignin gives a different flame shape and a longer flame length compared to fuel oil. Mainly this depends on how the fuel is fed into the combustion chamber and how much combustion air that is added as primary and secondary air. In the case of lignin combustion the required amount of air is more than in the fuel oil case. This generates more combustion gas and a different flow pattern is created. Based on the values from turbulent reaction rate for the different fuels an estimated flame length can be obtained. For fuel oil the combustion is very intense with a sharp peak in the beginning and a rapid decrease. For lignin the combustion starts not as intense as for the fuel oil case and has a smoother shape. The flame length appears to be approximately 2-3 meter longer for lignin than for fuel oil based on turbulent reaction rate in the computational simulations. The first technical study showed that there are many benefits of increasing dry solids content in the lime mud going into a kiln such as increased energy efficiency, reduced TRS, and reduced sodium in the kiln. However, data from operating kilns indicates that these benefits can be offset by increasing exit gas temperature that can limit kiln production capacity. Simulated

  9. iCFD: Interpreted Computational Fluid Dynamics - Degeneration of CFD to one-dimensional advection-dispersion models using statistical experimental design - The secondary clarifier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyonvarch, Estelle; Ramin, Elham; Kulahci, Murat; Plósz, Benedek Gy

    2015-10-15

    The present study aims at using statistically designed computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations as numerical experiments for the identification of one-dimensional (1-D) advection-dispersion models - computationally light tools, used e.g., as sub-models in systems analysis. The objective is to develop a new 1-D framework, referred to as interpreted CFD (iCFD) models, in which statistical meta-models are used to calculate the pseudo-dispersion coefficient (D) as a function of design and flow boundary conditions. The method - presented in a straightforward and transparent way - is illustrated using the example of a circular secondary settling tank (SST). First, the significant design and flow factors are screened out by applying the statistical method of two-level fractional factorial design of experiments. Second, based on the number of significant factors identified through the factor screening study and system understanding, 50 different sets of design and flow conditions are selected using Latin Hypercube Sampling (LHS). The boundary condition sets are imposed on a 2-D axi-symmetrical CFD simulation model of the SST. In the framework, to degenerate the 2-D model structure, CFD model outputs are approximated by the 1-D model through the calibration of three different model structures for D. Correlation equations for the D parameter then are identified as a function of the selected design and flow boundary conditions (meta-models), and their accuracy is evaluated against D values estimated in each numerical experiment. The evaluation and validation of the iCFD model structure is carried out using scenario simulation results obtained with parameters sampled from the corners of the LHS experimental region. For the studied SST, additional iCFD model development was carried out in terms of (i) assessing different density current sub-models; (ii) implementation of a combined flocculation, hindered, transient and compression settling velocity function; and (iii

  10. CFD modelling of condensers for freeze-drying processes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    room valve in front of the condenser entrance in open position. A lateral pipe is then present, representing the incondensable gases exhaust. Not all the internals have been reproduced in the geometry considered for the CFD simulations, but only the most significant ones: the spirals, the screen and the mushroom valve. 4.

  11. Computational fluid dynamics combustion model for natural gas; CFD forbraendingsmodel for naturgas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasmussen, N.B.

    1998-08-01

    The aim of the project is to update and develop the existing EDK-model (Eddy Dissipation Kinetic) for combustion of natural gas, to implement this model in a CFD-model (Computational Fluid Dynamic), and to test and use the model in practical calculations. The project has developed a good model for turbulent combustion, which is suitable for calculation of combustion of natural gas in test cases and practical applications. The project has shown that DGC needs a new CFD-programme for calculation of flow and combustion. A new programme has been obtained and DGC now has the possibility to intensify the application of CFD-models with combustion. The project has also shown that the combustion model still needs to be developed concurrently with new knowledge related to reactions in combustion. (EHS)

  12. Development of a compartment model based on CFD simulations for description of mixing in bioreactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crine, M.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Understanding and modeling the complex interactions between biological reaction and hydrodynamics are a key problem when dealing with bioprocesses. It is fundamental to be able to accurately predict the hydrodynamics behavior of bioreactors of different size and its interaction with the biological reaction. CFD can provide detailed modeling about hydrodynamics and mixing. However, it is computationally intensive, especially when reactions are taken into account. Another way to predict hydrodynamics is the use of "Compartment" or "Multi-zone" models which are much less demanding in computation time than CFD. However, compartments and fluxes between them are often defined by considering global quantities not representative of the flow. To overcome the limitations of these two methods, a solution is to combine compartment modeling and CFD simulations. Therefore, the aim of this study is to develop a methodology in order to propose a compartment model based on CFD simulations of a bioreactor. The flow rate between two compartments can be easily computed from the velocity fields obtained by CFD. The difficulty lies in the definition of the zones in such a way they can be considered as perfectly mixed. The creation of the model compartments from CFD cells can be achieved manually or automatically. The manual zoning consists in aggregating CFD cells according to the user's wish. The automatic zoning defines compartments as regions within which the value of one or several properties are uniform with respect to a given tolerance. Both manual and automatic zoning methods have been developed and compared by simulating the mixing of an inert scalar. For the automatic zoning, several algorithms and different flow properties have been tested as criteria for the compartment creation.

  13. Prognostics

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Prognostics has received considerable attention recently as an emerging sub-discipline within SHM. Prognosis is here strictly defined as “predicting the time at...

  14. Coupled in silico platform: Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vulović, Aleksandra; Šušteršič, Tijana; Cvijić, Sandra; Ibrić, Svetlana; Filipović, Nenad

    2017-10-17

    One of the critical components of the respiratory drug delivery is the manner in which the inhaled aerosol is deposited in respiratory tract compartments. Depending on formulation properties, device characteristics and breathing pattern, only a certain fraction of the dose will reach the target site in the lungs, while the rest of the drug will deposit in the inhalation device or in the mouth-throat region. The aim of this study was to link the Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) with physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modelling in order to predict aerolisolization of different dry powder formulations, and estimate concomitant in vivo deposition and absorption of amiloride hydrochloride. Drug physicochemical properties were experimentally determined and used as inputs for the CFD simulations of particle flow in the generated 3D geometric model of Aerolizer® dry powder inhaler (DPI). CFD simulations were used to simulate air flow through Aerolizer® inhaler and Discrete Phase Method (DPM) was used to simulate aerosol particles deposition within the fluid domain. The simulated values for the percent emitted dose were comparable to the values obtained using Andersen cascade impactor (ACI). However, CFD predictions indicated that aerosolized DPI have smaller particle size and narrower size distribution than assumed based on ACI measurements. Comparison with the literature in vivo data revealed that the constructed drug-specific PBPK model was able to capture amiloride absorption pattern following oral and inhalation administration. The PBPK simulation results, based on the CFD generated particle distribution data as input, illustrated the influence of formulation properties on the expected drug plasma concentration profiles. The model also predicted the influence of potential changes in physiological parameters on the extent of inhaled amiloride absorption. Overall, this study demonstrated the potential of the combined CFD-PBPK approach to model inhaled drug

  15. Prediction of subcooled flow boiling characteristics using two-fluid Eulerian CFD model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braz Filho, Francisco A.; Ribeiro, Guilherme B., E-mail: gbribeiro@ieav.cta.br; Caldeira, Alexandre D.

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • CFD multiphase model is used to predict subcooled flow boiling characteristics. • Better agreement is achieved for higher saturation pressures. • Onset of nucleate boiling and saturated boiling are well predicted. • CFD multiphase model tends to underestimate the void fraction. • Factors were adjusted in order to improve the void fraction results. - Abstract: The present study concerns a detailed analysis of flow boiling phenomena under high pressure systems using a two-fluid Eulerian approach provided by a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) solver. For this purpose, a vertical heated pipe made of stainless steel with an internal diameter of 15.4 mm was considered as the modeled domain. Two different uniform heat fluxes and three saturation pressures were applied to the channel wall, whereas water mass flux of 900 kg/m{sup 2} s was considered for all simulation cases. The model was validated against a set of experimental data and results have indicated a promising use of the CFD technique for estimation of the wall temperature, the liquid bulk temperature and the location of the departure of nucleate boiling. Changes in factors applied in the modeling of the interfacial heat transfer coefficient and bubble departure frequency were suggested, allowing a better prediction of the void fraction along the heated channel. The commercial CFD solver FLUENT 14.5 was used for the model implementation.

  16. Validation of cfd and simplified models with experimental data for multiphase flow in bends

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nennie, E.D.; Belfroid, S.P.C.; O'Mahoney, T.S.D.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper details of the measurement results of the forces on the bends in a 4" setup are compared to two models. The first model is a simple analytical model and is used to estimate the forces. In the second model, CFD is used. In the experiments only resulting forces, including upstream and

  17. Application of Scaling-Law and CFD Modeling to Hydrodynamics of Circulating Biomass Fluidized Bed Gasifier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazda Biglari

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Two modeling approaches, the scaling-law and CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics approaches, are presented in this paper. To save on experimental cost of the pilot plant, the scaling-law approach as a low-computational-cost method was adopted and a small scale column operating under ambient temperature and pressure was built. A series of laboratory tests and computer simulations were carried out to evaluate the hydrodynamic characteristics of a pilot fluidized-bed biomass gasifier. In the small scale column solids were fluidized. The pressure and other hydrodynamic properties were monitored for the validation of the scaling-law application. In addition to the scaling-law modeling method, the CFD approach was presented to simulate the gas-particle system in the small column. 2D CFD models were developed to simulate the hydrodynamic regime. The simulation results were validated with the experimental data from the small column. It was proved that the CFD model was able to accurately predict the hydrodynamics of the small column. The outcomes of this research present both the scaling law with the lower computational cost and the CFD modeling as a more robust method to suit various needs for the design of fluidized-bed gasifiers.

  18. Model-based Prognostics with Concurrent Damage Progression Processes

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Model-based prognostics approaches rely on physics-based models that describe the behavior of systems and their components. These models must account for the several...

  19. CFD MODELING OF FINE SCALE FLOW AND TRANSPORT IN THE HOUSTON METROPOLITAN AREA, TEXAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fine scale modeling of flows and air quality in Houston, Texas is being performed; the use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling is being applied to investigate the influence of morphologic structures on the within-grid transport and dispersion of sources in grid models ...

  20. A Transient 3D-CFD Model Incorporating Biological Processes for Use in Tissue Engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krühne, Ulrich; Wendt, D.; Martin, I.

    2010-01-01

    In this article a mathematical model is presented in which the fluid dynamic interaction between the liquid flow in a scaffold and growing cells is simulated. The model is based on a computational fluid dynamic (CFD) model for the representation of the fluid dynamic conditions in the scaffold...

  1. Comparison of two prognostic models for acute pulmonary embolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abd-ElRahim Ibrahim Youssef

    2016-10-01

    Conclusion: (1 There is an agreement to great extent in risk stratification of APE patients by PESI and ESC prognostic models, where mortality rate is increased among high risk classes of both models, (2 ESC prognostic model is more accurate than PESI model in mortality prediction of APE patients especially in the high risk class, (3 echocardiographic evidence of RVD and elevated plasma BNP can help to identify APE patients at increased risk of adverse short-term outcome and (4 integration of RVD assessment by echocardiography and BNP to clinical findings improves the prognostic value of ESC model.

  2. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Modeling for High Rate Pulverized Coal Injection (PCI) into the Blast Furnace

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Chenn Zhou

    2008-10-15

    Pulverized coal injection (PCI) into the blast furnace (BF) has been recognized as an effective way to decrease the coke and total energy consumption along with minimization of environmental impacts. However, increasing the amount of coal injected into the BF is currently limited by the lack of knowledge of some issues related to the process. It is therefore important to understand the complex physical and chemical phenomena in the PCI process. Due to the difficulty in attaining trus BF measurements, Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling has been identified as a useful technology to provide such knowledge. CFD simulation is powerful for providing detailed information on flow properties and performing parametric studies for process design and optimization. In this project, comprehensive 3-D CFD models have been developed to simulate the PCI process under actual furnace conditions. These models provide raceway size and flow property distributions. The results have provided guidance for optimizing the PCI process.

  3. Towards a CFD Model for Prediction of Wind Turbine Power Losses due to Icing in Cold Climate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Marie Cecilie; Sørensen, Henrik

    Icing induced power losses is an important issue when operating wind turbines in cold climate. This paper presents a concept of modelling ice accretion on wind turbines using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). The modelling concept works towards unifying the processes of modelling ice accretion...... and the aerodynamic analysis of the iced object into one CFD-based icing model. Modelling of icing and obtaining ice shapes in combination with mesh update by surface boundary displacement was demonstrated in the paper. It has been done by expressing in-cloud icing in CFD by an Eulerian multiphase model, implementing...... an icing module into the CFD solution and finally by surface boundary displacement also included in the CFD solution. The model has been developed using ANSYS-FLUENT and user-defined functions. The naca profile, NACA64618, has been used to illustrate the functionality of the model. Running ice accretion...

  4. CFD Wake Modelling with a BEM Wind Turbine Sub-Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anders Hallanger

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Modelling of wind farms using computational fluid dynamics (CFD resolving the flow field around each wind turbine's blades on a moving computational grid is still too costly and time consuming in terms of computational capacity and effort. One strategy is to use sub-models for the wind turbines, and sub-grid models for turbulence production and dissipation to model the turbulent viscosity accurately enough to handle interaction of wakes in wind farms. A wind turbine sub-model, based on the Blade Momentum Theory, see Hansen (2008, has been implemented in an in-house CFD code, see Hallanger et al. (2002. The tangential and normal reaction forces from the wind turbine blades are distributed on the control volumes (CVs at the wind turbine rotor location as sources in the conservation equations of momentum. The classical k-epsilon turbulence model of Launder and Spalding (1972 is implemented with sub-grid turbulence (SGT model, see Sha and Launder (1979 and Sand and Salvesen (1994. Steady state CFD simulations were compared with flow and turbulence measurements in the wake of a model scale wind turbine, see Krogstad and Eriksen (2011. The simulated results compared best with experiments when stalling (boundary layer separation on the wind turbine blades did not occur. The SGT model did improve turbulence level in the wake but seems to smear the wake flow structure. It should be noted that the simulations are carried out steady state not including flow oscillations caused by vortex shedding from tower and blades as they were in the experiments. Further improvement of the simulated velocity defect and turbulence level seems to rely on better parameter estimation to the SGT model, improvements to the SGT model, and possibly transient- instead of steady state simulations.

  5. Distributed Damage Estimation for Prognostics based on Structural Model Decomposition

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Model-based prognostics approaches capture system knowl- edge in the form of physics-based models of components that include how they fail. These methods consist of...

  6. Multiple Damage Progression Paths in Model-based Prognostics

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Model-based prognostics approaches employ do- main knowledge about a system, its components, and how they fail through the use of physics-based models. Compo- nent...

  7. CFD model of multiphase flow in the abrasive water jet tool

    OpenAIRE

    Říha, Zdeněk

    2015-01-01

    The possibility of using CFD fluid flow modeling in area of tools with abrasive water jet is described in the paper. The correct function of such tool is based on proper setting of multiphase flow of water, air and solid particles in the inner space of the tool. The multiphase fluid flow numerical simulation can provide information which show relation between the geometry and the flow field. Then, this stable CFD model of multiphase flow creates key to design of the tool able to work wi...

  8. Modeling chemical reactions in the indoor environment by CFD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Dan Nørtoft; Weschler, Charles J.

    2002-01-01

    The concentrations of ozone and a terpene that react in the gas-phase to produce a hypothetical product were investigated by computational fluid dynamics (CFD) for two different air exchange rates. Ozone entered the room with the ventilation air. The terpenes were introduced as a localized source...... with an emission pattern similar to an air freshener; this was in contrast to an otherwise identical earlier study in which the terpene was introduced as a floor source with an emission pattern similar to a floor care product (Sørensen and Weschler, 2002). The results show that there are large concentration...

  9. Development and Implementation of CFD-Informed Models for the Advanced Subchannel Code CTF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blyth, Taylor S. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Avramova, Maria [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)

    2017-04-01

    The research described in this PhD thesis contributes to the development of efficient methods for utilization of high-fidelity models and codes to inform low-fidelity models and codes in the area of nuclear reactor core thermal-hydraulics. The objective is to increase the accuracy of predictions of quantities of interests using high-fidelity CFD models while preserving the efficiency of low-fidelity subchannel core calculations. An original methodology named Physics- based Approach for High-to-Low Model Information has been further developed and tested. The overall physical phenomena and corresponding localized effects, which are introduced by the presence of spacer grids in light water reactor (LWR) cores, are dissected in corresponding four building basic processes, and corresponding models are informed using high-fidelity CFD codes. These models are a spacer grid-directed cross-flow model, a grid-enhanced turbulent mixing model, a heat transfer enhancement model, and a spacer grid pressure loss model. The localized CFD-models are developed and tested using the CFD code STAR-CCM+, and the corresponding global model development and testing in sub-channel formulation is performed in the thermal- hydraulic subchannel code CTF. The improved CTF simulations utilize data-files derived from CFD STAR-CCM+ simulation results covering the spacer grid design desired for inclusion in the CTF calculation. The current implementation of these models is examined and possibilities for improvement and further development are suggested. The validation experimental database is extended by including the OECD/NRC PSBT benchmark data. The outcome is an enhanced accuracy of CTF predictions while preserving the computational efficiency of a low-fidelity subchannel code.

  10. Development and Implementation of CFD-Informed Models for the Advanced Subchannel Code CTF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blyth, Taylor S.

    The research described in this PhD thesis contributes to the development of efficient methods for utilization of high-fidelity models and codes to inform low-fidelity models and codes in the area of nuclear reactor core thermal-hydraulics. The objective is to increase the accuracy of predictions of quantities of interests using high-fidelity CFD models while preserving the efficiency of low-fidelity subchannel core calculations. An original methodology named Physics-based Approach for High-to-Low Model Information has been further developed and tested. The overall physical phenomena and corresponding localized effects, which are introduced by the presence of spacer grids in light water reactor (LWR) cores, are dissected in corresponding four building basic processes, and corresponding models are informed using high-fidelity CFD codes. These models are a spacer grid-directed cross-flow model, a grid-enhanced turbulent mixing model, a heat transfer enhancement model, and a spacer grid pressure loss model. The localized CFD-models are developed and tested using the CFD code STAR-CCM+, and the corresponding global model development and testing in sub-channel formulation is performed in the thermal-hydraulic subchannel code CTF. The improved CTF simulations utilize data-files derived from CFD STAR-CCM+ simulation results covering the spacer grid design desired for inclusion in the CTF calculation. The current implementation of these models is examined and possibilities for improvement and further development are suggested. The validation experimental database is extended by including the OECD/NRC PSBT benchmark data. The outcome is an enhanced accuracy of CTF predictions while preserving the computational efficiency of a low-fidelity subchannel code.

  11. Turbulence modeling needs of commercial CFD codes: Complex flows in the aerospace and automotive industries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Befrui, Bizhan A.

    1995-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation discusses the following: STAR-CD computational features; STAR-CD turbulence models; common features of industrial complex flows; industry-specific CFD development requirements; applications and experiences of industrial complex flows, including flow in rotating disc cavities, diffusion hole film cooling, internal blade cooling, and external car aerodynamics; and conclusions on turbulence modeling needs.

  12. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Modeling And Analysis Delivery Order 0006: Cache-Aware Air Vehicles Unstructured Solver (AVUS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-08-01

    AFRL-VA-WP-TM-2006-3009 COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS ( CFD ) MODELING AND ANALYSIS Delivery Order 0006: Cache-Aware Air Vehicles Unstructured...CONTRACT NUMBER F33615-03-D-3307-0006 5b. GRANT NUMBER 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS ( CFD ) MODELING AND ANALYSIS

  13. Modeling toxic gas dispersion over urban area using GIS and CFD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Maohui; Jiang, Simin; Ai, Xiaoqiu; Guo, Yuerong

    2010-11-01

    To simulate toxic gas dispersion over urban area with consideration of the influence of wind, buildings and other obstacles within the dispersion site, an integrated strategy incorporating computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and GIS technologies is investigated. CFD is able to couple wind field with pollutant dispersion process and provide realistic simulation for geometrically complex scenarios, however, inadequate of geometry construction for urban scale applications. This paper focuses on how to take advantage of the available GIS data, the visualization and spatial discretization capabilities of GIS in CFD modeling. Topography and building data stored in GIS database are used to extract the detailed coordinates and heights of the buildings around the area of interest. Furthermore, a methodology of domain discretization, with restrict to underneath geometrical boundary, is proposed to construct computational grids for CFD simulations. For illustration purposes, a mixed residential and commercial area of Lujiazui in Shanghai is investigated. The CFD software, CFX5.5, is employed to predict plume concentrations, and the output can be rendered dynamically in GIS environment.

  14. Model-based Prognostics under Limited Sensing

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Prognostics is crucial to providing reliable condition-based maintenance decisions. To obtain accurate predictions of component life, a variety of sensors are often...

  15. Use of the FDA nozzle model to illustrate validation techniques in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hariharan, Prasanna; D'Souza, Gavin A; Horner, Marc; Morrison, Tina M; Malinauskas, Richard A; Myers, Matthew R

    2017-01-01

    A "credible" computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model has the potential to provide a meaningful evaluation of safety in medical devices. One major challenge in establishing "model credibility" is to determine the required degree of similarity between the model and experimental results for the model to be considered sufficiently validated. This study proposes a "threshold-based" validation approach that provides a well-defined acceptance criteria, which is a function of how close the simulation and experimental results are to the safety threshold, for establishing the model validity. The validation criteria developed following the threshold approach is not only a function of Comparison Error, E (which is the difference between experiments and simulations) but also takes in to account the risk to patient safety because of E. The method is applicable for scenarios in which a safety threshold can be clearly defined (e.g., the viscous shear-stress threshold for hemolysis in blood contacting devices). The applicability of the new validation approach was tested on the FDA nozzle geometry. The context of use (COU) was to evaluate if the instantaneous viscous shear stress in the nozzle geometry at Reynolds numbers (Re) of 3500 and 6500 was below the commonly accepted threshold for hemolysis. The CFD results ("S") of velocity and viscous shear stress were compared with inter-laboratory experimental measurements ("D"). The uncertainties in the CFD and experimental results due to input parameter uncertainties were quantified following the ASME V&V 20 standard. The CFD models for both Re = 3500 and 6500 could not be sufficiently validated by performing a direct comparison between CFD and experimental results using the Student's t-test. However, following the threshold-based approach, a Student's t-test comparing |S-D| and |Threshold-S| showed that relative to the threshold, the CFD and experimental datasets for Re = 3500 were statistically similar and the model could be

  16. A gas radiation property model applicable to general combustion CFD and its demonstration in oxy-fuel combustion simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yin, Chungen; Singh, Shashank; Romero, Sergio Sanchez

    2017-01-01

    and practically accurate and applicable to general combustion CFD, is presented, programmed and verified. The model is implemented in CFD simulation of a 0.8 MW oxy-fuel furnace, via which the applicability and usefulness of the model in combustion CFD is demonstrated. On the contrary, the usefulness......As a good compromise between computational efficiency and accuracy, the weighted-sum-of-gray-gases model (WSGGM) is often used in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling of combustion processes for evaluating gas radiative properties. However, the WSGGMs still have practical limitations (e...... of the WSGGMs in oxy-fuel combustion CFD is found to be compromised, mainly because that the important impacts of the high levels of CO under oxy-fuel combustion cannot be accounted for in the current framework of the WSGGMs....

  17. Diagnostic and Prognostic Models for Generator Step-Up Transformers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vivek Agarwal; Nancy J. Lybeck; Binh T. Pham

    2014-09-01

    In 2014, the online monitoring (OLM) of active components project under the Light Water Reactor Sustainability program at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) focused on diagnostic and prognostic capabilities for generator step-up transformers. INL worked with subject matter experts from the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) to augment and revise the GSU fault signatures previously implemented in the Electric Power Research Institute’s (EPRI’s) Fleet-Wide Prognostic and Health Management (FW-PHM) Suite software. Two prognostic models were identified and implemented for GSUs in the FW-PHM Suite software. INL and EPRI demonstrated the use of prognostic capabilities for GSUs. The complete set of fault signatures developed for GSUs in the Asset Fault Signature Database of the FW-PHM Suite for GSUs is presented in this report. Two prognostic models are described for paper insulation: the Chendong model for degree of polymerization, and an IEEE model that uses a loading profile to calculates life consumption based on hot spot winding temperatures. Both models are life consumption models, which are examples of type II prognostic models. Use of the models in the FW-PHM Suite was successfully demonstrated at the 2014 August Utility Working Group Meeting, Idaho Falls, Idaho, to representatives from different utilities, EPRI, and the Halden Research Project.

  18. Modeling flow inside an anaerobic digester by CFD techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendoza, Alexandra Martinez; Jimenez, P. Amparo Lopez [Departmento do Ingenieria Hidralica y Medio Ambiente, Universitat Politecnica de Valencia, Camino de Vera S/N 46022 (Spain); Martinez, Tatiana Montoya; Monanana, Vincente Fajardo [Grupo Aquas de Valencia. Avenida Marques del Turia 19 46005 Valencia (Spain)

    2011-07-01

    Anaerobic processes are used to treat high strength organic wastewater as well as for the treatment of primary and secondary sludge from conventional wastewater treatment plants. In these processes, heterotrophic microorganisms convert biodegradable organic matter to methane and carbon dioxide in the absence of dissolved oxygen and nitrate. Some of the most important aspects of the design of anaerobic digesters are related to hydraulic considerations. In spite of its important role in performance, hydraulics of flow inside digesters has not been quantified or adequately characterized. In this contribution a three-dimensional steady-state computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation has been performed for a particular anaerobic digester, in order to visualize the flow patterns. Flow and velocities profiles have been represented inside the digester to identify possible dead zones or stratifications. The geometry of a real digester installed in Valencia Waste Water Treatment Plant (located in Quart-Benager, Valencia, Spain) has been used in order to consider the proposed methodology.

  19. Model Adaptation for Prognostics in a Particle Filtering Framework

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — One of the key motivating factors for using particle filters for prognostics is the ability to include model parameters as part of the state vector to be estimated....

  20. A Model-based Avionic Prognostic Reasoner (MAPR)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Model-based Avionic Prognostic Reasoner (MAPR) presented in this paper is an innovative solution for non-intrusively monitoring the state of health (SoH) and...

  1. Model-based Prognostics with Fixed-lag Particle Filters

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Model-based prognostics exploits domain knowl- edge of the system, its components, and how they fail by casting the underlying physical phenom- ena in a...

  2. A CFD model of the wake of an offshore wind farm: Using a prescribed wake inflow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Réthoré, P.-E.; Bechmann, Andreas; Sørensen, Niels N.

    2007-01-01

      An CFD model of the wake of an offshore wind farm, expanding existing measurements is proposed. The method is based on solving the Navier Stokes equation in a large domain downstream an offshore wind farm. The inflow of the domain is estimated using existing met mast measurements from both free...

  3. Simulation of a MW rotor equipped with vortex generators using CFD and an actuator shape model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Troldborg, Niels; Zahle, Frederik; Sørensen, Niels N.

    2015-01-01

    This article presents a comparison of CFD simulations of the DTU 10 MW reference wind turbine with and without vortex generators installed on the inboard part of the blades. The vortex generators are modelled by introducing body forces determined using a modified version of the so-called BAY mode...

  4. Development of a three-dimensional CFD model for rotary lime kilns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lixin Tao; Blom, Roger (FS Dynamics Sweden AB, Goeteborg (Sweden)); Nordgren, Daniel (Innventia, Stockholm (Sweden))

    2010-11-15

    In the calcium loop of the recovery cycle in a Kraft process of pulp and paper production, rotary lime kilns are used to convert the lime mud, mainly CaCO3, back to quick lime, CaO, for re-use in the causticizing process. The lime kilns are one of the major energy consumption devices for paper and pulp industry. Because of the rising oil price and new emission limits, the pulp mills have been forced to look for alternative fuels for their lime kilns. One interesting alternative to oil, often easily available at pulp mills, is biofuels such as sawdust and bark. However the practical kiln operation often encounters some difficulties because of the uncertainties around the biofuel impact on the lime kiln performance. A deeper understanding of the flame characteristics is required when shifting from oil to biofuels. Fortunately recent advances in modern Computational Fluid Dynamics, CFD, have provided the possibility to study and predict the detailed flame characteristics regarding the lime kiln performance. In this project a three-dimensional CFD model for rotary lime kilns has been developed. To simulate a rotary lime kiln the developed CFD model integrates the three essential sub-models, i.e. the freeboard hot flow model, the lime bed model and the rotating refractory wall model and it is developed based on the modern CFD package: FLUENT which is commercially available on the market. The numerical simulations using the developed CFD model have been performed for three selected kiln operations fired with three different fuel mixtures. The predicted results from the CFD modelling are presented and discussed in order to compare the impacts on the kiln performance due to the different firing conditions. During the development, the lime kiln at the Soedra Cell Moensteraas mill has been used as reference kiln. To validate the CFD model, in-plant measurements were carried out in the Moensteraas lime kiln during an experiment campaign. The results obtained from the

  5. A framework for quantifying net benefits of alternative prognostic models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rapsomaniki, Eleni; White, Ian R; Wood, Angela M

    2012-01-01

    New prognostic models are traditionally evaluated using measures of discrimination and risk reclassification, but these do not take full account of the clinical and health economic context. We propose a framework for comparing prognostic models by quantifying the public health impact (net benefit......) of the treatment decisions they support, assuming a set of predetermined clinical treatment guidelines. The change in net benefit is more clinically interpretable than changes in traditional measures and can be used in full health economic evaluations of prognostic models used for screening and allocating risk...... reduction interventions. We extend previous work in this area by quantifying net benefits in life years, thus linking prognostic performance to health economic measures; by taking full account of the occurrence of events over time; and by considering estimation and cross-validation in a multiple...

  6. COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS MODELING OF SCALED HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANK MIXING - CFD MODELING SENSITIVITY STUDY RESULTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JACKSON VL

    2011-08-31

    The primary purpose of the tank mixing and sampling demonstration program is to mitigate the technical risks associated with the ability of the Hanford tank farm delivery and celtification systems to measure and deliver a uniformly mixed high-level waste (HLW) feed to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Uniform feed to the WTP is a requirement of 24590-WTP-ICD-MG-01-019, ICD-19 - Interface Control Document for Waste Feed, although the exact definition of uniform is evolving in this context. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) modeling has been used to assist in evaluating scaleup issues, study operational parameters, and predict mixing performance at full-scale.

  7. CFD Modelling of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm on Hemodynamic Loads Using a Realistic Geometry with CT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Soudah

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to find a correlation between the abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA geometric parameters, wall stress shear (WSS, abdominal flow patterns, intraluminal thrombus (ILT, and AAA arterial wall rupture using computational fluid dynamics (CFD. Real AAA 3D models were created by three-dimensional (3D reconstruction of in vivo acquired computed tomography (CT images from 5 patients. Based on 3D AAA models, high quality volume meshes were created using an optimal tetrahedral aspect ratio for the whole domain. In order to quantify the WSS and the recirculation inside the AAA, a 3D CFD using finite elements analysis was used. The CFD computation was performed assuming that the arterial wall is rigid and the blood is considered a homogeneous Newtonian fluid with a density of 1050 kg/m3 and a kinematic viscosity of 4×10-3 Pa·s. Parallelization procedures were used in order to increase the performance of the CFD calculations. A relation between AAA geometric parameters (asymmetry index (β, saccular index (γ, deformation diameter ratio (χ, and tortuosity index (ε and hemodynamic loads was observed, and it could be used as a potential predictor of AAA arterial wall rupture and potential ILT formation.

  8. Investigation of Airflow in a Room with displacement ventilation by means of a CFD-model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, T. V.; Nielsen, Peter Vilhelm

    The airflow in front of an inlet device in a room with displacement ventilation is investigated in this study. In continuation of the full-scale measurements and the development of a CFD-model, described in /1/, this report aims at testing the model and conducting numerical experiments to provide...... a detailed description of the air current along the floor. It is investigated if the model results comply with a theoretical model.......The airflow in front of an inlet device in a room with displacement ventilation is investigated in this study. In continuation of the full-scale measurements and the development of a CFD-model, described in /1/, this report aims at testing the model and conducting numerical experiments to provide...

  9. CFD Model of Water Droplet Transport for ISS Hygiene Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Chang H.

    2011-01-01

    The goal of the study is to assess the impacts of free water propagation in the Waste and Hygiene Compartment (WHC). Free water can be generated inside the WHC in small quantities due to crew hygiene activity. To mitigate potential impact of free water in Node 3 cabin the WHC doorway is enclosed by a waterproof bump-out, Kabin, with openings at the top and bottom. At the overhead side of the rack, there is a screen that prevents large drops of water from exiting. However, as the avionics fan in the WHC causes airflow toward the deck side of the rack, small quantities of free water may exit at the bottom of the Kabin. A Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis of Node 3 cabin airflow made possible to identify the paths of water transport. The Node 3 airflow was computed for several ventilation scenarios. To simulate the droplet transport the Lagrangian discrete phase approach was used. Various initial droplet distributions were considered in the study. The droplet diameter was varied in the range of 2-20 mm. The results of the computations showed that most of the drops fall to the rack surface not far from the WHC curtain. The probability of the droplet transport to the adjacent rack surface with electronic equipment was predicted.

  10. CFD MODEL OF THE CNG DIRECT INJECTION ENGINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zbigniew Czyż

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents CFD analysis of fuel flow in the CNG injector. The issues such a pressure drop along an injector channel, mass flow through the key sections of the injector geometry, flow rates, the impact of the needle shape on the deflection of the sprayed gas cone and the impact of the wall head are analyzed in the article. The simulation was made in the transient states conditions for full injection process, including the opening and closing of the injector. An injection time of 6 ms, velocity of 0.33 mm/ms and a lift of 0.5 mm were selected for opening and closing of injector based on experimental test. The simulation shows that the volume inside the injector is a kind of fuel accumulator, and the opening process of the needle influence the flow parameters in an inlet cross-section after a certain time, depending on a channel cross section. The calculations allowed to select the ratio of an injector duct cross sectional area to the aperture area of the injection capable of the reducing pressure loss. The unusual location of the injector in the socket of a glow plug in the Andoria ADCR engine makes a stream be impaired by a part of the head. This research result would be useful in developing an injector construction which will be used for an investigation of CNG addition into diesel engine.

  11. Aorta Ascending Aneurysm Analysis Using CFD Models towards Possible Anomalies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Simão

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Computational fluid dynamics (CFD can be seen as complementary tool alongside the visualization capabilities of cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR and computed tomography (CT imaging for decision-making. In this research CT images of three cases (i.e., a healthy heart pilot project and two patients with complex aortic disease are used to validate and analyse the corresponding computational results. Three 3D domains of the thoracic aorta were tested under hemodynamic conditions. Under normal conditions, the flow inside the thoracic aorta is more streamlined. In the presence of ascending aortic aneurysm, large areas of blue separation zones (i.e., low velocities are identified, as well as an internal geometry deformation of the aortic wall, respectively. This flow separation is characterized by the reversal of flow and sudden drop of the wall shear stress (WSS in the aorta. Moreover, the aortic aneurysm simulations adversely affect the flow by increasing the pressure drop and flow inefficiency, due to the anatomical configuration of the ascending aorta. Altered hemodynamics led to a vortex formation and locally reversed the flow that eventually induced a low flow velocity and oscillating WSS in the thoracic aorta. Significant changes in the hemodynamic characteristics affect the normal blood circulation with strong turbulence occurrence, damaging the aortic wall, leading ultimately to the need of surgical intervention to avoid fatal events.

  12. A CFD-informed quasi-steady model of flapping wing aerodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakata, Toshiyuki; Liu, Hao; Bomphrey, Richard J

    2015-11-01

    Aerodynamic performance and agility during flapping flight are determined by the combination of wing shape and kinematics. The degree of morphological and kinematic optimisation is unknown and depends upon a large parameter space. Aimed at providing an accurate and computationally inexpensive modelling tool for flapping-wing aerodynamics, we propose a novel CFD (computational fluid dynamics)-informed quasi-steady model (CIQSM), which assumes that the aerodynamic forces on a flapping wing can be decomposed into the quasi-steady forces and parameterised based on CFD results. Using least-squares fitting, we determine a set of proportional coefficients for the quasi-steady model relating wing kinematics to instantaneous aerodynamic force and torque; we calculate power with the product of quasi-steady torques and angular velocity. With the quasi-steady model fully and independently parameterised on the basis of high-fidelity CFD modelling, it is capable of predicting flapping-wing aerodynamic forces and power more accurately than the conventional blade element model (BEM) does. The improvement can be attributed to, for instance, taking into account the effects of the induced downwash and the wing tip vortex on the force generation and power consumption. Our model is validated by comparing the aerodynamics of a CFD model and the present quasi-steady model using the example case of a hovering hawkmoth. It demonstrates that the CIQSM outperforms the conventional BEM while remaining computationally cheap, and hence can be an effective tool for revealing the mechanisms of optimization and control of kinematics and morphology in flapping-wing flight for both bio-flyers and unmanned air systems.

  13. Integration of CFD codes and advanced combustion models for quantitative burnout determination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Javier Pallares; Inmaculada Arauzo; Alan Williams [University of Zaragoza, Zaragoza (Spain). Centre of Research for Energy Resources and Consumption (CIRCE)

    2007-10-15

    CFD codes and advanced kinetics combustion models are extensively used to predict coal burnout in large utility boilers. Modelling approaches based on CFD codes can accurately solve the fluid dynamics equations involved in the problem but this is usually achieved by including simple combustion models. On the other hand, advanced kinetics combustion models can give a detailed description of the coal combustion behaviour by using a simplified description of the flow field, this usually being obtained from a zone-method approach. Both approximations describe correctly general trends on coal burnout, but fail to predict quantitative values. In this paper a new methodology which takes advantage of both approximations is described. In the first instance CFD solutions were obtained of the combustion conditions in the furnace in the Lamarmora power plant (ASM Brescia, Italy) for a number of different conditions and for three coals. Then, these furnace conditions were used as inputs for a more detailed chemical combustion model to predict coal burnout. In this, devolatilization was modelled using a commercial macromolecular network pyrolysis model (FG-DVC). For char oxidation an intrinsic reactivity approach including thermal annealing, ash inhibition and maceral effects, was used. Results from the simulations were compared against plant experimental values, showing a reasonable agreement in trends and quantitative values. 28 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  14. Dispersed Two-Phase Flow Modelling for Nuclear Safety in the NEPTUNE_CFD Code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephane Mimouni

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to give an overview of the capabilities of Eulerian bifluid approach to meet the needs of studies for nuclear safety regarding hydrogen risk, boiling crisis, and pipes and valves maintenance. The Eulerian bifluid approach has been implemented in a CFD code named NEPTUNE_CFD. NEPTUNE_CFD is a three-dimensional multifluid code developed especially for nuclear reactor applications by EDF, CEA, AREVA, and IRSN. The first set of models is dedicated to wall vapor condensation and spray modelling. Moreover, boiling crisis remains a major limiting phenomenon for the analysis of operation and safety of both nuclear reactors and conventional thermal power systems. The paper aims at presenting the generalization of the previous DNB model and its validation against 1500 validation cases. The modelling and the numerical simulation of cavitation phenomena are of relevant interest in many industrial applications, especially regarding pipes and valves maintenance where cavitating flows are responsible for harmful acoustics effects. In the last section, models are validated against experimental data of pressure profiles and void fraction visualisations obtained downstream of an orifice with the EPOCA facility (EDF R&D. Finally, a multifield approach is presented as an efficient tool to run all models together.

  15. Local CFD kinetic model of cadmium vaporization during fluid bed incineration of municipal solid waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soria, J. [Instituto Multidisciplinario de Investigación y Desarrollo de la Patagonia Norte (IDEPA, CONICET-UNCo) y Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad Nacional del Comahue, Buenos Aires 1400, 8300 Neuquén (Argentina); Laboratoire Procédés, Matériaux et Energie Solaire (CNRS-PROMES), 7 Rue du Four Solaire, Odeillo, 66120 Font-Romeu (France); Gauthier, D., E-mail: Daniel.Gauthier@promes.cnrs.fr [Laboratoire Procédés, Matériaux et Energie Solaire (CNRS-PROMES), 7 Rue du Four Solaire, Odeillo, 66120 Font-Romeu (France); Falcoz, Q.; Flamant, G. [Laboratoire Procédés, Matériaux et Energie Solaire (CNRS-PROMES), 7 Rue du Four Solaire, Odeillo, 66120 Font-Romeu (France); Mazza, G. [Instituto Multidisciplinario de Investigación y Desarrollo de la Patagonia Norte (IDEPA, CONICET-UNCo) y Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad Nacional del Comahue, Buenos Aires 1400, 8300 Neuquén (Argentina)

    2013-03-15

    Highlights: ► A 2-D local CFD model for simulating the Cd vaporization process is presented. ► It includes a kinetic expression of Cd vaporization into the incineration process. ► Pyrolysis, volatiles’ combustion and residual carbon combustion are also taken into account. ► It fits very well the experimental results obtained on a lab-scale fluidized bed reported in literature. ► It also compares favorably with a model developed previously by the group. -- Abstract: The emissions of heavy metals during incineration of Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) are a major issue to health and the environment. It is then necessary to well quantify these emissions in order to accomplish an adequate control and prevent the heavy metals from leaving the stacks. In this study the kinetic behavior of Cadmium during Fluidized Bed Incineration (FBI) of artificial MSW pellets, for bed temperatures ranging from 923 to 1073 K, was modeled. FLUENT 12.1.4 was used as the modeling framework for the simulations and implemented together with a complete set of user-defined functions (UDFs). The CFD model combines the combustion of a single solid waste particle with heavy metal (HM) vaporization from the burning particle, and it takes also into account both pyrolysis and volatiles’ combustion. A kinetic rate law for the Cd release, derived from the CFD thermal analysis of the combusting particle, is proposed. The simulation results are compared with experimental data obtained in a lab-scale fluidized bed incinerator reported in literature, and with the predicted values from a particulate non-isothermal model, formerly developed by the authors. The comparison shows that the proposed CFD model represents very well the evolution of the HM release for the considered range of bed temperature.

  16. A CFD model for determining mixing and mass transfer in a high power agitated bioreactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bach, Christian; Albæk, Mads O.; Stocks, Stuart M.

    simulations, and the overall mass transfer coefficient was found to be in accordance with experimental data. This work illustrates the possibility of predicting the hydrodynamic performance of an agitated bioreactor using validated CFD models. These models can be applied in the testing of new bioreactor...... good agreement with the experimental data. The mass transfer coefficient was determined during three fed batch Trichoderma reesei fermentations at different process conditions previously described in [2]. Similarly the mass transfer was predicted by Higbie’s penetration model [3] from two-phase CFD......Prediction of mixing and mass transfer in agitated systems is a vital tool for process development and scale up in industrial biotechnology. In particular key process parameters such as mixing time and kLa are essential for bioprocess development [1]. In this work the mixing and mass transfer...

  17. CFD Modeling of the Two-Phase Flow in a Moist Air Powered Ejector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Marynowski

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to develop a CFD model taking into account the processes of condensation and evaporation in moist air powered ejectors. The study is realized with the CFD software Ansys-Fluent in which a 2D axisymmetric model of non-equilibrium condensation in high speed flow was implemented. Validation of the computational results is carried out using flow visualization. The evolution of the basic parameters characterizing the droplet condensation process is studied numerically along the ejector axis. The effects of some parameters (such as primary stagnation pressure and humidity rate present in the primary and secondary air flows are also examined. Limitations of the present numerical model are discussed.

  18. A Model-based Prognostics Approach Applied to Pneumatic Valves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J. Daigle

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Within the area of systems health management, the task of prognostics centers on predicting when components will fail. Model-based prognostics exploits domain knowledge of the system, its components, and how they fail by casting the underlying physical phenomena in a physics-based model that is derived from first principles. Uncertainty cannot be avoided in prediction, therefore, algorithms are employed that help in managing these uncertainties. The particle filtering algorithm has become a popular choice for model-based prognostics due to its wide applicability, ease of implementation, and support for uncertainty management. We develop a general model-based prognostics methodology within a robust probabilistic framework using particle filters. As a case study, we consider a pneumatic valve from the Space Shuttle cryogenic refueling system. We develop a detailed physics-based model of the pneumatic valve, and perform comprehensive simulation experiments to illustrate our prognostics approach and evaluate its effectiveness and robustness. The approach is demonstrated using historical pneumatic valve data from the refueling system.

  19. A CFD model for biomass combustion in a packed bed furnace

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karim, Md. Rezwanul [Faculty of Science, Engineering and Technology, Swinburne University of Technology, VIC 3122 (Australia); Department of Mechanical & Chemical Engineering, Islamic University of Technology, Gazipur 1704 (Bangladesh); Ovi, Ifat Rabbil Qudrat [Department of Mechanical & Chemical Engineering, Islamic University of Technology, Gazipur 1704 (Bangladesh); Naser, Jamal, E-mail: jnaser@swin.edu.au [Faculty of Science, Engineering and Technology, Swinburne University of Technology, VIC 3122 (Australia)

    2016-07-12

    Climate change has now become an important issue which is affecting environment and people around the world. Global warming is the main reason of climate change which is increasing day by day due to the growing demand of energy in developed countries. Use of renewable energy is now an established technique to decrease the adverse effect of global warming. Biomass is a widely accessible renewable energy source which reduces CO{sub 2} emissions for producing thermal energy or electricity. But the combustion of biomass is complex due its large variations and physical structures. Packed bed or fixed bed combustion is the most common method for the energy conversion of biomass. Experimental investigation of packed bed biomass combustion is difficult as the data collection inside the bed is challenging. CFD simulation of these combustion systems can be helpful to investigate different operational conditions and to evaluate the local values inside the investigation area. Available CFD codes can model the gas phase combustion but it can’t model the solid phase of biomass conversion. In this work, a complete three-dimensional CFD model is presented for numerical investigation of packed bed biomass combustion. The model describes the solid phase along with the interface between solid and gas phase. It also includes the bed shrinkage due to the continuous movement of the bed during solid fuel combustion. Several variables are employed to represent different parameters of solid mass. Packed bed is considered as a porous bed and User Defined Functions (UDFs) platform is used to introduce solid phase user defined variables in the CFD. Modified standard discrete transfer radiation method (DTRM) is applied to model the radiation heat transfer. Preliminary results of gas phase velocity and pressure drop over packed bed have been shown. The model can be useful for investigation of movement of the packed bed during solid fuel combustion.

  20. A CFD model for biomass combustion in a packed bed furnace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karim, Md. Rezwanul; Ovi, Ifat Rabbil Qudrat; Naser, Jamal

    2016-07-01

    Climate change has now become an important issue which is affecting environment and people around the world. Global warming is the main reason of climate change which is increasing day by day due to the growing demand of energy in developed countries. Use of renewable energy is now an established technique to decrease the adverse effect of global warming. Biomass is a widely accessible renewable energy source which reduces CO2 emissions for producing thermal energy or electricity. But the combustion of biomass is complex due its large variations and physical structures. Packed bed or fixed bed combustion is the most common method for the energy conversion of biomass. Experimental investigation of packed bed biomass combustion is difficult as the data collection inside the bed is challenging. CFD simulation of these combustion systems can be helpful to investigate different operational conditions and to evaluate the local values inside the investigation area. Available CFD codes can model the gas phase combustion but it can't model the solid phase of biomass conversion. In this work, a complete three-dimensional CFD model is presented for numerical investigation of packed bed biomass combustion. The model describes the solid phase along with the interface between solid and gas phase. It also includes the bed shrinkage due to the continuous movement of the bed during solid fuel combustion. Several variables are employed to represent different parameters of solid mass. Packed bed is considered as a porous bed and User Defined Functions (UDFs) platform is used to introduce solid phase user defined variables in the CFD. Modified standard discrete transfer radiation method (DTRM) is applied to model the radiation heat transfer. Preliminary results of gas phase velocity and pressure drop over packed bed have been shown. The model can be useful for investigation of movement of the packed bed during solid fuel combustion.

  1. Numerical modelling of pressure suppression pools with CFD and FEM codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paettikangas, T.; Niemi, J.; Timperi, A. (VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland (Finland))

    2011-06-15

    Experiments on large-break loss-of-coolant accident for BWR is modeled with computational fluid (CFD) dynamics and finite element calculations. In the CFD calculations, the direct-contact condensation in the pressure suppression pool is studied. The heat transfer in the liquid phase is modeled with the Hughes-Duffey correlation based on the surface renewal model. The heat transfer is proportional to the square root of the turbulence kinetic energy. The condensation models are implemented with user-defined functions in the Euler-Euler two-phase model of the Fluent 12.1 CFD code. The rapid collapse of a large steam bubble and the resulting pressure source is studied analytically and numerically. Pressure source obtained from simplified calculations is used for studying the structural effects and FSI in a realistic BWR containment. The collapse results in volume acceleration, which induces pressure loads on the pool walls. In the case of a spherical bubble, the velocity term of the volume acceleration is responsible of the largest pressure load. As the amount of air in the bubble is decreased, the peak pressure increases. However, when the water compressibility is accounted for, the finite speed of sound becomes a limiting factor. (Author)

  2. ADDRESSING HUMAN EXPOSURE TO AIR POLLUTANTS AROUND BUILDINGS IN URBAN AREAS WITH COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS (CFD) MODELS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations provide a number of unique opportunities for expanding and improving capabilities for modeling exposures to environmental pollutants. The US Environmental Protection Agency's National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL) has been c...

  3. Design, Modeling, and CFD Analysis of a Micro Hydro Pelton Turbine Runner: For the Case of Selected Site in Ethiopia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tilahun Nigussie; Abraham Engeda; Edessa Dribssa

    2017-01-01

    This paper addresses the design, modeling, and performance analysis of a Pelton turbine using CFD for one of the selected micro hydro potential sites in Ethiopia to meet the requirements of the energy demands...

  4. Experimental Investigation on the Aerodynamics of Isolated Rotating Wheels and Evaluation of Wheel Rotation Models Using Unsteady CFD

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Haag, Lukas; Blacha, Thomas; Indinger, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    .... In modern wind-tunnels the wheel rotation can be resembled close to reality, while, in their CFD development process, car manufactures rely on simplified models for considering rotating wheels...

  5. Pressure Pulsation Characteristics of a Model Pump-turbine Operating in the S-shaped Region: CFD Simulations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Xia, Linsheng; Cheng, Yongguang; Cai, Fang

    2017-01-01

    ... vibration with an increased risk of mechanical failure. CFD simulations were carried out to analyze the impacts of flow evolution on the pressure pulsations in the S-shaped region of a model pump-turbine...

  6. Validation of Hydrodynamic Load Models Using CFD for the OC4-DeepCwind Semisubmersible: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benitz, M. A.; Schmidt, D. P.; Lackner, M. A.; Stewart, G. M.; Jonkman, J.; Robertson, A.

    2015-03-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations were carried out on the OC4-DeepCwind semi-submersible to obtain a better understanding of how to set hydrodynamic coefficients for the structure when using an engineering tool such as FAST to model the system. The focus here was on the drag behavior and the effects of the free-surface, free-ends and multi-member arrangement of the semi-submersible structure. These effects are investigated through code-to-code comparisons and flow visualizations. The implications on mean load predictions from engineering tools are addressed. The work presented here suggests that selection of drag coefficients should take into consideration a variety of geometric factors. Furthermore, CFD simulations demonstrate large time-varying loads due to vortex shedding, which FAST's hydrodynamic module, HydroDyn, does not model. The implications of these oscillatory loads on the fatigue life needs to be addressed.

  7. Modeling and Simulation of Hamburger Cooking Process Using Finite Difference and CFD Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Sargolzaei

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Unsteady-state heat transfer in hamburger cooking process was modeled using one dimensional finite difference (FD and three dimensional computational fluid dynamic (CFD models. A double-sided cooking system was designed to study the effect of pressure and oven temperature on the cooking process. Three different oven temperatures (114, 152, 204°C and three different pressures (20, 332, 570 pa were selected and 9 experiments were performed. Applying pressure to hamburger increases the contact area of hamburger with heating plate and hence the heat transfer rate to the hamburger was increased and caused the weight loss due to water evaporation and decreasing cooking time, while increasing oven temperature led to increasing weight loss and decreasing cooking time. CFD predicted results were in good agreement with the experimental results than the finite difference (FD ones. But considering the long time needed for CFD model to simulate the cooking process (about 1 hour, using the finite difference model would be more economic.

  8. CFD and Ventilation Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Y.; Nielsen, Peter V.

    2011-01-01

    There has been a rapid growth of scientific literature on the application of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) in the research of ventilation and indoor air science. With a 1000–10,000 times increase in computer hardware capability in the past 20 years, CFD has become an integral part...... of scientific research and engineering development of complex air distribution and ventilation systems in buildings. This review discusses the major and specific challenges of CFD in terms of turbulence modelling, numerical approximation, and boundary conditions relevant to building ventilation. We emphasize...... the growing need for CFD verification and validation, suggest on-going needs for analytical and experimental methods to support the numerical solutions, and discuss the growing capacity of CFD in opening up new research areas. We suggest that CFD has not become a replacement for experiment and theoretical...

  9. CFD Modeling of Water Flow through Sudden Contraction and Expansion in a Horizontal Pipe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushik, V. V. R.; Ghosh, S.; Das, G.; Das, P. K.

    2011-01-01

    This paper deals with the use of commercial CFD software in teaching graduate level computational fluid dynamics. FLUENT 6.3.26 was chosen as the CFD software to teach students the entire CFD process in a single course. The course objective is to help students to learn CFD, use it in some practical problems and analyze as well as validate the…

  10. Aerosol-CFD modelling of ultrafine and black carbon particle emission, dilution, and growth near roadways

    OpenAIRE

    L. Huang; S. L. Gong; M. Gordon; J. Liggio; R. M. Staebler; C. A. Stroud; G. Lu; C. Mihele; J. R. Brook; C. Q. Jia

    2014-01-01

    Many studies have shown that on-road vehicle emissions are the dominant source of ultrafine particles (UFP; diameter < 100 nm) in urban areas and near-roadway environments. In order to advance our knowledge on the complex interactions and competition among atmospheric dilution, dispersion and dynamics of UFPs, an aerosol dynamics-CFD coupled model is developed and validated against field measurements. A unique approach of applying periodic boundary condition...

  11. Aspects of Using CFD for Wind Comfort Modeling Around Tall Buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Michael R.; Andersen, Lars

    2008-01-01

    The Light*House complex is investigated for uncomfortable wind climate and dangerous winds at pedestrian level. A CFD model is used for simulating the wind effect for 12 different directions and correlated to the wind statistics of a nearby meteorological station. Comparing to practical standards...... for safety and comfort, the results indicates that the building is safe for pedestrians. However, when designing surrounding builds, care shall be taken to avoid interaction between buildings....

  12. CFD modeling of heat transfer in a rectangular channel with dimplepin finning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spokoiny M. Yu.

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Using the CFD modeling method, the authors have investigated conjugate heat transfer in a rectangular channel with dimple-pin finning with hight of pins, depth of cavities and Reynolds number values varying in the range, characteristic for heat exchangers designed for liquid cooling of microelectronic devices, such as microprocessors. Criterion dependencies for calculation of heat transfer under these conditions have been obtained.

  13. Numerical modelling in building thermo-aeraulics: from CFD modelling to an hybrid finite volume / zonal approach; Modelisation numerique de la thermoaeraulique du batiment: des modeles CFD a une approche hybride volumes finis / zonale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellivier, A.

    2004-05-15

    For 3D modelling of thermo-aeraulics in building using field codes, it is necessary to reduce the computing time in order to model increasingly larger volumes. The solution suggested in this study is to couple two modelling: a zonal approach and a CFD approach. The first part of the work that was carried out is the setting of a simplified CFD modelling. We propose rules for use of coarse grids, a constant effective viscosity law and adapted coefficients for heat exchange in the framework of building thermo-aeraulics. The second part of this work concerns the creation of fluid Macro-Elements and their coupling with a calculation of CFD finite volume type. Depending on the boundary conditions of the problem, a local description of the driving flow is proposed via the installation and use of semi-empirical evolution laws. The Macro-Elements is then inserted in CFD computation: the values of velocity calculated by the evolution laws are imposed on the CFD cells corresponding to the Macro-Element. We use these two approaches on five cases representative of thermo-aeraulics in buildings. The results are compared with experimental data and with traditional RANS simulations. We highlight the significant gain of time that our approach allows while preserving a good quality of numerical results. (author)

  14. A CFD-based wind solver for a fast response transport and dispersion model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gowardhan, Akshay A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Brown, Michael J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pardyjak, Eric R [UNIV OF UTAH; Senocak, Inanc [BOISE STATE UNIV

    2010-01-01

    In many cities, ambient air quality is deteriorating leading to concerns about the health of city inhabitants. In urban areas with narrow streets surrounded by clusters of tall buildings, called street canyons, air pollution from traffic emissions and other sources is difficult to disperse and may accumulate resulting in high pollutant concentrations. For various situations, including the evacuation of populated areas in the event of an accidental or deliberate release of chemical, biological and radiological agents, it is important that models should be developed that produce urban flow fields quickly. For these reasons it has become important to predict the flow field in urban street canyons. Various computational techniques have been used to calculate these flow fields, but these techniques are often computationally intensive. Most fast response models currently in use are at a disadvantage in these cases as they are unable to correlate highly heterogeneous urban structures with the diagnostic parameterizations on which they are based. In this paper, a fast and reasonably accurate computational fluid dynamics (CFD) technique that solves the Navier-Stokes equations for complex urban areas has been developed called QUIC-CFD (Q-CFD). This technique represents an intermediate balance between fast (on the order of minutes for a several block problem) and reasonably accurate solutions. The paper details the solution procedure and validates this model for various simple and complex urban geometries.

  15. CFD Analyses and Experiments in a PAT Modeling: Pressure Variation and System Efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Modesto Pérez-Sánchez

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of a PAT modeling is presented for application in water pipe systems as an interesting and promising energy converter to improve the system energy efficiency. The study is focused on the use of a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD model in conjunction with laboratory data for representing PAT performance. The first stage of the procedure concerns a systematic analysis of the role played by the characteristic PAT parameters in the computational mesh definitions of the CFD model, with the aim of defining the most efficient set of capturing the main features of the PAT behaviour under different operating conditions. In the second stage, comparisons of CFD results and experiments were carried out to examine some system components for better understanding the PAT response. Specifically, the behavior of the pressure distribution along the PAT installation when implemented in a water pipe system are analyzed, and the links between pressure variation and the head drop in different system components responsible for the head losses and net head definition are also examined.

  16. Data-Driven CFD Modeling of Turbulent Flows Through Complex Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Jian-Xun

    2016-01-01

    The growth of computational resources in the past decades has expanded the application of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) from the traditional fields of aerodynamics and hydrodynamics to a number of new areas. Examples range from the heat and fluid flows in nuclear reactor vessels and in data centers to the turbulence flows through wind turbine farms and coastal vegetation plants. However, in these new applications complex structures are often exist (e.g., rod bundles in reactor vessels and turbines in wind farms), which makes fully resolved, first-principle based CFD modeling prohibitively expensive. This obstacle seriously impairs the predictive capability of CFD models in these applications. On the other hand, a limited amount of measurement data is often available in the systems in the above-mentioned applications. In this work we propose a data-driven, physics-based approach to perform full field inversion on the effects of the complex structures on the flow. This is achieved by assimilating observati...

  17. CFD analysis and flow model reduction for surfactant production in helix reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikačević N.M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Flow pattern analysis in a spiral Helix reactor is conducted, for the application in the commercial surfactant production. Step change response curves (SCR were obtained from numerical tracer experiments by three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD simulations. Non-reactive flow is simulated, though viscosity is treated as variable in the direction of flow, as it increases during the reaction. The design and operating parameters (reactor diameter, number of coils and inlet velocity are varied in CFD simulations, in order to examine the effects on the flow pattern. Given that 3D simulations are not practical for fast computations needed for optimization, scale-up and control, CFD flow model is reduced to one-dimensional axial dispersion (AD model with spatially variable dispersion coefficient. Dimensionless dispersion coefficient (Pe is estimated under different conditions and results are analyzed. Finally, correlation which relates Pe number with Reynolds number and number of coils from the reactor entrance is proposed for the particular reactor application and conditions.

  18. CFD modeling of artificial vortex air generator for green electric power

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismaeel Ali A.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents and discusses a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD simulation of artificial vortex air generator as part of the preliminary of Solar Vortex Power Generator for an electrical power generation. A vortex air generator system was built, consisting of concentric cylinders. The inner cylinder was fitted with stationary air guide vanes and covered at the top by a transparent plate to capture the solar radiation and create swirling updraft flow which is able to rotate wind turbine and produces power. The influence of inlet air velocity and temperature on the swirling strength and mass flow generated has been evaluated by validated CFD simulation. ANSYS Fluent software was adopted to solve the 3-D, steady state of Navier-Stokes and energy equations in cylindrical coordinate system integrated with discrete ordinates (DO radiation model. For the preliminary vortex generator design, the CFD results were validated first with previous experimental measurements. Then the variable operation parameters were carried out on the proposed model. The simulation result demonstrated that inflow velocity is a key parameter for enhancing the system performance. By increasing the inflow velocity from 0.4 m/s to 0.6 m/s and inflow temperature 323°k the enhancement rate of the mass air flow generated reached to 26% compared with 7% when increase the inflow temperature to 328°k and inflow velocity 0.4 m/s.

  19. Euler-Lagrange CFD modelling of unconfined gas mixing in anaerobic digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dapelo, Davide; Alberini, Federico; Bridgeman, John

    2015-11-15

    A novel Euler-Lagrangian (EL) computational fluid dynamics (CFD) finite volume-based model to simulate the gas mixing of sludge for anaerobic digestion is developed and described. Fluid motion is driven by momentum transfer from bubbles to liquid. Model validation is undertaken by assessing the flow field in a labscale model with particle image velocimetry (PIV). Conclusions are drawn about the upscaling and applicability of the model to full-scale problems, and recommendations are given for optimum application. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. CFD investigation of turbulence models for mechanical agitation of non-Newtonian fluids in anaerobic digesters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Binxin

    2011-02-01

    This study evaluates six turbulence models for mechanical agitation of non-Newtonian fluids in a lab-scale anaerobic digestion tank with a pitched blade turbine (PBT) impeller. The models studied are: (1) the standard k-ɛ model, (2) the RNG k-ɛ model, (3) the realizable k-ɛ model, (4) the standard k-ω model, (5) the SST k-ω model, and (6) the Reynolds stress model. Through comparing power and flow numbers for the PBT impeller obtained from computational fluid dynamics (CFD) with those from the lab specifications, the realizable k-ɛ and the standard k-ω models are found to be more appropriate than the other turbulence models. An alternative method to calculate the Reynolds number for the moving zone that characterizes the impeller rotation is proposed to judge the flow regime. To check the effect of the model setup on the predictive accuracy, both discretization scheme and numerical approach are investigated. The model validation is conducted by comparing the simulated velocities with experimental data in a lab-scale digester from literature. Moreover, CFD simulation of mixing in a full-scale digester with two side-entry impellers is performed to optimize the installation. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of rabbit nasal airflows for the development of hybrid CFD/PBPK models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corley, R A; Minard, K R; Kabilan, S; Einstein, D R; Kuprat, A P; Harkema, J R; Kimbell, J S; Gargas, M L; Kinzell, John H

    2009-05-01

    The percentages of total airflows over the nasal respiratory and olfactory epithelium of female rabbits were calculated from computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of steady-state inhalation. These airflow calculations, along with nasal airway geometry determinations, are critical parameters for hybrid CFD/physiologically based pharmacokinetic models that describe the nasal dosimetry of water-soluble or reactive gases and vapors in rabbits. CFD simulations were based upon three-dimensional computational meshes derived from magnetic resonance images of three adult female New Zealand White (NZW) rabbits. In the anterior portion of the nose, the maxillary turbinates of rabbits are considerably more complex than comparable regions in rats, mice, monkeys, or humans. This leads to a greater surface area to volume ratio in this region and thus the potential for increased extraction of water soluble or reactive gases and vapors in the anterior portion of the nose compared to many other species. Although there was considerable interanimal variability in the fine structures of the nasal turbinates and airflows in the anterior portions of the nose, there was remarkable consistency between rabbits in the percentage of total inspired airflows that reached the ethmoid turbinate region (approximately 50%) that is presumably lined with olfactory epithelium. These latter results (airflows reaching the ethmoid turbinate region) were higher than previous published estimates for the male F344 rat (19%) and human (7%). These differences in regional airflows can have significant implications in interspecies extrapolations of nasal dosimetry.

  2. Modernization of vertical Pelton turbines with the help of CFD and model testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mack, Reiner; Gola, Bartlomiej; Smertnig, Martin; Wittwer, Bernhard; Meusburger, Peter

    2014-03-01

    The modernization of water turbines bears a high potential of increasing the already installed hydropower capacity. In many projects the existing waterways allow a substantial increase of the available flow capacity and with it the energy output. But also the upgrading onto a state of the art hydraulic, mechanical and electrical design will increase the available power considerably after the rehabilitation. The two phase nature of the flow in Pelton turbines requires for the hydraulic refurbishment special care in the application of the available design methods. Where the flow in the high pressure section of the turbine is mainly of one phase nature, CFD has been used as a standard tool for many years. Also the jet quality, and with it the exploration of the source of flow disturbances that cause poor free surface quality can be investigated with CFD. The interaction of the jet with the buckets of the runner is also examined by means of CFD. However, its accuracy with respect to hydraulic efficiency is, because of the two phase flow and the transient flow process, in very few cases good enough for a reliable and accurate prediction of absolute numbers. The optimization of hydraulic bucket profiles is therefore always checked with measurements in homologous scaled model turbines. A similar situation exists for the housing flow after the water is discharged from the runner. Here also CFD techniques are available to explore the general mechanisms. However, due to the two phase flow nature, where only a very small space is filled with moving water, the experimental setup in a model turbine is always the final proof for optimizations of housing inserts and modifications. The hydraulic design of a modernization project for a power station equipped with vertical Pelton turbines of two different designs is described in the proposed paper. It will be shown, how CFD is applied to determine the losses in the high pressure section and how these results are combined with the

  3. Flow dynamics of a novel counterpulsation device characterized by CFD and PIV modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giridharan, G A; Lederer, C; Berthe, A; Goubergrits, L; Hutzenlaub, J; Slaughter, M S; Dowling, R D; Spence, P A; Koenig, S C

    2011-12-01

    Historically, single port valveless pneumatic blood pumps have had a high incidence of thrombus formation due to areas of blood stagnation and hemolysis due to areas of high shear stress. To ensure minimal hemolysis and favorable blood washing characteristics, particle image velocimetry (PIV) and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) were used to evaluate the design of a new single port, valveless counterpulsation device (Symphony). The Symphony design was tested in 6-h acute (n=8), 5-day (n=8) and 30-day (n=2) chronic experiments in a calf model (Jersey, 76 kg). Venous blood samples were collected during acute (hourly) and chronic (weekly) time courses to analyze for temporal changes in biochemical markers and quantify plasma free hemoglobin. At the end of the study, animals were euthanized and the Symphony and end-organs (brain, liver, kidney, lungs, heart, and spleen) were examined for thrombus formations. Both the PIV and the CFD showed the development of a strong moving vortex during filling phase and that blood exited the Symphony uniformly from all areas during ejection phase. The laminar shear stresses estimated by CFD remained well below the hemolysis threshold of 400 Pa inside the Symphony throughout filling and ejection phases. No areas of persistent blood stagnation or flow separation were observed. The maximum plasma free hemoglobin (washing characteristics without persistent areas of blood stagnation sites during the entire pump cycle, and has a low risk of hemolysis and thrombus formations. Copyright © 2011 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. CFD Model for Lift Force in a Wall-Bounded Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Baalbaki

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The modeling of the lift force in high shear rate pipe flow is an essential issue for the estimation of the droplet dispersion. The analytical models used in most CFD softwares, such as the popular models of Auton or Saffman, overestimate the intensity of the lift force for inertial particles at high particle Reynolds number. In this paper, after a review of DNS calculations, we present an overall solution for the lift force acting on a droplet in a shear flow, for moderate and high particle Reynolds number in the near-wall zone and for unbounded shear flow. Finally, some numerical results in a cylindrical pipe are presented.

  5. CFD Modeling of Non-Neutral Atmospheric Boundary Layer Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koblitz, Tilman

    cost than e.g. using large-eddy simulations. The developed ABL model is successfully validated using a range of different test cases with increasing complexity. Data from several large scale field campaigns, wind tunnel experiments, and previous numerical simulations is presented and compared against...... model results. A method is developed how to simulate the time-dependant non-neutral ABL flow over complex terrain: a precursor simulation is used to specify unsteady inlet boundary conditions on complex terrain domains. The advantage of the developed RANS model framework is its general applicability....... All implementations in the ABL model are tuning free, and except for standard site specific input parameters, no additional model coefficients need to be specified before the simulation. In summary the results show that the implemented modifications are applicable and reproduce the main flow...

  6. Modelling aerosol number distributions from a vehicle exhaust with an aerosol CFD model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albriet, B.; Sartelet, K. N.; Lacour, S.; Carissimo, B.; Seigneur, C.

    2010-03-01

    Vehicular traffic contributes significantly to the aerosol number concentrations at the local scale by emitting primary soot particles and forming secondary nucleated nanoparticles. Because of their potential health effects, more attention is paid to the traffic induced aerosol number distributions. The aim of this work is to explain the phenomenology leading to the formation and the evolution of the aerosol number distributions in the vicinity of a vehicle exhaust using numerical modelling. The emissions are representative of those of a light-duty diesel truck without a diesel particle filter. The atmospheric flow is modelled with a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code to describe the dispersion of pollutants at the local scale. The CFD code, coupled to a modal aerosol model (MAM) describing the aerosol dynamics, is used to model the tailpipe plume of a vehicle with emissions corresponding to urban driving conditions. On the basis of available measurements in Schauer et al. (1999), three surrogate species are chosen to treat the semi-volatile organic compounds in the emissions. The model simulates the formation of the aerosol distribution in the exhaust plume of a vehicle as follows. After emission to the atmosphere, particles are formed by nucleation of sulphuric acid and water vapour depending strongly on the thermodynamic state of the atmosphere and on the dilution conditions. The semi-volatile organic compounds are critical for the rapid growth of nanoparticles through condensation. The semi-volatile organic compounds are also important for the evolution of primary soot particles and can contribute substantially to their chemical composition. The most influential parameters for particle formation are the sulphur fuel content, the semi-volatile organic emissions and also the mass and initial diameter of the soot particles emitted. The model is able to take into account the complex competition between nucleation, condensation and dilution, as well as the

  7. Risk factors and prognostic models for perinatal asphyxia at term

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ensing, S.

    2015-01-01

    This thesis will focus on the risk factors and prognostic models for adverse perinatal outcome at term, with a special focus on perinatal asphyxia and obstetric interventions during labor to reduce adverse pregnancy outcomes. For the majority of the studies in this thesis we were allowed to use data

  8. CFD Modeling of Airflow in a Livestock Building

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rong, Li; Elhadidi, B.; Khalifa, H. E.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, a 2D simulation for a typical livestock building is performed to assess the ammonia emission removal rate to the atmosphere. Two geometry models are used and compared in order to represent the slatted floor. In the first model the floor is modeled as a slatted floor and in the second...... the accuracy of the porous jump assumption by comparing the velocity, and ammonia concentration in a 2D simulation, heated solid bodies are added to represent the livestock in the following simulations. The results of simulations with heat source also indicate that modeling the slatted floor with slats...... is necessary. Furthermore, the combination of low inlet velocity and heated objects causes the flow to be buoyancy dominated and unsteady. This unsteadiness can be common in similar buoyancy induced flows for high Rayleigh number flow. The paper concludes with tradeoffs suggested for simulation of livestock...

  9. Application Of CFD To Modeling Of Squeeze Mode Magnetorheological Dampers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gołdasz Janusz

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The so-called squeeze flow involves a magnetorheological (MR fluid sandwiched between two planar surfaces setting up a flow channel. The height of the channel varies according to a prescribed displacement or force profile. When exposed to a magnetic field of sufficient strength MR fluids develop a yield stress. In squeeze-mode devices the yield stress varies with both the magnetic field magnitude and the channel height. In this paper an unsteady flow model of an MR fluid in squeeze mode is proposed. The model is developed in Ansys Fluent R16. The MR material flow model is based on the apparent viscosity approach. In order to investigate the material's behaviour the authors prepared a model of an idealized squeeze-mode damper in which the fluid flow is enforced by varying the height of the channel. Using mesh animation, the model plate is excited, and as the mesh moves, the fluid is squeezed out of the gap. In the simulations the model is subjected to a range of displacement inputs of frequencies from 10 to 20 Hz, and local yield stress levels up to 30 kPa. The results are presented in the form of time histories of the normal force on the squeezing plate and loops of force vs. displacement (velocity.

  10. Development and validation of a CFD model predicting the backfill process of a nuclear waste gallery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gopala, Vinay Ramohalli, E-mail: gopala@nrg.eu [Nuclear Research and consultancy Group (NRG), P.O. Box 25, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Lycklama a Nijeholt, Jan-Aiso [Nuclear Research and consultancy Group (NRG), P.O. Box 25, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Bakker, Paul [Van Hattum en Blankevoort, Woerden (Netherlands); Haverkate, Benno [Nuclear Research and consultancy Group (NRG), P.O. Box 25, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands)

    2011-07-15

    Research highlights: > This work presents the CFD simulation of the backfill process of Supercontainers with nuclear waste emplaced in a disposal gallery. > The cement-based material used for backfill is grout and the flow of grout is modelled as a Bingham fluid. > The model is verified against an analytical solution and validated against the flowability tests for concrete. > Comparison between backfill plexiglas experiment and simulation shows a distinct difference in the filling pattern. > The numerical model needs to be further developed to include segregation effects and thixotropic behavior of grout. - Abstract: Nuclear waste material may be stored in underground tunnels for long term storage. The example treated in this article is based on the current Belgian disposal concept for High-Level Waste (HLW), in which the nuclear waste material is packed in concrete shielded packages, called Supercontainers, which are inserted into these tunnels. After placement of the packages in the underground tunnels, the remaining voids between the packages and the tunnel lining is filled-up with a cement-based material called grout in order to encase the stored containers into the underground spacing. This encasement of the stored containers inside the tunnels is known as the backfill process. A good backfill process is necessary to stabilize the waste gallery against ground settlements. A numerical model to simulate the backfill process can help to improve and optimize the process by ensuring a homogeneous filling with no air voids and also optimization of the injection positions to achieve a homogeneous filling. The objective of the present work is to develop such a numerical code that can predict the backfill process well and validate the model against the available experiments and analytical solutions. In the present work the rheology of Grout is modelled as a Bingham fluid which is implemented in OpenFOAM - a finite volume-based open source computational fluid dynamics

  11. Applications of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) in the modelling and design of ventilation systems in the agricultural industry: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, Tomás; Sun, Da-Wen; Grant, Jim; Fallon, Richard; Dodd, Vincent

    2007-09-01

    The application of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) in the agricultural industry is becoming ever more important. Over the years, the versatility, accuracy and user-friendliness offered by CFD has led to its increased take-up by the agricultural engineering community. Now CFD is regularly employed to solve environmental problems of greenhouses and animal production facilities. However, due to a combination of increased computer efficacy and advanced numerical techniques, the realism of these simulations has only been enhanced in recent years. This study provides a state-of-the-art review of CFD, its current applications in the design of ventilation systems for agricultural production systems, and the outstanding challenging issues that confront CFD modellers. The current status of greenhouse CFD modelling was found to be at a higher standard than that of animal housing, owing to the incorporation of user-defined routines that simulate crop biological responses as a function of local environmental conditions. Nevertheless, the most recent animal housing simulations have addressed this issue and in turn have become more physically realistic.

  12. Detailed CFD Modelling of Open Refrigerated Display Cabinets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Dinis Gaspar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A comprehensive and detailed computational fluid dynamics (CFDs modelling of air flow and heat transfer in an open refrigerated display cabinet (ORDC is performed in this study. The physical-mathematical model considers the flow through the internal ducts, across fans and evaporator, and includes the thermal response of food products. The air humidity effect and thermal radiation heat transfer between surfaces are taken into account. Experimental tests were performed to characterize the phenomena near physical extremities and to validate the numerical predictions of air temperature, relative humidity, and velocity. Numerical and experimental results comparison reveals the predictive capabilities of the computational model for the optimized conception and development of this type of equipments. Numerical predictions are used to propose geometrical and functional parametric studies that improve thermal performance of the ORDC and consequently food safety.

  13. Predicting optimum vortex tube performance using a simplified CFD model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karimi-Esfahani, M; Fartaj, A.; Rankin, G.W. [Univ. of Windsor, Dept. of Mechanical, Automotive and Materials Engineering, Windsor, Ontario (Canada)]. E-mail: mki_60@hotmail.com

    2004-07-01

    The Ranque-Hilsch tube is a particular type of vortex tube device. The flow enters the device tangentially near one end and exits from the open ends of the tube. The inlet air is of a uniform temperature throughout while the outputs are of different temperatures. One outlet is hotter and the other is colder than the inlet air. This device has no moving parts and does not require any additional power for its operation other than that supplied to the device to compress the inlet air. It has, however, not been widely used, mainly because of its low efficiency. In this paper, a simplified 2-dimensional computational fluid dynamics model for the flow in the vortex tube is developed using FLUENT. This model makes use of the assumption of axial symmetry throughout the entire flow domain. Compared to a three-dimensional computational solution, the simplified model requires significantly less computational time. This is important because the model is to be used for an optimization study. A user-defined function is generated to implement a modified version of the k-epsilon model to account for turbulence. This model is validated by comparing a particular solution with available experimental data. The variation of cold temperature drop and efficiency of the device with orifice diameter, inlet pressure and cold mass flow ratio qualitatively agree with experimental results. Variation of these performance indices with tube length did not agree with the experiments for small values of tube length. However, it did agree qualitatively for large values. (author)

  14. Comparison of Engineering Wake Models with CFD Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Søren Juhl; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær; Ivanell, S.

    2014-01-01

    The engineering wake models by Jensen [1] and Frandsen et al. [2] are assessed for different scenarios simulated using Large Eddy Simulation and the Actuator Line method implemented in the Navier-Stokes equations. The scenarios include the far wake behind a single wind turbine, a long row...... of turbines in an atmospheric boundary layer, idealised cases of an infinitely long row of wind turbines and infinite wind farms with three different spacings. Both models include a wake expansion factor, which is calibrated to fit the simulated wake velocities. The analysis highlights physical deficiencies...

  15. CFD modeling of a UV-LED photocatalytic odor abatement process in a continuous reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zimeng; Liu, Jing; Dai, Yuancan; Dong, Weiyang [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Zhang, Shicheng, E-mail: zhangsc@fudan.edu.cn [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Chen, Jianmin, E-mail: jmchen@fudan.edu.cn [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China)

    2012-05-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A CFD model is developed for a UV-LED based photocatalytic deodorization reactor. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Radiation field model and Langmuir-Hinshelwood kinetics are integrated in the model. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The model can predict the pollutant concentration profile and the reactor performance. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LED distance is predicted to be a critical parameter in photocatalytic reactor design. - Abstract: This paper presents a model study of a UV light-emitting-diode (UV-LED) based photocatalytic odor abatement process. It integrated computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling of the gas flow in the reactor with LED-array radiation field calculation and Langmuir-Hinshelwood reaction kinetics. It was applied to simulate the photocatalytic degradation of dimethyl sulfide (DMS) in a UV-LED reactor based on experimentally determined chemical kinetic parameters. A non-linear power law relating reaction rate to irradiation intensity was adopted. The model could predict the steady state DMS concentration profiles by calculating the advection, diffusion and Langmuir-Hinshelwood reaction kinetics. By affecting the radiation intensity and uniformity, the position of the LED array relative to the catalyst appeared to be a critical parameter determining DMS removal efficiency. Too small distances might yield low quantum efficiency and consequently poor abatement performance. This study provided an example of LED-based photocatalytic process modeling and gave insights into the optimization of light source design for photocatalytic applications.

  16. CFD modelling of condensers for freeze-drying processes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... the condenser, in order to evaluate condenser efficiency and gain deeper insights of the process to be used for the improvement of its design. Both a complete laboratory-scale freeze-drying apparatus and an industrial-scale condenser have been investigated in this work, modelling the process of water vapour deposition.

  17. Multiphase CFD modeling of nearfield fate of sediment plumes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saremi, Sina; Hjelmager Jensen, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    . The two-phase mixture solution based on the drift-flux method is evaluated for 3D simulation of material disposal and overflow discharge from the hoppers. The model takes into account the hindrance and resistance mechanisms in the mixture and is capable of describing the flow details within the plumes...

  18. CFD Modeling of Local Scour under Complex Free Surface Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bihs, Hans; Ahmad, Nadeem; Kamath, Arun; Arntsen, Øivind A.

    2017-04-01

    In the present study the open-source three-dimensional numerical model REEF3D is used to calculate the complex free surface flow over a spillway, the corresponding hydraulic jump downstream of the spillway and the resulting local scour. The numerical results are compared with experimental data. The transcritical flow changes from supercritical to subcritical after the hydraulic structure, which results in the hydraulic jump. The flow of the hydraulic jump is characterised by the its violent nature and the large amount of turbulence production. While the downstream area of a spillway is typically protected by a concrete apron, scour can still occur downstream of this protection. REEF3D has advanced interface capturing capabilities, with which it is possible to simulate the complex free surface dynamics. With the level set method free surface is modeled as the zero level set of a scalar signed distance function. The flow velocities are calculated together with the pressure on a staggered grid, ensuring a tight velocity-pressure coupling. Complex geometries are modeled with a ghost cell immersed boundary method. The convective terms of the momentum equations, the level set function and the equations of the k-ω turbulence model are discretized with the fifth-order finite difference WENO scheme. Parallelization of the numerical scheme is achieved by using the domain decomposition framework together with the MPI library. The topography of the sediment bed is implicitly described by a level set function. Based on bedload and suspended load transport formulations, the sediment continuity defect in the bed cells is converted into the rate of change of the vertical bed elevation. This strategy has two major advantages: the topology is a well defined surface when calculating the incipient motion on the sloping bed and the sand avalanche. In addition, the numerically error prone re-meshing can be avoided, because the complex boundary surface is accounted for by the immersed

  19. Reactor design, cold-model experiment and CFD modeling for chemical looping combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Shaohua; Ma, Jinchen; Hu, Xintao; Zhao, Haibo; Wang, Baowen; Zheng, Chuguang [Huazhong Univ. of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China). State Key Lab. of Coal Combustion

    2013-07-01

    Chemical looping combustion (CLC) is an efficient, clean and cheap technology for CO{sub 2} capture, and an interconnected fluidized bed is more appropriate solution for CLC. This paper aims to design a reactor system for CLC, carry out cold-model experiment of the system, and model fuel reactor using commercial CFD software. As for the CLC system, the air reactor (AR) is designed as a fast fluidized bed while the fuel reactor (FR) is a bubbling bed; a cyclone is used for solid separation of the AR exit flow. The AR and FR are separated by two U-type loop seals to remain gas sealed. Considered the chemical kinetics of oxygen carrier, fluid dynamics, pressure balance and mass balance of the system simultaneously, some key design parameters of a CH{sub 4}-fueled and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-based CLC reactor (thermal power of 50 kWth) are determined, including key geometric parameters (reactor cross-sectional area and reactor height) and operation parameters (bed material quantity, solid circulation rate, apparent gas velocity of each reactor). A cold-model bench having same geometric parameters with its prototype is built up to study the effects of various operation conditions (including gas velocity in the reactors and loop seals, and bed material height, etc.) on the solids circulation rate, gas leakage, and pressure balance. It is witnessed the cold-model system is able to meet special requirements for CLC system such as gas sealing between AR and FR, the circulation rate and particles residence time. Furthermore, the thermal FR reactor with oxygen carrier of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and fuel of CH{sub 4} is simulated by commercial CFD solver FLUENT. It is found that for the design case the combustion efficiency of CH{sub 4} reaches 88.2%. A few part of methane is unburned due to fast, large bubbles rising through the reactor.

  20. CFD modeling of particle dispersion and deposition coupled with particle dynamical models in a ventilated room

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guangping; Wang, Jiasong

    2017-10-01

    Two dynamical models, the traditional method of moments coupled model (MCM) and Taylor-series expansion method of moments coupled model (TECM) for particle dispersion distribution and gravitation deposition are developed in three-dimensional ventilated environments. The turbulent airflow field is modeled with the renormalization group (RNG) k-ε turbulence model. The particle number concentration distribution in a ventilated room is obtained by solving the population balance equation coupled with the airflow field. The coupled dynamical models are validated using experimental data. A good agreement between the numerical and experimental results can be achieved. Both models have a similar characteristic for the spatial distribution of particle concentration. Relative to the MCM model, the TECM model presents a more close result to the experimental data. The vortex structure existed in the air flow makes a relative large concentration difference at the center region and results in a spatial non-uniformity of concentration field. With larger inlet velocity, the mixing level of particles in the room is more uniform. In general, the new dynamical models coupled with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) in the current study provide a reasonable and accurate method for the temporal and spatial evolution of particles effected by the deposition and dispersion behaviors. In addition, two ventilation modes with different inlet velocities are proceeded to study the effect on the particle evolution. The results show that with the ceiling ventilation mode (CVM), the particles can be better mixed and the concentration level is also higher. On the contrast, with the side ceiling ventilation mode (SVM), the particle concentration has an obvious stratified distribution with a relative lower level and it makes a much better environment condition to the human exposure.

  1. Modeling of annular two-phase flow using a unified CFD approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Haipeng, E-mail: haipengl@kth.se; Anglart, Henryk, E-mail: henryk@kth.se

    2016-07-15

    Highlights: • Annular two-phase flow has been modeled using a unified CFD approach. • Liquid film was modeled based on a two-dimensional thin film assumption. • Both Eulerian and Lagrangian methods were employed for the gas core flow modeling. - Abstract: A mechanistic model of annular flow with evaporating liquid film has been developed using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). The model is employing a separate solver with two-dimensional conservation equations to predict propagation of a thin boiling liquid film on solid walls. The liquid film model is coupled to a solver of three-dimensional conservation equations describing the gas core, which is assumed to contain a saturated mixture of vapor and liquid droplets. Both the Eulerian–Eulerian and the Eulerian–Lagrangian approach are used to describe the droplet and vapor motion in the gas core. All the major interaction phenomena between the liquid film and the gas core flow have been accounted for, including the liquid film evaporation as well as the droplet deposition and entrainment. The resultant unified framework for annular flow has been applied to the steam-water flow with conditions typical for a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR). The simulation results for the liquid film flow rate show good agreement with the experimental data, with the potential to predict the dryout occurrence based on criteria of critical film thickness or critical film flow rate.

  2. How to bridge the gap between "unresolved" model and "resolved" model in CFD-DEM coupled method for sediment transport?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, D.; Fu, X.; Liu, X.

    2016-12-01

    In nature, granular materials exist widely in water bodies. Understanding the fundamentals of solid-liquid two-phase flow, such as turbulent sediment-laden flow, is of importance for a wide range of applications. A coupling method combining computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and discrete element method (DEM) is now widely used for modeling such flows. In this method, when particles are significantly larger than the CFD cells, the fluid field around each particle should be fully resolved. On the other hand, the "unresolved" model is designed for the situation where particles are significantly smaller than the mesh cells. Using "unresolved" model, large amount of particles can be simulated simultaneously. However, there is a gap between these two situations when the size of DEM particles and CFD cell is in the same order of magnitude. In this work, the most commonly used void fraction models are tested with numerical sedimentation experiments. The range of applicability for each model is presented. Based on this, a new void fraction model, i.e., a modified version of "tri-linear" model, is proposed. Particular attention is paid to the smooth function of void fraction in order to avoid numerical instability. The results show good agreement with the experimental data and analytical solution for both single-particle motion and also group-particle motion, indicating great potential of the new void fraction model.

  3. Bonneville Powerhouse 2 Fish Guidance Efficiency Studies: CFD Model of the Forebay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Serkowski, John A.; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2012-07-01

    In ongoing work, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (CENWP) is seeking to better understand and improve the conditions within the Bonneville Powerhouse 2 (B2) turbine intakes to improve survival of downstream migrant salmonid smolt. In this study, the existing B2 forebay computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model was modified to include a more detailed representation of all B2 turbine intakes. The modified model was validated to existing field-measured forebay ADCP velocities. The initial CFD model scenarios tested a single project operation and the impact of adding the Behavior Guidance System (BGS) or Corner Collector. These structures had impacts on forebay flows. Most notable was that the addition of the BGS and Corner Collector reduced the lateral extent of the recirculation areas on the Washington shore and Cascade Island and reduced the flow velocity parallel to the powerhouse in front of Units 11 and 12. For these same cases, at the turbine intakes across the powerhouse, there was very little difference in the flow volume into the gatewell for the clean forebay, and the forebay with the BGS in place and/or the Corner Collector operating. The largest differences were at Units 11 to 13. The CFD model cases testing the impact of the gatewell slot fillers showed no impact to the forebay flows, but large differences within the gatewells. With the slot fillers, the flow above the standard traveling screen and into the gatewell increased (about 100 cfs at each turbine intake) and the gap flow decreased across the powerhouse for all cases. The increased flow up the gatewell was further enhanced with only half the units operating. The flow into the gatewell slot was increased about 35 cfs for each bay of each intake across the powerhouse; this change was uniform across the powerhouse. The flows in the gatewell of Unit 12, the most impacted unit for the scenarios, was evaluated. In front of the vertical barrier screen, the CFD model with slot fillers

  4. A Comparative Study of CFD Models of a Real Wind Turbine in Solar Chimney Power Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehsan Gholamalizadeh

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available A solar chimney power plant consists of four main parts, a solar collector, a chimney, an energy storage layer, and a wind turbine. So far, several investigations on the performance of the solar chimney power plant have been conducted. Among them, different approaches have been applied to model the turbine inside the system. In particular, a real wind turbine coupled to the system was simulated using computational fluid dynamics (CFD in three investigations. Gholamalizadeh et al. simulated a wind turbine with the same blade profile as the Manzanares SCPP’s turbine (FX W-151-A blade profile, while a CLARK Y blade profile was modelled by Guo et al. and Ming et al. In this study, simulations of the Manzanares prototype were carried out using the CFD model developed by Gholamalizadeh et al. Then, results obtained by modelling different turbine blade profiles at different turbine rotational speeds were compared. The results showed that a turbine with the CLARK Y blade profile significantly overestimates the value of the pressure drop across the Manzanares prototype turbine as compared to the FX W-151-A blade profile. In addition, modelling of both blade profiles led to very similar trends in changes in turbine efficiency and power output with respect to rotational speed.

  5. Experimental and CFD analysis for prediction of vortex and swirl angle in the pump sump station model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, C. G.; Kim, B. H.; Bang, B. H.; Lee, Y. H.

    2015-01-01

    Sump model testing is mainly used to check flow conditions around the intake structure. In present paper, numerical simulation with SST turbulence model for a scaled sump model was carried out with air entrainment and two phases for prediction of locations of vortex generation. The sump model used for the CFD and experimental analysis was scaled down by a ratio of 1:10. The experiment was performed in Korea Maritime and Ocean University (KMOU) and the flow conditions around pump's intake structure were investigated. In this study, uniformity of flow distribution in the pump intake channel was examined to find out the specific causes of vortex occurrence. Furthermore, the effectiveness of an Anti Vortex Device (AVD) to suppress the vortex occurrence in a single intake pump sump model was examined. CFD and experimental analysis carried out with and without AVDs produced very similar results. Without the AVDs, the maximum swirl angle obtained for experimental and CFD analysis were 10.9 and 11.3 degree respectively. Similarly, with AVDs, the maximum swirl angle obtained for experimental and CFD analysis was 2.7 and 0.2 degree respectively. So, with reference to the ANSI/HI 98 standard that permits a maximum swirl angle of 5 degree, the use of AVDs in experimental and CFD analysis produced very desirable results which is well within the limit.

  6. A computational approach for coupled 1D and 2D/3D CFD modelling of pulse Tube cryocoolers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, T.; Spoor, P. S.; Ghiaasiaan, S. M.

    2017-12-01

    The physics behind Stirling-type cryocoolers are complicated. One dimensional (1D) simulation tools offer limited details and accuracy, in particular for cryocoolers that have non-linear configurations. Multi-dimensional Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) methods are useful but are computationally expensive in simulating cyrocooler systems in their entirety. In view of the fact that some components of a cryocooler, e.g., inertance tubes and compliance tanks, can be modelled as 1D components with little loss of critical information, a 1D-2D/3D coupled model was developed. Accordingly, one-dimensional – like components are represented by specifically developed routines. These routines can be coupled to CFD codes and provide boundary conditions for 2D/3D CFD simulations. The developed coupled model, while preserving sufficient flow field details, is two orders of magnitude faster than equivalent 2D/3D CFD models. The predictions show good agreement with experimental data and 2D/3D CFD model.

  7. Model Adaptation for Prognostics in a Particle Filtering Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhaskar Saha

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the key motivating factors for using particle filters for prognostics is the ability to include model parameters as part of the state vector to be estimated. This performs model adaptation in conjunction with state tracking, and thus, produces a tuned model that can used for long term predictions. This feature of particle filters works in most part due to the fact that they are not subject to the “curse of dimensionality”, i.e. the exponential growth of computational complexity with state dimension. However, in practice, this property holds for “well-designed” particle filters only as dimensionality increases. This paper explores the notion of wellness of design in the context of predicting remaining useful life for individual discharge cycles of Li-ion and Li-Polymer batteries. Prognostic metrics are used to analyze the tradeoff between different model designs and prediction performance. Results demonstrate how sensitivity analysis may be used to arrive at a well-designed prognostic model that can take advantage of the model adaptation properties of a particle filter.

  8. Model Adaptation for Prognostics in a Particle Filtering Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Bhaskar; Goebel, Kai Frank

    2011-01-01

    One of the key motivating factors for using particle filters for prognostics is the ability to include model parameters as part of the state vector to be estimated. This performs model adaptation in conjunction with state tracking, and thus, produces a tuned model that can used for long term predictions. This feature of particle filters works in most part due to the fact that they are not subject to the "curse of dimensionality", i.e. the exponential growth of computational complexity with state dimension. However, in practice, this property holds for "well-designed" particle filters only as dimensionality increases. This paper explores the notion of wellness of design in the context of predicting remaining useful life for individual discharge cycles of Li-ion batteries. Prognostic metrics are used to analyze the tradeoff between different model designs and prediction performance. Results demonstrate how sensitivity analysis may be used to arrive at a well-designed prognostic model that can take advantage of the model adaptation properties of a particle filter.

  9. Validation and analysis of forward osmosis CFD model in complex 3D geometries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gruber, Mathias F.; Gruber, Mathias F.; Johnson, Carl J.

    2012-01-01

    In forward osmosis (FO), an osmotic pressure gradient generated across a semi-permeable membrane is used to generate water transport from a dilute feed solution into a concentrated draw solution. This principle has shown great promise in the areas of water purification, wastewater treatment...... separation process and water permeation through membranes under various flow conditions. It is furthermore demonstrated how the CFD model can be used to optimize membrane geometry in such as way as to promote the mass transfer. © 2012 by the authors; licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland....

  10. CFD Fuel Slosh Modeling of Fluid-Structure Interaction in Spacecraft Propellant Tanks with Diaphragms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sances, Dillon J.; Gangadharan, Sathya N.; Sudermann, James E.; Marsell, Brandon

    2010-01-01

    Liquid sloshing within spacecraft propellant tanks causes rapid energy dissipation at resonant modes, which can result in attitude destabilization of the vehicle. Identifying resonant slosh modes currently requires experimental testing and mechanical pendulum analogs to characterize the slosh dynamics. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) techniques have recently been validated as an effective tool for simulating fuel slosh within free-surface propellant tanks. Propellant tanks often incorporate an internal flexible diaphragm to separate ullage and propellant which increases modeling complexity. A coupled fluid-structure CFD model is required to capture the damping effects of a flexible diaphragm on the propellant. ANSYS multidisciplinary engineering software employs a coupled solver for analyzing two-way Fluid Structure Interaction (FSI) cases such as the diaphragm propellant tank system. Slosh models generated by ANSYS software are validated by experimental lateral slosh test results. Accurate data correlation would produce an innovative technique for modeling fuel slosh within diaphragm tanks and provide an accurate and efficient tool for identifying resonant modes and the slosh dynamic response.

  11. 3D CFD validation of invert trap efficiency for sewer solid management using VOF model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Mohsin

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Earlier investigators have numerically carried out performance analysis of the invert trap fitted in an open channel using the stochastic discrete phase model (DPM by assuming the open channel flow to be closed conduit flow under pressure and assuming zero shear stress at the top wall. This is known as the fixed lid model. By assuming the top wall to be a shear free wall, they have been able to show that the velocity distribution looks similar to that of an open channel flow with zero velocity at the bottom and maximum velocity at the top, representing the free water surface, but no information has been provided for the pressure at the free water surface. Because of this assumption, the validation of the model in predicting the trap efficiency has performed significantly poorly. In addition, the free water surface subject to zero gauge pressure cannot be modeled using the fixed lid model because there is no provision of extra space in the form of air space for the fluctuating part of the water surface profile. It can, however, be modeled using the volume of fluid (VOF model because the VOF model is the appropriate model for open channel or free surface flow. Therefore, in the present study, three-dimensional (3D computational fluid dynamics (CFD modeling with the VOF model, which considers open channel flow with a free water surface, along with the stochastic DPM, was used to model the trap efficiency of an invert trap fitted in an open rectangular channel. The governing mathematical flow equations of the VOF model were solved using the ANSYS Fluent 14.0 software, reproducing the experimental conditions exactly. The results show that the 3D CFD predictions using the VOF model closely fit the experimental data for glass bead particles.

  12. Galerkin CFD solvers for use in a multi-disciplinary suite for modeling advanced flight vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffitt, Nicholas J.

    This work extends existing Galerkin CFD solvers for use in a multi-disciplinary suite. The suite is proposed as a means of modeling advanced flight vehicles, which exhibit strong coupling between aerodynamics, structural dynamics, controls, rigid body motion, propulsion, and heat transfer. Such applications include aeroelastics, aeroacoustics, stability and control, and other highly coupled applications. The suite uses NASA STARS for modeling structural dynamics and heat transfer. Aerodynamics, propulsion, and rigid body dynamics are modeled in one of the five CFD solvers below. Euler2D and Euler3D are Galerkin CFD solvers created at OSU by Cowan (2003). These solvers are capable of modeling compressible inviscid aerodynamics with modal elastics and rigid body motion. This work reorganized these solvers to improve efficiency during editing and at run time. Simple and efficient propulsion models were added, including rocket, turbojet, and scramjet engines. Viscous terms were added to the previous solvers to create NS2D and NS3D. The viscous contributions were demonstrated in the inertial and non-inertial frames. Variable viscosity (Sutherland's equation) and heat transfer boundary conditions were added to both solvers but not verified in this work. Two turbulence models were implemented in NS2D and NS3D: Spalart-Allmarus (SA) model of Deck, et al. (2002) and Menter's SST model (1994). A rotation correction term (Shur, et al., 2000) was added to the production of turbulence. Local time stepping and artificial dissipation were adapted to each model. CFDsol is a Taylor-Galerkin solver with an SA turbulence model. This work improved the time accuracy, far field stability, viscous terms, Sutherland?s equation, and SA model with NS3D as a guideline and added the propulsion models from Euler3D to CFDsol. Simple geometries were demonstrated to utilize current meshing and processing capabilities. Air-breathing hypersonic flight vehicles (AHFVs) represent the ultimate

  13. A Two-Temperature Open-Source CFD Model for Hypersonic Reacting Flows, Part One: Zero-Dimensional Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Casseau

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A two-temperature CFD (computational fluid dynamics solver is a prerequisite to any spacecraft re-entry numerical study that aims at producing results with a satisfactory level of accuracy within realistic timescales. In this respect, a new two-temperature CFD solver, hy2Foam, has been developed within the framework of the open-source CFD platform OpenFOAM for the prediction of hypersonic reacting flows. This solver makes the distinct juncture between the trans-rotational and multiple vibrational-electronic temperatures. hy2Foam has the capability to model vibrational-translational and vibrational-vibrational energy exchanges in an eleven-species air mixture. It makes use of either the Park TTv model or the coupled vibration-dissociation-vibration (CVDV model to handle chemistry-vibration coupling and it can simulate flows with or without electronic energy. Verification of the code for various zero-dimensional adiabatic heat baths of progressive complexity has been carried out. hy2Foam has been shown to produce results in good agreement with those given by the CFD code LeMANS (The Michigan Aerothermodynamic Navier-Stokes solver and previously published data. A comparison is also performed with the open-source DSMC (direct simulation Monte Carlo code dsmcFoam. It has been demonstrated that the use of the CVDV model and rates derived from Quantum-Kinetic theory promote a satisfactory consistency between the CFD and DSMC chemistry modules.

  14. Wind Loads on Ships and Offshore Structures Determined by Model Tests, CFD and Full-Scale Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aage, Christian

    1998-01-01

    -scale measurements have been carried out as well. The CFD method also offers the possibility of a computational estimate of scale effects related to wind tunnel model testing. An example of such an estimate on the ferry is discussed. This work has been published in more details in Proceedings of BOSS'97, Aage et al......Wind loads on ships and offshore structures have until recently been determined only by model tests, or by statistical methods based on model tests. By the development of Computational Fluid Dynamics or CFD there is now a realistic computational alternative. In principle, both methods should...... be validated systematically against full-scale measurements, but due to the great practical difficulties involved, this is almost never done. In this investigation, wind loads on a seagoing ferry and on a semisubmersible platform have been determined by model tests and by CFD. On the ferry, full...

  15. Comparison of CFD and operational dispersion models in an urban-like environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonioni, G.; Burkhart, S.; Burman, J.; Dejoan, A.; Fusco, A.; Gaasbeek, R.; Gjesdal, T.; Jäppinen, A.; Riikonen, K.; Morra, P.; Parmhed, O.; Santiago, J. L.

    2012-02-01

    Chemical plants, refineries, transportation of hazardous materials are some of the most attractive facilities for external attacks aimed at the release of toxic substances. Dispersion of these substances into the atmosphere forms a concentration distribution of airborne pollutants with severe consequences for exposed individuals. For emergency preparedness and management, the availability of assessed/validated dispersion models, which can be able to predict concentration distribution and thus dangerous zones for exposed individuals, is of primary importance. Air quality models, integral models and analytical models predict the transport and the turbulent dispersion of gases or aerosols after their release without taking into account in detail the presence of obstacles. Obstacles can modify the velocity field and in turn the concentration field. The Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) models on the other hand are able to describe such phenomena, but they need to be correctly set up, tested and validated in order to obtain reliable results. Within the project Europa-ERG1 TA 113.034 "NBC Modelling and Simulation" several different approaches in CFD modelling of turbulent dispersion in closed, semi-confined and urban-like environment were adopted and compared with experimental data and with operational models. In this paper the results of a comparison between models describing the dispersion of a neutral gas in an idealized urban-like environment are presented and discussed. Experimental data available in the literature have been used as a benchmark for assessing statistical performance for each model. Selected experimental trials include some water channel tests, that were performed by Coanda at 1:205 scale, and one full-scale case that was tested in the fall of 2001 at the Dugway Proving Grounds in Utah, using an array of shipping containers. The paper also suggests the adoption of improved statistical parameters in order to better address differences between models

  16. ANALISIS CFD UNJUK KERJA SIKLON DENGAN MENGGUNAKAN MODEL TURBULEN SPALART-ALLMARAS DAN RNG k- ε

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    suyitno suyitno

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk menganalisa karakteristik aliran dan unjuk kerja siklon terhadap pengaruh kecepatan gas masuk. Penelitian akan dilakukan secara numerik. Hasil dari analisa CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamic akan dibandingkan dengan hasil eksperimen dari literatur lain. Karena aliran dalam siklon dipercaya termasuk kedalam jenis turbulen sehingga dalam analisa CFD juga perlu melibatkan pengaruh turbulen dalam pemecahan persamaan momentumnya (Navier Stokes. Dua model turbulen yaitu Spalart-Allmaras dan RNG k-ε akan dilibatkan dalam perhitungan numerik. Dari hasil perhitungan numerik dan hasil eksperimen dapat disimpulkan bahwa desain siklon pada penelitian ini masih memungkinkan terjadinya aliran pintas. Besarnya efisiensi pemisahan partikel yang terjadi di atas 90% dan tidak tergantung secara signifikan pada kecepatan gas masuk. Peningkatan kecepatan gas masuk dari 13,2 m/s menjadi 17,8 m/s akan meningkatkan penurunan tekanan hampir dua kali lipat. Model Spalart-Allmaras lebih baik dalam memprediksi penurunan tekanan dan efisiensi pemisahan partikel dalam siklon untuk kisaran kecepatan gas masuk 13,2 m/s sampai 17,8 m/s dibandingkan model turbulen RNG k-ε.

  17. CFD modeling of space-time evolution of fast pyrolysis products in a bench-scale fluidized-bed reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    A model for the evolution of pyrolysis products in a fluidized bed has been developed. In this study the unsteady constitutive transport equations for inert gas flow and decomposition kinetics were modeled using the commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software FLUENT-12. The model system d...

  18. Electrochemistry-based Battery Modeling for Prognostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daigle, Matthew J.; Kulkarni, Chetan Shrikant

    2013-01-01

    Batteries are used in a wide variety of applications. In recent years, they have become popular as a source of power for electric vehicles such as cars, unmanned aerial vehicles, and commericial passenger aircraft. In such application domains, it becomes crucial to both monitor battery health and performance and to predict end of discharge (EOD) and end of useful life (EOL) events. To implement such technologies, it is crucial to understand how batteries work and to capture that knowledge in the form of models that can be used by monitoring, diagnosis, and prognosis algorithms. In this work, we develop electrochemistry-based models of lithium-ion batteries that capture the significant electrochemical processes, are computationally efficient, capture the effects of aging, and are of suitable accuracy for reliable EOD prediction in a variety of usage profiles. This paper reports on the progress of such a model, with results demonstrating the model validity and accurate EOD predictions.

  19. CFD Recombiner Modelling and Validation on the H2-Par and Kali-H2 Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphane Mimouni

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A large amount of Hydrogen gas is expected to be released within the dry containment of a pressurized water reactor (PWR, shortly after the hypothetical beginning of a severe accident leading to the melting of the core. According to local gas concentrations, the gaseous mixture of hydrogen, air and steam can reach the flammability limit, threatening the containment integrity. In order to prevent mechanical loads resulting from a possible conflagration of the gas mixture, French and German reactor containments are equipped with passive autocatalytic recombiners (PARs which preventively oxidize hydrogen for concentrations lower than that of the flammability limit. The objective of the paper is to present numerical assessments of the recombiner models implemented in CFD solvers NEPTUNE_CFD and Code_Saturne. Under the EDF/EPRI agreement, CEA has been committed to perform 42 tests of PARs. The experimental program named KALI-H2, consists checking the performance and behaviour of PAR. Unrealistic values for the gas temperature are calculated if the conjugate heat transfer and the wall steam condensation are not taken into account. The combined effects of these models give a good agreement between computational results and experimental data.

  20. Uncertainty evaluation by gamma transmission measurements and CFD model comparison in a FCC cold pilot unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dantas C.C.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The solid flow in air-catalyst in circulating fluidized bed was simulated with CFD model to obtain axial and radial distribution. Therefore, project parameters were confirmed and steady state operation condition was improved. Solid holds up axial end radial profiles simulation and comparison with gamma transmission measurements are in a good agreement. The transmission signal from an 241Am radioactive source was evaluated in NaI(Tl detector coupled to multichannel analyzer. This non intrusive measuring set up is installed at riser of a cold pilot unit to determine parameters of FCC catalyst flow at several concentrations. Mass flow rate calculated by combining solid hold up and solid phase velocity measurements was compared with catalyst inlet measured at down-comer. Evaluation in each measured parameter shows that a relative combined uncertainty of 6% in a 95% interval was estimated. Uncertainty analysis took into account a significant correlation in scan riser transmission measurements. An Eulerian approach of CFD model incorporating the kinetic theory of granular flow was adopted to describe the gas–solid two-phase flows in a multizone circulating reactor. Instantaneous and local gas-particle velocity, void fraction and turbulent parameters were obtained and results are shown in 2 D and 3D graphics.

  1. Development and validation of a CFD-based steam reformer model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kær, Søren Knudsen; Dahlqvist, Mathis; Saksager, Anders

    2006-01-01

    Steam reforming of liquid biofuels (ethanol, bio-diesel etc.) represents a sustainable source of hydrogen for micro Combined Heat and Power (CHP) production as well as Auxiliary Power Units (APUs). In relation to the design of the steam reforming reactor several parameter are important including...... for expensive prototypes. This paper presents an advanced Computational Fluid Dynamics based model of a steam reformer. The model was implemented in the commercial CFD code Fluent through the User Defined Functions interface. The model accounts for the flue gas flow as well as the reformate flow including...... a detailed mechanism for the reforming reactions. Heat exchange between the flue gas and reformate streams through the reformer reactor walls was also included as a conjugate heat transfer process.  From a review of published models for the catalytic steam reforming of ethanol and preliminary predictions...

  2. From Detailed Description of Chemical Reacting Carbon Particles to Subgrid Models for CFD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schulze S.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This work is devoted to the development and validation of a sub-model for the partial oxidation of a spherical char particle moving in an air/steam atmosphere. The particle diameter is 2 mm. The coal particle is represented by moisture- and ash-free nonporous carbon while the coal rank is implemented using semi-global reaction rate expressions taken from the literature. The submodel includes six gaseous chemical species (O2, CO2, CO, H2O, H2, N2. Three heterogeneous reactions are employed, along with two homogeneous semi-global reactions, namely carbon monoxide oxidation and the water-gas-shift reaction. The distinguishing feature of the subgrid model is that it takes into account the influence of homogeneous reactions on integral characteristics such as carbon combustion rates and particle temperature. The sub-model was validated by comparing its results with a comprehensive CFD-based model resolving the issues of bulk flow and boundary layer around the particle. In this model, the Navier-Stokes equations coupled with the energy and species conservation equations were used to solve the problem by means of the pseudo-steady state approach. At the surface of the particle, the balance of mass, energy and species concentration was applied including the effect of the Stefan flow and heat loss due to radiation at the surface of the particle. Good agreement was achieved between the sub-model and the CFD-based model. Additionally, the CFD-based model was verified against experimental data published in the literature (Makino et al. (2003 Combust. Flame 132, 743-753. Good agreement was achieved between numerically predicted and experimentally obtained data for input conditions corresponding to the kinetically controlled regime. The maximal discrepancy (10% between the experiments and the numerical results was observed in the diffusion-controlled regime. Finally, we discuss the influence of the Reynolds number, the ambient O2 mass fraction and the ambient

  3. Geometry optimization of a fibrous scaffold based on mathematical modelling and CFD simulation of a dynamic cell culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tajsoleiman, Tannaz; J. Abdekhodaie, Mohammad; Gernaey, Krist

    2016-01-01

    are the main bottlenecks in this type of processes. In this regard, mathematical modelling and computational fluid dynamics simulation (CFD) are powerful tools to identify an efficient and optimized design by providing reliable insights of the process. This study presents a mathematical model and CFD...... simulation of cartilage cell culture under a perfusion flow, which allows not only to characterize the supply of nutrients and metabolic products inside a fibrous scaffold, but also to assess the overall culture condition and predict the cell growth rate. Afterwards, the simulation results supported finding...

  4. Development of sump model for containment hydrogen distribution calculations using CFD code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ravva, Srinivasa Rao, E-mail: srini@aerb.gov.in [Indian Institute of Technology-Bombay, Mumbai (India); Nuclear Safety Analysis Division, Atomic Energy Regulatory Board, Mumbai (India); Iyer, Kannan N. [Indian Institute of Technology-Bombay, Mumbai (India); Gaikwad, A.J. [Nuclear Safety Analysis Division, Atomic Energy Regulatory Board, Mumbai (India)

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • Sump evaporation model was implemented in FLUENT using three different approaches. • Validated the implemented sump evaporation models against TOSQAN facility. • It was found that predictions are in good agreement with the data. • Diffusion based model would be able to predict both condensation and evaporation. - Abstract: Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations are necessary for obtaining accurate predictions and local behaviour for carrying out containment hydrogen distribution studies. However, commercially available CFD codes do not have all necessary models for carrying out hydrogen distribution analysis. One such model is sump or suppression pool evaporation model. The water in the sump may evaporate during the accident progression and affect the mixture concentrations in the containment. Hence, it is imperative to study the sump evaporation and its effect. Sump evaporation is modelled using three different approaches in the present work. The first approach deals with the calculation of evaporation flow rate and sump liquid temperature and supplying these quantities through user defined functions as boundary conditions. In this approach, the mean values of the domain are used. In the second approach, the mass, momentum, energy and species sources arise due to the sump evaporation are added to the domain through user defined functions. Cell values adjacent to the sump interface are used in this. Heat transfer between gas and liquid is calculated automatically by the code itself. However, in these two approaches, the evaporation rate was computed using an experimental correlation. In the third approach, the evaporation rate is directly estimated using diffusion approximation. The performance of these three models is compared with the sump behaviour experiment conducted in TOSQAN facility.Classification: K. Thermal hydraulics.

  5. CFD Analysis of a Slug Mixing Experiment Conducted on a VVER-1000 Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Moretti

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A commercial CFD code was applied, for validation purposes, to the simulation of a slug mixing experiment carried out at OKB “Gidropress” scaled facility in the framework of EC TACIS project R2.02/02: “Development of safety analysis capabilities for VVER-1000 transients involving spatial variations of coolant properties (temperature or boron concentration at core inlet.” Such experimental model reproduces a VVER-1000 nuclear reactor and is aimed at investigating the in-vessel mixing phenomena. The addressed experiment involves the start-up of one of the four reactor coolant pumps (the other three remaining idle, and the presence of a tracer slug on the starting loop, which is thus transported to the reactor pressure vessel where it mixes with the clear water. Such conditions may occur in a boron dilution scenario, hence the relevance of the addressed phenomena for nuclear reactor safety. Both a pretest and a posttest CFD simulations of the mentioned experiment were performed, which differ in the definition of the boundary conditions (based either on nominal quantities or on measured quantities, resp.. The numerical results are qualitatively and quantitatively analyzed and compared against the measured data in terms of space and time tracer distribution at the core inlet. The improvement of the results due to the optimization of the boundary conditions is evidenced, and a quantification of the simulation accuracy is proposed.

  6. The finite element method in making up meshes in ANSYS Meshing for CFD models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Віктор Іванович Троханяк

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Method of finite elements (FEM is used in calculating tasks of hydrodynamics and heat transfer tasks. The essence of the method consists in the approximate solution of a variational task. To formulate this task a functional concept is used. The type of a functional is different for different tasks and is selected through a special choice. Currently FEM is widely used in calculating the strength and in solving tasks of heat transfer in solids. However, it can be applied in calculating the flow of liquids and gases. There are also methods that combine elements of the finite volumes and finite elements methods. The combination of these methods make it possible to use a wide range of computational meshes ( tetragonal meshes, pyramidal meshes, prismatic meshes, polyhedral meshes what is necessary for solving tasks with complex geometry. This approach is used by CFD packages Ansys CFX, Ansys Fluent, Star-CD, Star-CCM +, Comsol and others. The method and the analysis of 2D mesh were carried out, using a method of final elements in ANSYS Meshing for heat exchangers with an inline arrangement of tubes in banks and with their curvilinear arrangement in compact banks of tubes of a new design. Particular features were considered and the algorithm of making up a mesh was developed for tasks of hydraulic and gas dynamics and thermal mass transfer. The most optimum and qualitative meshes for CFD models were chosen

  7. CFD Modeling of Flow and Ion Exchange Kinetics in a Rotating Bed Reactor System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, Hilde Kristina; Schjøtt Andersen, Patrick Alexander; Byström, Emil

    2017-01-01

    A rotating bed reactor (RBR) has been modeled using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). The flow pattern in the RBR was investigated and the flow through the porous material in it was quantified. A simplified geometry representing the more complex RBR geometry was introduced and the simplified...... model was able to reproduce the main characteristics of the flow. Alternating reactor shapes were investigated, and it was concluded that the use of baffles has a very large impact on the flows through the porous material. The simulations suggested, therefore, that even faster reaction rates could...... be achieved by making the baffles deeper. Two-phase simulations were performed, which managed to reproduce the deflection of the gas–liquid interface in an unbaffled system. A chemical reaction was implemented in the model, describing the ion-exchange phenomena in the porous material using four different...

  8. Grid Generation Issues in the CFD Modelling of Two-Phase Flow in a Pipe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Hernandez-Perez

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The grid generation issues found in the 3D simulation of two-phase flow in a pipe using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD are discussed in this paper. Special attention is given to the effect of the element type and structure of the mesh. The simulations were carried out using the commercial software package STAR-CCM+, which is designed for numerical simulation of continuum mechanics problems. The model consisted of a cylindrical vertical pipe. Different mesh structures were employed in the computational domain. The condition of two-phase flow was simulated with the Volume of Fluid (VOF model, taking into consideration turbulence effects using the k-e model. The results showed that there is a strong dependency of the flow behaviour on the mesh employed. The best result was obtained with the grid known as butterfly grid, while the cylindrical mesh produced misleading results. The simulation was validated against experimental results.

  9. A Generalized turbulent dispersion model for bubbly flow numerical simulation in NEPTUNE-CFD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laviéville, Jérôme, E-mail: Jerome-marcel.lavieville@edf.fr; Mérigoux, Nicolas, E-mail: nicolas.merigoux@edf.fr; Guingo, Mathieu, E-mail: mathieu.guingo@edf.fr; Baudry, Cyril, E-mail: Cyril.baudry@edf.fr; Mimouni, Stéphane, E-mail: stephane.mimouni@edf.fr

    2017-02-15

    The NEPTUNE-CFD code, based upon an Eulerian multi-fluid model, is developed within the framework of the NEPTUNE project, financially supported by EDF (Electricité de France), CEA (Commissariat à l’Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives), IRSN (Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire) and AREVA-NP. NEPTUNE-CFD is mainly focused on Nuclear Safety applications involving two-phase water-steam flows, like two-phase Pressurized Shock (PTS) and Departure from Nucleate Boiling (DNB). Many of these applications involve bubbly flows, particularly, for application to flows in PWR fuel assemblies, including studies related to DNB. Considering a very usual model for interfacial forces acting on bubbles, including drag, virtual mass and lift forces, the turbulent dispersion force is often added to moderate the lift effect in orthogonal directions to the main flow and get the right dispersion shape. This paper presents a formal derivation of this force, considering on the one hand, the fluctuating part of drag and virtual mass, and on the other hand, Turbulent Pressure derivation obtained by comparison between Lagrangian and Eulerian description of bubbles motion. An extension of the Tchen’s theory is used to express the turbulent kinetic energy of bubbles and the two-fluid turbulent covariance tensor in terms of liquid turbulent velocities and time scale. The model obtained by this way, called Generalized Turbulent Dispersion Model (GTD), does not require any user parameter. The model is validated against Liu & Bankoff air-water experiment, Arizona State University (ASU) experiment, DEBORA experiment and Texas A&M University (TAMU) boiling flow experiments.

  10. A Physics-Based Modeling Framework for Prognostic Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Chetan S.

    2014-01-01

    Prognostics and Health Management (PHM) methodologies have emerged as one of the key enablers for achieving efficient system level maintenance as part of a busy operations schedule, and lowering overall life cycle costs. PHM is also emerging as a high-priority issue in critical applications, where the focus is on conducting fundamental research in the field of integrated systems health management. The term diagnostics relates to the ability to detect and isolate faults or failures in a system. Prognostics on the other hand is the process of predicting health condition and remaining useful life based on current state, previous conditions and future operating conditions. PHM methods combine sensing, data collection, interpretation of environmental, operational, and performance related parameters to indicate systems health under its actual application conditions. The development of prognostics methodologies for the electronics field has become more important as more electrical systems are being used to replace traditional systems in several applications in the aeronautics, maritime, and automotive fields. The development of prognostics methods for electronics presents several challenges due to the great variety of components used in a system, a continuous development of new electronics technologies, and a general lack of understanding of how electronics fail. Similarly with electric unmanned aerial vehicles, electrichybrid cars, and commercial passenger aircraft, we are witnessing a drastic increase in the usage of batteries to power vehicles. However, for battery-powered vehicles to operate at maximum efficiency and reliability, it becomes crucial to both monitor battery health and performance and to predict end of discharge (EOD) and end of useful life (EOL) events. We develop an electrochemistry-based model of Li-ion batteries that capture the significant electrochemical processes, are computationally efficient, capture the effects of aging, and are of suitable

  11. CFD modelling of axial mixing in the intermediate and final rinses of cleaning-in-place procedures of straight pipes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Jifeng; Jensen, Bo Boye Busk; Nordkvist, Mikkel

    2018-01-01

    are derived from CFD results and applied to examine if the process is operated in an efficient and economic manner. It has been found that the displacement time can be predicted from the inner pipe diameter and the mean flow velocity using a power law relationship. Changing flow velocities does......The intermediate and final rinses of straight pipes, in which water replaces a cleaning agent of similar density and viscosity, are modelled using Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) methods. It is anticipated that the displacement process is achieved by convective and diffusive transport...... for optimizing the rinse steps with lower water consumption based on the above observations. A case of rinsing a 24 m long straight pipe describes the promising application of the CFD study. The recovery of cleaning agent can be up to 89.3% of the volume and the saving of intermediate rinsing water can...

  12. CFD model of thermal and velocity conditions in a particular indoor environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mora Perez, Miguel; Lopez Patino, Gonzalo; Lopez Jimenez, P. Amparo [Hydraulic and Environmental Engineering Department, Universitat Politecnica de Valencia (Spain); Guillen Guillamon, Ignacio [Applied Physics Department, Universitat Politecnica de Valencia (Spain)

    2013-07-01

    The demand for maintaining high indoor environmental quality (IEQ) with the minimum energy consumption is rapidly increasing. In the recent years, several studies have been completed to investigate the impact of indoor environment factors on human comfort, health and energy efficiency. Therefore, the design of the thermal environment in any sort of room, specially offices, has huge economic consequences. In this paper, a particular analysis on the air temperature in a multi-task room environment is modeled, in order to represent the velocities and temperatures inside the room by using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) techniques. This model will help to designers to analyze the thermal comfort regions inside the studied air volume and to visualize the whole temperatures inside the room, determining the effect of the fresh external incoming air in the internal air temperature.

  13. CFD Modelling of Local Hemodynamics in Intracranial Aneurysms Harboring Arterial Branches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krylov, Vladimir; Grigoryeva, Elena; Dolotova, Daria; Blagosklonova, Evgenia; Gavrilov, Andrey

    2017-01-01

    The main cause of non-traumatic subarachnoid haemorrhage is an intracranial aneurysm's rupture. The choice of treatment approach is exceptionally difficult in cases of aneurysms with additional branches on the aneurysm's dome or neck. The impact of the arterial branches on local hemodynamics is still unclear and controversial question. At the same time, up-to-date methods of image processing and mathematical modeling provide a way to investigate the hemodynamic environment of aneurysms. The paper discusses hemodynamic aspects of aneurysms harboring arterial branch through the use of patient-specific 3D models and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods. The analysis showed that the presence of the arterial branches has a great influence on flow streamlines and wall shear stress, particularly for side wall aneurysm.

  14. Temperature Field-Wind Velocity Field Optimum Control of Greenhouse Environment Based on CFD Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongbo Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The computational fluid dynamics technology is applied as the environmental control model, which can include the greenhouse space. Basic environmental factors are set to be the control objects, the field information is achieved via the division of layers by height, and numerical characteristics of each layer are used to describe the field information. Under the natural ventilation condition, real-time requirements, energy consumption, and distribution difference are selected as index functions. The optimization algorithm of adaptive simulated annealing is used to obtain optimal control outputs. A comparison with full-open ventilation shows that the whole index can be reduced at 44.21% and found that a certain mutual exclusiveness exists between the temperature and velocity field in the optimal course. All the results indicate that the application of CFD model has great advantages to improve the control accuracy of greenhouse.

  15. Coupling scales for modelling heavy metal vaporization from municipal solid waste incineration in a fluid bed by CFD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soria, José, E-mail: jose.soria@probien.gob.ar [Institute for Research and Development in Process Engineering, Biotechnology and Alternative Energies (PROBIEN, CONICET – UNCo), 1400 Buenos Aires St., 8300 Neuquén (Argentina); Gauthier, Daniel; Flamant, Gilles [Processes, Materials and Solar Energy Laboratory (PROMES-CNRS, UPR 8521), 7 Four Solaire Street, Odeillo, 66120 Font-Romeu (France); Rodriguez, Rosa [Chemical Engineering Institute, National University of San Juan, 1109 Libertador (O) Avenue, 5400 San Juan (Argentina); Mazza, Germán [Institute for Research and Development in Process Engineering, Biotechnology and Alternative Energies (PROBIEN, CONICET – UNCo), 1400 Buenos Aires St., 8300 Neuquén (Argentina)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • A CFD two-scale model is formulated to simulate heavy metal vaporization from waste incineration in fluidized beds. • MSW particle is modelled with the macroscopic particle model. • Influence of bed dynamics on HM vaporization is included. • CFD predicted results agree well with experimental data reported in literature. • This approach may be helpful for fluidized bed reactor modelling purposes. - Abstract: Municipal Solid Waste Incineration (MSWI) in fluidized bed is a very interesting technology mainly due to high combustion efficiency, great flexibility for treating several types of waste fuels and reduction in pollutants emitted with the flue gas. However, there is a great concern with respect to the fate of heavy metals (HM) contained in MSW and their environmental impact. In this study, a coupled two-scale CFD model was developed for MSWI in a bubbling fluidized bed. It presents an original scheme that combines a single particle model and a global fluidized bed model in order to represent the HM vaporization during MSW combustion. Two of the most representative HM (Cd and Pb) with bed temperatures ranging between 923 and 1073 K have been considered. This new approach uses ANSYS FLUENT 14.0 as the modelling platform for the simulations along with a complete set of self-developed user-defined functions (UDFs). The simulation results are compared to the experimental data obtained previously by the research group in a lab-scale fluid bed incinerator. The comparison indicates that the proposed CFD model predicts well the evolution of the HM release for the bed temperatures analyzed. It shows that both bed temperature and bed dynamics have influence on the HM vaporization rate. It can be concluded that CFD is a rigorous tool that provides valuable information about HM vaporization and that the original two-scale simulation scheme adopted allows to better represent the actual particle behavior in a fluid bed incinerator.

  16. CFD of mixing of multi-phase flow in a bioreactor using population balance model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Jayati; Shekhawat, Lalita Kanwar; Loomba, Varun; Rathore, Anurag S

    2016-05-01

    Mixing in bioreactors is known to be crucial for achieving efficient mass and heat transfer, both of which thereby impact not only growth of cells but also product quality. In a typical bioreactor, the rate of transport of oxygen from air is the limiting factor. While higher impeller speeds can enhance mixing, they can also cause severe cell damage. Hence, it is crucial to understand the hydrodynamics in a bioreactor to achieve optimal performance. This article presents a novel approach involving use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to model the hydrodynamics of an aerated stirred bioreactor for production of a monoclonal antibody therapeutic via mammalian cell culture. This is achieved by estimating the volume averaged mass transfer coefficient (kL a) under varying conditions of the process parameters. The process parameters that have been examined include the impeller rotational speed and the flow rate of the incoming gas through the sparger inlet. To undermine the two-phase flow and turbulence, an Eulerian-Eulerian multiphase model and k-ε turbulence model have been used, respectively. These have further been coupled with population balance model to incorporate the various interphase interactions that lead to coalescence and breakage of bubbles. We have successfully demonstrated the utility of CFD as a tool to predict size distribution of bubbles as a function of process parameters and an efficient approach for obtaining optimized mixing conditions in the reactor. The proposed approach is significantly time and resource efficient when compared to the hit and trial, all experimental approach that is presently used. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:613-628, 2016. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  17. Well-posedness and convergence of cfd two-fluid model for bubbly flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidheeswaran, Avinash

    The current research is focused on developing a well-posed multidimensional CFD two-fluid model (TFM) for bubbly flows. Two-phase flows exhibit a wide range of local flow instabilities such as Kelvin-Helmholtz, Rayleigh-Taylor, plume and jet instabilities. They arise due to the density difference and/or the relative velocity between the two phases. A physically correct TFM is essential to model these instabilities. However, this is not the case with the TFMs in numerical codes, which can be shown to have complex eigenvalues due to incompleteness and hence are ill-posed as initial value problems. A common approach to regularize an incomplete TFM is to add artificial physics or numerically by using a coarse grid or first order methods. However, it eliminates the local physical instabilities along with the undesired high frequency oscillations resulting from the ill-posedness. Thus, the TFM loses the capability to predict the inherent local dynamics of the two-phase flow. The alternative approach followed in the current study is to introduce appropriate physical mechanisms that make the TFM well-posed. First a well-posed 1-D TFM for vertical bubbly flows is analyzed with characteristics, and dispersion analysis. When an incomplete TFM is used, it results in high frequency oscillations in the solution. It is demonstrated through the travelling void wave problem that, by adding the missing short wavelength physics to the numerical TFM, this can be removed by making the model well-posed. To extend the limit of well-posedness beyond the well-known TFM of Pauchon and Banerjee [1], the mechanism of collision is considered, and it is shown by characteristics analysis that the TFM then becomes well-posed for all void fractions of practical interest. The aforementioned ideas are then extended to CFD TFM. The travelling void wave problem is again used to demonstrate that by adding appropriate physics, the problem of ill-posedness is resolved. Furthermore, issues pertaining to

  18. CFD modelling of supercritical water flow and heat transfer in a 2 × 2 fuel rod bundle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Podila, Krishna, E-mail: krishna.podila@cnl.ca; Rao, Yanfei, E-mail: yanfei.rao@cnl.ca

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • Bare and wire wrapped 2 × 2 fuel rod bundles were modelled with CFD. • Sensitivity of predictions to SST k–ω, v{sup 2}–f and turbulent Prandtl number was tested. • CFD predictions were assessed with experimentally reported fuel wall temperatures. - Abstract: In the present assessment of the CFD code, two heat transfer experiments using water at supercritical pressures were selected: a 2 × 2 rod bare bundle; and a 2 × 2 rod wire-wrapped bundle. A systematic 3D CFD study of the fluid flow and heat transfer at supercritical pressures for the rod bundle geometries was performed with the key parameter being the fuel rod wall temperature. The sensitivity of the prediction to the steady RANS turbulence models of SST k–ω, v{sup 2}–f and turbulent Prandtl number (Pr{sub t}) was tested to ensure the reliability of the predicted wall temperature obtained for the current analysis. Using the appropriate turbulence model based on the sensitivity analysis, the mesh refinement, or the grid convergence, was performed for the two geometries. Following the above sensitivity analyses and mesh refinements, the recommended CFD model was then assessed against the measurements from the two experiments. It was found that the CFD model adopted in the current work was able to qualitatively capture the trends reported by the experiments but the degree of temperature rise along the heated length was underpredicted. Moreover, the applicability of turbulence models varied case-by-case and the performance evaluation of the turbulence models was primarily based on its ability to predict the experimentally reported fuel wall temperatures. Of the two turbulence models tested, the SST k–ω was found to be better at capturing the measurements at pseudo-critical and supercritical test conditions, whereas the v{sup 2}–f performed better at sub-critical test conditions. Along with the appropriate turbulence model, CFD results were found to be particularly sensitive to

  19. COMPARISON OF EXPERIMENTS TO CFD MODELS FOR MIXING USING DUAL OPPOSING JETS IN TANKS WITH AND WITHOUT INTERNAL OBSTRUCTIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leishear, R.; Poirier, M.; Lee, S.; Fowley, M.

    2012-06-26

    This paper documents testing methods, statistical data analysis, and a comparison of experimental results to CFD models for blending of fluids, which were blended using a single pump designed with dual opposing nozzles in an eight foot diameter tank. Overall, this research presents new findings in the field of mixing research. Specifically, blending processes were clearly shown to have random, chaotic effects, where possible causal factors such as turbulence, pump fluctuations, and eddies required future evaluation. CFD models were shown to provide reasonable estimates for the average blending times, but large variations -- or scatter -- occurred for blending times during similar tests. Using this experimental blending time data, the chaotic nature of blending was demonstrated and the variability of blending times with respect to average blending times were shown to increase with system complexity. Prior to this research, the variation in blending times caused discrepancies between CFD models and experiments. This research addressed this discrepancy, and determined statistical correction factors that can be applied to CFD models, and thereby quantified techniques to permit the application of CFD models to complex systems, such as blending. These blending time correction factors for CFD models are comparable to safety factors used in structural design, and compensate variability that cannot be theoretically calculated. To determine these correction factors, research was performed to investigate blending, using a pump with dual opposing jets which re-circulate fluids in the tank to promote blending when fluids are added to the tank. In all, eighty-five tests were performed both in a tank without internal obstructions and a tank with vertical obstructions similar to a tube bank in a heat exchanger. These obstructions provided scale models of vertical cooling coils below the liquid surface for a full scale, liquid radioactive waste storage tank. Also, different jet

  20. Challenges and Issues on the CFD Modeling of Fluidized Beds: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Lettieri

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available We first describe the main approaches used to model fluidized suspensions. Focusing on the multifluid approach, we overview the principal averaging techniques that consent to turn granular systems into continua; in particular, we discuss volume, ensemble and time averages. We then use volume averages to derive the Eulerian equations of motion for fluidized suspensions of a finite number of monodisperse particle classes. We introduce the closure problem, and overview some widely adopted closure equations used to express the granular stress and the interaction forces between the phases, giving emphasis to the fluid-particle interaction force, in particular to the buoyancy and drag contributions. We conclude the work by discussing some published CFD simulations of mono and bidisperse fluidized beds, spanning different fluidization regimes and commenting on the insight that these studies provide.

  1. Modeling of sand-water slurry flow through horizontal pipe using CFD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Gopaliya Manoj

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents three-dimensional CFD analysis of two-phase (sand-water slurry flows through 263 mm diameter pipe in horizontal orientation for mixture velocity range of 3.5-4.7 m/s and efflux concentration range of 9.95-34% with three particle sizes viz. 0.165 mm, 0.29 mm and 0.55 mm with density 2650 kg/m3. RNG k-ε turbulence closure equations with Eulerian multi-phase model is used to simulate various slurry flows. The simulated values of local solid concentration are compared with the experimental data and are found to be in good agreement for all particle sizes. Effects of particle size on various slurry flow parameters such as pressure drop, solid phase velocity distribution, friction factor, granular pressure, turbulent viscosity, turbulent kinetic energy and its dissipation have been analyzed.

  2. Coupled 0D-1D CFD Modeling of Right Heart and Pulmonary Artery Morphometry Tree

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Melody; Yang, Weiguang; Feinstein, Jeffrey A.; Marsden, Alison

    2017-11-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is characterized by elevated pulmonary artery (PA) pressure and remodeling of the distal PAs resulting in right ventricular (RV) dysfunction and failure. It is hypothesized that patients with untreated ventricular septal defects (VSD) may develop PAH due to elevated flows and pressures in the PAs. Wall shear stress (WSS), due to elevated flows, and circumferential stress, due to elevated pressures, are known to play a role in vascular mechanobiology. Thus, simulating VSD hemodynamics and wall mechanics may facilitate our understanding of mechanical stimuli leading to PAH initiation and progression. Although 3D CFD models can capture detailed hemodynamics in the proximal PAs, they cannot easily model hemodynamics and wave propagation in the distal PAs, where remodeling occurs. To improve current PA models, we will present a new method that couples distal PA hemodynamics with RV function. Our model couples a 0D lumped parameter model of the RV to a 1D model of the PA tree, based on human PA morphometry data, to characterize RV performance and WSS changes in the PA tree. We will compare a VSD 0D-1D model and a 0D-3D model coupled to a mathematical morphometry tree model to quantify WSS in the entire PA vascular tree.

  3. Investigation on a gas-liquid ejector using three-dimensional CFD model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, S. H.; Song, X. G.; Park, Y. C.

    2012-11-01

    This paper is focusing on the numeral study of a gas-liquid ejector used for ballast water treatment. The gasliquid ejector is investigated through steady three-dimensional multiphase CFD analysis with commercial software ANSYS-CFX 13.0. Water as the primary fluid is driven through the driving nozzle and air is ejected into as the second gas instead of the ozone in real application. Several turbulence models such as Standard k-ɛ model, RNG k-ɛ model, SST model and k-ω model, and different mesh size and compared extensively with the experimental results to eliminate the influence of the auxiliary system, turbulence models and mesh generation. The appropriate numerical model in terms of the best combination of turbulence model and mesh size are used in the subsequent research the study the influence of the operating condition such as the driving pressure/velocity and the back pressure of the ejector on its performance. The results provide deep insight on the influence of various factors on the performance of gas-liquid ejector. And the proposed numerical model will be very helpful in the further design optimization of the gas-liquid ejectors.

  4. Validation of High-Fidelity CFD/CAA Framework for Launch Vehicle Acoustic Environment Simulation against Scale Model Test Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liever, Peter A.; West, Jeffrey S.; Harris, Robert E.

    2016-01-01

    A hybrid Computational Fluid Dynamics and Computational Aero-Acoustics (CFD/CAA) modeling framework has been developed for launch vehicle liftoff acoustic environment predictions. The framework couples the existing highly-scalable NASA production CFD code, Loci/CHEM, with a high-order accurate Discontinuous Galerkin solver developed in the same production framework, Loci/THRUST, to accurately resolve and propagate acoustic physics across the entire launch environment. Time-accurate, Hybrid RANS/LES CFD modeling is applied for predicting the acoustic generation physics at the plume source, and a high-order accurate unstructured mesh Discontinuous Galerkin (DG) method is employed to propagate acoustic waves away from the source across large distances using high-order accurate schemes. The DG solver is capable of solving 2nd, 3rd, and 4th order Euler solutions for non-linear, conservative acoustic field propagation. Initial application testing and validation has been carried out against high resolution acoustic data from the Ares Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) series to evaluate the capabilities and production readiness of the CFD/CAA system to resolve the observed spectrum of acoustic frequency content. This paper presents results from this validation and outlines efforts to mature and improve the computational simulation framework.

  5. CFD Modelling of Bore Erosion in Two-Stage Light Gas Guns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanoff, D. W.

    1998-01-01

    A well-validated quasi-one-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code for the analysis of the internal ballistics of two-stage light gas guns is modified to explicitly calculate the ablation of steel from the gun bore and the incorporation of the ablated wall material into the hydrogen working cas. The modified code is used to model 45 shots made with the NASA Ames 0.5 inch light gas gun over an extremely wide variety of gun operating conditions. Good agreement is found between the experimental and theoretical piston velocities (maximum errors of +/-2% to +/-6%) and maximum powder pressures (maximum errors of +/-10% with good igniters). Overall, the agreement between the experimental and numerically calculated gun erosion values (within a factor of 2) was judged to be reasonably good, considering the complexity of the processes modelled. Experimental muzzle velocities agree very well (maximum errors of 0.5-0.7 km/sec) with theoretical muzzle velocities calculated with loading of the hydrogen gas with the ablated barrel wall material. Comparison of results for pump tube volumes of 100%, 60% and 40% of an initial benchmark value show that, at the higher muzzle velocities, operation at 40% pump tube volume produces much lower hydrogen loading and gun erosion and substantially lower maximum pressures in the gun. Large muzzle velocity gains (2.4-5.4 km/sec) are predicted upon driving the gun harder (that is, upon using, higher powder loads and/or lower hydrogen fill pressures) when hydrogen loading is neglected; much smaller muzzle velocity gains (1.1-2.2 km/sec) are predicted when hydrogen loading is taken into account. These smaller predicted velocity gains agree well with those achieved in practice. CFD snapshots of the hydrogen mass fraction, density and pressure of the in-bore medium are presented for a very erosive shot.

  6. Optimization of pulverised coal combustion by means of CFD/CTA modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filkoski Risto V.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the work presented in this paper was to apply a method for handling two-phase reacting flow for prediction of pulverized coal combustion in large-scale boiler furnace and to assess the ability of the model to predict existing power plant data. The paper presents the principal steps and results of the numerical modeling of power boiler furnace with tangential disposition of the burners. The computational fluid dynamics/computational thermal analysis (CFD/CTA approach is utilized for creation of a three-dimensional model of the boiler furnace, including the platen superheater in the upper part of the furnace. Standard k-e model is employed for description of the turbulent flow. Coal combustion is modeled by the mixture fraction/probability density function approach for the reaction chemistry, with equilibrium assumption applied for description of the system chemistry. Radiation heat transfer is computed by means of the simplified P-N model, based on the expansion of the radiation intensity into an orthogonal series of spherical harmonics. Some distinctive results regarding the examined boiler performance in capacity range between 65 and 95% are presented graphically. Comparing the simulation predictions and available site measurements concerning temperature, heat flux and combustion efficiency, a conclusion can be drawn that the model produces realistic insight into the furnace processes. Qualitative agreement indicates reasonability of the calculations and validates the employed sub-models. After the validation and verification of the model it was used to check the combustion efficiency as a function of coal dust sieve characteristics, as well as the impact of burners modification with introduction of over fire air ports to the appearance of incomplete combustion, including CO concentration, as well as to the NOx concentration. The described case and other experiences with CFD/CTA stress the advantages of numerical modeling and

  7. Prognostic survival model for people diagnosed with invasive cutaneous melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baade, Peter D; Royston, Patrick; Youl, Philipa H; Weinstock, Martin A; Geller, Alan; Aitken, Joanne F

    2015-01-31

    The ability of medical practitioners to communicate risk estimates effectively to patients diagnosed with melanoma relies on accurate information about prognostic factors and their impact on survival. This study reports the development of one of the few melanoma prognostic models, called the Melanoma Severity Index (MSI), based on population-based cancer registry data. Data from the Queensland Cancer Registry for people (20-89 years) diagnosed with a single invasive melanoma between 1995 and 2008 (n = 28,654; 1,700 melanoma deaths). Additional clinical information about metastasis, ulceration and positive lymph nodes was manually extracted from pathology forms. Flexible parametric survival models were combined with multivariable fractional polynomial for selecting variables and transformations of continuous variables. Multiple imputation was used for missing covariate values. The MSI contained the variables thickness (transformed, explained 40.6% of variation in survival), body site (additional 1.9% in variation), metastasis (1.8%), positive nodes (0.7%), ulceration (1.3%), age (1.1%). Royston and Sauerbrei's D statistic (measure of discrimination) was 1.50 (95% CI = 1.44, 1.56) and the corresponding RD2 (measure of explained variation) was 0.47 (0.45, 0.49), demonstrating strong explanatory performance. The Harrell-C statistic was 0.88 (0.88, 0.89). Lacking an external validation dataset, we applied internal-external cross validation to demonstrate the consistency of the prognostic information across geographically-defined subsets of the cohort. The MSI provides good ability to predict survival for melanoma patients. Beyond the immediate clinical use, the MSI may have important public health and research applications for evaluations of public health interventions aimed at reducing deaths from melanoma.

  8. A CFD model for biomass fast pyrolysis in fluidized-bed reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Qingluan; Heindel, T. J.; Fox, R. O.

    2010-11-01

    A numerical study is conducted to evaluate the performance and optimal operating conditions of fluidized-bed reactors for fast pyrolysis of biomass to bio-oil. A comprehensive CFD model, coupling a pyrolysis kinetic model with a detailed hydrodynamics model, is developed. A lumped kinetic model is applied to describe the pyrolysis of biomass particles. Variable particle porosity is used to account for the evolution of particle physical properties. The kinetic scheme includes primary decomposition and secondary cracking of tar. Biomass is composed of reference components: cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin. Products are categorized into groups: gaseous, tar vapor, and solid char. The particle kinetic processes and their interaction with the reactive gas phase are modeled with a multi-fluid model derived from the kinetic theory of granular flow. The gas, sand and biomass constitute three continuum phases coupled by the interphase source terms. The model is applied to investigate the effect of operating conditions on the tar yield in a fluidized-bed reactor. The influence of various parameters on tar yield, including operating temperature and others are investigated. Predicted optimal conditions for tar yield and scale-up of the reactor are discussed.

  9. A Two-Temperature Open-Source CFD Model for Hypersonic Reacting Flows, Part Two: Multi-Dimensional Analysis †

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Casseau

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available hy2Foam is a newly-coded open-source two-temperature computational fluid dynamics (CFD solver that has previously been validated for zero-dimensional test cases. It aims at (1 giving open-source access to a state-of-the-art hypersonic CFD solver to students and researchers; and (2 providing a foundation for a future hybrid CFD-DSMC (direct simulation Monte Carlo code within the OpenFOAM framework. This paper focuses on the multi-dimensional verification of hy2Foam and firstly describes the different models implemented. In conjunction with employing the coupled vibration-dissociation-vibration (CVDV chemistry–vibration model, novel use is made of the quantum-kinetic (QK rates in a CFD solver. hy2Foam has been shown to produce results in good agreement with previously published data for a Mach 11 nitrogen flow over a blunted cone and with the dsmcFoam code for a Mach 20 cylinder flow for a binary reacting mixture. This latter case scenario provides a useful basis for other codes to compare against.

  10. Physics based Degradation Modeling and Prognostics of Electrolytic Capacitors under Electrical Overstress Conditions

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This paper proposes a physics based degradation modeling and prognostics approach for electrolytic capacitors. Electrolytic capacitors are critical components in...

  11. Prognostics Health Management and Physics based failure Models for Electrolytic Capacitors

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This paper proposes first principles based modeling and prognostics approach for electrolytic capacitors. Electrolytic capacitors and MOSFETs are the two major...

  12. An assessment of CFD-based wall heat transfer models in piston engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sircar, Arpan [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Paul, Chandan [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Ferreyro-Fernandez, Sebastian [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Imren, Abdurrahman [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Haworth, Daniel C [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    2017-04-26

    The lack of accurate submodels for in-cylinder heat transfer has been identified as a key shortcoming in developing truly predictive, physics-based computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models that can be used to develop combustion systems for advanced high-efficiency, low-emissions engines. Only recently have experimental methods become available that enable accurate near-wall measurements to enhance simulation capability via advancing models. Initial results show crank-angle dependent discrepancies with respect to previously used boundary-layer models of up to 100%. However, available experimental data is quite sparse (only few data points on engine walls) and limited (available measurements are those of heat flux only). Predictive submodels are needed for medium-resolution ("engineering") LES and for unsteady Reynolds-averaged simulations (URANS). Recently, some research groups have performed DNS studies on engine-relevant conditions using simple geometries. These provide very useful data for benchmarking wall heat transfer models under such conditions. Further, a number of new and more sophisticated models have also become available in the literature which account for these engine-like conditions. Some of these have been incorporated while others of a more complex nature, which include solving additional partial differential equations (PDEs) within the thin boundary layer near the wall, are underway. These models will then be tested against the available DNS/experimental data in both SI (spark-ignition) and CI (compression-ignition) engines.

  13. Optimization of a centrifugal compressor impeller using CFD: the choice of simulation model parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neverov, V. V.; Kozhukhov, Y. V.; Yablokov, A. M.; Lebedev, A. A.

    2017-08-01

    Nowadays the optimization using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) plays an important role in the design process of turbomachines. However, for the successful and productive optimization it is necessary to define a simulation model correctly and rationally. The article deals with the choice of a grid and computational domain parameters for optimization of centrifugal compressor impellers using computational fluid dynamics. Searching and applying optimal parameters of the grid model, the computational domain and solver settings allows engineers to carry out a high-accuracy modelling and to use computational capability effectively. The presented research was conducted using Numeca Fine/Turbo package with Spalart-Allmaras and Shear Stress Transport turbulence models. Two radial impellers was investigated: the high-pressure at ψT=0.71 and the low-pressure at ψT=0.43. The following parameters of the computational model were considered: the location of inlet and outlet boundaries, type of mesh topology, size of mesh and mesh parameter y+. Results of the investigation demonstrate that the choice of optimal parameters leads to the significant reduction of the computational time. Optimal parameters in comparison with non-optimal but visually similar parameters can reduce the calculation time up to 4 times. Besides, it is established that some parameters have a major impact on the result of modelling.

  14. Predicting self-pollution inside school buses using a CFD and multi-zone coupled model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fei; Lee, Eon S.; Liu, Junjie; Zhu, Yifang

    2015-04-01

    The in-cabin environment of a school bus is important for children's health. The pollutants from a bus's own exhaust contribute to children's overall exposure to air pollutants inside the school bus cabin. In this study, we adapted a coupled model originally developed for indoor environment to determine the relative contribution of the bus own exhaust to the in-cabin pollutant concentrations. The coupled model uses CFD (computational fluent dynamics) model to simulate outside concentration and CONTAM (a multi-zone model) for inside the school bus. The model was validated with experimental data in the literature. Using the validated model, we analyzed the effects of vehicle speed and tailpipe location on self-pollution inside the bus cabin. We confirmed that the pollution released from the tailpipe can penetrate into the bus cabin through gaps in the back emergency door. We found the pollution concentration inside school buses was the highest when buses were driven at a medium speed. In addition, locating the tailpipe on the side, behind the rear axle resulted in less self-pollution since there is less time for the suction effect to take place. The developed theoretical framework can be generalized to study other types of buses. These findings can be used in developing policy recommendations for reducing human exposure to air pollution inside buses.

  15. A comparison of contaminant plume statistics from a Gaussian puff and urban CFD model for two large cities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pullen, Julie; Boris, Jay P.; Young, Theodore; Patnaik, Gopal; Iselin, John

    This paper quantitatively assesses the spatial extent of modeled contaminated regions resulting from hypothetical airborne agent releases in major urban areas. We compare statistics from a release at several different sites in Washington DC and Chicago using a Gaussian puff model (SCIPUFF, version 1.3, with urban parameter settings) and a building-resolving computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model (FAST3D-CT). For a neutrally buoyant gas source term with urban meteorology, we compare near-surface dosage values within several kilometers of the release during the first half hour, before the gas is dispersed beyond the critical lethal level. In particular, using "fine-grain" point-wise statistics such as fractional bias, spatial correlations and the percentage of points lying within a factor of two, we find that dosage distributions from the Gaussian puff and CFD model share few features in common. Yet the "coarse-grain" statistic that compares areas contained within a given contour level reveals that the differences between the models are less pronounced. Most significant among these distinctions is the rapid lofting, leading to enhanced vertical mixing, and projection downwind of the contaminant by the interaction of the winds with the urban landscape in the CFD model. This model-to-model discrepancy is partially ameliorated by supplying the puff model with more detailed information about the urban boundary layer that evolves on the CFD grid. While improving the correspondence of the models when using the "coarse-grain" statistic, the additional information does not lead to quite as substantial an overall agreement between the models when the "fine-grain" statistics are compared. The taller, denser and more variable building landscape of Chicago created increased sensitivity to release site and led to greater divergence in FAST3D-CT and SCIPUFF results relative to the flatter, sparser and more uniform urban morphology of Washington DC.

  16. Response surface models for CFD predictions of air diffusion performance index in a displacement ventilated office

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, K.C. [Department of Research and Applications, O.Y.L. R and D Center, Lot 4739, Jalan BRP 8/2, Taman Bukit Rahman Putra, 47000, Sungai Buloh, Selangor Darul Ehsan (Malaysia); Kadirgama, K. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Universiti Tenaga Nasional, Km. 7, Jalan Kajang-Puchong, 43009 Kajang, Selangor Darul Ehsan (Malaysia); Ng, E.Y.K. [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore)

    2008-07-01

    Based on the Response Surface Methodology (RSM), the development of first- and second-order models for predicting the Air Diffusion Performance Index (ADPI) in a displacement-ventilated office is presented. By adopting the technique of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), the new ADPI models developed are used to investigate the effect of simultaneous variation of three design variables in a displacement ventilation case, i.e. location of the displacement diffuser (L{sub dd}), supply temperature (T) and exhaust position (L{sub ex}) on the comfort parameter ADPI. The RSM analyses are carried out with the aid of a statistical software package MINITAB. In the current study, the separate effect of individual design variable as well as the second-order interactions between these variables, are investigated. Based on the variance analyses of both the first- and second-order RSM models, the most influential design variable is the supply temperature. In addition, it is found that the interactions of supply temperature with other design variables are insignificant, as deduced from the second-order RSM model. The optimised ADPI value is subsequently obtained from the model equations. (author)

  17. Remote sensing data assimilation for a prognostic phenology model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thornton, Peter E [ORNL; Stockli, Reto [Colorado State University, Fort Collins

    2008-01-01

    Predicting the global carbon and water cycle requires a realistic representation of vegetation phenology in climate models. However most prognostic phenology models are not yet suited for global applications, and diagnostic satellite data can be uncertain and lack predictive power. We present a framework for data assimilation of Fraction of Photosynthetically Active Radiation absorbed by vegetation (FPAR) and Leaf Area Index (LAI) from the MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) to constrain empirical temperature, light, moisture and structural vegetation parameters of a prognostic phenology model. We find that data assimilation better constrains structural vegetation parameters than climate control parameters. Improvements are largest for drought-deciduous ecosystems where correlation of predicted versus satellite-observed FPAR and LAI increases from negative to 0.7-0.8. Data assimilation effectively overcomes the cloud- and aerosol-related deficiencies of satellite data sets in tropical areas. Validation with a 49-year-long phenology data set reveals that the temperature-driven start of season (SOS) is light limited in warm years. The model has substantial skill (R = 0.73) to reproduce SOS inter-annual and decadal variability. Predicted SOS shows a higher inter-annual variability with a negative bias of 5-20 days compared to species-level SOS. It is however accurate to within 1-2 days compared to SOS derived from net ecosystem exchange (NEE) measurements at a FLUXNET tower. The model only has weak skill to predict end of season (EOS). Use of remote sensing data assimilation for phenology model development is encouraged but validation should be extended with phenology data sets covering mediterranean, tropical and arctic ecosystems.

  18. Updating and prospective validation of a prognostic model for high sickness absence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roelen, C.A.M.; Heymans, M.W.; Twisk, J.W.R.; van Rhenen, W.; Pallesen, S.; Bjorvatn, B.; Moen, B.E.; Mageroy, N.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To further develop and validate a Dutch prognostic model for high sickness absence (SA). Methods Three-wave longitudinal cohort study of 2,059 Norwegian nurses. The Dutch prognostic model was used to predict high SA among Norwegian nurses at wave 2. Subsequently, the model was updated by

  19. On prognostic models, artificial intelligence and censored observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, S S; Hamilton, P W; Hughes, J G; Bell, D A

    2001-03-01

    The development of prognostic models for assisting medical practitioners with decision making is not a trivial task. Models need to possess a number of desirable characteristics and few, if any, current modelling approaches based on statistical or artificial intelligence can produce models that display all these characteristics. The inability of modelling techniques to provide truly useful models has led to interest in these models being purely academic in nature. This in turn has resulted in only a very small percentage of models that have been developed being deployed in practice. On the other hand, new modelling paradigms are being proposed continuously within the machine learning and statistical community and claims, often based on inadequate evaluation, being made on their superiority over traditional modelling methods. We believe that for new modelling approaches to deliver true net benefits over traditional techniques, an evaluation centric approach to their development is essential. In this paper we present such an evaluation centric approach to developing extensions to the basic k-nearest neighbour (k-NN) paradigm. We use standard statistical techniques to enhance the distance metric used and a framework based on evidence theory to obtain a prediction for the target example from the outcome of the retrieved exemplars. We refer to this new k-NN algorithm as Censored k-NN (Ck-NN). This reflects the enhancements made to k-NN that are aimed at providing a means for handling censored observations within k-NN.

  20. CFD post analysis of METEX-tests

    CERN Document Server

    Laure Blumenfeld, Cyril Kharoua, Yacine Kadi, Karel Samec, Mats Lindroos (CERN)

    This technical note summarises the additional CFD performed after the completion of the hydraulic METEX 1 and METEX 2 data tests to validate CFD turbulent simulation of liquid metal with the LES, RANS and SST model.

  1. Using prognostic models in CLL to personalize approach to clinical care: Are we there yet?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mina, Alain; Sandoval Sus, Jose; Sleiman, Elsa; Pinilla-Ibarz, Javier; Awan, Farrukh T; Kharfan-Dabaja, Mohamed A

    2017-10-28

    Four decades ago, two staging systems were developed to help stratify CLL into different prognostic categories. These systems, the Rai and the Binet staging, depended entirely on abnormal exam findings and evidence of anemia and thrombocytopenia. Better understanding of biologic, genetic, and molecular characteristics of CLL have contributed to better appreciating its clinical heterogeneity. New prognostic models, the GCLLSG prognostic index and the CLL-IPI, emerged. They incorporate biologic and genetic information related to CLL and are capable of predicting survival outcomes and cases anticipated to need therapy earlier in the disease course. Accordingly, these newer models are helping develop better informed surveillance strategies and ultimately tailor treatment intensity according to presence (or lack thereof) of certain prognostic markers. This represents a step towards personalizing care of CLL patients. We anticipate that as more prognostic factors continue to be identified, the GCLLSG prognostic index and CLL-IPI models will undergo further revisions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Stage Separation Failure: Model Based Diagnostics and Prognostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luchinsky, Dmitry; Hafiychuk, Vasyl; Kulikov, Igor; Smelyanskiy, Vadim; Patterson-Hine, Ann; Hanson, John; Hill, Ashley

    2010-01-01

    Safety of the next-generation space flight vehicles requires development of an in-flight Failure Detection and Prognostic (FD&P) system. Development of such system is challenging task that involves analysis of many hard hitting engineering problems across the board. In this paper we report progress in the development of FD&P for the re-contact fault between upper stage nozzle and the inter-stage caused by the first stage and upper stage separation failure. A high-fidelity models and analytical estimations are applied to analyze the following sequence of events: (i) structural dynamics of the nozzle extension during the impact; (ii) structural stability of the deformed nozzle in the presence of the pressure and temperature loads induced by the hot gas flow during engine start up; and (iii) the fault induced thrust changes in the steady burning regime. The diagnostic is based on the measurements of the impact torque. The prognostic is based on the analysis of the correlation between the actuator signal and fault-induced changes in the nozzle structural stability and thrust.

  3. CFD modeling of a UV-LED photocatalytic odor abatement process in a continuous reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zimeng; Liu, Jing; Dai, Yuancan; Dong, Weiyang; Zhang, Shicheng; Chen, Jianmin

    2012-05-15

    This paper presents a model study of a UV light-emitting-diode (UV-LED) based photocatalytic odor abatement process. It integrated computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling of the gas flow in the reactor with LED-array radiation field calculation and Langmuir-Hinshelwood reaction kinetics. It was applied to simulate the photocatalytic degradation of dimethyl sulfide (DMS) in a UV-LED reactor based on experimentally determined chemical kinetic parameters. A non-linear power law relating reaction rate to irradiation intensity was adopted. The model could predict the steady state DMS concentration profiles by calculating the advection, diffusion and Langmuir-Hinshelwood reaction kinetics. By affecting the radiation intensity and uniformity, the position of the LED array relative to the catalyst appeared to be a critical parameter determining DMS removal efficiency. Too small distances might yield low quantum efficiency and consequently poor abatement performance. This study provided an example of LED-based photocatalytic process modeling and gave insights into the optimization of light source design for photocatalytic applications. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. CFD modelling of an open core downdraft moving bed biomass gasifier; Modelado de un gasificador estratificado de lecho movil de biomasa, utilizando CFD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogel-Ramirez, A [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)]. E-mail: ARogelR@iingen.unam.mx

    2008-10-15

    This paper contains the description of a bidimensional Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), model Developer to simulate the flow and reaction in a stratified downdraft biomass gasifier, whereby Eulerian conservation equations are solved for particle and gas phase components, velocities and specific enthalpies. The model is based on the PHOENICS package and represents a tool which can be used in gasifier analysis and design. Contributions of chemical kinetics and the mixing rate using the EBU approach are considered in the gas phase global homogeneous reactions. The harmonic blending of chemical kinetics and mass transfer effects, determine the global heterogeneous reactions between char and O{sub 2}, CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O. The turbulence effect in the gas phase is accounted by the standard {kappa}-{epsilon} approach. The model provides information of the producer gas composition, velocities and temperature at the outlet, and allows different operating parameters and feed properties to be changed. Finally, a comparison with experimental data available in literature was done, which showed satisfactory agreement from a qualitative point of view, though further validation is required. [Spanish] Este estudio describe un modelo numerico bidimensional, basado en Dinamica de Fluidos Computacional (CFD), desarrollado para simular el flujo y las reacciones que ocurren en un gasificador estratificado de flujos paralelos, en el que se resuelven ecuaciones de conservacion Eulerianas para los componentes de la fase gaseosa, la fase solida, velocidades y entalpias especificas. El modelo esta basado en el codigo PHOENICS y representa una herramienta que puede ser utilizada en el analisis y diseno de gasificadores. En las reacciones globales homogeneas se consideran las contribuciones de la cinetica quimica y la rapidez de mezclado, usando el modelo Eddy Brake-UP (EBU). La medida harmonica de la cinetica quimica y la transferencia de masa, determinan las velocidades globales de

  5. Accumulation and transport of microbial-size particles in a pressure protected model burn unit: CFD simulations and experimental evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mimoun Maurice

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Controlling airborne contamination is of major importance in burn units because of the high susceptibility of burned patients to infections and the unique environmental conditions that can accentuate the infection risk. In particular the required elevated temperatures in the patient room can create thermal convection flows which can transport airborne contaminates throughout the unit. In order to estimate this risk and optimize the design of an intensive care room intended to host severely burned patients, we have relied on a computational fluid dynamic methodology (CFD. Methods The study was carried out in 4 steps: i patient room design, ii CFD simulations of patient room design to model air flows throughout the patient room, adjacent anterooms and the corridor, iii construction of a prototype room and subsequent experimental studies to characterize its performance iv qualitative comparison of the tendencies between CFD prediction and experimental results. The Electricité De France (EDF open-source software Code_Saturne® (http://www.code-saturne.org was used and CFD simulations were conducted with an hexahedral mesh containing about 300 000 computational cells. The computational domain included the treatment room and two anterooms including equipment, staff and patient. Experiments with inert aerosol particles followed by time-resolved particle counting were conducted in the prototype room for comparison with the CFD observations. Results We found that thermal convection can create contaminated zones near the ceiling of the room, which can subsequently lead to contaminate transfer in adjacent rooms. Experimental confirmation of these phenomena agreed well with CFD predictions and showed that particles greater than one micron (i.e. bacterial or fungal spore sizes can be influenced by these thermally induced flows. When the temperature difference between rooms was 7°C, a significant contamination transfer was observed to

  6. Accumulation and transport of microbial-size particles in a pressure protected model burn unit: CFD simulations and experimental evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beauchêne, Christian; Laudinet, Nicolas; Choukri, Firas; Rousset, Jean-Luc; Benhamadouche, Sofiane; Larbre, Juliette; Chaouat, Marc; Benbunan, Marc; Mimoun, Maurice; Lajonchère, Jean-Patrick; Bergeron, Vance; Derouin, Francis

    2011-03-03

    Controlling airborne contamination is of major importance in burn units because of the high susceptibility of burned patients to infections and the unique environmental conditions that can accentuate the infection risk. In particular the required elevated temperatures in the patient room can create thermal convection flows which can transport airborne contaminates throughout the unit. In order to estimate this risk and optimize the design of an intensive care room intended to host severely burned patients, we have relied on a computational fluid dynamic methodology (CFD). The study was carried out in 4 steps: i) patient room design, ii) CFD simulations of patient room design to model air flows throughout the patient room, adjacent anterooms and the corridor, iii) construction of a prototype room and subsequent experimental studies to characterize its performance iv) qualitative comparison of the tendencies between CFD prediction and experimental results. The Electricité De France (EDF) open-source software Code_Saturne® (http://www.code-saturne.org) was used and CFD simulations were conducted with an hexahedral mesh containing about 300 000 computational cells. The computational domain included the treatment room and two anterooms including equipment, staff and patient. Experiments with inert aerosol particles followed by time-resolved particle counting were conducted in the prototype room for comparison with the CFD observations. We found that thermal convection can create contaminated zones near the ceiling of the room, which can subsequently lead to contaminate transfer in adjacent rooms. Experimental confirmation of these phenomena agreed well with CFD predictions and showed that particles greater than one micron (i.e. bacterial or fungal spore sizes) can be influenced by these thermally induced flows. When the temperature difference between rooms was 7°C, a significant contamination transfer was observed to enter into the positive pressure room when the

  7. CFD Analysis of a Void Distribution Benchmark of the NUPEC PSBT Tests: Model Calibration and Influence of Turbulence Modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Krepper

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents CFD calculations of the void distribution tests of the PSBT benchmark using ANSYS CFX-12.1. First, relevant aspects of the implemented wall boiling model are reviewed highlighting the uncertainties in several model parameters. It is then shown that the measured cross-sectionally averaged values can be reproduced well with a single set of calibrated model parameters for different test cases. For the reproduction of patterns of void distribution cross-sections, attention has to be focussed on the modelling of turbulence in the narrow channel. Only a turbulence model with the capability to resolve turbulent secondary flows is able to reproduce at least qualitatively the observed void distribution patterns.

  8. Code Validation of CFD Heat Transfer Models for Liquid Rocket Engine Combustion Devices

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Coy, E. B

    2007-01-01

    .... The design of the rig and its capabilities are described. A second objective of the test rig is to provide CFD validation data under conditions relevant to liquid rocket engine thrust chambers...

  9. Turbulence Models: Data from Other Experiments: CFD Validation of Synthetic Jets and Turbulent Separation Control

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — CFD Validation of Synthetic Jets and Turbulent Separation Control. This web page provides data from experiments that may be useful for the validation of turbulence...

  10. DEVELOPMENT OF CFD SIMULATION APPLICATIONS FOR LOCAL-SCALE AREAS AND POTENTIAL INTERFACE WITH MESOSCALE MODELS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The presentation summarizes developments of ongoing applications of fine-scale (geometry specific) CFD simulations to urban areas within atmospheric boundary layers. Enabling technology today and challenges for the future are discussed. There is a challenging need to develop a ...

  11. Uncertainty Representation and Interpretation in Model-Based Prognostics Algorithms Based on Kalman Filter Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvan, Jose Ramon; Saxena, Abhinav; Goebel, Kai Frank

    2012-01-01

    This article discusses several aspects of uncertainty representation and management for model-based prognostics methodologies based on our experience with Kalman Filters when applied to prognostics for electronics components. In particular, it explores the implications of modeling remaining useful life prediction as a stochastic process, and how it relates to uncertainty representation, management and the role of prognostics in decision-making. A distinction between the interpretations of estimated remaining useful life probability density function is explained and a cautionary argument is provided against mixing interpretations for two while considering prognostics in making critical decisions.

  12. Thermohydraulic modeling of very high temperature reactors in regimes with loss of coolant using CFD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreira, Uebert G.; Dominguez, Dany S. [Universidade Estadual de Santa Cruz (UESC), Ilh´eus, BA (Brazil). Programa de P´os-Graduacao em Modelagem Computacional em Ciencia e Tecnologia; Mazaira, Leorlen Y.R.; Lira, Carlos A.B.O. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Departamento de Energia Nuclear; Hernandez, Carlos R.G., E-mail: uebert.gmoreira@gmail.com, E-mail: dsdominguez@gmail.com, E-mail: leored1984@gmail.com, E-mail: cabol@ufpe.br, E-mail: cgh@instec.cu [Instituto Superior de Tecnologas y Ciencias Aplicadas (InSTEC), La Habana (Cuba)

    2017-07-01

    The nuclear energy is a good alternative to meet the continuous increase in world energy demand. In this perspective, VHTRs (Very High Temperature Reactors) are serious candidates for energy generation due to its inherently safe performance, low power density and high conversion efficiency. However, the viability of these reactors depends on an efficient safety system in the operation of nuclear plants. The HTR (High Temperature Reactor)-10 model, an experimental reactor of the pebble bed type, is used as a case study in this work to perform the thermohydraulic simulation. Due to the complex patterns flow that appear in the pebble bed reactor core, and advances in computational capacity, CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) techniques are used to simulate these reactors. A realistic approach is adopted to simulate the central annular column of the reactor core, which each pebble bed element is modeled in detail. As geometrical model of the fuel elements was selected the BCC (Body Centered Cubic) arrangement. Previous works indicate this arrangement as the configuration that obtain higher fuel temperatures inside the core. Parameters considered for reactor design are available in the technical report of benchmark issues by IAEA (TECDOC-1694). Among the results obtained, we obtained the temperature profiles with different mass flow rates for the coolant. In general, the temperature distributions calculated are consistent with phenomenological behaviour. Even without consider the reactivity changes to reduce the reactor power or other safety procedures, the maximum temperatures do not exceed the recommended limits for fuel elements. (author)

  13. Numerical Study on a Detailed Air Flows in an Urban Area Using a CFD model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, A.

    2014-12-01

    In this study, detailed air flows in an urban area were analyzed using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model. For this model buildings used as the surface boundary in the model were constructed using Los Angeles Region Imagery Acquisition Consortium 2 Geographic Information System (LARIAC2 GIS) data. Three target areas centered at the cross roads of Broadway & 7th St., Olive & 12th St., and Wilshire blvd. & Carondelet, Los Angeles, California were considered. The size of each numerical domain is 400 m, 400 m, and 200 m in the x‒, y‒, and z‒directions, respectively. The grid sizes in the x‒, y‒, and z‒directions are 2 m, 2 m, and 2 m, respectively. Based on the inflow wind data provided by California Air Resources Board, detailed flow characteristics were investigated for each target area. Descending air flow were developed at the leeward area of tall building and ascending air current were occurred on the windward area of tall building. Vertically rotating vortices were formed in spaces between buildings, so-called, street canyons and horizontally rotating vortices appeared near cross roads. When flows came into narrow street canyon from wide street canyon, channeling effects appeared and flow speed increased for satisfying mass continuity.

  14. CFD Modelling of an Open Core Downdraft Moving Bed Biomass Gasifier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Rogel–Ramírez

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper contains the description of a bidimensional Computacional Fluid Dynamics (CFD, model developed to simulate the flow and reaction in a stratified downdraft biomass gasifier, whereby Eulerian conservation equations are solved for particle and gas phase components, velocities and specific enthalpies. The model is based on the PHOENICS package and represents a tool which can be used in gasifier analysis and design. Contributions of chemical kinetic and the mixing rate using the EBU approach are considered in the gas phase global homogeneous reactions. The harmonic blending of chemical kinetics and mass transfer effects, determine the global heterogeneous reactions between char and O2, CO2, and H2O. The turbulence effect in the gas phase is accounted by the standard k–s approach. The model provides information of the producer gas composition, velocities and temperature at the outlet, and allows different operating parameters and feed properties to be changed. Finally, a comparison with experimental data available in literature was done, which showed satisfactory agreement from a qualitative point of view, though further validation is required.

  15. CFD-Modeling of the Multistage Gasifier Capacity of 30 KW

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, A. A.; Kozlov, A. N.; Svishchev, D. A.; Donskoy, I. G.

    2017-11-01

    Single-stage fuel gasification processes have been developed and widely studied in Russia and abroad throughout the 20th century. They are fundamental to the creation and design of modern gas generator equipment. Many studies have shown that single-stage gasification process, have already reached the limit of perfection, which was a significant improvement in their performance becomes impossible and unprofitable. The most fully meet modern technical requirements of multistage gasification technology. In the first step of the process, is organized allothermic biomass pyrolysis using heat of exhaust gas and generating power plant. At this stage, the yield of volatile products (gas and tar) of fuel. In the second step, the layer of fuel is, the tar is decomposed by the action of hot air and steam, steam-gas mixture is formed further reacts with the charcoal in the third process stage. The paper presents a model developed by the authors of the multi-stage gasifier for wood chips. The model is made with the use of CFD-modeling software package (COMSOL Multiphisics). To describe the kinetics of wood pyrolysis and gasification of charcoal studies were carried out using a set of simultaneous thermal analysis. For this complex developed original methods of interpretation of measurements, including methods of technical analysis of fuels and determine the parameters of the detailed kinetics and mechanism of pyrolysis.

  16. CFD modeling of catheter-based Chemofilter device for filtering chemotherapy drugs from venous flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maani, Nazanin; Yee, Daryl; Nosonovsky, Michael; Greer, Julia; Hetts, Steven; Rayz, Vitaliy

    2017-11-01

    Purpose: Intra-arterial chemotherapy, a procedure where drugs are injected into arteries supplying a tumor, may cause systemic toxicity. The Chemofilter device, deployed in a vein downstream of the tumor, can chemically filter the excessive drugs from the circulation. In our study, CFD modeling of blood flow through the Chemofilter is used to optimize its hemodynamic performance. Methods:The Chemofilter consists of a porous membrane attached to a stent-like frame of the RX Accunet distal protection filters used for capturing blood clots. The membrane is formed by a lattice of symmetric micro-cells. This design provides a large surface area for the drug binding, and allows blood cells to pass through the lattice. A two-scale modeling approach is used, where the flow through individual micro-cells is simulated to determine the lattice permeability and then the entire device is modeled as a porous membrane. Results: The simulations detected regions of flow stagnation and recirculation caused by the membrane and its supporting frame. The effect of the membrane's leading angle on the velocity and pressure fields was determined. The device optimization will help the efficacy of drug absorption, while the risk of blood clotting reduces. NIH NCI R01CA194533.

  17. URBAN EFFICIENT ENERGY EVALUATION IN HIGH RESOLUTION URBAN AREAS BY USING ADAPTED WRF-UCM AND MICROSYS CFD MODELS

    Science.gov (United States)

    San Jose, R.; Perez, J. L.; Gonzalez, R. M.

    2009-12-01

    Urban metabolism modeling has advanced substantially during the last years due to the increased detail in mesoscale urban parameterization in meteorological mesoscale models and CFD numerical tools. Recently the implementation of the “urban canopy model” (UCM) into the WRF mesoscale meteorological model has produced a substantial advance on the understanding of the urban atmospheric heat flux exchanges in the urban canopy. The need to optimize the use of heat energy in urban environment has produced a substantial increase in the detailed investigation of the urban heat flux exchanges. In this contribution we will show the performance of using a tool called MICROSYS (MICRO scale CFD modelling SYStem) which is an adaptation of the classical urban canopy model but on a high resolution environment by using a classical CFD approach. The energy balance in the urban system can be determined in a micrometeorologicl sense by considering the energy flows in and out of a control volume. For such a control volume reaching from ground to a certain height above buildings, the energy balance equation includes the net radiation, the anthropogenic heat flux, the turbulent sensible heat flux, the turbulent latent heat flux, the net storage change within the control volume, the net advected flux and other sources and sinks. We have applied the MICROSYS model to an area of 5 km x 5 km with 200 m spatial resolution by using the WRF-UCM (adapted and the MICROSYS CFD model. The anthropogenic heat flux has been estimated by using the Flanner M.G. (2009) database and detailed GIS information (50 m resolution) of Madrid city. The Storage energy has been estimated by calculating the energy balance according to the UCM procedure and implementing it into the MICROSYS tool. Results show that MICROSYS can be used as an energy efficient tool to estimate the energy balance of different urban areas and buildings.

  18. Complex terrain wind resource estimation with the wind-atlas method: Prediction errors using linearized and nonlinear CFD micro-scale models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Troen, Ib; Bechmann, Andreas; Kelly, Mark C.

    2014-01-01

    flow model (CFD) for a number of sites in very complex terrain (large terrain slopes). We first briefly describe the Wind Atlas methodology as implemented in WAsP and the specifics of the “classical” model setup and the new setup allowing the use of the CFD computation engine. We discuss some known...... shortcomings of the linear orographic flow model (BZ) and possible modifications that could be considered, including the established RIX method....

  19. A self-standing two-fluid CFD model for vertical upward two-phase annular flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Y., E-mail: yang_liu@mail.dlut.edu.c [Key Laboratory of Ocean Energy Utilization and Energy Conservation of Ministry of Education, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024, Liaoning Province (China); Li, W.Z.; Quan, S.L. [Key Laboratory of Ocean Energy Utilization and Energy Conservation of Ministry of Education, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024, Liaoning Province (China)

    2011-05-15

    Research highlights: A mathematic model for two-phase annular flow is established in this paper. Pressure loss and wall shear stress increase with inlet gas and liquid flow velocities. Droplet mass fraction distribution exhibits a concave profile radially. - Abstract: In this paper, a new two-fluid CFD (computational fluid dynamics) model is proposed to simulate the vertical upward two-phase annular flow. This model solves the basic mass and momentum equations for the gas core region flow and the liquid film flow, where the basic governing equations are accounted for by the commercial CFD package Fluent6.3.26. The liquid droplet flow and the interfacial inter-phase effects are accounted for by the programmable interface of Fluent, UDF (user defined function). Unlike previous models, the present model includes the effect of liquid roll waves directly determined from the CFD code. It is able to provide more detailed and, the most important, self-standing information for both the gas core flow and the film flow as well as the inner tube wall situations.

  20. CFD simulation of near-field pollutant dispersion in the urban environment: A review of current modeling techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tominaga, Yoshihide; Stathopoulos, Ted

    2013-11-01

    Near-field pollutant dispersion in the urban environment involves the interaction of a plume and the flow field perturbed by building obstacles. In the past two decades, micro-scale Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation of pollutant dispersion around buildings and in urban areas has been widely used, sometimes in lieu of wind tunnel testing. This paper reviews current modeling techniques in CFD simulation of near-field pollutant dispersion in urban environments and discusses the findings to give insight into future applications. Key features of near-field pollutant dispersion around buildings from previous studies, i.e., three-dimensionality of mean flow, unsteadiness of large-scale flow structure, and anisotropy of turbulent scalar fluxes, are identified and discussed. This review highlights that it is important to choose appropriate numerical models and boundary conditions by understanding their inherent strengths and limitations. Furthermore, the importance of model evaluation was emphasized. Because pollutant concentrations around buildings can vary by orders of magnitudes in time and space, the model evaluation should be performed carefully, while paying attention to their uncertainty. Although CFD has significant potential, it is important to understand the underlying theory and limitations of a model in order to appropriately investigate the dispersion phenomena in question.

  1. CFD Modeling of Chamber Filling in a Micro-Biosensor for Protein Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islamov, Meiirbek; Sypabekova, Marzhan; Kanayeva, Damira; Rojas-Solórzano, Luis

    2017-10-03

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains one of the main causes of human death around the globe. The mortality rate for patients infected with active TB goes beyond 50% when not diagnosed. Rapid and accurate diagnostics coupled with further prompt treatment of the disease is the cornerstone for controlling TB outbreaks. To reduce this burden, the existing gap between detection and treatment must be addressed, and dedicated diagnostic tools such as biosensors should be developed. A biosensor is a sensing micro-device that consists of a biological sensing element and a transducer part to produce signals in proportion to quantitative information about the binding event. The micro-biosensor cell considered in this investigation is designed to operate based on aptamers as recognition elements against Mycobacterium tuberculosis secreted protein MPT64, combined in a microfluidic-chamber with inlet and outlet connections. The microfluidic cell is a miniaturized platform with valuable advantages such as low cost of analysis with low reagent consumption, reduced sample volume, and shortened processing time with enhanced analytical capability. The main purpose of this study is to assess the flooding characteristics of the encapsulated microfluidic cell of an existing micro-biosensor using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) techniques. The main challenge in the design of the microfluidic cell lies in the extraction of entrained air bubbles, which may remain after the filling process is completed, dramatically affecting the performance of the sensing element. In this work, a CFD model was developed on the platform ANSYS-CFX using the finite volume method to discretize the domain and solving the Navier-Stokes equations for both air and water in a Eulerian framework. Second-order space discretization scheme and second-order Euler Backward time discretization were used in the numerical treatment of the equations. For a given inlet-outlet diameter and dimensions of an in-house built cell chamber

  2. On the development of a subgrid CFD model for fire extinguishment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    TIESZEN,SHELDON R.; LOPEZ,AMALIA R.

    2000-02-02

    A subgrid model is presented for use in CFD fire simulations to account for thermal suppressants and strain. The extinguishment criteria is based on the ratio of a local fluid-mechanics time-scale to a local chemical time-scale compared to an empirically-determined critical Damkohler number. Local extinction occurs if this time scale is exceeded, global fire extinguishment occurs when local extinction has occurred for all combusting cells. The fluid mechanics time scale is based on the Kolmogorov time scale and the chemical time scale is based on blowout of a perfectly stirred reactor. The input to the reactor is based on cell averaged temperatures, assumed stoichiometric fuel/air composition, and cell averaged suppressant concentrations including combustion products. A detailed chemical mechanism is employed. The chemical time-scale is precalculated and mixing rules are used to reduce the composition space that must be parameterized. Comparisons with experimental data for fire extinguishment in a flame-stabilizing, backward-facing step geometry indicates that the model is conservative for this condition.

  3. 3D CFD Simulation of Plug Dynamics and Splitting through a Bifurcating Airway Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoi, Cory; Raessi, Mehdi

    2017-11-01

    Respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) occurs because of pulmonary surfactant insufficiency in the lungs of preterm infants. The common medical procedure to treat RDS, called surfactant respiratory therapy (SRT), involves instilling liquid surfactant plugs into the pulmonary airways. SRT's effectiveness highly depends on the ability to deliver surfactant through the complex branching airway network. Experimental and computational efforts have been made to understand complex fluid dynamics of liquid plug motion through the lung airways in order to increase SRT's response rate. However, previous computational work used 2D airway model geometries and studied plug dynamics of a pre-split plug. In this work, we present CFD simulations of surfactant plug motion through a 3D bifurcating airway model. In our 3D y-tube geometry representing the lung airways, we are not limited by 2D or pre-split plug assumptions. The airway walls are covered with a pre-existing liquid film. Using a passive scalar marking the surfactant plug, the plug splitting and surfactant film deposition is studied under various airway orientations. Exploring the splitting process and liquid distribution in a 3D geometry will advance our understanding of surfactant delivery and will increase the effectiveness of SRT.

  4. Modeling and simulation of PEM fuel cell's flow channels using CFD techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunha, Edgar F.; Andrade, Alexandre B.; Robalinho, Eric; Bejarano, Martha L.M.; Linardi, Marcelo [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)]. E-mails: efcunha@ipen.br; abodart@ipen.br; eric@ipen.br; mmora@ipen.br; mlinardi@ipen.br; Cekinski, Efraim [Instituto de Pesquisas Tecnologicas (IPT-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: cekinski@ipt.br

    2007-07-01

    Fuel cells are one of the most important devices to obtain electrical energy from hydrogen. The Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) consists of two important parts: the Membrane Electrode Assembly (MEA), where the reactions occur, and the flow field plates. The plates have many functions in a fuel cell: distribute reactant gases (hydrogen and air or oxygen), conduct electrical current, remove heat and water from the electrodes and make the cell robust. The cost of the bipolar plates corresponds up to 45% of the total stack costs. The Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) is a very useful tool to simulate hydrogen and oxygen gases flow channels, to reduce the costs of bipolar plates production and to optimize mass transport. Two types of flow channels were studied. The first type was a commercial plate by ELECTROCELL and the other was entirely projected at Programa de Celula a Combustivel (IPEN/CNEN-SP) and the experimental data were compared with modelling results. Optimum values for each set of variables were obtained and the models verification was carried out in order to show the feasibility of this technique to improve fuel cell efficiency. (author)

  5. Modelling NOX concentrations through CFD-RANS in an urban hot-spot using high resolution traffic emissions and meteorology from a mesoscale model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Beatriz; Santiago, Jose Luis; Martilli, Alberto; Martin, Fernando; Borge, Rafael; Quaassdorff, Christina; de la Paz, David

    2017-08-01

    Air quality management requires more detailed studies about air pollution at urban and local scale over long periods of time. This work focuses on obtaining the spatial distribution of NOx concentration averaged over several days in a heavily trafficked urban area in Madrid (Spain) using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model. A methodology based on weighted average of CFD simulations is applied computing the time evolution of NOx dispersion as a sequence of steady-state scenarios taking into account the actual atmospheric conditions. The inputs of emissions are estimated from the traffic emission model and the meteorological information used is derived from a mesoscale model. Finally, the computed concentration map correlates well with 72 passive samplers deployed in the research area. This work reveals the potential of using urban mesoscale simulations together with detailed traffic emissions so as to provide accurate maps of pollutant concentration at microscale using CFD simulations.

  6. A Discussion on Uncertainty Representation and Interpretation in Model-Based Prognostics Algorithms based on Kalman Filter Estimation Applied to Prognostics of Electronics Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celaya, Jose R.; Saxen, Abhinav; Goebel, Kai

    2012-01-01

    This article discusses several aspects of uncertainty representation and management for model-based prognostics methodologies based on our experience with Kalman Filters when applied to prognostics for electronics components. In particular, it explores the implications of modeling remaining useful life prediction as a stochastic process and how it relates to uncertainty representation, management, and the role of prognostics in decision-making. A distinction between the interpretations of estimated remaining useful life probability density function and the true remaining useful life probability density function is explained and a cautionary argument is provided against mixing interpretations for the two while considering prognostics in making critical decisions.

  7. Investigating the Effect of Damage Progression Model Choice on Prognostics Performance

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The success of model-based approaches to systems health management depends largely on the quality of the underly- ing models. In model-based prognostics, it is...

  8. A Comparison of Filter-based Approaches for Model-based Prognostics

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Model-based prognostics approaches use domain knowledge about a system and its failure modes through the use of physics-based models. Model-based prognosis is...

  9. Combining CFD simulations with blockoriented heatflow-network model for prediction of photovoltaic energy-production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haber, I. E.; Farkas, I.

    2011-01-01

    The exterior factors which influencing the working circumstances of photovoltaic modules are the irradiation, the optical air layer (Air Mass - AM), the irradiation angle, the environmental temperature and the cooling effect of the wind. The efficiency of photovoltaic (PV) devices is inversely proportional to the cell temperature and therefore the mounting of the PV modules can have a big affect on the cooling, due to wind flow-around and naturally convection. The construction of the modules could be described by a heatflow-network model, and that can define the equation which determines the cells temperature. An equation like this can be solved as a block oriented model with hybrid-analogue simulator such as Matlab-Simulink. In view of the flow field and the heat transfer, witch was calculated numerically, the heat transfer coefficients can be determined. Five inflow rates were set up for both pitched and flat roof cases, to let the trend of the heat transfer coefficient know, while these functions can be used for the Matlab/Simulink model. To model the free convection flows, the Boussinesq-approximation were used, integrated into the Navier-Stokes equations and the energy equation. It has been found that under a constant solar heat gain, the air velocity around the modules and behind the pitched-roof mounted module is increasing, proportionately to the wind velocities, and as result the heat transfer coefficient increases linearly, and can be described by a function in both cases. To the block based model the meteorological parameters and the results of the CFD simulations as single functions were attached. The final aim was to make a model that could be used for planning photovoltaic systems, and define their accurate performance for better sizing of an array of modules.

  10. AREVA NP approach to fuel reliability using a combination CFD fuel deposition modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keheley, T.; Pop, M. [AREVA, AREVA NP Inc. (United States); Bhandari, G. [CD-adapco (United States)

    2011-07-01

    With the current goal of zero fuel failures by 2010 at operating nuclear power plants in the Usa, it is important to be able to predict risk associated with crud deposition on fuel as close to reality as possible. AREVA has performed finely-resolved (CFD) thermal hydraulic analyses on the regions of interest of fuel assemblies for a number of years. This work was able to clearly show contrasts in thermal-hydraulic conditions, i.e., fluid velocities, fluid temperature, void fraction, shear rates, etc., all very consistent with the reported pattern of crud. More recently, this analysis was coupled to AREVA NP's model of crud formation to predict the pattern of accumulation surrounding a peripheral rod, resulting in a Level IV AREVA BWR Crud Risk Assessment Tool. This paper presents an example of the use of this combination of codes at two axial regions in a BWR: downstream of the grid spacer at the approximate elevation of peak lift-off (measured crud accumulation) and a short distance upstream of the grid spacer still in the presence of boiling but at an off-peak axial location with respect to observed crud accumulation. The predicted propensity for some species (e.g., ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) accumulation on the peripheral rod surface is markedly higher in the peak zone compared to the off-peak location. The distributions of other crud-relevant species on the fuel rod surface and with crud depth have also been calculated. The results suggest the influence of local flow conditions on the location and nature of crud formation. A closer examination of the results of the AREVA NP CFD combined with crud deposition predictive methodology shows that the distribution of deposition species on a rod surface at the peak axial location has no simple relationship to heat flux, axial flow velocity, channel average fluid temperature, and local void fraction. That is why a combination of detailed thermo-hydraulics and localized chemistry effects, as achieved by the AREVA NP code

  11. CFD modelling of liquid-solid transport in the horizontal eccentric annuli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayindla, Sneha; Challabotla, Niranjan Reddy

    2017-11-01

    In oil and gas drilling operations, different types of drilling fluids are used to transport the solid cuttings in an annulus between drill pipe and well casing. The inner pipe is often eccentric and flow inside the annulus can be laminar or turbulent regime. In the present work, Eulerian-Eulerian granular multiphase CFD model is developed to systematically investigate the effect of the rheology of the drilling fluid type (Newtonian and non-Newtonian), drill pipe eccentricity and inner pipe rotation on the efficiency of cuttings transport. Both laminar and turbulent flow regimes were considered. Frictional pressure drop is computed and compared with the flow loop experimental results reported in the literature. The results confirm that the annular frictional pressure loss in a fully eccentric annulus are significantly lesser than the concentric annulus. Inner pipe rotation improve the efficiency of the cuttings transport in laminar flow regime. Cuttings transport velocity and concentration distribution were analysed to predict the different flow patterns such as stationary bed, moving bed, heterogeneous and homogeneous bed formation.

  12. A coupled CFD and two-phase substrate kinetic model for enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danes, Nicholas; Sitaraman, Hariswaran; Stickel, Jonathan; Sprague, Michael

    2017-11-01

    Cost-effective production of fuels from lignocellulosic biomass is an important subject of research in order to meet the world's current and future energy demands. Enzymatic hydrolysis is one of the several steps in the biochemical conversion of biomass into fuels. This process involves the interplay of non-Newtonian fluid dynamics that happen over tens of seconds coupled with chemical reactions that happen over several hours. In this work, we present a coupled CFD-reaction model for conversion of cellulose to sugars in a benchtop mixer reactor. A subcycling approach is used to circumvent the large time scale disparity between fluid dynamics and reactions. We will present a validation study of our simulations with experiments for well-mixed and stratified reactor scenarios along with predictions for conversion rates and product concentrations at varying impeller speeds and in scaled-up reactors. This work is funded by the Bioenergy Technology Office of DOE and the NSF's Enriched Doctoral Training program (DMS-1551229).

  13. CFD modelling of shell-side asphaltenes deposition in a shell and tube heat exchanger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emani, Sampath; Ramasamy, M.; Shaari, Ku Zilati Ku

    2017-07-01

    Asphaltenes are identified as the main cause of crude oil fouling in the shell and tube exchangers. There are occasions where the crude oil flows through the shell side of the heat exchangers and some fouling is reported in the shell side of those heat exchangers. Understanding the fouling phenomena in the shell sides requires the knowledge on the irregular fluid flow paths and most susceptible locations of particles deposition. In the present work, an attempt has been made to investigate the effect of shear stress and surface roughness on shell-side asphaltenes deposition in a shell and tube heat exchanger through Computational Fluid Dynamics approach. The hydrodynamics of asphaltenes particles and the effect of various forces on the asphaltenes deposition on the heat transfer surfaces has been investigated through a Lagrangian based discrete-phase model. From the CFD analysis, the net mass deposition of the asphaltenes particles reduces with an increase in surface roughness from 0 to 0.04 mm and wall shear stress from 0 to 0.04 Pa for flow velocity 1 m/s, respectively. The asphaltenes mass deposition becomes constant with further increase in wall shear stress and surface roughness.

  14. CFD modeling of incinerator to increase PCBs removal from outlet gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaghmaeian, Kamyar; Jaafarzadeh, Nematallah; Nabizadeh, Ramin; Dastforoushan, Golbarg; Jaafari, Jalil

    2015-01-01

    Incineration of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) is an important alternative way for disposal of this type of hazardous waste. PCBs are very stable compounds and do not decompose readily. Individuals can be exposed to PCBs through several ways and damaged by their effects. A well design of a waste incinerator will convert these components to unharmfull materials. In this paper we have studied the design parameters of an incinerator with numerical approaches. The CFD software Fluent 6.3 is used for modelling of an incinerator. The effects of several baffles inside the incinerator on flow distribution and heat is investigated. The results show that baffles can reduce eddy flows, increase retaining times, and efficiencies. The baffles reduced cool areas and increased efficiencies of heat as maximum temperature in two and three baffle embedded incinerator were 100 and 200 °C higher than the non-baffle case, respectively. Also the gas emission leaves the incinerator with a lower speed across a longer path and the turbulent flow in the incinerator is stronger.

  15. CFD Modeling of Sodium-Oxide Deposition in Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor Compact Heat Exchangers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tatli, Emre; Ferroni, Paolo; Mazzoccoli, Jason

    2015-09-02

    The possible use of compact heat exchangers (HXs) in sodium-cooled fast reactors (SFR) employing a Brayton cycle is promising due to their high power density and resulting small volume in comparison with conventional shell-and-tube HXs. However, the small diameter of their channels makes them more susceptible to plugging due to Na2O deposition during accident conditions. Although cold traps are designed to reduce oxygen impurity levels in the sodium coolant, their failure, in conjunction with accidental air ingress into the sodium boundary, could result in coolant oxygen levels that are above the saturation limit in the cooler parts of the HX channels. This can result in Na2O crystallization and the formation of solid deposits on cooled channel surfaces, limiting or even blocking coolant flow. The development of analysis tools capable of modeling the formation of these deposits in the presence of sodium flow will allow designers of SFRs to properly size the HX channels so that, in the scenario mentioned above, the reactor operator has sufficient time to detect and react to the affected HX. Until now, analytical methodologies to predict the formation of these deposits have been developed, but never implemented in a high-fidelity computational tool suited to modern reactor design techniques. This paper summarizes the challenges and the current status in the development of a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) methodology to predict deposit formation, with particular emphasis on sensitivity studies on some parameters affecting deposition.

  16. TOPFLOW-experiments, model development and validation for the qualification of CFD-odes for two-phase flows. Final report; TOPFLOW-Experimente, Modellentwicklung und Validierung zur Qualifizierung von CFD-Codes fuer Zweiphasenstroemungen. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucas, D.; Beyer, M.; Banowski, M.; Seidel, T.; Krepper, E.; Liao, Y.; Apanasevich, P.; Gauss, F.; Ma, T.

    2016-12-15

    This report summarizes the main results obtained in frame of the project. The aim of the project was the qualification of CFD-methods for two-phase flows with phase transfer relevant for nuclear safety research. To reach this aim CFD-grade experimental data are required. Such data can be obtained at the TOPFLOW facility because of the combination of experiments in scales and at parameters which are relevant for nuclear safety research with innovative measuring techniques. The experimental part of this project comprises investigations on flows in vertical pipes using the ultrafast X-ray tomography, on flows with and without phase transfer in a special test basin and on counter-current flow limitation in a model of a PWR hot leg. These experiments are only briefly presented in this report since detailed documentations are given in separated reports for all of these 3 experimental series. One important results of the activities devoted on CFD qualification is the establishment of the baseline model concept and the definition of the baseline model for poly-disperse bubbly flows. This is an important contribution to improve the predictive capabilities of CFD-models basing on the two- or multi-fluid approach. On the other hand, the innovative Generalized Two-Phase Flow concept (GENTOP) aims on an extension of the range of applicability of CFD-methods. In many relevant flow situations different morphologies of the phases or different flow pattern occur simultaneously in one flow domain. In addition transitions between these morphologies may occur. The GENTOP-concept for the first time a framework was established which allows the simulation of such flow situations in a consistent manner. Other activities of the project aim on special model developments to improve the simulation capabilities for flows with phase transfer.

  17. Physics Based Modeling and Prognostics of Electrolytic Capacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Chetan; Ceyla, Jose R.; Biswas, Gautam; Goebel, Kai

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposes first principles based modeling and prognostics approach for electrolytic capacitors. Electrolytic capacitors have become critical components in electronics systems in aeronautics and other domains. Degradations and faults in DC-DC converter unit propagates to the GPS and navigation subsystems and affects the overall solution. Capacitors and MOSFETs are the two major components, which cause degradations and failures in DC-DC converters. This type of capacitors are known for its low reliability and frequent breakdown on critical systems like power supplies of avionics equipment and electrical drivers of electromechanical actuators of control surfaces. Some of the more prevalent fault effects, such as a ripple voltage surge at the power supply output can cause glitches in the GPS position and velocity output, and this, in turn, if not corrected will propagate and distort the navigation solution. In this work, we study the effects of accelerated aging due to thermal stress on different sets of capacitors under different conditions. Our focus is on deriving first principles degradation models for thermal stress conditions. Data collected from simultaneous experiments are used to validate the desired models. Our overall goal is to derive accurate models of capacitor degradation, and use them to predict performance changes in DC-DC converters.

  18. Design of a correlated validated CFD and genetic algorithm model for optimized sensors placement for indoor air quality monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousavi, Monireh Sadat; Ashrafi, Khosro; Motlagh, Majid Shafie Pour; Niksokhan, Mohhamad Hosein; Vosoughifar, HamidReza

    2017-09-01

    In this study, coupled method for simulation of flow pattern based on computational methods for fluid dynamics with optimization technique using genetic algorithms is presented to determine the optimal location and number of sensors in an enclosed residential complex parking in Tehran. The main objective of this research is costs reduction and maximum coverage with regard to distribution of existing concentrations in different scenarios. In this study, considering all the different scenarios for simulation of pollution distribution using CFD simulations has been challenging due to extent of parking and number of cars available. To solve this problem, some scenarios have been selected based on random method. Then, maximum concentrations of scenarios are chosen for performing optimization. CFD simulation outputs are inserted as input in the optimization model using genetic algorithm. The obtained results stated optimal number and location of sensors.

  19. Design of a correlated validated CFD and genetic algorithm model for optimized sensors placement for indoor air quality monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousavi, Monireh Sadat; Ashrafi, Khosro; Motlagh, Majid Shafie Pour; Niksokhan, Mohhamad Hosein; Vosoughifar, HamidReza

    2018-02-01

    In this study, coupled method for simulation of flow pattern based on computational methods for fluid dynamics with optimization technique using genetic algorithms is presented to determine the optimal location and number of sensors in an enclosed residential complex parking in Tehran. The main objective of this research is costs reduction and maximum coverage with regard to distribution of existing concentrations in different scenarios. In this study, considering all the different scenarios for simulation of pollution distribution using CFD simulations has been challenging due to extent of parking and number of cars available. To solve this problem, some scenarios have been selected based on random method. Then, maximum concentrations of scenarios are chosen for performing optimization. CFD simulation outputs are inserted as input in the optimization model using genetic algorithm. The obtained results stated optimal number and location of sensors.

  20. Multidisciplinary Rehabilitation Treatment of Patients With Chronic Low Back Pain: A Prognostic Model for Its Outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Hulst, Marije; Vollenbroek-Hutten, Miriam Marie Rosé; Groothuis-Oudshoorn, Catharina Gerarda Maria; Hermens, Hermanus J.

    Objectives: (1) To determine if treatment outcome in chronic low back pain can be predicted by a predefined multivariate prognostic model based on consistent predictors from the literature and (2) to explore the value of potentially prognostic factors further. Methods: Data were derived from a

  1. Systematic review of multivariable prognostic models for mild traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverberg, Noah D; Gardner, Andrew J; Brubacher, Jeffrey R; Panenka, William J; Li, Jun Jian; Iverson, Grant L

    2015-04-15

    Prognostic models can guide clinical management and increase statistical power in clinical trials. The availability and adequacy of prognostic models for mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) is uncertain. The present study aimed to (1) identify and evaluate multivariable prognostic models for MTBI, and (2) determine which pre-, peri-, and early post-injury variables have independent prognostic value in the context of multivariable models. An electronic search of MEDLINE, PsycINFO, PubMed, EMBASE, and CINAHL databases for English-language MTBI cohort studies from 1970-2013 was supplemented by Web of Science citation and hand searching. This search strategy identified 7789 articles after removing duplicates. Of 182 full-text articles reviewed, 26 met eligibility criteria including (1) prospective inception cohort design, (2) prognostic information collected within 1 month post-injury, and (3) 2+variables combined to predict clinical outcome (e.g., post-concussion syndrome) at least 1 month later. Independent reviewers extracted sample characteristics, study design features, clinical outcome variables, predictor selection methods, and prognostic model discrimination, calibration, and cross-validation. These data elements were synthesized qualitatively. The present review found no multivariable prognostic model that adequately predicts individual patient outcomes from MTBI. Suboptimal methodology limits their reproducibility and clinical usefulness. The most robust prognostic factors in the context of multivariable models were pre-injury mental health and early post-injury neuropsychological functioning. Women and adults with early post-injury anxiety also have worse prognoses. Relative to these factors, the severity of MTBI had little long-term prognostic value. Future prognostic studies should consider a broad range of biopsychosocial predictors in large inception cohorts.

  2. Improving Computational Efficiency of Prediction in Model-based Prognostics Using the Unscented Transform

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Model-based prognostics captures system knowledge in the form of physics-based models of components, and how they fail, in order to obtain accurate predictions of...

  3. CFD Experiments for Wind-Turbine-Platform Seakeeping Models and Flow Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunbar, Alexander; Paterson, Eric; Craven, Brent; Brasseur, James

    2013-11-01

    As part of the Penn State ``Cyber Wind Facility,'' we describe the development and application of a tightly-coupled CFD/6-DOF solver in OpenFOAM for the simulation of offshore floating wind turbine platforms. We highlight the tightly-coupled computational framework and validation of the solver via a comparison with benchmark experimental measurements. The validated CFD/6-DOF solver is then applied to the OC4 DeepCwind semisubmersible for the prediction of platform motion due to wind and wave loading. Supported by the US Department of Energy.

  4. CFD MODELING AND ANALYSIS FOR A-AREA AND H-AREA COOLING TOWERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S.; Garrett, A.; Bollinger, J.

    2009-09-02

    Mechanical draft cooling towers are designed to cool process water via sensible and latent heat transfer to air. Heat and mass transfer take place simultaneously. Heat is transferred as sensible heat due to the temperature difference between liquid and gas phases, and as the latent heat of the water as it evaporates. Mass of water vapor is transferred due to the difference between the vapor pressure at the air-liquid interface and the partial pressure of water vapor in the bulk of the air. Equations to govern these phenomena are discussed here. The governing equations are solved by taking a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) approach. The purpose of the work is to develop a three-dimensional CFD model to evaluate the flow patterns inside the cooling tower cell driven by cooling fan and wind, considering the cooling fans to be on or off. Two types of the cooling towers are considered here. One is cross-flow type cooling tower located in A-Area, and the other is counterflow type cooling tower located in H-Area. The cooling tower located in A-Area is mechanical draft cooling tower (MDCT) consisting of four compartment cells as shown in Fig. 1. It is 13.7m wide, 36.8m long, and 9.4m high. Each cell has its own cooling fan and shroud without any flow communications between two adjacent cells. There are water distribution decks on both sides of the fan shroud. The deck floor has an array of about 25mm size holes through which water droplet falls into the cell region cooled by the ambient air driven by fan and wind, and it is eventually collected in basin area. As shown in Fig. 1, about 0.15-m thick drift eliminator allows ambient air to be humidified through the evaporative cooling process without entrainment of water droplets into the shroud exit. The H-Area cooling tower is about 7.3 m wide, 29.3 m long, and 9.0 m high. Each cell has its own cooling fan and shroud, but each of two corner cells has two panels to shield wind at the bottom of the cells. There is some

  5. Comparison of Homogeneous and Heterogeneous CFD Fuel Models for Phase I of the IAEA CRP on HTR Uncertainties Benchmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerhard Strydom; Su-Jong Yoon

    2014-04-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) evaluation of homogeneous and heterogeneous fuel models was performed as part of the Phase I calculations of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Coordinate Research Program (CRP) on High Temperature Reactor (HTR) Uncertainties in Modeling (UAM). This study was focused on the nominal localized stand-alone fuel thermal response, as defined in Ex. I-3 and I-4 of the HTR UAM. The aim of the stand-alone thermal unit-cell simulation is to isolate the effect of material and boundary input uncertainties on a very simplified problem, before propagation of these uncertainties are performed in subsequent coupled neutronics/thermal fluids phases on the benchmark. In many of the previous studies for high temperature gas cooled reactors, the volume-averaged homogeneous mixture model of a single fuel compact has been applied. In the homogeneous model, the Tristructural Isotropic (TRISO) fuel particles in the fuel compact were not modeled directly and an effective thermal conductivity was employed for the thermo-physical properties of the fuel compact. On the contrary, in the heterogeneous model, the uranium carbide (UCO), inner and outer pyrolytic carbon (IPyC/OPyC) and silicon carbide (SiC) layers of the TRISO fuel particles are explicitly modeled. The fuel compact is modeled as a heterogeneous mixture of TRISO fuel kernels embedded in H-451 matrix graphite. In this study, a steady-state and transient CFD simulations were performed with both homogeneous and heterogeneous models to compare the thermal characteristics. The nominal values of the input parameters are used for this CFD analysis. In a future study, the effects of input uncertainties in the material properties and boundary parameters will be investigated and reported.

  6. CFD and Gaussian atmospheric dispersion models: A comparison for leak from carbon dioxide transportation and storage facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzoldi, Alberto; Hill, Tim; Colls, Jeremy J.

    Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) is of interest to the scientific community as a way of achieving significant global reduction of atmospheric CO 2 emission in the medium term. CO 2 would be transported from large emission points (e.g. coal fired power plants) to storage sites by surface/shallow high pressure pipelines. Modelling of CO 2 atmospheric dispersion after leakages from transportation facilities will be required before starting large scale CCS projects. This paper deals with the evaluation of the atmospheric dispersion CFD tool Fluidyn-PANACHE against Prairie Grass and Kit Fox field experiments. A description of the models for turbulence generation and dissipation used ( k- ɛ and k- l) and a comparison with the Gaussian model ALOHA for both field experiments are also outlined. The main outcome of this work puts PANACHE among the "fit-for-purpose" models, respecting all the prerequisites stated by Hanna et al. [Hanna, S.R., Chang, J.C. and Strimaitis, D.G., 1993. Hazardous gas model evaluation with field observations. Atmospheric Environment, 27, 2265-2285] for the evaluation of atmospheric dispersion model performance. The average under-prediction has been ascribed to the usage of mean wind speed and direction, which is characteristic of all CFD models. The authors suggest a modification of performance ranges for model acceptability measures, within the field of high pressure CO 2 transportation risk assessment, with the aim of accounting for the overall simplification induced by the usage of constant wind speed and direction within CFD atmospheric dispersion models.

  7. CFD modeling of hydro-biochemical behavior of MSW subjected to leachate recirculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Shi-Jin; Cao, Ben-Yi; Li, An-Zheng; Chen, Hong-Xin; Zheng, Qi-Teng

    2017-12-08

    The most commonly used method of operating landfills more sustainably is to promote rapid biodegradation and stabilization of municipal solid waste (MSW) by leachate recirculation. The present study is an application of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to the 3D modeling of leachate recirculation in bioreactor landfills using vertical wells. The objective is to model and investigate the hydrodynamic and biochemical behavior of MSW subject to leachate recirculation. The results indicate that the maximum recirculated leachate volume can be reached when vertical wells are set at the upper middle part of a landfill (H W/H T = 0.4), and increasing the screen length can be more helpful in enlarging the influence radius than increasing the well length (an increase in H S/H W from 0.4 to 0.6 results in an increase in influence radius from 6.5 to 7.7 m). The time to reach steady state of leachate recirculation decreases with the increase in pressure head; however, the time for leachate to drain away increases with the increase in pressure head. It also showed that methanogenic biomass inoculum of 1.0 kg/m3 can accelerate the volatile fatty acid depletion and increase the peak depletion rate to 2.7 × 10-6 kg/m3/s. The degradation-induced void change parameter exerts an influence on the processes of MSW biodegradation because a smaller parameter value results in a greater increase in void space.

  8. Aircraft Anomaly Prognostics Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Ridgetop Group will leverage its proven Electromechanical Actuator (EMA) prognostics methodology to develop an advanced model-based actuator prognostic reasoner...

  9. Plaque Brachytherapy for Uveal Melanoma: A Vision Prognostication Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, Niloufer [Department of Radiation Oncology, Taussig Cancer Center, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Khan, Mohammad K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Bena, James [Department of Quantitative Health Sciences, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Macklis, Roger [Department of Radiation Oncology, Taussig Cancer Center, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Singh, Arun D., E-mail: singha@ccf.org [Department of Ophthalmic Oncology, Cole Eye Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States)

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To generate a vision prognostication model after plaque brachytherapy for uveal melanoma. Methods and Materials: All patients with primary single ciliary body or choroidal melanoma treated with iodine-125 or ruthenium-106 plaque brachytherapy between January 1, 2005, and June 30, 2010, were included. The primary endpoint was loss of visual acuity. Only patients with initial visual acuity better than or equal to 20/50 were used to evaluate visual acuity worse than 20/50 at the end of the study, and only patients with initial visual acuity better than or equal to 20/200 were used to evaluate visual acuity worse than 20/200 at the end of the study. Factors analyzed were sex, age, cataracts, diabetes, tumor size (basal dimension and apical height), tumor location, and radiation dose to the tumor apex, fovea, and optic disc. Univariate and multivariable Cox proportional hazards were used to determine the influence of baseline patient factors on vision loss. Kaplan-Meier curves (log rank analysis) were used to estimate freedom from vision loss. Results: Of 189 patients, 92% (174) were alive as of February 1, 2011. At presentation, visual acuity was better than or equal to 20/50 and better than or equal to 20/200 in 108 and 173 patients, respectively. Of these patients, 44.4% (48) had post-treatment visual acuity of worse than 20/50 and 25.4% (44) had post-treatment visual acuity worse than 20/200. By multivariable analysis, increased age (hazard ratio [HR] of 1.01 [1.00-1.03], P=.05), increase in tumor height (HR of 1.35 [1.22-1.48], P<.001), and a greater total dose to the fovea (HR of 1.01 [1.00-1.01], P<.001) were predictive of vision loss. This information was used to develop a nomogram predictive of vision loss. Conclusions: By providing a means to predict vision loss at 3 years after treatment, our vision prognostication model can be an important tool for patient selection and treatment counseling.

  10. Modeling of Multisize Bubbly Flow and Application to the Simulation of Boiling Flows with the Neptune_CFD Code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophe Morel

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the modeling of boiling multisize bubbly flows and its application to the simulation of the DEBORA experiment. We follow the method proposed originally by Kamp, assuming a given mathematical expression for the bubble diameter pdf. The original model is completed by the addition of some new terms for vapor compressibility and phase change. The liquid-to-interface heat transfer term, which essentially determines the bubbles condensation rate in the DEBORA experiment, is also modeled with care. First numerical results realized with the Neptune_CFD code are presented and discussed.

  11. CFD approach to modelling, hydrodynamic analysis and motion characteristics of a laboratory underwater glider with experimental results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yogang Singh

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Underwater gliders are buoyancy propelled vehicle which make use of buoyancy for vertical movement and wings to propel the glider in forward direction. Autonomous underwater gliders are a patented technology and are manufactured and marketed by corporations. In this study, we validate the experimental lift and drag characteristics of a glider from the literature using Computational fluid dynamics (CFD approach. This approach is then used for the assessment of the steady state characteristics of a laboratory glider designed at Indian Institute of Technology (IIT Madras. Flow behaviour and lift and drag force distribution at different angles of attack are studied for Reynolds numbers varying from 105 to 106 for NACA0012 wing configurations. The state variables of the glider are the velocity, gliding angle and angle of attack which are simulated by making use of the hydrodynamic drag and lift coefficients obtained from CFD. The effect of the variable buoyancy is examined in terms of the gliding angle, velocity and angle of attack. Laboratory model of glider is developed from the final design asserted by CFD. This model is used for determination of static and dynamic properties of an underwater glider which were validated against an equivalent CAD model and simulation results obtained from equations of motion of glider in vertical plane respectively. In the literature, only empirical approach has been adopted to estimate the hydrodynamic coefficients of the AUG that are required for its trajectory simulation. In this work, a CFD approach has been proposed to estimate the hydrodynamic coefficients and validated with experimental data. A two-mass variable buoyancy engine has been designed and implemented. The equations of motion for this two-mass engine have been obtained by modifying the single mass version of the equations described in the literature. The objectives of the present study are to understand the glider dynamics adopting a CFD approach

  12. CFD analysis and flow model reduction for surfactant production in helix reactor = CFD analiza i redukcija modela strujanja za proizvodnju surfaktanta u helix reaktoru

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nikačević, N.M.; Thielen, L.; Twerda, A.; Hof, P.M.J. van den

    2015-01-01

    Flow pattern analysis in a spiral Helix reactor is conducted, for the application in commercial surfactant production. Step change response curves (SCR) were obtained from numerical tracer experiments by three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations. Non-reactive flow is

  13. Physical characterization of biomass fuels prepared for suspension firing in utility boilers for CFD modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosendahl, Lasse; Yin, Chungen; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2007-01-01

    shapes. The sample is subdivided by straw type, and coherent size, type and mass distribution parameters are reported for the entire sample. This type of data is necessary in order to use CFD reliably as a design and retrofit tool for co-firing biomass with fossil fuels, as the combustion processes...

  14. A Coupled VOF-Eulerian Multiphase CFD Model to Simulate Breaking Wave Impacts on Offshore Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tomaselli, Pietro; Christensen, Erik Damgaard

    2016-01-01

    Breaking wave-induced loads on offshore structures can be extremely severe. The air entrainment mechanism during the breaking process plays a not well-known role in the exerted forces. This paper present a CFD solver, developed in the Open-FOAM environment, capable of simulating the wave breaking...

  15. CFD modelling of cooling channel geometry of PEM fuel cell for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The evaluation is performed using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code based on a finite volume approach. The systems performances are presented as a function of the system temperature, operating parameters and cooling channel geometry. The results obtained indicate that incorporating cooling channels within ...

  16. CFD Modeling of Thermal Manikin Heat Loss in a Comfort Evaluation Benchmark Test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Håkan O.; Brohus, Henrik; Nielsen, Peter V.

    2007-01-01

    and companies still use several in-house codes for their calculations. The validation and association with human perception and heat losses in reality is consequently very difficult to make. This paper is providing requirements for the design and development of computer manikins and CFD benchmark tests...

  17. The Practicability of a Novel Prognostic Index (PI) Model and Comparison with Nottingham Prognostic Index (NPI) in Stage I-III Breast Cancer Patients Undergoing Surgical Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Jiahuai; Ye, Feng; Li, Shuaijie; Huang, Xiaojia; Yang, Lu; Xiao, Xiangsheng; Xie, Xiaoming

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated the prognostic value of various laboratory parameters in cancer patients. This study was to establish a prognostic index (PI) model for breast cancer patients based on the potential prognostic factors. A retrospective study of 1661 breast cancer patients who underwent surgical treatment between January 2002 and December 2008 at Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center was conducted. Multivariate analysis (Cox regression model) was performed to determine the independent prognostic factors and a prognostic index (PI) model was devised based on these factors. Survival analyses were used to estimate the prognostic value of PI, and the discriminatory ability of PI was compared with Nottingham Prognostic Index (NPI) by evaluating the area under the receiver operating characteristics curves (AUC). The mean survival time of all participants was 123.6 months. The preoperative globulin >30.0g/L, triglyceride >1.10mmol/L and fibrinogen >2.83g/L were identified as risk factors for shorter cancer-specific survival. The novel prognostic index model was established and enrolled patients were classified as low- (1168 patients, 70.3%), moderate- (410 patients, 24.7%) and high-risk groups (83 patients, 5.0%), respectively. Compared with the low-risk group, higher risks of poor clinical outcome were indicated in the moderate-risk group [Hazard ratio (HR): 1.513, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.169-1.959, p = 0.002] and high-risk group (HR: 2.481, 95%CI: 1.653-3.724, p< 0.001). The prognostic index based on three laboratory parameters was a novel and practicable prognostic tool. It may serve as complement to help predict postoperative survival in breast cancer patients.

  18. Evaluation of Hydraulic Loads on the Runner Blades of a Kaplan Turbine using CFD Simulation and Model Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoltan-Iosif Korka

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamic is today a standard procedure for analyzing and simulating the flow through several hydraulic machines. In this process, the fluid flow domain is divided into small volumes where the governing equations are converted into algebraic ones, which are numerically solved. Computational results strongly depend on the applied mathematical model and on the numerical methods used for converting the governing equations into the algebraic ones. The goal of the paper is to evaluate, by numerical simulation, the hydraulic loads (forces and torques on the runner blades of an existent Kaplan turbine and to compare them with the experimental results obtained from model test.

  19. Coupling scales for modelling heavy metal vaporization from municipal solid waste incineration in a fluid bed by CFD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soria, José; Gauthier, Daniel; Flamant, Gilles; Rodriguez, Rosa; Mazza, Germán

    2015-09-01

    Municipal Solid Waste Incineration (MSWI) in fluidized bed is a very interesting technology mainly due to high combustion efficiency, great flexibility for treating several types of waste fuels and reduction in pollutants emitted with the flue gas. However, there is a great concern with respect to the fate of heavy metals (HM) contained in MSW and their environmental impact. In this study, a coupled two-scale CFD model was developed for MSWI in a bubbling fluidized bed. It presents an original scheme that combines a single particle model and a global fluidized bed model in order to represent the HM vaporization during MSW combustion. Two of the most representative HM (Cd and Pb) with bed temperatures ranging between 923 and 1073K have been considered. This new approach uses ANSYS FLUENT 14.0 as the modelling platform for the simulations along with a complete set of self-developed user-defined functions (UDFs). The simulation results are compared to the experimental data obtained previously by the research group in a lab-scale fluid bed incinerator. The comparison indicates that the proposed CFD model predicts well the evolution of the HM release for the bed temperatures analyzed. It shows that both bed temperature and bed dynamics have influence on the HM vaporization rate. It can be concluded that CFD is a rigorous tool that provides valuable information about HM vaporization and that the original two-scale simulation scheme adopted allows to better represent the actual particle behavior in a fluid bed incinerator. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. A CFD model for analysis of performance, water and thermal distribution, and mechanical related failure in PEM fuel cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maher A.R. Sadiq Al-Baghdadi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a comprehensive three–dimensional, multi–phase, non-isothermal model of a Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM fuel cell that incorporates significant physical processes and key parameters affecting the fuel cell performance. The model construction involves equations derivation, boundary conditions setting, and solution algorithm flow chart. Equations in gas flow channels, gas diffusion layers (GDLs, catalyst layers (CLs, and membrane as well as equations governing cell potential and hygro-thermal stresses are described. The algorithm flow chart starts from input of the desired cell current density, initialization, iteration of the equations solution, and finalizations by calculating the cell potential. In order to analyze performance, water and thermal distribution, and mechanical related failure in the cell, the equations are solved using a computational fluid dynamic (CFD code. Performance analysis includes a performance curve which plots the cell potential (Volt against nominal current density (A/cm2 as well as losses. Velocity vectors of gas and liquid water, liquid water saturation, and water content profile are calculated. Thermal distribution is then calculated together with hygro-thermal stresses and deformation. The CFD model was executed under boundary conditions of 20°C room temperature, 35% relative humidity, and 1 MPA pressure on the lower surface. Parameters values of membrane electrode assembly (MEA and other base conditions are selected. A cell with dimension of 1 mm x 1 mm x 50 mm is used as the object of analysis. The nominal current density of 1.4 A/cm2 is given as the input of the CFD calculation. The results show that the model represents well the performance curve obtained through experiment. Moreover, it can be concluded that the model can help in understanding complex process in the cell which is hard to be studied experimentally, and also provides computer aided tool for design and optimization of PEM

  1. A CFD and experimental study on cavitation in positive displacement pumps: Benefits and drawbacks of the ‘full’ cavitation model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldo Iannetti

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To fill the gap in the literature in terms of numerical studies of positive displacement (PD pumps in a cavitating condition, a comprehensive and transient computational fluid dynamics (CFD model of a PD pump, simulating the cavitation arising during the suction stroke, was created. The ‘full’ cavitation model was utilized to study its capability on PD pump cavitation. A set of three plunger speeds were simulated. Using the highest plunger speed, an assessment was made of the effect of 1.5, 3, 4.5 and 15 parts per million (ppm of air mass fraction on pump performance and cavitation. An experimental test rig, replicating the CFD model, was designed and built in order to validate the numerical model and find its weaknesses. CFD modeled, in a consistent way, the fluid dynamics phenomena related to cavitation (the chamber pressure approaching the vapor pressure, the vaporization/condensation and the pressure spike occurrence at the end of the suction stroke marking the end of cavitation. On the other hand the CFD pressure trends calculated appeared stretched along the time axis with respect to the experimental data, and this highlighted issues in the multiphase and cavitation models: the vaporization/condensation rate calculated by CFD did not follow the real dynamics correctly because the non-condensable gas expansion was overestimated. This was seen when comparing the CFD/experimental results where the simulated pressure drop gradient at the beginning of the suction stroke and the pressure peaks as the valve closed exhibited a delay in their occurrence. The simulation results were sensitive to the dissolved air mass fraction as the delay depended on the amount of air dissolved in the water. Although the influence of the air mass fraction was considered consistent, the 3 ppm CFD case was the closest to the experimental results, whereas the analyst expected the 15 ppm case to be more accurate.

  2. CFD modeling of reactive pollutant dispersion in simplified urban configurations with different chemical mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Beatriz; Santiago, Jose-Luis; Martilli, Alberto; Palacios, Magdalena; Kirchner, Frank

    2016-09-01

    An accurate understanding of urban air quality requires considering a coupled behavior between the dispersion of reactive pollutants and atmospheric dynamics. Currently, urban air pollution is mostly dominated by traffic emission, where nitrogen oxides (NOx) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are the primary emitted pollutants. However, modeling reactive pollutants with a large set of chemical reactions, using a computational fluid dynamic (CFD) model, requires a large amount of computational (CPU) time. In this sense, the selection of the chemical reactions needed in different atmospheric conditions becomes essential in finding the best compromise between CPU time and accuracy. The purpose of this work is to assess the differences in NO and NO2 concentrations by considering three chemical approaches: (a) passive tracers (non-reactive), (b) the NOx-O3 photostationary state and (c) a reduced complex chemical mechanism based on 23 species and 25 reactions. The appraisal of the effects of chemical reactions focuses on studying the NO and NO2 dispersion in comparison with the tracer behavior within the street. In turn, the effect of including VOC reactions is also analyzed taking into account several VOC / NOx ratios of traffic emission. Given that the NO and NO2 dispersion can also be affected by atmospheric conditions, such as wind flow or the background concentration from season-dependent pollutants, in this work the influence of wind speeds and background O3 concentrations are studied. The results show that the presence of ozone in the street plays an important role in NO and NO2 concentrations. Therefore, greater differences linked to the chemical approach used are found with higher O3 concentrations and faster wind speeds. This bears relation to the vertical flux as a function of ambient wind speed since it increases the pollutant exchange between the street and the overlying air. This detailed study allows one to ascertain under which atmospheric conditions

  3. CFD modeling of reactive pollutant dispersion in simplified urban configurations with different chemical mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Sanchez

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available An accurate understanding of urban air quality requires considering a coupled behavior between the dispersion of reactive pollutants and atmospheric dynamics. Currently, urban air pollution is mostly dominated by traffic emission, where nitrogen oxides (NOx and volatile organic compounds (VOCs are the primary emitted pollutants. However, modeling reactive pollutants with a large set of chemical reactions, using a computational fluid dynamic (CFD model, requires a large amount of computational (CPU time. In this sense, the selection of the chemical reactions needed in different atmospheric conditions becomes essential in finding the best compromise between CPU time and accuracy. The purpose of this work is to assess the differences in NO and NO2 concentrations by considering three chemical approaches: (a passive tracers (non-reactive, (b the NOx–O3 photostationary state and (c a reduced complex chemical mechanism based on 23 species and 25 reactions. The appraisal of the effects of chemical reactions focuses on studying the NO and NO2 dispersion in comparison with the tracer behavior within the street. In turn, the effect of including VOC reactions is also analyzed taking into account several VOC ∕ NOx ratios of traffic emission. Given that the NO and NO2 dispersion can also be affected by atmospheric conditions, such as wind flow or the background concentration from season-dependent pollutants, in this work the influence of wind speeds and background O3 concentrations are studied. The results show that the presence of ozone in the street plays an important role in NO and NO2 concentrations. Therefore, greater differences linked to the chemical approach used are found with higher O3 concentrations and faster wind speeds. This bears relation to the vertical flux as a function of ambient wind speed since it increases the pollutant exchange between the street and the overlying air. This detailed study allows one to ascertain under which

  4. Uncertainty Representation and Interpretation in Model-based Prognostics Algorithms based on Kalman Filter Estimation

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This article discusses several aspects of uncertainty represen- tation and management for model-based prognostics method- ologies based on our experience with Kalman...

  5. Assessment of Human Safety and Thermal Comfort in High-Temperature Environment: CFD and Human Thermoregulation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xuefeng, Han; Wenguo, Weng; Shifei, Shen

    2010-05-01

    The safety and the thermal comfort of victims and firefighters are important in the building fires, which are a little dependent on the occupant fatalities. In order to investigate the effects of the dangerous environment on human body in fires, numerical calculation of the heat transfer and human thermoregulation are presented in this paper. The numerical manikins coupled with human thermal models were proved as powerful tools for visualizing thermal comfort. The two-node model by Gagge and multi-code thermoregulation models were investigated, and the Gagge's model was coupled with the CFD for high-temperature environment simulation, with which a numerical manikin was built. During the simulation, temperatures of skin and core compartment of Computer Simulated Person (CPS) were recorded respectively, and the Predicted Mean Vote index values were counted. The thermal load on skin is much higher than neutral cases and the skin can be burnt in minutes if no protection and heat abstraction methods were introduced. Though existing models can predict thermal comfort in general indoor environment, they are not suitable in predicting the thermal comfort with high-temperature cases. It was suggested that more research combining CFD coupling thermoregulation models with thermal manikin experiment are needed.

  6. Cumulative Intracranial Tumor Volume Augments the Prognostic Value of Diagnosis-Specific Graded Prognostic Assessment Model for Survival in Patients with Melanoma Cerebral Metastases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hirshman, Brian R; Wilson, Bayard R; Ali, Mir Amaan

    2017-01-01

    intracranial tumor volume (CITV) into the ds-GPA model for melanoma augmented its prognostic value. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether or not CITV augments the ds-GPA prognostic scale for melanoma. METHODS: We analyzed the survival pattern of 344 melanoma patients with BM treated with stereotactic radiosurgery...... (SRS) at separate institutions and validated our findings in an independent cohort of 201 patients. The prognostic value of ds-GPA for melanoma was quantitatively compared with and without the addition of CITV using the net reclassification index (NRI > 0) and integrated discrimination improvement (IDI...... validated these findings that CITV improves the prognostic utility of melanoma ds-GPA in an independent cohort of 201 melanoma cohort. CONCLUSION: The prognostic value of the ds-GPA scale for melanoma BM is enhanced by the incorporation of CITV....

  7. Assessment of a CFD model for short-range plume dispersion: Applications to the Fusion Field Trial 2007 (FFT-07) diffusion experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Pramod; Singh, Sarvesh Kumar; Ngae, Pierre; Feiz, Amir-Ali; Turbelin, Grégory

    2017-11-01

    Simulations of the short-range plume dispersion under different atmospheric conditions can provide essential information for the development of source reconstruction methodologies that allows to retrieve the location and intensity of an unknown hazardous pollutant source. This process required a comprehensive assessment of the atmospheric dispersion models with tracer diffusion experiments in various stability conditions. In this study, a comprehensive evaluation of a CFD model fluidyn-PANACHE is performed with the observations from available seven trials of single releases conducted in the Fusion Field Trail 2007 (FFT-07) tracer experiment. The CFD simulations are performed for each trial and it was observed that the CFD model fluidyn-PANACHE provides good agreement of the predicted concentrations with the observations in both stable and convective atmospheric conditions. A comprehensive analysis of the simulated results is performed by computing the statistical performance measures for the dispersion model evaluation. The CFD model predicts 65.4% of the overall concentration points within a factor of two to the observations. It was observed that the CFD model is predicting better in convective stability conditions in comparison to the trials conducted in stable stability. In convective conditions, 74.6% points were predicted within a factor of two to the observations which are higher than 59.3% concentration points predicted within a factor of two in the trials in stable atmospheric conditions.

  8. Experimental and CFD modelling for thermal comfort and CO2 concentration in office building

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabrein, H.; Hariri, A.; Leman, A. M.; Yusof, M. Z. M.; Afandi, A.

    2017-09-01

    Computational fluid dynamic CFD was used for simulating air flow, indoor air distribution and contamination concentration. Gases pollution and thermal discomfort affected occupational health and productivity of work place. The main objectives of this study are to investigate the impact of air change rate in CO2 concentration and to estimate the profile of CO2 concentration in the offices building. The thermal comfort and gases contamination are investigated by numerical analysis CFD which was validated by experiment. Thus the air temperature, air velocity and CO2 concentration were measured at several points in the chamber with four occupants. Comparing between experimental and numerical results showed good agreement. In addition, the CO2 concentration around human recorded high, compared to the other area. Moreover, the thermal comfort in this study is within the ASHRAE standard 55-2004.

  9. A CFD model for determining mixing and mass transfer in a high power agitated bioreactor

    OpenAIRE

    Bach, Christian; Albæk, Mads O.; Stocks, Stuart M.; Krühne, Ulrich; Gernaey, Krist V.

    2016-01-01

    Prediction of mixing and mass transfer in agitated systems is a vital tool for process development and scale up in industrial biotechnology. In particular key process parameters such as mixing time and kLa are essential for bioprocess development [1]. In this work the mixing and mass transfer performance of a high power agitated pilot scale bioreactor has been characterized using a novel combination of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and experimental investigations. The effect of turbulenc...

  10. Predicting night-time natural ventilation in Stanford's Y2E2 building using an integral model in combination with a CFD model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamberti, Giacomo; Gorle', Catherine

    2016-11-01

    Natural ventilation can significantly reduce energy consumption in buildings, but the presence of uncertainty makes robust design a challenging task. We will discuss the prediction of the natural ventilation performance during a 4 hour night-flush in Stanford's Y2E2 building using a combination of two models with different levels of fidelity: an integral model that solves for the average air and thermal mass temperature and a CFD model, used to calculate discharge and heat transfer coefficients to update the integral model. Uncertainties are propagated using polynomial chaos expansion to compute the mean and 95% confidence intervals of the quantities of interest. Comparison with building measurements shows that, despite a slightly to fast cooling rate, the measured air temperature is inside the 95% confidence interval predicted by the integral model. The use of information from the CFD model in the integral model reduces the maximum standard deviation of the volume-averaged air temperature by 20% when compared to using literature-based estimates for these quantities. The heat transfer coefficient resulting from the CFD model was found to be within the literature-based interval initially assumed for the integral model, but the discharge coefficients were found to be different.

  11. Development and validation of logistic prognostic models by predefined SAS-macros

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziegler, Christoph

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available In medical decision making about therapies or diagnostic procedures in the treatment of patients the prognoses of the course or of the magnitude of diseases plays a relevant role. Beside of the subjective attitude of the clinician mathematical models can help in providing such prognoses. Such models are mostly multivariate regression models. In the case of a dichotomous outcome the logistic model will be applied as the standard model. In this paper we will describe SAS-macros for the development of such a model, for examination of the prognostic performance, and for model validation. The rational for this developmental approach of a prognostic modelling and the description of the macros can only given briefly in this paper. Much more details are given in. These 14 SAS-macros are a tool for setting up the whole process of deriving a prognostic model. Especially the possibility of validating the model by a standardized software tool gives an opportunity, which is not used in general in published prognostic models. Therefore, this can help to develop new models with good prognostic performance for use in medical applications.

  12. 3D CFD modeling of subsonic and transonic flowing-gas DPALs with different pumping geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yacoby, Eyal; Sadot, Oren; Barmashenko, Boris D.; Rosenwaks, Salman

    2015-10-01

    Three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (3D CFD) modeling of subsonic (Mach number M ~ 0.2) and transonic (M ~ 0.9) diode pumped alkali lasers (DPALs), taking into account fluid dynamics and kinetic processes in the lasing medium is reported. The performance of these lasers is compared with that of supersonic (M ~ 2.7 for Cs and M ~ 2.4 for K) DPALs. The motivation for this study stems from the fact that subsonic and transonic DPALs require much simpler hardware than supersonic ones where supersonic nozzle, diffuser and high power mechanical pump (due to a drop in the gas total pressure in the nozzle) are required for continuous closed cycle operation. For Cs DPALs with 5 x 5 cm2 flow cross section pumped by large cross section (5 x 2 cm2) beam the maximum achievable power of supersonic devices is higher than that of the transonic and subsonic devices by only ~ 3% and ~ 10%, respectively. Thus in this case the supersonic operation mode has no substantial advantage over the transonic one. The main processes limiting the power of Cs supersonic DPALs are saturation of the D2 transition and large ~ 60% losses of alkali atoms due to ionization, whereas the influence of gas heating is negligible. For K transonic DPALs both the gas heating and ionization effects are shown to be unimportant. The maximum values of the power are higher than those in Cs transonic laser by ~ 11%. The power achieved in the supersonic and transonic K DPAL is higher than for the subsonic version, with the same resonator and K density at the inlet, by ~ 84% and ~ 27%, respectively, showing a considerable advantaged of the supersonic device over the transonic one. For pumping by rectangular beams of the same (5 x 2 cm2) cross section, comparison between end-pumping - where the laser beam and pump beam both propagate at along the same axis, and transverse-pumping - where they propagate perpendicularly to each other, shows that the output power and optical-to-optical efficiency are not

  13. CFD modeling and computation of convective heat coefficient transfer of automotive disc brake rotors -Modelado CFD y cálculo de la transferencia de coeficientes de calor por convección de rotores de freno de disco automotores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Belhocine

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Braking system is one of the important control systems of an automotive. For many years, the disc brakes have been used in automobiles for safe retardation of the vehicles. During braking enormous amount of heat will be generated and for effective braking sufficient heat dissipation is essential. The thermal performance of disc brake depends upon the characteristics of the airflow around the brake rotor and hence the aerodynamics is an important in the region of brake components. A CFD analysis is carried out on the braking system as a case study to make out the behaviour of airflow distribution around the disc brake components using ANSYS CFX software. We are interested in the determination of the heat transfer coefficient (HTC on each surface of a ventilated disc rotor varying with time in a transient state using CFD analysis, and then imported the surface film condition data into a corresponding FEM model for disc temperature analysis.

  14. Design, Modeling, and CFD Analysis of a Micro Hydro Pelton Turbine Runner: For the Case of Selected Site in Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tilahun Nigussie

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the design, modeling, and performance analysis of a Pelton turbine using CFD for one of the selected micro hydro potential sites in Ethiopia to meet the requirements of the energy demands. The site has a net head of 47.5 m and flow rate of 0.14 m3/s. The design process starts with the design of initial dimensions for the runner based on different literatures and directed towards the modeling of bucket using CATIA V5. The performance of the runner has been analyzed in ANSYS CFX (CFD under given loading conditions of the turbine. Consequently, the present study has also the ambition to reduce the size of the runner to have a cost effective runner design. The case study described in this paper provides an example of how the size of turbine can affect the efficiency of the turbine. These were discussed in detail which helps in understanding of the underlying fluid dynamic design problem as an aid for improving the efficiency and lowering the manufacturing cost for future study. The result showed that the model is highly dependent on the size and this was verified and discussed properly using flow visualization of the computed flow field and published result.

  15. [Prognostic factors of postoperative delayed gastric emptying after pancreaticoduodenectomy: a predictive model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, H T; Zong, Y; Zhao, Z Q; Wu, L F; Liu, J; Sun, B; Jiang, H C

    2017-05-01

    Objective: To study the prognostic factors of delayed gastric emptying(DGE) after pancreaticoduodenectomy(PD) and construct a prognostic predictive model for clinical application. Methods: Clinic data of 401 consecutive patients who underwent PD between January 2012 and July 2016 in the First Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University were retrospectively collected and analyzed. The patients were randomly selected to modeling group(n=299) and validation group(n=102) at a ratio of 3∶1. The data of modeling group were subjected to univariate and multivariate analysis for prognostic factors and to construct a prognostic predictive model of DGE after PD. The data of validation group were applied to test the prognostic predictive model. Results: DGE after PD occurred in 35 of 299 patients(11.7%) in the modeling group. The multivariate analysis of the modeling group showed that upper abdominal operation history(χ(2)=6.533, P=0.011), diabetes mellitus(χ(2)=17.872, P=0.000), preoperative hemoglobin predictive model of DGE after PD was constructed based on these factors and successfully tested. The area under the receiver operating characteristic(ROC) curve was 0.761(95%CI: 0.666-0.856) of the modeling group and 0.750(95% CI: 0.577-0.923) of the validation group. Conclusions: Upper abdominal operation history, diabetes mellitus, preoperative hemoglobinmodel is a valid tool to take precautions against DGE after PD.

  16. Prognostic immune-related gene models for breast cancer: a pooled analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jianli; Wang, Ying; Lao, Zengding; Liang, Siting; Hou, Jingyi; Yu, Yunfang; Yao, Herui; You, Na; Chen, Kai

    2017-01-01

    Breast cancer, the most common cancer among women, is a clinically and biologically heterogeneous disease. Numerous prognostic tools have been proposed, including gene signatures. Unlike proliferation-related prognostic gene signatures, many immune-related gene signatures have emerged as principal biology-driven predictors of breast cancer. Diverse statistical methods and data sets were used for building these immune-related prognostic models, making it difficult to compare or use them in clinically meaningful ways. This study evaluated successfully published immune-related prognostic gene signatures through systematic validations of publicly available data sets. Eight prognostic models that were built upon immune-related gene signatures were evaluated. The performances of these models were compared and ranked in ten publicly available data sets, comprising a total of 2,449 breast cancer cases. Predictive accuracies were measured as concordance indices (C-indices). All tests of statistical significance were two-sided. Immune-related gene models performed better in estrogen receptor-negative (ER-) and lymph node-positive (LN+) breast cancer subtypes. The three top-ranked ER- breast cancer models achieved overall C-indices of 0.62-0.63. Two models predicted better than chance for ER+ breast cancer, with C-indices of 0.53 and 0.59, respectively. For LN+ breast cancer, four models showed predictive advantage, with C-indices between 0.56 and 0.61. Predicted prognostic values were positively correlated with ER status when evaluated using univariate analyses in most of the models under investigation. Multivariate analyses indicated that prognostic values of the three models were independent of known clinical prognostic factors. Collectively, these analyses provided a comprehensive evaluation of immune-related prognostic gene signatures. By synthesizing C-indices in multiple independent data sets, immune-related gene signatures were ranked for ER+, ER-, LN+, and LN- breast

  17. Simulating Flow and Dispersion by Using WRF-CFD Coupled Model in a Built-Up Area of Shenyang, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yijia Zheng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Results are presented from a series of numerical studies designed to investigate the atmospheric boundary layer structure, ambient wind, and pollutant source location and their impacts on the wind field and pollutant distribution within the built-up areas of Shenyang, China. Two models, namely, Open Source Field Operation and Manipulation (OpenFOAM software package and Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF model, are used in the present study. Then the high resolution computational fluid dynamics (CFD numerical experiments were performed under the typical simulated atmospheric boundary conditions. It was found that the atmospheric boundary structure played a crucial role in the pollution within the building cluster, which determined the potential turbulent diffusion ability of the atmospheric surface layer; the change of the ambient wind direction can significantly affect the dispersion pattern of pollutants, which was a more sensitive factor than the ambient wind speed; under a given atmospheric state, the location of the pollution sources would dramatically determine the pollution patterns within built-up areas. The WRF-CFD numerical evaluation is a reliable method to understand the complicated flow and dispersion within built-up areas.

  18. A Framework for Model-Based Diagnostics and Prognostics of Switched-Mode Power Supplies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-02

    consumption, MOSFET voltage, diode reverse voltage, and 47K resistance consumption. ANNUAL CONFERENCE OF THE PROGNOSTICS AND HEALTH MANAGEMENT...methodology based on an equivalent circuit system simulation model developed from a commercially available switch-mode power supply, and empirical...of an integrated simulation model combining two empirical models in the application of SMPS: a circuit -based SMPS simulation model and the

  19. A prognostic model for lung adenocarcinoma patient survival with a focus on four miRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xianqiu; An, Zhaoling; Li, Peihui; Liu, Haihua

    2017-09-01

    There is currently no effective biomarker for determining the survival of patients with lung adenocarcinoma. The purpose of the present study was to construct a prognostic survival model using microRNA (miRNA) expression data from patients with lung adenocarcinoma. miRNA data were obtained from The Cancer Genome Atlas, and patients with lung adenocarcinoma were divided into either the training or validation set based on the random allocation principle. The prognostic model focusing on miRNA was constructed, and patients were divided into high-risk or low-risk groups as per the scores, to assess their survival time. The 5-year survival rate from the subgroups within the high- and low-risk groups was assessed. P-values of the prognostic model in the total population, the training set and validation set were 0.0017, 0.01986 and 0.02773, respectively, indicating that the survival time of the lung adenocarcinoma high-risk group was less than that of the low-risk group. Thus, the model had a good assessment effectiveness for the untreated group (P=0.00088) and the Caucasian patient group (P=0.00043). In addition, the model had the best prediction effect for the 5-year survival rate of the Caucasian patient group (AUC=0.629). In conclusion, the prognostic model developed in the present study can be used as an independent prognostic model for patients with lung adenocarcinoma.

  20. Higher Order Chemistry Models in the CFD Simulation of Laser-Ablated Carbon Plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, C. D.; Greendyke, R. B.; Creel, J. R.; Payne, B. T.

    2005-01-01

    Production of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) has taken place for a number of years and by a variety of methods such-as laser ablation, chemical vapor deposition, and arc-jet ablation. Yet, little is actually understood about the exact chemical kinetics and processes that occur in SWNT formation. In recent time, NASA Johnson Space Center has devoted a considerable effort to the experimental evaluation of the laser ablation production process for SWNT originally developed at Rice University. To fully understand the nature of the laser ablation process it is necessary to understand the development of the carbon plume dynamics within the laser ablation oven. The present work is a continuation of previous studies into the efforts to model plume dynamics using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). The ultimate goal of the work is to improve understanding of the laser ablation process, and through that improved understanding, refine the laser ablation production of SWNT. Fig. 1 shows a basic schematic of the laser-ablation oven at NASA-JSC. Construction of the facility is simple in concept. Two concentric quartz tubes of 1.5 mm thickness form the inner and outer tubes with inside diameters of 2.2 and 5.08 cm respectively. At one end of the inner tube are located two 60 Hz pulsed lasers operating at 1064 nm and 532 nm wavelength with beam diameters of 5 mm aligned coaxially with the longitudinal axis of the inner quartz tube. For standard nanotube production runs, a 10 ns 532 nm pulse is followed 50 ns later by a 10 ns 1064 nm pulse. Each pulse is of 300 mJ energy. A target of carbon graphite with approximately 1% nickel and cobalt catalysts is located at the other end of the inner quartz tube. In the ordinary processing of SWNT, a base flow of 100 sccm of argon is maintained from the laser location and exits past the carbon target at a pressure of 66.7 kPa. These conditions yield a baseline mass flow through the chamber of 2.723x10(exp -6)kg/s of argon. The whole

  1. Validation of a CFD model simulating charge and discharge of a small heat storage test module based on a sodium acetate water mixture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dannemand, Mark; Fan, Jianhua; Furbo, Simon

    2014-01-01

    for a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model. The CFD calculated temperatures are compared to measured temperatures internally in the box to validate the CFD model. Four cases are investigated; heating the test module with the sodium acetate water mixture in solid phase from ambient temperature to 52˚C; heating...... the module starting with the salt water mixture in liquid phase from 72˚C to 95˚C; heating up the module from ambient temperature with the salt water mixture in solid phase, going through melting, ending in liquid phase at 78˚C/82˚C; and discharging the test module from liquid phase at 82˚C, going through...

  2. Modelling of Underground Coal Gasification Process Using CFD Methods / Modelowanie Procesu Podziemnego Zgazowania Węgla Kamiennego Z Zastosowaniem Metod CFD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachowicz, Jan; Łączny, Jacek Marian; Iwaszenko, Sebastian; Janoszek, Tomasz; Cempa-Balewicz, Magdalena

    2015-09-01

    The results of model studies involving numerical simulation of underground coal gasification process are presented. For the purpose of the study, the software of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) was selected for simulation of underground coal gasification. Based on the review of the literature, it was decided that ANSYS-Fluent will be used as software for the performance of model studies. The ANSYS- -Fluent software was used for numerical calculations in order to identify the distribution of changes in the concentration of syngas components as a function of duration of coal gasification process. The nature of the calculations was predictive. A geometric model has been developed based on construction data of the georeactor used during the researches in Experimental Mine "Barbara" and Coal Mine "Wieczorek" and it was prepared by generating a numerical grid. Data concerning the georeactor power supply method and the parameters maintained during the process used to define the numerical model. Some part of data was supplemented based on the literature sources. The main assumption was to base the simulation of the georeactor operation on a mathematical models describing reactive fluid flow. Components of the process gas and the gasification agent move along the gasification channel and simulate physicochemical phenomena associated with the transfer of mass and energy as well as chemical reactions (together with the energy effect). Chemical reactions of the gasification process are based on a kinetic equation which determines the course of a particular type of equation of chemical coal gasification. The interaction of gas with the surrounding coal layer has also been described as a part of the model. The description concerned the transport of thermal energy. The coal seam and the mass rock are treated as a homogeneous body. Modelling studies assumed the coal gasification process is carried out with the participation of separately oxygen and air as a gasification agent

  3. An advanced CFD model to study the effect of non-condensable gas on cavitation in positive displacement pumps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iannetti Aldo

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available An advanced transient CFD model of a positive displacement reciprocating pump was created to study its behavior and performance in cavitating condition during the inlet stroke. The “full” cavitation model developed by Singhal et al. was utilized, and a sensitivity analysis test on two air mass fraction amounts (1.5 and 15 parts per million was carried out to study the influence of the dissolved air content in water on the cavitation phenomenon. The model was equipped with user defined functions to introduce the liquid compressibility, which stabilizes the simulation, and to handle the two-way coupling between the pressure field and the inlet valve lift history. Estimation of the performance is also presented in both cases.

  4. CFD modelling and PIV experimental validation of flow fields in urban environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gnatowska Renata

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of flow field in the urban boundary-layer (UBL in aspects of wind comfort around buildings and pollutant dispersion has grown in importance since human activity has become so intense that it started to have considerable impact on environment. The issue of wind comfort in urban areas is the result of complex interactions of many flow phenomena and for a long time it arouses a great interest of the research centres. The aim of article is to study urban atmospheric flow at the local scale, which allows for both a detailed reproduction of the flow phenomena and the development of wind comfort criteria. The proposed methodology involves the use of PIV wind tunnel experiments as well as numerical simulations (Computational Fluid Dynamics, CFD in order to enhance understanding of the flow phenomena at this particular scale in urban environments. The analysis has been performed for the 3D case of two surface-mounted buildings arranged in tandem, which were placed with one face normal to the oncoming flow. The local characteristics of flow were obtained by the use of commercial CFD code (ANSYS Fluent. The validation was carried out with reference to the PIV results.

  5. CFD Script for Rapid TPS Damage Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCloud, Peter

    2013-01-01

    This grid generation script creates unstructured CFD grids for rapid thermal protection system (TPS) damage aeroheating assessments. The existing manual solution is cumbersome, open to errors, and slow. The invention takes a large-scale geometry grid and its large-scale CFD solution, and creates a unstructured patch grid that models the TPS damage. The flow field boundary condition for the patch grid is then interpolated from the large-scale CFD solution. It speeds up the generation of CFD grids and solutions in the modeling of TPS damages and their aeroheating assessment. This process was successfully utilized during STS-134.

  6. Stabilizing a CFD model of an unstable system through model reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svein Hovland

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available We demonstate stabilization of a computational fluid dynamics model of an unstable system. The unstable heating of a two-dimensional plate is used as a case study. Active control is introduced by cooling parts of the boundaries of the plate. The high order of the original model is reduced by proper orthogonal decomposition, giving an unstable reduced order model with a state space structure convenient for controller design. A stabilizing controller based on pole placement is designed for the reduced order model and integral action is included to enhance performance. The controller is then applied to the full model, where it is shown through simulations to stabilize the system. The demonstrated procedure makes it possible to analyze stability properties and design control systems for a class of systems that would otherwise be very computationally demanding.

  7. The search for stable prognostic models in multiple imputed data sets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vergouw, D.; Heijmans, M.W.; Peat, G.M.; Kuijpers, T.; Croft, P.R.; de Vet, H.C.W.; van der Horst, H.E.; van der Windt, D.A.W.M.

    2010-01-01

    Background: In prognostic studies model instability and missing data can be troubling factors. Proposed methods for handling these situations are bootstrapping (B) and Multiple imputation (MI). The authors examined the influence of these methods on model composition. Methods: Models were constructed

  8. 3-D CFD Modeling for Parametric Study in a 300-MWe One-Stage Oxygen-Blown Entrained-Bed Coal Gasifier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Shin Park

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD modeling of the gasification performance in a one-stage, entrained-bed coal gasifier (Shell Coal Gasification Process (SCGP gasifier was performed, for the first time. The parametric study used various O2/coal and steam/coal ratios, and the modeling used a commercial code, ANSYS FLUENT. CFD modeling was conducted by solving the steady-state Navier–Stokes and energy equations using the Eulerian–Lagrangian method. Gas-phase chemical reactions were solved with the Finite–Rate/Eddy–Dissipation Model. The CFD model was verified with actual operating data of Demkolec demo Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC facility in Netherlands that used Drayton coal. For Illinois #6 coal, the CFD model was compared with ASPEN Plus results reported in National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL. For design coal used in the SCGP gasifier in Korea, carbon conversion efficiency, cold gas efficiency, temperature, and species mole fractions at the gasifier exit were calculated and the results were compared with those obtained by using ASPEN Plus-Kinetic. The optimal O2/coal and steam/coal ratios were 0.7 and 0.05, respectively, for the selected operating conditions.

  9. Improvement of SO{sub 2} removal with application of wall rings and advanced CFD modelling. The FGD plant in the Megalopolis power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofelsauer, J.; Marocco, L. [Alstom Power, Sesto San Giovanni (Italy); Notter, W. [Alstom Power, Stuttgart (Germany); Agalioti, M.; Leoussis, P. [PPC, Athens (Greece)

    2008-07-01

    Megalopolis SES is a lignite-fired steam-electric power plant (total 850 MW) located in southern Greece. The plant consists of four units. Unit III will be retrofitted with WFGD unit in order to meet the emission values of LCP 2001/80/EC. A CFD modelling of the absorber has been used to define gas, liquid and SO{sub 2} distribution inside the absorber with the goal to combine the optimised SO{sub 2} removal with lowest possible power consumption. The paper shows the results of the CFD study on Megalopolis III WFGD containing the fluid dynamic optimisation of nozzle arrangement including wall ring location. (orig.)

  10. Melanoma prognostic model using tissue microarrays and genetic algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould Rothberg, Bonnie E; Berger, Aaron J; Molinaro, Annette M; Subtil, Antonio; Krauthammer, Michael O; Camp, Robert L; Bradley, William R; Ariyan, Stephan; Kluger, Harriet M; Rimm, David L

    2009-12-01

    As a result of the questionable risk-to-benefit ratio of adjuvant therapies, stage II melanoma is currently managed by observation because available clinicopathologic parameters cannot identify the 20% to 60% of such patients likely to develop metastatic disease. Here, we propose a multimarker molecular prognostic assay that can help triage patients at increased risk of recurrence. Protein expression for 38 candidates relevant to melanoma oncogenesis was evaluated using the automated quantitative analysis (AQUA) method for immunofluorescence-based immunohistochemistry in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded specimens from a cohort of 192 primary melanomas collected during 1959 to 1994. The prognostic assay was built using a genetic algorithm and validated on an independent cohort of 246 serial primary melanomas collected from 1997 to 2004. Multiple iterations of the genetic algorithm yielded a consistent five-marker solution. A favorable prognosis was predicted by ATF2 ln(non-nuclear/nuclear AQUA score ratio) of more than -0.052, p21(WAF1) nuclear compartment AQUA score of more than 12.98, p16(INK4A) ln(non-nuclear/nuclear AQUA score ratio) of < or = -0.083, beta-catenin total AQUA score of more than 38.68, and fibronectin total AQUA score of < or = 57.93. Primary tumors that met at least four of these five conditions were considered a low-risk group, and those that met three or fewer conditions formed a high-risk group (log-rank P < .0001). Multivariable proportional hazards analysis adjusting for clinicopathologic parameters shows that the high-risk group has significantly reduced survival on both the discovery (hazard ratio = 2.84; 95% CI, 1.46 to 5.49; P = .002) and validation (hazard ratio = 2.72; 95% CI, 1.12 to 6.58; P = .027) cohorts. This multimarker prognostic assay, an independent determinant of melanoma survival, might be beneficial in improving the selection of stage II patients for adjuvant therapy.

  11. Parallel CFD simulation of flow in a 3D model of vibrating human vocal folds

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šidlof, Petr; Horáček, Jaromír; Řidký, V.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 80, č. 1 (2013), s. 290-300 ISSN 0045-7930 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP101/11/0207 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : numerical simulation * vocal folds * glottal airflow * inite volume method * parallel CFD Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics Impact factor: 1.532, year: 2013 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science?_ob=ArticleListURL&_method=list&_ArticleListID=-268060849&_sort=r&_st=13&view=c&_acct=C000034318&_version=1&_urlVersion=0&_userid=640952&md5=7c5b5539857ee9a02af5e690585b3126&searchtype=a

  12. V&V Of CFD Modeling Of The Argonne Bubble Experiment: FY15 Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoyt, Nathaniel C. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Wardle, Kent E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Bailey, James L. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Basavarajappa, Manjunath [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2015-09-30

    In support of the development of accelerator-driven production of the fission product Mo 99, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of an electron-beam irradiated, experimental-scale bubble chamber have been conducted in order to aid in interpretation of existing experimental results, provide additional insights into the physical phenomena, and develop predictive thermal hydraulic capabilities that can be applied to full-scale target solution vessels. Toward that end, a custom hybrid Eulerian-Eulerian-Lagrangian multiphase solver was developed, and simulations have been performed on high-resolution meshes. Good agreement between experiments and simulations has been achieved, especially with respect to the prediction of the maximum temperature of the uranyl sulfate solution in the experimental vessel. These positive results suggest that the simulation methodology that has been developed will prove to be suitable to assist in the development of full-scale production hardware.

  13. VOC level control by ventilation improvement of Flexography printing room using CFD modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamal Hadad

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD technique, the dispersion contours and the exposure rate of Flexographic printing workers to VOCs in a printing department is evaluated. Firstly, VOCs distribution is determined in the printing room due to the existing ventilation system. Through next steps, 4 scenarios for lowering VOCs concentration and its exposure rate to workers are analyzed. Concentration distributions of ethylene glycol (MEG as a representative of VOCs are determined for 4 scenarios. The results show that, regarding the existing ventilation, the concentration of MEG at the breathing height is 1×10-5 mg/m3 and it is higher than the standard permissible level. Finally, the findings of this study lead to lowered VOCs concentrations to 13.87×10-9 mg/m3 via changing the ventilation system for the Flexography Printing Room.

  14. CFD modelling of air-fired and oxy-fuel combustion of lignite in a 100 KW furnace

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Audai Hussein Al-Abbas; Jamal Naser; David Dodds [Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn, Vic. (Australia). Faculty of Engineering and Industrial Science

    2011-05-15

    A comprehensive computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modelling study was undertaken by integrating the combustion of pulverized dry lignite in several combustion environments. Four different cases were investigated: an air-fired and three different oxy-fuel combustion environments (25 vol.% O{sub 2} concentration (OF25), 27 vol.% O{sub 2} concentration (OF27), and 29 vol.% O{sub 2} concentration (OF29) were considered. The chemical reactions (devolatilization and char burnout), convective and radiative heat transfer, fluid and particle flow fields (homogenous and heterogenous processes), and turbulent models were employed in 3-D hybrid unstructured grid CFD simulations. The available experimental results from a lab-scale 100 KW firing lignite unit (Chalmer's furnace) were selected for the validation of these simulations. The numerical results showed that the flame temperature distributions and O{sub 2} consumptions of the OF25 case were approximately similar to the reference combustion case. In contrast, in the OF27 and OF29 combustion cases, the flame temperatures were higher and more confined in the closest region of the burner exit plane. This was a result of the quick consumption of oxygen that led to improve the ignition conditions in the latter combustion cases. Therefore, it is concluded that the resident time, stoichiometry, and recycled flue gas rates are relevant parameters to optimize the design of oxy-fuel furnaces. The findings showed reasonable agreement with the qualitative and quantitative measurements of temperature distribution profiles and species concentration profiles at the most intense combustion locations inside the furnace. These numerical results can provide useful information towards future modelling of the behaviour of pulverized brown coal in a large-scale oxy-fuel furnace/boiler in order to optimize the burner's and combustor's design. 46 refs., 16 figs., 6 tabs.

  15. Enhanced Prognostic Model for Lithium Ion Batteries Based on Particle Filter State Transition Model Modification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buddhi Arachchige

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on predicting the End of Life and End of Discharge of Lithium ion batteries using a battery capacity fade model and a battery discharge model. The proposed framework will be able to estimate the Remaining Useful Life (RUL and the Remaining charge through capacity fade and discharge models. A particle filter is implemented that estimates the battery’s State of Charge (SOC and State of Life (SOL by utilizing the battery’s physical data such as voltage, temperature, and current measurements. The accuracy of the prognostic framework has been improved by enhancing the particle filter state transition model to incorporate different environmental and loading conditions without retuning the model parameters. The effect of capacity fade in the reduction of the EOD (End of Discharge time with cycling has also been included, integrating both EOL (End of Life and EOD prediction models in order to get more accuracy in the estimations.

  16. Clinical prediction of 5-year survival in systemic sclerosis: validation of a simple prognostic model in EUSTAR centres

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fransen, J.; Popa-Diaconu, D.A.; Hesselstrand, R.; Carreira, P.; Valentini, G.; Beretta, L.; Airo, P.; Inanc, M.; Ullman, S.; Balbir-Gurman, A.; Sierakowski, S.; Allanore, Y.; Czirjak, L.; Riccieri, V.; Giacomelli, R.; Gabrielli, A.; Riemekasten, G.; Matucci-Cerinic, M.; Farge, D.; Hunzelmann, N.; Hoogen, F.H. Van den; Vonk, M.C.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is associated with a significant reduction in life expectancy. A simple prognostic model to predict 5-year survival in SSc was developed in 1999 in 280 patients, but it has not been validated in other patients. The predictions of a prognostic model are usually

  17. Prognostic models for physical capacity at discharge and 1 year postdischarge from rehabilitation in persons with spinal cord injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haisma, J.A.; van der Woude, L.H.V.; Stam, H.J.; Bergen, M.P.; Sluis, T.A.; de Groot, S.; Dallmeijer, A.J.; Bussmann, J.B.J.

    2007-01-01

    Haisma JA, van der Woude LH, Stam HJ, Bergen MP, Sluis TA, de Groot S, Dallmeijer AJ, Bussmann JB. Prognostic models for physical capacity at discharge and 1 year postdischarge from rehabilitation in persons with spinal cord injury. Objective: To develop prognostic models for physical capacity at

  18. External validation of prognostic models to predict risk of gestational diabetes mellitus in one Dutch cohort : prospective multicentre cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamain-de Ruiter, Marije; Kwee, Anneke; Naaktgeboren, Christiana A; de Groot, Inge; Evers, Inge M; Groenendaal, Floris; Hering, Yolanda R; Huisjes, Anjoke J M; Kirpestein, Cornel; Monincx, Wilma M; Siljee, Jacqueline E; Van 't Zelfde, Annewil; van Oirschot, Charlotte M; Vankan-Buitelaar, Simone A; Vonk, Mariska A A W; Wiegers, Therese A; Zwart, Joost J; Franx, Arie; Moons, Karel G M; Koster, Maria P H

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To perform an external validation and direct comparison of published prognostic models for early prediction of the risk of gestational diabetes mellitus, including predictors applicable in the first trimester of pregnancy. DESIGN: External validation of all published prognostic models in

  19. A comparison of the CFD simulation results in 5 x 5 sub-channels with mixing grids using different turbulence models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, L.X.; Zhou, M.J.; Chao, Y.M. [Beijing Jiaotong Univ. (China). School of Mechanical Electronic and Control Engineering

    2016-07-15

    We evaluated the performance of various turbulence models, including eddy viscosity models and Reynolds stress models, when analyzing rod bundles in fuel assemblies using the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) method. The models were assessed by calculating the pressure drop and Nusselt numbers in 5 x 5 rod bundles using the CFD software ANSYS CFX. Comparisons between the numerical and experimental results, as well as the swirl factor, cross-flow factor, and turbulence intensity utilized to evaluate the swirling and cross-flow, were used to analyze the inner relationship between the flow field and heat transfer. These comparisons allow the selection of the most appropriate turbulence model for modeling flow features and heat transfer in rod bundles.

  20. Use of CFD modeling for estimating spatial representativeness of urban air pollution monitoring sites and suitability of their locations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santiago, J. L.; Martin, F.

    2015-07-01

    A methodology to estimate the spatial representativeness of air pollution monitoring sites is applied to two urban districts. This methodology is based on high resolution maps of air pollution computed by using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) modelling tools. Traffic-emitted NO{sub 2} dispersion is simulated for several meteorological conditions taking into account the effect of the buildings on air flow and pollutant dispersion and using a steady state CFD-RANS approach. From these results, maps of average pollutant concentrations for January -May 2011 are computed as a combination of the simulated scenarios. Two urban districts of Madrid City were simulated. Spatial representativeness areas for 32 different sites within the same district (including the site of the operative air quality stations) have been estimated by computing the portion of the domains with average NO{sub 2} concentration differing less than a 20% of the concentration at each candidate monitoring site. New parameters such as the ratio AR between the representativeness area and the whole domain area or the representativeness index (IR) has been proposed to discuss and compare the representativeness areas. Significant differences between the spatial representativeness of the candidate sites of both studied districts have been found. The sites of the Escuelas Aguirre district have generally smaller representativeness areas than those of the Plaza de Castilla. More stations are needed to cover the Escuelas Aguirre district than for the Plaza de Castilla one. The operative air quality station of the Escuelas Aguirre district is less representative than the station of the Plaza de Castilla district. The cause of these differences seems to be the differences in urban structure of both districts prompting different ventilation. (Author)

  1. Use of CFD modeling for estimating spatial representativeness of urban air pollution monitoring sites and suitability of their locations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santiago, J.L.; Martin, F.

    2015-07-01

    A methodology to estimate the spatial representativeness of air pollution monitoring sites is applied to two urban districts. This methodology is based on high resolution maps of air pollution computed by using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) modelling tools. Traffic-emitted NO2 dispersion is simulated for several meteorological conditions taking into account the effect of the buildings on air flow and pollutant dispersion and using a steady state CFD-RANS approach. From these results, maps of average pollutant concentrations for January–May 2011 are computed as a combination of the simulated scenarios. Two urban districts of Madrid City were simulated. Spatial representativeness areas for 32 different sites within the same district (including the site of the operative air quality stations) have been estimated by computing the portion of the domains with average NO2 concentration differing less than a 20% of the concentration at each candidate monitoring site. New parameters such as the ratio AR between the representativeness area and the whole domain area or the representativeness index (IR) has been proposed to discuss and compare the representativeness areas. Significant differences between the spatial representativeness of the candidate sites of both studied districts have been found. The sites of the Escuelas Aguirre district have generally smaller representativeness areas than those of the Plaza de Castilla. More stations are needed to cover the Escuelas Aguirre district than for the Plaza de Castilla one. The operative air quality station of the Escuelas Aguirre district is less representative than the station of the Plaza de Castilla district. The cause of these differences seems to be the differences in urban structure of both districts prompting different ventilation. (Author)

  2. Active flap control on an aeroelastic wind turbine airfoil in gust conditions using both a CFD and an engineering model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillebaart, T.; Bernhammer, L. O.; van Zuijlen, A. H.; van Kuik, G. A. M.

    2014-06-01

    In the past year, smart rotor technology has been studied significantly as solution to the ever growing turbines. Aeroservoelastic tools are used to asses and predict the behavior of rotors using trailing edge devices like flaps. In this paper an unsteady aerodynamic model (Beddoes-Leishman type) and an CFD model (URANS) are used to analyze the aeroservoelastic response of a 2D three degree of freedom rigid body wind turbine airfoil with a deforming trailing edge flap encountering deterministic gusts. Both uncontrolled and controlled simulations are used to asses the differences between the two models for 2D aerservoelastic simulations. Results show an increase in the difference between models for the y component if the deforming trailing edge flap is used as control device. Observed flap deflections are significantly larger in the URANS model in certain cases, while the same controller is used. The pitch angle and moment shows large differences in the uncontrolled case, which become smaller, but remain significant when the controller is applied. Both models show similar reductions in vertical displacement, with a penalty of a significant increase in pitch angle deflections.

  3. Aeroelastic Stability of Suspension Bridges using CFD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stærdahl, Jesper Winther; Sørensen, Niels; Nielsen, Søren R.K.

    2007-01-01

    may lead to erroneous results and CFD simulations may be used for extrapolation into the critical region. The flow analysis serves as preliminary studies for evaluating flutter stability using CFD methods in three dimensions, where the span-wise correlation of vortex separation, skew inflow...... using CFD models and the aeroelastic stability boundary has been successfully determined when comparing two-dimensional flow situations using wind tunnel test data and CFD methods for the flow solution and two-degrees-of-freedom structural models in translation perpendicular to the flow direction...... the structural deformation. Furthermore, flutter derivatives are evaluated by CFD models using forced motion of a bridge section in a two-dimensional virtual wind tunnel. The parameter region of critical values is shown to be outside measured values. It is shown that a rough extrapolation of the measured values...

  4. Integrating CFD and building simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartak, M.; Beausoleil-Morrison, I.; Clarke, J.A.

    2002-01-01

    To provide practitioners with the means to tackle problems related to poor indoor environments, building simulation and computational 3uid dynamics can usefully be integrated within a single computational framework. This paper describes the outcomes from a research project sponsored by the European...... Commission, which furthered the CFD modelling aspects of the ESP-r system. The paper summarises the form of the CFD model, describes the method used to integrate the thermal and 3ow domains and reports the outcome from an empirical validation exercise. © 2002 Published by Elsevier Science Ltd....

  5. Statistical Analysis of Detailed 3-D CFD LES Simulations with Regard to CCV Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vítek Oldřich

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with statistical analysis of large amount of detailed 3-D CFD data in terms of cycle-to-cycle variations (CCVs. These data were obtained by means of LES calculations of many consecutive cycles. Due to non-linear nature of Navier-Stokes equation set, there is a relatively significant CCV. Hence, every cycle is slightly different – this leads to requirement to perform statistical analysis based on ensemble averaging procedure which enables better understanding of CCV in ICE including its quantification. The data obtained from the averaging procedure provides results on different space resolution levels. The procedure is applied locally, i.e., in every cell of the mesh. Hence there is detailed CCV information on local level – such information can be compared with RANS simulations. Next, volume/mass averaging provides information at specific locations – e.g., gap between electrodes of a spark plug. Finally, volume/mass averaging of the whole combustion chamber leads to global information which can be compared with experimental data or results of system simulation tools (which are based on 0-D/1-D approach.

  6. Prognostic Model for Survival in Patients With Early Stage Cervical Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biewenga, Petra; van der Velden, Jacobus; Mol, Ben Willem J.; Stalpers, Lukas J. A.; Schilthuis, Marten S.; van der Steeg, Jan Willem; Burger, Matthé P. M.; Buist, Marrije R.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In the management of early stage cervical cancer, knowledge about the prognosis is critical. Although many factors have an impact on survival, their relative importance remains controversial. This study aims to develop a prognostic model for survival in early stage cervical cancer

  7. Prognostic model for chronic hypertension in women with a history of hypertensive pregnancy disorders at term

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Velde-Visser, S.D.; Hermes, W.; Twisk, J; Franx, A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/157009939; Pampus, M.G.; Koopmans, C.; Mol, B. W J; de Groot, J.C.M.J.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction The association between hypertensive pregnancy disorders and cardiovascular disease later in life is well described. In this study we aim to develop a prognostic model from patients characteristics known before, early in, during and after pregnancy to identify women at increased risk of

  8. Prognostic model for survival in patients with early stage cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biewenga, Petra; van der Velden, Jacobus; Mol, Ben Willem J; Stalpers, Lukas J A; Schilthuis, Marten S; van der Steeg, Jan Willem; Burger, Matthé P M; Buist, Marrije R

    2011-02-15

    In the management of early stage cervical cancer, knowledge about the prognosis is critical. Although many factors have an impact on survival, their relative importance remains controversial. This study aims to develop a prognostic model for survival in early stage cervical cancer patients and to reconsider grounds for adjuvant treatment. A multivariate Cox regression model was used to identify the prognostic weight of clinical and histological factors for disease-specific survival (DSS) in 710 consecutive patients who had surgery for early stage cervical cancer (FIGO [International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics] stage IA2-IIA). Prognostic scores were derived by converting the regression coefficients for each prognostic marker and used in a score chart. The discriminative capacity was expressed as the area under the curve (AUC) of the receiver operating characteristic. The 5-year DSS was 92%. Tumor diameter, histological type, lymph node metastasis, depth of stromal invasion, lymph vascular space invasion, and parametrial extension were independently associated with DSS and were included in a Cox regression model. This prognostic model, corrected for the 9% overfit shown by internal validation, showed a fair discriminative capacity (AUC, 0.73). The derived score chart predicting 5-year DSS showed a good discriminative capacity (AUC, 0.85). In patients with early stage cervical cancer, DSS can be predicted with a statistical model. Models, such as that presented here, should be used in clinical trials on the effects of adjuvant treatments in high-risk early cervical cancer patients, both to stratify and to include patients. Copyright © 2010 American Cancer Society.

  9. The search for stable prognostic models in multiple imputed data sets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Vet Henrica CW

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In prognostic studies model instability and missing data can be troubling factors. Proposed methods for handling these situations are bootstrapping (B and Multiple imputation (MI. The authors examined the influence of these methods on model composition. Methods Models were constructed using a cohort of 587 patients consulting between January 2001 and January 2003 with a shoulder problem in general practice in the Netherlands (the Dutch Shoulder Study. Outcome measures were persistent shoulder disability and persistent shoulder pain. Potential predictors included socio-demographic variables, characteristics of the pain problem, physical activity and psychosocial factors. Model composition and performance (calibration and discrimination were assessed for models using a complete case analysis, MI, bootstrapping or both MI and bootstrapping. Results Results showed that model composition varied between models as a result of how missing data was handled and that bootstrapping provided additional information on the stability of the selected prognostic model. Conclusion In prognostic modeling missing data needs to be handled by MI and bootstrap model selection is advised in order to provide information on model stability.

  10. Modeling of microalgal shear-induced flocculation and sedimentation using a coupled CFD-population balance approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golzarijalal, Mohammad; Zokaee Ashtiani, Farzin; Dabir, Bahram

    2017-10-31

    In this study, shear-induced flocculation modeling of Chlorella sp. microalgae was conducted by combination of population balance modeling and CFD. The inhomogeneous Multiple Size Group (MUSIG) and the Euler-Euler two fluid models were coupled via Ansys-CFX-15 software package to achieve both fluid and particle dynamics during the flocculation. For the first time, a detailed model was proposed to calculate the collision frequency and breakage rate during the microalgae flocculation by means of the response surface methodology as a tool for optimization. The particle size distribution resulted from the model was in good agreement with that of the jar test experiment. Furthermore, the subsequent sedimentation step was also examined by removing the shear rate in both simulations and experiments. Consequently, variation in the shear rate and its effects on the flocculation behavior, sedimentation rate and recovery efficiency were evaluated. Results indicate that flocculation of Chlorella sp. microalgae under shear rates of 37, 182, and 387 s-1 is a promising method of pre-concentration which guarantees the cost efficiency of the subsequent harvesting process by recovering more than 90% of the biomass. © 2017 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 2017. © 2017 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  11. CFD [computational fluid dynamics] And Safety Factors. Computer modeling of complex processes needs old-fashioned experiments to stay in touch with reality.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leishear, Robert A.; Lee, Si Y.; Poirier, Michael R.; Steeper, Timothy J.; Ervin, Robert C.; Giddings, Billy J.; Stefanko, David B.; Harp, Keith D.; Fowley, Mark D.; Van Pelt, William B.

    2012-10-07

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is recognized as a powerful engineering tool. That is, CFD has advanced over the years to the point where it can now give us deep insight into the analysis of very complex processes. There is a danger, though, that an engineer can place too much confidence in a simulation. If a user is not careful, it is easy to believe that if you plug in the numbers, the answer comes out, and you are done. This assumption can lead to significant errors. As we discovered in the course of a study on behalf of the Department of Energy's Savannah River Site in South Carolina, CFD models fail to capture some of the large variations inherent in complex processes. These variations, or scatter, in experimental data emerge from physical tests and are inadequately captured or expressed by calculated mean values for a process. This anomaly between experiment and theory can lead to serious errors in engineering analysis and design unless a correction factor, or safety factor, is experimentally validated. For this study, blending times for the mixing of salt solutions in large storage tanks were the process of concern under investigation. This study focused on the blending processes needed to mix salt solutions to ensure homogeneity within waste tanks, where homogeneity is required to control radioactivity levels during subsequent processing. Two of the requirements for this task were to determine the minimum number of submerged, centrifugal pumps required to blend the salt mixtures in a full-scale tank in half a day or less, and to recommend reasonable blending times to achieve nearly homogeneous salt mixtures. A full-scale, low-flow pump with a total discharge flow rate of 500 to 800 gpm was recommended with two opposing 2.27-inch diameter nozzles. To make this recommendation, both experimental and CFD modeling were performed. Lab researchers found that, although CFD provided good estimates of an average blending time, experimental blending times varied

  12. Modelling of temporal and spatial evolution of sulphur oxides and sulphuric acid under large, two-stroke marine engine-like conditions using integrated CFD-chemical kinetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pang, Kar Mun; Karvounis, Nikolas; Walther, Jens Honore

    2017-01-01

    In this work, three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) studies of sulphur oxides (SOx) andsulphuric acid (H2SO4) formation processes in a large, low speed two-stroke marine diesel engine are carriedout. The current numerical study aims to investigate the conversion of sulphuric dioxide...... and areduced sulphur subset mechanism. In the present work, performance of the coupled CFD-chemicalkinetic model is evaluated using both qualitative and quantitative methods. The modelling results showthat the temporal and spatial evolutions of SOx predicted by the skeletal model are similar to those...... that acidcondensation may begin early at the top part of the cylinder liner. The predicted distribution correspondswell with the distribution of corroded parts observed in service engines. The model is expected to serve asan important tool to simulate the rates of SO2 absorption into lubricating oil film and H2SO4...

  13. CFD Modelling of the Effects of Operating Parameters on the Spreading of Liquids on a Spinning Disc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Pan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A novel dry slag granulation process based on a spinning disc is being developed by CSIRO. This process utilises centrifugal force to break up molten slag into droplets, which are then quenched into solidified granules by a flow of cold air. In this process the sensible heat of slag is recovered as hot air. In the present work, a previously developed steady-state, two-dimensional and multiphase CFD model was applied to perform parametric numerical experiments to investigate the effects of a number of parameters on the liquid film thickness at the disc edge, which included liquid mass feeding (pouring rate, disc spinning speed, disc radius, liquid viscosity, density and surface tension. The modelling results were compared with experimental data and were found to be in good agreement. To reduce the number of simulations needed, Box and Behnken's fractional factorial design of numerical experiment was adopted. Furthermore, in order for the modelling results to be applicable to atomisation of different liquids using spinning discs of different sizes, a dimensionless correlation was developed based on dimensional analysis of the numerical simulation data. The modelling results indicate that the liquid film thickness can be significantly influenced by the disc radius and spinning speed, the liquid mass feeding rate, viscosity and density, whereas the liquid surface tension has a negligible effect.

  14. Updating and prospective validation of a prognostic model for high sickness absence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roelen, C A M; Heymans, M W; Twisk, J W R; van Rhenen, W; Pallesen, S; Bjorvatn, B; Moen, B E; Magerøy, N

    2015-01-01

    To further develop and validate a Dutch prognostic model for high sickness absence (SA). Three-wave longitudinal cohort study of 2,059 Norwegian nurses. The Dutch prognostic model was used to predict high SA among Norwegian nurses at wave 2. Subsequently, the model was updated by adding person-related (age, gender, marital status, children at home, and coping strategies), health-related (BMI, physical activity, smoking, and caffeine and alcohol intake), and work-related (job satisfaction, job demands, decision latitude, social support at work, and both work-to-family and family-to-work spillover) variables. The updated model was then prospectively validated for predictions at wave 3. 1,557 (77 %) nurses had complete data at wave 2 and 1,342 (65 %) at wave 3. The risk of high SA was under-estimated by the Dutch model, but discrimination between high-risk and low-risk nurses was fair after re-calibration to the Norwegian data. Gender, marital status, BMI, physical activity, smoking, alcohol intake, job satisfaction, job demands, decision latitude, support at the workplace, and work-to-family spillover were identified as potential predictors of high SA. However, these predictors did not improve the model's discriminative ability, which remained fair at wave 3. The prognostic model correctly identifies 73 % of Norwegian nurses at risk of high SA, although additional predictors are needed before the model can be used to screen working populations for risk of high SA.

  15. CFD Modeling of Gas-Liquid Bubbly Flow in Horizontal Pipes: Influence of Bubble Coalescence and Breakup

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Ekambara

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Modelling of gas-liquid bubbly flows is achieved by coupling a population balance equation with the three-dimensional, two-fluid, hydrodynamic model. For gas-liquid bubbly flows, an average bubble number density transport equation has been incorporated in the CFD code CFX 5.7 to describe the temporal and spatial evolution of the gas bubbles population. The coalescence and breakage effects of the gas bubbles are modeled. The coalescence by the random collision driven by turbulence and wake entrainment is considered, while for bubble breakage, the impact of turbulent eddies is considered. Local spatial variations of the gas volume fraction, interfacial area concentration, Sauter mean bubble diameter, and liquid velocity are compared against experimental data in a horizontal pipe, covering a range of gas (0.25 to 1.34 m/s and liquid (3.74 to 5.1 m/s superficial velocities and average volume fractions (4% to 21%. The predicted local variations are in good agreement with the experimental measurements reported in the literature. Furthermore, the development of the flow pattern was examined at three different axial locations of L/D = 25, 148, and 253. The first location is close to the entrance region where the flow is still developing, while the second and the third represent nearly fully developed bubbly flow patterns.

  16. Developing Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD Models to Evaluate Available Energy in Exhaust Systems of Diesel Light-Duty Vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Fernández-Yáñez

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Around a third of the energy input in an automotive engine is wasted through the exhaust system. Since numerous technologies to harvest energy from exhaust gases are accessible, it is of great interest to find time- and cost-efficient methods to evaluate available thermal energy under different engine conditions. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD is becoming a very valuable tool for numerical predictions of exhaust flows. In this work, a methodology to build a simple three-dimensional (3D model of the exhaust system of automotive internal combustion engines (ICE was developed. Experimental data of exhaust gas in the most used part of the engine map in passenger diesel vehicles were employed as input for calculations. Sensitivity analyses of different numeric schemes have been conducted in order to attain accurate results. The model built allows for obtaining details on temperature and pressure fields along the exhaust system, and for complementing the experimental results for a better understanding of the flow phenomena and heat transfer through the system for further energy recovery devices.

  17. A Performance Prediction Method for Pumps as Turbines (PAT Using a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD Modeling Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Frosina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Small and micro hydropower systems represent an attractive solution for generating electricity at low cost and with low environmental impact. The pump-as-turbine (PAT approach has promise in this application due to its low purchase and maintenance costs. In this paper, a new method to predict the inverse characteristic of industrial centrifugal pumps is presented. This method is based on results of simulations performed with commercial three-dimensional Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD software. Model results have been first validated in pumping mode using data supplied by pump manufacturers. Then, the results have been compared to experimental data for a pump running in reverse. Experimentation has been performed on a dedicated test bench installed in the Department of Civil Construction and Environmental Engineering of the University of Naples Federico II. Three different pumps, with different specific speeds, have been analyzed. Using the model results, the inverse characteristic and the best efficiency point have been evaluated. Finally, results have been compared to prediction methods available in the literature.

  18. Two-compartmental population balance modeling of a pulsed spray fluidized bed granulation based on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huolong; Li, Mingzhong

    2014-11-20

    In this work a two-compartmental population balance model (TCPBM) was proposed to model a pulsed top-spray fluidized bed granulation. The proposed TCPBM considered the spatially heterogeneous granulation mechanisms of the granule growth by dividing the granulator into two perfectly mixed zones of the wetting compartment and drying compartment, in which the aggregation mechanism was assumed in the wetting compartment and the breakage mechanism was considered in the drying compartment. The sizes of the wetting and drying compartments were constant in the TCPBM, in which 30% of the bed was the wetting compartment and 70% of the bed was the drying compartment. The exchange rate of particles between the wetting and drying compartments was determined by the details of the flow properties and distribution of particles predicted by the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation. The experimental validation has shown that the proposed TCPBM can predict evolution of the granule size and distribution within the granulator under different binder spray operating conditions accurately. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. CFD-aerosol modeling of the effects of wall composition and inlet conditions on carbon nanotube catalyst particle activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, David P; Nasibulin, Albert G; Kauppinen, Esko I

    2008-08-01

    The evolution of iron catalyst particles during aerosol (floating catalyst) Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) synthesis of Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) from CO is computed using a multi species Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model incorporating a lognormal aerosol method of moments (MOM) to describe their dynamics and a combined chemical kinetics and equilibrium model for catalytic production of CO2. The influence of the presence of iron at the reactor walls, the fed particle size, number concentration and polydispersity and the effect of the catalytic production of CO2 at the reactor wall are studied in terms of particle size, concentration and polydispersity and reagent concentration during CNT synthesis. It is found that iron catalyst particle dynamics are essentially insensitive to wall iron concentrations and, for a wide range of particle sizes and concentrations, it is found that the catalyst particles are stable up to a critical CNT window in which CNT nucleation and growth occurs. Concentrations of catalyst particles significantly above 1 x 10(14) #/m3, however, lead to poor control over catalyst particle size and polydispersity at the CNT nucleation front which, in turn, leads to poor control over CNT diameter. The location of the growth window is shown to be directly associated with the availability of catalytically produced CO2 diffusing from the reactor walls to the reactor core. These results help to explain the large variations in CNT diameter and chirality and the inefficient use of catalyst material in other floating catalyst CNT processes based on in-situ catalyst particle synthesis.

  20. Evaluation of a Heating System in Poultry Houses Using a CFD Model / Evaluación de un Sistema de Calefacción en Galpones Avicolas Usando un Modelo en CFD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávio Alves Damasceno

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract.. The objective of this study was to adapt and validate a computer model using the Computational Fluid Dinamics (CFD, in the prediction of temperature and air speed in a duct distribution system coupled to a heating furnace that is used in typical poultry houses in tropical and subtropical countries. The validation of the model with experimental data was satisfactory, presentingnormalized mean square error NMSE values of 0.25 and 0.02 for air temperature and air speed, respectively. The results evidenced that the proposed model is adequate for predicting the air speed and temperature for this type of system, and could be used to improve the efficiency of the distribution of heat inside and around air ducts using different air speeds, types of materials and dimensions. / Resumen. El objetivo de este estudio fue adaptar y validar un modelo computacional haciendo uso de la dinámica de fluidos computacional (CFD para predecir la temperatura y la velocidad del aire en un sistema de distribución de ductos acoplado a un sitema de calefacción que es utilizado en las instalaciones avícola en los países tropicales y subtropicales. La validación del modelo con los datos experimentales fue satisfactoria, presentando valores medios normalizados del error cuadrado NMSE de 0,25 y 0,02 para la temperatura y velocidad del aire respectivamente. Los resultados muestran que el modelo propuesto es adecuado para predecir la velocidad del aire y la temperatura alrededor de este tipo de sistema, y podría ser utilizado para mejorar la eficiencia la distribución de calor en el interior y alrededor de los conductos, usando diferentes velocidades, tipos de materiales y dimensiones. 

  1. Modelling the defrost process in complex geometries – part 2: wall-function based coupling to a multi-region CFD solver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hertle Ellen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Presence of frost in air coolers reduces the performance and thus has to be removed frequently. A method commonly applied for frost removal is hot-gas defrosting. For the efficient design of this periodically performed operating sequence, a precise prediction of the process is essential. A CFD simulation is a capable tool for this evaluation. This paper presents an integration of a defrost model into a CFD solver of the software Open FOAM. The multi-region properties implemented in the existing code are adapted for the metal fin and tube structure and the air flow channel. The extension of the solver for evaluating the frost layer is accomplished by an interfacial wall function which models the frost characteristics and performs the thermal coupling. The extended solver is tested in a simplified environment, focusing on a fin-tube section. The simulated course of the defrost process and the total defrost time are discussed.

  2. Modelling the defrost process in complex geometries - part 2: wall-function based coupling to a multi-region CFD solver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertle, Ellen; van Buren, Simon; Figueiredo, Patric; Kneer, Reinhold; Rohlfs, Wilko

    2017-11-01

    Presence of frost in air coolers reduces the performance and thus has to be removed frequently. A method commonly applied for frost removal is hot-gas defrosting. For the efficient design of this periodically performed operating sequence, a precise prediction of the process is essential. A CFD simulation is a capable tool for this evaluation. This paper presents an integration of a defrost model into a CFD solver of the software Open FOAM. The multi-region properties implemented in the existing code are adapted for the metal fin and tube structure and the air flow channel. The extension of the solver for evaluating the frost layer is accomplished by an interfacial wall function which models the frost characteristics and performs the thermal coupling. The extended solver is tested in a simplified environment, focusing on a fin-tube section. The simulated course of the defrost process and the total defrost time are discussed.

  3. Modelling of Combustion and Pollutant Formation in a Large, Two-Stroke Marine Diesel Engine using Integrated CFD-Skeletal Chemical Mechanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pang, Kar Mun; Karvounis, Nikolas; Schramm, Jesper

    In this reported work, simulation studies of in-cylinder diesel combustion and pollutant formation processesin a two-stroke, low-speed uniflow-scavenged marine diesel engine are presented. Numerical computation is performed by integrating chemical kinetics into CFD computations. In order...... characteristics under high load condition in a marine diesel engine. Comparisons to the measurement show that the simulated pressure rise started 1.0 crank angle degree in advance and the calculated peak pressure is 1.7 % lower. The associated flame liftoff length is negligible, yielding high local equivalence...... to minimize the computational runtime, an in-house skeletal n-heptane chemical mechanism is coupled with the CFD model. This surrogate fuel model comprises 89 reactions with 32 species essential to diesel ignition/combustion processes as well as the formation of soot precursors and nitrogen monoxide (NO...

  4. Physics Based Electrolytic Capacitor Degradation Models for Prognostic Studies under Thermal Overstress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Chetan S.; Celaya, Jose R.; Goebel, Kai; Biswas, Gautam

    2012-01-01

    Electrolytic capacitors are used in several applications ranging from power supplies on safety critical avionics equipment to power drivers for electro-mechanical actuators. This makes them good candidates for prognostics and health management research. Prognostics provides a way to assess remaining useful life of components or systems based on their current state of health and their anticipated future use and operational conditions. Past experiences show that capacitors tend to degrade and fail faster under high electrical and thermal stress conditions that they are often subjected to during operations. In this work, we study the effects of accelerated aging due to thermal stress on different sets of capacitors under different conditions. Our focus is on deriving first principles degradation models for thermal stress conditions. Data collected from simultaneous experiments are used to validate the desired models. Our overall goal is to derive accurate models of capacitor degradation, and use them to predict performance changes in DC-DC converters.

  5. Physical Modeling for Anomaly Diagnostics and Prognostics Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Ridgetop developed an innovative, model-driven anomaly diagnostic and fault characterization system for electromechanical actuator (EMA) systems to mitigate...

  6. CFD modelling and validation of upward bubbly flow in an adiabatic vertical pipe using the quadrature method of moments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peña-Monferrer, C., E-mail: cmonfer@upv.es [Institute for Energy Engineering, Universitat Politècnica de València, 46022 València (Spain); Passalacqua, A., E-mail: albertop@iastate.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Chiva, S., E-mail: schiva@emc.uji.es [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Construction, Universitat Jaume I, 12080 Castelló de la Plana (Spain); Muñoz-Cobo, J.L., E-mail: jlcobos@iqn.upv.es [Institute for Energy Engineering, Universitat Politècnica de València, 46022 València (Spain)

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • A population balance equation solved with QMOM approximation is implemented in OpenFOAM. • Available models for interfacial forces and bubble induced turbulence are analyzed. • A vertical pipe flow is simulated for different bubbly flow conditions. • Two-phase flow characteristics in vertical pipes are properly predicted. - Abstract: An Eulerian–Eulerian approach was investigated to model adiabatic bubbly flow with CFD techniques. In the framework of the OpenFOAM{sup ®} software, a two-fluid model solver was modified to include a population balance equation, solved with the quadrature method of moments approximation to predict upward bubbly flow in vertical pipes considering the polydisperse nature of two-phase flow. Some progress have been made recently solving population balance equations in OpenFOAM{sup ®} and this research aims to extend its application to the case of vertical pipes under different conditions of liquid and gas velocities. In order to test the solver for nuclear applications, interfacial forces and bubble induced turbulence models were included to provide to this solver the capability to correctly predict the behavior of the continuous and disperse phases. Two-phase flow experiments with different superficial velocities of gas and liquid are used to validate the model and its implementation. Radial profiles of void fraction, gas and liquid velocities, Sauter mean diameter and turbulence intensity are compared to the computational results. These results are in satisfactory agreement with the experiments, showing the capability of the solver to predict two-phase flow characteristics.

  7. CFD Modelling of a Pump as Turbine (PAT with Rounded Leading Edge Impellers for Micro Hydro Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismail Mohd Azlan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A Pump as Turbine (PAT is one of micro hydro system components that is used to substitute a commercially available turbine due to its wide availability and low acquisition cost. However, PAT have high hydraulic losses due to differences in pump-turbine operation and hydraulic design. The fluid flowing inside the PAT is subjected to hydraulic losses due to the longer flow passage and unmatched fluid flow within the wall boundaries. This paper presents the effect of rounding the impeller leading edges of the pump on turbine performance. A CFD model of a PAT was designed to simulate virtual performance for the analysis. The aim of this study is to observe the internal hydraulic performance resulting from the changes in the performance characteristics. Highest efficiency was recorded at 17.0 l/s, an increase of 0.18%. The simulation results reveal that there is an improvement in hydraulic performance at overflow operation. The velocity vector visualization shows that there is a reduction in wake and consequently less flow separation along impeller flow passages. However, adjusting the sensitive impeller inlet geometry will also alter the velocity inlet vector and consequently change the velocity triangles for the turbo machinery system.

  8. Investigation of the Effects of Ship Induced Waves on the Littoral Zone with Field Measurements and CFD Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gábor Fleit

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Waves induced by ship movement might be harmful for the habitat in the littoral zone of rivers due to the temporally increasing bed shear stress, the high-energy breaking waves and the consequently related detachment of benthic animals. In order to understand the complex hydrodynamic phenomena resulting from littoral waves, we present the testing of a novel methodology that incorporates field observations and numerical tools. The study is performed at a section of the Danube River in Hungary and analyzes the influence of different ship types. The field methods consist of parallel acoustic measurements (using Acoustic Doppler Velocimetry (ADV conducted at the riverbed and Large Scale Particle Image Velocimetry (LSPIV of the water surface. ADV measurements provided near-bed flow velocities based on which the wave induced currents and local bed shear stress could be estimated. The LSPIV was able to quantify the dynamics of the breaking waves along the bank. Furthermore, computational fluid dynamics (CFD modeling was successfully applied to simulate the propagation and the breaking of littoral waves. The used techniques complement each other well and their joint application provides an adequate tool to support the improvement of riverine habitats.

  9. Assessment of the aerodynamic characteristics of thick airfoils in high Reynolds and moderate Ma numbers using CFD modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prospathopoulos, John M.; Papadakis, Giorgos; Sieros, Giorgos; Voutsinas, Spyros G.; Chaviaropoulos, Takis K.; Diakakis, Kostas

    2014-06-01

    The aerodynamic characteristics of thick airfoils in high Reynolds number is assessed using two different CFD RANS solvers: the compressible MaPFlow and the incompressible CRES-flowNS-2D both equipped with the k-ω SST turbulence model. Validation is carried out by comparing simulations against existing high Reynolds experimental data for the NACA 63-018 airfoil in the range of -10° to 20°. The use of two different solvers aims on one hand at increasing the credibility in the results and on the other at quantifying the compressibility effects. Convergence of steady simulations is achieved within a mean range of -10° to 14° which refers to attached or light stall conditions. Over this range the simulations from the two codes are in good agreement. As stall gets deeper, steady convergence ceases and the simulations must switch to unsteady. Lift and drag oscillations are produced which increase in amplitude as the angle of attack increases. Finally in post stall, the average CL is found to decrease up to ~24° or 32° for the FFA or the NACA 63-018 airfoils respectively, and then recover to higher values indicating a change in the unsteady features of the flow.

  10. A Prognostic Model for Development of Profound Shock among Children Presenting with Dengue Shock Syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phung Khanh Lam

    Full Text Available To identify risk factors and develop a prediction model for the development of profound and recurrent shock amongst children presenting with dengue shock syndrome (DSS.We analyzed data from a prospective cohort of children with DSS recruited at the Paediatric Intensive Care Unit of the Hospital for Tropical Disease in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. The primary endpoint was "profound DSS", defined as ≥2 recurrent shock episodes (for subjects presenting in compensated shock, or ≥1 recurrent shock episodes (for subjects presenting initially with decompensated/hypotensive shock, and/or requirement for inotropic support. Recurrent shock was evaluated as a secondary endpoint. Risk factors were pre-defined clinical and laboratory variables collected at the time of presentation with shock. Prognostic model development was based on logistic regression and compared to several alternative approaches.The analysis population included 1207 children of whom 222 (18% progressed to "profound DSS" and 433 (36% had recurrent shock. Independent risk factors for both endpoints included younger age, earlier presentation, higher pulse rate, higher temperature, higher haematocrit and, for females, worse hemodynamic status at presentation. The final prognostic model for "profound DSS" showed acceptable discrimination (AUC=0.69 for internal validation and calibration and is presented as a simple score-chart.Several risk factors for development of profound or recurrent shock among children presenting with DSS were identified. The score-chart derived from the prognostic models should improve triage and management of children presenting with DSS in dengue-endemic areas.

  11. Safety Injection Tank Performance Analysis Using CFD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Jai Oan; Lee, Jeong Ik; Nietiadi Yohanes Setiawan [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Addad Yacine [KUSTAR, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Bang, Young Seok; Yoo, Seung Hun [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    This may affect the core cooling capability and threaten the fuel integrity during LOCA situations. However, information on the nitrogen flow rate during discharge is very limited due to the associated experimental measurement difficulties, and these phenomena are hardly reflected in current 1D system codes. In the current study, a CFD analysis is presented which hopefully should allow obtaining a more realistic prediction of the SIT performance which can then be reflected on 1D system codes to simulate various accident scenarios. Current Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) calculations have had limited success in predicting the fluid flow accurately. This study aims to find a better CFD prediction and more accurate modeling to predict the system performance during accident scenarios. The safety injection tank with fluidic device was analyzed using commercial CFD. A fine resolution grid was used to capture the vortex of the fluidic device. The calculation so far has shown good consistency with the experiment. Calculation should complete by the conference date and will be thoroughly analyzed to be discussed. Once a detailed CFD computation is finished, a small-scale experiment will be conducted for the given conditions. Using the experimental results and the CFD model, physical models can be validated to give more reliable results. The data from CFD and experiments will provide a more accurate K-factor of the fluidic device which can later be applied in system code inputs.

  12. An updated PREDICT breast cancer prognostication and treatment benefit prediction model with independent validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candido Dos Reis, Francisco J; Wishart, Gordon C; Dicks, Ed M; Greenberg, David; Rashbass, Jem; Schmidt, Marjanka K; van den Broek, Alexandra J; Ellis, Ian O; Green, Andrew; Rakha, Emad; Maishman, Tom; Eccles, Diana M; Pharoah, Paul D P

    2017-05-22

    PREDICT is a breast cancer prognostic and treatment benefit model implemented online. The overall fit of the model has been good in multiple independent case series, but PREDICT has been shown to underestimate breast cancer specific mortality in women diagnosed under the age of 40. Another limitation is the use of discrete categories for tumour size and node status resulting in 'step' changes in risk estimates on moving between categories. We have refitted the PREDICT prognostic model using the original cohort of cases from East Anglia with updated survival time in order to take into account age at diagnosis and to smooth out the survival function for tumour size and node status. Multivariable Cox regression models were used to fit separate models for ER negative and ER positive disease. Continuous variables were fitted using fractional polynomials and a smoothed baseline hazard was obtained by regressing the baseline cumulative hazard for each patients against time using fractional polynomials. The fit of the prognostic models were then tested in three independent data sets that had also been used to validate the original version of PREDICT. In the model fitting data, after adjusting for other prognostic variables, there is an increase in risk of breast cancer specific mortality in younger and older patients with ER positive disease, with a substantial increase in risk for women diagnosed before the age of 35. In ER negative disease the risk increases slightly with age. The association between breast cancer specific mortality and both tumour size and number of positive nodes was non-linear with a more marked increase in risk with increasing size and increasing number of nodes in ER positive disease. The overall calibration and discrimination of the new version of PREDICT (v2) was good and comparable to that of the previous version in both model development and validation data sets. However, the calibration of v2 improved over v1 in patients diagnosed under the age

  13. A prognostic pollen emissions model for climate models (PECM1.0)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wozniak, Matthew C.; Steiner, Allison L.

    2017-11-01

    We develop a prognostic model called Pollen Emissions for Climate Models (PECM) for use within regional and global climate models to simulate pollen counts over the seasonal cycle based on geography, vegetation type, and meteorological parameters. Using modern surface pollen count data, empirical relationships between prior-year annual average temperature and pollen season start dates and end dates are developed for deciduous broadleaf trees (Acer, Alnus, Betula, Fraxinus, Morus, Platanus, Populus, Quercus, Ulmus), evergreen needleleaf trees (Cupressaceae, Pinaceae), grasses (Poaceae; C3, C4), and ragweed (Ambrosia). This regression model explains as much as 57 % of the variance in pollen phenological dates, and it is used to create a climate-flexible phenology that can be used to study the response of wind-driven pollen emissions to climate change. The emissions model is evaluated in the Regional Climate Model version 4 (RegCM4) over the continental United States by prescribing an emission potential from PECM and transporting pollen as aerosol tracers. We evaluate two different pollen emissions scenarios in the model using (1) a taxa-specific land cover database, phenology, and emission potential, and (2) a plant functional type (PFT) land cover, phenology, and emission potential. The simulated surface pollen concentrations for both simulations are evaluated against observed surface pollen counts in five climatic subregions. Given prescribed pollen emissions, the RegCM4 simulates observed concentrations within an order of magnitude, although the performance of the simulations in any subregion is strongly related to the land cover representation and the number of observation sites used to create the empirical phenological relationship. The taxa-based model provides a better representation of the phenology of tree-based pollen counts than the PFT-based model; however, we note that the PFT-based version provides a useful and climate-flexible emissions model for the

  14. A prognostic pollen emissions model for climate models (PECM1.0

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. C. Wozniak

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available We develop a prognostic model called Pollen Emissions for Climate Models (PECM for use within regional and global climate models to simulate pollen counts over the seasonal cycle based on geography, vegetation type, and meteorological parameters. Using modern surface pollen count data, empirical relationships between prior-year annual average temperature and pollen season start dates and end dates are developed for deciduous broadleaf trees (Acer, Alnus, Betula, Fraxinus, Morus, Platanus, Populus, Quercus, Ulmus, evergreen needleleaf trees (Cupressaceae, Pinaceae, grasses (Poaceae; C3, C4, and ragweed (Ambrosia. This regression model explains as much as 57 % of the variance in pollen phenological dates, and it is used to create a climate-flexible phenology that can be used to study the response of wind-driven pollen emissions to climate change. The emissions model is evaluated in the Regional Climate Model version 4 (RegCM4 over the continental United States by prescribing an emission potential from PECM and transporting pollen as aerosol tracers. We evaluate two different pollen emissions scenarios in the model using (1 a taxa-specific land cover database, phenology, and emission potential, and (2 a plant functional type (PFT land cover, phenology, and emission potential. The simulated surface pollen concentrations for both simulations are evaluated against observed surface pollen counts in five climatic subregions. Given prescribed pollen emissions, the RegCM4 simulates observed concentrations within an order of magnitude, although the performance of the simulations in any subregion is strongly related to the land cover representation and the number of observation sites used to create the empirical phenological relationship. The taxa-based model provides a better representation of the phenology of tree-based pollen counts than the PFT-based model; however, we note that the PFT-based version provides a useful and climate-flexible emissions

  15. Film Cooled Recession of SiC/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites: Test Development, CFD Modeling and Experimental Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Sakowski, Barbara A.; Fisher, Caleb

    2014-01-01

    SiCSiC ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) systems will play a crucial role in next generation turbine engines for hot-section component applications because of their ability to significantly increase engine operating temperatures, reduce engine weight and cooling requirements. However, the environmental stability of Si-based ceramics in high pressure, high velocity turbine engine combustion environment is of major concern. The water vapor containing combustion gas leads to accelerated oxidation and corrosion of the SiC based ceramics due to the water vapor reactions with silica (SiO2) scales forming non-protective volatile hydroxide species, resulting in recession of the ceramic components. Although environmental barrier coatings are being developed to help protect the CMC components, there is a need to better understand the fundamental recession behavior of in more realistic cooled engine component environments.In this paper, we describe a comprehensive film cooled high pressure burner rig based testing approach, by using standardized film cooled SiCSiC disc test specimen configurations. The SiCSiC specimens were designed for implementing the burner rig testing in turbine engine relevant combustion environments, obtaining generic film cooled recession rate data under the combustion water vapor conditions, and helping developing the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) film cooled models and performing model validation. Factors affecting the film cooled recession such as temperature, water vapor concentration, combustion gas velocity, and pressure are particularly investigated and modeled, and compared with impingement cooling only recession data in similar combustion flow environments. The experimental and modeling work will help predict the SiCSiC CMC recession behavior, and developing durable CMC systems in complex turbine engine operating conditions.

  16. Model Updating and Uncertainty Management for Aircraft Prognostic Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal addresses the integration of physics-based damage propagation models with diagnostic measures of current state of health in a mathematically rigorous...

  17. Introduction of prognostic rain in ECHAM5: design and Single Column Model simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Posselt, R.; Lohmann, U.

    2007-01-01

    International audience; Prognostic equations for the rain mass mixing ratio and the rain drop number concentration are introduced into the large-scale cloud microphysics parameterization of the ECHAM5 general circulation model (ECHAM5-PROG). To this end, a rain flux from one level to the next with the appropriate fall speed is introduced. This maintains rain water in the atmosphere to be available for the next time step. Rain formation in ECHAM5-PROG is, therefore, less dependent on the autoc...

  18. Bayesian based Prognostic Model for Predictive Maintenance of Offshore Wind Farms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asgarpour, Masoud

    2017-01-01

    The operation and maintenance costs of offshore wind farms can be significantly reduced if existing corrective actions are performed as efficient as possible and if future corrective actions are avoided by performing sufficient preventive actions. In this paper a prognostic model for degradation...... monitoring, fault detection and predictive maintenance of offshore wind components is defined. The diagnostic model defined in this paper is based on degradation, remaining useful lifetime and hybrid inspection threshold models. The defined degradation model is based on an exponential distribution...

  19. 3D-CFD simulation and neural network model for the j and f factors of the wavy fin-and-flat tube heat exchangers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Khoshvaght Aliabadi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available A three dimensional (3D computational fluid dynamics (CFD simulation and a neural network model are presented to estimate the behaviors of the Colburn factor (j and the Fanning friction factor (f for wavy fin - and - flat tube (WFFT heat exchangers. Effects of the five geometrical factors of fin pitch, fin height, fin length, fin thickness, and wavy amplitude are investigated over a wide range of Reynolds number (600CFD simulation results express that the geometrical parameters of wavy fins have significant effects on the j and f factors as a function of Reynolds number. The computational results have an adequate accuracy when compared to experimental data. The accuracy of the calculations of the j and f factors are evaluated by the values of the absolute average relative deviation (AARD, being respectively 3.8% and 8.2% for the CFD simulation and 1.3% and 1% for the neural network model. Finally, new correlations are proposed to estimate the values of the j and f factors with 3.22% and 3.68% AARD respectively.

  20. Prognostic factors for urachal cancer: a bayesian model-averaging approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, In Kyong; Lee, Joo Yong; Kwon, Jong Kyou; Park, Jae Joon; Cho, Kang Su; Ham, Won Sik; Hong, Sung Joon; Yang, Seung Choul; Choi, Young Deuk

    2014-09-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate prognostic factors and cancer-specific survival (CSS) in a cohort of 41 patients with urachal carcinoma by use of a Bayesian model-averaging approach. Our cohort included 41 patients with urachal carcinoma who underwent extended partial cystectomy, total cystectomy, transurethral resection, chemotherapy, or radiotherapy at a single institute. All patients were classified by both the Sheldon and the Mayo staging systems according to histopathologic reports and preoperative radiologic findings. Kaplan-Meier survival curves and Cox proportional-hazards regression models were carried out to investigate prognostic factors, and a Bayesian model-averaging approach was performed to confirm the significance of each variable by using posterior probabilities. The mean age of the patients was 49.88 ± 13.80 years and the male-to-female ratio was 24:17. The median follow-up was 5.42 years (interquartile range, 2.8-8.4 years). Five- and 10-year CSS rates were 55.9% and 43.4%, respectively. Lower Sheldon (p=0.004) and Mayo (pcancer-specific mortality in urachal carcinoma. The Mayo staging system might be more effective than the Sheldon staging system. In addition, the multivariate analyses suggested that tumor size may be a prognostic factor for urachal carcinoma.

  1. Watershed modeling tools and data for prognostic and diagnostic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambel-Leitao, P.; Brito, D.; Neves, R.

    2009-04-01

    When eutrophication is considered an important process to control it can be accomplished reducing nitrogen and phosphorus losses from both point and nonpoint sources and helping to assess the effectiveness of the pollution reduction strategy. HARP-NUT guidelines (Guidelines on Harmonized Quantification and Reporting Procedures for Nutrients) (Borgvang & Selvik, 2000) are presented by OSPAR as the best common quantification and reporting procedures for calculating the reduction of nutrient inputs. In 2000, OSPAR HARP-NUT guidelines on a trial basis. They were intended to serve as a tool for OSPAR Contracting Parties to report, in a harmonized manner, their different commitments, present or future, with regard to nutrients under the OSPAR Convention, in particular the "Strategy to Combat Eutrophication". HARP-NUT Guidelines (Borgvang and Selvik, 2000; Schoumans, 2003) were developed to quantify and report on the individual sources of nitrogen and phosphorus discharges/losses to surface waters (Source Orientated Approach). These results can be compared to nitrogen and phosphorus figures with the total riverine loads measured at downstream monitoring points (Load Orientated Approach), as load reconciliation. Nitrogen and phosphorus retention in river systems represents the connecting link between the "Source Orientated Approach" and the "Load Orientated Approach". Both approaches are necessary for verification purposes and both may be needed for providing the information required for the various commitments. Guidelines 2,3,4,5 are mainly concerned with the sources estimation. They present a set of simple calculations that allow the estimation of the origin of loads. Guideline 6 is a particular case where the application of a model is advised, in order to estimate the sources of nutrients from diffuse sources associated with land use/land cover. The model chosen for this was SWAT (Arnold & Fohrer, 2005) model because it is suggested in the guideline 6 and because it

  2. Co-firing biomass and coal-progress in CFD modelling capabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kær, Søren Knudsen; Rosendahl, Lasse Aistrup; Yin, Chungen

    2005-01-01

    This paper discusses the development of user defined FLUENT™ sub models to improve the modelling capabilities in the area of large biomass particle motion and conversion. Focus is put on a model that includes the influence from particle size and shape on the reactivity by resolving intra-particle...... particle conversion patterns. The improved model will impact the simulation capabilities of biomass fired boilers in the areas of thermal conditions, NOx formation and particle deposition behaviour....

  3. Introduction of prognostic rain in ECHAM5: design and single column model simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Posselt

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Prognostic equations for the rain mass mixing ratio and the rain drop number concentration are introduced into the large-scale cloud microphysics parameterization of the ECHAM5 general circulation model (ECHAM5-PROG. To this end, a rain flux from one level to the next with the appropriate fall speed is introduced. This maintains rain water in the atmosphere to be available for the next time step. Rain formation in ECHAM5-PROG is, therefore, less dependent on the autoconversion rate than the standard ECHAM5 but shifts the emphasis towards the accretion rates in accordance with observations. ECHAM5-PROG is tested and evaluated with Single Column Model (SCM simulations for two cases: the marine stratocumulus study EPIC (October 2001 and the continental mid-latitude ARM Cloud IOP (shallow frontal cloud case – March 2000. In case of heavy precipitation events, the prognostic equations for rain hardly affect the amount and timing of precipitation at the surface in different SCM simulations because heavy rain depends mainly on the large-scale forcing. In case of thin, drizzling clouds (i.e., stratocumulus, surface precipitation is sensitive to the number of sub-time steps used in the prognostic rain scheme. Cloud microphysical quantities, such as cloud liquid and rain water within the atmosphere, are sensitive to the number of sub-time steps in both considered cases. This results from the decreasing autoconversion rate and increasing accretion rate.

  4. Patient-specific CFD models for intraventricular flow analysis from 3D ultrasound imaging: Comparison of three clinical cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bavo, A M; Pouch, A M; Degroote, J; Vierendeels, J; Gorman, J H; Gorman, R C; Segers, P

    2017-01-04

    As the intracardiac flow field is affected by changes in shape and motility of the heart, intraventricular flow features can provide diagnostic indications. Ventricular flow patterns differ depending on the cardiac condition and the exploration of different clinical cases can provide insights into how flow fields alter in different pathologies. In this study, we applied a patient-specific computational fluid dynamics model of the left ventricle and mitral valve, with prescribed moving boundaries based on transesophageal ultrasound images for three cardiac pathologies, to verify the abnormal flow patterns in impaired hearts. One case (P1) had normal ejection fraction but low stroke volume and cardiac output, P2 showed low stroke volume and reduced ejection fraction, P3 had a dilated ventricle and reduced ejection fraction. The shape of the ventricle and mitral valve, together with the pathology influence the flow field in the left ventricle, leading to distinct flow features. Of particular interest is the pattern of the vortex formation and evolution, influenced by the valvular orifice and the ventricular shape. The base-to-apex pressure difference of maximum 2mmHg is consistent with reported data. We used a CFD model with prescribed boundary motion to describe the intraventricular flow field in three patients with impaired diastolic function. The calculated intraventricular flow dynamics are consistent with the diagnostic patient records and highlight the differences between the different cases. The integration of clinical images and computational techniques, therefore, allows for a deeper investigation intraventricular hemodynamics in patho-physiology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Climate feedbacks in a general circulation model incorporating prognostic clouds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colman, R.; Fraser, J. [Bureau of Meteorology Research Centre, Melbourne, Vic. (Australia); Rotstayn, L. [CSIRO Atmospheric Research, Aspendale (Australia)

    2001-11-01

    This study performs a comprehensive feedback analysis on the Bureau of Meteorology Research Centre General Circulation Model, quantifying all important feedbacks operating under an increase in atmospheric CO{sub 2}. The individual feedbacks are analysed in detail, using an offline radiation perturbation method, looking at long- and shortwave components, latitudinal distributions, cloud impacts, non-linearities under 2xCO{sub 2} and 4xCO{sub 2} warmings and at interannual variability. The water vapour feedback is divided into terms due to moisture height and amount changes. The net cloud feedback is separated into terms due to cloud amount, height, water content, water phase, physical thickness and convective cloud fraction. Globally the most important feedbacks were found to be (from strongest positive to strongest negative) those due to water vapour, clouds, surface albedo, lapse rate and surface temperature. For the longwave (LW) response the most important term of the cloud 'optical property' feedbacks is due to the water content. In the shortwave (SW), both water content and water phase changes are important. Cloud amount and height terms are also important for both LW and SW. Feedbacks due to physical cloud thickness and convective cloud fraction are found to be relatively small. All cloud component feedbacks (other than height) produce conflicting LW/SW feedbacks in the model. Furthermore, the optical property and cloud fraction feedbacks are also of opposite sign. The result is that the net cloud feedback is the (relatively small) product of conflicting physical processes. Non-linearities in the feedbacks are found to be relatively small for all but the surface albedo response and some cloud component contributions. The cloud impact on non-cloud feedbacks is also discussed: greatest impact is on the surface albedo, but impact on water vapour feedback is also significant. The analysis method here proves to be a powerful tool for detailing the

  6. CFD simulation of neutral ABL flows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Xiaodong

    This work is to evaluate the CFD prediction of Atmospheric Boundary Layer flow field over different terrains employing Fluent 6.3 software. How accurate the simulation could achieve depend on following aspects: viscous model, wall functions, agreement of CFD model with inlet wind velocity profile...... and top boundary condition. Fluent employ wall function roughness modifications based on data from experiments with sand grain roughened pipes and channels, describe wall adjacent zone with Roughness Height (Ks) instead of Roughness Length (z0). In a CFD simulation of ABL flow, the mean wind velocity...... ABL and the measurements are best documented until now. Comparison with measured data shows that the CFD model can well predict the velocity field and relative turbulence kinetic energy field. Furthermore, a series of artificial complex terrains are designed, and some of the main simulation results...

  7. An integral arc model for ablation controlled arcs based on CFD simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seeger, M [ABB Switzerland Ltd, Corporate Research, Im Segelhof 1, CH-5405 Baden-Daettwil, Switzerland (Switzerland); Niemeyer, L [ABB Switzerland Ltd, Corporate Research, Im Segelhof 1, CH-5405 Baden-Daettwil, Switzerland (Switzerland); Christen, T [ABB Switzerland Ltd, Corporate Research, Im Segelhof 1, CH-5405 Baden-Daettwil, Switzerland (Switzerland); Schwinne, M [RWTH Aachen, Institut fuer Hochspannungstechnik, Schinkelstrasse 2, D-52056 Aachen (Germany); Dommerque, R [RWTH Aachen, Institut fuer Hochspannungstechnik, Schinkelstrasse 2, D-52056 Aachen (Germany)

    2006-05-21

    A simple integral arc model for ablation arcs in tubes is presented. The model predicts the arc temperature in the axis, the average electrical field strength, the pressure generation and the mass ablation rate at the tube wall. The model is entirely based on first principles and does not require fit parameters. This is achieved with the help of detailed numerical arc simulations which use a combination of a radiative energy transfer code and computational fluid dynamics. This allows a physically correct and consistent averaging over the arc when deriving the integral model. New experiments for validation of the model were done. The results of the model are in satisfactory agreement with the older and new experimental data. The dependences of the predicted arc parameters are discussed for tube radii and lengths in the parameter range R = 2-8 mm and L = 40-80 mm, respectively.

  8. Experimental determination of temperatures of the inner wall of a boiler combustion chamber for the purpose of verification of a CFD model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Trávníček

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper focuses on the non-destructive method of determination of temperatures in the boiler combustion chamber. This method proves to be significant mainly as regards CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics simulations of combustion processes, in case of which it is subsequently advisable to verify the data calculated using CFD software application with the actually measured data. Verification of the method was based on usage of reference combustion equipment (130 kW which performs combustion of a mixture of waste sawdust and shavings originating in the course of production of wooden furniture. Measuring of temperatures inside the combustion chamber is – considering mainly the high temperature values – highly demanding and requires a special type of temperature sensors. Furthermore, as regards standard operation, it is not possible to install such sensors without performing structural alterations of the boiler. Therefore, for the purpose of determination of these temperatures a special experimental device was constructed while exploiting a thermal imaging system used for monitoring of the surface temperature of outer wall of the reference boiler. Temperatures on the wall of the boiler combustion chamber were determined on the basis of data measured using the experimental device as well as data from the thermal imaging system. These values might serve for verification of the respective CFD model of combustion equipment.

  9. Comparison of particle-wall interaction boundary conditions in the prediction of cyclone collection efficiency in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valverde Ramirez, M.; Coury, J.R.; Goncalves, J.A.S., E-mail: jasgon@ufscar.br [Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos (UFSCar), Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Quimica

    2009-07-01

    In recent years, many computational fluid dynamics (CFD) studies have appeared attempting to predict cyclone pressure drop and collection efficiency. While these studies have been able to predict pressure drop well, they have been only moderately successful in predicting collection efficiency. Part of the reason for this failure has been attributed to the relatively simple wall boundary conditions implemented in the commercially available CFD software, which are not capable of accurately describing the complex particle-wall interaction present in a cyclone. According, researches have proposed a number of different boundary conditions in order to improve the model performance. This work implemented the critical velocity boundary condition through a user defined function (UDF) in the Fluent software and compared its predictions both with experimental data and with the predictions obtained when using Fluent's built-in boundary conditions. Experimental data was obtained from eight laboratory scale cyclones with varying geometric ratios. The CFD simulations were made using the software Fluent 6.3.26. (author)

  10. CFD Modeling of Flow, Temperature, and Concentration Fields in a Pilot-Scale Rotary Hearth Furnace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; Su, Fu-Yong; Wen, Zhi; Li, Zhi; Yong, Hai-Quan; Feng, Xiao-Hong

    2014-01-01

    A three-dimensional mathematical model for simulation of flow, temperature, and concentration fields in a pilot-scale rotary hearth furnace (RHF) has been developed using a commercial computational fluid dynamics software, FLUENT. The layer of composite pellets under the hearth is assumed to be a porous media layer with CO source and energy sink calculated by an independent mathematical model. User-defined functions are developed and linked to FLUENT to process the reduction process of the layer of composite pellets. The standard k-ɛ turbulence model in combination with standard wall functions is used for modeling of gas flow. Turbulence-chemistry interaction is taken into account through the eddy-dissipation model. The discrete ordinates model is used for modeling of radiative heat transfer. A comparison is made between the predictions of the present model and the data from a test of the pilot-scale RHF, and a reasonable agreement is found. Finally, flow field, temperature, and CO concentration fields in the furnace are investigated by the model.

  11. A simplified prognostic model to predict mortality in patients with acute variceal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Han Hee; Park, Jae Myung; Han, Seunghoon; Park, Sung Min; Kim, Hee Yeon; Oh, Jung Hwan; Kim, Chang Wook; Yoon, Seung Kew; Choi, Myung-Gyu

    2017-11-24

    Acute variceal bleeding (AVB) is a major cause of death in patients with liver cirrhosis. The aim of this study was to investigate mortality predictors and develop a new simple prognostic model using easily verified factors at admission in AVB patients. Between January 2009 and May 2015, 333 consecutive patients with AVB were included. A simplified prognostic model was developed using multiple logistic regression after identifying significant predictors of 6-week mortality. Mortality prediction accuracy was assessed with area under the receiver operating characteristic (AUROC) curve. We compared the new model to existing models of model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) and Child-Pugh scores. The 6-week overall mortality rate was 12.9%. Multivariate analysis showed that C-reactive protein (CRP), total bilirubin, and the international normalized ratio were independent predictors of mortality. A new logistic model using these variables was developed. This model's AUROC was 0.834, which was significantly higher than that of MELD (0.764) or Child-Pugh scores (0.699). Two external validation studies showed that the AUROC of our model was consistently higher than 0.8. Our new simplified model accurately and consistently predicted 6-week mortality in patients with AVB using objective variables measured at admission. Our system can be used to identify high risk AVB patients. Copyright © 2017 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Prediction and validation of pool fire development in enclosures by means of CFD Models for risk assessment of nuclear power plants (Poolfire) - Report year 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van Hees, P.; Wahlqvist, J.; Kong, D. [Lund Univ., Lund (Sweden); Hostikka, S.; Sikanen, T. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland (Finland); Husted, B. [Haugesund Univ. College, Stord (Norway); Magnusson, T. [Ringhals AB, Vaeroebacka (Sweden); Joerud, F. [European Spallation Source (ESS), Lund (Sweden)

    2013-05-15

    Fires in nuclear power plants can be an important hazard for the overall safety of the facility. One of the typical fire sources is a pool fire. It is therefore important to have good knowledge on the fire behaviour of pool fire and be able to predict the heat release rate by prediction of the mass loss rate. This project envisages developing a pyrolysis model to be used in CFD models. In this report the activities for second year are reported, which is an overview of the experiments conducted, further development and validation of models and cases study to be selected in year 3. (Author)

  13. Accounting for treatment use when validating a prognostic model: a simulation study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romin Pajouheshnia

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prognostic models often show poor performance when applied to independent validation data sets. We illustrate how treatment use in a validation set can affect measures of model performance and present the uses and limitations of available analytical methods to account for this using simulated data. Methods We outline how the use of risk-lowering treatments in a validation set can lead to an apparent overestimation of risk by a prognostic model that was developed in a treatment-naïve cohort to make predictions of risk without treatment. Potential methods to correct for the effects of treatment use when testing or validating a prognostic model are discussed from a theoretical perspective.. Subsequently, we assess, in simulated data sets, the impact of excluding treated individuals and the use of inverse probability weighting (IPW on the estimated model discrimination (c-index and calibration (observed:expected ratio and calibration plots in scenarios with different patterns and effects of treatment use. Results Ignoring the use of effective treatments in a validation data set leads to poorer model discrimination and calibration than would be observed in the untreated target population for the model. Excluding treated individuals provided correct estimates of model performance only when treatment was randomly allocated, although this reduced the precision of the estimates. IPW followed by exclusion of the treated individuals provided correct estimates of model performance in data sets where treatment use was either random or moderately associated with an individual's risk when the assumptions of IPW were met, but yielded incorrect estimates in the presence of non-positivity or an unobserved confounder. Conclusions When validating a prognostic model developed to make predictions of risk without treatment, treatment use in the validation set can bias estimates of the performance of the model in future targeted individuals, and

  14. The role of CFD combustion modelling in hydrogen safety management – VI: Validation for slow deflagration in homogeneous hydrogen-air-steam experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cutrono Rakhimov, A., E-mail: cutrono@nrg.eu [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group (NRG), Westerduinweg 3, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Visser, D.C., E-mail: visser@nrg.eu [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group (NRG), Westerduinweg 3, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Holler, T., E-mail: tadej.holler@ijs.si [Jožef Stefan Institute (JSI), Jamova cesta 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Komen, E.M.J., E-mail: komen@nrg.eu [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group (NRG), Westerduinweg 3, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands)

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • Deflagration of hydrogen-air-steam homogeneous mixtures is modeled in a medium-scale containment. • Adaptive mesh refinement is applied on flame front positions. • Steam effect influence on combustion modeling capabilities is investigated. • Mean pressure rise is predicted with 18% under-prediction when steam is involved. • Peak pressure is evaluated with 5% accuracy when steam is involved. - Abstract: Large quantities of hydrogen can be generated during a severe accident in a water-cooled nuclear reactor. When released in the containment, the hydrogen can create a potential deflagration risk. The dynamic pressure loads resulting from hydrogen combustion can be detrimental to the structural integrity of the reactor. Therefore, accurate prediction of these pressure loads is an important safety issue. In previous papers, we validated a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) based method to determine the pressure loads from a fast deflagration. The combustion model applied in the CFD method is based on the Turbulent Flame Speed Closure (TFC). In our last paper, we presented the extension of this combustion model, Extended Turbulent Flame Speed Closure (ETFC), and its validation against hydrogen deflagration experiments in the slow deflagration regime. During a severe accident, cooling water will enter the containment as steam. Therefore, the effect of steam on hydrogen deflagration is important to capture in a CFD model. The primary objectives of the present paper are to further validate the TFC and ETFC combustion models, and investigate their capability to predict the effect of steam. The peak pressures, the trends of the flame velocity, and the pressure rise with an increase in the initial steam dilution are captured reasonably well by both combustion models. In addition, the ETFC model appeared to be more robust to mesh resolution changes. The mean pressure rise is evaluated with 18% under-prediction and the peak pressure is evaluated with 5

  15. 3D CFD computations of transitional flows using DES and a correlation based transition model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Niels N.

    process can be important for the aerodynamic performance. Today, the most widespread approach is to use fully turbulent computations, where the transitional process is ignored and the entire boundary layer on the wings or airfoils is handled by the turbulence model. The correlation based transition model...

  16. Turbulence-induced bubble collision force modeling and validation in adiabatic two-phase flow using CFD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Subash L., E-mail: sharma55@purdue.edu [School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907-1290 (United States); Hibiki, Takashi; Ishii, Mamoru [School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907-1290 (United States); Brooks, Caleb S. [Department of Nuclear, Plasma, and Radiological Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Schlegel, Joshua P. [Nuclear Engineering Program, Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, MO 65409 (United States); Liu, Yang [Nuclear Engineering Program, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Buchanan, John R. [Bechtel Marine Propulsion Corporation, Bettis Laboratory, West Mifflin, PA 15122 (United States)

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • Void distribution in narrow rectangular channel with various non-uniform inlet conditions. • Modeling of void diffusion due to bubble collision force. • Validation of new modeling in adiabatic air–water two-phase flow in a narrow channel. - Abstract: The prediction capability of the two-fluid model for gas–liquid dispersed two-phase flow depends on the accuracy of the closure relations for the interfacial forces. In previous studies of two-phase flow Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), interfacial force models for a single isolated bubble has been extended to disperse two-phase flow assuming the effect in a swarm of bubbles is similar. Limited studies have been performed investigating the effect of the bubble concentration on the lateral phase distribution. Bubbles, while moving through the liquid phase, may undergo turbulence-driven random collision with neighboring bubbles without significant coalescence. The rate of these collisions depends upon the bubble approach velocity and bubble spacing. The bubble collision frequency is expected to be higher in locations with higher bubble concentrations, i.e., volume fraction. This turbulence-driven random collision causes the diffusion of the bubbles from high concentration to low concentration. Based on experimental observations, a phenomenological model has been developed for a “turbulence-induced bubble collision force” for use in the two-fluid model. For testing the validity of the model, two-phase flow data measured at Purdue University are utilized. The geometry is a 10 mm × 200 mm cross section channel. Experimentally, non-uniform inlet boundary conditions are applied with different sparger combinations to vary the volume fraction distribution across the wider dimension. Examining uniform and non-uniform inlet data allows for the influence of the volume fraction to be studied as a separate effect. The turbulence-induced bubble collision force has been implemented in ANSYS CFX. The

  17. CFD modeling of two immiscible fluids mixing in a commercial scale static mixer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Abdolkarimi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A Computational Fluid Dynamics model based on the Eulerian formulation for multiphase flow was developed to model the mixing hydrodynamics of two immiscible fluids in a commercial scale static mixer. The two immiscible liquids were condensate and caustic solutions and were considered as two phases that are interpenetrating each other. The aim of this study was to develop a comprehensive Computational Fluid Dynamics model for predicting the impact of hydrodynamic parameters such as length, diameter and the arrangement of the corrugated plates of a static mixer on the degree of mixing and the pressure drop of the mixture. The model has been evaluated by comparing predictions of the degree of mixing and the mixture pressure drop with the same data available for the static mixer of the desulfurization plant of the Kharg petrochemical company. It has been shown that the predictions of the developed model are well adapted to the experimental data.

  18. Reduced nonlinear prognostic model construction from high-dimensional data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavrilov, Andrey; Mukhin, Dmitry; Loskutov, Evgeny; Feigin, Alexander

    2017-04-01

    Construction of a data-driven model of evolution operator using universal approximating functions can only be statistically justified when the dimension of its phase space is small enough, especially in the case of short time series. At the same time in many applications real-measured data is high-dimensional, e.g. it is space-distributed and multivariate in climate science. Therefore it is necessary to use efficient dimensionality reduction methods which are also able to capture key dynamical properties of the system from observed data. To address this problem we present a Bayesian approach to an evolution operator construction which incorporates two key reduction steps. First, the data is decomposed into a set of certain empirical modes, such as standard empirical orthogonal functions or recently suggested nonlinear dynamical modes (NDMs) [1], and the reduced space of corresponding principal components (PCs) is obtained. Then, the model of evolution operator for PCs is constructed which maps a number of states in the past to the current state. The second step is to reduce this time-extended space in the past using appropriate decomposition methods. Such a reduction allows us to capture only the most significant spatio-temporal couplings. The functional form of the evolution operator includes separately linear, nonlinear (based on artificial neural networks) and stochastic terms. Explicit separation of the linear term from the nonlinear one allows us to more easily interpret degree of nonlinearity as well as to deal better with smooth PCs which can naturally occur in the decompositions like NDM, as they provide a time scale separation. Results of application of the proposed method to climate data are demonstrated and discussed. The study is supported by Government of Russian Federation (agreement #14.Z50.31.0033 with the Institute of Applied Physics of RAS). 1. Mukhin, D., Gavrilov, A., Feigin, A., Loskutov, E., & Kurths, J. (2015). Principal nonlinear dynamical

  19. Impact of the initialisation on population balance CFD models coupled with two-phase flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hliwa, Ghizlane Zineb; Bannari, Rachid; Belghiti, Mly Taib

    2017-07-01

    Several studies have been made about Computational Fluid Dynamics simulations of bubble columns and compared to experimental data. In the present work, a rectangular bubble column is simulated using a model of two-phase flows. The inter-phase forces are used. A population balance equation is introduced by comparing two different models to account the effects of bubble size distribution. The turbulence model k-ɛ is used with mixture transport properties. In this work, the impact of boundary conditions at the inlet is studied. The numerical predictions are validated with experimental data available in the literature.

  20. CFD modeling and simulation of a hydropower system in generating clean electricity from water flow

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Akinyemi, Oladapo S; Liu, Yucheng

    2015-01-01

    ...) modeling and simulation. Performance of paddle wheels in producing hydropower out of running water under different speeds was evaluated, and effects of side and bottom fins and paddle wheel shape on power generation were...

  1. Application of transition modelling in CFD for use with turbine blades

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Dunn, Dwain I

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available achieved by the addition of the transition model (as in the boundary layer and Spalart-Allmaras with transition) compared to those without (Yang-shih k-e and Spalart-Allmaras without transition)....

  2. A CFD modeling study in an urban street canyon for ultrafine particles and population exposure: The intake fraction approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habilomatis, George; Chaloulakou, Archontoula

    2015-10-15

    Air quality in street canyons is of major importance, since the highest pollution levels are often encountered in these microenvironments. The canyon effect (reduced natural ventilation) makes them "hot spots" for particulate pollution contributing to adverse health effects for the exposed population. In this study we tried to characterize the influence of UFP (ultrafine particle) emissions from traffic on population exposure in an urban street canyon, by applying the intake fraction (iF) approach. One month long measurements of UFP levels have been monitored and used for the need of this study. We applied a three dimensional computational fluid dynamic (CFD) model based on real measurements for the simulation of UFP levels. We used infiltration factors, evaluated on a daily basis for the under study area, to estimate the indoor UFP levels. As a result the intake fraction for the pedestrians, residents and office workers is in the range of (1E-5)-(1E-4). The street canyon is mostly residential justifying partially the higher value of intake fraction for residents (1E-4). The above iF value is on the same order of magnitude with the corresponding one evaluated in a relative street canyon study. The total iF value in this microenvironment is one order of magnitude higher than ours, explained partially by the different use and activities. Two specific applications of iF to assess prioritization among emission sources and environmental justice issues are also examined. We ran a scenario with diesel and gasoline cars and diesel fueled vehicle seems to be a target source to improve overall iF. Our application focus on a small residential area, typical of urban central Athens, in order to evaluate high resolution iF. The significance of source-exposure relationship study in a micro scale is emphasized by recent research. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Advanced Multi-Phase Flow CFD Model Development for Solid Rocket Motor Flowfield Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liaw, Paul; Chen, Y. S.; Shang, H. M.; Doran, Denise

    1993-01-01

    It is known that the simulations of solid rocket motor internal flow field with AL-based propellants require complex multi-phase turbulent flow model. The objective of this study is to develop an advanced particulate multi-phase flow model which includes the effects of particle dynamics, chemical reaction and hot gas flow turbulence. The inclusion of particle agglomeration, particle/gas reaction and mass transfer, particle collision, coalescence and breakup mechanisms in modeling the particle dynamics will allow the proposed model to realistically simulate the flowfield inside a solid rocket motor. The Finite Difference Navier-Stokes numerical code FDNS is used to simulate the steady-state multi-phase particulate flow field for a 3-zone 2-D axisymmetric ASRM model and a 6-zone 3-D ASRM model at launch conditions. The 2-D model includes aft-end cavity and submerged nozzle. The 3-D model represents the whole ASRM geometry, including additional grain port area in the gas cavity and two inhibitors. FDNS is a pressure based finite difference Navier-Stokes flow solver with time-accurate adaptive second-order upwind schemes, standard and extended k-epsilon models with compressibility corrections, multi zone body-fitted formulations, and turbulence particle interaction model. Eulerian/Lagrangian multi-phase solution method is applied for multi-zone mesh. To simulate the chemical reaction, penalty function corrected efficient finite-rate chemistry integration method is used in FDNS. For the AL particle combustion rate, the Hermsen correlation is employed. To simulate the turbulent dispersion of particles, the Gaussian probability distribution with standard deviation equal to (2k/3)(exp 1/2) is used for the random turbulent velocity components. The computational results reveal that the flow field near the juncture of aft-end cavity and the submerged nozzle is very complex. The effects of the turbulent particles affect the flow field significantly and provide better

  4. CFD Studies on Biomass Thermochemical Conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yiqun; Yan, Lifeng

    2008-01-01

    Thermochemical conversion of biomass offers an efficient and economically process to provide gaseous, liquid and solid fuels and prepare chemicals derived from biomass. Computational fluid dynamic (CFD) modeling applications on biomass thermochemical processes help to optimize the design and operation of thermochemical reactors. Recent progression in numerical techniques and computing efficacy has advanced CFD as a widely used approach to provide efficient design solutions in industry. This paper introduces the fundamentals involved in developing a CFD solution. Mathematical equations governing the fluid flow, heat and mass transfer and chemical reactions in thermochemical systems are described and sub-models for individual processes are presented. It provides a review of various applications of CFD in the biomass thermochemical process field. PMID:19325848

  5. CFD Studies on Biomass Thermochemical Conversion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lifeng Yan

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Thermochemical conversion of biomass offers an efficient and economically process to provide gaseous, liquid and solid fuels and prepare chemicals derived from biomass. Computational fluid dynamic (CFD modeling applications on biomass thermochemical processes help to optimize the design and operation of thermochemical reactors. Recent progression in numerical techniques and computing efficacy has advanced CFD as a widely used approach to provide efficient design solutions in industry. This paper introduces the fundamentals involved in developing a CFD solution. Mathematical equations governing the fluid flow, heat and mass transfer and chemical reactions in thermochemical systems are described and sub-models for individual processes are presented. It provides a review of various applications of CFD in the biomass thermochemical process field.

  6. H2-O2 supercritical combustion modeling using a CFD code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benarous Abdallah

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The characteristics of propellant injection, mixing, and combustion have a profound effect on liquid rocket engine performance. The necessity of raising rocket engines performance requires a combustion chamber operation often in a supercritical regime. A supercritical combustion model based on a one-phase multi-components approach is developed and tested on a non-premixed H2-O2 flame configuration. A two equations turbulence model is used for describing the jet dynamics where a limited Pope correction is added to account for the oxidant spreading rate. Transport properties of the mixture are calculated using extended high pressure forms of the mixing rules. An equilibrium chemistry scheme is adopted in this combustion case, with both algebraic and stochastic expressions for the chemistry/turbulence coupling. The model was incorporated into a computational fluid dynamics commercial code (Fluent 6.2.16. The validity of the present model was investigated by comparing predictions of temperature, species mass fractions, recirculation zones and visible flame length to the experimental data measured on the Mascotte test rig. The results were confronted also with advanced code simulations. It appears that the agreement between the results was fairly good in the chamber regions situated downstream the near injection zone.

  7. 3D CFD computations of trasitional flows using DES and a correlation based transition model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Niels N.; Bechmann, Andreas; Zahle, Frederik

    2011-01-01

    The present article describes the application of the correlation based transition model of Menter et al. in combination with the Detached Eddy Simulation (DES) methodology to two cases with large degree of flow separation typically considered difficult to compute. Firstly, the flow is computed over...

  8. Perfusion kinetics in human brain tumor with DCE-MRI derived model and CFD analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandari, A; Bansal, A; Singh, A; Sinha, N

    2017-07-05

    Cancer is one of the leading causes of death all over the world. Among the strategies that are used for cancer treatment, the effectiveness of chemotherapy is often hindered by factors such as irregular and non-uniform uptake of drugs inside tumor. Thus, accurate prediction of drug transport and deposition inside tumor is crucial for increasing the effectiveness of chemotherapeutic treatment. In this study, a computational model of human brain tumor is developed that incorporates dynamic contrast enhanced-magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) data into a voxelized porous media model. The model takes into account realistic transport and perfusion kinetics parameters together with realistic heterogeneous tumor vasculature and accurate arterial input function (AIF), which makes it patient specific. The computational results for interstitial fluid pressure (IFP), interstitial fluid velocity (IFV) and tracer concentration show good agreement with the experimental results. The computational model can be extended further for predicting the deposition of chemotherapeutic drugs in tumor environment as well as selection of the best chemotherapeutic drug for a specific patient. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. CFD modelling of condensation process of water vapor in supersonic flows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wen, Chuang; Walther, Jens Honore; Yan, Yuying

    2016-01-01

    The condensation phenomenon of vapor plays an important role in various industries, such as the steam flow in turbines and refrigeration system. A mathematical model is developed to predict the spontaneous condensing phenomenon in the supersonic conditions using the nucleation and droplet growth...

  10. CFD modeling of condensation process of water vapor in supersonic flows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Yan; Walther, Jens Honore; Yan, Yuying

    2017-01-01

    The condensation phenomenon of vapor plays an important role in various industries, such as the steam flow in turbines and refrigeration system. A mathematical model is developed to predict the spontaneous condensing phenomenon in the supersonic flows using the nucleation and droplet growth...

  11. Simplified prognostic model for critically ill patients in resource limited settings in South Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haniffa, Rashan; Mukaka, Mavuto; Munasinghe, Sithum Bandara; De Silva, Ambepitiyawaduge Pubudu; Jayasinghe, Kosala Saroj Amarasiri; Beane, Abi; de Keizer, Nicolette; Dondorp, Arjen M

    2017-10-17

    Current critical care prognostic models are predominantly developed in high-income countries (HICs) and may not be feasible in intensive care units (ICUs) in lower- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Existing prognostic models cannot be applied without validation in LMICs as the different disease profiles, resource availability, and heterogeneity of the population may limit the transferability of such scores. A major shortcoming in using such models in LMICs is the unavailability of required measurements. This study proposes a simplified critical care prognostic model for use at the time of ICU admission. This was a prospective study of 3855 patients admitted to 21 ICUs from Bangladesh, India, Nepal, and Sri Lanka who were aged 16 years and over and followed to ICU discharge. Variables captured included patient age, admission characteristics, clinical assessments, laboratory investigations, and treatment measures. Multivariate logistic regression was used to develop three models for ICU mortality prediction: model 1 with clinical, laboratory, and treatment variables; model 2 with clinical and laboratory variables; and model 3, a purely clinical model. Internal validation based on bootstrapping (1000 samples) was used to calculate discrimination (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC)) and calibration (Hosmer-Lemeshow C-Statistic; higher values indicate poorer calibration). Comparison was made with the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II and Simplified Acute Physiology Score (SAPS) II models. Model 1 recorded the respiratory rate, systolic blood pressure, Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS), blood urea, haemoglobin, mechanical ventilation, and vasopressor use on ICU admission. Model 2, named TropICS (Tropical Intensive Care Score), included emergency surgery, respiratory rate, systolic blood pressure, GCS, blood urea, and haemoglobin. Model 3 included respiratory rate, emergency surgery, and GCS. AUC was 0.818 (95% confidence

  12. A hybrid prognostic model for multistep ahead prediction of machine condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roulias, D.; Loutas, T. H.; Kostopoulos, V.

    2012-05-01

    Prognostics are the future trend in condition based maintenance. In the current framework a data driven prognostic model is developed. The typical procedure of developing such a model comprises a) the selection of features which correlate well with the gradual degradation of the machine and b) the training of a mathematical tool. In this work the data are taken from a laboratory scale single stage gearbox under multi-sensor monitoring. Tests monitoring the condition of the gear pair from healthy state until total brake down following several days of continuous operation were conducted. After basic pre-processing of the derived data, an indicator that correlated well with the gearbox condition was obtained. Consecutively the time series is split in few distinguishable time regions via an intelligent data clustering scheme. Each operating region is modelled with a feed-forward artificial neural network (FFANN) scheme. The performance of the proposed model is tested by applying the system to predict the machine degradation level on unseen data. The results show the plausibility and effectiveness of the model in following the trend of the timeseries even in the case that a sudden change occurs. Moreover the model shows ability to generalise for application in similar mechanical assets.

  13. Prognostic models in acute pulmonary embolism: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, Antoine; Mallett, Susan; Daoud-Elias, Marie; Poggi, Jean-Noël; Clarke, Mike

    2016-01-01

    Objective To review the evidence for existing prognostic models in acute pulmonary embolism (PE) and determine how valid and useful they are for predicting patient outcomes. Design Systematic review and meta-analysis. Data sources OVID MEDLINE and EMBASE, and The Cochrane Library from inception to July 2014, and sources of grey literature. Eligibility criteria Studies aiming at constructing, validating, updating or studying the impact of prognostic models to predict all-cause death, PE-related death or venous thromboembolic events up to a 3-month follow-up in patients with an acute symptomatic PE. Data extraction Study characteristics and study quality using prognostic criteria. Studies were selected and data extracted by 2 reviewers. Data analysis Summary estimates (95% CI) for proportion of risk groups and event rates within risk groups, and accuracy. Results We included 71 studies (44 298 patients). Among them, 17 were model construction studies specific to PE prognosis. The most validated models were the PE Severity Index (PESI) and its simplified version (sPESI). The overall 30-day mortality rate was 2.3% (1.7% to 2.9%) in the low-risk group and 11.4% (9.9% to 13.1%) in the high-risk group for PESI (9 studies), and 1.5% (0.9% to 2.5%) in the low-risk group and 10.7% (8.8% to12.9%) in the high-risk group for sPESI (11 studies). PESI has proved clinically useful in an impact study. Shifting the cut-off or using novel and updated models specifically developed for normotensive PE improves the ability for identifying patients at lower risk for early death or adverse outcome (0.5–1%) and those at higher risk (up to 20–29% of event rate). Conclusions We provide evidence-based information about the validity and utility of the existing prognostic models in acute PE that may be helpful for identifying patients at low risk. Novel models seem attractive for the high-risk normotensive PE but need to be externally validated then be assessed in impact studies. PMID

  14. Accurate Modeling of Stability and Control Properties for Fighter Aircraft from CFD

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    Riemann Solver, obtaining second order accuracy, types of temporal schemes, etc [12]. The Spalart-Allmaras one-equation turbulence model, the Wilcox k...sacrifice of no static data. It is hypothesized that either Maneuver 4 or 5 will ultimately provide the best match of the comparison sets of data as...median maneuvers according to the metrics which would seem to correlate a good blend between dynamic and static data. It is also hypothesized that the

  15. MyrrhaFoam: A CFD model for the study of the thermal hydraulic behavior of MYRRHA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koloszar, Lilla; Buckingham, Sophia; Planquart, Philippe [von Karman Institute, Chaussée de Waterloo 72, B-1640 Rhode-St-Genèse (Belgium); Keijers, Steven [SCK-CEN, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium)

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • Development of a modeling approach for simulating the thermal hydraulics of heavy liquid metal nuclear reactors. • Detailed description of the modeling of each component through the MYRRHA reactor. • Detailed analysis of the flow field of the MYRRHA reactor under operating condition. • Assessment of the thermal load on the structures as well as the thermal stratification in the upper and the lower plenum. - Abstract: Numerical analysis of the thermohydraulic behavior of the innovative flexible fast spectrum research reactor, MYRRHA, under design by the Belgian Nuclear Research Center (SCK• CEN) is a very challenging task. The primary coolant of the reactor is Lead Bismuth Eutectic, LBE, which is an opaque heavy liquid metal with low Prandtl number. The simulation tool needs to involve many complex physical phenomena to be able to predict accurately the flow and thermal field in the pool type reactor. In the past few years, within the frame of a collaboration between SCK• CEN and the von Karman Institute, a new platform, MyrrhaFoam, was developed based on the open source simulation environment, OpenFOAM. The current tool can deal with incompressible buoyancy corrected steady/unsteady single phase flows. It takes into account conjugate heat transfer in the solid parts which is mandatory due to the expected high temperature gradients between the different parts of the reactor. The temperature dependent properties of LBE are also considered. MyrrhaFoam is supplemented with the most relevant thermal turbulence models for low Prandtl number liquids up to date.

  16. The Three-Dimensional Velocity Distribution of Wide Gap Taylor-Couette Flow Modelled by CFD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Shina Adebayo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A numerical investigation is conducted for the flow between two concentric cylinders with a wide gap, relevant to bearing chamber applications. This wide gap configuration has received comparatively less attention than narrow gap journal bearing type geometries. The flow in the gap between an inner rotating cylinder and an outer stationary cylinder has been modelled as an incompressible flow using an implicit finite volume RANS scheme with the realisable k-ε model. The model flow is above the critical Taylor number at which axisymmetric counterrotating Taylor vortices are formed. The tangential velocity profiles at all axial locations are different from typical journal bearing applications, where the velocity profiles are quasilinear. The predicted results led to two significant findings of impact in rotating machinery operations. Firstly, the axial variation of the tangential velocity gradient induces an axially varying shear stress, resulting in local bands of enhanced work input to the working fluid. This is likely to cause unwanted heat transfer on the surface in high torque turbomachinery applications. Secondly, the radial inflow at the axial end-wall boundaries is likely to promote the transport of debris to the junction between the end-collar and the rotating cylinder, causing the build-up of fouling in the seal.

  17. Uncertainty Quantification of CFD Data Generated for a Model Scramjet Isolator Flowfield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baurle, R. A.; Axdahl, E. L.

    2017-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics is now considered to be an indispensable tool for the design and development of scramjet engine components. Unfortunately, the quantification of uncertainties is rarely addressed with anything other than sensitivity studies, so the degree of confidence associated with the numerical results remains exclusively with the subject matter expert that generated them. This practice must be replaced with a formal uncertainty quantification process for computational fluid dynamics to play an expanded role in the system design, development, and flight certification process. Given the limitations of current hypersonic ground test facilities, this expanded role is believed to be a requirement by some in the hypersonics community if scramjet engines are to be given serious consideration as a viable propulsion system. The present effort describes a simple, relatively low cost, nonintrusive approach to uncertainty quantification that includes the basic ingredients required to handle both aleatoric (random) and epistemic (lack of knowledge) sources of uncertainty. The nonintrusive nature of the approach allows the computational fluid dynamicist to perform the uncertainty quantification with the flow solver treated as a "black box". Moreover, a large fraction of the process can be automated, allowing the uncertainty assessment to be readily adapted into the engineering design and development workflow. In the present work, the approach is applied to a model scramjet isolator problem where the desire is to validate turbulence closure models in the presence of uncertainty. In this context, the relevant uncertainty sources are determined and accounted for to allow the analyst to delineate turbulence model-form errors from other sources of uncertainty associated with the simulation of the facility flow.

  18. Analysis of mass transfer characteristics in a tubular membrane using CFD modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jixiang; Vedantam, Sreepriya; Spanjers, Henri; Nopens, Ingmar; van Lier, Jules B

    2012-10-01

    In contrast to the large amount of research into aerobic membrane bioreactors, little work has been reported on anaerobic membrane bioreactors (AMBRs). As to the application of membrane bioreactors, membrane fouling is a key issue. Membrane fouling generally occurs more seriously in AMBRs than in aerobic membrane bioreactors. However, membrane fouling could be managed through the application of suitable shear stress that can be introduced by the application of a two-phase flow. When the two-phase flow is applied in AMBRs, little is known about the mass transfer characteristics, which is of particular importance, in tubular membranes of AMBRs. In our present work, we have employed fluid dynamic modeling to analyze the mass transfer characteristics in the tubular membrane of a side stream AMBR in which, gas-lift two-phase flow was applied. The modeling indicated that the mass transfer capacity at the membrane surface at the noses of gas bubbles was higher than the mass transfer capacity at the tails of the bubbles, which is in contrast to the results when water instead of sludge is applied. At the given mass transfer rate, the filterability of the sludge was found to have a strong influence on the transmembrane pressure at a steady flux. In addition, the model also showed that the shear stress in the internal space of the tubular membrane was mainly around 20 Pa but could be as high as about 40 Pa due to gas bubble movements. Nonetheless, at these shear stresses a stable particle size distribution was found for sludge particles. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. CFD prediction and model experiment on suction vortices in pump sump

    OpenAIRE

    Okamura, Tomoyoshi; Kamemoto, Kyoji; Matsui, Jun

    2007-01-01

    The sump size is being reduced in order to lower the construction costs of urban drainage pump stations in Japan. As a result of such size reductions, undesirable vortices such as air-entrained and submerged vortices are apt to appear in sumps because of the higher flow velocities. The Turbomachinery Society of Japan (TSJ) Standard S002:2005 states that the appearance of such visible vortices is not permissible for conventional sumps, and experiments with scale models usually have been done t...

  20. Turbulence Model Sensitivity and Scour Gap Effect of Unsteady Flow around Pipe: A CFD Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbod Ali

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A numerical investigation of incompressible and transient flow around circular pipe has been carried out at different five gap phases. Flow equations such as Navier-Stokes and continuity equations have been solved using finite volume method. Unsteady horizontal velocity and kinetic energy square root profiles are plotted using different turbulence models and their sensitivity is checked against published experimental results. Flow parameters such as horizontal velocity under pipe, pressure coefficient, wall shear stress, drag coefficient, and lift coefficient are studied and presented graphically to investigate the flow behavior around an immovable pipe and scoured bed.

  1. CFD Modeling Two-phase Flow in the Rotationally Symmetric Bodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaroslav KRUTIL

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The work summarizes the basic findings which result from numerical modelling of flow at the mixture of air and water, with consideration of laminar and turbulent flow. The attention is focused on the development of the velocity profile of the liquid, depending on adhesion coefficient and the degree of hydrophobicity of the surface. We considered the geometry of a straight circular pipe arranged in vertical and horizontal position. The solution focuses on the finite element method and the tool utilized to evaluate the results was numerical program ANSYS Fluent.

  2. Experimental Measurement and CFD Model Development of Thick Wind Turbine Airfoils with Leading Edge Erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maniaci, David C.; White, Edward B.; Wilcox, Benjamin; Langel, Christopher M.; van Dam, C. P.; Paquette, Joshua A.

    2016-09-01

    Leading edge erosion and roughness accumulation is an issue observed with great variability by wind plant operators, but with little understanding of the effect on wind turbine performance. In wind tunnels, airfoil models are typically tested with standard grit roughness and trip tape to simulate the effects of roughness and erosion observed in field operation, but there is a lack of established relation between field measurements and wind tunnel test conditions. A research collaboration between lab, academic, and industry partners has sought to establish a method to estimate the effect of erosion in wind turbine blades that correlates to roughness and erosion measured in the field. Measurements of roughness and erosion were taken off of operational utility wind turbine blades using a profilometer. The field measurements were statistically reproduced in the wind tunnel on representative tip and midspan airfoils. Simultaneously, a computational model was developed and calibrated to capture the effect of roughness and erosion on airfoil transition and performance characteristics. The results indicate that the effects of field roughness fall between clean airfoil performance and the effects of transition tape. Severe leading edge erosion can cause detrimental performance effects beyond standard roughness. The results also indicate that a heavily eroded wind turbine blade can reduce annual energy production by over 5% for a utility scale wind turbine.

  3. Use of CFD modelling for analysing air parameters in auditorium halls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cichowicz, Robert

    2017-11-01

    Modelling with the use of numerical methods is currently the most popular method of solving scientific as well as engineering problems. Thanks to the use of computer methods it is possible for example to comprehensively describe the conditions in a given room and to determine thermal comfort, which is a complex issue including subjective sensations of the persons in a given room. The article presents the results of measurements and numerical computing that enabled carrying out the assessment of environment parameters, taking into consideration microclimate, temperature comfort, speeds in the zone of human presence and dustiness in auditory halls. For this purpose measurements of temperature, relative humidity and dustiness were made with the use of a digital microclimate meter and a laser dust particles counter. Thanks to the above by using the application DesignBuilder numerical computing was performed and the obtained results enabled determining PMV comfort indicator in selected rooms.

  4. Use of CFD modelling for analysing air parameters in auditorium halls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cichowicz Robert

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Modelling with the use of numerical methods is currently the most popular method of solving scientific as well as engineering problems. Thanks to the use of computer methods it is possible for example to comprehensively describe the conditions in a given room and to determine thermal comfort, which is a complex issue including subjective sensations of the persons in a given room. The article presents the results of measurements and numerical computing that enabled carrying out the assessment of environment parameters, taking into consideration microclimate, temperature comfort, speeds in the zone of human presence and dustiness in auditory halls. For this purpose measurements of temperature, relative humidity and dustiness were made with the use of a digital microclimate meter and a laser dust particles counter. Thanks to the above by using the application DesignBuilder numerical computing was performed and the obtained results enabled determining PMV comfort indicator in selected rooms.

  5. Unstructured mesh methods for CFD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peraire, J.; Morgan, K.; Peiro, J.

    1990-01-01

    Mesh generation methods for Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) are outlined. Geometric modeling is discussed. An advancing front method is described. Flow past a two engine Falcon aeroplane is studied. An algorithm and associated data structure called the alternating digital tree, which efficiently solves the geometric searching problem is described. The computation of an initial approximation to the steady state solution of a given poblem is described. Mesh generation for transient flows is described.

  6. Unsteady CFD modeling of micro-adaptive flow control for an axisymmetric body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Jubaraj; Heavey, Karen R.

    2006-06-01

    This paper describes a computational study undertaken, as part of a grand challenge project, to consider the aerodynamic effect of micro-adaptive flow control as a means to provide the divert authority needed to maneuver a projectile at a low subsonic speed. A time-accurate Navier Stokes computational technique has been used to obtain numerical solutions for the unsteady micro-jet-interaction flow field for the axisymmetric projectile body at subsonic speeds, Mach=0.11 and 0.24 and angles of attack, 0 4°. Numerical solutions have been obtained using both Reynolds-Averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) and a hybrid RANS/Large Eddy Simulation (LES) turbulence models. Unsteady numerical results show the effect of the jet on the flow field and the aerodynamic coefficients, in particular the lift force. This research has provided an increased fundamental understanding of the complex, three-dimensional (3D), time-dependent, aerodynamic interactions associated with micro-jet control for yawing spin-stabilized munitions.

  7. Unsteady CFD modeling of micro-adaptive flow control for an axisymmetric body

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahu, J.; Heavey, K.R. [U.S. Army Research Laboratory, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD (United States)]. E-mail: sahu@arl.army.mil

    2005-07-01

    This paper describes a computational study undertaken, as part of a grand challenge project, to consider the aerodynamic effect of micro-adaptive flow control as a means to provide the divert authority needed to maneuver a projectile at a low subsonic speed. A time-accurate Navier-Stokes computational technique has been used to obtain numerical solutions for the unsteady microjet-interaction flow field for the axisymmetric projectile body at subsonic speeds, Mach = 0.11 and 0.24 and angles of attack, 0{sup o} to 4{sup o}. Numerical solutions have been obtained using both Renolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) and a hybrid RANS/Large Eddy Simulation (LES) turbulence models. Unsteady numerical results show the effect of the jet on the flow field and the aerodynamic coefficients, in particular the lift force. This research has provided an increased fundamental understanding of the complex, three-dimensional, time-dependent, aerodynamic interactions associated with micro-jet control for yawing spin-stabilized munitions. (author)

  8. CFD Model Development and validation for High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor Cavity Cooling System (RCCS) Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassan, Yassin [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Corradini, Michael; Tokuhiro, Akira; Wei, Thomas Y.C.

    2014-07-14

    The Reactor Cavity Cooling Systems (RCCS) is a passive safety system that will be incorporated in the VTHR design. The system was designed to remove the heat from the reactor cavity and maintain the temperature of structures and concrete walls under desired limits during normal operation (steady-state) and accident scenarios. A small scale (1:23) water-cooled experimental facility was scaled, designed, and constructed in order to study the complex thermohydraulic phenomena taking place in the RCCS during steady-state and transient conditions. The facility represents a portion of the reactor vessel with nine stainless steel coolant risers and utilizes water as coolant. The facility was equipped with instrumentation to measure temperatures and flow rates and a general verification was completed during the shakedown. A model of the experimental facility was prepared using RELAP5-3D and simulations were performed to validate the scaling procedure. The experimental data produced during the steady-state run were compared with the simulation results obtained using RELAP5-3D. The overall behavior of the facility met the expectations. The facility capabilities were confirmed to be very promising in performing additional experimental tests, including flow visualization, and produce data for code validation.

  9. CFD Analysis of the Runaway Stability of a Model Pump-Turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, L. S.; Cheng, Y. G.; You, J. F.; Jiang, Y. Q.

    2016-11-01

    The relations between the runaway stability characteristics and the flow patterns inside the runner of pump-turbine are supposed to be close and should be studied. The runaway processes of a model pump-turbine at four guide-vane openings (GVOs) were simulated by the three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics. The results show that the runaway stability characteristics for the pump-turbine are different at different GVOs. For the small GVOs, the turbine characteristic trajectory undergoes damped oscillations; however, for large GVOs, the turbine characteristic trajectory settles into an un-damping oscillation. The evolution features of the reverse flow vortex structures (RFVS) at the runner inlet during the runaway oscillations have distinct patterns between the small and large GVOs. For small GVOs, the RFVSs only locate at the mid-span; however, for the large GVOs, the location of the RFVSs switches back and forth between the mid-span section and the hub side when the turbine passes in and out the turbine braking mode. The changes of RFVS at the runner inlet dominate the energy transfer among the hydraulic, mechanical and dissipation energies during the transient processes, and therefore affect the stability of hydraulic system.

  10. CH4 emission estimates from an active landfill site inferred from a combined approach of CFD modelling and in situ FTIR measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonderfeld, Hannah; Boesch, Hartmut; Jeanjean, Antoine P. R.; Riddick, Stuart N.; Allen, Grant; Ars, Sebastien; Davies, Stewart; Harris, Neil; Humpage, Neil; Leigh, Roland; Pitt, Joseph

    2017-04-01

    Globally, the waste sector contributes to nearly a fifth of anthropogenic methane (CH4) emitted to the atmosphere and is the second largest source of methane in the UK. In recent years great improvements to reduce those emissions have been achieved by installation of methane recovery systems at landfill sites and subsequently methane emissions reported in national emission inventories have been reduced. Nevertheless, methane emissions of landfills remain uncertain and quantification of emission fluxes is essential to verify reported emission inventories and to monitor changes in emissions. We are presenting data from the deployment of an in situ FTIR (Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer, Ecotech) for continuous and simultaneous sampling of CO2, CH4, N2O and CO with high time resolution of the order of minutes. During a two week field campaign at an operational landfill site in Eastern England in August 2014, measurements were taken within a radius of 320 m of the uncovered and active area of the landfill, which was still filled with new incoming waste. We have applied a computation fluid dynamics (CFD) model, constrained with local wind measurements and a detailed topographic map of the landfill site, to the in situ concentration data to calculate CH4 fluxes of the active site. A mean daytime flux of 0.83 mg m-2 s-1 (53.26 kg h-1) was calculated for the area of the active site. An additional source area was identified and incorporated into the CFD model, which resulted in higher total methane emissions of 75.97 kg h-1 for the combined emission areas. Our method of combining a CFD model to in situ data, in medium proximity of the source area, allows to distinguish between different emission areas and thereby provide more detailed information compared to bulk emission approaches.

  11. CFD simulation of reverse water-hammer induced by collapse of draft-tube cavity in a model pump-turbine during runaway process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoxi; Cheng, Yongguang; Xia, Linsheng; Yang, Jiandong

    2016-11-01

    This paper reports the preliminary progress in the CFD simulation of the reverse water-hammer induced by the collapse of a draft-tube cavity in a model pump-turbine during the runaway process. Firstly, the Fluent customized 1D-3D coupling model for hydraulic transients and the Schnerr & Sauer cavitation model for cavity development are introduced. Then, the methods are validated by simulating the benchmark reverse water-hammer in a long pipe caused by a valve instant closure. The simulated head history at the valve agrees well with the measured data in literature. After that, the more complicated reverse water-hammer in the draft-tube of a runaway model pump-turbine, which is installed in a model pumped-storage power plant, is simulated. The dynamic processes of a vapor cavity, from generation, expansion, shrink to collapse, are shown. After the cavity collapsed, a sudden increase of pressure can be evidently observed. The process is featured by a locally expending and collapsing vapor cavity that is around the runner cone, which is different from the conventional recognition of violent water- column separation. This work reveals the possibility for simulating the reverse water-hammer phenomenon in turbines by 3D CFD.

  12. A Hidden Semi-Markov Model with Duration-Dependent State Transition Probabilities for Prognostics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Realistic prognostic tools are essential for effective condition-based maintenance systems. In this paper, a Duration-Dependent Hidden Semi-Markov Model (DD-HSMM is proposed, which overcomes the shortcomings of traditional Hidden Markov Models (HMM, including the Hidden Semi-Markov Model (HSMM: (1 it allows explicit modeling of state transition probabilities between the states; (2 it relaxes observations’ independence assumption by accommodating a connection between consecutive observations; and (3 it does not follow the unrealistic Markov chain’s memoryless assumption and therefore it provides a more powerful modeling and analysis capability for real world problems. To facilitate the computation of the proposed DD-HSMM methodology, new forward-backward algorithm is developed. The demonstration and evaluation of the proposed methodology is carried out through a case study. The experimental results show that the DD-HSMM methodology is effective for equipment health monitoring and management.

  13. External validation of prognostic models to predict risk of gestational diabetes mellitus in one Dutch cohort: prospective multicentre cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamain-de Ruiter, Marije; Kwee, Anneke; Naaktgeboren, Christiana A; de Groot, Inge; Evers, Inge M; Groenendaal, Floris; Hering, Yolanda R; Huisjes, Anjoke J M; Kirpestein, Cornel; Monincx, Wilma M; Siljee, Jacqueline E; Van 't Zelfde, Annewil; van Oirschot, Charlotte M; Vankan-Buitelaar, Simone A; Vonk, Mariska A A W; Wiegers, Therese A; Zwart, Joost J; Franx, Arie; Moons, Karel G M; Koster, Maria P H

    2016-08-30

     To perform an external validation and direct comparison of published prognostic models for early prediction of the risk of gestational diabetes mellitus, including predictors applicable in the first trimester of pregnancy.  External validation of all published prognostic models in large scale, prospective, multicentre cohort study.  31 independent midwifery practices and six hospitals in the Netherlands.  Women recruited in their first trimester (diabetes mellitus of any type were excluded.  Discrimination of the prognostic models was assessed by the C statistic, and calibration assessed by calibration plots.  3723 women were included for analysis, of whom 181 (4.9%) developed gestational diabetes mellitus in pregnancy. 12 prognostic models for the disorder could be validated in the cohort. C statistics ranged from 0.67 to 0.78. Calibration plots showed that eight of the 12 models were well calibrated. The four models with the highest C statistics included almost all of the following predictors: maternal age, maternal body mass index, history of gestational diabetes mellitus, ethnicity, and family history of diabetes. Prognostic models had a similar performance in a subgroup of nulliparous women only. Decision curve analysis showed that the use of these four models always had a positive net benefit.  In this external validation study, most of the published prognostic models for gestational diabetes mellitus show acceptable discrimination and calibration. The four models with the highest discriminative abilities in this study cohort, which also perform well in a subgroup of nulliparous women, are easy models to apply in clinical practice and therefore deserve further evaluation regarding their clinical impact. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  14. An interfacial shear term evaluation study for adiabatic dispersed air–water two-phase flow with the two-fluid model using CFD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, S.L., E-mail: sharma55@purdue.edu [School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN (United States); Hibiki, T.; Ishii, M. [School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN (United States); Schlegel, J.P. [Department of Mining and Nuclear Engineering, Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, MO (United States); Buchanan, J.R.; Hogan, K.J. [Bettis Laboratory, Naval Nuclear Laboratory, West Mifflin, PA (United States); Guilbert, P.W. [ANSYS UK Ltd, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom)

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • Closure form of the interfacial shear term in three-dimensional form is investigated. • Assessment against adiabatic upward bubbly air–water flow data using CFD. • Effect of addition of the interfacial shear term on the phase distribution. - Abstract: In commercially available Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes such as ANSYS CFX and Fluent, the interfacial shear term is missing in the field momentum equations. The derivation of the two-fluid model (Ishii and Hibiki, 2011) indicates the presence of this term as a momentum source in the right hand side of the field momentum equation. The inclusion of this term is considered important for proper modeling of the interfacial momentum coupling between phases. For separated flows, such as annular flow, the importance of the shear term is understood in the one-dimensional (1-D) form as the major mechanism by which the wall shear is transferred to the gas phase (Ishii and Mishima, 1984). For gas dispersed two-phase flow CFD simulations, it is important to assess the significance of this term in the prediction of phase distributions. In the first part of this work, the closure of this term in three-dimensional (3-D) form in a CFD code is investigated. For dispersed gas–liquid flow, such as bubbly or churn-turbulent flow, bubbles are dispersed in the shear layer of the continuous phase. The continuous phase shear stress is mainly due to the presence of the wall and the modeling of turbulence through the Boussinesq hypothesis. In a 3-D simulation, the continuous phase shear stress can be calculated from the continuous fluid velocity gradient, so that the interfacial shear term can be closed using the local values of the volume fraction and the total stress of liquid phase. This form also assures that the term acts as an action-reaction force for multiple phases. In the second part of this work, the effect of this term on the volume fraction distribution is investigated. For testing the model two

  15. A point model for the design of a sulfur trioxide decomposer for the SI cycle and comparison with a CFD model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, You Ho; Lee, Jeong Ik; No, Hee Cheon [Department of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 373-1 Guseong-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea)

    2010-06-15

    Operating under the harsh environment with the significant energy consumption, the sulfur trioxide decomposer is one of the most important components, yet challenging tasks for the designers of an efficient SI cycle. We developed a point model to provide important guidelines for designers of a sulfur trioxide decomposer through estimating outlet physical quantities, such as outlet decomposition ratio, outlet temperature, and pressure drop of a sulfur trioxide decomposer. Then, results of the point model were compared to independent predictions obtained using a CFD model over a wide range of conditions with good agreement. The model indicates that decomposition ratio is a function of the representative non-dimensional design parameter and inlet flow composition. As inlet flow composition rarely affects outlet decomposition ratio, we found out that outlet decomposition ratio can be approximated solely as a function of the non-dimensional design parameter. We demonstrated that the model can provide general guidelines for designers of a sulfur trioxide decomposer to achieve a target decomposition ratio with an economical design. It turns out that an increase in operating pressure and catalyst surface area leads to an increase in outlet decomposition ratio while the reverse is true for an increase in mass flow rate. (author)

  16. Cluster-specific small airway modeling for imaging-based CFD analysis of pulmonary air flow and particle deposition in COPD smokers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghighi, Babak; Choi, Jiwoong; Choi, Sanghun; Hoffman, Eric A.; Lin, Ching-Long

    2017-11-01

    Accurate modeling of small airway diameters in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a crucial step toward patient-specific CFD simulations of regional airflow and particle transport. We proposed to use computed tomography (CT) imaging-based cluster membership to identify structural characteristics of airways in each cluster and use them to develop cluster-specific airway diameter models. We analyzed 284 COPD smokers with airflow limitation, and 69 healthy controls. We used multiscale imaging-based cluster analysis (MICA) to classify smokers into 4 clusters. With representative cluster patients and healthy controls, we performed multiple regressions to quantify variation of airway diameters by generation as well as by cluster. The cluster 2 and 4 showed more diameter decrease as generation increases than other clusters. The cluster 4 had more rapid decreases of airway diameters in the upper lobes, while cluster 2 in the lower lobes. We then used these regression models to estimate airway diameters in CT unresolved regions to obtain pressure-volume hysteresis curves using a 1D resistance model. These 1D flow solutions can be used to provide the patient-specific boundary conditions for 3D CFD simulations in COPD patients. Support for this study was provided, in part, by NIH Grants U01-HL114494, R01-HL112986 and S10-RR022421.

  17. Flow modification in canine intracranial aneurysm model by an asymmetric stent: studies using digital subtraction angiography (DSA) and image-based computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoi, Yiemeng; Ionita, Ciprian N.; Tranquebar, Rekha V.; Hoffmann, Kenneth R.; Woodward, Scott, H.; Taulbee, Dale B.; Meng, Hui; Rudin, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    An asymmetric stent with low porosity patch across the intracranial aneurysm neck and high porosity elsewhere is designed to modify the flow to result in thrombogenesis and occlusion of the aneurysm and yet to reduce the possibility of also occluding adjacent perforator vessels. The purposes of this study are to evaluate the flow field induced by an asymmetric stent using both numerical and digital subtraction angiography (DSA) methods and to quantify the flow dynamics of an asymmetric stent in an in vivo aneurysm model. We created a vein-pouch aneurysm model on the canine carotid artery. An asymmetric stent was implanted at the aneurysm, with 25% porosity across the aneurysm neck and 80% porosity elsewhere. The aneurysm geometry, before and after stent implantation, was acquired using cone beam CT and reconstructed for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis. Both steady-state and pulsatile flow conditions using the measured waveforms from the aneurysm model were studied. To reduce computational costs, we modeled the asymmetric stent effect by specifying a pressure drop over the layer across the aneurysm orifice where the low porosity patch was located. From the CFD results, we found the asymmetric stent reduced the inflow into the aneurysm by 51%, and appeared to create a stasis-like environment which favors thrombus formation. The DSA sequences also showed substantial flow reduction into the aneurysm. Asymmetric stents may be a viable image guided intervention for treating intracranial aneurysms with desired flow modification features. PMID:21666881

  18. Flow modification in canine intracranial aneurysm model by an asymmetric stent: studies using digital subtraction angiography (DSA) and image-based computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoi, Yiemeng; Ionita, Ciprian N.; Tranquebar, Rekha V.; Hoffmann, Kenneth R.; Woodward, Scott H.; Taulbee, Dale B.; Meng, Hui; Rudin, Stephen

    2006-03-01

    An asymmetric stent with low porosity patch across the intracranial aneurysm neck and high porosity elsewhere is designed to modify the flow to result in thrombogenesis and occlusion of the aneurysm and yet to reduce the possibility of also occluding adjacent perforator vessels. The purposes of this study are to evaluate the flow field induced by an asymmetric stent using both numerical and digital subtraction angiography (DSA) methods and to quantify the flow dynamics of an asymmetric stent in an in vivo aneurysm model. We created a vein-pouch aneurysm model on the canine carotid artery. An asymmetric stent was implanted at the aneurysm, with 25% porosity across the aneurysm neck and 80% porosity elsewhere. The aneurysm geometry, before and after stent implantation, was acquired using cone beam CT and reconstructed for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis. Both steady-state and pulsatile flow conditions using the measured waveforms from the aneurysm model were studied. To reduce computational costs, we modeled the asymmetric stent effect by specifying a pressure drop over the layer across the aneurysm orifice where the low porosity patch was located. From the CFD results, we found the asymmetric stent reduced the inflow into the aneurysm by 51%, and appeared to create a stasis-like environment which favors thrombus formation. The DSA sequences also showed substantial flow reduction into the aneurysm. Asymmetric stents may be a viable image guided intervention for treating intracranial aneurysms with desired flow modification features.

  19. Model-based prognostics for batteries which estimates useful life and uses a probability density function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Bhaskar (Inventor); Goebel, Kai F. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    This invention develops a mathematical model to describe battery behavior during individual discharge cycles as well as over its cycle life. The basis for the form of the model has been linked to the internal processes of the battery and validated using experimental data. Effects of temperature and load current have also been incorporated into the model. Subsequently, the model has been used in a Particle Filtering framework to make predictions of remaining useful life for individual discharge cycles as well as for cycle life. The prediction performance was found to be satisfactory as measured by performance metrics customized for prognostics for a sample case. The work presented here provides initial steps towards a comprehensive health management solution for energy storage devices.

  20. Prediction of gasoline yield in a fluid catalytic cracking (FCC riser using k-epsilon turbulence and 4-lump kinetic models: A computational fluid dynamics (CFD approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Ahsan

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Fluid catalytic cracking (FCC is an essential process for the conversion of gas oil to gasoline. This study is an effort to model the phenomenon numerically using commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD software, heavy density catalyst and 4-lump kinetic model. Geometry, boundary conditions and dimensions of industrial riser for catalytic cracking unit are conferred for 2D simulation using commercial CFD code FLUENT 6.3. Continuity, momentum, energy and species transport equations, applicable to two phase solid and gas flow, are used to simulate the physical phenomenon as efficient as possible. This study implements and predicts the use of the granular Eulerian multiphase model with species transport. Time accurate transient problem is solved with the prediction of mass fraction profiles of gas oil, gasoline, light gas and coke. The output curves demonstrate the breaking of heavy hydrocarbon in the presence of catalyst. An approach proposed in this study shows good agreement with the experimental and numerical data available in the literature.

  1. Modeling and validation of heat and mass transfer in individual coffee beans during the coffee roasting process using computational fluid dynamics (CFD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Torres, Beatriz; Hernández-Pérez, José Alfredo; Sierra-Espinoza, Fernando; Schenker, Stefan; Yeretzian, Chahan

    2013-01-01

    Heat and mass transfer in individual coffee beans during roasting were simulated using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Numerical equations for heat and mass transfer inside the coffee bean were solved using the finite volume technique in the commercial CFD code Fluent; the software was complemented with specific user-defined functions (UDFs). To experimentally validate the numerical model, a single coffee bean was placed in a cylindrical glass tube and roasted by a hot air flow, using the identical geometrical 3D configuration and hot air flow conditions as the ones used for numerical simulations. Temperature and humidity calculations obtained with the model were compared with experimental data. The model predicts the actual process quite accurately and represents a useful approach to monitor the coffee roasting process in real time. It provides valuable information on time-resolved process variables that are otherwise difficult to obtain experimentally, but critical to a better understanding of the coffee roasting process at the individual bean level. This includes variables such as time-resolved 3D profiles of bean temperature and moisture content, and temperature profiles of the roasting air in the vicinity of the coffee bean.

  2. Geoinformational prognostic model of mudflows hazard and mudflows risk for the territory of Ukrainian Carpathians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chepurna, Tetiana B.; Kuzmenko, Eduard D.; Chepurnyj, Igor V.

    2017-06-01

    The article is devoted to the geological issue of the space-time regional prognostication of mudflow hazard. The methodology of space-time prediction of mudflows hazard by creating GIS predictive model has been developed. Using GIS technologies the relevant and representative complex of significant influence of spatial and temporal factors, adjusted to use in the regional prediction of mudflows hazard, were selected. Geological, geomorphological, technological, climatic, and landscape factors have been selected as spatial mudflow factors. Spatial analysis is based on detection of a regular connection of spatial factor characteristics with spatial distribution of the mudflow sites. The function of a standard complex spatial index (SCSI) of the probability of the mudflow sites distribution has been calculated. The temporal, long-term prediction of the mudflows activity was based on the hypothesis of the regular reiteration of natural processes. Heliophysical, seismic, meteorological, and hydrogeological factors have been selected as time mudflow factors. The function of a complex index of long standing mudflow activity (CIMA) has been calculated. The prognostic geoinformational model of mudflow hazard up to 2020 year, a year of the next peak of the mudflows activity, has been created. Mudflow risks have been counted and carogram of mudflow risk assessment within the limits of administrative-territorial units has been built for 2020 year.

  3. Three-dimensional all-speed CFD code for safety analysis of nuclear reactor containment: Status of GASFLOW parallelization, model development, validation and application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Jianjun, E-mail: jianjun.xiao@kit.edu [Institute of Nuclear and Energy Technologies, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, P.O. Box 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Travis, John R., E-mail: jack_travis@comcast.com [Engineering and Scientific Software Inc., 3010 Old Pecos Trail, Santa Fe, NM 87505 (United States); Royl, Peter, E-mail: peter.royl@partner.kit.edu [Institute of Nuclear and Energy Technologies, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, P.O. Box 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Necker, Gottfried, E-mail: gottfried.necker@partner.kit.edu [Institute of Nuclear and Energy Technologies, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, P.O. Box 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Svishchev, Anatoly, E-mail: anatoly.svishchev@kit.edu [Institute of Nuclear and Energy Technologies, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, P.O. Box 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Jordan, Thomas, E-mail: thomas.jordan@kit.edu [Institute of Nuclear and Energy Technologies, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, P.O. Box 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • 3-D scalable semi-implicit pressure-based CFD code for containment safety analysis. • Robust solution algorithm valid for all-speed flows. • Well validated and widely used CFD code for hydrogen safety analysis. • Code applied in various types of nuclear reactor containments. • Parallelization enables high-fidelity models in large scale containment simulations. - Abstract: GASFLOW is a three dimensional semi-implicit all-speed CFD code which can be used to predict fluid dynamics, chemical kinetics, heat and mass transfer, aerosol transportation and other related phenomena involved in postulated accidents in nuclear reactor containments. The main purpose of the paper is to give a brief review on recent GASFLOW code development, validations and applications in the field of nuclear safety. GASFLOW code has been well validated by international experimental benchmarks, and has been widely applied to hydrogen safety analysis in various types of nuclear power plants in European and Asian countries, which have been summarized in this paper. Furthermore, four benchmark tests of a lid-driven cavity flow, low Mach number jet flow, 1-D shock tube and supersonic flow over a forward-facing step are presented in order to demonstrate the accuracy and wide-ranging capability of ICE’d ALE solution algorithm for all-speed flows. GASFLOW has been successfully parallelized using the paradigms of Message Passing Interface (MPI) and domain decomposition. The parallel version, GASFLOW-MPI, adds great value to large scale containment simulations by enabling high-fidelity models, including more geometric details and more complex physics. It will be helpful for the nuclear safety engineers to better understand the hydrogen safety related physical phenomena during the severe accident, to optimize the design of the hydrogen risk mitigation systems and to fulfill the licensing requirements by the nuclear regulatory authorities. GASFLOW-MPI is targeting a high

  4. A Prognostic Model for One-year Mortality in Patients Requiring Prolonged Mechanical Ventilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, Shannon S.; Garrett, Joanne; Hanson, Laura C.; Lanier, Joyce; Govert, Joe; Brake, Mary C.; Landucci, Dante L.; Cox, Christopher E.; Carey, Timothy S.

    2009-01-01

    Objective A measure that identifies patients who are at high risk of mortality after prolonged ventilation will help physicians communicate prognosis to patients or surrogate decision-makers. Our objective was to develop and validate a prognostic model for 1-year mortality in patients ventilated for 21 days or more. Design Prospective cohort study. Setting University-based tertiary care hospital Patients 300 consecutive medical, surgical, and trauma patients requiring mechanical ventilation for at least 21 days were prospectively enrolled. Measurements and Main Results Predictive variables were measured on day 21 of ventilation for the first 200 patients and entered into logistic regression models with 1-year and 3-month mortality as outcomes. Final models were validated using data from 100 subsequent patients. One-year mortality was 51% in the development set and 58% in the validation set. Independent predictors of mortality included requirement for vasopressors, hemodialysis, platelet count ≤150 ×109/L, and age ≥50. Areas under the ROC curve for the development model and validation model were 0.82 (se 0.03) and 0.82 (se 0.05) respectively. The model had sensitivity of 0.42 (se 0.12) and specificity of 0.99 (se 0.01) for identifying patients who had ≥90% risk of death at 1 year. Observed mortality was highly consistent with both 3- and 12-month predicted mortality. These four predictive variables can be used in a simple prognostic score that clearly identifies low risk patients (no risk factors, 15% mortality) and high risk patients (3 or 4 risk factors, 97% mortality). Conclusions Simple clinical variables measured on day 21 of mechanical ventilation can identify patients at highest and lowest risk of death from prolonged ventilation. PMID:18552692

  5. Flow characteristics analysis of purge gas in unitary pebble beds by CFD simulation coupled with DEM geometry model for fusion blanket

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Youhua [University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, 230027 (China); Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China); Chen, Lei [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China); Liu, Songlin, E-mail: slliu@ipp.ac.cn [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China); Luo, Guangnan [University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, 230027 (China); Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China)

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • A unitary pebble bed was built to analyze the flow characteristics of purge gas based on DEM-CFD method. • Flow characteristics between particles were clearly displayed. • Porosity distribution, velocity field distribution, pressure field distribution, pressure drop and the wall effects on velocity distribution were studied. - Abstract: Helium is used as the purge gas to sweep tritium out when it flows through the lithium ceramic and beryllium pebble beds in solid breeder blanket for fusion reactor. The flow characteristics of the purge gas will dominate the tritium sweep capability and tritium recovery system design. In this paper, a computational model for the unitary pebble bed was conducted using DEM-CFD method to study the purge gas flow characteristics in the bed, which include porosity distribution between pebbles, velocity field distribution, pressure field distribution, pressure drop as well as the wall effects on velocity distribution. Pebble bed porosity and velocity distribution with great fluctuations were found in the near-wall region and detailed flow characteristics between pebbles were displayed clearly. The results show that the numerical simulation model has an error with about 11% for estimating pressure drop when compared with the Ergun equation.

  6. Cross-National Validation of Prognostic Models Predicting Sickness Absence and the Added Value of Work Environment Variables

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roelen, Corne A. M.; Stapelfeldt, Christina M.; Heymans, Martijn W.; van Rhenen, Willem; Labriola, Merete; Nielsen, Claus V.; Bultmann, Ute; Jensen, Chris

    Purpose To validate Dutch prognostic models including age, self-rated health and prior sickness absence (SA) for ability to predict high SA in Danish eldercare. The added value of work environment variables to the models' risk discrimination was also investigated. Methods 2,562 municipal eldercare

  7. CFD modelling of laminar-turbulent transition for airfoils and rotors using the gamma-(Re)over-tilde (theta) model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Niels N.

    2009-01-01

    on the wings or airfoils is handled by the turbulence model. The correlation based transition model has lately shown promising results, and the present paper describes the effort of deriving the two non-public empirical correlations of the model to make the model complete. To verify the model it is applied...

  8. Prognostic model for survival in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma: results from the international kidney cancer working group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manola, Judith; Royston, Patrick; Elson, Paul; McCormack, Jennifer Bacik; Mazumdar, Madhu; Négrier, Sylvie; Escudier, Bernard; Eisen, Tim; Dutcher, Janice; Atkins, Michael; Heng, Daniel Y C; Choueiri, Toni K; Motzer, Robert; Bukowski, Ronald

    2011-08-15

    To develop a single validated model for survival in metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) using a comprehensive international database. A comprehensive database of 3,748 patients including previously reported clinical prognostic factors was established by pooling patient-level data from clinical trials. Following quality control and standardization, descriptive statistics were generated. Univariate analyses were conducted using proportional hazards models. Multivariable analysis using a log-logistic model stratified by center and multivariable fractional polynomials was conducted to identify independent predictors of survival. Missing data were handled using multiple imputation methods. Three risk groups were formed using the 25th and 75th percentiles of the resulting prognostic index. The model was validated using an independent data set of 645 patients treated with tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) therapy. Median survival in the favorable, intermediate and poor risk groups was 26.9 months, 11.5 months, and 4.2 months, respectively. Factors contributing to the prognostic index included treatment, performance status, number of metastatic sites, time from diagnosis to treatment, and pretreatment hemoglobin, white blood count, lactate dehydrogenase, alkaline phosphatase, and serum calcium. The model showed good concordance when tested among patients treated with TKI therapy (C statistic = 0.741, 95% CI: 0.714-0.768). Nine clinical factors can be used to model survival in mRCC and form distinct prognostic groups. The model shows utility among patients treated in the TKI era. ©2011 AACR.

  9. The role of CFD combustion modeling in hydrogen safety management – V: Validation for slow deflagrations in homogeneous hydrogen-air experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sathiah, Pratap [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group (NRG), Westerduinweg 3, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Holler, Tadej, E-mail: tadej.holler@ijs.si [Jozef Stefan Institute (JSI), Jamova cesta 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Kljenak, Ivo [Jozef Stefan Institute (JSI), Jamova cesta 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Komen, Ed [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group (NRG), Westerduinweg 3, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands)

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • Validation of the modeling approach for hydrogen deflagration is presented. • Modeling approach is based on two combustion models implemented in ANSYS Fluent. • Experiments with various initial hydrogen concentrations were used for validation. • The effects of heat transfer mechanisms selection were also investigated. • The grid sensitivity analysis was performed as well. - Abstract: The control of hydrogen in the containment is an important safety issue following rapid oxidation of the uncovered reactor core during a severe accident in a Nuclear Power Plant (NPP), because dynamic pressure loads from eventual hydrogen combustion can be detrimental to the structural integrity of the reactor safety systems and the reactor containment. In the set of our previous papers, a CFD-based method to assess the consequence of fast combustion of uniform hydrogen-air mixtures was presented, followed by its validation for hydrogen-air mixtures with diluents and for non-uniform hydrogen-air mixtures. In the present paper, the extension of this model for the slow deflagration regime is presented and validated using the hydrogen deflagration experiments performed in the medium-scale experimental facility THAI. The proposed method is implemented in the CFD software ANSYS Fluent using user defined functions. The paper describes the combustion model and the main results of code validation. It addresses questions regarding turbulence model selection, effect of heat transfer mechanisms, and grid sensitivity, as well as provides insights into the importance of combustion model choice for the slow deflagration regime of hydrogen combustion in medium-scale and large-scale experimental vessels mimicking the NPP containment.

  10. Thermal-hydraulic analysis of heat transfer in subchannels of the European high performance supercritical Water-Cooled Reactor for different CFD turbulence models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, Landy Y.; Rojas, Leorlen Y.; Gamez, Abel; Rosales, Jesus; Gonzalez, Daniel; Garcia, Carlos, E-mail: lcastro@instec.cu, E-mail: leored1984@gmail.com, E-mail: agamezgmf@gmail.com, E-mail: jrosales@instec.cu, E-mail: danielgonro@gmail.com, E-mail: cgh@instec.cu [Instituto Superior de Tecnologias y Ciencias Aplicadas (InSTEC), La Habana (Cuba); Oliveira, Carlos Brayner de, E-mail: cabol@ufpe.br [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Dominguez, Dany S., E-mail: dsdominguez@gmail.com [Universidade Estadual de Santa Cruz (UESC), Ilheus, BA (Brazil). Pos-Graduacao em Modelagem Computacional

    2015-07-01

    Chosen as one of six Generation‒IV nuclear-reactor concepts, Supercritical Water-cooled Reactors (SCWRs) are expected to have high thermal efficiencies within the range of 45 - 50% owing to the reactor's high pressures and outlet temperatures. In this reactor, the primary water enters the core under supercritical-pressure condition (25 MPa) at a temperature of 280 deg C and leaves it at a temperature of up to 510 deg C. Due to the significant changes in the physical properties of water at supercritical-pressure, the system is susceptible to local temperature, density and power oscillations. The behavior of supercritical water into the core of the SCWR, need to be sufficiently studied. Most of the methods available to predict the effects of the heat transfer phenomena within the pseudocritical region are based on empirical one-directional correlations, which do not capture the multidimensional effects and do not provide accurate results in regions such as the deteriorated heat transfer regime. In this paper, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis was carried out to study the thermal-hydraulic behavior of supercritical water flows in sub-channels of a typical European High Performance Light Water Reactor (HPLWR) fuel assembly using commercial CFD code CFX-14. It was determined the steady-state equilibrium parameters and calculated the temperature and density distributions. A comparative study for different turbulence models were carried out and the obtained results are discussed. (author)

  11. Prognostic factors for survival in adult patients with recurrent glioblastoma: a decision-tree-based model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audureau, Etienne; Chivet, Anaïs; Ursu, Renata; Corns, Robert; Metellus, Philippe; Noel, Georges; Zouaoui, Sonia; Guyotat, Jacques; Le Reste, Pierre-Jean; Faillot, Thierry; Litre, Fabien; Desse, Nicolas; Petit, Antoine; Emery, Evelyne; Lechapt-Zalcman, Emmanuelle; Peltier, Johann; Duntze, Julien; Dezamis, Edouard; Voirin, Jimmy; Menei, Philippe; Caire, François; Dam Hieu, Phong; Barat, Jean-Luc; Langlois, Olivier; Vignes, Jean-Rodolphe; Fabbro-Peray, Pascale; Riondel, Adeline; Sorbets, Elodie; Zanello, Marc; Roux, Alexandre; Carpentier, Antoine; Bauchet, Luc; Pallud, Johan

    2017-11-20

    We assessed prognostic factors in relation to OS from progression in recurrent glioblastomas. Retrospective multicentric study enrolling 407 (training set) and 370 (external validation set) adult patients with a recurrent supratentorial glioblastoma treated by surgical resection and standard combined chemoradiotherapy as first-line treatment. Four complementary multivariate prognostic models were evaluated: Cox proportional hazards regression modeling, single-tree recursive partitioning, random survival forest, conditional random forest. Median overall survival from progression was 7.6 months (mean, 10.1; range, 0-86) and 8.0 months (mean, 8.5; range, 0-56) in the training and validation sets, respectively (p = 0.900). Using the Cox model in the training set, independent predictors of poorer overall survival from progression included increasing age at histopathological diagnosis (aHR, 1.47; 95% CI [1.03-2.08]; p = 0.032), RTOG-RPA V-VI classes (aHR, 1.38; 95% CI [1.11-1.73]; p = 0.004), decreasing KPS at progression (aHR, 3.46; 95% CI [2.10-5.72]; p < 0.001), while independent predictors of longer overall survival from progression included surgical resection (aHR, 0.57; 95% CI [0.44-0.73]; p < 0.001) and chemotherapy (aHR, 0.41; 95% CI [0.31-0.55]; p < 0.001). Single-tree recursive partitioning identified KPS at progression, surgical resection at progression, chemotherapy at progression, and RTOG-RPA class at histopathological diagnosis, as main survival predictors in the training set, yielding four risk categories highly predictive of overall survival from progression both in training (p < 0.0001) and validation (p < 0.0001) sets. Both random forest approaches identified KPS at progression as the most important survival predictor. Age, KPS at progression, RTOG-RPA classes, surgical resection at progression and chemotherapy at progression are prognostic for survival in recurrent glioblastomas and should inform the treatment decisions.

  12. Multicollinearity in prognostic factor analyses using the EORTC QLQ-C30: identification and impact on model selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Steen, Kristel; Curran, Desmond; Kramer, Jocelyn; Molenberghs, Geert; Van Vreckem, Ann; Bottomley, Andrew; Sylvester, Richard

    2002-12-30

    Clinical and quality of life (QL) variables from an EORTC clinical trial of first line chemotherapy in advanced breast cancer were used in a prognostic factor analysis of survival and response to chemotherapy. For response, different final multivariate models were obtained from forward and backward selection methods, suggesting a disconcerting instability. Quality of life was measured using the EORTC QLQ-C30 questionnaire completed by patients. Subscales on the questionnaire are known to be highly correlated, and therefore it was hypothesized that multicollinearity contributed to model instability. A correlation matrix indicated that global QL was highly correlated with 7 out of 11 variables. In a first attempt to explore multicollinearity, we used global QL as dependent variable in a regression model with other QL subscales as predictors. Afterwards, standard diagnostic tests for multicollinearity were performed. An exploratory principal components analysis and factor analysis of the QL subscales identified at most three important components and indicated that inclusion of global QL made minimal difference to the loadings on each component, suggesting that it is redundant in the model. In a second approach, we advocate a bootstrap technique to assess the stability of the models. Based on these analyses and since global QL exacerbates problems of multicollinearity, we therefore recommend that global QL be excluded from prognostic factor analyses using the QLQ-C30. The prognostic factor analysis was rerun without global QL in the model, and selected the same significant prognostic factors as before. Copyright 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Computational fluid dynamics-habitat suitability index (CFD-HSI) modelling as an exploratory tool for assessing passability of riverine migratory challenge zones for fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haro, Alexander J.; Chelminski, Michael; Dudley, Robert W.

    2015-01-01

    We developed two-dimensional computational fluid hydraulics-habitat suitability index (CFD-HSI) models to identify and qualitatively assess potential zones of shallow water depth and high water velocity that may present passage challenges for five major anadromous fish species in a 2.63-km reach of the main stem Penobscot River, Maine, as a result of a dam removal downstream of the reach. Suitability parameters were based on distribution of fish lengths and body depths and transformed to cruising, maximum sustained and sprint swimming speeds. Zones of potential depth and velocity challenges were calculated based on the hydraulic models; ability of fish to pass a challenge zone was based on the percent of river channel that the contiguous zone spanned and its maximum along-current length. Three river flows (low: 99.1 m3 sec-1; normal: 344.9 m3 sec-1; and high: 792.9 m3 sec-1) were modelled to simulate existing hydraulic conditions and hydraulic conditions simulating removal of a dam at the downstream boundary of the reach. Potential depth challenge zones were nonexistent for all low-flow simulations of existing conditions for deeper-bodied fishes. Increasing flows for existing conditions and removal of the dam under all flow conditions increased the number and size of potential velocity challenge zones, with the effects of zones being more pronounced for smaller species. The two-dimensional CFD-HSI model has utility in demonstrating gross effects of flow and hydraulic alteration, but may not be as precise a predictive tool as a three-dimensional model. Passability of the potential challenge zones cannot be precisely quantified for two-dimensional or three-dimensional models due to untested assumptions and incomplete data on fish swimming performance and behaviours.

  14. External validation of prognostic models to predict risk of gestational diabetes mellitus in one Dutch cohort: prospective multicentre cohort study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamain-de Ruiter, M.; Kwee, A.; Naaktgeboren, C.A.; Groot, I. de; Evers, I.M.; Groenendaal, F.; Hering, Y.R.; Huisjes, A.J.M.; Kirpestein, C.; Monincx, W.M.; Siljee, J.E.; Zelfde, A. van't; Oirschot, C.M. van; Vankan-Buitelaar, S.A.; Vonk, M.A.A.W.; Wiegers, T.A.; Zwart, J.J.; Franx, A.; Moons, K.G.M.; Koster, M.P.H.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To perform an external validation and direct comparison of published prognostic models for early prediction of the risk of gestational diabetes mellitus, including predictors applicable in the first trimester of pregnancy. Design: External validation of all published prognostic models in

  15. A prognostic model of therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome for predicting survival and transformation to acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintás-Cardama, Alfonso; Daver, Naval; Kim, Hawk; Dinardo, Courtney; Jabbour, Elias; Kadia, Tapan; Borthakur, Gautam; Pierce, Sherry; Shan, Jianqin; Cardenas-Turanzas, Marylou; Cortes, Jorge; Ravandi, Farhad; Wierda, William; Estrov, Zeev; Faderl, Stefan; Wei, Yue; Kantarjian, Hagop; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo

    2014-10-01

    We evaluated the characteristics of a cohort of patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) related to therapy (t-MDS) to create a prognostic model. We identified 281 patients with MDS who had received previous chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy for previous malignancy. Potential prognostic factors were determined using univariate and multivariate analyses. Multivariate Cox regression analysis identified 7 factors that independently predicted short survival in t-MDS: age ≥ 65 years (hazard ratio [HR], 1.63), Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status 2-4 (HR, 1.86), poor cytogenetics (-7 and/or complex; HR, 2.47), World Health Organization MDS subtype (RARs or RAEB-1/2; HR, 1.92), hemoglobin (HR, 2.24), platelets (HR, 2.01), and transfusion dependency (HR, 1.59). These risk factors were used to create a prognostic model that segregated patients into 3 groups with distinct median overall survival: good (0-2 risk factors; 34 months), intermediate (3-4 risk factors; 12 months), and poor (5-7 risk factors; 5 months) (P < .001) and 1-year leukemia-free survival (96%, 84%, and 72%, respectively, P = .003). This model also identified distinct survival groups according to t-MDS therapy. In summary, we devised a prognostic model specifically for patients with t-MDS that predicted overall survival and leukemia-free survival. This model might facilitate the development of risk-adapted therapeutic strategies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Prognostics for Microgrid Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Abhinav

    2012-01-01

    Prognostics is the science of predicting future performance and potential failures based on targeted condition monitoring. Moving away from the traditional reliability centric view, prognostics aims at detecting and quantifying the time to impending failures. This advance warning provides the opportunity to take actions that can preserve uptime, reduce cost of damage, or extend the life of the component. The talk will focus on the concepts and basics of prognostics from the viewpoint of condition-based systems health management. Differences with other techniques used in systems health management and philosophies of prognostics used in other domains will be shown. Examples relevant to micro grid systems and subsystems will be used to illustrate various types of prediction scenarios and the resources it take to set up a desired prognostic system. Specifically, the implementation results for power storage and power semiconductor components will demonstrate specific solution approaches of prognostics. The role of constituent elements of prognostics, such as model, prediction algorithms, failure threshold, run-to-failure data, requirements and specifications, and post-prognostic reasoning will be explained. A discussion on performance evaluation and performance metrics will conclude the technical discussion followed by general comments on open research problems and challenges in prognostics.

  17. Prognostic factors in gastric cancer evaluated by using Cox regression model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghiandoni, G; Rocchi, M B; Signoretti, P; Belbusti, F

    1998-06-01

    To identify the most relevant short-term predictor variables in gastric cancer removal. A retrospective survival analysis executed by using the Cox regression model; the follow-up period is included between 18 and 90 months. A district general hospital surgery unit: "Divisione di Chirurgia Generale, Ospedale Civile di Urbino" (Marche, Italy). One hundred and twenty nine consecutive patients operated for gastric cancer. Surgery (total or subtotal gastrectomy). Survival times. Lymph node involvement (N) (p extension (T) (p < 0.001) and the age of the patients (p < 0.05) have been recognized as significant prognostic factors. Results show that the short-term prognosis largely depends on both the earliness of the diagnosis and the age of the patients.

  18. CFD computations of the second round of MEXICO rotor measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Niels N.; Zahle, Frederik; Boorsma, K.

    2016-01-01

    A comparison, between selected wind tunnel data from the NEW MEXICO measuring campaign and CFD computations are shown. The present work, documents that a state of the art CFD code, including a laminar turbulent transition model, can provide good agreement with experimental data. Good agreement...

  19. Use of SANA experimental data for validation and verification of MGT-3D and a CFD porous media model for VHTR application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baggemann, J. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Nuclear Waste Management and Reactor Safety (IEK-6), 52428 Juelich (Germany); Technische Universität Dresden, Professur für Wasserstoff- und Kernenergietechnik, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Shi, D.; Kasselmann, S.; Kelm, S. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Nuclear Waste Management and Reactor Safety (IEK-6), 52428 Juelich (Germany); Allelein, H.-J. [RWTH Aachen University, Institute for Reactor Safety and Reactor Technology (LRST), 52062 Aachen (Germany); Hurtado, A. [Technische Universität Dresden, Professur für Wasserstoff- und Kernenergietechnik, 01062 Dresden (Germany)

    2016-08-15

    This paper forces on the investigation of heat transfer including thermal conduction, thermal radiation and convection in atmospheric pressure in the pebble bed type reactor. SANA experiment is chosen to conduct the validation of the simulation results. Firstly, the SANA experimental facility is presented which provided measurement data for high temperature heat transfer in closed pebble beds. Secondly, the simulation model of MGT-3D and the CFD porous media model are introduced, which include the geometry, the materials and the boundary conditions. At last, this paper introduces the validation scheme including both code to code and code to experiment comparisons based on the Juelich experimental database. The steady state and transient cases are considered in the verification and validation. The results are analyzed and a conclusion will be given in the end of this paper.

  20. Developments and Validations of Fully Coupled CFD and Practical Vortex Transport Method for High-Fidelity Wake Modeling in Fixed and Rotary Wing Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anusonti-Inthra, Phuriwat

    2010-01-01

    A novel Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) coupling framework using a conventional Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (BANS) solver to resolve the near-body flow field and a Particle-based Vorticity Transport Method (PVTM) to predict the evolution of the far field wake is developed, refined, and evaluated for fixed and rotary wing cases. For the rotary wing case, the RANS/PVTM modules are loosely coupled to a Computational Structural Dynamics (CSD) module that provides blade motion and vehicle trim information. The PVTM module is refined by the addition of vortex diffusion, stretching, and reorientation models as well as an efficient memory model. Results from the coupled framework are compared with several experimental data sets (a fixed-wing wind tunnel test and a rotary-wing hover test).

  1. CFD Analysis in Subsea and Marine Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasak, Hrvoje

    2017-12-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is established in design and analysis for a range of industries, but its use in Marine and Naval Hydrodynamics is behind the trend. This can be attributed to the complexity of modelling needs, including presence of free surface, irregular transient flows, fluid-structure coupling and presence of established modelling tools based on potential theory. In this paper, state-of-the-art of CFD in Naval Hydrodynamics, wave and offshore applications is given, with an update of recent advances, validation and computing requirements for typical simulation cases.

  2. Kartonkikonesalin CFD-simulointi

    OpenAIRE

    Kettunen, Ville

    2016-01-01

    Kartonkikoneen ilmanvaihto on vaativa prosessi. Energiankulutus on merkittävää, mutta muun prosessin lämmöntalteenotto vähentää kulutusta. Ilmanjako kartonkikonesaliin on tärkeää, ja CFD–simuloinnilla (Computational Fluid Dynamics, virtauslaskenta) tätä voitaisiin optimoida. Tässä työssä käytettiin Autodeskin CFD 2017 –ohjelmaa, joka sisälsi geometrian mallintamiseen työkalun Autodesk Simstudio Tools 2016 R2. Työn tarkoituksena oli tarkastella CFD-simuloinnilla kartonkikonesalin olosuhtei...

  3. A prognostic model to predict the success of artificial insemination in dairy cows based on readily available data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutten, C.J.; Steeneveld, W.; Vernooij, J.C.M.; Huijps, K.; Nielen, M.; Hogeveen, H.

    2016-01-01

    A prognosis of the likelihood of insemination success is valuable information for the decision to start inseminating a cow. This decision is important for the reproduction management of dairy farms. The aim of this study was to develop a prognostic model for the likelihood of successful first

  4. A prognostic model to predict the success of artificial insemination in dairy cows based on readily available data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutten, C J|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/353551031; Steeneveld, W|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304833169; Vernooij, J C M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/340304596; Huijps, K|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304837881; Nielen, M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/123535298; Hogeveen, H|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/126322864

    2016-01-01

    A prognosis of the likelihood of insemination success is valuable information for the decision to start inseminating a cow. This decision is important for the reproduction management of dairy farms. The aim of this study was to develop a prognostic model for the likelihood of successful first

  5. Predicting stabilizing treatment outcomes for complex posttraumatic stress disorder and dissociative identity disorder: an expertise-based prognostic model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baars, E.W.; van der Hart, O.; Nijenhuis, E.R.S.; Chu, J.A.; Glas, G.; Draaijer, N.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop an expertise-based prognostic model for the treatment of complex posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and dissociative identity disorder (DID).We developed a survey in 2 rounds: In the first round we surveyed 42 experienced therapists (22 DID and 20 complex

  6. Implementation of Remaining Useful Lifetime Transformer Models in the Fleet-Wide Prognostic and Health Management Suite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agarwal, Vivek [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Lybeck, Nancy J. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Pham, Binh [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Rusaw, Richard [Electric Power Research Inst. (EPRI), Palo Alto, CA (United States); Bickford, Randall [Expert Microsystems, Orangevale, CA (United States)

    2015-02-01

    Research and development efforts are required to address aging and reliability concerns of the existing fleet of nuclear power plants. As most plants continue to operate beyond the license life (i.e., towards 60 or 80 years), plant components are more likely to incur age-related degradation mechanisms. To assess and manage the health of aging plant assets across the nuclear industry, the Electric Power Research Institute has developed a web-based Fleet-Wide Prognostic and Health Management (FW-PHM) Suite for diagnosis and prognosis. FW-PHM is a set of web-based diagnostic and prognostic tools and databases, comprised of the Diagnostic Advisor, the Asset Fault Signature Database, the Remaining Useful Life Advisor, and the Remaining Useful Life Database, that serves as an integrated health monitoring architecture. The main focus of this paper is the implementation of prognostic models for generator step-up transformers in the FW-PHM Suite. One prognostic model discussed is based on the functional relationship between degree of polymerization, (the most commonly used metrics to assess the health of the winding insulation in a transformer) and furfural concentration in the insulating oil. The other model is based on thermal-induced degradation of the transformer insulation. By utilizing transformer loading information, established thermal models are used to estimate the hot spot temperature inside the transformer winding. Both models are implemented in the Remaining Useful Life Database of the FW-PHM Suite. The Remaining Useful Life Advisor utilizes the implemented prognostic models to estimate the remaining useful life of the paper winding insulation in the transformer based on actual oil testing and operational data.

  7. Intercomparisons of Prognostic, Diagnostic, and Inversion Modeling Approaches for Estimation of Net Ecosystem Exchange over the Pacific Northwest Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, D. P.; Jacobson, A. R.; Nemani, R. R.

    2013-12-01

    The recent development of large spatially-explicit datasets for multiple variables relevant to monitoring terrestrial carbon flux offers the opportunity to estimate the terrestrial land flux using several alternative, potentially complimentary, approaches. Here we developed and compared regional estimates of net ecosystem exchange (NEE) over the Pacific Northwest region of the U.S. using three approaches. In the prognostic modeling approach, the process-based Biome-BGC model was driven by distributed meteorological station data and was informed by Landsat-based coverages of forest stand age and disturbance regime. In the diagnostic modeling approach, the quasi-mechanistic CFLUX model estimated net ecosystem production (NEP) by upscaling eddy covariance flux tower observations. The model was driven by distributed climate data and MODIS FPAR (the fraction of incident PAR that is absorbed by the vegetation canopy). It was informed by coarse resolution (1 km) data about forest stand age. In both the prognostic and diagnostic modeling approaches, emissions estimates for biomass burning, harvested products, and river/stream evasion were added to model-based NEP to get NEE. The inversion model (CarbonTracker) relied on observations of atmospheric CO2 concentration to optimize prior surface carbon flux estimates. The Pacific Northwest is heterogeneous with respect to land cover and forest management, and repeated surveys of forest inventory plots support the presence of a strong regional carbon sink. The diagnostic model suggested a stronger carbon sink than the prognostic model, and a much larger sink that the inversion model. The introduction of Landsat data on disturbance history served to reduce uncertainty with respect to regional NEE in the diagnostic and prognostic modeling approaches. The FPAR data was particularly helpful in capturing the seasonality of the carbon flux using the diagnostic modeling approach. The inversion approach took advantage of a global

  8. Herringbone-like hydrodynamic structures in microchannels: A CFD model to evaluate the enhancement of surface binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Elena; Piergiovanni, Monica; Arrigoni, Chiara; Fukuda, Junji; Gautieri, Alfonso; Moretti, Matteo; Dubini, Gabriele

    2017-10-01

    Selected adsorption efficiency of a molecule in solution in a microchannel is strongly influenced by the convective/diffusive mass transport phenomena that supply the target molecule to the adsorption surface. In a standard microchannel with a rectangular cross section, laminar flow regime limits the fluid mixing, thus suggesting that mass transport conditions can be improved by the introduction of herringbone-like structures. Tuning of these geometrical patterns increases the concentration gradient of the target molecule at the adsorption surface. A computational fluid dynamic (CFD) study was performed to evaluate the relation between the geometrical herringbone patterns and the concentration gradient improvement in a 14 mm long microchannel. The results show that the inhomogeneity of the concentration gradient can provide an improved and localized adsorption under specific geometrical features, which can be tuned in order to adapt the adsorption pattern to the specific assay requirements. Copyright © 2017 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Analysis of the Hydrogen Reduction Rate of Magnetite Concentrate Particles in a Drop Tube Reactor Through CFD Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Deqiu; Mohassab, Yousef; Elzohiery, Mohamed; Sohn, H. Y.

    2016-06-01

    A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) approach, coupled with experimental results, was developed to accurately evaluate the kinetic parameters of iron oxide particle reduction. Hydrogen reduction of magnetite concentrate particles was used as a sample case. A detailed evaluation of the particle residence time and temperature profile inside the reactor is presented. This approach eliminates the errors associated with assumptions like constant particle temperature and velocity while the particles travel down a drop tube reactor. The gas phase was treated as a continuum in the Eulerian frame of reference, and the particles are tracked using a Lagrangian approach in which the trajectory and velocity are determined by integrating the equation of particle motion. In addition, a heat balance on the particle that relates the particle temperature to convection and radiation was also applied. An iterative algorithm that numerically solves the governing coupled ordinary differential equations was developed to determine the pre-exponential factor and activation energy that best fit the experimental data.

  10. CFD modelling of two-phase stirred bioreaction systems by segregated solution of the Euler-Euler model

    OpenAIRE

    Elqotbi, Mohammed; Vlaev, S.D.; Montastruc, Ludovic; Nikov, Iordan

    2013-01-01

    International audience; An advanced study of a bioreactor system involving a Navier-Stokes based model has been accomplished. The model allows a more realistic impeller induced flow image to be combined with the Monod bioreaction kinetics reported previously. The time-course of gluconic acid production by Aspergillus niger strain is simulated at kinetic conditions proposed in the literature. The simulation is based on (1) a stepwise solution strategy resolving first the fluid flow field, furt...

  11. A semi-parabolic wake model for large offshore wind farms based on the open source CFD solver OpenFOAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cabezón D.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Wake effect represents one of the main sources of energy loss and uncertainty when designing offshore wind farms. Traditionally analytical models have been used to optimize and estimate power deficits. However these models have shown to underestimate wake effect and consequently overestimate output power [1, 2]. This means that analytical models can be very helpful at optimizing preliminary layouts but not as accurate as needed for an ultimate fine design. Different techniques can be found in the literature to study wind turbine wakes that include simplified kinematic models and more advanced field models, that solve flow equations with different turbulence closure schemes. See the review papers of Crespo et al. [3], Vermeer et al. [4], and Sanderse et al. [5]. Purely elliptic Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD models based on the actuator disk technique have been developed during the last years [6–8]. They consider wind turbine rotor as a disk where a distribution of axial forces act over the incoming air. It is a fair approach but it can still be computationally expensive for big wind farms in an operative mode. With this technique still active, an alternative approach inspired on the parabolic wake models [9, 10] is proposed. Wind turbine rotors continue to be represented as actuator disks but now the domain is split into subdomains containing one or more wind turbines. The output of each subdomain is mapped onto the input boundary of the next one until the end of the domain is reached, getting a considerable decrease on computational time, by a factor of order 10. As the model is based on the open source CFD solver OpenFOAM, it can be parallelized to speed-up convergence. The near wake is calculated so no initial wind speed deficit profiles have to be supposed as in totally parabolic models and alternative turbulence models, such as the anisotropic Reynolds Stress Model (RSM can be used. Traditional problems of elliptic models related to

  12. Prognostic Modeling in Pathologic N1 Breast Cancer Without Elective Nodal Irradiation After Current Standard Systemic Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jeong Il; Park, Won; Choi, Doo Ho; Huh, Seung Jae; Nam, Seok Jin; Kim, Seok Won; Lee, Jeong Eon; Kil, Won Ho; Im, Young-Hyuck; Ahn, Jin Seok; Park, Yeon Hee; Cho, Eun Yoon

    2015-08-01

    This study was conducted to establish a prognostic model in patients with pathologic N1 (pN1) breast cancer who have not undergone elective nodal irradiation (ENI) under the current standard management and to suggest possible indications for ENI. We performed a retrospective study with patients with pN1 breast cancer who received the standard local and preferred adjuvant chemotherapy treatment without neoadjuvant chemotherapy and ENI from January 2005 to June 2011. Most of the indicated patients received endocrine and trastuzumab therapy. In 735 enrolled patients, the median follow-up period was 58.4 months (range, 7.2-111.3 months). Overall, 55 recurrences (7.4%) developed, and locoregional recurrence was present in 27 patients (3.8%). Recurrence-free survival was significantly related to lymphovascular invasion (P = .04, hazard ratio [HR], 1.83; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.03-2.88), histologic grade (P = .03, HR, 2.57; 95% CI, 1.05-6.26), and nonluminal A subtype (P = .02, HR, 3.04; 95% CI, 1.23-7.49) in multivariate analysis. The prognostic model was established by these 3 prognostic factors. Recurrence-free survival was less than 90% at 5 years in cases with 2 or 3 factors. The prognostic model has stratified risk groups in pN1 breast cancer without ENI. Patients with 2 or more factors should be considered for ENI. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Predicting stabilizing treatment outcomes for complex posttraumatic stress disorder and dissociative identity disorder: an expertise-based prognostic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baars, Erik W; van der Hart, Onno; Nijenhuis, Ellert R S; Chu, James A; Glas, Gerrit; Draijer, Nel

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop an expertise-based prognostic model for the treatment of complex posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and dissociative identity disorder (DID). We developed a survey in 2 rounds: In the first round we surveyed 42 experienced therapists (22 DID and 20 complex PTSD therapists), and in the second round we surveyed a subset of 22 of the 42 therapists (13 DID and 9 complex PTSD therapists). First, we drew on therapists' knowledge of prognostic factors for stabilization-oriented treatment of complex PTSD and DID. Second, therapists prioritized a list of prognostic factors by estimating the size of each variable's prognostic effect; we clustered these factors according to content and named the clusters. Next, concept mapping methodology and statistical analyses (including principal components analyses) were used to transform individual judgments into weighted group judgments for clusters of items. A prognostic model, based on consensually determined estimates of effect sizes, of 8 clusters containing 51 factors for both complex PTSD and DID was formed. It includes the clusters lack of motivation, lack of healthy relationships, lack of healthy therapeutic relationships, lack of other internal and external resources, serious Axis I comorbidity, serious Axis II comorbidity, poor attachment, and self-destruction. In addition, a set of 5 DID-specific items was constructed. The model is supportive of the current phase-oriented treatment model, emphasizing the strengthening of the therapeutic relationship and the patient's resources in the initial stabilization phase. Further research is needed to test the model's statistical and clinical validity.

  14. Cross-national validation of prognostic models predicting sickness absence and the added value of work environment variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roelen, Corné A M; Stapelfeldt, Christina M; Heymans, Martijn W; van Rhenen, Willem; Labriola, Merete; Nielsen, Claus V; Bültmann, Ute; Jensen, Chris

    2015-06-01

    To validate Dutch prognostic models including age, self-rated health and prior sickness absence (SA) for ability to predict high SA in Danish eldercare. The added value of work environment variables to the models' risk discrimination was also investigated. 2,562 municipal eldercare workers (95% women) participated in the Working in Eldercare Survey. Predictor variables were measured by questionnaire at baseline in 2005. Prognostic models were validated for predictions of high (≥30) SA days and high (≥3) SA episodes retrieved from employer records during 1-year follow-up. The accuracy of predictions was assessed by calibration graphs and the ability of the models to discriminate between high- and low-risk workers was investigated by ROC-analysis. The added value of work environment variables was measured with Integrated Discrimination Improvement (IDI). 1,930 workers had complete data for analysis. The models underestimated the risk of high SA in eldercare workers and the SA episodes model had to be re-calibrated to the Danish data. Discrimination was practically useful for the re-calibrated SA episodes model, but not the SA days model. Physical workload improved the SA days model (IDI = 0.40; 95% CI 0.19-0.60) and psychosocial work factors, particularly the quality of leadership (IDI = 0.70; 95% CI 053-0.86) improved the SA episodes model. The prognostic model predicting high SA days showed poor performance even after physical workload was added. The prognostic model predicting high SA episodes could be used to identify high-risk workers, especially when psychosocial work factors are added as predictor variables.

  15. A note on prognostic accuracy evaluation of regression models applied to longitudinal autocorrelated binary data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Barbati

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Focus of this work was on evaluating the prognostic accuracy of two approaches for modelling binary longitudinal outcomes, a Generalized Estimating Equation (GEE and a likelihood based method, Marginalized Transition Model (MTM, in which a transition model is combined with a marginal generalized linear model describing the average response as a function of measured predictors.Methods: A retrospective study on cardiovascular patients and a prospective study on sciatic pain were used to evaluate discrimination by computing the Area Under the Receiver-Operating-Characteristics curve, (AUC, the Integrated Discrimination Improvement (IDI and the Net Reclassification Improvement (NRI at different time occasions. Calibration was also evaluated. A simulation study was run in order to compare model’s performance in a context of a perfect knowledge of the data generating mechanism. Results: Similar regression coefficients estimates and comparable calibration were obtained; an higher discrimination level for MTM was observed. No significant differences in calibration and MSE (Mean Square Error emerged in the simulation study, that instead confirmed the MTM higher discrimination level. Conclusions: The choice of the regression approach should depend on the scientific question being addressed, i.e. if the overall population-average and calibration or the subject-specific patterns and discrimination are the objectives of interest, and some recently proposed discrimination indices are useful in evaluating predictive accuracy also in a context of longitudinal studies.

  16. A simple prognostic model for overall survival in metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assi, Hazem I.; Patenaude, Francois; Toumishey, Ethan; Ross, Laura; Abdelsalam, Mahmoud; Reiman, Tony

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The primary purpose of this study was to develop a simpler prognostic model to predict overall survival for patients treated for metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) by examining variables shown in the literature to be associated with survival. Methods: We conducted a retrospective analysis of patients treated for mRCC at two Canadian centres. All patients who started first-line treatment were included in the analysis. A multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression model was constructed using a stepwise procedure. Patients were assigned to risk groups depending on how many of the three risk factors from the final multivariate model they had. Results: There were three risk factors in the final multivariate model: hemoglobin, prior nephrectomy, and time from diagnosis to treatment. Patients in the high-risk group (two or three risk factors) had a median survival of 5.9 months, while those in the intermediate-risk group (one risk factor) had a median survival of 16.2 months, and those in the low-risk group (no risk factors) had a median survival of 50.6 months. Conclusions: In multivariate analysis, shorter survival times were associated with hemoglobin below the lower limit of normal, absence of prior nephrectomy, and initiation of treatment within one year of diagnosis. PMID:27217858

  17. Incorporating a prognostic representation of marine nitrogen fixers into the global ocean biogeochemical model HAMOCC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulsen, Hanna; Ilyina, Tatiana; Six, Katharina D.; Stemmler, Irene

    2017-03-01

    Nitrogen (N2) fixation is a major source of bioavailable nitrogen to the euphotic zone, thereby exerting an important control on ocean biogeochemical cycling. This paper presents the incorporation of prognostic N2 fixers into the HAMburg Ocean Carbon Cycle model (HAMOCC), a component of the Max Planck Institute Earth System Model (MPI-ESM). Growth dynamics of N2 fixers in the model are based on physiological characteristics of the cyanobacterium Trichodesmium. The applied temperature dependency confines diazotrophic growth and N2 fixation to the tropical and subtropical ocean roughly between 40°S and 40°N. Simulated large-scale spatial patterns compare well with observations, and the global N2 fixation rate of 135.6 Tg N yr-1 is within the range of current estimates. The vertical distribution of N2 fixation also matches well the observations, with a major fraction of about 85% occurring in the upper 20 m. The observed seasonal variability at the stations BATS and ALOHA is reasonably reproduced, with highest fixation rates in northern summer/fall. Iron limitation was found to be an important factor in controlling the simulated distribution of N2 fixation, especially in the Pacific Ocean. The new model component considerably improves the representation of present-day N2 fixation in HAMOCC. It provides the basis for further studies on the role of diazotrophs in global biogeochemical cycles, as well as on the response of N2 fixation to changing environmental conditions.

  18. A flexible alternative to the Cox proportional hazards model for assessing the prognostic accuracy of hospice patient survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Branko Miladinovic

    Full Text Available Prognostic models are often used to estimate the length of patient survival. The Cox proportional hazards model has traditionally been applied to assess the accuracy of prognostic models. However, it may be suboptimal due to the inflexibility to model the baseline survival function and when the proportional hazards assumption is violated. The aim of this study was to use internal validation to compare the predictive power of a flexible Royston-Parmar family of survival functions with the Cox proportional hazards model. We applied the Palliative Performance Scale on a dataset of 590 hospice patients at the time of hospice admission. The retrospective data were obtained from the Lifepath Hospice and Palliative Care center in Hillsborough County, Florida, USA. The criteria used to evaluate and compare the models' predictive performance were the explained variation statistic R(2, scaled Brier score, and the discrimination slope. The explained variation statistic demonstrated that overall the Royston-Parmar family of survival functions provided a better fit (R(2 =0.298; 95% CI: 0.236-0.358 than the Cox model (R(2 =0.156; 95% CI: 0.111-0.203. The scaled Brier scores and discrimination slopes were consistently higher under the Royston-Parmar model. Researchers involved in prognosticating patient survival are encouraged to consider the Royston-Parmar model as an alternative to Cox.

  19. Analysis of the hydraulic effects associated to the location of an inflatable rubber weir over a spillway profile through experimental and numerical (CFD model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarai Díaz García

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The ease of rubber weirs to adapt themselves to different flow conditions makes them interesting for placement over spillway profiles, allowing to increase the stored volume in ordinary operation without compromising the dam’s response in case of flooding. The objective of this study is to analyze the effect of locating an inflatable weir over a spillway profile in what regards its hydraulic response. With this purpose, an experimental and a numerical CFD model of a WES original spillway profile are developed, to then include an EPDM weir whose effect is analyzed for different inflation levels. Numerical and experimental results are close and highlight significant variations in the pressure distribution along the spillway, with aeration playing a significant role. This study concludes that the placement of this particular inflatable weir has an overall positive result if conveniently undertaken, but additional studies with different geometries are required to delve in the topic.

  20. Modelling of temporal and spatial evolution of sulphur oxides and sulphuric acid under large, two-stroke marine engine-like conditions using integrated CFD-chemical kinetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pang, Kar Mun; Karvounis, Nikolas; Walther, Jens Honore

    2017-01-01

    In this work, three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) studies of sulphur oxides (SOx) andsulphuric acid (H2SO4) formation processes in a large, low speed two-stroke marine diesel engine are carriedout. The current numerical study aims to investigate the conversion of sulphuric dioxide...... by thebase mechanism. Predictions of the variations of SOx and the associated SO2 to SO3 conversion inresponse to the change of fuel sulphur content, swirl velocity, start of injection, scavenge pressure andhumidity qualitatively agree with numerical and experimental results from the literature. The model...... isfurther evaluated using the measured SO2 to SO3 conversion levels in a low load, low scavenge pressurecase and a low load, high scavenge pressure case. The absolute values of simulated and measured conversionlevels are close, although the former appear to be higher. The current results show...

  1. Quantitative modeling of clinical, cellular, and extracellular matrix variables suggest prognostic indicators in cancer: a model in neuroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadeo, Irene; Piqueras, Marta; Montaner, David; Villamón, Eva; Berbegall, Ana P; Cañete, Adela; Navarro, Samuel; Noguera, Rosa

    2014-02-01

    Risk classification and treatment stratification for cancer patients is restricted by our incomplete picture of the complex and unknown interactions between the patient's organism and tumor tissues (transformed cells supported by tumor stroma). Moreover, all clinical factors and laboratory studies used to indicate treatment effectiveness and outcomes are by their nature a simplification of the biological system of cancer, and cannot yet incorporate all possible prognostic indicators. A multiparametric analysis on 184 tumor cylinders was performed. To highlight the benefit of integrating digitized medical imaging into this field, we present the results of computational studies carried out on quantitative measurements, taken from stromal and cancer cells and various extracellular matrix fibers interpenetrated by glycosaminoglycans, and eight current approaches to risk stratification systems in patients with primary and nonprimary neuroblastoma. New tumor tissue indicators from both fields, the cellular and the extracellular elements, emerge as reliable prognostic markers for risk stratification and could be used as molecular targets of specific therapies. The key to dealing with personalized therapy lies in the mathematical modeling. The use of bioinformatics in patient-tumor-microenvironment data management allows a predictive model in neuroblastoma.

  2. Elevated neutrophil and monocyte counts in peripheral blood are associated with poor survival in patients with metastatic melanoma: a prognostic model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, H; Bastholt, L; Geertsen, P

    2005-01-01

    We aimed to create a prognostic model in metastatic melanoma based on independent prognostic factors in 321 patients receiving interleukin-2 (IL-2)-based immunotherapy with a median follow-up time for patients currently alive of 52 months (range 15-189 months). The patients were treated as part...... factors in univariate analyses. Subsequently, a multivariate Cox's regression analysis identified elevated LDH (P

  3. CH4 emission estimates from an active landfill site inferred from a combined approach of CFD modelling and in situ FTIR measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonderfeld, Hannah; Bösch, Hartmut; Jeanjean, Antoine P. R.; Riddick, Stuart N.; Allen, Grant; Ars, Sébastien; Davies, Stewart; Harris, Neil; Humpage, Neil; Leigh, Roland; Pitt, Joseph

    2017-10-01

    Globally, the waste sector contributes to nearly a fifth of anthropogenic methane emitted to the atmosphere and is the second largest source of methane in the UK. In recent years great improvements to reduce those emissions have been achieved by the installation of methane recovery systems at landfill sites, and subsequently methane emissions reported in national emission inventories have been reduced. Nevertheless, methane emissions of landfills remain uncertain and quantification of emission fluxes is essential to verify reported emission inventories and to monitor changes in emissions. Here we present a new approach for methane emission quantification from a complex source such as a landfill site by applying a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model to calibrated in situ measurements of methane as part of a field campaign at a landfill site near Ipswich, UK, in August 2014. The methane distribution for different meteorological scenarios is calculated with the CFD model and compared to methane mole fractions measured by an in situ Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer downwind of the prevailing wind direction. Assuming emissions only from the active site, a mean daytime flux of 0.83 mg m-2 s-1, corresponding to a spatially integrated emission of 53.3 kg h-1, was estimated. The addition of a secondary source area adjacent to the active site, where some methane hotspots were observed, improved the agreement between the simulated and measured methane distribution. As a result, the flux from the active site was reduced slightly to 0.71 mg m-2 s-1 (45.6 kg h-1), and at the same time an additional flux of 0.32 mg m-2 s-1 (30.4 kg h-1) was found from the secondary source area. This highlights the capability of our method to distinguish between different emission areas of the landfill site, which can provide more detailed information about emission source apportionment compared to other methods deriving bulk emissions.

  4. System Interdependency Modeling in the Design of Prognostic and Health Management Systems in Smart Manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinowski, M L; Beling, P A; Haimes, Y Y; LaViers, A; Marvel, J A; Weiss, B A

    2015-01-01

    The fields of risk analysis and prognostics and health management (PHM) have developed in a largely independent fashion. However, both fields share a common core goal. They aspire to manage future adverse consequences associated with prospective dysfunctions of the systems under consideration due to internal or external forces. This paper describes how two prominent risk analysis theories and methodologies - Hierarchical Holographic Modeling (HHM) and Risk Filtering, Ranking, and Management (RFRM) - can be adapted to support the design of PHM systems in the context of smart manufacturing processes. Specifically, the proposed methodologies will be used to identify targets - components, subsystems, or systems - that would most benefit from a PHM system in regards to achieving the following objectives: minimizing cost, minimizing production/maintenance time, maximizing system remaining usable life (RUL), maximizing product quality, and maximizing product output. HHM is a comprehensive modeling theory and methodology that is grounded on the premise that no system can be modeled effectively from a single perspective. It can also be used as an inductive method for scenario structuring to identify emergent forced changes (EFCs) in a system. EFCs connote trends in external or internal sources of risk to a system that may adversely affect specific states of the system. An important aspect of proactive risk management includes bolstering the resilience of the system for specific EFCs by appropriately controlling the states. Risk scenarios for specific EFCs can be the basis for the design of prognostic and diagnostic systems that provide real-time predictions and recognition of scenario changes. The HHM methodology includes visual modeling techniques that can enhance stakeholders' understanding of shared states, resources, objectives and constraints among the interdependent and interconnected subsystems of smart manufacturing systems. In risk analysis, HHM is often paired

  5. Prognostic models based on patient snapshots and time windows: Predicting disease progression to assisted ventilation in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreiro, André V; Amaral, Pedro M T; Pinto, Susana; Tomás, Pedro; de Carvalho, Mamede; Madeira, Sara C

    2015-12-01

    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is a devastating disease and the most common neurodegenerative disorder of young adults. ALS patients present a rapidly progressive motor weakness. This usually leads to death in a few years by respiratory failure. The correct prediction of respiratory insufficiency is thus key for patient management. In this context, we propose an innovative approach for prognostic prediction based on patient snapshots and time windows. We first cluster temporally-related tests to obtain snapshots of the patient's condition at a given time (patient snapshots). Then we use the snapshots to predict the probability of an ALS patient to require assisted ventilation after k days from the time of clinical evaluation (time window). This probability is based on the patient's current condition, evaluated using clinical features, including functional impairment assessments and a complete set of respiratory tests. The prognostic models include three temporal windows allowing to perform short, medium and long term prognosis regarding progression to assisted ventilation. Experimental results show an area under the receiver operating characteristics curve (AUC) in the test set of approximately 79% for time windows of 90, 180 and 365 days. Creating patient snapshots using hierarchical clustering with constraints outperforms the state of the art, and the proposed prognostic model becomes the first non population-based approach for prognostic prediction in ALS. The results are promising and should enhance the current clinical practice, largely supported by non-standardized tests and clinicians' experience. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. GPU Accelerated Prognostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorospe, George E., Jr.; Daigle, Matthew J.; Sankararaman, Shankar; Kulkarni, Chetan S.; Ng, Eley

    2017-01-01

    Prognostic methods enable operators and maintainers to predict the future performance for critical systems. However, these methods can be computationally expensive and may need to be performed each time new information about the system becomes available. In light of these computational requirements, we have investigated the application of graphics processing units (GPUs) as a computational platform for real-time prognostics. Recent advances in GPU technology have reduced cost and increased the computational capability of these highly parallel processing units, making them more attractive for the deployment of prognostic software. We present a survey of model-based prognostic algorithms with considerations for leveraging the parallel architecture of the GPU and a case study of GPU-accelerated battery prognostics with computational performance results.

  7. Prognostic modeling of oral cancer by gene profiles and clinicopathological co-variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mes, Steven W; Te Beest, Dennis; Poli, Tito; Rossi, Silvia; Scheckenbach, Kathrin; van Wieringen, Wessel N; Brink, Arjen; Bertani, Nicoletta; Lanfranco, Davide; Silini, Enrico M; van Diest, Paul J; Bloemena, Elisabeth; Leemans, C René; van de Wiel, Mark A; Brakenhoff, Ruud H

    2017-08-29

    Accurate staging and outcome prediction is a major problem in clinical management of oral cancer patients, hampering high precision treatment and adjuvant therapy planning. Here, we have built and validated multivariable models that integrate gene signatures with clinical and pathological variables to improve staging and survival prediction of patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Gene expression profiles from 249 human papillomavirus (HPV)-negative OSCCs were explored to identify a 22-gene lymph node metastasis signature (LNMsig) and a 40-gene overall survival signature (OSsig). To facilitate future clinical implementation and increase performance, these signatures were transferred to quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays and validated in an independent cohort of 125 HPV-negative tumors. When applied in the clinically relevant subgroup of early-stage (cT1-2N0) OSCC, the LNMsig could prevent overtreatment in two-third of the patients. Additionally, the integration of RT-qPCR gene signatures with clinical and pathological variables provided accurate prognostic models for oral cancer, strongly outperforming TNM. Finally, the OSsig gene signature identified a subpopulation of patients, currently considered at low-risk for disease-related survival, who showed an unexpected poor prognosis. These well-validated models will assist in personalizing primary treatment with respect to neck dissection and adjuvant therapies.

  8. Experimental verification of a CFD model intended for the determination of restitution coefficients used in erosion modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernik Bartłomiej

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Erosion caused by solid particles transported with the steam or flue gas has a negative impact on the power unit reliability and availability. The erosion rate depends inter alia on the restitution of the particle velocity upon impact. The restitution coefficients determine the angle of the particle reflection off the tube surface and the particle post-impingement velocity, i.e., they determine the direction of the particle path, which has a substantial impact on the erosion phenomenon inside the tube. An attempt is made herein to develop a method of determination of restitution coefficients by means of numerical modelling assisted by experimental testing on physical models that will be implemented further in the Ansys Fluent code. Such a numerical procedure will verify the model of erosion caused by particles of iron oxides. The erodent impingement angle α1, the impingement velocity w1, and the reflection velocity w2 are measured using the Casio High-Speed Exilim EX-F1 camera, which enables filming at a high rate. The film is then processed graphically for “frame-by-frame” tracking. The following erodents were used in the testing: iron oxides, quartz sand with a different grain size (490, 1000, 1500, 2000 μm, and 1000 μm-diameter steel balls. The steel balls, due to their ideal shape, were treated as the comparative analysis reference standard. Erosion of three types of 5x10 cm plates was tested: a plasma-coated plate with an anti-erosion layer, an aluminium plate; and a steel sheet plate. Based on the restitution coefficient testing results, numerical simulations were performed of the particle reflection off the surface.

  9. State of the art in CFD pre- and postprocessing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vembe, B. E.; Hansen, E. W. M.

    1994-06-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is a generic name for a wide range of numerical techniques that are used for obtaining solutions to the governing equations of thermo-fluid dynamics with or without chemical reactions. The report presents to the state of the art in pre- and postprocessing for CFD codes, both commercial and in-house SINTEF-NTH codes. The objectives of advanced CFD systems are discussed and the techniques for pre- and postprocessing are reviewed. The user friendliness of CFD codes, in general, are highlighted. A common definition of a user friendly computer program is one that is easy to learn, efficient, easy to remember, and satisfactory to use. Most of today's commercial CFD codes could benefit from an enhanced interface. It is desirable to develop standard data formats for input and output of CFD codes and direct-manipulation user interfaces are desirable in CFD applications. Largest potential for improvements of CFD codes and for users is in geometry modeling and grid generation.

  10. Prognostic scoring systems for mortality in intensive care units--the APACHE model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niewiński, Grzegorz; Starczewska, Małgorzata; Kański, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    The APACHE (Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation) scoring system is time consuming. The mean time for introducing a patient's data to APACHE IV is 37.3 min. Nevertheless, statisticians have known for years that the higher the number of variables the mathematical model describes, the more accurate the model. Because of the necessity of gathering data over a 24-hour period and of determining one cause for ICU admission, the system is troublesome and prone to mistakes. The evolution of the APACHE scoring system is an example of unfulfilled hopes for accurately estimating the risk of death for patients admitted to the ICU; satisfactory prognostic effects resulting from the use of APACHE II and III have been recently studied in patients undergoing liver transplantations. Because no increase in the predictive properties of successive versions has been observed, the search for other solutions continues. The APACHE IV scoring system is helpful; however, its use without prepared spreadsheets is almost impractical. Therefore, although many years have passed since its original publication, APACHE II or its extension APACHE III is currently used in clinical practice.

  11. Arbitrary Shape Deformation in CFD Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landon, Mark; Perry, Ernest

    2014-01-01

    Sculptor(R) is a commercially available software tool, based on an Arbitrary Shape Design (ASD), which allows the user to perform shape optimization for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) design. The developed software tool provides important advances in the state-of-the-art of automatic CFD shape deformations and optimization software. CFD is an analysis tool that is used by engineering designers to help gain a greater understanding of the fluid flow phenomena involved in the components being designed. The next step in the engineering design process is to then modify, the design to improve the components' performance. This step has traditionally been performed manually via trial and error. Two major problems that have, in the past, hindered the development of an automated CFD shape optimization are (1) inadequate shape parameterization algorithms, and (2) inadequate algorithms for CFD grid modification. The ASD that has been developed as part of the Sculptor(R) software tool is a major advancement in solving these two issues. First, the ASD allows the CFD designer to freely create his own shape parameters, thereby eliminating the restriction of only being able to use the CAD model parameters. Then, the software performs a smooth volumetric deformation, which eliminates the extremely costly process of having to remesh the grid for every shape change (which is how this process had previously been achieved). Sculptor(R) can be used to optimize shapes for aerodynamic and structural design of spacecraft, aircraft, watercraft, ducts, and other objects that affect and are affected by flows of fluids and heat. Sculptor(R) makes it possible to perform, in real time, a design change that would manually take hours or days if remeshing were needed.

  12. Improving Clinical Risk Stratification at Diagnosis in Primary Prostate Cancer: A Prognostic Modelling Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent J Gnanapragasam

    2016-08-01

    new five-stratum risk stratification system was produced, and its prognostic power was compared against the current system, with PCSM as the outcome. The results were analysed using a Cox hazards model, the log-rank test, Kaplan-Meier curves, competing-risks regression, and concordance indices. In the training set, the new risk stratification system identified distinct subgroups with different risks of PCSM in pair-wise comparison (p < 0.0001. Specifically, the new classification identified a very low-risk group (Group 1, a subgroup of intermediate-risk cancers with a low PCSM risk (Group 2, hazard ratio [HR] 1.62 [95% CI 0.96-2.75], and a subgroup of intermediate-risk cancers with an increased PCSM risk (Group 3, HR 3.35 [95% CI 2.04-5.49] (p < 0.0001. High-risk cancers were also sub-classified by the new system into subgroups with lower and higher PCSM risk: Group 4 (HR 5.03 [95% CI 3.25-7.80] and Group 5 (HR 17.28 [95% CI 11.2-26.67] (p < 0.0001, respectively. These results were recapitulated in the testing set and remained robust after inclusion of competing risks. In comparison to the current risk stratification system, the new system demonstrated improved prognostic performance, with a concordance index of 0.75 (95% CI 0.72-0.77 versus 0.69 (95% CI 0.66-0.71 (p < 0.0001. In an external cohort, the new system achieved a concordance index of 0.79 (95% CI 0.75-0.84 for predicting PCSM versus 0.66 (95% CI 0.63-0.69 (p < 0.0001 for the current NICE risk stratification system. The main limitations of the study were that it was registry based and that follow-up was relatively short.A novel and simple five-stratum risk stratification system outperforms the standard three-stratum risk stratification system in predicting the risk of PCSM at diagnosis in men with primary non-metastatic prostate cancer, even when accounting for competing risks. This model also allows delineation of new clinically relevant subgroups of men who might potentially receive more appropriate

  13. Advanced Methods for Determining Prediction Uncertainty in Model-Based Prognostics with Application to Planetary Rovers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daigle, Matthew J.; Sankararaman, Shankar

    2013-01-01

    Prognostics is centered on predicting the time of and time until adverse events in components, subsystems, and systems. It typically involves both a state estimation phase, in which the current health state of a system is identified, and a prediction phase, in which the state is projected forward in time. Since prognostics is mainly a prediction problem, prognostic approaches cannot avoid uncertainty, which arises due to several sources. Prognostics algorithms must both characterize this uncertainty and incorporate it into the predictions so that informed decisions can be made about the system. In this paper, we describe three methods to solve these problems, including Monte Carlo-, unscented transform-, and first-order reliability-based methods. Using a planetary rover as a case study, we demonstrate and compare the different methods in simulation for battery end-of-discharge prediction.

  14. A Modeling Framework for Prognostic Decision Making and its Application to UAV Mission Planning

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The goal of prognostic decision making (PDM) is to utilize information on anticipated system health changes in selecting future actions. One of the key challenges in...

  15. Dicty_cDB: CFD579 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CF (Link to library) CFD579 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U16381-1 CFD579P (Link to Original site) CFD...579F 129 CFD579Z 319 CFD579P 448 - - Show CFD579 Library CF (Link to library) Clone ID CFD... URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/CF/CFD5-D/CFD579Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID CFD...579P (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >CFD579 (CFD579Q) /CSM/CF/CFD5-D/CFD5...alignments: (bits) Value CFD579 (CFD579Q) /CSM/CF/CFD5-D/CFD579Q.Seq.d/ 220 1e-56 CFD769 (CFD769Q) /CSM/CF/CFD7-C/CFD

  16. Clinical Risk Factors and Prognostic Model for Primary Graft Dysfunction after Lung Transplantation in Patients with Pulmonary Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porteous, Mary K; Lee, James C; Lederer, David J; Palmer, Scott M; Cantu, Edward; Shah, Rupal J; Bellamy, Scarlett L; Lama, Vibha N; Bhorade, Sangeeta M; Crespo, Maria M; McDyer, John F; Wille, Keith M; Localio, A Russell; Orens, Jonathan B; Shah, Pali D; Weinacker, Ann B; Arcasoy, Selim; Wilkes, David S; Ware, Lorraine B; Christie, Jason D; Kawut, Steven M; Diamond, Joshua M

    2017-10-01

    Pulmonary hypertension from pulmonary arterial hypertension or parenchymal lung disease is associated with an increased risk for primary graft dysfunction after lung transplantation. We evaluated the clinical determinants of severe primary graft dysfunction in pulmonary hypertension and developed and validated a prognostic model. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of patients in the multicenter Lung Transplant Outcomes Group with pulmonary hypertension at transplant listing. Severe primary graft dysfunction was defined as PaO2/FiO2 ≤200 with allograft infiltrates at 48 or 72 hours after transplantation. Donor, recipient, and operative characteristics were evaluated in a multivariable explanatory model. A prognostic model derived using donor and recipient characteristics was then validated in a separate cohort. In the explanatory model of 826 patients with pulmonary hypertension, donor tobacco smoke exposure, higher recipient body mass index, female sex, listing mean pulmonary artery pressure, right atrial pressure and creatinine at transplant, cardiopulmonary bypass use, transfusion volume, and reperfusion fraction of inspired oxygen were associated with primary graft dysfunction. Donor obesity was associated with a lower risk for primary graft dysfunction. Using a 20% threshold for elevated risk, the prognostic model had good negative predictive value in both derivation and validation cohorts (89.1% [95% confidence interval, 85.3-92.8] and 83.3% [95% confidence interval, 78.5-88.2], respectively), but low positive predictive value. Several recipient, donor, and operative characteristics were associated with severe primary graft dysfunction in patients with pulmonary hypertension, including several risk factors not identified in the overall transplant population. A prognostic model with donor and recipient clinical risk factors alone had low positive predictive value, but high negative predictive value, to rule out high risk for primary graft dysfunction.

  17. The Cambridge CFD Grid for Large Scale Distributed CFD Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Xiaobo; Hayes, Mark; Jenkins, K.; Cant, Stewart R.

    2005-01-01

    A revised version submitted for publication in the Elsevier Journal of Future Generation Computer Systems: promotional issue on Grid Computing, originally appeared in the Proceedings of ICCS 2004, Krakow, Poland, June 2004 The Cambridge CFD (computational fluid dynamics) Grid is a distributed problem solving environment for large-scale CFD applications set up between the Cambridge eScience Centre and the CFD Lab in the Engineering Department at the University of Cambridge. A Web portal, th...

  18. CFD for hypersonic propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Povinelli, Louis A.

    1991-01-01

    An overview is given of research activity on the application of computational fluid dynamics (CDF) for hypersonic propulsion systems. After the initial consideration of the highly integrated nature of air-breathing hypersonic engines and airframe, attention is directed toward computations carried out for the components of the engine. A generic inlet configuration is considered in order to demonstrate the highly three dimensional viscous flow behavior occurring within rectangular inlets. Reacting flow computations for simple jet injection as well as for more complex combustion chambers are then discussed in order to show the capability of viscous finite rate chemical reaction computer simulations. Finally, the nozzle flow fields are demonstrated, showing the existence of complex shear layers and shock structure in the exhaust plume. The general issues associated with code validation as well as the specific issue associated with the use of CFD for design are discussed. A prognosis for the success of CFD in the design of future propulsion systems is offered.

  19. Degradation of pharmaceuticals in UV (LP)/H₂O₂ reactors simulated by means of kinetic modeling and computational fluid dynamics (CFD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wols, B A; Harmsen, D J H; Wanders-Dijk, J; Beerendonk, E F; Hofman-Caris, C H M

    2015-05-15

    UV/H2O2 treatment is a well-established technique to degrade organic micropollutants. A CFD model in combination with an advanced kinetic model is presented to predict the degradation of organic micropollutants in UV (LP)/H2O2 reactors, accounting for the hydraulics, fluence rate, complex (photo)chemical reactions in the water matrix and the interactions between these processes. The model incorporates compound degradation by means of direct UV photolysis, OH radical and carbonate radical reactions. Measurements of pharmaceutical degradations in pilot-scale UV/H2O2 reactors are presented under different operating conditions. A comparison between measured and modeled degradation for a group of 35 pharmaceuticals resulted in good model predictions for most of the compounds. The research also shows that the degradation of organic micropollutants can be dependent on temperature, which is relevant for full-scale installations that are operated at different temperatures over the year. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Dicty_cDB: CFD557 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CF (Link to library) CFD557 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U16450-1 CFD557E (Link to Original site) CFD...557F 601 CFD557Z 707 CFD557P 1308 CFD557E 1253 Show CFD557 Library CF (Link to library) Clone ID CFD...ginal site URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/CF/CFD5-C/CFD557Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID CFD...557E (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >CFD557 (CFD557Q) /CSM/CF/CFD5-C/CFD...ragtvsfyl spkmtsdapadpsqdvffqnsihsspfgnctkyyentnnatctacfdlpmdispglyilq ffwefnpkgi

  1. Interactive CFD simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Duque Lombana, Juan Fernando

    2007-01-01

    This project is about the development of an implementable Interactive Computer Fluid Dynamics methodology -- The range of this work begins with an overview of the current status of computational fluid dynamics simulation software and methodologies, continues with an introduction to what interactive and interactivity mean, develops an all original interactive CFD methodology to follow for the solution of fluid scenarios and finally, the description of the implementation of an interactive solve...

  2. Fifty years of CFD for room air distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter Vilhelm

    2015-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) was first introduced in the ventilation industry in the 1970s. CFD has been increasingly used since then, as testified by the number of peer-reviewed articles, which was less than 10 per year in the 1990s, and which is now 60 to 70 per year. This article discusses...... the principle behind CFD, the development in numerical schemes, turbulence models and the importance of the increased computer size since the 1970s. Special attention is given to the selection of the correct governing equations, to the understanding of low turbulent flow, to the selection of turbulence models...

  3. [Molecular biological evaluation of prognostic parameters in GIST. Development of an integrative model of tumor progression].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haller, F

    2010-10-01

    Prognosis evaluation in gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) is currently based on tumor diameter, mitotic counts and anatomic localisation. There are two risk classifications as well as the first ever TNM classification for GISTs, whereby the risk classification according to the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology (AFIP) has the best correlation with clinical follow-up according to own experiences. "Very low/low risk" GISTs are almost benign, while the majority of "high risk" GISTs metastasize and benefit from adjuvant therapy. Careful evaluation of mitotic counts in 50 high-power fields is of particular relevance for correct risk classification. Apart from these classical prognostic factors, many molecular genetic parameters with correlation to follow-up have been evaluated and may help to improve prognosis evaluation of GISTs in the future. Since most of the molecular genetic parameters are associated or even determined by the clinico-pathological parameters, an integrated model for tumor progression of GISTs is helpful to interpret the different factors in correlation to one another. In particular for "intermediate risk" GISTs, additional parameters are needed for improved prognosis evaluation.

  4. Wind Loads on Ships and Offshore Structures Estimated by CFD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aage, Christian; Hvid, S.L.; Hughes, P.H.

    1997-01-01

    Wind loads on ships and offshore structures could until recently be determined only by model tests, or by statistical methods based on model tests. By the development of Computational Fluid Dynamics or CFD there is now a realistic computational alternative available. In this paper, wind loads...... on a seagoing ferry and on a semisubmersible offshore platform have been estimated by CFD. The results have been compared with wind tunnel model tests and, for the ferry, a few full-scale measurements, and good agreement is obtained. The CFD method offers the possibility of a computational estimate of scale...... effects related to wind tunnel model testing. An example of such an estimate on the ferry is discussed. Due to the time involved in generating the computational mesh and in computing the solution, the CFD method is not at the moment economically competitive to routine wind tunnel model testing....

  5. The role of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) in hair science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spicka, Peter; Grald, Eric

    2004-01-01

    The use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) as a virtual prototyping tool is widespread in the consumer packaged goods industry. CFD refers to the calculation on a computer of the velocity, pressure, and temperature and chemical species concentrations within a flowing liquid or gas. Because the performance of manufacturing equipment and product designs can be simulated on the computer, the benefit of using CFD is significant time and cost savings when compared to traditional physical testing methods. CFD has been used to design, scale-up and troubleshoot mixing tanks, spray dryers, heat exchangers and other process equipment. Recently, computer models of the capillary wicking process inside fibrous structures have been added to CFD software. These models have been used to gain a better understanding of the absorbent performance of diapers and feminine protection products. The same models can also be used to represent the movement of shampoo, conditioner, colorants and other products through the hair and scalp. In this paper, we provide an introduction to CFD and show some examples of its application to the manufacture of consumer products. We also provide sonic examples to show the potential of CFD for understanding the performance of products applied to the hair and scalp.

  6. The role of CFD combustion modeling in hydrogen safety management – IV: Validation based on non-homogeneous hydrogen–air experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sathiah, Pratap, E-mail: pratap.sathiah78@gmail.com [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group (NRG), Westerduinweg 3, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Komen, Ed, E-mail: komen@nrg.eu [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group (NRG), Westerduinweg 3, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Roekaerts, Dirk, E-mail: d.j.e.m.roekaerts@tudelft.nl [Delft University of Technology, Department of Process and Energy, Section Fluid Mechanics, Mekelweg 2, 2628 CD Delft (Netherlands)

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • TFC combustion model is further extended to simulate flame propagation in non-homogeneous hydrogen–air mixtures. • TFC combustion model results are in good agreement with large-scale non-homogeneous hydrogen–air experiments. • The model is further extended to account for the non-uniform hydrogen–air–steam mixture for the presence of PARs on hydrogen deflagration. - Abstract: The control of hydrogen in the containment is an important safety issue in NPPs during a loss of coolant accident, because the dynamic pressure loads from hydrogen combustion can be detrimental to the structural integrity of the reactor safety systems and the reactor containment. In Sathiah et al. (2012b), we presented a computational fluid dynamics based method to assess the consequence of the combustion of uniform hydrogen–air mixtures. In the present article, the extension of this method to and its validation for non-uniform hydrogen–air mixture is described. The method is implemented in the CFD software ANSYS FLUENT using user defined functions. The extended code is validated against non-uniform hydrogen–air experiments in the ENACCEF facility. It is concluded that the maximum pressure and intermediate peak pressure were predicted within 12% and 18% accuracy. The eigen frequencies of the residual pressure wave phenomena were predicted within 4%. It is overall concluded that the current model predicts the considered ENACCEF experiments well.

  7. Modelling of the spent fuel heat-up in the spent fuel pools using one-dimensional system codes and CFD codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grazevicius, Audrius; Kaliatka, Algirdas [Lithuanian Energy Institute, Kaunas (Lithuania). Lab. of Nuclear Installation Safety

    2017-07-15

    The main functions of spent fuel pools are to remove the residual heat from spent fuel assemblies and to perform the function of biological shielding. In the case of loss of heat removal from spent fuel pool, the fuel rods and pool water temperatures would increase continuously. After the saturated temperature is reached, due to evaporation of water the pool water level would drop, eventually causing the uncover of spent fuel assemblies, fuel overheating and fuel rods failure. This paper presents an analysis of loss of heat removal accident in spent fuel pool of BWR 4 and a comparison of two different modelling approaches. The one-dimensional system thermal-hydraulic computer code RELAP5 and CFD tool ANSYS Fluent were used for the analysis. The results are similar, but the local effects cannot be simulated using a one-dimensional code. The ANSYS Fluent calculation demonstrated that this three-dimensional treatment allows to avoid the need for many one-dimensional modelling assumptions in the pool modelling and enables to reduce the uncertainties associated with natural circulation flow calculation.

  8. User Interface Developed for Controls/CFD Interdisciplinary Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center, in conjunction with the University of Akron, is developing analytical methods and software tools to create a cross-discipline "bridge" between controls and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) technologies. Traditionally, the controls analyst has used simulations based on large lumping techniques to generate low-order linear models convenient for designing propulsion system controls. For complex, high-speed vehicles such as the High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT), simulations based on CFD methods are required to capture the relevant flow physics. The use of CFD should also help reduce the development time and costs associated with experimentally tuning the control system. The initial application for this research is the High Speed Civil Transport inlet control problem. A major aspect of this research is the development of a controls/CFD interface for non-CFD experts, to facilitate the interactive operation of CFD simulations and the extraction of reduced-order, time-accurate models from CFD results. A distributed computing approach for implementing the interface is being explored. Software being developed as part of the Integrated CFD and Experiments (ICE) project provides the basis for the operating environment, including run-time displays and information (data base) management. Message-passing software is used to communicate between the ICE system and the CFD simulation, which can reside on distributed, parallel computing systems. Initially, the one-dimensional Large-Perturbation Inlet (LAPIN) code is being used to simulate a High Speed Civil Transport type inlet. LAPIN can model real supersonic inlet features, including bleeds, bypasses, and variable geometry, such as translating or variable-ramp-angle centerbodies. Work is in progress to use parallel versions of the multidimensional NPARC code.

  9. CFD simulations of the MEXICO rotor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bechmann, Andreas; Sørensen, Niels N.; Zahle, Frederik

    2011-01-01

    The wake behind a wind turbine model is investigated using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), and results are compared with measurements. The turbine investigated is the three‐bladed test rotor (D = 4.5 m) used in the Model Experiments in Controlled Conditions (MEXICO) wind tunnel experiment....... During the MEXICO experiment, particle image velocimetry measurements of the induction upstream and downstream of the rotor were performed for different operating conditions, giving a unique dataset to verify theoretical models and CFD models. The present paper first describes the efforts in reproducing...... the experimental results using the Reynold‐Averaged Navier‐Stokes method. Second, three‐dimensional airfoil characteristics are extracted that allow simulations with simpler wake models. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd....

  10. Prediction of overall survival for patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer: development of a prognostic model through a crowdsourced challenge with open clinical trial data

    OpenAIRE

    Guinney, Justin; Tao WANG; Laajala, Teemu D; Winner, Kimberly Kanigel; Bare, J. Christopher; Neto, Elias Chaibub; Khan, Suleiman A.; Peddinti, Gopal; Airola, Antti; Pahikkala, Tapio; Mirtti, Tuomas; Yu, Thomas; Bot, Brian M.; Shen, Liji; Abdallah, Kald

    2017-01-01

    Background: Improvements to prognostic models in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer have the potential to augment clinical trial design and guide treatment strategies. In partnership with Project Data Sphere, a not-for-profit initiative allowing data from cancer clinical trials to be share