WorldWideScience

Sample records for prognosis elevated sympathetic

  1. Association between the sympathetic firing pattern and anxiety level in patients with the metabolic syndrome and elevated blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Elisabeth; Dawood, Tye; Straznicky, Nora; Sari, Carolina; Schlaich, Markus; Esler, Murray; Lambert, Gavin

    2010-03-01

    Recent evidence indicates that stress is associated with obesity, hypertension and metabolic abnormalities. Stress pathways, including both the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and the sympathetic nervous system, are activated in individuals with the metabolic syndrome. In order to gain some insight into the relation between sympathetic nervous system activation, metabolic profile and stress, we examined the pattern of sympathetic nervous firing in eight women and 17 men with the metabolic syndrome and elevated blood pressure (BP) in relation to their underlying psychological stress. Both multiunit and single-unit muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) were recorded by using the technique of microneurography and psychological stress was assessed by Spielberger's State and Trait Anxiety scores and the Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II). Women had higher cholesterol levels, higher depressive symptom scores and similar multiunit MSNA compared with the men but displayed a disturbed firing pattern of sympathetic activity as indicated by a higher incidence of multiple spikes per burst (P pattern did not correlate with any aspect of the metabolic profile; however it was significantly associated with anxiety state and trait and the affective component of the BDI scores. In particular, higher incidence of multiple firing (more than two spikes) during a sympathetic neural burst was associated with higher trait anxiety score (R = 0.557, P = 0.004) and higher affective depressive symptoms (R = 0.517, P = 0.008). Somatic symptoms bore no association with the sympathetic firing pattern. These results suggest that chronic mental stress modulates the pattern of sympathetic activity, which, in turn, may confer greater cardiovascular risk on individuals with the metabolic syndrome and elevated BP.

  2. Cerebrospinal Fluid Hypernatremia Elevates Sympathetic Nerve Activity and Blood Pressure via the Rostral Ventrolateral Medulla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stocker, Sean D; Lang, Susan M; Simmonds, Sarah S; Wenner, Megan M; Farquhar, William B

    2015-12-01

    Elevated NaCl concentrations of the cerebrospinal fluid increase sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) in salt-sensitive hypertension. Neurons of the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) play a pivotal role in the regulation of SNA and receive mono- or polysynaptic inputs from several hypothalamic structures responsive to hypernatremia. Therefore, the present study investigated the contribution of RVLM neurons to the SNA and pressor response to cerebrospinal fluid hypernatremia. Lateral ventricle infusion of 0.15 mol/L, 0.6 mol/L, and 1.0 mol/L NaCl (5 µL/10 minutes) produced concentration-dependent increases in lumbar SNA, adrenal SNA, and arterial blood pressure, despite no change in splanchnic SNA and a decrease in renal SNA. Ganglionic blockade with chlorisondamine or acute lesion of the lamina terminalis blocked or significantly attenuated these responses, respectively. RVLM microinjection of the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABAA) agonist muscimol abolished the sympathoexcitatory response to intracerebroventricular infusion of 1 mol/L NaCl. Furthermore, blockade of ionotropic glutamate, but not angiotensin II type 1, receptors significantly attenuated the increase in lumbar SNA, adrenal SNA, and arterial blood pressure. Finally, single-unit recordings of spinally projecting RVLM neurons revealed 3 distinct populations based on discharge responses to intracerebroventricular infusion of 1 mol/L NaCl: type I excited (46%; 11/24), type II inhibited (37%; 9/24), and type III no change (17%; 4/24). All neurons with slow conduction velocities were type I cells. Collectively, these findings suggest that acute increases in cerebrospinal fluid NaCl concentrations selectively activate a discrete population of RVLM neurons through glutamate receptor activation to increase SNA and arterial blood pressure. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  3. Elevated nuclear CCND1 expression confers an unfavorable prognosis for early stage lung adenocarcinoma patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ping; Zhao, Mengyang; Liu, Zhen; Liu, Yiyi; Chen, Yiyu; Luo, Rongcheng; Fang, Weiyi

    2015-01-01

    Purposes: To examine the expression pattern of CCND1 and analyze the correlation of its nuclear expression with clinicopathologic features and prognosis in lung adenocarcinoma. Methods: CCND1 mRNA and protein levels in lung adenocarcinoma tissues were examined. The relationship between nuclear CCND1 protein expression and clinical features including survival prognosis was analyzed. Results: CCND1 mRNA levels were markedly increased in lung adenocarcinoma (P=0.0019). Western blot analysis confirmed increased nuclear CCND1 protein expression in lung adenocarcinoma specimens. Immunohistochemistry analysis confirmed that CCND1 protein was predominantly nuclear localized in lung adenocarcinoma cells and significantly elevated relative to normal lung tissues (Plung adenocarcinoma patients by strata analysis. Finally, nuclear CCND1 expression tended to be an independent prognostic indicator (P=0.087) for lung adenocarcinoma patient survival. Conclusion: Increased nuclear CCND1 is a potential unfavorable prognostic factor for lung adenocarcinoma patients, especially those with clinical early stage (stage I+II). PMID:26884860

  4. [The clinical characteristics and prognosis of non ST segment elevation acute coronary syndrome in different genders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Chun-li; Qiao, Shu-bin; Zhu, Jun; Chen, Jue; Yang, Wei-xian; Zhang, Yan; Liang, Yan; Zhang, Jun; Zhang, Wen-jia

    2010-09-01

    To determine gender differences in baseline characteristics and intervention treatment in relation to prognosis in patients with non-ST segment elevation acute coronary syndrome (NSTEACS). A total of 814 patients (545 men and 269 women) with NSTEACS were randomized to early intervention (coronary angiography 36 hours after randomization). The primary outcome was a composite of death, myocardial infarction, or stroke at 6 months. Women were older and more frequently had hypertension, diabetes, and history of coronary artery disease (CAD) or chronic angina (P different gender had the different prognostic predictor. Severe coronary diseases were as an independent predictor for both male and female patients. An early intervention strategy resulted in a beneficial effect in men which was not seen in women.

  5. AMPUTATION AND REFLEX SYMPATHETIC DYSTROPHY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    GEERTZEN, JHB; EISMA, WH

    Reflex sympathetic dystrophy is a chronic pain syndrome characterized by chronic burning pain, restricted range of motion, oedema and vasolability. Patients are difficult to treat and the prognosis is very often poor. This report emphasizes that an amputation in case of a reflex sympathetic

  6. [The prognosis and clinicopathological characteristics of 70 gastric cancer patients with elevated serum AFP].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y K; Shen, L; Zhang, X T

    2017-07-23

    Objective: This study aimed to review the clinicopathological characteristics and prognosis of advanced gastric cancer patients with elevated serum Alpha-fetoprotein (AFP). Methods: From August 2006 to May 2016, 70patients with advanced gastric cancer were enrolled retrospectively. All these patients had pathologically confirmed gastric adenocarcinoma, had a serum AFP level of more than 20 ng/ml, and received at least first-line treatment. The clinicopathological data and follow-up data were collected for analysis. Results: Liver metastasis was more common in patients with AFP≥1 000 ng/ml, compared with AFPAFP level decreased ≥50% after first-line chemotherapy, the disease control rate and overall survival were both better than those in patients with AFP decreased AFP-elevated gastric cancer is a special subtype of gastric cancer. It's a heterogeneous cancer with different clinical outcomes. The extent of decrease of serum AFP level during follow-up may be a sensitive prognostic and predictive biomarker. Liver metastasis were more common in these patients, and combined treatment may improve survival.

  7. Elevated leukocyte count as a harbinger of systemic inflammation, disease progression, and poor prognosis: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmielewski, Piotr Paweł; Strzelec, Bartłomiej

    2017-10-24

    Total leukocyte count increases significantly in response to infection, trauma, inflammation, and certain diseases. Factors affecting leukocyte count in healthy adults include sex, hormonal milieu, genetic inheritance, stress level, diet, nutrition, and lifestyle (e.g. tobacco-induced inflammatory changes, chronic psychological stress, etc.). To date, numerous studies have reported that high but normal leukocyte counts at baseline predict increased cardiovascular and noncardiovascular mortality in older adults. Recent findings suggest that elevated leukocyte count within the normal range, but especially neutrophil and monocyte counts, may be a harbinger of increased systemic inflammation and subclinical disease. Moreover, elderly people who tend to have high but normal leukocyte counts are at greater risk of cancer, cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, some other age-related conditions, and they also have increased all-cause mortality. These results indicate that strong and reliable inflammatory markers, such as leukocyte count, may reflect the rate of ageing and therefore can predict long-term survival in the elderly. Remarkably, leukocyte count correlates positively with genuine markers of systemic inflammation like C-reactive protein and interleukin 6. Interestingly, some authors conclude that leukocyte counts have a stronger prognostic ability with regard to total and cardiovascular mortality than total cholesterol or low-density lipoproteins. The fact that these inflammatory markers are clinically useful predictors of long-term survival in the elderly is quite remarkable as these blood parameters are included in routine medical check-ups. Therefore, they can be used as simple and reliable morphological indicators of chronic systemic inflammation, disease progression, and poor prognosis, especially among individuals who are likely to develop age-related conditions. Nevertheless, the pathomechanism that links elevated but normal leukocyte counts to increased

  8. Elevated expression of Thoc1 is associated with aggressive phenotype and poor prognosis in colorectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Chenchen; Yue, Ben; Yuan, Chenwei; Zhao, Senlin; Fang, Changyi; Yu, Yang; Yan, Dongwang, E-mail: yandw70@163.com

    2015-12-04

    The THO complex 1 (Thoc1) is a nuclear matrix protein playing vital roles in transcription elongation and mRNA export. Recently, aberrant expression of Thoc1 has been reported in an increasing array of tumor types. However, the clinical significance of Thoc1 expression in colorectal cancer (CRC) is still unknown. The present study aimed to characterize the expression of Thoc1 in human CRC and evaluate its clinical significance. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and Western blotting analyses showed that the mRNA and protein expression of Thoc1 in CRC specimens was significantly higher than that in adjacent normal colon mucosae. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) was conducted to characterize the expression pattern of Thoc1 in 185 archived paraffin-embedded CRC specimens. Statistical analyses revealed that high levels of Thoc1 expression were associated with the clinical stages and tumor differentiation. CRC patients with high levels of Thoc1 expression had poorer overall-survival and disease-free survival, whereas those with lower levels of Thoc1 expression survived longer. Furthermore, multivariate Cox regression analyses demonstrated that Thoc1 expression remained an independent prognostic factor for increased disease recurrence and decreased survival. Our results suggest for the first time that Thoc1 is involved in the development and progression of CRC, and elevated expression of Thoc1 is associated with aggressive phenotype and poor prognosis in CRC. These findings may prove to be clinically useful for developing a new therapeutic target of CRC treatment.

  9. Peripheral chemoreflex activation contributes to sympathetic baroreflex impairment in chronic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Despas, Fabien; Lambert, Elisabeth; Vaccaro, Angelica; Labrunee, Marc; Franchitto, Nicolas; Lebrin, Marine; Galinier, Michel; Senard, Jean-Michel; Lambert, Gavin; Esler, Murray; Pathak, Atul

    2012-04-01

    Chemoreflex-mediated sympathetic activation contributes to both initiation and progression of chronic heart failure (CHF). To study the direct role of increased peripheral chemosensitivity in reducing sympathetic baroreflex function in CHF patients, we compared sympathetic baroreflex function, assessed by the slope of the relationship between muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) and DBP, in CHF patients with augmented (n = 18) and normal (n = 20) peripheral chemosensitivity. Using a double-blind, randomized, vehicle-controlled study, we examined the effect of chemoreflex deactivation (by breathing 100% oxygen for 15 min) on sympathetic baroreflex function in CHF patients with elevated and with normal chemosensitivity. Baseline MSNA was elevated (60.6 ± 3.2 vs. 48.9 ± 3.7 bursts/min, P peripheral chemosensitivity compared with controls. Administration of 100% oxygen led to a significant decrease in MSNA (from 60.5 ± 3.2 to 52.6 ± 3.2 bursts/min, P peripheral chemoreflex sensitivity directly decreases sympathetic baroreflex function in CHF patients. This interaction contributes to sympathetic overactivity and blunted sympathetic baroreflex function of CHF patients and may explain how chemoreceptors contribute to the bad prognosis of CHF patients.

  10. Elevated expression of HSP10 protein inhibits apoptosis and associates with poor prognosis of astrocytoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Weibing; Fan, Shuang-Shi; Feng, Juan; Xiao, Desheng; Fan, Songqing; Luo, Jiadi

    2017-01-01

    elevated expression of HSP10 protein inhibits apoptosis and associates with poor prognosis of astrocytoma.

  11. Elevated C-reactive protein in the diagnosis, prognosis, and cause of cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allin, Kristine H; Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2011-01-01

    -phase response, chronic inflammation, the molecular biology, function and measurement of CRP, circulating levels of CRP in health and disease, the principle of Mendelian randomization, the association between circulating levels of CRP and cancer prognosis, and cancer biomarkers. In the Copenhagen General...

  12. Elevated C-reactive protein in the diagnosis, prognosis, and cause of cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allin, Kristine H; Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2011-01-01

    -phase response, chronic inflammation, the molecular biology, function and measurement of CRP, circulating levels of CRP in health and disease, the principle of Mendelian randomization, the association between circulating levels of CRP and cancer prognosis, and cancer biomarkers. In the Copenhagen General...... Population Study of approximately 63,500 individuals, the distribution of circulating levels of CRP was markedly skewed to the right with 97% of the participants having CRP levels3¿mg/L) had an 80% greater risk of early death compared with those with low CRP levels (3¿mg/L at diagnosis had a 1.7-fold...

  13. Sympathetic Overactivity in Chronic Kidney Disease: Consequences and Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasdeep Kaur

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of chronic kidney disease (CKD is increasing worldwide, with more than 26 million people suffering from CKD in the United States alone. More patients with CKD die of cardiovascular complications than progress to dialysis. Over 80% of CKD patients have hypertension, which is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Another common, perhaps underappreciated, feature of CKD is an overactive sympathetic nervous system. This elevation in sympathetic nerve activity (SNA not only contributes to hypertension but also plays a detrimental role in the progression of CKD independent of any increase in blood pressure. Indeed, high SNA is associated with poor prognosis and increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality independent of its effect on blood pressure. This brief review will discuss some of the consequences of sympathetic overactivity and highlight some of the potential pathways contributing to chronically elevated SNA in CKD. Mechanisms leading to chronic sympathoexcitation in CKD are complex, multifactorial and to date, not completely understood. Identification of the mechanisms and/or signals leading to sympathetic overactivity in CKD are crucial for development of effective therapeutic targets to reduce the increased cardiovascular risk in this patient group.

  14. Elevated Levels of Dickkopf-1 Are Associated with β-Catenin Accumulation and Poor Prognosis in Patients with Chondrosarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Changbao; Zhou, Hua; Zhang, Xiaolin; Ma, Xinlong; Liu, Zhongjun; Liu, Xiaoguang

    2014-01-01

    Background Dickkopf-1 (DKK1) is an antagonist of Wnt/β-catenin signaling implicated in tumorigenesis. However, the biological role of DKK1 and β-catenin involved in chondrosarcoma has not been sufficiently investigated. This study was designed to investigate the expression profiles of DKK1 and β-catenin, and to clarify their clinical values in chondrosarcoma. Methods The mRNA and protein levels of DKK1 and β-catenin in fresh chondrosarcoma and the corresponding non-tumor tissues were analyzed by Real-time PCR and Western blot, respectively. The protein expression patterns of DKK1 and β-catenin were investigated by immunohistochemistry. The associations among DKK1 level, β-catenin accumulation, clinicopathological factors and the overall survival were separately evaluated. Results Both DKK1 and β-catenin levels were remarkably elevated in chondrosarcoma compared with the corresponding non-tumor tissues. High DKK1 level and positive β-catenin accumulation in chondrosarcoma specimens were 58.7% and 53.9%, respectively. Elevated DKK1 level significantly correlated with positive β-catenin accumulation, and they were remarkably associated with histological grade and Musculoskeletal Tumor Society stage. Furthermore, DKK1 level and β-catenin accumulation had significant impacts on the prognosis of chondrosarcoma patients. Multivariate analysis revealed that DKK1 level was an independent prognostic factor for overall survival. Conclusions Elevated DKK1 levels associated with β-catenin accumulation play a crucial role in chondrosarcoma. DKK1 can serve as a novel predictor of poor prognosis in patients with chondrosarcoma. PMID:25144498

  15. Elevated bilirubin levels are associated with a better renal prognosis and ameliorate kidney fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sehoon; Kim, Do Hyoung; Hwang, Jin Ho; Kim, Yong-Chul; Kim, Jin Hyuk; Lim, Chun Soo; Kim, Yon Su; Yang, Seung Hee; Lee, Jung Pyo

    2017-01-01

    Bilirubin has been reported to protect against kidney injury. However, further studies highlighting the beneficial effects of bilirubin on renal fibrosis and chronic renal function decline are necessary. We assessed a prospective cohort with a reference range of total bilirubin levels. The primary outcome was a 30% reduction in the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) from baseline, and the secondary outcome was a doubling of the serum creatinine levels, halving of the eGFR and the initiation of dialysis. In addition, experiments with tubular epithelial cells and C57BL/6 mice were performed to investigate the protective effects of bilirubin on kidney fibrosis. As a result, 1,080 patients were included in the study cohort. The study group with relative hyperbilirubinemia (total bilirubin 0.8-1.2 mg/dL) showed a better prognosis in terms of the primary outcome (adjusted hazard ratio (HR) 0.33, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.19-0.59, P kidney disease progression.

  16. Impact of Atrial Fibrillation During ST-Segment-Elevation Myocardial Infarction on Infarct Characteristics and Prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinstadler, Sebastian J; Stiermaier, Thomas; Eitel, Charlotte; Fuernau, Georg; Saad, Mohammed; Pöss, Janine; de Waha, Suzanne; Mende, Meinhard; Desch, Steffen; Metzler, Bernhard; Thiele, Holger; Eitel, Ingo

    2018-02-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is frequently observed in patients with ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction and associated with worse clinical outcome. However, the mechanisms for this increased risk are not fully understood. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship of the presence of AF to cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) derived myocardial salvage and damage as well as clinical outcomes. This multicenter CMR study enrolled 786 patients with ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction. CMR parameters (infarct size, myocardial salvage index, microvascular obstruction, and myocardial function) were assessed 3 (interquartile range [IQR], 2-4) days post-ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction and compared between patients with or without AF during hospitalization. Major adverse cardiac events were assessed as a composite of all-cause death, reinfarction, and new congestive heart failure at 12 months. AF was documented in 48 (6.1%) patients. There was no significant difference in infarct size (18 [IQR, 9-29]% versus 17 [IQR, 9-25]% of left ventricular mass; P=0.340), myocardial salvage index (51 [IQR, 34-69] versus 51 [IQR, 33-69]; P=0.830), or microvascular obstruction (0.6 [IQR, 0-2.0]% versus 0.0 [IQR, 0-1.8]% of left ventricular mass; P=0.340) between groups. Patients with AF had significantly lower left ventricular (47 [IQR, 34-54]% versus 51 [IQR, 44-58]%; P=0.003) and left atrial (42 [IQR, 17-57]% versus 53 [IQR, 45-59]%; PURL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00712101. © 2018 American Heart Association, Inc.

  17. Elevated plasma vitamin B12 levels and cancer prognosis: A population-based cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arendt, Johan Frederik Håkonsen; Farkas, Dora Kormendine; Pedersen, Lars

    2015-01-01

    cohort: 72.6%]. Thirty-day mortality was elevated for patients with Cbl levels of 601-800pmol/L or >800pmol/L, compared to patients with levels of 200-600pmol/L [(MRR (95% confidence interval): 601-800pmol/L vs. 200-600pmol/L: 1.9 (1.6-2.2); >800pmol/L vs. 200-600pmol/L: 2.7 (2.4-3.1)]. This association...... study using data from Danish medical registries during 1998-2014. The study included 25,017 patients with a cancer diagnosis and Cbl levels of 200-600pmol/L (reference/normal range), 601-800pmol/L and >800pmol/L measured up to one year prior to diagnosis, and a comparison cohort of 61,988 cancer...... using the Charlson comorbidity index. RESULTS: Survival probabilities were lower among patients with elevated Cbl levels than among patients with normal levels and among members of the comparison cohort [(1-year survival,%) Cbl: 200-600pmol/L: 69.3%; 601-800pmol/L: 49.6%; >800pmol/L: 35.8%; comparison...

  18. Falsely Elevated Serum Vitamin B12 Levels Were Associated with the Severity and Prognosis of Chronic Viral Liver Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugihara, Takaaki; Koda, Masahiko; Okamoto, Toshiaki; Miyoshi, Kenichi; Matono, Tomomitsu; Oyama, Kenji; Hosho, Keiko; Okano, Jun-Ichi; Isomoto, Hajime; Murawaki, Yoshikazu

    2017-03-01

    Vitamin B12 is stored primarily in the liver, and highly elevated serum vitamin B12 levels occur in acute hepatitis and severe alcoholic liver disease. We evaluated the relationship between vitamin B12 levels and liver disease severity and long term prognosis in patients with chronic viral hepatitis and cirrhosis. We enrolled 90 patients (57 men, 33 women) with chronic viral hepatitis and cirrhosis who admitted to our hospital as a prospective cohort study. Overall, 37 patients had chronic hepatitis and 53 had cirrhosis (Child-Pugh A 33, B 13, and C 7); 57 patients had primary liver cancer. Serum vitamin B12 concentration and holotranscobalamin (holoTC) II (active form of vitamin B12) were determined and followed prospectively for at least 5 years. Mean total serum vitamin B12 concentration was significantly higher in Child-Pugh C (1308 ± 599 pg/mL) compared to those with chronic hepatitis (655 ± 551 pg/mL), Child-Pugh A (784 ± 559 pg/mL), and Child-Pugh B (660 ± 464 pg/mL) (P = 0.036) Presence of primary liver cancer also influenced serum vitamin B12 levels [657 (167-2956) vs. 432 (189-2956); P = 0.015]. Patients were divided into quartiles by vitamin B12 level. Patients without primary liver cancer in quartile 4 (≥ 880 pg/mL) demonstrated significantly poorer prognosis than those in quartiles 1-3 (B12 - holoTC II) × 100] was significantly higher in Child-Pugh B and C 86 (80-87)% than chronic hepatitis and Child-Pugh A 77 (31-89)% (P = 0.006) Multivariate analysis indicated serum vitamin B12 levels (HR = 1.001, P = 0.029) as a prognostic factor. Falsely elevated serum vitamin B12 levels mainly composed of increased holoHC were associated with severity (Child-Pugh C and primary liver cancer) and prognosis in chronic viral liver disease.

  19. TIMI risk score underestimates prognosis in unstable angina/non-ST segment elevation myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorlat, Anne; Claeys, Marc J; De Raedt, Herbert; Gevaert, Sofie; Vandekerckhove, Yves; Dubois, Philippe; De Meester, Antoine; Vrints, Christiaan

    2008-01-01

    To determine the value of the TIMI risk score in the individual risk stratification of patients with unstable angina/non-ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (UA/NSTEMI). TIMI risk score is a validated tool to identify groups of patients at high risk for major cardiac events. Its prognostic value in individual patients with current diagnostic tools and therapy is unknown. TIMI risk score was assessed in patients with UA/NSTEMI admitted to six Belgian hospitals and related to clinical outcome at 30 days. Of the 500 patients enrolled, 49.4% were placed in the low TIMI risk group (score = 0-3) and 50.6% in the high-risk group (score = 4-7). Multivariate analysis identified raised cardiac markers and invasive strategy, but not high TIMI risk score as independent predictors of death and new myocardial infarction (MI). Moreover, the incidence of death and MI in the low TIMI risk group with positive cardiac markers was not lower than in the high TIMI risk group with positive markers: 15.1% versus 17.8% (P = 0.7). TIMI risk score is of limited value for individual risk stratification. The presence of positive cardiac markers (troponin) appears to be a more powerful prognostic marker.

  20. The relationship between admission heart rate and early prognosis in patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salwa, Paweł; Gorczyca-Michta, Iwona; Wożakowska-Kapłon, Beata

    2015-01-01

    Heart rate (HR) is a basic cardiovascular parameter. The relationship between HR and cardiovascular mortality and morbidity has been indicated in clinical trials and epidemiological studies. The evaluation of the relationship between HR upon hospital admission and the in-hospital prognosis in a group of patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). The medical records of 927 patients were subject to retrospective analysis. The patients were classified on the basis of HR upon hospital admission: bpm (n = 75), 60-69 bpm (n = 169), 70-79 bpm (n = 245), 80-89 bpm (n = 172), 90-99 bpm (n = 134), and ≥ 100 bpm (n = 132). A group of patients with HR of 60-69 bpm on hospital admission (n = 169) constituted a reference group. Patients with atrioventricular blocks and arrhythmias were excluded from the analysis. Early mortality and co-existing diseases were evaluated in the study population. Patients with HR ≥ 90 bpm demonstrated heart failure symptoms considerably more often than patients with HR of 60-69 bpm (p = 0.0010). In-hospital mortality was significantly higher in patients with a HR of more than 90 bpm and bradycardia. The relationship between HR and cardiovascular mortality is shown with a J-shaped curve. HR is strictly correlated with early cardiovascular mortality in a population of patients with STEMI. The relationship between HR and early mortality is demonstrated by a J-shaped curve.

  1. Investigating the prevalence, predictors, and prognosis of suboptimal statin use early after a non-ST elevation acute coronary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Richard M; Yin, Peng; Hanson, Anita; FitzGerald, Richard; Morris, Andrew P; Stables, Rod H; Jorgensen, Andrea L; Pirmohamed, Munir

    High-potency statin therapy is recommended in the secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease but discontinuation, dose reduction, statin switching, and/or nonadherence occur in practice. To determine the prevalence and predictors of deviation from high-potency statin use early after a non-ST elevation acute coronary syndrome (NSTE-ACS) and its association with subsequent major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) and all-cause mortality (ACM). A total of 1005 patients from a UK-based prospective NSTE-ACS cohort study discharged on high-potency statin therapy (atorvastatin 80 mg, rosuvastatin 20 mg, or 40 mg daily) were included. At 1 month, patients were divided into constant high-potency statin users, and suboptimal users incorporating statin discontinuation, dose reduction, switching statin to a lower equivalent potency, and/or statin nonadherence. Follow-up was a median of 16 months. There were 156 suboptimal (∼15.5%) and 849 constant statin users. Factors associated in multivariable analysis with suboptimal statin occurrence included female sex (odds ratio 1.75, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.14-2.68) and muscular symptoms (odds ratio 4.28, 95% CI 1.30-14.08). Suboptimal statin use was associated with increased adjusted risks of time to MACE (hazard ratio 2.10, 95% CI 1.25-3.53, P = .005) and ACM (hazard ratio 2.46, 95% CI 1.38-4.39, P = .003). Subgroup analysis confirmed that the increased MACE/ACM risks were principally attributable to statin discontinuation or nonadherence. Conversion to suboptimal statin use is common early after NSTE-ACS and is partly related to muscular symptoms. Statin discontinuation or non-adherence carries an adverse prognosis. Interventions that preserve and enhance statin utilization could improve post NSTE-ACS outcomes. Copyright © 2017 National Lipid Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Long-term prognosis of chronic kidney disease in non-ST elevation acute coronary syndrome treated with invasive strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roldán Torres, Ildefonso; Salvador Mercader, Inmaculada; Cabadés Rumbeu, Claudia; Díez Gil, José Luis; Ferrando Cervelló, José; Monteagudo Viana, Marta; Fernández Galera, Rubén; Mora Llabata, Vicente

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have an increased risk of adverse cardiovascular outcomes after non-ST elevation acute coronary syndrome (NSTEACS). However, the information available on this specific population, is scarce. We evaluate the impact of CKD on long-term prognosis in patients with NSTEACS managed with invasive strategy. We conduct a prospective registry of patients with NSTEACS and coronary angiography. CKD was defined as a glomerular filtration rate < 60ml/min/1,73m2. The composite primary end-point was cardiac death and non fatal cardiovascular readmission. We estimated the cumulative probability and hazard rate (HR) of combined primary end-point at 3-years according to the presence or absence of CKD. We included 248 p with mean age of 66.9 years, 25% women. CKD was present at baseline in 67 patients (27%). Patients with CKD were older (74.9 vs. 63.9 years; P<.0001) with more prevalence of hypertension (89.6 vs. 66.3%; P<.0001), diabetes (53.7 vs. 35.9%; P=.011), history of heart failure (13.4 vs. 3.9%; P=.006) and anemia (47.8 vs. 16%; P<.0001). No differences in the extent of coronary artery disease. CKD was associated with higher cumulative probability (49.3 vs. 28.2%; log-rank P=.001) and HR of the primary combined end-point (HR: 1.94; CI95%: 1.12-3.27; P=.012). CKD was an independent predictor of adverse cardiovascular outcomes at 3-years (HR: 1.66; CI95%: 1.05-2.61; P=.03). In NSTEACS patients treated with invasive strategie CKD is associated independently with an increased risk of adverse cardiovascular outcomes at 3years. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Nefrología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Elevated Preoperative Neutrophil-Lymphocyte Ratio Is Associated with Poor Prognosis in Hepatocellular Carcinoma Patients Treated with Liver Transplantation: A Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Dong Sun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to investigate the prognostic value of neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio (NLR in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC patients treated with liver transplantation (LT through meta-analysis. Relevant articles were sought in PubMed, Embase, and Wangfang databases up to July 2015. A total of 1687 patients from 10 studies were included in this meta-analysis. Meta-analysis results showed that elevated NLR was significantly associated with poorer overall survival (OS (HR = 2.71, 95% CI: 1.91–3.83 and poorer disease-free survival (DFS (HR = 3.61, 95% CI: 2.23–5.84 in HCC patients treated with LT. Moreover, subgroup analysis showed the significant association between elevated preoperative NLR and poor prognosis was not altered by cutoff values of NLR or types of LT. Therefore, elevated preoperative NLR is associated with poor prognosis in HCC patients treated with LT. Preoperative NLR should be used to predict the prognosis of HCC after LT in our clinical work.

  4. Long term prognosis of atrial fibrillation in ST-elevation myocardial infarction patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topaz, Guy; Flint, Nir; Steinvil, Arie; Finkelstein, Arik; Banai, Shmuel; Keren, Gad; Shacham, Yacov; Yankelson, Lior

    2017-08-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a well-known complication in the setting of ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). Data on the long-term prognostic implications of New-Onset AF (NOAF) complicating STEMI in the era of complete revascularization remains controversial. Our aim therefore was to evaluate the long-term prognosis of prior AF (pAF) and new-onset AF (NOAF) in STEMI patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). We studied 1657 consecutive STEMI patients hospitalized in the cardiac intensive care unit during 2008-2014. We reviewed patient records for the occurrence of pAF and NOAF. NOAF was defined as AF occurring within 30days of the STEMI episode. Patients were followed for a mean period of 3.4±2.1years. Within our cohort 77 (4.6%) patients had pAF and 47 (2.8%) had NOAF. Patients with any AF were older and had a reduced systolic ejection fraction. Thirty-day mortality and all-cause mortality rates were significantly higher in patients with pAF in comparison to those without AF (9.1% vs. 2.2% p<0.001 and 31.2% vs. 9.4%, p<0.001, respectively). NOAF showed a trend for increased all-cause mortality (17% vs. 9.1%, p=0.07) and 30-days mortality (6.4% vs. 2.1%. p=0.09). In a multivariate regression model, pAF but not NOAF was a predictor of mortality throughout the follow-up period (HR 2.02, 95% CI 1.2 to 3.1, p=0.005 and HR 1.1, 95% CI 0.56 to 2.2, p=0.75, respectively). Prior AF and not new-onset AF is an independent predictor of both short and long term mortality in patients treated with PCI. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Long-term prognosis in an ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction population treated with routine primary percutaneous coronary intervention: from clinical trial to real-life experience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Sune; Galatius, Soren; Mogelvang, Rasmus

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We sought to describe the long-term prognosis after routine primary percutaneous coronary intervention (pPCI) in a contemporary consecutive population of patients with presumed ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction, compare it with similar results from the landmark DANAMI-2 trial...... trial reached the combined end point of death, reinfarction, or stroke (P=0.68), whereas the all-cause mortality was 13.0% and 13.7%, respectively (P=0.65). Patients admitted during off hours had the same risk of reaching the combined end point of death, reinfarction, or stroke compared with patients......). Furthermore, the long-term prognosis was the same regardless of whether the pPCI was performed during off hours or office hours. Thus, pPCI including transportation of patients from noninvasive centers can be applied successfully in a real-life population....

  6. Prevalence and prognosis of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction and elevated N-terminal pro brain natriuretic peptide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, Christian Malchau; Bay, Morten; Kirk, Vibeke

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the epidemiological features and prognosis of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFPEF) and to compare these findings with those from patients with reduced ejection fraction. Furthermore the effects of N-terminal pro brain natriuretic peptide (NT-p...

  7. Strengthening the case that elevated levels of programmed death ligand 1 predict poor prognosis in hepatocellular carcinoma patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong J

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Jian-Hong Zhong,1,* Cheng-Piao Luo,2,* Chun-Yan Zhang,2 Le-Qun Li1 1Hepatobiliary Surgery Department, 2Experimental Department, Affiliated Tumor Hospital of Guangxi Medical University, Nanning, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Immunotherapy targeting programmed death receptor 1 and programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1 has shown impressive antitumor efficacy in several solid cancers, including advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. Since response rates of various cancers to such immunotherapy appear to correlate with PD-L1 expression levels, several studies have examined whether PD-L1 expression correlates with HCC pathology and patient prognosis. In this paper, we analyzed the strength and limitations of a recent meta-analysis of associations of PD-L1 with HCC characteristics and patient prognosis. Keywords: hepatocellular carcinoma, programmed death ligand 1, hepatic resection, prognoses

  8. Pelvic irradiation-induced eosinophilia is correlated to prognosis of cervical cancer patients and transient elevation of serum interleukin 5 level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Hideya; Inoue, Takehiro; Tanaka, Eiichi; Isohashi, Fumiaki; Koizumi, Masahiko; Shuo, Xing; Nakamura, Hironobu; Inoue, Toshihiko

    2005-08-01

    To determine the significance of eosinophilia and serum interleukin 5 (IL-5) levels induced by radiotherapy in patients with gynecological cancer. First, we examined changes in the number of eosinophils before and during radiotherapy in 145 patients with cervical cancer who underwent external radiotherapy and brachytherapy. Eosinophilia was defined as > or =10% eosinophils or > or =500 eosinophils/mm3. Next, we determined serum IL-5 levels prospectively in 20 patients, comprising 18 cases of cervical cancer, one of uterine corpus cancer, and one of vaginal cancer. Eosinophilia was seen in 88 patients (61%). Patients with advanced disease stage IV showed 32% eosinophila, lower than those of stage I (63%), II (69%), and III (65%) disease patients (p=0.03). The 5-year cause-specific survival rate was 76% for patients with eosinophilia (+) and 53% for patients without eosinophilia (p=0.0003). Thus, eosinophilia correlates to stage classification and a good prognosis. Of the 20 patients studied prospectively, the six with elevated serum IL-5 level at one week (6/20=30%) all showed eosinophilia (100%), whereas only six of the other 14 patients had eosinophilia (43%, p=0.04). Radiotherapy induced transient elevation of serum IL-5 levels and is related with eosinophilia, which is correlated to prognosis.

  9. Sympathetic nervous system and chronic renal failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boero, R; Pignataro, A; Ferro, M; Quarello, F

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this work was to review evidence on the role of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) in chronic renal failure (CRF). Three main points are discussed: 1) SNS and pathogenesis of arterial hypertension; 2) SNS and cardiovascular risk; 3) implication of SNS in arterial hypotension during hemodialysis. Several lines of evidence indicate the presence of a sympathetic hyperactivity in CRF, and its relationship with arterial hypertension. It is suggested that diseased kidneys send afferent nervous signals to central integrative sympathetic nuclei, thus contributing to the development and maintenance of arterial hypertension. The elimination of these impulses with nephrectomy could explain the concomitant reduction of blood pressure. Several experiments confirmed this hypothesis. Regarding SNS and cardiovascular risk, some data suggest that reduced heart rate variability identifies an increased risk for both all causes and sudden death, independently from other recognized risk factors. Symptomatic hypotension is a common problem during hemodialysis treatment, occurring in approximately 20-30% of all hemodialysis sessions and is accompanied by acute withdrawal of sympathetic activity, vasodilation and relative bradicardia. This reflex is thought to be evoked by vigorous contraction of a progressively empty left ventricle, activating cardiac mechanoceptors. This inhibits cardiovascular centers through vagal afferents, and overrides the stimulation by baroreceptor deactivation. Alternative explanations include cerebral ischemia and increased production of nitric oxide, which inhibit central sympathetic activity. It is hoped that therapies aimed at modulating sympathetic nerve activity in patients with CRF will ameliorate their prognosis and quality of life.

  10. Prevalence, characteristics, and prognosis role of type 1 ST elevation in the peripheral ECG leads in patients with Brugada syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollin, A; Sacher, F; Gourraud, J B; Pasquié, J L; Raczka, F; Duparc, A; Mondoly, P; Cardin, C; Delay, M; Chatel, S; Derval, N; Denis, A; Sadron, M; Davy, J M; Hocini, M; Jaïs, P; Jesel, L; Haïssaguerre, M; Probst, V; Maury, P

    2013-07-01

    Despite isolated reports of Brugada syndrome (BrS) in the inferior or lateral leads, the prevalence and prognostic value of ST elevation in the peripheral electrocardiographic (ECG) leads in patients with BrS remain poorly known. To study the prevalence, characteristics, and prognostic value of type 1 ST elevation and ST depression in the peripheral ECG leads in a large cohort of patients with BrS. ECGs from 323 patients with BrS (age 47 ± 13 years; 257 men) with spontaneous (n = 141) or drug-induced (n = 182) type 1 ECG were retrospectively reviewed. Two hundred twenty-five (70%) patients were asymptomatic, 72 (22%) patients presented with unexplained syncope, and 26 (8%) patients presented with sudden death (12 patients) or appropriated implantable cardioverter-defibrillator therapies (14 patients) at diagnosis or over a mean follow-up of 48 ± 34 months. Thirty (9%) patients presented with type 1 ST elevation in at least 1 peripheral lead (22 patients in the aVR leads, 2 in the inferior leads, 5 in both aVR and inferior leads, and 1 in the aVR and VL leads). Patients with type 1 ST elevation in the peripheral leads more often had mutations in the SCN5A gene, were more often inducible, had slower heart rate, and higher J-wave amplitude in the right precordial leads. Twenty-seven percent (8 of 30) of the patients with type 1 ST elevation in the peripheral leads experimented sudden death/appropriate implantable cardioverter-defibrillator therapy, whereas it occurred in only 6% (18 of 293) of other patients (P leads was independently associated with malignant arrhythmic events (odds ratio 4.58; 95% confidence interval 1.7-12.32; P = .0025). Type 1 ST elevation in the peripheral ECG leads can be seen in 10% of the patients with BrS and is an independent predictor for a malignant arrhythmic event. Copyright © 2013 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Usefulness of delta troponin for diagnosis and prognosis assessment of non-ST-segment elevation acute chest pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchis, Juan; Abellán, Lidia; García-Blas, Sergio; Mainar, Luis; Mollar, Anna; Valero, Ernesto; Consuegra-Sánchez, Luciano; Roqué, Mercé; Bertomeu-González, Vicente; Chorro, Francisco J; Núñez, Eduardo; Núñez, Julio

    2016-09-01

    The additional diagnostic and prognostic information provided by delta high-sensitivity troponin T (hs-cTnT) in patients with acute chest pain and hs-cTnT elevation remains unclear. The study group consisted of 601 patients presenting at the emergency department with non-ST-segment elevation acute chest pain and hs-cTnT elevation after two determinations (admission and within the first six hours). Maximum hs-cTnT and delta hs-cTnT (absolute or percentage change between the two measurements) were considered. Cutoff values were optimized using the quartile distribution for the endpoints. The endpoints were diagnostic (significant stenosis in the coronary angiogram) and prognostic (death or recurrent myocardial infarction at one year). Regarding the diagnostic endpoint, 114 patients showed a normal angiogram. Both maximum hs-cTnT ⩾80 ng/ml (OR 2.5, 95% CI 1.3-4.8, P=0.005) and delta hs-cTnT ⩾20 ng/l (OR 2.1, 95% CI 1.1-4.0, P=0.02) median value cutoffs were related to significant coronary stenosis. Furthermore, the combination of hs-cTn acute chest pain. Low maximum and low delta hs-cTnT are associated with a normal coronary angiogram, which could make the final diagnosis challenging in some cases. © The European Society of Cardiology 2015.

  12. Optimized Prognosis Assessment in ST-Segment-Elevation Myocardial Infarction Using a Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging Risk Score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiermaier, Thomas; Jobs, Alexander; de Waha, Suzanne; Fuernau, Georg; Pöss, Janine; Desch, Steffen; Thiele, Holger; Eitel, Ingo

    2017-11-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) demonstrated great potential for the prediction of major adverse cardiac events (MACE) in ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction. The aim of this study was to develop and validate a CMR-based risk score for ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction patients. The scoring model was developed and validated on ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction cohorts from 2 independent randomized controlled trials (n=738 and n=458 patients, respectively) and included left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction, infarct size, and microvascular obstruction. Primary end point was the 12-month MACE rate consisting of death, reinfarction, and new congestive heart failure. In the derivation cohort, LV ejection fraction ≤47%, infarct size ≥19%LV, and microvascular obstruction ≥1.4%LV were identified as the best cutoff values for MACE prediction. According to the hazard ratios in multivariable regression analysis, the CMR risk score was created by attributing 1 point for LV ejection fraction ≤47%, 1 point for infarct size ≥19%LV, and 2 points for microvascular obstruction ≥1.4%LV. In the validation cohort, the score showed a good prediction of MACE (area under the curve: 0.76). Stratification into a low (0/1 point) and high-risk group (≥2 points) resulted in significantly higher MACE rates in high-risk patients (9.0% versus 2.2%; P=0.001). Inclusion of the CMR score in addition to a model of clinical risk factors led to a significant increase of C statistics from 0.74 to 0.83 (P=0.037), a net reclassification improvement of 0.18 (P=0.009), and an integrated discriminative improvement of 0.04 (P=0.010). Our approach integrates the prognostic information of CMR imaging into a simple risk score that showed incremental prognostic value over clinical risk factors in ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction patients. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifiers: NCT00712101 and NCT02158468. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  13. A large cohort study reveals the association of elevated peripheral blood lymphocyte-to-monocyte ratio with favorable prognosis in nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC is an endemic neoplasm in southern China. Although NPC sufferers are sensitive to radiotherapy, 20-30% of patients finally progress with recurrence and metastases. Elevated lymphocyte-to-monocyte ratio (LMR has been reported to be associated with favorable prognosis in some hematology malignancies, but has not been studied in NPC. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether LMR could predict the prognosis of NPC patients. METHODS: A retrospective cohort of 1,547 non-metastatic NPC patients was recruited between January 2005 and June 2008. The counts for peripheral lymphocyte and monocyte were retrieved, and the LMR was calculated. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, univariate and multivariate COX proportional hazards analyses were applied to evaluate the associations of LMR with overall survival (OS, disease-free survival (DFS, distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS and loco-regional recurrence-free survival (LRRFS, respectively. RESULTS: Univariate analysis revealed that higher LMR level (≥ 5.220 was significantly associated with superior OS, DFS and DMFS (P values <0.001. The higher lymphocyte count (≥ 2.145 × 10(9/L was significantly associated with better OS (P = 0.002 and DMFS (P = 0.031, respectively, while the lower monocyte count (<0.475 × 10(9/L was associated with better OS (P = 0.012, DFS (P = 0.011 and DMFS (P = 0.003, respectively. Multivariate Cox proportional hazard analysis showed that higher LMR level was a significantly independent predictor for superior OS (hazard ratio or HR = 0.558, 95% confidence interval or 95% CI = 0.417-0.748; P<0.001, DFS (HR = 0.669, 95% CI = 0.535-0.838; P<0.001 and DMFS (HR = 0.543, 95% CI = 0.403-0.732; P<0.001, respectively. The advanced T and N stages were also independent indicators for worse OS, DFS, and DMFS, except that T stage showed borderline statistical significance for DFS (P = 0.053 and DMFS (P = 0.080. CONCLUSIONS: The

  14. The elevated preoperative fasting blood glucose predicts a poor prognosis in patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma: The Fujian prospective investigation of cancer (FIESTA) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Dan; Peng, Feng; Lin, Xiandong; Chen, Gang; Liang, Binying; Li, Chao; Zhang, Hejun; Liao, Xuehong; Lin, Jinxiu; Zheng, Xiongwei; Niu, Wenquan

    2016-10-04

    Diabetes as a latent risk factor for cancer has been extensively investigated, while its postoperative prognosis for esophageal cancer is rarely reported. We therefore sought to assess whether the elevated fasting blood glucose before surgery was associated with poor survival in esophageal cancer patients by eliciting a subset of data from the ongoing Fujian prospective investigation of cancer (FIESTA) study. Over 15-year follow-up, 2535 patients receiving three-field lymphadenectomy were assessable. Only patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) (n=2396) were analyzed due to the lower prevalence of the other histological types. In ESCC patients, the follow-up duration ranged from 0.5 to 180 months (median 38.2 months). The median survival time (MST) was remarkably shorter in males than in females (80.7 vs. 180+ months, Log-rank test: Pfasting blood glucose was 1.11 (95% confidence interval or CI: 1.09-1.14, Pfasting blood glucose for the survival of ESCC patients. Taken together, our findings convincingly demonstrated that the elevated preoperative fasting blood glucose can predict poor survival of ESCC patients, especially in males.

  15. Interplay Between Adiponectin and Pro-Atrial Natriuretic Peptide and Prognosis in Patients With ST-Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindberg, Søren; Jensen, Jan S; Hoffmann, Søren

    2015-01-01

    Natriuretic peptides (NPs) may regulate adipocyte metabolism including adiponectin. Infusion of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) increases plasma adiponectin in patients with heart failure. However, this relation has not been examined in a clinical setting or in myocardial infarction (MI). Accord......Natriuretic peptides (NPs) may regulate adipocyte metabolism including adiponectin. Infusion of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) increases plasma adiponectin in patients with heart failure. However, this relation has not been examined in a clinical setting or in myocardial infarction (MI......). Accordingly, we investigated the interplay between proANP and adiponectin and the prognostic implications in patients with MI. We prospectively included 680 patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) treated with primary percutaneous coronary intervention from September 2006 to December...... 2008. Blood samples were drawn immediately before percutaneous coronary intervention. Additionally, we included 40 patients with 4 obtained blood samples during STEMI. Adiponectin and proANP were measured in all plasma samples. All patients were followed for 5 years. End points were all-cause mortality...

  16. Coronary Artery Dominance and Long-term Prognosis in Patients With ST-segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction Treated With Primary Angioplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Assi, Emad; Castiñeira-Busto, María; González-Salvado, Violeta; Raposeiras-Roubin, Sergio; Riziq-Yousef Abumuaileq, Rami; Peña-Gil, Carlos; Rigueiro-Veloso, Pedro; Ocaranza, Raimundo; García-Acuña, José María; González-Juanatey, José Ramón

    2016-01-01

    The long-term prognostic significance of coronary artery dominance pattern in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction is poorly characterized. We investigated the prognosis of such patients according to whether they had right dominance, left dominance, or codominance. This was a retrospective study of 767 patients, who were admitted to hospital between 2007 and 2012 with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction and treated with primary percutaneous coronary intervention. We determined the effect of the coronary dominance pattern on all-cause mortality and readmission for infarction, adjusting for mortality as a competing event. A total of 80.9% of patients had right coronary dominance, and 8.6% had left coronary dominance. Over 40.8 months' [interquartile range, 21.9-58.3 months] follow-up, 118 (15.4%) deaths were recorded, of which 39 (5.1%) were in hospital. Mortality for right dominance, left dominance, and codominance was 7.1%, 36.4%, and 13.8% (P ˂ .001), respectively. Cause of death was cardiovascular in 7.1%, 21.2%, and 2.4%. On Cox multivariate analysis, left dominance was significantly associated with mortality (hazard ratio = 1.76; P = .02). Taking "coronary dominance" into account in prediction of risk of death improved the discrimination and calibration capacity of GRACE (Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events) scoring. At follow-up, 9.3% (71 patients) had reinfarction. On multivariate analysis, left dominance was an independent predictor of reinfarction (subhazard ratio = 2.06; P = .01). In ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction treated with primary percutaneous coronary intervention, left coronary artery dominance confers a higher risk of death and reinfarction than right coronary artery dominance, and should be included in prognostic stratification. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Long-term Prognosis of Patients With Non-ST-segment Elevation Acute Myocardial Infarction and Coronary Arteries Without Significant Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redondo-Diéguez, Alfredo; Gonzalez-Ferreiro, Rocío; Abu-Assi, Emad; Raposeiras-Roubin, Sergio; Aidhodjayeva, Ozoda; López-López, Andrea; Castiñeira-Busto, María; Peña-Gil, Carlos; García-Acuña, Jose María; González-Juanatey, José Ramón

    2015-09-01

    There is debate regarding the prognostic significance of the absence of significant coronary lesions in patients with non-ST-segment elevation acute myocardial infarction. We investigated long-term prognosis in a contemporary cohort of these patients. Retrospective observational study of 5203 patients with acute coronary syndrome. Propensity score matching was used to create 2 groups of 367 patients with non-ST-segment elevation acute myocardial infarction matched by the absence or presence of significant coronary lesions. In the matched cohort, we determined the impact of the absence of significant coronary lesions on mortality or readmission for acute coronary syndrome for 4.8 (2.6) years after discharge. Mortality or readmission for acute coronary syndrome was lower among patients without significant lesions (26.4% vs 32.7%; P = .09). Mortality in both groups was 19.1%. In contrast, patients without significant lesions had a lower incidence of readmission for acute coronary syndrome (2.0/100 vs 3.9/100 person-years; P = .003). The incidence of mortality or readmission for acute coronary syndrome was similar in patients without significant lesions and those with significant 1-vessel disease (26.4% vs 27.5%; P = .19), but lower than that in patients with 2-vessel disease (37.8%; P = .007) and 3-vessel disease or left main coronary artery disease (41.1%; P = .002). Patients with non-ST-segment elevation acute myocardial infarction and coronary arteries without significant lesions have similar long-term mortality but lower readmission rates for acute coronary syndrome than patients with significant lesions. Mortality or readmission for acute coronary syndrome is similar in patients without significant lesions and patients with 1-vessel disease, but lower than in patients with disease in 2 or more vessels. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Impact of newly diagnosed abnormal glucose regulation on long-term prognosis in low risk patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction: A follow-up study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelnoor Michael

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients with acute myocardial infarction and newly detected abnormal glucose regulation have been shown to have a less favourable prognosis compared to patients with normal glucose regulation. The importance and timing of oral glucose tolerance testing (OGTT in patients with acute myocardial infarction without known diabetes is uncertain. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the impact of abnormal glucose regulation classified by an OGTT in-hospital and at three-month follow-up on clinical outcome in patients with acute ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI without known diabetes. Methods Patients (n = 224, age 58 years with a primary percutanous coronary intervention (PCI treated STEMI were followed for clinical events (all-cause mortality, non-fatal myocardial re-infarction, recurrent ischemia causing hospital admission, and stroke. The patients were classified by a standardised 75 g OGTT at two time points, first, at a median time of 16.5 hours after hospital admission, then at three-month follow-up. Based on the OGTT results, the patients were categorised according to the WHO criteria and the term abnormal glucose regulation was defined as the sum of impaired fasting glucose, impaired glucose tolerance and type 2-diabetes. Results The number of patients diagnosed with abnormal glucose regulation in-hospital and at three-month was 105 (47% and 50 (25%, respectively. During the follow up time of (median 33 (27, 39 months, 58 (25.9% patients experienced a new clinical event. There were six deaths, 15 non-fatal re-infarction, 33 recurrent ischemia, and four strokes. Kaplan-Meier analysis of survival free of composite end-points showed similar results in patients with abnormal and normal glucose regulation, both when classified in-hospital (p = 0.4 and re-classified three months later (p = 0.3. Conclusions Patients with a primary PCI treated STEMI, without previously known diabetes, appear to have an excellent

  19. Tailored antiplatelet therapy to improve prognosis in patients exhibiting clopidogrel low-response prior to percutaneous coronary intervention for stable angina or non-ST elevation acute coronary syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paarup Dridi, Nadia; Johansson, Pär I; Lønborg, Jacob T

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aim: To investigate whether an intensified antiplatelet regimen could improve prognosis in stable or non-ST elevation in acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patients exhibiting high on-treatment platelet reactivity (HTPR) on clopidogrel and treated with percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI......). There is a wide variability in the platelet reactivity to clopidogrel and HTPR has been associated with a poor prognosis. Methods: In this observational study, 923 consecutive patients without ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) and adequately pre-treated with clopidogrel were screened for HTPR...... was demonstrated in 237 patients (25.7%). Of these, 114 continued on conventional clopidogrel therapy, while the remaining 123 received intensified antiplatelet therapy with either double-dose clopidogrel (150 mg daily, n = 55) or the newer P2Y12-inhibitors, prasugrel or ticagrelor (n = 68) for at least 30 days...

  20. Sympathetic overactivity--the Cinderella of cardiovascular risk factors in dialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vonend, Oliver; Rump, L Christian; Ritz, Eberhard

    2008-01-01

    Cardiovascular morbidity and mortality is exceedingly high in patients with chronic renal failure. Sympathetic overactivity is an important pathomechanism contributing to progression of renal disease as well as cardiovascular complications. For more than 30 years it has been known that plasma levels of norepinephrine are elevated in chronic renal failure pointing to increased sympathetic nerve activity. The kidneys are richly innervated by efferent sympathetic and afferent sensory nerves. They participate in many reflex adjustments of renal function. Initially, this finding had not been attributed to increased efferent sympathetic drive, but rather to reduced renal clearance and defective neuronal reuptake of norepinephrine. At this time, however, the evidence for increased sympathetic drive is solid. Interventions to reduce sympathetic overactivity will provide new therapeutic approaches. The available experimental and clinical evidence to suggest such a pathophysiological role of sympathetic overactivity is summarized in this current review.

  1. Reflex sympathetic dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, J N; Valley, M A

    1994-01-01

    In summary, RSD is pain of neuropathic origin. The diagnosis is often obscure and requires a complete history, physical, and psychological evaluations. The diagnosis depends on symptoms (burning pain, allodynia and hyperpathia); signs (edema, sudomotor changes, temperature changes); and objective measurements, such as skin temperature, QSART, radiographs, and triple-phase bone scans; as well as the clinical response to a sympathetic block. Management of RSD should be designed to promote restoration of function utilizing physical therapy made possible by sympathetic, central, or peripheral nerve blockade. Medications may include nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, tricyclic antidepressants, and vasoactive drugs. Psychologic support is an important part of the patient's rehabilitation. Dorsal column or peripheral nerve stimulators, sympathectomies, and narcotics should be considered only when other more conservative measures have failed.

  2. Risk profile and in-hospital prognosis in elderly patients presenting for acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction in the Tunisian context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walid Jomaa

    2016-11-01

    Conclusions: In the Tunisian context, elderly patients presenting with STEMI have higher prevalence of risk factors and a worse in-hospital course in comparison to younger patients. Clinical presentation on-admission has a strong impact on in-hospital prognosis.

  3. Sympathetic nervous activity in cirrhosis. A survey of plasma catecholamine studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl; Ring-Larsen, H; Christensen, N J

    1985-01-01

    This review summarizes recent progress in the knowledge of catecholamines in cirrhosis. Compensated patients have normal plasma concentration of noradrenaline. Highly elevated plasma noradrenaline concentration in decompensated patients indicates that the sympathetic nervous system is enhanced...... in this condition. This may especially apply to the sympathetic tone in the kidney, as evaluated by regional measurements of noradrenaline overflow. Hepatic elimination of catecholamines is only slightly reduced. Activation of the sympathetic nervous system seems to play an important role in the avid sodium...

  4. [Usefulness of TIMI Risk Score in assessing the prognosis in patients with acute coronary syndromes without ST elevation assigned to early percutaneous coronary intervention. Comparison of the high-risk and the moderate-risk patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szyguła-Jurkiewicz, Bozena; Wilczek, Krzysztof; Trzeciak, Przemysław; Poloński, Lech

    2004-09-01

    Risk stratification in acute coronary syndromes (ACS) without ST segment elevation plays an important role in choosing treatment strategy and making further prognosis. We aimed at 1) assessing the usefulness of TIMI Risk Score in risk stratification and prognosis in unselected patients with ACS without ST elevation who underwent early percutaneous revascularization, 2) comparing the frequency of adverse events (death, MI, repeat revascularization in high-risk and moderate-risk patients during 14 days from revascularization, 3) comparing the efficacy of percutaneous revascularization in the high-risk and in the moderate-risk group. High-risk (TIMI Risk Score > or = 5 points) and moderate-risk (TIMI Risk Score 3-4 points) group comprised 324 and 240 patients respectively. High-risk group comprised older patients, fewer men, more diabetics and hypertensive patients. Peripheral vessel disease and prior MI was also more frequent in the high-risk group. More high-risk patients had initial TIMI flow TIMI 3 flow after revascularization was achieved in fewer high-risk patients. During 14-day follow-up the frequency of combined end-point (death, MI, repeat revascularization) was more frequent in the high-risk group (8.95% vs 1.67%). TIMI Risk Score is an easy to use and useful method in risk stratification and prediction of adverse events in patients with ACS without ST segment elevation assigned to early percutaneous intervention in the early post-procedure period.

  5. Effects of Antidepressants, but not Psychopathology, on Cardiac Sympathetic Control : A Longitudinal Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Licht, Carmilla M. M.; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.; de Geus, Eco J. C.

    2012-01-01

    Increased sympathetic activity has been hypothesized to have a role in the elevated somatic disease risk in persons with depressive or anxiety disorders. However, it remains unclear whether increased sympathetic activity reflects a direct effect of anxiety or depression or an indirect effect of

  6. Time of symptom onset and value of myocardial blush and infarct size on prognosis in patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wieringa, Wouter G; Lexis, Chris P H; Mahmoud, Karim D; Ottervanger, Jan Paul; Burgerhof, Johannes G M; Pundziute, Gabija; van 't Hof, Arnoud W J; van Gilst, Wiek H; Lipsic, Erik

    In patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), the time of onset of ischemia has been associated with myocardial infarction (MI) size. Myocardial blush grade (MBG) reflects myocardial response to ischemia/reperfusion injury, which may differ according to time of the day. The

  7. Fractional Flow Reserve-Guided Complete Revascularization Improves the Prognosis in Patients With ST-Segment-Elevation Myocardial Infarction and Severe Nonculprit Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lønborg, Jacob; Engstrøm, Thomas; Kelbæk, Henning

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The impact of disease severity on the outcome after complete revascularization in patients with ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction and multivessel disease is uncertain. The objective of this post hoc study was to evaluate the impact of number of diseased vessel, lesion locatio...... characteristics. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION: URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01960933....

  8. Elevated serum levels of vascular endothelial growth factor predict a poor prognosis of platinum-based chemotherapy in non-small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zang JL

    2017-01-01

    : In conclusion, the serum VEGF levels were found to be a poor prognostic biomarker for the efficacy of platinum-based chemotherapy in terms of PFS, but it was not shown to be a suitable predictive marker for clinical response to platinum-based chemotherapy. Keywords: non-small cell lung cancer, VEGF, progression-free survival, platinum, chemotherapy, Luminex multiplex, prognosis

  9. ST-segment abnormalities are associated with long-term prognosis in non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndromes: The ERICO-ECG study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandão, Rodrigo M; Samesima, Nelson; Pastore, Carlos A; Staniak, Henrique L; Lotufo, Paulo A; Bensenor, Isabela M; Goulart, Alessandra C; Santos, Itamar S

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to identify whether ST-segment abnormalities, in the admission or during in-hospital stay, are associated with survival and/or new incident myocardial infarction (MI) in 623 non-ST-elevation acute coronary syndrome participants of the Strategy of Registry of Acute Coronary Syndrome (ERICO) study. ERICO is conducted in a community-based hospital. ST-segment analysis was based on the Minnesota Code. We built Cox regression models to study whether ECG was an independent predictor for clinical outcomes. Median follow-up was 3years. We found higher risk of death due to MI in individuals with ST-segment abnormalities in the final ECG (adjusted hazard ratio: 2.68; 95% confidence interval: 1.14-6.28). Individuals with ST-segment abnormalities in any tracing had a non-significant trend toward a higher risk of fatal or new non-fatal MI (p=0.088). ST-segment abnormalities after the initial tracing added long-term prognostic information. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The History of Sympathetic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashmonai, Moshe

    2016-11-01

    At present, primary hyperhidrosis is the main indication for sympathectomy. For upper thoracic sympathetic ablation, excision of the second thoracic ganglion alone or with the first and/or third ganglia was the standard during the open surgery era. With the advent of thoracoscopy, modifications related to the level, extent, and type of ablation were proposed to attenuate compensatory hyperhidrosis. The ideal operation for sympathetic denervation of the face and upper limbs remain to be defined. Controlled double-blind studies with quantitave measurements of sweat production are required. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Relevance of Sympathetic Nervous System Activation in Obesity and Metabolic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia A. Thorp

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sympathetic tone is well recognised as being implicit in cardiovascular control. It is less readily acknowledged that activation of the sympathetic nervous system is integral in energy homeostasis and can exert profound metabolic effects. Accumulating data from animal and human studies suggest that central sympathetic overactivity plays a pivotal role in the aetiology and complications of several metabolic conditions that can cluster to form the Metabolic Syndrome (MetS. Given the known augmented risk for type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and premature mortality associated with the MetS understanding the complex pathways underlying the metabolic derangements involved has become a priority. Many factors have been proposed to contribute to increased sympathetic nerve activity in metabolic abnormalities including obesity, impaired baroreflex sensitivity, hyperinsulinemia, and elevated adipokine levels. Furthermore there is mounting evidence to suggest that chronic sympathetic overactivity can potentiate two of the key metabolic alterations of the MetS, central obesity and insulin resistance. This review will discuss the regulatory role of the sympathetic nervous system in metabolic control and the proposed pathophysiology linking sympathetic overactivity to metabolic abnormalities. Pharmacological and device-based approaches that target central sympathetic drive will also be discussed as possible therapeutic options to improve metabolic control in at-risk patient cohorts.

  12. Evidence and consequences of the central role of the kidneys in the pathophysiology of sympathetic hyperactivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Elisabeth Vink

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Chronic elevation of the sympathetic nervous system has been identified as a major contributor to the complex pathophysiology of hypertension, states of volume overload -such as heart failure- and progressive kidney disease. It is also a strong determinant for clinical outcome. This review focuses on the central role of the kidneys in the pathogenesis of sympathetic hyperactivity. As a consequence, renal denervation may be an attractive option to treat sympathetic hyperactivity. The review will also focus on first results and the still remaining questions of this new treatment option.

  13. The value of plasma D-dimer level on admission in predicting no-reflow after primary percutaneous coronary intervention and long-term prognosis in patients with acute ST segment elevation myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erkol, Ayhan; Oduncu, Vecih; Turan, Burak; Kılıçgedik, Alev; Sırma, Dicle; Gözübüyük, Gökhan; Karabay, Can Yücel; Guler, Ahmet; Dündar, Cihan; Tigen, Kürşat; Pala, Selçuk; Kırma, Cevat

    2014-10-01

    D-dimer is a final product of fibrin degradation and gives an indirect estimation of the thrombotic burden. We aimed to investigate the value of plasma D-dimer levels on admission in predicting no-reflow after primary percutaneous coronary intervention (p-PCI) and long-term prognosis in patients with ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). We retrospectively involved 569 patients treated with p-PCI for acute STEMIs. We prospectively followed up the patients for a median duration of 38 months. Angiographic no-reflow was defined as postprocedural thrombolysis in myocardial infarction (TIMI) flow grade grade admission D-dimer levels in the highest quartile (Q4), compared to the rates in other quartiles. However, Cox proportional hazard model revealed that high D-dimer on admission (Q4) was not an independent predictor of mortality or MACE. In contrast, electrocardiographic no-reflow was independently predictive of both mortality [Hazard ratio (HR) 2.88, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.04-8.58, p = 0.041] and MACE [HR 1.90, 95% CI 1.32-4.71, p = 0.042]. In conclusion, plasma D-dimer level on admission independently predicts no-reflow after p-PCI. However, D-dimer has no independent prognostic value in patients with STEMI.

  14. Sympathetic Activation is Associated with Exercise Limitation in COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haarmann, Helge; Folle, Jan; Nguyen, Xuan Phuc; Herrmann, Peter; Heusser, Karsten; Hasenfuß, Gerd; Andreas, Stefan; Raupach, Tobias

    2016-10-01

    Exercise intolerance, skeletal muscle dysfunction, and reduced daily activity are central in COPD patients and closely related to quality of life and prognosis. Studies assessing muscle exercise have revealed an increase in sympathetic outflow as a link to muscle hypoperfusion and exercise limitation. Our primary hypothesis was that muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) correlates with exercise limitation in COPD. MSNA was evaluated at rest and during dynamic or static handgrip exercise. Additionally, we assessed heart rate, blood pressure, CO2 tension, oxygen saturation (SpO2), and breathing frequency. Ergospirometry was performed to evaluate exercise capacity. We assessed MSNA of 14 COPD patients and 8 controls. In patients, MSNA was negatively correlated with peak oxygen uptake (VO2% pred) (r = -0.597; p = 0.040). During dynamic or static handgrip exercise, patients exhibited a significant increase in MSNA, which was not observed in the control group. The increase in MSNA during dynamic handgrip was highly negatively correlated with peak exercise capacity in Watts (w) and peak oxygen uptake (VO2/kg) (r = -0.853; p = 0.002 and r = -0.881; p = 0.002, respectively). Our study reveals an association between increased MSNA and limited exercise capacity in patients with COPD. Furthermore, we found an increased sympathetic response to moderate physical exercise (handgrip), which may contribute to exercise intolerance in COPD.

  15. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... your chances of survival. The estimate of how the disease will go for you is called prognosis. It ... to discuss cancer prognosis (the likely course of the disease). Learn key points about prognosis and how to ...

  16. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... disease will go for you is called prognosis. It can be hard to understand what prognosis means ... prognosis include: The type of cancer and where it is in your body The stage of the ...

  17. Reflex sympathetic dystrophy in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekgül, Hasan; Serdaroglu, Guil; Uyar, Meltem; Tütüncüoglu, Sarenur

    2002-04-01

    Reflex sympathetic dystrophy is characterized by constant burning pain and hyperesthesia in an extremity. Lower extremities are usually affected. Pain is accompanied by swelling, sweating, vasomotor instability and sometimes trophic changes. There may be a history of minor injury or not. Muscle spasms, myoclonus or focal dystonia may occur. Diffuse pain, loss of function and autonomic dysfunction are three main criteria suggested for diagnosis. Symptoms can last a few days to as long as a year. In this report we present a girl with multiple limb involvement of stage I RSD. The sympathetic skin responses were tested during a remission period. She had milder attacks with a recurrence rate of 4 per year in the following three years from onset.

  18. Effects of peripheral chemoreceptors deactivation on sympathetic activity in heart transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciarka, Agnieszka; Najem, Boutaïna; Cuylits, Nicolas; Leeman, Marc; Xhaet, Olivier; Narkiewicz, Krzysztof; Antoine, Martine; Degaute, Jean-Paul; van de Borne, Philippe

    2005-05-01

    Heart transplantation initially normalizes sympathetic hyperactivity directed at the muscle circulation. However, sympathetic activity increases with time after transplantation and the exact mechanisms responsible for sympathetic control in heart transplant recipients remain unclear. We examined the effects of peripheral chemoreflex deactivation caused by breathing 100% oxygen on muscle sympathetic nerve activity (expressed as number of burst per minute and mean burst amplitude), heart rate, and mean blood pressure in 13 heart transplant recipients, 13 patients with essential hypertension, and 10 controls. Heart transplant recipients disclosed the highest sympathetic activity, whereas it did not differ between controls and patients with essential hypertension (51+/-16 versus 37+/-14 versus 39+/-12 burst/min, respectively; Pactivity (-4+/-4 versus -1+/-2 burst/min, Pactivity (-4+/-4 versus 0+/-3 burst/min, Pactivity (2+/-4 versus 3+/-3 burst/min, P=NS; 95+/-11 versus 95+/-13% of amplitude at baseline, P=NS) in control subjects. The sympathetic response to hyperoxia was more marked in heart transplant recipients than in controls (85+/-9 versus 95+/-11% of baseline amplitude; Pactivity was most evident in patients with the longest time after heart transplantation (r=-0.75, Pactivation increases resting muscle sympathetic nerve activity and favors blood pressure elevation after heart transplantation.

  19. Morbidity in reflex sympathetic dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Murray, C; Cohen, A.; Perkins, T.; Davidson, J; Sills, J

    2000-01-01

    Reflex sympathetic dystrophy (RSD), an unusual diagnosis in general paediatrics, is well recognised by paediatric rheumatologists. This study reports the presentation and the clinical course of 46 patients (35 female, age range 8-15.2) with RSD. The patients saw professionals from an average of 2.3 specialties (range 1-5). Twenty five (54%) had a history of trauma. Median time to diagnosis was 12 weeks (range 1-130). Many children had multiple investigations and treatments. Once d...

  20. Value of 18F-FDG PET negativity and Tg suppressibility as markers of prognosis in patients with elevated Tg and 131I-negative differentiated thyroid carcinoma (TENIS syndrome).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranade, Rohit; Kand, Purushottam; Basu, Sandip

    2015-10-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the prognostic value of fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) PET negativity and thyroglobulin (Tg) suppressibility in differentiated thyroid carcinoma patients with elevated Tg and a negative radioiodine scan. The study population was selected from thyroid cancer patients registered at a large tertiary cancer care center for management and consisted of patients with metastatic thyroid cancer with elevated Tg on follow-up, negative 131I whole-body scan and negative 18F-FDG PET/computed tomography (CT) study. Patients with thyroid carcinoma were subjected to a thyroid-stimulating hormone-stimulated assessment on the basis of a 131I whole-body scan, serum Tg level and whole-body 18F-FDG PET/CT scan for evaluation of metastatic disease burden. The same patients were subjected to a follow-up evaluation of serum Tg and whole-body 18F-FDG PET/CT scan under thyroid-stimulating hormone suppression while on thyroxine sodium. Comparison was also made between the findings of 18F-FDG PET/CT in patients demonstrating suppressible Tg. A total of 40 (25 male and 15 female) patients were included in the study. All patients had a negative whole-body 18F-FDG PET/CT study but had stimulated Tg more than 5 ng/dl (range: 5.1-> 250 ng/ml), indicating the presence of disease. The patients demonstrated variable Tg suppressibility and were classified on the basis of the extent of Tg suppressibility (%Tg suppressibility > 90% in 21 patients; %Tg suppressibility 65-90% in 12 patients; and %Tg suppressibility 65%) is observed in a significant fraction of these patients, which appears to be independent of the status of metastasis or the histopathology. Also patients who show no Tg suppressibility but had a negative 18F-FDG PET/CT scan still had a better prognosis indicated by the disease-free interval in these patients as indicated in our study. Whether there exists any relation between the extent of suppressibility and their long-term outcome

  1. The Sympathetic Nervous System in Obesity Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohmeier, Thomas E.; Iliescu, Radu

    2013-01-01

    Abundant evidence supports a role of the sympathetic nervous system in the pathogenesis of obesity-related hypertension. However, the nature and temporal progression of mechanisms underlying this sympathetically mediated hypertension are incompletely understood. Recent technological advances allowing direct recordings of renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA) in conscious animals, together with direct suppression of RSNA by renal denervation and reflex-mediated global sympathetic inhibition in experimental animals and human subjects have been especially valuable in elucidating these mechanisms. These studies strongly support the concept that increased RSNA is the critical mechanism by which increased central sympathetic outflow initiates and maintains reductions in renal excretory function, causing obesity hypertension. Potential determinants of renal sympathoexcitation and the differential mechanisms mediating the effects of renal-specific versus reflex-mediated, global sympathetic inhibition on renal hemodynamics and cardiac autonomic function are discussed. These differential mechanisms may impact the efficacy of current device-based approaches for hypertension therapy. PMID:23677623

  2. Sympathetic vasoconstrictor nerve function in alcoholic neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, K; Andersen, K; Smith, T

    1984-01-01

    The peripheral sympathetic vasomotor nerve function was investigated in 18 male chronic alcoholics admitted for intellectual impairment or polyneuropathy. By means of the local 133Xenon washout technique, the sympathetic veno-arteriolar axon-reflex was studied. This normally is responsible for a ...

  3. Sympathetic blocks for visceral cancer pain management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mercadante, Sebastiano; Klepstad, Pal; Kurita, Geana Paula

    2015-01-01

    The neurolytic blocks of sympathetic pathways, including celiac plexus block (CPB) and superior hypogastric plexus block (SHPB) , have been used for years. The aim of this review was to assess the evidence to support the performance of sympathetic blocks in cancer patients with abdominal visceral...

  4. Sympathetic actions on the skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roatta, Silvestro; Farina, Dario

    2010-01-01

    The sympathetic nervous system (SNS) modulates several functions in skeletal muscle fibers, including metabolism, ionic transport across the membrane, and contractility. These actions, together with the sympathetic control of other organ systems, support intense motor activity. However, some SNS actions on skeletal muscles may not always be functionally advantageous. Implications for motor control and sport performance are discussed.

  5. The human sympathetic nervous system: its relevance in hypertension and heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parati, Gianfranco; Esler, Murray

    2012-05-01

    Evidence assembled in this review indicates that sympathetic nervous system dysfunction is crucial in the development of heart failure and essential hypertension. This takes the form of persistent and adverse activation of sympathetic outflows to the heart and kidneys in both conditions. An important goal for clinical scientists is translation of the knowledge of pathophysiology, such as this, into better treatment for patients. The achievement of this 'mechanisms to management' transition is at different stages of development with regard to the two disorders. Clinical translation is mature in cardiac failure, knowledge of cardiac neural pathophysiology having led to the introduction of beta-adrenergic blockers, an effective therapy. With essential hypertension perhaps we are on the cusp of effective translation, with recent successful testing of selective catheter-based renal sympathetic nerve ablation in patients with resistant hypertension, an intervention firmly based on the demonstration of activation of the renal sympathetic outflow. Additional evidence in this regard is provided by the results of pilot studies exploring the possibility to reduce blood pressure in resistant hypertensives through electrical stimulation of the area of carotid baroreceptors. Despite the general importance of the sympathetic nervous system in blood pressure regulation, and the specific demonstration that the blood pressure elevation in essential hypertension is commonly initiated and sustained by sympathetic nervous activation, drugs antagonizing this system are currently underutilized in the care of patients with hypertension. Use of beta-adrenergic blocking drugs is waning, given the propensity of this drug class to have adverse metabolic effects, including predisposition to diabetes development. The blood pressure lowering achieved with carotid baroreceptor stimulation and with the renal denervation device affirms the importance of the sympathetic nervous system in

  6. Effects of leptin on sympathetic nerve activity in conscious mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Donald A; Despas, Fabien; Rahmouni, Kamal

    2015-09-01

    The adipocyte-derived hormone, leptin, has emerged as an important regulator of regional sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) with pathophysiological implications in obesity. Genetically engineered mice are useful to understand the molecular pathways underlying the SNA responses evoked by leptin. However, so far the effect of leptin on direct SNA in mice has been studied under general anesthesia. Here, we examined the sympathetic responses evoked by leptin in conscious mice. Mice were instrumented, under ketamine/xylazine anesthesia, with renal or lumbar SNA recordings using a thin (40 gauge) bipolar platinum-iridium wire. The electrodes were exteriorized at the nape of the neck and mice were allowed (5 h) to recover from anesthesia. Interestingly, the reflex increases in renal and lumbar SNA caused by sodium nitroprusside (SNP)-induced hypotension was higher in the conscious phase versus the anesthetized state, whereas the increase in both renal and lumbar SNA evoked by leptin did not differ between anesthetized or conscious mice. Next, we assessed whether isoflurane anesthesia would yield a better outcome. Again, the SNP-induced increase in renal SNA and baroreceptor-renal SNA reflex were significantly elevated in the conscious states relative to isoflurane-anesthetized phase, but the renal SNA response induced by leptin in the conscious states were qualitatively comparable to those evoked above. Thus, despite improvement in sympathetic reflexes in conscious mice the sympathetic responses evoked by leptin mimic those induced during anesthesia. © 2015 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American Physiological Society and The Physiological Society.

  7. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Overview Research Cancer Screening Cancer Screening Overview Screening Tests Research Diagnosis and Staging Symptoms Diagnosis Staging Prognosis ... Cancer Prevention Overview Screening Cancer Screening Overview Screening Tests Diagnosis & Staging Symptoms Diagnosis Staging Prognosis Treatment Types ...

  8. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Understanding Cancer Prognosis Oncologist Anthony L. Back, M.D., a national expert on doctor-patient communications, talks with one of his patients about what she'd like to know of her prognosis. Credit: National ...

  9. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... during a certain period of time after diagnosis. Disease-free survival This statistic is the percentage of ... discuss cancer prognosis (the likely course of the disease). Learn key points about prognosis and how to ...

  10. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... doctor may tell you that you have a good prognosis if statistics suggest that your cancer is ... about how to discuss prognosis with their patients. Good communication, he says, is part of providing good ...

  11. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Prognosis Questions to Ask about Your Diagnosis Research Understanding Cancer Prognosis Oncologist Anthony L. Back, M.D., a national expert on doctor-patient communications, talks with one of his patients about what ...

  12. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... doctor to give you an accurate prognosis. Understanding the Difference Between Cure and Remission Cure means that ... about her colorectal cancer prognosis. Diving Out of the Dark View this video on YouTube. Andrew wants ...

  13. Morbidity in reflex sympathetic dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, C S; Cohen, A; Perkins, T; Davidson, J E; Sills, J A

    2000-03-01

    Reflex sympathetic dystrophy (RSD), an unusual diagnosis in general paediatrics, is well recognised by paediatric rheumatologists. This study reports the presentation and the clinical course of 46 patients (35 female, age range 8-15.2) with RSD. The patients saw professionals from an average of 2.3 specialties (range 1-5). Twenty five (54%) had a history of trauma. Median time to diagnosis was 12 weeks (range 1-130). Many children had multiple investigations and treatments. Once diagnosis was made, treatment followed with physiotherapy and analgesics. Median time to recovery was seven weeks (range 1-140), with 27.5% relapsing. Nine children required assessment by the child and adolescent psychiatry team. This disease, though rare, has significant morbidity and it is therefore important to raise clinicians' awareness of RSD in childhood. Children with the condition may then be recognised and referred for appropriate management earlier, and spared unnecessary investigations and treatments which may exacerbate the condition.

  14. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... chances of survival. The estimate of how the disease will go for you is called prognosis. It can be hard to understand what prognosis means and also hard to talk about, even for doctors. Many Factors Can Affect Your Prognosis Some of the factors that affect ...

  15. Reflex sympathetic dystrophy and cigarette smoking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, H S; Hawthorne, K B; Jackson, W T

    1988-05-01

    Although the cause of reflex sympathetic dystrophy (RSD) remains unknown, hyperactivity of the sympathetic nerves and secondary vasospasm may be pathogenic in this syndrome. A retrospective epidemiologic study of RSD was done on 53 in-patients from 1978-1985. Cigarette smoking was strikingly increased in patient frequency in RSD (68% versus 37% of hospitalized controls, p less than 0.0001). Eighty-seven percent of the patients had a history of trauma or surgery, and 38% had other associated diseases. Cigarette smoking is statistically linked to RSD and may be involved in its pathogenesis by enhancing sympathetic activity, vasoconstriction, or by some other unknown mechanism.

  16. Identification of sites of sympathetic outflow at rest and during emotional arousal: concurrent recordings of sympathetic nerve activity and fMRI of the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macefield, Vaughan G; James, Cheree; Henderson, Luke A

    2013-09-01

    The sympathetic nervous system subserves many of the autonomic responses to mental stress and emotional processing. While peripheral markers of sympathetic activity can be obtained indirectly - by measuring heart rate, blood pressure, sweat release and skin blood flow - these effector-organ responses are slower compared to the directly recorded sympathetic nerve activity. Microneurography, in which a tungsten microelectrode is inserted percutaneously into a peripheral nerve in awake human subjects, allows one to record sympathetic nerve activity to either muscle or skin. Muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) is involved in the beat-to-beat control of blood pressure, and is elevated during mental stress; chronic stress can lead to high blood pressure. The primary role of skin sympathetic nerve activity (SSNA) is to regulate body temperature by controlling sweat release and skin blood flow, but it has also been commandeered for emotional expression. In this review we discuss our recent work in which we have performed concurrent microelectrode recordings of MSNA or SSNA and fMRI of the brain, with a view to identifying areas in the brain responsible for generating the increases in sympathetic outflow at rest and during emotional engagement. Spontaneous bursts of MSNA at rest were positively correlated to activity in the left dorsomedial hypothalamus and left insula, and bilaterally in the ventromedial hypothalamus, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, posterior cingulate cortex and precuneus. Spontaneous bursts of SSNA at rest were positively correlated with activity in the left ventromedial nucleus of the thalamus, the left posterior and right anterior insula, the right orbitofrontal and frontal cortices and bilaterally in the mid-cingulate cortex and precuneus. Increases in SSNA occurred when subjects viewed emotionally charged images, resulting in increases in activity in the central and lateral amygdala, dorsolateral pons, thalamus, nucleus accumbens, and cerebellar

  17. Sympathetic outflow enhances the stretch reflex response in the relaxed soleus muscle in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjortskov, Nis; Skotte, Jørgen; Hye-Knudsen, Christian; Fallentin, Nils

    2005-04-01

    Animal experiments suggest that an increase in sympathetic outflow can depress muscle spindle sensitivity and thus modulate the stretch reflex response. The results are, however, controversial, and human studies have failed to demonstrate a direct influence of the sympathetic nervous system on the sensitivity of muscle spindles. We studied the effect of increased sympathetic outflow on the short-latency stretch reflex in the soleus muscle evoked by tapping the Achilles tendon. Nine subjects performed three maneuvers causing a sustained activation of sympathetic outflow to the leg: 3 min of static handgrip exercise at 30% of maximal voluntary contraction, followed by 3 min of posthandgrip ischemia, and finally during a 3-min mental arithmetic task. Electromyography was measured from the soleus muscle with bipolar surface electrodes during the Achilles tendon tapping, and beat-to-beat changes in heart rate and mean arterial blood pressure were monitored continuously. Mean arterial pressure was significantly elevated during all three maneuvers, whereas heart rate was significantly elevated during static handgrip exercise and mental arithmetic but not during posthandgrip ischemia. The peak-to-peak amplitude of the short-latency stretch reflex was significantly increased during mental arithmetic (P < 0.05), static handgrip exercise (P < 0.001), and posthandgrip ischemia (P < 0.005). When expressed in percent change from rest, the mean peak-to-peak amplitude increased by 111 (SD 100)% during mental arithmetic, by 160 (SD 103)% during static handgrip exercise, and by 90 (SD 67)% during posthandgrip ischemia. The study clearly indicates a facilitation of the short-latency stretch reflex during increased sympathetic outflow. We note that the enhanced stretch reflex responses observed in relaxed muscles in the absence of skeletomotor activity support the idea that the sympathetic nervous system can exert a direct influence on the human muscle spindles.

  18. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Diagnosis Staging Prognosis Treatment Types of Treatment Side Effects Clinical Trials Cancer Drugs Complementary & Alternative Medicine Coping Feelings & Cancer Adjusting to ...

  19. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Staging Prognosis Treatment Types of Treatment Side Effects Clinical Trials Cancer Drugs Complementary & Alternative Medicine Coping Feelings & Cancer Adjusting to Cancer Self Image & ...

  20. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... our information on Coping With Cancer helpful. Understanding Statistics About Survival Doctors estimate prognosis by using statistics that researchers have collected over many years about ...

  1. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Prevention Risk Factors Genetics Cancer Prevention Overview Research Cancer Screening Cancer Screening Overview Screening Tests Research Diagnosis and Staging Symptoms Diagnosis Staging Prognosis Questions ...

  2. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Questions to Ask about Your Diagnosis Research Understanding Cancer Prognosis Oncologist Anthony L. Back, M.D., a ... for provider care teams (PDF-210KB). Understanding Your Cancer Prognosis Video View this video on YouTube. Three ...

  3. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... with the same type of cancer. Several types of statistics may be used to estimate prognosis. The most ... see the benefit of new treatments and ways of finding cancer. So, the statistics your doctor uses to make a prognosis may ...

  4. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... hard to talk about, even for doctors. Many Factors Can Affect Your Prognosis Some of the factors that affect prognosis include: The type of cancer ... think they are too impersonal to be of value to you. It is up to you to ...

  5. Tonic arterial chemoreceptor activity contributes to cardiac sympathetic activation in mild ovine heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Daniel T; May, Clive N; Booth, Lindsea C; Ramchandra, Rohit

    2014-08-01

    Heart failure (HF) is associated with a large increase in cardiac sympathetic nerve activity (CSNA), which has detrimental effects on the heart and promotes arrhythmias and sudden death. There is increasing evidence that arterial chemoreceptor activation plays an important role in stimulating renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA) and muscle sympathetic nerve activity in HF. Given that sympathetic nerve activity to individual organs is differentially controlled, we investigated whether tonic arterial chemoreceptor activation contributes to the increased CSNA in HF. We recorded CSNA and RSNA in conscious normal sheep and in sheep with mild HF induced by rapid ventricular pacing (ejection fraction chemoreceptor function was evaluated by supplementing room air with 100% intranasal oxygen (2-3 l min(-1)) for 20 min, thereby deactivating chemoreceptors. The effects of hyperoxia on resting levels and baroreflex control of heart rate, CSNA and RSNA were determined. In HF, chemoreceptor deactivation induced by hyperoxia significantly reduced CSNA [90 ± 2 versus 75 ± 5 bursts (100 heart beats)(-1), P chemoreceptor deactivation reduced heart rate without a significant effect on CSNA or RSNA. In summary, deactivation of peripheral chemoreceptors during HF reduced the elevated levels of CSNA, indicating that tonic arterial chemoreceptor activation plays a critical role in stimulating the elevated CSNA in HF. © 2014 The Authors. Experimental Physiology © 2014 The Physiological Society.

  6. Peripheral chemoreceptor contributions to sympathetic and cardiovascular responses during hypercapnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoemaker, J K; Vovk, A; Cunningham, D A

    2002-12-01

    We tested the hypothesis that integrated sympathetic and cardiovascular reflexes are modulated by systemic CO2 differently in hypoxia than in hyperoxia (n = 7). Subjects performed a CO2 rebreathe protocol that equilibrates CO2 partial pressures between arterial and venous blood and that elevates end tidal CO2 (PET(CO2)) from approximately 40 to approximately 58 mmHg. This test was repeated under conditions where end tidal oxygen levels were clamped at 50 (hypoxia) or 200 (hyperoxia) mmHg. Heart rate (HR; EKG), stroke volume (SV; Doppler ultrasound), blood pressure (MAP; finger plethysmograph), and muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) were measured continuously during the two protocols. MAP at 40 mmHg PET(CO2) (i.e., the first minute of the rebreathe) was greater during hypoxia versus hyperoxia (P 50 mmHg PET(CO2)) than hyperoxia (> 55 mmHg). MSNA increased earlier during hypoxic hypercapnia (> 45 mmHg) compared with hyperoxic hypercapnia (> 55 mmHg). Thus, in these conscious humans, the dose-response effect of PET(CO2) on the integrated cardiovascular responses was shifted to the left during hypoxic hypercapnia. The combined data indicate that peripheral chemoreceptors exert important influence over cardiovascular reflex responses to hypercapnia.

  7. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Treatment Types of Cancer Treatment Side Effects Clinical Trials Information A to Z List of Cancer Drugs ... Prognosis Treatment Types of Treatment Side Effects Clinical Trials Cancer Drugs Complementary & Alternative Medicine Coping Feelings & Cancer ...

  8. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Cancer Common Cancer Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer Leukemia Liver Cancer Lung ... need for different kinds of information about her colorectal cancer prognosis. Diving Out of the Dark View this ...

  9. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Cancer Treatment Types of Cancer Treatment Side Effects Clinical Trials Information A to Z List of Cancer ... Staging Prognosis Treatment Types of Treatment Side Effects Clinical Trials Cancer Drugs Complementary & Alternative Medicine Coping Feelings & ...

  10. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Diagnosis Staging Prognosis Treatment Types of Treatment Side Effects Clinical Trials Cancer Drugs Complementary & Alternative Medicine Coping Feelings & Cancer Adjusting to Cancer Self Image & Sexuality Day to Day Life Survivorship Support for Caregivers ...

  11. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... help coping with your prognosis, you may find our information on Coping With Cancer helpful. Understanding Statistics ... comments on this post. All comments must follow our comment policy . National Cancer Institute at the National ...

  12. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to estimate cancer-specific survival that does not use information about the cause of death. It is ... of finding cancer. So, the statistics your doctor uses to make a prognosis may not be based ...

  13. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to talk about, even for doctors. Many Factors Can Affect Your Prognosis Some of the factors that ... Understanding your cancer and knowing what to expect can help you and your loved ones make decisions. ...

  14. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of survival. The estimate of how the disease will go for you is called prognosis. It can ... they cannot be used to predict exactly what will happen to you. Everyone is different. Treatments and ...

  15. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... respond to treatment Seeking Information About Your Prognosis Is a Personal Decision When you have cancer, you ... the decisions you may face include: Which treatment is best for you If you want treatment How ...

  16. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Research Diagnosis and Staging Symptoms Diagnosis Staging Prognosis Questions to Ask about Your Diagnosis Research Cancer Treatment ... List of Cancer Drugs Complementary & Alternative Medicine (CAM) Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research Coping with ...

  17. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Cancer Treatment Types of Cancer Treatment Side Effects Clinical Trials Information A to Z List of Cancer Drugs ... Staging Prognosis Treatment Types of Treatment Side Effects Clinical Trials Cancer Drugs Complementary & Alternative Medicine Coping Feelings & Cancer ...

  18. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... hard to talk about, even for doctors. Many Factors Can Affect Your Prognosis Some of the factors ... Services Website Linking U.S. Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute ...

  19. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Research Cancer Treatment Types of Cancer Treatment Side Effects Clinical Trials Information A to Z List of ... Diagnosis Staging Prognosis Treatment Types of Treatment Side Effects Clinical Trials Cancer Drugs Complementary & Alternative Medicine Coping ...

  20. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... respond to treatment Seeking Information About Your Prognosis Is a Personal Decision When you have cancer, you and ... certain how it will go for you. If You Decide Not to Have Treatment If you decide ...

  1. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to treatment Seeking Information About Your Prognosis Is a Personal Decision When you have cancer, you and ... will go for you. If You Decide Not to Have Treatment If you decide not to have ...

  2. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Research Tools, Specimens, and Data Conducting Clinical Trials Statistical Tools and Data Terminology Resources NCI Data Catalog ... before cancer How you respond to treatment Seeking Information About Your Prognosis Is a Personal Decision When ...

  3. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to Ask about Your Diagnosis Research Cancer Treatment Types of Cancer Treatment Side Effects Clinical Trials Information ... Tests Diagnosis & Staging Symptoms Diagnosis Staging Prognosis Treatment Types of Treatment Side Effects Clinical Trials Cancer Drugs ...

  4. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Recurrent Cancer Common Cancer Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer Leukemia Liver Cancer Lung ... need for different kinds of information about her colorectal cancer prognosis. Diving Out of the Dark View this ...

  5. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... on Coping With Cancer helpful. Understanding Statistics About Survival Doctors estimate prognosis by using statistics that researchers ... The most commonly used statistics include: Cancer-specific survival This is the percentage of patients with a ...

  6. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... side effects from the cancer treatments you received. Video Series This video series offers the perspectives of ... care teams (PDF-210KB). Understanding Your Cancer Prognosis Video View this video on YouTube. Three cancer patients ...

  7. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to treatment Seeking Information About Your Prognosis Is a Personal Decision When you have cancer, you and ... how long she has to live. For Doctors, a Patient-Centered Approach View this video on YouTube. ...

  8. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... spread. Certain traits of the cancer cells Your age and how healthy you were before cancer How ... Your Cancer Prognosis Video View this video on YouTube. Three cancer patients and their doctor share their ...

  9. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... medical records. Relative survival This statistic is another method used to estimate cancer-specific survival that does ... poor prognosis if the cancer is harder to control. Whatever your doctor tells you, keep in mind ...

  10. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Diagnosis Staging Prognosis Questions to Ask about Your Diagnosis Research Cancer Treatment Types of Cancer Treatment Side Effects Clinical Trials ... Cancer Screening Overview Screening Tests Diagnosis & Staging ... Treatment Types of Treatment Side Effects Clinical Trials Cancer ...

  11. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... in a clear and supportive way. Two viewer guides are also available: for patients (PDF-210KB) and for provider care teams (PDF-210KB). Understanding Your Cancer Prognosis Video View this video on YouTube. ...

  12. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... M.D., a national expert on doctor-patient communications, talks with one of his patients about what ... how to discuss prognosis with their patients. Good communication, he says, is part of providing good care. ...

  13. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Unusual Cancers of Childhood Treatment Childhood Cancer Genomics Study Findings Metastatic Cancer Metastatic Cancer Research Common Cancer ... your prognosis. Survival statistics most often come from studies that compare treatments with each other, rather than ...

  14. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... treatment Seeking Information About Your Prognosis Is a Personal Decision When you have cancer, you and your ... about it, and gain valuable insight from the personal ways each patient has approached questions about their ...

  15. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... suggest that your cancer is likely to respond well to treatment. Or, he may tell you that you have a poor prognosis if the cancer is harder to control. Whatever your doctor tells you, keep in mind ...

  16. Anatomy of the sympathetic pathways in the cavernous sinus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Overbeeke, J. J.; Dujovny, M.; Troost, D.

    1995-01-01

    We studied sympathetic fibres in the cavernous sinus in 40 unfixed specimens obtained from human cadavers. Sympathetic fibres in the cavernous sinus are understood to be grouped in a plexiform configuration surrounding the internal carotid artery and have a diffuse distribution among the sympathetic

  17. Insulin restores myocardial presynaptic sympathetic neuronal integrity in insulin-resistant diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thackeray, James T; deKemp, Robert A; Beanlands, Rob S; DaSilva, Jean N

    2013-10-01

    Diabetes is associated with increased sympathetic activity, elevated norepinephrine, impaired heart rate variability, and the added risk of cardiovascular mortality. The temporal development of sympathetic neuronal dysfunction, response to therapy, and relation to ventricular function is not well characterized. Sympathetic neuronal integrity was serially investigated in high fat diet-fed streptozotocin diabetic rats using [(11)C]meta-hydroxyephedrine (HED) positron emission tomography at baseline, 8 weeks of diabetes, and after a further 8 weeks of insulin or insulin-sensitizing metformin therapy. Myocardial HED retention was reduced in diabetic rats (n = 16) compared to non-diabetics (n = 6) at 8 weeks by 52-57% (P = .01) with elevated plasma and myocardial norepinephrine levels. Echocardiography pulse-wave Doppler measurements demonstrated prolonged mitral valve deceleration and increased early-to-atrial filling velocity, consistent with diastolic dysfunction. Insulin but not metformin evoked recovery of HED retention and plasma norepinephrine (P < .05), whereas echocardiography measurements of diastolic function were not improved by either treatment. Relative expressions of norepinephrine reuptake transporter and β-adrenoceptors were lower in metformin-treated as compared to insulin-treated diabetic and non-diabetic rats. Diabetic rats exhibited depressed heart rate variability and impaired diastolic function which persisted despite insulin treatment. HED imaging provides sound estimation of sympathetic function. Effective glycemic control can recover sympathetic function in diabetic rats without the corresponding recovery of echocardiography indicators of diastolic dysfunction. HED positron emission tomography imaging may be useful in stratifying cardiovascular risk among diabetic patients and in evaluating the effect of glycemic therapy on the heart.

  18. Increased Efferent Cardiac Sympathetic Nerve Activity and Defective Intrinsic Heart Rate Regulation in Type 2 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaung, H P Aye; Baldi, J Chris; Wang, Heng-Yu; Hughes, Gillian; Cook, Rosalind F; Bussey, Carol T; Sheard, Phil W; Bahn, Andrew; Jones, Peter P; Schwenke, Daryl O; Lamberts, Regis R

    2015-08-01

    Elevated sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) coupled with dysregulated β-adrenoceptor (β-AR) signaling is postulated as a major driving force for cardiac dysfunction in patients with type 2 diabetes; however, cardiac SNA has never been assessed directly in diabetes. Our aim was to measure the sympathetic input to and the β-AR responsiveness of the heart in the type 2 diabetic heart. In vivo recording of SNA of the left efferent cardiac sympathetic branch of the stellate ganglion in Zucker diabetic fatty rats revealed an elevated resting cardiac SNA and doubled firing rate compared with nondiabetic rats. Ex vivo, in isolated denervated hearts, the intrinsic heart rate was markedly reduced. Contractile and relaxation responses to β-AR stimulation with dobutamine were compromised in externally paced diabetic hearts, but not in diabetic hearts allowed to regulate their own heart rate. Protein levels of left ventricular β1-AR and Gs (guanine nucleotide binding protein stimulatory) were reduced, whereas left ventricular and right atrial β2-AR and Gi (guanine nucleotide binding protein inhibitory regulatory) levels were increased. The elevated resting cardiac SNA in type 2 diabetes, combined with the reduced cardiac β-AR responsiveness, suggests that the maintenance of normal cardiovascular function requires elevated cardiac sympathetic input to compensate for changes in the intrinsic properties of the diabetic heart. © 2015 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  19. Trapping and Sympathetic Cooling of Boron Ions

    CERN Document Server

    Rugango, Rene; Shu, Gang; Brown, Kenneth R

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate the trapping and sympathetic cooling of B$^{+}$ ions in a Coulomb crystal of laser-cooled Ca$^{+}$, We non-destructively confirm the presence of the both B$^+$ isotopes by resonant excitation of the secular motion. The B$^{+}$ ions are loaded by ablation of boron and the secular excitation spectrum also reveals features consistent with ions of the form B$_{n}^{+}$.

  20. Value of lead aVR in predicting acute occlusion of proximal left anterior descending coronary artery and in-hospital outcome in ST-elevation myocardial infarction: an electrocardiographic predictor of poor prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aygul, Nazif; Ozdemir, Kurtulus; Tokac, Mehmet; Aygul, Meryem Ulku; Duzenli, Mehmet Akif; Abaci, Adnan; Bacaksiz, Ahmet; Yazici, Hüseyin; Bodur, Sait

    2008-01-01

    We aimed to investigate the value of ST elevation in lead aVR (ST upward arrow aVR) in predicting the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) occlusion site proximal to first septal perforator (S(1)) and its effect on in-hospital outcome in ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). The study included 950 patients with STEMI. Patients were divided into 2 groups as aVR(+) and aVR(-) according to the presence of an ST upward arrow aVR of 0.5 mm or greater. ST elevation in lead aVR was seen in 155 (16%) patients, and LAD occlusion proximal to S(1) was detected in 52% of patients in the aVR(+) group and in 9% of patients in the aVR(-) group. aVR positivity was associated with higher heart rate, lower systolic blood pressure and ejection fraction, and worse Killip class at the hospital admission. In-hospital mortality was 19% in the aVR(+) group and 5% in the aVR(-) group. aVR positivity was an independent predictor of in-hospital death. This study revealed that ST upward arrow aVR was not only a good indicator of LAD occlusion proximal to S(1) but also a source of valuable information about in-hospital outcome in patients with STEMI.

  1. Renal sympathetic denervation attenuates hypertension and vascular remodeling in renovascular hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Peng; Huang, Pei-Pei; Yang, Yun; Liu, Chi; Lu, Yan; Wang, Fang; Sun, Wei; Kong, Xiang-Qing

    2017-01-01

    Li P, Huang P, Yang Y, Liu C, Lu Y, Wang F, Sun W, Kong X. Renal sympathetic denervation attenuates hypertension and vascular remodeling in renovascular hypertensive rats. J Appl Physiol 122: 121-129, 2017. First published October 14, 2016; doi:10.1152/japplphysiol.01019.2015-Sympathetic activity is enhanced in patients with essential or secondary hypertension, as well as in various hypertensive animal models. Therapeutic targeting of sympathetic activation is considered an effective antihypertensive strategy. We hypothesized that renal sympathetic denervation (RSD) attenuates hypertension and improves vascular remodeling and renal disease in the 2-kidney, 1-clip (2K1C) rat model. Rats underwent 2K1C modeling or sham surgery; then rats underwent RSD or sham surgery 4 wk later, thus resulting in four groups (normotensive-sham, normotensive-RSD, 2K1C-sham, and 2K1C-RSD). Norepinephrine was measured by ELISA. Echocardiography was used to assess heart function. Fibrosis and apoptosis were assessed by Masson and TUNEL staining. Changes in mean arterial blood pressure in response to hexamethonium and plasma norepinephrine levels were used to evaluate basal sympathetic nerve activity. The 2K1C modeling success rate was 86.8%. RSD reversed the elevated systolic blood pressure induced by 2K1C, but had no effect on body weight. Compared with rats in the 2K1C-sham group, rats in the 2K1C-RSD group showed lower left ventricular mass/body weight ratio, interventricular septal thickness in diastole, left ventricular end-systolic diameter, and left ventricular posterior wall thickness in systole, whereas fractional shortening and ejection fraction were higher. Right kidney apoptosis and left kidney hypertrophy were not changed by RSD. Arterial fibrosis was lower in animals in the 2K1C-RSD group compared with those in the 2K1C-sham group. RSD reduced plasma norepinephrine and basal sympathetic activity in rats in the 2K1C-RSD group compared with rats in the 2K1C-sham group. These

  2. Sympathetic reflex control of blood flow in human peripheral tissues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, O

    1991-01-01

    sympathetic vasoconstrictor reflexes are blocked. Blood flow has been measure by the local 133Xe-technique. The results indicate the presence of spinal as well as supraspinal sympathetic vasoconstrictor reflexes to human peripheral tissues. Especially is emphasized the presence of a local sympathetic veno......Sympathetic vasoconstrictor reflexes are essential for the maintenance of arterial blood pressure in upright position. It has been generally believed that supraspinal sympathetic vasoconstrictor reflexes elicited by changes in baroreceptor activity play an important role. Recent studies on human...

  3. Sympathetic nervous dysregulation in the absence of systolic left ventricular dysfunction in a rat model of insulin resistance with hyperglycemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suuronen Erik J

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diabetes mellitus is strongly associated with cardiovascular dysfunction, derived in part from impairment of sympathetic nervous system signaling. Glucose, insulin, and non-esterified fatty acids are potent stimulants of sympathetic activity and norepinephrine (NE release. We hypothesized that sustained hyperglycemia in the high fat diet-fed streptozotocin (STZ rat model of sustained hyperglycemia with insulin resistance would exhibit progressive sympathetic nervous dysfunction in parallel with deteriorating myocardial systolic and/or diastolic function. Methods Cardiac sympathetic nervous integrity was investigated in vivo via biodistribution of the positron emission tomography radiotracer and NE analogue [11C]meta-hydroxyephedrine ([11C]HED. Cardiac systolic and diastolic function was evaluated by echocardiography. Plasma and cardiac NE levels and NE reuptake transporter (NET expression were evaluated as correlative measurements. Results The animal model displays insulin resistance, sustained hyperglycemia, and progressive hypoinsulinemia. After 8 weeks of persistent hyperglycemia, there was a significant 13-25% reduction in [11C]HED retention in myocardium of STZ-treated hyperglycemic but not euglycemic rats as compared to controls. There was a parallel 17% reduction in immunoblot density for NE reuptake transporter, a 1.2 fold and 2.5 fold elevation of cardiac and plasma NE respectively, and no change in sympathetic nerve density. No change in ejection fraction or fractional area change was detected by echocardiography. Reduced heart rate, prolonged mitral valve deceleration time, and elevated transmitral early to atrial flow velocity ratio measured by pulse-wave Doppler in hyperglycemic rats suggest diastolic impairment of the left ventricle. Conclusions Taken together, these data suggest that sustained hyperglycemia is associated with elevated myocardial NE content and dysregulation of sympathetic nervous system

  4. Cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex and its implications for sympathetic activation in chronic heart failure and hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, W-W; Xiong, X-Q; Chen, Q; Li, Y-H; Kang, Y-M; Zhu, G-Q

    2015-04-01

    Persistent excessive sympathetic activation greatly contributes to the pathogenesis of chronic heart failure (CHF) and hypertension. Cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex (CSAR) is a sympathoexcitatory reflex with positive feedback characteristics. Humoral factors such as bradykinin, adenosine and reactive oxygen species produced in myocardium due to myocardial ischaemia stimulate cardiac sympathetic afferents and thereby reflexly increase sympathetic activity and blood pressure. The CSAR is enhanced in myocardial ischaemia, CHF and hypertension. The enhanced CSAR at least partially contributes to the sympathetic activation and pathogenesis of these diseases. Nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS), hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) and rostral ventrolateral medulla are the most important central sites involved in the modulation and integration of the CSAR. Angiotensin II, AT1 receptors and NAD(P)H oxidase-derived superoxide anions pathway in the PVN are mainly responsible for the enhanced CSAR in CHF and hypertension. Central angiotensin-(1-7), nitric oxide, endothelin, intermedin, hydrogen peroxide and several other signal molecules are involved in regulating CSAR. Blockade of the CSAR shows beneficial effects in CHF and hypertension. This review focuses on the anatomical and physiological basis of the CSAR, the interaction of CSAR with baroreflex and chemoreflex, and the role of enhanced CSAR in the pathogenesis of CHF and hypertension. © 2015 Scandinavian Physiological Society. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Diabetic cardiac autonomic dysfunction. Parasympathetic versus sympathetic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uehara, Akihiko; Kurata, Chinori; Sugi, Toshihiko; Mikami, Tadashi; Shouda, Sakae [Hamamatsu Univ. School of Medicine, Shizuoka (Japan)

    1999-04-01

    Diabetic cardiac autonomic dysfunction often causes lethal arrhythmia and sudden cardiac death. {sup 123}I-Metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) can evaluate cardiac sympathetic dysfunction, and analysis of heart rate variability (HRV) can reflect cardiac parasympathetic activity. We examined whether cardiac parasympathetic dysfunction assessed by HRV may correlate with sympathetic dysfunction assessed by MIBG in diabetic patients. In 24-hour electrocardiography, we analyzed 4 HRV parameters: high-frequency power (HF), HF in the early morning (EMHF), rMSSD and pNN50. MIBG planar images and SPECT were obtained 15 minutes (early) and 150 minutes (late) after injection and the heart washout rate was calculated. The defect score in 9 left ventricular regions was scored on a 4 point scale (0=normal - 3=severe defect). In 20 selected diabetic patients without congestive heart failure, coronary artery disease and renal failure, parasympathetic HRV parameters had a negative correlation with the sum of defect scores (DS) in the late images (R=-0.47 to -0.59, p<0.05) and some parameters had a negative correlation with the washout rate (R=-0.50 to -0.55, p<0.05). In a total of 64 diabetic patients also, these parameters had a negative correlation with late DS (R=-0.28 to -0.35, p<0.05) and early DS (R=-0.27 to -0.32, p<0.05). The progress of diabetic cardiac parasympathetic dysfunction may parallel the sympathetic one. (author)

  6. Hibernating myocardium results in partial sympathetic denervation and nerve sprouting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Stanley F.; Ovchinnikov, Vladislav; Canty, John M.

    2013-01-01

    Hibernating myocardium due to chronic repetitive ischemia is associated with regional sympathetic nerve dysfunction and spontaneous arrhythmic death in the absence of infarction. Although inhomogeneity in regional sympathetic innervation is an acknowledged substrate for sudden death, the mechanism(s) responsible for these abnormalities in viable, dysfunctional myocardium (i.e., neural stunning vs. sympathetic denervation) and their association with nerve sprouting are unknown. Accordingly, markers of sympathetic nerve function and nerve sprouting were assessed in subendocardial tissue collected from chronically instrumented pigs with hibernating myocardium (n = 18) as well as sham-instrumented controls (n = 7). Hibernating myocardium exhibited evidence of partial sympathetic denervation compared with the normally perfused region and sham controls, with corresponding regional reductions in tyrosine hydroxylase protein (−32%, P myocardium (n = 9). In conclusion, sympathetic nerve dysfunction in hibernating myocardium is most consistent with partial sympathetic denervation and is associated with regional nerve sprouting. The extent of sympathetic remodeling is similar in animals that develop sudden death compared with survivors; this suggests that sympathetic remodeling in hibernating myocardium is not an independent trigger for sudden death. Nevertheless, sympathetic remodeling likely contributes to electrical instability in combination with other factors. PMID:23125211

  7. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... medical records. Relative survival This statistic is another method used to estimate cancer-specific survival that does ... your prognosis. Survival statistics most often come from studies that compare ... by their creator. In such cases, it is necessary to contact the writer, artists, ...

  8. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer Leukemia Liver Cancer Lung ... may have questions about how serious your cancer is and your chances of survival. The estimate of how the disease will go for you is called prognosis. It ...

  9. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Staging Prognosis Questions to Ask about Your Diagnosis Research Cancer Treatment Types of Cancer Treatment Side Effects Clinical Trials Information ... Cancer Genomics Study Findings Metastatic Cancer Metastatic Cancer Research ... Cancer Types Recurrent Cancer Midline Tract Carcinoma Childhood Midline Tract ...

  10. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Cancer Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) ... may have questions about how serious your cancer is and your chances of survival. The estimate of how the disease will go for you is called prognosis. It ...

  11. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to you. Everyone is different. Treatments and how people respond to treatment can differ greatly. Also, it takes years to see the benefit of new treatments and ways of finding cancer. So, the statistics your doctor uses to make a prognosis may not be based on treatments ...

  12. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Your Cancer Prognosis Video View this video on YouTube. Three cancer patients and their doctor, Anthony L. ... One Couple's Creative Response View this video on YouTube. Vanessa, an artist, and her husband Roy discover ...

  13. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Your Diagnosis Research Understanding Cancer Prognosis Oncologist Anthony L. Back, M.D., a national expert on doctor- ... Centered Approach View this video on YouTube. Anthony L. Back, M.D., coaches other oncologists about how ...

  14. Prognosis of dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Vorst, IE

    2016-01-01

    Background: In this thesis, we focused on the prognosis of patients with dementia who visited a hospital (inpatient or day clinic care) in the Netherlands. So far, absolute mortality risks for dementia were lacking in the Netherlands, whereas these risks have been available for years for cancer or

  15. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... before cancer How you respond to treatment Seeking Information About Your Prognosis Is a Personal Decision When ... Twitter Instagram YouTube Google+ LinkedIn GovDelivery RSS CONTACT INFORMATION Contact Us LiveHelp Online Chat MORE INFORMATION About ...

  16. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... it in a clear and supportive way. Two viewer guides are also available: for patients (PDF-210KB) and for provider care teams (PDF-210KB). Understanding Your Cancer Prognosis Video View this video on YouTube. Three cancer patients and their doctor, Anthony L. ...

  17. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... about what she'd like to know of her prognosis. Credit: National Cancer Institute If you have ... this video on YouTube. Vanessa, an artist, and her husband Roy discover how to support each other’s ...

  18. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Your Diagnosis Research Understanding Cancer Prognosis Oncologist Anthony L. Back, M.D., a national expert on doctor- ... YouTube. Three cancer patients and their doctor, Anthony L. Back, M.D. -- an oncologist who is also ...

  19. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) ... may have questions about how serious your cancer is and your chances of survival. The estimate of how the disease will go for you is called prognosis. It ...

  20. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... decisions you may face include: Which treatment is best for you If you want treatment How to best take care of yourself and manage treatment side ... the most about your situation is in the best position to discuss your prognosis and explain what ...

  1. Post-procedural TIMI flow grade 2 is not associated with improved prognosis in patients with non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction undergoing percutaneous coronary revascularization (PL-ACS registry).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karwowski, Jarosław; Poloński, Lech; Gierlotka, Marek; Gąsior, Mariusz; Bęćkowski, Maciej; Kowalik, Ilona; Szwed, Hanna

    2016-01-01

    The impact of final Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction (TIMI) flow in the infarct-related artery (IRA) on outcomes in non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarc-tion (NSTEMI) patients treated with percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is unknown. This study aimed to evaluate the impact of post-procedural TIMI flow in IRA on outcomes in NSTEMI patients undergoing percutaneous coronary revascularization. We analyzed 2,767 patients with first NSTEMI from the Polish Registry of Acute Coronary Syndromes (PL-ACS) who underwent PCI. The patients were divided according to post-procedural culprit vessel TIMI (0-1: 90, 3.26%; 2: 61, 2.20%; 3: 2,616, 94.54%). The following mortality values were obtained in TIMI 0-1, 2, and 3 groups, respec-tively: in-hospital, 12.22%, 13.11%, 1.72% (p TIMI 0-1 and 2 were not signifi-cantly different. Optimal TIMI 3 was independently associated with baseline TIMI 2-3 (OR ± ± 95% CI: 7.070 [4.35-11.82]), p TIMI 0-2. Only achieving final TIMI 3 in IRA improves outcomes in NSTEMI patients treated with percutaneous coronary revascularization. The mortality rate of near-normal TIMI 2 is comparable to that of TIMI 0-1 after PCI. (.

  2. Increased sympathetic tone in forearm subcutaneous tissue in primary hypothyroidism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vagn Nielsen, H; Hasselström, K; Feldt-Rasmussen, U

    1987-01-01

    Sympathetic reflex regulation of subcutaneous blood flow (SBF) in the forearm was studied in eight patients with primary hypothyroidism. Diastolic arterial pressure was greater than or equal to 95 mmHg in five patients. SBF was determined by local clearance of Na99mTcO4. Sympathetic vasoconstrict......Sympathetic reflex regulation of subcutaneous blood flow (SBF) in the forearm was studied in eight patients with primary hypothyroidism. Diastolic arterial pressure was greater than or equal to 95 mmHg in five patients. SBF was determined by local clearance of Na99mTcO4. Sympathetic.......02)). In conclusion sympathetic vasoconstrictor activity in adipose tissue is markedly increased in primary hypothyroidism. Sympathetic tone and arterial pressure are reduced during treatment....

  3. Early diabetes treatment does not prevent sympathetic dysinnervation in the streptozotocin diabetic rat heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thackeray, James T; deKemp, Robert A; Beanlands, Rob S; DaSilva, Jean N

    2014-08-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) studies have demonstrated reduced sympathetic neuronal integrity in high-fat diet fed streptozotocin insulin-resistant diabetic rats in parallel with abnormal early-to-atrial transmitral velocity. We hypothesized that administration of anti-glycemic drugs early after diabetes induction would prevent sympathetic neuronal dysfunction. Male Sprague-Dawley rats fed high-fat diet were administered streptozotocin (45 mg·kg(-1), ip, n = 23) to induce diabetes or vehicle alone (n = 6). Diabetic rats were randomized to receive insulin (4 U·day(-1)), metformin (650 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1)), rosiglitazone (4 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1)), or no treatment 1 week after streptozotocin. Small animal PET imaging using the norepinephrine analog [(11)C]meta-hydroxyephedrine (HED) at baseline and 8 weeks of diabetes determined sympathetic neuronal integrity. Echocardiography assessed cardiac function. Plasma norepinephrine levels were determined in parallel. Ex vivo immunoblotting was performed at the end of the experiment to compare the relative expression of various proteins involved in metabolic and noradrenergic signaling. Insulin restored blood glucose and lipid levels to normal. Despite improved plasma lipid levels, neither metformin nor rosiglitazone reduced blood glucose. At 8 weeks, untreated and treated diabetics displayed a 39%-42% reduction in myocardial HED standardized uptake values (P < .05). In all diabetic groups, plasma norepinephrine was elevated (2.3- to 3.3-fold, P < .05) and norepinephrine reuptake transporter expression reduced (28%-35%, P < .05) compared to non-diabetics. Doppler echocardiography revealed delayed development of prolonged mitral valve deceleration and elevated early-to-atrial filling velocity ratio among treated diabetic rats. Early glycemic treatment of insulin-resistant diabetic rats did not prevent deterioration of sympathetic neuronal integrity though ventricular filling abnormalities were delayed.

  4. Clinical utility of sympathetic blockade in cardiovascular disease management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chan Soon; Lee, Hae-Young

    2017-04-01

    A dysregulated sympathetic nervous system is a major factor in the development and progression of cardiovascular disease; thus, understanding the mechanism and function of the sympathetic nervous system and appropriately regulating sympathetic activity to treat various cardiovascular diseases are crucial. Areas covered: This review focused on previous studies in managing hypertension, atrial fibrillation, coronary artery disease, heart failure, and perioperative management with sympathetic blockade. We reviewed both pharmacological and non-pharmacological management. Expert commentary: Chronic sympathetic nervous system activation is related to several cardiovascular diseases mediated by various pathways. Advancement in measuring sympathetic activity makes visualizing noninvasively and evaluating the activation level even in single fibers possible. Evidence suggests that sympathetic blockade still has a role in managing hypertension and controlling the heart rate in atrial fibrillation. For ischemic heart disease, beta-adrenergic receptor antagonists have been considered a milestone drug to control symptoms and prevent long-term adverse effects, although its clinical implication has become less potent in the era of successful revascularization. Owing to pathologic involvement of sympathetic nervous system activation in heart failure progression, sympathetic blockade has proved its value in improving the clinical course of patients with heart failure.

  5. Reproductive prognosis in endometriosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjordt Hansen, Maj V; Dalsgaard, Torur; Hartwell, Dorthe

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the reproductive long-term prognosis of women with and without endometriosis, to explore changes over time, and to quantify the contribution of artificial reproductive techniques. DESIGN: Cohort study. SETTING: Denmark 1977-2009. SAMPLE: Data retrieved from four national...... registries. Among 15-49-year-old women during the period 1977-82, 24 667 were diagnosed with endometriosis and 98 668 (1:4) women without endometriosis were age-matched. METHODS: To assess long-term reproductive prognosis, all pregnancy outcomes were identified among the women with and without endometriosis......, but this was restricted to pregnancies from assisted reproduction. CONCLUSION: Women with endometriosis have slightly fewer children, but this lessened over time due to artificially conceived pregnancies. The risk for miscarriages and ectopic pregnancies was increased compared with women without the disease....

  6. Neuropeptide Y as an indicator of successful alterations in sympathetic nervous activity after renal sympathetic denervation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dörr, Oliver; Ewen, Sebastian; Liebetrau, Christoph; Möllmann, Helge; Gaede, Luise; Linz, Dominik; Hohl, Mathias; Troidl, Christian; Bauer, Timm; Böhm, Michael; Hamm, Christian; Mahfoud, Felix; Nef, Holger

    2015-12-01

    Renal sympathetic denervation (RSD) represents a safe and effective treatment option for certain patients with resistant hypertension and has been shown to decrease sympathetic activity. Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is a neurotransmitter that is co-released with norepinephrine and is up-regulated during increased sympathetic activity. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of RSD on NPY and to analyze the association between changes in NPY levels and blood pressure reduction after RSD. A total of 150 consecutive patients (age 64.9 ± 10.2 years) from three clinical centers undergoing RSD were included in this study. Response to RSD was defined as an office systolic blood pressure (SBP) reduction of >10 mmHg 6 months after RSD. Venous blood samples for measurement of NPY were collected prior to and 6 months after RSD. BP and NPY levels were significantly reduced by 23/9 mmHg (p = 0.001/0.001) and 0.24 mg/dL (p RSD. There was a significant correlation between baseline SBP- and RSD-related systolic BP reduction (r = -0.43; p RSD (>10 mmHg) was associated with a significantly greater reduction in NPY level when compared with BP non-responders (p = 0.001). This study demonstrates an effect of RSD on serum NPY levels, a specific marker for sympathetic activity. The association between RSD-related changes in SBP and NPY levels provides further evidence of the effect of RSD on the sympathetic nervous system.

  7. Reflex sympathetic dystrophy: changing concepts and taxonomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton-Hicks, M; Jänig, W; Hassenbusch, S; Haddox, J D; Boas, R; Wilson, P

    1995-10-01

    We present a revised taxonomic system for disorders previously called reflex sympathetic dystrophy (RSD) and causalgia. The system resulted from a special consensus conference that was convened on this topic and is based upon the patient's history, presenting symptoms, and findings at the time of diagnosis. The disorders are grouped under the umbrella term CRPS: complex regional pain syndrome. This overall term, CRPS, requires the presence of regional pain and sensory changes following a noxious event. Further, the pain is associated with findings such as abnormal skin color, temperature change, abnormal sudomotor activity, or edema. The combination of these findings exceeds their expected magnitude in response to known physical damage during and following the inciting event. Two types of CRPS have been recognized: type I, corresponds to RSD and occurs without a definable nerve lesion, and type II, formerly called causalgia refers to cases where a definable nerve lesion is present. The term sympathetically maintained pain (SMP) was also evaluated and considered to be a variable phenomenon associated with a variety of disorders, including CRPS types I and II. These revised categories have been included in the 2nd edition of the IASP Classification of Chronic Pain Syndromes.

  8. [A case of prolonged paroxysmal sympathetic hyperactivity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Akiko; Ide, Shuhei; Iwasaki, Yuji; Kaga, Makiko; Arima, Masataka

    2016-03-01

    We report the case of a 4-year-old girl who presented with paroxysmal sympathetic hyperactivity (PSH), after developing severe hypoxic-ischemic-encephalopathy because of cardiopulmonary arrest. She showed dramatic paroxysmal sympathetic activity with dystonia. She was treated with wide variety of medications against PSH, which were found to be effective in previous studies. Among them, morphine, bromocriptine, propranolol, and clonidine were effective in reducing the frequency of her attacks while gabapentin, baclofen, dantrolene, and benzodiazepine were ineffective. Though the paroxysms decreased markedly after the treatment, they could not be completely controlled beyond 500 days. Following the treatment, levels of plasma catecholamines and their urinary metabolites decreased to normal during inter- paroxysms. However, once a paroxysm had recurred, these levels were again very high. This case study is considered significant for two rea- sons. One is that PSH among children have been rarely reported, and the other is that this case of prolonged PSH delineated the transition of plasma catecholamines during the treatment. The excitatory: inhibitory ratio (EIR) model proposed by Baguley was considered while dis- cussing drug sensitivity in this case. Accumulation of similar case studies will help establish more effective treatment strategies and elucidate the pathophysiology of PSH.

  9. Reflex sympathetic dystrophy: Early treatment and psychological aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geertzen, J.H.B.; De Bruijn, H.; De Bruijn-Kofman, A.T.; Arendzen, J.H.

    1994-01-01

    We report the results of two prospective studies of early treatment and psychological aspects in a series of 26 patients with sympathetic reflex dystrophy of the hand in which treatment was started within 3 months after diagnosis. Ismelin blocks is an often used therapy in sympathetic reflex

  10. Microdialysis: Touching the fingertips of the cardiac sympathetic nervous system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Th.W. Lameris (Thomas)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractFor years sympathetic activity in man and experimental animals has been assessed by measuring circulating catecholamines. As their plasma concentration is not only determined by sympathetic activity but also by spillover and clearance, it is only useful as a screening tool for

  11. The Effect of Sympathetic Antagonists on the Antidepressant Action ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Alprazolam is an anti-anxiety drug shown to be effective in the treatment of depression. In this study, the effect of sympathetic receptor antagonists on alprazolam–induced antidepressant action was studied using a mouse model of forced swimming behavioral despair. The interaction of three sympathetic receptor ...

  12. Beta-2 adrenoreceptor gene polymorphisms and sympathetic outflow in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tank, Jens; Heusser, Karsten; Diedrich, Andre; Hering, Dagmara; Luft, Friedrich C; Busjahn, Andreas; Aydin, Atakan; Limon, Janusz; Narkiewicz, Krzysztof; Jordan, Jens

    2011-10-01

    Previous association studies suggested that common polymorphisms of the beta-2 adrenoreceptor gene leading to glycine for arginine substitution at position 16 or glutamic acid for glutamine substitution at position 27 affect blood pressure. We reasoned that measurements of resting sympathetic nerve traffic could increase the sensitivity of defining a gene phenotype relationship. We studied 111 Caucasian subjects (70 men, 41 women) with blood pressure<140/90 mmHg. We measured electrocardiogram, beat-by-beat finger blood pressure, brachial blood pressure, and muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) using microneurography. We genotyped the functionally relevant polymorphisms of the beta-2 adrenoreceptor gene by means of allele-specific polymerase chain reaction. Sympathetic nerve traffic was similar regardless of genotypes. We obtained similar results when we quantified sympathetic nerve traffic as bursts/100 heart beats or as normalized burst area or when we adjusted resting sympathetic nerve traffic for gender, age, and blood pressure. The polymorphism at position 27 affects sympathetic regulation in men. Men with a Glu/Glu genotype had a significant positive correlation between blood pressure and MSNA. While our study was not sufficiently powered to detect subtle influences of genetic variability in the beta-2 adrenoreceptor gene on resting sympathetic nerve traffic, a large effect is unlikely. However the observation that beta-2 adrenoreceptor genotype may affect coupling between resting sympathetic nerve traffic and systolic blood pressure deserves to be tested in larger populations.

  13. Plasma dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) is independent of sympathetic activity in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eldrup, E; Christensen, N J; Andreasen, J

    1989-01-01

    To clarify the origin of plasma DOPA (3,4-Dihydroxyphenylalanine), the relationship between plasma DOPA and acute or chronic changes in sympathetic activity has been studied. Plasma DOPA and noradrenaline (NA) concentrations were measured by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography...... is not related to sympathetic activity and may be of non-neuronal origin....

  14. Sympathetic ophthalmia after injury in the iraq war.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freidlin, Julie; Pak, John; Tessler, Howard H; Putterman, Allen M; Goldstein, Debra A

    2006-01-01

    A 21-year-old US soldier received a penetrating eye injury while fighting in Iraq and was treated with evisceration. Sympathetic ophthalmia developed, which responded well to steroid treatment. This is the first case of sympathetic ophthalmia after a war injury reported since World War II.

  15. Sympathetic Nerve Fibers in Human Cervical and Thoracic Vagus Nerves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seki, Atsuko; Green, Hunter R.; Lee, Thomas D.; Hong, LongSheng; Tan, Jian; Vinters, Harry V.; Chen, Peng-Sheng; Fishbein, Michael C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Vagus nerve stimulation therapy (VNS) has been used for chronic heart failure (CHF), and is believed to improve imbalance of autonomic control by increasing parasympathetic activity. Although it is known that there is neural communication between the VN and the cervical sympathetic trunk, there are few data regarding the quantity and/or distribution of the sympathetic components within the VN. Objective To examine the sympathetic component within human VN and correlate these with the presence of cardiac and neurologic diseases. Methods We performed immunohistochemistry on 31 human cervical and thoracic VNs (total 104 VNs) from autopsies and we reviewed the patients’ records. We correlated the quantity of sympathetic nerve fibers within the VNs with cardiovascular and neurologic disease states. Results All 104 VNs contain TH positive (sympathetic) nerve fibers; the mean TH positive areas were 5.47% in right cervical, 3.97% in left cervical, 5.11% in right thoracic, and 4.20% in left thoracic VN. The distribution of TH positive nerve fibers varied from case to case: central, peripheral, or scattered throughout nerve bundles. No statistically significant differences in nerve morphology were seen between diseases in which VNS is considered effective (depression and CHF), and other cardiovascular diseases, or neurodegenerative disease. Conclusion Human VNs contain sympathetic nerve fibers. The sympathetic component within the VN could play a role in physiologic effects reported with VNS. The recognition of sympathetic nerve fibers in the VNs may lead to better understanding of the therapeutic mechanisms of VNS. PMID:24768897

  16. Renal sympathetic denervation: MDCT evaluation of the renal arteries.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hutchinson, Barry D

    2013-08-01

    Percutaneous transluminal renal sympathetic denervation is a new treatment of refractory systemic hypertension. The purpose of this study was to assess the clinical utility of MDCT to evaluate the anatomic configuration of the renal arteries in the context of renal sympathetic denervation.

  17. Prognosis for year 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, John S; Ball, Marion J

    2002-11-20

    New knowledge from biotechnology and new capabilities provided by the evolving global information infrastructure are already transforming health care. Three clusters of technologies hold particular promise: grid computing, intimate computing, and micro laboratory computing. The confluence of these technologies will change clinical laboratory equipment into portable devices, easing the administrative details involved in delivering care and ushering in a new age of monitoring clinical states. Two vignettes, an office visit and a clinical trial, are offered as prognosis for clinical care in 2013. New capabilities hold the power to transform health care, making it truly patient centered as the Institute of Medicine (IOM) has urged.

  18. Sympathetic activation in exercise is not dependent on muscle acidosis. Direct evidence from studies in metabolic myopathies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vissing, J.; Vissing, S. F.; MacLean, D. A.; Saltin, B.; Quistorff, B.; Haller, R. G.; Blomqvist, C. G. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Muscle acidosis has been implicated as a major determinant of reflex sympathetic activation during exercise. To test this hypothesis we studied sympathetic exercise responses in metabolic myopathies in which muscle acidosis is impaired or augmented during exercise. As an index of reflex sympathetic activation to muscle, microneurographic measurements of muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) were obtained from the peroneal nerve. MSNA was measured during static handgrip exercise at 30% of maximal voluntary contraction force to exhaustion in patients in whom exercise-induced muscle acidosis is absent (seven myophosphorylase deficient patients; MD [McArdle's disease], and one patient with muscle phosphofructokinase deficiency [PFKD]), augmented (one patient with mitochondrial myopathy [MM]), or normal (five healthy controls). Muscle pH was monitored by 31P-magnetic resonance spectroscopy during handgrip exercise in the five control subjects, four MD patients, and the MM and PFKD patients. With handgrip to exhaustion, the increase in MSNA over baseline (bursts per minute [bpm] and total activity [%]) was not impaired in patients with MD (17+/-2 bpm, 124+/-42%) or PFKD (65 bpm, 307%), and was not enhanced in the MM patient (24 bpm, 131%) compared with controls (17+/-4 bpm, 115+/-17%). Post-handgrip ischemia studied in one McArdle patient, caused sustained elevation of MSNA above basal suggesting a chemoreflex activation of MSNA. Handgrip exercise elicited an enhanced drop in muscle pH of 0.51 U in the MM patient compared with the decrease in controls of 0.13+/-0.02 U. In contrast, muscle pH increased with exercise in MD by 0.12+/-0.05 U and in PFKD by 0.01 U. In conclusion, patients with glycogenolytic, glycolytic, and oxidative phosphorylation defects show normal muscle sympathetic nerve responses to static exercise. These findings indicate that muscle acidosis is not a prerequisite for sympathetic activation in exercise.

  19. Blockade of angiotensin AT1-receptors in the rostral ventrolateral medulla of spontaneously hypertensive rats reduces blood pressure and sympathetic nerve discharge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew M Allen

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available Microinjections of angiotensin II (Ang II into the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM induce a sympathetically-mediated increase in blood pressure (BP, through an interaction with AT1-receptors. Under basal conditions in anaesthetised animals, microinjections of AT 1-receptor antagonists into the RVLM have little, or no effect on BP, suggesting that the angiotensin input to this nucleus is not tonically active. In contrast, microinjections of AT1-receptor antagonists into the RVLM of sodium-deplete rats and TGR(mRen227 rats, induce a depressor response through sympatho-inhibition. This indicates that when the renin-angiotensin system is activated, angiotensin can act in the RVLM to support sympathetic nerve discharge and BP. This study examined whether angiotensin inputs to the RVLM are activated in the spontaneously hypertensive rat — a pathophysiological model which displays increases in both brain angiotensin levels and sympathetic nerve activity. Bilateral microinjections of the AT 1-receptor antagonist candesartan cilexetil, (1 nmol in 100 nl, into the RVLM of the spontaneously hypertensive rat induced a significant decrease in lumbar sympathetic nerve discharge (-18±2% and BP (140±6 to 115±6 mmHg. In contrast, similar microinjections in the Wistar-Kyoto (WKY rat had no effect on BP or sympathetic nerve discharge. These results are interpreted to suggest that Ang II inputs to the RVLM are activated in the spontaneously hypertensive rat to maintain an elevated level of sympathetic nerve discharge, even in the face of increased BP.

  20. Differential Toxicities of Intraneurally Injected Mercuric Chloride for Sympathetic and Somatic Motor Fibers: An Ultrastructural Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Jung Cheng

    2011-02-01

    Conclusion: This study demonstrated an undue susceptibility of sympathetic fibers to mercury intoxication. The mechanisms that underlie the selective reaction of sympathetic fibers to mercury warrant further investigation.

  1. Rad-deletion Phenocopies Tonic Sympathetic Stimulation of the Heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitan, Bryana M; Manning, Janet R; Withers, Catherine N; Smith, Jeffrey D; Shaw, Robin M; Andres, Douglas A; Sorrell, Vincent L; Satin, Jonathan

    2016-12-01

    Sympathetic stimulation modulates L-type calcium channel (LTCC) gating to contribute to increased systolic heart function. Rad is a monomeric G-protein that interacts with LTCC. Genetic deletion of Rad (Rad(-/-)) renders LTCC in a sympathomimetic state. The study goal was to use a clinically inspired pharmacological stress echocardiography test, including analysis of global strain, to determine whether Rad(-/-) confers tonic positive inotropic heart function. Sarcomere dynamics and strain showed partial parallel isoproterenol (ISO) responsiveness for wild-type (WT) and for Rad(-/-). Rad(-/-) basal inotropy was elevated compared to WT but was less responsiveness to ISO. Rad protein levels were lower in human patients with end-stage non-ischemic heart failure. These results show that Rad reduction provides a stable inotropic response rooted in sarcomere level function. Thus, reduced Rad levels in heart failure patients may be a compensatory response to need for increased output in the setting of HF. Rad deletion suggests a future therapeutic direction for inotropic support.

  2. Beta blocker dose and markers of sympathetic activation in heart failure patients: interrelationships and prognostic significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen-Solal, Alain; Jacobson, Arnold F; Piña, Ileana L

    2017-11-01

    Extent of cardiac sympathetic activation can be estimated from physiological parameters, blood biomarkers, and imaging findings. This study examined the prognostic value of three markers of sympathetic activity and their relationship to beta blocker dose in heart failure patients. A post hoc analysis of 858 heart failure subjects in the ADMIRE-HF trial was performed. Variables related to sympathetic activity were plasma norepinephrine, baseline heart rate, the heart to mediastinum (H/M) ratio of 123 I-mIBG uptake, and beta blocker dose. Univariate and multivariate analyses for occurrence of mortality (all-cause and cardiac) and arrhythmic events were performed. Beta blocker dose was significantly related to age, heart rate, b-type natriuretic peptide (negatively), body mass index, body weight and plasma norepinephrine. Univariate predictors of all-cause and cardiac mortality were baseline heart rate (χ2  = 4.5, P = 0.029 and χ2  = 5 .2, P = 0.022, respectively), plasma norepinephrine level (χ2  = 8.9, P = 0.0006 and χ2  = 8.6, P = 0.003, respectively), and H/M (χ = 22.4, P 67 b.p.m. was associated with significantly higher cardiac mortality. Higher beta blocker dose was associated with lower mortality, but of the variables associated with sympathetic activity examined, cardiac 123 I-mIBG uptake was the most powerful prognostic marker in heart failure patients. Elevated heart rate was associated with greater risk for cardiac death. © 2017 The Authors. ESC Heart Failure published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology.

  3. Sympathetic nervous system in obesity-related hypertension: mechanisms and clinical implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalil, Graziela Z; Haynes, William G

    2013-01-01

    Obesity markedly increases the risk of hypertension and cardiovascular disease, which may be related to activation of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS). Sympathetic overactivity directly and indirectly contributes to blood pressure (BP) elevation in obesity, including stimulation of the renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system (RAAS). The adipocyte-derived peptide leptin suppresses appetite, increases thermogenesis, but also raises SNS activity and BP. Obese individuals exhibit hyperleptinemia but are resistant to its appetite-suppressing actions. Interestingly, animal models of obesity exhibit preserved sympathoexcitatory and pressor actions of leptin, despite resistance to its anorexic and metabolic actions, suggesting selective leptin resistance. Disturbance of intracellular signaling at specific hypothalamic neural networks appears to underlie selective leptin resistance. Delineation of these pathways should lead to novel approaches to treatment. In the meantime, treatment of obesity–hypertension has relied on antihypertensive drugs. Although sympathetic blockade is mechanistically attractive in obesity–hypertension, in practice its effects are disappointing because of adverse metabolic effects and inferior outcomes. On the basis of subgroup analyses of obese patients in large randomized clinical trials, drugs such as diuretics and RAAS blockers appear superior in preventing cardiovascular events in obesity–hypertension. An underused alternative approach to obesity–hypertension is induction of weight loss, which reduces circulating leptin and insulin, partially reverses resistance to these hormones, decreases sympathetic activation and improves BP and other risk factors. Though weight loss induced by lifestyle is often modest and transient, carefully selected pharmacological weight loss therapies can produce substantial and sustained antihypertensive effects additive to lifestyle interventions. PMID:22048570

  4. Impact of Non-Invasive Ventilation on Sympathetic Nerve Activity in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haarmann, Helge; Folle, Jan; Nguyen, Xuan Phuc; Herrmann, Peter; Heusser, Karsten; Hasenfuß, Gerd; Andreas, Stefan; Raupach, Tobias

    2017-02-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is associated with elevated sympathetic nerve activity, which is probably linked to an increased cardiovascular risk, and may contribute to muscle dysfunction by heightened muscle vasoconstrictor drive. We hypothesized that resistive unloading of respiratory muscles by intermittent non-invasive ventilation (NIV) reduces sympathetic tone at rest and during subsequent handgrip exercise in patients with COPD. Muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) in the peroneal nerve, heart rate, blood pressure, CO2, and SpO2 were continuously recorded in 5 COPD patients with intermittent NIV and 11 control COPD patients without NIV. Static and dynamic handgrip exercises were performed before and after NIV. At baseline, heart rate-adjusted MSNA (bursts/100 heart beats) did not differ between groups. NIV did not significantly affect MSNA levels at rest. However, during handgrip exercises directly following NIV, MSNA was lower than before, which was significant for dynamic handgrip (67.00 ± 3.70 vs. 62.13 ± 4.50 bursts/100 heart beats; p = 0.035 in paired t test). In contrast, MSNA (non-significantly) increased in the control group during repeated dynamic or static handgrip. During dynamic handgrip, tCO2 was lower after NIV than before (change by -5.04 ± 0.68 mmHg vs. -0.53 ± 0.64 in the control group; p = 0.021), while systolic and diastolic blood pressure did not change significantly. NIV reduces sympathetic activation during subsequent dynamic handgrip exercise and thereby may elicit positive effects on the cardiovascular system as well as on muscle function in patients with COPD.

  5. Fractional Flow Reserve-Guided Complete Revascularization Improves the Prognosis in Patients With ST-Segment-Elevation Myocardial Infarction and Severe Nonculprit Disease: A DANAMI 3-PRIMULTI Substudy (Primary PCI in Patients With ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction and Multivessel Disease: Treatment of Culprit Lesion Only or Complete Revascularization).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lønborg, Jacob; Engstrøm, Thomas; Kelbæk, Henning; Helqvist, Steffen; Kløvgaard, Lene; Holmvang, Lene; Pedersen, Frants; Jørgensen, Erik; Saunamäki, Kari; Clemmensen, Peter; De Backer, Ole; Ravkilde, Jan; Tilsted, Hans-Henrik; Villadsen, Anton Boel; Aarøe, Jens; Jensen, Svend Eggert; Raungaard, Bent; Køber, Lars; Høfsten, Dan Eik

    2017-04-01

    The impact of disease severity on the outcome after complete revascularization in patients with ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction and multivessel disease is uncertain. The objective of this post hoc study was to evaluate the impact of number of diseased vessel, lesion location, and severity of the noninfarct-related stenosis on the effect of fractional flow reserve-guided complete revascularization. In the DANAMI-3-PRIMULTI study (Primary PCI in Patients With ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction and Multivessel Disease: Treatment of Culprit Lesion Only or Complete Revascularization), we randomized 627 ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction patients to fractional flow reserve-guided complete revascularization or infarct-related percutaneous coronary intervention only. In patients with 3-vessel disease, fractional flow reserve-guided complete revascularization reduced the primary end point (all-cause mortality, reinfarction, and ischemia-driven revascularization; hazard ratio [HR], 0.33; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.17-0.64; P=0.001), with no significant effect in patients with 2-vessel disease (HR, 0.77; 95% CI, 0.47-1.26; P=0.29; P for interaction =0.046). A similar effect was observed in patients with diameter stenosis ≥90% of noninfarct-related arteries (HR, 0.32; 95% CI, 0.18-0.62; P=0.001), but not in patients with less severe lesions (HR, 0.72; 95% CI, 0.44-1.19; P=0.21; P for interaction =0.06). The effect was most pronounced in patients with 3-vessel disease and noninfarct-related stenoses ≥90%, and in this subgroup, there was a nonsignificant reduction in the end point of mortality and reinfarction (HR, 0.32; 95% CI, 0.08-1.32; P=0.09). Proximal versus distal location did not influence the benefit from complete revascularization. The benefit from fractional flow reserve-guided complete revascularization in ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction patients with multivessel disease was dependent on the presence of 3-vessel disease and

  6. Prognosis of Colorectal Cancer Patients with Elevated Endothelin-1 Concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maqsood M. Elahi

    2004-01-01

    Conclusion: Preoperative plasma big ET-1 concentrations may be useful in predicting overall survival in patients with colorectal cancer. Plasma big ET-1 concentrations may be useful in the selection of high-risk, lymph node-negative patients with colorectal cancer for adjuvant therapy.

  7. Role of the medullary lateral tegmental field in sympathetic control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghali, Michael George Zaki

    2017-01-01

    The sympathetic nervous system maintains and regulates arterial pressure and tissue perfusion, via control of cardiac output and vasomotor tone. Sympatho-vascular-mediated increases in blood pressure are effected by arterioloconstriction, which causes an increase in afterload, and/or venoconstriction, which increases venous return, left ventricular preload, and consequently, the force of cardiac contraction via Frank-Starling mechanisms; withdrawal of sympathetic drive elicits reciprocal effects. Spinalization reduces mammalian arterial pressure to 40-50 mm Hg consequent to the elimination of descending medullary pre-sympathetic bulbospinal drive to preganglionic sympathetic fibers in the intermediolateral cell column of the spinal cord. Beyond agreement that sympathetic tone is generated supraspinally, there is only controversy. One hypothesis posits that pre-sympathetic medullary regions, such as the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) and caudal raphé group, possess intrinsic tonic activity. Alternatively, pre-sympathetic medullary regions may receive tonic excitation from other areas in the brainstem. Neurons in the lateral tegmental field (LTF), an exclusively propriobulbar entity (cf. pre-Bötzinger complex - the propriobulbar inspiratory rhythmogenic kernel of the respiratory network), fire before and project to pre-sympathetic units in RVLM and caudal raphé and exhibit activity correlated to the cardiac-related rhythm in sympathetic nerve discharge, making the LTF a likely candidate for the primary source of basal sympathoexcitation. The LTF is additionally involved in a variety of cardiovascular and sympathetic reflexes (i.e., baroreflex, Bezold-Jarisch reflex). As it receives descending afferents from the infralimbic cortex and associated limbic structures, suggesting a role in the sympathetic response to fear, as well as vestibular inputs, consistent with a role in coordinating the sympathetic response with emesis proper, the LTF appears to play an

  8. Reflex sympathetic dystrophy after a burn injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Laan, L; Goris, R J

    1996-06-01

    Reflex sympathetic dystrophy (RSD) is a disease that can appear after minor trauma or operation to an extremity. The injury may vary from a simple contusion to a fracture. The prevalence of burns as a cause of RSD, within a population of 829 patients with RSD, was studied retrospectively. Prospectively, we documented the medical history, signs and symptoms of all patients with RSD, seen by our department during the period from January 1984 to 31 December 1994. Four patients had developed RSD after a burn injury, resulting in a prevalence of 0.5 per cent. Though the clinical signs of early RSD are similar to those of a (thermal) burn, alertness to recognize inflammatory signs, in combination with the increase in complaints after exercise, is necessary for early diagnosis and treatment of the complicating RSD.

  9. Cocaine-induced reflex sympathetic dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gay, D; Singh, A

    2000-11-01

    Reflex sympathetic dystrophy (RSD) usually follows traumatic injuries or neurologic disorders. The authors report a rare case of RSD that followed intraarterial administration of cocaine in a patient with a history of intravenous drug abuse. The cocaine was self-administered inadvertently into the femoral artery rather than the femoral vein. Despite the intense pain, swelling, and dermatologic changes that followed, the diagnosis of RSD was not considered until scintigraphic studies suggested it. A combination of normal radiographs, a normal leukocyte study, and an abnormal bone scan in the region of tenderness and swelling excluded other possibilities and suggested RSD. In our patient, RSD was likely caused by an ischemic autonomic injury from the vasoconstrictor action of cocaine. Clinical follow-up and relief using phentolamine, an alpha-adrenergic blocker and vasodilator, made the diagnosis of RSD most likely.

  10. Lymphocytic Meningitis in Patients with Sympathetic Ophthalmia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goudot, Mathilde; Groh, Matthieu; Salah, Sawsen; Monnet, Dominique; Blanche, Philippe; Brézin, Antoine P

    2017-04-01

    This study aimed at reporting lymphocytic meningitis in patients diagnosed with sympathetic ophthalmia (SO). In this single-center retrospective observational case series, we reviewed cases diagnosed with SO. We analyzed the patients' inciting injuries, the characteristics of uveitis and the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analyses. Nine patients were diagnosed with SO and CSF analyses were available in all cases. Four cases had lymphocytic pleocytosis, 3 of which showed marked CSF inflammation with more than 300 lymphocytes/mm 3 . The inciting event in these 3 patients was a globe perforation injury, whereas 4 patients without meningitis had SO following a surgical intervention. In this case series of patients with SO, lymphocytic meningitis was a common finding. The prevalence of meningitis in patients with SO and its value for the diagnosis of the disease needs to be further studied.

  11. Cardiac sympathetic neuronal imaging using PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lautamaeki, Riikka; Tipre, Dnyanesh [Johns Hopkins University, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Baltimore, MD (United States); Bengel, Frank M. [Johns Hopkins University, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Baltimore, MD (United States); Cardiovascular Nuclear Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2007-06-15

    Balance of the autonomic nervous system is essential for adequate cardiac performance, and alterations seem to play a key role in the development and progression of various cardiac diseases. PET imaging of the cardiac autonomic nervous system has advanced extensively in recent years, and multiple pre- and postsynaptic tracers have been introduced. The high spatial and temporal resolution of PET enables noninvasive quantification of neurophysiologic processes at the tissue level. Ligands for catecholamine receptors, along with radiolabeled catecholamines and catecholamine analogs, have been applied to determine involvement of sympathetic dysinnervation at different stages of heart diseases such as ischemia, heart failure, and arrhythmia. This review summarizes the recent findings in neurocardiological PET imaging. Experimental studies with several radioligands and clinical findings in cardiac dysautonomias are discussed. (orig.)

  12. CHAIN RECONNECTIONS OBSERVED IN SYMPATHETIC ERUPTIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshi, Navin Chandra; Magara, Tetsuya [School of Space Research, Kyung Hee University, Yongin, Gyeonggi-Do, 446-701 (Korea, Republic of); Schmieder, Brigitte; Aulanier, Guillaume [LESIA, Observatoire de Paris, PSL Research University, CNRS Sarbonne Universités, Univ. Paris 06, Univ. Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, 5 place Jules Jansson, F-92195 Meudon (France); Guo, Yang, E-mail: navin@khu.ac.kr, E-mail: njoshi98@gmail.com [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, 210023 Nanjing (China)

    2016-04-01

    The nature of various plausible causal links between sympathetic events is still a controversial issue. In this work, we present multiwavelength observations of sympathetic eruptions, associated flares, and coronal mass ejections (CMEs) occurring on 2013 November 17 in two close active regions. Two filaments, i.e., F1 and F2, are observed in between the active regions. Successive magnetic reconnections, caused for different reasons (flux cancellation, shear, and expansion) have been identified during the whole event. The first reconnection occurred during the first eruption via flux cancellation between the sheared arcades overlying filament F2, creating a flux rope and leading to the first double-ribbon solar flare. During this phase, we observed the eruption of overlying arcades and coronal loops, which leads to the first CME. The second reconnection is believed to occur between the expanding flux rope of F2 and the overlying arcades of filament F1. We suggest that this reconnection destabilized the equilibrium of filament F1, which further facilitated its eruption. The third stage of reconnection occurred in the wake of the erupting filament F1 between the legs of the overlying arcades. This may create a flux rope and the second double-ribbon flare and a second CME. The fourth reconnection was between the expanding arcades of the erupting filament F1 and the nearby ambient field, which produced the bi-directional plasma flows both upward and downward. Observations and a nonlinear force-free field extrapolation confirm the possibility of reconnection and the causal link between the magnetic systems.

  13. Retention of finger blood flow against postural change as an indicator of successful sympathetic block in the upper limb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakatani T

    2017-02-01

    91 SGBs in nine patients. Two SGBs were excluded from the analysis due to the absence of Horner’s sign. We divided 89 procedures into two groups according to elevation in skin temperature of the thumb: by over 1°C (sympathetic block group, n=62 and by <1°C (nonsympathetic block group, n=27. Finger blood flow decreased significantly just after a change in posture from the supine to long sitting position after SGB in both groups. In the sympathetic block group, the ratio of finger blood flow in the long sitting position/supine position with a change in posture significantly increased after SGB compared with before SGB (before SGB: range 0.09–0.94, median 0.53; after SGB: range 0.33–1.2, median 0.89, p<0.0001.Conclusion: Our study shows that with sympathetic block in the upper limb, the ratio of finger blood flow significantly increases despite baroreflexes stimulated by postural change from the supine to long sitting position. Retention of finger blood flow against postural changes may be an indicator of sympathetic block in the upper limb after SGB or brachial plexus block. Keywords: sympathetic block, baroreflex, stellate ganglion block, peripheral blood flow, thermography

  14. Clinical aspects and prognosis of Brugada syndrome in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Probst, Vincent; Denjoy, Isabelle; Meregalli, Paola G.; Amirault, Jean-Christophe; Sacher, Frederic; Mansourati, Jacques; Babuty, Dominique; Villain, Elisabeth; Victor, Jacques; Schott, Jean-Jacques; Lupoglazoff, Jean-Marc; Mabo, Philippe; Veltmann, Christian; Jesel, Laurence; Chevalier, Philippe; Clur, Sally-Ann B.; Haissaguerre, Michel; Wolpert, Christian; Le Marec, Herve; Wilde, Arthur A. M.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Brugada syndrome is an arrhythmogenic disease characterized by an ECG pattern of ST-segment elevation in the right precordial leads and augmented risk of sudden cardiac death. Little is known about the clinical presentation and prognosis of this disease in children. METHODS AND RESULTS:

  15. Glutamate and GABA in vestibulo-sympathetic pathway neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gay R Holstein

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The vestibulo-sympathetic reflex actively modulates blood pressure during changes in posture. This reflex allows humans to stand up and quadrupeds to rear or climb without a precipitous decline in cerebral perfusion. The vestibulo-sympathetic reflex pathway conveys signals from the vestibular end organs to the caudal vestibular nuclei. These cells, in turn, project to pre-sympathetic neurons in the rostral and caudal ventrolateral medulla (RVLM and CVLM, respectively. The present study assessed glutamate- and GABA-related immunofluorescence associated with central vestibular neurons of the vestibulo-sympathetic reflex pathway in rats. Retrograde FluoroGold tract tracing was used to label vestibular neurons with projections to RVLM or CVLM, and sinusoidal galvanic vestibular stimulation was employed to activate these pathways. Central vestibular neurons of the vestibulo-sympathetic reflex were identified by co-localization of FluoroGold and cFos protein, which accumulates in some vestibular neurons following galvanic stimulation. Triple-label immunofluorescence was used to co-localize glutamate- or GABA- labeling in the identified vestibulo-sympathetic reflex pathway neurons. Most activated projection neurons displayed intense glutamate immunofluorescence, suggestive of glutamatergic neurotransmission. To support this, anterograde tracer was injected into the caudal vestibular nuclei. Vestibular axons and terminals in RVLM and CVLM co-localized the anterograde tracer and vesicular glutamate transporter-2 signals. Other retrogradely-labeled cFos-positive neurons displayed intense GABA immunofluorescence. Vestibulo-sympathetic reflex pathway neurons of both phenotypes were present in the caudal medial and spinal vestibular nuclei, and projected to both RVLM and CVLM. As a group, however, triple-labeled vestibular cells with intense glutamate immunofluorescence were located more rostrally in the vestibular nuclei than the GABAergic neurons. Only the

  16. Spontaneously hypertensive rat Y chromosome increases indexes of sympathetic nervous system activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ely, D; Caplea, A; Dunphy, G; Daneshvar, H; Turner, M; Milsted, A; Takiyyudin, M

    1997-02-01

    Previous studies from our laboratory have demonstrated that the Y chromosome from the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) is responsible for a significant portion of the elevated blood pressure and also produces an earlier pubertal rise in plasma testosterone. We performed the following studies to determine whether the SHR Y chromosome raises blood pressure by sympathetic nervous system responses as measured by adrenal chromogranin A and plasma and tissue catecholamines. Male SHR from the University of Akron colony were studied from 5 to 20 weeks of age. Blood pressure was measured by tail-cuff, tail artery cannulation, and aortic telemetry (Data Sciences); acute (air stress) and chronic (territorial colony) social stressors were compared; blood was collected for determination of plasma catecholamines; and adrenal glands were analyzed at 15 weeks for catecholamines. Rats with the SHR Y chromosome had higher blood pressure and plasma norepinephrine than those with the normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) Y chromosome. However, the SHR Y chromosome did not significantly change responsiveness to acute or chronic stressors. Phentolamine and clonidine prevented the stress responses. Adrenal chromogranin A levels were elevated 37% and 40% and adrenal norepinephrine content 29% and 100% at 4 and 10 weeks of age, respectively, in rats with an SHR Y chromosome compared with WKY. Chemical sympathectomy normalized blood pressure in all strains and significantly reduced norepinephrine (36% to 41%) in all strains except in WKY, which already had a normal blood pressure. In conclusion, the SHR Y chromosome appears to increase the chronic sympathetic nervous system. A potential mechanism could be a Y locus that influences chronic sympathetic nervous system activity, which may reinforce neurohumoral factors and structural components of the vessel wall, accelerating the development of hypertension.

  17. Obesity-Related Metabolic Syndrome: Mechanisms of Sympathetic Overactivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Paola Canale

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of the metabolic syndrome has increased worldwide over the past few years. Sympathetic nervous system overactivity is a key mechanism leading to hypertension in patients with the metabolic syndrome. Sympathetic activation can be triggered by reflex mechanisms as arterial baroreceptor impairment, by metabolic factors as insulin resistance, and by dysregulated adipokine production and secretion from visceral fat with a mainly permissive role of leptin and antagonist role of adiponectin. Chronic sympathetic nervous system overactivity contributes to a further decline of insulin sensitivity and creates a vicious circle that may contribute to the development of hypertension and of the metabolic syndrome and favor cardiovascular and kidney disease. Selective renal denervation is an emerging area of interest in the clinical management of obesity-related hypertension. This review focuses on current understanding of some mechanisms through which sympathetic overactivity may be interlaced to the metabolic syndrome, with particular regard to the role of insulin resistance and of some adipokines.

  18. Receptor-mediated regional sympathetic nerve activation by leptin.

    OpenAIRE

    Haynes, W G; Morgan, D. A.; Walsh, S.A.; Mark, A. L.; Sivitz, W I

    1997-01-01

    Leptin is a peptide hormone produced by adipose tissue which acts centrally to decrease appetite and increase energy expenditure. Although leptin increases norepinephrine turnover in thermogenic tissues, the effects of leptin on directly measured sympathetic nerve activity to thermogenic and other tissues are not known. We examined the effects of intravenous leptin and vehicle on sympathetic nerve activity to brown adipose tissue, kidney, hindlimb, and adrenal gland in anesthetized Sprague-Da...

  19. Sympathetic Nervous System, Hypertension, Obesity and Metabolic Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seravalle, Gino; Grassi, Guido

    2016-09-01

    Experimental and clinical studies have clearly shown the role of the sympathetic nervous system in the pathophysiology of several cardiovascular and non-cardiovascular diseases. This short review will be aimed at focusing and discussing the new information collected on two specific clinical conditions such as obesity and metabolic syndrome. The paper will briefly describe the four main mechanisms that represent the common link between these two pathophysiological conditions and that through the sympathetic nervous system contribute to increase the cardiovascular risk.

  20. Vestibular control of sympathetic activity. An otolith-sympathetic reflex in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, H.; Biaggioni, I.; Voustianiouk, A.; Diedrich, A.; Costa, F.; Clarke, R.; Gizzi, M.; Raphan, T.; Cohen, B.

    2002-01-01

    It has been proposed that a vestibular reflex originating in the otolith organs and other body graviceptors modulates sympathetic activity during changes in posture with regard to gravity. To test this hypothesis, we selectively stimulated otolith and body graviceptors sinusoidally along different head axes in the coronal plane with off-vertical axis rotation (OVAR) and recorded sympathetic efferent activity in the peroneal nerve (muscle sympathetic nerve activity, MSNA), blood pressure, heart rate, and respiratory rate. All parameters were entrained during OVAR at the frequency of rotation, with MSNA increasing in nose-up positions during forward linear acceleration and decreasing when nose-down. MSNA was correlated closely with blood pressure when subjects were within +/-90 degrees of nose-down positions with a delay of 1.4 s, the normal latency of baroreflex-driven changes in MSNA. Thus, in the nose-down position, MSNA was probably driven by baroreflex afferents. In contrast, when subjects were within +/-45 degrees of the nose-up position, i.e., when positive linear acceleration was maximal along the naso-ocipital axis, MSNA was closely related to gravitational acceleration at a latency of 0.4 s. This delay is too short for MSNA changes to be mediated by the baroreflex, but it is compatible with the delay of a response originating in the vestibular system. We postulate that a vestibulosympathetic reflex, probably originating mainly in the otolith organs, contributes to blood pressure maintenance during forward linear acceleration. Because of its short latency, this reflex may be one of the earliest mechanisms to sustain blood pressure upon standing.

  1. Role of sympathetic nerve activity in the process of fainting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi eIwase

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Syncope is defined as a transient loss of consciousness and postural tone, characterized by rapid onset, short duration, and spontaneous recovery, and the process of syncope progression will be described with two types of sympathetic change. Simultaneous recordings of microneurographically recorded MSNA and continuous and noninvasive blood pressure measurement have disclose what is going on in the course of progression of the syncope. Vasovagal or neurally mediated syncope, three stages are identified in the course of syncope onset, oscillation, imbalance, and catastrophe phases. The vasovagal syncope is characterized by the sympathoexcitation, followed by vagal overcome via the Bezold-Jarisch reflex. Orthostatic syncope is caused by the response failure or lack of sympathetic nerve activity toward the orthostatic challenge followed by the fluid shift, and subsequent cerebral low perfusion. Four causes are considered for the compensatory failure, which triggers the orthostatic syncope; hypovolemia, increased pooling in the lower body, failure to activate the sympathetic activity, and failure of vasoconstriction against sympathetic vasoconstrictive stimulation. Many pathophysiological conditions were described in the viewpoint of 1 exaggerated sympathoexcitation and 2 failure to activate the sympathetic nerve. We conclude that the sympathetic nervous system can control the cardiovascular function, and its failure resulted syncope, however, responses of the system by microneurographically recorded MSNA would determine the pathophysiology of the onset and progression of syncope, explaining the treatment effect that could be achieved by the analysis of this mechanism.

  2. Copeptin, resistant hypertension and renal sympathetic denervation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwerg, Marius; Slagman, Anna; Stangl, Karl; Stangl, Verena

    Renal denervation is used as a treatment option for patients with resistant hypertension. But only a subgroup of patients benefits from renal sympathetic denervation (RDN). Biomarkers might be helpful to identify patients who respond to RDN. Copeptin as a surrogate for vasopressin levels is increased in hypertension and other cardiovascular diseases. This study aims to evaluate the effect of RDN on Copeptin and its prognostic value for response to RDN. A total of 40 patients have been included in the study. The responder rate was 47.5% on 24 h ambulatory blood pressure measurements. The mean systolic 24 h blood pressure dropped from 152 ± 10 mmHg to 147 ± 17 mmHg (p = .044) in the six month follow up. The mean baseline level of Copeptin was 7.4 pmol/l (interquartile range 3.7-11.6) for responders and 8.4 pmol/l (interquartile range 5.7-11-8) for non-responders (p = .53). The Copeptin levels did not change over time after renal denervation. Baseline measurements of Copeptin in patients undergoing RDN for resistant hypertension have no predictive value for response to RDN. Despite lowering the blood pressure RDN has no influence on Copeptin levels in this short time follow up period.

  3. Intrathecal Intermittent Orexin-A Causes Sympathetic Long-Term Facilitation and Sensitizes the Peripheral Chemoreceptor Response to Hypoxia in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seung Jae; Pilowsky, Paul M; Farnham, Melissa M J

    2016-09-01

    Intermittent hypoxia causes a persistent increase in sympathetic nerve activity (SNA), which progresses to hypertension in conditions such as obstructive sleep apnea. Orexins (A and B) are hypothalamic neurotransmitters with arousal-promoting and sympathoexcitatory effects. We investigated whether the sustained elevation of SNA, termed sympathetic long-term facilitation, after acute intermittent hypoxia (AIH) is caused by endogenous orexin acting on spinal sympathetic preganglionic neurons. The role of orexin in the increased SNA response to AIH was investigated in urethane-anesthetized, vagotomized, and artificially ventilated Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 58). A spinally infused subthreshold dose of orexin-A (intermittent; 0.1 nmol × 10) produced long-term enhancement in SNA (41.4% ± 6.9%) from baseline. This phenomenon was not produced by the same dose of orexin-A administered as a bolus intrathecal infusion (1 nmol; 7.3% ± 2.3%). The dual orexin receptor blocker, Almorexant, attenuated the effect of sympathetic long-term facilitation generated by intermittent orexin-A (20.7% ± 4.5% for Almorexant at 30 mg∙kg(-1) and 18.5% ± 1.2% for 75 mg∙kg(-1)), but not in AIH. The peripheral chemoreflex sympathoexcitatory response to hypoxia was greatly enhanced by intermittent orexin-A and AIH. In both cases, the sympathetic chemoreflex sensitization was reduced by Almorexant. Taken together, spinally acting orexin-A is mechanistically sufficient to evoke sympathetic long-term facilitation. However, AIH-induced sympathetic long-term facilitation appears to rely on mechanisms that are independent of orexin neurotransmission. Our findings further reveal that the activation of spinal orexin receptors is critical to enhance peripheral chemoreceptor responses to hypoxia after AIH. Copyright © 2016 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  4. Data Elevator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2017-04-29

    Data Elevator: Efficient Asynchronous Data Movement in Hierarchical Storage Systems Multi-layer storage subsystems, including SSD-based burst buffers and disk-based parallel file systems (PFS), are becoming part of HPC systems. However, software for this storage hierarchy is still in its infancy. Applications may have to explicitly move data among the storage layers. We propose Data Elevator for transparently and efficiently moving data between a burst buffer and a PFS. Users specify the final destination for their data, typically on PFS, Data Elevator intercepts the I/O calls, stages data on burst buffer, and then asynchronously transfers the data to their final destination in the background. This system allows extensive optimizations, such as overlapping read and write operations, choosing I/O modes, and aligning buffer boundaries. In tests with large-scale scientific applications, Data Elevator is as much as 4.2X faster than Cray DataWarp, the start-of-art software for burst buffer, and 4X faster than directly writing to PFS. The Data Elevator library uses HDF5's Virtual Object Layer (VOL) for intercepting parallel I/O calls that write data to PFS. The intercepted calls are redirected to the Data Elevator, which provides a handle to write the file in a faster and intermediate burst buffer system. Once the application finishes writing the data to the burst buffer, the Data Elevator job uses HDF5 to move the data to final destination in an asynchronous manner. Hence, using the Data Elevator library is currently useful for applications that call HDF5 for writing data files. Also, the Data Elevator depends on the HDF5 VOL functionality.

  5. Prognosis of Cyclic Vomiting Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Gordon Millichap

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Investigators from Teikyo University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan, evaluated the clinical features, prognosis, and prophylaxis of cyclic vomiting syndrome and the relationship between the syndrome and levels of adrenocorticotropic/antidiuretic hormones (ACTH/ADH.

  6. Thoracic sympathetic block reduces respiratory system compliance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Ely Martins Benseñor

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Thoracic epidural anesthesia (TEA following thoracic surgery presents known analgesic and respiratory benefits. However, intraoperative thoracic sympathetic block may trigger airway hyperreactivity. This study weighed up these beneficial and undesirable effects on intraoperative respiratory mechanics. DESIGN AND SETTING: Randomized, double-blind clinical study at a tertiary public hospital. METHODS: Nineteen patients scheduled for partial lung resection were distributed using a random number table into groups receiving active TEA (15 ml 0.5% bupivacaine, n = 9 or placebo (15 ml 0.9% saline, n = 10 solutions that also contained 1:200,000 epinephrine and 2 mg morphine. Under general anesthesia, flows and airway and esophageal pressures were recorded. Pressure-volume curves, lower inflection points (LIP, resistance and compliance at 10 ml/kg tidal volume were established for respiratory system, chest wall and lungs. Student’s t test was performed, including confidence intervals (CI. RESULTS: Bupivacaine rose 5 ± 1 dermatomes upwards and 6 ± 1 downwards. LIP was higher in the bupivacaine group (6.2 ± 2.3 versus 3.6 ± 0.6 cmH2O, p = 0.016, CI = -3.4 to -1.8. Respiratory system and lung compliance were higher in the placebo group (respectively 73.3 ± 10.6 versus 51.9 ± 15.5, p = 0.003, CI = 19.1 to 23.7; 127.2 ± 31.7 versus 70.2 ± 23.1 ml/cmH2O, p < 0.001, CI = 61 to 53. Resistance and chest wall compliance showed no difference. CONCLUSION: TEA decreased respiratory system compliance by reducing its lung component. Resistance was unaffected. Under TEA, positive end-expiratory pressure and recruitment maneuvers are advisable.

  7. Direct conscious telemetry recordings demonstrate increased renal sympathetic nerve activity in rats with chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim M Salman

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease (CKD is associated with sympathetic hyperactivity and impaired blood pressure control reflex responses, yet direct evidence demonstrating these features of autonomic dysfunction in conscious animals is still lacking. Here we measured renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA and mean arterial pressure (MAP using telemetry-based recordings in a rat model of CKD, the Lewis Polycystic Kidney (LPK rat, and assessed responses to chemoreflex activation and acute stress. Male LPK and Lewis control animals (total n=16 were instrumented for telemetric recording of RSNA and MAP. At 12–13 weeks-of-age, resting RSNA and MAP, sympathetic and haemodynamic responses to both peripheral (hypoxia: 10% O2 and central chemoreflex (hypercapnia: 7% CO2 activation and acute stress (open-field exposure, were measured. As indicators of renal function, urinary protein (UPro and creatinine (Ucr levels were assessed. LPK rats had higher resting RSNA (1.2±0.1 vs. 0.6±0.1 µV, p<0.05 and MAP (151±8 vs. 97±2 mmHg, p<0.05 compared to Lewis. MAP was negatively correlated with Ucr (r=-0.80, p=0.002 and positively correlated with RSNA (r=0.66, p=0.014, with multiple linear regression modeling indicating the strongest correlation was with Ucr. RSNA and MAP responses to activation of the central chemoreflex and open-field stress were reduced in the LPK relative to the Lewis (all p<0.05. This is the first description of dual conscious telemetry recording of RSNA and MAP in a genetic rodent model of CKD. Elevated RSNA is likely a key contributor to the marked hypertension in this model, while attenuated RSNA and MAP responses to central chemoreflex activation and acute stress in the LPK indicate possible deficits in the neural processing of autonomic outflows evoked by these sympathoexcitatory pathways.

  8. Cardiac sympathetic afferent denervation attenuates cardiac remodeling and improves cardiovascular dysfunction in rats with heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Han-Jun; Wang, Wei; Cornish, Kurtis G; Rozanski, George J; Zucker, Irving H

    2014-10-01

    The enhanced cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex (CSAR) contributes to the exaggerated sympathoexcitation in chronic heart failure (CHF). Increased sympathoexcitation is positively related to mortality in patients with CHF. However, the potential beneficial effects of chronic CSAR deletion on cardiac and autonomic function in CHF have not been previously explored. Here, we determined the effects of chronic CSAR deletion on cardiac remodeling and autonomic dysfunction in CHF. To delete the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 receptor-expressing CSAR afferents selectively, epicardial application of resiniferatoxin (50 μg/mL), an ultrapotent analog of capsaicin, was performed during myocardium infarction surgery in rats. This procedure largely abolished the enhanced CSAR, prevented the exaggerated renal and cardiac sympathetic nerve activity and improved baroreflex sensitivity in CHF rats. Most importantly, we found that epicardial application of resiniferatoxin largely prevented the elevated left ventricle end-diastolic pressure, lung edema, and cardiac hypertrophy, partially reduced left ventricular dimensions in the failing heart, and increased cardiac contractile reserve in response to β-adrenergic receptor stimulation with isoproterenol in CHF rats. Molecular evidence showed that resiniferatoxin attenuated cardiac fibrosis and apoptosis and reduced expression of fibrotic markers and transforming growth factor-β receptor I in CHF rats. Pressure-volume loop analysis showed that resiniferatoxin reduced the end-diastolic pressure volume relationships in CHF rats, indicating improved cardiac compliance. In summary, cardiac sympathetic afferent deletion exhibits protective effects against deleterious cardiac remodeling and autonomic dysfunction in CHF. These data suggest a potential new paradigm and therapeutic potential in the management of CHF. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  9. Inflammation in CRPS: role of the sympathetic supply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlereth, Tanja; Drummond, Peter D; Birklein, Frank

    2014-05-01

    Acute Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) is associated with signs of inflammation such as increased skin temperature, oedema, skin colour changes and pain. Pro-inflammatory cytokines (tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-2 (IL-2), IL-1beta, IL-6) are up-regulated, whereas anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-4, IL-10) are diminished. Adaptive immunity seems to be involved in CRPS pathophysiology as many patients have autoantibodies directed against β2 adrenergic and muscarinic-2 receptors. In an animal tibial fracture model changes in the innate immune response such as up-regulation of keratinocytes are also found. Additionally, CRPS is accompanied by increased neurogenic inflammation which depends mainly on neuropeptides such as CGRP and Substance P. Besides inflammatory signs, sympathetic nervous system involvement in CRPS results in cool skin, increased sweating and sympathetically-maintained pain. The norepinephrine level is lower in the CRPS-affected than contralateral limb, but sympathetic sprouting and up-regulation of alpha-adrenoceptors may result in an adrenergic supersensitivity. The sympathetic nervous system and inflammation interact: norepinephrine influences the immune system and the production of cytokines. There is substantial evidence that this interaction contributes to the pathophysiology and clinical presentation of CRPS, but this interaction is not straightforward. How inflammation in CRPS might be exaggerated by sympathetic transmitters requires further elucidation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Sympathetic Innervation Promotes Arterial Fate by Enhancing Endothelial ERK Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardanaud, Luc; Pibouin-Fragner, Laurence; Dubrac, Alexandre; Mathivet, Thomas; English, Isabel; Brunet, Isabelle; Simons, Michael; Eichmann, Anne

    2016-08-19

    Arterial endothelial cells are morphologically, functionally, and molecularly distinct from those found in veins and lymphatic vessels. How arterial fate is acquired during development and maintained in adult vessels is incompletely understood. We set out to identify factors that promote arterial endothelial cell fate in vivo. We developed a functional assay, allowing us to monitor and manipulate arterial fate in vivo, using arteries isolated from quails that are grafted into the coelom of chick embryos. Endothelial cells migrate out from the grafted artery, and their colonization of host arteries and veins is quantified. Here we show that sympathetic innervation promotes arterial endothelial cell fate in vivo. Removal of sympathetic nerves decreases arterial fate and leads to colonization of veins, whereas exposure to sympathetic nerves or norepinephrine imposes arterial fate. Mechanistically, sympathetic nerves increase endothelial ERK (extracellular signal-regulated kinase) activity via adrenergic α1 and α2 receptors. These findings show that sympathetic innervation promotes arterial endothelial fate and may lead to novel approaches to improve arterialization in human disease. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. The articulo-cardiac sympathetic reflex in spinalized, anesthetized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Tomohiro; Suzuki, Atsuko; Ito, Ryuzo

    2006-04-01

    Somatic afferent regulation of heart rate by noxious knee joint stimulation has been proven in anesthetized cats to be a reflex response whose reflex center is in the brain and whose efferent arc is a cardiac sympathetic nerve. In the present study we examined whether articular stimulation could influence heart rate by this efferent sympathetic pathway in spinalized rats. In central nervous system (CNS)-intact rats, noxious articular movement of either the knee or elbow joint resulted in an increase in cardiac sympathetic nerve activity and heart rate. However, although in acutely spinalized rats a noxious movement of the elbow joint resulted in a significant increase in cardiac sympathetic nerve activity and heart rate, a noxious movement of the knee joint had no such effect and resulted in only a marginal increase in heart rate. Because this marginal increase was abolished by adrenalectomy suggests that it was due to the release of adrenal catecholamines. In conclusion, the spinal cord appears to be capable of mediating, by way of cardiac sympathetic nerves, the propriospinally induced reflex increase in heart rate that follows noxious stimulation of the elbow joint, but not the knee joint.

  12. Stress cardiomyopathy: diagnosis, pathophysiology, management, and prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ajay K; Singh, Jagmeet P; Heist, E Kevin

    2011-09-01

    Stress cardiomyopathy is now a well-recognized reversible cardiomyopathy, with a clinical presentation mimicking Acute Coronary syndrome in the absence of significant coronary artery disease. It is often encountered in postmenopausal females and is usually precipitated by acute emotional or physical stressors. In this review, we have attempted to summarize relevant data regarding diagnosis, typical and atypical presentations, pathophysiology, management options, and prognosis. Typically, patients present with chest pain and shortness of breath, transient electrocardiographic changes, moderate troponin elevation, and are found to have wall motion abnormalities (apical and midventricular akinesis with preserved basal segment systolic function) without obstructive coronary lesions, with complete resolution in next few weeks. The precise pathophysiology remains unclear, but excessive catecholamine stimulation, metabolic disturbances, and dysfunction of microcirculation are thought to be the underlying mechanisms.

  13. Reactive oxygen species in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus alter sympathetic activity during metabolic syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JOSIANE CAMPOS CRUZ

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN contains heterogeneous populations of neurons involved in autonomic and neuroendocrine regulation. The PVN plays an important role in the sympathoexcitatory response to increasing circulating levels of angiotensin II (Ang-II, which activates AT1 receptors in the circumventricular organs (OCVs, mainly in the subfornical organ (SFO. Circulating Ang-II induces a de novo synthesis of Ang-II in SFO neurons projecting to pre-autonomic PVN neurons. Activation of AT1 receptors induces intracellular increases in reactive oxygen species (ROS, leading to increases in sympathetic nerve activity (SNA. Chronic sympathetic nerve activation promotes a series of metabolic disorders that characterizes the metabolic syndrome (MetS: dyslipidemia, hyperinsulinemia, glucose intolerance, hyperleptinemia and elevated plasma hormone levels, such as noradrenaline, glucocorticoids, leptin, insulin and Ang-II. This review will discuss the contribution of our laboratory and others regarding the sympathoexcitation caused by peripheral Ang-II-induced reactive oxygen species along the subfornical organ and paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus. We hypothesize that this mechanism could be involved in metabolic disorders underlying MetS.

  14. Effect of ghrelin on regulation of splenic sympathetic nerve discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balivada, Sivasai; Pawar, Hitesh N; Montgomery, Shawnee; Kenney, Michael J

    2016-12-01

    Ghrelin influences immune system function and modulates the sympathetic nervous system; however, the contribution of ghrelin to neural-immune interactions is not well-established because the effect of ghrelin on splenic sympathetic nerve discharge (SND) is not known. This study tested the hypothesis that central ghrelin administration would inhibit splenic SND in anesthetized rats. Rats received intracerebroventricular (ICV) injections of ghrelin (1nmol/kg) or aCSF. Lumbar SND recordings provided a non-visceral nerve control. The ICV ghrelin administration significantly increased splenic and lumbar SND, whereas mean arterial pressure (MAP) was not altered. These findings provide fundamental information regarding the nature of sympathetic-immune interactions. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) enhances sympathetic neurite growth in rat hearts at early developmental stages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miwa, Keiko; Lee, Jong-Kook; Takagishi, Yoshiko; Opthof, Tobias; Fu, Xianming; Kodama, Itsuo

    2010-01-01

    Molecular signaling of sympathetic innervation of myocardium is an unresolved issue. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of neurotrophic factors on sympathetic neurite growth towards cardiomyocytes. Cardiomyocytes (CMs) and sympathetic neurons (SNs) were isolated from neonatal

  16. Maternal protein restriction increases respiratory and sympathetic activities and sensitizes peripheral chemoreflex in male rat offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Brito Alves, José L; Nogueira, Viviane O; Cavalcanti Neto, Marinaldo P; Leopoldino, Andréia M; Curti, Carlos; Colombari, Débora S A; Colombari, Eduardo; Wanderley, Almir G; Leandro, Carol G; Zoccal, Daniel B; Costa-Silva, João H

    2015-05-01

    Maternal protein restriction in rats increases the risk of adult offspring arterial hypertension through unknown mechanisms. The aims of the study were to evaluate the effects of a low-protein (LP) diet during pregnancy and lactation on baseline sympathetic and respiratory activities and peripheral chemoreflex sensitivity in the rat offspring. Wistar rat dams were fed a control [normal-protein (NP); 17% protein] or an LP (8% protein) diet during pregnancy and lactation, and their male offspring were studied at 30 d of age. Direct measurements of baseline arterial blood pressure (ABP), heart rate (HR), and respiratory frequency (Rf) as well as peripheral chemoreflex activation (potassium cyanide: 0.04%) were recorded in pups while they were awake. In addition, recordings of the phrenic nerve (PN) and thoracic sympathetic nerve (tSN) activities were obtained from the in situ preparations. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) expression was also evaluated in carotid bifurcation through a Western blotting assay. At 30 d of age, unanesthetized LP rats exhibited enhanced resting Rf (P = 0.001) and similar ABP and HR compared with the NP rats. Despite their similar baseline ABP values, LP rats exhibited augmented low-frequency variability (∼91%; P = 0.01). In addition, the unanesthetized LP rats showed enhanced pressor (P = 0.01) and tachypnoeic (P = 0.03) responses to peripheral chemoreflex activation. The LP rats displayed elevated baseline tSN activity (∼86%; P = 0.02) and PN burst frequency (45%; P = 0.01) and amplitude (53%; P = 0.001) as well as augmented sympathetic (P = 0.01) and phrenic (P = 0.04) excitatory responses to peripheral chemoreflex activation compared with the NP group. Furthermore, LP rats showed an increase of ∼100% in HIF-1α protein density in carotid bifurcation compared with NP rats. Sympathetic-respiratory overactivity and amplified peripheral chemoreceptor responses, potentially through HIF-1α-dependent mechanisms, precede the onset

  17. Role of sympathetic nervous system and neuropeptides in obesity hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hall J.E.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is the most common cause of human essential hypertension in most industrialized countries. Although the precise mechanisms of obesity hypertension are not fully understood, considerable evidence suggests that excess renal sodium reabsorption and a hypertensive shift of pressure natriuresis play a major role. Sympathetic activation appears to mediate at least part of the obesity-induced sodium retention and hypertension since adrenergic blockade or renal denervation markedly attenuates these changes. Recent observations suggest that leptin and its multiple interactions with neuropeptides in the hypothalamus may link excess weight gain with increased sympathetic activity. Leptin is produced mainly in adipocytes and is believed to regulate energy balance by acting on the hypothalamus to reduce food intake and to increase energy expenditure via sympathetic activation. Short-term administration of leptin into the cerebral ventricles increases renal sympathetic activity, and long-term leptin infusion at rates that mimic plasma concentrations found in obesity raises arterial pressure and heart rate via adrenergic activation in non-obese rodents. Transgenic mice overexpressing leptin also develop hypertension. Acute studies suggest that the renal sympathetic effects of leptin may depend on interactions with other neurochemical pathways in the hypothalamus, including the melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4-R. However, the role of this pathway in mediating the long-term effects of leptin on blood pressure is unclear. Also, it is uncertain whether there is resistance to the chronic renal sympathetic and blood pressure effects of leptin in obese subjects. In addition, leptin also has other cardiovascular and renal actions, such as stimulation of nitric oxide formation and improvement of insulin sensitivity, which may tend to reduce blood pressure in some conditions. Although the role of these mechanisms in human obesity has not been elucidated, this

  18. Different sympathetic pathways control the metabolism of distinct bone envelopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bataille, Caroline; Mauprivez, Cédric; Haÿ, Eric; Baroukh, Brigitte; Brun, Adrian; Chaussain, Catherine; Marie, Pierre J; Saffar, Jean-Louis; Cherruau, Marc

    2012-05-01

    Bone remodeling, the mechanism that modulates bone mass adaptation, is controlled by the sympathetic nervous system through the catecholaminergic pathway. However, resorption in the mandible periosteum envelope is associated with cholinergic Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide (VIP)-positive nerve fibers sensitive to sympathetic neurotoxics, suggesting that different sympathetic pathways may control distinct bone envelopes. In this study, we assessed the role of distinct sympathetic pathways on rat femur and mandible envelopes. To this goal, adult male Wistar rats were chemically sympathectomized or treated with agonists/antagonists of the catecholaminergic and cholinergic pathways; femora and mandibles were sampled. Histomorphometric analysis showed that sympathectomy decreased the number of preosteoclasts and RANKL-expressing osteoblasts in mandible periosteum but had no effect on femur trabecular bone. In contrast, pharmacological stimulation or repression of the catecholaminergic cell receptors impacted the femur trabecular bone and mandible endosteal retromolar zone. VIP treatment of sympathectomized rats rescued the disturbances of the mandible periosteum and alveolar wall whereas the cholinergic pathway had no effect on the catecholaminergic-dependent envelopes. We also found that VIP receptor-1 was weakly expressed in periosteal osteoblasts in the mandible and was increased by VIP treatment, whereas osteoblasts of the retromolar envelope that was innervated only by tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactive fibers, constitutively expressed beta-2 adrenergic receptors. These data highlight the complexity of the sympathetic control of bone metabolism. Both the embryological origin of the bone (endochondral for the femur, membranous for the mandibular periosteum and the socket wall) and environmental factors specific to the innervated envelope may influence the phenotype of the sympathetic innervation. We suggest that an origin-dependent imprint of bone cells through

  19. Bursting into space: alterations of sympathetic control by space travel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckberg, D. L.

    2003-01-01

    AIM: Astronauts return to Earth with reduced red cell masses and hypovolaemia. Not surprisingly, when they stand, their heart rates may speed inordinately, their blood pressures may fall, and some may experience frank syncope. We studied autonomic function in six male astronauts (average +/- SEM age: 40 +/- 2 years) before, during, and after the 16-day Neurolab space shuttle mission. METHOD: We recorded electrocardiograms, finger photoplethysmographic arterial pressures, respiration, peroneal nerve muscle sympathetic activity, plasma noradrenaline and noradrenaline kinetics, and cardiac output, and we calculated stroke volume and total peripheral resistance. We perturbed autonomic function before and during spaceflight with graded Valsalva manoeuvres and lower body suction, and before and after the mission with passive upright tilt. RESULTS: In-flight baseline sympathetic nerve activity was increased above pre-flight levels (by 10-33%) in three subjects, in whom noradrenaline spillover and clearance also were increased. Valsalva straining provoked greater reductions of arterial pressure, and proportionally greater sympathetic responses in space than on Earth. Lower body suction elicited greater increases of sympathetic nerve activity, plasma noradrenaline, and noradrenaline spillover in space than on Earth. After the Neurolab mission, left ventricular stroke volume was lower and heart rate was higher during tilt, than before spaceflight. No astronaut experienced orthostatic hypotension or pre-syncope during 10 min of post-flight tilting. CONCLUSION: We conclude that baseline sympathetic outflow, however measured, is higher in space than on earth, and that augmented sympathetic nerve responses to Valsalva straining, lower body suction, and post-flight upright tilt represent normal adjustments to greater haemodynamic stresses associated with hypovolaemia.

  20. Elevated CO

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoosbeek, Marcel R.

    2016-01-01

    Sustained increased productivity of trees growing in elevated CO2 depends in part on their stoichiometric flexibility, i.e., increasing their nutrient use efficiency, or on increased nutrient uptake from the soil. Phosphorus (P) may be a nutrient as limiting as nitrogen (N) in

  1. Optimized sympathetic cooling of atomic mixtures via fast adiabatic strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Stephen; Sundaram, Bala [Department of Physics, University of Massachusetts, Boston, Massachusetts 02125 (United States); Onofrio, Roberto [Dipartimento di Fisica ' ' Galileo Galilei' ' , Universita di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, Padova I-35131 (Italy); Department of Physics, University of Massachusetts, Boston, Massachusetts 02125 (United States); Institute for Theoretical Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics (ITAMP), Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States)

    2011-11-15

    We discuss fast frictionless cooling techniques in the framework of sympathetic cooling of cold atomic mixtures. It is argued that optimal cooling of an atomic species--in which the deepest quantum degeneracy regime is achieved--may be obtained by means of sympathetic cooling with another species whose trapping frequency is dynamically changed to maintain constancy of the Lewis-Riesenfeld adiabatic invariant. Advantages and limitations of this cooling strategy are discussed, with particular regard to the possibility of cooling Fermi gases to a deeper degenerate regime.

  2. Centrally administered resistin enhances sympathetic nerve activity to the hindlimb but attenuates the activity to brown adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosari, S; Rathner, J A; Chen, F; Kosari, S; Badoer, E

    2011-07-01

    Resistin, an adipokine, is believed to act in the brain to influence energy homeostasis. Plasma resistin levels are elevated in obesity and are associated with metabolic and cardiovascular disease. Increased muscle sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) is a characteristic of obesity, a risk factor for diabetes and cardiovascular disease. We hypothesized that resistin affects SNA, which contributes to metabolic and cardiovascular dysfunction. Here we investigated the effects of centrally administered resistin on SNA to muscle (lumbar) and brown adipose tissue (BAT), outputs that influence cardiovascular and energy homeostasis. Overnight-fasted rats were anesthetized, and resistin (7 μg) was administered into the lateral cerebral ventricle (intracerebroventricular). The lumbar sympathetic nerve trunk or sympathetic nerves supplying BAT were dissected free, and nerve activity was recorded. Arterial blood pressure, heart rate, body core temperature, and BAT temperature were also recorded. Responses to resistin or vehicle were monitored for 4 h after intracerebroventricular administration. Acutely administered resistin increased lumbar SNA but decreased BAT SNA. Mean arterial pressure and heart rate, however, were not significantly affected by resistin. BAT temperature was significantly reduced by resistin, and there was a concomitant fall in body temperature. The findings indicate that resistin has differential effects on SNA to tissues involved in metabolic and cardiovascular regulation. The decreased BAT SNA and the increased lumbar SNA elicited by resistin suggest that it may contribute to the increased muscle SNA and reduced energy expenditure observed in obesity and diabetes.

  3. Protective effect of ischemic preconditioning on ischemia/reperfusion-induced acute kidney injury through sympathetic nervous system in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsui, Hidenobu; Tanaka, Ryosuke; Yamagata, Masayo; Yukimura, Tokihito; Ohkita, Mamoru; Matsumura, Yasuo

    2013-10-15

    We have found that a series of brief renal ischemia and reperfusion (preconditioning), before the time of ischemia significantly attenuated the ischemia/reperfusion-induced acute kidney injury through endothelial nitric oxide synthase. In this study, we examined the effects of ischemic preconditioning on renal sympathetic nervous system and kidney function in ischemia/reperfusion-induced acute kidney injury with or without nitric oxide synthase inhibitor. Ischemia/reperfusion-induced acute kidney injury was made by clamping the left renal artery and vein for 45-min followed by reperfusion, 2 weeks after the contralateral nephrectomy. Ischemic preconditioning, consisting of three cycles of 2-min ischemia followed by 5-min reperfusion, was performed before the 45-min ischemia. Ischemic preconditioning suppressed the enhanced renal sympathetic nerve activity during ischemia and the elevated renal venous plasma norepinephrine level after reperfusion, and attenuated renal dysfunction and histological damage. The renoprotective effect of ischemic preconditioning was diminished by N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (0.3 mg/kg, i.v.), a nonselective nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, 5 min before the start of ischemic preconditioning. Thus, ischemic preconditioning decreased renal sympathetic nerve activity and norepinephrine release probably through activating nitric oxide production, thereby improving ischemia/reperfusion-induced acute kidney injury. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Orthostatic tolerance, cerebral oxygenation, and blood velocity in humans with sympathetic failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harms, M. P.; Colier, W. N.; Wieling, W.; Lenders, J. W.; Secher, N. H.; van Lieshout, J. J.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Patients with orthostatic hypotension due to sympathetic failure become symptomatic when standing, although their capability to maintain cerebral blood flow is reported to be preserved. We tested the hypothesis that in patients with sympathetic failure, orthostatic symptoms

  5. Carotid baroreceptor stimulation, sympathetic activity, baroreflex function, and blood pressure in hypertensive patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heusser, K.; Tank, J.; Engeli, S.; Diedrich, A.; Menne, J.; Eckert, S.; Peters, T.; Sweep, F.C.; Haller, H.; Pichlmaier, A.M.; Luft, F.C.; Jordan, J.

    2010-01-01

    In animals, electric field stimulation of carotid baroreceptors elicits a depressor response through sympathetic inhibition. We tested the hypothesis that the stimulation acutely reduces sympathetic vasomotor tone and blood pressure in patients with drug treatment-resistant arterial hypertension.

  6. Accidental Haemorrhage and Fetal Prognosis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1974-04-17

    Apr 17, 1974 ... perinatal mortality associated with accidental haemorrhage. The importance of clinical signs in determining fetal prognosis is discussed. A suggested clinical approach to cases of accidental haemorrhage, where on admission the fetus is found to be alive in utero, is given. S. Afr. Med. l., 48, 764 (1974).

  7. Reflex sympathetic dystrophy after modified radical mastectomy: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saddison, D K; Vanek, V W

    1993-07-01

    Despite the long history of descriptions of reflex sympathetic dystrophy (RSD), much confusion remains regarding its pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment. It most commonly occurs after trauma and is more frequent in women, white persons, and the elderly. The first case of RSD after mastectomy is reported and the proposed pathophysiology and management of RSD are reviewed.

  8. The Effect of Sympathetic Antagonists on the Antidepressant Action ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The interaction of three sympathetic receptor antagonists with benzodiazepines, which may impact the clinical use of alprazolam, was also studied. Behavioral despair was examined in six groups of albino mice. Drugs were administered intraperitoneally. The control group received only a single dose of 1% Tween 80.

  9. The clinical value of cardiac sympathetic imaging in heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Emil; Kjaer, Andreas; Hasbak, Philip

    2014-01-01

    The autonomic nervous system plays an important role in the pathology of heart failure. The single-photon emission computed tomography tracer iodine-123-metaiodobenzylguanidine ((123) I-MIBG) can be used to investigate the activity of the predominant neurotransmitter of the sympathetic nervous...

  10. Menstrual cycle effects on sympathetic neural responses to upright tilt.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fu, Q.; Okazaki, K.; Shibata, S.; Shook, R.P.; Gunday, T.B. van; Galbreath, M.M.; Reelick, M.F; Levine, B.D.

    2009-01-01

    Young women are more susceptible to orthostatic intolerance than men, though the sex-specific pathophysiology remains unknown. As blood pressure (BP) is regulated through the baroreflex mechanism, we tested the hypothesis that baroreflex control of muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) during

  11. Sympathetic recovery from anger is associated with emotion regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahle, Sarah; Miller, Jonas G; Lopez, Monica; Hastings, Paul D

    2016-02-01

    Prior work has focused on how and whether autonomic reactivity in response to emotionally evocative events is associated with better emotion regulation skills in children, but little is known about autonomic recovery processes in children and how they might relate to regulation. In a sample of 67 3.5-year-olds, we examined sympathetic responding during an anger provocation and during a repair period immediately following. Piecewise latent growth curve models were used to estimate changes in pre-ejection period (PEP) that occurred during the provocation period and during the repair period. Mothers reported on global aspects of emotion regulation. On average, children showed a small but significant increase in sympathetic activity (PEP shortening) during the provocation period. Although a significant mean pattern of change was not detected during the repair period, there was significant variability in individual trajectories. These individual differences in physiological change during the repair period were associated with emotion regulation, such that children who were rated as having better emotion regulation showed greater sympathetic recovery (PEP lengthening) during the repair period. This suggests that effectively well-regulated preschoolers are more capable of terminating sympathetic responding after a provocation of anger has ended rather than continuing to be physiologically primed for fight-or-flight responding. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Adipose afferent reflex: sympathetic activation and obesity hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, X-Q; Chen, W-W; Zhu, G-Q

    2014-03-01

    Excessive sympathetic activity contributes to the pathogenesis of hypertension and the progression of the related organ damage. Adipose afferent reflex (AAR) is a sympatho-excitatory reflex that the afferent activity from white adipose tissue (WAT) increases sympathetic outflow and blood pressure. Hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN or PVH) is one of the central sites in the control of the AAR, and ionotropic glutamate receptors in the nucleus mediate the AAR. The AAR is enhanced in obesity and obesity hypertension. Enhanced WAT afferent activity and AAR contribute to the excessive sympathetic activation and hypertension in obesity. Blockage of the AAR attenuates the excessive sympathetic activity and hypertension. Leptin may be one of sensors in the WAT for the AAR, and is involved in the enhanced AAR in obesity and hypertension. This review focuses on the neuroanatomical basis and physiological functions of the AAR, and the important role of the enhanced AAR in the pathogenesis of obesity hypertension. © 2013 Scandinavian Physiological Society. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Baroreflex control of sympathetic activity in experimental hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.C.C. Irigoyen

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available The arterial baroreceptor reflex system is one of the most powerful and rapidly acting mechanisms for controlling arterial pressure. The purpose of the present review is to discuss data relating sympathetic activity to the baroreflex control of arterial pressure in two different experimental models: neurogenic hypertension by sinoaortic denervation (SAD and high-renin hypertension by total aortic ligation between the renal arteries in the rat. SAD depresses baroreflex regulation of renal sympathetic activity in both the acute and chronic phases. However, increased sympathetic activity (100% was found only in the acute phase of sinoaortic denervation. In the chronic phase of SAD average discharge normalized but the pattern of discharges was different from that found in controls. High-renin hypertensive rats showed overactivity of the renin angiotensin system and a great depression of the baroreflexes, comparable to the depression observed in chronic sinoaortic denervated rats. However, there were no differences in the average tonic sympathetic activity or changes in the pattern of discharges in high-renin rats. We suggest that the difference in the pattern of discharges may contribute to the increase in arterial pressure lability observed in chronic sinoaortic denervated rats.

  14. Dual sympathetic and parasympathetic hypothalamic output to white adipose tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kreier, F.; Veder, L.L.; Kalsbeek, A.; Sauerwein, H.P.; Fliers, E.; Romijn, J.A.; Mettenleiter, T.C.; Buijs, R.M.

    2006-01-01

    The balance of lipogenesis and lipolysis in fat tissue is regulated both by the interaction of blood born factors and by the autonomic nervous system (ANS). The sympathetic branch stimulates lipolysis, whereas its antagonist, the parasympathetic branch, promotes lipogenesis. Here, by applying two

  15. Dynamic resistance training decreases sympathetic tone in hypertensive ovariectomized rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimojo, G.L.; Palma, R.K.; Brito, J.O.; Sanches, I.C. [Laboratório de Fisiologia Translacional, Programa de Ciências da Reabilitação, Universidade Nove de Julho, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Irigoyen, M.C. [Instituto do Coração, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); De Angelis, K. [Laboratório de Fisiologia Translacional, Programa de Ciências da Reabilitação, Universidade Nove de Julho, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-03-27

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of resistance exercise training on hemodynamics and cardiac autonomic control in ovariectomized spontaneously hypertensive rats. Female rats were divided into 4 groups: sedentary control (SC), sedentary hypertensive (SH), sedentary hypertensive ovariectomized (SHO), and resistance-trained hypertensive ovariectomized (RTHO). Resistance exercise training was performed on a vertical ladder (5 days/week, 8 weeks) at 40-60% maximal load. Direct arterial pressure was recorded. Vagal and sympathetic tones were measured by heart rate (HR) responses to methylatropine (3 mg/kg, iv) and propranolol (4 mg/kg, iv). Ovariectomy resulted in additional increases in blood pressure in hypertensive rats and was associated with decreased vagal tone. Resistance exercise trained rats had lower mean arterial pressure than untrained rats (RTHO: 159±2.2 vs SHO: 177±3.4 mmHg), as well as resting bradycardia (RTHO: 332±9.0 vs SHO: 356±5 bpm). Sympathetic tone was also lower in the trained group. Moreover, sympathetic tone was positively correlated with resting HR (r=0.7, P<0.05). The additional arterial pressure increase in hypertensive rats caused by ovarian hormone deprivation was attenuated by moderate-intensity dynamic resistance training. This benefit may be associated with resting bradycardia and reduced cardiac sympathetic tone after training, which suggests potential benefits of resistance exercise for the management of hypertension after ovarian hormone deprivation.

  16. Causes and consequences of increased sympathetic activity in renal disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joles, JA; Koomans, HA

    Much evidence indicates increased sympathetic nervous activity (SNA) in renal disease. Renal ischemia is probably a primary event leading to increased SNA. Increased SNA often occurs in association with hypertension. However, the deleterious effect of increased SNA on the diseased kidney is not only

  17. Increased muscle perfusion reduces muscle sympathetic nerve activity during handgripping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joyner, M. J.; Wieling, W.

    1993-01-01

    This study sought to determine whether increasing blood flow to active muscles can blunt the normal rise in muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) during heavy rhythmic forearm exercise in humans. Subjects performed 5- to 6-min exercise bouts of handgripping (30/min) at 40-50% of maximum voluntary

  18. Prolonged Paroxysmal Sympathetic Storming Associated with Spontaneous Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Paroxysmal sympathetic storming (PSS is a rare disorder characterized by acute onset of nonstimulated tachycardia, hypertension, tachypnea, hyperthermia, external posturing, and diaphoresis. It is most frequently associated with severe traumatic brain injuries and has been reported in intracranial tumors, hydrocephalous, severe hypoxic brain injury, and intracerebral hemorrhage. Although excessive release of catecholamine and therefore increased sympathetic activities have been reported in subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH, there is no descriptive report of PSS primarily caused by spontaneous SAH up to date. Here, we report a case of prolonged PSS in a patient with spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage and consequent vasospasm. The sympathetic storming started shortly after patient was rewarmed from hypothermia protocol and symptoms responded to Labetalol, but intermittent recurrence did not resolve until 3 weeks later with treatment involving Midazolam, Fentanyl, Dexmedetomidine, Propofol, Bromocriptine, and minimizing frequency of neurological and vital checks. In conclusion, prolonged sympathetic storming can also be caused by spontaneous SAH. In this case, vasospasm might be a precipitating factor. Paralytics and hypothermia could mask the manifestations of PSS. The treatment of the refractory case will need both timely adjustment of medications and minimization of exogenous stressors or stimuli.

  19. Voltage-Induced Ca²⁺ Release in Postganglionic Sympathetic Neurons in Adult Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Li Sun

    Full Text Available Recent studies have provided evidence that depolarization in the absence of extracellular Ca2+ can trigger Ca2+ release from internal stores in a variety of neuron subtypes. Here we examine whether postganglionic sympathetic neurons are able to mobilize Ca2+ from intracellular stores in response to depolarization, independent of Ca2+ influx. We measured changes in cytosolic ΔF/F0 in individual fluo-4 -loaded sympathetic ganglion neurons in response to maintained K+ depolarization in the presence (2 mM and absence of extracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]e. Progressive elevations in extracellular [K+]e caused increasing membrane depolarizations that were of similar magnitude in 0 and 2 mM [Ca2+]e. Peak amplitude of ΔF/F0 transients in 2 mM [Ca2+]e increased in a linear fashion as the membrane become more depolarized. Peak elevations of ΔF/F0 in 0 mM [Ca2+]e were ~5-10% of those evoked at the same membrane potential in 2 mM [Ca2+]e and exhibited an inverse U-shaped dependence on voltage. Both the rise and decay of ΔF/F0 transients in 0 mM [Ca2+]e were slower than those of ΔF/F0 transients evoked in 2 mM [Ca2+]e. Rises in ΔF/F0 evoked by high [K+]e in the absence of extracellular Ca2+ were blocked by thapsigargin, an inhibitor of endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPase, or the inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3 receptor antagonists 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate and xestospongin C, but not by extracellular Cd2+, the dihydropyridine antagonist nifedipine, or by ryanodine at concentrations that caused depletion of ryanodine-sensitive Ca2+ stores. These results support the notion that postganglionic sympathetic neurons possess the ability to release Ca2+ from IP3-sensitive internal stores in response to membrane depolarization, independent of Ca2+ influx.

  20. Regulation of sympathetic nervous system function after cardiovascular deconditioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasser, E. M.; Moffitt, J. A.

    2001-01-01

    Humans subjected to prolonged periods of bed rest or microgravity undergo deconditioning of the cardiovascular system, characterized by resting tachycardia, reduced exercise capability, and a predisposition for orthostatic intolerance. These changes in cardiovascular function are likely due to a combination of factors, including changes in control of body fluid balance or cardiac alterations resulting in inadequate maintenance of stroke volume, altered arterial or venous vascular function, reduced activation of cardiovascular hormones, and diminished autonomic reflex function. There is evidence indicating a role for each of these mechanisms. Diminished reflex activation of the sympathetic nervous system and subsequent vasoconstriction appear to play an important role. Studies utilizing the hindlimb-unloaded (HU) rat, an animal model of deconditioning, evaluated the potential role of altered arterial baroreflex control of the sympathetic nervous system. These studies indicate that HU results in blunted baroreflex-mediated activation of both renal and lumbar sympathetic nerve activity in response to a hypotensive stimulus. HU rats are less able to maintain arterial pressure during hemorrhage, suggesting that diminished ability to increase sympathetic activity has functional consequences for the animal. Reflex control of vasopressin secretion appears to be enhanced following HU. Blunted baroreflex-mediated sympathoexcitation appears to involve altered central nervous system function. Baroreceptor afferent activity in response to changes in arterial pressure is unaltered in HU rats. However, increases in efferent sympathetic nerve activity for a given decrease in afferent input are blunted after HU. This altered central nervous system processing of baroreceptor inputs appears to involve an effect at the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM). Specifically, it appears that tonic GABAA-mediated inhibition of the RVLM is enhanced after HU. Augmented inhibition apparently

  1. Características clínicas y pronóstico a un año de pacientes con síndrome coronario agudo sin elevación del segmento ST y arterias coronarias sanas Clinical characteristics and one year prognosis of patients with acute coronary syndrome without ST segment elevation and normal coronary arteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilson López

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: describir las características clínicas y el pronóstico de los pacientes con infarto sin elevación del segmento ST y arterias coronarias normales. Métodos: estudio de cohorte en pacientes con infarto sin elevación del segmento ST con enfermedad coronaria o arterias coronarias normales (sin enfermedad coronaria, en el que se compararon: forma de presentación, intervenciones y desenlaces a un año. Resultados: cada cohorte estuvo compuesta por 24 pacientes. El grupo de pacientes sin enfermedad coronaria fue más joven (56±10 años vs. 63±10 años, p=0,026 y tuvo mayor cantidad de mujeres (62% vs. 29%, p=0,02. El puntaje de riesgo TIMI fue mayor en el grupo con enfermedad coronaria (3,3 vs. 2,5, p=0,02; sin embargo, no se tradujo en coronariografías más tempranas (sin enfermedad coronaria 19±18 h vs. con enfermedad coronaria 27±21 h, p=0,18. El número de vasos enfermos en los pacientes con enfermedad coronaria fue 1,6 y se implantaron 2,04 stents en promedio; en 75% de los casos éstos fueron no medicados. La estancia hospitalaria fue significativamente mayor en el grupo con enfermedad coronaria (3,5±1,7 vs. 2,3±1,1, p=0,01. Los pacientes sin enfermedad coronaria mostraron mejor fracción de eyección (0,57±0,06 vs. 0,50±0,12 y menor número de defectos segmentarios de contractilidad (8 vs. 15 pacientes, p=0,03. No hubo diferencias en cuanto a mortalidad por causa cardiovascular (con enfermedad coronaria 1 caso, sin enfermedad coronaria 0 casos, necesidad de nueva coronariografía (con enfermedad coronaria 1 caso, sin enfermedad coronaria 0 casos y rehospitalización por dolor torácico (6 casos en ambos grupos. Conclusiones: la probabilidad de rehospitalización por dolor torácico, necesidad de nueva coronariografía y muerte no difirió entre los pacientes con infarto sin elevación del segmento ST con o sin enfermedad coronaria obstructiva.Objective: to describe the clinical characteristics and prognosis of patients

  2. Hyperoxia attenuates muscle sympathetic nerve activity following isocapnic hypoxia in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Querido, Jordan S; Kennedy, Paul M; Sheel, A William

    2010-04-01

    Hypoxia may sensitize the carotid chemoreceptors, resulting in a sustained elevation of muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) that outlasts the hypoxic stimulus. To test this hypothesis, we determined the effect of carotid body inhibition on the sustained elevation of MSNA following isocapnic hypoxia in humans. Seven healthy subjects (5 male, 2 female) breathed 100% O(2) (hyperoxia) for 1 min before (2 interventions) and after (2-3 interventions) 20 min of isocapnic hypoxia (80% arterial oxyhemoglobin saturation). MSNA was continuously recorded from the common peroneal nerve with microneurography. There was no effect of hyperoxia on MSNA before exposure to isocapnic hypoxia. During the isocapnic hypoxia exposure, there was an increase in minute ventilation and heart rate that subsided once hypoxia was terminated. In contrast, there was an increase in MSNA burst frequency that persisted for approximately 25 min after cessation of the stimulus. Hyperoxia resulted in a transient reduction in MSNA burst frequency of 28% (P 0.05) in the three posthypoxia interventions, respectively. Our results suggest that input from the carotid chemoreceptors is obligatory for the sustained elevation of MSNA initiated by chemoreflex stimulation. We attribute the decrease in MSNA to a transient hyperoxia-induced attenuation of carotid chemoreceptor sensitivity.

  3. 11C-meta-hydroxyephedrine: a promising PET radiopharmaceutical for imaging the sympathetic nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boschi, Stefano; Lodi, Filippo; Boschi, Laura; Nanni, Cristina; Chondrogiannis, Sotirios; Colletti, Patrick M; Rubello, Domenico; Fanti, Stefano

    2015-02-01

    Dysfunction of the sympathetic nervous system underlies many cardiac diseases and can be assessed by molecular imaging using SPECT tracers as I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (I-MIBG). The norepinephrine analog C-meta-hydroxyephedrine (HED) has been used with PET to map the regional distribution of cardiac sympathetic neurons. Hydroxyephedrine is rapidly transported into sympathetic neurons by the norepinephrine transporter and stored in vesicles. This review describes the mechanism of action, radiosynthesis, and application of HED in the assessment of the cardiac sympathetic nervous system in heart failure, myocardial infarction, and arrhythmias. Noncardiac applications of HED in the clinical setting of sympathetic nervous system tumors and other emerging research applications are described.

  4. Gender Differences in Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada Disease and Sympathetic Ophthalmia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yujuan Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada disease (VKH and sympathetic ophthalmia (SO are types of T-cell mediated autoimmune granulomatous uveitis. Although the two diseases share common clinical features, they have certain differences in gender predilections. VKH classically has been reported as more prevalent in females than males, yet some studies in Japan and China have not found differences in gender prevalence. Male patients have a higher risk of chorioretinal degeneration, vitiligo, and worse prognosis. Conversely, the changing levels of estrogen/progesterone during pregnancy and the menstrual cycle as well as higher levels of TGF-β show a protective role in females. Potential causes of female predilection for VKH are associated with HLA-DR and HLA-DQ alleles. SO, a bilateral granulomatous uveitis, occurs in the context of one eye after a penetrating injury due to trauma or surgery. In contrast to the female dominance in VKH, males are more frequently affected by SO due to a higher incidence of ocular injury, especially during wartime. However, no gender predilection of SO has been reported in postsurgical cases. No clinically different manifestations are revealed between males and females in SO secondary to either ocular trauma or surgery. The potential causes of the gender difference may provide hints on future treatment and disease evaluation.

  5. Continuous Thoracic Sympathetic Ganglion Block in Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Patients with Spinal Cord Stimulation Implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EungDon Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The sympathetic block is widely used for treating neuropathic pain such as complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS. However, single sympathetic block often provides only short-term effect. Moreover, frequent procedures for sympathetic block may increase the risk of complications. The use of epidural route may be limited by concern of infection in case of previous implantation of the spinal cord stimulation (SCS. In contrast, a continuous sympathetic block can be administered without such concerns. The continuous thoracic sympathetic block (TSGB has been used to treat the ischemic disease and other neuropathic conditions such as postherpetic neuralgia. We administered continuous thoracic sympathetic block using catheter in CRPS patients who underwent SCS implantations and achieved desirable outcomes. We believe a continuous sympathetic block is a considerable option before performing neurolysis or radiofrequency rhizotomy and even after SCS implantation.

  6. Prognosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Myers, Jonathan; Brawner, Clinton A; Haykowsky, Mark J F

    2015-01-01

    benefits of exercise and the mechanisms underlying these benefits. Studies on the outcome benefits of exercise training, including mortality and hospitalization, have been convincing. This article reviews the physiologic benefits of exercise training in HF, studies on exercise training in women, results......Patients with heart failure (HF) were once discouraged from participating in exercise programs because of concerns regarding safety and the potential for harm to an already damaged myocardium. However, studies over the last 3 decades have provided extensive insights into both the health outcome...

  7. Sympathetic activation and endothelial dysfunction in polycystic ovary syndrome are not explained by either obesity or insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Elisabeth A; Teede, Helena; Sari, Carolina Ika; Jona, Eveline; Shorakae, Soulmaz; Woodington, Kiri; Hemmes, Robyn; Eikelis, Nina; Straznicky, Nora E; De Courten, Barbora; Dixon, John B; Schlaich, Markus P; Lambert, Gavin W

    2015-12-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common endocrine condition underpinned by insulin resistance and associated with increased risk of obesity, type 2 diabetes and adverse cardiovascular risk profile. Previous data suggest autonomic imbalance [elevated sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activity and decreased heart rate variability (HRV)] as well as endothelial dysfunction in PCOS. However, it is not clear whether these abnormalities are driven by obesity and metabolic disturbance or whether they are independently related to PCOS. We examined multiunit and single-unit muscle SNS activity (by microneurography), HRV (time and frequency domain analysis) and endothelial function [ischaemic reactive hyperaemia index (RHI) using the EndoPAT device] in 19 overweight/obese women with PCOS (BMI: 31·3 ± 1·5 kg/m(2), age: 31·3 ± 1·6 years) and compared them with 21 control overweight/obese women (BMI: 33·0 ± 1·4 kg/m(2), age: 28·2 ± 1·6 years) presenting a similar metabolic profile (fasting total, HDL and LDL cholesterol, glucose, triglycerides, insulin sensitivity and blood pressure). Women with PCOS had elevated multiunit muscle SNS activity (41 ± 2 vs 33 ± 3 bursts per 100 heartbeats, P obesity and metabolic disturbances. Sympathetic activation and endothelial dysfunction may confer greater cardiovascular risk in women with PCOS. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Regulation of the renal sympathetic nerves in heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohit eRamchandra

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Heart failure (HF is a serious debilitating condition with poor survival rates and an increasing level of prevalence. Heart failure is associated with an increase in renal norepinephrine spillover, which is an independent predictor of mortality in HF patients. The excessive sympatho-excitation that is a hallmark of heart failure has long-term effects that contribute to disease progression. An increase in directly recorded renal sympathetic nerve activity has also been recorded in animal models of heart failure. This review will focus on the mechanisms controlling sympathetic nerve activity to the kidney during normal conditions and alterations in these mechanisms during heart failure. In particular the roles of afferent reflexes and central mechanisms will be discussed.

  9. Orexin-A controls sympathetic activity and eating behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni eMessina

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available It is extremely important for the health to understand the regulatory mechanisms of energy expenditure. These regulatory mechanisms play a central role in the pathogenesis of body weight alteration. The hypothalamus integrates nutritional information derived from all peripheral organs. This region of the brain controls hormonal secretions and neural pathways of the brainstem. Orexin-A is a hypothalamic neuropeptide involved in the regulation of feeding behavior, sleep-wakefulness rhythm, and neuroendocrine homeostasis. This neuropeptide is involved in the control of the sympathetic activation, blood pressure, metabolic status, and blood glucose level. This minireview focuses on relationship between the sympathetic nervous system and orexin-A in the control of eating behavior and energy expenditure. The thermoregulatory hypothesis of food intake is analyzed, underlining the role played by orexin-A in the control of food intake related to body temperature. Furthermore, the paradoxical eating behavior induced orexin-A is illustrated in this minireview.

  10. The biophysics of renal sympathetic denervation using radiofrequency energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Hitesh C; Dhillon, Paramdeep S; Mahfoud, Felix; Lindsay, Alistair C; Hayward, Carl; Ernst, Sabine; Lyon, Alexander R; Rosen, Stuart D; di Mario, Carlo

    2014-05-01

    Renal sympathetic denervation is currently performed in the treatment of resistant hypertension by interventionists who otherwise do not typically use radiofrequency (RF) energy ablation in their clinical practice. Adequate RF lesion formation is dependent upon good electrode-tissue contact, power delivery, electrode-tissue interface temperature, target-tissue impedance and the size of the catheter's active electrode. There is significant interplay between these variables and hence an appreciation of the biophysical determinants of RF lesion formation is required to provide effective and safe clinical care to our patients. In this review article, we summarize the biophysics of RF ablation and explain why and how complications of renal sympathetic denervation may occur and discuss methods to minimise them.

  11. Gender affects sympathetic and hemodynamic response to postural stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoemaker, J. K.; Hogeman, C. S.; Khan, M.; Kimmerly, D. S.; Sinoway, L. I.

    2001-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that differences in sympathetic reflex responses to head-up tilt (HUT) between males (n = 9) and females (n = 8) were associated with decrements in postural vasomotor responses in women. Muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA; microneurography), heart rate, stroke volume (SV; Doppler), and blood pressure (Finapres) were measured during a progressive HUT protocol (5 min at each of supine, 20 degrees, 40 degrees, and 60 degrees ). MSNA and hemodynamic responses were also measured during the cold pressor test (CPT) to examine nonbaroreflex neurovascular control. SV was normalized to body surface area (SV(i)) to calculate the index of cardiac output (Q(i)), and total peripheral resistance (TPR). During HUT, heart rate increased more in females versus males (P gender-specific autonomic responses to cardiovascular stress. The different MSNA response to postural stress between genders may contribute importantly to decrements in blood pressure control during HUT in females.

  12. Experiencing Physical Pain Leads to More Sympathetic Moral Judgments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Qianguo; Zhu, Yi; Luo, Wen-bo

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that observing another’s pain can evoke other-oriented emotions, which instigate empathic concern for another’s needs. It is not clear whether experiencing first-hand physical pain may also evoke other-oriented emotion and thus influence people’s moral judgment. Based on the embodied simulation literature and neuroimaging evidence, the present research tested the idea that participants who experienced physical pain would be more sympathetic in their moral judgments. Study 1 showed that ice-induced physical pain facilitated higher self-assessments of empathy, which motivated participants to be more sympathetic in their moral judgments. Study 2 confirmed findings in study 1 and also showed that State Perspective Taking subscale of the State Empathy Scale mediated the effects of physical pain on moral judgment. These results provide support for embodied view of morality and for the view that pain can serve a positive psychosocial function. PMID:26465603

  13. The Brain Melanocortin System, Sympathetic Control, and Obesity Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    do Carmo, Jussara M.; Wang, Zhen; Hall, John E.

    2014-01-01

    Excess weight gain is the most significant, preventable cause of increased blood pressure (BP) in patients with primary (essential) hypertension and increases the risk for cardiovascular and renal diseases. In this review, we discuss the role of the brain melanocortin system in causing increased sympathetic activity in obesity and other forms of hypertension. In addition, we highlight potential mechanisms by which the brain melanocortin system modulates metabolic and cardiovascular functions. PMID:24789984

  14. Pathophysiology of Resistant Hypertension: The Role of Sympathetic Nervous System

    OpenAIRE

    Costas Tsioufis; Athanasios Kordalis; Dimitris Flessas; Ioannis Anastasopoulos; Dimitris Tsiachris; Vasilios Papademetriou; Christodoulos Stefanadis

    2011-01-01

    Resistant hypertension (RH) is a powerful risk factor for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Among the characteristics of patients with RH, obesity, obstructive sleep apnea, and aldosterone excess are covering a great area of the mosaic of RH phenotype. Increased sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activity is present in all these underlying conditions, supporting its crucial role in the pathophysiology of antihypertensive treatment resistance. Current clinical and experimental knowledge po...

  15. Cyclosporine impairs vasodilation without increased sympathetic activity in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, C M; He, H; Pincus, T; Wood, A J

    1995-10-01

    Hypertension and nephrotoxicity frequently complicate treatment with cyclosporine; two suggested mechanisms are increased sympathetic activity and altered vascular reactivity. It is difficult to assess these mechanisms in patients receiving cyclosporine after transplantation because of the accompanying major physiological alterations. Therefore, we studied 12 patients with rheumatoid arthritis twice--while they were taking and not taking cyclosporine. We measured vascular response in the dorsal hand vein using the linear variable differential transformer technique. Cyclosporine treatment significantly attenuated vasodilation induced by 60 ng/min isoproterenol (no cyclosporine, 19.8 +/- 3.5% versus cyclosporine, 7.9 +/- 2.2%; P = .02) and prostaglandin E1 at 1000 pg/min (no cyclosporine, 72.6 +/- 10.2% versus cyclosporine 45.6 +/- 9.0%) and 2000 pg/min (no cyclosporine, 100.8 +/- 14.7% versus cyclosporine, 68.6 +/- 8.0%; F = 5.47, P = .047). However, neither vascular response to phenylephrine or nitroglycerin nor sympathetic activity assessed by measurement of norepinephrine spillover with a radioisotope dilution technique was affected by cyclosporine (no cyclosporine, 516.1 +/- 47.9 ng/min versus cyclosporine, 476.6 +/- 51.8 ng/min; P = .42). Cyclosporine impaired venodilation in response to two agonists that act through adenylate cyclase without altering alpha-agonist-induced venoconstriction or sympathetic activity. Therefore, in humans impaired vasodilation rather than sympathetic activation or enhanced vasoconstriction may be an important mechanism for the alterations of vascular tone that occur after long-term cyclosporine administration.

  16. Brown Adipose Tissue Has Sympathetic-Sensory Feedback Circuits

    OpenAIRE

    Ryu, Vitaly; Garretson, John T.; Liu, Yang; Vaughan, Cheryl H.; Bartness, Timothy J.

    2015-01-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) is an important source of thermogenesis which is nearly exclusively dependent on its sympathetic nervous system (SNS) innervation. We previously demonstrated the SNS outflow from brain to BAT using the retrograde SNS-specific transneuronal viral tract tracer, pseudorabies virus (PRV152) and demonstrated the sensory system (SS) inflow from BAT to brain using the anterograde SS-specific transneuronal viral tract tracer, H129 strain of herpes simplex virus-1. Several b...

  17. Sympathetic Nerves in Breast Cancer: Angiogenesis and Antiangiogenic Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    cancer pain. Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 2007;51:388. 35. Powe DG, Entschladen F. Targeted therapies: Using beta - blockers to inhibit breast cancer ...of Rochester Cancer Center Symposium. Rochester, NY (November 11, 2010.) SYMPATHETIC NERVOUS SYSTEM INNERVATION AND FUNCTION IN A BETA -ADRENERGIC...production by divergent pathways in high beta -AR-expressing breast cancer cell lines. Breast Cancer Res Treat. 2011;130:747-58. 2. Lorton D, Hewitt D

  18. Dynamics of Phosphoinositide-Dependent Signaling in Sympathetic Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruse, Martin; Vivas, Oscar; Traynor-Kaplan, Alexis

    2016-01-01

    In neurons, loss of plasma membrane phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2] leads to a decrease in exocytosis and changes in electrical excitability. Restoration of PI(4,5)P2 levels after phospholipase C activation is therefore essential for a return to basal neuronal activity. However, the dynamics of phosphoinositide metabolism have not been analyzed in neurons. We measured dynamic changes of PI(4,5)P2, phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate, diacylglycerol, inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate, and Ca2+ upon muscarinic stimulation in sympathetic neurons from adult male Sprague-Dawley rats with electrophysiological and optical approaches. We used this kinetic information to develop a quantitative description of neuronal phosphoinositide metabolism. The measurements and analysis show and explain faster synthesis of PI(4,5)P2 in sympathetic neurons than in electrically nonexcitable tsA201 cells. They can be used to understand dynamic effects of receptor-mediated phospholipase C activation on excitability and other PI(4,5)P2-dependent processes in neurons. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2] is a minor phospholipid in the cytoplasmic leaflet of the plasma membrane. Depletion of PI(4,5)P2 via phospholipase C-mediated hydrolysis leads to a decrease in exocytosis and alters electrical excitability in neurons. Restoration of PI(4,5)P2 is essential for a return to basal neuronal activity. However, the dynamics of phosphoinositide metabolism have not been analyzed in neurons. We studied the dynamics of phosphoinositide metabolism in sympathetic neurons upon muscarinic stimulation and used the kinetic information to develop a quantitative description of neuronal phosphoinositide metabolism. The measurements and analysis show a several-fold faster synthesis of PI(4,5)P2 in sympathetic neurons than in an electrically nonexcitable cell line, and provide a framework for future studies of PI(4,5)P2-dependent processes in neurons. PMID:26818524

  19. The brain melanocortin system, sympathetic control, and obesity hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Alexandre A; do Carmo, Jussara M; Wang, Zhen; Hall, John E

    2014-05-01

    Excess weight gain is the most significant, preventable cause of increased blood pressure (BP) in patients with primary (essential) hypertension and increases the risk for cardiovascular and renal diseases. In this review, we discuss the role of the brain melanocortin system in causing increased sympathetic activity in obesity and other forms of hypertension. In addition, we highlight potential mechanisms by which the brain melanocortin system modulates metabolic and cardiovascular functions.

  20. Recurrent and migratory reflex sympathetic dystrophy in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, H C; Nelson, V S

    2000-01-01

    Reflex sympathetic dystrophy is a syndrome characterized by superficial pain and tenderness associated with swelling, vasomotor instability, and dystrophic changes of the skin. In children, it is rarely reported and is felt to have a more benign and self-limited course. This case illustrates that, in children, reflex sympathetic dystrophy can occur without any previous history of trauma, and may be recurrent and migratory. A review of the literature is included. An 11-year-old girl, with no history of trauma, presented in 1992 with spontaneous onset of right leg pain. She was diagnosed with reflex sympathetic dystrophy, and she was treated unsuccessfully with oral medications. Her symptoms then resolved in 2 weeks after receiving epidural anaesthesia and aggressive physical therapy. Over the next 5 years, she presented to the paediatric rehabilitation clinic three times with recurrent RSD in her bilateral arms. The first two times were refractory to conservative management and resolved with four stellate ganglion blocks. The third recurrence persisted with three stellate ganglion blocks and resolved with gabapentin.

  1. Sympathetically-mediated thermogenic response to food in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liverini, G; Iossa, S; Lionetti, L; Mollica, M P; Barletta, A

    1995-02-01

    The aim of this work was to assess the participation of the sympathetic nervous system in the thermogenic response to food in control and hyperphagic rats. Rats were fed either a control (CD) or energy dense (ED) diet. After 15 days, CD rats received a small (7 kJ) meal composed of either control or energy dense diet, while ED rats received a small meal composed of energy dense diet. The experiment was then repeated, with the exception that rats received a larger portion (35 kJ) of the test meal. The postprandial increase in oxygen consumption was measured for 30 min after the small meal and 90-180 min after the completion of the large meal. The measurements were made in saline-injected and propranolol-injected rats. ED rats exhibited hyperphagia as well as an increase of 32% in resting metabolic rate after a 16 h fast. The sympathetically-mediated postprandial increase in oxygen consumption was greater after an energy dense meal than after a control meal in CD rats, and was higher in ED rats than in CD rats fed an energy dense meal. It was concluded that the sympathetically-mediated increase in the thermogenic response to food, as well as the increase in fasting metabolic rate can help prevent obesity development in hyperphagic rats.

  2. Paroxysmal sympathetic hyperactivity: An entity to keep in mind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godoy, D A; Panhke, P; Guerrero Suarez, P D; Murillo-Cabezas, F

    2017-12-15

    Paroxysmal sympathetic hyperactivity (PSH) is a potentially life-threatening neurological emergency secondary to multiple acute acquired brain injuries. It is clinically characterized by the cyclic and simultaneous appearance of signs and symptoms secondary to exacerbated sympathetic discharge. The diagnosis is based on the clinical findings, and high alert rates are required. No widely available and validated homogeneous diagnostic criteria have been established to date. There have been recent consensus attempts to shed light on this obscure phenomenon. Its physiopathology is complex and has not been fully clarified. However, the excitation-inhibition model is the theory that best explains the different aspects of this condition, including the response to treatment with the available drugs. The key therapeutic references are the early recognition of the disorder, avoiding secondary injuries and the triggering of paroxysms. Once sympathetic crises occur, they must peremptorily aborted and prevented. of the later the syndrome is recognized, the poorer the patient outcome. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  3. The effect of chemoreceptor stimulation upon muscle sympathetic nerve activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gates, Gregory J; Bartels, Matthew N; Downey, John A; De Meersman, Ronald E

    2009-07-31

    The aim of this investigation was to quantify the combined peripheral and central chemoreceptor contribution to sympathetic outflow above (post) and below (pre) the chemoreceptor ventilatory threshold (CVT). We measured muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) in seven subjects during hypoxic/hypercapnic and room air rebreathe protocols. Comparisons were made using a repeated measures analysis of variance with two within subject factors. One factor contained three levels--hyperventilation, pre-CVT, and post-CVT. The other factor contained two levels--rebreathe and control. Total MSNA increased from hyperventilation to pre-CVT to post-CVT in the rebreathe trial (385.7+/-95.9, 592.4+/-155.7, 882.0+/-235.4 au/15s respectively) and remained constant in the control trial (433.0+/-189.3, 409.1+/-183.4, 406.1+/-161.4 au/15s respectively). Ventilation increased in the rebreathe trial only. Heart rate and blood pressure did not change in either trial. These data suggest that the chemoreceptors significantly contribute to the modulation of sympathetic outflow.

  4. Patterning of sympathetic nerve activity in response to vestibular stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerman, I. A.; McAllen, R. M.; Yates, B. J.

    2000-01-01

    Growing evidence suggests a role for the vestibular system in regulation of autonomic outflow during postural adjustments. In the present paper we review evidence for the patterning of sympathetic nerve activity elicited by vestibular stimulation. In response to electrical activation of vestibular afferents, firing of sympathetic nerves located throughout the body is altered. However, activity of the renal nerve is most sensitive to vestibular inputs. In contrast, high-intensity simultaneous activation of cutaneous and muscle inputs elicits equivalent changes in firing of the renal, superior mesenteric and lumbar colonic nerves. Responses of muscle vasoconstrictor (MVC) efferents to vestibular stimulation are either inhibitory (Type I) or are comprised of a combination of excitation and inhibition (Type II). Interestingly, single MVC units located in the hindlimb exhibited predominantly Type I responses while those located in the forelimb and face exhibited Type II responses. Furthermore, brachial and femoral arterial blood flows were dissociated in response to vestibular stimulation, such that brachial vascular resistance increased while femoral resistance decreased. These studies demonstrate that vestibulosympathetic reflexes are patterned according to both the anatomical location and innervation target of a particular sympathetic nerve, and can lead to distinct changes in local blood flow.

  5. Fertility prognosis for infertile couples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bostofte, E; Bagger, P; Michael, A

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To develop a fertility prognosis model for infertile couples. DESIGN: Prospective follow-up study. PARTICIPANTS: In the period November 30, 1977 to June 1, 1985, 321 consecutive couples were investigated for infertility at Hvidovre University Hospital. Investigation of the female...... MEASURE: The Cox regression model was used to predict the time required to conceive based on informations provided by fertility investigations. RESULTS: Three of 16 prognostic variables (the period of infertility, the female infertility factor, and the P-test) possess significant prognostic information...

  6. Cardiovascular parameters and neural sympathetic discharge variability before orthostatic syncope: role of sympathetic baroreflex control to the vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbic, Franca; Heusser, Karsten; Marchi, Andrea; Zamunér, Antonio Roberto; Gauger, Peter; Tank, Jens; Jordan, Jens; Diedrich, André; Robertson, David; Dipaola, Franca; Achenza, Sara; Porta, Alberto; Furlan, Raffaello

    2015-04-01

    We tested the hypothesis that altered sympathetic baroreceptor control to the vessels (svBRS) and disrupted coupling between blood pressure (BP) fluctuations and muscle sympathetic activity (MSNA) discharge pattern in the low frequency band (LF, around 0.1 Hz) precede vasovagal syncope. Seven healthy males underwent ECG, BP, respiratory, and MSNA recordings at baseline (REST) and during a 15 min 80° head-up tilt, followed by a -10 mmHg step wise increase of lower body negative pressure up to presyncope. Spectral and coherence analyses of systolic arterial pressure (SAP) and MSNA variability provided the indexes of vascular sympathetic modulation, LFSAP, and of the linear coupling between MSNA and SAP in the low frequency band (around 0.1 Hz), K(2)MSNA-SAP(LF). svBRS was assessed as the slope of the regression line between MSNA and diastolic arterial pressure (DAP). Data were analyzed at REST, during asymptomatic and presyncope periods of tilt. svBRS declined during presyncope period compared to REST and asymptomatic tilt. The presyncope period was characterized by a decrease of RR interval, LFMSNA, LFSAP, and K(2)MSNA-SAP(LF) values compared to the asymptomatic one, whereas MSNA burst rate was unchanged. The reduction of svBRS producing an altered coupling between MSNA and SAP variability at 0.1 Hz, may provoke circulatory changes leading to presyncope.

  7. Course prognosis of cervical osteochondrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolesov V.N.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available

    Today we can state that in spite of a considerable number of cervical osteochondrosis studies, there is a lack of research devoted to analysis of its course. There is no correlation between initial expert evaluations of cervical osteo-chondrosis cases and further course of pathological process. Goal of the research is to develop system of course prognosis of cervical osteochondrosis taking into account environmental infuence, heredity, living conditions, psychological profle of patient’s personality. Materials and methods. Dynamics of degenerative-dystrophic changes progressing of cervical vertebrae in 236 patients was analyzed. Results. Received data demonstrated that probability of stage I changing to stage II, III and IV depended on patients’ sex, age and type of labour activity, frequent supercooling and stress. Probability of fast progression of cervical osteochondrosis (5-year cycle of stage I changing to stage III and IV was to a great extent associated with heredity, urban living, presence of endocrine system diseases, syndrome of nonspecifc dysplasia of connective tissue and low indices of quality of life. Conclusion. Proposed system allows making prognosis of morphologic changes in spinal cord, and is based on radiation methods of verifcation without taking into consideration dynamics of neurological symptomatology.

  8. Troponin elevation in subarachnoid hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis N. Mavridis

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Troponin (tr elevation in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH patients is often difficult to be appropriately assessed by clinicians, causing even disagreements regarding its management between neurosurgeons and cardiologists. The purpose of this article was to review the literature regarding the clinical interpretation of tr elevation in SAH. We searched for articles in PubMed using the key words: “troponin elevation” and “subarachnoid hemorrhage”. All of them, as well as relative neurosurgical books, were used for this review. Some type of cardiovascular abnormality develops in most SAH patients. Neurogenic stunned myocardium is a frequent SAH complication, due to catecholamine surge which induces cardiac injury, as evidenced by increased serum tr levels, electrocardiographic (ECG changes and cardiac wall motion abnormalities. Tr elevation, usually modest, is an early and specific marker for cardiac involvement after SAH and its levels peak about two days after SAH. Cardiac tr elevation predictors include poor clinical grade, intraventricular hemorrhage, loss of consciousness at ictus, global cerebral edema, female sex, large body surface area, lower systolic blood pressure, higher heart rate and prolonged Q-Tc interval. Elevated tr levels are associated with disability and death (especially tr >1 μg/L, worse neurological grade, systolic and diastolic cardiac dysfunction, pulmonary congestion, longer intensive care unit stay and incidence of vasospasm. Tr elevation is a common finding in SAH patients and constitutes a rightful cause of worry about the patients' cardiac function and prognosis. It should be therefore early detected, carefully monitored and appropriately managed by clinicians.

  9. Effect of sympathetic nerve block on acute inflammatory pain and hyperalgesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, J L; Rung, G W; Kehlet, H

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Sympathetic nerve blocks relieve pain in certain chronic pain states, but the role of the sympathetic pathways in acute pain is unclear. Thus the authors wanted to determine whether a sympathetic block could reduce acute pain and hyperalgesia after a heat injury in healthy volunteers....... acute inflammatory pain or hyperalgesia after a heat injury in human skin.......BACKGROUND: Sympathetic nerve blocks relieve pain in certain chronic pain states, but the role of the sympathetic pathways in acute pain is unclear. Thus the authors wanted to determine whether a sympathetic block could reduce acute pain and hyperalgesia after a heat injury in healthy volunteers....... The duration and quality of blocks were evaluated by the sympatogalvanic skin response and skin temperature. Bilateral heat injuries were produced on the medial surfaces of the calves with a 50 x 25 mm thermode (47 degrees C, 7 min) 45 min after the blocks. Pain intensity induced by heat, pain thresholds...

  10. Dynamic Lateralization of Pupil Dilation Evoked by Locus Coeruleus Activation Results from Sympathetic, Not Parasympathetic, Contributions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Liu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Pupil size is collectively controlled by the sympathetic dilator and parasympathetic sphincter muscles. Locus coeruleus (LC activation has been shown to evoke pupil dilation, but how the sympathetic and parasympathetic pathways contribute to this dilation remains unknown. We examined pupil dilation elicited by LC activation in lightly anesthetized rats. Unilateral LC activation evoked bilateral but lateralized pupil dilation; i.e., the ipsilateral dilation was significantly larger than the contralateral dilation. Surgically blocking the ipsilateral, but not contralateral, sympathetic pathway significantly reduced lateralization, suggesting that lateralization is mainly due to sympathetic contribution. Moreover, we found that sympathetic, but not parasympathetic, contribution is correlated with LC activation frequency. Together, our results unveil the frequency-dependent contributions of the sympathetic and parasympathetic pathways to LC activation-evoked pupil dilation and suggest that lateralization in task-evoked pupil dilations may be used as a biomarker for autonomic tone.

  11. Leptin-Induced Sympathetic Nerve Activation: Signaling Mechanisms and Cardiovascular Consequences in Obesity

    OpenAIRE

    Rahmouni, Kamal

    2010-01-01

    Obesity increases cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in part by inducing hypertension. One factor linking excess fat mass to cardiovascular diseases may be the sympathetic cardiovascular actions of leptin. Initial studies of leptin showed it regulates appetite and enhances energy expenditure by activating sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) to thermogenic brown adipose tissue. Further study, however, demonstrated leptin also causes sympathetic excitation to the kidney that, in turn, increase...

  12. Sympathetic Vasoconstrictor Responsiveness of the Leg Vasculature During Experimental Endotoxemia and Hypoxia in Humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brassard, Patrice; Zaar, Morten; Thaning, Pia

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Sympathetic vasoconstriction regulates peripheral circulation and controls blood pressure, but sepsis is associated with hypotension. We evaluated whether apparent loss of sympathetic vasoconstrictor responsiveness relates to distended smooth muscles or to endotoxemia and/or hypoxia...... was calculated during 1) adenosine infusion (vasodilator control), 2) hypoxia (FIO2 = 10%), 3) endotoxemia, and 4) endotoxemia + hypoxia. Leg sympathetic vasoconstrictor responsiveness (reduction in leg vascular conductance) was evaluated by femoral artery tyramine infusion. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS...

  13. Brain stem activity changes associated with restored sympathetic drive following CPAP treatment in OSA subjects: a longitudinal investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundblad, Linda C; Fatouleh, Rania H; McKenzie, David K; Macefield, Vaughan G; Henderson, Luke A

    2015-08-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is associated with significantly elevated muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA), leading to hypertension and increased cardiovascular morbidity. Although little is known about the mechanisms responsible for the sympathoexcitation, we have recently shown that the elevated MSNA in OSA is associated with altered neural processing in various brain stem sites, including the dorsolateral pons, rostral ventrolateral medulla, medullary raphe, and midbrain. Given the risk associated with elevated MSNA, we aimed to determine if treatment of OSA with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) would reduce the elevated MSNA and reverse the brain stem functional changes associated with the elevated MSNA. We performed concurrent recordings of MSNA and blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signal intensity of the brain stem, using high-resolution functional magnetic resonance imaging, in 15 controls and 13 subjects with OSA, before and after 6 mo CPAP treatment. As expected, 6 mo of CPAP treatment significantly reduced MSNA in subjects with OSA, from 54 ± 4 to 23 ± 3 bursts/min and from 77 ± 7 to 36 ± 3 bursts/100 heart beats. Importantly, we found that MSNA-coupled changes in BOLD signal intensity within the dorsolateral pons, medullary raphe, and rostral ventrolateral medulla returned to control levels. That is, CPAP treatment completely reversed brain stem functional changes associated with elevated MSNA in untreated OSA subjects. These data highlight the effectiveness of CPAP treatment in reducing one of the most significant health issues associated with OSA, that is, elevated MSNA and its associated elevated morbidity. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  14. Cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex control of cardiac function in normal and chronic heart failure states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Han-Jun; Rozanski, George J; Zucker, Irving H

    2017-04-15

    the normal state enhances myocardial contractility. CSAR activation also decreased left ventricular (LV) systolic and diastolic volumes with little effect on LV end-diastolic pressure (LVEDP) or the end-diastolic P-V relationship (EDPVR) in sham rats. Compared to sham, CHF rats exhibit a reduced increase in the slope of the ESPVR and dp/dtmax in response to BK, indicating a poor contractile response to CSAR activation. Interestingly, BK application in CHF rats increased cardiac systolic and diastolic volumes and further increased the elevated LVEDP, neither of which was seen in sham rats. Following CSAR inhibition by epicardial lidocaine, blood pressure, HR, LVSP, dp/dt, LVEDP and ESPVR decreased in CHF rats whereas lidocaine had little effect in sham rats, indicating that the CSAR is tonically active in CHF and contributes to cardiac dysfunction. Furthermore, we found that epicardial lidocaine paradoxically decreased LV end-diastolic volume (preload) in CHF rats, which was not observed in sham rats. The decreased preload by lidocaine in CHF rats may be due to a reduction in peripheral vascular resistance since epicardial lidocaine significantly lowered peripheral (renal) sympathetic nerve activity in CHF rats but not in sham rats. Furthermore, chronic ablation of CSAR by epicardial application of a selective afferent neurotoxin, resiniferatoxin, selectively lowered diastolic blood pressure both at daytime and night-time with less effect on systolic blood pressure in CHF rats. Our data suggest that there is an imbalance between cardiac and peripheral responses to CSAR in CHF animals compared to sham-operated controls. © 2017 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2017 The Physiological Society.

  15. Fertility prognosis for infertile couples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bostofte, E; Bagger, P; Michael, A

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To develop a fertility prognosis model for infertile couples. DESIGN: Prospective follow-up study. PARTICIPANTS: In the period November 30, 1977 to June 1, 1985, 321 consecutive couples were investigated for infertility at Hvidovre University Hospital. Investigation of the female...... MEASURE: The Cox regression model was used to predict the time required to conceive based on informations provided by fertility investigations. RESULTS: Three of 16 prognostic variables (the period of infertility, the female infertility factor, and the P-test) possess significant prognostic information....... The period of infertility and the P-test are best scored as continuous variables, whereas the female infertility factor are best categorized in four classes, i.e., normal, ovulation or cervical disorder, anatomic disorder, or a combination of disorders. CONCLUSIONS: The three prognostic variables...

  16. Hand eczema - prognosis and consequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, A. H.; Johansen, J D; Hald, M

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hand eczema is recognized as a long-lasting disease with personal and societal repercussions. Long-term studies are required to generate information on factors contributing to a poor outcome. OBJECTIVES: The aims of this 7-year follow-up study were to evaluate the clinical course...... of patients with hand eczema, the occupational consequences and to identify risk factors associated with a poor prognosis. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In all, 536 patients with hand eczema participated and were examined by a dermatologist. The clinical severity was assessed at baseline and 7 years later using...... a self-administrated photographic guide. Additional information was obtained from a questionnaire. RESULTS: Based on the photographic guide, 73% experienced a clinical improvement. Notably, 20% had moderate to very severe hand eczema at follow-up. Severe hand eczema or frequent eruptions at baseline...

  17. Hyperventilation induces sympathetic overactivation in mesial temporal epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assenza, Giovanni; Mecarelli, Oriano; Tombini, Mario; Pulitano, Patrizia; Pellegrino, Giovanni; Benvenga, Antonella; Assenza, Federica; Campana, Chiara; Di Pino, Giovanni; Di Lazzaro, Vincenzo

    2015-02-01

    Hyperventilation (HV) during electroencephalography (EEG) is a standard clinical procedure to trigger seizures in patients affected by mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE). Despite the pathophysiology of this susceptibility to HV is not definitively understood, it may be hypothesized to be related to ictal and interictal sympathetic nervous system abnormalities, the presence of which is well known in MTLE patients. In order to test this hypothesis we investigated the HV effect on heart rate variability (HRV) in a group of MTLE patients, compared to a matched group of healthy controls. Forty patients affected by MTLE and 40 age- and sex-matched controls were enrolled in the study. In those subjects, a standard electroencephalographic recording has been acquired and the high and the low frequency components (HF, LF) of heart rate variability (HRV) and their ratio (LF/HF) have been analyzed at rest and during the HV. Indeed, LF/HF is a reliable index of sympathetic tone modulation. HRV did not differ between MTLE and healthy subjects at rest, whereas HV induced a significant LF/HF increase only in MTLE. Within the MTLE group, males showed higher LF/HF increase during HV respect to females, while no differences related to the side of the epileptic focus were found. MTLE patients showed an increased sympathetic response to HV compared to healthy subjects. HRV analysis points towards an autonomic overactivation as a pathophysiological pathway subtending seizure triggered by hyperventilation in MTLE. Autonomic susceptibility in MTLE may help to explain the increased prevalence of arrhythmic events in these patients, potentially predisposing to Sudden Unexpected Death in Epilepsy (SUDEP). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Sympathetic block by metal clips may be a reversible operation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Lars L; Mikkelsen, Rasmus T; Derejko, Miroslawa

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Thoracoscopic sympathectomy is now used routinely to treat patients with disabling primary hyperhidrosis or facial blushing. Published results are excellent, but side effects, such as compensatory sweating, are also very frequent. The surgical techniques used and the levels of targeting...... suggests in theory that application of metal clips to the sympathetic chain is a reversible procedure if only the observation period is prolonged. Further studies with longer periods between application and removal as well as investigations of nerve conduction should be encouraged, because we do not know...

  19. Pre-treatment with clopidogrel and postprocedure troponin elevation after elective percutaneous coronary intervention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nienhuis, MB; Ottervanger, JP; Miedema, Kor; Suryapranata, H; de Boer, MJ; Hoorntje, JCA; van 't Hof, AWJ; Gosselink, M; Zijlstra, F; Dambrink, Jan Hendrik Everwijn

    Elevated troponin after elective percutaneous coronary intervention (PCl) has been associated with a worse prognosis. Pretreatment with clopidogrel may be beneficial in patients undergoing PCl. Therefore, a prospective observational study was conducted to address the potential role of clopidogrel in

  20. (In)activity-related neuroplasticity in brainstem control of sympathetic outflow: unraveling underlying molecular, cellular, and anatomical mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mischel, Nicholas A.; Subramanian, Madhan; Dombrowski, Maryetta D.; Llewellyn-Smith, Ida J.

    2015-01-01

    More people die as a result of physical inactivity than any other preventable risk factor including smoking, high cholesterol, and obesity. Cardiovascular disease, the number one cause of death in the United States, tops the list of inactivity-related diseases. Nevertheless, the vast majority of Americans continue to make lifestyle choices that are creating a rapidly growing burden of epidemic size and impact on the United States healthcare system. It is imperative that we improve our understanding of the mechanisms by which physical inactivity increases the incidence of cardiovascular disease and how exercise can prevent or rescue the inactivity phenotype. The current review summarizes research on changes in the brain that contribute to inactivity-related cardiovascular disease. Specifically, we focus on changes in the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM), a critical brain region for basal and reflex control of sympathetic activity. The RVLM is implicated in elevated sympathetic outflow associated with several cardiovascular diseases including hypertension and heart failure. We hypothesize that changes in the RVLM contribute to chronic cardiovascular disease related to physical inactivity. Data obtained from our translational rodent models of chronic, voluntary exercise and inactivity suggest that functional, anatomical, and molecular neuroplasticity enhances glutamatergic neurotransmission in the RVLM of sedentary animals. Collectively, the evidence presented here suggests that changes in the RVLM resulting from sedentary conditions are deleterious and contribute to cardiovascular diseases that have an increased prevalence in sedentary individuals. The mechanisms by which these changes occur over time and their impact are important areas for future study. PMID:25957223

  1. Regulation of lipolysis by the sympathetic nervous system: a microdialysis study in normal and spinal cord-injured subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, A K; Elam, M; Friberg, P; Biering-Sörensen, F; Sullivan, L; Lönnroth, P

    1997-04-01

    To evaluate the regulation of lipolysis by the sympathetic nervous system, eight spinal cord-injured (SCI) subjects with a lesion above T5 resulting in a decentralization of the lower-body sympathetic nervous system and adrenal medulla (age, 36 +/- 2 years; weight, 82 +/- 5 kg; body fat mass, 26.8 +/- 3.0 kg; all mean +/- SE) and nine control subjects (age, 33 +/- 2; weight, 80 +/- 3; NS; body fat mass, 16.1 +/- 1.5 kg; P exercise. SCI subjects had an increased body fat mass, hyperinsulinemia, and an elevated lipolytic rate at rest compared with control subjects. ATBF and lipolysis were activated to a normal extent following mental stress and isometric handgrip exercise in the umbilical region in control subjects. ATBF was increased in tissue above but not below the lesion level in SCI subjects following mental stress. Glycerol release was not different between groups in either tissue region despite significantly lower noradrenaline and adrenaline levels in SCI subjects. This finding argues against a significant adrenergic control of the lipolytic rate at rest. Furthermore, the small differences in stimulated glycerol release between groups, as well as the increased plasma glycerol levels in SCI subjects, cast doubt on the view that interruption of adrenergic activity below the lesion is the sole mechanism underlying the increased body fat mass in SCI subjects.

  2. Central exogenous nitric oxide decreases cardiac sympathetic drive and improves baroreflex control of heart rate in ovine heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramchandra, Rohit; Hood, Sally G; May, Clive N

    2014-08-01

    Heart failure (HF) is associated with increased cardiac and renal sympathetic drive, which are both independent predictors of poor prognosis. A candidate mechanism for the centrally mediated sympathoexcitation in HF is reduced synthesis of the inhibitory neuromodulator nitric oxide (NO), resulting from downregulation of neuronal NO synthase (nNOS). Therefore, we investigated the effects of increasing the levels of NO in the brain, or selectively in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN), on cardiac sympathetic nerve activity (CSNA) and baroreflex control of CSNA and heart rate in ovine pacing-induced HF. The resting level of CSNA was significantly higher in the HF than in the normal group, but the resting level of RSNA was unchanged. Intracerebroventricular infusion of the NO donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP; 500 μg · ml(-1)· h(-1)) in conscious normal sheep and sheep in HF inhibited CSNA and restored baroreflex control of heart rate, but there was no change in RSNA. Microinjection of SNP into the PVN did not cause a similar cardiac sympathoinhibition in either group, although the number of nNOS-positive cells was decreased in the PVN of sheep in HF. Reduction of endogenous NO with intracerebroventricular infusion of N(ω)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester decreased CSNA in normal but not in HF sheep and caused no change in RSNA in either group. These findings indicate that endogenous NO in the brain provides tonic excitatory drive to increase resting CSNA in the normal state, but not in HF. In contrast, exogenously administered NO inhibited CSNA in both the normal and HF groups via an action on sites other than the PVN. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  3. Effects of 12 months continuous positive airway pressure on sympathetic activity related brainstem function and structure in obstructive sleep apnea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luke Anthony Henderson

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA is greatly elevated in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA during normoxic daytime wakefulness. Increased MSNA is a precursor to hypertension and elevated cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. However, the mechanisms underlying the high MSNA in OSA are not well understood. In this study we used concurrent microneurography and magnetic resonance imaging to explore MSNA-related brainstem activity changes and anatomical changes in 15 control and 15 subjects with OSA prior to and following 6 and 12 months of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP treatment. We found that 6 and 12 months of CPAP treatment significantly reduced the elevated resting MSNA in individuals with OSA. Furthermore, this MSNA reduction was associated with restoration of MSNA-related activity and structural changes in the medullary raphe, rostral ventrolateral medulla, dorsolateral pons and ventral midbrain. This restoration occurred after 6 months of CPAP treatment and was maintained following 12 months CPAP. These findings show that continual CPAP treatment is an effective long-term treatment for elevated MNSA likely due to its effects on restoring brainstem structure and function.

  4. Sympathetic laser cooling of antiprotons with molecular anions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, Sebastian; Fesel, Julian; Tietje, Ingmari; Zimmer, Christian; Hinterberger, Alexander; Doser, Michael; Yzombard, Pauline; Comparat, Daniel; Aegis Collaboration

    2017-04-01

    Antimatter experiments conducted at the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) at CERN address the fundamental questions why primordial antimatter is not observed in the present Universe. The weak equivalent principle (WEP) can be tested measuring the gravitational acceleration of antihydrogen atoms in the Earth's gravitational field that are horizontally emitted from a Penning trap. The antihydrogen atoms can be produced via resonant charge exchange of Rydberg positronium and antiprotons at temperatures potentially determined by the recoil limit of the constituents To prepare an ensemble of cold antihydrogen with a narrow velocity spread we plan to extend the existing electron cooling mechanism of antiprotons by laser-cooling techniques of negative C2-molecules in a Penning trap in order to sympathetically cool antiprotons to the mK regime. The generation of cold antihydrogen atoms can ultimately also be used for precision spectroscopy experiments of electromagnetic interaction as a test of CPT symmetry. In this presentation the status of the experiment at CERN and a computational study of sympathetic cooling of antiprotons using photodetachment cooling, Doppler and AC Stark Sisyphus cooling of C2-will be presented.

  5. Carotid body (Thermoreceptors, sympathetic neural activation, and cardiometabolic disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Iturriaga

    Full Text Available The carotid body (CB is the main peripheral chemoreceptor that senses the arterial PO2, PCO2 and pH. In response to hypoxemia, hypercapnia and acidosis, carotid chemosensory discharge elicits reflex respiratory, autonomic and cardiovascular adjustments. The classical construct considers the CB as the main peripheral oxygen sensor, triggering reflex physiological responses to acute hypoxemia and facilitating the ventilatory acclimation to chronic hypoxemia at high altitude. However, a growing body of experimental evidence supports the novel concept that an abnormally enhanced CB chemosensory input to the brainstem contributes to overactivation of the sympathetic nervous system, and consequent pathology. Indeed, the CB has been implicated in several diseases associated with increases in central sympathetic outflow. These include hypertension, heart failure, sleep apnea, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and metabolic syndrome. Indeed, ablation of the CB has been proposed for the treatment of severe and resistant hypertension in humans. In this review, we will analyze and discuss new evidence supporting an important role for the CB chemoreceptor in the progression of autonomic and cardiorespiratory alterations induced by heart failure, obstructive sleep apnea, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and metabolic syndrome.

  6. Stressed power motivation, sympathetic activation, immune function, and illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClelland, D C; Floor, E; Davidson, R J; Saron, C

    1980-01-01

    Previous research has reported that individuals high in the need for Power, high in inhibition, and high in power stress (the HHH group) are more likely than other individuals to report more severe illnesses. The present study investigates the possibility that the mechanism underlying this relationship is greater sympathetic activation in the HHH group which has an immunosuppressive effect. College males with the HHH syndrome reported more frequent and more severe illnesses than other individuals, as in previous studies. More of the HHH than other subjects also showed above average epinephrine excretion rates in urine and below average concentrations of immunoglobulin A in saliva (S-IgA). Furthermore, higher rates of epinephrine excretion were significantly associated with lower S-IgA concentrations, and lower S-IgA concentrations were significantly associated with reports of more frequent illnesses. The findings are interpreted as consistent with the hypothesis that a strong need for Power, if it is inhibited and stressed, leads to chronic sympathetic overactivity which has an immunosuppressive effect making individuals characterized by this syndrome more susceptible to illness.

  7. Sympathetic mediated vasomotion and skin capillary permeability in diabetic patients with peripheral neuropathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lefrandt, JD; Hoeven, JH; Roon, AM; Smit, AJ; Hoogenberg, K

    Aims/hypothesis. A loss of sympathetic function could lead to changes in capillary fluid filtration in diabetic patients. We investigated whether a decreased sympathetically mediated vasomotion in the skin in diabetic patients with peripheral neuropathy is associated with an abnormal capillary

  8. Muscle Sympathetic Nerve Activity During Intense Lower Body Negative Pressure to Presyncope in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-24

    pressure oscillations, and concluded that it is the influence of sympathetic rather than vagal activation and withdrawal that primarily drives these low...Netherlands). MSNA was recorded directly from peroneal nerves with the microneurography technique (Hagbarth & Vallbo, 1968). Nerve signals were band...suggesting either reduced sensitivity (Ichinose et al. 2006) or complete removal (Fagius et al. 1985) of sympathetic baroreflex influences . These

  9. Arrhythmogenic effect of sympathetic histamine in mouse hearts subjected to acute ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Gonghao; Hu, Jing; Li, Teng; Ma, Xue; Meng, Jingru; Jia, Min; Lu, Jun; Ohtsu, Hiroshi; Chen, Zhong; Luo, Xiaoxing

    2012-02-10

    The role of histamine as a newly recognized sympathetic neurotransmitter has been presented previously, and its postsynaptic effects greatly depended on the activities of sympathetic nerves. Cardiac sympathetic nerves become overactivated under acute myocardial ischemic conditions and release neurotransmitters in large amounts, inducing ventricular arrhythmia. Therefore, it is proposed that cardiac sympathetic histamine, in addition to norepinephrine, may have a significant arrhythmogenic effect. To test this hypothesis, we observed the release of cardiac sympathetic histamine and associated ventricular arrhythmogenesis that was induced by acute ischemia in isolated mouse hearts. Mast cell-deficient mice (MCDM) and histidine decarboxylase knockout (HDC(-/-)) mice were used to exclude the potential involvement of mast cells. Electrical field stimulation and acute ischemia-reperfusion evoked chemical sympathectomy-sensitive histamine release from the hearts of both MCDM and wild-type (WT) mice but not from HDC(-/-) mice. The release of histamine from the hearts of MCDM and WT mice was associated with the development of acute ischemia-induced ventricular tachycardia and ventricular fibrillation. The incidence and duration of induced ventricular arrhythmias were found to decrease in the presence of the selective histamine H(2) receptor antagonist famotidine. Additionally, the released histamine facilitated the arrhythmogenic effect of simultaneously released norepinephrine. We conclude that, under acute ischemic conditions, cardiac sympathetic histamine released by overactive sympathetic nerve terminals plays a certain arrhythmogenic role via H(2) receptors. These findings provided novel insight into the pathophysiological roles of sympathetic histamine, which may be a new therapeutic target for acute ischemia-induced arrhythmias.

  10. The Sympathetic Release Test: A Test Used to Assess Thermoregulation and Autonomic Control of Blood Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tansey, E. A.; Roe, S. M.; Johnson, C. J.

    2014-01-01

    When a subject is heated, the stimulation of temperature-sensitive nerve endings in the skin, and the raising of the central body temperature, results in the reflex release of sympathetic vasoconstrictor tone in the skin of the extremities, causing a measurable temperature increase at the site of release. In the sympathetic release test, the…

  11. Hepatic intestinal uptake and release of catecholamines in alcoholic cirrhosis. Evidence of enhanced hepatic intestinal sympathetic nervous activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Jens Henrik; Ring-Larsen, H; Christensen, N J

    1987-01-01

    spillover represents a minimum value. Our results indicate that the augmented circulating catecholamines in cirrhosis do not result from diminished removal but are contributed to from increased sympathetic nervous activity in the hepatic intestinal area (enhanced mesenteric sympathetic nervous activity)....

  12. Syncope: epidemiology, etiology and prognosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rose M F Lisboa Da Silva

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Syncope is a common medical problem, with a frequency between 15% and 39%. In the general population, the annual number episodes are 18.1 to 39.7 per 1000 patients, with similar incidence between genders. The first report of the incidence of syncope is 6.2 per 1000 person-years. However, there is a significant increase in the incidence of syncope after 70 years of age with rate annual 19.5 per thousand individuals after 80 years. It presents a recurrence rate of 35% and 29% of physical injury. Among the causes of syncope, the mediated neural reflex, known as neurocardiogenic or vasovagal syncope, is the most frequent. The others are of cardiac origin, orthostatic hypotension, carotid sinus hypersensitivity, neurological and endocrinological causes and psychiatric disorders. The diagnosis of syncope can be made by clinical method associated with the electrocardiogram in up 50% of patients. Its prognosis is determined by the underlying etiology specifically the presence and severity of cardiac disease. The annual mortality can reach between 18 and 33% if cardiac cause, and between 0 and 12% if the noncardiac cause. Thus, it is imperative to identify its cause and risk stratification for positive impact in reducing morbidity and mortality.

  13. Renal sympathetic denervation after Symplicity HTN-3 and therapeutic drug monitoring in severe hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sverre Erik Kjeldsen

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Renal sympathetic denervation (RDN has been and is still proposed as a new treatment modality in patients with apparently treatment resistant hypertension (TRH, a condition defined as persistent blood pressure elevation despite prescription of at least 3 antihypertensive drugs including a diuretic. However, the large fall in blood pressure after RDN reported in the first randomized study, Symplicity HTN-2 and multiple observational studies has not been confirmed in five subsequent prospective randomized studies and may be largely explained by non-specific effects such as improvement of drug adherence in initially poorly adherent patients (the Hawthorne effect, placebo effect and regression to the mean. The overall blood-pressure lowering effect of RDN seems rather limited and the characteristics of true responders are largely unknown. Accordingly, RDN is not ready for clinical practice. In most patients with apparently TRH, drug monitoring and improvement of drug adherence may prove more effective and cost-beneficial to achieve blood pressure control. In the meantime, research should aim at identifying characteristics of those patients with truly TRH who may respond to RDN.

  14. Effects of the menstrual cycle on sympathetic neural responses to mental stress in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Jason R; Lawrence, Johnathan E

    2007-12-01

    The influence of the menstrual cycle on resting muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) remains controversial, and the effect of the menstrual cycle on MSNA responses to mental stress is unknown. We examined MSNA, mean arterial pressure (MAP), and heart rate (HR) responses to mental stress (via mental arithmetic) in 11 healthy females during the early follicular (EF) and mid-luteal (ML) phases of the menstrual cycle. The menstrual cycle did not alter resting MSNA (EF, 13 +/- 3 bursts min(-1) versus ML, 13 +/- 2 bursts min(-1)), MAP (EF, 79 +/- 3 mmHg versus ML, 81 +/- 2 mmHg) and HR (EF, 66 +/- 3 beats min(-1) versus ML, 64 +/- 2 beats min(-1)). 5 min of mental stress increased MSNA, MAP and HR during both the EF (delta 4 +/- 2 bursts min(-1), delta 12 +/- 2 mmHg, delta 18 +/- 2 beats min(-1); P stress. MSNA remained elevated during the initial 5 min of recovery in both the EF (delta 6 +/- 1 bursts min(-1); P stress are not different during the EF and ML phases of the menstrual cycle in young, healthy females. However, MSNA activation during recovery from mental stress is prolonged during the ML phase compared to the EF phase.

  15. Sympathetic-mediated activation versus suppression of the immune system: consequences for hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, Adam J; Zimmerman, Matthew C

    2016-02-01

    It is generally well-accepted that the immune system is a significant contributor in the pathogenesis of hypertension. Specifically, activated and pro-inflammatory T-lymphocytes located primarily in the vasculature and kidneys appear to have a causal role in exacerbating elevated blood pressure. It has been proposed that increased sympathetic nerve activity and noradrenaline outflow associated with hypertension may be primary contributors to the initial activation of the immune system early in the disease progression. However, it has been repeatedly demonstrated in many different human and experimental diseases that sympathoexcitation is immunosuppressive in nature. Moreover, human hypertensive patients have demonstrated increased susceptibility to secondary immune insults like infections. Thus, it is plausible, and perhaps even likely, that in diseases like hypertension, specific immune cells are activated by increased noradrenaline, while others are in fact suppressed. We propose a model in which this differential regulation is based upon activation status of the immune cell as well as the resident organ. With this, the concept of global immunosuppression is obfuscated as a viable target for hypertension treatment, and we put forth the concept of focused organ-specific immunotherapy as an alternative option. © 2015 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2015 The Physiological Society.

  16. Early Fever As a Predictor of Paroxysmal Sympathetic Hyperactivity in Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinson, Holly E; Schreiber, Martin A; Laurie, Amber L; Baguley, Ian J; Bourdette, Dennis; Ling, Geoffrey S F

    Paroxysmal sympathetic hyperactivity (PSH) is characterized by episodic, hyperadrenergic alterations in vital signs after traumatic brain injury (TBI). We sought to apply an objective scale to the vital sign alterations of PSH in order to determine whether 1 element might be predictive of developing PSH. We conducted an observational study of consecutive TBI patients (Glasgow Coma Scale score ≤12) and monitored the cohort for clinical evidence of PSH. PSH was defined as a paroxysm of 3 or more of the following characteristics: (1) tachycardia, (2) tachypnea, (3) hypertension, (4) fever, (5) dystonia (rigidity or decerebrate posturing), and (6) diaphoresis, with no other obvious causation (ie, alcohol withdrawal, sepsis). The Modified Clinical Feature Severity Scale (mCFSS) was applied to each participant once daily for the first 5 days of hospitalization. Nineteen (11%) of the 167 patients met criteria for PSH. Patients with PSH had a higher 5-day cumulative mCFSS score than those without PSH (median [interquartile range] = 36 [29-42] vs 29 [22-35], P = .01). Of the 4 components of the mCFSS, elevated temperature appeared to be most predictive of the development of PSH, especially during the first 24 hours (odds ratio = 1.95; 95% confidence interval, 1.12-3.40). Early fever after TBI may signal impending autonomic dysfunction.

  17. Menstrual cycle alters sympathetic neural responses to orthostatic stress in young, eumenorrheic women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Jason R; Lawrence, Johnathan E; Klein, Jenna C

    2009-07-01

    Sympathetic baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) and muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) responses during early follicular (EF) and midluteal (ML) phases of the menstrual cycle are controversial. We hypothesize an augmented sympathetic BRS and MSNA response to orthostatic stress during the ML phase of the menstrual cycle. MSNA, mean arterial pressure (MAP), and heart rate (HR) were recorded during progressive lower body negative pressure (LBNP) (-5, -10, -15, -20, -30, and -40 mmHg; 3 min/stage) in 13 healthy, eumenorrheic women (age 21 +/- 1 yr). Sympathetic BRS was assessed by examining relations between spontaneous fluctuations of diastolic arterial pressure and MSNA at rest and during progressive LBNP. Plasma estradiol (42 +/- 6 vs. 112 +/- 12 pg/ml; P menstrual cycle. These findings suggest that hormonal fluctuations of eumenorrheic women may influence sympathoexcitation during an orthostatic challenge, but not through sympathetic baroreflex-mediated pathways.

  18. National Elevation Dataset (NED)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The U.S. Geological Survey has developed a National Elevation Database (NED). The NED is a seamless mosaic of best-available elevation data. The 7.5-minute elevation...

  19. Elevated Liver Enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symptoms Elevated liver enzymes By Mayo Clinic Staff Elevated liver enzymes may indicate inflammation or damage to cells in the liver. Inflamed or ... than normal amounts of certain chemicals, including liver enzymes, into the bloodstream, which can result in elevated ...

  20. Higher sympathetic nerve activity during ventricular (VVI) than during dual-chamber (DDD) pacing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, J. A.; Morillo, C. A.; Eckberg, D. L.; Ellenbogen, K. A.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We determined the short-term effects of single-chamber ventricular pacing and dual-chamber atrioventricular (AV) pacing on directly measured sympathetic nerve activity. BACKGROUND: Dual-chamber AV cardiac pacing results in greater cardiac output and lower systemic vascular resistance than does single-chamber ventricular pacing. However, it is unclear whether these hemodynamic advantages result in less sympathetic nervous system outflow. METHODS: In 13 patients with a dual-chamber pacemaker, we recorded the electrocardiogram, noninvasive arterial pressure (Finapres), respiration and muscle sympathetic nerve activity (microneurography) during 3 min of underlying basal heart rate and 3 min of ventricular and AV pacing at rates of 60 and 100 beats/min. RESULTS: Arterial pressure was lowest and muscle sympathetic nerve activity was highest at the underlying basal heart rate. Arterial pressure increased with cardiac pacing and was greater with AV than with ventricular pacing (change in mean blood pressure +/- SE: 10 +/- 3 vs. 2 +/- 2 mm Hg at 60 beats/min; 21 +/- 5 vs. 14 +/- 2 mm Hg at 100 beats/min; p < 0.05). Sympathetic nerve activity decreased with cardiac pacing and the decline was greater with AV than with ventricular pacing (60 beats/min -40 +/- 11% vs. -17 +/- 7%; 100 beats/min -60 +/- 9% vs. -48 +/- 10%; p < 0.05). Although most patients showed a strong inverse relation between arterial pressure and muscle sympathetic nerve activity, three patients with severe left ventricular dysfunction (ejection fraction < or = 30%) showed no relation between arterial pressure and sympathetic activity. CONCLUSIONS: Short-term AV pacing results in lower sympathetic nerve activity and higher arterial pressure than does ventricular pacing, indicating that cardiac pacing mode may influence sympathetic outflow simply through arterial baroreflex mechanisms. We speculate that the greater incidence of adverse outcomes in patients treated with single-chamber ventricular

  1. Egr3 dependent sympathetic target tissue innervation in the absence of neuron death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Li

    Full Text Available Nerve Growth Factor (NGF is a target tissue derived neurotrophin required for normal sympathetic neuron survival and target tissue innervation. NGF signaling regulates gene expression in sympathetic neurons, which in turn mediates critical aspects of neuron survival, axon extension and terminal axon branching during sympathetic nervous system (SNS development. Egr3 is a transcription factor regulated by NGF signaling in sympathetic neurons that is essential for normal SNS development. Germline Egr3-deficient mice have physiologic dysautonomia characterized by apoptotic sympathetic neuron death and abnormal innervation to many target tissues. The extent to which sympathetic innervation abnormalities in the absence of Egr3 is caused by altered innervation or by neuron death during development is unknown. Using Bax-deficient mice to abrogate apoptotic sympathetic neuron death in vivo, we show that Egr3 has an essential role in target tissue innervation in the absence of neuron death. Sympathetic target tissue innervation is abnormal in many target tissues in the absence of neuron death, and like NGF, Egr3 also appears to effect target tissue innervation heterogeneously. In some tissues, such as heart, spleen, bowel, kidney, pineal gland and the eye, Egr3 is essential for normal innervation, whereas in other tissues such as lung, stomach, pancreas and liver, Egr3 appears to have little role in innervation. Moreover, in salivary glands and heart, two tissues where Egr3 has an essential role in sympathetic innervation, NGF and NT-3 are expressed normally in the absence of Egr3 indicating that abnormal target tissue innervation is not due to deregulation of these neurotrophins in target tissues. Taken together, these results clearly demonstrate a role for Egr3 in mediating sympathetic target tissue innervation that is independent of neuron survival or neurotrophin deregulation.

  2. Production and sympathetic cooling of complex molecular ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Chaobo

    2008-06-24

    This thesis reports on experimental and theoretical studies of the sympathetic cooling of complex molecular ions demonstrating that this general method for cooling atomic and molecular ions is reliable and efficient. For this purpose, complex molecular ions and barium ions have been confined simultaneously in a linear Paul trap. The complex molecular ions are generated in an electrospray ionization system and transferred to the trap via a 2 m long octopole ion guide. These molecular ions are pre-cooled by room temperature helium buffer gas so that they can be captured by the trap. The atomic barium ions are loaded from a barium evaporator oven and are laser-cooled by a 493 nm cooling laser and a 650 nm repumping laser. Due to the mutual Coulomb interaction among these charged particles, the kinetic energy of the complex molecular ions can be reduced significantly. In our experiments we have demonstrated the sympathetic cooling of various molecules (CO{sub 2}, Alexa Fluor 350, glycyrrhetinic acid, cytochrome c) covering a wide mass range from a few tens to 13000 amu. In every case the molecular ions could be cooled down to millikelvin temperatures. Photo-chemical reactions of the {sup 138}Ba{sup +} ions in the ({sup 2}P{sub 1/2}) excited state with gases such as O{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, or N{sub 2}O, could be observed. If the initial {sup 138}Ba{sup +} ion ensemble is cold, the produced {sup 138}BaO{sup +} ions are cold as well, with a similar temperature as the laser-cooled barium ions (a few tens of millikelvin). The back-reaction of {sup 138}BaO{sup +} ions with neutral CO to {sup 138}Ba{sup +} is possible and was observed in our experiments as well. A powerful molecular dynamics (MD) simulation program has been developed. With this program dynamic properties of ion ensembles, such as sympathetic interactions or heating effects, have been investigated and experimental results have been analyzed to obtain, for example, ion numbers and temperatures. Additionally, the

  3. Matured Hop Bittering Components Induce Thermogenesis in Brown Adipose Tissue via Sympathetic Nerve Activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yumie Morimoto-Kobayashi

    Full Text Available Obesity is the principal symptom of metabolic syndrome, which refers to a group of risk factors that increase the likelihood of atherosclerosis. In recent decades there has been a sharp rise in the incidence of obesity throughout the developed world. Iso-α-acids, the bitter compounds derived from hops in beer, have been shown to prevent diet-induced obesity by increasing lipid oxidation in the liver and inhibition of lipid absorption from the intestine. Whereas the sharp bitterness induced by effective dose of iso-α-acids precludes their acceptance as a nutrient, matured hop bittering components (MHB appear to be more agreeable. Therefore, we tested MHB for an effect on ameliorating diet-induced body fat accumulation in rodents. MHB ingestion had a beneficial effect but, compared to iso-α-acids and despite containing structurally similar compounds, acted via different mechanisms to reduce body fat accumulation. MHB supplementation significantly reduced body weight gain, epididymal white adipose tissue weight, and plasma non-esterified free fatty acid levels in diet-induced obese mice. We also found that uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1 expression in brown adipose tissue (BAT was significantly increased in MHB-fed mice at both the mRNA and protein levels. In addition, MHB administration in rats induced the β-adrenergic signaling cascade, which is related to cAMP accumulation in BAT, suggesting that MHB could modulate sympathetic nerve activity innervating BAT (BAT-SNA. Indeed, single oral administration of MHB elevated BAT-SNA in rats, and this elevation was dissipated by subdiaphragmatic vagotomy. Single oral administration of MHB maintained BAT temperature at a significantly higher level than in control rats. Taken together, these findings indicate that MHB ameliorates diet-induced body fat accumulation, at least partly, by enhancing thermogenesis in BAT via BAT-SNA activation. Our data suggests that MHB is a useful tool for developing functional

  4. Hypoxic activation of arterial chemoreceptors inhibits sympathetic outflow to brown adipose tissue in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madden, C J; Morrison, S F

    2005-07-15

    In urethane-chloralose anaesthetized, neuromuscularly blocked, artificially ventilated rats, we demonstrated that activation of carotid chemoreceptors inhibits the elevated levels of brown adipose tissue (BAT) sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) evoked by hypothermia, by microinjection of prostaglandin E2 into the medial preoptic area or by disinhibition of neurones in the raphe pallidus area (RPa). Peripheral chemoreceptor stimulation with systemic administration of NaCN (50 microg in 0.1 ml) or with hypoxic ventilation (8% O2-92% N2, 30 s) completely inhibited BAT SNA. Arterial chemoreceptor-evoked inhibition of BAT SNA was eliminated by prior bilateral transections of the carotid sinus nerves or by prior inhibition of neurones within the commissural nucleus tractus solitarii (commNTS) with glycine (40 nmol/80 nl) or with the GABAA receptor agonist muscimol (160 pmol/80 nl; 77 +/- 10% attenuation), or by prior blockade of ionotropic excitatory amino acid receptors in the commNTS with kynurenate (8 nmol/80 nl; 82 +/- 10% attenuation). Furthermore, activation of commNTS neurones following local microinjection of bicuculline (30 pmol/60 nl) completely inhibited the elevated level of BAT SNA resulting from disinhibition of neurones in the RPa. These results demonstrate that hypoxic stimulation of arterial chemoreceptor afferents leads to an inhibition of BAT SNA and BAT thermogenesis through an EAA-mediated activation of second-order, arterial chemoreceptor neurones in the commNTS. Peripheral chemoreceptor-evoked inhibition of BAT SNA could directly contribute to (or be permissive for) the hypoxia-evoked reductions in body temperature and oxygen consumption that serve as an adaptive response to decreased oxygen availability.

  5. Hypoxic hepatopathy: pathophysiology and prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birrer, Richard; Takuda, Yasuharu; Takara, Tsuyoshi

    2007-01-01

    Dramatic transient elevation in serum concentrations of hepatic enzymes occurs in some patients following a hypo-perfusion state. This entity is variously termed "shock liver" or "ischemic hepatitis", since the pathogenesis is considered to be ischemia. However, hypotension or shock is not always present. We analyzed the medical records of 293 patients (322 episodes) who had a hypoxic state and were admitted to the critical care units of two general hospitals over a 13-year period. Hepatic injury was identified in about 1% of patients in critical care admissions. In addition to hypotension, the causes for hepatic injury were a low flow state secondary to congestive heart failure and hypoxia from sepsis or respiratory failure and hypoxemia from a variety of etiologies. These values were mostly normalized within several days when the hypoxic etiology was corrected and a serious co-morbid state did not intervene. Marked elevation of hepatic enzymes can be identified not only in patients with hypotension, but also in normotensive patients in hypoxic state. Thus, the condition is appropriately termed hypoxic hepatopathy.

  6. Prehospital thrombolysis for acute st-segment elevation myocardial infarction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamfers, Evert Jan Pieter

    2003-01-01

    Early treatment of acute ST elevation myocardial infarction is associated with a good prognosis and a low incidence of complications. Prehospital administration of thrombolytic treatment is one of the ways of starting treatment early after onset of symptoms. Fifteen years of experience in

  7. Sympathetic dysfunction of central origin in patients with ALS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsborg, M; Andersen, E B; Wiinberg, N

    2003-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a severe, progressive disease affecting both the central and peripheral parts of the motor nervous system. Some studies have shown unequivocal indications of a more disseminated disease also affecting the autonomic nervous system. We therefore evaluated...... the centrally and peripherally mediated autonomic vascular reflexes by (i) the local 133-Xenon washout technique, and (ii) the head-up tilt table test. The results correlated to clinical scores. We examined nine ALS patients and 15 age-matched controls. The 133-Xenon washout test showed a significant reduction....... There were no correlations between the ALS Severity Scores and blood flow changes, diastolic blood pressure or MAP. Our study supports previous results, but indicates abnormalities consistent with a solely centrally located sympathetic dysfunction in ALS, independent of the stage of the disease....

  8. Prospects for sympathetic cooling of optically stark decelerated molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barletta, Paolo; Tennyson, Jonathan; Barker, Peter F.

    2009-05-01

    A novel approach has recently been proposed for producing ultra-cold molecules by sympathetic cooling with optically co-trapped rare gas (Rg) atoms [1]. For an efficient planning and realization of the experiment theoretical determination of atom-molecule cross sections at ultra-low energies is very important. In this contribution I will present calculations of scattering lengths and cross sections for he Rg-H2 and Rg-benzene complexes (Rg=He,Ne,Ar,Kr,Xe), with particular emphasis on Ar and Kr. H2 and benzene are considered in their lowest vibrational-rotational states. A direct Monte Carlo simulation of the dynamics of the cooling process has been made by means of the Bird method. This simulation will enable the optimization of the experimental apparatus, and to test the cooling capability of the different Rg gases. [1] P. Barletta, J. Tennyson, P.F. Barker, Phys. Rev. A, 78, 052707 (2008).

  9. The natural history of post-traumatic reflex sympathetic dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zyluk, A

    1998-02-01

    The paper presents the results of a prospective trial to examine the natural history of early reflex sympathetic dystrophy (RSD). Thirty patients with post-traumatic RSD of the hand were observed without treatment. They were reassessed 1, 2 and 6 months after diagnosis with a final assessment at 10 to 18 months (average 13 months). Twenty-seven patients completed the study. Three were withdrawn during the study because of persistence of signs and symptoms of RSD and were given further treatment. Of the 27 patients who completed the study, only one showed sufficient features of the condition to warrant the diagnosis of mild RSD. In the remaining 26, most features of RSD had resolved spontaneously. Pain and swelling disappeared more quickly than other features of RSD. Although the signs and symptoms of RSD had largely gone at 13 months, the hands were still functionally impaired because of weaker grip strength.

  10. Pathophysiology of Resistant Hypertension: The Role of Sympathetic Nervous System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costas Tsioufis

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Resistant hypertension (RH is a powerful risk factor for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Among the characteristics of patients with RH, obesity, obstructive sleep apnea, and aldosterone excess are covering a great area of the mosaic of RH phenotype. Increased sympathetic nervous system (SNS activity is present in all these underlying conditions, supporting its crucial role in the pathophysiology of antihypertensive treatment resistance. Current clinical and experimental knowledge points towards an impact of several factors on SNS activation, namely, insulin resistance, adipokines, endothelial dysfunction, cyclic intermittent hypoxaemia, aldosterone effects on central nervous system, chemoreceptors, and baroreceptors dysregulation. The further investigation and understanding of the mechanisms leading to SNS activation could reveal novel therapeutic targets and expand our treatment options in the challenging management of RH.

  11. Pathophysiology of Resistant Hypertension: The Role of Sympathetic Nervous System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsioufis, Costas; Kordalis, Athanasios; Flessas, Dimitris; Anastasopoulos, Ioannis; Tsiachris, Dimitris; Papademetriou, Vasilios; Stefanadis, Christodoulos

    2011-01-01

    Resistant hypertension (RH) is a powerful risk factor for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Among the characteristics of patients with RH, obesity, obstructive sleep apnea, and aldosterone excess are covering a great area of the mosaic of RH phenotype. Increased sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activity is present in all these underlying conditions, supporting its crucial role in the pathophysiology of antihypertensive treatment resistance. Current clinical and experimental knowledge points towards an impact of several factors on SNS activation, namely, insulin resistance, adipokines, endothelial dysfunction, cyclic intermittent hypoxaemia, aldosterone effects on central nervous system, chemoreceptors, and baroreceptors dysregulation. The further investigation and understanding of the mechanisms leading to SNS activation could reveal novel therapeutic targets and expand our treatment options in the challenging management of RH. PMID:21331155

  12. Catecholamines and Paroxysmal Sympathetic Hyperactivity after Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Ortega, Juan F; Baguley, Ian J; Gates, Thomas A; Garcia-Caballero, Manuel; Quesada-Garcia, Juan G; Prieto-Palomino, Miguel A

    2017-01-01

    Paroxysmal sympathetic hyperactivity (PSH) affects a significant minority of people in the intensive care unit after severe traumatic brain injury. Systematic research has yet to elucidate or quantify the extent of the role of the catecholamines or adrenocortical and thyroid axis hormonal influences in the condition. Data were prospectively collected on 80 consecutive patients, 18 of whom developed clinical signs of PSH (22.5%). Catecholamine and hormonal data were collected sequentially at 4-h intervals or during and between episodes of PSH. Evaluated variables showed 200-300% increases in catecholamines and, to a lesser extent, adrenocortical hormones during paroxysms. The majority of PSH episodes (72%) were noted to be in response to an observable triggering event. These changes were not observed in subjects without PSH. These data go some way to explain why PSH produces adverse consequences in survivors of TBI with the condition.

  13. Suppressive effects of adaptive servo-ventilation on ventricular premature complexes with attenuation of sympathetic nervous activity in heart failure patients with sleep-disordered breathing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwaya, Shoji; Yoshihisa, Akiomi; Nodera, Minoru; Owada, Takashi; Yamada, Shinya; Sato, Takamasa; Suzuki, Satoshi; Yamaki, Takayoshi; Sugimoto, Koichi; Kunii, Hiroyuki; Nakazato, Kazuhiko; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Saitoh, Shu-Ichi; Takeishi, Yasuchika

    2014-07-01

    Ventricular arrhythmias play a critical role in chronic heart failure (CHF) and are associated with adverse clinical outcomes. Sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) is associated with arrhythmias and/or a poor prognosis in CHF. Adaptive servo-ventilation (ASV) is a ventilatory support system designed to normalize ventilation in CHF patients with SDB. However, the effects of ASV on ventricular arrhythmias and sympathetic nervous activity are still unclear. Nineteen CHF patients with SDB were examined. We performed simultaneous overnight polysomnography and 24-h Holter ECG monitoring, and measured levels of daily urinary catecholamines for two consecutive days (baseline and on ASV). ASV significantly improved the apnea-hypopnea index (p CHF with SDB.

  14. Cardiac Sympathetic Hyperactivity after Chemotherapy: Early Sign of Cardiotoxicity?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarita Lígia Pessoa de Melo Machado Guimarães

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chemotherapy with anthracyclines and trastuzumab can cause cardiotoxicity. Alteration of cardiac adrenergic function assessed by metaiodobenzylguanidine labeled with iodine-123 (123I-mIBG seems to precede the drop in left ventricular ejection fraction. Objective: To evaluate and to compare the presence of cardiovascular abnormalities among patients with breast cancer undergoing chemotherapy with anthracyclines and trastuzumab, and only with anthracycline. Methods: Patients with breast cancer were analyzed clinical, laboratory, electrocardiographic and echocardiographic and cardiac sympathetic activity. In scintigraphic images, the ratio of 123I-mIBG uptake between the heart and mediastinum, and the washout rate were calculated. The variables were compared between patients who received anthracyclines and trastuzumab (Group 1 and only anthracyclines (Group 2. Results: Twenty patients, with mean age 57 ± 14 years, were studied. The mean left ventricular ejection fraction by echocardiography was 67.8 ± 4.0%. Mean washout rate was 28.39 ± 9.23% and the ratio of 123I-mIBG uptake between the heart and mediastinum was 2.07 ± 0.28. Of the patients, 82% showed an increased in washout rate, and the ratio of 123I-mIBG uptake between the heart and mediastinum decreased in 25%. Concerning the groups, the mean washout rate of Group 1 was 32.68 ± 9.30% and of Group 2 was 24.56 ± 7.72% (p = 0,06. The ratio of 123I-mIBG uptake between the heart and mediastinum was normal in all patients in Group 2, however, the Group 1, showed 50% the ratio of 123I-mIBG uptake between the heart and mediastinum ≤ 1.8 (p = 0.02. Conclusion: In women with breast cancer undergoing chemotherapy, assessment of cardiac sympathetic activity with 123I-mIBG appears to be an early marker of cardiotoxicity. The combination of chemotherapy showed higher risk of cardiac adrenergic hyperactivity.

  15. Effect of weightlessness on sympathetic-adrenomedullary activity of rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvetňanský, R.; Torda, T.; Macho, L.; Tigranian, R. A.; Serova, L.; Genin, A. M.

    Three cosmic experiments were performed in which rats spent 18-20 days in space on board the biosatellites "COSMOS 782", "COSMOS 936" and "COSMOS 1129". The following indicators of the sympathetic-adrenomedullary system (SAS) activity were measured: tissue and plasma catecholamines (CA), CA-synthesizing enzymes—tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), dopamine-β-hydroxylase (DBH), phenylethanolamine-N-methyltransferase (PNMT)—as well as CA-degrading enzymes—monoamine oxidase (MAO) and catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT). Adrenal epinephrine (EPI) and norepinephrine (NE) as well as CA-synthesizing and degrading enzymes were not significantly changed in the animals after flight on COSMOS 782. On the other hand, a significant increase was found in heart CA, the indicator which is usually decreased after stress. 26 days after landing all values were at control levels. The results obtained, compared to our previous stress experiments on Earth, suggest that prolonged weightlessness does not appear to be a pronounced stressful stimulus for the SAS. Heart and plasma CA, mainly NE, were increased both in the group living in the state of weightlessness and the group living in a centrifuge and exposed to artificial gravitation 1 g (COSMOS 936), suggesting again that prolonged weightlessness is not an intensive stressful stimulus for the SAS. The animals exposed after space flight on COSMOS 1129 to repeated immobilization stress on Earth showed a significant decrease of adrenal EPI and an expressive increase of adrenal TH activity compared to stressed animals which were not in space. Thus, the results corroborate that prolonged state of weightlessness during space flight though not representing by itself an intensive stressful stimulus for the sympathetic-adrenomedullary system, was found to potentiate the response of "cosmic rats" to stress exposure after return to Earth.

  16. Cardiac Sympathetic Hyperactivity after Chemotherapy: Early Sign of Cardiotoxicity?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guimarães, Sarita Lígia Pessoa de Melo Machado [Pós-Graduação em Ciências da Saúde da Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (PGCS-UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Hospital Agamenon Magalhães (HAM), Recife, PE (Brazil); Brandão, Simone Cristina Soares, E-mail: simonecordis@yahoo.com.br [Pós-Graduação em Ciências da Saúde da Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (PGCS-UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Andrade, Luciana Raposo [Hospital Santa Joana, Recife, PE (Brazil); Maia, Rafael José Coelho [Pós-Graduação em Ciências da Saúde da Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (PGCS-UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Hospital Agamenon Magalhães (HAM), Recife, PE (Brazil); Markman Filho, Brivaldo [Pós-Graduação em Ciências da Saúde da Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (PGCS-UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2015-09-15

    Chemotherapy with anthracyclines and trastuzumab can cause cardiotoxicity. Alteration of cardiac adrenergic function assessed by metaiodobenzylguanidine labeled with iodine-123 ({sup 123}I-mIBG) seems to precede the drop in left ventricular ejection fraction. To evaluate and to compare the presence of cardiovascular abnormalities among patients with breast cancer undergoing chemotherapy with anthracyclines and trastuzumab, and only with anthracycline. Patients with breast cancer were analyzed clinical, laboratory, electrocardiographic and echocardiographic and cardiac sympathetic activity. In scintigraphic images, the ratio of {sup 123}I-mIBG uptake between the heart and mediastinum, and the washout rate were calculated. The variables were compared between patients who received anthracyclines and trastuzumab (Group 1) and only anthracyclines (Group 2). Twenty patients, with mean age 57 ± 14 years, were studied. The mean left ventricular ejection fraction by echocardiography was 67.8 ± 4.0%. Mean washout rate was 28.39 ± 9.23% and the ratio of {sup 123}I-mIBG uptake between the heart and mediastinum was 2.07 ± 0.28. Of the patients, 82% showed an increased in washout rate, and the ratio of {sup 123}I-mIBG uptake between the heart and mediastinum decreased in 25%. Concerning the groups, the mean washout rate of Group 1 was 32.68 ± 9.30% and of Group 2 was 24.56 ± 7.72% (p = 0,06). The ratio of {sup 123}I-mIBG uptake between the heart and mediastinum was normal in all patients in Group 2, however, the Group 1, showed 50% the ratio of {sup 123}I-mIBG uptake between the heart and mediastinum ≤ 1.8 (p = 0.02). In women with breast cancer undergoing chemotherapy, assessment of cardiac sympathetic activity with {sup 123}I-mIBG appears to be an early marker of cardiotoxicity. The combination of chemotherapy showed higher risk of cardiac adrenergic hyperactivity.

  17. Novel Biomarker for Prognosis, Treatment Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    An NCI Cancer Currents blog about a study of a new type of cancer biomarker that measures the extent of chromosomal instability as a way to potentially predict patient prognosis and help guide cancer treatment choices.

  18. Atypical odontalgia. Its aetiology and prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooke, R I; Schnurr, R F

    1993-12-01

    Atypical odontalgia is a chronic pain disorder in which persistent pain develops in clinically normal teeth. Its possible aetiology and long-term prognosis are discussed. Suggested management regimes are reviewed.

  19. Sympathetic Blocks Provided Sustained Pain Relief in a Patient with Refractory Painful Diabetic Neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianguo Cheng

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The sympathetic nervous system has been implicated in pain associated with painful diabetic neuropathy. However, therapeutic intervention targeted at the sympathetic nervous system has not been established. We thus tested the hypothesis that sympathetic nerve blocks significantly reduce pain in a patient with painful diabetic neuropathy who has failed multiple pharmacological treatments. The diagnosis of small fiber sensory neuropathy was based on clinical presentations and confirmed by skin biopsies. A series of 9 lumbar sympathetic blocks over a 26-month period provided sustained pain relief in his legs. Additional thoracic paravertebral blocks further provided control of the pain in the trunk which can occasionally be seen in severe diabetic neuropathy cases, consequent to extensive involvement of the intercostal nerves. These blocks provided sustained and significant pain relief and improvement of quality of life over a period of more than two years. We thus provided the first clinical evidence supporting the notion that sympathetic nervous system plays a critical role in painful diabetic neuropathy and sympathetic blocks can be an effective management modality of painful diabetic neuropathy. We concluded that the sympathetic nervous system is a valuable therapeutic target of pharmacological and interventional modalities of treatments in painful diabetic neuropathy patients.

  20. Renal sympathetic nerve, blood flow, and epithelial transport responses to thermal stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Thad E

    2017-05-01

    Thermal stress is a profound sympathetic stress in humans; kidney responses involve altered renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA), renal blood flow, and renal epithelial transport. During mild cold stress, RSNA spectral power but not total activity is altered, renal blood flow is maintained or decreased, and epithelial transport is altered consistent with a sympathetic stress coupled with central volume loaded state. Hypothermia decreases RSNA, renal blood flow, and epithelial transport. During mild heat stress, RSNA is increased, renal blood flow is decreased, and epithelial transport is increased consistent with a sympathetic stress coupled with a central volume unloaded state. Hyperthermia extends these directional changes, until heat illness results. Because kidney responses are very difficult to study in humans in vivo, this review describes and qualitatively evaluates an in vivo human skin model of sympathetically regulated epithelial tissue compared to that of the nephron. This model utilizes skin responses to thermal stress, involving 1) increased skin sympathetic nerve activity (SSNA), decreased skin blood flow, and suppressed eccrine epithelial transport during cold stress; and 2) increased SSNA, skin blood flow, and eccrine epithelial transport during heat stress. This model appears to mimic aspects of the renal responses. Investigations of skin responses, which parallel certain renal responses, may aid understanding of epithelial-sympathetic nervous system interactions during cold and heat stress. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Respiratory modulation of sympathetic nerve activity is enhanced in male rat offspring following uteroplacental insufficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menuet, C; Wlodek, M E; Fong, A Y; Allen, A M

    2016-06-01

    Sympathetic nerve activity to the cardiovascular system displays prominent respiratory-related modulation which leads to the generation of rhythmic oscillations in blood pressure called Traube-Hering waves. An amplification of this respiratory modulation of sympathetic activity is observed in hypertension of both genetic, the spontaneously hypertensive rat, and induced, chronic intermittent hypoxia or maternal protein restriction during gestation, origin. Male offspring of mothers with uteroplacental insufficiency, induced by bilateral uterine vessel ligation at 18 days of gestation, are also hypertensive in adulthood. In this study we examined whether these male offspring display altered respiratory modulation of sympathetic activity at pre-hypertensive ages compared to controls. Respiratory, cardiovascular and sympathetic parameters were examined using the working heart-brainstem preparation in 35 day old male rats that had reduced birth weight due to uteroplacental insufficiency. Whilst all respiratory parameters were not different between groups, we observed an enhanced respiratory-related burst of thoracic sympathetic nerve activity and amplified Traube-Hering waves in the growth-restricted group. This group also showed an increased sympathetic and bradycardic response to activation of peripheral chemoreceptors. The observations add support to the view that altered respiratory modulation of sympathetic activity represents a common mechanism involved in the development of several forms of hypertension. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. The Nucleus of the Solitary Tract and the coordination of respiratory and sympathetic activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel B. Zoccal

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that breathing introduces rhythmical oscillations in the heart rate and arterial pressure levels. Sympathetic oscillations coupled to the respiratory activity have been suggested as an important homeostatic mechanism optimizing tissue perfusion and blood gas uptake/delivery. This respiratory-sympathetic coupling is strengthened in conditions of blood gas challenges (hypoxia and hypercapnia as a result of the synchronized activation of brainstem respiratory and sympathetic neurons, culminating with the emergence of entrained cardiovascular and respiratory reflex responses. Studies have proposed that the ventrolateral region of the medulla oblongata is a major site of synaptic interaction between respiratory and sympathetic neurons. However, other brainstem regions also play a relevant role in the patterning of respiratory and sympathetic motor outputs. Recent findings suggest that the neurons of the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS, in the dorsal medulla, are essential for the processing and coordination of respiratory and sympathetic responses to hypoxia. The NTS is the first synaptic station of the cardiorespiratory afferent inputs, including peripheral chemoreceptors, baroreceptors and pulmonary stretch receptors. The synaptic profile of the NTS neurons receiving the excitatory drive from afferent inputs is complex and involves distinct neurotransmitters, including glutamate, ATP and acetylcholine. In the present review we discuss the role of the NTS circuitry in coordinating sympathetic and respiratory reflex responses. We also analyze the neuroplasticity of NTS neurons and their contribution for the development of cardiorespiratory dysfunctions, as observed in neurogenic hypertension, obstructive sleep apnea and metabolic disorders.

  3. The neuro-osteogenic network: The sympathetic regulation of bone resorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akifumi Togari

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Bone is innervated by sympathetic and sensory neurons, which play important roles in bone remodeling. Direct neuro-osteogenic cross-talk has been demonstrated using an in vitro co-culture model comprising osteoblastic or osteoclastic cells, and neurite-spouting mouse superior cervical ganglia, suggesting that these cells are directly regulated by sympathetic neurons. The increase in sympathetic nervous activity causes bone loss through increased bone resorption and decreased bone formation, associated with β2-adrenergic activity toward both osteoblastic and osteoclastic cells. The increased bone resorption is based on the stimulation of both osteoclastogenesis and osteoclastic activity. These studies suggest β-blockers to be effective against osteoporosis, in which case there is increased sympathetic activity. Epidemiological studies have demonstrated high blood pressure to be associated with increased bone loss and β-blockers to be potential candidates for drugs to treat osteoporosis and fractures. In animal experiments, a lower dose of β-blocker also improved bone mass and biomechanical fragility in a hypertensive model. Although the interplay between sympathetic and sensory neurons is poorly understood, interestingly, sensory denervated rats have been demonstrated to show similar bone metabolism to rats with hyperactivity of sympathetic tone. This review summarized both in vitro and in vivo evidence implicating sympathetic neuronal activity in bone resorption.

  4. Machinery prognostics and prognosis oriented maintenance management

    CERN Document Server

    Yan, Jihong

    2014-01-01

    This book gives a complete presentatin of the basic essentials of machinery prognostics and prognosis oriented maintenance management, and takes a look at the cutting-edge discipline of intelligent failure prognosis technologies for condition-based maintenance.  Latest research results and application methods are introduced for signal processing, reliability moelling, deterioration evaluation, residual life prediction and maintenance-optimization as well as applications of these methods.

  5. Sensitivity to ischaemia of single sympathetic nerve fibres innervating the dorsum of the human foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Z'Graggen, W J; Solà, R; Graf, N E; Serra, J; Bostock, H

    2017-07-01

    Changes in nerve conduction velocity following an impulse (i.e. velocity recovery cycles) reflect after-potentials, and can provide an indication of altered nerve membrane properties. This study used microneurography to assess the effects of ischaemia on single human sympathetic fibres innervating the dorsum of the foot. It was found that velocity recovery cycles can distinguish whether a sympathetic nerve fibre is depolarized or not. The method may be used to detect membrane depolarization of sympathetic nerve fibres in human patients when autonomic neuropathy is suspected. The aim of this study was to determine whether velocity recovery cycles (VRCs) could detect the effects of ischaemia on sympathetic nerve fibres. VRCs of human sympathetic nerve fibres of the superficial peroneal nerve innervating the dorsum of the foot were recorded by microneurography in seven healthy volunteers. Sympathetic nerve fibres were identified by studying their response to manoeuvres increasing sympathetic outflow and by measuring activity-dependent slowing at 2 Hz stimulation. VRCs were assessed at rest, during 30 min of induced limb ischaemia and during 20 min of recovery after ischaemia. From each VRC was measured the relative refractory period (RRP), the supernormality and the time to peak supernormality (SN@). During ischaemia, RRP increased from the baseline value of 37.4 ± 8.7 ms (mean ± SEM) to 67.1 ± 12.1 ms (P fibres. It is concluded that these sympathetic nerve fibres are sensitive to ischaemia, and that VRCs provide a method to study changes of axonal membrane potential of human sympathetic nerve fibres in vivo. © 2017 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2017 The Physiological Society.

  6. Assessment of the sympathetic level of lesion in patients with spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Previnaire, J G; Soler, J M; El Masri, W; Denys, P

    2009-02-01

    To study the vasomotor responses (skin axon-reflex vasodilatation (SkARV) to stimulation of the skin in spinal cord injury (SCI) patients. To assess the completeness of the sympathetic injury and to define the sympathetic level of lesion in paraplegic and tetraplegic patients. Centre Calve, Fondation Hopale and Centre Bouffard-Vercelli, France. A total of 81 SCI patients ranging from C2 to L2. A mechanical stimulation was applied to the skin on both sides of the trunk, using a blunt instrument. The presence of an abnormal response below the lesion helped define the sympathetic level. Above the lesion, SkARV was observed in all patients. In patients with a complete sympathetic injury, the response below the lesion was either a vasoconstrictor response in upper motor neuron lesions, or total absence of SkARV in lower motor neuron lesions. There was excellent correspondence between complete somatic (American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) A) and complete sympathetic lesions (100% of paraplegic and 94% of tetraplegic patients), whereas an incomplete somatic (ASIA B-D) lesion was often associated with a complete sympathetic lesion. In 34% of complete ASIA A patients, a sympathetic zone of partial preservation was found, extending below the lesion on sensory denervated dermatomes. SkARV is a simple bedside test that allows the assessment of sympathetic completeness of injury across the lesion as well as the excitability of the isolated spinal cord. We suggest that the definition of sympathetic level should be part of the classification of complete thoracic SCI.

  7. Physiological and pathophysiological interactions between the respiratory central pattern generator and the sympathetic nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molkov, Yaroslav I; Zoccal, Daniel B; Baekey, David M; Abdala, Ana P L; Machado, Benedito H; Dick, Thomas E; Paton, Julian F R; Rybak, Ilya A

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory modulation seen in the sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) implies that the respiratory and sympathetic networks interact. During hypertension elicited by chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH), the SNA displays an enhanced respiratory modulation reflecting strengthened interactions between the networks. In this chapter, we review a series of experimental and modeling studies that help elucidate possible mechanisms of sympatho-respiratory coupling. We conclude that this coupling significantly contributes to both the sympathetic baroreflex and the augmented sympathetic activity after exposure to CIH. This conclusion is based on the following findings. (1) Baroreceptor activation results in perturbation of the respiratory pattern via transient activation of postinspiratory neurons in the Bötzinger complex (BötC). The same BötC neurons are involved in the respiratory modulation of SNA, and hence provide an additional pathway for the sympathetic baroreflex. (2) Under hypercapnia, phasic activation of abdominal motor nerves (AbN) is accompanied by synchronous discharges in SNA due to the common source of this rhythmic activity in the retrotrapezoid nucleus (RTN). CIH conditioning increases the CO2 sensitivity of central chemoreceptors in the RTN which results in the emergence of AbN and SNA discharges under normocapnic conditions similar to those observed during hypercapnia in naïve animals. Thus, respiratory-sympathetic interactions play an important role in defining sympathetic output and significantly contribute to the sympathetic activity and hypertension under certain physiological or pathophysiological conditions, and the theoretical framework presented may be instrumental in understanding of malfunctioning control of sympathetic activity in a variety of disease states. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Hypofunction of the Sympathetic Nervous System as a Possible Etiologic Cause of Recurrent Aphthous Stomatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Present, Steven I; Check, Jerome H

    2016-06-01

    Recurrent aphthous stomatitis is a common disorder of the oral mucosa. The symptoms can range from a minor nuisance to severe forms that can be extremely debilitating. Two cases of chronic aphthous stomatitis are described. The patients sought help to ameliorate vasomotor symptoms. A diagnosis of sympathetic nervous system hypofunction was established. Treatment was aimed at restoring normal sympathetic function by the administration of dextroamphetamine sulfate. Since the patients have been on the amphetamine salts, neither their vasomotor symptoms nor their aphthous lesions have returned. Hypofunction of the sympathetic nervous system should be considered as a possible etiologic factor in patients with recurrent oral ulcers when not associated with known systemic diseases.

  9. Sympathetic ophthalmia associated with antecedent adherent leucoma--a rare association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dada, T; Kumar, A; Sharma, N

    1998-06-01

    To report a rare association of sympathetic ophthalmia with an antecedent adherent leucoma. A 40-year-old patient with an adherent leucoma developed sympathetic ophthalmia in the fellow eye, 15 years after the occurrence of a perforated corneal ulcer. Intravenous pulse dexamethasone therapy followed by tapering oral prednisolone led to complete resolution of the disease process in the sympathising eye. Patients with an adherent leucoma subsequent to a perforated corneal ulcer may remain at an increased risk of developing sympathetic ophthalmia during their lifetime.

  10. Lumbar Sympathetic Pulsed Radiofrequency Treatment for Primary Erythromelalgia: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jin Young; Sim, Woo Seog; Kang, Ryung A; Lee, Eun Kyung; Yang, Jae Young; Kim, Dae Yoon

    2017-01-01

    Erythromelalgia is often refractory and resistant to many forms of treatment. Numerous therapeutic options have been tried, but effective treatment remains elusive. The sympathetic nervous system has been involved in various painful conditions of neuropathic, vascular, and visceral origin. Sympathetic block is helpful in making a diagnosis and managing pain. We report a case of excellent pain relief after lumbar sympathetic pulsed radiofrequency treatment in a patient with primary erythromelalgia of the lower extremities. This case suggests the viability of pulsed radiofrequency treatment in patients with erythromelalgia. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Electrophysiological study of relations between the dorsal nerve of the penis and the lumbar sympathetic chain in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuliano, F; Rampin, O; Jardin, A; Rousseau, J P

    1993-12-01

    Afferent sensory inputs from the penis are carried by the dorsal nerve of the penis (DNP) to the spinal cord. Sympathetic outflow involved in the control of the urogenital tract is partly conveyed by the lumbosacral sympathetic chain. Our aim was to search for a sympathetic component in the DNP and relations between DNP afferents and sympathetic fibers conveyed by the distal sympathetic chain in anesthetized adult male rats. Stimulation of the lumbar sympathetic chain at the L4-L5 level (LSC4-5) elicited an evoked discharge on the DNP. This discharge was abolished by cutting the sympathetic chain distal to the stimulation site. Ganglionic blockade with hexamethonium and various neural sections revealed the presence of sympathetic postganglionic fibers in the DNP, originating in the sympathetic chain. Stimulation of the DNP evoked a reflex discharge in the LSC. This reflex was spinally mediated since it was abolished by acute spinal cord transection at the L5 level. Acute spinalization at the T8 level significantly reduced the latency of the evoked response. We hypothesize that both spinal and supraspinal control exist over relations of the DNP afferents with sympathetic outflow to the pelvis. Increase in sympathetic tone elicited by activation of penile sensory fibers could play a role in regulation of sexual function.

  12. Meigs' Syndrome with Elevated Serum CA125: Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esin Kasap

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available An elevated serum CA125 level in association with a pelvic mass,pleural effusion,and massive ascites usually signifies a dismal prognosis in a postmenopausal woman.However, surgery and histopathological examination are required for the correct diagnosis and treatment,since an elevated CA125 level can be falsely positive for ovarian malignancy.We present a case of Meigs' syndrome due to left ovarian fibroma with elevated CA125 level in a postmenopausal woman. [J Contemp Med 2016; 6(2.000: 114-117

  13. Role of the sympathetic nervous system in hypertension and hypertension-related cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seravalle, Gino; Mancia, Giuseppe; Grassi, Guido

    2014-06-01

    A number of cardiovascular disease have been shown to be characterized by a marked increase in sympathetic drive to the heart and the peripheral circulation. This is the case for essential hypertension, congestive heart failure, cardiac arrhythmias, obesity, metabolic syndrome, obstructive sleep apnea, and chronic renal disease. This review focuses on the most recent findings documenting the role of sympathetic neural factors in the development and progression of the hypertensive state as well as in the pathogenesis of hypertension-related target organ damage. It also reviews the role of sympathetic neural factors in the development of cardiovascular diseases not necessarily strictly related to the hypertensive state, such as congestive heart failure, cardiac arrhythmias, obesity, metabolic syndrome and renal failure. The paper will finally review the pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions acting on the sympathetic drive. Emphasis will be given to the new approaches, such as renal nerves ablation and carotid baroreceptor stimulation, which have been shown to exert sympathoinhibitory effects.

  14. The anemia of microgravity and recumbency. Role of sympathetic neural control of erythropoietin production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, David; Krantz, Sanford B.; Biaggioni, Italo

    We hypothesize that reduced sympathetic stimulation of erythropoietin production may maintain the anemia which develops in virtually all space travellers. We tested this hypothesis in a human model of reduced sympathetic activity. Thirty-three patients with the Bradbury-Eggleston syndrome were divided into three groups according to their hemoglobin (Hgb) level. Patients with low Hgb had lower upright norepinephrine and lower upright renin. Patients with anemia also had inappropriately low plasma erythropoietin levels. We administered recombinant erythropoietin (Epogen) 25-50 units/kg s.c. 3 times per week and found that the anemia seen in autonomic failure could be reversed by this treatment. These results support the hypothesis that erythropoiesis is modulated by the sympathetic nervous system and that such mechanisms may also operate in the microgravity environment where sympathetic activity is reduced.

  15. ACE INHIBITION ATTENUATES SYMPATHETIC CORONARY VASOCONSTRICTION IN PATIENTS WITH CORONARY-ARTERY DISEASE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    PERONDI, R; SAINO, A; TIO, RA; POMIDOSSI, G; GREGORINI, L; ALESSIO, P; MORGANTI, A; ZANCHETTI, A; MANCIA, G

    Background. In humans, angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition attenuates the vasoconstriction induced by sympathetic stimulation in a number of peripheral districts. Whether this is also the case in the coronary circulation is unknown, however. Methods and Results. In nine normotensive

  16. Effects of ACTH4–10 on synaptic transmission in frog sympathetic ganglion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouters, W.; Bercken, J. van den

    1979-01-01

    The influenced of ACHT4−10, a behaviourally active fragment of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) devoid of endocrine activity, on synaptic transmission in the paravertebral sympathetic ganglion of the frog was investigated. Postsynaptic potentials evoked by electrical stimulation of preganglionic

  17. Paraventricular nucleus is involved in the central pathway of cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex in rats

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ming-Kui Zhong; Yang-Can Duan; Ai-Dong Chen; Bo Xu; Xing-Ya Gao; Wei De; Guo-Qing Zhu

    2008-01-01

    ...) modulate the cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex (CSAR). The present study was designed to demonstrate more conclusively that the PVN is an important component of the central neurocircuitry of the CSAR...

  18. Sympathetic neural adaptation to hypocaloric diet with or without exercise training in obese metabolic syndrome subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Straznicky, Nora E; Lambert, Elisabeth A; Nestel, Paul J

    2010-01-01

    Sympathetic nervous system (SNS) overactivity contributes to the pathogenesis and target organ complications of obesity. This study was conducted to examine the effects of lifestyle interventions (weight loss alone or together with exercise) on SNS function....

  19. Bed rest attenuates sympathetic and pressor responses to isometric exercise in antigravity leg muscles in humans

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Atsunori Kamiya; Daisaku Michikami; Tomoke Shiozawa; Satoshi Iwase

    2004-01-01

      Although spaceflight and bed rest are known to cause muscular atrophy in the antigravity muscles of the legs, the changes in sympathetic and cardiovascular responses to exercises using the atrophied...

  20. Bed rest attenuates sympathetic and pressor responses to isometric exercise in antigravity leg muscles in humans

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Atsunori Kamiya; Daisaku Michikami; Tomoki Shiozawa; Satoshi Iwase; Junichiro Hayano; Toru Kawada; Kenji Sunagawa; Tadaaki Mano

    2004-01-01

    Although spaceflight and bed rest are known to cause muscular atrophy in the antigravity muscles of the legs, the changes in sympathetic and cardiovascular responses to exercises using the atrophied...

  1. The role of carotid chemoreceptors in the sympathetic activation by adenosine in humans.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmers, H.J.L.M.; Rongen, G.A.P.J.M.; Karemaker, J.M.; Wieling, W.; Marres, H.A.M.; Lenders, J.W.M.

    2004-01-01

    The direct vasodilatory and negative chronotropic effects of adenosine in humans are counterbalanced by a reflex increase in sympathetic nerve traffic. A suggested mechanism for this reflex includes peripheral chemoreceptor activation. We, therefore, assessed the contribution of carotid

  2. Liver afferents contribute to water drinking-induced sympathetic activation in human subjects: a clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    May, M.; Gueler, F.; Barg-Hock, H.; Heiringhoff, K.H.; Engeli, S.; Heusser, K.; Diedrich, A.; Brandt, A.; Strassburg, C.P.; Tank, J.; Sweep, F.C.; Jordan, J.

    2011-01-01

    Water drinking acutely increases sympathetic activity in human subjects. In animals, the response appears to be mediated through transient receptor potential channel TRPV4 activation on osmosensitive hepatic spinal afferents, described as osmopressor response. We hypothesized that hepatic

  3. Racemic ketamine decreases muscle sympathetic activity but maintains the neural response to hypotensive challenges in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kienbaum, P.; Heuter, T.; Michel, M. C.; Peters, J.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cardiovascular stimulation and increased catecholamine plasma concentrations during ketamine anesthesia have been attributed to increased central sympathetic activity as well as catecholamine reuptake inhibition in various experimental models. However, direct recordings of efferent

  4. Renal denervation in male rats with heart failure improves ventricular sympathetic nerve innervation and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinkham, Maximilian I; Loftus, Michael T; Amirapu, Satya; Guild, Sarah-Jane; Quill, Gina; Woodward, William R; Habecker, Beth A; Barrett, Carolyn J

    2017-03-01

    Heart failure is characterized by the loss of sympathetic innervation to the ventricles, contributing to impaired cardiac function and arrhythmogenesis. We hypothesized that renal denervation (RDx) would reverse this loss. Male Wistar rats underwent myocardial infarction (MI) or sham surgery and progressed into heart failure for 4 wk before receiving bilateral RDx or sham RDx. After additional 3 wk, left ventricular (LV) function was assessed, and ventricular sympathetic nerve fiber density was determined via histology. Post-MI heart failure rats displayed significant reductions in ventricular sympathetic innervation and tissue norepinephrine content (nerve fiber density in the LV of MI+sham RDx hearts was 0.31 ± 0.05% vs. 1.00 ± 0.10% in sham MI+sham RDx group, P heart failure. Our findings show denervating the renal nerves improves cardiac sympathetic innervation and function in the post-MI failing heart. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  5. Iowa Bedrock Surface Elevation

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research Facility — This Digital Elevation Model (DEM) of the bedrock surface elevation in Iowa was compiled using all available data, principally information from GEOSAM, supplemented...

  6. Leptin into the rostral ventral lateral medulla (RVLM augments renal sympathetic nerve activity and blood pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria J Barnes

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Leptin is a hormone released from adipose tissue. While this hormone normally acts to reduce feeding behavior and increase energy expenditure, in obesity, resistance to these effects occurs even though the hormone is released in large amounts. Although leptin no longer works to suppress feeding in the obese, leptin retains its potent effects on other autonomic functions such as blood pressure regulation. Leptin has been associated with hypertension and increased sympathetic autonomic activity. Therefore, leptin is emerging as a major contributor to the hypertensive state observed in obesity. Sympathetic control of blood pressure is maintained principally by autonomic reflex control circuits in the caudal brainstem. The rostral ventral-lateral medulla (RVLM is the primary regulator of the sympathetic nervous system, sending excitatory fibers to sympathetic preganglionic neurons to regulate sympathetic control over resistance vessels and blood pressure. Previous studies from our laboratory have shown that neurons in the ventral lateral medulla express leptin receptors (ObRb. Our present study using pseudo-rabies multi-synaptic retrograde tract tracing and immunohistochemical methods revealed that neurons within the RVLM that send sympathetic projections to the kidney express leptin receptors. Acute microinjection of leptin (1 and 3µg; 40nL into the RVLM evoked a significant increase in Mean Arterial Pressure (MAP and renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA. When the 3µg dose of leptin was preceded with a leptin antagonist, (SLAN-4; 1ng, it attenuated the cardiovascular response of leptin. Taken together, these data suggest that leptin’s actions within the RVLM may influence blood pressure and renal sympathetic nerve activity.

  7. LEPTIN SIGNALING IN THE NUCLEUS TRACTUS SOLITARII INCREASES SYMPATHETIC NERVE ACTIVITY TO THE KIDNEY

    OpenAIRE

    Mark, Allyn L.; Agassandian, Khristofor; Morgan, Donald A.; Liu, Xuebo; Cassell, Martin D.; Rahmouni, Kamal

    2008-01-01

    The hypothalamic arcuate nucleus was initially regarded as the principal site of leptin action, but there is increasing evidence for functional leptin receptors (Ob-Rb) in extra-hypothalamic sites, including the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS). We previously demonstrated that arcuate injection of leptin increases sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) to brown adipose tissue (BAT) and kidney. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that leptin signaling in the NTS affects sympathetic neural outflow...

  8. Sympathetic skin responses in hemiplegic patients with and without complex regional pain syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Selçuk Barin; Ersoz Murat; Inanir Murat; Kurtaran Aydan; Akyuz Müfit

    2006-01-01

    Background and Aims: To investigate whether there were changes in the sympathetic skin responses (SSR) in the limbs with complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) type I in hemiplegic patients. Setting: A physical medicine and rehabilitation center in Turkey . Materials and Methods: Sympathetic skin responses were evaluated in 69 stroke patients (41 with CRPS and 28 without CRPS) and 20 healthy volunteers. SSR were recorded on the paretic and healthy hands after stimulation of the ipsilateral...

  9. Enhanced adipose afferent reflex contributes to sympathetic activation in diet-induced obesity hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Xiao-Qing; Chen, Wei-Wei; Han, Ying; Zhou, Ye-Bo; Zhang, Feng; Gao, Xing-Ya; Zhu, Guo-Qing

    2012-11-01

    We recently found that adipose afferent reflex (AAR) induced by chemical stimulation of white adipose tissue (WAT) increased sympathetic outflow and blood pressure in normal rats. The study was designed to test the hypothesis that AAR contributes to sympathetic activation in obesity hypertension. Male rats were fed with a control diet (12% kcal as fat) or high-fat diet (42% kcal as fat) for 12 weeks to induce obesity hypertension. Stimulation of WAT with capsaicin increased renal sympathetic nerve activity and mean arterial pressure. Both AAR and WAT afferent activity were enhanced in obesity hypertension (OH) compared with obesity nonhypertension (ON) and in ON compared with obesity-resistant or control diet rats. WAT sensory denervation induced by resiniferatoxin caused greater decreases in renal sympathetic nerve activity and mean arterial pressure in OH than ON and in ON than obesity-resistant or control. The depressor effect of resiniferatoxin lasted ≥ 3 weeks in OH. Leptin antagonist in WAT reduced renal sympathetic nerve activity and mean arterial pressure in OH. WAT injection of capsaicin increased plasma renin, angiotensin II, and norepinephrine levels in OH and caused more c-fos expression in paraventricular nucleus in OH than ON and in ON than obesity-resistant or control rats. Inhibiting paraventricular nucleus neurons with lidocaine attenuated renal sympathetic nerve activity in OH and ON, decreased mean arterial pressure in OH, and abolished the capsaicin-induced AAR in all groups. The results indicate that enhanced AAR contributes to sympathetic activation in OH, and paraventricular nucleus plays an important role in the enhanced AAR and sympathetic activation in OH.

  10. Vestibular Modulation of Sympathetic Nerve Activity to Muscle and Skin in Humans

    OpenAIRE

    Hammam, Elie; Vaughan G Macefield

    2017-01-01

    We review the existence of vestibulosympathetic reflexes in humans. While several methods to activate the human vestibular apparatus have been used, galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) is a means of selectively modulating vestibular afferent activity via electrodes over the mastoid processes, causing robust vestibular illusions of side-to-side movement. Sinusoidal GVS (sGVS) causes partial entrainment of sympathetic outflow to muscle and skin. Modulation of muscle sympathetic nerve activity...

  11. Tyrosine hydroxylase activity decreases with induction of cholinergic properties in cultured sympathetic neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Wolinsky, Eve; Patterson, Paul H.

    1983-01-01

    Establishment of transmitter phenotype is an essential step in neuronal development. Studies on rat sympathetic neurons both in vivo and in vitro have provided evidence that mature cholinergic sympathetic neurons arise from previously noradrenergic neurons. Cultured rat superior cervical ganglion neurons can be influenced by their environment to remain noradrenergic, to acquire dual transmitter function, or to become predominantly cholinergic. Several other neuronal traits, such as a variety ...

  12. Sympathetic activity and markers of cardiovascular risk in nondiabetic severely obese patients: the effect of the initial 10% weight loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Elisabeth A; Rice, Toni; Eikelis, Nina; Straznicky, Nora E; Lambert, Gavin W; Head, Geoffrey A; Hensman, Chris; Schlaich, Markus P; Dixon, John B

    2014-10-01

    Obesity is associated with elevated cardiovascular mortality, which may be attributed, in part, to sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activation and an associated poor metabolic profile. We examined the effects of laparoscopic adjustable gastric band (LAGB) on SNS activity and cardiovascular profile when the initial weight loss of 10%, corresponding to the recommendation of clinical guidelines, was reached. Direct muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA, microneurography), baroreflex function, and cardiovascular profile were examined before and after a predetermined weight loss of 10% in 23 severely obese nondiabetic individuals. The 10% weight loss was achieved at an average of 7.3 ± 1.4 months (range = 1.3-23.3 months). This was associated with significant improvement in office systolic and diastolic blood pressure (BP) (-12 mm Hg and -5 mm Hg, respectively), a decrease in MSNA (33 ± 3 to 22 ± 3 bursts per minute), improvement in cardiac (16 ± 3 to 31 ± 4 ms/mm Hg) and sympathetic (-2.23 ± 0.39 to -4.30 ± 0.96 bursts/100 heartbeats/mm Hg) baroreflex function, total cholesterol (5.33 ± 0.13 to 4.97 ± 0.16 mmol/L), fasting insulin (29.3 ± 2.4 to 19.6 ± 1.1 mmol/L), and creatinine clearance (172 ± 11 to 142 ± 8 ml/min). None of the cardiovascular risk improvement related to the rate of weight loss. The change in systolic and diastolic BP correlated with change in waist circumference (r = 0.46, P = 0.04; r = 0.50, P = 0.02, respectively). The initial 10% weight loss induced by LAGB was associated with substantial hemodynamic, metabolic, SNS, and renal function improvements. Changes in waist circumference appear to be an important factor contributing to BP adaptation after LAGB surgery. © American Journal of Hypertension, Ltd 2014. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Cannabinoid CB1 receptor inverse agonist MJ08 stimulates glucose production via hepatic sympathetic innervation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Liu, Hongying; Guan, Hua; Xue, Nina; Wang, Lili

    2017-11-05

    As a key insulin target tissue for maintaining systemic glucose homeostasis, the liver plays important roles in improving obesity-associated insulin intolerance via selective cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonism/inverse agonism. However, it is unclear whether this receptor inverse agonism affects hepatic glucose metabolism. MJ08 is a novel cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist/inverse agonist that has superior inverse agonism over the well-known antagonist/inverse agonist, SR141716 (rimonabant). MJ08 remarkably elevates fasting blood glucose independent of inhibition of insulin release in mice. In the current study, MJ08 was used to investigate the mechanism by which liver cannabinoid CB1 receptor inverse activation regulates hepatic glucose metabolism. MJ08 stimulated hepatic glucose production (HGP) in a dose-dependent manner and promoted gluconeogenic gene expression in perfused rat liver. SR141716 exhibited similar but weaker effects. The cannabinoid CB1 receptor agonist (WIN 55,212-2), Gs protein-cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent pathway inhibitors (NF449 and H89), β-adrenoceptor antagonist (propranolol), and peripheral sympathetic inhibitor (reserpine) could antagonize MJ08-induced HGP. Furthermore, MJ08 and SR141716 induced monoamine neurotransmitter (noradrenaline) release and increased cAMP content significantly in perfused liver, although only a slight increase was observed in primary cultured hepatocytes. These results indicate that local liver cannabinoid CB1 receptor inverse agonism via hepatic sympathetic innervation is responsible for the HGP induced by MJ08. Thus, high inverse agonistic activity could increase fasting blood glucose levels and should be avoided in the development of peripheral cannabinoid CB1 receptor-targeted weight-loss drugs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Influence of sympathetic autonomic arousal on tics: implications for a therapeutic behavioral intervention for Tourette syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Yoko; Cavanna, Andrea; Critchley, Hugo D

    2009-12-01

    The pharmacological treatment of Tourette syndrome (TS) has improved due to the application of new medications and combinations of medications, coupled to greater phenomenological and neurobiological understanding of the condition. Nevertheless, for many individuals with TS, potentially troublesome tics persist despite optimized drug treatment. Anecdotally, a relationship is frequently described between tic frequency and states of bodily arousal and/or focused attention. The galvanic skin response (GSR) is an accessible and sensitive index of sympathetic nervous activity, reflecting centrally induced changes in peripheral autonomic arousal. Sympathetic nervous arousal, measured using GSR, has been shown to have an inverse relationship with an electroencephalographic index of cortical excitability (slow cortical potential), and GSR arousal biofeedback shows promise as an adjunctive therapy in management of treatment-resistant epilepsy. We examined how changes in sympathetic arousal, induced using GSR biofeedback, impact on tic frequency in individuals with TS. Two different physiological states (sympathetic arousal and relaxation) were induced using GSR biofeedback in 15 individuals with a diagnosis of TS. During both biofeedback sessions, participants were videotaped to monitor the occurrence of tics. We observed significantly lower tics during relaxation biofeedback compared to arousal biofeedback, with tic frequency positively correlating with sympathetic arousal during the arousal session. These findings indicate that the conjunction of focused attention to task and reduced peripheral sympathetic tone inhibits tic expression and suggests a potential therapeutic role of biofeedback relaxation training for tic management in patients with TS.

  15. Renal sympathetic denervation for treatment of patients with heart failure: summary of the available evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nammas, Wail; Koistinen, Juhani; Paana, Tuomas; Karjalainen, Pasi P

    2017-08-01

    Heart failure syndrome results from compensatory mechanisms that operate to restore - back to normal - the systemic perfusion pressure. Sympathetic overactivity plays a pivotal role in heart failure; norepinephrine contributes to maintenance of the systemic blood pressure and increasing preload. Cardiac norepinephrine spillover increases in patients with heart failure; norepinephrine exerts direct toxicity on cardiac myocytes resulting in a decrease of synthetic activity and/or viability. Importantly, cardiac norepinephrine spillover is a powerful predictor of mortality in patients with moderate to severe HF. This provided the rationale for trials that demonstrated survival benefit associated with the use of beta adrenergic blockers in heart failure with reduced ejection fraction. Nevertheless, the MOXCON trial demonstrated that rapid uptitration of moxonidine (inhibitor of central sympathetic outflow) in patients with heart failure was associated with excess mortality and morbidity, despite reduction of plasma norepinephrine. Interestingly, renal norepinephrine spillover was the only independent predictor of adverse outcome in patients with heart failure, in multivariable analysis. Recently, renal sympathetic denervation has emerged as a novel approach for control of blood pressure in patients with treatment-resistant hypertension. This article summarizes the available evidence for the effect of renal sympathetic denervation in the setting of heart failure. Key messages Experimental studies supported a beneficial effect of renal sympathetic denervation in heart failure with reduced ejection fraction. Clinical studies demonstrated improvement of symptoms, and left ventricular function. In heart failure and preserved ejection fraction, renal sympathetic denervation is associated with improvement of surrogate endpoints.

  16. Change in sympathetic nerve firing pattern associated with dietary weight loss in the metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Elisabeth; Straznicky, Nora E; Dawood, Tye; Ika-Sari, Carolina; Grima, Mariee; Esler, Murray D; Schlaich, Markus P; Lambert, Gavin W

    2011-01-01

    Sympathetic activation in subjects with the metabolic syndrome (MS) plays a role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease development. Diet-induced weight loss decreases sympathetic outflow. However the mechanisms that account for sympathetic inhibition are not known. We sought to provide a detailed description of the sympathetic response to diet by analyzing the firing behavior of single-unit sympathetic nerve fibers. Fourteen subjects (57 ± 2 years, nine men, five females) fulfilling ATP III criteria for the MS underwent a 3-month low calorie diet. Metabolic profile, hemodynamic parameters, and multi-unit and single-unit muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA, microneurography) were assessed prior to and at the end of the diet. Patients' weight dropped from 96 ± 4 to 88 ± 3 kg (P metabolic parameters (fasting glucose: -0.302.1 ± 0.118 mmol/l, total cholesterol: -0.564 ± 0.164 mmol/l, triglycerides: -0.414 ± 0.137 mmol/l, P metabolic parameters. The sympathoinhibition associated with weight loss involves marked changes, not only in the rate but also in the firing pattern of active vasoconstrictive fibers.

  17. The role of carotid chemoreceptors in the sympathetic activation by adenosine in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmers, Henri J L M; Rongen, Gerard A; Karemaker, John M; Wieling, Wouter; Marres, Henri A M; Lenders, Jacques W M

    2004-01-01

    The direct vasodilatory and negative chronotropic effects of adenosine in humans are counterbalanced by a reflex increase in sympathetic nerve traffic. A suggested mechanism for this reflex includes peripheral chemoreceptor activation. We, therefore, assessed the contribution of carotid chemoreceptors to sympatho-excitation by adenosine. Muscle sympathetic nerve activity was recorded during adenosine infusion (140 microg.kg(-1).min(-1) for 5 min) in five patients lacking carotid chemoreceptors after bilateral carotid body tumour resection (one male and four female, mean age 51 +/- 11 years) and in six healthy controls (two male and four female, mean age 50 +/- 7 years). Sympathetic responses to sodium nitroprusside injections were assessed to measure baroreceptor-mediated sympathetic activation. In response to adenosine, controls showed no change in blood pressure, an increase in heart rate (+48.2 +/- 13.2%; Pactivity (+195 +/- 103%; Pactivity. Adenosine-induced hypotension in individual patients elicited less sympathetic activation than equihypotensive sodium nitroprusside injections. In humans lacking carotid chemoreceptors, adenosine infusion elicits hypotension due to the absence of significant sympatho-excitation. Chemoreceptor activation is essential for counterbalancing the direct vasodilation by adenosine. In addition, blunting of the baroreflex sympathetic response to adenosine-induced hypotension may indicate a direct sympatho-inhibitory effect of adenosine.

  18. Sympathetic pain? A role of poor parasympathetic nervous system engagement in vicarious pain states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazarewicz, Julia; Verdejo-Garcia, Antonio; Giummarra, Melita J

    2015-11-01

    This study investigated the psychophysiological correlates of the subjective experience of vicarious pain; that is, a spontaneous experience of pain when seeing another in pain. Forty-nine healthy, otherwise pain-free individuals aged 18-55 years completed empathy and anxiety questionnaires and were classified into three groups: vicarious responders with high anxiety (n = 11), vicarious responders with low anxiety (n = 22), and nonresponders (n = 16). Electrophysiological recordings of heart rate variability (HRV) during paced breathing and cognitive stress (serial sevens task) were completed before participants viewed short videos of athletes in states of pain or happiness, taken from Australian League Football matches. Change in beats per minute, relative to neutral scenes, were analyzed for the first 4 s after onset of the painful or happy event. Anxious responders had lower HF-HRV than both other groups, implicating poor parasympathetic regulation specific to states of stress. Both vicarious responder groups had elevated HR at the event onset, regardless of valence. After viewing painful injuries, nonanxious vicarious responders showed sustained HR over time, anxious responders showed HR acceleration with a peak at 3 s after the injury onset, and nonresponders showed a pattern of marked HR deceleration. These findings suggest that vicarious pain in anxious responders is associated with poorly regulated sympathetic arousal via insufficient inhibitory parasympathetic activity, whereas nonanxious persons show sustained arousal. Clearly, multiple mechanisms in the central and peripheral nervous system must play a role in vicarious pain states, and the different manifestations are likely to lead to very different behavioral consequences. © 2015 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  19. Sympathetic Tone Induced by High Acoustic Tempo Requires Fast Respiration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken Watanabe

    Full Text Available Many studies have revealed the influences of music, and particularly its tempo, on the autonomic nervous system (ANS and respiration patterns. Since there is the interaction between the ANS and the respiratory system, namely sympatho-respiratory coupling, it is possible that the effect of musical tempo on the ANS is modulated by the respiratory system. Therefore, we investigated the effects of the relationship between musical tempo and respiratory rate on the ANS. Fifty-two healthy people aged 18-35 years participated in this study. Their respiratory rates were controlled by using a silent electronic metronome and they listened to simple drum sounds with a constant tempo. We varied the respiratory rate-acoustic tempo combination. The respiratory rate was controlled at 15 or 20 cycles per minute (CPM and the acoustic tempo was 60 or 80 beats per minute (BPM or the environment was silent. Electrocardiograms and an elastic chest band were used to measure the heart rate and respiratory rate, respectively. The mean heart rate and heart rate variability (HRV were regarded as indices of ANS activity. We observed a significant increase in the mean heart rate and the low (0.04-0.15 Hz to high (0.15-0.40 Hz frequency ratio of HRV, only when the respiratory rate was controlled at 20 CPM and the acoustic tempo was 80 BPM. We suggest that the effect of acoustic tempo on the sympathetic tone is modulated by the respiratory system.

  20. Consolation as possible expression of sympathetic concern among chimpanzees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Teresa; Castellanos, Miguel A.; de Waal, Frans B. M.

    2010-01-01

    Chimpanzees are known to spontaneously provide contact comfort to recent victims of aggression, a behavior known as consolation. Similar behavior in human children is attributed to empathic or sympathetic concern. In line with this empathy hypothesis, chimpanzee consolation has been shown to reduce the recipient's state of arousal, hence to likely alleviate distress. Other predictions from the empathy hypothesis have rarely been tested, however, owing to small sample sizes in previous studies. An exceptionally large database of spontaneous consolation in two outdoor-housed groups of chimpanzees lends further support to the empathy hypothesis in that consolation occurred disproportionally between individuals that are socially close (i.e., kin and affiliation partners) and was more typical of females than males, which differences are also known of human empathy. These effects were demonstrated using generalized linear mixed models, which control multiple variables at once. An exception to the above pattern was formed by the highest-ranking males, which frequently offered consolation to victims of aggression, probably as part of their general policing function in chimpanzee society. Consolation occurred more frequently in the absence of reconciliation between former opponents, suggesting that actors are sensitive to the contact need of victims of aggression, which may be greater if the aggressor ignores them. That consolation is an integrated part of close mutual relationships is supported by the tendency for it being reciprocated. PMID:20547864

  1. [Reflex sympathetic dystrophy secondary to piriformis syndrome: a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akçali, Didem; Taş, Ayça; Cizmeci, Pelin; Oktar, Suna; Zinnuroğlu, Murat; Arslan, Emre; Köseoğlu, Hüseyin; Babacan, Avni

    2009-04-01

    Piriformis syndrome is a rare cause of hip and foot pain which may be due to sciatic nerve irritation because of anatomic abnormalities of sciatic nerve and piriformis muscle or herniated disc, facet syndrome, trochanteric bursit, sacroiliac joint dysfunction, endometriosis and other conditions where sciatic nerve is irritated. There has been no reflex sympathetic dystrophy (RSD) case presented due to piriformis syndrome before. A sixty-two-year-old female patient had right foot and hip pain (VNS: 8), redness and swelling in the foot since 15 days. Her history revealed long walks and travelling 3 weeks ago and sitting on the foot for a long time for a couple of days. Physical examination revealed painful hip movement, positive straight leg rise. Erythema and hyperalgesia was present in dorsum of the right foot. Right foot dorsiflexion was weak and hyperesthesia was found in right L4-5 dermatome. Medical treatment and ultrasound treatment to piriformis muscle was not effective. The patient was injected 40 mg triamcinolon and local anesthetic in right piriformis muscle under floroscopy by diagnosis of piriformis syndrome, neuropathic pain and RSD. Pain and hyperalgesia resolved and motor weakness was better. During follow-up right foot redness resolved and pain decreased (VNS: 1). In this case report, there was vascular, muscle and skeletal signs supporting RSD, which shows us the therapoetic effect of diagnostic piriformis injection. The patient history, physical examination and diagnostic tests were evaluated by a multidisciplinary team which contributed to the treatment.

  2. The complex interaction between overweight, hypertension, and sympathetic overactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldstein, Carlos; Julius, Stevo

    2009-01-01

    There is ample evidence in the epidemiological and clinical literature that hypertension and overweight are closely and causally interrelated. Sympathetic nervous system (SNS) overactivity has been well documented in both hypertension and overweight, but it is not clear whether this is a coincidental finding or whether the association reflects a mechanistic role of SNS in these two interrelated clinical conditions. Whereas in this review we focus on the evidence for a primary role of SNS in the development of hypertension and overweight, it is clear that the process can be initiated from other starting points such as primary overeating or sleep apnea. After overweight evolves, hormones secreted by fat cells further accelerate SNS overactivity, weight gain, and blood pressure increase. The main thesis of this article is that regardless of where the process started, the same clinical picture of hypertension, overweight, and SNS overactivity will emerge. There is good evidence that in genetically prone individuals, prolonged SNS stimulation elicits a down regulation of beta-adrenergic receptors. This in turn decreases the ability to dissipate calories and diminishes the beta-adrenoceptor-mediated vasodilatation. We hypothesize that beta-adrenoceptor downregulation is the linchpin in the association of SNS with overweight and hypertension.

  3. High-resolution Observations of Sympathetic Filament Eruptions by NVST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yingna; Li, Shangwei; Zhou, Tuanhui; Van Ballegooijen, Adriaan A.; Sun, Xudong; Ji, Haisheng

    2017-08-01

    We investigate two sympathetic filament eruptions observed by the New Vacuum Solar Telescope (NVST) on 2015 October 15. The full picture of the eruptions is obtained from the corresponding SDO/AIA observations. The two filaments start from the east border of active region NOAA 12434 in the north and end in one large quiescent filament channel in the south. The left filament erupts firstly, followed by the right filament eruption about 10 minutes later. Clear twist structure and rotating motion are observed in both filaments during the eruption. Both eruptions are failed, since the filaments firstly rise up, then flow towards the south and merge into the southern large quiescent filament. We also observe repeating activations of mini filaments below the right filament after its eruption. Using magnetic field models constructed based on SDO/HMI magnetograms by flux rope insertion method, we find that the left filament eruption is likely to be triggered by kink instability, while weakening of overlying magnetic fields due to magnetic reconnection at an X-point between the two filament systems might play an important role in the onset of the right filament eruption.

  4. Reflex sympathetic dystrophy/complex regional pain syndrome, type 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.H. Botha

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Complex regional pain syndrome (CPRS, type 1 is a pain disorder that develops unpredictably and can follow a minor injury. A 12-year-old boy presented with severe pain in the feet and could not walk or stand weight bearing. Normal X-rays showed osteopenic changes and radiolucent lines, which appeared to be stress fractures. Three-phase bone scintigraphy showed no uptake in the left lower leg on the blood pool phase or on the immediate or delayed images. This indicated typical CPRS type 1 in children. The uptake in the right foot was increased and the stress fracture and other illness could not be differentiated. Computed tomography was done to exclude stress fractures. Only osteopenic changes in both calcaneus bones were found and there was no evidence of cortical stress fractures. Magnetic resonance images revealed oedema in the calcaneus and talus bones of both feet. The patient received epidural narcotic infusion with sympathetic blockage for 1 week combined with extensive physiotherapy. The blood pool phase of the bone scan became normal within 2 weeks, and increased uptake in both feet was noticed. The patient was followed up with MRI every 3 months and the bone marrow oedema disappeared after 6 months.

  5. Prognosis of synchronous bilateral breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Marianne; Tjønneland, Anne; Balslev, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Currently, no consistent evidence-based guidelines for the management of synchronous bilateral breast cancer (SBBC) exist and it is uncertain how presenting with SBBC affects patients' prognosis. We conducted a review of studies analyzing the association between SBBC and prognosis. The studies...... that reported adjusted effect measures were included in meta-analyses of effect of bilaterality on breast cancer mortality. From 57 initially identified records 17 studies from 11 different countries including 8,050 SBBC patients were included. The quality of the studies varied but was generally low with small...

  6. [Syncope : epidemiology, definition, classification, pathophysiology and prognosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heeger, C-H; Rillig, A; Ouyang, F; Kuck, K-H; Tilz, R R

    2014-06-01

    Syncope is a common clinical issue. Around 40 % of the total population experience syncope during their lifetime. Serious injuries and reduced quality of life are often observed after syncope. Furthermore, in some cases syncope can be associated with an unfavorable prognosis. Due to the complex etiology and pathophysiology, syncope provides challenges for doctors both in private and in clinical practices. This review is based on the latest European guidelines for syncope which were formulated by internists, neurologists, emergency physicians and cardiologists and gives an overview of the current epidemiology, definition, classification, pathophysiology and prognosis of syncope.

  7. Magnitude of Morning Surge in Blood Pressure Is Associated with Sympathetic but Not Cardiac Baroreflex Sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Aaron W; Hissen, Sarah L; Macefield, Vaughan G; Brown, Rachael; Taylor, Chloe E

    2016-01-01

    The ability of the arterial baroreflex to regulate blood pressure may influence the magnitude of the morning surge in blood pressure (MSBP). The aim was to investigate the relationships between sympathetic and cardiac baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) and the morning surge. Twenty-four hour ambulatory blood pressure was recorded in 14 young individuals. The morning surge was defined via the pre-awakening method, which is calculated as the difference between mean blood pressure values 2 h before and 2 h after rising from sleep. The mean systolic morning surge, diastolic morning surge, and morning surge in mean arterial pressures were 15 ± 2, 13 ± 1, and 11 ± 1 mmHg, respectively. During the laboratory protocol, continuous measurements of blood pressure, heart rate, and muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) were made over a 10-min period of rest. Sympathetic BRS was quantified by plotting MSNA burst incidence against diastolic pressure (sympathetic BRSinc), and by plotting total MSNA against diastolic pressure (sympathetic BRStotal). Cardiac BRS was quantified using the sequence method. The mean values for sympathetic BRSinc, sympathetic BRStotal and cardiac BRS were -1.26 ± 0.26 bursts/100 hb/mmHg, -1.60 ± 0.37 AU/beat/mmHg, and 13.1 ± 1.5 ms/mmHg respectively. Significant relationships were identified between sympathetic BRSinc and the diastolic morning surge (r = 0.62, p = 0.02) and the morning surge in mean arterial pressure (r = 0.57, p = 0.03). Low sympathetic BRS was associated with a larger morning surge in mean arterial and diastolic blood pressure. Trends for relationships were identified between sympathetic BRStotal and the diastolic morning surge (r = 0.52, p = 0.066) and the morning surge in mean arterial pressure (r = 0.48, p = 0.095) but these did not reach significance. There were no significant relationships between cardiac BRS and the morning surge. These findings indicate that the ability of the baroreflex to buffer increases in blood pressure

  8. Meigs’ Syndrome with Elevated Serum CA125: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mongkol Benjapibal

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available An elevated serum CA125 level in association with a pelvic mass, pleural effusion, and massive ascites usually signifies a dismal prognosis in a postmenopausal woman. However, surgery and histopathological examination are required for the correct diagnosis and treatment, since an elevated CA125 level can be falsely positive for ovarian malignancy. We present a case of Meigs’ syndrome due to right ovarian fibroma with elevated CA125 level in a postmenopausal woman.

  9. Biomarkers and Prognosis in Malignant Lymphomas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hagenbeek, Anton; Gascoyne, Randy D.; Dreyling, Martin; Kluin, Philip; Engert, Andreas; Salles, Gilles

    Approximately 100 hematologists and pathologists from Europe, the United States, and Canada participated in the workshop Biomarkers and Prognosis in Malignant Lymphomas, held in Mandelieu, France,April 11-13, 2008, under the leadership of Anton Hagenbeek, Randy Gascoyne, and Gilles Salles.

  10. User's Guide to the Stand Prognosis Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    William R. Wykoff; Nicholas L. Crookston; Albert R. Stage

    1982-01-01

    The Stand Prognosis Model is a computer program that projects the development of forest stands in the Northern Rocky Mountains. Thinning options allow for simulation of a variety of management strategies. Input consists of a stand inventory, including sample tree records, and a set of option selection instructions. Output includes data normally found in stand, stock,...

  11. Clinical severity and prognosis of hand eczema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hald, M; Agner, T; Blands, J

    2009-01-01

    to identify factors associated with severe disease and a poor prognosis. METHODS: Study participants were 799 patients with HE from nine dermatological clinics in Denmark. Severity assessment of the HE was done at baseline and at the 6-month follow-up using the Hand Eczema Severity Index (HECSI...

  12. Pulmonary embolism : diagnostic management and prognosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klok, Frederikus Albertus

    2010-01-01

    This thesis describes the diagnostic management, short term prognosis and long term complications of pulmonary embolism. We have validated a newly derived clinical decision rule, the revised Geneva score, for predicting the pre-test probability of having acute pulmonary embolism. This rule can be

  13. The natural history and prognosis of epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beghi, Ettore; Giussani, Giorgia; Sander, Josemir W

    2015-09-01

    Epilepsy is a brain condition characterized by the recurrence of unprovoked seizures. Generally, prognosis refers to the probability of attaining seizure freedom on treatment and little is known about the natural history of the untreated condition. Here, we summarize aspects of the prognosis and prognostic predictors of treated and untreated epilepsy and of its different syndromes. Usually, epilepsy is a fairly benign condition. Most epilepsies have a good prognosis for full seizure control and eventual discontinuation of AEDs, but epilepsy syndromes have differing outcomes and responses to treatment. Prognostic factors include aetiology, EEG abnormalities, type of seizures and the number of seizures experienced before treatment onset, and poor early effects of drugs. Early response to treatment is an important positive predictor of long-term prognosis, while the history of a high number of seizures at the time of diagnosis, intellectual disability, and symptomatic aetiology are negative predictors. Different prognostic patterns can be identified, suggesting that the epileptogenic process is not static. Epilepsy carries a greater than expected risk of premature death. Aetiology is the single most important risk factor for premature death.

  14. Brown adipose tissue has sympathetic-sensory feedback circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Vitaly; Garretson, John T; Liu, Yang; Vaughan, Cheryl H; Bartness, Timothy J

    2015-02-04

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) is an important source of thermogenesis which is nearly exclusively dependent on its sympathetic nervous system (SNS) innervation. We previously demonstrated the SNS outflow from brain to BAT using the retrograde SNS-specific transneuronal viral tract tracer, pseudorabies virus (PRV152) and demonstrated the sensory system (SS) inflow from BAT to brain using the anterograde SS-specific transneuronal viral tract tracer, H129 strain of herpes simplex virus-1. Several brain areas were part of both the SNS outflow to, and receive SS inflow from, interscapular BAT (IBAT) in these separate studies suggesting SNS-SS feedback loops. Therefore, we tested whether individual neurons participated in SNS-SS crosstalk by injecting both PRV152 and H129 into IBAT of Siberian hamsters. To define which dorsal root ganglia (DRG) are activated by BAT SNS stimulation, indicated by c-Fos immunoreactivity (IR), we prelabeled IBAT DRG innervating neurons by injecting the retrograde tracer Fast Blue (FB) followed 1 week later by intra-BAT injections of the specific β3-adrenoceptor agonist CL316,243 in one pad and the vehicle in the contralateral pad. There were PRV152+H129 dually infected neurons across the neuroaxis with highest densities in the raphe pallidus nucleus, nucleus of the solitary tract, periaqueductal gray, hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus, and medial preoptic area, sites strongly implicated in the control of BAT thermogenesis. CL316,243 significantly increased IBAT temperature, afferent nerve activity, and c-Fos-IR in C2-C4 DRG neurons ipsilateral to the CL316,243 injections versus the contralateral side. The neuroanatomical reality of the SNS-SS feedback loops suggests coordinated and/or multiple redundant control of BAT thermogenesis. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/352181-10$15.00/0.

  15. A new organellar complex in rat sympathetic neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matt S Ramer

    Full Text Available Membranous compartments of neurons such as axons, dendrites and modified primary cilia are defining features of neuronal phenotype. This is unlike organelles deep to the plasma membrane, which are for the most part generic and not related directly to morphological, neurochemical or functional specializations. However, here we use multi-label immunohistochemistry combined with confocal and electron microscopy to identify a very large (approximately 6 microns in diameter, entirely intracellular neuronal organelle which occurs singly in a ubiquitous but neurochemically distinct and morphologically simple subset of sympathetic ganglion neurons. Although usually toroidal, it also occurs as twists or rods depending on its intracellular position: tori are most often perinuclear whereas rods are often found in axons. These 'loukoumasomes' (doughnut-like bodies bind a monoclonal antibody raised against beta-III-tubulin (SDL.3D10, although their inability to bind other beta-III-tubulin monoclonal antibodies indicate that the responsible antigen is not known. Position-morphology relationships within neurons and their expression of non-muscle heavy chain myosin suggest a dynamic structure. They associate with nematosomes, enigmatic nucleolus-like organelles present in many neural and non-neural tissues, which we now show to be composed of filamentous actin. Loukoumasomes also separately interact with mother centrioles forming the basal body of primary cilia. They express gamma tubulin, a microtubule nucleator which localizes to non-neuronal centrosomes, and cenexin, a mother centriole-associated protein required for ciliogenesis. These data reveal a hitherto undescribed organelle, and depict it as an intracellular transport machine, shuttling material between the primary cilium, the nematosome, and the axon.

  16. Increased vascular sympathetic modulation in mice with Mas receptor deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabello Casali, Karina; Ravizzoni Dartora, Daniela; Moura, Marina; Bertagnolli, Mariane; Bader, Michael; Haibara, Andrea; Alenina, Natalia; Irigoyen, Maria Claudia; Santos, Robson A

    2016-01-01

    The angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2)/angiotensin (Ang)-(1-7)/Mas axis could modulate the heart rate (HR) and blood pressure variabilities (BPV) which are important predictors of cardiovascular risk and provide information about the autonomic modulation of the cardiovascular system. Therefore we investigated the effect of Mas deficiency on autonomic modulation in wild type and Mas-knockout (KO) mice. Blood pressure was recorded at high sample rate (4000 Hz). Stationary sequences of 200-250 beats were randomly chosen. Frequency domain analysis of HR and BPV was performed with an autoregressive algorithm on the pulse interval sequences and on respective systolic sequences. The KO group presented an increase of systolic arterial pressure (SAP; 127.26±11.20 vs 135.07±6.98 mmHg), BPV (3.54±1.54 vs 5.87±2.12 mmHg(2)), and low-frequency component of systolic BPV (0.12±0.11 vs 0.47±0.34 mmHg(2)). The deletion of Mas receptor is associated with an increase of SAP and with an increased BPV, indicating alterations in autonomic control. Increase of sympathetic vascular modulation in absence of Mas evidences the important role of Ang-(1-7)/Mas on cardiovascular regulation. Moreover, the absence of significant changes in HR and HRV can indicate an adaptation of autonomic cardiac balance. Our results suggest that the Ang-(1-7)/Mas axis seems more important in autonomic modulation of arterial pressure than HR. © The Author(s) 2016.

  17. Differential effects of defibrillation on systemic and cardiac sympathetic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bode, F; Wiegand, U; Raasch, W; Richardt, G; Potratz, J

    1998-01-01

    Objective—To assess the effect of defibrillation shocks on cardiac and circulating catecholamines.
Design—Prospective examination of myocardial catecholamine balance during dc shock by simultaneous determination of arterial and coronary sinus plasma concentrations. Internal countershocks (10-34 J) were applied in 30 patients after initiation of ventricular fibrillation for a routine implantable cardioverter defibrillator test. Another 10 patients were externally cardioverted (50-360 J) for atrial fibrillation.
Main outcome measures—Transcardiac noradrenaline, adrenaline, and lactate gradients immediately after the shock.
Results—After internal shock, arterial noradrenaline increased from a mean (SD) of 263 (128) pg/ml at baseline to 370 (148) pg/ml (p = 0.001), while coronary sinus noradrenaline fell from 448 (292) to 363 (216) pg/ml (p = 0.01), reflecting a shift from cardiac net release to net uptake. After external shock delivery, there was a similar increase in arterial noradrenaline, from 260 (112) to 459 (200) pg/ml (p = 0.03), while coronary sinus noradrenaline remained unchanged. Systemic adrenaline increased 11-fold after external shock (p = 0.01), outlasting the threefold rise following internal shock (p = 0.001). In both groups, a negative transmyocardial adrenaline gradient at baseline decreased further, indicating enhanced myocardial uptake. Cardiac lactate production occurred after ventricular fibrillation and internal shock, but not after external cardioversion, so the neurohumoral changes resulted from the defibrillation process and not from alterations in oxidative metabolism.
Conclusions—A dc shock induces marked systemic sympathoadrenal and sympathoneuronal activation, but attenuates cardiac sympathetic activity. This might promote the transient myocardial depression observed after electrical discharge to the heart.

 Keywords: defibrillation;  autonomic cardiac function;  catecholamines;  lactate

  18. The effects of phenylpropanolamine on human sympathetic nervous system function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lake, C R; Chernow, B; Zaloga, G; Labow, J; Quirk, R; Hedges, S M

    1988-05-01

    Phenylpropanolamine (PPA) is a sympathomimetic agent, very similar in structure to amphetamine. In the United States, it is present in over 130 medications, primarily anorectic agents and cough and cold remedies, many available without a prescription. The effects of PPA on blood pressure (BP) remain controversial and its mechanisms of action unknown. We studied acute (1 and 2 hours) and 2-week effects of a daily dose of 75 mg of sustained release PPA administered to 14 normal volunteers. Measurements of heart rate, BP, and plasma catecholamines (CA) were made with the subject in the supine and standing positions, and upon gripping a hand dynamometer for 5 minutes. Although systolic BP across all postures and sampling times was significantly higher when subjects were taking PPA in comparison to placebo (F = 5.95, p = 0.03), in no subject did the increase in BP reach hypertensive or clinically significant levels and no substantial changes in CA levels were found. Our study population was relatively young and normotensive; even such a small BP increase may pose greater problems for hypertensive, obese subjects likely to be users of diet aids. Strenuous isometric exercise did not cause any greater increase in BP or CA after subjects took PPA versus placebo. PPA blood levels 24 hours after the last of 14 daily doses were similar to levels 1 and 2 hours after an initial dose. We conclude from these data that recommended doses of PPA have only minimal sympathetic nervous system (SNS) and cardiovascular effects in young, healthy, normotensive populations at the times and dose studied.

  19. Elevated NT-proBNP and coronary calcium score in relation to coronary artery disease in asymptomatic type 2 diabetic patients with elevated urinary albumin excretion rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinhard, Henrik; Hansen, Peter R; Persson, Frederik

    2011-01-01

    Elevated plasma N-terminal (NT)-proBNP levels and coronary calcium score (CCS) not only predicts myocardial ischaemia and coronary artery stenosis but also adverse cardiovascular events and mortality in type 2 diabetic patients with an increased urinary albumin excretion rate (UAER), whereas low...... levels are associated with low frequency of coronary artery disease (CAD) and good prognosis. The underlying causes of poor prognosis in patients with elevated NT-proBNP are not known; thus, we investigated the role of putative asymptomatic CAD in type 2 diabetic patients with UAER >30 mg/24 h...

  20. Recurrent postoperative CRPS I in patients with abnormal preoperative sympathetic function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, William E; Ahmad, Mahmood

    2008-02-01

    A complex regional pain syndrome of an extremity that has previously resolved can recur after repeat surgery at the same anatomic site. Complex regional pain syndrome is described as a disease of the autonomic nervous system. The purpose of this study was to evaluate preoperative and postoperative sympathetic function and the recurrence of complex regional pain syndrome type I (CRPS I) in patients after repeat carpal tunnel surgery. Thirty-four patients who developed CRPS I after initial carpal tunnel releases and required repeat open carpal tunnel surgeries were studied. Laser Doppler imaging (LDI) was used to assess preoperative sympathetic function 5-7 days prior to surgery and to assess postoperative sympathetic function 19-22 days after surgery or 20-22 days after resolution of the CRPS I. Sympathetic nervous system function was prospectively examined by testing reflex-evoked vasoconstrictor responses to sympathetic stimuli recorded with LDI of both hands. Patients were assigned to 1 of 2 groups based on LDI responses to sympathetic provocation. Group I (11 of 34) patients had abnormal preoperative LDI studies in the hands that had prior surgeries, whereas group II (23 of 34) patients had normal LDI studies. Each patient in this study had open repeat carpal tunnel surgery. In group I, 8 of 11 patients had recurrent CRPS I, whereas in group II, 3 of 23 patients had recurrent CRPS I. All of the recurrent CRPS I patients were successfully treated with sympathetic blockade, occupational therapy, and pharmacologic modalities. Repeat LDI after recurrent CRPS I resolution was abnormal in 8 of 8 group I patients and in 1 of 3 group II patients. CRPS I can recur after repeat hand surgery. Our study results may, however, identify those individuals who may readily benefit from perioperative therapies. Prognostic I.

  1. Involvement of hypothalamic AMP-activated protein kinase in leptin-induced sympathetic nerve activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanida, Mamoru; Yamamoto, Naoki; Shibamoto, Toshishige; Rahmouni, Kamal

    2013-01-01

    In mammals, leptin released from the white adipose tissue acts on the central nervous system to control feeding behavior, cardiovascular function, and energy metabolism. Central leptin activates sympathetic nerves that innervate the kidney, adipose tissue, and some abdominal organs in rats. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is essential in the intracellular signaling pathway involving the activation of leptin receptors (ObRb). We investigated the potential of AMPKα2 in the sympathetic effects of leptin using in vivo siRNA injection to knockdown AMPKα2 in rats, to produce reduced hypothalamic AMPKα2 expression. Leptin effects on body weight, food intake, and blood FFA levels were eliminated in AMPKα2 siRNA-treated rats. Leptin-evoked enhancements of the sympathetic nerve outflows to the kidney, brown and white adipose tissues were attenuated in AMPKα2 siRNA-treated rats. To check whether AMPKα2 was specific to sympathetic changes induced by leptin, we examined the effects of injecting MT-II, a melanocortin-3 and -4 receptor agonist, on the sympathetic nerve outflows to the kidney and adipose tissue. MT-II-induced sympatho-excitation in the kidney was unchanged in AMPKα2 siRNA-treated rats. However, responses of neural activities involving adipose tissue to MT-II were attenuated in AMPKα2 siRNA-treated rats. These results suggest that hypothalamic AMPKα2 is involved not only in appetite and body weight regulation but also in the regulation of sympathetic nerve discharges to the kidney and adipose tissue. Thus, AMPK might function not only as an energy sensor, but as a key molecule in the cardiovascular, thermogenic, and lipolytic effects of leptin through the sympathetic nervous system.

  2. Human muscle sympathetic nerve activity and plasma noradrenaline kinetics in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertl, Andrew C.; Diedrich, Andre; Biaggioni, Italo; Levine, Benjamin D.; Robertson, Rose Marie; Cox, James F.; Zuckerman, Julie H.; Pawelczyk, James A.; Ray, Chester A.; Buckey, Jay C Jr; hide

    2002-01-01

    Astronauts returning from space have reduced red blood cell masses, hypovolaemia and orthostatic intolerance, marked by greater cardio-acceleration during standing than before spaceflight, and in some, orthostatic hypotension and presyncope. Adaptation of the sympathetic nervous system occurring during spaceflight may be responsible for these postflight alterations. We tested the hypotheses that exposure to microgravity reduces sympathetic neural outflow and impairs sympathetic neural responses to orthostatic stress. We measured heart rate, photoplethysmographic finger arterial pressure, peroneal nerve muscle sympathetic activity and plasma noradrenaline spillover and clearance, in male astronauts before, during (flight day 12 or 13) and after the 16 day Neurolab space shuttle mission. Measurements were made during supine rest and orthostatic stress, as simulated on Earth and in space by 7 min periods of 15 and 30 mmHg lower body suction. Mean (+/- S.E.M.) heart rates before lower body suction were similar pre-flight and in flight. Heart rate responses to -30 mmHg were greater in flight (from 56 +/- 4 to 72 +/- 4 beats min(-1)) than pre-flight (from 56 +/- 4 at rest to 62 +/- 4 beats min(-1), P Noradrenaline spillover and clearance were increased from pre-flight levels during baseline periods and during lower body suction, both in flight (n = 3) and on post-flight days 1 or 2 (n = 5, P noradrenaline spillover and clearance were increased. The sympathetic response to 30 mmHg lower body suction was at pre-flight levels or higher in each subject (35 pre-flight vs. 40 bursts min(-1) in flight). No astronaut experienced presyncope during lower body suction in space (or during upright tilt following the Neurolab mission). We conclude that in space, baseline sympathetic neural outflow is increased moderately and sympathetic responses to lower body suction are exaggerated. Therefore, notwithstanding hypovolaemia, astronauts respond normally to simulated orthostatic stress

  3. An electrophysiological approach to the evaluation of regional sympathetic dysfunction: a proposed classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longmire, David R

    2006-01-01

    The importance to physicians of maintaining a level of understanding of illnesses and their treatment continues to reveal itself in a most striking fashion when it comes to the progressive interest recently directed to disorders of the autonomic nervous system (ANS). In particular, the relevance to pain practitioners of disease states which directly involve the sympathetic portion of the ANS has increased markedly following the international renaming of reflex sympathetic dystrophy (RSD) and causalgia to complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) Type I and Type II respectively, as well as sympathetically maintained pain (SMP). Subsequently it has become better understood that many other forms of neuropathic pain also demonstrate local abnormalities of the sympathetic nervous supply to the skin within the painful territory, thereby increasing the diagnostic value of these (often subtle) cutaneous clinical signs. The objectives of this presentation include (a) a concise review of laboratory tests that are currently used in the evaluation of the autonomic nervous system, (b) a discussion of those procedures that were developed for the assessment of sympathetic sudomotor function, (c) a review of the anatomic pathways subserving those electrophysiological methods for sudomotor testing, and (d) the current diagnostic classification for regional abnormalities of sympathetic sudomotor dysfunction. Methods used in the preparation of this article have included a review of (a) historic clinical and laboratory articles (or translations thereof) regarding the medical importance of disorders of the autonomic nervous system, dating back to more than 155 years ago (b) anatomic and electrophysiological basis for electroneurodiagnostic sudomotor testing, and (c) the author's proposal for a diagnostic classification of regional sympathetic sudomotor dysfunction.

  4. (In)activity-dependent alterations in resting and reflex control of splanchnic sympathetic nerve activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mischel, Nicholas A; Mueller, Patrick J

    2011-12-01

    The negative effects of sympathetic overactivity on long-term cardiovascular health are becoming increasingly clear. Moreover, recent work done in animal models of cardiovascular disease suggests that sympathetic tone to the splanchnic vasculature may play an important role in the development and maintenance of these disease states. Work from our laboratory and others led us to hypothesize that a lack of chronic physical activity increases resting and reflex-mediated splanchnic sympathetic nerve activity, possibly through changes occurring in a key brain stem center involved in sympathetic regulation, the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM). To address this hypothesis, we recorded mean arterial pressure (MAP) and splanchnic sympathetic nerve activity (SSNA) in a group of active and sedentary animals that had been housed for 10-13 wk with or without running wheels, respectively. In experiments performed under Inactin anesthesia, we tested responses to RVLM microinjections of glutamate, responses to baroreceptor unloading, and vascular reactivity, the latter of which was performed under conditions of autonomic blockade. Sedentary animals exhibited enhanced resting SSNA and MAP, augmented increases in SSNA to RVLM activation and baroreceptor unloading, and enhanced vascular reactivity to α(1)-receptor mediated vasoconstriction. Our results suggest that a sedentary lifestyle increases the risk of cardiovascular disease by augmenting resting and reflex-mediated sympathetic output to the splanchnic circulation and also by increasing vascular sensitivity to adrenergic stimulation. We speculate that regular physical exercise offsets or reverses the progression of these disease processes via similar or disparate mechanisms and warrant further examination into physical (in)activity-induced sympathetic nervous system plasticity.

  5. Involvement of hypothalamic AMP-activated protein kinase in leptin-induced sympathetic nerve activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamoru Tanida

    Full Text Available In mammals, leptin released from the white adipose tissue acts on the central nervous system to control feeding behavior, cardiovascular function, and energy metabolism. Central leptin activates sympathetic nerves that innervate the kidney, adipose tissue, and some abdominal organs in rats. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK is essential in the intracellular signaling pathway involving the activation of leptin receptors (ObRb. We investigated the potential of AMPKα2 in the sympathetic effects of leptin using in vivo siRNA injection to knockdown AMPKα2 in rats, to produce reduced hypothalamic AMPKα2 expression. Leptin effects on body weight, food intake, and blood FFA levels were eliminated in AMPKα2 siRNA-treated rats. Leptin-evoked enhancements of the sympathetic nerve outflows to the kidney, brown and white adipose tissues were attenuated in AMPKα2 siRNA-treated rats. To check whether AMPKα2 was specific to sympathetic changes induced by leptin, we examined the effects of injecting MT-II, a melanocortin-3 and -4 receptor agonist, on the sympathetic nerve outflows to the kidney and adipose tissue. MT-II-induced sympatho-excitation in the kidney was unchanged in AMPKα2 siRNA-treated rats. However, responses of neural activities involving adipose tissue to MT-II were attenuated in AMPKα2 siRNA-treated rats. These results suggest that hypothalamic AMPKα2 is involved not only in appetite and body weight regulation but also in the regulation of sympathetic nerve discharges to the kidney and adipose tissue. Thus, AMPK might function not only as an energy sensor, but as a key molecule in the cardiovascular, thermogenic, and lipolytic effects of leptin through the sympathetic nervous system.

  6. The Effects of Weight Loss Versus Weight Loss Maintenance on Sympathetic Nervous System Activity and Metabolic Syndrome Components

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Straznicky, Nora E; Grima, Mariee T; Eikelis, Nina; Nestel, Paul J; Dawood, Tye; Schlaich, Markus P; Chopra, Reena; Masuo, Kazuko; Esler, Murray D; Sari, Carolina I; Lambert, Gavin W; Lambert, Elisabeth A

    2011-01-01

    This study demonstrates divergent effects of successful weight loss maintenance on whole body norepinephrine spillover rate and muscle sympathetic nerve activity in obese metabolic syndrome subjects. Context...

  7. De stille elever

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther-Lindqvist, Ditte Alexandra

    2012-01-01

    Det er blevet en afgørende samværskompetence i uddannelsessystemet at stå aktivt frem og deltage verbalt i skoleklassens liv både fagligt og socialt. Men ikke alle elever deltager lige villigt verbalt i plenum. Artiklen handler om de stille elever og konsekvenserne af stillehed i skolen. Det...... foreslås at skolesystemet sanktionerer ældre elever hårdere for stillehed end yngre elever og det forklares med at skolelivet også er en kultivering henimod elevhed som social identitet og denne er der forventning om at eleverne mestrer i udskolingen....

  8. Neural correlates of fear-induced sympathetic response associated with the peripheral temperature change rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshihara, Kazufumi; Tanabe, Hiroki C; Kawamichi, Hiroaki; Koike, Takahiko; Yamazaki, Mika; Sudo, Nobuyuki; Sadato, Norihiro

    2016-07-01

    Activation of the sympathetic nervous system is essential for coping with environmental stressors such as fearful stimuli. Recent human imaging studies demonstrated that activity in some cortical regions, such as the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and anterior insula cortex (aIC), is related to sympathetic activity. However, little is known about the functional brain connectivity related to sympathetic response to fearful stimuli. The participants were 32 healthy, right-handed volunteers. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used to examine brain activity when watching horror and control movies. Fingertip temperature was taken during the scanning as a measure of sympathetic response. The movies were watched a second time, and the degree of fear (9-point Likert-type scale) was evaluated every three seconds. The brain activity of the ACC, bilateral aIC, and bilateral anterior prefrontal cortex (aPFC) was correlated with the change rate of fingertip temperature, with or without fearful stimuli. Functional connectivity analysis revealed significantly greater positive functional connectivity between the amygdala and the ACC and between the amygdala and the aIC when watching the horror movie than when watching the control movie. Whole-brain psycho-physiological interaction (PPI) analysis revealed that the functional connectivity between the left amygdala and the ACC was modulated according to the fear rating. Our results indicate that the increased functional connectivity between the left amygdala and the ACC represents a sympathetic response to fearful stimuli. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Neonatal testosterone exposure induces early development of follicular cysts followed by sympathetic ovarian hyperinnervation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anesetti, Gabriel; Chávez-Genaro, Rebeca

    2015-05-20

    This study analysed the temporal association between ovarian cyst development induced by neonatal androgenisation and sympathetic innervation. Neonatal rats (postnatal Days 1 to 5) were treated with testosterone or dihydrotestosterone and the effects were evaluated at postnatal Days 20, 40, 90 or 180. Ovulation rate, number of cystic follicles and density of sympathetic fibres were analysed. The effects of surgical denervation or gonadotrophin stimulation were also assessed. Rats exposed to testosterone showed no oestrous cycle activity and did not ovulate, maintaining a polycystic ovarian morphology at all ages studied. Also, a significant increase in ovarian density of noradrenergic fibres was detected at postnatal Days 90 and 180. Sympathectomy was unable to re-establish ovarian activity; however, human chorionic gonadotrophin stimulation was enough to induce ovulation. The impact of dihydrotestosterone on ovarian function was less noticeable, showing the coexistence of corpora lutea and cystic structures without changes in sympathetic innervation. Our findings suggest that a remodelling of ovarian sympathetic innervation occurs as a response to modifications in the pattern of follicular growth induced by testosterone. A role of sympathetic innervation in the maintenance of the polycystic condition is suggested.

  10. Hypothalamic ERK mediates the anorectic and thermogenic sympathetic effects of leptin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmouni, Kamal; Sigmund, Curt D; Haynes, William G; Mark, Allyn L

    2009-03-01

    Leptin is an adipocyte hormone that plays a major role in energy balance. Leptin receptors in the hypothalamus are known to signal via distinct mechanisms, including signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT3) and phosphoinositol-3 kinase (PI 3-kinase). Here, we tested the hypothesis that extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) is mediating leptin action in the hypothalamus. Biochemical, pharmacological, and physiological approaches were combined to characterize leptin activation of ERK in the hypothalamus in rats. Leptin activates ERK1/2 in a receptor-mediated manner that involves JAK2. Leptin-induced ERK1/2 activation was restricted to the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus. Pharmacological blockade of hypothalamic ERK1/2 reverses the anorectic and weight-reducing effects of leptin. The pharmacological antagonists of ERK1/2 did not attenuate leptin-induced activation of STAT3 or PI 3-kinase. Blockade of ERK1/2 abolishes leptin-induced increases in sympathetic nerve traffic to thermogenic brown adipose tissue (BAT) but does not alter the stimulatory effects of leptin on sympathetic nerve activity to kidney, hindlimb, or adrenal gland. In contrast, blockade of PI 3-kinase prevents leptin-induced sympathetic activation to kidney but not to BAT, hindlimb, or adrenal gland. Our findings indicate that hypothalamic ERK plays a key role in the control of food intake, body weight, and thermogenic sympathetic outflow by leptin but does not participate in the cardiovascular and renal sympathetic actions of leptin.

  11. 50 Years of Microneurography: Learning the Language of the Peripheral Sympathetic Nervous System in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoemaker, J Kevin; Badrov, Mark B; Klassen, Stephen A; Fadel, Paul J

    2018-02-07

    As a primary component of homeostasis, the sympathetic nervous system enables rapid adjustments to stress through its ability to communicate messages among organs and cause targeted and graded end organ responses. Key in this communication model is the pattern of neural signals emanating from the central to peripheral components of the sympathetic nervous system. But what is the communication strategy employed in peripheral sympathetic nerve activity (SNA)? Can we develop and interpret the system of coding in SNA that improves our understanding of the neural control of the circulation? In 1968, Hagbarth and Vallbo reported the first use of microneurographic methods to record sympathetic discharges in peripheral nerves of conscious humans, allowing quantification of SNA at rest and sympathetic responsiveness to physiological stressors in health and disease. This technique also has enabled a growing investigation into the coding patterns within, and cardiovascular outcomes associated with, postganglionic SNA. This review outlines how results obtained by microneurographic means have improved our understanding of SNA outflow patterns at the action potential level, focusing on SNA directed towards skeletal muscle (MSNA) in conscious humans.

  12. Identification of human sympathetic neurovascular control using multivariate wavelet decomposition analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleem, Saqib; Teal, Paul D; Kleijn, W Bastiaan; Ainslie, Philip N; Tzeng, Yu-Chieh

    2016-09-01

    The dynamic regulation of cerebral blood flow (CBF) is thought to involve myogenic and chemoreflex mechanisms, but the extent to which the sympathetic nervous system also plays a role remains debated. Here we sought to identify the role of human sympathetic neurovascular control by examining cerebral pressure-flow relations using linear transfer function analysis and multivariate wavelet decomposition analysis that explicitly accounts for the confounding effects of dynamic end-tidal Pco2 (PetCO2 ) fluctuations. In 18 healthy participants randomly assigned to the α1-adrenergic blockade group (n = 9; oral Prazosin, 0.05 mg/kg) or the placebo group (n = 9), we recorded blood pressure, middle cerebral blood flow velocity, and breath-to-breath PetCO2 Analyses showed that the placebo administration did not alter wavelet phase synchronization index (PSI) values, whereas sympathetic blockade increased PSI for frequency components ≤0.03 Hz. Additionally, three-way interaction effects were found for PSI change scores, indicating that the treatment response varied as a function of frequency and whether PSI values were PetCO2 corrected. In contrast, sympathetic blockade did not affect any linear transfer function parameters. These data show that very-low-frequency CBF dynamics have a composite origin involving, not only nonlinear and nonstationary interactions between BP and PetCO2 , but also frequency-dependent interplay with the sympathetic nervous system. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  13. Changes in the Skin Conductance Monitor as an End Point for Sympathetic Nerve Blocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gungor, Semih; Rana, Bhumika; Fields, Kara; Bae, James J; Mount, Lauren; Buschiazzo, Valeria; Storm, Hanne

    2017-11-01

    There is a lack of objective methods for determining the achievement of sympathetic block. This study validates the skin conductance monitor (SCM) as an end point indicator of successful sympathetic blockade as compared with traditional monitors. This interventional study included 13 patients undergoing 25 lumbar sympathetic blocks to compare time to indication of successful blockade between the SCM indices and traditional measures, clinically visible hyperemia, clinically visible engorgement of veins, subjective skin temperature difference, unilateral thermometry monitoring, bilateral comparative thermometry monitoring, and change in waveform amplitude in pulse oximetry plethysmography, within a 30-minute observation period. Differences in the SCM indices were studied pre- and postblock to validate the SCM. SCM showed substantially greater odds of indicating achievement of sympathetic block in the next moment (i.e., hazard rate) compared with all traditional measures (clinically visible hyperemia, clinically visible engorgement of veins, subjective temperature difference, unilateral thermometry monitoring, bilateral comparative thermometry monitoring, and change in waveform amplitude in pulse oximetry plethysmography; P ≤ 0.011). SCM indicated successful block for all (100%) procedures, while the traditional measures failed to indicate successful blocks in 16-84% of procedures. The SCM indices were significantly higher in preblock compared with postblock measurements (P SCM is a more reliable and rapid response indicator of a successful sympathetic blockade when compared with traditional monitors.

  14. Amylin Acts in the Central Nervous System to Increase Sympathetic Nerve Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes-Santos, Caroline; Zhang, Zhongming; Morgan, Donald A.; Guo, Deng-Fu; Russo, Andrew F.

    2013-01-01

    The pancreatic hormone amylin acts in the central nervous system (CNS) to decrease food intake and body weight. We hypothesized that amylin action in the CNS promotes energy expenditure by increasing the activity of the sympathetic nervous system. In mice, ip administration of amylin significantly increased c-Fos immunoreactivity in hypothalamic and brainstem nuclei. In addition, mice treated with intracerebroventricular (icv) amylin (0.1 and 0.2 nmol) exhibited a dose-related decrease in food intake and body weight, measured 4 and 24 hours after treatment. The icv injection of amylin also increased body temperature in mice. Using direct multifiber sympathetic nerve recording, we found that icv amylin elicited a significant and dose-dependent increase in sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) subserving thermogenic brown adipose tissue (BAT). Of note, icv injection of amylin also evoked a significant and dose-related increase in lumbar and renal SNA. Importantly, icv pretreatment with the amylin receptor antagonist AC187 (20 nmol) abolished the BAT SNA response induced by icv amylin, indicating that the sympathetic effects of amylin are receptor-mediated. Conversely, icv amylin-induced BAT SNA response was enhanced in mice overexpressing the amylin receptor subunit, RAMP1 (receptor-activity modifying protein 1), in the CNS. Our data demonstrate that CNS action of amylin regulates sympathetic nerve outflow to peripheral tissues involved in energy balance and cardiovascular function. PMID:23645151

  15. Influence of gender on prognosis of acute coronary syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrerizo-García, José Luis; Pérez-Calvo, Juan I; Zalba-Etayo, Begoña

    2015-01-01

    Ischemic heart disease presents different features in men and women. We analyzed the relation between gender and prognosis in patients who had suffered a high-risk acute coronary syndrome (ACS). This was a prospective analytical cohort study performed at Lozano Blesa University Hospital, Zaragoza, Spain, of 559 patients diagnosed with high-risk ACS with and without ST-segment elevation according to the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines. The sample was divided into two groups by gender and differences in epidemiologic, laboratory, electrocardiographic and echocardiographic variables and treatment were recorded. A Cox's proportional hazard model was applied and 6-month mortality was analyzed as the main variable. The median age was 65.2±12.7 years, and 21.8% were women. Baseline characteristics in women were more unfavorable, with higher GRACE scores, older age, higher prevalence of hypertension, diabetes and heart failure, lower ejection fraction and more renal dysfunction at admission. Women suffered more adverse cardiovascular events (27.9% vs. 15.8%, p=0.002). Sixty-four patients died, 18.9% of the women vs. 9.4% of the men (p=0.004). After multivariate analysis, female gender did not present an independent relation with mortality. Hemoglobin level, renal function, ejection fraction and Killip class >1 presented significant differences. Acute syndrome coronary in women has a worse prognosis than in men. Their adverse course is due to their baseline characteristics and not to their gender. Copyright © 2012 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  16. Endometrial cancer, types, prognosis, female hormones and antihormones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulrich, L S G

    2011-01-01

    . Prognosis is also dependent on tumor differentiation and stage, and treatment should be adjusted accordingly. In this paper, the different types of endometrial cancer, staging, prognosis, diagnosis, prevention, treatment and their relationship to estrogen and other female hormones are reviewed....

  17. Undervisning af tosprogede elever

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horst, Christian

    2003-01-01

    Artiklen fremdrager hovedresultaterne fra Virginia P. Collier's og Wayne P. Thomas's længdeundersøgelser af tosprogede elever i USA, som formentlig er de mest omfattende undersøgelser af undervisningen af tosprogede elever overhovedet. Resultaterne diskuteres i relation til udviklingen af en...

  18. Elevated cholesterol levels have a poor prognosis in a cholestasis scenario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuño-Lámbarri, Natalia; Barbero-Becerra, Varenka J; Uribe, Misael; Chávez-Tapia, Norberto C

    2017-01-01

    Cholestasis results from defective bile flow through the biliary ducts leading to the accumulation of bile acids (BAs) in hepatocytes and serum. It has been seen that cholestasis is associated with hypercholesterolemia, which is a prerequisite for gallstone formation and primary biliary cirrhosis, being some of the most common gastrointestinal disorders in Western societies. Cytotoxic BAs induce proinflammatory mediators, oxidative stress, and apoptosis in hepatocytes, whereas cytoprotective BAs prevent them; they can also modify the plasmatic membrane structure of cells or mitochondrial outer membrane properties as well as the distribution of cholesterol, altering various proteins involved in BAs homeostasis. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. NUCKS nuclear elevated expression indicates progression and prognosis of ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Ce; Qin, Ling; Gao, Hongyu; Gu, Lina; Yang, Chang; Liu, Hebing; Liu, Tianbo

    2017-09-01

    NUCKS (nuclear, casein kinase, and cyclin-dependent kinase substrate) is implicated in the tumorigenesis of several human malignancies, but its role in ovarian cancer remains unknown. We aim to investigate NUCKS expression and its clinical significance in ovarian cancer. The messenger RNA expression of NUCKS was determined in normal and malignant ovarian tissues using quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay. Immunohistochemistry was applied to detect the status of NUCKS protein expression in 121 ovarian cancer tissues. NUCKS protein high expression was detected in 52 (43.0%) of 121 patients. NUCKS messenger RNA expression was gradually upregulated in non-metastatic ovarian cancers ( n = 20), metastatic ovarian cancers ( n = 20), and its matched metastatic lesions ( n = 20) in comparison with that in normal ovarian tissues ( n = 10; p ovarian cancer was associated significantly with the Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage ( p = 0.037), histological grade ( p = 0.003), residual disease ( p = 0.013), lymph node metastasis ( p = 0.002), response to chemotherapy ( p ovarian cancer with p values of ovarian cancer especially in advanced ovarian cancer.

  20. Impact of aging on cardiac sympathetic innervation measured by {sup 123}I-mIBG imaging in patients with systolic heart failure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rengo, Giuseppe; Ferrara, Nicola [Scientific Institute of Telese Terme, Salvatore Maugeri Foundation, IRCCS, Telese Terme (Italy); University of Naples Federico II, Division of Geriatrics, Department of Translational Medical Sciences, Naples (Italy); Pagano, Gennaro; Formisano, Roberto; Komici, Klara; Petraglia, Laura; Parisi, Valentina; Femminella, Grazia Daniela; De Lucia, Claudio; Cannavo, Alessandro; Memmi, Alessia; Leosco, Dario [University of Naples Federico II, Division of Geriatrics, Department of Translational Medical Sciences, Naples (Italy); Vitale, Dino Franco [Scientific Institute of Telese Terme, Salvatore Maugeri Foundation, IRCCS, Telese Terme (Italy); Paolillo, Stefania [Institute of Diagnostic and Nuclear Development, SDN Foundation, Naples (Italy); Attena, Emilio [Fatebenefratelli Hospital, Department of Cardiology, Naples (Italy); Pellegrino, Teresa [Institute of Biostructures and Bioimages of the National Council of Research, Naples (Italy); Federico II University of Naples, Division of Imaging, Radiotherapy, Neuroradiology, and Medical Physics, Department of Advanced Biomedical Sciences, Naples (Italy); Dellegrottaglie, Santo [Ospedale Medico-Chirurgico Accreditato Villa dei Fiori, Division of Cardiology, Acerra, Naples (Italy); Trimarco, Bruno; Filardi, Pasquale Perrone [Federico II University of Naples, Division of Cardiology, Department of Advanced Biomedical Sciences, Naples (Italy); Cuocolo, Alberto [Institute of Diagnostic and Nuclear Development, SDN Foundation, Naples (Italy); Federico II University of Naples, Division of Imaging, Radiotherapy, Neuroradiology, and Medical Physics, Department of Advanced Biomedical Sciences, Naples (Italy)

    2016-12-15

    Sympathetic nervous system (SNS) hyperactivity is a salient characteristic of chronic heart failure (HF) and contributes to the progression of the disease. Iodine-123 meta-iodobenzylguanidine ({sup 123}I-mIBG) imaging has been successfully used to assess cardiac SNS activity in HF patients and to predict prognosis. Importantly, SNS hyperactivity characterizes also physiological ageing, and there is conflicting evidence on cardiac {sup 123}I-mIBG uptake in healthy elderly subjects compared to adults. However, little data are available on the impact of ageing on cardiac sympathetic nerve activity assessed by {sup 123}I-mIBG scintigraphy, in patients with HF. We studied 180 HF patients (age = 66.1 ± 10.5 years [yrs]), left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF = 30.6 ± 6.3 %) undergoing cardiac {sup 123}I-mIBG imaging. Early and late heart to mediastinum (H/M) ratios and washout rate were calculated in all patients. Demographic, clinical, and echocardiographic data were also collected. Our study population consisted of 53 patients aged >75 years (age = 77.7 ± 4.0 year), 67 patients aged 62-72 years (age = 67.9 ± 3.2 years) and 60 patients aged ≤61 year (age = 53.9 ± 5.6 years). In elderly patients, both early and late H/M ratios were significantly lower compared to younger patients (p < 0.05). By multivariate analysis, H/M ratios (both early and late) and washout rate were significantly correlated with LVEF and age. Our data indicate that, in a population of HF patients, there is an independent age-related effect on cardiac SNS innervation assessed by {sup 123}I-mIBG imaging. This finding suggests that cardiac {sup 123}I-mIBG uptake in patients with HF might be affected by patient age. (orig.)

  1. Vital prognosis after hospitalization for COPD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestbo, J; Prescott, E; Lange, P

    1998-01-01

    STUDY AIM: To examine survival after admission due to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in a population sample over a time span of 15 years. DESIGN: Linkage between a prospective population cohort and register information on hospitalization and mortality. SETTING: The Copenhagen City...... Heart Study (CCHS). PARTICIPANTS: A total of 267 men and 220 women who had participated in the CCHS and who were hospitalized with a discharge diagnosis of COPD (ICD-8 491-2). MAIN RESULTS: The crude 5-yr survival rate after a COPD admission was 45% (37% for men and 52% for women). Mortality risk...... associated with prognosis. Survival after admission due to COPD did not change significantly over time. CONCLUSION: Compared to previous studies of COPD patients, the present study indicates that prognosis after hospital admission remains virtually unchanged over the last decades. FEV1 is still the strongest...

  2. [Sympathetic ophthalmia in a case of neurilemmoma of the ciliary body].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignat, F; Simionescu, C

    1993-01-01

    The paper presents the case of a 62-year-old male patient, which has been hospitalized with the symptomatology of a acute glaucoma through intumescent lens. After the lens extraction, the globe evolution was to atrophy with chronic irrigation, starting a hypertensive cyclitis at the other eye, assumed to be a sympathetic ophthalmia. After several acute evolutive episodes at both eyes, the enucleation of the primal eye was made and a ciliary body tumour (neurinoma) was discovered. After enucleation under general and local cortisone treatment, the inflammatory phenomena at the sympathetic eye were entering in remission; but the hypertony, which was considered to be an open-angle pre-existent glaucoma, was persistent. The paper also discusses the sympathetic ophthalmia producing mechanism the characteristics of the ciliary body tumour and the diagnosis problems raised by this case.

  3. Retrogradely Transported TrkA Endosomes Signal Locally within Dendrites to Maintain Sympathetic Neuron Synapses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn M. Lehigh

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Sympathetic neurons require NGF from their target fields for survival, axonal target innervation, dendritic growth and formation, and maintenance of synaptic inputs from preganglionic neurons. Target-derived NGF signals are propagated retrogradely, from distal axons to somata of sympathetic neurons via TrkA signaling endosomes. We report that a subset of TrkA endosomes that are transported from distal axons to cell bodies translocate into dendrites, where they are signaling competent and move bidirectionally, in close proximity to synaptic protein clusters. Using a strategy for spatially confined inhibition of TrkA kinase activity, we found that distal-axon-derived TrkA signaling endosomes are necessary within sympathetic neuron dendrites for maintenance of synapses. Thus, TrkA signaling endosomes have unique functions in different cellular compartments. Moreover, target-derived NGF mediates circuit formation and synapse maintenance through TrkA endosome signaling within dendrites to promote aggregation of postsynaptic protein complexes.

  4. Effects of lumbar sympathetic ganglion block for a patient with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitoh, Takeshi; Kobayashi, Koichi; Ina, Hiroaki; Ofusa, Yukihiro; Otagiri, Tetsutaro; Tanaka, Satoshi; Ono, Koichi

    2006-01-01

    A 59-year-old man with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) received lumbar epidural and sympathetic ganglion blocks to increase regional blood flow and improve his clinical symptoms. After a lumbar epidural block (0.5% mepivacaine), the skin temperature of his affected lower extremities rose by 7.0 degrees C and became close to that of the intact side, and the distance he was able to walk with his cane increased from 2 to 8 m. The clinical effects produced by the lumbar sympathetic ganglion block (99.5% alcohol) were sustained for approximately 8 weeks after the first block and for approximately 6 weeks after the second block. There were no particular adverse effects or complications associated with these nerve block procedures. Epidural and sympathetic ganglion blocks for an ALS patient, albeit their effects are of a transient nature, may improve related clinical symptoms, and were thought to play a contributory role in improving our patient's quality of life.

  5. Success probability of atom-molecule sympathetic cooling: A statistical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Masato; Krems, Roman; Tscherbul, Timur

    2017-04-01

    Sympathetic cooling with ultracold atoms is a promising route toward creating colder and denser ensembles of polar molecules at temperatures below 1 mK. Rigorous quantum scattering calculations can be carried out to identify atom-molecule collision systems with suitable collisional properties for sympathetic cooling experiments. The accuracy of such calculations is limited by the uncertainties of the underlying ab initio interaction potentials. To overcome these limitations, we introduce a statistical approach based on cumulative probability distributions for the ratio of elastic-to-inelastic collision cross sections, from which the success probability of atom-molecule sympathetic cooling can be estimated. Our analysis shows that, for a range of experimentally relevant collision systems, the cumulative probabilities are not sensitive to the number of rotational states in the basis set, potentially leading to a dramatic reduction of the computational cost of simulating cold molecular collisions in external fields.

  6. Sympathetic neural control of indoleamine metabolism in the rat pineal gland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, H. J.; Hsuan, M.; Wurtman, R. J.

    1975-01-01

    The mechanisms responsible for the acceleration in rat pineal biosynthetic activity in response to prolonged exposure to darkness or to immobilization were investigated in animals whose pineals were surgically denervated. Some animals were adrenalectomized to remove one potential source of circulating catecholamines, and some were subjected to a partial chemical sympathectomy accomplished by a series of intravenous injections of 6-hydroxydopamine. Results suggest that N-acetyltransferase (NAT) activity can be enhanced either by release of norepinephrine from sympathetic terminals within the pineal or from sympathetic nerve terminals elsewhere. The stress of immobilization stimulates the pineal by increasing circulating catecholamines. Photic control of pineal function requires intact pineal sympathetic innervation, since the onset of darkness apparently does not cause a sufficient rise in circulating catecholamines to stimulate the pineal. The present studies suggest that nonspecific stress triggers increased biosynthesis and secretion of melatonin; it is possible that this hormone may participate in mechanisms of adaptation.

  7. Pacemaker current inhibition in experimental human cardiac sympathetic activation: a double-blind, randomized, crossover study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, C; Heusser, K; Zoerner, A A; Großhennig, A; Wenzel, D; May, M; Sweep, F C G J; Mehling, H; Luft, F C; Tank, J; Jordan, J

    2014-06-01

    Hyperpolarization-activated, cyclic nucleotide-gated 4 (HCN4) channels comprise the final pathway for autonomic heart rate (HR) regulation. We hypothesized that HCN4 inhibition could reverse autonomic imbalance in a human model of cardiac sympathetic activation. Nineteen healthy men ingested oral metoprolol+reboxetine, ivabradine+reboxetine, or placebo+reboxetine in a double-blind, randomized, crossover fashion. We assessed HR, blood pressure (BP), stroke volume, and cardiac output during rest and profound orthostatic stress. HR variability, BP variability, and baroreflex sensitivity were analyzed. Metoprolol, but not ivabradine, decreased resting HR and BP. Ivabradine attenuated the HR increase to orthostatic stress, albeit to a lesser extent than metoprolol. Stroke volume and cardiac output at a given HR were significantly lower with metoprolol. Unlike metoprolol, ivabradine did not affect HR variability, BP variability, or baroreflex sensitivity. Ivabradine attenuates sympathetic influences on HR at the sinus node level, leaving myocardial sympathetic activation unopposed. Reversal of parasympathetic dysfunction by ivabradine appears limited.

  8. Fetal rat sympathetic neurons maintained in a serum-free medium retain induced cholinergic characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, D; Iacovitti, L; Burton, H

    1984-05-01

    When maintained in some serum-containing media, fetal rat sympathetic neurons acquire substantial choline acetyltransferase activity and form cholinergic synapses in vitro. However, when they are maintained in a serum-free, defined culture medium, choline acetyltransferase activity is not detected and cholinergic synapses are not observed. In this study, we have examined the effects of various times of exposure to a medium inducing cholinergic function on the properties of neurons subsequently maintained in defined medium. We report that 2-day, but not 2-h, exposure to this inducing medium causes a long-lasting (greater than 6 weeks) increase (7-10-fold) in the activity of choline acetyltransferase and that, under these conditions, sympathetic neurons in vitro form cholinergic, electrical and mixed function cholinergic and electrical synapses. We conclude that a relatively brief exposure to media inducing cholinergic function can cause long-lasting changes in the functional properties of sympathetic neurons in vitro.

  9. Melanoma prognosis in Europe: far from equal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsea, A M; Del Marmol, V; Stratigos, A; Geller, A C

    2014-07-01

    Comprehensive, population-based analysis of melanoma survival throughout Europe is hindered by the uneven coverage and quality of European cancer registries, and by logistical and financial shortcomings. Mortality-to-incidence ratios (MIRs) have been used as a proxy for estimating survival for multiple cancers and to model melanoma prognosis, higher MIR values reflecting poorer prognosis. Updated and improved pan-European estimates of mortality and incidence rates for melanoma have become available through the International Agency for Research of Cancer project Globocan 2008, showing marked differences among European countries. To analyse MIRs for melanoma across Europe and their relationship with national health expenditures, aiming to identify countries and regions with disproportionately poor prognosis. Estimated age-standardized rates of melanoma incidence and mortality provided by Globocan 2008 were used to calculate the MIR for each European country and region. Total health expenditures per capita in European countries for 2008 were provided by the World Health Organization/Global Health Observatory. The potential correlation between MIR and total health expenditure per capita was analysed through Pearson's correlation. Mortality-to-incidence ratios for melanoma ranged between 0·09 in Switzerland and 0·44 in Latvia. The regional average MIR was the highest in Central and Eastern Europe at 0·35; the lowest was in Western Europe, at 0·13. We found a strong inverse correlation between the individual nation's total health expenditure per capita and the calculated melanoma MIR (r = -0·76, P < 0·05). While further improvement of melanoma registration is necessary, our findings reveal sharp disparities in the prognosis of melanoma across the Continent, correlated with significant differences in health care expenditures. © 2014 British Association of Dermatologists.

  10. Single-unit muscle sympathetic nervous activity and its relation to cardiac noradrenaline spillover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Elisabeth A; Schlaich, Markus P; Dawood, Tye; Sari, Carolina; Chopra, Reena; Barton, David A; Kaye, David M; Elam, Mikael; Esler, Murray D; Lambert, Gavin W

    2011-05-15

    Recent work using single-unit sympathetic nerve recording techniques has demonstrated aberrations in the firing pattern of sympathetic nerves in a variety of patient groups. We sought to examine whether nerve firing pattern is associated with increased noradrenaline release. Using single-unit muscle sympathetic nerve recording techniques coupled with direct cardiac catheterisation and noradrenaline isotope dilution methodology we examined the relationship between single-unit firing patterns and cardiac and whole body noradrenaline spillover to plasma. Participants comprised patients with hypertension (n=6), depression (n=7) and panic disorder (n =9) who were drawn from our ongoing studies. The patient groups examined did not differ in their single-unit muscle sympathetic nerve firing characteristics nor in the rate of spillover of noradrenaline to plasma from the heart. The median incidence of multiple spikes per beat was 9%. Patients were stratified according to the firing pattern: low level of incidence (less than 9% incidence of multiple spikes per beat) and high level of incidence (greater than 9% incidence of multiple spikes per beat). High incidence of multiple spikes within a cardiac cycle was associated with higher firing rates (P noradrenaline spillover to plasma and (multi-unit) muscle sympathetic nerve activity in subjects with low incidence of multiple spikes was not different to that of those with high incidence of multiple spikes. In those with high incidence of multiple spikes there occurred a parallel activation of the sympathetic outflow to the heart, with cardiac noradrenaline spillover to plasma being two times that of subjects with low nerve firing rates (11.0 ± 1.5 vs. 22.0 ± 4.5 ng min⁻¹, P noradrenaline spillover.

  11. Sympathetic nerve-derived ATP regulates renal medullary blood flow via vasa recta pericytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott S Wildman

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Pericyte cells are now known to be a novel locus of blood flow control, being able to regulate capillary diameter via their unique morphology and expression of contractile proteins. We have previously shown that exogenous ATP causes constriction of vasa recta via renal pericytes, acting at a variety of membrane bound P2 receptors on descending vasa recta, and therefore may be able to regulate medullary blood flow (MBF. Regulation of MBF is essential for appropriate urine concentration and providing essential oxygen and nutrients to this region of high, and variable, metabolic demand. Various sources of endogenous ATP have been proposed, including from epithelial, endothelial and red blood cells in response to stimuli such as mechanical stimulation, local acidosis, hypoxia, and exposure to various hormones. Extensive sympathetic innervation of the nephron has previously been shown, however the innervation reported has focused around the proximal and distal tubules, and ascending loop of Henle. We hypothesise that sympathetic nerves are an additional source of ATP acting at renal pericytes and therefore regulate MBF. Using a rat live kidney slice model in combination with video imaging and confocal microscopy techniques we firstly show sympathetic nerves in close proximity to vasa recta pericytes in both the outer and inner medulla. Secondly, we demonstrate pharmacological stimulation of sympathetic nerves in situ (by tyramine evokes pericyte-mediated vasoconstriction of vasa recta capillaries; inhibited by the application of the P2 receptor antagonist suramin. Lastly, tyramine-evoked vasoconstriction of vasa recta by pericytes is significantly less than ATP-evoked vasoconstriction. Sympathetic innervation may provide an additional level of functional regulation in the renal medulla that is highly localized. It now needs to be determined under which physiological/pathophysiological circumstances that sympathetic innervation of renal pericytes is

  12. Role of the sympathetic nervous system in carbon tetrachloride-induced hepatotoxicity and systemic inflammation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung-Chun Lin

    Full Text Available Carbon tetrachloride (CCl4 is widely used as an animal model of hepatotoxicity and the mechanisms have been arduously studied, however, the contribution of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS in CCl4-induced acute hepatotoxicity remains controversial. It is also known that either CCl4 or SNS can affect systemic inflammatory responses. The aim of this study was to establish the effect of chemical sympathectomy with 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA in a mouse model of CCl4-induced acute hepatotoxicity and systemic inflammatory response. Mice exposed to CCl4 or vehicle were pretreated with 6-OHDA or saline. The serum levels of aminotransferases and alkaline phosphatase in the CCl4-poisoning mice with sympathetic denervation were significantly lower than those without sympathetic denervation. With sympathetic denervation, hepatocellular necrosis and fat infiltration induced by CCl4 were greatly decreased. Sympathetic denervation significantly attenuated CCl4-induced lipid peroxidation in liver and serum. Acute CCl4 intoxication showed increased expression of inflammatory cytokines/chemokines [eotaxin-2/CCL24, Fas ligand, interleukin (IL-1α, IL-6, IL-12p40p70, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1/CCL2, and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α], as well as decreased expression of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and keratinocyte-derived chemokine. The overexpressed levels of IL-1α, IL-6, IL-12p40p70, MCP-1/CCL2, and TNF-α were attenuated by sympathetic denervation. Pretreatment with dexamethasone significantly reduced CCl4-induced hepatic injury. Collectively, this study demonstrates that the SNS plays an important role in CCl4-induced acute hepatotoxicity and systemic inflammation and the effect may be connected with chemical- or drug-induced hepatotoxicity and circulating immune response.

  13. Use of iodine-123 metaiodobenzylguanidine scintigraphy to assess cardiac sympathetic denervation and the impact of hypertension in patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamura, Koji; Nakatani, Yuko; Onishi, Satoshi [Dept. of Internal Medicine, Keihanna Hospital, Hirakata City, Osaka (Japan); Utsunomiya, Keita; Saika, Yoshinori [Dept. of Radiology, Keihanna Hospital, Hirakata City (Japan); Iwasaka, Toshiji [Cardiovascular Center, Kansai Medical University, Osaka (Japan)

    1999-10-01

    The objectives of this clinical study using iodine-123 metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) scintigraphy were (a) to evaluate cardiac sympathetic denervation in non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) patients with and without hypertension and (b) to investigate the relation between cardiac sympathetic denervation and prognosis in NIDDM patients. We compared clinical characteristics and MIBG data [heart to mediastinum (H/M) ratio and % washout rate (WR)] in a control group and NIDDM patients with and without hypertension. MIBG scintigraphy was performed in 11 controls and 82 NIDDM patients without overt cardiovascular disease except for hypertension (systolic blood pressure {>=}140 and/or diastolic blood pressure {>=}90 mmHg). After MIBG examination, blood pressure was measured regularly in all NIDDM patients. There were significant differences between 65 normotensive and 17 hypertensive NIDDM patients with respect to age (55{+-}11 vs 63{+-}12 years, respectively, P<0.05), prevalence of diabetic retinopathy (12% vs 35%, respectively, P<0.05) and systolic blood pressure (120{+-}12 vs 145{+-}16 mmHg, respectively, P<0.001). The H/M ratio in hypertensive NIDDM patients was significantly lower than in the control group (1.81{+-}0.29 vs 2.27{+-}0.20, respectively, P<0.01). During the follow-up period (18{+-} 12 months), 17 NIDDM patients newly developed hypertension after MIBG examination. There were no significant differences in their clinical characteristics compared with persistently normotensive or hypertensive NIDDM patients. %WR in patients with new onset hypertension was significantly higher than in the control group (30.88%{+-}16.87% vs 12.89%{+-}11.94%, respectively, P<0.05). Moreover, in these patients %WR correlated with duration from the date of MIBG scintigraphy to the onset of hypertension (r=-0.512, P<0.05). Five NIDDM patients died during the follow-up period (four newly hypertensive patients and one normotensive patient). There were significant

  14. How a Simple Ankle Sprain Turned Into Neuropathic Pain: Complex Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy Versus Erythromelalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lurati, Ann Regina

    2017-11-01

    A 36-year-old woman sustained a Grade 2 ankle sprain at work. Two days after the injury, the ankle and foot became red and she complained of "intense burning pain." First diagnosed with complex reflex sympathetic dystrophy, the employee was prescribed medications that provided some pain relief; a subsequent temporary nerve block provided additional relief. However, the symptoms returned and she was treated unsuccessfully with surgical sympathectomy. The employee was referred to a neurologist and diagnosed with primary erythromelalgia, a rare pain disorder that can be mistaken as complex reflex sympathetic dystrophy.

  15. Menstrual cycle phase does not affect sympathetic neural activity in women with postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stickford, Abigail S L; VanGundy, Tiffany B; Levine, Benjamin D; Fu, Qi

    2015-05-01

    Women with the postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS) report fluctuations in orthostatic tolerance throughout the menstrual cycle. The mechanism(s) underlying blood pressure control across the menstrual cycle in women with POTS are unknown. The findings of the present study indicate that the menstrual cycle does not affect muscle sympathetic nerve activity but modulates blood pressure and vasoconstriction in POTS women during orthostatic stress. Factors other than sympathetic neural activity are likely responsible for the symptoms of orthostatic intolerance across the menstrual cycle in women with POTS. Patients with the postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS) are primarily premenopausal women, which may be attributed to female sex hormones. We tested the hypothesis that hormonal fluctuations of the menstrual cycle alter sympathetic neural activity and orthostatic tolerance in POTS women. Ten POTS women were studied during the early follicular (EF) and mid-luteal (ML) phases of the menstrual cycle. Haemodynamics and muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) were measured when supine, during 60 deg upright tilt for 45 min or until presyncope, and during the cold pressor test (CPT) and Valsalva manoeuvres. Blood pressure and total peripheral resistance were higher during rest and tilting in the ML than EF phase; however, heart rate, stroke volume and cardiac output were similar between phases. There were no mean ± SD differences in MSNA burst frequency (8 ± 8 EF phase vs. 10 ± 10 bursts min(-1) ML phase at rest; 34 ± 15 EF phase vs. 36 ± 16 bursts min(-1) ML phase at 5 min tilt), burst incidence or total activity, nor any differences in the cardiovagal and sympathetic baroreflex sensitivities between phases under any condition. The incidence of presyncope was also the same between phases. There were no differences in haemodynamic or sympathetic responses to CPT or Valsalva. These results suggest that the menstrual cycle does

  16. Serotonin nerve terminals in the dorsomedial medulla facilitate sympathetic and ventilatory responses to hemorrhage and peripheral chemoreflex activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kung, Ling-Hsuan; Scrogin, Karie E

    2011-11-01

    Serotonin neurons of the caudal raphe facilitate ventilatory and sympathetic responses that develop following blood loss in conscious rats. Here, we tested whether serotonin projections to the caudal portion of the dorsomedial brain stem (including regions of the nucleus tractus solitarius that receive cardiovascular and chemosensory afferents) contribute to cardiorespiratory compensation following hemorrhage. Injections of the serotonin neurotoxin 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine produced >90% depletion of serotonin nerve terminals in the region of injection. Withdrawal of ∼21% of blood volume over 10 min produced a characteristic three-phase response that included 1) a normotensive compensatory phase, 2) rapid sympathetic withdrawal and hypotension, and 3) rapid blood pressure recovery accompanied by slower recovery of heart rate and sympathetic activity. A gradual tachypnea developed throughout hemorrhage, which quickly reversed with the advent of sympathetic withdrawal. Subsequently, breathing frequency and neural minute volume (determined by diaphragmatic electromyography) declined below baseline following termination of hemorrhage but gradually recovered over time. Lesioned rats showed attenuated sympathetic and ventilatory responses during early compensation and later recovery from hemorrhage. Both ventilatory and sympathetic responses to chemoreceptor activation with potassium cyanide injection were attenuated by the lesion. In contrast, the gain of sympathetic and heart rate baroreflex responses was greater, and low-frequency oscillations in blood pressure were reduced after lesion. Together, the data are consistent with the view that serotonin innervation of the caudal dorsomedial brain stem contributes to sympathetic compensation during hypovolemia, possibly through facilitation of peripheral chemoreflex responses.

  17. Control of pineal indole biosynthesis by changes in sympathetic tone caused by factors other than environmental lighting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, H. J.; Eng, J. P.; Wurtman, R. J.

    1973-01-01

    Description of experimental investigations showing that, in addition to environmental lighting, other manipulations known to modify sympathetic tone can also modify pineal indole biosynthesis. Comparable alterations in sympathetic tone that occur in response to activity or feeding cycles may be instrumental in generating the pineal rhythms that persist in the absence of light-dark cycle.

  18. Catheter-Based Renal Nerve Ablation and Centrally Generated Sympathetic Activity in Difficult-to-Control Hypertensive Patients: Prospective Case Series

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brinkmann, J.; Heusser, K.; Schmidt, B.M.; Menne, J.; Klein, G.; Bauersachs, J.; Haller, H.; Sweep, F.C.; Diedrich, A.; Jordan, J.; Tank, J.

    2012-01-01

    Endovascular renal nerve ablation has been developed to treat resistant hypertension. In addition to lowering efferent renal sympathetic activation, the intervention may attenuate central sympathetic outflow through decreased renal afferent nerve traffic, as evidenced by a recent case report. We

  19. Investigation of Dose-Related Effects of Carnosine on Anxiety with Sympathetic Skin Response and T-maze

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazan Dolu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Carnosine is a dipeptide formed of the amino acids β-alanine and histidine. Only a limited number of studies have examined the effects of carnosine on sympathetic nerve activation and anxiety. The present study was undertaken to determine the dose-related effects of carnosine on anxiety in the elevated T-maze test (ETM with electrodermal activity (EDA. Carnosine was injected in three groups of rats with doses of 10 (low dose, 100 (medium dose and 1000 (high dose mg/kg i.p. Physiological saline was injected in the sham group. The anxiety scores of the rats were measured with ETM 20 minutes after injection. Then, SCL was measured. The decreased number of entries into the open arm (NEOA, the percentage of time spent in the open arm (% TSOA and higher EDA [shown by skin conductance level (SCL] indicate higher anxiety. The NEOA and % TSOA were lower in the high-dose group than in the other groups. SCL was lower in the medium-dose carnosine group than in the high-dose carnosine and sham groups. SCL was higher in the high-dose group than in the medium-dose and sham groups. Our results suggest that high-dose carnosine produced anxiety-like effects as assessed in the SCL and ETM. Medium-dose carnosine acted as an anxiolytic. The anxiety-related responses of carnosine depend on its dose-related effect.

  20. Enlarged superior cervical sympathetic ganglion mimicking a metastatic lymph node in the retropharyngeal space: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae Min; Kim, Jin Na; Kim, Se Hoon; Choi, Eun Chang [Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    The superior cervical sympathetic ganglion, the largest and most cranial of the three cervical sympathetic ganglia, transfers sympathetic signals to specific targets on the head and neck. This ganglion is located just lateral to the retropharyngeal space along the medial margin of the carotid sheath. Located thus, an enlarged superior cervical sympathetic ganglion can mimic a metastatic lymph node in the retropharyngeal space of the suprahyoid neck in head and neck cancer patients. However, this is often disregarded by radiologists due to lack of interest in its anatomic location. We present a case of an enlarged superior cervical sympathetic ganglion mimicking a retropharyngeal metastatic lymph node in a 42-year-old man with oral tongue cancer.

  1. Persistently elevated alkaline phosphatase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Jitin; Gorard, David A

    2012-08-24

    A 32-year-old overweight asymptomatic man was found to have a persistently raised serum alkaline phosphatase at 250-300 U/l (normal range liver function tests were unremarkable apart from an initial marginally elevated alanine transaminase, which normalised with weight reduction. Abdominal imaging revealed a fatty liver but an extensive serological search for significant hepatobiliary disease was negative. Subsequent isoenzyme electrophoresis revealed normal liver and bone fractions of alkaline phosphatase but a grossly elevated intestinal fraction. Elevated intestinal fraction of alkaline phosphatase should be considered in the investigation of unexplained alkaline phosphatase, particularly when the usual associated hepatobiliary and bony pathologies are not present. Although an elevated intestinal fraction of alkaline phosphatase can be linked to significant gastrointestinal pathology, this case report highlights that it can be a benign biochemical finding.

  2. AB308. SPR-35 Sympathetic reinnervation of the urinary bladder using somatic donor nerves in a canine model of lower motoneuron lesioned bladder

    OpenAIRE

    Barbe, Mary F.; Gomez-Amaya, Sandra; Lewis, Jennifer K.; Dachert, Stephen R.; Wood, Matthew W.; Braverman, Alan S.; Ruggieri, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Preganglionic sympathetic axons to pelvic viscera originate from lumbar preganglionic neurons and contribute to sympathetic chain ganglia and lumbar splanchnic nerves to the inferior mesenteric ganglia (many via the hypogastric nerve). Postganglionic sympathetic axons to the urinary bladder originate mostly from L7?S2 sympathetic chain ganglia and inferior mesenteric ganglion. We tested if after bladder decentralization and transfer of a lumbar originating nerve, postganglionic symp...

  3. Indsatser for tosprogede elever

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Dines; Jakobsen, Vibeke; Jensen, Vibeke Myrup

    Fagligt set klarer tosprogede elever sig dårligere i skolen og det videre uddannelsessystem end ’danske’ elever. Kommuner og folkeskoler har derfor sat en række tiltag i værk, som sigter mod at forbedre de tosprogede elevers skole- og uddannelsessituation. Rapporten kortlægger og analyserer...... af klasseundervisningen. Analysen viser, at de elever, der bliver taget ud af klassen for at få ekstra undervisning i dansk som andetsprog, klarer sig dårligere end elever, der modtager ekstraundervisningen i klassen eller uden for skoletid. Undersøgelsen er baseret på spørgeskemaundersøgelser blandt...... kommunale forvaltningschefer, skoleledere, lærere og forældre til børn i 2. klasse samt lærere til og elever i 9. klasse, SFI’s forløbsundersøgelse af årgang 1995 og registerdata. Undersøgelsen er via Ministeriet for Børn og Undervisning betalt med midler fra satspuljeaftalen 2009 om integration....

  4. Clinical features, management, and prognosis of spontaneous coronary artery dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tweet, Marysia S; Hayes, Sharonne N; Pitta, Sridevi R; Simari, Robert D; Lerman, Amir; Lennon, Ryan J; Gersh, Bernard J; Khambatta, Sherezade; Best, Patricia J M; Rihal, Charanjit S; Gulati, Rajiv

    2012-07-31

    Spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD) is an acute coronary event of uncertain origin. Clinical features and prognosis remain insufficiently characterized. A retrospective single-center cohort study identified 87 patients with angiographically confirmed SCAD. Incidence, clinical characteristics, treatment modalities, in-hospital outcomes, and long-term risk of SCAD recurrence or major adverse cardiac events were evaluated. Mean age was 42.6 years; 82% were female. Extreme exertion at SCAD onset was more frequent in men (7 of 16 versus 2 of 71; P<0.001), and postpartum status was observed in 13 of 71 women (18%). Presentation was ST-elevation myocardial infarction in 49%. Multivessel SCAD was found in 23%. Initial conservative management (31 of 87) and coronary artery bypass grafting (7 of 87) were associated with an uncomplicated in-hospital course, whereas percutaneous coronary intervention was complicated by technical failure in 15 of 43 patients (35%) and 1 death. During a median follow-up of 47 months (interquartile range, 18-106 months), SCAD recurred in 15 patients, all female. Estimated 10-year rate of major adverse cardiac events (death, heart failure, myocardial infarction, and SCAD recurrence) was 47%. Fibromuscular dysplasia of the iliac artery was identified incidentally in 8 of 16 femoral angiograms (50%) undertaken before closure device placement and in the carotid arteries of 2 others with carotid dissection. SCAD affects a young, predominantly female population, frequently presenting as ST-elevation myocardial infarction. Although in-hospital mortality is low regardless of initial treatment, percutaneous coronary intervention is associated with high rates of complication. Risks of SCAD recurrence and major adverse cardiac events in the long term emphasize the need for close follow-up. Fibromuscular dysplasia is a novel association and potentially causative factor.

  5. ACUTE CORONARY SINDROMES SECOND PART: PROGNOSIS, TREATMENTAND SECONDARY PREVENTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stevan Ilić

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available The prognosis of patients with acute coronary syndromes is directly depends on risk, so it is necessary for the risk stratification to be carried out both at the admittance and during the treatment phase, as well as after the dismissal from hospital. There are many variables that influence the risk, being categorized as either high or low. It is important to emphasise that low risk doesn’t mean that there is no risk at all. The sort of therapic approach that would be applied depends on electrocardiogramic presentation of acute isochemical syndrome. If the patient with persistant elevation of ST segments is in question, then the first step is aimed at achieving reperfusion by the trombolitical therapy application or primary percutanae coronary intervention. Trombolisis is not applied in case of a patient who doesn’t have a persistant ST elevation, but expresses ST segments depression, change of T waves or has a normal electrocardiograme (acute coronary syndrome without persistant ST evaluation. If there is a high risk, the inhibitors of receptors Gp llb/lla and higher coronary angiography are applied. However, if there is a low risk, troponines are determined again. If troponines are positive, the procedure is the same as in patient with high risk; if troponines are negative two times, further procedure depens on the stress test results. A long-term treatment of patients with acute coronary syndrome is necessary in order to prevent new cardic events to come into being. It presuposes life style change, modification of risk factors as well a medications for second prevention.

  6. Standardization of I-123-meta-iodobenzylguanidine myocardial sympathetic activity imaging: phantom calibration and clinical applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nakajima, Kenichi; Verschure, Derk O.; Okuda, Koichi; Verberne, Hein J.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Myocardial sympathetic imaging with I-123-meta-iodobenzylguanidine (I-123-mIBG) has gained clinical momentum. Although the need for standardization of I-123-mIBG myocardial uptake has been recognized, the availability of practical clinical standardization approaches is limited. The need for

  7. Variation in measurements of grip strength : a study in reflex sympathetic dystrophy patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geertzen, J.H.; Dijkstra, P.U.; Stewart, R.E.; Groothoff, J.W.; Ten Duis, H.J.; Eisma, W.H.

    The clinical picture of reflex sympathetic dystrophy (RSD) is characterized by a combination of the triad: autonomic, motor and sensory changes. In this study, the grip strength is measured in 29 upper extremity RSD patients. We used the generalizability theory to assess the extent of the

  8. Dynamic scintigraphic study of the reflex sympathetic dystrophy syndrome and of osteonecrosis of the femoral condyle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laurin, J.; Acquaviva, P.C.; Siles, P.C.; Kaphan, G.

    1985-01-01

    Bone scintigraphy associated with a dynamic study is being increasingly used in order to improve the specificity of the method. This dynamic study is performed with the injection of a bone seeker 99mTc-methylene diphosphonate. The method is found to be valuable for early identification of patients with suspected reflex sympathetic distrophy syndrome and with osteonecrosis of the femoral condyle.

  9. Fostering College-Going Expectations of Immigrant Students through the Sympathetic Touch of School Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Daniel D.

    2016-01-01

    This article intends to support the efforts of administrators, teachers, and community activists to center race, equity, and anti-deficit perspectives within the practice of school leadership. By drawing upon methods of critical race studies, and Du Bois's 1935 concept of the sympathetic touch, the author provides examples of anti-deficit…

  10. Acute electromyostimulation decreases muscle sympathetic nerve activity in patients with advanced chronic heart failure (EMSICA Study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labrunée, Marc; Despas, Fabien; Marque, Philippe; Guiraud, Thibaut; Galinier, Michel; Senard, Jean Michel; Pathak, Atul

    2013-01-01

    Muscle passive contraction of lower limb by neuromuscular electrostimulation (NMES) is frequently used in chronic heart failure (CHF) patients but no data are available concerning its action on sympathetic activity. However, Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation (TENS) is able to improve baroreflex in CHF. The primary aim of the present study was to investigate the acute effect of TENS and NMES compared to Sham stimulation on sympathetic overactivity as assessed by Muscle Sympathetic Nerve Activity (MSNA). We performed a serie of two parallel, randomized, double blinded and sham controlled protocols in twenty-two CHF patients in New York Heart Association (NYHA) Class III. Half of them performed stimulation by TENS, and the others tested NMES. Compare to Sham stimulation, both TENS and NMES are able to reduce MSNA (63.5 ± 3.5 vs 69.7 ± 3.1 bursts / min, p < 0.01 after TENS and 51.6 ± 3.3 vs 56.7 ± 3.3 bursts / min, p < 0, 01 after NMES). No variation of blood pressure, heart rate or respiratory parameters was observed after stimulation. The results suggest that sensory stimulation of lower limbs by electrical device, either TENS or NMES, could inhibit sympathetic outflow directed to legs in CHF patients. These properties could benefits CHF patients and pave the way for a new non-pharmacological approach of CHF.

  11. Spontaneous reflex sympathetic dystrophy (Sudeck's atrophy) syndrome associated with idiopathic thrombocytopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidaka, T; Suzuki, K; Hara, M; Kawagoe, M; Nakamura, H

    1992-06-01

    A 37-year-old woman developed reflex sympathetic dystrophy (RSD) (Sudeck's atrophy) syndrome in the right foot. Simultaneously, she had idiopathic thrombocytopenia. There was no history of injury or bone fracture before onset of RSD. Spontaneous RSD associated with idiopathic thrombocytopenia has rarely been described. A possible relationship between the 2 conditions is discussed.

  12. Involvement of multiple calcium channels in neurotransmitter release from cultured sympathetic neurons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirning, L.D.; Perney, T.M.; Miller, R.J.

    1986-03-01

    The release of neurotransmitters has been defined to be a Ca/sup + +/ dependent process, however, the role of Ca/sup + +/ channels in the release process is unclear. Primary cultures of sympathetic nerves from superior cervical ganglia were used to examine the specific actions of dihydropyridine (DHP) drugs. In nerve cultures, /sup 3/H-norepinepharine (NE) was taken up in a desipramine blockable fashion and released on exposure to high external K/sup +/ concentrations. NE release was virtually abolished by Co/sup + +/ (3 mM) or in Ca/sup + +/ free media, demonstrating the Ca/sup + +/ dependence of the release. However, the antagonist DHP, nimodipine, was ineffective in blocking transmitter release in concentrations up to 10/sup -5/M. In contrast, the agonist DHP, Bay K8644 (10/sup -6/M), significantly enhanced transmitter release by 35-40% of control. This enhancement was blocked down to control levels by nimodipine (10/sup -6/M). The authors have also demonstrated high affinity /sup 3/H-nitrendipine binding sites (B/sub max/ = 179 fmoles/mg, Kd = 0.25 nM) on these sympathetic neuronal membranes. These data suggest that DHP sensitive Ca/sup + +/ channels, which have been shown to modulate SP release from DRG neurons in culture are not usually involved in NE release from sympathetic neurons. However, prolonged opening of these channels by the DHP agonist, Bay K8644, increases the overall Ca/sup + +/ influx into sympathetic nerves to enhance transmitter release.

  13. Spontanous periodic breathing is associated with sympathetic hyperreactivity and baroreceptor dysfunction in hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binggeli, Christian; Sudano, Isabella; Corti, Roberto; Spieker, Lukas; Jenni, Rolf; Lüscher, Thomas F; Noll, Georg

    2010-05-01

    Intermittent periods of hypoxemia such as during periodic breathing are associated with hypertension and increased sympathetic activity. In patients with sleep apnea syndrome, hypertension is common. Treating apnea improves hypertension and reduces sympathetic outflow. The aim of the present study was to investigate the phenomenon and mechanisms of spontaneous periodic breathing in patients with hypertension. We examined 43 hypertensive patients with untreated hypertension without left-ventricular dysfunction, heart failure or sleep apnea syndrome. Muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSA), heart rate (HR), blood pressure (BP) and respiration were continuously recorded at rest and during cold-pressor testing. Oxygen and a CO2-enriched gas were used to test central and peripheral chemoreceptors, respectively. Baroreceptor gain was measured using the alpha method. Seven out of 43 patients showed spontaneous periodic breathing while awake. No difference in MSA, HR and BP was seen between patients with and without periodic breathing at rest except the breathing pattern. However, the cold-pressor test caused a larger increase of MSA in patients with periodic breathing (203 +/- 62 vs. 62 +/- 8%, P common in patients with hypertension and is associated with greatly enhanced responses to cold-pressor testing. We suggest increased baroreceptor gain and sympathetic outflow as a cause for the oscillatory respiration pattern via barorespiratory coupling.

  14. Increased sympathetic activity in chronic pancreatitis patients is associated with hyperalgesia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buscher, H.C.J.L.; Goor, H. van; Sweep, C.G.J.; Lenders, J.W.M.; Wilder-Smith, O.H.G.

    2010-01-01

    Pain treatment in chronic pancreatitis patients is difficult, with pain frequently relapsing or persisting. Recent studies suggest that altered central nervous system pain processing underlies the chronic pain state in these patients. There is evidence that increased sympathetic activity may also

  15. Macrophage populations and cardiac sympathetic denervation during L-NAME-induced hypertension in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neves, S R S; Machado, C R S; Pinto, A M T

    2006-01-01

    The rat model of hypertension induced by prolonged treatment with Nomega-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) has been extensively used. However, the effects on cardiac autonomic innervation are unknown. Here, the cardiac sympathetic innervation is analyzed in parallel with myocardial lesions a...

  16. The cognitive and affective alexithymia dimensions in the regulation of sympathetic responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bermond, B.; Bierman, D.J.; Cladder, M.A.; Moormann, P.P.; Vorst, H.C.M.

    2010-01-01

    Objective The literature regarding research into alexithymia and sympathetic responses is far from consistent. An explanation might be on the way subjects are classified. Generally, subjects are diagnosed as either alexithymic or non-alexithymic on the basis of questionnaires focusing on the

  17. Increased sympathetic activation in patients with vasovagal syncope is associated with higher mean platelet volume levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabul, H K; Celik, M; Yuksel, U Ç; Yalcinkaya, E; Gokoglan, Y; Bugan, B; Barcin, C; Celik, T; Iyisoy, A

    2014-01-01

    Vasovagal syncope (VVS) is supposed to be modulated by increased sympathetic tone following an orthostatic maneuver. Increased sympathetic activity may have an important role in mean platelet volume (MPV), either by peripheral activation or by effects on thrombocytopoiesis. We aimed to show the effects of increased sympathetic activity on platelet size in patients with VVS in the present study. Thirty-seven patients with VVS were compared with age- and sex-matched 33 patients without VVS. All patients have undergone 24 hour holter monitoring for heart rate variability (HRV) and time-domain HRV analysis. Blood samples for MPV measurements were taken before 24 hour holter monitoring. Group 1 was consisted of 37 patients with VVS and group 2 was consisted of 33 patients without VVS. We observed that SDNN, SDNN index, SDSD, RMSDD, PNN50 count were significantly lower and MPV was found significantly higher in patients with VVS (p SDSD (r = -0.396), NN50 count (r = -0.395) and RMSDD (r = -0.393). Multivariate regression analysis showed that SDNN was the only independent variable, which had a significant effect on increased MPV level (β = -0.295 , p = 0.016). We found that MPV was closely associated with increased sympathetic activity in patients with VVS. Our analysis supports the hypothesis that alterations in autonomic status might play a role in the development of platelet size.

  18. Enhanced sympathetic arousal in response to FMRI scanning correlates with task induced activations and deactivations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Muehlhan

    Full Text Available It has been repeatedly shown that functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI triggers distress and neuroendocrine response systems. Prior studies have revealed that sympathetic arousal increases, particularly at the beginning of the examination. Against this background it appears likely that those stress reactions during the scanning procedure may influence task performance and neural correlates. However, the question how sympathetic arousal elicited by the scanning procedure itself may act as a potential confounder of fMRI data remains unresolved today. Thirty-seven scanner naive healthy subjects performed a simple cued target detection task. Levels of salivary alpha amylase (sAA, as a biomarker for sympathetic activity, were assessed in samples obtained at several time points during the lab visit. SAA increased two times, immediately prior to scanning and at the end of the scanning procedure. Neural activation related to motor preparation and timing as well as task performance was positively correlated with the first increase. Furthermore, the first sAA increase was associated with task induced deactivation (TID in frontal and parietal regions. However, these effects were restricted to the first part of the experiment. Consequently, this bias of scanner related sympathetic activation should be considered in future fMRI investigations. It is of particular importance for pharmacological investigations studying adrenergic agents and the comparison of groups with different stress vulnerabilities like patients and controls or adolescents and adults.

  19. Marital Conflict and Children's Externalizing Behavior: Interactions between Parasympathetic and Sympathetic Nervous System Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sheikh, Mona; Kouros, Chrystyna D.; Erath, Stephen; Cummings, E. Mark; Keller, Peggy; Staton, Lori

    2009-01-01

    Toward greater specificity in the prediction of externalizing problems in the context of interparental conflict, interactions between children's parasympathetic and sympathetic nervous system (PNS and SNS) activity were examined as moderators. PNS activity was indexed by respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) and RSA reactivity (RSA-R) to lab…

  20. An autocrine Wnt5a-Ror signaling loop mediates sympathetic target innervation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Yun Kyoung; Collins, Sarah Ellen; Ho, Hsin-Yi Henry; Zhao, Haiqing; Kuruvilla, Rejji

    2013-05-01

    During nervous system development, axon branching at nerve terminals is an essential step in the formation of functional connections between neurons and target cells. It is known that target tissues exert control of terminal arborization through secretion of trophic factors. However, whether the in-growing axons themselves produce diffusible cues to instruct target innervation remains unclear. Here, we use conditional mutant mice to show that Wnt5a derived from sympathetic neurons is required for their target innervation in vivo. Conditional deletion of Wnt5a resulted in specific deficits in the extension and arborization of sympathetic fibers in their final target fields, while no defects were observed in the overall tissue patterning, proliferation, migration or differentiation of neuronal progenitors. Using compartmentalized neuronal cultures, we further demonstrate that the Ror receptor tyrosine kinases are required locally in sympathetic axons to mediate Wnt5a-dependent branching. Thus, our study suggests an autocrine Wnt5a-Ror signaling pathway that directs sympathetic axon branching during target innervation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Acute electromyostimulation decreases muscle sympathetic nerve activity in patients with advanced chronic heart failure (EMSICA Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Labrunée

    Full Text Available Muscle passive contraction of lower limb by neuromuscular electrostimulation (NMES is frequently used in chronic heart failure (CHF patients but no data are available concerning its action on sympathetic activity. However, Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation (TENS is able to improve baroreflex in CHF. The primary aim of the present study was to investigate the acute effect of TENS and NMES compared to Sham stimulation on sympathetic overactivity as assessed by Muscle Sympathetic Nerve Activity (MSNA.We performed a serie of two parallel, randomized, double blinded and sham controlled protocols in twenty-two CHF patients in New York Heart Association (NYHA Class III. Half of them performed stimulation by TENS, and the others tested NMES.Compare to Sham stimulation, both TENS and NMES are able to reduce MSNA (63.5 ± 3.5 vs 69.7 ± 3.1 bursts / min, p < 0.01 after TENS and 51.6 ± 3.3 vs 56.7 ± 3.3 bursts / min, p < 0, 01 after NMES. No variation of blood pressure, heart rate or respiratory parameters was observed after stimulation.The results suggest that sensory stimulation of lower limbs by electrical device, either TENS or NMES, could inhibit sympathetic outflow directed to legs in CHF patients. These properties could benefits CHF patients and pave the way for a new non-pharmacological approach of CHF.

  2. Cortisol and Children's Adjustment: The Moderating Role of Sympathetic Nervous System Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sheikh, Mona; Erath, Stephen A.; Buckhalt, Joseph A.; Granger, Douglas A.; Mize, Jacquelyn

    2008-01-01

    We examined relations among cortisol, markers of sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activity (including salivary alpha-amylase and skin conductance level), and children's adjustment. We also tested the Bauer et al. ("Journal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics," 23(2), 102-113, 2002) hypothesis that interactions between the SNS and cortisol…

  3. High dose ascorbic acid does not reverse central sympathetic overactivity in chronic heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gomes, M.E.R.; El Messaoudi, S.; Lenders, J.W.M.; Bellersen, L.; Verheugt, F.W.A.; Smits, P.; Tack, C.J.J.

    2011-01-01

    WHAT IS KNOWN AND OBJECTIVE: The increased central sympathetic activity typically associated with chronic heart failure (CHF) is probably mediated by formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the brain. Our objective was to undertake a trial to test our hypothesis that administration of the

  4. A Hypothalamic Leptin-Glutamate Interaction in the Regulation of Sympathetic Nerve Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Zheng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Accumulated evidence indicates that obesity-induced type 2 diabetes (T2D is associated with enhanced sympathetic activation. The present study was conducted to investigate the role for leptin-glutamate signaling within the hypothalamus in regulating sympathetic nerve activity. In anesthetized rats, microinjections of leptin (5 ng ~ 100 ng into the arcuate nucleus (ARCN and paraventricular nucleus (PVN induced increases in renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA, blood pressure (BP, and heart rate (HR. Prior microinjections of NMDA receptor antagonist AP5 (16 pmol into the ARCN or PVN reduced leptin-induced increases in RSNA, BP, and HR in both ARCN and PVN. Knockdown of a leptin receptor with siRNA inhibited NMDA-induced increases in RSNA, BP, and HR in the ARCN but not in the PVN. Confocal calcium imaging in the neuronal NG108 and astrocytic C6 cells demonstrated that preincubation with leptin induced an increase in intracellular calcium green fluorescence when the cells were challenged with glutamate. In high-fat diet and low-dose streptozotocin-induced T2D rats, we found that leptin receptor and NMDA NR1 receptor expressions in the ARCN and PVN were significantly increased. In conclusion, these studies provide evidence that within the hypothalamic nuclei, leptin-glutamate signaling regulates the sympathetic activation. This may contribute to the sympathoexcitation commonly observed in obesity-related T2D.

  5. Sympathetic nervous activity in cirrhosis. A survey of plasma catecholamine studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, J H; Ring-Larsen, H; Christensen, N J

    1985-01-01

    -water retention and decreased kidney perfusion observed in decompensated cirrhosis. Volume- en baro-receptors are likely to elicit this overactivity. The decreased systemic arterial blood pressure may be a primary event which is in part counteracted by enhanced sympathetic nervous activity and activated renin...

  6. Tonic activity of carotid body chemoreceptors contributes to the increased sympathetic drive in essential hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siński, Maciej; Lewandowski, Jacek; Przybylski, Jacek; Bidiuk, Joanna; Abramczyk, Piotr; Ciarka, Agnieszka; Gaciong, Zbigniew

    2012-05-01

    Carotid chemoreceptors provoke an increase in muscle sympathetic nerve activation (MSNA) in response to hypoxia; they are also tonically active during normoxic breathing. The contribution of peripheral chemoreceptors to sympathetic activation in hypertension is incompletely understood. The aim of our study was to investigate the effect of chemoreceptor deactivation on sympathetic activity in untreated patients with hypertension. A total of 12 untreated hypertensive males and 11 male controls participated in this randomized, crossover, placebo-controlled study. MSNA, systolic blood pressure(BP), diastolic BP, heart rate (HR), electrocardiogram, hemoglobin oxygen saturation (Sat%) and respiratory movements were measured during repeated 10-min periods of respiration with 100% oxygen or 21% oxygen in a blinded fashion. Compared with controls, hypertensives had higher resting MSNA (38 ± 10 vs. 29 ± 0.9 burst per min, Pchemoreceptor deactivation with hyperoxia. HR decreased and Sat% increased in both the study groups. These results confirm the role of tonic chemoreceptor drive in the development of sympathetic overactivity in hypertension.

  7. Variation in measurements of range of motion : a study in reflex sympathetic dystrophy patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geertzen, J.H.B.; Dijkstra, P.U.; Stewart, R.E; Groothoff, J.W.; ten Duis, H J; Eisma, W.H.

    1998-01-01

    Objective: To quantify the amount of variation attributed to different sources of variation in measurement results of upper extremity range of motion, and to estimate the smallest detectable difference (SDD) between measurements in reflex sympathetic dystrophy (RSD) patients. Design: Two observers

  8. Cortisol-induced impairments of working memory require acute sympathetic activation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elzinga, B.M.; Roelofs, K.

    2005-01-01

    The present study assessed whether the effects of cortisol on working memory depend on the level of adrenergic activity (as measured by sympathetic activation) during memory performance. After exposure to a psychosocial stress task, participants were divided into cortisol responders and

  9. Sympathetic nervous system activation, arterial shear rate, and flow-mediated dilation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thijssen, D.H.J.; Atkinson, C.L.; Ono, K.; Sprung, V.S.; Spence, A.L.; Pugh, C.J.; Green, D.J.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the contribution of arterial shear to changes in flow-mediated dilation (FMD) during sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activation in healthy humans. Ten healthy men reported to our laboratory four times. Bilateral FMD, shear rate (SR), and catecholamines were

  10. Exercise training attenuates sympathetic activation and oxidative stress in diet-induced obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, G; Liu, J-Y; Zhang, H-X; Li, Q; Zhang, S-W

    2015-01-01

    It is known that excessive sympathetic activity and oxidative stress are enhanced in obesity. This study aimed to clarify whether exercise training (ET) attenuates sympathetic activation and oxidative stress in obesity. The obesity was induced by high-fat diet (HFD) for 12 weeks. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned to four groups: regular diet (RD) plus sedentary (RD-S), RD plus ET (RD-ET), HFD plus sedentary (HFD-S), and HFD plus ET (HFD-ET). The rats in RD-ET and HFD-ET groups were trained on a motorized treadmill for 60 min/day, five days/week for 8 weeks. The sympathetic activity was evaluated by the plasma norepinephrine (NE) level. The superoxide anion, malondialdehyde and F2-isoprostanes levels in serum and muscles were measured to evaluate oxidative stress. The ET prevented the increases in the body weight, arterial pressure and white adipose tissue mass in HFD rats. The NE level in plasma and oxidative stress related parameters got lower in HFD-ET group compared with HFD-S group. We have found decreased mRNA and protein levels of toll-like receptor (TLR)-2 and TLR-4 by ET in HFD rats. These findings suggest that ET may be effective for attenuating sympathetic activation and oxidative stress in diet-induced obesity.

  11. The effect of empagliflozin on muscle sympathetic nerve activity in patients with type II diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Jens; Tank, Jens; Heusser, Karsten; Heise, Tim; Wanner, Christoph; Heer, Martina; Macha, Sreeraj; Mattheus, Michaela; Lund, Søren S; Woerle, Hans J; Broedl, Uli C

    2017-09-01

    Inhibition of sodium glucose cotransporter 2 with empagliflozin results in caloric loss by increasing urinary glucose excretion and has a mild diuretic effect. Diuretic effects are usually associated with reflex-mediated increases in sympathetic tone, whereas caloric loss is associated with decreased sympathetic tone. In an open-label trial, muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) (burst frequency, burst incidence, and total MSNA) was assessed using microneurography performed off-treatment and on day 4 of treatment with empagliflozin 25 mg once daily in 22 metformin-treated patients with type II diabetes (mean [range] age 54 [40-65] years). Systolic and diastolic blood pressure (BP), heart rate, urine volume, and body weight were assessed before and on day 4 (BP, heart rate), day 5 (urine volume), or day 6 (body weight) of treatment with empagliflozin. After 4 days of treatment with empagliflozin, no significant changes in MSNA were apparent despite a numerical increase in urine volume, numerical reductions in BP, and significant weight loss. There were no clinically relevant changes in heart rate. Empagliflozin is not associated with clinically relevant reflex-mediated sympathetic activation in contrast to increases observed with diuretics in other studies. Our study suggests a novel mechanism through which sodium glucose cotransporter 2 inhibition affects human autonomic cardiovascular regulation. Copyright © 2017 American Society of Hypertension. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Pacemaker current inhibition in experimental human cardiac sympathetic activation: a double-blind, randomized, crossover study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schroeder, C.; Heusser, K.; Zoerner, A.A.; Grosshennig, A.; Wenzel, D.; May, M.; Sweep, F.C.; Mehling, H.; Luft, F.C.; Tank, J.; Jordan, J.

    2014-01-01

    Hyperpolarization-activated, cyclic nucleotide-gated 4 (HCN4) channels comprise the final pathway for autonomic heart rate (HR) regulation. We hypothesized that HCN4 inhibition could reverse autonomic imbalance in a human model of cardiac sympathetic activation. Nineteen healthy men ingested oral

  13. Acute electromyostimulation Decreases Muscle Sympathetic Nerve Activity in Patients with Advanced Chronic Heart Failure (EMSICA Study)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labrunée, Marc; Despas, Fabien; Marque, Philippe; Guiraud, Thibaut; Galinier, Michel; Senard, Jean Michel; Pathak, Atul

    2013-01-01

    Background Muscle passive contraction of lower limb by neuromuscular electrostimulation (NMES) is frequently used in chronic heart failure (CHF) patients but no data are available concerning its action on sympathetic activity. However, Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation (TENS) is able to improve baroreflex in CHF. The primary aim of the present study was to investigate the acute effect of TENS and NMES compared to Sham stimulation on sympathetic overactivity as assessed by Muscle Sympathetic Nerve Activity (MSNA). Methods We performed a serie of two parallel, randomized, double blinded and sham controlled protocols in twenty-two CHF patients in New York Heart Association (NYHA) Class III. Half of them performed stimulation by TENS, and the others tested NMES. Results Compare to Sham stimulation, both TENS and NMES are able to reduce MSNA (63.5 ± 3.5 vs 69.7 ± 3.1 bursts / min, p < 0.01 after TENS and 51.6 ± 3.3 vs 56.7 ± 3.3 bursts / min, p < 0, 01 after NMES). No variation of blood pressure, heart rate or respiratory parameters was observed after stimulation. Conclusion The results suggest that sensory stimulation of lower limbs by electrical device, either TENS or NMES, could inhibit sympathetic outflow directed to legs in CHF patients. These properties could benefits CHF patients and pave the way for a new non-pharmacological approach of CHF. PMID:24265770

  14. Effects of cervical sympathetic nerve stimulation on the cerebral microcirculation: possible clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passatore, M; Deriu, F; Roatta, S; Grassi, C; Micieli, G

    1996-01-01

    The action of bilateral cervical sympathetic nerve (CSN) stimulation on mean cerebral blood flow (CBF) and on its rhythmical fluctuations was studied in normotensive rabbits by using laser-Doppler flowmetry (LDF). A reduction in mean CBF, mediated by alpha-adrenoceptors, was the predominant effect; it was more often present and larger in size in the vascular beds supplied by the carotid than in those supplied by the vertebro-basilar system. This suggests that the sympathetic action facilitates a redistribution of blood flow to the brain stem. The effect induced by CSN stimulation on CBF spontaneous oscillations was a consistent decrease in amplitude and an increase in frequency, irrespective of the changes produced on the mean level of CBF. The possible implications of the sympathetic action on the state of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) are discussed. Experimental and clinical data dealing with the influence of sympathetic activation on the cerebrovascular system have been compared. As a result the possibility of analysing the spontaneous oscillations of CBF for clinical purposes is suggested.

  15. Sympathetic activation by the cold pressor test does not increase the muscle force generation capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roatta, Silvestro; Farina, Dario

    2011-06-01

    A positive inotropic action by the sympathetic nervous system on skeletal muscles has been observed and investigated in animal and in vitro studies. This action provided a theoretical basis for the putative ergogenic action of catecholamines and adrenergic agonists, although there is no clear evidence of this effect in humans. The aim of this study was to investigate the occurrence of inotropic effects associated to physiological sympathetic activation in healthy subjects. The muscle force capacity was investigated in the tibialis anterior (n = 9 subjects) and in the soleus (n = 9) muscles electrically stimulated with single pulses and double pulses with variable interspike interval (4-1,000 ms) and short pulse trains (frequency: 5-14 Hz) before, during, and after sympathetic activation by the cold pressor test (CPT). CPT significantly decreased by 10.4 ± 7.2 and 10.6 ± 4.4% the force produced by single and double pulse stimulation, respectively, and produced smaller decreases in the force obtained by train stimulation in the tibialis anterior, while no significant changes were observed in either type of contraction in the soleus muscle. CPT failed to induce any increase in the force capacity of the investigated muscles. The prevalent decrease in force evidenced in this study supports the concept that the weakening sympathetic action on type I fiber, already shown to occur in humans, prevails over the putative potentiating action.

  16. Chick eye extract promotes expression of a cholinergic enzyme in sympathetic ganglia in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacovitti, L; Teitelman, G; Joh, T H; Reis, D J

    1987-05-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that, in rat, individual sympathetic neurons can express both adrenergic and cholinergic biosynthetic enzymes in culture. Moreover, the levels of these enzymes can be regulated by factors present in their environment. In the present study, we sought to determine whether cultures of chick sympathetic neurons express both adrenergic and cholinergic enzymes, whether both enzymes are expressed in the same neurons, and whether the levels of these enzymes can be influenced by environmental factors. In our system, we tested one such factor found in embryonic eye extract (EEE) which has been shown to specifically increase the activity of the cholinergic enzyme choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) in cultures of chick parasympathetic neurons Varon et al., Brain Res., 173 (1979) 29-45; Nishi and Berg. J. Neurosci., 1 (1981) 505-513). At various times in vitro, cultures were analyzed using biochemical, immunocytochemical and autoradiographic techniques. We found that only those cultures of sympathetic neurons supplemented with EEE developed detectable levels of ChAT enzyme activity at 2 days, which increased significantly by 14 days in vitro. Supplementation with EEE did not affect the level of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) activity. Furthermore, irrespective of nutrient medium, all neurons in all cultures contained TH immunoreactivity and possessed a high-affinity amine uptake system as demonstrated by autoradiography. These studies suggest that neurons of chick sympathetic ganglia can be influenced by factors present in EEE to express a cholinergic enzyme and that this enzyme is coexpressed by cells also exhibiting an adrenergic phenotype.

  17. Is kidney ischemia the central mechanism in parallel activation of the renin and sympathetic system?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siddiqi, Laima; Joles, Jaap A.; Grassi, Guido; Blankestijn, Peter J.

    In chronic kidney disease simultaneous activation of the renin - angiotensin and sympathetic systems occurs. Kidney ischemia seems to play a key role in the pathogenesis. This review firstly summarizes experimental and clinical evidence in chronic kidney disease supporting this idea and addresses

  18. Prognosis of pregnancy-associated breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Guek Eng; Mayer, Erica L; Partridge, Ann

    2017-06-01

    Conventionally, breast cancer diagnosed during pregnancy and within the years following have been referred to collectively as pregnancy-associated breast cancer. However, increasing evidence suggests that breast cancer diagnosed during pregnancy is a different entity from that diagnosed postpartum, both in terms of prognosis and biology. Given the increasing number of women who find themselves diagnosed with breast cancer during or following a pregnancy, future research and discussion should separate these two into distinct groups: breast cancer diagnosed during pregnancy and breast cancer diagnosed postpartum in an effort to enhance our understanding to inform and improve clinical management and counseling.

  19. Ventilation inhibits sympathetic action potential recruitment even during severe chemoreflex stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badrov, Mark B; Barak, Otto F; Mijacika, Tanja; Shoemaker, Leena N; Borrell, Lindsay J; Lojpur, Mihajlo; Drvis, Ivan; Dujic, Zeljko; Shoemaker, J Kevin

    2017-11-01

    This study investigated the influence of ventilation on sympathetic action potential (AP) discharge patterns during varying levels of high chemoreflex stress. In seven trained breath-hold divers (age 33 ± 12 yr), we measured muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) at baseline, during preparatory rebreathing (RBR), and during 1 ) functional residual capacity apnea (FRC Apnea ) and 2 ) continued RBR. Data from RBR were analyzed at matched (i.e., to FRC Apnea ) hemoglobin saturation (HbSat) levels (RBR Matched ) or more severe levels (RBR End ). A third protocol compared alternating periods (30 s) of FRC and RBR (FRC-RBR ALT ). Subjects continued each protocol until 85% volitional tolerance. AP patterns in MSNA (i.e., providing the true neural content of each sympathetic burst) were studied using wavelet-based methodology. First, for similar levels of chemoreflex stress (both HbSat: 71 ± 6%; P = NS), RBR Matched was associated with reduced AP frequency and APs per burst compared with FRC Apnea (both P < 0.001). When APs were binned according to peak-to-peak amplitude (i.e., into clusters), total AP clusters increased during FRC Apnea (+10 ± 2; P < 0.001) but not during RBR Matched (+1 ± 2; P = NS). Second, despite more severe chemoreflex stress during RBR End (HbSat: 56 ± 13 vs. 71 ± 6%; P < 0.001), RBR End was associated with a restrained increase in the APs per burst (FRC Apnea : +18 ± 7; RBR End : +11 ± 5) and total AP clusters (FRC Apnea : +10 ± 2; RBR End : +6 ± 4) (both P < 0.01). During FRC-RBR ALT , all periods of FRC elicited sympathetic AP recruitment (all P < 0.001), whereas all periods of RBR were associated with complete withdrawal of AP recruitment (all P = NS). Presently, we demonstrate that ventilation per se restrains and/or inhibits sympathetic axonal recruitment during high, and even extreme, chemoreflex stress. NEW & NOTEWORTHY The current study demonstrates that the sympathetic neural recruitment

  20. Sympathetic modulation of muscle spindle afferent sensitivity to stretch in rabbit jaw closing muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roatta, S; Windhorst, U; Ljubisavljevic, M; Johansson, H; Passatore, M

    2002-04-01

    Previous reports showed that sympathetic stimulation affects the activity of muscle spindle afferents (MSAs). The aim of the present work is to study the characteristics of sympathetic modulation of MSA response to stretch: (i) on the dynamic and static components of the stretch response, and (ii) on group Ia and II MSAs to evaluate potentially different effects. In anaesthetised rabbits, the peripheral stump of the cervical sympathetic nerve (CSN) was stimulated at 10 impulses s(-1) for 45-90 s. The responses of single MSAs to trapezoidal displacement of the mandible were recorded from the mesencephalic trigeminal nucleus. The following characteristic parameters were determined from averaged trapezoidal responses: initial frequency (IF), peak frequency at the end of the ramp (PF), and static index (SI). From these, other parameters were derived: dynamic index (DI = PF - SI), dynamic difference (DD = PF - IF) and static difference (SD = SI - IF). The effects of CSN stimulation were also evaluated during changes in the state of intrafusal muscle fibre contraction induced by succinylcholine and curare. In a population of 124 MSAs, 106 units (85.4 %) were affected by sympathetic stimulation. In general, while changes in resting discharge varied among different units (Ia vs. II) and experimental conditions (curarised vs. non-curarised), ranging from enhancement to strong depression of firing, the amplitude of the response to muscle stretches consistently decreased. This was confirmed and detailed in a quantitative analysis performed on 49 muscle spindle afferents. In both the non-curarised (23 units) and curarised (26 units) condition, stimulation of the CSN reduced the response amplitude in terms of DD and SD, but hardly affected DI. The effects were equally present in both Ia and II units; they were shown to be independent from gamma drive and intrafusal muscle tone and not secondary to muscle hypoxia. Sympathetic action on the resting discharge (IF) was less

  1. Modulation of renal sympathetic innervation: recent insights beyond blood pressure control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linz, Dominik; Hohl, Mathias; Elliott, Adrian D; Lau, Dennis H; Mahfoud, Felix; Esler, Murray D; Sanders, Prashanthan; Böhm, Michael

    2018-02-10

    Renal afferent and efferent sympathetic nerves are involved in the regulation of blood pressure and have a pathophysiological role in hypertension. Additionally, several conditions that frequently coexist with hypertension, such as heart failure, obstructive sleep apnea, atrial fibrillation, renal dysfunction, and metabolic syndrome, demonstrate enhanced sympathetic activity. Renal denervation (RDN) is an approach to reduce renal and whole body sympathetic activation. Experimental models indicate that RDN has the potential to lower blood pressure and prevent cardio-renal remodeling in chronic diseases associated with enhanced sympathetic activation. Studies have shown that RDN can reduce blood pressure in drug-naïve hypertensive patients and in hypertensive patients under drug treatment. Beyond its effects on blood pressure, sympathetic modulation by RDN has been shown to have profound effects on cardiac electrophysiology and cardiac arrhythmogenesis. RDN can display anti-arrhythmic effects in a variety of animal models for atrial fibrillation and ventricular arrhythmias. The first non-randomized studies demonstrate that RDN may promote the maintenance of sinus rhythm following catheter ablation in patients with atrial fibrillation. Registry data point towards a beneficial effect of RDN to prevent ventricular arrhythmias in patients with heart failure and electrical storm. Further large randomized placebo-controlled trials are needed to confirm the antihypertensive and anti-arrhythmic effects of RDN. Here, we will review the current literature on anti-arrhythmic effects of RDN with the focus on atrial fibrillation and ventricular arrhythmias. We will discuss new insights from preclinical and clinical mechanistic studies and possible clinical implications of RDN.

  2. Focal myocardial infarction induces global remodeling of cardiac sympathetic innervation: neural remodeling in a spatial context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajijola, Olujimi A; Yagishita, Daigo; Patel, Krishan J; Vaseghi, Marmar; Zhou, Wei; Yamakawa, Kentaro; So, Eileen; Lux, Robert L; Mahajan, Aman; Shivkumar, Kalyanam

    2013-10-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) induces neural and electrical remodeling at scar border zones. The impact of focal MI on global functional neural remodeling is not well understood. Sympathetic stimulation was performed in swine with anteroapical infarcts (MI; n = 9) and control swine (n = 9). A 56-electrode sock was placed over both ventricles to record electrograms at baseline and during left, right, and bilateral stellate ganglion stimulation. Activation recovery intervals (ARIs) were measured from electrograms. Global and regional ARI shortening, dispersion of repolarization, and activation propagation were assessed before and during sympathetic stimulation. At baseline, mean ARI was shorter in MI hearts than control hearts (365 ± 8 vs. 436 ± 9 ms, P < 0.0001), dispersion of repolarization was greater in MI versus control hearts (734 ± 123 vs. 362 ± 32 ms(2), P = 0.02), and the infarcted region in MI hearts showed longer ARIs than noninfarcted regions (406 ± 14 vs. 365 ± 8 ms, P = 0.027). In control animals, percent ARI shortening was greater on anterior than posterior walls during right stellate ganglion stimulation (P = 0.0001), whereas left stellate ganglion stimulation showed the reverse (P = 0.0003). In infarcted animals, this pattern was completely lost. In 50% of the animals studied, sympathetic stimulation, compared with baseline, significantly altered the direction of activation propagation emanating from the intramyocardial scar during pacing. In conclusion, focal distal anterior MI alters regional and global pattern of sympathetic innervation, resulting in shorter ARIs in infarcted hearts, greater repolarization dispersion, and altered activation propagation. These conditions may underlie the mechanisms by which arrhythmias are initiated when sympathetic tone is enhanced.

  3. The MEK-ERK pathway negatively regulates bim expression through the 3' UTR in sympathetic neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristiansen Mark

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Apoptosis plays a critical role during neuronal development and disease. Developing sympathetic neurons depend on nerve growth factor (NGF for survival during the late embryonic and early postnatal period and die by apoptosis in its absence. The proapoptotic BH3-only protein Bim increases in level after NGF withdrawal and is required for NGF withdrawal-induced death. The regulation of Bim expression in neurons is complex and this study describes a new mechanism by which an NGF-activated signalling pathway regulates bim gene expression in sympathetic neurons. Results We report that U0126, an inhibitor of the prosurvival MEK-ERK pathway, increases bim mRNA levels in sympathetic neurons in the presence of NGF. We find that this effect is independent of PI3-K-Akt and JNK-c-Jun signalling and is not mediated by the promoter, first exon or first intron of the bim gene. By performing 3' RACE and microinjection experiments with a new bim-LUC+3'UTR reporter construct, we show that U0126 increases bim expression via the bim 3' UTR. We demonstrate that this effect does not involve a change in bim mRNA stability and by using PD184352, a specific MEK1/2-ERK1/2 inhibitor, we show that this mechanism involves the MEK1/2-ERK1/2 pathway. Finally, we demonstrate that inhibition of MEK/ERK signalling independently reduces cell survival in NGF-treated sympathetic neurons. Conclusions These results suggest that in sympathetic neurons, MEK-ERK signalling negatively regulates bim expression via the 3' UTR and that this regulation is likely to be at the level of transcription. This data provides further insight into the different mechanisms by which survival signalling pathways regulate bim expression in neurons.

  4. Morning blood pressure surge is associated with arterial stiffness and sympathetic baroreflex sensitivity in hypertensive seniors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Yoshiyuki; Galbreath, M Melyn; Shibata, Shigeki; Jarvis, Sara S; Bivens, Tiffany B; Vongpatanasin, Wanpen; Levine, Benjamin D; Fu, Qi

    2013-09-15

    Morning blood pressure (BP) surge is considered to be an independent risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. We tested the hypothesis that increased large-artery stiffness and impaired sympathetic baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) contribute to augmented morning surge in elderly hypertensive subjects. Morning surge was assessed as morning systolic BP averaged for 2 h just after waking up minus minimal sleeping systolic BP by using ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM) in 40 untreated hypertensive [68 ± 1 (SE) yr] and 30 normotensive (68 ± 1 yr) subjects. Beat-by-beat finger BP and muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) were recorded in the supine position and at 60° upright tilt. We assessed arterial stiffness with carotid-to-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV) and sympathetic BRS during spontaneous breathing. Awake and asleep ABPM-BPs and morning surge were higher in hypertensive than normotensive subjects (all P surge ≥35 mmHg (median value) had higher cfPWV (11.9 ± 0.5 vs. 9.9 ± 0.4 m/s, P = 0.002) and lower sympathetic BRS (supine: -2.71 ± 0.25 vs. -3.73 ± 0.29, P = 0.011; upright: -2.62 ± 0.22 vs. -3.51 ± 0.35 bursts·100 beats(-1)·mmHg(-1), P = 0.052) than those with morning surge 0.05), while upright total peripheral resistance was higher in hypertensive subjects with greater morning surge than those with lesser morning surge (P = 0.050). Morning surge was correlated positively with cfPWV (r = 0.59, P surge is associated with arterial stiffness and sympathetic BRS, as well as vasoreactivity during orthostasis in hypertensive seniors.

  5. Nonselective Blocking of the Sympathetic Nervous System Decreases Detrusor Overactivity in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Shin Park

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The involuntary dual control systems of the autonomic nervous system (ANS in the bladder of awake spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs were investigated through simultaneous registrations of intravesical and intraabdominal pressures to observe detrusor overactivity (DO objectively as a core symptom of an overactive bladder. SHRs (n = 6 showed the features of overactive bladder syndrome during urodynamic study, especially DO during the filling phase. After injection of the nonselective sympathetic blocking agent labetalol, DO disappeared in 3 of 6 SHRs (50%. DO frequency decreased from 0.98 ± 0.22 min−1 to 0.28 ± 0.19 min−1 (p < 0.01, and DO pressure decreased from 3.82 ± 0.57 cm H2O to 1.90 ± 0.86 cm H2O (p < 0.05. This suggests that the DO originating from the overactive parasympathetic nervous system is attenuated by the nonselective blocking of the sympathetic nervous system. The detailed mechanism behind this result is still not known, but parasympathetic overactivity seems to require overactive sympathetic nervous system activity in a kind of balance between these two systems. These findings are consistent with recent clinical findings suggesting that patients with idiopathic overactive bladder may have ANS dysfunction, particularly a sympathetic dysfunction. The search for newer and better drugs than the current anticholinergic drugs as the mainstay for overactive bladder will be fueled by our research on these sympathetic mechanisms. Further studies of this principle are required.

  6. Proteinuria can predict prognosis after liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Heng-Chih; Chen, Ying-Jen; Lin, Jhe-Ping; Tsai, Ming-Jung; Jenq, Chang-Chyi; Lee, Wei-Chen; Tsai, Ming-Hung; Fan, Pei-Chun; Chang, Chih-Hsiang; Chang, Ming-Yang; Tian, Ya-Chung; Hung, Cheng-Chieh; Fang, Ji-Tseng; Yang, Chih-Wei; Chen, Yung-Chang

    2016-09-15

    Proteinuria is a manifestation of renal dysfunction and it has been demonstrated to be a significant prognostic factor in various clinical situations. The study was designed to analyze prognosis of patients receiving liver transplantation as well as to determine predictive performance of perioperative proteinuria. We retrospectively reviewed data of patients who had received a liver transplant in a medical center between 2002 and 2010. Demographic information and clinical characteristic parameters were recorded on the day of intensive care unit admission before operation and on postoperative days 1, 7, and 14. Among a total of 323 patients, in-hospital mortality and 90-day mortality rates were 13.0 % (42/323) and 14.2 % (46/323), respectively. Patients with proteinuria on admission had higher rates of acute kidney injury (26.8 % vs. 8.8 %, p proteinuria on admission and Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score were independent predictors of in-hospital mortality. The discriminatory ability of proteinuria plus SOFA was even better than that of SOFA alone, especially on postoperative day 1. The presence of proteinuria before liver transplantation is supposed to be recognized as a negative predictor for in-hospital survival. Moreover, the presence of proteinuria after liver transplantation can assist in the early prediction of poor short-term prognosis for patients receiving liver transplantation.

  7. Acute kidney injury: can we improve prognosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Christine W; Symons, Jordan M

    2010-12-01

    The incidence of pediatric acute kidney injury (AKI) is increasing. AKI has been found to be independently associated with increased mortality, and current management options are limited in that they are mainly supportive. The use of various definitions of AKI can still be found in the literature, making it difficult to discern the epidemiology behind pediatric AKI. The use of a more uniform definition is a necessary first step to clarify AKI epidemiology and direct our research efforts, and it will ultimately improve prognosis. There is evidence that neonates and infants may be at higher risk for AKI than adults. However, the least amount of research is found for this youngest age group, and more focused efforts on this population are necessary. This paper reviews existing data on and definitions for pediatric AKI, general preventive and treatment strategies, as well as ongoing research efforts on AKI. We are hopeful that the prognosis of AKI will improve with collaboration on a multicenter, multinational scale in the form of prospective, long-term studies on pediatric AKI.

  8. Fatigue damage prognosis using affine arithmetic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gbaguidi, Audrey; Kim, Daewon

    2014-02-01

    Among the essential steps to be taken in structural health monitoring systems, damage prognosis would be the field that is least investigated due to the complexity of the uncertainties. This paper presents the possibility of using Affine Arithmetic for uncertainty propagation of crack damage in damage prognosis. The structures examined are thin rectangular plates made of titanium alloys with central mode I cracks and a composite plate with an internal delamination caused by mixed mode I and II fracture modes, under a harmonic uniaxial loading condition. The model-based method for crack growth rates are considered using the Paris Erdogan law model for the isotropic plates and the delamination growth law model proposed by Kardomateas for the composite plate. The parameters for both models are randomly taken and their uncertainties are considered as defined by an interval instead of a probability distribution. A Monte Carlo method is also applied to check whether Affine Arithmetic (AA) leads to tight bounds on the lifetime of the structure.

  9. Symptoms, location and prognosis of pulmonary embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Sanz, M T; Pena-Álvarez, C; López-Landeiro, P; Bermo-Domínguez, A; Fontúrbel, T; González-Barcala, F J

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary embolism (PE) is a common disease with variable symptoms and high overall mortality. The clinical relevance of the extent of PE is still debatable, and the role of anticoagulation in patients with subsegmental involvement has been contested. Our objective is to describe the clinical details of patients with PE in our hospital and to analyze their prognosis based on the extent of the disease. Retrospective study of 313 patients diagnosed with PE by chest computed tomography (CT) scan at the Hospital Complex of Pontevedra in Spain for six years. Predictors of mortality were determined by multivariate analysis. Women accounted for 56% of patients, and patient median age was 70 years (interquartile range 53-78 years). Subsegmental PE accounted for 7% of all cases; these patients were younger and had lower comorbidity; they reported chest pain more often, performed better in blood gas analysis and none of them had proximal deep vein thrombosis (DVT). Patients with subsegmental PE had a higher survival rate. Factors independently associated with mortality were cancer diagnosis and higher comorbidity. Patients with subsegmental PE clinically differ from those with more proximal PE. Underlying diseases have more influence on the prognosis than the extent of the disease. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Portuguesa de Pneumologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  10. [Bronchial asthma pathogenesis and genetic prognosis development].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balmasova, I P; Sepiashvili, R I; Sepiashvili, Ia R; Malova, E S

    2014-01-01

    The review is dedicated to an actual problem--genetic prognosis of risk of bronchial asthma development that is quite a complex aspect of studies from a methodological viewpoint. Bronchial asthma--heterogeneous disease by both etiology and clinical characteristics. At the same time genetic prognosis is based on the unity of pathogenetic mechanisms of development, though in immunological reactions that are the base of this disease, alternative variants are possible. The aim of this review is carrying out parallels between modern achievements in the field of deciphering trigger mechanisms of bronchial asthma pathogenesis and object of genetic studies based on these mechanisms. Among the examined conceptions--role of epithelial tissue in trigger mechanisms of bronchial asthma, variants of key role of immune system cells, first of all, T-helpers of various types for further development of inflammatory-effector reactions with damage characteristic for this disease. Compliance of contemporary approaches of genetic studies and novel concepts of bronchial asthma pathogenesis is shown.

  11. NRP1 and NRP2 cooperate to regulate gangliogenesis, axon guidance and target innervation in the sympathetic nervous system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maden, Charlotte H.; Gomes, John; Schwarz, Quenten; Davidson, Kathryn; Tinker, Andrew; Ruhrberg, Christiana

    2012-01-01

    The sympathetic nervous system (SNS) arises from neural crest (NC) cells during embryonic development and innervates the internal organs of vertebrates to modulate their stress response. NRP1 and NRP2 are receptors for guidance cues of the class 3 semaphorin (SEMA) family and are expressed in partially overlapping patterns in sympathetic NC cells and their progeny. By comparing the phenotypes of mice lacking NRP1 or its ligand SEMA3A with mice lacking NRP1 in the sympathetic versus vascular endothelial cell lineages, we demonstrate that SEMA3A signalling through NRP1 has multiple cell-autonomous roles in SNS development. These roles include neuronal cell body positioning, neuronal aggregation and axon guidance, first during sympathetic chain assembly and then to regulate the innervation of the heart and aorta. Loss of NRP2 or its ligand SEMA3F impaired sympathetic gangliogenesis more mildly than loss of SEMA3A/NRP1 signalling, but caused ectopic neurite extension along the embryonic aorta. The analysis of compound mutants lacking SEMA3A and SEMA3F or NRP1 and NRP2 in the SNS demonstrated that both signalling pathways cooperate to organise the SNS. We further show that abnormal sympathetic development in mice lacking NRP1 in the sympathetic lineage has functional consequences, as it causes sinus bradycardia, similar to mice lacking SEMA3A. PMID:22790009

  12. Role of inflammatory marker YKL-40 in the diagnosis, prognosis and cause of cardiovascular and liver diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaergaard, A.D.; Johansen, Julia Sidenius; Bojesen, Stig Egil

    2016-01-01

    also hepatic stellate cells. Observational studies show that plasma YKL-40 levels are elevated in patients with cardiovascular and liver disease and are associated with disease severity and prognosis. Furthermore, elevated plasma YKL-40 levels in apparently healthy individuals are associated with a 2......This review summarizes present evidence for the role of YKL-40 in the diagnosis, prognosis and cause of cardiovascular and alcoholic liver disease. The question of whether YKL-40 is merely a marker or a causal factor in the development of cardiovascular and liver disease is addressed, with emphasis...... rather than a drug and placebo, and like a blinded trial, it allows inference about causality. Moreover, the review also covers background on the molecular biology and functions of YKL-40, YKL-40 levels in healthy individuals and reference range, and the role of YKL-40 as a biomarker of cardiovascular...

  13. Lumbar sympathetic blockade in children with complex regional pain syndromes: a double blind placebo-controlled crossover trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Petra M; Zurakowski, David; Berde, Charles B; Sethna, Navil F

    2009-08-01

    Sympathetic blockade is used in the management of complex regional pain syndromes in children, but there are no data on the efficacy or mechanism(s) by which it produces pain relief. The purpose of this study is to compare the efficacy of lidocaine administered by lumbar sympathetic to IV route. Under general anesthesia, children with unilateral lower limb complex regional pain syndromes received catheters along the lumbar sympathetic chain. In a double-blind placebo-controlled crossover design, patients received IV lidocaine and lumbar sympathetic saline or lumbar sympathetic lidocaine and IV saline. Spontaneous and evoked pain ratings and sensory thresholds were assessed before and after these two lidocaine/saline doses and between routes of lumbar sympathetic blockade and IV. Twenty-three patients, ages 10-18 yr, were enrolled. There was evidence for reduction of mean pain intensity of allodynia to brush (mean -1.4, 95% confidence interval [CI] -2.5 to -0.3) and to pinprick temporal summation (mean -1.3, 95% CI -2.5 to -0.2) with lidocaine treatment via the lumbar sympathetic blockade compared to IV route. Lumbar sympathetic blockade also produced significant reduction in pain intensity compared to pretreatment values of allodynia to brush, pinprick and pinprick temporal summation and verbal pain scores. IV lidocaine did not produce significant changes in spontaneous and evoked pain intensity measurements compared to pretreatment values. There were no carryover effects as assessed by route-by-period interaction. Under the conditions of this study, the results provide some direct evidence that a component of pain may be mediated by abnormal sympathetic efferent activity.

  14. Udeskole og elevers handlekompetence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breiting, Søren

    2011-01-01

    Elever elsker at komme væk fra undervisningen i skolen. Er det positivt eller negativt? Og hvad har betydning for, at eleverne får mest muligt ud af oplevelserne uden for skolen? Forskellige former for udeskole giver nogle oplagte muligheder, så eleverne udvikler sig som engagerede borgere i et...

  15. Interaktive tavler - interaktive elever

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reusch, Charlotte; Otzen, Elsebeth

    2012-01-01

    Abstract, Poster-præsentation 13.-14. juni 2012, Pilotprojekt: Interaktive tavler ? interaktive elever Lektor, cand. pæd., Elsebeth Otzen og Lektor, cand. mag., Charlotte Reusch, Institut for Skole og Læring, Læreruddannelsen, Professionshøjskolen Metropol, København Hvordan motiverer en interaktiv...... tavle lærere og elever? Hvad sker der mellem elev, stof og lærer, når læreren bliver i stand til at billedliggøre og dynamisere sine oplæg på tavlen? Bliver læreroplæg prioriteret? Bliver eleverne aktive, eller ender den interaktive tavle med blot at understøtte lærerens envejskommunikation til klassen......? Og hvad sker der mellem eleverne? Disse spørgsmål var igangsættende for arbejdet med pilotprojektet Interaktive tavler ? interaktive elever, som blev afviklet i skoleåret 2010-2011. Projektet blev udført af en tværfaglig gruppe, bestående af lektorer i matematik, biologi og dansk i læreruddannelsen...

  16. Regional myocardial sympathetic denervation predicts the risk of sudden cardiac arrest in ischemic cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallavollita, James A; Heavey, Brendan M; Luisi, Andrew J; Michalek, Suzanne M; Baldwa, Sunil; Mashtare, Terry L; Hutson, Alan D; Dekemp, Robert A; Haka, Michael S; Sajjad, Munawwar; Cimato, Thomas R; Curtis, Anne B; Cain, Michael E; Canty, John M

    2014-01-21

    The PAREPET (Prediction of ARrhythmic Events with Positron Emission Tomography) study sought to test the hypothesis that quantifying inhomogeneity in myocardial sympathetic innervation could identify patients at highest risk for sudden cardiac arrest (SCA). Left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) is the only parameter identifying patients at risk of SCA who benefit from an implantable cardiac defibrillator (ICD). We prospectively enrolled 204 subjects with ischemic cardiomyopathy (LVEF ≤35%) eligible for primary prevention ICDs. Positron emission tomography (PET) was used to quantify myocardial sympathetic denervation ((11)C-meta-hydroxyephedrine [(11)C-HED]), perfusion ((13)N-ammonia) and viability (insulin-stimulated (18)F-2-deoxyglucose). The primary endpoint was SCA defined as arrhythmic death or ICD discharge for ventricular fibrillation or ventricular tachycardia >240 beats/min. After 4.1 years follow-up, cause-specific SCA was 16.2%. Infarct volume (22 ± 7% vs. 19 ± 9% of left ventricle [LV]) and LVEF (24 ± 8% vs. 28 ± 9%) were not predictors of SCA. In contrast, patients developing SCA had greater amounts of sympathetic denervation (33 ± 10% vs. 26 ± 11% of LV; p = 0.001) reflecting viable, denervated myocardium. The lower tertiles of sympathetic denervation had SCA rates of 1.2%/year and 2.2%/year, whereas the highest tertile had a rate of 6.7%/year. Multivariate predictors of SCA were PET sympathetic denervation, left ventricular end-diastolic volume index, creatinine, and no angiotensin inhibition. With optimized cut-points, the absence of all 4 risk factors identified low risk (44% of cohort; SCA <1%/year); whereas ≥2 factors identified high risk (20% of cohort; SCA ∼12%/year). In ischemic cardiomyopathy, sympathetic denervation assessed using (11)C-HED PET predicts cause-specific mortality from SCA independently of LVEF and infarct volume. This may provide an improved approach for the identification of patients most likely to benefit from

  17. Long-term facilitation of expiratory and sympathetic activities following acute intermittent hypoxia in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemes, E V; Aiko, S; Orbem, C B; Formentin, C; Bassi, M; Colombari, E; Zoccal, D B

    2016-07-01

    Acute intermittent hypoxia (AIH) promotes persistent increases in ventilation and sympathetic activity, referred as long-term facilitation (LTF). Augmented inspiratory activity is suggested as a major component of respiratory LTF. In this study, we hypothesized that AIH also elicits a sustained increase in expiratory motor activity. We also investigated whether the expiratory LTF contributes to the development of sympathetic LTF after AIH. Rats were exposed to AIH (10 × 6-7% O2 for 45 s, every 5 min), and the cardiorespiratory parameters were evaluated during 60 min using in vivo and in situ approaches. In unanesthetized conditions (n = 9), AIH elicited a modest but sustained increase in baseline mean arterial pressure (MAP, 104 ± 2 vs. 111 ± 3 mmHg, P < 0.05) associated with enhanced sympathetic and respiratory-related variabilities. In the in situ preparations (n = 9), AIH evoked LTF in phrenic (33 ± 12%), thoracic sympathetic (75 ± 25%) and abdominal nerve activities (69 ± 14%). The sympathetic overactivity after AIH was phase-locked with the emergence of bursts in abdominal activity during the late-expiratory phase. In anesthetized vagus-intact animals, AIH increased baseline MAP (113 ± 3 vs. 122 ± 2 mmHg, P < 0.05) and abdominal muscle activity (535 ± 94%), which were eliminated after pharmacological inhibition of the retrotrapezoid nucleus/parafacial respiratory group (RTN/pFRG). These findings indicate that increased expiratory activity is also an important component of AIH-elicited respiratory LTF. Moreover, the development of sympathetic LTF after AIH is linked to the emergence of active expiratory pattern and depends on the integrity of the neurones of the RTN/pFRG. © 2016 Scandinavian Physiological Society. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Sympathetic regulation of blood pressure in normotension and hypertension: when sex matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briant, L J B; Charkoudian, N; Hart, E C

    2016-02-01

    What is the topic of this review? Hypertension is a major problem in Western society. Risk of hypertension increases with age, especially in women, who have lower risk compared with men until menopause. This review outlines the sex differences in the sympathetic control of blood pressure and how these mechanisms change with age. What advances does it highlight? It has recently been recognized that men and women regulate blood pressure by different physiological mechanisms. This is important for both the understanding and the clinical management of individual patients with hypertension. This review summarizes recent advances in understanding how the regulation of blood pressure in hypertension by the sympathetic nervous system differs between men and women. The sympathetic nervous system has a central role in the regulation of arterial blood pressure (BP) and in the development of hypertension in humans. Recent evidence points to differences between the sexes in the integrative mechanisms by which BP is controlled, suggesting that the development of hypertension may follow distinct pathways in women compared with men. An important aspect of sympathetic control of BP is its substantial interindividual variability. In healthy young men, the variability in sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) is balanced by variability in cardiac output and vascular adrenergic responses, such that BP remains similar, and normal, across a severalfold range of resting SNA values. In young women, variability in resting SNA is similar to that seen in men, but the 'balancing' mechanisms are strikingly different; women exhibit greater β-adrenergic vasodilatation compared with men, which minimizes the pressor effects of a given level of SNA. Ageing is associated with increased SNA and a loss of the balancing factors seen in younger people, leading to an increased risk of hypertension in older people. Loss of oestrogen with menopause in women appears to be linked mechanistically with the decrease

  19. Sympathetic activity of S-(+-ketamine low doses in the epidural space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slobodan Mihaljevic

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: S-(+-ketamine is an intravenous anaesthetic and sympathomimetic with properties of local anaesthetic. It has an effect of an analgetic and local anaesthetic when administered epidurally, but there are no data whether low doses of S-(+-ketamine have sympathomimetic effects. The aim of this study was to determine whether low doses of S-(+-ketamine, given epidurally together with local anaesthetic, have any effect on sympathetic nervous system, both systemic and below the level of anaesthetic block. METHODS: The study was conducted on two groups of patients to whom epidural anaesthesia was administered to. Local anaesthesia (0.5% bupivacaine was given to one group (control group while local anaesthesia and S-(+-ketamine were given to other group. Age, height, weight, systolic, diastolic and mean arterial blood pressure were measured. Non-competitive enzyme immunochemistry method (Cat Combi ELISA was used to determine the concentrations of catecholamines (adrenaline and noradrenaline. Immunoenzymometric determination with luminescent substrate on a machine called Vitros Eci was used to determine the concentration of cortisol. Pulse transit time was measured using photoplethysmography. Mann-Whitney U-test, Wilcoxon test and Friedman ANOVA were the statistical tests. Blood pressure, pulse, adrenaline, noradrenaline and cortisol concentrations were measured in order to estimate systemic sympathetic effects. RESULTS: 40 patients in the control group were given 0.5% bupivacaine and 40 patients in the test group were given 0.5% bupivacaine with S-(+-ketamine. Value p < 0.05 has been taken as a limit of statistical significance. CONCLUSIONS: Low dose of S-(+-ketamine administered epidurally had no sympathomimetic effects; it did not change blood pressure, pulse, serum hormones or pulse transit time. Low dose of S-(+-ketamine administered epidurally did not deepen sympathetic block. Adding 25 mg of S-(+-ketamine to 0

  20. Anorexia nervosa depends on adrenal sympathetic hyperactivity: opposite neuroautonomic profile of hyperinsulinism syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lechin F

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Fuad Lechin1,2, Bertha van der Dijs1,2, Betty Pardey-Maldonado1, Jairo E Rivera1, Scarlet Baez1, Marcel E Lechin31Department of Pathophysiology, Sections of Neuroendocrinology, Neuropharmacology, and Neurochemistry, Instituto de Medicina Experimental, Faculty of Medicine, Universidad Central de Venezuela, Caracas; 2Instituto de Vias Digestivas Caracas, Centro Clínico Profesional, Caracas, Venezuela; 3Department of Internal Medicine, Texas A and M Health Science Center, College of Medicine, Texas, USAObjective: The aim of our study was to determine the central and peripheral autonomic nervous system profiles underlying anorexia nervosa (AN syndrome, given that affected patients present with the opposite clinical profile to that seen in the hyperinsulinism syndrome.Design: We measured blood pressure and heart rate, as well as circulating neurotransmitters (noradrenaline, adrenaline, dopamine, plasma serotonin, and platelet serotonin, using high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection, during supine resting, one minute of orthostasis, and after five minutes of exercise. In total, 22 AN patients (12 binge-eating/purging type and 10 restricting type and age-, gender-, and race-matched controls (70 ± 10.1% versus 98 ± 3.0% of ideal body weight were recruited.Results: We found that patients with AN had adrenal sympathetic overactivity and neural sympathetic underactivity, demonstrated by a predominance of circulating adrenaline over noradrenaline levels, not only during the supine resting state (52 ± 2 versus 29 ± 1 pg/mL but also during orthostasis (67 ± 3 versus 32 ± 2 pg/mL, P < 0.05 and after exercise challenge (84 ± 4 versus 30 ± 3 pg/mL, P < 0.01.Conclusion: Considering that this peripheral autonomic nervous system disorder depends on the absolute predominance of adrenomedullary C1 adrenergic nuclei over A5 noradrenergic pontine nucleus, let us ratify the abovementioned findings. The AN syndrome depends on the

  1. Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis: Treatment and Prognosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajime Fujimoto

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF is a chronic progressive lung disease with a prognosis that can be worse than for many cancers. The initial stages of the condition were thought to mainly involve chronic inflammation; therefore, corticosteroids and other drugs that have anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive actions were used. However, recently, agents targeting persistent fibrosis resulting from aberrant repair of alveolar epithelial injury have been in the spotlight. There has also been an increase in the number of available antifibrotic treatment options, starting with pirfenidone and nintedanib. These drugs prevent deterioration but do not improve IPF. Therefore, nonpharmacologic approaches such as long-term oxygen therapy, pulmonary rehabilitation, and lung transplantation must be considered as additional treatment modalities.

  2. Prognosis of depression in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meats, P; Timol, M; Jolley, D

    1991-11-01

    Fifty-six consecutively admitted elderly (65 and over) patients with depression were assessed on mental, physical and social states. They were followed up and assessed at home one year later. A group of 24 depressed in-patients aged under 65 years admitted to the same ward during the same period was also assessed. Outcome was different for the two groups, with 68% of the elderly 'well' at one year, against 50% of the younger group. The younger group were more likely to have 'poor' outcome (41%) than the elderly (16%). However, there were more deaths than expected, particularly in the elderly. These findings differ from some previous studies, and indicate an excellent prognosis for depression in the elderly. Outcome in younger patients is less good.

  3. Prognosis of ventricular fibrillation in hospital

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, G V; Torp-Pedersen, C; Køber, L

    1992-01-01

    In a retrospective study of 520 patients with in-hospital ventricular fibrillation 421 (81%) had acute myocardial infarction (MI), 66 (13%) had ischaemic heart disease (IHD) without MI, 33 (6%) had no signs of IHD. The in-hospital mortality of these three groups was 51%, 52%, and 27%, respectively...... (P = 0.01). Logistic regression analysis demonstrated that heart failure and cardiogenic shock were significant risk factors for in-hospital death among patients with IHD. Among discharged patients 1 and 5 years survival was 78% and 51% for patients with MI, 63% and 25% for patients with IHD, 67...... with known IHD suffering in-hospital VF without AMI have a very poor short- and long-term prognosis. These patients need extensive cardiac examination....

  4. C-Reactive Protein Is an Important Biomarker for Prognosis Tumor Recurrence and Treatment Response in Adult Solid Tumors: A Systematic Review.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shrotriya, Shiva

    2015-01-01

    A systematic literature review was done to determine the relationship between elevated CRP and prognosis in people with solid tumors. C-reactive protein (CRP) is a serum acute phase reactant and a well-established inflammatory marker. We also examined the role of CRP to predict treatment response and tumor recurrence.

  5. VSM growth is stimulated in sympathetic neuron/VSM cocultures: role of TGF-beta2 and endothelin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damon, D H

    2000-02-01

    Sympathetic nerves are purported to stimulate blood vessel growth. The mechanism(s) underlying this stimulation has not been determined. With use of an in vitro coculture model, the present study tests the hypothesis that sympathetic neurons stimulate the growth of vascular smooth muscle (VSM) and evaluates potential mechanisms mediating this stimulation. Sympathetic neurons isolated from superior cervical ganglia (SCG) stimulated the growth of VSM. Growth of VSM in the presence of SCG (856 +/- 81%) was significantly greater than that in the absence of SCG (626 +/- 66%, P VSM growth in transwell cocultures. An antibody that neutralized the activity of transforming growth factor-beta2 (TGF-beta2) inhibited SCG stimulation of VSM growth in coculture. SCG stimulation of VSM growth was also inhibited by an endothelin A receptor antagonist. These data suggest novel mechanisms for sympathetic modulation of vascular growth that may play a role in the physiological and/or pathological growth of the vasculature.

  6. Meal-induced activation of the sympathetic nervous system and its cardiovascular and thermogenic effects in man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Baak, Marleen A

    2008-05-23

    The postprandial activation of the peripheral sympathetic nervous system is crucial to maintain cardiovascular homeostasis. A contribution of postprandial sympathetic activation to the thermic effect of food is not always evident and depends on the size and composition of the meal, with carbohydrates having the clearest effect. Signals related to food intake from various origins (e.g. gut, hepatoportal area, baroreceptors) are integrated in the brain and result in increased peripheral sympathetic outflow. It is of interest to further explore the role of diet composition in the level of sympathetic activation during the day in view of the potential role of adrenergic overactivity in the pathogenesis of obesity and its cardiovascular and metabolic comorbidities.

  7. Bed rest attenuates sympathetic and pressor responses to isometric exercise in antigravity leg muscles in humans.(Author Abstract)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Michikami, Daisaku; Mano, Tadaaki; Iwase, Satoshi; Shiozawa, Tomoki; Hayano, Junichiro; Sunagawa, Kenji; Kawada, Toru; Kamiya, Atsunori

    2004-01-01

    Although spaceflight and bed rest are known to cause muscular atrophy in the antigravity muscles of the legs, the changes in sympathetic and cardiovascular responses to exercises using the atrophied...

  8. A review of the autonomic nervous system and exploration of diagnoses associated with reflex sympathetic dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, C

    1994-01-01

    The hand therapy literature about reflex sympathetic dystrophy (RSD) tends to discuss this phenomenon in terms of traumatic hand or upper-extremity injury etiology. Hand therapists' bibliographies run the risk of being inbred and delimited to orthopedic and neurologic sources. Nonetheless, this well-developed body of knowledge identifies cardinal signs and symptoms, stages, and clinical types of RSD. Therapy guidelines have been well detailed in accordance with pathophysiologic explanations. The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of the autonomic nervous system (ANS), to briefly consider the history of the term "sympathetic," and to explore familiar and less well-known predisposing events and associated diagnoses. Appreciating the gamut of diagnoses associated with RSD may promote additional opportunities for hand therapist collaboration in the care for this complicated and challenging diagnostic group.

  9. Does the sympathetic nervous system contribute to the pathophysiology of metabolic syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Marina C. dos Santos; Pinto, Izabella S. de Jesus; Mourão, Aline A.; Fajemiroye, James O.; Colombari, Eduardo; Reis, Ângela A. da Silva; Freiria-Oliveira, André H.; Ferreira-Neto, Marcos L.; Pedrino, Gustavo R.

    2015-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome (MS), formally known as syndrome X, is a clustering of several risk factors such as obesity, hypertension, insulin resistance, and dislypidemia which could lead to the development of diabetes and cardiovascular diseases (CVD). The frequent changes in the definition and diagnostic criteria of MS are indications of the controversy and the challenges surrounding the understanding of this syndrome among researchers. Obesity and insulin resistance are leading risk factors of MS. Moreover, obesity and hypertension are closely associated to the increase and aggravation of oxidative stress. The recommended treatment of MS frequently involves change of lifestyles to prevent weight gain. MS is not only an important screening tool for the identification of individuals at high risk of CVD and diabetes but also an indicator of suitable treatment. As sympathetic disturbances and oxidative stress are often associated with obesity and hypertension, the present review summarizes the role of sympathetic nervous system and oxidative stress in the MS. PMID:26379553

  10. Changes in muscle sympathetic nerve activity and calf blood flow during static handgrip exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, M; Mano, T; Iwase, S

    1990-01-01

    To test the function of sympathetic vasco-constrictor nerves on blood flow in resting limbs during static muscle contraction, muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) to the leg muscle was recorded from the tibial nerve microneurographically before, during and after 2 min of static handgrip (SHG). Simultaneously, calf blood flow (CBF) was measured by strain gauge plethysmography. An increase in MSNA, a decrease in CBF and an increase in calf vascular resistance (CVR) in the same resting limb occurred concomitantly during SHG. However, the increase in CVR was blunted in the second minute of handgrip when MSNA was still increasing. The results indicated that the decrease of CBF during SHG reflects the increase in MSNA, while the dissociation between MSNA and CVR at the later period of SHG may be related to metabolic change produced by the vasoconstriction.

  11. Head-up suspension in humans: effects on sympathetic vasomotor activity and cardiovascular responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamsuzzaman, A S; Sugiyama, Y; Kamiya, A; Fu, Q; Mano, T

    1998-05-01

    We hypothesized that muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) and cardiovascular responses to the conventional head-up tilt (HUT) are different from those to head-up suspension (HUS) because of antigravity muscle activity. The MSNA from the tibial nerve, heart rate, blood pressure, stroke volume, cardiac output, and calf blood flow were measured in 13 healthy young subjects. Left atrial diameter was measured by two-dimensional echocardiography in another nine subjects. The resting MSNA and cardiovascular responses at a low level (20 degrees) of orthostasis were similar during both modes. At higher levels (40 and 60 degrees), the responses of MSNA, heart rate, stroke volume, and cardiac output were significantly stronger and there was a smaller reduction in calf blood flow during HUT than during HUS (P antigravity muscles during HUT may have additive effects on sympathetic vasoconstrictor and cardiovascular responses to orthostatic stress.

  12. Central and cerebrovascular effects of leg crossing in humans with sympathetic failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harms, Mark P M; Wieling, Wouter; Colier, Willy N J M

    2010-01-01

    Leg crossing increases arterial pressure and combats symptomatic orthostatic hypotension in patients with sympathetic failure. This study compared the central and cerebrovascular effects of leg crossing in patients with sympathetic failure and healthy controls. We addressed the relationship between......-matched controls during leg crossing. In the patients, leg crossing increased MAP from 58 (42-79) to 72 (52-89) compared with 84 (70-95) to 90 (74-94) mmHg in the controls. MCA Vmean increased from 55 (38-77) to 63 (45-80) and from 56 (46-77) to 64 (46-80) cm/s respectively (P....12 (0.52-3.27)] in the patients compared with the controls [0.83 (-0.11 to 2.04) micromol/l]. In the control subjects, CO increased 11% (P

  13. Autonomic Nervous System Responses to Viewing Green and Built Settings: Differentiating Between Sympathetic and Parasympathetic Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena M.H.E. van den Berg

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This laboratory study explored buffering and recovery effects of viewing urban green and built spaces on autonomic nervous system activity. Forty-six students viewed photos of green and built spaces immediately following, and preceding acute stress induction. Simultaneously recorded electrocardiogram and impedance cardiogram signal was used to derive respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA and pre-ejection period (PEP, indicators of respectively parasympathetic and sympathetic activity. The findings provide support for greater recovery after viewing green scenes, as marked by a stronger increase in RSA as a marker of parasympathetic activity. There were no indications for greater recovery after viewing green scenes in PEP as a marker of sympathetic activity, and there were also no indications of greater buffering effects of green space in neither RSA nor PEP. Overall, our findings are consistent with a predominant role of the parasympathetic nervous system in restorative effects of viewing green space.

  14. Skuldertesten "Kombineret Elevation"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Mikkel Bek; Overkær, Brian

    2010-01-01

    Formål: At udarbejde en testprotokol for testen Kombineret Elevation (KE) og undersøge test-retest variationen ved test af elite svømmere, samt diskutere testens relevans og validitet. Materiale og Metode: 9 elite og 10 sub-elite svømmere, heraf var 11 mænd og 8 kvinder, gennemførte testen KE 2...

  15. STEAL PHENOMENON AFTER LUMBAR AND THORACIC SYMPATHETIC GANGLION BLOCKADE IN DOGS1 THE INFLUENCE OF INTRAVASCULAR VOLUME

    OpenAIRE

    Marunaka, Shu; Hashizume, Keiji; Yamagami, Hiroaki; MIYATA, Yoshihisa; Furuya, Hitoshi

    2000-01-01

    The steal phenomenon between the bilateral sides following unilateral sympathetic denervation can be influenced by intravascular blood volume. We studied the changes in skin temperature as an indicator of this phenomenon induced by unilateral lumbar or thoracic sympathetic ganglion blockade in dogs under various hemodynamics. Each of 30 dogs in lumbar and thoracic experiments, which were divided into three groups according to mean right atrial pressure (RAP, mmHg) as hypovolemic (RAP<3 ; n=10...

  16. High Dialysate Calcium Concentration May Cause More Sympathetic Stimulus During Hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez, Zaida N C; Silva, Bruno C; Reis, Luciene Dos; Castro, Manuel C M; Ramos, Camila D; Costa-Hong, Valeria; Bortolotto, Luiz A; Consolim-Colombo, Fernanda; Dominguez, Wagner V; Oliveira, Ivone B; Moysés, Rosa M A; Elias, Rosilene M

    2016-01-01

    Acute activation of sympathetic activation during hemodialysis is essential to maintain blood pressure (BP), albeit long-term overactivity contributes to higher mortality. Low heart rate variability (HRV), a measure of autonomic nervous system activity, and abnormal ankle-brachial index (ABI) are associated with higher mortality in patients on hemodialysis. In this study, we assessed HRV and ABI pre and post dialysis in incident patients on hemodialysis using high (1.75mmol/l) and low (1.25mmol/l) dialysate calcium concentration (DCa). HRV was measured as the ratio between low frequency and high frequency power (LF/HF). Thirty patients (age 47±16 years, 67% men) were studied in two consecutive mid-week hemodialysis sessions. Mean BP variation was positive with DCa 1.75 and negative with DCa 1.25 [4.0 (-6.0, 12.2 mmHg) vs. -3.2 (-9.8, 1.3 mmHg); p=0.050]. Reduction of ABI from pre to post HD was related to higher sympathetic activity (p=0.031). The increase in LF/HF ratio was higher with DCa 1.75 (58.3% vs. 41.7% in DCa 1.75 and 1.25, respectively, RR 2.8; p=0.026). Although higher DCa is associated with better hemodynamic tolerability during hemodialysis, this occurs at the expense of increased sympathetic activity. Higher sympathetic activity was associated with a decrease of ABI during hemodialysis. © 2016 The Author(s) Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. High Dialysate Calcium Concentration May Cause More Sympathetic Stimulus During Hemodialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaida N. C. Jimenez

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Acute activation of sympathetic activation during hemodialysis is essential to maintain blood pressure (BP, albeit long-term overactivity contributes to higher mortality. Low heart rate variability (HRV, a measure of autonomic nervous system activity, and abnormal ankle-brachial index (ABI are associated with higher mortality in patients on hemodialysis. In this study, we assessed HRV and ABI pre and post dialysis in incident patients on hemodialysis using high (1.75mmol/l and low (1.25mmol/l dialysate calcium concentration (DCa. Methods: HRV was measured as the ratio between low frequency and high frequency power (LF/HF. Thirty patients (age 47±16 years, 67% men were studied in two consecutive mid-week hemodialysis sessions. Results: Mean BP variation was positive with DCa 1.75 and negative with DCa 1.25 [4.0 (-6.0, 12.2 mmHg vs. -3.2 (-9.8, 1.3 mmHg; p=0.050]. Reduction of ABI from pre to post HD was related to higher sympathetic activity (p=0.031. The increase in LF/HF ratio was higher with DCa 1.75 (58.3% vs. 41.7% in DCa 1.75 and 1.25, respectively, RR 2.8; p=0.026. Conclusion: Although higher DCa is associated with better hemodynamic tolerability during hemodialysis, this occurs at the expense of increased sympathetic activity. Higher sympathetic activity was associated with a decrease of ABI during hemodialysis.

  18. A brain leptin-renin angiotensin system interaction in the regulation of sympathetic nerve activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilzendeger, Aline M.; Morgan, Donald A.; Brooks, Leonard; Dellsperger, David; Liu, Xuebo; Grobe, Justin L.; Rahmouni, Kamal; Sigmund, Curt D.

    2012-01-01

    The sympathetic nervous system, leptin, and renin-angiotensin system (RAS) have been implicated in obesity-associated hypertension. There is increasing evidence for the presence of both leptin and angiotensin II receptors in several key brain cardiovascular and metabolic control regions. We tested the hypothesis that the brain RAS plays a facilitatory role in the sympathetic nerve responses to leptin. In rats, intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of losartan (5 μg) selectively inhibited increases in renal and brown adipose tissue (BAT) sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) produced by leptin (10 μg ICV) but did not reduce the SNA responses to corticotrophin-releasing factor (CRF) or the melanocortin receptor agonist MTII. In mice with deletion of angiotensin II type-1a receptors (AT1aR−/−), increases in renal and BAT SNA induced by leptin (2 μg ICV) were impaired whereas SNA responses to MTII were preserved. Decreases in food intake and body weight with ICV leptin did not differ in AT1aR−/− vs. AT1aR+/+ mice. ICV leptin in rats increased AT1aR and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) mRNA in the subfornical organ and AT1aR mRNA in the arcuate nucleus, suggesting leptin-induced upregulation of the brain RAS in specific brain regions. To evaluate the role of de novo production of brain angiotensin II in SNA responses to leptin, we treated rats with captopril (12.5 μg ICV). Captopril attenuated leptin effects on renal and BAT SNA. In conclusion, these studies provide evidence that the brain RAS selectively facilitates renal and BAT sympathetic nerve responses to leptin while sparing effects on food intake. PMID:22610169

  19. [Autonomic angiotensinergic fibres in the human heart with an efferent sympathetic cophenotype].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohlender, J; Nussberger, J; Tevaearai, H; Imboden, H

    2015-06-01

    The autonomic innervation of the heart consists of sympathetic and parasympathetic nerve fibres, and fibres of the intrinsic ganglionated plexus with noradrenaline and acytylcholine as principal neurotransmitters. The fibres co-release neuropeptides to modulate intracardiac neurotransmission by specific presynaptic and postsynaptic receptors. The coexpression of angiotensin II in sympathetic fibres of the human heart and its role are not known so far. Autopsy specimens of human hearts were studied (n=3; ventricles). Using immunocytological methods, cryostat sections were stained by a murine monoclonal antibody (4B3) directed against angiotensin II and co-stained by polyclonal antibodies against tyrosine hydroxylase, a catecholaminergic marker. Visualisation of the antibodies was by confocal light microscopy or laser scanning microscopy. Angiotensin II-positive autonomic fibres with and without a catecholaminergic cophenotype (hydroxylase-positive) were found in all parts of the human ventricles. In the epicardium, the fibres were grouped in larger bundles of up to 100 and more fibres. They followed the preformed anatomic septa and epicardial vessels towards the myocardium and endocardium where the bundles dissolved and the individual fibres spread between myocytes and within the endocardium. Generally, angiotensinergic fibres showed no synaptic enlargements or only a few if they were also catecholaminergic. The exclusively catechalominergic fibres were characterised by multiple beaded synapses. The autonomic innervation of the human heart contains angiotensinergic fibres with a sympathetic efferent phenotype and exclusively angiotensinergic fibers representing probably afferents. Angiotensinergic neurotransmission may modulate intracardiac sympathetic and parasympathetic activity and thereby influence cardiac and circulatory function. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. White Matter Changes Associated with Resting Sympathetic Tone in Frontotemporal Dementia vs. Alzheimer's Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario F Mendez

    Full Text Available Resting sympathetic tone, a measure of physiological arousal, is decreased in patients with apathy and inertia, such as those with behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD and other frontally-predominant disorders.To identify the neuroanatomical correlates of skin conductance levels (SCLs, an index of resting sympathetic tone and apathy, among patients with bvFTD, where SCLs is decreased, compared to those with Alzheimer's disease (AD, where it is not.This study analyzed bvFTD (n = 14 patients and a comparison group with early-onset AD (n = 19. We compared their resting SCLs with gray matter and white matter regions of interest and white matter measures of fiber integrity on magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion tensor imaging.As expected, bvFTD patients, compared to AD patients, had lower SCLs, which correlated with an apathy measure, and more gray matter loss and abnormalities of fiber integrity (fractional anisotropy and mean diffusivity in frontal-anterior temporal regions. After controlling for group membership, the SCLs were significantly correlated with white matter volumes in the cingulum and inferior parietal region in the right hemisphere.Among dementia patients, SCLs, and resting sympathetic tone, may correlate with quantity of white matter, rather than with gray matter or with white matter fiber integrity. Loss of white matter volumes, especially involving a right frontoparietal network, may reflect chronic loss of cortical axons that mediate frontal control of resting sympathetic tone, changes that could contribute to the apathy and inertia of bvFTD and related disorders.

  1. Micro-anatomy of the renal sympathetic nervous system: a human postmortem histologic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atherton, Daniel S; Deep, Nicholas L; Mendelsohn, Farrell O

    2012-07-01

    Hypertension remains an epidemic uncontrolled with pharmacologic therapies. A novel catheter inserted into the renal artery has been shown to lower blood pressure by ablating the renal sympathetic nerves with radiofrequency energy delivered through the arterial wall. We report a histologic study describing the anatomic substrate for this technique, specifically the renal sympathetic nervous system. Histological sections from proximal, middle, and distal renal artery segments from nine renal arteries (five human autopsies) were analyzed. Nerves were manually counted and their distance from the lumen-intima interface was measured using a micrometer. The nerves were then categorized by location into 0.5-mm-wide "rings" that were arranged circumferentially around the renal artery lumen. Of all nerves detected, 1.0% was in the 0-0.5 mm ring, 48.3% were in the 0.5-1.0 mm ring, 25.6% were in the 1.0-1.5 mm ring, 15.5% were in the 1.5-2.0 mm ring, and 9.5% were in the 2.0-2.5 mm ring. Beyond 0.5 mm, the proportion of nerves tended to decrease as the distance from the lumen increased. Totally, 90.5% of all nerves in this study existed within 2.0 mm of the renal artery lumen. Additionally, the number of nerves tended to increase along the length of the artery from proximal to distal segments (proximal = 216; middle = 323; distal = 417). In conclusion, our analysis indicates that a great proportion of renal sympathetic nerves have close proximity to the lumen-intima interface and should thus be accessible via renal artery interventional approaches such as catheter ablation. This data provides important anatomic information for the development of ablation and other type devices for renal sympathetic denervation. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Effects of nitric oxide synthase inhibition on sympathetically-mediated tachycardia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whalen, E. J.; Johnson, A. K.; Lewis, S. J.

    1999-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine whether inhibition of nitric oxide (NO) synthesis directly alters the tachycardia produced by sympathetically-derived norepinephrine. The NO synthase inhibitor, N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME; 50 micromol/kg, i.v.), produced a marked rise in mean arterial blood pressure. This pressor response was associated with a fall in heart rate which involved the withdrawal of cardiac sympathetic nerve activity. The NO-donor, sodium nitroprusside (5 microg/kg, i.v.), produced a pronounced fall in mean arterial blood pressure but only a minor increase in heart rate. The beta-adrenoceptor agonist, isoproterenol (0.5 micromol/kg, i.v.), and the membrane-permeable cAMP analogue, 8-(4-chlorophenylthiol)-cAMP (10 micromol/kg, i.v.), produced falls in mean arterial blood pressure and pronounced increases in heart rate. The indirectly acting sympathomimetic agent, tyramine (0.5 mg/kg, i.v.), produced a pressor response and a tachycardia. The effects of sodium nitroprusside, tyramine, isoproterenol and 8-(4-chlorophenylthiol)-cAMP on mean arterial blood pressure were not markedly affected by L-NAME. However, the tachycardia produced by these agents was considerably exaggerated in the presence of this NO synthesis inhibitor. These findings suggest that L-NAME potentiates the tachycardia produced by sympathetically-derived norepinephrine. The increased responsiveness to norepinephrine may involve (i) a rapid up-regulation of cardiac beta1-adrenoceptors and cAMP signaling in cardiac pacemaker cells due to the loss of the inhibitory influence of cardiac NO, and (ii) the up-regulation of beta1-adrenoceptor-mediated signal transduction processes in response to the L-NAME-induced withdrawal of cardiac sympathetic nerve activity.

  3. Central efferent pathways mediating skin cooling-evoked sympathetic thermogenesis in brown adipose tissue

    OpenAIRE

    Nakamura, Kazuhiro; Morrison, Shaun F.

    2006-01-01

    Control of thermoregulatory effectors by the autonomic nervous system is a critical component of rapid cold-defense responses, which are triggered by thermal information from the skin. However, the central autonomic mechanism driving thermoregulatory effector responses to skin thermal signals remains to be determined. Here, we examined the involvement of several autonomic brain regions in sympathetic thermogenic responses in brown adipose tissue (BAT) to skin cooling in urethane-chloralose-an...

  4. 1.5 T augmented reality navigated interventional MRI: paravertebral sympathetic plexus injections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marker, David R; U Thainual, Paweena; Ungi, Tamas; Flammang, Aaron J; Fichtinger, Gabor; Iordachita, Iulian I; Carrino, John A; Fritz, Jan

    2017-01-01

    The high contrast resolution and absent ionizing radiation of interventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be advantageous for paravertebral sympathetic nerve plexus injections. We assessed the feasibility and technical performance of MRI-guided paravertebral sympathetic injections utilizing augmented reality navigation and 1.5 T MRI scanner. A total of 23 bilateral injections of the thoracic (8/23, 35%), lumbar (8/23, 35%), and hypogastric (7/23, 30%) paravertebral sympathetic plexus were prospectively planned in twelve human cadavers using a 1.5 Tesla (T) MRI scanner and augmented reality navigation system. MRI-conditional needles were used. Gadolinium-DTPA-enhanced saline was injected. Outcome variables included the number of control magnetic resonance images, target error of the needle tip, punctures of critical nontarget structures, distribution of the injected fluid, and procedure length. Augmented-reality navigated MRI guidance at 1.5 T provided detailed anatomical visualization for successful targeting of the paravertebral space, needle placement, and perineural paravertebral injections in 46 of 46 targets (100%). A mean of 2 images (range, 1-5 images) were required to control needle placement. Changes of the needle trajectory occurred in 9 of 46 targets (20%) and changes of needle advancement occurred in 6 of 46 targets (13%), which were statistically not related to spinal regions (P = 0.728 and P = 0.86, respectively) and cadaver sizes (P = 0.893 and P = 0.859, respectively). The mean error of the needle tip was 3.9±1.7 mm. There were no punctures of critical nontarget structures. The mean procedure length was 33±12 min. 1.5 T augmented reality-navigated interventional MRI can provide accurate imaging guidance for perineural injections of the thoracic, lumbar, and hypogastric sympathetic plexus.

  5. Vestibular Modulation of Sympathetic Nerve Activity to Muscle and Skin in Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elie Hammam

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available We review the existence of vestibulosympathetic reflexes in humans. While several methods to activate the human vestibular apparatus have been used, galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS is a means of selectively modulating vestibular afferent activity via electrodes over the mastoid processes, causing robust vestibular illusions of side-to-side movement. Sinusoidal GVS (sGVS causes partial entrainment of sympathetic outflow to muscle and skin. Modulation of muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA from vestibular inputs competes with baroreceptor inputs, with stronger temporal coupling to the vestibular stimulus being observed at frequencies remote from the cardiac frequency; “super entrainment” was observed in some individuals. Low-frequency (<0.2 Hz sGVS revealed two peaks of modulation per cycle, with bilateral recordings of MSNA or skin sympathetic nerve activity, providing evidence of lateralization of sympathetic outflow during vestibular stimulation. However, it should be noted that GVS influences the firing of afferents from the entire vestibular apparatus, including the semicircular canals. To identify the specific source of vestibular input responsible for the generation of vestibulosympathetic reflexes, we used low-frequency (<0.2 Hz sinusoidal linear acceleration of seated or supine subjects to, respectively, target the utricular or saccular components of the otoliths. While others had discounted the semicircular canals, we showed that the contributions of the utricle and saccule to the vestibular modulation of MSNA are very similar. Moreover, that modulation of MSNA occurs at accelerations well below levels at which subjects are able to perceive any motion indicates that, like vestibulospinal control of posture, the vestibular system contributes to the control of blood pressure through potent reflexes in humans.

  6. Effects of tiotropium on sympathetic activation during exercise in stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kitada S

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Kenji Yoshimura, Ryoji Maekura, Toru Hiraga, Seigo Kitada, Keisuke Miki, Mari Miki, Yoshitaka TateishiDepartment of Respiratory Medicine, Toneyama National Hospital, Osaka, JapanBackground: Tiotropium partially relieves exertional dyspnea and reduces the risk of congestive heart failure in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD patients. However, its effect on the sympathetic activation response to exercise is unknown.Aims: This study aimed to determine whether tiotropium use results in a sustained reduction in sympathetic activation during exercise.Methods: We conducted a 12-week, open-label (treatments: tiotropium 18 µg or oxitropium 0.2 mg × 3 mg, crossover study in 17 COPD patients. Treatment order was randomized across subjects. The subjects underwent a pulmonary function test and two modes of cardiopulmonary exercise (constant work rate and incremental exercise testing using a cycle ergometer, with measurement of arterial catecholamines after each treatment period.Results: Forced expiratory volume in 1 second and forced vital capacity were significantly larger in the tiotropium treatment group. In constant exercise testing, exercise endurance time was longer, with improvement in dyspnea during exercise and reduction in dynamic hyperinflation in the tiotropium treatment group. Similarly, in incremental exercise testing, exercise time, carbon dioxide production, and minute ventilation at peak exercise were significantly higher in the tiotropium treatment group. Plasma norepinephrine concentrations and dyspnea intensity were also lower during submaximal isotime exercise and throughout the incremental workload exercise in the tiotropium treatment group.Conclusion: Tiotropium suppressed the increase of sympathetic activation during exercise at the end of the 6-week treatment, as compared with the effect of oxipropium. This effect might be attributed to improvement in lung function and exercise capacity and reduction in exertional dyspnea

  7. Sympathetic Neural Adaptation to Hypocaloric Diet With or Without Exercise Training in Obese Metabolic Syndrome Subjects

    OpenAIRE

    Straznicky, Nora E.; Lambert, Elisabeth A.; Nestel, Paul J.; McGrane, Mariee T.; Dawood, Tye; Schlaich, Markus P.; Masuo, Kazuko; Eikelis, Nina; de Courten, Barbora; Mariani, Justin A.; Esler, Murray D.; Socratous, Florentia; Chopra, Reena; Sari, Carolina I.; Paul, Eldho

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Sympathetic nervous system (SNS) overactivity contributes to the pathogenesis and target organ complications of obesity. This study was conducted to examine the effects of lifestyle interventions (weight loss alone or together with exercise) on SNS function. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Untreated men and women (mean age 55 ? 1 year; BMI 32.3 ? 0.5 kg/m2) who fulfilled Adult Treatment Panel III metabolic syndrome criteria were randomly allocated to either dietary weight loss (WL, n = ...

  8. Exercise training reduces sympathetic modulation on cardiovascular system and cardiac oxidative stress in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertagnolli, Mariane; Schenkel, Paulo C; Campos, Cristina; Mostarda, Cristiano T; Casarini, Dulce E; Belló-Klein, Adriane; Irigoyen, Maria C; Rigatto, Katya

    2008-11-01

    Spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) show increased cardiac sympathetic activity, which could stimulate cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, cardiac damage, and apoptosis. Norepinephrine (NE)-induced cardiac oxidative stress seems to be involved in SHR cardiac hypertrophy development. Because exercise training (ET) decreases sympathetic activation and oxidative stress, it may alter cardiac hypertrophy in SHR. The aim of this study was to determine, in vivo, whether ET alters cardiac sympathetic modulation on cardiovascular system and whether a correlation exists between cardiac oxidative stress and hypertrophy. Male SHRs (15-weeks old) were divided into sedentary hypertensive (SHR, n = 7) and exercise-trained hypertensive rats (SHR-T, n = 7). Moderate ET was performed on a treadmill (5 days/week, 60 min, 10 weeks). After ET, cardiopulmonary reflex responses were assessed by bolus injections of 5-HT. Autoregressive spectral estimation was performed for systolic arterial pressure (SAP) with oscillatory components quantified as low (LF: 0.2-0.75 Hz) and high (HF: 0.75-4.0 Hz) frequency ranges. Cardiac NE concentration, lipid peroxidation, antioxidant enzymes activities, and total nitrates/nitrites were determined. ET reduced mean arterial pressure, SAP variability (SAP var), LF of SAP, and cardiac hypertrophy and increased cardiopulmonary reflex responses. Cardiac lipid peroxidation was decreased in trained SHRs and positively correlated with NE concentrations (r = 0.89, P < 0.01) and heart weight/body weight ratio (r = 0.72, P < 0.01), and inversely correlated with total nitrates/nitrites (r = -0.79, P < 0.01). Moreover, in trained SHR, cardiac total nitrates/nitrites were inversely correlated with NE concentrations (r = -0.82, P < 0.01). ET attenuates cardiac sympathetic modulation and cardiac hypertrophy, which were associated with reduced oxidative stress and increased nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability.

  9. Vestibular Modulation of Sympathetic Nerve Activity to Muscle and Skin in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammam, Elie; Macefield, Vaughan G.

    2017-01-01

    We review the existence of vestibulosympathetic reflexes in humans. While several methods to activate the human vestibular apparatus have been used, galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) is a means of selectively modulating vestibular afferent activity via electrodes over the mastoid processes, causing robust vestibular illusions of side-to-side movement. Sinusoidal GVS (sGVS) causes partial entrainment of sympathetic outflow to muscle and skin. Modulation of muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) from vestibular inputs competes with baroreceptor inputs, with stronger temporal coupling to the vestibular stimulus being observed at frequencies remote from the cardiac frequency; “super entrainment” was observed in some individuals. Low-frequency (<0.2 Hz) sGVS revealed two peaks of modulation per cycle, with bilateral recordings of MSNA or skin sympathetic nerve activity, providing evidence of lateralization of sympathetic outflow during vestibular stimulation. However, it should be noted that GVS influences the firing of afferents from the entire vestibular apparatus, including the semicircular canals. To identify the specific source of vestibular input responsible for the generation of vestibulosympathetic reflexes, we used low-frequency (<0.2 Hz) sinusoidal linear acceleration of seated or supine subjects to, respectively, target the utricular or saccular components of the otoliths. While others had discounted the semicircular canals, we showed that the contributions of the utricle and saccule to the vestibular modulation of MSNA are very similar. Moreover, that modulation of MSNA occurs at accelerations well below levels at which subjects are able to perceive any motion indicates that, like vestibulospinal control of posture, the vestibular system contributes to the control of blood pressure through potent reflexes in humans. PMID:28798718

  10. Effect of generalised sympathetic activation by cold pressor test on cerebral haemodynamics in healthy humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roatta, S; Micieli, G; Bosone, D; Losano, G; Bini, R; Cavallini, A; Passatore, M

    1998-07-15

    There is no general agreement regarding several aspects of the role of the sympathetic system on cerebral haemodynamics such as extent of effectiveness, operational range and site of action. This study was planned to identify the effect of a generalised sympathetic activation on the cerebral haemodynamics in healthy humans before it is masked by secondary corrections, metabolic or myogenic in nature. A total of 35 healthy volunteers aged 20-35 underwent a 5 min lasting cold pressor test (CPT) performed on their left hand. The cerebral blood flow (CBF) velocity in the middle cerebral arteries and arterial blood pressure were recorded with transcranial Doppler sonography and with a non-invasive finger-cuff method, respectively. The ratio of arterial blood pressure to mean blood velocity (ABP/Vm) and Pulsatility Index (PI) were calculated throughout each trial. CPT induced an increase in mean ABP (range 2-54 mmHg depending on the subject) and only a slight, though significant, increase in blood velocity in the middle cerebral artery (+2.4 and +4.4% on ipsi- and contralateral side, respectively). During CPT, the ratio ABP/Vm increased and PI decreased in all subjects on both sides. These changes began simultaneously with the increase in blood pressure. The increase in ABP/Vm ratio is attributed to an increase in the cerebrovascular resistance, while the concomitant reduction in PI is interpreted as due to the reduction in the compliance of the middle cerebral artery. The results suggest that generalised increases in the sympathetic discharge, causing increases in ABP, can prevent concomitant increases in CBF by acting on both small resistance and large compliant vessels. This effect is also present when a slight increase in blood pressure occurs, which suggests a moderate increase in the sympathetic discharge, i.e. when ABP remains far below the upper limit of CBF autoregulation.

  11. Modulation operated by the sympathetic nervous system on jaw reflexes and masticatory movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passatore, Magda; Roatta, Silvestro

    2007-04-01

    The sympathetic nervous system (SNS), that is activated under condition of physical, psychological and psychosocial stress, affects force production and fatigability of muscles by controlling both muscle blood flow and the intracellular contractile mechanism. In addition SNS may affect motor function by modulating afferent activity from muscle spindles that are highly concentrated in jaw-closing muscles. Possible implications of these actions on masticatory function and myofascial pain are discussed.

  12. Morphine: An Effective Abortive Therapy for Pediatric Paroxysmal Sympathetic Hyperactivity After Hypoxic Brain Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Raithel, Deborah S.; Ohler, Kirsten H.; Porto, Isabel; Bicknese, Alma R.; Kraus, Donna M.

    2015-01-01

    Paroxysmal sympathetic hyperactivity (PSH) is a life-threatening condition characterized by hyperadrenergic activity and autonomic dysfunction. Also termed autonomic storms, PSH can occur after a variety of cerebral insults, most commonly traumatic brain injury. Limited pediatric literature is available, especially in patients with brain injury from hypoxia. No consensus exists for the terminology, diagnostic criteria, or treatment algorithm for PSH. Thus, the optimal management, including me...

  13. Increased sympathetic activity in normotensive offspring of malignant hypertensive parents compared to offspring of normotensive parents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.F. Lopes

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Malignant hypertension seems to be the consequence of very high blood pressure. Furthermore, an increase in sympathetic and renin-angiotensin system activity is considered to be the main mechanisms producing malignant hypertension. In the present study, 10 offspring of malignant hypertensive (OMH parents (age 28 ± 5 years, 7 males, 3 females, 2 white and 8 non-white and 10 offspring of normotensive (ONT parents (age 28 ± 6 years, 2 males, 8 females, 3 white and 7 non-white were evaluated. The OMH group had significantly higher (P < 0.05 casual blood pressure (125 ± 10/81 ± 5 mmHg compared with ONT (99 ± 13/67 ± 5 mmHg. The increase in blood pressure was greater in OMH (Δ SBP = 17 ± 2 vs Δ SBP = 9 ± 1 mmHg in ONT during cold pressor testing, but they had a lower increase in heart rate (Δ HR = 13 ± 2 vs Δ HR = 20 ± 3 bpm in ONT during isometric exercise (handgrip test. Sympathetic activity, measured by microneurography, was significantly higher (P < 0.05 before exercise in OMH (17 ± 6 vs 11 ± 4 burst/min in ONT and exhibited a greater increase (Δ = 18 ± 10 vs Δ = 8 ± 3 burst/min in ONT during isometric exercise. This study showed increased sympathetic activity in OMH before exercise and a greater response during isometric exercise, suggesting an autonomic abnormality before exercise and a greater sympathetic response to physical stress in OMH compared to ONT.

  14. Reproductive prognosis in daughters of women with and without endometriosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsgaard, T; Hansen, Maj Vadskjær Hjordt; Hartwell, D

    2013-01-01

    Do daughters of women with endometriosis exhibit an increased risk of endometriosis and impaired long-term reproductive prognosis when compared with daughters of women without endometriosis?......Do daughters of women with endometriosis exhibit an increased risk of endometriosis and impaired long-term reproductive prognosis when compared with daughters of women without endometriosis?...

  15. Development of a perfect prognosis probabilistic model for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A prediction model based on the perfect prognosis method was developed to predict the probability of lightning and probable time of its occurrence over the south-east Indian region. In the perfect prognosis method, statistical relationships are established using past observed data. For real time applications, the predictors ...

  16. Extracellular Matrix Biomarkers for Diagnosis, Prognosis, Imaging, and Targeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0240 TITLE: Extracellular Matrix Biomarkers for Diagnosis, Prognosis, Imaging, and Targeting PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Extracellular Matrix Biomarkers for Diagnosis, Prognosis, Imaging, and Targeting 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-14...the management and treatment of metastatic breast cancer. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Breast Cancer, Metastasis, Extracellular Matrix , Tumor Microenvironment

  17. Fault Diagnosis and Prognosis Based on Lebesgue Sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-02

    prognosis (FDP), and decision-making, etc. Diagnosis and prognosis, as fundamental enabling techniques, are not new concepts ( Tumer & Bajwa, 2004...OF THE PROGNOSTICS AND HEALTH MANAGEMENT SOCIETY 2014 of the 9th ieee international conference on control and automation. Tumer , I., & Bajwa, A. (2004

  18. Leptin signaling in the nucleus tractus solitarii increases sympathetic nerve activity to the kidney.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark, Allyn L; Agassandian, Khristofor; Morgan, Donald A; Liu, Xuebo; Cassell, Martin D; Rahmouni, Kamal

    2009-02-01

    The hypothalamic arcuate nucleus was initially regarded as the principal site of leptin action, but there is increasing evidence for functional leptin receptors in extrahypothalamic sites, including the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS). We demonstrated previously that arcuate injection of leptin increases sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) to brown adipose tissue and kidney. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that leptin signaling in the NTS affects sympathetic neural outflow. Using a stereotaxic device in anesthetized rats, we microinjected leptin (0.25 to 1.00 microg) or saline into the NTS while recording SNA to kidney and brown adipose tissue. Microinjection of leptin into the commissural and medial subnuclei of the caudal NTS at the level of the area postrema in Sprague-Dawley rats produced a dose-related increase in renal SNA (+112+/-15% with leptin 1 microg; n=7; Pleptin receptors, because it was not observed in Zucker obese rats that have a missense mutation in the leptin receptor. Rostral NTS injection of leptin failed to increase SNA, indicating that leptin signaling in the NTS is probably confined to the caudal NTS at the level of the area postrema. In summary, this study demonstrates that leptin signaling in the caudal NTS increases SNA to the kidney but not to the brown adipose tissue. The study strengthens the concept of a distributed brain network of leptin action and demonstrates that these distributed brain sites can mediate contrasting sympathetic responses to leptin.

  19. Three-phase bone studies in hemiplegia with reflex sympathetic dystrophy and the effect of disuse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greyson, N.D.; Tepperman, P.S.

    1984-04-01

    Eighty-five patients with cerebral vascular accidents were assessed with three-phase bone scintigraphy of the hands and with whole-body delayed bone imaging. Nine patients (10%) had normal three-phase bone images. Fifty-five patients (65%) showed decreased blood flow and blood-pool images of the hands and wrists with normal delayed bone scintigrams, indicating the effect of paralysis or disuse. Twenty-one patients (25%) had diffuse increased uptake with periarticular accentuation, felt to be bone-scintigraphic evidence of reflex sympathetic dystrophy of the hands and wrists; in two patients this occurred before its clinical appearance. Thriteen of the 21 reflex sympathetic dystrophy syndromes (RDS)-involved limbs (62%) had increased blood flow, whereas 8 (38%) had decreased flow. Gross limb blood flow appears to be related to the degree of muscle activity, but flow may be altered by the presence of sympathetic changes. A possible dissociation between whole-limb flow and bone blood flow in paralyzed limbs involved with RDS is discussed.

  20. MR-guided Periarterial Ethanol Injection for Renal Sympathetic Denervation: A Feasibility Study in Pigs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Streitparth, F., E-mail: florian.streitparth@charite.de; Walter, A.; Stolzenburg, N.; Heckmann, L.; Breinl, J. [Charite, Humboldt University, Department of Radiology (Germany); Rinnenthal, J. L. [Charite, Humboldt University, Department of Neuropathology (Germany); Beck, A.; De Bucourt, M.; Schnorr, J. [Charite, Humboldt University, Department of Radiology (Germany); Bernhardt, U. [InnoRa GmbH (Germany); Gebauer, B.; Hamm, B.; Guenther, R. W. [Charite, Humboldt University, Department of Radiology (Germany)

    2013-06-15

    Purpose. To evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of image-guided periarterial ethanol injection as an alternative to transluminal radiofrequency ablation. Methods. Unilateral renal periarterial ethanol injection was performed under general anesthesia in 6 pigs with the contralateral kidney serving as control. All interventions were performed in an open 1.0 T MRI system under real-time multiplanar guidance. The injected volume was 5 ml (95 % ethanol labelled marked MR contrast medium) in 2 pigs and 10 ml in 4 pigs. Four weeks after treatment, the pigs underwent MRI including MRA and were killed. Norepinephrine (NE) concentration in the renal parenchyma served as a surrogate parameter to analyze the efficacy of sympathetic denervation. In addition, the renal artery and sympathetic nerves were examined histologically to identify evidence of vascular and neural injury. Results. In pigs treated with 10 ml ethanol, treatment resulted in neural degeneration. We found a significant reduction of NE concentration in the kidney parenchyma of 53 % (p < 0.02) compared with the untreated contralateral kidney. In pigs treated with 5 ml ethanol, no significant changes in histology or NE were observed. There was no evidence of renal arterial stenosis in MRI, macroscopy or histology in any pig. Conclusion. MR-guided periarterial ethanol injection was feasible and efficient for renal sympathetic denervation in a swine model. This technique may be a promising alternative to the catheter-based approach in the treatment of resistant arterial hypertension.