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Sample records for progesterone negative feedback

  1. Decreased LH pulsatility during initiation of gonadotropin superovulation treatment in the cow: evidence for negative feedback other than estradiol and progesterone.

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    Gosselin, N; Price, C A; Roy, R; Carrière, P D

    2000-09-01

    LH pulse secretion is suppressed during superovulation of cattle. The objective of this study was to determine how soon after initiation of superovulation treatments this suppressive effect occurs, and to test the hypothesis that decreased LH pulsatility is not related to changes in circulating estradiol or progesterone. Heifers (n = 7/group) were injected with eCG (FOLLIGON: a single injection of 2,500 IU) or twice daily injections of decreasing doses of FOLLTROPIN-V (total equivalent of 280 mg of NIH-FSH-P1) or F.S.H.-P (total equivalent of 28 mg of Armour standard) or saline (time controls), starting on Day 10 (Day 0 = estrus). Blood samples were taken every 10 min for 12 h intervals on the day prior to first injection, at 8 to 20 h and 32 to 44 h after initiation of gonadotropin treatment, and also during prostaglandin (PG)-induced luteolysis. A simple method based on robust statistics and on graphical representations of time series was developed to characterize LH pulses. There was a significant interaction between time and treatment for mean LH, estradiol and progesterone when control and treated groups were analyzed together, and no interaction when only the gonadotropin groups were analyzed together. When compared to pretreatment values, pulse frequency of LH was significantly reduced (Pgonadotropin treatment. Mean LH concentrations were also reduced 32 to 44 h following initiation of treatments (Pcow causes a rapid decrease in pulsatile release of LH and suggests that this effect is not mediated through the negative feedback actions of estradiol and progesterone.

  2. Progesterone Negatively Regulates BCRP in Progesterone Receptor-Positive Human Breast Cancer Cells

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    Xiaojuan Wu

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP plays a crucial role in multidrug resistance (MDR. Previous studies have shown that steroid hormones, like progesterone (PROG, regulate BCRP expression. The presence of a progesterone response element (PRE in the BCRP promoter, suggests that PROG may regulate transcription of BCRP. Methods: To investigate the role of PROG in the regulation of BCRP expression, two constructs encoding full-length BCRP driven by either an endogenous PRE promoter or a constitutive CMV promoter, were transfected into T47D cells that express the progesterone receptor (PR or into PR-negative MDA-MB-231 cells. Results: After treatment with PROG, qPCR and Western blotting analyses indicated that BCRP mRNA and BCRP protein levels were significantly reduced in a dose-dependent manner in PR-positive cells, but PROG had no significant effect on BCRP levels in the PR-negative cells. The effect observed in PR-positive cells was reversed by co-treatment with RU-486, a specific PROG inhibitor. Cytometric analysis confirmed that BCRP-mediated drug efflux was inhibited and chemosensitivity to mitoxantrone was markedly increased by PROG treatment. Conclusion: These results suggest that PROG reverses BCRP-mediated MDR by down-regulating BCRP expression in breast cancer cells by affecting transcription from the PRE-containing BCRP promoter. Our studies suggest that breast cancer patients with BCRP-mediated MDR may be successfully treated with PROG.

  3. Progesterone

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cancer. Progesterone is also used to bring on menstruation (period) in women of childbearing age who have ... in the uterus. It works to bring on menstruation by replacing the natural progesterone that some women ...

  4. Positive feedback promotes oscillations in negative feedback loops.

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    Ananthasubramaniam, Bharath; Herzel, Hanspeter

    2014-01-01

    A simple three-component negative feedback loop is a recurring motif in biochemical oscillators. This motif oscillates as it has the three necessary ingredients for oscillations: a three-step delay, negative feedback, and nonlinearity in the loop. However, to oscillate, this motif under the common Goodwin formulation requires a high degree of cooperativity (a measure of nonlinearity) in the feedback that is biologically "unlikely." Moreover, this recurring negative feedback motif is commonly observed augmented by positive feedback interactions. Here we show that these positive feedback interactions promote oscillation at lower degrees of cooperativity, and we can thus unify several common kinetic mechanisms that facilitate oscillations, such as self-activation and Michaelis-Menten degradation. The positive feedback loops are most beneficial when acting on the shortest lived component, where they function by balancing the lifetimes of the different components. The benefits of multiple positive feedback interactions are cumulative for a majority of situations considered, when benefits are measured by the reduction in the cooperativity required to oscillate. These positive feedback motifs also allow oscillations with longer periods than that determined by the lifetimes of the components alone. We can therefore conjecture that these positive feedback loops have evolved to facilitate oscillations at lower, kinetically achievable, degrees of cooperativity. Finally, we discuss the implications of our conclusions on the mammalian molecular clock, a system modeled extensively based on the three-component negative feedback loop.

  5. The neurosteroid progesterone underlies estrogen positive feedback of the LH surge

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    Paul E Micevych

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Our understanding the steroid regulation of neural function has rapidly evolved in the past decades. Not long ago the prevailing thoughts were that peripheral steroid hormones carried information to the brain which passively responded to these steroids. These steroid actions were slow, taking hours to days to be realized because they regulated gene expression. Over the past three decades, discoveries of new steroid receptors, rapid membrane initiated signaling mechanisms and de novo neurosteroidogenesis have shed new light on the complexity of steroids actions within the nervous system. Sexual differentiation of the brain during development occurs predominately through timed steroid-mediated expression of proteins and long term epigenetic modifications. In contrast across the estrous cycle, estradiol release from developing ovarian follicles initially increases slowly and then at proestrus increases rapidly. This pattern of estradiol release acts through both classical genomic mechanisms and rapid membrane-initiated signaling in the brain to coordinate reproductive behavior and physiology. This review focuses on recently discovered estrogen receptor- (ER membrane signaling mechanisms that estradiol utilizes during estrogen positive feedback to stimulate de novo progesterone synthesis within the hypothalamus to trigger the luteinizing hormone surge important for ovulation and estrous cyclicity. The activation of these signaling pathways appears to be coordinated by the rising and waning of estradiol throughout the estrous cycle and integral to the negative and positive feedback mechanisms of estradiol. This differential responsiveness is part of the timing mechanism triggering the luteinizing hormone surge.

  6. The impact of positive, negative and topical relevance feedback

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    Kaptein, Rianne; Kamps, Jaap; Hiemstra, Djoerd

    2008-01-01

    This document contains a description of experiments for the 2008 Relevance Feedback track. We experiment with different amounts of feedback, including negative relevance feedback. Feedback is implemented using massive weighted query expansion. Parsimonious query expansion using only relevant

  7. Experiments with positive, negative and topical relevance feedback

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaptein, R.; Kamps, J.; Li, R.; Hiemstra, D.

    2008-01-01

    This document contains a description of experiments for the 2008 Relevance Feedback track. We experiment with different amounts of feedback, including negative relevance feedback. Feedback is implemented using massive weighted query expansion. Parsimonious query expansion using Dirichlet smoothing

  8. The impact of positive, negative and topical relevance feedback

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaptein, R.; Kamps, J.; Hiemstra, D.; Voorhees, E.M.; Buckland, L.P.

    2009-01-01

    This document contains a description of experiments for the 2008 Relevance Feedback track. We experiment with different amounts of feedback, including negative relevance feedback. Feedback is implemented using massive weighted query expansion. Parsimonious query expansion using only relevant

  9. Do AGN Outflows Support Negative Feedback?

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    Fischer, Travis

    2017-08-01

    Radiation, winds, and jets of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) have been shown to interact with their host galaxy interstellar medium. This radiative or quasar mode of feedback is thought to play a large role in terminating star formation in the galaxy and the accretion of matter onto the central supermassive black hole, accounting for the observed correlation between central black hole and host bulge mass. Recent IFU observations of the nearby Seyfert 2 AGN Mrk 573 have shown that gas radiatively driven by the central engine only travels to radii of approximately 750pc, much smaller than what would be required to evacuate gas from the host bulge. Using archival HST imaging and spectroscopy, we propose to perform similar kinematic analyses on a sample of 23 additional, nearby Seyfert AGN. By generating radiative driving models and comparing them to the observed ionized-gas kinematics in each target, we will determine the maximum outflow radii of the ionized gas and whether these outflows are of scales that would be required in successful negative feedback scenarios.

  10. Reactions to Positive and Negative Feedback: Enhancement and Consistency Effects.

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    Stake, Jayne E.

    1982-01-01

    Explored reactions of low, medium, and high self-esteem college students to positive and negative feedback in two studies. Results showed that mood and satisfaction ratings related to feedback but not self-esteem; and attribution following failure feedback source accuracy ratings, and performance improvement related somewhat to feedback and…

  11. Counterintuitive effects of negative social feedback on attention.

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    Anderson, Brian A

    2017-04-01

    Which stimuli we pay attention to is strongly influenced by learning. Stimuli previously associated with reward outcomes, such as money and food, and stimuli previously associated with aversive outcomes, such as monetary loss and electric shock, automatically capture attention. Social reward (happy expressions) can bias attention towards associated stimuli, but the role of negative social feedback in biasing attentional selection remains unexplored. On the one hand, negative social feedback often serves to discourage particular behaviours. If attentional selection can be curbed much like any other behavioural preference, we might expect stimuli associated with negative social feedback to be more readily ignored. On the other hand, if negative social feedback influences attention in the same way that other aversive outcomes do, such feedback might ironically bias attention towards the stimuli it is intended to discourage selection of. In the present study, participants first completed a training phase in which colour targets were associated with negative social feedback. Then, in a subsequent test phase, these same colour stimuli served as task-irrelevant distractors during a visual search task. The results strongly support the latter interpretation in that stimuli previously associated with negative social feedback impaired search performance.

  12. Affect Matters: When Writing Feedback Leads to Negative Feeling

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    Taggart, Amy Rupiper; Laughlin, Mary

    2017-01-01

    A continuous challenge in the writing classroom is maintaining openness and positivity around feedback. There are myriad factors that influence the felt experience of the feedback process, and the researchers wanted to understand better how students experience and perceive negative moments, as well as what factors remain salient in their minds…

  13. Effects of Informative and Confirmatory Feedback on Brain Activation During Negative Feedback Processing

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    Yeon-Kyoung eWoo

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The current study compared the effects of informative and confirmatory feedback on brain activation during negative feedback processing. For confirmatory feedback trials, participants were informed that they had failed the task, whereas informative feedback trials presented task relevant information along with the notification of their failure. Fourteen male undergraduates performed a series of spatial-perceptual tasks and received feedback while their brain activity was recorded. During confirmatory feedback trials, greater activations in the amygdala, dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, and the thalamus (including the habenular were observed in response to incorrect responses. These results suggest that confirmatory feedback induces negative emotional reactions to failure. In contrast, informative feedback trials elicited greater activity in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC when participants experienced failure. Further psychophysiological interaction (PPI analysis revealed a negative coupling between the DLPFC and the amygdala during informative feedback relative to confirmatory feedback trials. These findings suggest that providing task-relevant information could facilitate implicit down-regulation of negative emotions following failure.

  14. Systematic Design of EMI-Resilient Negative-Feedback Amplifiers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Horst, M.J.

    2012-01-01

    The information transfer capacity of negative-feedback amplifiers, and electronic circuits in general, is limited by three fundamental limitations being noise, bandwidth, and signal power. Electromagnetic Interference (EMI) is not a fundamental limitation, but it also hampers the information

  15. Negative feedbacks in the economy and industrial location

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brakman, S; Garretsen, H; Gigengack, R; vanMarrewijk, C; Wagenvoort, R

    1996-01-01

    Incorporating regional asymmetry and negative feedbacks (congestion) in a model of economic geography and international trade shows that complete specialization of production at one location is unlikely. We identify an agglomerating force: the home market effect, and two spreading forces,

  16. A multiple relevance feedback strategy with positive and negative models.

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    Yunlong Ma

    Full Text Available A commonly used strategy to improve search accuracy is through feedback techniques. Most existing work on feedback relies on positive information, and has been extensively studied in information retrieval. However, when a query topic is difficult and the results from the first-pass retrieval are very poor, it is impossible to extract enough useful terms from a few positive documents. Therefore, the positive feedback strategy is incapable to improve retrieval in this situation. Contrarily, there is a relatively large number of negative documents in the top of the result list, and it has been confirmed that negative feedback strategy is an important and useful way for adapting this scenario by several recent studies. In this paper, we consider a scenario when the search results are so poor that there are at most three relevant documents in the top twenty documents. Then, we conduct a novel study of multiple strategies for relevance feedback using both positive and negative examples from the first-pass retrieval to improve retrieval accuracy for such difficult queries. Experimental results on these TREC collections show that the proposed language model based multiple model feedback method which is generally more effective than both the baseline method and the methods using only positive or negative model.

  17. A multiple relevance feedback strategy with positive and negative models.

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    Ma, Yunlong; Lin, Hongfei

    2014-01-01

    A commonly used strategy to improve search accuracy is through feedback techniques. Most existing work on feedback relies on positive information, and has been extensively studied in information retrieval. However, when a query topic is difficult and the results from the first-pass retrieval are very poor, it is impossible to extract enough useful terms from a few positive documents. Therefore, the positive feedback strategy is incapable to improve retrieval in this situation. Contrarily, there is a relatively large number of negative documents in the top of the result list, and it has been confirmed that negative feedback strategy is an important and useful way for adapting this scenario by several recent studies. In this paper, we consider a scenario when the search results are so poor that there are at most three relevant documents in the top twenty documents. Then, we conduct a novel study of multiple strategies for relevance feedback using both positive and negative examples from the first-pass retrieval to improve retrieval accuracy for such difficult queries. Experimental results on these TREC collections show that the proposed language model based multiple model feedback method which is generally more effective than both the baseline method and the methods using only positive or negative model.

  18. A Biopsychosocial Model Based on Negative Feedback and Control

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    Timothy Andrew Carey

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Although the biopsychosocial model has been a popular topic of discussion for over four decades it has not had the traction in fields of research that might be expected of such an intuitively appealing idea. One reason for this might be the absence of an identified mechanism or a functional architecture that is authentically biopsychosocial. What is needed is a robust mechanism that is equally important to biochemical processes as it is to psychological and social processes. Negative feedback may be the mechanism that is required. Negative feedback has been implicated in the regulation of neurotransmitters as well as important psychological and social processes such as emotional regulation and the relationship between a psychotherapist and a client. Moreover, negative feedback is purported to also govern the activity of all other organisms as well as humans. Perceptual Control Theory (PCT describes the way in which negative feedback establishes control at increasing levels of perceptual complexity. Thus, PCT may be the first biopsychosocial model to be articulated in functional terms. In this paper we outline the working model of PCT and explain how PCT provides an embodied hierarchical neural architecture that utilises negative feedback to control physiological, psychological, and social variables. PCT has major implications for both research and practice and, importantly, provides a guide by which fields of research that are currently separated may be integrated to bring about substantial progress in understanding the way in which the brain alters, and is altered by, its behavioural and environmental context.

  19. A biopsychosocial model based on negative feedback and control.

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    Carey, Timothy A; Mansell, Warren; Tai, Sara J

    2014-01-01

    Although the biopsychosocial model has been a popular topic of discussion for over four decades it has not had the traction in fields of research that might be expected of such an intuitively appealing idea. One reason for this might be the absence of an identified mechanism or a functional architecture that is authentically biopsychosocial. What is needed is a robust mechanism that is equally important to biochemical processes as it is to psychological and social processes. Negative feedback may be the mechanism that is required. Negative feedback has been implicated in the regulation of neurotransmitters as well as important psychological and social processes such as emotional regulation and the relationship between a psychotherapist and a client. Moreover, negative feedback is purported to also govern the activity of all other organisms as well as humans. Perceptual Control Theory (PCT) describes the way in which negative feedback establishes control at increasing levels of perceptual complexity. Thus, PCT may be the first biopsychosocial model to be articulated in functional terms. In this paper we outline the working model of PCT and explain how PCT provides an embodied hierarchical neural architecture that utilizes negative feedback to control physiological, psychological, and social variables. PCT has major implications for both research and practice and, importantly, provides a guide by which fields of research that are currently separated may be integrated to bring about substantial progress in understanding the way in which the brain alters, and is altered by, its behavioral and environmental context.

  20. Negative Feedback in Genetic Circuits Confers Evolutionary Resilience and Capacitance

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    David C. Marciano

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Natural selection for specific functions places limits upon the amino acid substitutions a protein can accept. Mechanisms that expand the range of tolerable amino acid substitutions include chaperones that can rescue destabilized proteins and additional stability-enhancing substitutions. Here, we present an alternative mechanism that is simple and uses a frequently encountered network motif. Computational and experimental evidence shows that the self-correcting, negative-feedback gene regulation motif increases repressor expression in response to deleterious mutations and thereby precisely restores repression of a target gene. Furthermore, this ability to rescue repressor function is observable across the Eubacteria kingdom through the greater accumulation of amino acid substitutions in negative-feedback transcription factors compared to genes they control. We propose that negative feedback represents a self-contained genetic canalization mechanism that preserves phenotype while permitting access to a wider range of functional genotypes.

  1. Adaptive disengagement buffers self-esteem from negative social feedback.

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    Leitner, Jordan B; Hehman, Eric; Deegan, Matthew P; Jones, James M

    2014-11-01

    The degree to which self-esteem hinges on feedback in a domain is known as a contingency of self-worth, or engagement. Although previous research has conceptualized engagement as stable, it would be advantageous for individuals to dynamically regulate engagement. The current research examined whether the tendency to disengage from negative feedback accounts for variability in self-esteem. We created the Adaptive Disengagement Scale (ADS) to capture individual differences in the tendency to disengage self-esteem from negative outcomes. Results demonstrated that the ADS is reliable and valid (Studies 1 and 2). Furthermore, in response to negative social feedback, higher scores on the ADS predicted greater state self-esteem (Study 3), and this relationship was mediated by disengagement (Study 4). These findings demonstrate that adaptive disengagement protects self-esteem from negative outcomes and that the ADS is a valid measure of individual differences in the implementation of this process. © 2014 by the Society for Personality and Social Psychology, Inc.

  2. Seeing ghosts: Negative body evaluation predicts overestimation of negative social feedback

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alleva, J.M.; Lange, W.G.; Jansen, A.T.M.; Martijn, C.

    2014-01-01

    The current study investigated whether negative body evaluation predicts women's overestimation of negative social feedback related to their own body (i.e., covariation bias). Sixty-five female university students completed a computer task where photos of their own body, of a control woman's body,

  3. Enhanced Feedback-Related Negativity in Alzheimer’s Disease

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    Shuhei Yamaguchi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD, the most common cause of dementia in the elderly, results in the impairment of executive function, including that of performance monitoring. Feedback-related negativity (FRN is an electrophysiological measure reflecting the activity of this monitoring system via feedback signals, and is generated from the anterior cingulate cortex. However, there have been no reports on FRN in AD. Based on prior aging studies, we hypothesized that FRN would decrease in AD patients. To assess this, FRN was measured in healthy individuals and those with AD during a simple gambling task involving positive and negative feedback stimuli. Contrary to our hypothesis, FRN amplitude increased in AD patients, compared with the healthy elderly. We speculate that this may reflect the existence of a compensatory mechanism against the decline in executive function. Also, there was a significant association between FRN amplitude and depression scores in AD, and the FRN amplitude tended to increase insomuch as the Self-rating Depression Scale (SDS was higher. This result suggests the existence of a negative bias in the affective state in AD. Thus, the impaired functioning monitoring system in AD is a more complex phenomenon than we thought.

  4. Clinicopathologic Characteristics of Oestrogen Receptor-Positive/Progesterone Receptor-Negative/Her2-Negative Breast Cancer According to a Novel Definition of Negative Progesterone Receptor Status: A Large Population-Based Study from China.

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    An-qi Li

    Full Text Available A lack of progesterone receptor (PgR expression in oestrogen receptor-positive (ER+ tumours is associated with worse survival. PgR status is usually defined as positive or negative using 1% positive nuclei as a cut-off point. In this study, we aimed to assess the clinicopathologic characteristics of ER+/PgR-/HER2- tumours by comparing them with ER+/PgR+/HER2- tumours using a PgR cut-off point of 20% as a divisive criterion.We analysed 1,522 patients with primary breast cancer who had undergone surgery at the Cancer Center of Fudan University between 2012 and 2014. Age, grade, tumour size, lymph node status and lymphovascular invasion were assessed. Multinomial logistic regression, linear regression and chi-square test models were applied to assess associations between ER, PR and clinical features.ER+/PgR-/HER2- tumours showed poorer clinicopathologic characteristics relative to ER+/PgR+/HER2- tumours using a PgR threshold of 20% instead of 1%. The clinicopathologic characteristics did not differ between tumours with purely negative PgR expression and tumours with a PgR percentage ranging from 1% to 19%. The prognostic significance of PR expression appeared more pronounced in patients under a high Ki-67 status than those under a low Ki-67 status.Based on these findings, we propose the use of a novel threshold of 20% to define PgR status. Nevertheless, the impact of this new criterion on patient management and clinical treatment requires additional study.

  5. Positive and negative assessment center feedback in relation to development self-efficacy, feedback seeking, and promotion.

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    Dimotakis, Nikolaos; Mitchell, Deb; Maurer, Todd

    2017-11-01

    In this field study we examined both positive and negative developmental feedback given in managerial assessment centers in relation to employees' self-efficacy for their ability to improve their relevant skills assessed in the centers, the extent to which they sought subsequent feedback from others at work, and the career outcome of being promoted to a higher level position within the organization. We found that feedback was related to self-efficacy for improvement which was in turn positively related to feedback seeking, which was positively linked to the career outcome of promotion (e.g., feedback leads to self-efficacy for improvement leads to feedback seeking leads to promotion). In addition, we tested boundary variables for the effects of feedback in this model. Both social support for development and implicit theory of ability moderated the effects of negative feedback on self-efficacy. Having more support and believing that abilities can be improved buffered the detrimental impact of negative feedback on self-efficacy. We discuss implications for theory, future research and practical implications drawing upon literature on assessment centers, feedback and feedback seeking, employee development and career success. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  6. Relationship between Counseling Students' Childhood Memories and Current Negative Self-Evaluations When Receiving Corrective Feedback

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    Stroud, Daniel; Olguin, David; Marley, Scott

    2016-01-01

    This article entails a study focused on the relationship between counseling students' negative childhood memories of receiving corrective feedback and current negative self-evaluations when receiving similar feedback in counselor education programs. Participants (N = 186) completed the Corrective Feedback Instrument-Revised (CFI-R; Hulse-Killacky…

  7. Anger and attitudinal reactions to negative feedback: The effects of emotional instability and power

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niemann, Jana; Wisse, Barbara; Rus, Diana; Van Yperen, Nico W.; Sassenberg, Kai

    2014-01-01

    Feedback is a basic tool that is used to stimulate learning and performance at all organizational levels. However, negative feedback can sometimes evoke defensive responses such as feelings of anger or the repudiation of the feedback. In two experiments we explored whether people’s negating

  8. Comparing the effects of positive and negative feedback in information-integration category learning.

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    Freedberg, Michael; Glass, Brian; Filoteo, J Vincent; Hazeltine, Eliot; Maddox, W Todd

    2017-01-01

    Categorical learning is dependent on feedback. Here, we compare how positive and negative feedback affect information-integration (II) category learning. Ashby and O'Brien (2007) demonstrated that both positive and negative feedback are required to solve II category problems when feedback was not guaranteed on each trial, and reported no differences between positive-only and negative-only feedback in terms of their effectiveness. We followed up on these findings and conducted 3 experiments in which participants completed 2,400 II categorization trials across three days under 1 of 3 conditions: positive feedback only (PFB), negative feedback only (NFB), or both types of feedback (CP; control partial). An adaptive algorithm controlled the amount of feedback given to each group so that feedback was nearly equated. Using different feedback control procedures, Experiments 1 and 2 demonstrated that participants in the NFB and CP group were able to engage II learning strategies, whereas the PFB group was not. Additionally, the NFB group was able to achieve significantly higher accuracy than the PFB group by Day 3. Experiment 3 revealed that these differences remained even when we equated the information received on feedback trials. Thus, negative feedback appears significantly more effective for learning II category structures. This suggests that the human implicit learning system may be capable of learning in the absence of positive feedback.

  9. The interaction of positive and negative sensory feedback loops in dynamic regulation of a motor pattern.

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    Ausborn, Jessica; Wolf, Harald; Stein, Wolfgang

    2009-10-01

    In many rhythmic behaviors, phasic sensory feedback modifies the motor pattern. This modification is assumed to depend on feedback sign (positive vs. negative). While on a phenomenological level feedback sign is well defined, many sensory pathways also process antagonistic, and possibly contradictory, sensory information. We here model the locust flight pattern generator and proprioceptive feedback provided by the tegula wing receptor to test the functional significance of sensory pathways processing antagonistic information. We demonstrate that the tegula provides delayed positive feedback via interneuron 301, while all other pathways provide negative feedback. Contradictory to previous assumptions, the increase of wing beat frequency when the tegula is activated during flight is due to the positive feedback. By use of an abstract model we reveal that the regulation of motor pattern frequency by sensory feedback critically depends on the interaction of positive and negative feedback, and thus on the weighting of antagonistic pathways.

  10. Age-related changes in deterministic learning from positive versus negative performance feedback

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    van de Vijver, I.; Ridderinkhof, K.R.; de Wit, S.

    2015-01-01

    Feedback-based learning declines with age. Because older adults are generally biased toward positive information ("positivity effect"), learning from positive feedback may be less impaired than learning from negative outcomes. The literature documents mixed results, due possibly to variability

  11. Nonmonotone systems decomposable into monotone systems with negative feedback

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    Enciso, G. A.; Smith, H. L.; Sontag, E. D.

    Motivated by the work of Angeli and Sontag [Monotone control systems, IEEE Trans. Automat. Control 48 (2003) 1684-1698] and Enciso and Sontag [On the global attractivity of abstract dynamical systems satisfying a small gain hypothesis, with applications to biological delay systems, Discrete Continuous Dynamical Systems, to appear] in control theory, we show that certain finite and infinite dimensional semi-dynamical systems with "negative feedback" can be decomposed into a monotone "open-loop" system with "inputs" and a decreasing "output" function. The original system is reconstituted by "plugging the output into the input". Employing a technique of Gouzé [A criterion of global convergence to equilibrium for differential systems with an application to Lotka-Volterra systems, Rapport de Recherche 894, INRIA] and Cosner [Comparison principles for systems that embed in cooperative systems, with applications to diffusive Lotka-Volterra models, Dynam. Cont., Discrete Impulsive Systems 3 (1997) 283-303] of imbedding the system into a larger symmetric monotone system, we are able to obtain information on the asymptotic behavior of solutions, including existence of positively invariant sets and global convergence.

  12. Threshold sensitivity of quartz variometers with negative feedback

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    Odintsov, V. I.; Petrov, V. G.

    2017-05-01

    The maximum achievable parameters of magnetometers based on optomechanical quartz variometers are studied in connection with the planned transition of the international network Intermagnet to 1-s recording and the need to provide the network of Russian geomagnetic observatories with domestic magnetometers that satisfy Intermagnet requirements. The mechanism of negative feedback effect on the sensitivity threshold of a variometer with an optoelectronic angle transducer is shown. The optimization criterion for the size and shape of the magnets made of different magnetic materials is defined by the maximum ratio of the magnetic moment to the inertial moment. Theoretical and experimental evaluation of the variometer noise level is based on vicalloy and samarium-cobalt. It is shown that the frequency range of magnetometers with variometers based on vicalloy and samarium-cobalt will be bounded from above by frequencies of 1.6 and 6.4 Hz, respectively, at a threshold sensitivity of about 1 pT. These ratios of the frequency and threshold sensitivity for the given magnetic materials are probably limited for quartz variometers with an optoelectronic angle transducer.

  13. Evolutionary selection of expectations in positive and negative feedback markets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anufriev, M.; Hommes, C.H.; Philipse, R.H.S.

    2013-01-01

    An economic environment is a feedback system, where the dynamics of aggregate variables depend on individual expectations and vice versa. The type of feedback mechanism is crucial for the aggregate outcome. Experiments with human subjects (Heemeijer et al., J Econ Dyn Control 33:1052-1072, 2009 )

  14. Evolutionary selection of expectations in positive and negative feedback markets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anufriev, M.; Hommes, C.H.; Philipse, R.H.S.

    2010-01-01

    An economic environment is a feedback system, where dynamics of aggregate variables depend on individual expectations and also shape them. The type of feedback mechanism is crucial for the aggregate outcome. Experiments with human subjects (Heemeijer et al, 2009) have shown that price converges to

  15. Dissociation between active and observational learning from positive and negative feedback in Parkinsonism.

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    Stefan Kobza

    Full Text Available Feedback to both actively performed and observed behaviour allows adaptation of future actions. Positive feedback leads to increased activity of dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra, whereas dopamine neuron activity is decreased following negative feedback. Dopamine level reduction in unmedicated Parkinson's Disease patients has been shown to lead to a negative learning bias, i.e. enhanced learning from negative feedback. Recent findings suggest that the neural mechanisms of active and observational learning from feedback might differ, with the striatum playing a less prominent role in observational learning. Therefore, it was hypothesized that unmedicated Parkinson's Disease patients would show a negative learning bias only in active but not in observational learning. In a between-group design, 19 Parkinson's Disease patients and 40 healthy controls engaged in either an active or an observational probabilistic feedback-learning task. For both tasks, transfer phases aimed to assess the bias to learn better from positive or negative feedback. As expected, actively learning patients showed a negative learning bias, whereas controls learned better from positive feedback. In contrast, no difference between patients and controls emerged for observational learning, with both groups showing better learning from positive feedback. These findings add to neural models of reinforcement-learning by suggesting that dopamine-modulated input to the striatum plays a minor role in observational learning from feedback. Future research will have to elucidate the specific neural underpinnings of observational learning.

  16. Want More? Learn Less: Motivation Affects Adolescents Learning from Negative Feedback.

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    Zhuang, Yun; Feng, Wenfeng; Liao, Yu

    2017-01-01

    The primary goal of the present study was to investigate how positive and negative feedback may differently facilitate learning throughout development. In addition, the role of motivation as a modulating factor was examined. Participants (children, adolescents, and adults) completed two forms of the guess and application task (GAT). Feedback from the Cool-GAT task has low motivational salience because there are no consequences, while feedback from the Hot-GAT task has high motivational salience as it pertains to receiving a reward. The results indicated that negative feedback leads to a reduction in learning compared to positive feedback. The effect of negative feedback was greater in adolescent participants compared to children and adults in the Hot-GAT task, suggesting an interaction between age and motivation level on learning. Further analysis indicated that greater risk was associated with a greater reduction in learning from negative feedback and again, the reduction was greatest in adolescents. In summary, the current study supports the idea that learning from positive feedback and negative feedback differs throughout development. In a rule-based learning task, when associative learning is primarily in practice, participants learned less from negative feedback. This reduction is amplified during adolescence when task-elicited motivation is high.

  17. Dissociation between active and observational learning from positive and negative feedback in Parkinsonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobza, Stefan; Ferrea, Stefano; Schnitzler, Alfons; Pollok, Bettina; Südmeyer, Martin; Bellebaum, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Feedback to both actively performed and observed behaviour allows adaptation of future actions. Positive feedback leads to increased activity of dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra, whereas dopamine neuron activity is decreased following negative feedback. Dopamine level reduction in unmedicated Parkinson's Disease patients has been shown to lead to a negative learning bias, i.e. enhanced learning from negative feedback. Recent findings suggest that the neural mechanisms of active and observational learning from feedback might differ, with the striatum playing a less prominent role in observational learning. Therefore, it was hypothesized that unmedicated Parkinson's Disease patients would show a negative learning bias only in active but not in observational learning. In a between-group design, 19 Parkinson's Disease patients and 40 healthy controls engaged in either an active or an observational probabilistic feedback-learning task. For both tasks, transfer phases aimed to assess the bias to learn better from positive or negative feedback. As expected, actively learning patients showed a negative learning bias, whereas controls learned better from positive feedback. In contrast, no difference between patients and controls emerged for observational learning, with both groups showing better learning from positive feedback. These findings add to neural models of reinforcement-learning by suggesting that dopamine-modulated input to the striatum plays a minor role in observational learning from feedback. Future research will have to elucidate the specific neural underpinnings of observational learning.

  18. Evaluating the negative or valuing the positive? Neural mechanisms supporting feedback-based learning across development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Duijvenvoorde, Anna C K; Zanolie, Kiki; Rombouts, Serge A R B; Raijmakers, Maartje E J; Crone, Eveline A

    2008-09-17

    How children learn from positive and negative performance feedback lies at the foundation of successful learning and is therefore of great importance for educational practice. In this study, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to examine the neural developmental changes related to feedback-based learning when performing a rule search and application task. Behavioral results from three age groups (8-9, 11-13, and 18-25 years of age) demonstrated that, compared with adults, 8- to 9-year-old children performed disproportionally more inaccurately after receiving negative feedback relative to positive feedback. Additionally, imaging data pointed toward a qualitative difference in how children and adults use performance feedback. That is, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and superior parietal cortex were more active after negative feedback for adults, but after positive feedback for children (8-9 years of age). For 11- to 13-year-olds, these regions did not show differential feedback sensitivity, suggesting that the transition occurs around this age. Pre-supplementary motor area/anterior cingulate cortex, in contrast, was more active after negative feedback in both 11- to 13-year-olds and adults, but not 8- to 9-year-olds. Together, the current data show that cognitive control areas are differentially engaged during feedback-based learning across development. Adults engage these regions after signals of response adjustment (i.e., negative feedback). Young children engage these regions after signals of response continuation (i.e., positive feedback). The neural activation patterns found in 11- to 13-year-olds indicate a transition around this age toward an increased influence of negative feedback on performance adjustment. This is the first developmental fMRI study to compare qualitative changes in brain activation during feedback learning across distinct stages of development.

  19. Negative Plant–Soil Feedback and Positive Species Interaction in a Herbaceous Plant Community

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonanomi, G.; Rietkerk, M.G.; Dekker, S.C.; Mazzoleni, S.

    2005-01-01

    Increasing evidence shows that facilitative interaction and negative plant–soil feedback are driving factors of plant population dynamics and community processes. We studied the intensity and the relative impact of negative feedback on clonal growth and seed germination of Scirpus holoschoenus, a

  20. Negative Plant-Soil Feedback and Positive Species Interaction in a Herbaceous Plant Community

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonanomi, G.; Rietkerk, M.; Dekker, S.C.; Mazzoleni, S.

    2005-01-01

    Increasing evidence shows that facilitative interaction and negative plant¿soil feedback are driving factors of plant population dynamics and community processes. We studied the intensity and the relative impact of negative feedback on clonal growth and seed germination of Scirpus holoschoenus, a

  1. Oscillatory profiles of positive, negative and neutral feedback stimuli during adaptive decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Peng; Baker, Travis E; Warren, Chris; Li, Hong

    2016-09-01

    The electrophysiological response to positive and negative feedback during reinforcement learning has been well documented over the past two decades, yet, little is known about the neural response to uninformative events that often follow our actions. To address this issue, we recorded the electroencephalograph (EEG) during a time-estimation task using both informative (positive and negative) and uninformative (neutral) feedback. In the time-frequency domain, uninformative feedback elicited significantly less induced beta-gamma activity than informative feedback. This result suggests that beta-gamma activity is particularly sensitive to feedback that can guide behavioral adjustments, consistent with other work. In contrast, neither theta nor delta activity were sensitive to the difference between negative and neutral feedback, though both frequencies discriminated between positive, and non-positive (neutral or negative) feedback. Interestingly, in the time domain, we observed a linear relationship in the amplitude of the feedback-related negativity (neutral>negative>positive), a component of the event-related brain potential thought to index a specific kind of reinforcement learning signal called a reward prediction error. Taken together, these results suggest that the reinforcement learning system treats neutral feedback as a special case, providing valuable information about the electrophysiological measures used to index the cognitive function of frontal midline cortex. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Learning from Negative Feedback in Patients with Major Depressive Disorder is Attenuated by SSRI Antidepressants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad M. Herzallah

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available One barrier to interpreting past studies of cognition and Major Depressive Disorder (MDD has been the failure in many studies to adequately dissociate the effects of MDD from the potential cognitive side effects of Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRI use. To better understand how remediation of depressive symptoms affects cognitive function in MDD, we evaluated three groups of subjects: medication-naïve patients with MDD, medicated patients with MDD receiving the SSRI paroxetine and healthy control subjects. All were administered a category-learning task that allows for dissociation between learning from positive feedback (reward versus learning from negative feedback (punishment. Healthy subjects learned significantly better from positive feedback than medication-naïve and medicated MDD groups, whose learning accuracy did not differ significantly. In contrast, medicated patients with MDD learned significantly less from negative feedback than medication-naïve patients with MDD and healthy subjects, whose learning accuracy was comparable. A comparison of subject’s relative sensitivity to positive versus negative feedback showed that both the medicated MDD and healthy control groups conform to Kahneman and Tversky’s (1979 Prospect Theory, which expects losses (negative feedback to loom psychologically slightly larger than gains (positive feedback. However, medicated MDD and HC profiles are not similar, which indicates that the state of medicated MDD is not ‘normal’ when compared to HC, but rather balanced with less learning from both positive and negative feedback. On the other hand, medication-naïve patients with MDD violate Prospect Theory by having significantly exaggerated learning from negative feedback. This suggests that SSRI antidepressants impair learning from negative feedback, while having negligible effect on learning from positive feedback. Overall, these findings shed light on the importance of dissociating the

  3. Processing of Positive and Negative Feedback in Patients with Cerebellar Lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rustemeier, Martina; Koch, Benno; Schwarz, Michael; Bellebaum, Christian

    2016-08-01

    It is well accepted that the cerebellum plays a crucial role in the prediction of the sensory consequences of movements. Recent findings of altered error processing in patients with selective cerebellar lesions led to the hypothesis that feedback processing and feedback-based learning might be affected by cerebellar damage as well. Thus, the present study investigated learning from and processing of positive and negative feedback in 12 patients with selective cerebellar lesions and healthy control subjects. Participants performed a monetary feedback learning task. The processing of positive and negative feedback was assessed by means of event-related potentials (ERPs) during the learning task and during a separate task in which the frequencies of positive and negative feedback were balanced. Patients did not show a general learning deficit compared to controls. Relative to the control group, however, patients with cerebellar lesions showed significantly higher ERP difference wave amplitudes (rewards-losses) in a time window between 250 and 450 ms after feedback presentation, possibly indicating impaired outcome prediction. The analysis of the original waveforms suggested that patients and controls primarily differed in their pattern of feedback-related negativity and P300 amplitudes. Our results add to recent findings on altered performance monitoring associated with cerebellar damage and demonstrate, for the first time, alterations of feedback processing in patients with cerebellar damage. Unaffected learning performance appears to suggest that chronic cerebellar lesions can be compensated in behaviour.

  4. The Role of Implicit Negative Feedback in Language Development-Some Reflections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hind Talal Mashrah

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the importance of feedback, especially the implicit negative feedback in learning process to enhance language development. The definition of the feedback and the types are elaborated in relation to how the types contribute in improving the comprehension and the acquisition of second language in the process of communication with native and non-native speakers of English by providing comprehensible input and modified output. The theory of implicit negative impact which focuses on three significant areas: (1 type of implicit negative feedback, (2 the critical role of noticing to increase the knowledge and the acquisition by demonstrating research studies to prove, and (3 the key role of interaction to increase the acquisition and the comprehension are detailed with supportive literature. The paper also briefs some limitations encountered while applying such type of feedback in the learning process.

  5. Comparison of Radiologic Features of Triple-Negative and Estrogen Receptor/Progesteron Receptor Positive Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Joong; Kim, Keum Won; Kim, Dae Ho; Cho, Yong Jun; Hwang, Cheol Mog; Seo, Jae Young; Kim, Jin Suk; Yoon, Dae Sung [Dept. of Konyang University College of Medicine, Konyang University Hospital, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Gyu Soon [Dept. of Radiology, Eulji University College of Medicine, Eulji University Hospital, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-06-15

    To retrospectively investigate the imaging [mammographic, ultrasonographic (US), magnetic resonance (MR) imaging] features and standardized uptake values (SUV) in positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) of triple-negative breast cancers (TNBC) and to compare them with breast cancers that are either estrogen receptor (ER) positive or progesteron receptor (PR) positive. 155 breast cancers cases were identified in 134 women (mean age, 51 years; range, 31-86 years). Surgically confirmed TNBC (n = 27) and ER-positive/PR-positive breast cancers (n = 81) were included among them. Cancers were investigated with mammography (n = 81), US (n = 106), MR imaging (n = 34) and PET-CT (n = 59). Mammographic findings are identified by detection of characteristic masses and microcalcifications. US findings included tumor size, margin, tumor shape, calcification and posterior shadowing. MR findings included tumor size, shape, margin, internal enhancement, intratumoral signal intensity and kinetics. Peak SUVs (p-SUV) of breast cancers were evaluated in PET/CT. These findings were compared with TNBC and ER/PR positive groups. Mammographic findings had no significant association with the TNBC. High pathological grade (p < 0.05), larger than 2 cm in size, well-marginal mass, and round or oval-shaped (p < 0.05) is US were significantly associated with TNBC. In MR imaging, round mass shape (p < 0.05), well-circumscribed mass margin (p < 0.05), rim enhancement (p < 0.05), were significantly associated with TNBC. The peak SUV of TNBC tend to be higher than that of ER-positive/PR-positive breast cancer (7.95 {+-} 5.50 vs. 4.91 {+-} 3.00, p < 0.05). TNBC tend to have high pathological grade, are of a large, round and smooth mass with rim enhancement on MR and US. In addition to above features, PET-CT with SUV estimation can improve the accuracy of test through the evaluation of TNBC.

  6. When speculators meet constructors: positive versus negative feedback in experimental housing markets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bao, T.; Hommes, C.

    2015-01-01

    Asset markets are characterized by positive feedback through speculative demand. But housing markets distinguish themselves from other asset markets in that the supply of housing is endogenous, and adds negative feedback to the market. We design an experimental housing market and study how the

  7. The effect of positive and negative verbal feedback on surgical skills performance and motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannappan, Aarthy; Yip, Dana T; Lodhia, Nayna A; Morton, John; Lau, James N

    2012-01-01

    There is considerable effort and time invested in providing feedback to medical students and residents during their time in training. However, little effort has been made to measure the effects of positive and negative verbal feedback on skills performance and motivation to learn and practice. To probe these questions, first-year medical students (n = 25) were recruited to perform a peg transfer task on Fundamentals of Laparoscopic Surgery box trainers. Time to completion and number of errors were recorded. The students were then randomized to receive either positive or negative verbal feedback from an expert in the field of laparoscopic surgery. After this delivery of feedback, the students repeated the peg transfer task. Differences in performance pre- and post-feedback and also between the groups who received positive feedback (PF) vs negative feedback (NF) were analyzed. A survey was then completed by all the participants. Baseline task times were similar between groups (PF 209.3 seconds; NF 203 seconds, p = 0.58). The PF group averaged 1.83 first-time errors while the NF group 1 (p = 0.84). Post-feedback task times were significantly decreased for both groups (PF 159.75 seconds, p = 0.05; NF 132.08 seconds, p = 0.002). While the NF group demonstrated a greater improvement in mean time than the PF group, this was not statistically significant. Both groups also made fewer errors (PF 0.33 errors, p = 0.04; NF 0.38 errors, p = 0.23). When surveyed about their responses to standardized feedback scenarios, the students stated that both positive and negative verbal feedback could be potent stimulants for improved performance and motivation. Further research is required to better understand the effects of feedback on learner motivation and the interpersonal dynamic between mentors and their trainees. Copyright © 2012 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Estrogen receptor-positive, progesterone receptor-negative breast cancer: association with growth factor receptor expression and tamoxifen resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arpino, Grazia; Weiss, Heidi; Lee, Adrian V; Schiff, Rachel; De Placido, Sabino; Osborne, C Kent; Elledge, Richard M

    2005-09-07

    Clinical data indicate that estrogen receptor-positive/progesterone receptor-negative (ER+/PR-) breast cancers are less sensitive to tamoxifen than are ER+/PR+ tumors. It has also been reported that tamoxifen may be less effective in tumors that overexpress either HER-2 or HER-1 (epidermal growth factor receptor) and that signaling through these receptors reduces PR expression in experimental models. We hypothesized that ER+/PR- breast tumors are more likely than ER+/PR+ breast tumors to have an aggressive phenotype, to express HER-1 and overexpress HER-2, and are less likely to benefit from tamoxifen adjuvant therapy. Clinical and biological features of 31 415 patients with ER+/PR+ tumors were compared with those of 13,404 patients with ER+/PR- tumors. Association between disease-free survival (DFS) and HER-1 and HER-2 status was analyzed in a subset of 11,399 patients receiving adjuvant tamoxifen therapy. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using Cox regression or Kaplan-Meier analyses, and all statistical tests were two-sided. ER+/PR- tumors were more frequent in older patients, were larger in size, had a higher S-phase fraction, and were more likely to be aneuploid than ER+/PR+ tumors. Furthermore, three times as many ER+/PR- tumors as ER+/PR+ tumors expressed HER-1 (25% versus 8%; P HER-1-expressing tumors than with HER-1-negative tumors (HR = 1.9, 95% CI = 1.0 to 3.5; P = .05); a stronger association between worse DFS and HER-2 overexpression was observed (HR = 2.3, 95% CI = 1.2 to 4.3; P = .006). However, results varied by PR status. Among tamoxifen-treated women with ER+/PR+ tumors, HER-1 or HER-2 status was not associated with worse DFS. Among women with ER+/PR- tumors, however, both HER-1 expression (HR = 2.4, 95% CI = 1.0 to 5.4; P = .036) and HER-2 overexpression (HR = 2.6, 95% CI = 1.1 to 6.0; P = .022) were associated with a higher likelihood of recurrence. ER+/PR- tumors express higher levels of HER-1 and HER-2 and

  9. Interrogative pressure in simulated forensic interviews: the effects of negative feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGroarty, Allan; Baxter, James S

    2007-08-01

    Much experimental research on interrogative pressure has concentrated on the effects of leading questions, and the role of feedback in influencing responses in the absence of leading questions has been neglected by comparison. This study assessed the effect of negative feedback and the presence of a second interviewer on interviewee responding in simulated forensic interviews. Participants viewed a videotape of a crime, answered questions about the clip and were requestioned after receiving feedback. Compared with neutral feedback, negative feedback resulted in more response changes, higher reported state anxiety and higher ratings of interview difficulty. These results are consistent with Gudjonsson and Clark's (1986) model of interrogative suggestibility. The presence and involvement of a second interviewer did not significantly affect interviewee responding, although trait anxiety scores were elevated when a second interviewer was present. The theoretical and applied implications of these findings are considered.

  10. Controlling a negative loaded hydraulic cylinder using pressure feedback

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, M.R.; Andersen, T.O.

    2010-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the inherent oscillatory nature of pressure compensated velocity control of a hydraulic cylinder subjected to a negative load and suspended by means of an over-center valve. Initially, a linearized stability analysis of such a hydraulic circuit is carried out clearly...

  11. Positive and negative feedback learning and associated dopamine and serotonin transporter binding after methamphetamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolyarova, Alexandra; O'Dell, Steve J; Marshall, John F; Izquierdo, Alicia

    2014-09-01

    Learning from mistakes and prospectively adjusting behavior in response to reward feedback is an important facet of performance monitoring. Dopamine (DA) pathways play an important role in feedback learning and a growing literature has also emerged on the importance of serotonin (5HT) in reward learning, particularly during punishment or reward omission (negative feedback). Cognitive impairments resulting from psychostimulant exposure may arise from altered patterns in feedback learning, which in turn may be modulated by DA and 5HT transmission. We analyzed long-term, off-drug changes in learning from positive and negative feedback and associated striatal DA transporter (DAT) and frontocortical 5HT transporter (SERT) binding in rats pretreated with methamphetamine (mAMPH). Specifically, we assessed the reversal phase of pairwise visual discrimination learning in rats receiving single dose- (mAMPHsingle) vs. escalating-dose exposure (mAMPHescal). Using fine-grained trial-by-trial analyses, we found increased sensitivity to and reliance on positive feedback in mAMPH-pretreated animals, with the mAMPHsingle group showing more pronounced use of this type of feedback. In contrast, overall negative feedback sensitivity was not altered following any mAMPH treatment. In addition to validating the enduring effects of mAMPH on early reversal learning, we found more consecutive error commissions before the first correct response in mAMPH-pretreated rats. This behavioral rigidity was negatively correlated with subregional frontocortical SERT whereas positive feedback sensitivity negatively correlated with striatal DAT binding. These results provide new evidence for the overlapping, yet dissociable roles of DA and 5HT systems in overcoming perseveration and in learning new reward rules. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Negative consequences of positive feedbacks in US wildfire management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David E Calkin

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Over the last two decades wildfire activity, damage, and management cost within the US have increased substantially. These increases have been associated with a number of factors including climate change and fuel accumulation due to a century of active fire suppression. The increased fire activity has occurred during a time of significant ex-urban development of the Wildland Urban Interface (WUI along with increased demand on water resources originating on forested landscapes. These increased demands have put substantial pressure on federal agencies charged with wildfire management to continue and expand the century old policy of aggressive wildfire suppression. However, aggressive wildfire suppression is one of the major factors that drive the increased extent, intensity, and damage associated with the small number of large wildfires that are unable to be suppressed. In this paper we discuss the positive feedback loops that lead to demands for increasing suppression response while simultaneously increasing wildfire risk in the future. Despite a wealth of scientific research that demonstrates the limitations of the current management paradigm pressure to maintain the existing system are well entrenched and driven by the existing social systems that have evolved under our current management practice. Interestingly, US federal wildland fire policy provides considerable discretion for managers to pursue a range of management objectives; however, societal expectations and existing management incentive structures result in policy implementation that is straining the resilience of fire adapted ecosystems and the communities that reside in and adjacent to them.

  13. Discrete and ultradiscrete models for biological rhythms comprising a simple negative feedback loop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibo, Shingo; Ito, Hiroshi

    2015-08-07

    Many biological rhythms are generated by negative feedback regulation. Griffith (1968) proved that a negative feedback model with two variables expressed by ordinary differential equations do not generate self-sustained oscillations. Kurosawa et al. (2002) expanded Griffith׳s result to the general type of negative feedback model with two variables. In this paper, we propose discrete and ultradiscrete feedback models with two variables that exhibit self-sustained oscillations. To obtain the model, we applied tropical discretization and ultradiscretization to a continuous model with two variables and then investigated its bifurcation structures and the conditions of parameters for oscillations. We found that when the degradation rate of the variables is lower than their synthesis rate, the proposed models generate oscillations by Neimark-Sacker bifurcation. We further demonstrate that the ultradiscrete model can be reduced to a Boolean system under some conditions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Oscillations in MAPK cascade triggered by two distinct designs of coupled positive and negative feedback loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Feedback loops, both positive and negative are embedded in the Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) cascade. In the three layer MAPK cascade, both feedback loops originate from the terminal layer and their sites of action are either of the two upstream layers. Recent studies have shown that the cascade uses coupled positive and negative feedback loops in generating oscillations. Two plausible designs of coupled positive and negative feedback loops can be elucidated from the literature; in one design the positive feedback precedes the negative feedback in the direction of signal flow and vice-versa in another. But it remains unexplored how the two designs contribute towards triggering oscillations in MAPK cascade. Thus it is also not known how amplitude, frequency, robustness or nature (analogous/digital) of the oscillations would be shaped by these two designs. Results We built two models of MAPK cascade that exhibited oscillations as function of two underlying designs of coupled positive and negative feedback loops. Frequency, amplitude and nature (digital/analogous) of oscillations were found to be differentially determined by each design. It was observed that the positive feedback emerging from an oscillating MAPK cascade and functional in an external signal processing module can trigger oscillations in the target module, provided that the target module satisfy certain parametric requirements. The augmentation of the two models was done to incorporate the nuclear-cytoplasmic shuttling of cascade components followed by induction of a nuclear phosphatase. It revealed that the fate of oscillations in the MAPK cascade is governed by the feedback designs. Oscillations were unaffected due to nuclear compartmentalization owing to one design but were completely abolished in the other case. Conclusion The MAPK cascade can utilize two distinct designs of coupled positive and negative feedback loops to trigger oscillations. The amplitude, frequency and

  15. Stereotype threat engenders neural attentional bias toward negative feedback to undermine performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Chad E; Leitner, Jordan B

    2014-10-01

    Stereotype threat, a situational pressure individuals experience when they fear confirming a negative group stereotype, engenders a cascade of physiological stress responses, negative appraisals, and performance monitoring processes that tax working memory resources necessary for optimal performance. Less is known, however, about how stereotype threat biases attentional processing in response to performance feedback, and how such attentional biases may undermine performance. Women received feedback on math problems in stereotype threatening compared to stereotype-neutral contexts while continuous EEG activity was recorded. Findings revealed that stereotype threatened women elicited larger midline P100 ERPs, increased phase locking between anterior cingulate cortex and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (two regions integral for attentional processes), and increased power in left fusiform gyrus in response to negative feedback compared to positive feedback and women in stereotype-neutral contexts. Increased power in left fusiform gyrus in response to negative feedback predicted underperformance on the math task among stereotype threatened women only. Women in stereotype-neutral contexts exhibited the opposite trend. Findings suggest that in stereotype threatening contexts, neural networks integral for attention and working memory are biased toward negative, stereotype confirming feedback at very early speeds of information processing. This bias, in turn, plays a role in undermining performance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Hypothalamic effects of progesterone on regulation of the pulsatile and surge release of luteinising hormone in female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Wen; Li, Xiaofeng; Adekunbi, Daniel; Liu, Yali; Long, Hui; Wang, Li; Lyu, Qifeng; Kuang, Yanping; O'Byrne, Kevin T

    2017-08-14

    Progesterone can block the oestradiol-induced GnRH/LH surge and inhibit LH pulse frequency. Recent studies reported that progesterone prevented premature LH surges during ovarian hyperstimulation in women. As the most potent stimulator of GnRH/LH release, kisspeptin is believed to mediate the positive and negative feedback effects of oestradiol in the hypothalamic anteroventral periventricular (AVPV) and arcuate (ARC) nuclei, while the region-specific role of progesterone receptors in these nuclei remains unknown. This study examined the hypothesis that progesterone inhibits LH surge and pulsatile secretion via its receptor in the ARC and/or AVPV nuclei. Adult female rats received a single injection of pregnant mare serum gonadotropin followed by progesterone or vehicle. Progesterone administration resulted in a significant prolongation of the oestrous cycle and blockade of LH surge. However, microinjection of the progesterone receptor antagonist, RU486, into the AVPV reversed the prolonged cycle length and rescued the progesterone blockade LH surge, while RU486 into the ARC shortened LH pulse interval in the progesterone treated rats. These results demonstrated that progesterone's inhibitory effect on the GnRH/LH surge and pulsatile secretion is mediated by its receptor in the kisspeptin enriched hypothalamic AVPV and ARC respectively, which are essential for progesterone regulation of oestrous cyclicity in rats.

  17. Negative feedback enables fast and flexible collective decision-making in ants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Grüter

    Full Text Available Positive feedback plays a major role in the emergence of many collective animal behaviours. In many ants pheromone trails recruit and direct nestmate foragers to food sources. The strong positive feedback caused by trail pheromones allows fast collective responses but can compromise flexibility. Previous laboratory experiments have shown that when the environment changes, colonies are often unable to reallocate their foragers to a more rewarding food source. Here we show both experimentally, using colonies of Lasius niger, and with an agent-based simulation model, that negative feedback caused by crowding at feeding sites allows ant colonies to maintain foraging flexibility even with strong recruitment to food sources. In a constant environment, negative feedback prevents the frequently found bias towards one feeder (symmetry breaking and leads to equal distribution of foragers. In a changing environment, negative feedback allows a colony to quickly reallocate the majority of its foragers to a superior food patch that becomes available when foraging at an inferior patch is already well underway. The model confirms these experimental findings and shows that the ability of colonies to switch to a superior food source does not require the decay of trail pheromones. Our results help to resolve inconsistencies between collective foraging patterns seen in laboratory studies and observations in the wild, and show that the simultaneous action of negative and positive feedback is important for efficient foraging in mass-recruiting insect colonies.

  18. The feedback related negativity encodes both social rejection and explicit social expectancy violation

    OpenAIRE

    Rongjun eYu; Sai eSun

    2014-01-01

    Humans consistently make predictions about the valence of future events and use feedback to validate initial predictions. While the valence of outcomes provides utilitarian information, the accuracy of predictions is crucial for future performance adjustment. The feedback related negativity (FRN), identified as a marker of reward prediction error, possibly encodes social rejection and social prediction error. To test this possibility, we used event related potential (ERP) techniques combined ...

  19. The effect of negative feedback on noise propagation in transcriptional gene networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooshangi, Sara; Weiss, Ron

    2006-06-01

    This paper analyzes how the delay and repression strength of negative feedback in single-gene and multigene transcriptional networks influences intrinsic noise propagation and oscillatory behavior. We simulate a variety of transcriptional networks using a stochastic model and report two main findings. First, intrinsic noise is not attenuated by the addition of negative or positive feedback to transcriptional cascades. Second, for multigene negative feedback networks, synchrony in oscillations among a cell population can be improved by increasing network depth and tightening the regulation at one of the repression stages. Our long term goal is to understand how the noise characteristics of complex networks can be derived from the properties of modules that are used to compose these networks.

  20. Fear of negative evaluation modulates electrocortical and behavioral responses when anticipating social evaluative feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melle J.W. Van Der Molen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive models posit that the fear of negative evaluation (FNE is a hallmark feature of social anxiety. As such, individuals with high FNE may show biased information processing when faced with social evaluation. The aim of the current study was to examine the neural underpinnings of anticipating and processing of social-evaluative feedback, and its correlates with FNE. We used a social judgment paradigm in which female participants (N=31 were asked to indicate whether they believed to be socially accepted or rejected by their peers. Anticipatory attention was indexed by the stimulus preceding negativity (SPN, while the feedback-related negativity and P3 were used to index the processing of social-evaluative feedback. Results provided evidence of an optimism bias in social peer evaluation, as participants more often predicted to be socially accepted than rejected. Participants with high levels of FNE needed more time to provide their judgments about the social-evaluative outcome. While anticipating social-evaluative feedback, SPN amplitudes were larger for anticipated social acceptance than for social rejection feedback. Interestingly, the SPN during anticipated social acceptance was larger in participants with high levels of FNE. None of the feedback-related brain potentials correlated with the FNE. Together, the results provide evidence of biased information processing in individuals with high levels of FNE when anticipating (rather than processing social-evaluative feedback. The delayed response times in high FNE individuals were interpreted to reflect augmented vigilance imposed by the upcoming social evaluative threat. Allegedly, the SPN constitutes a neural marker of this vigilance in females with higher FNE levels, particularly when anticipating social acceptance feedback.

  1. Age-related changes in deterministic learning from positive versus negative performance feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Vijver, Irene; Ridderinkhof, K Richard; de Wit, Sanne

    2015-01-01

    Feedback-based learning declines with age. Because older adults are generally biased toward positive information ("positivity effect"), learning from positive feedback may be less impaired than learning from negative outcomes. The literature documents mixed results, due possibly to variability between studies in task design. In the current series of studies, we investigated the influence of feedback valence on reinforcement learning in young and older adults. We used nonprobabilistic learning tasks, to more systematically study the effects of feedback magnitude, learning of stimulus-response (S-R) versus stimulus-outcome (S-O) associations, and working-memory capacity. In most experiments, older adults benefitted more from positive than negative feedback, but only with large feedback magnitudes. Positivity effects were pronounced for S-O learning, whereas S-R learning correlated with working-memory capacity in both age groups. These results underline the context dependence of positivity effects in learning and suggest that older adults focus on high gains when these are informative for behavior.

  2. Learning from clients: A qualitative investigation of psychotherapists' reactions to negative verbal feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brattland, Heidi; Høiseth, Juni R; Burkeland, Olav; Inderhaug, Tryggve S; Binder, Per E; Iversen, Valentina C

    2016-11-09

    To explore how therapists experience, react to, and learn from negative feedback from their clients. Eighteen experienced therapists' written descriptions of episodes where they had received negative verbal feedback from clients were analyzed according to the Consensual Qualitative Research methodology. Receiving feedback was experienced as challenging, but educational. Learning was manifested in different ways: (a) Immediately Applied Learning-therapists improved the following therapy process by changing their behavior with the client, (b) Retrospectively Applied Learning-therapists made changes in their way of working with subsequent clients, and (c) Non-Applied Learning-new ideas generated by the experience had not been translated into behavior. We compared cases describing these manifestations of learning and found differences in the nature of the feedback and how therapists understood, reacted, and responded to it. The therapists benefitted from obtaining and being open to specific feedback from their clients, regulating their own emotional reactions, accommodating dissatisfied clients, and considering how they themselves contributed to negative therapy processes.

  3. Lyapunov-based Stability of Feedback Interconnections of Negative Imaginary Systems

    KAUST Repository

    Ghallab, Ahmed G.

    2017-10-19

    Feedback control systems using sensors and actuators such as piezoelectric sensors and actuators, micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) sensors and opto-mechanical sensors, are allowing new advances in designing such high precision technologies. The negative imaginary control systems framework allows for robust control design for such high precision systems in the face of uncertainties due to unmodelled dynamics. The stability of the feedback interconnection of negative imaginary systems has been well established in the literature. However, the proofs of stability feedback interconnection which are used in some previous papers have a shortcoming due to a matrix inevitability issue. In this paper, we provide a new and correct Lyapunov-based proof of one such result and show that the result is still true.

  4. The Human Ventromedial Frontal Lobe Is Critical for Learning from Negative Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Elizabeth Z.; Fellows, Lesley K.

    2008-01-01

    Are positive and negative feedback weighed in a common balance in the brain, or do they influence behaviour through distinct neural mechanisms? Recent neuroeconomic studies in both human and non-human primates indicate that the ventromedial frontal lobe carries information about both losses and gains, suggesting that this region may encode value…

  5. Early Detection of Online Auction Opportunistic Sellers through the Use of Negative-Positive Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinert, Gregory J.

    2010-01-01

    Apparently fraud is a growth industry. The monetary losses from Internet fraud have increased every year since first officially reported by the Internet Crime Complaint Center (IC3) in 2000. Prior research studies and third-party reports of fraud show rates substantially higher than eBay's reported negative feedback rate of less than 1%. The…

  6. Evaluating the negative or valuing the positive? Neural mechanisms supporting feedback-based learning across development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Duijvenvoorde, A.C.K.; Zanolie, K.; Rombouts, S.A.R.B.; Raijmakers, M.E.J.; Crone, E.A.

    2008-01-01

    Howchildren learn from positive and negative performance feedback lies at the foundation of successful learning and is therefore of great importance for educational practice. In this study, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to examine the neural developmental changes related to

  7. Evaluating the negative or valuing the positive? Neural mechanisms supporting feedback-based learning across development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.C.K. van Duijvenvoorde (Anna C.); K. Zanolie (Kiki); S.A.R.B. Rombouts (Serge); M.E.J. Raijmakers (Maartje E.); E.A. Crone (Eveline)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractHow children learn from positive and negative performance feedback lies at the foundation of successful learning and is therefore of great importance for educational practice. In this study, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to examine the neural developmental changes

  8. Changes in Intrinsic Motivation as a Function of Negative Feedback and Threats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deci, Edward L.; Cascio, Wayne F.

    Recent studies have demonstrated that external rewards can affect intrinsic motivation to perform an activity. Money tends to decrease intrinsic motivation, whereas positive verbal reinforcements tend to increase intrinsic motivation. This paper presents evidence that negative feedback and threats of punishment also decrease intrinsic motivation.…

  9. Relatedness is a poor predictor of negative plant-soil feedbacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrabi, Zia; Tuck, Sean L

    2015-02-01

    Understanding the mechanisms underlying negative plant-soil feedbacks remains a critical challenge in plant ecology. If closely related species are more similar, then phylogeny could be used as a predictor for plant species interactions, simplifying our understanding of how plant-soil feedbacks structure plant communities, underlie invasive species dynamics, or reduce agricultural productivity. Here, we test the utility of phylogeny for predicting plant-soil feedbacks by undertaking a hierarchical Bayesian meta-analysis on all available pairwise plant-soil feedback experiments conducted over the last two decades, including 133 plant species in 329 pairwise interactions. We found that the sign and magnitude of plant-soil feedback effects were not explained by the phylogenetic distance separating interacting species. This result was consistent across different life forms, life cycles, provenances, and phylogenetic scales. Our analysis shows that, contrary to widespread assumption, relatedness is a poor predictor of plant-soil feedback effects. © 2014 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2014 New Phytologist Trust.

  10. Feedback-related negativity in children with two subtypes of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingbo Gong

    Full Text Available The current model of ADHD suggests abnormal reward and punishment sensitivity, although differences in ADHD subgroups are unclear. This study aimed to investigate the effect of feedback valence (reward or punishment and punishment magnitude (small or large on Feedback-Related Negativity (FRN and Late Positive Potential (LPP in two subtypes of ADHD (ADHD-C and ADHD-I compared to typically developing children (TD during a children's gambling task.Children with ADHD-C (n = 16, children with ADHD-I (n = 15 and typically developing children (n = 15 performed a children's gambling task under three feedback conditions: large losses, small losses and gains. FRN and LPP components in brain potentials were recorded and analyzed.In TD children and children with ADHD-C, large loss feedback evoked more negative FRN amplitudes than small loss feedback, suggesting that brain sensitivity to the punishment and its magnitude is not impaired in children with ADHD-C. In contrast to these two groups, the FRN effect was absent in children with ADHD-I. The LPP amplitudes were larger in children with ADHD-C in comparison with those with ADHD-I, regardless of feedback valence and magnitude.Children with ADHD-C exhibit intact brain sensitivity to punishment similar to TD children. In contrast, children with ADHD-I are significantly impaired in neural sensitivity to the feedback stimuli and in particular, to punishment, compared to TD and ADHD-C children. Thus, FRN, rather than LPP, is a reliable index of the difference in reward and punishment sensitivity across different ADHD-subcategories.

  11. Feedback-related negativity in children with two subtypes of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Jingbo; Yuan, Jiajin; Wang, Suhong; Shi, Lijuan; Cui, Xilong; Luo, Xuerong

    2014-01-01

    The current model of ADHD suggests abnormal reward and punishment sensitivity, although differences in ADHD subgroups are unclear. This study aimed to investigate the effect of feedback valence (reward or punishment) and punishment magnitude (small or large) on Feedback-Related Negativity (FRN) and Late Positive Potential (LPP) in two subtypes of ADHD (ADHD-C and ADHD-I) compared to typically developing children (TD) during a children's gambling task. Children with ADHD-C (n = 16), children with ADHD-I (n = 15) and typically developing children (n = 15) performed a children's gambling task under three feedback conditions: large losses, small losses and gains. FRN and LPP components in brain potentials were recorded and analyzed. In TD children and children with ADHD-C, large loss feedback evoked more negative FRN amplitudes than small loss feedback, suggesting that brain sensitivity to the punishment and its magnitude is not impaired in children with ADHD-C. In contrast to these two groups, the FRN effect was absent in children with ADHD-I. The LPP amplitudes were larger in children with ADHD-C in comparison with those with ADHD-I, regardless of feedback valence and magnitude. Children with ADHD-C exhibit intact brain sensitivity to punishment similar to TD children. In contrast, children with ADHD-I are significantly impaired in neural sensitivity to the feedback stimuli and in particular, to punishment, compared to TD and ADHD-C children. Thus, FRN, rather than LPP, is a reliable index of the difference in reward and punishment sensitivity across different ADHD-subcategories.

  12. Show me the Money: the impact of actual rewards and losses on the feedback negativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, Anna; Riesel, Anja; Proudfit, Greg Hajcak

    2014-06-01

    The feedback negativity (FN) is an event-related potential component which is typically conceptualized as a negativity in response to losses that is absent in response to gains. However, there is also evidence that variation in the FN reflects the neural response to gains. The present study sought to explore these possibilities by manipulating the context in which loss and gain feedback was presented in a straightforward gambling task. In half the blocks, participants could win or lose money (Value condition), and in half the blocks, participants could not win or lose any money (No Value condition). The degree to which losses and gains were differentiated from one another (i.e., the ΔFN) was greater in the Value condition than in the No Value condition. Furthermore, though the responses to loss feedback and gain feedback were each enhanced in the Value condition relative to the No-Value condition, the effect of the monetary manipulation was substantially larger for the positivity to gains than the negativity to losses. This is consistent with the notion that the FN might reflect two independent processes, but that variation in the FN depends more upon the response to rewards than losses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. A PI3-kinase-mediated negative feedback regulates neuronal excitability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howlett, Eric; Lin, Curtis Chun-Jen; Lavery, William; Stern, Michael

    2008-11-01

    Use-dependent downregulation of neuronal activity (negative feedback) can act as a homeostatic mechanism to maintain neuronal activity at a particular specified value. Disruption of this negative feedback might lead to neurological pathologies, such as epilepsy, but the precise mechanisms by which this feedback can occur remain incompletely understood. At one glutamatergic synapse, the Drosophila neuromuscular junction, a mutation in the group II metabotropic glutamate receptor gene (DmGluRA) increased motor neuron excitability by disrupting an autocrine, glutamate-mediated negative feedback. We show that DmGluRA mutations increase neuronal excitability by preventing PI3 kinase (PI3K) activation and consequently hyperactivating the transcription factor Foxo. Furthermore, glutamate application increases levels of phospho-Akt, a product of PI3K signaling, within motor nerve terminals in a DmGluRA-dependent manner. Finally, we show that PI3K increases both axon diameter and synapse number via the Tor/S6 kinase pathway, but not Foxo. In humans, PI3K and group II mGluRs are implicated in epilepsy, neurofibromatosis, autism, schizophrenia, and other neurological disorders; however, neither the link between group II mGluRs and PI3K, nor the role of PI3K-dependent regulation of Foxo in the control of neuronal excitability, had been previously reported. Our work suggests that some of the deficits in these neurological disorders might result from disruption of glutamate-mediated homeostasis of neuronal excitability.

  14. A PI3-kinase-mediated negative feedback regulates neuronal excitability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Howlett

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Use-dependent downregulation of neuronal activity (negative feedback can act as a homeostatic mechanism to maintain neuronal activity at a particular specified value. Disruption of this negative feedback might lead to neurological pathologies, such as epilepsy, but the precise mechanisms by which this feedback can occur remain incompletely understood. At one glutamatergic synapse, the Drosophila neuromuscular junction, a mutation in the group II metabotropic glutamate receptor gene (DmGluRA increased motor neuron excitability by disrupting an autocrine, glutamate-mediated negative feedback. We show that DmGluRA mutations increase neuronal excitability by preventing PI3 kinase (PI3K activation and consequently hyperactivating the transcription factor Foxo. Furthermore, glutamate application increases levels of phospho-Akt, a product of PI3K signaling, within motor nerve terminals in a DmGluRA-dependent manner. Finally, we show that PI3K increases both axon diameter and synapse number via the Tor/S6 kinase pathway, but not Foxo. In humans, PI3K and group II mGluRs are implicated in epilepsy, neurofibromatosis, autism, schizophrenia, and other neurological disorders; however, neither the link between group II mGluRs and PI3K, nor the role of PI3K-dependent regulation of Foxo in the control of neuronal excitability, had been previously reported. Our work suggests that some of the deficits in these neurological disorders might result from disruption of glutamate-mediated homeostasis of neuronal excitability.

  15. The feedback related negativity encodes both social rejection and explicit social expectancy violation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rongjun eYu

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Humans consistently make predictions about the valence of future events and use feedbacks to update initial predictions. While the valence of outcomes provides utilitarian information, the accuracy of predictions is crucial for future performance adjustment. The feedback related negativity (FRN, identified as a marker of reward prediction error, possibly encodes social rejection and social prediction error. To test this possibility, we used event related potential techniques combined with social tasks in which participants make explicit prediction (whether others will accept their ‘friend request’ or not, Experiment 1 or implicit prediction (whether they would like this person or not, Experiment 2 respectively and then receive social feedback. We found that the FRN is sensitive to social rejection and explicit social prediction error in Experiment 1 but not implicit social prediction error in Experiment 2. We conclude that the FRN encodes social rejection and explicit social expectancy violation.

  16. The feedback related negativity encodes both social rejection and explicit social expectancy violation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Sai; Yu, Rongjun

    2014-01-01

    Humans consistently make predictions about the valence of future events and use feedback to validate initial predictions. While the valence of outcomes provides utilitarian information, the accuracy of predictions is crucial for future performance adjustment. The feedback related negativity (FRN), identified as a marker of reward prediction error, possibly encodes social rejection and social prediction error. To test this possibility, we used event related potential (ERP) techniques combined with social tasks in which participants were required to make explicit predictions (whether others will accept their “friend request” or not, Experiment 1) or implicit predictions (whether they would like this person or not, Experiment 2) respectively, and then received social feedback. We found that the FRN is sensitive to social rejection and explicit social prediction error in Experiment 1 but not implicit social prediction error in Experiment 2. We conclude that the FRN encodes social rejection and explicit social expectancy violation. PMID:25120457

  17. The anti-waggle dance: use of the stop signal as negative feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parry Macdonald Kietzman

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Numerous activities within honey bee (Apis mellifera L. colonies rely on feedback loops for organization at the group level. Classic examples of these self-organizing behaviors occur during foraging and swarm nest site selection. The waggle dance provides positive feedback, promoting foraging at a specific location or increased scouting at a potential nest site. Rather less well known than the waggle dance, the stop signal, a short vibration often delivered while butting against a dancing bee, is currently best understood as a counter to the waggle dance, offering negative feedback towards the advertised foraging location or nest site. When the stop signal is received by a waggle dancer she is more likely to terminate her dance early and retire from the dance floor. Bees that experienced danger or overcrowding at a food source are more likely to perform the stop signal upon their return to the colony, resulting in an inhibition of foraging at that location. During a swarm’s nest site selection process, scout bees that visited a different site than the one being advertised are more likely to stop-signal the waggle dancer than are scouts that had visited the same site. Over time, the scout bees build recruitment to a single site until a quorum is reached and the swarm can move to it. The balance between the positive feedback from the waggle dance and the negative feedback from the stop signal allows for a more sensitive adjustment of response from the colony as a unit. Many of the processes associated with the feedback loops organizing a honey bee colony’s activities are in striking parallel to other systems, such as intercellular interactions involved in motor neuron function.

  18. Genome-Wide Negative Feedback Drives Transgenerational DNA Methylation Dynamics in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassam, Mohamed; Duvernois-Berthet, Evelyne; Cortijo, Sandra; Takashima, Kazuya; Saze, Hidetoshi; Toyoda, Atsushi; Fujiyama, Asao; Colot, Vincent; Kakutani, Tetsuji

    2015-01-01

    Epigenetic variations of phenotypes, especially those associated with DNA methylation, are often inherited over multiple generations in plants. The active and inactive chromatin states are heritable and can be maintained or even be amplified by positive feedback in a transgenerational manner. However, mechanisms controlling the transgenerational DNA methylation dynamics are largely unknown. As an approach to understand the transgenerational dynamics, we examined long-term effect of impaired DNA methylation in Arabidopsis mutants of the chromatin remodeler gene DDM1 (Decrease in DNA Methylation 1) through whole genome DNA methylation sequencing. The ddm1 mutation induces a drastic decrease in DNA methylation of transposable elements (TEs) and repeats in the initial generation, while also inducing ectopic DNA methylation at hundreds of loci. Unexpectedly, this ectopic methylation can only be seen after repeated self-pollination. The ectopic cytosine methylation is found primarily in the non-CG context and starts from 3’ regions within transcription units and spreads upstream. Remarkably, when chromosomes with reduced DNA methylation were introduced from a ddm1 mutant into a DDM1 wild-type background, the ddm1-derived chromosomes also induced analogous de novo accumulation of DNA methylation in trans. These results lead us to propose a model to explain the transgenerational DNA methylation redistribution by genome-wide negative feedback. The global negative feedback, together with local positive feedback, would ensure robust and balanced differentiation of chromatin states within the genome. PMID:25902052

  19. Genome-wide negative feedback drives transgenerational DNA methylation dynamics in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Tasuku; Tarutani, Yoshiaki; To, Taiko Kim; Kassam, Mohamed; Duvernois-Berthet, Evelyne; Cortijo, Sandra; Takashima, Kazuya; Saze, Hidetoshi; Toyoda, Atsushi; Fujiyama, Asao; Colot, Vincent; Kakutani, Tetsuji

    2015-04-01

    Epigenetic variations of phenotypes, especially those associated with DNA methylation, are often inherited over multiple generations in plants. The active and inactive chromatin states are heritable and can be maintained or even be amplified by positive feedback in a transgenerational manner. However, mechanisms controlling the transgenerational DNA methylation dynamics are largely unknown. As an approach to understand the transgenerational dynamics, we examined long-term effect of impaired DNA methylation in Arabidopsis mutants of the chromatin remodeler gene DDM1 (Decrease in DNA Methylation 1) through whole genome DNA methylation sequencing. The ddm1 mutation induces a drastic decrease in DNA methylation of transposable elements (TEs) and repeats in the initial generation, while also inducing ectopic DNA methylation at hundreds of loci. Unexpectedly, this ectopic methylation can only be seen after repeated self-pollination. The ectopic cytosine methylation is found primarily in the non-CG context and starts from 3' regions within transcription units and spreads upstream. Remarkably, when chromosomes with reduced DNA methylation were introduced from a ddm1 mutant into a DDM1 wild-type background, the ddm1-derived chromosomes also induced analogous de novo accumulation of DNA methylation in trans. These results lead us to propose a model to explain the transgenerational DNA methylation redistribution by genome-wide negative feedback. The global negative feedback, together with local positive feedback, would ensure robust and balanced differentiation of chromatin states within the genome.

  20. Within-cycle fluctuations in progesterone negatively predict changes in both in-pair and extra-pair desire among partnered women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roney, James R; Simmons, Zachary L

    2016-05-01

    Grebe et al. (2016) argued that women's sexual interest in their own partners may be under different hormonal regulation than their sexual desire for other men. They measured partnered women's salivary hormones and reports of attraction to different categories of men at two time points separated by one week. Change in progesterone positively predicted change in women's desire for their own partners, whereas change in estradiol was a negative predictor. These results are opposite to those we previously reported for the hormonal prediction of general sexual desire in a study that employed frequent hormone sampling across multiple menstrual cycles (Roney and Simmons, 2013). Here, to test replication of the Grebe et al. findings, we assessed hormonal predictors of targeted in-pair and extra-pair desire among the subset of the sample from our 2013 paper who reported being in romantic relationships. Contrary to Grebe et al. (2016), we found that within-cycle fluctuations in progesterone were negatively correlated with changes in women's desire for both their own partners and other men. In addition, both in-pair and extra-pair desire were elevated within the fertile window and lowest during the luteal phase. Our findings contradict the idea that partner-specific desire has a unique form of hormonal regulation, and instead support a general elevation of sexual motivation associated with hormonal indices of fecundity. Discussion focuses on possible reasons for the discrepancies in findings between our study and that of Grebe et al. (2016), and on the evolved functions of women's sexual motivation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Near infrared single photon avalanche detector with negative feedback and self quenching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linga, Krishna; Yevtukhov, Yuriy; Liang, Bing

    2009-08-01

    We present the design and development of a negative feedback devices using the internal discrete amplifier approach used for the development of a single photon avalanche photodetector in the near infrared wavelength region. This new family of photodetectors with negative feedback, requiring no quenching mechanism using Internal Discrete Amplification (IDA) mechanism for the realization of very high gain and low excess noise factor in the visible and near infrared spectral regions, operates in the non-gated mode under a constant bias voltage. The demonstrated device performance far exceeds any available solid state Photodetectors in the near infrared wavelength range. The measured devices have Gain > 2×105, Excess noise factor researchers in the field of Ladar/Lidar, free space optical communication, 3D imaging, industrial and scientific instrumentation, night vision, quantum cryptography, and other military, defence and aerospace applications.

  2. Exposure to an inflammatory challenge enhances neural sensitivity to negative and positive social feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muscatell, Keely A; Moieni, Mona; Inagaki, Tristen K; Dutcher, Janine M; Jevtic, Ivana; Breen, Elizabeth C; Irwin, Michael R; Eisenberger, Naomi I

    2016-10-01

    Inflammation, part of the body's innate immune response, can lead to "sickness behaviors," as well as alterations in social and affective experiences. Elevated levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines have been associated with increased neural sensitivity to social rejection and social threat, but also decreased neural sensitivity to rewards. However, recent evidence suggests that inflammation may actually enhance sensitivity to certain social rewards, such as those that signal support and care. Despite a growing interest in how inflammation influences neural reactivity to positive and negative social experiences, no known studies have investigated these processes in the same participants, using a similar task. To examine this issue, 107 participants were randomly assigned to receive either placebo or low-dose endotoxin, which safely triggers an inflammatory response. When levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines were at their peak, participants were scanned using fMRI while they received positive, negative, and neutral feedback from an "evaluator" (actually a confederate) about how they came across in an audio-recorded interview. In response to negative feedback (vs. neutral), participants in the endotoxin condition showed heightened neural activity in a number of threat-related neural regions (i.e., bilateral amygdala, dorsal anterior cingulate cortex) and a key mentalizing-related region (i.e., dorsomedial PFC), compared to placebo participants. Interestingly, when receiving positive feedback (vs. neutral), endotoxin (vs. placebo) led to greater neural activity in the ventral striatum and ventromedial PFC, regions often implicated in processing reward, as well as greater activity in dorsomedial PFC. Together, these results reveal that individuals exposed to an inflammatory challenge are more "neurally sensitive" to both negative and positive social feedback, suggesting that inflammation may lead to a greater vigilance for both social threats and social rewards

  3. Tuning the activation threshold of a kinase network by nested feedback loops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justman, Quincey A; Serber, Zach; Ferrell, James E; El-Samad, Hana; Shokat, Kevan M

    2009-04-24

    Determining proper responsiveness to incoming signals is fundamental to all biological systems. We demonstrate that intracellular signaling nodes can tune a signaling network's response threshold away from the basal median effective concentration established by ligand-receptor interactions. Focusing on the bistable kinase network that governs progesterone-induced meiotic entry in Xenopus oocytes, we characterized glycogen synthase kinase-3beta (GSK-3beta) as a dampener of progesterone responsiveness. GSK-3beta engages the meiotic kinase network through a double-negative feedback loop; this specific feedback architecture raises the progesterone threshold in correspondence with the strength of double-negative signaling. We also identified a marker of nutritional status, l-leucine, which lowers the progesterone threshold, indicating that oocytes integrate additional signals into their cell-fate decisions by modulating progesterone responsiveness.

  4. Expression Optimization and Inducible Negative Feedback in Cell-Free Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karig, David K [ORNL; Iyer, Sukanya [ORNL; Simpson, Michael L [ORNL; Doktycz, Mitchel John [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    Synthetic biology offers great promise to a variety of applications through the forward engineering of biological function. Most efforts in this field have focused on employing living cells. Cell-free approaches, on the other hand, offer simpler and more flexible contexts, but few synthetic systems based on cell-free protein expression have been constructed. Here, we evaluate cell-free regulatory systems based on T7 promoter driven expression, and we demonstrate negative feedback, an essential motif in many natural and engineered systems. First, we characterize variants of TetR and LacI repressible T7 promoters in a cell-free context and examine sequence elements that determine expression efficiency. Then, we explore different approaches for composing regulatory systems, leading to the implementation of inducible negative feedback in E. coli extracts and in the minimal PURE system, which consists of purified proteins necessary for transcription and translation. Our quantitative cell-free component characterizations and demonstration of negative feedback embody important steps on the path to harnessing biological function in a bottom up fashion.

  5. Negative feedback regulation of Wnt4 signaling by EAF1 and EAF2/U19.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyang Wan

    Full Text Available Previous studies indicated that EAF (ELL-associated factor family members, EAF1 and EAF2/U19, play a role in cancer and embryogenesis. For example, EAF2/U19 may serve as a tumor suppressor in prostate cancer. At the same time, EAF2/U19 is a downstream factor in the non-canonical Wnt 4 signaling pathway required for eye development in Xenopus laevis, and along with EAF1, contributes to convergence and extension movements in zebrafish embryos through Wnt maintenance. Here, we used zebrafish embryos and mammalian cells to show that both EAF1 and EAF2/U19 were up-regulated by Wnt4 (Wnt4a. Furthermore, we found that EAF1 and EAF2/U19 suppressed Wnt4 expression by directly binding to the Wnt4 promoter as seen in chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. These findings indicate that an auto-regulatory negative feedback loop occurs between Wnt4 and the EAF family, which is conserved between zebrafish and mammalian. The rescue experiments in zebrafish embryos showed that early embryonic development required the maintenance of the appropriate levels of Wnt4a through the feedback loop. Others have demonstrated that the tumor suppressors p63, p73 and WT1 positively regulate Wnt4 expression while p21 has the opposite effect, suggesting that maintenance of appropriate Wnt4 expression may also be critical for adult tissue homeostasis and prevention against tumor initiation. Thus, the auto-regulatory negative feedback loop that controls expression of Wnt4 and EAF proteins may play an important role in both embryonic development and tumor suppression. Our findings provide the first convincing line of evidence that EAF and Wnt4 form an auto-regulatory negative feedback loop in vivo.

  6. Progesterone-dependent immunomodulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szekeres-Bartho, J; Polgar, B; Kozma, N; Miko, E; Par, G; Szereday, L; Barakonyi, A; Palkovics, T; Papp, O; Varga, P

    2005-01-01

    The biological effects of progesterone are mediated by a 34-kDa protein named the progesterone-induced blocking factor (PIBF). PIBF, synthesized by lymphocytes of healthy pregnant women in the presence of progesterone, inhibits arachidonic acid release as well as NK activity, and modifies the cytokine balance. Within the cell the full-length PIBF is associated with the centrosome, while secretion of shorter forms is induced by activation of the cell. PIBF induces nuclear translocation of STAT6 as well as PKC phosphorylation and exerts a negative effect on STAT4 phosphorylation. The concentration of PIBF in pregnancy urine is related to the positive or negative outcome of pregnancy; furthermore, premature pregnancy termination is predictable by lower than normal pregnancy PIBF values. In vivo data suggest the biological importance of the above findings. Treatment of pregnant Balb/c mice with the antiprogesterone RU 486 results in an increased resorption rate, which is associated with the inability of spleen cells to produce PIBF. High resorption rates induced by progesterone receptor block as well as those due to high NK activity are corrected by simultaneous PIBF treatment.

  7. Attention training through gaze-contingent feedback: Effects on reappraisal and negative emotions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Alvaro; Everaert, Jonas; Koster, Ernst H W

    2016-10-01

    Reappraisal is central to emotion regulation but its mechanisms are unclear. This study tested the theoretical prediction that emotional attention bias is linked to reappraisal of negative emotion-eliciting stimuli and subsequent emotional responding using a novel attentional control training. Thirty-six undergraduates were randomly assigned to either the control or the attention training condition and were provided with different task instructions while they performed an interpretation task. Whereas control participants freely created interpretations, participants in the training condition were instructed to allocate attention toward positive words to efficiently create positive interpretations (i.e., recruiting attentional control) while they were provided with gaze-contingent feedback on their viewing behavior. Transfer to attention bias and reappraisal success was evaluated using a dot-probe task and an emotion regulation task which were administered before and after the training. The training condition was effective at increasing attentional control and resulted in beneficial effects on the transfer tasks. Analyses supported a serial indirect effect with larger attentional control acquisition in the training condition leading to negative attention bias reduction, in turn predicting greater reappraisal success which reduced negative emotions. Our results indicate that attentional mechanisms influence the use of reappraisal strategies and its impact on negative emotions. The novel attention training highlights the importance of tailored feedback to train attentional control. The findings provide an important step toward personalized delivery of attention training. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  8. Negative feedback in ants: crowding results in less trail pheromone deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czaczkes, Tomer J; Grüter, Christoph; Ratnieks, Francis L W

    2013-04-06

    Crowding in human transport networks reduces efficiency. Efficiency can be increased by appropriate control mechanisms, which are often imposed externally. Ant colonies also have distribution networks to feeding sites outside the nest and can experience crowding. However, ants do not have external controllers or leaders. Here, we report a self-organized negative feedback mechanism, based on local information, which downregulates the production of recruitment signals in crowded parts of a network by Lasius niger ants. We controlled crowding by manipulating trail width and the number of ants on a trail, and observed a 5.6-fold reduction in the number of ants depositing trail pheromone from least to most crowded conditions. We also simulated crowding by placing glass beads covered in nest-mate cuticular hydrocarbons on the trail. After 10 bead encounters over 20 cm, forager ants were 45 per cent less likely to deposit pheromone. The mechanism of negative feedback reported here is unusual in that it acts by downregulating the production of a positive feedback signal, rather than by direct inhibition or the production of an inhibitory signal.

  9. The association of positive and negative feedback with clinical performance, self-evaluation and practice contribution of nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plakht, Ygal; Shiyovich, Arthur; Nusbaum, Lika; Raizer, Haya

    2013-10-01

    Providing consistent and high-quality feedback is a crucial component of clinical instruction. Such feedback can improve the students' ability to reflect themselves more accurately. However, giving feedback, especially negative is intricate. To evaluate the level of feedback provided to nursing students during clinical practice and investigate their association with related outcomes, such us clinical performance, self-evaluation of achievements and contribution of the practice to the professional skills. Cross-sectional study. 124 third-year nursing students during their "Emergency Nursing" (EN) clinical practice were instructed, criticized and graded by three teachers from the university staff. Following their clinical practice the students filled-out a questionnaire, in which they evaluated the feedback provided by their teachers, the contribution of the practice to their professional skills and their personal performance. Additionally, the teachers' grades of students' achievements were collected. Accuracy of students' self-evaluation was calculated as the arithmetical difference between the students' grades and the teachers' grades. The mean grades of positive and negative feedback were 74.5/100 and 70.7/100, respectively. Higher-quality positive feedback was associated with higher teachers' grade (p=0.027) and with "very high" evaluation of the contribution of the practice (p=0.022). Higher-quality positive feedback was associated with student's over-self-evaluation (p=0.02), whereas higher-quality negative feedback was associated with more accurate self-evaluation (p=0.015). High-quality positive feedback is associated with higher grades, higher contribution of the clinical practice to the student and over-self-evaluation whereas high-quality negative feedback is related to an accurate self evaluation of the students' performance. Teachers should pay more attention to administering high-quality positive and negative feedback. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd

  10. Negative Conversion of Progesterone Receptor Status after Primary Systemic Therapy Is Associated with Poor Clinical Outcome in Patients with Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Soomin; Kim, Hyun Jeong; Kim, Milim; Chung, Yul Ri; Kang, Eunyoung; Kim, Eun-Kyu; Kim, Se Hyun; Kim, Yu Jung; Kim, Jee Hyun; Kim, In Ah; Park, So Yeon

    2018-01-24

    Alteration of biomarker status after primary systemic therapy (PST) is occasionally found in breast cancer. This study was conducted to clarify the clinical implications of change of biomarker status in breast cancer patients treated with PST. The pre-chemotherapeutic biopsy and post-chemotherapeutic resection specimens of 442 breast cancer patients who had residual disease after PST were included in this study. The association between changes of biomarker status after PST and clinicopathologic features of tumors, and survival of the patients, were analyzed. Estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR) and HER2 status changed after PST in 18 (4.1%), 80 (18.1%), and 15 (3.4%) patients, respectively. ER and PR mainly underwent positive to negative conversion, whereas HER2 status underwent negative to positive conversion. Negative conversion of ER and PR status after PST was associated with reduced disease-free survival. Moreover, a decline in the Allred score for PR in post-PST specimens was significantly associated with poor clinical outcome of the patients. HER2 change did not have prognostic significance. In multivariate analyses, negative PR status after PST was found to be an independent adverse prognostic factor in the whole patient group, in the adjuvant endocrine therapy-treated subgroup, and also in pre-PST PR positive subgroup. ER and HER2 status changed little after PST, whereas PR status changed significantly. In particular, negative conversion of PR status was as a poor prognostic indicator, suggesting that re-evaluation of basic biomarkers is mandatory in breast cancer after PST for proper management and prognostication of patients.

  11. Response to "The Iris Hypothesis: A Negative or Positive Cloud Feedback?"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Ming-Dah; Lindzen, Richard S.; Hou, Arthur Y.; Lau, William K. M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Based on radiance measurements of Japan's Geostationary Meteorological Satellite, Lindzen et al. found that the high-level cloud cover averaged over the tropical western Pacific decreases with increasing sea surface temperature. They further found that the response of high-level clouds to the sea surface temperature had an effect of reducing the magnitude of climate change, which is referred as a negative climate feedback. Lin et al. reassessed the results found by Lindzen et al. by analyzing the radiation and clouds derived from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System measurements. They found a weak positive feedback between high-level clouds and the surface temperature. We have found that the approach taken by Lin et al. to estimating the albedo and the outgoing longwave radiation is incorrect and that the inferred climate sensitivity is unreliable.

  12. Dicer and Hsp104 Function in a Negative Feedback Loop to Confer Robustness to Environmental Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Oberti

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Epigenetic mechanisms can be influenced by environmental cues and thus evoke phenotypic variation. This plasticity can be advantageous for adaptation but also detrimental if not tightly controlled. Although having attracted considerable interest, it remains largely unknown if and how environmental cues such as temperature trigger epigenetic alterations. Using fission yeast, we demonstrate that environmentally induced discontinuous phenotypic variation is buffered by a negative feedback loop that involves the RNase Dicer and the protein disaggregase Hsp104. In the absence of Hsp104, Dicer accumulates in cytoplasmic inclusions and heterochromatin becomes unstable at elevated temperatures, an epigenetic state inherited for many cell divisions after the heat stress. Loss of Dicer leads to toxic aggregation of an exogenous prionogenic protein. Our results highlight the importance of feedback regulation in building epigenetic memory and uncover Hsp104 and Dicer as homeostatic controllers that buffer environmentally induced stochastic epigenetic variation and toxic aggregation of prionogenic proteins.

  13. A novel TGFβ modulator that uncouples R-Smad/I-Smad-mediated negative feedback from R-Smad/ligand-driven positive feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Wenchao; Monteiro, Rui; Zuo, Jie; Simões, Filipa Costa; Martella, Andrea; Andrieu-Soler, Charlotte; Grosveld, Frank; Sauka-Spengler, Tatjana; Patient, Roger

    2015-02-01

    As some of the most widely utilised intercellular signalling molecules, transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) superfamily members play critical roles in normal development and become disrupted in human disease. Establishing appropriate levels of TGFβ signalling involves positive and negative feedback, which are coupled and driven by the same signal transduction components (R-Smad transcription factor complexes), but whether and how the regulation of the two can be distinguished are unknown. Genome-wide comparison of published ChIP-seq datasets suggests that LIM domain binding proteins (Ldbs) co-localise with R-Smads at a substantial subset of R-Smad target genes including the locus of inhibitory Smad7 (I-Smad7), which mediates negative feedback for TGFβ signalling. We present evidence suggesting that zebrafish Ldb2a binds and directly activates the I-Smad7 gene, whereas it binds and represses the ligand gene, Squint (Sqt), which drives positive feedback. Thus, the fine tuning of TGFβ signalling derives from positive and negative control by Ldb2a. Expression of ldb2a is itself activated by TGFβ signals, suggesting potential feed-forward loops that might delay the negative input of Ldb2a to the positive feedback, as well as the positive input of Ldb2a to the negative feedback. In this way, precise gene expression control by Ldb2a enables an initial build-up of signalling via a fully active positive feedback in the absence of buffering by the negative feedback. In Ldb2a-deficient zebrafish embryos, homeostasis of TGFβ signalling is perturbed and signalling is stably enhanced, giving rise to excess mesoderm and endoderm, an effect that can be rescued by reducing signalling by the TGFβ family members, Nodal and BMP. Thus, Ldb2a is critical to the homeostatic control of TGFβ signalling and thereby embryonic patterning.

  14. Acute stress modulates feedback processing in men and women: differential effects on the feedback-related negativity and theta and beta power.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stella Banis

    Full Text Available Sex-specific prevalence rates in mental and physical disorders may be partly explained by sex differences in physiological stress responses. Neural networks that might be involved are those underlying feedback processing. Aim of the present EEG study was to investigate whether acute stress alters feedback processing, and whether stress effects differ between men and women. Male and female participants performed a gambling task, in a control and a stress condition. Stress was induced by exposing participants to a noise stressor. Brain activity was analyzed using both event-related potential and time-frequency analyses, measuring the feedback-related negativity (FRN and feedback-related changes in theta and beta oscillatory power, respectively. While the FRN and feedback-related theta power were similarly affected by stress induction in both sexes, feedback-related beta power depended on the combination of stress induction condition and sex. FRN amplitude and theta power increases were smaller in the stress relative to the control condition in both sexes, demonstrating that acute noise stress impairs performance monitoring irrespective of sex. However, in the stress but not in the control condition, early lower beta-band power increases were larger for men than women, indicating that stress effects on feedback processing are partly sex-dependent. Our findings suggest that sex-specific effects on feedback processing may comprise a factor underlying sex-specific stress responses.

  15. Acute Stress Modulates Feedback Processing in Men and Women: Differential Effects on the Feedback-Related Negativity and Theta and Beta Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banis, Stella; Geerligs, Linda; Lorist, Monicque M.

    2014-01-01

    Sex-specific prevalence rates in mental and physical disorders may be partly explained by sex differences in physiological stress responses. Neural networks that might be involved are those underlying feedback processing. Aim of the present EEG study was to investigate whether acute stress alters feedback processing, and whether stress effects differ between men and women. Male and female participants performed a gambling task, in a control and a stress condition. Stress was induced by exposing participants to a noise stressor. Brain activity was analyzed using both event-related potential and time-frequency analyses, measuring the feedback-related negativity (FRN) and feedback-related changes in theta and beta oscillatory power, respectively. While the FRN and feedback-related theta power were similarly affected by stress induction in both sexes, feedback-related beta power depended on the combination of stress induction condition and sex. FRN amplitude and theta power increases were smaller in the stress relative to the control condition in both sexes, demonstrating that acute noise stress impairs performance monitoring irrespective of sex. However, in the stress but not in the control condition, early lower beta-band power increases were larger for men than women, indicating that stress effects on feedback processing are partly sex-dependent. Our findings suggest that sex-specific effects on feedback processing may comprise a factor underlying sex-specific stress responses. PMID:24755943

  16. Simplified phase noise model for negative-resistance oscillators and a comparison with feedback oscillator models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everard, Jeremy; Xu, Min; Bale, Simon

    2012-03-01

    This paper describes a greatly simplified model for the prediction of phase noise in oscillators which use a negative resistance as the active element. It is based on a simple circuit consisting of the parallel addition of a noise current, a negative admittance/resistance, and a parallel (Qlimited) resonant circuit. The transfer function is calculated as a forward trans-resistance (VOUT/IIN) and then converted to power. The effect of limiting is incorporated by assuming that the phase noise element of the noise floor is kT/2, i.e., -177 dBm/Hz at room temperature. The result is the same as more complex analyses, but enables a simple, clear insight into the operation of oscillators. The phase noise for a given power in the resonator appears to be lower than in feedback oscillators. The reasons for this are explained. Simulation and experimental results are included.

  17. Expression of Ski can act as a negative feedback mechanism on retinoic acid signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melling, Meaghan A; Friendship, Charlotte R C; Shepherd, Trevor G; Drysdale, Thomas A

    2013-06-01

    Retinoic acid signaling is essential for many aspects of early development in vertebrates. To control the levels of signaling, several retinoic acid target genes have been identified that act to suppress retinoic acid signaling in a negative feedback loop. The nuclear protein Ski has been extensively studied for its ability to suppress transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) signaling but has also been implicated in the repression of retinoic acid signaling. We demonstrate that ski expression is up-regulated in response to retinoic acid in both early Xenopus embryos and in human cell lines. Blocking retinoic acid signaling using a retinoic acid antagonist results in a corresponding decrease in the levels of ski mRNA. Finally, overexpression of SKI in human cells results in reduced levels of CYP26A1 mRNA, a known target of retinoic acid signaling. Our results, coupled with the known ability of Ski to repress retinoic acid signaling, demonstrate that Ski expression is a novel negative feedback mechanism acting on retinoic acid signaling. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Motor imagery based brain-computer interface: a study of the effect of positive and negative feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Franco, Mar; Yuan, Peng; Zhang, Dan; Hong, Bo; Gao, Shangkai

    2011-01-01

    Co-adaptation between the human brain and computers is an important issue in brain-computer interface (BCI) research. However, most of the research has focused on the computer side of BCI, such as developing powerful machine-learning algorithms, while less research has focused on investigating how BCI users may optimally adapt. This paper assesses the influences of positive and negative visual feedback on motor imagery (MI) skills by evaluating the performance. More precisely, a MI based BCI paradigm was employed with fake visual feedback, regardless of subjects' real performance. Subjects were exposed to two experimental conditions--one positive and one negative, in which 80% or 30% of the trials were associated with positive feedback, respectively. The main EEG feature for MI-BCI classification--the asymmetry of mu-rhythm between hemispheres--was more prominent only after the negative feedback session. In addition, the negative feedback condition was accompanied by larger heart rate variability compared to the positive feedback condition. Our results suggest that visual feedback is an important aspect to take into account when designing BCI skill acquisition sessions.

  19. Worse prognosis in breast cancer patients can be predicted by immunohistochemical analysis of positive MMP-2 and negative estrogen and progesterone receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edneia A. S. Ramos

    Full Text Available Summary Introduction: Breast cancer is the most cause of death, and approximately 90% of these deaths are due to metastases. Matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2 gelatinase activity is able to degrade a major constituent of the tumor microenvironment, type IV collagen. Two well-established proteins used as markers in clinical practice for breast cancer are the receptors for estrogen (ER and progesterone (PR. Although the presence of these receptors has been associated with a better prognosis, loss of these proteins can occur during tumor progression, with subsequent resistance to hormone therapy. Objective: To study the correlation among MMP-2, ER, and PR, as well as the establishment of the metastatic process in primary breast tumors. Method: Breast cancer samples (n=44 were analyzed by immunohistochemistry for MMP-2, ER, and PR. Results: We observed that 90% of patients who had metastases and died showed positive staining for MMP-2 (p=0.0082 for both. Using Kaplan-Meier analysis, we found that negative ER patients who were also positive for MMP-2 had even worse disease-free survival (DFS and overall survival (OS (p= 0.012 and p=0.005, respectively. Similar results were found in PR-negative patients for DFS (a trend p=0.077 and OS (p=0.038. Conclusion: Regardless of our small sample size (n=44, the data obtained strongly suggest that MMP-2 in combination with already well-established markers could help to predict the emergence of metastases and death in patients with breast cancer.

  20. Elevated atmospheric CO2 negatively impacts photosynthesis through radiative forcing and physiology-mediated climate feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Peng; Zhuang, Qianlai; Ciais, Philippe; Welp, Lisa; Li, Wenyu; Xin, Qinchuan

    2017-02-01

    Increasing atmospheric CO2 affects photosynthesis involving directly increasing leaf carboxylation rates, stomatal closure, and climatic effects. The direct effects are generally thought to be positive leading to increased photosynthesis, while its climatic effects can be regionally positive or negative. These effects are usually considered to be independent from each other, but they are in fact coupled through interactions between land surface exchanges of gases and heat and the physical climate system. In particular, stomatal closure reduces evapotranspiration and increases sensible heat emissions from ecosystems, leading to decreased atmospheric moisture and precipitation and local warming. We use a coupled earth system model to attribute the influence of the increase in CO2 on gross primary productivity (GPP) during the period of 1930-2011. In our model, CO2 radiative effects cause climate change that has only a negligible effect on global GPP (a reduction of 0.9 ± 2% during the last 80 years) because of opposite responses between tropical and northern biomes. On the other hand, CO2 physiological effects on GPP are both positive, by increased carboxylation rates and water use efficiency (7.1 ± 0.48% increase), and negative, by vegetation-climate feedback reducing precipitation, as a consequence of decreased transpiration and increased sensible heat in areas without water limitation (2.7 ± 1.76% reduction).When considering the coupled atmosphere-vegetation system, negative climate feedback on photosynthesis and plant growth due to the current level of CO2 opposes 29-38% of the gains from direct fertilization effects.

  1. The estrogen receptor negative-progesterone receptor positive breast carcinoma is a biological entity and not a technical artifact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Char Hong; Pathy, Nirmala Bhoo; Taib, Nur Aishah; Mun, Kein Seong; Rhodes, Anthony; Yip, Cheng Har

    2012-01-01

    The ER-/PR+ breast tumor may be the result of a false ER negative result. The aim of this study was to investigate whether there is a difference in patient and tumor characteristics of the ER-/PR+ phenotype in an Asian setting. A total of 2629 breast cancer patients were categorized on the basis of their age, ethnicity, tumor hormonal receptor phenotype, grade and histological type. There were 1230 (46.8%) ER+/PR+, 306 (11.6%) ER+/PR-, 122 (4.6%) ER-/PR+ and 972 (37%) ER-/PR-. ER-/PR+ tumors were 2.5 times more likely to be younger than 50 years at diagnosis (OR: 2.52; 95% CI: 1.72-3.67). Compared to ER+/PR+ tumors, the ER-/ PR+ phenotype was twice more likely to be associated with grade 3 tumors (OR:2.02; 95%CI: 1.00-4.10). In contrast, compared to ER-/PR- tumors, the ER-/PR+ phenotype was 90% less likely to be associated with a grade 3 tumor (OR: 0.12; 95%CI:0.05-0.26), and more likely to have invasive lobular than invasive ductal histology (OR: 3.66; 95%CI: 1.47-9.11). These results show that the ER-/PR+ phenotype occurs in a younger age group and is associated with intermediate histopathological characteristics compared to ER+/PR+ and ER-/PR- tumors. This may imply that it is a distinct entity and not a technical artifact.

  2. A Simple Negative Interaction in the Positive Transcriptional Feedback of a Single Gene Is Sufficient to Produce Reliable Oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miró-Bueno, Jesús M.; Rodríguez-Patón, Alfonso

    2011-01-01

    Negative and positive transcriptional feedback loops are present in natural and synthetic genetic oscillators. A single gene with negative transcriptional feedback needs a time delay and sufficiently strong nonlinearity in the transmission of the feedback signal in order to produce biochemical rhythms. A single gene with only positive transcriptional feedback does not produce oscillations. Here, we demonstrate that this single-gene network in conjunction with a simple negative interaction can also easily produce rhythms. We examine a model comprised of two well-differentiated parts. The first is a positive feedback created by a protein that binds to the promoter of its own gene and activates the transcription. The second is a negative interaction in which a repressor molecule prevents this protein from binding to its promoter. A stochastic study shows that the system is robust to noise. A deterministic study identifies that the dynamics of the oscillator are mainly driven by two types of biomolecules: the protein, and the complex formed by the repressor and this protein. The main conclusion of this paper is that a simple and usual negative interaction, such as degradation, sequestration or inhibition, acting on the positive transcriptional feedback of a single gene is a sufficient condition to produce reliable oscillations. One gene is enough and the positive transcriptional feedback signal does not need to activate a second repressor gene. This means that at the genetic level an explicit negative feedback loop is not necessary. The model needs neither cooperative binding reactions nor the formation of protein multimers. Therefore, our findings could help to clarify the design principles of cellular clocks and constitute a new efficient tool for engineering synthetic genetic oscillators. PMID:22205920

  3. Selective positive-negative feedback produces the winner-take-all competition in recurrent neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuai; Liu, Bo; Li, Yangming

    2013-02-01

    The winner-take-all (WTA) competition is widely observed in both inanimate and biological media and society. Many mathematical models are proposed to describe the phenomena discovered in different fields. These models are capable of demonstrating the WTA competition. However, they are often very complicated due to the compromise with experimental realities in the particular fields; it is often difficult to explain the underlying mechanism of such a competition from the perspective of feedback based on those sophisticate models. In this paper, we make steps in that direction and present a simple model, which produces the WTA competition by taking advantage of selective positive-negative feedback through the interaction of neurons via p-norm. Compared to existing models, this model has an explicit explanation of the competition mechanism. The ultimate convergence behavior of this model is proven analytically. The convergence rate is discussed and simulations are conducted in both static and dynamic competition scenarios. Both theoretical and numerical results validate the effectiveness of the dynamic equation in describing the nonlinear phenomena of WTA competition.

  4. The feedback negativity reflects favorable compared to nonfavorable outcomes based on global, not local, alternatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kujawa, Autumn; Smith, Ezra; Luhmann, Christian; Hajcak, Greg

    2013-02-01

    The feedback negativity (FN) has been shown to reflect the binary evaluation of possible outcomes in a context-dependent manner, but it is unclear whether context dependence is based on global or local alternatives. A cued gambling task was used to examine whether the FN is sensitive to possible outcomes on a given trial, or the range of outcomes across trials. On 50% of trials, participants could break even or lose money; on remaining trials, participants could win or break even. Breaking even was an unfavorable outcome relative to all possibilities in the current task, but the best possible outcome on 50% of trials. Results indicated that breaking even elicited an FN in both contexts, and reward feedback was uniquely associated with an enhanced positivity. Results suggest that the magnitude of the FN depends on all possible outcomes within the current task and are consistent with the view that the FN reflects reward-related neural activity. Copyright © 2012 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  5. Vibration Analysis of a Piecewise-Smooth System with Negative Stiffness under Delayed Feedback Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongmei Huang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The principal resonance of a delayed piecewise-smooth (DPWS system with negative stiffness under narrow-band random excitation is investigated in aspects of multiscale analysis, design methodology of the controller, and response properties. The amplitude-frequency response and steady-state moments together with the corresponding stability conditions of the controlled stochastic system are derived, in which the degradation case is also under consideration. Then, from the perspective of the equivalent damping, the comparisons of the response characteristics of the controlled system to the uncontrolled system, such as the phenomenon of frequency island, are fulfilled. Furthermore, sensitivity of the system response to feedback gain and time delay is studied and interesting dynamic properties are found. Meanwhile, the classification of the steady-state solution is also discussed. To control the maximum amplitude, the feedback parameters are determined by the frequency response together with stability boundaries which must be utilized to exclude the combinations of the unstable parameters. For the case with small noise intensity, mean-square responses present the similar characteristics to what is discussed in the deterministic case.

  6. Negative feedback and transcriptional overshooting in a regulatory network for horizontal gene transfer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raul Fernandez-Lopez

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Horizontal gene transfer (HGT is a major force driving bacterial evolution. Because of their ability to cross inter-species barriers, bacterial plasmids are essential agents for HGT. This ability, however, poses specific requisites on plasmid physiology, in particular the need to overcome a multilevel selection process with opposing demands. We analyzed the transcriptional network of plasmid R388, one of the most promiscuous plasmids in Proteobacteria. Transcriptional analysis by fluorescence expression profiling and quantitative PCR revealed a regulatory network controlled by six transcriptional repressors. The regulatory network relied on strong promoters, which were tightly repressed in negative feedback loops. Computational simulations and theoretical analysis indicated that this architecture would show a transcriptional burst after plasmid conjugation, linking the magnitude of the feedback gain with the intensity of the transcriptional burst. Experimental analysis showed that transcriptional overshooting occurred when the plasmid invaded a new population of susceptible cells. We propose that transcriptional overshooting allows genome rebooting after horizontal gene transfer, and might have an adaptive role in overcoming the opposing demands of multilevel selection.

  7. Adolescents' comments in social media : Why do adolescents receive negative feedback and who is most at risk?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koutamanis, Maria; Vossen, Helen G M; Valkenburg, Patti M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Receiving negative peer feedback in social media may have negative consequences for adolescents' psychosocial development and well-being. Therefore, the first aim of this study was to investigate online behavior (i.e., online social exploration, risky online self-presentation) that predicts

  8. Adolescents’ comments in social media: why do adolescents receive negative feedback and who is most at risk?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koutamanis, M.; Vossen, H.G.M.; Valkenburg, P.M.

    2015-01-01

    Receiving negative peer feedback in social media may have negative consequences for adolescents’ psychosocial development and well-being. Therefore, the first aim of this study was to investigate online behavior (i.e., online social exploration, risky online self-presentation) that predicts

  9. Negative feedback, beliefs and personal goals in prediction of dysfunctional emotions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popov Boris

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Rational emotive behavior therapy (REBT demonstrates good results in evaluation therapy researches. However, some of its basic concepts, as well as theory as a whole itself, did not receive satisfactory empirical support so far, in comparison to other cognitive models (Beck, Lazarus etc.. Quasiexperimental study was designed to test the role that (1 negative feedback (A and (2 irrational beliefs (B both play in formation of dysfunctional negative emotions, in the context of significant personal goals (in our case value of potential award - G. ABC theoretical model received limited support: statistically significant three-times interaction A x B x G was found in predicting general negative emotional state, as well as anger. In contrast with that, ANOVA showed only main effect of irrational beliefs (as continuous variable to be significant in predicting emotions of anxiety and depression. Findings are discussed in the context of REBT theory of emotions, as well as their possible practical applications. Limitations of the study were also mentioned. .

  10. The effects of the personality traits and positive and negative feedback on the perceived self-efficacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smederevac-Stokić Snežana

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this study was to determine the relation between the self-efficacy, feedback and personality traits. The participants were 114 psychology students attending their first and third year from the University of Novi Sad. In the first part of the research, all subjects completed The NEO-PI-R (Costa and McCrae, 1992.. In the second phase the subjects were asked to create a short measurement scale. Before and after this task, as well as after the given feedback, the students completed The Self-efficacy Questionnaire (Terry, 1995. The feedback was the criterion to divide subjects into three groups: the first group received the positive, the second negative, and third group received no feedback. Criteria variables in the MANCOVA (repeated measures were the estimated success, difficulty and ability to perform the task in the three stages of measurement. Predictor variables were the type of the feedback and the personality traits, as covariates. The results suggest that before feedback, the impact of traits on the self-efficacy was significant. But after received feedback, self-efficacy was related to the type of received feedback only. These results showed that self-efficacy was significantly influenced both by personality traits and feedback context.

  11. Messenger RNA Fluctuations and Regulatory RNAs Shape the Dynamics of Negative Feedback Loop

    CERN Document Server

    Martínez, María Rodríguez; Tlusty, Tsvi; Pilpel, Yitzhak; Furman, Itay; 10.1103/PhysRevE.81.031924

    2010-01-01

    Single cell experiments of simple regulatory networks can markedly differ from cell population experiments. Such differences arise from stochastic events in individual cells that are averaged out in cell populations. For instance, while individual cells may show sustained oscillations in the concentrations of some proteins, such oscillations may appear damped in the population average. In this paper we investigate the role of RNA stochastic fluctuations as a leading force to produce a sustained excitatory behavior at the single cell level. Opposed to some previous models, we build a fully stochastic model of a negative feedback loop that explicitly takes into account the RNA stochastic dynamics. We find that messenger RNA random fluctuations can be amplified during translation and produce sustained pulses of protein expression. Motivated by the recent appreciation of the importance of non--coding regulatory RNAs in post--transcription regulation, we also consider the possibility that a regulatory RNA transcri...

  12. Tree range expansion may be enhanced by escape from negative plant-soil feedbacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy-Neumann, Sarah; Ibáñez, Inés

    2012-12-01

    Many plant species are expected to shift their distributional ranges in response to global warming. As they arrive at new sites, migrant plant species may be released from their natural soil pathogens and/or deprived of key symbiotic organisms. Under such scenarios plant-soil feedbacks (PSF) will likely have an impact on plant species' ability to establish in new areas. In this study we evaluated the role that PSF may play on the migratory potential of dominant temperate tree species at the northern limit of their distributional range in the Great Lakes region of North America. To test their ability to expand their current range, we assessed seedling establishment, i.e., survival, of local and potential migrant tree species in a field transplant experiment. To test for the presence and strength of PSF, we also assessed seedling survival during establishment in a greenhouse experiment, where the potential migrant species were grown in soils collected within and beyond their distributional ranges. The combination of experiments provided us with a comprehensive understanding of the role of PSF in seedling establishment in new areas. In the field, we found that survival for most migrant species was similar to those of the local community, ensuring that these species could establish in areas beyond their current range. In the greenhouse, we found that the majority of species experienced strong negative conspecific feedbacks mediated by soil biota, but these responses occurred for most species only in low light conditions. Lastly, our combined results indicate that migrant tree species can colonize and may even have enhanced short-term recruitment beyond their ranges due to a lack of conspecific adults (and the resulting negative PSF from these adults).

  13. Smart conjugated polymer nanocarrier for healthy weight loss by negative feedback regulation of lipase activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Lei; Zhu, Sha; Zhang, Lei; Feng, Pei-Jian; Yao, Xi-Kuang; Qian, Cheng-Gen; Zhang, Can; Jiang, Xi-Qun; Shen, Qun-Dong

    2016-02-01

    Healthy weight loss represents a real challenge when obesity is increasing in prevalence. Herein, we report a conjugated polymer nanocarrier for smart deactivation of lipase and thus balancing calorie intake. After oral administration, the nanocarrier is sensitive to lipase in the digestive tract and releases orlistat, which deactivates the enzyme and inhibits fat digestion. It also creates negative feedback to control the release of itself. The nanocarrier smartly regulates activity of the lipase cyclically varied between high and low levels. In spite of high fat diet intervention, obese mice receiving a single dose of the nanocarrier lose weight over eight days, whereas a control group continues the tendency to gain weight. Daily intragastric administration of the nanocarrier leads to lower weight of livers or fat pads, smaller adipocyte size, and lower total cholesterol level than that of the control group. Near-infrared fluorescence of the nanocarrier reveals its biodistribution.Healthy weight loss represents a real challenge when obesity is increasing in prevalence. Herein, we report a conjugated polymer nanocarrier for smart deactivation of lipase and thus balancing calorie intake. After oral administration, the nanocarrier is sensitive to lipase in the digestive tract and releases orlistat, which deactivates the enzyme and inhibits fat digestion. It also creates negative feedback to control the release of itself. The nanocarrier smartly regulates activity of the lipase cyclically varied between high and low levels. In spite of high fat diet intervention, obese mice receiving a single dose of the nanocarrier lose weight over eight days, whereas a control group continues the tendency to gain weight. Daily intragastric administration of the nanocarrier leads to lower weight of livers or fat pads, smaller adipocyte size, and lower total cholesterol level than that of the control group. Near-infrared fluorescence of the nanocarrier reveals its biodistribution

  14. Negative feedback regulation of Homer 1a on norepinephrine-dependent cardiac hypertrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiarello, Carmelina; Bortoloso, Elena; Carpi, Andrea; Furlan, Sandra; Volpe, Pompeo, E-mail: pompeo.volpe@unipd.it

    2013-07-15

    Homers are scaffolding proteins that modulate diverse cell functions being able to assemble signalling complexes. In this study, the presence, sub-cellular distribution and function of Homer 1 was investigated. Homer 1a and Homer 1b/c are constitutively expressed in cardiac muscle of both mouse and rat and in HL-1 cells, a cardiac cell line. As judged by confocal immunofluorescence microscopy, Homer 1a displays sarcomeric and peri-nuclear localization. In cardiomyocytes and cultured HL-1 cells, the hypertrophic agonist norepinephrine (NE) induces α{sub 1}-adrenergic specific Homer 1a over-expression, with a two-to-three-fold increase within 1 h, and no up-regulation of Homer 1b/c, as judged by Western blot and qPCR. In HL-1 cells, plasmid-driven over-expression of Homer 1a partially antagonizes activation of ERK phosphorylation and ANF up-regulation, two well-established, early markers of hypertrophy. At the morphometric level, NE-induced increase of cell size is likewise and partially counteracted by exogenous Homer 1a. Under the same experimental conditions, Homer 1b/c does not have any effect on ANF up-regulation nor on cell hypertrophy. Thus, Homer 1a up-regulation is associated to early stages of cardiac hypertrophy and appears to play a negative feedback regulation on molecular transducers of hypertrophy. -- Highlights: • Homer 1a is constitutively expressed in cardiac tissue. • In HL-1 cells, norepinephrine activates signaling pathways leading to hypertrophy. • Homer 1a up-regulation is an early event of norepinephrine-induced hypertrophy. • Homer 1a plays a negative feedback regulation modulating pathological hypertrophy. • Over-expression of Homer 1a per se does not induce hypertrophy.

  15. Absent progesterone receptor expression in the lymph node metastases of ER-positive, HER2-negative breast cancer is associated with relapse on tamoxifen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snell, Cameron E; Gough, Madeline; Middleton, Kathryn; Hsieh, Michael; Furnas, Lauren; Seidl, Brenton; Gibbons, Kristen; Pyke, Christopher; Shannon, Catherine; Woodward, Natasha; Armes, Jane E

    2017-11-01

    Progesterone receptor (PR) expression is prognostic in early stage breast cancer. There are several reports of discordant expression between primary tumour and axillary lymph node (ALN) metastasis expression of oestrogen receptor (ER) and PR. We sought to determine whether expression of these biomarkers in the synchronous ALN metastases of ER positive (+), HER2 negative (-) breast cancer could provide more accurate prognostic information. The retrospective cohort included 229 patients from a single institution with ER+, HER2- breast cancer who had synchronous ALN metastatic disease (2005-2014). PR expression was correlated with relapse-free survival, and subset analysis was performed for patients who received adjuvant tamoxifen or an aromatase inhibitor. One patient had an ER+ primary tumour, which was ER- in the ALN metastasis. 27 (11.3%) were PR- in the primary tumour and 56 (23.6%) in the ALN metastasis. The predominant change was from PR+ in the primary tumour to PR- in the lymph node. Absence of PR expression in the ALN was significantly associated with relapse; however, this was not the case in the primary tumour. In a subset analysis of patients taking adjuvant endocrine therapy, poorer prognosis was limited to those with PR- metastases on tamoxifen (HR=5.203, 95% CI 1.649 to 16.416, p=0.005). No significant prognostic effect of PR- metastases in patients taking aromatase inhibitors was seen (HR=1.519, 95% CI 0.675 to 3.418, p=0.312). Evaluation of PR expression in ALN metastasis may enable prediction of patients who are less likely to benefit from adjuvant tamoxifen. This study should be replicated in other cohorts. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  16. Negative feedback regulation of auxin signaling by ATHB8/ACL5-BUD2 transcription module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baima, Simona; Forte, Valentina; Possenti, Marco; Peñalosa, Andrés; Leoni, Guido; Salvi, Sergio; Felici, Barbara; Ruberti, Ida; Morelli, Giorgio

    2014-06-01

    The role of auxin as main regulator of vascular differentiation is well established, and a direct correlation between the rate of xylem differentiation and the amount of auxin reaching the (pro)cambial cells has been proposed. It has been suggested that thermospermine produced by ACAULIS5 (ACL5) and bushy and dwarf2 (BUD2) is one of the factors downstream to auxin contributing to the regulation of this process in Arabidopsis. Here, we provide an in-depth characterization of the mechanism through which ACL5 modulates xylem differentiation. We show that an increased level of ACL5 slows down xylem differentiation by negatively affecting the expression of homeodomain-leucine zipper (HD-ZIP) III and key auxin signaling genes. This mechanism involves the positive regulation of thermospermine biosynthesis by the HD-ZIP III protein Arabidopsis thaliana homeobox8 tightly controlling the expression of ACL5 and BUD2. In addition, we show that the HD-ZIP III protein REVOLUTA contributes to the increased leaf vascularization and long hypocotyl phenotype of acl5 likely by a direct regulation of auxin signaling genes such as like auxin resistant2 (LAX2) and LAX3. We propose that proper formation and differentiation of xylem depend on a balance between positive and negative feedback loops operating through HD-ZIP III genes. © The Author 2014. Published by the Molecular Plant Shanghai Editorial Office in association with Oxford University Press on behalf of CSPB and IPPE, SIBS, CAS.

  17. Extracellular Polyphosphate Inhibits Proliferation in an Autocrine Negative Feedback Loop in Dictyostelium discoideum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suess, Patrick M; Gomer, Richard H

    2016-09-16

    Polyphosphate is a polymer of phosphate residues linked by high energy phosphoanhydride bonds. Despite being highly conserved throughout nature, its function is poorly understood. Here we show that Dictyostelium cells accumulate extracellular polyphosphate, and this acts to inhibit proliferation at high cell densities. In shaking culture, extracellular polyphosphate concentrations increase as cell density increases, and if the concentration of polyphosphate observed at the stationary phase is added to cells at mid-log, proliferation is halted. Adding an exopolyphosphatase to cell cultures or stationary phase conditioned medium decreases polyphosphate levels and abrogates the anti-proliferative effect. The cells show saturable binding of polyphosphate, suggesting the presence of a cell surface polyphosphate receptor. Extracellular polyphosphate accumulation is potentiated by decreased nutrient levels, potentially as a means to anticipate starvation. Loss of the Dictyostelium polyphosphate kinase DdPpk1 causes intracellular polyphosphate levels to become undetectable and negatively affects fitness, cytokinesis, and germination. However, cells lacking DdPpk1 accumulate ∼50% normal levels of extracellular polyphosphate, suggesting an additional means of synthesis. We found that cells lacking inositol hexakisphosphate kinase, which is responsible for the synthesis of the inositol pyrophosphates IP7 and IP8, reach abnormally high cell densities and show decreased extracellular polyphosphate levels. Two different enzymes thus appear to mediate the synthesis of Dictyostelium extracellular polyphosphate, which is used as a signal in an autocrine negative feedback loop to regulate cell proliferation. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. Individual Differences in the Habitual Use of Cognitive Reappraisal Predict the Reward-related Feedback Negativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liyang eSai

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have shown that instructed cognitive reappraisal can regulate the neural processing of reward. However, it is still unclear whether the habitual use of cognitive reappraisal in everyday life can influence brain activity associated with reward processing. In the present study, participant’s neural responses to reward were measured using electroencephalography (EEG recorded during a gambling task, while their tendency to use cognitive reappraisal was assessed using the Emotion Regulation Questionnaire (ERQ. Event-related potential (ERP results indicated that losses on the gambling task elicited greater negative reward-related feedback negativity (FN than gains. The differential FN between losses and gains was significantly correlated with cognitive reappraisal scores across participants, such that individuals with a higher tendency to use cognitive reappraisal showed stronger reward processing (i.e. amplified FN difference between losses and gains. This correlation remained significant after controlling for expressive suppression scores. However, expressive suppression per se was not correlated with FN differences. Taken together, these results suggest that the habitual use of cognitive reappraisal influences the neural processing of reward.

  19. A negative feedback model for a mechanism based description of longitudinal observations. Application for bone turnover biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boroujerdi, M A; Schmidt, S

    2013-01-01

    In modern medicine the diagnosis and prognosis of an abnormal metabolic condition is based on blood borne measurements involving one or more biomarker. This paper reports the development of a minimal negative feedback model for the description of longitudinal biomarkers concentrations for treatment of osteoporosis in postmenopausal women. Literature data were obtained from double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial over three years. There were four treatment groups: 1) Placebo, 2) Alendronate, 3) Conjugated Estrogen, and/or 4) Combination therapy. The negative feedback model consists of a biomarker and a companion controller. By considering the above basal biomarker values it is shown that the dynamics can be described by a second order differential equation without the involvement of biomarker production rate. The second order differential equation is also analogous to classical negative feedback servomechanism model with two parameters ω(n) and ξ. It was assumed that the rate constants defining the negative feedback model were equal which would set ξ to 0.707 with only ω(n) to be estimated. ω(n) was estimated for both lumbar spine bone mineral density (BMD) and bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BAP) in four treatments groups. The t(½) of BMD and BAP were estimated at 26.8 (0.30) and 9.4 (0.30) days respectively. The negative feedback model of BMD supports the mechanism whereby Conjugated Estrogen and Alendronate decrease the clearance rate constant of BMD analogous to increased apoptosis of osteoclasts. The linked negative feedback models facilitate a mechanism based prediction of BMD using the concentrations of the bone turnover marker BAP.

  20. Stochastic focusing coupled with negative feedback enables robust regulation in biochemical reaction networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milias-Argeitis, Andreas; Engblom, Stefan; Bauer, Pavol; Khammash, Mustafa

    2015-12-06

    Nature presents multiple intriguing examples of processes that proceed with high precision and regularity. This remarkable stability is frequently counter to modellers' experience with the inherent stochasticity of chemical reactions in the regime of low-copy numbers. Moreover, the effects of noise and nonlinearities can lead to 'counterintuitive' behaviour, as demonstrated for a basic enzymatic reaction scheme that can display stochastic focusing (SF). Under the assumption of rapid signal fluctuations, SF has been shown to convert a graded response into a threshold mechanism, thus attenuating the detrimental effects of signal noise. However, when the rapid fluctuation assumption is violated, this gain in sensitivity is generally obtained at the cost of very large product variance, and this unpredictable behaviour may be one possible explanation of why, more than a decade after its introduction, SF has still not been observed in real biochemical systems. In this work, we explore the noise properties of a simple enzymatic reaction mechanism with a small and fluctuating number of active enzymes that behaves as a high-gain, noisy amplifier due to SF caused by slow enzyme fluctuations. We then show that the inclusion of a plausible negative feedback mechanism turns the system from a noisy signal detector to a strong homeostatic mechanism by exchanging high gain with strong attenuation in output noise and robustness to parameter variations. Moreover, we observe that the discrepancy between deterministic and stochastic descriptions of stochastically focused systems in the evolution of the means almost completely disappears, despite very low molecule counts and the additional nonlinearity due to feedback. The reaction mechanism considered here can provide a possible resolution to the apparent conflict between intrinsic noise and high precision in critical intracellular processes. © 2015 The Author(s).

  1. Oestradiol negative feedback inhibition on LH secretion during lactation is prolonged in adolescent primiparous rhesus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, M E

    1993-01-01

    Lactational infertility in rhesus monkeys is significantly prolonged in adolescent primiparous compared with adult multiparous mothers. In order to determine if this longer period of infertility for young mothers is the result of a greater sensitivity to nursing-induced inhibition of LH release either by enhanced oestradiol negative feedback or a direct non-gonadally mediated suppression, the effects of periodic administration of oestradiol on serum LH concentrations in nursing ovariectomized adolescent primiparous (Prp; n = 5) and adult multiparous (Mlt; n = 7) mothers was assessed. Females were treated every 5-6 weeks with a 21-day time-release capsule of oestradiol which produced serum concentrations of approximately 250, 90 and 45 pmol/l by +6, +13 and +20 days after treatment. Thus, the design permitted assessment of LH and prolactin concentrations under a regime of 21 days of decreasing oestradiol levels followed by 2-3 weeks of no oestradiol treatment. Females were studied from week 3 to week 42 post partum and oestradiol treatment occurred during weeks 5, 11, 21, 26, 31, 36 and 41. Behavioural observations indicated that the amount of time mothers nursed their offspring decreased in a similar fashion throughout the lactational period for both Prp and Mlt females. LH concentrations under the 'no oestradiol' conditions progressively increased throughout lactation reaching maximum levels by week 36 post partum in a similar manner for both Prp and Mlt mothers. These data suggest that differences in fertility between adolescent and adult nursing mothers observed previously cannot be attributed to a difference in a direct non-gonadally-mediated affect on LH. With respect to oestradiol negative feedback inhibition of LH, oestradiol treatment effectively suppressed serum LH concentrations at all points during lactation up to week 31, at which time LH concentrations were maximally suppressed in both Prp and Mlt mothers at +6 days after treatment but by day +13 LH

  2. MK3 controls Polycomb target gene expression via negative feedback on ERK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prickaerts Peggy

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene-environment interactions are mediated by epigenetic mechanisms. Polycomb Group proteins constitute part of an epigenetic cellular transcriptional memory system that is subject to dynamic modulation during differentiation. Molecular insight in processes that control dynamic chromatin association and dissociation of Polycomb repressive complexes during and beyond development is limited. We recently showed that MK3 interacts with Polycomb repressive complex 1 (PRC1. The functional relevance of this interaction, however, remained poorly understood. MK3 is activated downstream of mitogen- and stress-activated protein kinases (M/SAPKs, all of which fulfill crucial roles during development. We here use activation of the immediate-early response gene ATF3, a bona fide PRC1 target gene, as a model to study how MK3 and its effector kinases MAPK/ERK and SAPK/P38 are involved in regulation of PRC1-dependent ATF3 transcription. Results Our current data show that mitogenic signaling through ERK, P38 and MK3 regulates ATF3 expression by PRC1/chromatin dissociation and epigenetic modulation. Mitogenic stimulation results in transient P38-dependent H3S28 phosphorylation and ERK-driven PRC1/chromatin dissociation at PRC1 targets. H3S28 phosphorylation by itself appears not sufficient to induce PRC1/chromatin dissociation, nor ATF3 transcription, as inhibition of MEK/ERK signaling blocks BMI1/chromatin dissociation and ATF3 expression, despite induced H3S28 phosphorylation. In addition, we establish that concomitant loss of local H3K27me3 promoter marking is not required for ATF3 activation. We identify pERK as a novel signaling-induced binding partner of PRC1, and provide evidence that MK3 controls ATF3 expression in cultured cells via negative regulatory feedback on M/SAPKs. Dramatically increased ectopic wing vein formation in the absence of Drosophila MK in a Drosophila ERK gain-of-function wing vein patterning model, supports the

  3. A computational model clarifies the roles of positive and negative feedback loops in the Drosophila circadian clock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Junwei, E-mail: wangjunweilj@yahoo.com.c [Cisco School of Informatics, Guangdong University of Foreign Studies, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Zhou Tianshou [School of Mathematics and Computational Science, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China)

    2010-06-14

    Previous studies showed that a single negative feedback structure should be sufficient for robust circadian oscillations. It is thus pertinent to ask why current cellular clock models almost universally have interlocked negative feedback loop (NFL) and positive feedback loop (PFL). Here, we propose a molecular model that reflects the essential features of the Drosophila circadian clock to clarify the different roles of negative and positive feedback loops. In agreement with experimental observations, the model can simulate circadian oscillations in constant darkness, entrainment by light-dark cycles, as well as phenotypes of per{sup 01} and clk{sup Jrk} mutants. Moreover, sustained oscillations persist when the PFL is removed, implying the crucial role of NFL for rhythm generation. Through parameter sensitivity analysis, it is revealed that incorporation of PFL increases the robustness of the system to regulatory processes in PFL itself. Such reduced models can aid understanding of the design principles of circadian clocks in Drosophila and other organisms with complex transcriptional feedback structures.

  4. CFTR negatively regulates cyclooxygenase-2-PGE(2) positive feedback loop in inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing; Jiang, Xiao Hua; Chen, Hui; Guo, Jing Hui; Tsang, Lai Ling; Yu, Mei Kuen; Xu, Wen Ming; Chan, Hsiao Chang

    2012-06-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a cAMP-dependent anion channel mostly expressed in epithelia. Accumulating evidence suggests that CF airway epithelia are overwhelmed by excessive inflammatory cytokines and prostaglandins (PGs), which eventually lead to the over-inflammatory condition observed in CF lung disease. However, the exact underlying mechanism remains elusive. In this study, we observed increased cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression and over-production of prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) in human CF bronchial epithelia cell line (CFBE41o--) with elevated NF-κB activity compared to a wild-type airway epithelial cell line (16HBE14o--). Moreover, we demonstrated that CFTR knockout mice had inherently higher levels of COX-2 and NF-κB activity, supporting the notion that lack of CFTR results in hyper-inflammatory signaling. In addition, we identified a positive feedback loop for production of PGE(2) involving PKA and transcription factor, CREB. More importantly, overexpression of wild-type CFTR significantly suppressed COX-2 expression in CFBE41o- cells, and wild-type CFTR protein expression was significantly increased when 16HBE14o-- cells were challenged with LPS as well as PGE(2), indicating possible involvement of CFTR in negative regulation of COX-2/PGE(2). In conclusion, CFTR is a negative regulator of PGE(2)-mediated inflammatory response, defect of which may result in excessive activation of NF-κB, leading to over production of PGE(2) as seen in inflammatory CF tissues. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. The interplay between feedback-related negativity and individual differences in altruistic punishment: An EEG study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mothes, Hendrik; Enge, Sören; Strobel, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    To date, the interplay betwexen neurophysiological and individual difference factors in altruistic punishment has been little understood. To examine this issue, 45 individuals participated in a Dictator Game with punishment option while the feedback-related negativity (FRN) was derived from the electroencephalogram (EEG). Unlike previous EEG studies on the Dictator Game, we introduced a third party condition to study the effect of fairness norm violations in addition to employing a first person perspective. For the first time, we also examined the role of individual differences, specifically fairness concerns, positive/negative affectivity, and altruism/empathy as well as recipients' financial situation during altruistic punishment. The main results show that FRN amplitudes were more pronounced for unfair than for fair assignments in both the first person and third party perspectives. These findings suggest that FRN amplitudes are sensitive to fairness norm violations and play a crucial role in the recipients' evaluation of dictator assignments. With respect to individual difference factors, recipients' current financial situation affected the FRN fairness effect in the first person perspective, indicating that when being directly affected by the assignments, more affluent participants experienced stronger violations of expectations in altruistic punishment decisions. Regarding individual differences in trait empathy, in the third party condition FRN amplitudes were more pronounced for those who scored lower in empathy. This may suggest empathy as another motive in third party punishment. Independent of the perspective taken, higher positive affect was associated with more punishment behavior, suggesting that positive emotions may play an important role in restoring violated fairness norms.

  6. Negative feedback loop of cholesterol regulation is impaired in the livers of patients with Alagille syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyahara, Yuki; Bessho, Kazuhiko; Kondou, Hiroki; Hasegawa, Yasuhiro; Yasuda, Kie; Ida, Shinobu; Ihara, Yoshiyuki; Mizuta, Koichi; Miyoshi, Yoko; Ozono, Keiichi

    2015-02-02

    To characterize cholesterol regulation in the liver of patients with Alagille syndrome (AGS). Serum total cholesterol (TC) and total bile acid (TBA) levels were measured in 23 AGS patients. The expressions of genes involved in cholesterol regulation, including low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR), scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI), 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR), cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (CYP7A1), ATP-binding cassette transporter (ABC) A1, and ABCG1/5/8, were measured in liver tissues from five of these patients. Expression of regulators for these genes, including farnesoid X receptor/small heterodimer partner (SHP), liver X receptor α (LXRα) and mature Sterol regulatory element-binding protein 2 (SREBP2) was measured. The expression of mature SREBP2 protein was also examined. Serum TC and TBA levels were correlated in the AGS patients. Liver cholesterol was also increased compared with controls, and correlated with bile acid contents. LDLR, SR-BI, HMGCR, and ABCGs mRNA expression were upregulated, while CYP7A1 mRNA expression was downregulated in AGS livers. SHP and LXRα mRNA expression was also increased, but maturation of SREBP2 was not suppressed in the patients. The major upregulators of liver cholesterol might be increased in AGS patients, indicating an impaired negative feedback mechanism and accelerated liver cholesterol accumulation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Who Deserves My Trust? Cue-Elicited Feedback Negativity Tracks Reputation Learning in Repeated Social Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diandian Li

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Trust and trustworthiness contribute to reciprocal behavior and social relationship development. To make better decisions, people need to evaluate others’ trustworthiness. They often assess this kind of reputation by learning through repeated social interactions. The present event-related potential (ERP study explored the reputation learning process in a repeated trust game where subjects made multi-round decisions of investment to different partners. We found that subjects gradually learned to discriminate trustworthy partners from untrustworthy ones based on how often their partners reciprocated the investment, which was indicated by their own investment decisions. Besides, electrophysiological data showed that the faces of the untrustworthy partners induced larger feedback negativity (FN amplitude than those of the trustworthy partners, but only in the late phase of the game. The ERP results corresponded with the behavioral pattern and revealed that the learned trustworthiness differentiation was coded by the cue-elicited FN component. Consistent with previous research, our findings suggest that the anterior cue-elicited FN reflects the reputation appraisal and tracks the reputation learning process in social interactions.

  8. Participation of hippocampal formation in negative feedback inhibition of penile erection in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, A Y; Chan, J Y; Chan, S H

    1998-03-30

    Detailed information on how the central nervous system regulates penile erection, particularly the inhibitory aspect, is sparse. We observed in Sprague-Dawley rats anesthetized and maintained with chloral hydrate that administration of papaverine (400 microg) directly into the corpora cavernosum of the penis produced an increase in intracavernous pressure (ICP). This elicited experimental index for penile erection was accompanied by a transient increase in the root mean square values, concurrent with a shift in the contribution of Theta (increase) and delta (decrease) power to the hippocampal electroencephalographic (hEEG) activity. Reversal blockade of these hEEG responses with xylocaine, given either intrathecally at the L6-S1 spinal levels or unilaterally to the hippocampal formation, significantly heightened and prolonged the ICP response. Pretreatment with xylocaine by itself, however, did not alter appreciably the baseline ICP or hEEG activity. These results suggest the presence of a novel negative feedback inhibitory mechanism in the hippocampal formation, which is triggered by ascending sensory inputs initiated by tumescence of the penis during normal erectile processes. Copyright 1998 Elsevier Science B.V.

  9. An Actomyosin-Arf-GEF Negative Feedback Loop for Tissue Elongation under Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Junior J; Zulueta-Coarasa, Teresa; Maier, Janna A; Lee, Donghoon M; Bruce, Ashley E E; Fernandez-Gonzalez, Rodrigo; Harris, Tony J C

    2017-08-07

    In response to a pulling force, a material can elongate, hold fast, or fracture. During animal development, multi-cellular contraction of one region often stretches neighboring tissue. Such local contraction occurs by induced actomyosin activity, but molecular mechanisms are unknown for regulating the physical properties of connected tissue for elongation under stress. We show that cytohesins, and their Arf small G protein guanine nucleotide exchange activity, are required for tissues to elongate under stress during both Drosophila dorsal closure (DC) and zebrafish epiboly. In Drosophila, protein localization, laser ablation, and genetic interaction studies indicate that the cytohesin Steppke reduces tissue tension by inhibiting actomyosin activity at adherens junctions. Without Steppke, embryogenesis fails, with epidermal distortions and tears resulting from myosin misregulation. Remarkably, actomyosin network assembly is necessary and sufficient for local Steppke accumulation, where live imaging shows Steppke recruitment within minutes. This rapid negative feedback loop provides a molecular mechanism for attenuating the main tension generator of animal tissues. Such attenuation relaxes tissues and allows orderly elongation under stress. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Genetic variation of dopamine and serotonin function modulates the feedback-related negativity during altruistic punishment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enge, Sören; Mothes, Hendrik; Fleischhauer, Monika; Reif, Andreas; Strobel, Alexander

    2017-06-07

    Why do humans cooperate and often punish norm violations of others? In the present study, we sought to investigate the genetic bases of altruistic punishment (AP), which refers to the costly punishment of norm violations with potential benefit for other individuals. Recent evidence suggests that norm violations and unfairness are indexed by the feedback-related negativity (FRN), an anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) generated neural response to expectancy violations. Given evidence on the role of serotonin and dopamine in AP as well as in FRN-generation, we explored the impact of genetic variation of serotonin and dopamine function on FRN and AP behavior in response to unfair vs. fair monetary offers in a Dictator Game (DG) with punishment option. In a sample of 45 healthy participants we observed larger FRN amplitudes to unfair DG assignments both for 7-repeat allele carriers of the dopamine D4 receptor (DRD4) exon III polymorphism and for l/l-genotype carriers of the serotonin transporter gene-linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLRP). Moreover, 5-HTTLPR l/l-genotype carriers punished unfair offers more strongly. These findings support the role of serotonin and dopamine in AP, potentially via their influence on neural mechanisms implicated in the monitoring of expectancy violations and their relation to impulsive and punishment behavior.

  11. Negative feedback from CaSR signaling to aquaporin-2 sensitizes vasopressin to extracellular Ca2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranieri, Marianna; Tamma, Grazia; Di Mise, Annarita; Russo, Annamaria; Centrone, Mariangela; Svelto, Maria; Calamita, Giuseppe; Valenti, Giovanna

    2015-07-01

    We previously described that high luminal Ca(2+) in the renal collecting duct attenuates short-term vasopressin-induced aquaporin-2 (AQP2) trafficking through activation of the Ca(2+)-sensing receptor (CaSR). Here, we evaluated AQP2 phosphorylation and permeability, in both renal HEK-293 cells and in the dissected inner medullary collecting duct, in response to specific activation of CaSR with NPS-R568. In CaSR-transfected cells, CaSR activation drastically reduced the basal levels of AQP2 phosphorylation at S256 (AQP2-pS256), thus having an opposite effect to vasopressin action. When forskolin stimulation was performed in the presence of NPS-R568, the increase in AQP2-pS256 and in the osmotic water permeability were prevented. In the freshly isolated inner mouse medullar collecting duct, stimulation with forskolin in the presence of NPS-R568 prevented the increase in AQP2-pS256 and osmotic water permeability. Our data demonstrate that the activation of CaSR in the collecting duct prevents the cAMP-dependent increase in AQP2-pS256 and water permeability, counteracting the short-term vasopressin response. By extension, our results suggest the attractive concept that CaSR expressed in distinct nephron segments exerts a negative feedback on hormones acting through cAMP, conferring high sensitivity of hormone to extracellular Ca(2+). © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  12. Endocannabinoid Signaling, Glucocorticoid-Mediated Negative Feedback and Regulation of the HPA Axis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, M. N.; Tasker, J. G.

    2012-01-01

    The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis regulates the outflow of glucocorticoid hormones under basal conditions and in response to stress. Within the last decade, a large body of evidence has mounted indicating that the endocannabinoid system is involved in the central regulation of the stress response; however, the specific role endocannabinoid signalling plays in phases of HPA axis regulation, or the neural sites of action mediating this regulation, was not mapped out until recently. This review aims to collapse the current state of knowledge regarding the role of the endocannabinoid system in the regulation of the HPA axis to put together a working model of how and where endocannabinoids act within the brain to regulate outflow of the HPA axis. Specifically, we discuss the role of the endocannabinoid system in the regulation of the HPA axis under basal conditions, activation in response to acute stress and glucocorticoid-mediated negative feedback. Interestingly, there appears to be some anatomical specificity to the role of the endocannabinoid system in each phase of HPA axis regulation, as well as distinct roles of both anandamide and 2-arachidonoylglycerol in these phases. Ultimately, the current level of information indicates that endocannabinoid signalling acts to suppress HPA axis activity through concerted actions within the prefrontal cortex, amygdala and hypothalamus. PMID:22214537

  13. Estradiol negative and positive feedback in a prenatal androgen-induced mouse model of polycystic ovarian syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Aleisha M; Prescott, Melanie; Campbell, Rebecca E

    2013-02-01

    Gonadal steroid hormone feedback is impaired in polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS), a common endocrine disorder characterized by hyperandrogenism and an associated increase in LH pulse frequency. Using a prenatal androgen (PNA)-treated mouse model of PCOS, we aimed to investigate negative and positive feedback effects of estrogens on the hypothalamic-pituitary axis regulation of LH. PNA-treated mice exhibited severely disrupted estrous cycles, hyperandrogenism, significantly reduced fertility, and altered ovarian morphology. To assess the negative feedback effects of estrogens, LH was measured before and after ovariectomy and after estradiol (E2) administration. Compared with controls, PNA-treated mice exhibited a blunted postcastration rise in LH (P positive feedback, control and PNA-treated GnRH-green fluorescent protein transgenic mice were subjected to a standard ovariectomy with E2-replacement regimen, and both plasma and perfusion-fixed brains were collected at the time of the expected GnRH/LH surge. Immunocytochemistry and confocal imaging of cFos and green fluorescent protein were used to assess GnRH neuron activation and spine density. In the surged group, both control and PNA-treated mice had significantly increased LH and cFos activation in GnRH neurons (P positive and -negative GnRH neurons to examine whether there was an increase in spine density in cFos-expressing GnRH neurons of surged mice as expected. A significant increase in spine density in cFos-expressing GnRH neurons was evident in control animals; however, no significant increase was observed in the PNA-treated mice because spine density was elevated across all GnRH neurons. These data support that PNA treatment results in a PCOS-like phenotype that includes impaired E2-negative feedback. Additionally, although E2-positive feedback capability is retained in PNA mice, elevated GnRH neuron spine density may reflect altered synaptic regulation.

  14. Feedback-related negativity is enhanced in adolescence during a gambling task with and without probabilistic reinforcement learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Velázquez, Eduardo S; Ramos-Loyo, Julieta; González-Garrido, Andrés A; Sequeira, Henrique

    2015-01-21

    Feedback-related negativity (FRN) is a negative deflection that appears around 250 ms after the gain or loss of feedback to chosen alternatives in a gambling task in frontocentral regions following outcomes. Few studies have reported FRN enhancement in adolescents compared with adults in a gambling task without probabilistic reinforcement learning, despite the fact that learning from positive or negative consequences is crucial for decision-making during adolescence. Therefore, the aim of the present research was to identify differences in FRN amplitude and latency between adolescents and adults on a gambling task with favorable and unfavorable probabilistic reinforcement learning conditions, in addition to a nonlearning condition with monetary gains and losses. Higher rate scores of high-magnitude choices during the final 30 trials compared with the first 30 trials were observed during the favorable condition, whereas lower rates were observed during the unfavorable condition in both groups. Higher FRN amplitude in all conditions and longer latency in the nonlearning condition were observed in adolescents compared with adults and in relation to losses. Results indicate that both the adolescents and the adults improved their performance in relation to positive and negative feedback. However, the FRN findings suggest an increased sensitivity to external feedback to losses in adolescents compared with adults, irrespective of the presence or absence of probabilistic reinforcement learning. These results reflect processing differences on the neural monitoring system and provide new perspectives on the dynamic development of an adolescent's brain.

  15. Hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia blunts the Insulin-Inpp5f negative feedback loop in the diabetic heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Danna; Zhang, Yajun; Shen, Mingzhi; Sun, Yongfeng; Xia, Qing; Zhang, Yingmei; Liu, Xuedong; Wang, Haichang; Yuan, Lijun

    2016-02-24

    The leading cause of death in diabetic patients is diabetic cardiomyopathy, in which alteration of Akt signal plays an important role. Inpp5f is recently found to be a negative regulator of Akt signaling, while its expression and function in diabetic heart is largely unknown. In this study, we found that in both the streptozotocin (STZ) and high fat diet (HFD) induced diabetic mouse models, Inpp5f expression was coordinately regulated by insulin, blood glucose and lipid levels. Increased Inpp5f was inversely correlated with the cardiac function. Further studies revealed that Insulin transcriptionally activated Inpp5f in an Sp1 dependent manner, and increased Inpp5f in turn reduced the phosphorylation of Akt, forming a negative feedback loop. The negative feedback plays a protective role under diabetic condition. However, high blood glucose and lipid, which are characteristics of uncontrolled diabetes and type 2 diabetes, increased Inpp5f expression through activation of NF-κB, blunts the protective feedback. Thus, our study has revealed that Inpp5f provides as a negative feedback regulator of insulin signaling and downregulation of Inpp5f in diabetes is cardioprotective. Increased Inpp5f by hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia is an important mediator of diabetic cardiomyopathy and is a promising therapeutic target for the disease.

  16. Negative plant-soil feedbacks increase with plant abundance, and are unchanged by competition

    Science.gov (United States)

    John L. Maron; Alyssa Laney Smith; Yvette K. Ortega; Dean E. Pearson; Ragan M. Callaway

    2016-01-01

    Plant-soil feedbacks and interspecific competition are ubiquitous interactions that strongly influence the performance of plants. Yet few studies have examined whether the strength of these interactions corresponds with the abundance of plant species in the field, or whether feedbacks and competition interact in ways that either ameliorate or exacerbate their...

  17. The Facilitatory Effect of Negative Feedback on the Emergence of Analogical Reasoning Abilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Linden J.; Hoyle, Alison M.; Towse, Andrea S.

    2010-01-01

    This paper focuses on the development of analogical reasoning abilities in 5- and 6-year-old children. Our particular interest relates to the way in which analogizing is influenced by the provision of task-based feedback coupled with a self-explanation requirement. Both feedback and self-explanation provide children with opportunities to engage in…

  18. HER2 in Breast Cancer Stemness: A Negative Feedback Loop towards Trastuzumab Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babak Nami

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available HER2 receptor tyrosine kinase that is overexpressed in approximately 20% of all breast cancers (BCs is a poor prognosis factor and a precious target for BC therapy. Trastuzumab is approved by FDA to specifically target HER2 for treating HER2+ BC. However, about 60% of patients with HER2+ breast tumor develop de novo resistance to trastuzumab, partially due to the loss of expression of HER2 extracellular domain on their tumor cells. This is due to shedding/cleavage of HER2 by metalloproteinases (ADAMs and MMPs. HER2 shedding results in the accumulation of intracellular carboxyl-terminal HER2 (p95HER2, which is a common phenomenon in trastuzumab-resistant tumors and is suggested as a predictive marker for trastuzumab resistance. Up-regulation of the metalloproteinases is a poor prognosis factor and is commonly seen in mesenchymal-like cancer stem cells that are risen during epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT of tumor cells. HER2 cleavage during EMT can explain why secondary metastatic tumors with high percentage of mesenchymal-like cancer stem cells are mostly resistant to trastuzumab but still sensitive to lapatinib. Importantly, many studies report HER2 interaction with oncogenic/stemness signaling pathways including TGF-β/Smad, Wnt/β-catenin, Notch, JAK/STAT and Hedgehog. HER2 overexpression promotes EMT and the emergence of cancer stem cell properties in BC. Increased expression and activation of metalloproteinases during EMT leads to proteolytic cleavage and shedding of HER2 receptor, which downregulates HER2 extracellular domain and eventually increases trastuzumab resistance. Here, we review the hypothesis that a negative feedback loop between HER2 and stemness signaling drives resistance of BC to trastuzumab.

  19. Negative feedback governs gonadotrope frequency-decoding of gonadotropin releasing hormone pulse-frequency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Lim

    Full Text Available The synthesis of the gonadotropin subunits is directed by pulsatile gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH from the hypothalamus, with the frequency of GnRH pulses governing the differential expression of the common alpha-subunit, luteinizing hormone beta-subunit (LHbeta and follicle-stimulating hormone beta-subunit (FSHbeta. Three mitogen-activated protein kinases, (MAPKs, ERK1/2, JNK and p38, contribute uniquely and combinatorially to the expression of each of these subunit genes. In this study, using both experimental and computational methods, we found that dual specificity phosphatase regulation of the activity of the three MAPKs through negative feedback is required, and forms the basis for decoding the frequency of pulsatile GnRH. A fourth MAPK, ERK5, was shown also to be activated by GnRH. ERK5 was found to stimulate FSHbeta promoter activity and to increase FSHbeta mRNA levels, as well as enhancing its preference for low GnRH pulse frequencies. The latter is achieved through boosting the ultrasensitive behavior of FSHbeta gene expression by increasing the number of MAPK dependencies, and through modulating the feedforward effects of JNK activation on the GnRH receptor (GnRH-R. Our findings contribute to understanding the role of changing GnRH pulse-frequency in controlling transcription of the pituitary gonadotropins, which comprises a crucial aspect in regulating reproduction. Pulsatile stimuli and oscillating signals are integral to many biological processes, and elucidation of the mechanisms through which the pulsatility is decoded explains how the same stimulant can lead to various outcomes in a single cell.

  20. Dissociation of response and feedback negativity in schizophrenia: Electrophysiological and computational evidence for a deficit in the representation of value

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah E Morris

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Contrasting theories of schizophrenia propose that the disorder is characterized by a deficit in phasic changes in dopamine activity in response to ongoing events or, alternatively, by a weakness in the representation of the value of responses. Schizophrenia patients have reliably reduced brain activity following incorrect responses but other research suggests that they may have intact feedback-related potentials, indicating that the impairment may be specifically response-related. We used event-related brain potentials and computational modeling to examine this issue by comparing the neural response to outcomes with the neural response to behaviors that predict outcomes in patients with schizophrenia and psychiatrically healthy comparison subjects. We recorded feedback-related activity in a passive gambling task and a time estimation task and error-related activity in a flanker task. Patients’ brain activity following an erroneous response was reduced compared to comparison subjects but feedback-related activity did not differ between groups. Using computational modeling, we simulated the effects of an overall reduction in patients’ sensitivity to feedback, selective insensitivity to positive or negative feedback, reduced learning rate and a decreased representation of the value of the response given the stimulus on each trial. The results of the computational modeling suggest that schizophrenia patients exhibit weakened representation of response values, possibly due to failure of the basal ganglia to strongly associate stimuli with appropriate response alternatives.

  1. An ultra low noise telecom wavelength free running single photon detector using negative feedback avalanche diode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zhizhong; Hamel, Deny R; Heinrichs, Aimee K; Jiang, Xudong; Itzler, Mark A; Jennewein, Thomas

    2012-07-01

    It is challenging to implement genuine free running single-photon detectors for the 1550 nm wavelength range with simultaneously high detection efficiency (DE), low dark noise, and good time resolution. We report a novel read out system for the signals from a negative feedback avalanche diode (NFAD) [M. A. Itzler, X. Jiang, B. Nyman, and K. Slomkowski, "Quantum sensing and nanophotonic devices VI," Proc. SPIE 7222, 72221K (2009); X. Jiang, M. A. Itzler, K. ODonnell, M. Entwistle, and K. Slomkowski, "Advanced photon counting techniques V," Proc. SPIE 8033, 80330K (2011); M. A. Itzler, X. Jiang, B. M. Onat, and K. Slomkowski, "Quantum sensing and nanophotonic devices VII," Proc. SPIE 7608, 760829 (2010)], which allows useful operation of these devices at a temperature of 193 K and results in very low darkcounts (∼100 counts per second (CPS)), good time jitter (∼30 ps), and good DE (∼10%). We characterized two NFADs with a time-correlation method using photons generated from weak coherent pulses and photon pairs produced by spontaneous parametric down conversion. The inferred detector efficiencies for both types of photon sources agree with each other. The best noise equivalent power of the device is estimated to be 8.1 × 10(-18) W Hz(-1/2), more than 10 times better than typical InP/InGaAs single photon avalanche diodes (SPADs) show in free running mode. The afterpulsing probability was found to be less than 0.1% per ns at the optimized operating point. In addition, we studied the performance of an entanglement-based quantum key distribution (QKD) using these detectors and develop a model for the quantum bit error rate that incorporates the afterpulsing coefficients. We verified experimentally that using these NFADs it is feasible to implement QKD over 400 km of telecom fiber. Our NFAD photon detector system is very simple, and is well suited for single-photon applications where ultra-low noise and free-running operation is required, and some afterpulsing

  2. An ultra low noise telecom wavelength free running single photon detector using negative feedback avalanche diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zhizhong; Hamel, Deny R.; Heinrichs, Aimee K.; Jiang, Xudong; Itzler, Mark A.; Jennewein, Thomas

    2012-07-01

    It is challenging to implement genuine free running single-photon detectors for the 1550 nm wavelength range with simultaneously high detection efficiency (DE), low dark noise, and good time resolution. We report a novel read out system for the signals from a negative feedback avalanche diode (NFAD) [M. A. Itzler, X. Jiang, B. Nyman, and K. Slomkowski, "Quantum sensing and nanophotonic devices VI," Proc. SPIE 7222, 72221K (2009), 10.1117/12.814669; X. Jiang, M. A. Itzler, K. ODonnell, M. Entwistle, and K. Slomkowski, "Advanced photon counting techniques V," Proc. SPIE 8033, 80330K (2011), 10.1117/12.883543; M. A. Itzler, X. Jiang, B. M. Onat, and K. Slomkowski, "Quantum sensing and nanophotonic devices VII," Proc. SPIE 7608, 760829 (2010), 10.1117/12.843588], which allows useful operation of these devices at a temperature of 193 K and results in very low darkcounts (˜100 counts per second (CPS)), good time jitter (˜30 ps), and good DE (˜10%). We characterized two NFADs with a time-correlation method using photons generated from weak coherent pulses and photon pairs produced by spontaneous parametric down conversion. The inferred detector efficiencies for both types of photon sources agree with each other. The best noise equivalent power of the device is estimated to be 8.1 × 10-18 W Hz-1/2, more than 10 times better than typical InP/InGaAs single photon avalanche diodes (SPADs) show in free running mode. The afterpulsing probability was found to be less than 0.1% per ns at the optimized operating point. In addition, we studied the performance of an entanglement-based quantum key distribution (QKD) using these detectors and develop a model for the quantum bit error rate that incorporates the afterpulsing coefficients. We verified experimentally that using these NFADs it is feasible to implement QKD over 400 km of telecom fiber. Our NFAD photon detector system is very simple, and is well suited for single-photon applications where ultra-low noise and free

  3. Differential contributions of nitric oxide synthase isoforms at hippocampal formation to negative feedback regulation of penile erection in the rat

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Alice Y W; Chan, Julie Y H; Chan, Samuel H H

    2002-01-01

    We established previously that a novel negative feedback mechanism for the regulation of penile erection, which is triggered by ascending sensory inputs initiated by tumescence of the penis, exists in the hippocampal formation (HF). This study further evaluated the participation of nitric oxide (NO) and the contribution of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) isoforms at the HF in this process.Adult, male Sprague-Dawley rats that were anaesthetized and maintained with chloral hydrate were used, and in...

  4. Boolean network approach to negative feedback loops of the p53 pathways: synchronized dynamics and stochastic limit cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Hao; Qian, Min

    2009-01-01

    Deterministic and stochastic Boolean network models are built for the dynamics of negative feedback loops of the p53 pathways. It is shown that the main function of the negative feedback in the p53 pathways is to keep p53 at a low steady state level, and each sequence of protein states in the negative feedback loops, is globally attracted to a closed cycle of the p53 dynamics after being perturbed by outside signal (e.g., DNA damage). Our theoretical and numerical studies show that both the biological stationary state and the biological oscillation after being perturbed are stable for a wide range of noise level. Applying the mathematical circulation theory of Markov chains, we investigate their stochastic synchronized dynamics and by comparing the network dynamics of the stochastic model with its corresponding deterministic network counterpart, a dominant circulation in the stochastic model is the natural generalization of the deterministic limit cycle in the deterministic system. Moreover, the period of the main peak in the power spectrum, which is in common use to characterize the synchronized dynamics, perfectly corresponds to the number of states in the main cycle with dominant circulation. Such a large separation in the magnitude of the circulations--between a dominant, main cycle and the rest--gives rise to the stochastic synchronization phenomenon.

  5. A negative-feedback loop regulating ERK1/2 activation and mediated by RasGPR2 phosphorylation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Jinqi [Departments of Pharmacology, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Cook, Aaron A.; Bergmeier, Wolfgang [Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Sondek, John, E-mail: sondek@med.unc.edu [Departments of Pharmacology, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States)

    2016-05-20

    The dynamic regulation of ERK1 and -2 (ERK1/2) is required for precise signal transduction controlling cell proliferation, differentiation, and survival. However, the underlying mechanisms regulating the activation of ERK1/2 are not completely understood. In this study, we show that phosphorylation of RasGRP2, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF), inhibits its ability to activate the small GTPase Rap1 that ultimately leads to decreased activation of ERK1/2 in cells. ERK2 phosphorylates RasGRP2 at Ser394 located in the linker region implicated in its autoinhibition. These studies identify RasGRP2 as a novel substrate of ERK1/2 and define a negative-feedback loop that regulates the BRaf–MEK–ERK signaling cascade. This negative-feedback loop determines the amplitude and duration of active ERK1/2. -- Highlights: •ERK2 phosphorylates the guanine nucleotide exchange factor RasGRP2 at Ser394. •Phosphorylated RasGRP2 has decreased capacity to active Rap1b in vitro and in cells. •Phosphorylation of RasGRP2 by ERK1/2 introduces a negative-feedback loop into the BRaf-MEK-ERK pathway.

  6. Negative feedback as an obligatory antecedent to the estradiol-induced luteinizing hormone surge in ovariectomized pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesner, J S; Price-Taras, E A; Kraeling, R R; Rampacek, G B; Barb, C R

    1989-09-01

    In ovariectomized pigs, estradiol treatment induces a preovulatory-like luteinizing hormone (LH) surge, but only after serum LH concentrations are suppressed for 48 h. This inhibition of LH release is attributable in large part to inhibition of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) release. The present report examines the dependency of the estradiol-induced LH surge on this preceding phase of negative feedback. Ten ovariectomized gilts were given an i.m. injection of estradiol benzoate (10 micrograms/kg BW). Beginning at the time of estradiol treatment, 5 of these gilts received 1-microgram GnRH pulses i.v. every 45 min for 48 h, i.e. during the period of negative feedback. The remaining 5 control gilts received comparable infusions of vehicle. Estradiol induced the characteristic biphasic LH response in control gilts. On the other hand, the inhibitory LH response to estradiol was prevented and the ensuing LH surge was blocked in 4 of the 5 gilts given GnRH pulses during the negative feedback phase. These results indicate that suppressing release of GnRH and/or LH is an important antecedent to full expression of the LH surge in ovariectomized pigs. Assimilation of this observation with the existing literature provides novel insights into the neuroendocrine control of LH secretion in castrated and ovary-intact gilts.

  7. The Effects of Positive and Negative Feedback on Maximal Voluntary Contraction Level of the Biceps Brachii Muscle: Moderating Roles of Gender and Conscientiousness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarıkabak, Murat; Yaman, Çetin; Tok, Serdar; Binboga, Erdal

    2016-11-02

    We investigated the effect of positive and negative feedback on maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) of the biceps brachii muscle and explored the mediating effects of gender and conscientiousness. During elbow flexion, MVCs were measured in positive, negative, and no-feedback conditions. Participants were divided into high- and low-conscientiousness groups based on the median split of their scores on Tatar's five-factor personality inventory. Considering all participants 46 college student athletes (21 female, 28 male), positive feedback led to a greater MVC percentage change (-5.76%) than did negative feedback (2.2%). MVC percentage change in the positive feedback condition differed significantly by gender, but the negative feedback condition did not. Thus, positive feedback increased female athletes' MVC level by 3.49%, but decreased male athletes' MVC level by 15.6%. For conscientiousness, MVC percentage change in the positive feedback condition did not differ according to high and low conscientiousness. However, conscientiousness interacted with gender in the positive feedback condition, increasing MVC in high-conscientiousness female athletes and decreasing MVC in low-conscientiousness female athletes. Positive feedback decreased MVC in both high- and low-conscientiousness male athletes. © The Author(s) 2016.

  8. Leader-member exchange and member performance: a new look at individual-level negative feedback-seeking behavior and team-level empowerment climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ziguang; Lam, Wing; Zhong, Jian An

    2007-01-01

    From a basis in social exchange theory, the authors investigated whether, and how, negative feedback-seeking behavior and a team empowerment climate affect the relationship between leader-member exchange (LMX) and member performance. Results showed that subordinates' negative feedback-seeking behavior mediated the relationship between LMX and both objective and subjective in-role performance. In addition, the level of a team's empowerment climate was positively related to subordinates' own sense of empowerment, which in turn negatively moderated the effects of LMX on negative feedback-seeking behavior. 2007 APA, all rights reserved

  9. Consequences of positive and negative feedback: the impact on emotions and extra-role behaviors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belschak, F.D.; den Hartog, D.N.

    2009-01-01

    These studies examine employees' emotional reactions to performance feedback from their supervisors as well as subsequent effects on attitudes and (intentions to show) affect-driven work behaviors (counterproductive behavior, turnover, citizenship, and affective commitment). A pre-study (N= 72)

  10. Influences of State and Trait Affect on Behavior, Feedback-Related Negativity, and P3b in the Ultimatum Game.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riepl, Korbinian; Mussel, Patrick; Osinsky, Roman; Hewig, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigates how different emotions can alter social bargaining behavior. An important paradigm to study social bargaining is the Ultimatum Game. There, a proposer gets a pot of money and has to offer part of it to a responder. If the responder accepts, both players get the money as proposed by the proposer. If he rejects, none of the players gets anything. Rational choice models would predict that responders accept all offers above 0. However, evidence shows that responders typically reject a large proportion of all unfair offers. We analyzed participants' behavior when they played the Ultimatum Game as responders and simultaneously collected electroencephalogram data in order to quantify the feedback-related negativity and P3b components. We induced state affect (momentarily emotions unrelated to the task) via short movie clips and measured trait affect (longer-lasting emotional dispositions) via questionnaires. State happiness led to increased acceptance rates of very unfair offers. Regarding neurophysiology, we found that unfair offers elicited larger feedback-related negativity amplitudes than fair offers. Additionally, an interaction of state and trait affect occurred: high trait negative affect (subsuming a variety of aversive mood states) led to increased feedback-related negativity amplitudes when participants were in an angry mood, but not if they currently experienced fear or happiness. We discuss that increased rumination might be responsible for this result, which might not occur, however, when people experience happiness or fear. Apart from that, we found that fair offers elicited larger P3b components than unfair offers, which might reflect increased pleasure in response to fair offers. Moreover, high trait negative affect was associated with decreased P3b amplitudes, potentially reflecting decreased motivation to engage in activities. We discuss implications of our results in the light of theories and research on depression and

  11. Influences of State and Trait Affect on Behavior, Feedback-Related Negativity, and P3b in the Ultimatum Game.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korbinian Riepl

    Full Text Available The present study investigates how different emotions can alter social bargaining behavior. An important paradigm to study social bargaining is the Ultimatum Game. There, a proposer gets a pot of money and has to offer part of it to a responder. If the responder accepts, both players get the money as proposed by the proposer. If he rejects, none of the players gets anything. Rational choice models would predict that responders accept all offers above 0. However, evidence shows that responders typically reject a large proportion of all unfair offers. We analyzed participants' behavior when they played the Ultimatum Game as responders and simultaneously collected electroencephalogram data in order to quantify the feedback-related negativity and P3b components. We induced state affect (momentarily emotions unrelated to the task via short movie clips and measured trait affect (longer-lasting emotional dispositions via questionnaires. State happiness led to increased acceptance rates of very unfair offers. Regarding neurophysiology, we found that unfair offers elicited larger feedback-related negativity amplitudes than fair offers. Additionally, an interaction of state and trait affect occurred: high trait negative affect (subsuming a variety of aversive mood states led to increased feedback-related negativity amplitudes when participants were in an angry mood, but not if they currently experienced fear or happiness. We discuss that increased rumination might be responsible for this result, which might not occur, however, when people experience happiness or fear. Apart from that, we found that fair offers elicited larger P3b components than unfair offers, which might reflect increased pleasure in response to fair offers. Moreover, high trait negative affect was associated with decreased P3b amplitudes, potentially reflecting decreased motivation to engage in activities. We discuss implications of our results in the light of theories and research on

  12. Bullying and negative appearance feedback among adolescents: Is it objective or misperceived weight that matters?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kirsty; Dale, Jeremy; Guy, Alexa; Wolke, Dieter

    2018-02-01

    This study investigated (1) whether involvement in bullying as a bully, victim or bully-victim was associated with objectively measured overweight or underweight, or whether it was related to weight misperception (i.e., inaccurate perceptions), and (2) whether appearance-specific feedback mediated the relationship between bullying and weight misperception. In Stage 1, 2782 adolescents aged 11-16 years from British secondary schools were screened for peer bullying and victimisation. In Stage 2, 411 adolescents with weight and height data (objective n = 319, self-report n = 92) also self-reported on their weight perception and appearance-specific feedback. Neither bullying nor victimisation were related to objective underweight or overweight. Victims were at increased odds of overweight misperception, while bully-victims were at increased odds of underweight misperception. Additionally, there was an indirect effect of appearance feedback on overweight misperception in bully-victims. Both victims and bully-victims are at increased risk of weight misperception, posing further detrimental effects to their health and wellbeing. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Negative Regulators of an RNAi-Heterochromatin Positive Feedback Loop Safeguard Somatic Genome Integrity in Tetrahymena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhren, Jan H; Noto, Tomoko; Kataoka, Kensuke; Gao, Shan; Liu, Yifan; Mochizuki, Kazufumi

    2017-03-07

    RNAi-mediated positive feedback loops are pivotal for the maintenance of heterochromatin, but how they are downregulated at heterochromatin-euchromatin borders is not well understood. In the ciliated protozoan Tetrahymena, heterochromatin is formed exclusively on the sequences that are removed from the somatic genome by programmed DNA elimination, and an RNAi-mediated feedback loop is important for assembling heterochromatin on the eliminated sequences. In this study, we show that the heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1)-like protein Coi6p, its interaction partners Coi7p and Lia5p, and the histone demethylase Jmj1p are crucial for confining the production of small RNAs and the formation of heterochromatin to the eliminated sequences. The loss of Coi6p, Coi7p, or Jmj1p causes ectopic DNA elimination. The results provide direct evidence for the existence of a dedicated mechanism that counteracts a positive feedback loop between RNAi and heterochromatin at heterochromatin-euchromatin borders to maintain the integrity of the somatic genome. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Depression-related difficulties disengaging from negative faces are associated with sustained attention to negative feedback during social evaluation and predict stress recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Alvaro; Romero, Nuria; De Raedt, Rudi

    2017-01-01

    The present study aimed to clarify: 1) the presence of depression-related attention bias related to a social stressor, 2) its association with depression-related attention biases as measured under standard conditions, and 3) their association with impaired stress recovery in depression. A sample of 39 participants reporting a broad range of depression levels completed a standard eye-tracking paradigm in which they had to engage/disengage their gaze with/from emotional faces. Participants then underwent a stress induction (i.e., giving a speech), in which their eye movements to false emotional feedback were measured, and stress reactivity and recovery were assessed. Depression level was associated with longer times to engage/disengage attention with/from negative faces under standard conditions and with sustained attention to negative feedback during the speech. These depression-related biases were associated and mediated the association between depression level and self-reported stress recovery, predicting lower recovery from stress after giving the speech.

  15. A Regulated Double-Negative Feedback Decodes the Temporal Gradient of Input Stimulation in a Cell Signaling Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sang-Min; Shin, Sung-Young; Cho, Kwang-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Revealing the hidden mechanism of how cells sense and react to environmental signals has been a central question in cell biology. We focused on the rate of increase of stimulation, or temporal gradient, known to cause different responses of cells. We have investigated all possible three-node enzymatic networks and identified a network motif that robustly generates a transient or sustained response by acute or gradual stimulation, respectively. We also found that a regulated double-negative feedback within the motif is essential for the temporal gradient-sensitive switching. Our analysis highlights the essential structure and mechanism enabling cells to properly respond to dynamic environmental changes. PMID:27584002

  16. Observational evidence that positive and negative AGN feedback depends on galaxy mass and jet power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalfountzou, E.; Stevens, J. A.; Jarvis, M. J.; Hardcastle, M. J.; Wilner, D.; Elvis, M.; Page, M. J.; Trichas, M.; Smith, D. J. B.

    2017-10-01

    Several studies support the existence of a link between the active galactic nucleus (AGN) and star formation activity. Radio jets have been argued to be an ideal mechanism for direct interaction between the AGN and the host galaxy. A drawback of previous surveys of AGN is that they are fundamentally limited by the degeneracy between redshift and luminosity in flux-density limited samples. To overcome this limitation, we present far-infrared Herschel observations of 74 radio-loud quasars (RLQs), 72 radio-quiet quasars (RQQs) and 27 radio galaxies (RGs), selected at 0.9 positive radio-jet feedback or radio AGN triggering is linked to star formation triggering, and (3) RGs have lower SFRs by a factor of 2.5 than the RLQ sub-sample with the same BH mass and bolometric luminosity. We suggest that there is some jet power threshold at which radio-jet feedback switches from enhancing star formation (by compressing gas) to suppressing it (by ejecting gas). This threshold depends on both galaxy mass and jet power.

  17. Positive and negative feedbacks and free-scale pattern distribution in rural-population dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Concepción L Alados

    Full Text Available Depopulation of rural areas is a widespread phenomenon that has occurred in most industrialized countries, and has contributed significantly to a reduction in the productivity of agro-ecological resources. In this study, we identified the main trends in the dynamics of rural populations in the Central Pyrenees in the 20th C and early 21st C, and used density independent and density dependent models and identified the main factors that have influenced the dynamics. In addition, we investigated the change in the power law distribution of population size in those periods. Populations exhibited density-dependent positive feedback between 1960 and 2010, and a long-term positive correlation between agricultural activity and population size, which has resulted in a free-scale population distribution that has been disrupted by the collapse of the traditional agricultural society and by emigration to the industrialized cities. We concluded that complex socio-ecological systems that have strong feedback mechanisms can contribute to disruptive population collapses, which can be identified by changes in the pattern of population distribution.

  18. Fast negative feedback enables mammalian auditory nerve fibers to encode a wide dynamic range of sound intensities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Ospeck

    Full Text Available Mammalian auditory nerve fibers (ANF are remarkable for being able to encode a 40 dB, or hundred fold, range of sound pressure levels into their firing rate. Most of the fibers are very sensitive and raise their quiescent spike rate by a small amount for a faint sound at auditory threshold. Then as the sound intensity is increased, they slowly increase their spike rate, with some fibers going up as high as ∼300 Hz. In this way mammals are able to combine sensitivity and wide dynamic range. They are also able to discern sounds embedded within background noise. ANF receive efferent feedback, which suggests that the fibers are readjusted according to the background noise in order to maximize the information content of their auditory spike trains. Inner hair cells activate currents in the unmyelinated distal dendrites of ANF where sound intensity is rate-coded into action potentials. We model this spike generator compartment as an attenuator that employs fast negative feedback. Input current induces rapid and proportional leak currents. This way ANF are able to have a linear frequency to input current (f-I curve that has a wide dynamic range. The ANF spike generator remains very sensitive to threshold currents, but efferent feedback is able to lower its gain in response to noise.

  19. Progesterone for premenstrual syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ford, Olive; Lethaby, Anne; Roberts, Helen; Mol, Ben Willem J.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: About 5% of women experience severe symptoms called premenstrual syndrome (PMS), only in the two weeks before their menstrual periods. Treatment with progesterone may restore a deficiency, balance menstrual hormone levels or reduce effects of falling progesterone levels on the brain or

  20. Changes of Attention during Value-Based Reversal Learning Are Tracked by N2pc and Feedback-Related Negativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariann Oemisch

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Previously learned reward values can have a pronounced impact, behaviorally and neurophysiologically, on the allocation of selective attention. All else constant, stimuli previously associated with a high value gain stronger attentional prioritization than stimuli previously associated with a low value. The N2pc, an ERP component indicative of attentional target selection, has been shown to reflect aspects of this prioritization, by changes of mean amplitudes closely corresponding to selective enhancement of high value target processing and suppression of high value distractor processing. What has remained unclear so far is whether the N2pc also reflects the flexible and repeated behavioral adjustments needed in a volatile task environment, in which the values of stimuli are reversed often and unannounced. Using a value-based reversal learning task, we found evidence that the N2pc amplitude flexibly and reversibly tracks value-based choices during the learning of reward associated stimulus colors. Specifically, successful learning of current value-contingencies was associated with reduced N2pc amplitudes, and this effect was more apparent for distractor processing, compared with target processing. In addition, following a value reversal the feedback related negativity(FRN, an ERP component that reflects feedback processing, was amplified and co-occurred with increased N2pc amplitudes in trials following low-value feedback. Importantly, participants that showed the greatest adjustment in N2pc amplitudes based on feedback were also the most efficient learners. These results allow further insight into how changes in attentional prioritization in an uncertain and volatile environment support flexible adjustments of behavior.

  1. Changes of Attention during Value-Based Reversal Learning Are Tracked by N2pc and Feedback-Related Negativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oemisch, Mariann; Watson, Marcus R; Womelsdorf, Thilo; Schubö, Anna

    2017-01-01

    Previously learned reward values can have a pronounced impact, behaviorally and neurophysiologically, on the allocation of selective attention. All else constant, stimuli previously associated with a high value gain stronger attentional prioritization than stimuli previously associated with a low value. The N2pc, an ERP component indicative of attentional target selection, has been shown to reflect aspects of this prioritization, by changes of mean amplitudes closely corresponding to selective enhancement of high value target processing and suppression of high value distractor processing. What has remained unclear so far is whether the N2pc also reflects the flexible and repeated behavioral adjustments needed in a volatile task environment, in which the values of stimuli are reversed often and unannounced. Using a value-based reversal learning task, we found evidence that the N2pc amplitude flexibly and reversibly tracks value-based choices during the learning of reward associated stimulus colors. Specifically, successful learning of current value-contingencies was associated with reduced N2pc amplitudes, and this effect was more apparent for distractor processing, compared with target processing. In addition, following a value reversal the feedback related negativity(FRN), an ERP component that reflects feedback processing, was amplified and co-occurred with increased N2pc amplitudes in trials following low-value feedback. Importantly, participants that showed the greatest adjustment in N2pc amplitudes based on feedback were also the most efficient learners. These results allow further insight into how changes in attentional prioritization in an uncertain and volatile environment support flexible adjustments of behavior.

  2. Sound shielding by a piezoelectric membrane and a negative capacitor with feedback control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sluka, Tomás; Kodama, Hidekazu; Fukada, Eiichi; Mokrý, Pavel

    2008-08-01

    The design and realization of an adaptive sound-shielding system based on a method to control the effective elastic stiffness of piezoelectric materials are presented in this paper. In this system, the sound-shielding effect is achieved by a sound reflection from the piezoelectric curved membrane fixed in rigid frame and connected to an active analog circuit that behaves as a negative capacitor. The acoustic transmission loss through the curved membrane was measured for the incident sound of frequency 1.6 kHz and of acoustic pressure level 80 dB. When the negative capacitor in the system was properly adjusted, the acoustic pressure level of the transmitted sound was reduced from the initial 60 dB to 15 dB by the action of the negative capacitor. Then the system was exposed to naturally changing operational conditions, and their effect on sound-shielding efficiency was studied. It is shown that the acoustic transmission loss of the system dropped by 35 dB within 30 min from the moment of negative capacitor adjustment. Therefore, a self-adjustment of the system has been implemented by appending an additional digital control circuit to the negative capacitor. It is shown that the aforementioned deteriorating effect has been eliminated by the adjusting action of the control circuit. The long-time sustainable value of 60 dB in the acoustic transmission loss of the adaptive sound shielding system has been achieved.

  3. Progesterone resistance in endometriosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Patel, Bansari G; Rudnicki, Martin; Yu, Jie

    2017-01-01

    Endometriosis is a common cause of pelvic pain and affects up to 10% of women of reproductive age. Aberrant progesterone signaling in the endometrium plays a significant role in impaired decidualization and establishment of ectopic endometrial implants. Eutopic endometrial cells from women...... renders infants susceptible to neonatal uterine bleeding and endometriosis. Progesterone action is crucial to decreasing inflammation in the endometrium, and deviant progesterone signaling results in a proinflammatory phenotype. Conversely, chronic inflammation can induce a progesterone resistant state...... and their targets. Environmental toxins, such as dioxin, play a possible role in the genesis of endometriosis by permitting an inflammatory milieu. A consequence of impaired progesterone action is that hormonal therapy is rendered ineffective for a subset of women with endometriosis. Synthetic progestins...

  4. Tunable stochastic pulsing in the Escherichia coli multiple antibiotic resistance network from interlinked positive and negative feedback loops.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Garcia-Bernardo

    Full Text Available Cells live in uncertain, dynamic environments and have many mechanisms for sensing and responding to changes in their surroundings. However, sudden fluctuations in the environment can be catastrophic to a population if it relies solely on sensory responses, which have a delay associated with them. Cells can reconcile these effects by using a tunable stochastic response, where in the absence of a stressor they create phenotypic diversity within an isogenic population, but use a deterministic response when stressors are sensed. Here, we develop a stochastic model of the multiple antibiotic resistance network of Escherichia coli and show that it can produce tunable stochastic pulses in the activator MarA. In particular, we show that a combination of interlinked positive and negative feedback loops plays an important role in setting the dynamics of the stochastic pulses. Negative feedback produces a pulsatile response that is tunable, while positive feedback serves to amplify the effect. Our simulations show that the uninduced native network is in a parameter regime that is of low cost to the cell (taxing resistance mechanisms are expressed infrequently and also elevated noise strength (phenotypic variability is high. The stochastic pulsing can be tuned by MarA induction such that variability is decreased once stresses are sensed, avoiding the detrimental effects of noise when an optimal MarA concentration is needed. We further show that variability in the expression of MarA can act as a bet hedging mechanism, allowing for survival in time-varying stress environments, however this effect is tunable to allow for a fully induced, deterministic response in the presence of a stressor.

  5. Tunable stochastic pulsing in the Escherichia coli multiple antibiotic resistance network from interlinked positive and negative feedback loops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Bernardo, Javier; Dunlop, Mary J

    2013-01-01

    Cells live in uncertain, dynamic environments and have many mechanisms for sensing and responding to changes in their surroundings. However, sudden fluctuations in the environment can be catastrophic to a population if it relies solely on sensory responses, which have a delay associated with them. Cells can reconcile these effects by using a tunable stochastic response, where in the absence of a stressor they create phenotypic diversity within an isogenic population, but use a deterministic response when stressors are sensed. Here, we develop a stochastic model of the multiple antibiotic resistance network of Escherichia coli and show that it can produce tunable stochastic pulses in the activator MarA. In particular, we show that a combination of interlinked positive and negative feedback loops plays an important role in setting the dynamics of the stochastic pulses. Negative feedback produces a pulsatile response that is tunable, while positive feedback serves to amplify the effect. Our simulations show that the uninduced native network is in a parameter regime that is of low cost to the cell (taxing resistance mechanisms are expressed infrequently) and also elevated noise strength (phenotypic variability is high). The stochastic pulsing can be tuned by MarA induction such that variability is decreased once stresses are sensed, avoiding the detrimental effects of noise when an optimal MarA concentration is needed. We further show that variability in the expression of MarA can act as a bet hedging mechanism, allowing for survival in time-varying stress environments, however this effect is tunable to allow for a fully induced, deterministic response in the presence of a stressor.

  6. Localized adenosine signaling provides fine-tuned negative feedback over a wide dynamic range of neocortical network activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Magnus J. E.

    2014-01-01

    Although the patterns of activity produced by neocortical networks are now better understood, how these states are activated, sustained, and terminated still remains unclear. Negative feedback by the endogenous neuromodulator adenosine may potentially play an important role, as it can be released by activity and there is dense A1 receptor expression in the neocortex. Using electrophysiology, biosensors, and modeling, we have investigated the properties of adenosine signaling during physiological and pathological network activity in rat neocortical slices. Both low- and high-rate network activities were reduced by A1 receptor activation and enhanced by block of A1 receptors, consistent with activity-dependent adenosine release. Since the A1 receptors were neither saturated nor completely unoccupied during either low- or high-rate activity, adenosine signaling provides a negative-feedback mechanism with a wide dynamic range. Modeling and biosensor experiments show that during high-rate activity increases in extracellular adenosine concentration are highly localized and are uncorrelated over short distances that are certainly adenosine release during low-rate activity, although it is present, is probably a consequence of small localized increases in adenosine concentration that are rapidly diminished by diffusion and active removal mechanisms. Saturation of such removal mechanisms when higher concentrations of adenosine are released results in the accumulation of inosine, explaining the strong purine signal during high-rate activity. PMID:25392170

  7. The Context Matters: Outcome Probability and Expectation Mismatch Modulate the Feedback Negativity When Self-Evaluation of Response Correctness Is Possible.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leue, Anja; Cano Rodilla, Carmen; Beauducel, André

    2015-01-01

    Individuals typically evaluate whether their performance and the obtained feedback match. Previous research has shown that feedback negativity (FN) depends on outcome probability and feedback valence. It is, however, less clear to what extent previous effects of outcome probability on FN depend on self-evaluations of response correctness. Therefore, we investigated the effects of outcome probability on FN amplitude in a simple go/no-go task that allowed for the self-evaluation of response correctness. We also investigated effects of performance incompatibility and feedback valence. In a sample of N = 22 participants, outcome probability was manipulated by means of precues, feedback valence by means of monetary feedback, and performance incompatibility by means of feedback that induced a match versus mismatch with individuals' performance. We found that the 100% outcome probability condition induced a more negative FN following no-loss than the 50% outcome probability condition. The FN following loss was more negative in the 50% compared to the 100% outcome probability condition. Performance-incompatible loss resulted in a more negative FN than performance-compatible loss. Our results indicate that the self-evaluation of the correctness of responses should be taken into account when the effects of outcome probability and expectation mismatch on FN are investigated.

  8. Model of Calcium Oscillations Due to Negative Feedback in Olfactory Cilia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reidl, Juergen; Borowski, Peter; Sensse, Anke

    2006-01-01

    We present a mathematical model for Ca oscillations in the cilia of olfactory sensory neurons. The underlying mechanism is based on direct negative regulation of cyclic nucleotide-gated channels by calcium/calmodulin and does not require any autocatalysis such as calcium-induced calcium release...

  9. Plasma oestrogen, progesterone and other reproductive responses of gilts to photoperiods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacker, R R; King, G J; Ntunde, B N; Narendran, R

    1979-11-01

    Yorkshire gilts in 18 cool-white fluorescent light with 6 h dark daily and those in 9.0-10.8 h natural light exhibited puberty earlier (165 and 175 days: P less than 0.05) and had more corpora lutea (13.5 and 12.6: P less than 0.05) than those reared in complete darkness (200 days and 11.3 respectively). Weekly samples of plasma showed significant fluctuations of progesterone which confirmed the different times of the first over oestrus (puberty). In all 3 groups total oestrogen concentrations showed a peak at about 135 days. The correlation between oestrogen and progesterone values changed from a positive to a negative value at about 135 days of age. It is suggested that the oestrogen peak marks a time of change in sensitivity of the reproductive system to hormonal feedback.

  10. Dynamics of GnRH Neuron Ionotropic GABA and Glutamate Synaptic Receptors Are Unchanged during Estrogen Positive and Negative Feedback in Female Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xinhuai; Porteous, Robert; Herbison, Allan E

    2017-01-01

    Inputs from GABAergic and glutamatergic neurons are suspected to play an important role in regulating the activity of the gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons. The GnRH neurons exhibit marked plasticity to control the ovarian cycle with circulating estradiol concentrations having profound "feedback" effects on their activity. This includes "negative feedback" responsible for suppressing GnRH neuron activity and "positive feedback" that occurs at mid-cycle to activate the GnRH neurons to generate the preovulatory luteinizing hormone surge. In the present study, we employed brain slice electrophysiology to question whether synaptic ionotropic GABA and glutamate receptor signaling at the GnRH neuron changed at times of negative and positive feedback. We used a well characterized estradiol (E)-treated ovariectomized (OVX) mouse model to replicate negative and positive feedback. Miniature and spontaneous postsynaptic currents (mPSCs and sPSCs) attributable to GABA A and glutamatergic receptor signaling were recorded from GnRH neurons obtained from intact diestrous, OVX, OVX + E (negative feedback), and OVX + E+E (positive feedback) female mice. Approximately 90% of GnRH neurons exhibited spontaneous GABA A -mPSCs in all groups but no significant differences in the frequency or kinetics of mPSCs were found at the times of negative or positive feedback. Approximately 50% of GnRH neurons exhibited spontaneous glutamate mPSCs but again no differences were detected. The same was true for spontaneous PSCs in all cases. These observations indicate that the kinetics of ionotropic GABA and glutamate receptor synaptic transmission to GnRH neurons remain stable across the different estrogen feedback states.

  11. Negative Feedbacks by Isoprenoids on a Mevalonate Kinase Expressed in the Corpora Allata of Mosquitoes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pratik Nyati

    Full Text Available Juvenile hormones (JH regulate development and reproductive maturation in insects. JHs are synthesized through the mevalonate pathway (MVAP, an ancient metabolic pathway present in the three domains of life. Mevalonate kinase (MVK is a key enzyme in the MVAP. MVK catalyzes the synthesis of phosphomevalonate (PM by transferring the γ-phosphoryl group from ATP to the C5 hydroxyl oxygen of mevalonic acid (MA. Despite the importance of MVKs, these enzymes have been poorly characterized in insects.We functionally characterized an Aedes aegypti MVK (AaMVK expressed in the corpora allata (CA of the mosquito. AaMVK displayed its activity in the presence of metal cofactors. Different nucleotides were used by AaMVK as phosphoryl donors. In the presence of Mg(2+, the enzyme has higher affinity for MA than ATP. The activity of AaMVK was regulated by feedback inhibition from long-chain isoprenoids, such as geranyl diphosphate (GPP and farnesyl diphosphate (FPP.AaMVK exhibited efficient inhibition by GPP and FPP (Ki less than 1 μM, and none by isopentenyl pyrophosphate (IPP and dimethyl allyl pyrophosphate (DPPM. These results suggest that GPP and FPP might act as physiological inhibitors in the synthesis of isoprenoids in the CA of mosquitoes. Changing MVK activity can alter the flux of precursors and therefore regulate juvenile hormone biosynthesis.

  12. Be kind to your eating disorder patients: the impact of positive and negative feedback on the explicit and implicit self-esteem of female patients with eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderlinden, J; Kamphuis, J H; Slagmolen, C; Wigboldus, D; Pieters, G; Probst, M

    2009-12-01

    Lack of self-esteem may play an important role in the development of eating disorders (ED). This study investigated the differential impact of positive and negative feedback on implicit and explicit self-esteem in women with an ED (N=25) as compared to women without an ED (N=29). False feedback (positive or negative) was given on participant's performance on a specifically developed intellectual test. Before and after the performance, explicit and implicit self-esteem was measured. On the explicit measure ED patients reacted congruently with the nature of the feedback. On the implicit measure only ED patients responded to the positive feedback with an improvement of self-esteem, with no effect for negative feedback. The control group was unaffected by either feedback. Furthermore, no correlation was observed between the explicit and implicit measures, a finding suggesting that these measurements tap different constructs. Positive feedback affects implicit self-esteem of female patients with eating disorders. The results underline the importance of positively approaching women with ED.

  13. Study of Estrogen Receptor and Progesterone Receptor Expression in Breast Ductal Carcinoma In Situ by Immunohistochemical Staining in ER/PgR-Negative Invasive Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrescu, Andrei; Chang, Monique; Kirtani, Vatsala; Turi, George K; Hennawy, Randa; Hindenburg, Alexander A

    2011-01-01

    Background. To our knowledge, the hormone receptor status of noncontiguous ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) occurring concurrently in ER/PgR-negative invasive cancer has not been studied. The current study was undertaken to investigate the ER/PgR receptor status of DCIS of the breast in patients with ER/PgR-negative invasive breast cancer. Methods. We reviewed the immunohistochemical (IHC) staining for ER and PgR of 187 consecutive cases of ER/PgR-negative invasive breast cancers, collected from 1995 to 2002. To meet the criteria for the study, we evaluated ER/PgR expression of DCIS cancer outside of the invasive breast cancer. Results. A total of 37 cases of DCIS meeting the above criteria were identified. Of these, 16 cases (43.2%) showed positive staining for ER, PgR, or both. Conclusions. In our study of ER/PgR-negative invasive breast cancer we found that in 8% of cases noncontiguous ER/PR-positive DCIS was present. In light of this finding, it may be important for pathologists to evaluate the ER/PgR status of DCIS occurring in the presence of ER/PgR-negative invasive cancer, as this subgroup could be considered for chemoprevention.

  14. Afterpulsing studies of low-noise InGaAs/InP single-photon negative-feedback avalanche diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korzh, Boris; Lunghi, Tommaso; Kuzmenko, Kateryna; Boso, Gianluca; Zbinden, Hugo

    2015-08-01

    We characterise the temporal evolution of the afterpulse probability in a free-running negative-feedback avalanche diode (NFAD) over an extended range, from ? ns to ? ms. This is possible thanks to an extremely low dark count rate on the order of 1 cps at 10% efficiency, achieved by operating the NFAD at temperatures as low as 143 K. Experimental results in a large range of operating temperatures (223-143 K) are compared with a legacy afterpulsing model based on multiple trap families at discrete energy levels, which is found to be lacking in physical completeness. Subsequently, we expand on a recent proposal which considers a continuous spectrum of traps by introducing well-defined edges to the spectrum, which are experimentally observed.

  15. Differential contributions of nitric oxide synthase isoforms at hippocampal formation to negative feedback regulation of penile erection in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Alice Y W; Chan, Julie Y H; Chan, Samuel H H

    2002-05-01

    We established previously that a novel negative feedback mechanism for the regulation of penile erection, which is triggered by ascending sensory inputs initiated by tumescence of the penis, exists in the hippocampal formation (HF). This study further evaluated the participation of nitric oxide (NO) and the contribution of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) isoforms at the HF in this process. Adult, male Sprague-Dawley rats that were anaesthetized and maintained with chloral hydrate were used, and intracavernous pressure (ICP) recorded from the corpus cavernosum of the penis was employed as our experimental index for penile erection. Microinjection bilaterally of a NO donor, S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (0.25 or 1 nmoles), or the NO precursor, L-arginine (1 or 5 nmoles), into the hippocampal CA1 or CA3 subfield or dentate gyrus elicited a significant reduction in baseline ICP. Bilateral hippocampal application of a NO trapping agent, 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (10 nmoles), significantly potentiated the elevation in ICP induced by intracavernous administration of papaverine (400 microg). Microinjection bilaterally into the HF of equimolar doses (0.5 or 2.5 pmoles) of two selective neuronal NOS inhibitors, 7-nitroindazole or N(omega)-propyl-L-arginine; or equimolar doses (50 or 250 pmoles) of two selective inducible NOS inhibitors, aminoguanidine or S-methylisothiourea, significantly enhanced the magnitude and/or duration of the papaverine-induced elevation in ICP. In contrast, hippocampal application of a potent endothelial NOS inhibitor, N5-(1-iminoethyl)-L-ornithine (18 or 92 nmoles), was ineffective. Neither of these inhibitors, furthermore, affected baseline ICP. These results suggest that NO generated via both neuronal and inducible NOS at the HF may participate in negative feedback regulation of penile erection.

  16. Differential contributions of nitric oxide synthase isoforms at hippocampal formation to negative feedback regulation of penile erection in the rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Alice Y W; Chan, Julie Y H; Chan, Samuel H H

    2002-01-01

    We established previously that a novel negative feedback mechanism for the regulation of penile erection, which is triggered by ascending sensory inputs initiated by tumescence of the penis, exists in the hippocampal formation (HF). This study further evaluated the participation of nitric oxide (NO) and the contribution of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) isoforms at the HF in this process.Adult, male Sprague-Dawley rats that were anaesthetized and maintained with chloral hydrate were used, and intracavernous pressure (ICP) recorded from the corpus cavernosum of the penis was employed as our experimental index for penile erection.Microinjection bilaterally of a NO donor, S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (0.25 or 1 nmoles), or the NO precursor, L-arginine (1 or 5 nmoles), into the hippocampal CA1 or CA3 subfield or dentate gyrus elicited a significant reduction in baseline ICP.Bilateral hippocampal application of a NO trapping agent, 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (10 nmoles), significantly potentiated the elevation in ICP induced by intracavernous administration of papaverine (400 μg).Microinjection bilaterally into the HF of equimolar doses (0.5 or 2.5 pmoles) of two selective neuronal NOS inhibitors, 7-nitroindazole or Nω-propyl-L-arginine; or equimolar doses (50 or 250 pmoles) of two selective inducible NOS inhibitors, aminoguanidine or S-methylisothiourea, significantly enhanced the magnitude and/or duration of the papaverine-induced elevation in ICP. In contrast, hippocampal application of a potent endothelial NOS inhibitor, N5-(1-iminoethyl)-L-ornithine (18 or 92 nmoles), was ineffective. Neither of these inhibitors, furthermore, affected baseline ICP.These results suggest that NO generated via both neuronal and inducible NOS at the HF may participate in negative feedback regulation of penile erection. PMID:11976262

  17. Experimental investigation on nonlinear dynamics of 1550 nm VCSEL simultaneously subject to orthogonal optical injection and negative optoelectronic feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Tao; Xia, Guang-Qiong; Chen, Jian-Jun; Tang, Xi; Lin, Xiao-Dong; Yang, Xin; Huang, Shou-Wen; Wu, Zheng-Mao

    2017-04-01

    Nonlinear dynamic characteristics of a 1550 nm vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (1550 nm VCSEL) simultaneously subject to orthogonal optical injection and negative optoelectronic feedback are experimentally investigated. The results show that, under suitable orthogonal optical injection the VCSEL can exhibit rich nonlinear dynamic behaviors such as stable state (S), period-one (P1), period-two (P2), chaos (CO), stable injection locking (SIL) and polarization switching (PS). After further introducing negative optoelectronic feedback with a certain feedback delay time, the dynamic distribution of the orthogonal optical injection 1550 nm VCSEL is significantly affected, and some new phenomena including three-frequency quasiperiodic (Q3) state can be observed. With the increase of optoelectronic feedback strength, the S and SIL regions typically are shrank, while the quasiperiodic (QP) and CO regions are enlarged.

  18. Fulfilling desire: evidence for negative feedback between men's testosterone, sociosexual psychology, and sexual partner number.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puts, David A; Pope, Lauramarie E; Hill, Alexander K; Cárdenas, Rodrigo A; Welling, Lisa L M; Wheatley, John R; Marc Breedlove, S

    2015-04-01

    Across human societies and many nonhuman animals, males have greater interest in uncommitted sex (more unrestricted sociosexuality) than do females. Testosterone shows positive associations with male-typical sociosexual behavior in nonhuman animals. Yet, it remains unclear whether the human sex difference in sociosexual psychology (attitudes and desires) is mediated by testosterone, whether any relationships between testosterone and sociosexuality differ between men and women, and what the nature of these possible relationships might be. In studies to resolve these questions, we examined relationships between salivary testosterone concentrations and sociosexual psychology and behavior in men and women. We measured testosterone in all men in our sample, but only in those women taking oral contraception (OC-using women) in order to reduce the influence of ovulatory cycle variation in ovarian hormone production. We found that OC-using women did not differ from normally-ovulating women in sociosexual psychology or behavior, but that circulating testosterone mediated the sex difference in human sociosexuality and predicted sociosexual psychology in men but not OC-using women. Moreover, when sociosexual psychology was controlled, men's sociosexual behavior (number of sexual partners) was negatively related to testosterone, suggesting that testosterone drives sociosexual psychology in men and is inhibited when those desires are fulfilled. This more complex relationship between androgens and male sexuality may reconcile some conflicting prior reports. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Positive or negative feedback of optokinetic signals: degree of the misrouted optic flow determines system dynamics of human ocular motor behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chien-Cheng; Bockisch, Christopher J; Olasagasti, Itsaso; Weber, Konrad P; Straumann, Dominik; Huang, Melody Ying-Yu

    2014-04-09

    The optokinetic system in healthy humans is a negative-feedback system that stabilizes gaze: slow-phase eye movements (i.e., the output signal) minimize retinal slip (i.e., the error signal). A positive-feedback optokinetic system may exist due to the misrouting of optic fibers. Previous studies have shown that, in a zebrafish mutant with a high degree of the misrouting, the optokinetic response (OKR) is reversed. As a result, slow-phase eye movements amplify retinal slip, forming a positive-feedback optokinetic loop. The positive-feedback optokinetic system cannot stabilize gaze, thus leading to spontaneous eye oscillations (SEOs). Because the misrouting in human patients (e.g., with a condition of albinism or achiasmia) is partial, both positive- and negative-feedback loops co-exist. How this co-existence affects human ocular motor behavior remains unclear. We presented a visual environment consisting of two stimuli in different parts of the visual field to healthy subjects. One mimicked positive-feedback optokinetic signals and the other preserved negative-feedback optokinetic signals. By changing the ratio and position of the visual field of these visual stimuli, various optic nerve misrouting patterns were simulated. Eye-movement responses to stationary and moving stimuli were measured and compared with computer simulations. The SEOs were correlated with the magnitude of the virtual positive-feedback optokinetic effect. We found a correlation among the simulated misrouting, the corresponding OKR, and the SEOs in humans. The proportion of the simulated misrouting needed to be greater than 50% to reverse the OKR and at least greater than or equal to 70% to evoke SEOs. Once the SEOs were evoked, the magnitude positively correlated to the strength of the positive-feedback OKR. This study provides a mechanism of how the misrouting of optic fibers in humans could lead to SEOs, offering a possible explanation for a subtype of infantile nystagmus syndrome (INS).

  20. miR-98 suppresses melanoma metastasis through a negative feedback loop with its target gene IL-6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fei; Li, Xin-ji; Qiao, Li; Shi, Fei; Liu, Wen; Li, You; Dang, Yu-ping; Gu, Wei-jie; Wang, Xiao-gang; Liu, Wei

    2014-10-03

    Dysregulated microRNA (miRNA) expression has a critical role in tumor development and metastasis. However, the mechanism by which miRNAs control melanoma metastasis is unknown. Here, we report reduced miR-98 expression in melanoma tissues with increasing tumor stage as well as metastasis; its expression is also negatively associated with melanoma patient survival. Furthermore, we demonstrate that miR-98 inhibits melanoma cell migration in vitro as well as metastatic tumor size in vivo. We also found that IL-6 is a target gene of miR-98, and IL-6 represses miR-98 levels via the Stat3-NF-κB-lin28B pathway. In an in vivo melanoma model, we demonstrate that miR-98 reduces melanoma metastasis and increases survival in part by reducing IL-6 levels; it also decreases Stat3 and p65 phosphorylation as well as lin28B mRNA levels. These results suggest that miR-98 inhibits melanoma metastasis in part through a novel miR-98-IL-6-negative feedback loop.

  1. FGF2 translationally induced by hypoxia is involved in negative and positive feedback loops with HIF-1alpha.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Conte

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2 is a major angiogenic factor involved in angiogenesis and arteriogenesis, however the regulation of its expression during these processes is poorly documented. FGF2 mRNA contains an internal ribosome entry site (IRES, a translational regulator expected to allow mRNA expression during cellular stress. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In the present study, we have developed a skin ischemia model in transgenic mice expressing a reporter transgene under the control of the FGF2 IRES. The results reveal that FGF2 is induced at the protein level during ischemia, concomitant with HIF-1alpha induction and a decrease in FGF2 mRNA. In addition, the FGF2 IRES is strongly activated under these ischemic conditions associated with hypoxia, whereas cap-dependent translation is repressed by 4E-BP hypophosphorylation. We also show that up-regulation of FGF2 protein expression in response to hypoxia correlates with the increase of FGF2 IRES activity in vitro, in human retinoblasts 911. The use of siRNAs targeting HIF or FGF2 indicates that FGF2 and HIF-1alpha reciprocally regulate their expression/accumulation, by a negative feedback loop in early hypoxia, followed by a positive feedback loop in late hypoxia. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: FGF2 expression is up-regulated in vivo and in vitro in response to hypoxia. Strikingly, this up-regulation is not transcriptional. It seems to occur by an IRES-dependent mechanism, revealing new mechanistic aspects of the hypoxic response. In addition, our data show that FGF2 interacts with HIF-1alpha in a unique crosstalk, with distinct stages in early and late hypoxia. These data reveal the physiological importance of IRES-dependent translation during hypoxic stress and underline the complexity of the cellular response to hypoxia, suggesting a novel role of FGF2 in the regulation of HIF-1alpha during the induction of angiogenesis.

  2. Negative feedback avalanche diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itzler, Mark Allen (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A single-photon avalanche detector is disclosed that is operable at wavelengths greater than 1000 nm and at operating speeds greater than 10 MHz. The single-photon avalanche detector comprises a thin-film resistor and avalanche photodiode that are monolithically integrated such that little or no additional capacitance is associated with the addition of the resistor.

  3. Feedback negativity and decision-making behavior in the Balloon Analogue Risk Task (BART) in adolescents is modulated by peer presence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Luisa; Hewig, Johannes; Weichold, Karina; Silbereisen, Rainer K; Miltner, Wolfgang H R

    2017-02-01

    Adolescent risk taking is strongly influenced by peer presence. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of peer presence on the ERP after negative and positive feedback in the time range of the feedback-related negativity (FRN). Eighteen male adolescents completed a version of the Balloon Analogue Risk Task (BART) under two conditions: playing alone and while observed by a peer. We recorded the ERPs after success or failure feedback and analyzed risk-taking behavior under both conditions. Behavioral results show that the participants were more cautious when being watched by a peer, especially after success. ERPs show that participants under peer presence exhibit more negative FRN after failure feedback than in the single condition, but no greater positivities after success feedback in the observed condition compared to the single condition. Results are in line with reinforcement learning theory and psychological aspects of loss prevention. The results suggest that the effect of peer presence on risk-taking behavior depends on the specific situational context. © 2016 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  4. Decreased endogenous progesterone and ratio of progesterone to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PRECIOUS

    2010-02-01

    Feb 1, 2010 ... Progesterone and estrogen are two steroid hormones whose exposure may decrease the risk and delay the onset of ischemic stroke. The main objective of this study was to determine the plasma level of progesterone, estrogen and ratio of progesterone/estrogen in ischemic stroke patients. The plasma.

  5. Decreased endogenous progesterone and ratio of progesterone to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Progesterone and estrogen are two steroid hormones whose exposure may decrease the risk and delay the onset of ischemic stroke. The main objective of this study was to determine the plasma level of progesterone, estrogen and ratio of progesterone/estrogen in ischemic stroke patients. The plasma levels of ...

  6. Involvement of noradrenergic innervation from locus coeruleus to hippocampal formation in negative feedback regulation of penile erection in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, A Y; Huang, C M; Chan, J Y; Chan, S H

    2001-01-01

    We demonstrated previously that a novel negative feed back mechanism for the regulation of penile erection, which is triggered by ascending sensory inputs initiated by tumescence of the penis, exists in the hippocampal formation (HF). This study further elucidated the role of the locus coeruleus (LC), which is the largest aggregate of norepinephrine-containing neurons in the brain and provides the major noradrenergic innervation to the HF, in this process. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats that were anesthetized and maintained with chloral hydrate were used. The intracavernous pressure (ICP) recorded from the corpus cavernosum of the penis was used as the experimental index for penile erection. Electrical activation of the LC elicited a significant reduction in baseline ICP. Similar observations were obtained on microinjection bilaterally into the hippocampal CA1 or CA3 subfield or dentate gyrus of equimolar doses (5 nmol) of norepinephrine (alpha1-, alpha2-agonist), phenylephrine (alpha1-agonist), or BHT 933 (alpha2-agonist). Bilateral electrolytic lesions of the LC discernibly enhanced the magnitude and/or duration of the elevation in ICP induced by intracavernous administration of papaverine (400 microgram). A potentiation of the papaverine-evoked ICP increase was also observed following pretreatment with bilateral hippocampal application of equimolar doses (250 pmol) of either prazosin (alpha1-, alpha2B-, alpha2C-antagonist), naftopidil (alpha1A/D-antagonist), yohimbine (alpha2-antagonst), or rauwolscine (alpha2B-, alpha2C-antagonist). None of these antagonists, however, affected baseline ICP. These results suggest that noradrenergic innervation of the HF that originates from the LC may play an active role in negative feedback regulation of penile erection, engaging at least alpha1A/D-, alpha2B-, and alpha2C-adrenoceptors in the HF.

  7. Escalating risk and the moderating effect of resistance to peer influence on the P200 and feedback-related negativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiat, John; Straley, Elizabeth; Cheadle, Jacob E

    2016-03-01

    Young people frequently socialize together in contexts that encourage risky decision making, pointing to a need for research into how susceptibility to peer influence is related to individual differences in the neural processing of decisions during sequentially escalating risk. We applied a novel analytic approach to analyze EEG activity from college-going students while they completed the Balloon Analogue Risk Task (BART), a well-established risk-taking propensity assessment. By modeling outcome-processing-related changes in the P200 and feedback-related negativity (FRN) sequentially within each BART trial as a function of pump order as an index of increasing risk, our results suggest that analyzing the BART in a progressive fashion may provide valuable new insights into the temporal neurophysiological dynamics of risk taking. Our results showed that a P200, localized to the left caudate nucleus, and an FRN, localized to the left dACC, were positively correlated with the level of risk taking and reward. Furthermore, consistent with our hypotheses, the rate of change in the FRN was higher among college students with greater self-reported resistance to peer influence. © The Author (2015). Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. SEL-10/Fbw7-dependent negative feedback regulation of LIN-45/Braf signaling in C. elegans via a conserved phosphodegron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Cova, Claire; Greenwald, Iva

    2012-11-15

    The conserved E3 ubiquitin ligase component named SEL-10 in Caenorhabditis elegans and Fbw7 in mammals targets substrates for ubiquitin-mediated degradation through a high-affinity binding site called a Cdc4 phosphodegron (CPD). As many known substrates of Fbw7 are oncoproteins, the identification of new substrates may offer insight into cancer biology as well as aspects of proteome regulation. Here, we evaluated whether the presence of an evolutionarily conserved CPD would be a feasible complement to proteomics-based approaches for identifying new potential substrates. For functional assessments, we focused on LIN-45, a component of the signal transduction pathway underlying vulval induction and the ortholog of human Braf, an effector of Ras in numerous cancers. Our analysis demonstrates that LIN-45 behaves as a bona fide substrate of SEL-10, with mutation of the CPD or loss of sel-10 resulting in increased activity and protein stability in vivo. Furthermore, during vulval induction, the downstream kinase MPK-1/ERK is also required for LIN-45 protein degradation in a negative feedback loop, resulting in degradation of LIN-45 where ERK is highly active. As the CPD consensus sequence is conserved in human Braf, we propose that Fbw7 may also regulate Braf stability in some cell contexts. We discuss the implications of our findings for vulval development in C. elegans, the potential applicability to human Braf, and the value of a CPD-based predictive approach for human Fbw7 substrates.

  9. Semi-algebraic optimization of temperature compensation in a general switch-type negative feedback model of circadian clocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aase, Sven Ole; Ruoff, Peter

    2008-03-01

    Temperature compensation is an essential property of circadian oscillators which enables them to act as physiological clocks. We have analyzed the temperature compensating behavior of a generalized transcriptional-translational negative feedback oscillator with a hard hysteretic switch and rate constants with an Arrhenius-type temperature dependence. These oscillations can be considered as the result of a lowpass filtering operator acting on a train of rectangular pulses. Such a signal-processing viewpoint makes it possible to express, in a semi-algebraic manner, the period length, the oscillator's control (sensitivity) coefficients, and the first and second-order derivatives of the period-temperature relationship. We have used the semi-algebraic approach to investigate a 3-dimensional Goodwin-type representation of the oscillator, where local optimization for temperature compensation has been considered. In the local optimization, activation energies are found, which lead to a zero first order derivative and to a closest-to-zero second order derivative at a given reference temperature. We find that the major contribution to temperature compensation over an extended temperature range is given by the (local) zero first order derivative, while only minor contributions to temperature compensation are given by an optimized second order derivative. In biological terms this could be interpreted to relate to a circadian clock mechanism which during evolution is being optimized for a certain but relative narrow (habitat) temperature range.

  10. Acute Stress Modulates Feedback Processing in Men and Women : Differential Effects on the Feedback-Related Negativity and Theta and Beta Power

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Banis, Stella; Geerligs, Linda; Lorist, Monicque M.; Banis, Hendrika

    2014-01-01

    Sex-specific prevalence rates in mental and physical disorders may be partly explained by sex differences in physiological stress responses. Neural networks that might be involved are those underlying feedback processing. Aim of the present EEG study was to investigate whether acute stress alters

  11. Be kind to your eating disorder patients: The impact of positive and negative feedback on the explicit and implicit self-esteem of female patients with eating disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanderlinden, J.; Kamphuis, J.H.; Slagmolen, C.J.J.; Wigboldus, D.H.J.; Pieters, G.; Probst, M.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Lack of self-esteem may play an important role in the development of eating disorders (ED). This study investigated the differential impact of positive and negative feedback on implicit and explicit self-esteem in women with an ED (N=25) as compared to women without an ED (N=29). METHOD:

  12. Be kind to your eating disorder patients: the impact of positive and negative feedback on the explicit and implicit self-esteem of female patients with eating disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanderlinden, J.; Kamphuis, J.H.; Slagmolen, C.; Wigboldus, D.; Pieters, G.; Probst, M.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Lack of self-esteem may play an important role in the development of eating disorders (ED). This study investigated the differential impact of positive and negative feedback on implicit and explicit self-esteem in women with an ED (N=25) as compared to women without an ED (N=29). METHOD:

  13. High progesterone levels during the luteal phase related to the use of an aromatase inhibitor in breast cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alviggi, C; Marci, R; Vallone, R

    2017-01-01

    cancer, several studies have demonstrated that progesterone could expand a transformation-sensitive stem cell population in the mammary glands. The estrogen negative feedback effect on the hypothalamus-pituitary axis and the disruption of steroid biosynthesis and could represent an intriguing reason......OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the hormonal profile in three breast cancer patients who underwent controlled ovarian stimulation in the presence of the aromatase inhibitor letrozole. PATIENTS AND METHODS: In IVF University referral center, a case series of three breast cancer patients who underwent...... behind this phenomenon. Our results highlight the need to evaluate further the increase in progesterone levels in the luteal phase in women with breast cancer undergoing COS with letrozole....

  14. Women's Perspective on Progesterone: A Qualitative Study Conducted in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spark, M Joy; Dunn, Rebecca A; Houlahan, Kelli L

    2009-01-01

    This study explored the perspective of women using compounded progesterone preparations. Semi-structured interviews were conducted in Victoria, Australia with eight self-selected women who were dispensed a progesterone-only preparation. Participating women gained symptome relief for migraine, painful breasts, mood swings, bloating, hot flushes, and other conditions. The participants also experienced unexpected benefits such as improvement in irregular and painful periods, relief from cystitis, or increased libido, without any reported negative side effects. The participants appreciated the ability to adjust the dose and dosage form to their individual requirements and held a positive perception of progesterone as a "natural" product. Accessibility of progesterone treatment is limited due to the limited number of doctors that have knowledge about the treatment, little information available for lay people, and cost. Participants who had been treated with progesterone were willing to share their experience with others, and many heard about progesterone therapy from their social contacts. The cost of progesterone therapy, which was often more expensive than traditional hormone replacement therapy, was outweighed by the benefits received. These women found that progesterone treatment, although hard to access, was beneficial over conventional therapy.

  15. Generalized Anxiety Disorder and Social Anxiety Disorder, but Not Panic Anxiety Disorder, Are Associated with Higher Sensitivity to Learning from Negative Feedback: Behavioral and Computational Investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khdour, Hussain Y; Abushalbaq, Oday M; Mughrabi, Ibrahim T; Imam, Aya F; Gluck, Mark A; Herzallah, Mohammad M; Moustafa, Ahmed A

    2016-01-01

    Anxiety disorders, including generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), social anxiety disorder (SAD), and panic anxiety disorder (PAD), are a group of common psychiatric conditions. They are characterized by excessive worrying, uneasiness, and fear of future events, such that they affect social and occupational functioning. Anxiety disorders can alter behavior and cognition as well, yet little is known about the particular domains they affect. In this study, we tested the cognitive correlates of medication-free patients with GAD, SAD, and PAD, along with matched healthy participants using a probabilistic category-learning task that allows the dissociation between positive and negative feedback learning. We also fitted all participants' data to a Q-learning model and various actor-critic models that examine learning rate parameters from positive and negative feedback to investigate effects of valence vs. action on performance. SAD and GAD patients were more sensitive to negative feedback than either PAD patients or healthy participants. PAD, SAD, and GAD patients did not differ in positive-feedback learning compared to healthy participants. We found that Q-learning models provide the simplest fit of the data in comparison to other models. However, computational analysis revealed that groups did not differ in terms of learning rate or exploration values. These findings argue that (a) not all anxiety spectrum disorders share similar cognitive correlates, but are rather different in ways that do not link them to the hallmark of anxiety (higher sensitivity to negative feedback); and (b) perception of negative consequences is the core feature of GAD and SAD, but not PAD. Further research is needed to examine the similarities and differences between anxiety spectrum disorders in other cognitive domains and potential implementation of behavioral therapy to remediate cognitive deficits.

  16. Progesterone as an immunomodulatory molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szekeres-Bartho, J; Barakonyi, A; Par, G; Polgar, B; Palkovics, T; Szereday, L

    2001-06-01

    Increased progesterone sensitivity of pregnancy lymphocytes is due to activation-induced appearance of progesterone binding sites in the lymphocytes. Following recognition of fetally derived antigens gamma/delta TCR+ cells develop progesterone receptors. Progesterone binding results in the synthesis of a mediator protein named the progesterone-induced blocking factor (PIBF). PIBF by acting on the phospholipase A2 enzyme interferes with arachidonic acid metabolism, induces a Th2 biased immune response, and by controlling NK activity exerts an anti-abortive effect.

  17. Kisspeptin-gpr54 signaling at the GnRH neuron is necessary for negative feedback regulation of luteinizing hormone secretion in female mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Shel-Hwa; Clarkson, Jenny; Herbison, Allan E

    2014-01-01

    Kisspeptin-Gpr54 signaling is critical for regulating the activity of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons in mammals. Previous studies have shown that the negative feedback mechanism is disrupted in global Gpr54-null mutants. The present investigation aimed to determine (1) if a lack of cyclical estrogen exposure of the GnRH neuronal network in the life-long hypogonadotropic Gpr54-null mice contributed to their failed negative feedback mechanism and (2) the cellular location of disrupted kisspeptin-Gpr54 signaling. Plasma luteinizing hormone (LH) concentrations were determined in individual adult female mice when intact, following ovariectomy (OVX) and in response to an acute injection of 17β-estradiol (E2). Control mice exhibited a characteristic rise in LH after OVX that was suppressed by acute E2. Global Gpr54-null mice failed to exhibit any post-OVX increase in LH or response to E2. Adult female global Gpr54-null mice given a cyclical regimen of estradiol for three cycles prior to OVX also failed to exhibit any post-OVX increase in LH or response to E2. To address whether Gpr54 signaling at the GnRH neuron itself was necessary for the failed response to OVX in global Gpr54-null animals, adult female mice with a GnRH neuron-selective deletion of Gpr54 were examined. These mice also failed to exhibit any post-OVX increase in LH or response to E2. These experiments demonstrate defective negative feedback in global Gpr54-null mice that cannot be attributed to a lack of prior exposure of the GnRH neuronal network to cyclical estradiol. The absence of negative feedback in GnRH neuron-selective Gpr54-null mice demonstrates the necessity of direct kisspeptin signaling at the GnRH neuron for this mechanism to occur. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Positive and negative feedback in the earthquake cycIe: the role of pore fluids on states of criticality in the crust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. R. Sammonds

    1994-06-01

    Full Text Available Fluids exert a strong physical and chemical control on local processes of rock fracture and friction. For example they may accelerate fracture by stress corrosion reactions or the development of overpressure (a form of positive feedback, or retard fracture by time-dependent stress relaxation or dilatant hardening (negative feed-back, thereby introducing a variable degree of local force conservation into the process. In particular the valve action of dynamic faulting may be important in tuning the Earth to a metastable state of incipient failure on all scales over several cycles, similar to current models of Self-Organised Criticality (SOC as a paradigm for eartiquakes However laboratory results suggest that ordered fluctuations about this state may occur in a single cycle due to non conservative processes involving fluids which have the potential to be recognised, at least in the short term, in the scaling properties of earthquake statistics. Here we describe a 2-D cellular automaton which uses local rules of positive and negative feedback to model the effect of fluids on failure in a heterogeneous medium in a single earthquake cycle. The model successfully predicts the observed fractal distribution of fractures, with a negative correlation between the predicted seismic b-value and the local crack extension force G. Such a negative correlation is found in laboratory tests involving (a fluid-assisted crack growth in tension (b water-saturated compressional deformation, and (c in field results on an intermediate scale from hydraulic mining-induced seismicity all cases where G can be determined independently, and where the physical and chemical action of pore fluids is to varying degrees a controlled variable. For a finite local hardening mechanism (negative feedback, the model exhibits a systematic increase followed by a decrease in the seismic b-value as macroscopic failure is approached, similar to that found in water-saturated laboratory tests

  19. The self-limiting dynamics of TGF-β signaling in silico and in vitro, with negative feedback through PPM1A upregulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junjie Wang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The TGF-β/Smad signaling system decreases its activity through strong negative regulation. Several molecular mechanisms of negative regulation have been published, but the relative impact of each mechanism on the overall system is unknown. In this work, we used computational and experimental methods to assess multiple negative regulatory effects on Smad signaling in HaCaT cells. Previously reported negative regulatory effects were classified by time-scale: degradation of phosphorylated R-Smad and I-Smad-induced receptor degradation were slow-mode effects, and dephosphorylation of R-Smad was a fast-mode effect. We modeled combinations of these effects, but found no combination capable of explaining the observed dynamics of TGF-β/Smad signaling. We then proposed a negative feedback loop with upregulation of the phosphatase PPM1A. The resulting model was able to explain the dynamics of Smad signaling, under both short and long exposures to TGF-β. Consistent with this model, immuno-blots showed PPM1A levels to be significantly increased within 30 min after TGF-β stimulation. Lastly, our model was able to resolve an apparent contradiction in the published literature, concerning the dynamics of phosphorylated R-Smad degradation. We conclude that the dynamics of Smad negative regulation cannot be explained by the negative regulatory effects that had previously been modeled, and we provide evidence for a new negative feedback loop through PPM1A upregulation. This work shows that tight coupling of computational and experiments approaches can yield improved understanding of complex pathways.

  20. Negative feedback regulation of ABA biosynthesis in peanut (Arachis hypogaea): a transcription factor complex inhibits AhNCED1 expression during water stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shuai; Li, Meijuan; Su, Liangchen; Ge, Kui; Li, Limei; Li, Xiaoyun; Liu, Xu; Li, Ling

    2016-11-28

    Abscisic acid (ABA), a key plant stress-signaling hormone, is produced in response to drought and counteracts the effects of this stress. The accumulation of ABA is controlled by the enzyme 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase (NCED). In Arabidopsis, NCED3 is regulated by a positive feedback mechanism by ABA. In this study in peanut (Arachis hypogaea), we demonstrate that ABA biosynthesis is also controlled by negative feedback regulation, mediated by the inhibitory effect on AhNCED1 transcription of a protein complex between transcription factors AhNAC2 and AhAREB1. AhNCED1 was significantly down-regulated after PEG treatment for 10 h, at which time ABA content reached a peak. A ChIP-qPCR assay confirmed AhAREB1 and AhNAC2 binding to the AhNCED1 promoter in response to ABA. Moreover, the interaction between AhAREB1 and AhNAC2, and a transient expression assay showed that the protein complex could negatively regulate the expression of AhNCED1. The results also demonstrated that AhAREB1 was the key factor in AhNCED1 feedback regulation, while AhNAC2 played a subsidiary role. ABA reduced the rate of AhAREB1 degradation and enhanced both the synthesis and degradation rate of the AhNAC2 protein. In summary, the AhAREB1/AhNAC2 protein complex functions as a negative feedback regulator of drought-induced ABA biosynthesis in peanut.

  1. The CaM Kinase CMK-1 Mediates a Negative Feedback Mechanism Coupling the C. elegans Glutamate Receptor GLR-1 with Its Own Transcription.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin J Moss

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Regulation of synaptic AMPA receptor levels is a major mechanism underlying homeostatic synaptic scaling. While in vitro studies have implicated several molecules in synaptic scaling, the in vivo mechanisms linking chronic changes in synaptic activity to alterations in AMPA receptor expression are not well understood. Here we use a genetic approach in C. elegans to dissect a negative feedback pathway coupling levels of the AMPA receptor GLR-1 with its own transcription. GLR-1 trafficking mutants with decreased synaptic receptors in the ventral nerve cord (VNC exhibit compensatory increases in glr-1 mRNA, which can be attributed to increased glr-1 transcription. Glutamatergic transmission mutants lacking presynaptic eat-4/VGLUT or postsynaptic glr-1, exhibit compensatory increases in glr-1 transcription, suggesting that loss of GLR-1 activity is sufficient to trigger the feedback pathway. Direct and specific inhibition of GLR-1-expressing neurons using a chemical genetic silencing approach also results in increased glr-1 transcription. Conversely, expression of a constitutively active version of GLR-1 results in decreased glr-1 transcription, suggesting that bidirectional changes in GLR-1 signaling results in reciprocal alterations in glr-1 transcription. We identify the CMK-1/CaMK signaling axis as a mediator of the glr-1 transcriptional feedback mechanism. Loss-of-function mutations in the upstream kinase ckk-1/CaMKK, the CaM kinase cmk-1/CaMK, or a downstream transcription factor crh-1/CREB, result in increased glr-1 transcription, suggesting that the CMK-1 signaling pathway functions to repress glr-1 transcription. Genetic double mutant analyses suggest that CMK-1 signaling is required for the glr-1 transcriptional feedback pathway. Furthermore, alterations in GLR-1 signaling that trigger the feedback mechanism also regulate the nucleocytoplasmic distribution of CMK-1, and activated, nuclear-localized CMK-1 blocks the feedback pathway. We

  2. The CaM Kinase CMK-1 Mediates a Negative Feedback Mechanism Coupling the C. elegans Glutamate Receptor GLR-1 with Its Own Transcription

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Benjamin J.; Park, Lidia; Dahlberg, Caroline L.; Juo, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Regulation of synaptic AMPA receptor levels is a major mechanism underlying homeostatic synaptic scaling. While in vitro studies have implicated several molecules in synaptic scaling, the in vivo mechanisms linking chronic changes in synaptic activity to alterations in AMPA receptor expression are not well understood. Here we use a genetic approach in C. elegans to dissect a negative feedback pathway coupling levels of the AMPA receptor GLR-1 with its own transcription. GLR-1 trafficking mutants with decreased synaptic receptors in the ventral nerve cord (VNC) exhibit compensatory increases in glr-1 mRNA, which can be attributed to increased glr-1 transcription. Glutamatergic transmission mutants lacking presynaptic eat-4/VGLUT or postsynaptic glr-1, exhibit compensatory increases in glr-1 transcription, suggesting that loss of GLR-1 activity is sufficient to trigger the feedback pathway. Direct and specific inhibition of GLR-1-expressing neurons using a chemical genetic silencing approach also results in increased glr-1 transcription. Conversely, expression of a constitutively active version of GLR-1 results in decreased glr-1 transcription, suggesting that bidirectional changes in GLR-1 signaling results in reciprocal alterations in glr-1 transcription. We identify the CMK-1/CaMK signaling axis as a mediator of the glr-1 transcriptional feedback mechanism. Loss-of-function mutations in the upstream kinase ckk-1/CaMKK, the CaM kinase cmk-1/CaMK, or a downstream transcription factor crh-1/CREB, result in increased glr-1 transcription, suggesting that the CMK-1 signaling pathway functions to repress glr-1 transcription. Genetic double mutant analyses suggest that CMK-1 signaling is required for the glr-1 transcriptional feedback pathway. Furthermore, alterations in GLR-1 signaling that trigger the feedback mechanism also regulate the nucleocytoplasmic distribution of CMK-1, and activated, nuclear-localized CMK-1 blocks the feedback pathway. We propose a model in

  3. Double-negative feedback loop between ZEB2 and miR-145 regulates epithelial-mesenchymal transition and stem cell properties in prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Dong; Wang, Min; Guo, Wei; Huang, Shuai; Wang, Zeyu; Zhao, Xiaohui; Du, Hong; Song, Libing; Peng, Xinsheng

    2014-12-01

    The invasion and metastasis of tumors are triggered by an epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT), which is regulated by microRNAs (miRNAs). EMT also promotes malignant tumor progression and the maintenance of the stem cell property, which endows cancer cells with the capabilities of self-renewal and immortalized proliferation. The transcriptional repressor zinc-finger E-box binding homeobox 2 (ZEB2), as an EMT activator, might be an important promoter of metastasis in some tumors. Here, we report that ZEB2 directly represses the transcription of miR-145, which is a strong repressor of EMT. In turn, ZEB2 is also a direct target of miR-145. Further, our findings show that the downregulation of ZEB2 not only represses invasion, migration, EMT, and the stemness of prostate cancer (PCa) cells, but also suppresses the capability of PC-3 cells to invade bone in vivo. Importantly, the expression level of ZEB2 as revealed by immunohistochemical analysis is positively correlated to bone metastasis, the serum free PSA level, the total PSA level, and the Gleason score in PCa patients and is negatively correlated with miR-145 expression in primary PCa specimens. Thus, our findings demonstrate a double-negative feedback loop between ZEB2 and miR-145 and indicate that the ZEB2/miR-145 double-negative feedback loop plays a significant role in the control of EMT and stem cell properties during the bone metastasis of PCa cells. These results suggest that the double-negative feedback loop between ZEB2 and miR-145 contributes to PCa progression and metastasis and might have therapeutic relevance for the bone metastasis of PCa.

  4. Feedback Valence Affects Auditory Perceptual Learning Independently of Feedback Probability

    OpenAIRE

    Amitay, Sygal; Moore, David R.; Molloy, Katharine; Halliday, Lorna F.

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that negative feedback is more effective in driving learning than positive feedback. We investigated the effect on learning of providing varying amounts of negative and positive feedback while listeners attempted to discriminate between three identical tones; an impossible task that nevertheless produces robust learning. Four feedback conditions were compared during training: 90% positive feedback or 10% negative feedback informed the participants that they wer...

  5. Pembrolizumab and Ruxolitinib Phosphate in Treating Patients With Metastatic Stage IV Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-28

    Breast Carcinoma Metastatic in the Bone; Estrogen Receptor Negative; HER2/Neu Negative; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma

  6. The inhibitory effects of AR/miR-190a/YB-1 negative feedback loop on prostate cancer and underlying mechanism

    OpenAIRE

    Shaohua Xu; Tao Wang; Wen Song; Tao Jiang; Feng Zhang; Yu Yin; Shi-Wen Jiang; Kongming Wu; Zuoren Yu; Chenguang Wang; Ke Chen

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer at advanced stages including metastatic and castration-resistant cancer remains incurable due to the lack of effective therapies. MiR-190a belongs to the small noncoding RNA family and has an important role in breast cancer metastasis. However, it is still unknown whether miR-190a plays a role in prostate cancer development. Herein, we first observed AR/miR-190a/YB-1 forms an auto-regulatory negative feedback loop in prostate cancer: miR-190a expression was down-regulated by A...

  7. A Phase II Study Evaluating the Role of Androgen Receptors as Targets for Therapy of Pre-treated Post-menopausal Patients With ER/PgR-negative/AR-positive or ER and/or PgRpositive/ AR-positive Metastatic Breast Cancer (ARTT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-28

    Metastatic Breastcancer; Estrogen Receptor Positive Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor Negative Neoplasm; Progesterone Receptor Positive Tumor; Progesterone Receptor Negative Neoplasm; Androgen Receptor Gene Overexpression

  8. Effects of affective arousal on choice behavior, reward prediction errors, and feedback-related negativities in human reward-based decision making

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Hsiang eLiu

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Emotional experience has a pervasive impact on choice behavior, but the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Introducing facial-expression primes into a probabilistic learning task, we investigated how affective arousal regulates reward-related choice based on behavioral, model fitting, and feedback-related negativity (FRN data. Sixty-six paid subjects were randomly assigned to the Neutral-Neutral (NN, Angry-Neutral (AN, and Happy-Neutral (HN groups. A total of 960 trials were conducted. Subjects in each group were randomly exposed to half trials of the pre-determined emotional faces and another half of the neutral faces before choosing between two cards drawn from two decks with different assigned reward probabilities. Trial-by-trial data were fit with a standard reinforcement learning model using the Bayesian estimation approach. The temporal dynamics of brain activity were simultaneously recorded and analyzed using event-related potentials. Our analyses revealed that subjects in the NN group gained more reward values than those in the other two groups; they also exhibited comparatively differential estimated model-parameter values for reward prediction errors. Computing the difference wave of FRNs in reward versus non-reward trials, compared to the NN group, we found that subjects in the AN and HN groups had larger General FRNs (i.e., FRNs in no-reward trials minus FRNs in reward trials and Expected FRNs (i.e., FRNs in expected reward-omission trials minus FRNs in expected reward-delivery trials, indicating an interruption in predicting reward. Further, both AN and HN groups appeared to be more sensitive to negative outcomes than the NN group. Collectively, our study suggests that affective arousal negatively regulates reward-related choice, probably through overweighting with negative feedback.

  9. Contribution of cGMP but not peroxynitrite to negative feedback regulation of penile erection elicited by nitric oxide in the hippocampal formation of the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, J Y H; Chan, S H H; Chang, A Y W

    2004-01-01

    We established previously that nitric oxide (NO) in the hippocampal formation (HF) participates actively in negative feedback regulation of penile erection. This study further evaluated whether this process engaged soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC)/cGMP cascade or peroxynitrite in the HF. Intracavernous pressure (ICP) recorded from the penis in adult, male Sprague-Dawley rats anesthetized with chloral hydrate was employed as our experimental index for penile erection. Microinjection bilaterally of a NO-independent sGC activator, YC-1 (0.1 or 1 nmol) or a cGMP analog, 8-Bromo-cGMP (0.1 or 1 nmol), into the HF elicited a significant reduction in baseline ICP. Bilateral application into the HF of equimolar doses (0.5 or 1 nmol) of a sGC inhibitor, LY83583 or a NO-sensitive sGC inhibitor, ODQ significantly antagonized the decrease in baseline ICP induced by co-administration of the NO precursor, L-arginine (5 nmol), along with significant enhancement of the magnitude of papaverine-induced elevation in ICP. In contrast, a peroxynitrite scavenger, L-cysteine (50 or 100 pmol), or an active peroxynitrite decomposition catalyst, 5,10,15,20-tetrakis-(N-methyl-4'-pyridyl)-porphyrinato iron (III) (10 or 50 pmol), was ineffective in both events. These results suggest that NO may participate in negative feedback regulation of penile erection by activating the sGC/cGMP cascade in the HF selectively.

  10. miR-486 sustains NF-κB activity by disrupting multiple NF-κB-negative feedback loops

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Song, Libing; Lin, Chuyong; Gong, Hui; Wang, Chanjuan; Liu, Liping; Wu, Jueheng; Tao, Sha; Hu, Bo; Cheng, Shi-Yuan; Li, Mengfeng; Li, Jun

    2013-01-01

    .... Herein, we report that miR-486 directly suppresses NF-κB-negative regulators, CYLD and Cezanne, as well as multiple A20 activity regulators, including ITCH, TNIP-1, TNIP-2 and TNIP-3, resulting in promotion of ubiquitin conjugations in NF-κ...

  11. MicroRNA miR-308 regulates dMyc through a negative feedback loop in Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaveh Daneshvar

    2012-10-01

    The abundance of Myc protein must be exquisitely controlled to avoid growth abnormalities caused by too much or too little Myc. An intriguing mode of regulation exists in which Myc protein itself leads to reduction in its abundance. We show here that dMyc binds to the miR-308 locus and increases its expression. Using our gain-of-function approach, we show that an increase in miR-308 causes a destabilization of dMyc mRNA and reduced dMyc protein levels. In vivo knockdown of miR-308 confirmed the regulation of dMyc levels in embryos. This regulatory loop is crucial for maintaining appropriate dMyc levels and normal development. Perturbation of the loop, either by elevated miR-308 or elevated dMyc, caused lethality. Combining elevated levels of both, therefore restoring balance between miR-308 and dMyc levels, resulted in lower apoptotic activity and suppression of lethality. These results reveal a sensitive feedback mechanism that is crucial to prevent the pathologies caused by abnormal levels of dMyc.

  12. Progesterone stimulates adipocyte determination and differentiation 1/sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1c gene expression. potential mechanism for the lipogenic effect of progesterone in adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacasa, D; Le Liepvre, X; Ferre, P; Dugail, I

    2001-04-13

    Fatty acid synthase (FAS), a nutritionally regulated lipogenic enzyme, is transcriptionally controlled by ADD1/SREBP1c (adipocyte determination and differentiation 1/sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1c), through insulin-mediated stimulation of ADD1/SREBP1c expression. Progesterone exerts lipogenic effects on adipocytes, and FAS is highly induced in breast tumor cell lines upon progesterone treatment. We show here that progesterone up-regulates ADD1/SREBP1c expression in the MCF7 breast cancer cell line and the primary cultured preadipocyte from rat parametrial adipose tissue. In MCF7, progesterone induced ADD1/SREBP1c and Metallothionein II (a well known progesterone-regulated gene) mRNAs, with comparable potency. In preadipocytes, progesterone increased ADD1/SREBP1c mRNA dose-dependently, but not SREBP1a or SREBP2. Run-on experiments demonstrated that progesterone action on ADD1/SREBP1c was primarily at the transcriptional level. The membrane-bound and mature nuclear forms of ADD1/SREBP1 protein accumulated in preadipocytes cultured with progesterone, and FAS induction could be abolished by adenovirus-mediated overexpression of a dominant negative form of ADD1/SREBP1 in these cells. Finally, in the presence of insulin, progesterone was unable to up-regulate ADD1/SREBP1c mRNA in preadipocytes, whereas its effect was restored after 24 h of insulin deprivation. Together these results demonstrate that ADD1/SREBP1c is controlled by progesterone, which, like insulin, acts by increasing ADD1/SREBP1c gene transcription. This provides a potential mechanism for the lipogenic actions of progesterone on adipose tissue.

  13. HER2 phosphorylation is maintained by a PKB negative feedback loop in response to anti-HER2 herceptin in breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merel Gijsen

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Herceptin (trastuzumab is used in patients with breast cancer who have HER2 (ErbB2-positive tumours. However, its mechanisms of action and how acquired resistance to Herceptin occurs are still poorly understood. It was previously thought that the anti-HER2 monoclonal antibody Herceptin inhibits HER2 signalling, but recent studies have shown that Herceptin does not decrease HER2 phosphorylation. Its failure to abolish HER2 phosphorylation may be a key to why acquired resistance inevitably occurs for all responders if Herceptin is given as monotherapy. To date, no studies have explained why Herceptin does not abolish HER2 phosphorylation. The objective of this study was to investigate why Herceptin did not decrease HER2 phosphorylation despite being an anti-HER2 monoclonal antibody. We also investigated the effects of acute and chronic Herceptin treatment on HER3 and PKB phosphorylation in HER2-positive breast cancer cells. Using both Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET methodology and conventional Western blot, we have found the molecular mechanisms whereby Herceptin fails to abolish HER2 phosphorylation. HER2 phosphorylation is maintained by ligand-mediated activation of EGFR, HER3, and HER4 receptors, resulting in their dimerisation with HER2. The release of HER ligands was mediated by ADAM17 through a PKB negative feedback loop. The feedback loop was activated because of the inhibition of PKB by Herceptin treatment since up-regulation of HER ligands and ADAM17 also occurred when PKB phosphorylation was inhibited by a PKB inhibitor (Akt inhibitor VIII, Akti-1/2. The combination of Herceptin with ADAM17 inhibitors or the panHER inhibitor JNJ-26483327 was able to abrogate the feedback loop and decrease HER2 phosphorylation. Furthermore, the combination of Herceptin with JNJ-26483327 was synergistic in tumour inhibition in a BT474 xenograft model. We have determined that a PKB negative feedback loop links ADAM17 and HER ligands in maintaining

  14. Does elevated progesterone on day of oocyte maturation play a role in the racial disparities in IVF outcomes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Micah J; Royster, G Donald; Taneja, Mansi; Healy, Mae Wu; Zarek, Shvetha M; Christy, Alicia Y; DeCherney, Alan H; Widra, Eric; Devine, Kate

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate if premature progesterone elevation on the last day of assisted reproduction technique stimulation contributes to racial disparities in IVF outcome. A total of 3289 assisted reproduction technique cycles were evaluated in Latino, Asian, African American, and white women. Live birth was more likely in white women (42.6%) compared with Asian (34.8%) and African American women (36.3%), but was similar to Latino women (40.7%). In all racial groups, progesterone was negatively associated with live birth and the negative effect of progesterone persisted when adjusting for confounders. Although the effect of elevated progesterone was similar in all racial groups, the prevalence of elevated progesterone differed. Progesterone > 1.5 ng/ml occurred in only 10.6% of cycles in white women compared with 18.0% in Latino and 20.2% in Asian women. Progesterone > 2 ng/ml occurred in only 2.3% of cycles in white women compared with 6.3% in Latino, 5.9% in Asian and 4.4% in African American women. The increased prevalence of premature elevated progesterone persisted when controlling for IVF stimulation parameters. In conclusion, premature progesterone elevation had a negative effect on live birth in all racial groups studied. The prevalence of elevated progesterone was higher in racial minorities. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Double-negative feedback between S-phase cyclin-CDK and CKI generates abruptness in the G1/S switch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rainis eVenta

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The G1/S transition is a crucial decision point in the cell cycle. At G1/S, there is an abrupt switch from a state of high CDK inhibitor (CKI levels and low S-phase CDK activity to a state of high S-phase CDK activity and degraded CKI. In budding yeast, this transition is triggered by phosphorylation of the Cdk1 inhibitor Sic1 at multiple sites by G1-phase CDK (Cln1,2-Cdk1 and S-phase CDK (Clb5,6-Cdk1 complexes. Using mathematical modeling we demonstrate that the mechanistic basis for the abruptness and irreversibility of the G1/S transition is the highly specific phosphorylation of Sic1 by S-phase CDK complex. This switch is generated by a double negative feedback loop in which S-CDK1 phosphorylates Sic1, thus targeting it for destruction, and thereby liberating further S-CDK1 from the inhibitory Sic1-S-CDK1 complex. Our model predicts that the abruptness of the switch depends upon a strong binding affinity within the Sic1-S-CDK inhibitory complex. In vitro phosphorylation analysis using purified yeast proteins revealed that free Clb5-Cdk1 can create positive feedback by phosphorylating Sic1 that is bound in the inhibitory complex, and that Sic1 inhibits Clb5-Cdk1 with a sub-nanomolar inhibition constant. Our model also predicts that if the G1-phase CDK complex is too efficient at targeting Sic1 for destruction, then G1/S becomes a smooth and readily reversible transition. We propose that the optimal role for the G1-phase CDK in the switch would not be to act as a kinase activity directly responsible for abrupt degradation of CKI, but rather to act as a priming signal that initiates a positive feedback loop driven by emerging free S-phase CDK.

  16. The Feedback-Related Negativity and the P300 Brain Potential Are Sensitive to Price Expectation Violations in a Virtual Shopping Task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Alexandre; Buratto, Luciano G.; Goto, Nobuhiko; Brotherhood, Emilie V.

    2016-01-01

    A large body of evidence shows that buying behaviour is strongly determined by consumers’ price expectations and the extent to which real prices violate these expectations. Despite the importance of this phenomenon, little is known regarding its neural mechanisms. Here we show that two patterns of electrical brain activity known to index prediction errors–the Feedback-Related Negativity (FRN) and the feedback-related P300 –were sensitive to price offers that were cheaper than participants’ expectations. In addition, we also found that FRN amplitude time-locked to price offers predicted whether a product would be subsequently purchased or not, and further analyses suggest that this result was driven by the sensitivity of the FRN to positive price expectation violations. This finding strongly suggests that ensembles of neurons coding positive prediction errors play a critical role in real-life consumer behaviour. Further, these findings indicate that theoretical models based on the notion of prediction error, such as the Reinforcement Learning Theory, can provide a neurobiologically grounded account of consumer behavior. PMID:27658301

  17. The Feedback-Related Negativity and the P300 Brain Potential Are Sensitive to Price Expectation Violations in a Virtual Shopping Task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Alexandre; Buratto, Luciano G; Goto, Nobuhiko; Brotherhood, Emilie V

    A large body of evidence shows that buying behaviour is strongly determined by consumers' price expectations and the extent to which real prices violate these expectations. Despite the importance of this phenomenon, little is known regarding its neural mechanisms. Here we show that two patterns of electrical brain activity known to index prediction errors-the Feedback-Related Negativity (FRN) and the feedback-related P300 -were sensitive to price offers that were cheaper than participants' expectations. In addition, we also found that FRN amplitude time-locked to price offers predicted whether a product would be subsequently purchased or not, and further analyses suggest that this result was driven by the sensitivity of the FRN to positive price expectation violations. This finding strongly suggests that ensembles of neurons coding positive prediction errors play a critical role in real-life consumer behaviour. Further, these findings indicate that theoretical models based on the notion of prediction error, such as the Reinforcement Learning Theory, can provide a neurobiologically grounded account of consumer behavior.

  18. The Feedback-Related Negativity and the P300 Brain Potential Are Sensitive to Price Expectation Violations in a Virtual Shopping Task.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Schaefer

    Full Text Available A large body of evidence shows that buying behaviour is strongly determined by consumers' price expectations and the extent to which real prices violate these expectations. Despite the importance of this phenomenon, little is known regarding its neural mechanisms. Here we show that two patterns of electrical brain activity known to index prediction errors-the Feedback-Related Negativity (FRN and the feedback-related P300 -were sensitive to price offers that were cheaper than participants' expectations. In addition, we also found that FRN amplitude time-locked to price offers predicted whether a product would be subsequently purchased or not, and further analyses suggest that this result was driven by the sensitivity of the FRN to positive price expectation violations. This finding strongly suggests that ensembles of neurons coding positive prediction errors play a critical role in real-life consumer behaviour. Further, these findings indicate that theoretical models based on the notion of prediction error, such as the Reinforcement Learning Theory, can provide a neurobiologically grounded account of consumer behavior.

  19. Overview of progesterone profiles in dairy cows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blavy, P.; Derks, M.; Martin, O.

    2016-01-01

    kernel of three data points was used to smooth the progesterone time series. The time between start of progesterone rise and end of progesterone decline was identified by fitting a simple model consisting of base length and a quadratic curve to progesterone data, and this luteal like phase (LLP) was used...... to classify progesterone profiles without recourse to an a priori set of rules, which arbitrarily segment the natural variability in these profiles. Using data-derived profile shapes may allow a more accurate assessment of the effects of for example nutritional management or breeding system on progesterone...

  20. Elevated progesterone during ovarian stimulation for IVF

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al-Azemi, M; Kyrou, D; Kolibianakis, E M

    2012-01-01

    There is an ongoing debate regarding the impact of premature progesterone rise on the IVF outcome. The objective of this review is to assess evidence of poorer ongoing pregnancy rate in IVF cycles with elevated serum progesterone at the end of follicular phase in ovarian stimulation. It also...... of premature progesterone in stimulated IVF cycles. There is an ongoing debate regarding the impact of premature progesterone rise on the IVF outcome. The objective of this review is to assess evidence of poorer ongoing pregnancy rate in IVF cycles with elevated serum progesterone at the end of follicular...... should document the cause and origin of premature progesterone in stimulated IVF cycles....

  1. Disruption of negative feedback loop between vasohibin-1 and vascular endothelial growth factor decreases portal pressure, angiogenesis, and fibrosis in cirrhotic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coch, Laura; Mejias, Marc; Berzigotti, Annalisa; Garcia-Pras, Ester; Gallego, Javier; Bosch, Jaime; Mendez, Raul; Fernandez, Mercedes

    2014-08-01

    Pathological angiogenesis represents a critical hallmark for chronic liver diseases. Understanding the mechanisms regulating angiogenesis is essential to develop new therapeutic strategies that specifically target pathological angiogenesis without affecting physiological angiogenesis. Here we investigated the contribution and therapeutic impact of the endogenous angioinhibitor vasohibin-1 in portal hypertension and cirrhosis. The spatiotemporal expression profiling of vasohibin-1 and its relationship with vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), angiogenesis, and fibrogenesis was determined through the analysis of human cirrhotic liver specimens, widely accepted in vivo animal models of portal hypertension and cirrhosis, and in vitro angiogenesis assays. Effects of vasohibin-1 overexpression by adenoviral-mediated gene transfer on angiogenesis, fibrogenesis, and portal hypertension-associated hemodynamic alterations were also studied in rats. We found that vasohibin-1 and VEGF are up-regulated, in mesentery and liver, in cirrhotic and precirrhotic portal hypertensive rats and cirrhosis patients. Our results are consistent with vasohibin-1/VEGF cascades being spatially and temporally coordinated through a negative-feedback loop driving pathological angiogenesis. Paradoxically, further overexpression of vasohibin-1 by adenoviral gene transfer exerts multifold beneficial effects in portal hypertension and cirrhosis: reduction of pathologic angiogenesis, attenuation of liver fibrogenesis partly mediated through inhibition of hepatic stellate cell activation, and significant decreases in portocollateralization, splanchnic blood flow, portohepatic resistance, and portal pressure. The explanation for this apparent contradiction is that, unlike endogenous vasohibin-1, the ectopic overexpression is not regulated by VEGF and therefore disrupts the negative-feedback loop, thus generating constant, but lower levels of VEGF synthesis sufficient to maintain vascular

  2. The fission yeast homeodomain protein Yox1p binds to MBF and confines MBF-dependent cell-cycle transcription to G1-S via negative feedback.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Aligianni

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The regulation of the G1- to S-phase transition is critical for cell-cycle progression. This transition is driven by a transient transcriptional wave regulated by transcription factor complexes termed MBF/SBF in yeast and E2F-DP in mammals. Here we apply genomic, genetic, and biochemical approaches to show that the Yox1p homeodomain protein of fission yeast plays a critical role in confining MBF-dependent transcription to the G1/S transition of the cell cycle. The yox1 gene is an MBF target, and Yox1p accumulates and preferentially binds to MBF-regulated promoters, via the MBF components Res2p and Nrm1p, when they are transcriptionally repressed during the cell cycle. Deletion of yox1 results in constitutively high transcription of MBF target genes and loss of their cell cycle-regulated expression, similar to deletion of nrm1. Genome-wide location analyses of Yox1p and the MBF component Cdc10p reveal dozens of genes whose promoters are bound by both factors, including their own genes and histone genes. In addition, Cdc10p shows promiscuous binding to other sites, most notably close to replication origins. This study establishes Yox1p as a new regulatory MBF component in fission yeast, which is transcriptionally induced by MBF and in turn inhibits MBF-dependent transcription. Yox1p may function together with Nrm1p to confine MBF-dependent transcription to the G1/S transition of the cell cycle via negative feedback. Compared to the orthologous budding yeast Yox1p, which indirectly functions in a negative feedback loop for cell-cycle transcription, similarities but also notable differences in the wiring of the regulatory circuits are evident.

  3. Evidence for active, nonlinear, negative feedback in the vibration response of the apical region of the in-vivo guinea-pig cochlea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinn, C; Maier, H; Zenner, H; Gummer, A W

    2000-04-01

    The transverse vibration response of the organ of Corti near the apical end of the guinea-pig cochlea was measured in vivo. For cochleae in good physiological condition, as ascertained with threshold compound action potentials and the endocochlear potential, increasing amounts of attenuation and phase lag were found as the intensity was decreased below 80 dB SPL. These nonlinear phenomena disappeared post mortem. The data suggest that an active, nonlinear damping mechanism exists at low intensities at the apex of the cochlea. The phase nonlinearity, evident at all frequencies except at the best frequency (BF), was limited to a total phase change of 0.25 cycles, implying negative feedback of electromechanical force from the outer hair cells into a compliant organ of Corti. The amplitude nonlinearity was largest above BF, possibly due to interaction with a second vibration mode. The high-frequency flank of the amplitude response curve was shifted to lower frequencies by as much as 0.6 octave (oct) for a 50-dB reduction of sound intensity; the reduction of BF was 0.3 oct, but there was no change of relative bandwidth (Q(10 dB)). Detailed frequency responses measured at 60 dB SPL were consistent with non-dispersive, travelling-wave motion: travel time to the place of BF (400 Hz at 60 dB SPL) was 2.9 ms, Q(10 dB) was 1.0; standing-wave motion occurred above 600 Hz. Based on comparison with neural and mechanical data from the base of the cochlea, amplitudes at the apex appear to be sufficient to yield behavioural thresholds. It is concluded that active negative feedback may be a hallmark of the entire cochlea at low stimulus frequencies and that, in contrast to the base, the apex does not require active amplification.

  4. Fulfilling Desire: Evidence for negative feedback between men’s testosterone, sociosexual psychology, and sexual partner number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puts, David A.; Pope, Lauramarie E.; Hill, Alexander K.; Cárdenas, Rodrigo A.; Welling, Lisa L. M.; Wheatley, John R.; Breedlove, S. Marc

    2015-01-01

    Across human societies and many nonhuman animals, males have greater interest in uncommitted sex (more unrestricted sociosexuality) than do females. Testosterone shows positive associations with male-typical sociosexual behavior in nonhuman animals. Yet, it remains unclear whether the human sex difference in sociosexual psychology (attitudes and desires) is mediated by testosterone, whether any relationships between testosterone and sociosexuality differ between men and women, and what the nature of these possible relationships might be. In studies to resolve these questions, we examined relationships between salivary testosterone concentrations and sociosexual psychology and behavior in men and women. We measured testosterone in all men in our sample, but only in those women taking oral contraception (OC-using women) in order to reduce the influence of ovulatory cycle variation in ovarian hormone production. We found that OC-using women did not differ from normally-ovulating women in sociosexual psychology or behavior, but that circulating testosterone mediated the sex difference in human sociosexuality and predicted sociosexual psychology in men but not OC-using women. Moreover, when sociosexual psychology was controlled, men’s sociosexual behavior (number of sexual partners) was negatively related to testosterone, suggesting that testosterone drives sociosexual psychology in men and is inhibited when those desires are fulfilled. This more complex relationship between androgen and male sexuality may reconcile some conflicting prior reports. PMID:25644313

  5. The dialectic role of progesterone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Johannes C; Ott, Johannes

    2009-04-20

    Progesterone is known to be metabolized into various metabolites exerting various effects, predominantly into 5alpha-pregnanes and 4-pregnenes. Studies on uterine tissues showed numerous progesterone-converting enzymes such as 5alpha-reductase (5alphaR), 5beta-reductase, 3alpha-, 3beta-, 20alpha-, and 20beta-hydroxysteroid oxidoreductases and others. The main progesterone-metabolizing enzymes in human breast tissues are 5alphaR, 3alpha-HSO 3beta-HSO, and 20alpha-HSO. Tumor genesis in the breast has been shown to be enhanced by high 5alphaR activity and suppression of 3alpha-HSO and 20alpha-HSO. A major determinant of 5alphaR, the breast's gate-keeping enzyme activity is the genetic variation in the enzyme's gene. Two polymorphisms within the steroid 5alphaR type 2 gene, Ala>Thr at codon 49 and Val>Leu at codon 89 have been reported to strongly affect the enzyme's activity, even in regard to breast cancer risk. As steroid hormones are known to be converted into many other steroids occupying different receptors and thereby exerting various different effects, progesterone receptors are important factors when mediating the hormone's effects. The progesterone receptor (PR) gene is transcribed from one gene by two alternative promoters and translated into PR-B, a potent transcriptional activator, and PR-A, the shorter isoform, necessary to oppose the effects of PR-B. In addition, endocrine reactions are modulated by epigenetics. The expression of progesterone receptors has been shown to be up- and downregulated by various epigenetic mechanisms. Many factors must be also taken into account in hormonal (replacement) therapy. Thus natural steroids should not be disparaged as treatment options for gender-specific diseases. An update on endocrinological knowledge and experience is rather mandatory for gynaecologists.

  6. Feedback Valence Affects Auditory Perceptual Learning Independently of Feedback Probability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amitay, Sygal; Moore, David R.; Molloy, Katharine; Halliday, Lorna F.

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that negative feedback is more effective in driving learning than positive feedback. We investigated the effect on learning of providing varying amounts of negative and positive feedback while listeners attempted to discriminate between three identical tones; an impossible task that nevertheless produces robust learning. Four feedback conditions were compared during training: 90% positive feedback or 10% negative feedback informed the participants that they were doing equally well, while 10% positive or 90% negative feedback informed them they were doing equally badly. In all conditions the feedback was random in relation to the listeners’ responses (because the task was to discriminate three identical tones), yet both the valence (negative vs. positive) and the probability of feedback (10% vs. 90%) affected learning. Feedback that informed listeners they were doing badly resulted in better post-training performance than feedback that informed them they were doing well, independent of valence. In addition, positive feedback during training resulted in better post-training performance than negative feedback, but only positive feedback indicating listeners were doing badly on the task resulted in learning. As we have previously speculated, feedback that better reflected the difficulty of the task was more effective in driving learning than feedback that suggested performance was better than it should have been given perceived task difficulty. But contrary to expectations, positive feedback was more effective than negative feedback in driving learning. Feedback thus had two separable effects on learning: feedback valence affected motivation on a subjectively difficult task, and learning occurred only when feedback probability reflected the subjective difficulty. To optimize learning, training programs need to take into consideration both feedback valence and probability. PMID:25946173

  7. The Rice Transcription Factor WRKY53 Suppresses Herbivore-Induced Defenses by Acting as a Negative Feedback Modulator of Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Activity1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Lingfei; Ye, Meng; Zhang, Tongfang; Zhou, Guoxin; Wang, Qi; Lu, Jing

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms by which herbivore-attacked plants activate their defenses are well studied. By contrast, little is known about the regulatory mechanisms that allow them to control their defensive investment and avoid a defensive overshoot. We characterized a rice (Oryza sativa) WRKY gene, OsWRKY53, whose expression is rapidly induced upon wounding and induced in a delayed fashion upon attack by the striped stem borer (SSB) Chilo suppressalis. The transcript levels of OsWRKY53 are independent of endogenous jasmonic acid but positively regulated by the mitogen-activated protein kinases OsMPK3/OsMPK6. OsWRKY53 physically interacts with OsMPK3/OsMPK6 and suppresses their activity in vitro. By consequence, it modulates the expression of defensive, MPK-regulated WRKYs and thereby reduces jasmonic acid, jasmonoyl-isoleucine, and ethylene induction. This phytohormonal reconfiguration is associated with a reduction in trypsin protease inhibitor activity and improved SSB performance. OsWRKY53 is also shown to be a negative regulator of plant growth. Taken together, these results show that OsWRKY53 functions as a negative feedback modulator of MPK3/MPK6 and thereby acts as an early suppressor of induced defenses. OsWRKY53 therefore enables rice plants to control the magnitude of their defensive investment during early signaling. PMID:26453434

  8. Effects of metformin treatment on luteal phase progesterone concentration in polycystic ovary syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meenakumari K.J.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The causes of luteal phase progesterone deficiency in polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS are not known. To determine the possible involvement of hyperinsulinemia in luteal phase progesterone deficiency in women with PCOS, we examined the relationship between progesterone, luteinizing hormone (LH and insulin during the luteal phase and studied the effect of metformin on luteal progesterone levels in PCOS. Patients with PCOS (19 women aged 18-35 years were treated with metformin (500 mg three times daily for 4 weeks prior to the test cycle and throughout the study period, and submitted to ovulation induction with clomiphene citrate. Blood samples were collected from control (N = 5, same age range as PCOS women and PCOS women during the late follicular (one sample and luteal (3 samples phases and LH, insulin and progesterone concentrations were determined. Results were analyzed by one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA, Duncan's test and Karl Pearson's coefficient of correlation (r. The endocrine study showed low progesterone level (4.9 ng/ml during luteal phase in the PCOS women as compared with control (21.6 ng/ml. A significant negative correlation was observed between insulin and progesterone (r = -0.60; P < 0.01 and between progesterone and LH (r = -0.56; P < 0.05 concentrations, and a positive correlation (r = 0.83; P < 0.001 was observed between LH and insulin. The study further demonstrated a significant enhancement in luteal progesterone concentration (16.97 ng/ml in PCOS women treated with metformin. The results suggest that hyperinsulinemia/insulin resistance may be responsible for low progesterone levels during the luteal phase in PCOS. The luteal progesterone level may be enhanced in PCOS by decreasing insulin secretion with metformin.

  9. A PXR-mediated negative feedback loop attenuates the expression of CYP3A in response to the PXR agonist pregnenalone-16α-carbonitrile.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian Bailey

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The nuclear receptor superfamily of ligand-activated transcription factors plays a central role in the regulation of cellular responses to chemical challenge. Nuclear receptors are activated by a wide range of both endogenous and exogenous chemicals, and their target genes include those involved in the metabolism and transport of the activating chemical. Such target gene activation, thus, acts to remove the stimulating xenobiotic or to maintain homeostatic levels of endogenous chemicals. Given the dual nature of this system it is important to understand how these two roles are balanced, such that xenobiotics are efficiently removed while not impacting negatively on homeostasis of endogenous chemicals. Using DNA microarray technology we have examined the transcriptome response of primary rat hepatocytes to two nuclear receptor ligands: Pregnenalone-16α-carbonitrile (PCN, a xenobiotic PXR agonist, and lithocholic acid, an endogenous mixed PXR/VDR/FXR agonist. We demonstrate that despite differences in the profile of activated nuclear receptors, transcriptome responses for these two ligands are broadly similar at lower concentrations, indicating a conserved general response. However, as concentrations of stimulating ligand rises, the transcriptome responses diverge, reflecting a need for specific responses to the two stimulating chemicals. Finally, we demonstrate a novel feed-back loop for PXR, whereby ligand-activation of PXR suppresses transcription of the PXR gene, acting to attenuate PXR protein expression levels at higher ligand concentrations. Through in silico simulation we demonstrate that this feed-back loop is an important factor to prevent hyperexpression of PXR target genes such as CYP3A and confirm these findings in vitro. This novel insight into the regulation of the PXR-mediated regulatory signal networks provides a potential mechanistic rationale for the robustness in steroid homeostasis within the cell.

  10. A negative feedback loop that limits the ectopic activation of a cell type-specific sporulation sigma factor of Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, Mónica; Real, Gonçalo; Santos, Joana; Carneiro, Jorge; Moran, Charles P; Henriques, Adriano O

    2011-09-01

    Two highly similar RNA polymerase sigma subunits, σ(F) and σ(G), govern the early and late phases of forespore-specific gene expression during spore differentiation in Bacillus subtilis. σ(F) drives synthesis of σ(G) but the latter only becomes active once engulfment of the forespore by the mother cell is completed, its levels rising quickly due to a positive feedback loop. The mechanisms that prevent premature or ectopic activation of σ(G) while discriminating between σ(F) and σ(G) in the forespore are not fully comprehended. Here, we report that the substitution of an asparagine by a glutamic acid at position 45 of σ(G) (N45E) strongly reduced binding by a previously characterized anti-sigma factor, CsfB (also known as Gin), in vitro, and increased the activity of σ(G) in vivo. The N45E mutation caused the appearance of a sub-population of pre-divisional cells with strong activity of σ(G). CsfB is normally produced in the forespore, under σ(F) control, but sigGN45E mutant cells also expressed csfB and did so in a σ(G)-dependent manner, autonomously from σ(F). Thus, a negative feedback loop involving CsfB counteracts the positive feedback loop resulting from ectopic σ(G) activity. N45 is invariant in the homologous position of σ(G) orthologues, whereas its functional equivalent in σ(F) proteins, E39, is highly conserved. While CsfB does not bind to wild-type σ(F), a E39N substitution in σ(F) resulted in efficient binding of CsfB to σ(F). Moreover, under certain conditions, the E39N alteration strongly restrains the activity of σ(F) in vivo, in a csfB-dependent manner, and the efficiency of sporulation. Therefore, a single amino residue, N45/E39, is sufficient for the ability of CsfB to discriminate between the two forespore-specific sigma factors in B. subtilis.

  11. A negative feedback loop that limits the ectopic activation of a cell type-specific sporulation sigma factor of Bacillus subtilis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica Serrano

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Two highly similar RNA polymerase sigma subunits, σ(F and σ(G, govern the early and late phases of forespore-specific gene expression during spore differentiation in Bacillus subtilis. σ(F drives synthesis of σ(G but the latter only becomes active once engulfment of the forespore by the mother cell is completed, its levels rising quickly due to a positive feedback loop. The mechanisms that prevent premature or ectopic activation of σ(G while discriminating between σ(F and σ(G in the forespore are not fully comprehended. Here, we report that the substitution of an asparagine by a glutamic acid at position 45 of σ(G (N45E strongly reduced binding by a previously characterized anti-sigma factor, CsfB (also known as Gin, in vitro, and increased the activity of σ(G in vivo. The N45E mutation caused the appearance of a sub-population of pre-divisional cells with strong activity of σ(G. CsfB is normally produced in the forespore, under σ(F control, but sigGN45E mutant cells also expressed csfB and did so in a σ(G-dependent manner, autonomously from σ(F. Thus, a negative feedback loop involving CsfB counteracts the positive feedback loop resulting from ectopic σ(G activity. N45 is invariant in the homologous position of σ(G orthologues, whereas its functional equivalent in σ(F proteins, E39, is highly conserved. While CsfB does not bind to wild-type σ(F, a E39N substitution in σ(F resulted in efficient binding of CsfB to σ(F. Moreover, under certain conditions, the E39N alteration strongly restrains the activity of σ(F in vivo, in a csfB-dependent manner, and the efficiency of sporulation. Therefore, a single amino residue, N45/E39, is sufficient for the ability of CsfB to discriminate between the two forespore-specific sigma factors in B. subtilis.

  12. Estrogen and progesterone receptors in human breast cancer. Correlation with histologic subtype and degree of differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, R H; Lakatua, D J; Haus, E; Yasmineh, W J

    1986-09-01

    Microscopic review of 490 consecutive human breast biopsy and mastectomy specimens were correlated with estrogen and progesterone receptor content of the tissue, by subtype and degree of differentiation. Of the 4 grades of differentiation, the less differentiated Grade III and IV tumors showed significantly lower levels of estrogen and progesterone receptors in infiltrating ductal and lobular carcinoma (P less than 0.001). In contrast, patients with medullary carcinoma had the lowest tissue levels of estrogen and progesterone receptors with approximately 80% of the cases with less than 10 fmol/mg protein. Patients with mucinous carcinoma had the highest percentages of positive estrogen and progesterone receptor levels (75% and 87%, respectively). Sixty-three percent of the patients with Grade IV infiltrating ductal carcinoma were younger than 53 years of age (P less than 0.001). Patients younger than 53 years of age with Grade II and III infiltrating ductal carcinoma also had significantly lower levels of estrogen receptors, but not of progesterone receptors, than those patients older than 53 years of age (P less than 0.001). Nineteen of 20 "normal" breast tissue specimens were negative (less than 3 fmol/mg protein) for estrogen and progesterone receptors. About 50% of 17 tissue specimens from benign breast lesions (fibroadenoma, fibrocystic disease, sclerosing adenosis) showed positive estrogen (greater than 10 fmol/mg protein) or progesterone receptor values. In two patients with gynecomastia, no estrogen or progesterone receptors were detectable.

  13. Progesterone receptor structure and protease activity in primary human endometrial carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feil, P D; Clarke, C L; Satyaswaroop, P G

    1988-03-01

    Monoclonal antibodies were used to investigate progesterone receptor structure (isoforms) in 33 primary human endometrial tumors. The monoclonal antibodies recognized on protein blots two progesterone receptor proteins with molecular weights of 116,000 and 81,000. The Mr 116,000 protein appeared as a triplet, while a single band was found for the Mr 81,000 protein. The triplet/singlet structure was found in all progesterone receptor-positive tumors, regardless of the degree of tumor differentiation. Protease activity, which gave rise to a false-negative pattern on protein blots, was found in approximately one-half of the tumors in which it was investigated. Inclusion of a cocktail of protease inhibitors during sample preparation resulted in the maintenance of the triplet/singlet progesterone receptor structure. Mixing experiments using a progesterone receptor-rich human endometrial carcinoma (EnCa 101), which lacks protease activity, and protease-containing primary tumor homogenates indicated that the protease was leupeptin sensitive. Interestingly, while the proteolytic activity reduced or eliminated the triplet/singlet progesterone receptor structure seen on protein blot analysis, it did not affect progesterone receptor concentration measured by Scatchard analysis. Sample preparation in the presence of protease inhibitors is therefore a requisite for structural analysis of the progesterone receptor in endometrial tumors.

  14. Melatonin implants do not alter estrogen feedback or advance puberty in gilts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennaway, D J; Hughes, P E; van Wettere, W H E J

    2015-05-01

    Puberty in pigs is often delayed during late summer and autumn, with long daylength the most likely cause. We hypothesised (1) that gilts born around the shortest day would have a later release from the negative feedback actions of estradiol than gilts born around the spring equinox and (2) melatonin treatment would result in an earlier release from estradiol negative feedback and advance the onset of puberty in gilts born around the spring equinox. We first determined the optimal number of estradiol implants required to monitor the release from estradiol negative feedback in ovariectomised gilts. Secondly we determined whether melatonin implants altered negative feedback in 4 cohorts of ovariectomised gilts born between the winter solstice and spring equinox, and in the following year whether melatonin altered the time of the first ovulation in 5 cohorts of intact gilts born between the winter solstice and spring equinox. Plasma LH and FSH increased between 126 and 210d of age (P0.05). Age at first detection of elevated plasma progesterone in untreated, intact gilts decreased across the 4 cohorts (P0.05). In conclusion, while we confirmed that estradiol sensitivity is decreased as gilts age, we failed to demonstrate any effects of season or melatonin on estradiol feedback or melatonin on puberty. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Student life - Handling negative feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day-Calder, Mandy

    2017-06-28

    It is worth spending time reflecting on the expectations you set for yourself. Hopefully, your aim is to be the best nurse you can be, but there is a reason that your course is the length it is; the skills and aptitude needed to become a proficient nurse take time to master.

  16. The inhibitory effects of AR/miR-190a/YB-1 negative feedback loop on prostate cancer and underlying mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shaohua; Wang, Tao; Song, Wen; Jiang, Tao; Zhang, Feng; Yin, Yu; Jiang, Shi-Wen; Wu, Kongming; Yu, Zuoren; Wang, Chenguang; Chen, Ke

    2015-08-28

    Prostate cancer at advanced stages including metastatic and castration-resistant cancer remains incurable due to the lack of effective therapies. MiR-190a belongs to the small noncoding RNA family and has an important role in breast cancer metastasis. However, it is still unknown whether miR-190a plays a role in prostate cancer development. Herein, we first observed AR/miR-190a/YB-1 forms an auto-regulatory negative feedback loop in prostate cancer: miR-190a expression was down-regulated by AR activation; YB-1 functions are as an AR activator; miR-190a inhibited AR expression and transactivation through direct binding to 3'UTR of YB-1 gene. MiR-190a contributes the human prostate cancer cell growth through AR-dependent signaling. Moreover, we examined the expression of miR-190a and observed a significant decrease in human prostate cancers. Reduced expression of miR-190a was inversely correlated to AR levels of prostate cancer patients, and patients with higher miR-190a expression in their tumor have improved tumor-free survival. Taken together, our findings identified a biochemical and functional link between miR-190a with reduced expression in advanced prostate cancer, YB-1 and AR signaling in prostate cancer.

  17. TRIM30α Is a Negative-Feedback Regulator of the Intracellular DNA and DNA Virus-Triggered Response by Targeting STING.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanming Wang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Uncontrolled immune responses to intracellular DNA have been shown to induce autoimmune diseases. Homeostasis regulation of immune responses to cytosolic DNA is critical for limiting the risk of autoimmunity and survival of the host. Here, we report that the E3 ubiquitin ligase tripartite motif protein 30α (TRIM30α was induced by herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 infection in dendritic cells (DCs. Knockdown or genetic ablation of TRIM30α augmented the type I IFNs and interleukin-6 response to intracellular DNA and DNA viruses. Trim30α-deficient mice were more resistant to infection by DNA viruses. Biochemical analyses showed that TRIM30α interacted with the stimulator of interferon genes (STING, which is a critical regulator of the DNA-sensing response. Overexpression of TRIM30α promoted the degradation of STING via K48-linked ubiquitination at Lys275 through a proteasome-dependent pathway. These findings indicate that E3 ligase TRIM30α is an important negative-feedback regulator of innate immune responses to DNA viruses by targeting STING.

  18. Brain-midgut cross-talk and autocrine metabolastat via the sNPF/CCAP negative feed-back loop in the American cockroach, Periplaneta americana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikani, Azam; Watari, Yasuhiko; Takeda, Makio

    2015-12-01

    Immunohistochemical reactivities against short neuropeptide F (sNPF-ir) and crustacean cardioactive peptide (CCAP-ir) were detected in both the brain-subesophageal ganglion (Br-SOG) and midgut epithelial cells of the male American cockroach, Periplaneta americana. Four weeks of starvation increased the number of sNPF-ir cells and decreased the CCAP-ir cells in the Br-SOG, whereas refeeding reversed these effects. The contents of sNPF in the Br-SOG, midgut and hemolymph titer decreased in response to an injection of CCAP into the hemocoel of normally fed male cockroaches, while CCAP titers/contents decreased in response to an injection of sNPF. The results of a double-labeling experiment demonstrated that sNPF-ir co-existed in CCAP-ir cells in the pars intercerebralis (PI), dorsolateral region of protocerebrum (DL), deutocerebrum (De) and SOG. sNPF-ir and CCAP-ir were also colocalized in the midgut. sNPF and CCAP are neuropeptides and midgut factors that interact with each other. Since the two peptides are known to be secreted by identical cells that affect each other, this constitutes autocrine negative feedback regulation for a quick response to food accessibility/inaccessibility. These peptides not only constitute the switch in the digestive mechanism but also couple digestive adaptation with behavior. A CCAP injection suppressed locomotor activity when cockroaches were starved, whereas sNPF activated it when they were fed.

  19. Audio Feedback -- Better Feedback?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voelkel, Susanne; Mello, Luciane V.

    2014-01-01

    National Student Survey (NSS) results show that many students are dissatisfied with the amount and quality of feedback they get for their work. This study reports on two case studies in which we tried to address these issues by introducing audio feedback to one undergraduate (UG) and one postgraduate (PG) class, respectively. In case study one…

  20. Developmental programming: Impact of prenatal exposure to bisphenol-A and methoxychlor on steroid feedbacks in sheep

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abi Salloum, Bachir; Steckler, Teresa L.; Herkimer, Carol; Lee, James S. [Department of Pediatrics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Padmanabhan, Vasantha, E-mail: vasantha@umich.edu [Department of Pediatrics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); The Reproductive Sciences Program, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2013-05-01

    Bisphenol-A (BPA), a polymer used in plastics manufacturing, and methoxychlor (MXC), a pesticide, are endocrine disrupting compounds with estrogenic and anti-androgenic properties. Prenatal BPA or MXC treatment induces reproductive defects in sheep with BPA causing prepubertal luteinizing hormone (LH) hypersecretion and dampening of periovulatory LH surges and MXC lengthening follicular phase and delaying the LH surge. In this study, we addressed the underlying neuroendocrine defects by testing the following hypotheses: 1) prenatal BPA, but not MXC reduces sensitivity to estradiol and progesterone negative feedback, 2) prenatal BPA, but not MXC increases pituitary responsiveness to gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH), and 3) prenatal BPA dampens LH surge response to estradiol positive feedback challenge while prenatal MXC delays the timing of the LH surge. Pregnant sheep were treated with either 1) 5 mg/kg/day BPA (produces approximately twice the level found in human circulation, n = 8), 2) 5 mg/kg/day MXC (the lowest observed effect level stated in the EPA National Toxicology Program's Report; n = 6), or 3) vehicle (cotton seed oil: C: n = 6) from days 30 to 90 of gestation. Female offspring of these ewes were ovariectomized at 21 months of age and tested for progesterone negative, estradiol negative, estradiol positive feedback sensitivities and pituitary responsiveness to GnRH. Results revealed that sensitivity to all 3 feedbacks as well as pituitary responsiveness to GnRH were not altered by either of the prenatal treatments. These findings suggest that the postpubertal reproductive defects seen in these animals may have stemmed from ovarian defects and the steroidal signals emanating from them. - Highlights: ► Prenatal BPA/MXC does not affect reproductive neuroendocrine steroid feedbacks. ► Prenatal BPA or MXC treatment failed to alter pituitary sensitivity to GnRH. ► LH excess in BPA-treated sheep may be due to reduced ovarian feedback signals.

  1. Interrupted E2F1-miR-34c-SCF negative feedback loop by hyper-methylation promotes colorectal cancer cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shu; Wu, Bo; Sun, Haimei; Ji, Fengqing; Sun, Tingyi; Zhao, Yan; Zhou, Deshan

    2015-12-24

    Tumour suppressor miR-34c deficiency resulted from hyper-methylation in its promoter is believed to be one of the main causes of colorectal cancer (CRC). Till date, miR-34c has been validated as a direct target of p53; but previous evidence suggested other transcription factor(s) must be involved in miR-34c transcription. In the present study, we in the first place identified a core promoter region (-1118 to -883 bp) of pre-miR-34c which was embedded within a hyper-methylated CpG island. Secondly, E2F1 promoted miR-34c transcription by physical interaction with the miR-34c promoter at site -897 to -889 bp. The transcriptional activating effect of E2F1 on miR-34c was in a p53 independent manner but profoundly promoted in the presence of p53 with exposure to 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (DAC). Thirdly, stem cell factor (SCF), a miR-34c target, was specifically reduced upon an introduction of E2F1 which lead to suppression of CRC cell proliferation. The E2F1-suppressed cell proliferation was partially abrogated by additional miR-34c inhibitor, indicating that the anti-proliferation effect of E2F1 was probably through activating miR-34c-SCF axis. Finally, SCF/KIT signalling increased E2F1 production by reducing its proteosomal degradation dependent on PI3K/Akt-GSK3β pathway. In conclusion, our results suggested the existence of E2F1-miR-34c-SCF negative feedback loop which was interrupted by the hyper-methylation of miR-34c promoter in CRC cells and increased cell proliferation. © 2016 Authors.

  2. Feedback and Incentives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Tor Viking; Poulsen, Anders; Villeval, Marie Claire

    2009-01-01

    use two pay schemes, a piece rate and a tournament. We find that overall feedback does not improve performance. In contrast to the piece-rate pay scheme there is some evidence of positive peer effects in tournaments since the underdogs almost never quit the competition even when lagging significantly......This paper experimentally investigates the impact of different pay schemes and relative performance feedback policies on employee effort. We explore three feedback rules: no feedback on relative performance, feedback given halfway through the production period, and continuously updated feedback. We...... behind, and front runners do not slack off. But in both pay schemes relative performance feedback reduces the quality of the low performers' work; we refer to this as a "negative quality peer effect"....

  3. [Progesterone and prevention of preterm birth].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, F; Senat, M-V

    2015-10-01

    The literature confirms the interest of progesterone for prevention of preterm delivery in specific indications for patients carrying a singleton pregnancy. In contrast, randomized trials have shown no benefit using progesterone in the prevention of prematurity in twins and even an adverse effect. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. PROGESTERONE: BIOSYNTHESIS FROM PREGNENOLONE IN HOLARRHENA FLORIBUNDA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    BENNETT, R D; HEFTMANN, E

    1965-08-06

    After administration of pregnenolone-4-C(14) to Holarrhena floribunda leaves, radioactive progesterone was isolated and purified to constant specific activity by chromatography, conversion to a derivative, and recrystallization. The result suggests that the biogenetic sequence leading to progesterone is the same in plants as in animals.

  5. Estrogen and progesterone receptors in gynecomastia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pensler, J M; Silverman, B L; Sanghavi, J; Goolsby, C; Speck, G; Brizio-Molteni, L; Molteni, A

    2000-10-01

    The etiology of gynecomastia is unknown. There seems to be no increased incidence of malignancies in patients with idiopathic gynecomastia; however, patients with Klinefelter syndrome exhibit an increased incidence of malignancy. The authors reviewed the results of 34 patients with gynecomastia diagnosed in adolescence who, following initial evaluation, had a mastectomy. The estrogen and progesterone receptors were analyzed in these patients. Three of the patients were diagnosed with Klinefelter syndrome. These three patients exhibited elevated amounts of estrogen and progesterone receptors. None of the patients who were not diagnosed with this syndrome demonstrated significant elevation of their estrogen or progesterone receptors. The presence of elevated estrogen and progesterone receptors in patients with Klinefelter syndrome provides a potential mechanism by which these patients may develop breast neoplasms. The absence of elevated estrogen and progesterone receptors in patients with idiopathic gynecomastia may serve to clarify why these patients' disease rarely degenerates into malignancy.

  6. Autoimmune Progesterone Dermatitis: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachana George

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Autoimmune progesterone dermatitis is a rare cyclic premenstrual allergic reaction to progesterone produced during the luteal phase of a woman's menstrual cycle. Patients present with a variety of conditions including erythema multiforme, eczema, urticaria, angioedema, and progesterone-induced anaphylaxis. Case. Thirty-eight-year-old woman G2P2002 presents with erythema multiforme and urticarial rash one week prior to her menses starting one year after menarche. She was treated with oral contraceptive pills and the symptoms resolved. Conclusion. This is a typical case of progesterone autoimmunity. The diagnosis is based on cyclic nature of the dermatitis. This differentiates the condition from other allergies or systemic diseases with skin manifestations. Inhibition of ovulation in such cases results in decrease in progesterone secretion and prevention of symptoms.

  7. Bile acids exert negative feedback control on bile acid synthesis in cultured pig hepatocytes by suppression of cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kwekkeboom, J.; Princen, H.M.G.; Voorthuizen, E.M. van; Kempen, H.J.M.

    1990-01-01

    Feedback regulation of bile acid synthesis by its end products was studied in cultured hepatocytes of young weaned pigs. We previously showed that conversion of exogenous [14C] cholesterol into bile acids was suppressed by addition of bile acids to the culture medium. In the present study, the

  8. The impact of progesterone on memory consolidation of threatening images in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felmingham, Kim L; Fong, Wing Chee; Bryant, Richard A

    2012-11-01

    Recent findings suggest that consolidation of emotional memories is influenced by menstrual phase in women. In contrast to other phases, in the mid-luteal phase when progesterone levels are elevated, cortisol levels are increased and correlated with emotional memory. This study examined the impact of progesterone on cortisol and memory consolidation of threatening stimuli under stressful conditions. Thirty women were recruited for the high progesterone group (in the mid-luteal phase) and 26 for the low progesterone group (in non-luteal phases of the menstrual cycle). Women were shown a series of 20 neutral or threatening images followed immediately by either a stressor (cold pressor task) or control condition. Participants returned two days later for a surprise free recall test of the images and salivary cortisol responses were monitored. High progesterone levels were associated with higher baseline and stress-evoked cortisol levels, and enhanced memory of negative images when stress was received. A positive correlation was found between stress-induced cortisol levels and memory recall of threatening images. These findings suggest that progesterone mediates cortisol responses to stress and subsequently predicts memory recall for emotionally arousing stimuli. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Sensor and instrumentation for progesterone detection

    KAUST Repository

    Zia, Asif I.

    2012-05-01

    The reported research work uses a real time and noninvasive method to detect progesterone hormone concentration in purified water using Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (E.I.S.) technique. Planar capacitive sensor, consisting of inter-digitated microelectrodes, is designed and fabricated on silicon substrate using thin-film Microelectromechanical system (MEMS) based semiconductor device fabrication technology. The sensor in conjunction with EIS is used to evaluate conductivity, permeability and dielectric properties of reproductive hormone progesterone and its concentration quantification in purified water. Impedance spectrums are obtained with various concentrations of the hormone in purified water by using an electric circuit in order to extract sample conductance. Relationship of sample conductance with progesterone concentration level is studied in this research work. The ability of E.I.S. to detect progesterone concentration is aimed to be used in dairy farming industry in order to obtain better reproductive performance of the dairy cattle. © 2012 IEEE.

  10. Uses of progesterone in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, M P; Shantha, S

    1999-01-01

    Progesterone is the natural progestagen produced by the corpus luteum during the luteal phase. It is absorbed when administered orally, but is greater than 90% metabolized during the first hepatic pass. This greatly limits the efficacy of once-daily administration and also results in unphysiologically high levels of progesterone metabolites, particularly those reduced at the 5-a position. These metabolites can cause dizziness and drowsiness to the point of preventing the operation of a motor vehicle. Synthetic progestins, such as medroxyprogesterone acetate and norethindrone acetate (NETA), have been specifically designed to resist enzymatic degradation and remain active after oral administration. However, these compounds exert undesirable effects on the liver and often cause severe psychological side effects. The permeability of the skin does not allow for administration of progesterone in the quantities normally produced by the corpus luteum, i.e., up to 25 mg/day during the mid-luteal phase. To avoid this problem, synthetic progestins such as NETA have been administered transdermally. These compounds, though, just like synthetic estrogens administered non-orally, retain undesirable hepatic effects even when administered transdermally. Transvaginal administration of progesterone is a practical non-oral route available for administering progesterone. Early experience was gained with vaginal suppositories, which lack manufacturing controls. Recently, a new progesterone gel formulation has been designed for vaginal use. The clinical acceptability of this product has been enhanced by the bioadhesive characteristics of its polycarbophil-based gel, which conveys controlled and sustained-released properties. Investigations have shown that because of local direct vagina-to-uterus transport, which results in a preferential uterine uptake of progesterone, this formulation given in conjunction with physiological amounts of estradiol produces endometrial changes similar to

  11. PROGESTERONE EXERTS NEUROPROTECTIVE EFFECTS AFTER BRAIN INJURY

    OpenAIRE

    Stein, Donald G.

    2007-01-01

    Progesterone, although still widely considered primarily a sex hormone, is an important agent affecting many central nervous system functions. This review assesses recent, primarily in vivo, evidence that progesterone can play an important role in promoting and enhancing repair after traumatic brain injury and stroke. Although many of its specific actions on neuroplasticity remain to be discovered, there is growing evidence that this hormone may be a safe and effective treatment for traumatic...

  12. Progesterone exerts neuroprotective effects after brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Donald G

    2008-03-01

    Progesterone, although still widely considered primarily a sex hormone, is an important agent affecting many central nervous system functions. This review assesses recent, primarily in vivo, evidence that progesterone can play an important role in promoting and enhancing repair after traumatic brain injury and stroke. Although many of its specific actions on neuroplasticity remain to be discovered, there is growing evidence that this hormone may be a safe and effective treatment for traumatic brain injury and other neural disorders in humans.

  13. Women's attractiveness changes with estradiol and progesterone across the ovulatory cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puts, David A; Bailey, Drew H; Cárdenas, Rodrigo A; Burriss, Robert P; Welling, Lisa L M; Wheatley, John R; Dawood, Khytam

    2013-01-01

    In many species, females are more sexually attractive to males near ovulation. Some evidence suggests a similar pattern in humans, but methodological limitations prohibit firm conclusions at present, and information on physiological mechanisms underlying any such pattern is lacking. In 202 normally-cycling women, we explored whether women's attractiveness changed over the cycle as a function of two likely candidates for mediating these changes: estradiol and progesterone. We scheduled women to attend one session during the late follicular phase and another during the mid-luteal phase. At each session, facial photographs, voice recordings and saliva samples were collected. All photographs and voice recordings were subsequently rated by men for attractiveness and by women for flirtatiousness and attractiveness to men. Saliva samples were assayed for estradiol and progesterone. We found that progesterone and its interaction with estradiol negatively predicted vocal attractiveness and overall (facial plus vocal) attractiveness to men. Progesterone also negatively predicted women's facial attractiveness to men and female-rated facial attractiveness, facial flirtatiousness and vocal attractiveness, but not female-rated vocal flirtatiousness. These results strongly suggest a pattern of increased attractiveness during peak fertility in the menstrual cycle and implicate estradiol and progesterone in driving these changes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Biased Reasoning : Adaptive Responses to Health Risk Feedback

    OpenAIRE

    Renner, Britta

    2004-01-01

    The present study examined reactions toward repeated self relevant feedback. Participants in a community health screening received feedback about their cholesterol level on two separate occasions. Reactions to the first feedback were examined with regard to feedback valence and expectedness. The findings showed that negative feedback was devalued, but only when it was unexpected. Feedback consistency war incorporated into analyses of the second feedback. Again, results showed that negative fe...

  15. Progesterone attenuates astro- and microgliosis and enhances oligodendrocyte differentiation following spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labombarda, Florencia; González, Susana; Lima, Analia; Roig, Paulina; Guennoun, Rachida; Schumacher, Michael; De Nicola, Alejandro F

    2011-09-01

    Reactive gliosis, demyelination and proliferation of NG2+ oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPC) are common responses to spinal cord injury (SCI). We previously reported that short-term progesterone treatment stimulates OPC proliferation whereas chronic treatment enhances OPC differentiation after SCI. Presently, we further studied the proliferation/differentiation of glial cells involved in inflammation and remyelination in male rats with SCI subjected to acute (3 days) or chronic (21 days) progesterone administration. Rats received several pulses of bromodeoyuridine (BrdU) 48 and 72 h post-SCI, and sacrificed 3 or 21 days post-SCI. Double colocalization of BrdU and specific cell markers showed that 3 days of SCI induced a strong proliferation of S100β+ astrocytes, OX-42+ microglia/macrophages and NG2+ cells. At this stage, the intense GFAP+ astrogliosis was BrdU negative. Twenty one days of SCI enhanced maturation of S100β+ cells into GFAP+ astrocytes, but decreased the number of CC1+ oligodendrocytes. Progesterone treatment inhibited astrocyte and microglia /macrophage proliferation and activation in the 3-day SCI group, and inhibited activation in the 21-day SCI group. BrdU/NG2 double labeled cells were increased by progesterone at 3 days, indicating a proliferation stimulus, but decreased them at 21 days. However, progesterone-enhancement of CC1+/BrdU+ oligodendrocyte density, suggest differentiation of OPC into mature oligondendrocytes. We conclude that progesterone effects after SCI involves: a) inhibition of astrocyte proliferation and activation; b) anti-inflammatory effects by preventing microglial activation and proliferation, and c) early proliferation of NG2+ progenitors and late remyelination. Thus, progesterone behaves as a glioactive factor favoring remyelination and inhibiting reactive gliosis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. A paracrine role for the epithelial progesterone receptor in mammary gland development

    OpenAIRE

    Brisken, Cathrin; Park, Sissela; Vass, Tibor; Lydon, John P.; O’Malley, Bert W.; Weinberg, Robert A.

    1998-01-01

    Recently generated progesterone receptor (PR)-negative (PR−/−) mice provide an excellent model for dissecting the role of progesterone in the development of the mammary gland during puberty and pregnancy. However, the full extent of the mammary gland defect in these mice caused by the absence of the PR cannot be assessed, because PR−/− mice do not exhibit estrous cycles and fail to become pregnant. To circumvent this difficulty, we have transplanted PR−/− breasts into wild-type mice, and we h...

  17. Influence of monoolein on progesterone transdermal delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanessa de Souza Cardoso Quintão

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available abstract This work aimed to investigate in vitro the influence of monoolein (MO on progesterone (PG transdermal delivery and skin retention. Information about the role of MO as an absorption enhancer for lipophilic molecules can help on innovative product development capable of delivering the hormone through the skin in a consistent manner, improving transdermal therapy of hormonal replacement. MO was dispersed in propylene glycol under heat at concentrations of 0% (control, 5% w/w, 10% w/w and 20% w/w. Then, 0.6% of PG (w/w was added to each formulation. Permeation profile of the hormone was determined in vitro for 48 h using porcine skin in Franz diffusion cells. PG permeation doubled when 5% (w/w of MO was present in formulation in comparison to both the control and higher MO concentrations (10% and 20% w/w. An equal trend was observed for PG retention in stratum corneum (SC and reminiscent skin (E+D. PG release rates from the MO formulations, investigated using cellulose membranes, revealed that concentrations of MO higher than 5% (w/w hindered PG release, which indeed negatively reflected on the hormone permeation through the skin. In conclusion, this work demonstrated the feasibility of MO addition (at 5% w/w in formulations as a simple method to increase transdermal PG delivery for therapies of hormonal replacement. In contrast, higher MO concentrations (from 10% to 20% w/w can control active release, and this approach could be extrapolated to other lipophilic, low-molecular-weight molecules.

  18. Tg737 regulates epithelial-mesenchymal transition and cancer stem cell properties via a negative feedback circuit between Snail and HNF4α during liver stem cell malignant transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qike; Pu, Meng; Zhao, Ge; Dai, Bin; Bian, Zhenyuan; Tang, Haili; Chen, Chong; Liu, Wei; Qu, Xuan; Shen, Liangliang; Tao, Kaishan

    2017-08-28

    Determining the origin of liver cancer stem cells is important for treating hepatocellular carcinoma. Tg737 deficiency plays an important role in the malignant transformation of liver stem cells, but the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Here we established a chemical-induced mouse hepatoma model and found that Tg737 and hepatocyte nuclear factor 4-alpha (HNF4α) expression decreased and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-related marker expression increased during liver cancer development. To investigate the underlying mechanism, we knocked down Tg737 in WB-F344 (WB) rat hepatic oval cells. Loss of Tg737 resulted in nuclear β-catenin accumulation and activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway, which further promoted EMT and the malignant phenotype. XAV939, a β-catenin inhibitor, attenuated WB cell malignant transformation due to Tg737 knockdown. To clarify the relationships of Tg737, the β-catenin pathway, and HNF4α, we inhibited Snail and overexpressed HNF4α after Tg737 knockdown in WB cells and found that Snail and HNF4α comprise a negative feedback circuit. Taken together, the results showed that Tg737 regulates a Wnt/β-catenin/Snail-HNF4α negative feedback circuit, thereby blocking EMT and the malignant transformation of liver stem cells to liver cancer stem cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Progesterone induces adult mammary stem cell expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Purna A; Jackson, Hartland W; Beristain, Alexander G; Di Grappa, Marco A; Mote, Patricia A; Clarke, Christine L; Stingl, John; Waterhouse, Paul D; Khokha, Rama

    2010-06-10

    Reproductive history is the strongest risk factor for breast cancer after age, genetics and breast density. Increased breast cancer risk is entwined with a greater number of ovarian hormone-dependent reproductive cycles, yet the basis for this predisposition is unknown. Mammary stem cells (MaSCs) are located within a specialized niche in the basal epithelial compartment that is under local and systemic regulation. The emerging role of MaSCs in cancer initiation warrants the study of ovarian hormones in MaSC homeostasis. Here we show that the MaSC pool increases 14-fold during maximal progesterone levels at the luteal dioestrus phase of the mouse. Stem-cell-enriched CD49fhi cells amplify at dioestrus, or with exogenous progesterone, demonstrating a key role for progesterone in propelling this expansion. In aged mice, CD49fhi cells display stasis upon cessation of the reproductive cycle. Progesterone drives a series of events where luminal cells probably provide Wnt4 and RANKL signals to basal cells which in turn respond by upregulating their cognate receptors, transcriptional targets and cell cycle markers. Our findings uncover a dynamic role for progesterone in activating adult MaSCs within the mammary stem cell niche during the reproductive cycle, where MaSCs are putative targets for cell transformation events leading to breast cancer.

  20. Detection of oestrogen and progesterone receptor expression in breast tumors by semiquantitative PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackl, T; Zickl, M; Dobianer, K; Hruza, C; Czerwenka, K; Spona, J

    1998-01-01

    Estimation of oestrogen receptors (ER) and progesterone receptors (PgR) by dextran-coated charcoal (DCC) or immunohistochemical methods have become standard practices in the management of breast cancer. A "multiplex" polymerase chain reaction (PCR) system was developed for quantitative estimation of ER and PgR mRNA in breast tumour specimens. A statistically significant correlation could be found between the mRNA of the oestrogen and the progesterone receptor (p < or = 0.0001). Protein data defined in classes, compared with mRNA data showed a significant correlation for the oestrogen receptor (p < or = 0.0001) as well as for the progesterone receptor (p < or = 0.046). Messenger RNA could be determined by the present PCR system in tumours assayed as negative by DCC method. Therefore, this sensitive PCR procedure, which requires small amounts of material may be very useful as a diagnostic test to determine the choice of therapy.

  1. Insulin Activates RSK (p90 Ribosomal S6 Kinase) to Trigger a New Negative Feedback Loop That Regulates Insulin Signaling for Glucose Metabolism*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smadja-Lamère, Nicolas; Shum, Michael; Déléris, Paul; Roux, Philippe P.; Abe, Jun-Ichi; Marette, André

    2013-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that the mTORC1/S6K1 pathway is activated by insulin and nutrient overload (e.g. amino acids (AA)), which leads to the inhibition of the PI3K/Akt pathway via the inhibitory serine phosphorylation of IRS-1, notably on serine 1101 (Ser-1101). However, even in the absence of AA, insulin can still promote IRS-1 Ser-1101 phosphorylation by other kinases that remain to be fully characterized. Here, we describe a new negative regulator of IRS-1, the p90 ribosomal S6 kinase (RSK). Computational analyses revealed that Ser-1101 within IRS-1 falls into the consensus motif of RSK. Moreover, recombinant RSK phosphorylated IRS-1 C-terminal fragment on Ser-1101, which was prevented by mutations of this site or when a kinase-inactive mutant of RSK was used. Using antibodies directed toward the phosphorylation sites located in the activation segment of RSK (Ser-221 or Ser-380), we found that insulin activates RSK in L6 myocytes in the absence of AA overload. Inhibition of RSK using either the pharmacological inhibitor BI-D1870 or after adenoviral expression of a dominant negative RSK1 mutant (RSK1-DN) showed that RSK selectively phosphorylates IRS-1 on Ser-1101. Accordingly, expression of the RSK1-DN mutant in L6 myocytes and FAO hepatic cells improved insulin action on glucose uptake and glucose production, respectively. Furthermore, RSK1 inhibition prevented insulin resistance in L6 myocytes chronically exposed to high glucose and high insulin. These results show that RSK is a novel regulator of insulin signaling and glucose metabolism and a potential mediator of insulin resistance, notably through the negative phosphorylation of IRS-1 on Ser-1101. PMID:24036112

  2. Effect of exogenous progesterone on oestrus response of West ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Twenty-four (24) healthy, parous West African dwarf (WAD) does aged 2 – 3 years were used to study the effects of varying doses of progesterone on oestrus synchronization and plasma progesterone levels. The does were randomly assigned to 4 treatment groups consisting of 12.5, 25.0 and 37.5 mg progesterone ...

  3. Progesterone receptor expression declines in the guinea pig uterus during functional progesterone withdrawal and in response to prostaglandins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toni N Welsh

    Full Text Available Progesterone withdrawal is essential for parturition, but the mechanism of this pivotal hormonal change is unclear in women and other mammals that give birth without a pre-labor drop in maternal progesterone levels. One possibility suggested by uterine tissue analyses and cell culture models is that progesterone receptor levels change at term decreasing the progesterone responsiveness of the myometrium, which causes progesterone withdrawal at the functional level and results in estrogen dominance enhancing uterine contractility. In this investigation we have explored whether receptor mediated functional progesterone withdrawal occurs during late pregnancy and labor in vivo. We have also determined whether prostaglandins that induce labor cause functional progesterone withdrawal by altering myometrial progesterone receptor expression. Pregnant guinea pigs were used, since this animal loses progesterone responsiveness at term and gives birth in the presence of high maternal progesterone level similarly to primates. We found that progesterone receptor mRNA and protein A and B expression decreased in the guinea pig uterus during the last third of gestation and in labor. Prostaglandin administration reduced while prostaglandin synthesis inhibitor treatment increased progesterone receptor A protein abundance. Estrogen receptor-1 protein levels remained unchanged during late gestation, in labor and after prostaglandin or prostaglandin synthesis inhibitor administration. Steroid receptor levels were higher in the non-pregnant than in the pregnant uterine horns. We conclude that the decreasing expression of both progesterone receptors A and B is a physiological mechanism of functional progesterone withdrawal in the guinea pig during late pregnancy and in labor. Further, prostaglandins administered exogenously or produced endogenously stimulate labor in part by suppressing uterine progesterone receptor A expression, which may cause functional progesterone

  4. Progesterone Receptor Expression Declines in the Guinea Pig Uterus during Functional Progesterone Withdrawal and in Response to Prostaglandins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsh, Toni N.; Hirst, Jonathan J.; Palliser, Hannah; Zakar, Tamas

    2014-01-01

    Progesterone withdrawal is essential for parturition, but the mechanism of this pivotal hormonal change is unclear in women and other mammals that give birth without a pre-labor drop in maternal progesterone levels. One possibility suggested by uterine tissue analyses and cell culture models is that progesterone receptor levels change at term decreasing the progesterone responsiveness of the myometrium, which causes progesterone withdrawal at the functional level and results in estrogen dominance enhancing uterine contractility. In this investigation we have explored whether receptor mediated functional progesterone withdrawal occurs during late pregnancy and labor in vivo. We have also determined whether prostaglandins that induce labor cause functional progesterone withdrawal by altering myometrial progesterone receptor expression. Pregnant guinea pigs were used, since this animal loses progesterone responsiveness at term and gives birth in the presence of high maternal progesterone level similarly to primates. We found that progesterone receptor mRNA and protein A and B expression decreased in the guinea pig uterus during the last third of gestation and in labor. Prostaglandin administration reduced while prostaglandin synthesis inhibitor treatment increased progesterone receptor A protein abundance. Estrogen receptor-1 protein levels remained unchanged during late gestation, in labor and after prostaglandin or prostaglandin synthesis inhibitor administration. Steroid receptor levels were higher in the non-pregnant than in the pregnant uterine horns. We conclude that the decreasing expression of both progesterone receptors A and B is a physiological mechanism of functional progesterone withdrawal in the guinea pig during late pregnancy and in labor. Further, prostaglandins administered exogenously or produced endogenously stimulate labor in part by suppressing uterine progesterone receptor A expression, which may cause functional progesterone withdrawal, promote

  5. Formativ Feedback

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hyldahl, Kirsten Kofod

    Denne bog undersøger, hvordan lærere kan anvende feedback til at forbedre undervisningen i klasselokalet. I denne sammenhæng har John Hattie, professor ved Melbourne Universitet, udviklet en model for feedback, hvilken er baseret på synteser af meta-analyser. I 2009 udgav han bogen "Visible...

  6. Progesterone Receptor Scaffolding Function in Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    response. PR are expressed in multiple human tissues including the uterus, mammary gland , brain, pancreas, thymus , bone, ovary, testes, and in the...ABSTRACT Progesterone receptors (PR) are critical mediators of mammary gland development and contribute to breast cancer progression. Progestin...receptors (PR) are critical for massive breast epithelial cell expansion during mammary gland development and contribute to breast cancer progression

  7. Determination of plasma progesterone during pregnancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molen, H.J. van der

    A modification of Short's method for the determination of plasma progesterone is described, which allows the estimation of 0.5–1.0 μg per sample. The reliability of the method is tested and plasma levels in cord and peripheral blood during pregnancy are reported.

  8. Estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and human epidermal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Current clinical practice employs the use of estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), as biomarkers to appropriately select patients that would benefit from targeted therapy against these major molecular pathways of the disease. This study aims at ...

  9. Milk progesterone concentrations: an accurate early pregnancy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The optimal day of milk sampling for pregnancy diagnosis by milk progesterone quantitation was determined as well as the diagnostic efficiency of the test for days 14- 24 post insemination in dairy cattle. The results show that on days. 22 and 23 after insemination diagnostic efficiencies of approximately 100% can be ...

  10. Fear of feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackman, Jay M; Strober, Myra H

    2003-04-01

    Nobody likes performance reviews. Subordinates are terrified they'll hear nothing but criticism. Bosses think their direct reports will respond to even the mildest criticism with anger or tears. The result? Everyone keeps quiet. That's unfortunate, because most people need help figuring out how to improve their performance and advance their careers. This fear of feedback doesn't come into play just during annual reviews. At least half the executives with whom the authors have worked never ask for feedback. Many expect the worst: heated arguments, even threats of dismissal. So rather than seek feedback, people try to guess what their bosses are thinking. Fears and assumptions about feedback often manifest themselves in psychologically maladaptive behaviors such as procrastination, denial, brooding, jealousy, and self-sabotage. But there's hope, say the authors. Those who learn adaptive techniques can free themselves from destructive responses. They'll be able to deal with feedback better if they acknowledge negative emotions, reframe fear and criticism constructively, develop realistic goals, create support systems, and reward themselves for achievements along the way. Once you've begun to alter your maladaptive behaviors, you can begin seeking regular feedback from your boss. The authors take you through four steps for doing just that: self-assessment, external assessment, absorbing the feedback, and taking action toward change. Organizations profit when employees ask for feedback and deal well with criticism. Once people begin to know how they are doing relative to management's priorities, their work becomes better aligned with organizational goals. What's more, they begin to transform a feedback-averse environment into a more honest and open one, in turn improving performance throughout the organization.

  11. Comparing intramuscular progesterone, vaginal progesterone and 17 -hydroxyprogestrone caproate in IVF and ICSI cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf Moini

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Supplementation of luteal phase with progesterone is prescribed for women undergoing routine IVF treatment.Objective: The objective of this study was to compare the efficacy of three types of progesterone on biochemical, clinical and ongoing pregnancy rates and abortion and live birth rates.Materials and Methods: A prospective randomized study was performed at Royan Institute between March 2008 and March 2009 in women under 40 years old, who use GnRH analog down-regulation. One hundred eighty six patients in three groups were received progesterone in oil (100 mg, IM daily, intravaginal progesterone (400 mg, twice daily and 17- hydroxyprogestrone caproate (375mg, every three days, respectively.Results: Final statistical analysis after withdrawal of some patients was performed in 50, 50 and 53 patients in group 1, 2 and 3 respectively. No differences between the groups were found in baseline characteristics. No statistical significance different was discovered for biochemical, clinical and ongoing pregnancies. Although the abortion rate was statistically higher in group 1 (p=0.025 the live birth rate was not statistically significant between the three groups.Conclusion: The effects of three types of progesterone were similar on pregnancies rate. We suggest the use of intravaginal progesterone during the luteal phase in patients undergoing an IVF-ET program because of the low numbers of abortions, and high ongoing pregnancy rates

  12. Concentrations of estrogen and progesterone in breast milk and their relationship with the mother's diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Mengqing; Xiao, Hailong; Li, Kelei; Jiang, Jiajing; Wu, Kejian; Li, Duo

    2017-09-20

    The aim of the present study was to determine the concentrations of estradiol (E2), estriol (E3) and progesterone in breast milk over different lactation periods, and to assess their relationship with the mother's diet. Ninety-six breast milk samples as well as 24-hour dietary records from 32 lactating mothers were collected on day 1 (colostrum), day 14 (transitional milk) and day 42 (mature milk) after delivery in Hangzhou, China. The concentrations of E2, E3 and progesterone differed significantly through different periods of lactation (p milk and mature milk was 1.60 ± 0.96 μg L -1 , 0.83 ± 0.36 μg L -1 and 1.26 ± 0.48 μg L -1 , respectively. The concentrations of E3 were 2.09 ± 1.66 μg L -1 , 2.23 ± 1.74 μg L -1 and 4.64 ± 2.15 μg L -1 , respectively. The concentrations of progesterone were 6.10 ± 8.30 μg L -1 , 4.25 ± 4.76 μg L -1 and 1.70 ± 2.42 μg L -1 , respectively. The concentration of progesterone in breast milk was significantly negatively correlated with the intake of protein (p = 0.015), fat (p = 0.008), vegetables (p = 0.012), and meat and eggs (p = 0.036), while the concentration of E3 was significantly positively correlated with the intake of soy products (p = 0.025). This information indicates that the concentrations of E2, E3 and progesterone in breast milk varied over the lactating period. Dietary intake will to some extent affect the contents of E3 and progesterone in breast milk.

  13. Dysregulation of endothelial colony-forming cell function by a negative feedback loop of circulating miR-146a and -146b in cardiovascular disease patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting-Yu Chang

    Full Text Available Functional impairment of endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs, a specific cell lineage of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs is highly associated with the severity of coronary artery disease (CAD, the most common type of cardiovascular disease (CVD. Emerging evidence show that circulating microRNAs (miRNAs in CAD patients' body fluid hold a great potential as biomarkers. However, our knowledge of the role of circulating miRNA in regulating the function of ECFCs and the progression of CAD is still in its infancy. We showed that when ECFCs from healthy volunteers were incubated with conditioned medium or purified exosomes of cultured CAD ECFCs, the secretory factors from CAD ECFCs dysregulated migration and tube formation ability of healthy ECFCs. It is known that exosomes influence the physiology of recipient cells by introducing RNAs including miRNAs. By using small RNA sequencing (smRNA-seq, we deciphered the circulating miRNome in the plasma of healthy individual and CAD patients, and found that the plasma miRNA spectrum from CAD patients was significantly different from that of healthy control. Interestingly, smRNA-seq of both healthy and CAD ECFCs showed that twelve miRNAs that had a higher expression in the plasma of CAD patients also showed higher expression in CAD ECFCs when compared with healthy control. This result suggests that these miRNAs may be involved in the regulation of ECFC functions. For identification of potential mRNA targets of the differentially expressed miRNA in CAD patients, cDNA microarray analysis was performed to identify the angiogenesis-related genes that were down-regulated in CAD ECFCs and Pearson's correlation were used to identify miRNAs that were negatively correlated with the identified angiogenesis-related genes. RT-qPCR analysis of the five miRNAs that negatively correlated with the down-regulated angiogenesis-related genes in plasma and ECFC of CAD patients showed miR-146a-5p and miR-146b-5p up

  14. Offering effective feedback to trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iskander, Morkos

    2015-01-01

    Effective feedback on performance is an integral part of clinical training. It allows the trainee to critically reflect on their development, as well as enable the teacher to chart progress and detect areas for development. In order to provide effective feedback, we need to take into account the performance itself, but also the setting where feedback is offered, and the expected outcomes of the encounter. As ever, negative feedback remains more difficult to give and receive, and as such requires a greater degree of delicacy to produce a positive result.

  15. Carboplatin and Paclitaxel Albumin-Stabilized Nanoparticle Formulation Before Surgery in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Inflammatory Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-06

    Inflammatory Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor Negative; Progesterone Receptor Negative; HER2/Neu Negative

  16. Gamma-Secretase/Notch Signalling Pathway Inhibitor RO4929097, Paclitaxel, and Carboplatin Before Surgery in Treating Patients With Stage II or Stage III Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-03

    Estrogen Receptor Negative; HER2/Neu Negative; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma

  17. Triple Negative Breast Cancer – An Overview

    OpenAIRE

    Aysola, Kartik; Desai, Akshata; Welch, Crystal; Xu, Jingyao; QIN, YUNLONG; REDDY, VAISHALI; Matthews,Roland; Owens, Charlotte; Okoli, Joel; Beech, Derrick J; Piyathilake, Chandrika J.; Reddy, Shyam P; Rao, Veena N.

    2013-01-01

    Triple Negative Breast Cancer (TNBC) is a heterogeneous disease that based on immunohistochemistry (IHC) is estrogen receptor (ER) negative, progesterone receptor (PR) negative and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) negative. TNBC is typically observed in young AA women and Hispanic women who carry a mutation in the BRCA1 gene. TNBC is characterized by a distinct molecular profile, aggressive nature and lack of targeted therapies. The purpose of this article is to review the curr...

  18. Progesterone to prevent spontaneous preterm birth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Roberto; Yeo, Lami; Chaemsaithong, Piya; Chaiworapongsa, Tinnakorn; Hassan, Sonia

    2014-01-01

    Summary Preterm birth is the leading cause of perinatal morbidity and mortality worldwide, and its prevention is an important healthcare priority. Preterm parturition is one of the ‘great obstetrical syndromes’ and is caused by multiple etiologies. One of the mechanisms of disease is the untimely decline in progesterone action, which can be manifested by a sonographic short cervix in the midtrimester. The detection of a short cervix in the midtrimester is a powerful risk factor for preterm delivery. Vaginal progesterone can reduce the rate of preterm delivery by 45%, and the rate of neonatal morbidity (admission to neonatal intensive care unit, respiratory distress syndrome, need for mechanical ventilation, etc.). To prevent one case of spontaneous preterm birth preterm birth in women with a short cervix both with and without a prior history of preterm birth. In patients with a prior history of preterm birth, vaginal progesterone is as effective as cervical cerclage to prevent preterm delivery. 17α-Hydroxyprogesterone caproate has not been shown to be effective in reducing the rate of spontaneous preterm birth in women with a short cervix. PMID:24315687

  19. Childhood conditions influence adult progesterone levels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandra Núñez-de la Mora

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Average profiles of salivary progesterone in women vary significantly at the inter- and intrapopulation level as a function of age and acute energetic conditions related to energy intake, energy expenditure, or a combination of both. In addition to acute stressors, baseline progesterone levels differ among populations. The causes of such chronic differences are not well understood, but it has been hypothesised that they may result from varying tempos of growth and maturation and, by implication, from diverse environmental conditions encountered during childhood and adolescence.To test this hypothesis, we conducted a migrant study among first- and second-generation Bangladeshi women aged 19-39 who migrated to London, UK at different points in the life-course, women still resident in Bangladesh, and women of European descent living in neighbourhoods similar to those of the migrants in London (total n = 227. Data collected included saliva samples for radioimmunoassay of progesterone, anthropometrics, and information from questionnaires on diet, lifestyle, and health. Results from multiple linear regression, controlled for anthropometric and reproductive variables, show that women who spend their childhood in conditions of low energy expenditure, stable energy intake, good sanitation, low immune challenges, and good health care in the UK have up to 103% higher levels of salivary progesterone and an earlier maturation than women who develop in less optimal conditions in Sylhet, Bangladesh (F9,178 = 5.05, p < 0.001, standard error of the mean = 0.32; adjusted R(2 = 0.16. Our results point to the period prior to puberty as a sensitive phase when changes in environmental conditions positively impact developmental tempos such as menarcheal age (F2,81 = 3.21, p = 0.03 and patterns of ovarian function as measured using salivary progesterone (F2,81 = 3.14, p = 0.04.This research demonstrates that human females use an extended period of the life cycle prior

  20. Providing Feedback: Practical Skills and Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkany, David; Deitte, Lori

    2017-06-01

    Feedback is an essential component of education. It is designed to influence, reinforce, and change behaviors, concepts, and attitudes in learners. Although providing constructive feedback can be challenging, it is a learnable skill. The negative consequences of destructive feedback or lack of feedback all together are far-reaching. This article summarizes the components of constructive feedback and provides readers with tangible skills to enhance their ability to give effective feedback to learners and peers. Copyright © 2017 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. [Reproductive physiology of the European mink: progesterone profile during pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amstislavskiĭ, S Ia; Zav'ialov, E L; Ternovskaia, Iu G; Gerlinskaia, L A

    2010-04-01

    Reproductive physiology of the European mink, an endangered mustelid species, has been so far scarcely investigated. This study confirms that in European mink embryo implantation occurs on the day 12 of pregnancy. Progesterone profile during pregnancy has been compared in European mink and domestic ferret. In both species, progesterone increases at peri-implantation period, i. e. on day 8 and day 12 after mating. However, toward the end of pregnancy, on day 40 after mating, progesterone concentration in faeces of the ferrets decreases and does not differ from the initial level. In contrast, increase of progesterone during first 12 days of pregnancy in European mink is not as rapid as in ferrets, but in this species, there is no visible decrease of progesterone at the end of pregnancy. Peak levels of progesterone in faeces (day 8, 12) are lower in European mink than in ferret.

  2. Autoimmune Progesterone Dermatitis Presenting as Stevens-Johnson Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drayer, Sara M; Laufer, Larry R; Farrell, Maureen E

    2017-10-01

    Autoimmune progesterone dermatitis is an uncommon disease presenting with cyclical skin eruptions corresponding with the menstrual cycle luteal phase. Because symptoms are precipitated by rising progesterone levels, treatment relies on hormone suppression. A 22-year-old nulligravid woman presented with symptoms mistaken for Stevens-Johnson syndrome. A cyclic recurrence of her symptoms was noted, and the diagnosis of autoimmune progesterone dermatitis was made by an intradermal progesterone challenge. After 48 months, she remained refractory to medical management and definitive surgical treatment with bilateral oophorectomy was performed. Autoimmune progesterone dermatitis is a challenging diagnosis owing to its rarity and variety of clinical presentations. Treatment centers on suppression of endogenous progesterone and avoidance of exogenous triggers. When these modalities fail, surgical management must be undertaken.

  3. The Positive Impact of Negative Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    model (FRLM), depicted in Figure 2, is one of the most widely studied leadership theories since the mid-1980s ( Northouse , 2007). This approach is...Psychology, 79(4), 506–517 (1994). Northouse , Peter G. Leadership Theory and Practice. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, 2007. Nowack

  4. The benefits of progesterone therapy in imminent abortion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Abadi

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The causes of imminent abortion are multi-factorial. The biggest causal factor is the low level of serum progesterone level. The lowest critical level of serum progesterone for survivability of pregnancy is 10 ng/ml. Eighty percent of patients experiencing abortion showed that their progesterone level was < 10 ng/ml. Patients who realized that their pregnancy would experience hemorrhage generally would suffer from depression. Stress was one of the factors responsible for the occurence of abortion. Administration of natural progesterone substitution (not  progestogen accelerates the disappearance of uterine contractions, and speeds up the stoppage of bleeding. In addition, progesterone has the effect of anti-anxiety. Adminstration of oral progesterone would result in metabolism in the intestine and liver, such that physiological level of serum progesterone could not be reached, while administration of suppositoria progesterone would result in physiological level of serum, such that it was effective to prevent imminent abortion. (Med J Indones 2005; 14:258-62Keywords: progesterone, imminent abortion

  5. MicroRNA dysregulation in response to RARβ2 inhibition reveals a negative feedback loop between MicroRNAs 1, 133a, and RARβ2 during tail and spinal cord regeneration in the adult newt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepp, Amanda C; Carlone, Robert L

    2015-12-01

    The molecular events underlying epimorphic regeneration of the adult urodele amphibian tail and caudal spinal cord are undetermined. Given the dynamic nature of gene expression control by retinoic acid (RA) signaling and the pleiotropic effects of microRNAs (miRNAs) on multiple mRNA targets in this complex system, we examined whether RA signaling through a specific receptor, RARβ2, alters expression of select miRNAs during spinal cord regeneration. An initial screen identified 18 highly conserved miRNAs dysregulated in regenerating tail and spinal cord tissues after inhibition of RARβ2 signaling with a selective antagonist, LE135. miRNAs let-7c, miR-1, and miR-223 were expressed within the ependymoglial cells, coincident spatially with the expression of RARβ2. Altering the expression pattern of these three miRNAs led to a significant inhibition of caudal ependymal tube outgrowth by 21 days post tail amputation. We demonstrated that miR-1 targets the 3'-untranslated region of RARβ2 mRNA in vitro; and in vivo, up-regulation of miR-1 led to a significant decrease in RARβ2 protein. These and previous data suggest that miR-1 and miR-133a, both members of the same miRNA gene cluster, may participate with RARβ2 in a negative feedback loop contributing to the regulation of the ependymal response after tail amputation. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Inverse Relationship between Progesterone Receptor and Myc in Endometrial Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamar Kavlashvili

    Full Text Available Endometrial cancer, the most common gynecologic malignancy, is a hormonally-regulated disease. Response to progestin therapy positively correlates with hormone receptor expression, in particular progesterone receptor (PR. However, many advanced tumors lose PR expression. We recently reported that the efficacy of progestin therapy can be significantly enhanced by combining progestin with epigenetic modulators, which we term "molecularly enhanced progestin therapy." What remained unclear was the mechanism of action and if estrogen receptor α (ERα, the principle inducer of PR, is necessary to restore functional expression of PR via molecularly enhanced progestin therapy. Therefore, we modeled advanced endometrial tumors that have lost both ERα and PR expression by generating ERα-null endometrial cancer cell lines. CRISPR-Cas9 technology was used to delete ERα at the genomic level. Our data demonstrate that treatment with a histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi was sufficient to restore functional PR expression, even in cells devoid of ERα. Our studies also revealed that HDACi treatment results in marked downregulation of the oncogene Myc. We established that PR is a negative transcriptional regulator of Myc in endometrial cancer in the presence or absence of ERα, which is in contrast to studies in breast cancer cells. First, estrogen stimulation augmented PR expression and decreased Myc in endometrial cancer cell lines. Second, progesterone increased PR activity yet blunted Myc mRNA and protein expression. Finally, overexpression of PR by adenoviral transduction in ERα-null endometrial cancer cells significantly decreased expression of Myc and Myc-regulated genes. Analysis of the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA database of endometrial tumors identified an inverse correlation between PR and Myc mRNA levels, with a corresponding inverse correlation between PR and Myc downstream transcriptional targets SRD5A1, CDK2 and CCNB1. Together, these data

  7. Hvad siger forskningen om feedback?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holdt Christensen, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Feedback skal serveres ligesom en gammeldags sandwich. Først lidt brød, så det lidt sejere kød og til sidst igen til lidt brød”. Sådan nogenlunde lyder en pragmatisk løsning på udfordringerne ved at give feedback. Når medarbejdere skal have negativ feedback, skal denne altså pakkes ind, så feedb...... feedbacken indledes med let fordøjeligt positiv feedback, derefter kommer den negative – og noget sværere fordøjelige – feedback, og til sidst afrundes feedbacken med en god udgangsreplik, nemlig den positive feedback.......”Feedback skal serveres ligesom en gammeldags sandwich. Først lidt brød, så det lidt sejere kød og til sidst igen til lidt brød”. Sådan nogenlunde lyder en pragmatisk løsning på udfordringerne ved at give feedback. Når medarbejdere skal have negativ feedback, skal denne altså pakkes ind, så...

  8. Feedback, Incentives and Peer Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Tor Viking; Poulsen, Anders; Villeval, Marie Claire

    . The pay schemes are a piece rate payment scheme and a winner takes-all tournament. We find that the principal should not provide any information on relative  performance, regardless of the pay scheme used, since feedback does not improve performance. Indeed, we do not find evidence of positive peer...... effects in the piece-rate pay scheme. In both pay schemes, interim feedback generates negative quality peer effects on the less able performers. We find however evidence of positive peer effects in the tournament scheme since the underdogs almost never quit the competition even when lagging significantly......This paper experimentally investigates the impact of different pay and relative performance information policies on employee effort. We explore three information policies: No feedback, feedback given halfway through the production period, and continuously updated feedback about relative performance...

  9. Local effect of progesterone infusion into the porcine ovarian artery on androgen and estrogen secretion during the middle luteal phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasowska, Barbara; Stefańczyk-Krzymowska, Stanisława

    2009-07-01

    The present study was undertaken to elucidate whether an increased, but physiological, amount of progesterone (P(4)) supplied to the porcine corpus luteum (CL) affects luteal secretion of androgens and estrogens in freely moving gilts. On day 9 of the estrous cycle, the jugular veins as well as both ovarian arteries and both ovarian veins of gilts were cannulated. Progesterone was infused into the right ovarian arteries of experimental gilts (n=5) on days 10, 11 and 12 of the estrous cycle at a rate adequate to physiological retrograde transfer found during the middle luteal phase of the cycle. The left ovarian arteries of the experimental gilts were infused with saline. Both ovarian arteries of the control gilts (n=5) were infused with saline. The P(4) infusion rate was 0.62 microg/min (10 day), 2x0.62 microg/min (11 day) and 3x0.62 microg/min (12 day). Blood samples were collected from the jugular vein and both ovarian veins of the experimental and control gilts on days 10-12 of the estrous cycle before and after P(4) or saline infusion. The mean plasma androstenedione (A(4)) level in the ovarian vein ipsilateral to the P(4)-infused ovary was higher (pgilts as well as the control gilts. The ovarian venous level of testosterone (T) in the ovarian vein ipsilateral to the P(4)-infused ovary on days 10-12 of the estrous cycle was not significantly different (p>0.05) from those found in the contralateral ovarian vein of the experimental gilts and ovarian vein of the control gilts. However, on day 12, a decrease in T concentration was demonstrated in the ovarian vein ipsilateral to the P4-infused ovary in comparison to those of the contralateral and control ovarian veins. The mean plasma 17beta-estradiol (E(2)) level in the ovarian vein ipsilateral to the P(4)-infused ovary was lower on days 10-12 than those found in the contralateral ovarian vein of the experimental gilts and in the ovarian vein of the control gilts (pfeedback for A(4) secretion and a negative

  10. Sex steroid induced negative mood may be explained by the paradoxical effect mediated by GABAA modulators.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andreen, L.; Nyberg, S.; Turkmen, S.; Wingen, G.A. van; Fernandez, G.S.E.; Backstrom, T.

    2009-01-01

    Certain women experience negative mood symptoms as a result of progesterone during the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle, progestagens in hormonal contraceptives, or the addition of progesterone or progestagens in sequential hormone therapy (HT). This phenomenon is believed to be mediated via the

  11. Progesterone supplementation in women with otherwise unexplained recurrent miscarriages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munawar Hussain

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Recurrent miscarriages, the loss of three or more consecutive intrauterine pregnancies before 20 weeks of gestation with the same partner, affect 1%-1.5% of the pregnant population. The inadequate secretion of progesterone in early pregnancy has been proposed as a cause of recurrent miscarriages. Aims: The aim was to investigate the efficacy of progesterone supplementation in patients with unexplained recurrent miscarriages. Settings And Design: This was a 9-year cohort study of women with otherwise unexplained recurrent miscarriages who attended a recurrent miscarriage clinic in a tertiary care university hospital. Subjects and Methods: Women with at least three unexplained recurrent miscarriages were included in the study. They were divided into three groups according to their initial and 48-h repeat progesterone levels. For women with inadequate endogenous progesterone secretion, natural progesterone vaginal pessaries 400 mg 12-hourly were offered until 12 weeks gestation. Statistical Analysis: Proportions and 95% confidence intervals calculated for categorical variables and the chi-square test were used to show statistical significance. Medians and ranges were calculated for noncontinuous variables. Results: Pregnancy cycles (n = 203 were analyzed to examine the miscarriage rate following progesterone supplementation. Overall live birth and miscarriage rates were 63% and 36%, respectively. When analyzed by the number of previous miscarriages there was a reduction in the miscarriage rate following progesterone supplementation in women with 4 previous miscarriages when compared with historical data. Conclusions: Progesterone supplementation may have beneficial effects in women with otherwise unexplained recurrent miscarriages.

  12. Perspectives for on-site monitoring of progesterone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Posthuma-Trumpie, G.A.; Amerongen, van A.; Korf, J.; Berkel, van W.J.H.

    2009-01-01

    The steroid hormone progesterone is the primary biomarker of the reproductive status of female mammals. Current techniques of monitoring progesterone are based predominantly on (enzyme) immunoassays, but these are too expensive to be affordable in daily screening programmes because of their

  13. Progesterone profiles of postpartum dairy cows as an aid to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    mining the concentration of progesterone in milk samples. (Laing & Heap, 1971; Darling, Laing & Harkness, 1974). The rapid measurement of progesterone in milk using a semi-automated radioimmunoassay (RIA) is now a well established technique for pregnancy diagnosis in dairy cows. (Booth & Holdsworth, 1976).

  14. Progesterone, Estradiol and their Receptors in Leiomyomata and the

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Estradiol and progesterone binding in uterine leiomyomata and in normal uterine tissues. Obstetrics and. Gynaecology. 1980; 55: 4-20. 4. Jorge RP, Edgrad C, Jacques G,. Christine V, Bernard S and Albert N. Effect of Decapeptyl, an agonist analog of GnRH on estrogens, estrogen sulfates, and progesterone receptors in.

  15. Diagnosis of pregnancy in dairy cows based on the progesterone ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A linear discriminant function (LDF) was used to estimate the level of milk progesterone which allowed the best overall classification of dairy cows into pregnant and non-pregnant groups (confirmed by rectal palpation). Progesterone levels were measured in milk samples drawn between 20 and 24 days after insemination.

  16. A Randomized Trial of Progesterone in Women with Recurrent Miscarriages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coomarasamy, Arri; Williams, Helen; Truchanowicz, Ewa; Seed, Paul T; Small, Rachel; Quenby, Siobhan; Gupta, Pratima; Dawood, Feroza; Koot, Yvonne E M; Bender Atik, Ruth; Bloemenkamp, Kitty W M; Brady, Rebecca; Briley, Annette L; Cavallaro, Rebecca; Cheong, Ying C; Chu, Justin J; Eapen, Abey; Ewies, Ayman; Hoek, Annemieke; Kaaijk, Eugenie M; Koks, Carolien A M; Li, Tin-Chiu; MacLean, Marjory; Mol, Ben W; Moore, Judith; Ross, Jackie A; Sharpe, Lisa; Stewart, Jane; Vaithilingam, Nirmala; Farquharson, Roy G; Kilby, Mark D; Khalaf, Yacoub; Goddijn, Mariette; Regan, Lesley; Rai, Rajendra

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Progesterone is essential for the maintenance of pregnancy. However, whether progesterone supplementation in the first trimester of pregnancy would increase the rate of live births among women with a history of unexplained recurrent miscarriages is uncertain. METHODS: We conducted a

  17. Carbopol-based gels for nasal delivery of progesterone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathnam, Grace; Narayanan, N; Ilavarasan, R

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the nasal absorption of progesterone from carbopol-based nasal gels in rabbits. Progesterone nasal gels were prepared by dispersing carbopol 974 (1%, 1.5%, and 2%) in distilled water followed by addition of progesterone/progesterone-beta cyclodextrin complex dissolved in propylene glycol then neutralization. The potential use of beta cyclodextrin (CD) as nasal absorption enhancer by simple addition, as a physical mixture and as a complex with progesterone was investigated. The absolute bioavailability of progesterone from nasal gels in rabbits was studied by estimating the serum progesterone level by competitive solid-phase enzyme immunoassay in comparison to intravenous injection. The carbopol gel formulations produced a significant increase in bioavailability. CD complex promotes the nasal absorption of progesterone from carbopol gels as compared with gels where the CD is added by simple addition and gels which do not contain CD. This method of addition of CD as an inclusion complex in the gels could be considered as a preferred platform in nasal drug administration.

  18. Effect of Progesterone Therapy versus Diet Modification on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of Progesterone Therapy versus Diet Modification on Constipation during Pregnancy. ... Aim: To compare the effect of progesterone versus diet modification in the treatment of constipation during pregnancy. Subjects and Methods: ... A randomized placebo controlled trial is required to confirm the data of this study.

  19. Progesterone, selected heavy metals and micronutrients in pregnant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Environmental and endocrine factors have been implicated in the aetiology of recurrent abortion, with poorly understood roles. Luteal phase insufficiency marked with insufficient progesterone secretion has been reported. Objective: To define the involvement of progesterone, trace metals, and Vitamin E in ...

  20. Diagnosis of pregnancy in dairy cows based on the progesterone ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two of the many factors which may affect the accuracy of pregnancy diagnosis using milk progesterone levels are day of sampling and number of samples taken per cow. These two aspects were analysed using information obtained from progesterone profiles encompassing 359 pregnancy tests. Where a single sample was ...

  1. Seasonal contributions to climate feedbacks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colman, R. [Bureau of Meteorology Research Centre, GPO Box 1289K, Melbourne, VIC (Australia)

    2003-05-01

    Heading Abstract. This study addresses the question: how do the contributions to feedbacks in a climate model vary over the seasonal cycle? To answer this the feedbacks are evaluated from an equilibrium doubled CO{sub 2} experiment performed using the Bureau of Meteorology Research Centre (BMRC) General Circulation Model. Monthly means of the top-of-atmosphere radiative perturbations (which together comprise the annual climate feedbacks) are extracted to produce a mean annual cycle. It is found that the radiative contributions to the total longwave (LW) feedback are fairly constant throughout the year. Those to the total shortwave (SW) feedback, on the other hand, vary by a factor of three, from a maximum in July to a minimum in November. Of the LW feedbacks, contributions to the lapse rate shows greatest seasonal variation, while those to water vapour and cloud feedbacks vary by relatively small amounts throughout the year. Contributions to the lapse rate feedback as a function of surface type and latitude reveal conflicting positive and negative radiative perturbations, which vary most strongly at high latitudes. Of the SW feedbacks, contributions to both albedo and cloud show large seasonal variations. Radiative perturbations contributing to albedo feedback vary in strength with snow and sea-ice retreat which occurs at different latitudes and in different months. They are shown to be highly sensitive to the amount of incident solar radiation in a given month. SW radiative perturbations due to cloud changes vary in sign between opposite seasons. Contributions to the seasonal variations of the cloud component feedbacks, which make up the total cloud feedback, are also examined. In the LW, the feedback is dominated by the total cloud water term. Radiative perturbations due to this component show relatively little variation throughout the year. In the SW, the main source of seasonal variation occurs for contributions to the cloud amount feedback: radiative

  2. Clinicopathological comparison of triple negative breast cancers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Key words: Basal subtype, estrogen receptor, hormone receptors, human epidermal growth factor receptor‑2/neu, progesterone receptor, triple negative. Date of Acceptance: 10‑Nov‑2014. Introduction. Breast cancer is by far the most frequent cancer among women worldwide with an estimated 1.38 million new cases of ...

  3. Progesterone withdrawal I: pro-convulsant effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, M H; Smith, S S

    1998-10-05

    Pro-convulsant withdrawal properties have been reported for a variety of GABA-modulatory drugs, such as the benzodiazepines (BDZs, [S.E. File, The history of BDZ dependence: a review of animal studies, Neurosci. Biobehav. Rev. 14 (1990) 135-146; P.R. Finley, P. E. Nolan, Precipitation of BDZ withdrawal following sudden discontinuation of midazolam, DICP 23 (1989) 151-152]), barbiturates and ethanol [N. Kokka, D.E. Sapp, U. Witte, R.W. Olsen, Sex differences in sensitivity to pentylenetetrazol but not in GABAA receptor binding, Pharm. Biochem. Behav. 43 (1992) 441-447]. In this report, we test the hypothesis that pro-convulsant effects are produced by withdrawal from the GABA-modulatory neurosteroid 3alpha-OH-5alpha-pregnan-20-one (3alpha,5alpha-THP) after sustained exposure to elevated circulating levels of its parent compound progesterone (P). Seizure activity was precipitated by picrotoxin or with the BDZ inverse agonist n-methyl-beta-carboline-3-carboxamide (beta-CC), and a seizure rating determined 24 h after abrupt discontinuation of P following a multiple withdrawal/chronic administration paradigm. In some cases, a pseudopregnant rat model was employed to produce increased ovarian production of P prior to withdrawal (ovariectomy). Rats undergoing P withdrawal exhibited greater seizure-like activity than vehicle-treated controls, and received seizure scores in the same range as rats undergoing BDZ withdrawal. Administration of a 5alpha-reductase blocker, MK-906, along with P, prevented this pro-convulsant effect of P withdrawal, suggesting that the GABA-modulatory 3alpha,5alpha-THP is the active compound responsible for this withdrawal effect. Combined administration of P and diazepam produced synergistic effects upon withdrawal and produced a seizure score higher than observed after withdrawal from either agent alone. These results suggest that P exhibits withdrawal properties via the neuroactive steroid 3alpha, 5alpha-THP, that include exacerbation of

  4. Scientific Message Translation and the Heuristic Systematic Model: Insights for Designing Educational Messages About Progesterone and Breast Cancer Risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitt, Rose; Perrault, Evan; Smith, Sandi; Keating, David M; Nazione, Samantha; Silk, Kami; Russell, Jessica

    2016-06-01

    Results of ongoing scientific research on environmental determinants of breast cancer are not typically presented to the public in ways they can easily understand and use to take preventive actions. In this study, results of scientific studies on progesterone exposure as a risk factor for breast cancer were translated into high and low literacy level messages. Using the heuristic systematic model, this study examined how ability, motivation, and message processing (heuristic and systematic) influenced perceptions of risk beliefs and negative attitudes about progesterone exposure among women who read the translated scientific messages. Among the 1254 participants, those given the higher literacy level message had greater perceptions of risk about progesterone. Heuristic message cues of source credibility and perceived message quality, as well as motivation, also predicted risk beliefs. Finally, risk beliefs were a strong predictor of negative attitudes about exposure to progesterone. The results can help improve health education message design in terms of practitioners having better knowledge of message features that are the most persuasive to the target audiences on this topic.

  5. Sera of patients with recurrent miscarriages containing anti-trophoblast antibodies (ATAB) reduce hCG and progesterone production in trophoblast cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Schönfeldt, Viktoria; Rogenhofer, Nina; Ruf, Katharina; Thaler, Christian J; Jeschke, Udo

    2016-09-01

    Reproductive failure including RM has been suggested to correlate with antibodies that cross react with HLA-negative syncytiotrophoblasts and we have reported that 17% of women with 2 or more miscarriages and 34% of women with 3 or more miscarriages express anti-trophoblast antibodies (ATAB). Until now, the mechanism, how ATAB interfere with pregnancy success is not known. HCG and progesterone both play fundamental roles in supporting human pregnancy. Therefore we investigated the effects of sera of RM patients containing ATAB on the hCG and progesterone production of cells of the choriocarcinoma cell line JEG-3. In vitro study to investigate effects of patient sera with and without ATAB on hCG and progesterone secretion of JEG-3 cells. The presence of ATAB was detected as described earlier. Effects of sera from ATAB positive and ATAB negative RM patients on hCG and progesterone secretion by JEG-3 cells were analysed 12 and 24h after plating. Sera of women without pregnancy pathologies served as controls. Sera of ATAB-positive RM patients significantly inhibit hCG secretion of JEG-3 cells for 12h after plating compared to sera of healthy controls (p=0.019) and significantly reduce progesterone production for 12h (p=0.046) and 24h (p=0.027) of co-culture. Sera of ATAB-negative RM patient show no significant effect on progesterone secretion. Inhibition of hCG and progesterone production might point to a mechanism, how ATAB interfere with early pregnancies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Using Feedback to Promote Physical Activity: The Role of the Feedback Sign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Jan-Niklas; Kowatsch, Tobias

    2017-06-02

    Providing feedback is a technique to promote health behavior that is emphasized by behavior change theories. However, these theories make contradicting predictions regarding the effect of the feedback sign-that is, whether the feedback signals success or failure. Thus, it is unclear whether positive or negative feedback leads to more favorable behavior change in a health behavior intervention. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of the feedback sign in a health behavior change intervention. Data from participants (N=1623) of a 6-month physical activity intervention was used. Participants received a feedback email at the beginning of each month. Feedback was either positive or negative depending on the participants' physical activity in the previous month. In an exploratory analysis, change in monthly step count averages was used to evaluate the feedback effect. The feedback sign did not predict the change in monthly step count averages over the course of the intervention (b=-84.28, P=.28). Descriptive differences between positive and negative feedback can be explained by regression to the mean. The feedback sign might not influence the effect of monthly feedback emails sent out to participants of a large-scale physical activity intervention. However, randomized studies are needed to further support this conclusion. Limitations as well as opportunities for future research are discussed.

  7. Luteolytic efficiency of reduced doses of cloprostenol in the ewe. Effect of progesterone concentrations at the time of treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granados-Villarreal, Luz María; Zarco, Luis; Mejía, Octavio; Sánchez-Torres, María Teresa; Pablos-Hach, José Luis

    2017-11-01

    Seventy six ewes were treated with 7.5, 12.5, 25 or 50μg of cloprostenol on day 6 or 9 post-estrus to compare the luteolytic efficiency of the PGF2α analogue at each stage and to evaluate if progesterone concentrations at the time of treatment affect such efficiency. Blood samples were obtained before cloprostenol administration and 12, 24, 48, and 72h thereafter. There was an effect of dose (p<0.05) but not of day post-estrus on the proportion of animals completing luteolysis. As the dose increased, the proportion of ewes completing luteolysis also increased. Also, as the dose increased from 7.5 to 25μg, more ewes showed a transient progesterone decline instead of an absence of response, indicating that in some ewes reduced doses initiated luteolysis but were not able to finish the process. Since the dose of 25μg resulted in close to 50% luteolytic efficacy, this group was used to study the effects of progesterone concentrations at the time of treatment on the response to cloprostenol. Pre-treatment progesterone concentrations were higher (p<0.01) in ewes experiencing luteolytic failure than in those that completed luteolysis. There was a negative correlation between initial progesterone concentrations and their reduction by 12h post-treatment. It is concluded that high progesterone concentrations are associated with a reduction in sensitivity to small doses of cloprostenol. Possible mechanisms and implications of this luteoprotective effect are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Elevated progesterone in GnRH agonist down regulated in vitro fertilisation (IVFICSI) cycles reduces live birth rates but not embryo quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahoud, Robert; Kwik, Michele; Ryan, John; Al-Jefout, Moamar; Foley, Jane; Illingworth, Peter

    2012-02-01

    To assess the impact of pre-hCG elevated progesterone on live birth outcomes during GnRH agonist long down regulated protocol assisted reproduction cycles. Retrospective cohort study. Single Centre Private IVF Clinic. A total of 582 consecutive cycles of IVF/ICSI in 2003. All patients underwent a long down-regulation protocol, controlled ovarian stimulation and IVF/ICSI. Serum progesterone concentrations were measured just prior to HCG administration. 253 patients were followed to 2009 for outcomes of their frozen embryo cycles. Live birth rate in fresh and frozen cycles. Patients in the upper quartile pre-hCG progesterone concentration (≥ 5.4 pmol/L) had a higher final estradiol level, more oocytes collected and more usable embryos, when compared to those with lower quartiles. They also had lower live birth rates per cycle started (21.9% vs. 15%, P live birth rates from frozen embryo cycles were not significantly different between the groups. Pre-hCG progesterone elevation leads to lower live birth rates in stimulated IVF cycles. Live birth rates achieved with frozen embryos in the high progesterone cycles suggest, that pre-hCG progesterone elevation negatively affects endometrial receptivity without adversely affecting embryo quality.

  9. Radioimmunoassay for progesterone in human saliva during the menstrual cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luisi, M.; Franchi, F.; Kicovic, P.M.; Silvestri, D.; Cossu, G.; Catarsi, A.L.; Barletta, D.; Gasperi, M. (Pisa Univ. (Italy))

    1981-10-01

    A sensitive, specific and accurate radioimmunoassay of progesterone in human saliva is described, using /sup 3/H. The assay had a sensitivity of 8 pg/tube and blanks were negligible. The intra- and inter-assay coefficients of variation were 5.2 and 9.4%, respectively. The mean recovery from 60 samples was 93.2 +- 6.3%. Results obtained from nine healthy, normally menstruating women showed that salivary progesterone rose from the 4th day before ovulation to a mean peak (+- SD) of 1.14 +- 0.17 ng/ml on the 8th day after ovulation, followed by a gradual decline. Correlation of salivary and simultaneously obtained plasma progesterone levels was good (r = 0.47; P < 0.001), although the maximum percent increase in salivary progesterone was more than 10 times greater than that of plasma progesterone. Salivary progesterone is thought to reflect the unbound fraction of plasma progesterone and this non-invasive technique can be used for serial investigations in which frequent samplings are required.

  10. Progesterone and Mental Rotation Task: Is There Any Effect?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donatas Noreika

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mental rotation task (MRT incorporates elements of spatial abilities, important in many professions, with people of both genders involved. Importantly, these are the areas where spatial tasks might be performed for long time periods; thus adverse effects of mental fatigue are highly unwanted. Substantial variation of MRT performance in relation to estrogen levels has been observed in many studies, whereas the role of progesterone remains elusive. Here we aimed to elucidate the effect of progesterone level on the long-duration (1.5 hours performance of MRT. We included three groups of subjects: a group of males as a control, a group of females in their follicular phase (low progesterone and a group of females in their luteal phase (high progesterone, MRT accuracy and response time, subjective fatigue ratings and cardiovascular measures together with 17β-estradiol and progesterone concentrations were analyzed. We found that subjective ratings of fatigue increased, performance accuracy increased, and mean response times decreased during the task in all groups. Females in luteal phase were significantly slower not only than men, but also than females in their follicular phase. An increase in subjective fatigue ratings was positively related to progesterone level—at higher progesterone levels, females felt more tired.

  11. The rebirth of progesterone in the prevention of preterm labor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmouder, Vanessa M; Prescott, Gina M; Franco, Albert; Fan-Havard, Patty

    2013-04-01

    To evaluate data since 2003 on the efficacy and safety of progesterone supplementation in the prevention of preterm labor. A MEDLINE and Ovid database search (January 2003-September 2012) was performed using the search terms preterm, progesterone, and 17α-hydroxyprogesterone caproate. All relevant abstracts were reviewed. For efficacy and safety data, the search was limited to randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials with the primary outcome of preterm delivery, fetal loss, or neonatal morbidity or mortality. Quality of the studies was assessed using the CONSORT (Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials) guidelines for reporting parallel-group randomized trials. Eleven articles were selected for review. Preterm birth, prior to 37 weeks' gestation, remains the leading cause of neonatal morbidity and mortality in the US due to lack of treatment options. Recently, the use of progesterone to prevent preterm labor, deemed decades ago to be ineffective, has been reexamined. Progesterone formulations and dosage regimens varied greatly between studies. In patients with prior preterm birth or shortened cervix shown on transvaginal ultrasound, progesterone appears efficacious in reducing the rate of preterm birth. However, this benefit was not demonstrated in multiple-gestation pregnancies. Overall, progesterone was well tolerated and appeared safe for mother and fetus. More studies are needed to confirm the dosage regimen and population that will benefit most from progesterone. Progesterone appears to be safe and efficacious in reducing the risk of preterm birth in a select group of high-risk women with prior spontaneous preterm births and those with an ultrasound-confirmed short cervix. Women with multiple gestations do not benefit from progesterone supplementation.

  12. Prediction of ovulation in women using a rapid progesterone radioimmunoassay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleming, R.; Coults, J.R.T. (Glasgow Univ. (UK))

    1982-02-01

    A rapid (3-h) radioimmunoassay of plasma progesterone has been developed and used successfully to predict the time of ovulation in women undergoing artificial insemination. The results obtained using progesterone levels to date the stage of the cycle were analysed retrospectively by (1) estimation of the length of the ensuing luteal phases and comparison of these with luteal phase lengths of a control group (2) comparison of the dating using progesterone levels with retrospective determination of LH values and (3) by analysis of the dating in cycles in which conception occurred.

  13. Estrogen and Progesterone hormone receptor expression in oral cavity cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, M; Biegner, T; Teriete, P; Hoefert, S; Krimmel, M; Munz, A; Reinert, S

    2016-09-01

    Recent studies have shown an increase in the incidence of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) in younger patients. The hypothesis that tumors could be hormonally induced during pregnancy or in young female patients without the well-known risk factors alcohol or tobacco abuse seems to be plausible. Estrogen Receptor alpha (ERα) and Progesterone Receptor (PR) expression were analyzed in normal oral mucosa (n=5), oral precursor lesions (simple hyperplasia, n=11; squamous intraepithelial neoplasia, SIN I-III, n=35), and OSCC specimen. OSCCs were stratified in a young female (n=7) study cohort and older patients (n=46). In the young female study cohort three patients (n=3/7) developed OSCC during or shortly after pregnancy. Breast cancer tissues were used as positive control for ERα and PR expression. ERα expression was found in four oral precursor lesions (squamous intraepithelial neoplasia, SIN I-III, n=4/35, 11%) and in five OSCC specimen (n=5/46, 11%). The five ERα positive OSCC samples were older male patients. All patients within the young female study cohort were negatively stained for both ERα and PR. ER expression could be regarded as a seldom risk factor for OSCC. PR expression seems to be not relevant for the development of OSCC.

  14. Progesterone modulation of diazepam withdrawal syndrome in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesce, M E; Acevedo, X; Pinardi, G; Miranda, H F

    1996-12-01

    The influence of progesterone and oestrogens on the benzodiazepine withdrawal syndrome in mice was studied. The intraperitoneal administration of 15 mg/kg of flumazenil induced a withdrawal syndrome in chronic diazepam-treated mice, characterized by jerks, usually accompanied by tail lifts, and seizures. The principal finding of the present work is that the intensity of diazepam withdrawal syndrome was significantly reduced by acute administration of progesterone as revealed by a low incidence of jerks and seizures. The action of progesterone could be due to a modulatory role of the hormone on neuronal activity as an anxiolytic agent. The modulatory activity of progesterone appears to be related to changes in the pharmacological properties of benzodiazepine receptors.

  15. Effect of Progesterone Therapy versus Diet Modification on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The pathophysiology underlying functional constipation is undoubtedly, multifactorial, and not well understood. Progressively, rising progesterone and estrogen levels ... Women with endocrine disorders (hypothyroidism),. Hirschsprung's disease, spinal anomalies, anorectal pathology, inflammatory bowel disease, previous.

  16. Progesterone receptor levels independently predict survival in endometrial adenocarcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyholm, H C; Christensen, Ib Jarle; Nielsen, Anette Lynge

    1995-01-01

    Estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) contents were determined by biochemical (dextran charcoal-coated (DCC) assay) and immunohistochemical (ICA) methods in biopsies from 145 primary endometrial adenocarcinomas and those with eligible receptor measurements were analyzed with respect...

  17. Contraception with depot medroxy progesterone acetate (DMPA) in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    , South-South Nigeria. Cosmos E. Enyindah, Faith C. Mmom. Abstract. Clinical experience with depot medroxy progesterone acetate (DMPA) at the family planning clinic of the University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital st st between 1 of ...

  18. Cardiac concomitants of feedback processing.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crone, E.A.; van der Veen, F.M.; van der Molen, M.W.; Somsen, R.J.; van Beek, B.; Jennings, J.R.

    2003-01-01

    This study examined the heart rate changes associated with positive and negative performance feedback in a probabilistic learning task derived from Holroyd and Coles (2002). In this task, 21 20-29 yr old college students were presented with six stimuli and asked to respond by pressing a left versus

  19. Feedback: Breakfast of Champions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justman, Jeffrey J.

    Feedback is an important skill that people need to learn in life. Feedback is crucial in a public speaking class to improve speaking skills. Providing and receiving feedback is what champions feed on to be successful, thus feedback is called the "Breakfast of Champions." Feedback builds speakers' confidence. Providing in-depth feedback…

  20. Distinct cognitive effects of estrogen and progesterone in menopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berent-Spillson, Alison; Briceno, Emily; Pinsky, Alana; Simmen, Angela; Persad, Carol C; Zubieta, Jon-Kar; Smith, Yolanda R

    2015-09-01

    The effects of postmenopausal hormone treatment on cognitive outcomes are inconsistent in the literature. Emerging evidence suggests that cognitive effects are influenced by specific hormone formulations, and that progesterone is more likely to be associated with positive outcomes than synthetic progestin. There are very few studies of unopposed progesterone in postmenopausal women, and none that use functional neuroimaging, a sensitive measure of neurobiological function. In this study of 29 recently postmenopausal women, we used functional MRI and neuropsychological measures to separately assess the effects of estrogen or progesterone treatment on visual and verbal cognitive function. Women were randomized to receive 90 days of either estradiol or progesterone counterbalanced with placebo. After each treatment arm, women were given a battery of verbal and visual cognitive function and working memory tests, and underwent functional MRI including verbal processing and visual working memory tasks. We found that both estradiol and progesterone were associated with changes in activation patterns during verbal processing. Compared to placebo, women receiving estradiol treatment had greater activation in the left prefrontal cortex, a region associated with verbal processing and encoding. Progesterone was associated with changes in regional brain activation patterns during a visual memory task, with greater activation in the left prefrontal cortex and right hippocampus compared to placebo. Both treatments were associated with a statistically non-significant increase in number of words remembered following the verbal task performed during the fMRI scanning session, while only progesterone was associated with improved neuropsychological measures of verbal working memory compared to placebo. These results point to potential cognitive benefits of both estrogen and progesterone. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Paraquat inhibits progesterone synthesis in human placental mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milczarek, Ryszard; Sokołowska, Ewa; Rybakowska, Iwona; Kaletha, Krystian; Klimek, Jerzy

    2016-07-01

    Human placenta mitochondria produces huge amounts of progesterone necessary for maintaining the pregnancy. Lipid peroxidation in human placental mitochondria inhibits progesterone synthesis and that inhibition can be reversed by superoxide dismutase and other antioxidants. Paraquat (PQ) a highly toxic herbicide generates superoxide radical inside cells and induces lipid peroxidation. Hence, it is supposed to stimulate lipid peroxidation in human placental mitochondria and in consequence to inhibit a placental mitochondrial steroidogenesis. Placentas were obtained from normal pregnancies. All experiments were done using isolated human placental mitochondria. Mitochondrial lipid peroxidation was determined as tiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS). A conversion of cholesterol to pregnenolone or pregnenolone to progesterone was measured using radiolabeled steroids and thin layer chromatography. PQ enhanced the iron-dependent lipid peroxidation as also PQ heightened the inhibitory action of this process on progesterone synthesis in isolated human placental mitochondria. Paradoxically, a superoxide dismutase (SOD) reversed the inhibition of progesterone synthesis only minimally although it strongly inhibited PQ stimulated iron-dependent lipid peroxidation. When iron was absent, PQ stimulated only negligible lipid peroxidation but strongly inhibited progesterone synthesis. SOD had no effect on inhibition of progesterone synthesis by PQ. PQ strongly inhibited of the conversion of cholesterol to pregnenolone but had not got any influence on the enzymatic activity of mitochondrial 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase. PQ strongly decreased the efficiency of NADPH-dependent cytochrome P450 reduction as well as it promoted the rapid oxidation of the pre-reduced mitochondrial cytochrome P450. However PQ has not inhibited combined activity of adrenodoxin reductase and adrenodoxin. We conclude that the most important reason of the inhibition of progesterone synthesis by PQ

  2. A case of autoimmune progesterone dermatitis in an adolescent female.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakarla, Nirupama; Zurawin, Robert K

    2006-04-01

    Progesterone-induced dermatitis is a rare disorder. It typically occurs in females due to an autoimmune phenomenon to endogenous progesterone production, but can also be caused by exogenous intake of a synthetic progestin. Here, we present a case of autoimmune progesterone dermatitis (AIPD) seen in an adolescent female. The patient is a 15-year-old Caucasian female with no significant past medical history and no prior exogenous hormone use, who presented to her primary care physician complaining of cyclic skin eruptions. She noted that her dermatologic symptoms occurred monthly, just prior to her menses. An intradermal skin test using 0.1 cc of progesterone was performed. The patient immediately developed a wheal, confirming the diagnosis of AIPD. The patient was begun on a continuous regimen of an oral contraceptive pill with 30 micrograms of ethinyl estradiol and 0.15 mg of levonorgestrel. The skin eruptions have not returned since the initiation of this therapy. Autoimmune progesterone dermatitis manifests via the occurrence of cyclic skin eruptions. Women with the disorder commonly present with dermatologic lesions in the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle. Diagnosis of AIPD is confirmed by performing a skin allergen test using progesterone. Due to its rarity, AIPD should be considered a diagnosis of exclusion. In cases believed to be due to an endogenous production of progesterone, several methods of therapy have been attempted. The ultimate goal of therapy is the suppression of ovulation, which will prevent endogenous hormone production as progesterone is only produced in ovulatory cycles. Currently, the first-line choice of therapy is a combination oral contraceptive. If this treatment is ineffective, patients have been treated with danazol, gonadotropin releasing hormone analogs, tamoxifen, and oophorectomy with varying success.

  3. The role of progesterone in prevention of preterm birth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jodie M Dodd

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Jodie M Dodd, Caroline A CrowtherDiscipline of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia, AustraliaAbstract: Preterm birth continues to provide an enormous challenge in the delivery of perinatal health care, and is associated with considerable short and long-term health consequences for surviving infants. Progesterone has a role in maintaining pregnancy, by suppression of the calcium–calmodulin–myosin light chain kinase system. Additionally, progesterone has recognized anti-inflammatory properties, raising a possible link between inflammatory processes, alterations in progesterone receptor expression and the onset of preterm labor. Systematic reviews of randomized controlled trials evaluating the use of intramuscular and vaginal progesterone in women considered to be at increased risk of preterm birth have been published, with primary outcomes of perinatal death, preterm birth <34 weeks, and neurodevelopmental handicap in childhood. Eleven randomized controlled trials were included in the systematic review, involving 2714 women and 3452 infants, with results presented according to the reason women were considered to be at increased risk of preterm birth. While there is a potential beneficial effect in the use of progesterone for some women considered to be at increased risk of preterm birth, primarily in the reduction in the risk of preterm birth before 34 weeks gestation, it remains unclear if the observed prolongation of pregnancy translates into improved health outcomes for the infant.Keywords: progesterone, preterm birth, systematic review, randomized trial

  4. Determination of estriol, estradiol, estrone, and progesterone in cosmetic products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubinger, Jean C

    2015-01-01

    This report describes the development and validation of a reverse phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method with UV detection for the determination of the hormones estriol, estradiol, estrone, and progesterone in topically applied products. The developed method was then used to conduct a postmarket survey of consumer products for these hormones. Each product was first mixed with Celite and then extracted with methanol. Extracts were cleaned on a Waters Oasis HLB solid phase extraction cartridge, and then analyzed using reversed phase HPLC. The analytes were separated using an Agilent Zorbax Eclipse XDB C8 (5 μm, 250 mm by 4.6 mm) analytical column and detected by their absorbance at 230 nm. Chromatographic separation was achieved by a 1.0-ml/min linear gradient from 30% acetonitrile and 70% water to 80% acetonitrile and 20% water over 30 min. A final 5 min hold time and a re-equilibration time of 10 min were used to prepare the column for subsequent analysis. Recovery from two different brand lotions spiked with three different levels of estriol, estradiol, estrone, and progesterone ranged from 81.8% to 101%. In this study, a total of 70 cosmetic products were surveyed. Twenty two (63%) of the 35 products were labeled as containing an estrogen and/ or progesterone and also provided quantitative label information about the hormone ingredient. The most frequently labeled hormones were progesterone (66%), estriol (46%), estradiol (11%), and estrone (6%). Six products labeled as containing estriol were found to contain estradiol. An estrogen and/or progesterone were found in 34 products at concentrations ranging from 86.0 to 26,800 μg/g. Progesterone was not found in one product labeled as containing this hormone. An additional 35 products, which did not list hormones on their labels, were analyzed and estrogen or progesterone was not detected in these products.

  5. Evaluation of clinical evidences for progesterone therapy in catamenial epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao CHEN

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective To formulate the best treatment plan for catamenial epilepsy patients by evaluating the efficacy and side effect of progesterone therapy via evidence-based medicine.  Methods Catamenial epilepsy, drug therapy, progesterone, allopregnanolone, systematic review and randomized controlled trial (RCT both in Chinese and English were used as retrieval words. Databases including Wanfang Data, VIP, China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI, Cochrane Library, PubMed and Google Scholar were used with applying of manual searching. Systematic reviews, RCTs, open-label trials, prospective and retrospective case analysis, case-observation studies and reviews were collected and evaluated by Jadad Scale.  Results After screening, 18 relevant resources were selected, including one systematic review, 3 RCTs, one open-label trial, 2 prospective case-controlled studies, one follow-up study and 10 reviews. Ten of the articles were evaluated to be high quality (Jadad Scale score ≥ 4, and the other 8 were of low quality (Jadad Scale score < 4. After the efficacy and safety of those clinical studies were evaluated, the results were summarized as follows: 1 progesterone combined with antiepileptic drugs (AEDs was well tolerated and resulted in a significant reduction of seizure frequency in a majority of patients with catamenial epilepsy. 2 Both natural progesterone and synthetic progesterone could be used in the treatment for catamenial epilepsy. 3 There were two ways of progestogen therapy for catamenial epilepsy: cyclical progesterone hormone therapy and suppressive therapy. The former was more commonly used.  Conclusions Using evidence-based medicine evaluation can provide best clinical evidence for the progesterone treatment on catamenial epilepsy. doi: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2014.12.007

  6. Estrogen and progesterone receptor testing in breast carcinoma: concordance of results between local and reference laboratories in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila Cristina Lordelo Wludarski

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Breast cancer accounts for approximately one quarter of all cancers in females. Estrogen and progesterone receptor testing has become an essential part of the clinical evaluation of breast carcinoma patients, and accurate results are critical in identifying patients who may benefit from hormone therapy. The present study had the aim of investigating the concordance of the results from hormone receptor tests between a reference laboratory and local (or community laboratories in Brazil. DESIGN AND SETTING: Retrospective study at a reference pathology laboratory. METHODS: The concordance in the results from hormone receptor tests between a reference laboratory and 146 local laboratories in Brazil was compared in relation to 500 invasive breast carcinoma cases, using immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: There was concordance in 89.4% (447/500 cases and 85.0% (425/500 cases of the results from estrogen (κ = 0.744, P < 0.001 and progesterone (κ = 0.688, P < 0.001 receptor tests, respectively, between local and reference laboratories. This was similar to findings in other countries. The false negative rates from estrogen and progesterone receptor tests in local laboratories were 8.7% and 14.4%, respectively. The false positive rates from estrogen and progesterone receptor tests in local laboratories were 15.5% and 16.0%, respectively. CONCLUSION: Technical and result interpretation issues may explain most of the discordances in hormone receptor testing in local laboratories. Validation of estrogen and progesterone receptor tests at local laboratories, with rigorous quality control measures, is strongly recommended in order to avoid erroneous treatment of breast cancer patients.

  7. Evaluate Risk/Benefit of Nab Paclitaxel in Combination With Gemcitabine and Carboplatin Compared to Gemcitabine and Carboplatin in Triple Negative Metastatic Breast Cancer (or Metastatic Triple Negative Breast Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-05

    Breast Tumor; Breast Cancer; Cancer of the Breast; Estrogen Receptor- Negative Breast Cancer; HER2- Negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor- Negative Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Metastatic Breast Cancer; Metastatic Breast Cancer

  8. On the vertical extent of atmospheric feedbacks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colman, R.A. [Bureau of Meteorology, Melbourne, VIC (Australia). Research Centre

    2001-03-01

    This study addresses the question: what vertical regions contribute the most to water vapor, surface temperature, lapse rate and cloud fraction feedback strengths in a general circulation model? Multi-level offline radiation perturbation calculations are used to diagnose the feedback contribution from each model level. As a first step, to locate regions of maximum radiative sensitivity to climate changes, the top of atmosphere radiative impact for each feedback is explored for each process by means of idealized parameter perturbations on top of a control (1 x CO{sub 2}) model climate. As a second step, the actual feedbacks themselves are calculated using the changes modelled from a 2 x CO{sub 2} experiment. The impact of clouds on water vapor and lapse rate feedbacks is also isolated using 'clear sky' calculations. Considering the idealized changes, it is found that the radiative sensitivity to water vapor changes is a maximum in the tropical lower troposphere. The sensitivity to temperature changes has both upper and lower tropospheric maxima. The sensitivity to idealized cloud changes is positive (warming) for upper level cloud increases but negative (cooling) for lower level increases, due to competing long and shortwave effects. Considering the actual feedbacks, it is found that water vapor feedback is a maximum in the tropical upper troposphere, due to the large relative increases in specific humidity which occur there. The actual lapse rate feedback changes sign with latitude and is a maximum (negative) again in the tropical upper troposphere. Cloud feedbacks reflect the general decrease in low- to mid-level low-latitude cloud, with an increase in the very highest cloud. This produces a net positive (negative) shortwave (longwave) cloud feedback. The role of clouds in the strength of the water vapor and lapse rate feedbacks is also discussed. (orig.)

  9. Skriftlig feedback i engelskundervisningen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Hanne Wacher

    2017-01-01

    The article describes useful feedback strategies in language teaching and describes the feedback practices of lower-seconday teachers in Denmark. The article is aimed at language teahcers in secondary schools.......The article describes useful feedback strategies in language teaching and describes the feedback practices of lower-seconday teachers in Denmark. The article is aimed at language teahcers in secondary schools....

  10. Immunohistochemical Expression of Estrogen and Progesterone Receptors in Epulis Fissuratum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Seyedmajidi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Epulis Fissuratum (Epulis Fissuratum (EF or Denture Epulis or inflammatory fibrous hyperplasia is a common hyperplastic tumor-like lesion with reactive nature, related to loose and ill-fitting, full or partial removable dentures and it is more common in women than men. For this reason, hormonal influences may also play role in its creation. The effect of steroid hormones especially sex hormones (Estrogen and progesterone on oral mucosa is identified in some studies. In the present study, the distribution pattern and presence of estrogen and progesterone receptors in epithelial, stromal, endothelial and inflammatory cells in Epulis Fissuratum was investigated. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was carried out on 30 samples of paraffin blocks with Epulis Fissuratum diagnosis and 30 samples of normal mucosal tissues as a control group who have had surgery as a margin beside the above lesions and had been obtained from the oral and maxillofacial pathology departement of Babol Dental School since 2003 up to 2010. Intensity of staining and immunoreactivity were evaluated using subjective index and considering the positive control group (breast carcinoma.Results: Epithelial, stromal, endothelial and inflammatory cells didn’t show reaction with monoclonal antibodies against estrogen and progesterone in none of the samples. Conclusion: It seems that the hypothesis of the existence of estrogen and progesterone receptors in epulis fissuratum and normal oral mucosa is ruled out. The possibility of direct effect of estrogen and progesterone in occurring of epulis fissuratum is rejected.

  11. Distribution of estrogen and progesterone receptors in Epulis Fissuratum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahrabi Sh.

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Epulides Fissurata (EF are common proliferative and denture- induced lesions of the oral cavity with a predilection for female. This suggests a possible role for sex steroid hormones in the development and progression of these lesions. Purpose: The objective of this study was the immunohistochemical evaluation of epulis fissuratum of the oral cavity for estrogen and progesterone receptors expression in epithelial, stromal, inflammatory and endothelial cells populations. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 15 samples of formalin- fixed, paraffin- embedded epulis fissuratums including marginal mucosal tissues in 4 cases as a control group, were immuno-histochemically evaluated for estrogen and progesterone receptors protein expression. Result: In 10 cases, estrogen receptor positivity was found within the epithelium and progesterone receptor immunoreactivity was present in 7 cases. Stromal cells exhibited estrogen and progesterone receptor immunostaining in many cases but only few cases showed expression of these receptors in the inflammatory and endothelial cells. Estrogen and progesterone receptors were also detected in some cases containing salivary glands tissue. Conclusion: Although chronic irritation may be the initiating factor for the occurence of epulis fissuratum, some of the cells in the lesion, could be potential targets for estrogen and progestrone hormones.

  12. Comparison of pregnancy rates with intramuscular and vaginal progesterone use for luteal phase support in intracytoplasmic sperm injection cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Isikalan

    2016-12-01

    Conclusion: The results of vaginal progesterone administration were similar with the results obtained with intramuscular progesterone. Vaginal progesterone use is a more tolerable method for patients. [Cukurova Med J 2016; 41(4.000: 639-647

  13. False feedback and beliefs influence name recall in younger and older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickland-Hughes, Carla M; West, Robin Lea; Smith, Kimberly A; Ebner, Natalie C

    2017-09-01

    Feedback is an important self-regulatory process that affects task effort and subsequent performance. Benefits of positive feedback for list recall have been explored in research on goals and feedback, but the effect of negative feedback on memory has rarely been studied. The current research extends knowledge of memory and feedback effects by investigating face-name association memory and by examining the potential mediation of feedback effects, in younger and older adults, through self-evaluative beliefs. Beliefs were assessed before and after name recognition and name recall testing. Repeated presentation of false positive feedback was compared to false negative feedback and a no feedback condition. Results showed that memory self-efficacy declined over time for participants in the negative and no feedback conditions but was sustained for those receiving positive feedback. Furthermore, participants who received negative feedback felt older after testing than before testing. For name recall, the positive feedback group outperformed the negative feedback and no feedback groups combined, with no age interactions. The observed feedback-related effects on memory were fully mediated by changes in memory self-efficacy. These findings advance our understanding of how beliefs are related to feedback in memory and inform future studies examining the importance of self-regulation in memory.

  14. AGN feedback in dwarf galaxies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dashyan, Gohar; Silk, Joseph; Mamon, Gary A.; Dubois, Yohan; Hartwig, Tilman

    2018-02-01

    Dwarf galaxy anomalies, such as their abundance and cusp-core problems, remain a prime challenge in our understanding of galaxy formation. The inclusion of baryonic physics could potentially solve these issues, but the efficiency of stellar feedback is still controversial. We analytically explore the possibility of feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in dwarf galaxies and compare AGN and supernova (SN) feedback. We assume the presence of an intermediate-mass black hole within low-mass galaxies and standard scaling relations between the relevant physical quantities. We model the propagation and properties of the outflow and explore the critical condition for global gas ejection. Performing the same calculation for SNe, we compare the ability of AGNs and SNe to drive gas out of galaxies. We find that a critical halo mass exists below which AGN feedback can remove gas from the host halo and that the critical halo mass for an AGN is greater than the equivalent for SNe in a significant part of the parameter space, suggesting that an AGN could provide an alternative and more successful source of negative feedback than SNe, even in the most massive dwarf galaxies.

  15. Mineralocorticoid receptor haplotype, estradiol, progesterone and emotional information processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamstra, Danielle A; de Kloet, E Ronald; Quataert, Ina; Jansen, Myrthe; Van der Does, Willem

    2017-02-01

    Carriers of MR-haplotype 1 and 3 (GA/CG; rs5522 and rs2070951) are more sensitive to the influence of oral contraceptives (OC) and menstrual cycle phase on emotional information processing than MR-haplotype 2 (CA) carriers. We investigated whether this effect is associated with estradiol (E2) and/or progesterone (P4) levels. Healthy MR-genotyped premenopausal women were tested twice in a counterbalanced design. Naturally cycling (NC) women were tested in the early-follicular and mid-luteal phase and OC-users during OC-intake and in the pill-free week. At both sessions E2 and P4 were assessed in saliva. Tests included implicit and explicit positive and negative affect, attentional blink accuracy, emotional memory, emotion recognition, and risky decision-making (gambling). MR-haplotype 2 homozygotes had higher implicit happiness scores than MR-haplotype 2 heterozygotes (p=0.031) and MR-haplotype 1/3 carriers (p<0.001). MR-haplotype 2 homozygotes also had longer reaction times to happy faces in an emotion recognition test than MR-haplotype 1/3 (p=0.001). Practice effects were observed for most measures. The pattern of correlations between information processing and P4 or E2 differed between sessions, as well as the moderating effects of the MR genotype. In the first session the MR-genotype moderated the influence of P4 on implicit anxiety (sr=-0.30; p=0.005): higher P4 was associated with reduction in implicit anxiety, but only in MR-haplotype 2 homozygotes (sr=-0.61; p=0.012). In the second session the MR-genotype moderated the influence of E2 on the recognition of facial expressions of happiness (sr=-0.21; p=0.035): only in MR-haplotype 1/3 higher E2 was correlated with happiness recognition (sr=0.29; p=0.005). In the second session higher E2 and P4 were negatively correlated with accuracy in lag2 trials of the attentional blink task (p<0.001). Thus NC women, compared to OC-users, performed worse on lag 2 trials (p=0.041). The higher implicit happiness scores of MR

  16. A comparison of climate feedbacks in general circulation models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colman, R. [Bureau of Meteorology Research Centre, GPO Box 1289K Melbourne 3001 (Australia)

    2003-05-01

    Heading Abstract. A comparison is performed for water vapour, cloud, albedo and lapse rate feedbacks taken from published results of 'offline' feedback calculations for general circulation models (GCMs) with mixed layer oceans performing 2 x CO{sub 2} and solar perturbation experiments. All feedbacks show substantial inter-model spread. The impact of uncertainties in feedbacks on climate sensitivity is discussed. A negative correlation is found between water vapour and lapse rate feedbacks, and also between longwave and shortwave components of the cloud feedback. The mean values of the feedbacks are compared with results derived from model intercomparisons which evaluated cloud forcing derived feedbacks under idealized climate forcing. Results are found to be comparable between the two approaches, after allowing for differences in experimental technique and diagnostic method. Recommendations are made for the future reporting of climate feedbacks. (orig.)

  17. Evidence that exposure to progesterone alone is a sufficient stimulus to cause a precipitous rise in the immunomodulatory protein the progesterone induced blocking factor (PIBF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Rachael A; Check, Jerome H; Dougherty, Michael P

    2016-02-01

    To determine if exposure to progesterone alone is sufficient to increase the production of the immunomodulatory protein known as the progesterone induced blocking factor (PIBF). Also to determine what method of progesterone delivery or form of P best stimulates PIBF secretion. Serum samples from patients with infertility and paid volunteers were evaluated for both PIBF and progesterone at various times during the follicular phase and the luteal phase in both natural cycles and cycles involving embryo transfer after endogenous and exogenous progesterone exposure and after various synthetic progestins. PIBF was measured by a non-commercial research ELISA assay. Comparisons were made of serum PIBF before and after exposure to progesterone, 17-hydroxyprogesterone, and oral contraceptives. PIBF was also measured before and after transfer of embryos. Progesterone alone without exposure to the fetal allogeneic stimulus was able to produce a marked increase in serum PIBF. Neither a synthetic progestin (19-nortestosterone derivative) nor 17-hydroxyprogesterone caused an increase in PIBF. Some PIBF is generally detected even in the follicular phase. A previous concept considered that an allogeneic stimulus, e.g., from the fetal semi-allograft, was necessary to induce de novo progesterone receptors in gamma delta T cells, which, in turn, when exposed to a high concentration of progesterone, would secrete high levels of PIBF. These data show that exposure to an allogeneic stimulus is not needed to cause a marked rise in PIBF, merely progesterone alone is sufficient.

  18. Use of Progesterone Treatment for the Prevention of Recurrent Preterm Birth: Identification of Obstacles to Change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lim, Arianne C.; Goossens, Astrid; Ravelli, Anita C. J.; Boer, Kees; Bruinse, Hein W.; Mol, Ben Willem J.

    2010-01-01

    Progesterone treatment has proven to be effective in preventing recurrent preterm birth. The use of progesterone varies widely between different obstetric clinics in the Netherlands. The study aimed to identify factors that hamper or facilitate the use of progesterone to create an implementation

  19. Milk progesterone on day 5 following insemination in the dairy cow ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Despite the importance of progesterone on the fertility of lactating dairy cows, the factors that affect post ovulatory progesterone concentration are still unclear. Thus, the aim of the present study was to identify factors associated with the post ovulatory progesterone rise following 1st insemination in lactating dairy cows.

  20. Fabrication of Progesterone-Loaded Nanofibers for the Drug Delivery Applications in Bovine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karuppannan, Chitra; Sivaraj, Mehnath; Kumar, J. Ganesh; Seerangan, Rangasamy; Balasubramanian, S.; Gopal, Dhinakar Raj

    2017-02-01

    Progesterone is a potent drug for synchronization of the estrus and ovulation cycles in bovine. At present, the estrus cycle of bovine is controlled by the insertion of progesterone-embedded silicone bands. The disadvantage of nondegradable polymer inserts is to require for disposal of these bands after their use. The study currently focuses on preparation of biodegradable progesterone-incorporated nanofiber for estrus synchronization. Three different concentrations (1.2, 1.9, and 2.5 g) of progesterone-impregnated nanofibers were fabricated using electrospinning. The spun membrane were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetric analysis, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Uniform surface morphology, narrow size distribution, and interaction between progesterone and zein were confirmed by SEM. FTIR spectroscopy indicated miscibility and interaction between zein and progesterone. X-ray analysis indicated that the size of zein crystallites increased with progesterone content in nanofibers. Significant differences in thermal behavior of progesterone-impregnated nanofiber were observed by DSC. Cell viability studies of progesterone-loaded nanofiber were examined using MTT assay. In vitro release experiment is to identify the suitable progesterone concentration for estrus synchronization. This study confirms that progesterone-impregnated nanofibers are an ideal vehicle for progesterone delivery for estrus synchronization of bovines.

  1. Aromatase activity in receptor negative breast and endometrial cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berstein, LM; Kovalevskij, A; Larionov, A; Tsyrlina, E; Vasilyev, D; Zimarina, T; Thijssen, JHH

    Among the factors for estrogen and progesterone receptors (ER and PR) negativity of tumors of reproductive tissue special attention., is attracted by ability of the tumor produce estrogens (as intratumoral regulators of ER and PR) through reaction of aromatization. 101 samples of tumor tissue (64

  2. Progesterone profiles of postpartum dairy cows as an aid to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    insemination. It was concluded that repeat breeding could be due to several reasons, only some of which could be identified from progesterone profiles. Daaglikse melkprogesteroonwaardes van 44 melkkoeie is bepaal vanaf kalwing tot besetting sodat progesteroon- profiele gebruik kon word om voortplantingsgebreke.

  3. Effects of progesterone injection on performance, plasma hormones ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An experiment was conducted to evaluate responses of feed-satiated and feed- restricted breeder hens to daily injection of progesterone (P4). A total of 64 Cobb 500 hens were fed either restricted or ad libitum from 27 to 38 wk of age. Fourteen laying hens from each group were selected to conduct P4 injection assay.

  4. Effect of exogenous progesterone on oestrus response of West ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2008-01-04

    Jan 4, 2008 ... 1Department of Veterinary Physiology, Pharmacology and Biochemistry, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of. Agriculture, PMB 2373 ... progesterone treatments and 1.0 ml physiological saline as the control. The animals were ... are more researches on goat reproduction and manage- ment in ...

  5. Progesterone supplementation and the prevention of preterm birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norwitz, Errol R; Caughey, Aaron B

    2011-01-01

    Preterm birth is currently the most important problem in maternal-child health in the United States and possibly throughout the world. It complicates one in eight US deliveries, and accounts for over 85% of all perinatal morbidity and mortality. Although survival of preterm infants has increased steadily over the past four decades-due in large part to the use of antenatal corticosteroids, improvements in neonatal resuscitation, and the introduction of neonatal intensive care units-efforts to prevent preterm birth have been largely unsuccessful. On February 3, 2011, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the use of progesterone supplementation (hydroxyprogesterone caproate) during pregnancy to reduce the risk of recurrent preterm birth in women with a history of at least one prior spontaneous preterm delivery. This is the first time that the FDA has approved a medication for the prevention of preterm birth, and represents the first approval of a drug specifically for use in pregnancy in almost 15 years. This article reviews the evidence behind the use of progesterone for the prevention of preterm birth, and provides guidelines for the use of progesterone supplementation in clinical practice. A number of areas of ongoing controversy are addressed, including the optimal formulation and route of administration, the safety of progesterone supplementation in pregnancy, and its proposed mode of action.

  6. Effects of progesterone injection on performance, plasma hormones ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PRECIOUS

    2009-11-16

    Nov 16, 2009 ... steroid hormones (P4, E2 and testosterone) and regres- sed ovary. Progesterone injection increased numbers of hens holding a hard-shelled egg in their uterus. Proges- terone injection had no significant effect on glucose home ostasis and lipid metabolism. Restricted fed and laying ad libitum fed breeder ...

  7. Effect of Exogenous Progesterone on Testes Characteristics of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The parameters measured include seminiferous tubule diameter, paired testes weight (PTW), testis density, Daily sperm production (DSP) from gonadal sperm reserves (GSR) and DSP from quantitative testicular histology (QTH). The results show that progesterone significantly (P<0.05) increased the values of DSP from ...

  8. Long-term effects of prenatal progesterone exposure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vedel, C.; Larsen, H.; Holmskov, Anni

    2016-01-01

    children from 498 twin pregnancies, were followed-up. PREDICT was a placebo-controlled randomized clinical trial examining the effect of progesterone for prevention of preterm delivery in unselected twin pregnancies. Medical histories of the children were reviewed and neurophysiological development...

  9. 21 CFR 862.1620 - Progesterone test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Progesterone test system. 862.1620 Section 862.1620 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... in the diagnosis and treatment of disorders of the ovaries or placenta. (b) Classification. Class I...

  10. Rodent Models of Non-classical Progesterone Action Regulating Ovulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melinda A. Mittelman-Smith

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available It is becoming clear that steroid hormones act not only by binding to nuclear receptors that associate with specific response elements in the nucleus but also by binding to receptors on the cell membrane. In this newly discovered manner, steroid hormones can initiate intracellular signaling cascades which elicit rapid effects such as release of internal calcium stores and activation of kinases. We have learned much about the translocation and signaling of steroid hormone receptors from investigations into estrogen receptor α, which can be trafficked to, and signal from, the cell membrane. It is now clear that progesterone (P4 can also elicit effects that cannot be exclusively explained by transcriptional changes. Similar to E2 and its receptors, P4 can initiate signaling at the cell membrane, both through progesterone receptor and via a host of newly discovered membrane receptors (e.g., membrane progesterone receptors, progesterone receptor membrane components. This review discusses the parallels between neurotransmitter-like E2 action and the more recently investigated non-classical P4 signaling, in the context of reproductive behaviors in the rodent.

  11. Progesterone Regulation of Synaptic Transmission and Plasticity in Rodent Hippocampus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foy, Michael R.; Akopian, Garnik; Thompson, Richard F.

    2008-01-01

    Ovarian hormones influence memory formation by eliciting changes in neural activity. The effects of various concentrations of progesterone (P4) on synaptic transmission and plasticity associated with long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD) were studied using in vitro hippocampal slices. Extracellular studies show that the…

  12. Characterization of the Ca2+ Channels Involved in the Progesterone ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There is evidence that intracellular Ca2+ concentration plays significant roles in sperm function such as motility and acrosome reaction. Many calcium channels have been identified in the plasma membrane of sperm. Progesterone (P4) stimulates Ca2+ influx and acrosome reaction in human spermatozoa. The effects of ...

  13. Unpacking social hypersensitivity: vulnerability to the absence of positive feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cikara, Mina; Girgus, Joan S

    2010-10-01

    Navigating social life requires accurately calibrated sensitivity to external feedback, thus extreme sensitivity to external feedback may be maladaptive. Using a daily diary design, the authors investigated whether the relationship between social hypersensitivity and daily events predicted level, lability, and reactivity of both self-esteem and affect. Relative to their less sensitive peers, socially hypersensitive people exhibited lower levels of self-esteem and greater negative affect and experienced greater fluctuations in self-esteem and negative affect. Although most people were negatively reactive to the presence of negative feedback, socially hypersensitive people were negatively reactive to the absence of positive feedback as well. The authors argue that reactivity to the absence of positive feedback is a fundamental, heretofore untested aspect of what makes social hypersensitivity a pernicious orientation.

  14. Autoimmune Progesterone Dermatitis: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatma Çetinözman Aksoy

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune progesteron dermatitis (AIPD is a rare disorder which is characterized by cyclical premenstrual flares of cutaneous or mucocutaneous manifestations. We present a 36-year-old woman with a 2-year history of oral ulcers and a rash which presents a week before every menstruation. She also had a history of recurrent herpes labialis infection; however herpes simplex virus could not be detected by PCR in oral lesions. Routine laboratory investigations, as well as serum complement levels were normal, except for elevated ANA titer (1/160. Histopathological examination of one of the papules was consistent with erythema multiforme and immunobullous diseases were ruled out by negative immunofluorescence studies. Based on the history and the clinical features, AIPD was suspected and the diagnosis was confirmed by flare of the lesions after progesterone challenge test. Subsequently, oral tamoxifen was started which controlled her flares significantly and no major side effects except amenorrhea was observed during treatment. Next she was given spironolactone which did not control her symptoms, therefore oral prednisolone had to be introduced. Due to its rare occurence, clinical features, pathogenesis, diagnostic and treatment alternatives of AIPD are discussed in this study based on the review of the medical literature.

  15. Rateless feedback codes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jesper Hemming; Koike-Akino, Toshiaki; Orlik, Philip

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposes a concept called rateless feedback coding. We redesign the existing LT and Raptor codes, by introducing new degree distributions for the case when a few feedback opportunities are available. We show that incorporating feedback to LT codes can significantly decrease both...... the coding overhead and the encoding/decoding complexity. Moreover, we show that, at the price of a slight increase in the coding overhead, linear complexity is achieved with Raptor feedback coding....

  16. Protective actions of progesterone in the cardiovascular system: potential role of membrane progesterone receptors (mPRs) in mediating rapid effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Peter; Pang, Yefei

    2013-06-01

    The protective functions of progesterone in the cardiovascular system have received little attention even though evidence has accumulated that progesterone lowers blood pressure, inhibits coronary hyperactivity and has powerful vasodilatory and natriuretic effects. One possible reason why potential beneficial actions of progesterone on cardiovascular functions have not been extensively studied is that divergent effects to those of progesterone have been observed in many clinical trials with synthetic progestins such as medroxyprogesterone acetate which are associated with increased risk of coronary disease. Evidence that progesterone exerts protective effects on cardiovascular functions is briefly reviewed. The finding that progesterone administration decreases blood vessel vasoconstriction in several animal models within a few minutes suggests that rapid, nongenomic progesterone mechanisms are of physiological importance in regulating vascular tone. Rapid activation of second messenger pathways by progesterone has been observed in vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells, resulting in alterations in endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activity and calcium influx, respectively. Both nuclear progesterone receptors (PRs) and novel membrane progesterone receptors (mPRs) are candidates for the intermediaries in these rapid, cell-surface initiated progesterone actions in endothelial and smooth muscle vascular cells. PRs have been detected in both cell types. New data are presented showing mPRα, mPRβ and mPRγ are also present in human endothelial and smooth muscle vascular cells. Preliminary evidence suggests mPRs mediate rapid progestin signaling in these endothelial cells, resulting in down-regulation of cAMP production and increased nitric oxide synthesis. The role of mPRs in progesterone regulation of cardiovascular functions warrants further investigation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Developing Sustainable Feedback Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carless, David; Salter, Diane; Yang, Min; Lam, Joy

    2011-01-01

    Feedback is central to the development of student learning, but within the constraints of modularized learning in higher education it is increasingly difficult to handle effectively. This article makes a case for sustainable feedback as a contribution to the reconceptualization of feedback processes. The data derive from the Student Assessment and…

  18. Cell-specific localization of progesterone receptors in the bovine ovary at different stages of the oestrous cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Haeseleer, M; Simoens, P; Van den Broeck, W

    2007-04-01

    This immunohistochemical study describes the localization of progesterone receptors (PR) in the bovine ovary of 23 cows at different stages of the oestrous cycle. In primordial, primary and secondary follicles the score for PR in the follicle cells increased progressively with the maturation of the follicle. In vital tertiary follicles and cystic atretic follicles a moderate score for PR was found, while in obliterative atretic follicles the score was much lower. Scores were high in corpora hemorrhagica, low in corpora lutea and still lower in corpora albicantia. Low PR scores were also found in the tunica albuginea and surface epithelium. Cyclic variations of PR immunoreactivity were manifest in most ovarian tissues. Follicular scores for PR were high in oestrus and decreased during the following stages, whereas scores in corpora lutea cells varied according to a characteristic pattern with high levels during oestrus and metoestrus. The variations in the scores for PR in the different ovarian cell types suggest a cell-specific and cycle-dependent influence of progesterone. A negative correlation was found between the PR scores and the plasma progesterone concentration.

  19. Immunohistochemical expression of estrogens and progesterone receptors in carcinoma ex pleomorphic adenoma-undifferentiated and adenocarcinoma types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarakji, Bassel; Nassani, Mohammad Z; Sloan, Philip

    2010-05-01

    Cancer of the salivary gland is one of the common cancers in the head and the neck regions. This type of cancer develops in the minor and the major salivary glands, and it sometimes metastasizes to other organs, particularly the lung. Morphologic mimicry and similarity in the expression of steroid hormone receptors between salivary gland tumours and breast tumours are well-known phenomena and are occasionally debated in the field of surgical pathology. The expression of sex hormone receptors in some tumours suggests a role for these receptors in tumor pathogenesis and therapy. Previous studies of the expression of estrogens and progesterone receptors in salivary gland tumours have reported conflicting results. Our study aimed to characterize alteration in the immunohistochemical expression of oestrogens receptor and progesterone receptor in the tumour cells of carcinoma arising in pleomorphic adenoma. 27 cases of carcinoma arising in pleomorphic adenoma (undifferentiated and adenocarcinoma types) were examined. The results showed that 27 (100 %) of 27 cases had negative nuclear staining for either oestrogens or progesterone receptors. Our data suggest that carcinomas arising in pleomorphic adenoma were not dependent on endocrine function.

  20. Types and frequencies of feedback interventions in classroom interaction in secondary education.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voerman, L.; Meijer, P.C.; Korthagen, F.A.J.; Simons, R.J.

    2012-01-01

    Contributing to the growing amount of literature on learning-enhancing feedback, this article attempts to distinguish between progress feedback and discrepancy feedback. Building on relevant literature drawn from psychology, we propose the use of a ratio of 3:1, positive:negative feedback. We

  1.  The Values of CA-125, Progesterone, ß-HCG and Estradiol in the Early Prediction of Ectopic Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hala Abdul Qadir Al-Moayed

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available  Objective: To explore the diagnostic value and measurement of serum CA-125, the single measurement of progesterone (P,ß-HCG, and estradiol (E2 in the early diagnosis of ectopic pregnancy.Methods: Serum levels of CA-125, progesterone, ß-HCG and estradiol were measured by Enzyme Linked Immuno Sorbent Assay (ELISA techniques in 40 symptomatic women with ectopic pregnancy and 24 women with normal intrauterine pregnancy during gestational age of 4-10 weeks at Al-Kadhmiya Teaching Hospital, Baghdad, Iraq, between November 2010 and June 2011.Results: The mean ±SEM serum levels of CA-125, progesterone, ß-HCG, and estradiol in patients with ectopic pregnancies (16.51±2.39U/ml; 2.54±0.47ng/ml; 72.75±12.27mIU/ml; 13.4±2.14pg/ml; respectively were significantly lower than the levels in normal intrauterine pregnancies (74.25±18.5U/ml; 28.36±3.7ng/ml; 249.54±18.0mIU/ml; 112.7±23.6pg/ml; respectively. When using a CA-125 concentration of 20.5 U/ml as a cut-off value for the diagnosis of ectopic pregnancy, sensitivity was 75.7�20specificity 100�20the positive predictive value was100�0and the negative predictive value 71.4�onclusion: The measurement of CA-125 and progesterone levels is useful in discriminating ectopic from normal gestations.

  2. Feedback effect on flute dynamics in a mirror machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Be'Ery, Ilan; Seemann, Omri

    2015-11-01

    Active feedback techniques may stabilize the flute instability in mirror traps and make them viable candidates for fusion machines. A fast feedback with optical sensors and electrical actuators was implemented in a table-top mirror machine and used to study several aspects of feedback stabilization. For a cold, dense plasma the feedback reduces dramatically the flute amplitude of the first two mode. For higher temperature plasma, a significant increase of plasma density due to feedback stabilization is also demonstrated. The effect of changing feedback gain and phase has some interesting feature such as asymmetry with respect to positive and negative phase shifts and non-monotonic dependence of flute amplitude on feedback gain. These effects are explained using simplified analytic model of the flute and feedback.

  3. Feedback and efficient behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casal, Sandro; DellaValle, Nives; Mittone, Luigi; Soraperra, Ivan

    2017-01-01

    Feedback is an effective tool for promoting efficient behavior: it enhances individuals' awareness of choice consequences in complex settings. Our study aims to isolate the mechanisms underlying the effects of feedback on achieving efficient behavior in a controlled environment. We design a laboratory experiment in which individuals are not aware of the consequences of different alternatives and, thus, cannot easily identify the efficient ones. We introduce feedback as a mechanism to enhance the awareness of consequences and to stimulate exploration and search for efficient alternatives. We assess the efficacy of three different types of intervention: provision of social information, manipulation of the frequency, and framing of feedback. We find that feedback is most effective when it is framed in terms of losses, that it reduces efficiency when it includes information about inefficient peers' behavior, and that a lower frequency of feedback does not disrupt efficiency. By quantifying the effect of different types of feedback, our study suggests useful insights for policymakers.

  4. Situated Formative Feedback

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lukassen, Niels Bech; Wahl, Christian; Sorensen, Elsebeth Korsgaard

    This study addresses the conceptual challenge of providing students with good quality feedback to enhance student learning in an online community of practice (COP). The aim of the study is to identify feedback mechanisms in a virtual learning environment (VLE) and to create a full formative...... feedback episode (FFE) through an online dialogue. The paper argues that dialogue is crucial for student learning and that feedback is not only something the teacher gives to the student. Viewing good quality feedback as social, situated, formative, emphasis is put on the establishment of dialogue. We...... refer to this type of feedback as, Situated Formative Feedback (SFF). As a basis for exploring, identifying and discussing relevant aspects of SFF the paper analyses qualitative data from a Moodle dialogue. Data are embedded in the qualitative analytic program Nvivo and are analysed with a system...

  5. A phase plane graph based model of the ovulatory cycle lacking the "positive feedback" phenomenon

    OpenAIRE

    Kurbel Sven

    2012-01-01

    Abstract When hormones during the ovulatory cycle are shown in phase plane graphs, reported FSH and estrogen values form a specific pattern that resembles the leaning “&" symbol, while LH and progesterone (Pg) values form a "boomerang" shape. Graphs in this paper were made using data reported by Stricker et al. [Clin Chem Lab Med 2006;44:883–887]. These patterns were used to construct a simplistic model of the ovulatory cycle without the conventional "positive feedback" phenomenon. The model ...

  6. Immunohistochemical assessment of oestrogen and progesterone receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grabau, D A; Thorpe, S M; Knoop, A

    2000-01-01

    Two different methods to determine steroid receptors were analysed with respect to their ability to estimate prognosis in primary breast cancer patients. The immunohistochemical assay (IHA) was compared with the dextran-coated charcoal (DCC) method of receptor determination. A random sample of 281...... of patients, receptor positive cases fared better than negative cases in all situations. Investigation of the prognostic power revealed that classification based on IHA allowed better discrimination of patients than classification based on the DCC method. The reason for this difference might be because...

  7. Follower-Centered Perspective on Feedback: Effects of Feedback Seeking on Identification and Feedback Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Gong, Zhenxing; Li, Miaomiao; Qi, Yaoyuan; Zhang, Na

    2017-01-01

    In the formation mechanism of the feedback environment, the existing research pays attention to external feedback sources and regards individuals as objects passively accepting feedback. Thus, the external source fails to realize the individuals’ need for feedback, and the feedback environment cannot provide them with useful information, leading to a feedback vacuum. The aim of this study is to examine the effect of feedback-seeking by different strategies on the supervisor-feedback environme...

  8. A prospective randomized multicentre study comparing vaginal progesterone gel and vaginal micronized progesterone tablets for luteal support after in vitro fertilization/intracytoplasmic sperm injection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergh, Christina; Lindenberg, Svend; Al Humaidan, Peter Samir Heskjær

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY QUESTION: Is vaginal progesterone gel equivalent to vaginal micronized progesterone tablets concerning ongoing pregnancy rate and superior concerning patient convenience when used for luteal support after IVF/ICSI? SUMMARY ANSWER: Equivalence of treatments in terms of ongoing live intraut...

  9. Stress-induced progesterone secretion and progesterone receptor immunoreactivity in the paraventricular nucleus are modulated by pubertal development in male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romeo, Russell D; Bellani, Rudy; McEwen, Bruce S

    2005-12-01

    Male rats show a differential adrenocortical response to stress before and after pubertal development, such that prepubertal animals have a more prolonged stress-induced corticosterone response compared to adults. Whether pubertal maturation affects other adrenocortical responses to stress is currently unknown. To address this question, we assessed stress-induced progesterone secretion in both intact and gonadectomized prepubertal (28 days of age) and adult (77 days of age) male rats either before or after exposure to a 30 min session of restraint stress. We found that prepubertal males show a greater and more prolonged stress-induced progesterone response compared to adults. We also found a similar effect in castrated prepubertal and adult males, indicating the differential stress-induced progesterone response is not gonadal in origin. We also examined progesterone receptor (PR) levels by immunohistochemistry in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of the hypothalamus, a key regulatory nucleus of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, and found lower PR protein expression in the PVN of prepubertal compared to adult males. These data indicate that in addition to corticosterone, stress-induced adrenocortical progesterone levels are differentially affected by pubertal maturation. Furthermore, these data raise the possibility of different progesterone sensitivity of the PVN before and after puberty. The significance of this differential response is presently unknown. However, given the pleiotropic effects of progesterone on male physiology and behaviour, it is likely that the disparate post-stress exposure to progesterone affects the prepubertal and adult male differently.

  10. Social anxiety and the ironic effects of positive interviewer feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budnick, Christopher J; Kowal, Marta; Santuzzi, Alecia M

    2015-01-01

    Positive interviewer feedback should encourage positive experiences and outcomes for interviewees. Yet, positive feedback is inconsistent with socially anxious interviewees' negative self-views. Socially anxious interviewees might experience increased self-focus while attempting to reconcile the inconsistency between their self-perceptions and that feedback. This could interfere with successful interview performance. This study used a 3 (feedback: positive, negative, no) × 2 (social anxiety: high, low) between-subjects design. Undergraduate students (N = 88) completed a measure of dispositional social anxiety. They then engaged in a simulated interview with a White confederate trained to adhere to a standardized script. Interviewees received positive, negative, or no interviewer feedback. Each interview was video recorded to code anxiety displays, impression management tactics, and interview success. Following positive feedback, socially anxious interviewees displayed more anxiety, less assertiveness, and received lower success ratings. Among anxious interviewees, increased self-focus provided an indirect path between positive feedback and lower success. Consistent with self-verification theory, anxious interviewees had poorer interview performance following positive feedback that contradicted their negative self-views. Thus, socially anxious interviewees might be at a disadvantage when interviewing, especially following positive feedback. Implications for interviewees and interviewers are discussed.

  11. Neural correlates of anticipation and processing of performance feedback in social anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitmann, Carina Y; Peterburs, Jutta; Mothes-Lasch, Martin; Hallfarth, Marlit C; Böhme, Stephanie; Miltner, Wolfgang H R; Straube, Thomas

    2014-12-01

    Fear of negative evaluation, such as negative social performance feedback, is the core symptom of social anxiety. The present study investigated the neural correlates of anticipation and perception of social performance feedback in social anxiety. High (HSA) and low (LSA) socially anxious individuals were asked to give a speech on a personally relevant topic and received standardized but appropriate expert performance feedback in a succeeding experimental session in which neural activity was measured during anticipation and presentation of negative and positive performance feedback concerning the speech performance, or a neutral feedback-unrelated control condition. HSA compared to LSA subjects reported greater anxiety during anticipation of negative feedback. Functional magnetic resonance imaging results showed deactivation of medial prefrontal brain areas during anticipation of negative feedback relative to the control and the positive condition, and medial prefrontal and insular hyperactivation during presentation of negative as well as positive feedback in HSA compared to LSA subjects. The results indicate distinct processes underlying feedback processing during anticipation and presentation of feedback in HSA as compared to LSA individuals. In line with the role of the medial prefrontal cortex in self-referential information processing and the insula in interoception, social anxiety seems to be associated with lower self-monitoring during feedback anticipation, and an increased self-focus and interoception during feedback presentation, regardless of feedback valence. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Progesterone and the Latency Period: Threatened Preterm Labor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Borna

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Preterm labor is a major contributor to neonatal morbidity and mortality and results in increased obstetric and pediatric care costs. The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of vaginal progesterone for maintenance therapy following treatment of threatened preterm labor for preventing preterm birth.Methods: The study included 70 singleton pregnant women with preterm labor with intact membranes. Patients were randomized to receive either maintenance vaginal progesterone therapy (n=37 administered (400 mg daily or no treatment (controls, n=33 after discontinuation of acute intravenous tocolysis.Results: The two groups were similar with at respect to maternal age, race, parity, gestational age at admission, bishop score, and preterm delivery risk factors .Compared to the control group, the mean ±SD time gained from initiation of maintenance therapy to delivery (36/1117/9 versus 24/5227/2 (meanSD days, p=0.037 and the gestational age at delivery (36.071.56 vs. 34.51.3 weeks, p=0.041 were higher in the vaginal progesterone maintenance therapy group. No significant differences were found with recurrent preterm labor 13 (35.1% versus 19 (57.6%, p=0.092. Respiratory distress syndrome 4 (10.8% versus 12 (36.4% p=0.021, Low birth weight10 (27% versus, 17 (51.5% p=0.04, birth weight (3101.54±587.9gr versus r 2609.39±662.9gr, p=0.002 were significantly different between the two groups.Conclusion: The gestational age and time gained from initiation of maintenance therapy to delivery were longer in women receiving vaginal maintenance tocolysis with progesterone and improve perinatal outcomes. However, maintenance therapy did not decrease the recurrence of preterm labor episodes.

  13. Improving the developability profile of pyrrolidine progesterone receptor partial agonists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kallander, Lara S.; Washburn, David G.; Hoang, Tram H.; Frazee, James S.; Stoy, Patrick; Johnson, Latisha; Lu, Qing; Hammond, Marlys; Barton, Linda S.; Patterson, Jaclyn R.; Azzarano, Leonard M.; Nagilla, Rakesh; Madauss, Kevin P.; Williams, Shawn P.; Stewart, Eugene L.; Duraiswami, Chaya; Grygielko, Eugene T.; Xu, Xiaoping; Laping, Nicholas J.; Bray, Jeffrey D.; Thompson, Scott K. (GSKPA)

    2010-09-17

    The previously reported pyrrolidine class of progesterone receptor partial agonists demonstrated excellent potency but suffered from serious liabilities including hERG blockade and high volume of distribution in the rat. The basic pyrrolidine amine was intentionally converted to a sulfonamide, carbamate, or amide to address these liabilities. The evaluation of the degree of partial agonism for these non-basic pyrrolidine derivatives and demonstration of their efficacy in an in vivo model of endometriosis is disclosed herein.

  14. Progesterone Therapy for the Prevention of Preterm Labor in Women with Single Risk-factor: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kefayat Chaman-Ara

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Preterm labor is a common complication of pregnancy which has become a main health concern around the world due to its negative consequences. Objective: To investigate the efficacy of progesterone therapy in the prevention of preterm labor in women with single risk factor. Search strategy: A PubMed, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, ClinicalTrials.gov, Science Direct, Scopus, OVID, EMBASE, SID, Magiran and Google Scholar search (date last searched April 2016 without any time, language and location restriction was done. Inclusion criteria: All randomized clinical trials of singleton pregnancies with single risk factor (prior preterm labor without short cervical length or short cervical length without prior preterm labor which were randomized to progesterone and control groups were included in our meta-analysis. Primary outcome: Our primary outcome was gestational age at delivery. Results: 13 studies (1259 subjects and 2653 control women were included in the meta-analysis. Using random effect model showed that mean gestational age at delivery of progesterone group is 0.74 (0.41-1.06 month longer than that of control group with CI=95% which is significant statically. Conclusions: Progesterone therapy is an effective intervention for the prevention of preterm labor in women with single risk factor. 

  15. Progesterone Action in Endometrial Cancer, Endometriosis, Uterine Fibroids, and Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J. Julie; Kurita, Takeshi

    2013-01-01

    Progesterone receptor (PR) mediates the actions of the ovarian steroid progesterone, which together with estradiol regulates gonadotropin secretion, prepares the endometrium for implantation, maintains pregnancy, and differentiates breast tissue. Separation of estrogen and progesterone actions in hormone-responsive tissues remains a challenge. Pathologies of the uterus and breast, including endometrial cancer, endometriosis, uterine fibroids, and breast cancer, are highly associated with estrogen, considered to be the mitogenic factor. Emerging evidence supports distinct roles of progesterone and its influence on the pathogenesis of these diseases. Progesterone antagonizes estrogen-driven growth in the endometrium, and insufficient progesterone action strikingly increases the risk of endometrial cancer. In endometriosis, eutopic and ectopic tissues do not respond sufficiently to progesterone and are considered to be progesterone-resistant, which contributes to proliferation and survival. In uterine fibroids, progesterone promotes growth by increasing proliferation, cellular hypertrophy, and deposition of extracellular matrix. In normal mammary tissue and breast cancer, progesterone is pro-proliferative and carcinogenic. A key difference between these tissues that could explain the diverse effects of progesterone is the paracrine interactions of PR-expressing stroma and epithelium. Normal endometrium is a mucosa containing large quantities of distinct stromal cells with abundant PR, which influences epithelial cell proliferation and differentiation and protects against carcinogenic transformation. In contrast, the primary target cells of progesterone in the breast and fibroids are the mammary epithelial cells and the leiomyoma cells, which lack specifically organized stromal components with significant PR expression. This review provides a unifying perspective for the diverse effects of progesterone across human tissues and diseases. PMID:23303565

  16. Progesterone modulates microtubule dynamics and epiboly progression during zebrafish gastrulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckerle, Stephanie; Ringler, Mario; Lecaudey, Virginie; Nitschke, Roland; Driever, Wolfgang

    2017-12-26

    Control of microtubule dynamics is crucial for cell migration. We analyzed regulation of microtubule network dynamics in the zebrafish yolk cell during epiboly, the earliest coordinated gastrulation movement. We labeled microtubules with EMTB-3GFP and EB3-mCherry to visualize and measure microtubule dynamics by TIRF microscopy live imaging. Yolk cell microtubules dynamics is temporally modulated during epiboly progression. We used maternal zygotic Pou5f3 mutant (MZspg) embryos, which develop strong distortions of microtubule network organization and epiboly retardation, to investigate genetic control of microtubule dynamics. In MZspg embryos, microtubule plus-end growth tracks move slower and are less straight compared to wild-type. MZspg embryos have altered steroidogenic enzyme expression, resulting in increased pregnenolone and reduced progesterone levels. We show that progesterone positively affects microtubule plus-end growth and track straightness. Progesterone may thus act as a non-cell-autonomous regulator of microtubule dynamics across the large yolk cell, and may adjust differing demands on microtubule dynamics and stability during initiation and progression phases of epiboly. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. RF feedback for KEKB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ezura, Eizi; Yoshimoto, Shin-ichi; Akai, Kazunori [National Lab. for High Energy Physics, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1996-08-01

    This paper describes the present status of the RF feedback development for the KEK B-Factory (KEKB). A preliminary experiment concerning the RF feedback using a parallel comb-filter was performed through a choke-mode cavity and a klystron. The RF feedback has been tested using the beam of the TRISTAN Main Ring, and has proved to be effective in damping the beam instability. (author)

  18. Neural cryptography with feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruttor, Andreas; Kinzel, Wolfgang; Shacham, Lanir; Kanter, Ido

    2004-04-01

    Neural cryptography is based on a competition between attractive and repulsive stochastic forces. A feedback mechanism is added to neural cryptography which increases the repulsive forces. Using numerical simulations and an analytic approach, the probability of a successful attack is calculated for different model parameters. Scaling laws are derived which show that feedback improves the security of the system. In addition, a network with feedback generates a pseudorandom bit sequence which can be used to encrypt and decrypt a secret message.

  19. Neural cryptography with feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruttor, Andreas; Kinzel, Wolfgang; Shacham, Lanir; Kanter, Ido

    2004-04-01

    Neural cryptography is based on a competition between attractive and repulsive stochastic forces. A feedback mechanism is added to neural cryptography which increases the repulsive forces. Using numerical simulations and an analytic approach, the probability of a successful attack is calculated for different model parameters. Scaling laws are derived which show that feedback improves the security of the system. In addition, a network with feedback generates a pseudorandom bit sequence which can be used to encrypt and decrypt a secret message.

  20. Feedback in surgical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Boghdady, Michael; Alijani, Afshin

    2017-04-01

    The positive effect of feedback has long been recognized in surgical education. Surgical educators convey feedback to improve the performance of the surgical trainees. We aimed to review the scientific classification and application of feedback in surgical education, and to propose possible future directions for research. A literature search was performed using Pubmed, OVID, CINAHL, Web of science, EMBASE, ERIC database and Google Scholar. The following search terms were used: 'feedback', 'feedback in medical education', 'feedback in medical training' and 'feedback in surgery'. The search was limited to articles in English. From 1157 citations, 12 books and 43 articles met the inclusion criteria and were selected for this review. Feedback comes in a variety of types and is an essential tool for learning and developing performance in surgical education. Different methods of feedback application are evolving and future work needs to concentrate on the value of each method as well as the role of new technologies in surgical education. Copyright © 2016 Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (Scottish charity number SC005317) and Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Strategies for effective feedback

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kritek, Patricia A

    2015-01-01

    Provision of regular feedback to trainees on clinical performance by supervising providers is increasingly recognized as an essential component of undergraduate and graduate health sciences education...

  2. Feedback stabilization initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-06-01

    Much progress has been made in attaining high confinement regimes in magnetic confinement devices. These operating modes tend to be transient, however, due to the onset of MHD instabilities, and their stabilization is critical for improved performance at steady state. This report describes the Feedback Stabilization Initiative (FSI), a broad-based, multi-institutional effort to develop and implement methods for raising the achievable plasma betas through active MHD feedback stabilization. A key element in this proposed effort is the Feedback Stabilization Experiment (FSX), a medium-sized, national facility that would be specifically dedicated to demonstrating beta improvement in reactor relevant plasmas by using a variety of MHD feedback stabilization schemes.

  3. Policy Feedback System (PFS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Policy Feedback System (PFS) is a web application developed by the Office of Disability Policy Management Information (ODPMI) team that gathers empirical data...

  4. Feedback Loop Gains and Feedback Behavior (1996)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kampmann, Christian Erik

    2012-01-01

    Linking feedback loops and system behavior is part of the foundation of system dynamics, yet the lack of formal tools has so far prevented a systematic application of the concept, except for very simple systems. Having such tools at their disposal would be a great help to analysts in understanding...... large, complicated simulation models. The paper applies tools from graph theory formally linking individual feedback loop strengths to the system eigenvalues. The significance of a link or a loop gain and an eigenvalue can be expressed in the eigenvalue elasticity, i.e., the relative change...... of an eigenvalue resulting from a relative change in the gain. The elasticities of individual links and loops may be found through simple matrix operations on the linearized system. Even though the number of feedback loops can grow rapidly with system size, reaching astronomical proportions even for modest systems...

  5. ADAM-17: a novel therapeutic target for triple negative breast cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McGowan, P M

    2013-02-01

    Validated targeted therapy is currently unavailable for patients with invasive breast cancer negative for oestrogen receptors, progesterone receptors and HER2 [i.e., those with triple-negative (TN) disease]. ADAM-17 is a protease involved in the activations of several ligands that bind to and promotes intracellular signalling from the EGFR\\/HER family of receptors.

  6. Progesterone is essential for protecting against LPS-induced pregnancy loss. LIF as a potential mediator of the anti-inflammatory effect of progesterone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julieta Aisemberg

    Full Text Available Lipopolysaccharide (LPS administration to mice on day 7 of gestation led to 100% embryonic resorption after 24 h. In this model, nitric oxide is fundamental for the resorption process. Progesterone may be responsible, at least in part, for a Th2 switch in the feto-maternal interface, inducing active immune tolerance against fetal antigens. Th2 cells promote the development of T cells, producing leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF, which seems to be important due to its immunomodulatory action during early pregnancy. Our aim was to evaluate the involvement of progesterone in the mechanism of LPS-induced embryonic resorption, and whether LIF can mediate hormonal action. Using in vivo and in vitro models, we provide evidence that circulating progesterone is an important component of the process by which infection causes embryonic resorption in mice. Also, LIF seems to be a mediator of the progesterone effect under inflammatory conditions. We found that serum progesterone fell to very low levels after 24 h of LPS exposure. Moreover, progesterone supplementation prevented embryonic resorption and LPS-induced increase of uterine nitric oxide levels in vivo. Results show that LPS diminished the expression of the nuclear progesterone receptor in the uterus after 6 and 12 h of treatment. We investigated the expression of LIF in uterine tissue from pregnant mice and found that progesterone up-regulates LIF mRNA expression in vitro. We observed that LIF was able to modulate the levels of nitric oxide induced by LPS in vitro, suggesting that it could be a potential mediator of the inflammatory action of progesterone. Our observations support the view that progesterone plays a critical role in a successful pregnancy as an anti-inflammatory agent, and that it could have possible therapeutic applications in the prevention of early reproductive failure associated with inflammatory disorders.

  7. It's all about timing: An electrophysiological examination of feedback-based learning with immediate and delayed feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbel, Yael; Hong, Lucia; Baker, Travis E; Holroyd, Clay B

    2017-05-01

    Feedback regarding an individual's action can occur immediately or with a temporal delay. Processing of feedback that varies in its delivery time is proposed to engage different brain mechanisms. fMRI data implicate the striatum in the processing of immediate feedback, and the medial temporal lobe (MTL) in the processing of delayed feedback. The present study offers an electrophysiological examination of feedback processing in the context of timing, by studying the effects of feedback timing on the feedback-related negativity (FRN), a product of the midbrain dopamine system, and elucidating whether the N170 ERP component could capture MTL activation associated with the processing of delayed feedback. Participants completed a word-object paired association learning task; they received feedback 500ms (immediate feedback condition) following a button press during the learning of two sets of 14 items, and at a delay of 6500ms (delayed feedback condition) during the learning of the other two sets. The results indicated that while learning outcomes did not differ under the two timing conditions, Event Related Potential (ERPs) pointed to differential activation of the examined ERP components. FRN amplitude was found to be larger following the immediate feedback condition when compared with the delayed feedback condition, and sensitive to valence and learning only under the immediate feedback condition. Additionally, the amplitude of the N170 was found larger following the delayed feedback condition when compared with the immediate feedback condition. Taken together, the findings of the present study support the contention that the processing of delayed feedback involves a shift away from midbrain dopamine activation to the recruitment of the MTL. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Analysis of snow feedbacks in 14 general circulation models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Randall, D.A.; Cess, R.D.; Blanchet, J.P.; Chalita, S.; Colman, R.; Dazlich, D.A.; Del Genio, A.D.; Keup, E.; Lacis, A.; Le Treut, H. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States)]|[State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY (United States)]|[Canadian Climate Center, Ontario (Canada)]|[Lab. de Meteorologie Dynamique, Paris (France)]|[Bureau of Meteorology Research Center, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia)]|[NASA, Goddard Inst. for Space Studies, New York, NY (United States)]|[Univ. of Hamburg (Germany)

    1994-10-01

    Snow feedbacks produced by 14 atmospheric general circulation models have been analyzed through idealized numerical experiments. Included in the analysis is an investigation of the surface energy budgets of the models. Negative or weak positive snow feedbacks occurred in some of the models, while others produced strong positive snow feedbacks. These feedbacks are due not only to melting snow, but also to increases in boundary temperature, changes in air temperature, changes in water vapor, and changes in cloudiness. As a result, the net response of each model is quite complex. We analyze in detail the responses of one model with a strong positive snow feedback and another with a weak negative snow feedback. Some of the models include a temperature dependence of the snow albedo, and this has significantly affected the results.

  9. Progesterone inhibits epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition in endometrial cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul H van der Horst

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Every year approximately 74,000 women die of endometrial cancer, mainly due to recurrent or metastatic disease. The presence of tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs as well as progesterone receptor (PR positivity has been correlated with improved prognosis. This study describes two mechanisms by which progesterone inhibits metastatic spread of endometrial cancer: by stimulating T-cell infiltration and by inhibiting epithelial-to-mesenchymal cell transition (EMT. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Paraffin sections from patients with (n = 9 or without (n = 9 progressive endometrial cancer (recurrent or metastatic disease were assessed for the presence of CD4+ (helper, CD8+ (cytotoxic and Foxp3+ (regulatory T-lymphocytes and PR expression. Progressive disease was observed to be associated with significant loss of TILs and loss of PR expression. Frozen tumor samples, used for genome-wide expression analysis, showed significant regulation of pathways involved in immunesurveillance, EMT and metastasis. For a number of genes, such as CXCL14, DKK1, DKK4, PEG10 and WIF1, quantitive RT-PCR was performed to verify up- or downregulation in progressive disease. To corroborate the role of progesterone in regulating invasion, Ishikawa (IK endometrial cancer cell lines stably transfected with PRA (IKPRA, PRB (IKPRB and PRA+PRB (IKPRAB were cultured in presence/absence of progesterone (MPA and used for genome-wide expression analysis, Boyden- and wound healing migration assays, and IHC for known EMT markers. IKPRB and IKPRAB cell lines showed MPA induced inhibition of migration and loss of the mesenchymal marker vimentin at the invasive front of the wound healing assay. Furthermore, pathway analysis of significantly MPA regulated genes showed significant down regulation of important pathways involved in EMT, immunesuppression and metastasis: such as IL6-, TGF-β and Wnt/β-catenin signaling. CONCLUSION: Intact progesterone signaling in non

  10. The challenge of giving written thesis feedback to nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuvesson, Hanna; Borglin, Gunilla

    2014-11-01

    Providing effective written feedback on nursing student's assignments can be a challenging task for any assessor. Additionally, as the student groups tend to become larger, written feedback is likely to gain an overall more prominent position than verbal feedback. Lack of formal training or regular discussion in the teaching faculty about the skill set needed to provide written feedback could negatively affect the students' learning abilities. In this brief paper, we discuss written feedback practices, whilst using the Bachelor of Science in Nursing thesis as an example. Our aim is to highlight the importance of an informed understanding of the impact written feedback can have on students. Creating awareness about this can facilitate the development of more strategic and successful written feedback strategies. We end by offering examples of some relatively simple strategies for improving this practice. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Progesterone Induces Scolex Evagination of the Human Parasite Taenia solium: Evolutionary Implications to the Host-Parasite Relationship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobedo, Galileo; Camacho-Arroyo, Ignacio; Hernández-Hernández, Olivia Tania; Ostoa-Saloma, Pedro; García-Varela, Martín; Morales-Montor, Jorge

    2010-01-01

    Taenia solium cysticercosis is a health problem in underdeveloped and developed countries. Sex hormones are involved in cysticercosis prevalence in female and male pigs. Here, we evaluated the effects of progesterone and its antagonist RU486 on scolex evagination, which is the initial step in the development of the adult worm. Interestingly, progesterone increased T. solium scolex evagination and worm growth, in a concentration-independent pattern. Progesterone effects could be mediated by a novel T. solium progesterone receptor (TsPR), since RU486 inhibits both scolex evagination and worm development induced by progesterone. Using RT-PCR and western blot, sequences related to progesterone receptor were detected in the parasite. A phylogenetic analysis reveals that TsPR is highly related to fish and amphibian progesterone receptors, whereas it has a distant relation with birds and mammals. Conclusively, progesterone directly acts upon T. solium cysticerci, possibly through its binding to a progesterone receptor synthesized by the parasite. PMID:20037735

  12. Progesterone Induces Scolex Evagination of the Human Parasite Taenia solium: Evolutionary Implications to the Host-Parasite Relationship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galileo Escobedo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Taenia solium cysticercosis is a health problem in underdeveloped and developed countries. Sex hormones are involved in cysticercosis prevalence in female and male pigs. Here, we evaluated the effects of progesterone and its antagonist RU486 on scolex evagination, which is the initial step in the development of the adult worm. Interestingly, progesterone increased T. solium scolex evagination and worm growth, in a concentration-independent pattern. Progesterone effects could be mediated by a novel T. solium progesterone receptor (TsPR, since RU486 inhibits both scolex evagination and worm development induced by progesterone. Using RT-PCR and western blot, sequences related to progesterone receptor were detected in the parasite. A phylogenetic analysis reveals that TsPR is highly related to fish and amphibian progesterone receptors, whereas it has a distant relation with birds and mammals. Conclusively, progesterone directly acts upon T. solium cysticerci, possibly through its binding to a progesterone receptor synthesized by the parasite.

  13. Feedback in Language Teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamel, Vivian

    In this paper, two theoretical approaches to language teaching, the audio-lingual and the cognitive code methods, are examined with respect to how they deal with feedback in the classroom situation. Audio-lingual theorists either ignore completely the need for feedback in the classroom or deal with it only in terms of its reinforcing attributes.…

  14. Fault Tolerant Feedback Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoustrup, Jakob; Niemann, H.

    2001-01-01

    An architecture for fault tolerant feedback controllers based on the Youla parameterization is suggested. It is shown that the Youla parameterization will give a residual vector directly in connection with the fault diagnosis part of the fault tolerant feedback controller. It turns out that there...

  15. Feedback og interpersonel kommunikation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dindler, Camilla

    2016-01-01

    Som interpersonel kommunikationsform handler feedback om at observere, mærke og italesætte det, som handler om relationen mellem samtaleparterne mere end om samtaleemnet. Her er fokus på, hvad der siges og hvordan der kommunikeres sammen. Feedback er her ikke en korrigerende tilbagemelding til...

  16. Consequences of loss of progesterone receptor expression in development of invasive endometrial cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Hanekamp, Eline; Blok, Leen; Gielen, Susanne; Smid-Koopman, Ellen; Kühne, Liesbeth; Ruiter, Petra; Chadha-Ajwani, Savi; Brinkmann, Albert; Grootegoed, Anton; Burger, Curt; Huikeshoven, Frans

    2003-01-01

    textabstractPURPOSE: In endometrial cancer, loss of progesterone receptors (PR) is associated with more advanced disease. This study aimed to investigate the mechanism of action of progesterone and the loss of its receptors (PRA and PRB) in development of endometrial cancer. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: A 9600-cDNA microarray analysis was performed to study regulation of gene expression in the human endometrial cancer subcell line Ishikawa PRAB-36 by the progestagen medroxy progesterone acetate (MPA)...

  17. Feedback i matematik

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sortkær, Bent

    2017-01-01

    Feedback bliver i litteraturen igen og igen fremhævet som et af de mest effektive midler til at fremme elevers præstationer i skolen (Hartberg, Dobson, & Gran, 2012; Hattie & Timperley, 2007; Wiliam, 2015). Dette på trods af, at flere forskere påpeger, at feedback ikke altid er læringsfremmende...... (Hattie & Gan, 2011), og nogle endda viser, at feedback kan have en negativ virkning i forhold til præstationer (Kluger & DeNisi, 1996). Artiklen vil undersøge disse tilsyneladende modstridende resultater ved at stille spørgsmålet: Under hvilke forudsætninger virker feedback i matematik læringsfremmende......? Dette gøres ved at dykke ned i forskningslitteraturen omhandlende feedback ud fra en række temaer for på den måde at besvare ovenstående spørgsmål....

  18. Platinum Based Chemotherapy or Capecitabine in Treating Patients With Residual Triple-Negative Basal-Like Breast Cancer Following Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-03

    Estrogen Receptor Negative; HER2/Neu Negative; Invasive Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage III Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma

  19. Gamma-secretase/Notch Signalling Pathway Inhibitor RO4929097 in Treating Patients With Advanced, Metastatic, or Recurrent Triple Negative Invasive Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-28

    Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Male Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  20. Acute noise stress impairs feedback processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Banis, Stella; Lorist, Monicque M.

    2012-01-01

    We examined the impact of acute noise stress on the feedback-related negativity (FRN) and whether this effect depended on stressor predictability. Participants performed a gambling task in a silence and a noise condition with either predictable or unpredictable noise. FRN amplitude was measured in

  1. Brain Endogenous Feedback and Degrees of Consciousness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carrara-Augustenborg, Claudia; Pereira Jr., Alfredo

    2012-01-01

    positive and negative feedback loops. Variable levels of consciousness are proposed to depend on the degree of resonance between these networks. The resonance can occur in the absence of salient external stimulation and, even when such stimulation occurs, the response of the coupled networks is always...

  2. Negative ... concord?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giannakidou, A

    The main claim of this paper is that a general theory of negative concord (NC) should allow for the possibility of NC involving scoping of a universal quantifier above negation. I propose that Greek NC instantiates this option. Greek n-words will be analyzed as polarity sensitive universal

  3. Subminimal negation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Colacito, A.; de Jongh, D.; Vargas Sandoval, A.L.

    Minimal logic, i.e., intuitionistic logic without the ex falso principle, is investigated in its original form with a negation symbol instead of a symbol denoting the contradiction. A Kripke semantics is developed for minimal logic and its sublogics with a still weaker negation by introducing a

  4. Negative Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Negative Leadership by Colonel David M. Oberlander United States Army United States Army War...SUBTITLE Negative Leadership 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Colonel David M...Dr. Richard C. Bullis Department of Command Leadership , and Management 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING/MONITORING

  5. An electrochemical immunosensor for detecting progesterone in milk from dairy cows

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Ling; Yang, Wei; Xia, Cheng; Xu, Chuang; Zhang, Hongyou

    2018-01-01

    In this study, an electrochemical immunosensor for milk progesterone produced by dairy cows was developed. Using the immunosensor, milk progesterone levels in healthy estrus dairy cows was found to range from 1 to 6 ng/mL 20 days after estrus. There were high levels of progesterone in the milk from cows with prolonged luteal phase and luteal cysts, which ranged from 15 to 28 and 19 to 29 ng/mL, respectively. Cows with inactive ovaries also showed low milk progesterone levels of 1-8 ng/mL, but...

  6. Progesterone modulates the proliferation and differentiation of human periodontal ligament cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Gongjie; Cai, Chuan; Dai, Juan; Liu, Yali; Zhang, Rui; Dai, Yuanyuan; Wen, Li; Ding, Yin

    2010-08-01

    Hormone deficiency has been recognized as a risk factor for periodontal disease in postmenopausal women. However, the anabolic effects of progesterone on human periodontal ligament cells (hPDLCs) are still unclear. Therefore, the objective of this study was to detect the expression of progesterone receptor (PgR) in hPDLCs and investigate the bone-sparing effects of progesterone. We detected PgR expression in hPDLCs by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and immunocytochemistry. After progesterone stimulation, the percentage of hPDLCs entering the S + G2M phase of the cell cycle increased significantly, accompanied by an increased cell growth curve. In both basic culture medium and osteogenic medium, progesterone activated alkaline phosphatase-positive cells and alizarin red-positive nodules. Moreover, mineralization-related markers were up-regulated by progesterone in both time-dependent and dose-dependent manners. In contrast, these effects of progesterone were blocked by the PgR antagonist (RU486). Our results demonstrated that the PgR is expressed in hPDLCs at the gene and protein level, and that progesterone can stimulate the proliferation and differentiation of the hPDLCs. These findings suggest that progesterone may play a significant role in osteoblastic function of hPDLCs and may influence the maintenance of alveolar bone mass.

  7. Estrogen and progesterone receptors in human breast cancer. Correlation with histologic subtype and degree of differentiation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mohammed, R H; Lakatua, D J; Haus, E; Yasmineh, W J

    1986-01-01

    Microscopic review of 490 consecutive human breast biopsy and mastectomy specimens were correlated with estrogen and progesterone receptor content of the tissue, by subtype and degree of differentiation...

  8. Progesterone increases dopamine neurone number in differentiating mouse embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz, N F; Díaz-Martínez, N E; Velasco, I; Camacho-Arroyo, I

    2009-08-01

    Progesterone participates in the regulation of several functions in mammals, including brain differentiation and dopaminergic transmission, but the role of progesterone in dopaminergic cell differentiation is unknown. We investigated the effects of progesterone on dopaminergic differentiation of embryonic stem cells using a five-stage protocol. Cells were incubated with different progesterone concentrations during the proliferation (stage 4) or differentiation (stage 5) phases. Progesterone added at 1, 10 and 100 nm during stage 4 increased the number of dopamine neurones at stage 5 by 72%, 80% and 62%, respectively, compared to the control group. The administration of progesterone at stage 5 did not induce significant changes in the number of dopamine neurones. These actions were not mediated by the activation of intracellular progesterone receptors because RU 486 did not block the positive effects of progesterone on differentiation to dopaminergic neurones. The results obtained suggest that progesterone should prove useful with respect to producing higher proportions of dopamine neurones from embryonic stem cells in the treatment of Parkinson's disease.

  9. Short communication: Plasma progesterone concentration and ovarian dynamics of lactating Jersey cows treated with 1 or 2 intravaginal progesterone inserts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraes, João G N; Silva, Paula R B; Bortoletto, Nathália; Scanavez, Alexandre L A; Chebel, Ricardo C

    2016-03-01

    The objectives of the current experiment were to determine circulating progesterone concentrations and ovarian follicle development of lactating Jersey cows treated with 1 or 2 controlled internal drug release (CIDR) insert containing 1.38 g of progesterone during proestrus. Cows were enrolled in the experiment at 34 ± 3 d in milk and were paired by parity, body condition score, body weight, and milk yield. Estrous cycles were presynchronized with an injection of GnRH concurrent with a new CIDR insert (study d -7) and 2 injections of PGF2α given 5 and 6 d after the GnRH injection (study d -2 and -1, respectively). Cows assigned to the 1CIDR treatment (n=30) or 2CIDR treatment (n=30) received 1 and 2 CIDR inserts, respectively, from study d 0 through 7. Control cows (n=10) did not receive further treatment. On study d -2 and daily from study d 0 through 7, ovaries were examined by transrectal ultrasound and blood samples were collected for determination of progesterone. On study d 7, CIDR inserts were removed after ultrasound exam and blood sample collection. Progesterone concentration from study d 0 through 7 was greatest for 2CIDR cows (2.17 ± 0.09 ng/mL), followed by 1CIDR cows (1.37 ± 0.10 ng/mL) and control cows (0.62 ± 0.21 ng/mL). The interaction between treatment and study day affected progesterone concentration from study d 0 through 7. The average increase in progesterone concentration from study d 1 through 7 was 0.80 ng/mL for 1CIDR and 1.72 ng/mL for 2CIDR cows compared with control cows. The percentage of cows that ovulated between study d 0 and 7 was greatest for control cows (80%), but it did not differ between 1CIDR (12%) and 2CIDR (3.7%) cows. Growth of class III follicles (10-17 mm) identified on study d 0 was affected by treatment because 1CIDR cows had larger class III follicles than 2CIDR cows on study d 5, 6 and 7. A larger proportion of control cows developed a new follicular wave between study d 0 and 7 (control=60.0%, 1CIDR=12.0%, 2

  10. The Role of Progesterone and a Novel Progesterone Receptor, Progesterone Receptor Membrane Component 1, in the Inflammatory Response of Fetal Membranes to Ureaplasma parvum Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liping Feng

    Full Text Available Ureaplasma parvum (U. parvum is gaining recognition as an important pathogen for chorioamnionitis and preterm premature rupture of membranes. We aimed to investigate the roles of progesterone (P4 and a novel progesterone receptor, progesterone receptor membrane component 1 (PGRMC1, in the response of fetal membranes to U. parvum. Fetal membrane cells (amnion, chorion and decidua were isolated and confirmed to be free of Mycoplasmataceae. Cells were treated with U. parvum (5x106 CFU, and adherence was quantified by qPCR. Amnion and chorion cells were transfected with scrambled siRNA or validated PGRMC1 siRNA for 72h. Cells were then treated with U. parvum for 4h with or without pretreatment with P4 (10-7 M or ethanol for 1h. Interleukin-8 (IL-8, matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9 and cyclooxygenase (COX-2 mRNA expression were quantified by qRT-PCR. Culture medium was harvested and analyzed for IL-8 and prostaglandin (PGE2 secretion by ELISA and MMP9 activity by zymography. U. parvum had a mean adherence of 15.0±0.6%, 16.9± 3.7% and 4.7±0.3% in cultured amnion, chorion and decidua cells, respectively. Exposure to U. parvum elicited significant inflammatory responses including induction of IL-8, COX-2, PGE2 and MMP9. A possible role of PGRMC1 was identified in the inhibition of U. parvum-stimulated COX-2 and MMP9 mRNA expression in chorion cells and MMP9 activity in amnion cells. On the other hand, it might enhance the U. parvum-stimulated IL-8 protein secretion in amnion cells. P4, mediated through PGRMC1, significantly inhibited U. Parvum-induced MMP9 mRNA and COX-2 mRNA expression in chorion cells. P4 appeared to attenuate U. parvum induced IL-8 mRNA expression in chorion cells, but this P4 effect might not mediated through PGRMC1. In summary, U. parvum preferentially adheres to and induces inflammatory responses in chorion and amnion cells. P4 and PGRMC1 appear to differentially modulate the inflammatory responses induced by U. parvum among

  11. Multiple-pattern stability in a photorefractive feedback system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwab, M.; Denz, C.; Saffman, M.

    1999-01-01

    We report on the observation of a multiple-pattern stability region in a photorefractive single-feedback system. Whereas hexagonal patterns are predominant for feedback with positive diffraction length we show that a variety of stable non-hexagonal patterns are generated for certain negative...

  12. Feedback som tredjeordensiagttagelse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ane Qvortrup

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Feedback tilskrives stor betydning for læring, men trods intensiv forskning på området synes det svært at fange, hvori feedbacks særlige potentiale består. I forsøgene på at gøre dette knyttes an til en række faktorer eller parametre, der fremhæves som centrale. En af disse faktorer er tid, hvor der kredses om forskellen mellem umiddelbar og forsinket feedback samt om fordele og ulemper ved hver af de to. I denne artikel knyttes der an til en forståelse af feedback som tredjeordensiagttagelse, og der sættes herfra fokus på, hvordan man i en praktisk undervisningssituation kan imødekomme tidsfaktoren knyttet til feedback. Med udgangspunkt i et undervisningsforløb på bachelorniveau, hvor der er arbejdet systematisk med feedback understøttet af Wikis, belyses det, hvordan et sådant arbejde synes at have potentiale for understøttelse af såvel læring som undervisning. En sådan teoretisk reflekteret belysning kan udgøre et refleksionsprogram for fremtidig planlægning af og løbende refleksion over undervisning.     The article investigates the effect of feedback on learning. Feedback has been shown to be one of the most powerful influences on achievement in education. But, in spite of much research on the matter, there is no agreement on how the special potential of feedback can be described, and consequently no agreement on what is good and bad feedback. This article sets out to rectify this omission by seeking a new theoretical framework that is sensitive to the complexity of the impact of feedback. The author propose a system theoretical frame and through its use identifies significant didactical issues. Although feedback is described as an internal, system-relative construction, when seen through a system theoretical lens different teaching environments create diverse conditions for feedback constructions. The final section of the paper explores this idea in relation to wikis.

  13. Effects of physiological and/or disease status on the response of postpartum dairy cows to synchronization of estrus using an intravaginal progesterone device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNally, Julie C; Crowe, Mark A; Roche, James F; Beltman, Marijke E

    2014-12-01

    Progesterone treatments are used to increase submission rates in postpartum dairy cows; however, in many cases the protocol is used as a blanket therapy for all cows without regard for physiological or disease state. The objective of this study was to identify the physiological or disease classes of cows that respond well (or not) to synchronization of estrus via progesterone. Dairy cows (n = 402) were monitored peri and postpartum to establish their physiological or disease status. Animals were classified as having negative energy balance, clinical lameness, uterine infection (UI), anovulatory anestrus, high somatic cell counts, and healthy (H). Blood samples were collected at five different time points and analyzed for metabolites. All animals received an 8-day controlled internal drug release protocol, which included GnRH at insertion and PGF2α the day before removal. Response to the protocol was determined by visual observation of estrus synchronization. Conception rate was determined by ultrasonography between Days 32 and 35 after artificial insemination. Animals without UI were 1.9 times more likely to respond and two times more likely to be confirmed pregnant than those with UI. There was no relationship between negative energy balance and clinical lameness in the visual estrous response, but both conditions were associated with reduced conception rates. Dairy cows in anovulatory anestrus responded successfully to the protocol in both estrous response and conception rates. High glutathione peroxidase concentrations had a positive effect on conception rates, whereas high non-esterified fatty acids and beta-hydroxybutyrate had a negative effect on the estrous response. In conclusion, disease and physiological states of dairy cows determined the response to progesterone-based synchronization. The more disease or physiological problems the cows had, the lower the estrous response and conception rates; cows with these problems were not ideal candidates for

  14. Neural Correlates of Feedback Processing in Decision Making under Risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beate eSchuermann

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Event-related brain potentials (ERP provide important information about the sensitivity of the brain to process varying risks. The aim of the present study was to determine how different risk levels are reflected in decision-related ERPs, namely the feedback-related negativity (FRN and the P300. Material and Methods. 20 participants conducted a probabilistic two-choice gambling task while an electroencephalogram was recorded. Choices were provided between a low-risk option yielding low rewards and low losses and a high-risk option yielding high rewards and high losses. While options differed in expected risks, they were equal in expected values and in feedback probabilities. Results. At the behavioral level, participants were generally risk-averse but modulated their risk-taking behavior according to reward history. An early positivity (P200 was enhanced on negative feedbacks in high-risk compared to low-risk options. With regard to the FRN, there were significant amplitude differences between positive and negative feedbacks in high-risk options, but not in low-risk options. While the FRN on negative feedbacks did not vary with decision riskiness, reduced amplitudes were found for positive feedbacks in high-risk relative to low-risk choices. P300 amplitudes were larger in high-risk decisions, and in an additive way, after negative compared to positive feedback. Discussion. The present study revealed significant influences of risk and valence processing on ERPs. FRN findings suggest that the reward prediction error signal is increased after high-risk decisions. The increased P200 on negative feedback in risky decisions suggests that large negative prediction errors are processed as early as in the P200 time range. The later P300 amplitude is sensitive to feedback valence as well as to the risk of a decision. Thus, the P300 carries additional information for reward processing, mainly the enhanced motivational significance of risky

  15. Gemcitabine resistance in breast cancer cells regulated by PI3K/AKT-mediated cellular proliferation exerts negative feedback via the MEK/MAPK and mTOR pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang XL

    2014-06-01

    ability of 231/Gem cells. Western blot analysis showed that treatment with a PI3K/AKT inhibitor decreased the expression levels of p-AKT, p-MEK, p-mTOR, and p-P70S6K; however, treatments with either MEK/MAPK or mTOR inhibitor significantly increased p-AKT expression. Thus, our data suggest that gemcitabine resistance in breast cancer cells is mainly mediated by activation of the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway. This occurs through elevated expression of p-AKT protein to promote cell proliferation and is negatively regulated by the MEK/MAPK and mTOR pathways. Keywords: chemoresistance, gemcitabine, breast cancer

  16. Feedback and efficient behavior.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandro Casal

    Full Text Available Feedback is an effective tool for promoting efficient behavior: it enhances individuals' awareness of choice consequences in complex settings. Our study aims to isolate the mechanisms underlying the effects of feedback on achieving efficient behavior in a controlled environment. We design a laboratory experiment in which individuals are not aware of the consequences of different alternatives and, thus, cannot easily identify the efficient ones. We introduce feedback as a mechanism to enhance the awareness of consequences and to stimulate exploration and search for efficient alternatives. We assess the efficacy of three different types of intervention: provision of social information, manipulation of the frequency, and framing of feedback. We find that feedback is most effective when it is framed in terms of losses, that it reduces efficiency when it includes information about inefficient peers' behavior, and that a lower frequency of feedback does not disrupt efficiency. By quantifying the effect of different types of feedback, our study suggests useful insights for policymakers.

  17. Feedback and Incentives:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Tor Viking; Poulsen, Anders; Villeval, Marie-Claire

    This paper experimentally investigates the impact of different pay and relative performance information policies on employee effort. We explore three information policies: No feedback about relative performance, feedback given halfway through the production period, and continuously updated feedba...... of positive peer effects since the underdogs almost never quit the competition even when lagging significantly behind, and frontrunners do not slack off. Moreover, in both pay schemes information feedback reduces the quality of the low performers' work.......This paper experimentally investigates the impact of different pay and relative performance information policies on employee effort. We explore three information policies: No feedback about relative performance, feedback given halfway through the production period, and continuously updated feedback....... The pay schemes are a piece rate payment scheme and a winner-takes-all tournament. We find that, regardless of the pay scheme used, feedback does not improve performance. There are no significant peer effects in the piece-rate pay scheme. In contrast, in the tournament scheme we find some evidence...

  18. Strategies for effective feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kritek, Patricia A

    2015-04-01

    Provision of regular feedback to trainees on clinical performance by supervising providers is increasingly recognized as an essential component of undergraduate and graduate health sciences education; however, many individuals have not been formally trained in this pedagogical skill. At the bedside or in the clinic, effective performance feedback can be accomplished by following four key steps. Begin by setting expectations that incorporate the trainee's personal goals and external objectives. Delineate how and when you will provide feedback to the learner. Next, directly observe the trainee's performance. This can be challenging while engaged on a busy clinical service, but a focus on discrete activities or interactions (e.g., family meeting, intravascular volume assessment using bedside ultrasound, or obtaining informed consent) is helpful. The third step is to plan and prioritize the feedback session. Feedback is most effective when given in a timely fashion and delivered in a safe environment. Limit the issues addressed because learners often disengage if confronted with too many deficiencies. Finally, when delivering feedback, begin by listening to the trainee's self-evaluation and then take a balanced approach. Describe in detail what the trainee does well and discuss opportunities for improvement with emphasis on specific, modifiable behaviors. The feedback loop is completed with a plan for follow-up reassessment. Through the use of these relatively simple practices, both the trainee and teacher can have a more productive learning experience.

  19. Feedback - fra et elevperspektiv

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Benedikte Vilslev; Pedersen, Bent Sortkær

    Feedback bliver i litteraturen igen og igen fremhævet som et af de mest effektive midler til at fremme elevers præstationer i skolen (Hattie og Timperley, 2007). Andre studier er dog inde på at feedback ikke altid er læringsfremmende og nogle viser endda at feedback kan have en negativ virkning i...... forhold til præstationer (Kluger & DeNisi, 1996). I forsøget på at forklare hvordan og hvorfor feedback virker (forskelligt), er der undersøgt flere dimensioner og forhold omkring feedback (se bl.a. Black og Wiliam, 1998; Hattie og Timperley, 2007; Shute, 2008). Dog er der få studier der undersøger...... hvordan feedback opleves fra et elevperspektiv (Ruiz-Primo og Li, 2013). Samtidig er der i feedbacklitteraturen en mangel på kvalitative studier, der kommer tæt på fænomenet feedback, som det viser sig i klasserummet (Ruiz-Primo og Li, 2013) i naturlige omgivelser (Black og Wiliam, 1998), og hvordan...

  20. Progesterone and non-specific immunologic mechanisms in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szekeres-Bartho, J; Par, G; Szereday, L; Smart, C Y; Achatz, I

    1997-09-01

    Progesterone-dependent immunomodulation is one of the mechanisms that enables pregnancy to proceed to term. Immunologic effects of progesterone are mediated by a protein named the progesterone-induced blocking factor (PIBF). Among other effects this protein inhibits natural killer (NK) activity and displays an anti-abortive effect in mice. Recently, we have shown that PIBF induces a Th2 shift in vitro. The present study was aimed at investigating the in vivo effect of PIBF on cytokine production, as well as the relationship between cytokine production, NK activity, and pregnancy loss. Balb-c mice on day 8.5 of pregnancy were injected intraperitoneally with 0.5 mg of rabbit anti-PIBF immunoglobulin G (IgG). Another group of mice was simultaneously treated with anti-NK monoclonal antibodies. Mice treated with the same amount of normal rabbit serum or untreated mice of similar gestational age were used as controls. The animals were sacrificed and their uteri were inspected. The ratio of living and resorbed embryos was determined. NK activity as well as cytokine expression on the spleen cells were determined by immunocytochemistry and enzyme-linked immunoadsorbent assay (ELISA). Mitogen-activated spleen cells from anti-PIBF-treated mice produced significantly (P < 0.001) less IL-10 than those of pregnant control mice. A significantly higher percentage (P < 0.001) of spleen cells from anti-PIBF-treated mice expressed interferon-gamma (IFN gamma) as determined by immunocytochemistry, than those of untreated pregnant mice. There was a positive relationship between the percentage of IFN gamma-positive spleen cells and resorption rates, and an inverse relationship between the latter and interleukin-10 (IL-10) production. All these effects were corrected by treatment with anti-NK antibodies. Our data suggest that PIBF contributes to the success of gestation via cytokine-mediated inhibition of NK activity.

  1. Neural correlates of feedback processing in obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endrass, Tanja; Koehne, Svenja; Riesel, Anja; Kathmann, Norbert

    2013-05-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) patients show hyperactive performance monitoring when monitoring their own actions. Hyperactive performance monitoring is related to OCD symptomatology, like the unflexibility of compulsive behaviors, and was suggested as a potential endophenotype for the disorder. However, thus far the functioning of the performance monitoring system in OCD remains unclear in processes where performance is not monitored in one's own actions internally, but through external feedback during learning. The present study investigated whether electrocortical indicators of feedback processing are hyperactive, and whether feedback-guided learning is compromised in OCD. A modified deterministic four-choice object reversal learning task was used that required recurrent feedback-based behavioral adjustment in response to changing reward contingencies. Electrophysiological correlates of feedback processing (i.e. feedback-related negativity [FRN] and P300) were measured in 25 OCD patients and 25 matched healthy comparison subjects. Deficits in behavioral adjustment were found in terms of higher error rates of OCD patients in response to negative feedback. Whereas the FRN was unchanged for reversal negative feedback, it was reduced for negative feedback that indicated that a newly selected stimulus was still incorrect. The observed FRN reduction suggests attenuated monitoring of feedback during the learning process in OCD potentially contributing to a deficit in adaptive behavior reflected in obsessive thoughts and actions. The reduction of FRN amplitudes contrasts with overactive performance monitoring of self-generated errors. Nevertheless, the findings contribute to the theoretical framework of performance monitoring, suggesting a dissociation of processing systems for actions and feedback with specific alterations of these two systems in OCD. © 2013 American Psychological Association

  2. Regional feedbacks under changing climate and land-use conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batlle Bayer, L.; van den Hurk, B. J. J. M.; Strengers, B. J.; van Minnen, J. G.

    2012-04-01

    Ecosystem responses to a changing climate and human-induced climate forcings (e.g. deforestation) might amplify (positive feedback) or dampen (negative feedback) the initial climate response. Feedbacks may include the biogeochemical (e.g. carbon cycle) and biogeophysical feedbacks (e.g. albedo and hydrological cycle). Here, we first review the most important feedbacks and put them into the context of a conceptual framework, including the major processes and interactions between terrestrial ecosystems and climate. We explore potential regional feedbacks in four hot spots with pronounced potential changes in land-use/management and local climate: sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), Europe, the Amazon Basin and South and Southeast Asia. For each region, the relevant human-induced climate forcings and feedbacks were identified based on published literature. When evapotranspiration is limited by a soil water deficit, heat waves in Europe are amplified (positive soil moisture-temperature feedback). Drought events in the Amazon lead to further rainfall reduction when water recycling processes are affected (positive soil moisture-precipitation feedback). In SSA, the adoption of irrigation in the commonly rainfed systems can modulate the negative soil moisture-temperature feedback. In contrast, future water shortage in South and Southeast Asia can turn the negative soil moisture-temperature feedback into a positive one. Further research including advanced modeling strategies is needed to isolate the dominant processes affecting the strength and sign of the feedbacks. In addition, the socio-economic dimension needs to be considered in the ecosystems-climate system to include the essential role of human decisions on land-use and land-cover change (LULCC). In this context, enhanced integration between Earth System (ES) and Integrated Assessment (IA) modeling communities is strongly recommended.

  3. Genetic Susceptibility to Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Stevens, Kristen N.; Vachon, Celine M.; Couch, Fergus J.

    2013-01-01

    Triple negative breast cancers (TNBC), defined by the absence of estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 expression, account for 12-24% of all breast cancers. TNBC is associated with early recurrence of disease and poor outcome. Germline mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 breast cancer susceptibility genes have been associated with up to 15% of TNBC, and TNBC accounts for 70% of breast tumors arising in BRCA1 mutation carriers and 16-23% of breast ...

  4. Prenatal Exposure to Progesterone Affects Sexual Orientation in Humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinisch, June M.; Mortensen, Erik Lykke; Sanders, Stephanie A.

    2017-01-01

    Prenatal sex hormone levels affect physical and behavioral sexual differentiation in animals and humans. Although prenatal hormones are theorized to influence sexual orientation in humans, evidence is sparse. Sexual orientation variables for 34 prenatally progesterone-exposed subjects (17 males...... preparation. Controls were matched on 14 physical, medical, and socioeconomic variables. A structured interview conducted by a psychologist and self-administered questionnaires were used to collect data on sexual orientation, self-identification, attraction to the same and other sex, and history of sexual...... in the development of sexual orientation....

  5. Luteal Support for IVF/ICSI Cycles with Crinone 8% (90 mg Twice Daily Results in Higher Pregnancy Rates Than with Intramuscular Progesterone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Hong Ho

    2008-08-01

    Conclusion: The use of vaginal progesterone gel twice daily for luteal support results in better pregnancy outcomes than intramuscular progesterone. A high local progesterone effect from vaginal gel might improve endometrial receptivity under extraordinarily high serum estradiol levels.

  6. Online assessment: what influences students to engage with feedback?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Alan

    2014-07-01

    The intention of giving written feedback is to close the gap between the standard achieved and the standard desired, but students do not always read it. Web-based marking tools are increasingly being used in assessment practices to deliver the feedback. What motivates students to read the feedback provided, especially since the advent of these online marking tools, is poorly understood. This research looked at the factors likely to influence a medical student's engagement with written feedback delivered through an online marking tool (grademark by Turnitin). What motivates students to read the feedback provided Third-year medical students on a UK undergraduate medical course submitted an assignment online. A questionnaire was distributed to a cohort of them following the release of their results and feedback, allowing quantitative and qualitative data collection. Software recorded whether they opened their feedback. Previous examination performance figures were also collated. Online feedback is accessible and acceptable to the majority of students. Personal demographics, computer literacy, previous course performance, or personal motivational drivers did not predict those who did or did not read it. Some students reported seeing little value in feedback because of their previous negative experiences. A minority found feedback hurtful, and were likely to show avoidance behaviours. This research found that feedback provided through an online marking tool overcame many of the problems associated with handwritten feedback, but alone was not enough to ensure universal engagement. Feedback dialogues are proposed as a method to overcome negative student experiences, enhance tutor performance and encourage future student engagement. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. 'Playing the game': How do surgical trainees seek feedback using workplace-based assessment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaunt, Anne; Patel, Abhilasha; Rusius, Victoria; Royle, T James; Markham, Deborah H; Pawlikowska, Teresa

    2017-09-01

    Although trainees and trainers find feedback interactions beneficial, difficulties in giving and receiving feedback are reported. Few studies have explored what drives trainees to seek feedback. This study explores how workplace-based assessments (WBAs) influence the ways surgical trainees seek feedback and feedback interactions. Utilising a template analysis approach, we conducted 10 focus groups with 42 surgical trainees from four regions across the UK. Data were independently coded by three researchers, incorporating three a priori themes identified from a previous quantitative study. Further themes emerged from exploration of these data. The final template, agreed by the three researchers, was applied to all focus group transcripts. The themes were linked in a diagrammatical form to allow critical exploration of the data. Trainees' perceptions of the purpose of WBA for learning or an assessment of learning, and their relationship with their trainer impacted upon how trainees chose to use WBA. Perceiving WBA as a test led trainees to 'play the game': seek positive and avoid negative feedback through WBA. Perceiving WBA as a chance to learn led trainees to seek negative feedback. Some trainees sought negative feedback outside WBA. Negative feedback was more important for changing practice compared with positive feedback, which enabled trainees to 'look good' but had less of an effect on changing clinical practice. The timing of feedback relative to WBA was also important, with immediate feedback being more beneficial for learning; however, delayed feedback was still sought using WBA. Trainees' perceptions of the purpose of WBA and their relationship with their trainer informed when they chose to seek feedback. Trainees who perceived WBA as a test were led to 'play the game' by seeking positive and avoiding negative feedback. Outside of WBA, trainees sought negative feedback, which was most important for change in practice. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and The

  8. Does Constructive Performance Feedback Improve Citizenship Intentions and Job Satisfaction? The Roles of Perceived Opportunities for Advancement, Respect, and Mood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, Kristin L.; Kulkarni, Mukta

    2012-01-01

    Organizational experts have long touted the importance of delivering negative performance feedback in a manner that enhances employee receptivity to feedback, yet the broader impacts of constructive feedback have received relatively little attention. The present investigation explored the impact of constructive, critical feedback on organizational…

  9. Feedback in analog circuits

    CERN Document Server

    Ochoa, Agustin

    2016-01-01

    This book describes a consistent and direct methodology to the analysis and design of analog circuits with particular application to circuits containing feedback. The analysis and design of circuits containing feedback is generally presented by either following a series of examples where each circuit is simplified through the use of insight or experience (someone else’s), or a complete nodal-matrix analysis generating lots of algebra. Neither of these approaches leads to gaining insight into the design process easily. The author develops a systematic approach to circuit analysis, the Driving Point Impedance and Signal Flow Graphs (DPI/SFG) method that does not require a-priori insight to the circuit being considered and results in factored analysis supporting the design function. This approach enables designers to account fully for loading and the bi-directional nature of elements both in the feedback path and in the amplifier itself, properties many times assumed negligible and ignored. Feedback circuits a...

  10. NAIP 2015 Imagery Feedback

    Data.gov (United States)

    Farm Service Agency, Department of Agriculture — The NAIP 2015 Imagery Feedback web application allows users to make comments and observations about the quality of the 2015 National Agriculture Imagery Program...

  11. Dynamic aspects of the tubuloglomerular feedback mechanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holstein-Rathlou, N H

    1992-01-01

    Tubuloglomerular feedback (TGF) is an important intrarenal regulatory mechanism, which acts to stabilize renal blood flow, GFR, and the tubular flow rate. The anatomical basis for this negative feedback system is the Juxtaglomerular Apparatus (JGA). This is located at the point of contact between......, proximal tubular compliance, and TGF function. It is concluded that the thiobarbiturate inactin, the most used anesthetic, has more detrimental effects on renal function than halothane and other barbiturates. In halothane anesthetized rats, the proximal tubular pressure oscillates with a frequency of 30...

  12. Vaginal cytology, vaginoscopy and progesterone profile: breeding tools in bitches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. C. S. Reddy

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The exfoliative vaginal cytology, vaginoscopic examination of vaginal mucosa and progesterone profiles were recorded in an attempt to identify the ideal time of breeding in bitches. A total of 18 anestrus bitches were selected and divided into 03 groups (Control, CABG and eCG groups. The bitches in control group did not receive any treatment and exhibited estrus. The estrus was induced with Cabergoline (CABG and equine Chorionic Gonadotropin (eCG in the other two groups of bitches. In control group, higher percentage of superficial cells (89.94 ± 0.64 and lower percentage of intermediate (7.30 ± 0.77 and parabasal cells (2.76 ± 0.30 were characteristic vaginal cytological changes during estrus. Vaginoscopic examination of CABG group of bitches revealed that the vaginal mucus was creamy and paper white with angular shrinkage during estrus. In eCG group of bitches, the plasma progesterone concentration was 1.55 ± 0.19 ng/ml on day 8.00 ± 0.71 of proestrus. The conception rates were 66.66, 83.33 and 83.33 per cent in Control, Cabergoline and eCG groups, respectively. The litter size varied from 3.50 + 1.12 to 4.83 + 0.83 in the three groups.

  13. Progesterone receptor modulates ERα action in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Hisham; Russell, I Alasdair; Stark, Rory; Rueda, Oscar M; Hickey, Theresa E; Tarulli, Gerard A; Serandour, Aurelien A; Serandour, Aurelien A A; Birrell, Stephen N; Bruna, Alejandra; Saadi, Amel; Menon, Suraj; Hadfield, James; Pugh, Michelle; Raj, Ganesh V; Brown, Gordon D; D'Santos, Clive; Robinson, Jessica L L; Silva, Grace; Launchbury, Rosalind; Perou, Charles M; Stingl, John; Caldas, Carlos; Tilley, Wayne D; Carroll, Jason S

    2015-07-16

    Progesterone receptor (PR) expression is used as a biomarker of oestrogen receptor-α (ERα) function and breast cancer prognosis. Here we show that PR is not merely an ERα-induced gene target, but is also an ERα-associated protein that modulates its behaviour. In the presence of agonist ligands, PR associates with ERα to direct ERα chromatin binding events within breast cancer cells, resulting in a unique gene expression programme that is associated with good clinical outcome. Progesterone inhibited oestrogen-mediated growth of ERα(+) cell line xenografts and primary ERα(+) breast tumour explants, and had increased anti-proliferative effects when coupled with an ERα antagonist. Copy number loss of PGR, the gene coding for PR, is a common feature in ERα(+) breast cancers, explaining lower PR levels in a subset of cases. Our findings indicate that PR functions as a molecular rheostat to control ERα chromatin binding and transcriptional activity, which has important implications for prognosis and therapeutic interventions.

  14. Progesterone and Bone: Actions Promoting Bone Health in Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanadin Seifert-Klauss

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Estradiol (E2 and progesterone (P4 collaborate within bone remodelling on resorption (E2 and formation (P4. We integrate evidence that P4 may prevent and, with antiresorptives, treat women's osteoporosis. P4 stimulates osteoblast differentiation in vitro. Menarche (E2 and onset of ovulation (P4 both contribute to peak BMD. Meta-analysis of 5 studies confirms that regularly cycling premenopausal women lose bone mineral density (BMD related to subclinical ovulatory disturbances (SODs. Cyclic progestin prevents bone loss in healthy premenopausal women with amenorrhea or SOD. BMD loss is more rapid in perimenopause than postmenopause—decreased bone formation due to P4 deficiency contributes. In 4 placebo-controlled RCTs, BMD loss is not prevented by P4 in postmenopausal women with increased bone turnover. However, 5 studies of E2-MPA co-therapy show greater BMD increases versus E2 alone. P4 fracture data are lacking. P4 prevents bone loss in pre- and possibly perimenopausal women; progesterone co-therapy with antiresorptives may increase bone formation and BMD.

  15. Novel Progesterone Receptors: Neural Localization and Possible Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra L Petersen

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Progesterone (P4 regulates a wide range of neural functions and likely acts through multiple receptors. Over the past 30 years, most studies investigating neural effects of P4 focused on genomic and non-genomic actions of the classical progestin receptor (PGR. More recently the focus has widened to include two groups of non-classical P4 signaling molecules. Members of the Class II progestin and adipoQ receptor (PAQR family are called membrane progestin receptors (mPRs and include: mPRα (PAQR7, mPRβ (PAQR8, mPRγ (PAQR5, mPRδ (PAQR6 and mPRε (PAQR9. Members of the b5-like heme/steroid-binding protein family include progesterone receptor membrane component 1 (PGRMC1, PGRMC2, neudesin and neuferricin. Results of our recent mapping studies show that members of the PGRMC1/S2R family, but not mPRs, are quite abundant in forebrain structures important for neuroendocrine regulation and other non-genomic effects of P4. Herein we describe the structures, neuroanatomical localization and signaling mechanisms of these molecules. We also discuss possible roles for Pgrmc1/S2R in gonadotropin release, feminine sexual behaviors, fluid balance and neuroprotection, as well as catamenial epilepsy.

  16. Progesterone Inhibits Human Myometrial Contractions by Action on Membrane Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Remzi Gokdeniz

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: The mechanisms for myometrial inhibition are still being investigated Aim: To examine mechanisms of progesterone (P4 inhibition of uterine contractility. Methods: Prospective study Tertiary care center at St. Joseph’s Hospital and at Maricopa Hospital, Phoenix, AZ and research center in Arizona, USA. During 2010-2011, 24 women given birth by cesarean section. Uterine tissues from women (n=24 at term were suspended in organ chambers and exposed to various agents. Contractility was registered and compared before and after addition of agents. Tissues were treated with P4 alone, a progestin (R5020 with low affinity to the progesterone membrane receptor (mPR, or a non-sex steroid (cholesterol. Other tissues were pretreated with inhibitors of adenylate cyclase (SQ 22536, phosphodiesterase (rolipram, nitric oxide (NO synthases (L-NAME or a nuclear P4 receptor antagonist (mifepristone, MIF, followed by P4. Data were analyzed by ANOVA. Results: P4 (P0.05 inhibitory effects. P4 inhibition is not blocked by MIF, SQ, ODQ, rolipram or L-NAME (P>0.05. Conclusions: P4 rapidly inhibits myometrial contractility by nongenomic mechanisms through action on mPR but not via cAMP, cGMP, or NO [Cukurova Med J 2013; 38(1.000: 92-102

  17. Stress-induced increases in progesterone and cortisol in naturally cycling women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Ycaza Herrera

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Studies with animals of both sexes show that the adrenal glands release progesterone in addition to cortisol in response to stress. However, little is known about the progesterone response to stress in naturally cycling women. We investigated the effect of stress on estradiol, progesterone, and cortisol levels in women during the follicular phase of the menstrual cycle. We found that physical stress (the cold pressor test had no effect on estradiol levels, but increased progesterone and cortisol. We also found positive correlations between baseline progesterone and cortisol levels, as well as between the change in progesterone and cortisol before and after water exposure in both the stress and control sessions. Mediation analyses revealed during the stress session, the change in progesterone from baseline to 42-min post-stress onset was mediated by the magnitude of change in cortisol levels across the same time span. Overall, these findings reveal that progesterone released in response to stress as observed in animals and men extends to women during the low ovarian output follicular phase of the menstrual cycle, and that the mechanism of release may be similar to the mechanism of cortisol release.

  18. Progesterone-induced spike-wave discharges are inhibited by finasteride

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Budziszewska, B.; Tetich, M.; Luijtelaar, E.L.J.M. van; Lason, W.

    2004-01-01

    Previously, it was found that progesterone aggravates spike-wave discharges (SWD) in WAG/Rij rats in a non-genomic way. In order to elucidate whether the regulatory effect of progesterone depends on its conversion to allopregnanolone, the effect of finasteride, a 5?-reductase inhibitor, on

  19. Development of a competitive lateral flow immunoassay for progesterone : influence of coating conjugates and buffer components

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Posthuma-Trumpie, Geertruida A.; Korf, Jakob; van Amerongen, Aart

    2008-01-01

    Several aspects of the development of competitive lateral flow immunoassays (LFIAs) are described. The quantitation of progesterone is taken as an example. The LFIA format consisted of a nitrocellulose membrane spotted with various progesterone conjugates as the test line. A mixture of primary

  20. Development of a competitive lateral flow immunoassay for progesterone: influence of coating conjugates and buffer components

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Posthuma-Trumpie, G.A.; Korf, J.; Amerongen, van A.

    2008-01-01

    Several aspects of the development of competitive lateral flow immunoassays (LFIAs) are described. The quantitation of progesterone is taken as an example. The LFIA format consisted of a nitrocellulose membrane spotted with various progesterone conjugates as the test line. A mixture of primary

  1. Serum progesterone as an indicator of cyclic activity in post-partum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Serum progesterone as an indicator of cyclic activity in post-partum goat does. V.M. Mmbengwa ... Reproduction is a major factor contributing to the efficiency of meat and milk production (Khanum et al.,. 2008). .... where energy intake was limited, exhibited low levels of serum progesterone concentrations and consequently.

  2. Radioimmunoassays to determine the presence of progesterone and estrone in the starfish Asterias rubens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dieleman, S.J.; Schoenmakers, H.J.N.

    1979-01-01

    RIA's have been made for progesterone and estrone with the antisera S74B7 and 7604-7 40, respectively, which will be described. The characteristics of the RIA for progesterone resemble those of other reported RIA's. The antiserum for the RIA of estrone is highly specific, with main cross-reactions

  3. Influence of the reuse of progesterone implants in a fixed-time ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    aghomotsegin

    2015-01-28

    Jan 28, 2015 ... the reuse of the P4 implant can influence the conception rates of dairy cows. Key words: Heat stress, Holstein cows, ... progesterone concentration achieved after insertion of new or reused progesterone ... insemination was performed with semen from the same bull and single inseminator. A pregnancy ...

  4. Oral progesterone decreases saccadic eye velocity and increases sedation in women.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broekhoven, F. van; Backstrom, T.; Verkes, R.J.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the neurophysiological and behavioural effects of a single dose of progesterone in women. Allopregnanolone is a metabolite of progesterone and a potent positive modulator of the GABA(A) receptor and produces sedative and anxiolytic effects. This study was

  5. Progesterone treatment shows greater protection in brain vs. retina in a rat model of middle cerebral artery occlusion: Progesterone receptor levels may play an important role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Rachael S; Sayeed, Iqbal; Oumarbaeva, Yuliya; Morrison, Katherine C; Choi, Paul H; Pardue, Machelle T; Stein, Donald G

    2016-11-22

    To determine whether inflammation increases in retina as it does in brain following middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO), and whether the neurosteroid progesterone, shown to have protective effects in both retina and brain after MCAO, reduces inflammation in retina as well as brain. MCAO rats treated systemically with progesterone or vehicle were compared with shams. Protein levels of cytosolic NF-κB, nuclear NF-κB, phosphorylated NF-κB, IL-6, TNF-α, CD11b, progesterone receptor A and B, and pregnane X receptor were assessed in retinas and brains at 24 and 48 h using western blots. Following MCAO, significant increases were observed in the following inflammatory markers: pNF-κB and CD11b at 24 h in both brain and retina, nuclear NF-κB at 24 h in brain and 48 h in retina, and TNF-α at 24 h in brain.Progesterone treatment in MCAO animals significantly attenuated levels of the following markers in brain: pNF-κB, nuclear NF-κB, IL-6, TNF-α, and CD11b, with significantly increased levels of cytosolic NF-κB. Retinas from progesterone-treated animals showed significantly reduced levels of nuclear NF-κB and IL-6 and increased levels of cytosolic NF-κB, with a trend for reduction in other markers. Post-MCAO, progesterone receptors A and B were upregulated in brain and downregulated in retina. Inflammatory markers increased in both brain and retina after MCAO, with greater increases observed in brain. Progesterone treatment reduced inflammation, with more dramatic reductions observed in brain than retina. This differential effect may be due to differences in the response of progesterone receptors in brain and retina after injury.

  6. Effects of dexamethasone on progesterone and estrogen profiles and uterine progesterone receptor localization during pregnancy in Sahel goat in Semi-Arid region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dauda Yahi

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the widespread use of dexamethasone in veterinary and human medicine, it is reported to cause some severe pregnancy related side effects like abortion in some animals. The mechanism of the response is not clear but seems to be related to interspecies and/or breed difference in response which may involve alterations in the concentrations of some reproductive hormones. Methods Twenty Sahel goats comprising 18 does and 2 bucks were used for this study. Pregnancies were achieved by natural mating after synchronization. Repeated dexamethasone injections were given at 0.25 mg/kg body weight. Blood samples were collected biweekly for hormonal assay. Uterine biopsies were harvested at days 28 and day 78 of gestation through caesarean section for immunohistochemical analysis using 3 pregnant does randomly selected from each group at each instant. Data were expressed as Means ± Standard Deviations and analyzed using statistical soft ware package, GraphPad Instant, version 3.0 (2003 and progesterone receptor (PR were scored semi-quantitatively. Results Dexamethasone treatments had no significant (p > 0.05 effect on progesterone and estrogen concentrations in pregnant Sahel goats but up regulated PR from 2+ to 3+ in second trimester. Conclusion As dexamethasone adverse effect on placenta is an established fact, the lack of effect on progesterone level in this study may be due to the fact that unlike other species whose progesterone production during pregnancy is placenta – dependent, in goats is corpus luteum - dependent. Consequently dexamethasone adverse effect on placenta reported in literatures did not influence progesterone levels during pregnancy in Sahel goat. The up regulation of progesterone receptor (PR in Sahel goat gravid uterus is a beneficial effects and that dexamethasone can safely be used in corpus luteum – dependent progesterone secreting pregnant animal species like Sahel goat and camel. Therefore

  7. Effects of dexamethasone on progesterone and estrogen profiles and uterine progesterone receptor localization during pregnancy in Sahel goat in Semi-Arid region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahi, Dauda; Ojo, Nicholas Adetayo; Mshelia, Gideon Dauda

    2017-01-01

    Despite the widespread use of dexamethasone in veterinary and human medicine, it is reported to cause some severe pregnancy related side effects like abortion in some animals. The mechanism of the response is not clear but seems to be related to interspecies and/or breed difference in response which may involve alterations in the concentrations of some reproductive hormones. Twenty Sahel goats comprising 18 does and 2 bucks were used for this study. Pregnancies were achieved by natural mating after synchronization. Repeated dexamethasone injections were given at 0.25 mg/kg body weight. Blood samples were collected biweekly for hormonal assay. Uterine biopsies were harvested at days 28 and day 78 of gestation through caesarean section for immunohistochemical analysis using 3 pregnant does randomly selected from each group at each instant. Data were expressed as Means ± Standard Deviations and analyzed using statistical soft ware package, GraphPad Instant, version 3.0 (2003) and progesterone receptor (PR) were scored semi-quantitatively. Dexamethasone treatments had no significant (p > 0.05) effect on progesterone and estrogen concentrations in pregnant Sahel goats but up regulated PR from 2+ to 3+ in second trimester. As dexamethasone adverse effect on placenta is an established fact, the lack of effect on progesterone level in this study may be due to the fact that unlike other species whose progesterone production during pregnancy is placenta - dependent, in goats is corpus luteum - dependent. Consequently dexamethasone adverse effect on placenta reported in literatures did not influence progesterone levels during pregnancy in Sahel goat. The up regulation of progesterone receptor (PR) in Sahel goat gravid uterus is a beneficial effects and that dexamethasone can safely be used in corpus luteum - dependent progesterone secreting pregnant animal species like Sahel goat and camel. Therefore source of progesterone secretions during pregnancy should be considered

  8. Positive Feedback From Male Authority Figures Boosts Women's Math Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Lora E; Kondrak, Cheryl L; Ward, Deborah E; Streamer, Lindsey

    2018-03-01

    People often search for cues in the environment to determine whether or not they will be judged or treated negatively based on their social identities. Accordingly, feedback from gatekeepers-members of majority groups who hold authority and power in a field-may be an especially important cue for those at risk of experiencing social identity threat, such as women in math settings. Across a series of studies, women who received positive ("Good job!") versus objective (score only) feedback from a male (vs. female) authority figure in math reported greater confidence; belonging; self-efficacy; more favorable Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) attitudes/identification/interest; and greater implicit identification with math. Men were affected only by the type of math feedback they received, not by the source of feedback. A meta-analysis across studies confirmed results. Together, these findings suggest that positive feedback from gatekeepers is an important situational cue that can improve the outcomes of negatively stereotyped groups.

  9. Students’ expectations of feedback given on draft writing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zach Simpson

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Academic writing is the primary means of assessing university students and feedback (oral or written responses on writing can contribute significantly to student learning and success (Ferris, 2003; Hyland & Hyland, 2006. This study explores students’ expectations of feedback on draft writing. The research design was two-pronged. The initial quantitative aspect employed a questionnaire which students completed after receiving feedback from Writing Centre consultants who aim to give developmental feedback. A subsequent phase involved focus groups with volunteer students. This mixed methods design allowed for greater depth of understanding as the qualitative findings extended the quantitative results. The study concludes that students expect feedback to be understandable, encouraging and to focus on both positive and negative aspects of their writing. Importantly, students expect feedback to ‘unpack’ the conventions of academic literacy while still encouraging independence and originality.

  10. Negative plant soil feedback explaining ring formation in clonal plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carteni, F.; Marasco, A.; Bonanomi, G.; Mazzoleni, S.; Rietkerk, M.G.; Giannino, F.

    2012-01-01

    Ring shaped patches of clonal plants have been reported in different environments, but the mechanisms underlying such pattern formation are still poorly explained. Water depletion in the inner tussocks zone has been proposed as a possible cause, although ring patterns have been also observed in

  11. Negative consequences of positive feedbacks in US wildfire management

    Science.gov (United States)

    David E. Calkin; Matthew P. Thompson; Mark A. Finney

    2015-01-01

    Over the last two decades wildfire activity, damage, and management cost within the US have increased substantially. These increases have been associated with a number of factors including climate change and fuel accumulation due to a century of active fire suppression. The increased fire activity has occurred during a time of significant ex-urban development of the...

  12. A biopsychosocial model based on negative feedback and control

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Carey, Timothy A; Mansell, Warren; Tai, Sara J

    2014-01-01

    Although the biopsychosocial model has been a popular topic of discussion for over four decades it has not had the traction in fields of research that might be expected of such an intuitively appealing idea...

  13. The Influence of Teacher Feedback on Children's Perceptions of Student-Teacher Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skipper, Yvonne; Douglas, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Background: Teachers can deliver feedback using person ("you are clever") or process terms ("you worked hard"). Person feedback can lead to negative academic outcomes, but there is little experimental research examining the impact of feedback on children's perceptions of the student-teacher relationship. Aim: We examined the…

  14. The Effect of Positive Feedback in a Constraint-Based Intelligent Tutoring System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitrovic, Antonija; Ohlsson, Stellan; Barrow, Devon K.

    2013-01-01

    Tutoring technologies for supporting learning from errors via negative feedback are highly developed and have proven their worth in empirical evaluations. However, observations of empirical tutoring dialogs highlight the importance of positive feedback in the practice of expert tutoring. We hypothesize that positive feedback works by reducing…

  15. Vaginal versus intramuscular progesterone in the prevention of preterm labor and their effect on uterine and fetal blood flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azza A. Abd El Hameed

    2012-09-01

    Conclusion: Vaginally administrated progesterone was nearly as equally effective as intra muscular progesterone in the prevention of PTL in women at risk and both were associated with significant reduction in fetal MCA-PI and RI, but a significant reduction in uterine artery RI and PI was observed only after vaginal progesterone.

  16. Encouraging residents to seek feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delva, Dianne; Sargeant, Joan; Miller, Stephen; Holland, Joanna; Alexiadis Brown, Peggy; Leblanc, Constance; Lightfoot, Kathryn; Mann, Karen

    2013-12-01

    To explore resident and faculty perceptions of the feedback process, especially residents' feedback-seeking activities. We conducted focus groups of faculty and residents exploring experiences in giving and receiving feedback, feedback-seeking, and suggestions to support feedback-seeking. Using qualitative methods and an iterative process, all authors analyzed the transcribed audiotapes to identify and confirm themes. Emerging themes fit a framework situating resident feedback-seeking as dependent on four central factors: (1) learning/workplace culture, (2) relationships, (3) purpose/quality of feedback, (4) emotional responses to feedback. Residents and faculty agreed on many supports and barriers to feedback-seeking. Strengthening the workplace/learning culture through longitudinal experiences, use of feedback forms and explicit expectations for residents to seek feedback, coupled with providing a sense of safety and adequate time for observation and providing feedback were suggested. Tensions between faculty and resident perceptions regarding feedback-seeking related to fear of being found deficient, the emotional costs related to corrective feedback and perceptions that completing clinical work is more valued than learning. Resident feedback-seeking is influenced by multiple factors requiring attention to both faculty and learner roles. Further study of specific influences and strategies to mitigate the tensions will inform how best to support residents in seeking feedback.

  17. Feedback, Lineages and Self-Organizing Morphogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameeran Kunche

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Feedback regulation of cell lineage progression plays an important role in tissue size homeostasis, but whether such feedback also plays an important role in tissue morphogenesis has yet to be explored. Here we use mathematical modeling to show that a particular feedback architecture in which both positive and negative diffusible signals act on stem and/or progenitor cells leads to the appearance of bistable or bi-modal growth behaviors, ultrasensitivity to external growth cues, local growth-driven budding, self-sustaining elongation, and the triggering of self-organization in the form of lamellar fingers. Such behaviors arise not through regulation of cell cycle speeds, but through the control of stem or progenitor self-renewal. Even though the spatial patterns that arise in this setting are the result of interactions between diffusible factors with antagonistic effects, morphogenesis is not the consequence of Turing-type instabilities.

  18. Feedback, Lineages and Self-Organizing Morphogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calof, Anne L.; Lowengrub, John S.; Lander, Arthur D.

    2016-01-01

    Feedback regulation of cell lineage progression plays an important role in tissue size homeostasis, but whether such feedback also plays an important role in tissue morphogenesis has yet to be explored. Here we use mathematical modeling to show that a particular feedback architecture in which both positive and negative diffusible signals act on stem and/or progenitor cells leads to the appearance of bistable or bi-modal growth behaviors, ultrasensitivity to external growth cues, local growth-driven budding, self-sustaining elongation, and the triggering of self-organization in the form of lamellar fingers. Such behaviors arise not through regulation of cell cycle speeds, but through the control of stem or progenitor self-renewal. Even though the spatial patterns that arise in this setting are the result of interactions between diffusible factors with antagonistic effects, morphogenesis is not the consequence of Turing-type instabilities. PMID:26989903

  19. Preimplantation Factor (PIF Promotes HLA-G, -E, -F, -C Expression in JEG-3 Choriocarcinoma Cells and Endogenous Progesterone Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miya Soukaina Hakam

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Pregnancy success requires mandatory maternal tolerance of the semi/ allogeneic embryo involving embryo-derived signals. Expression levels of PreImplantation Factor (PIF, a novel peptide secreted by viable embryos, correlate with embryo development, and its early detection in circulation correlates with a favourable pregnancy outcome. PIF enhances endometrial receptivity to promote embryo implantation. Via the p53 pathway, it increases trophoblast invasion, improving cell survival / immune privilege. PIF also reduces spontaneous and LPS-induced foetal death in immune naïve murine model. We examined PIF effect on gene expression of human leukocyte antigen (HLA-G, -E -F and –C and the influence of PIF on local progesterone activity in JEG-3 choriocarcinoma cells. Methods: PIF and progesterone (P4 effects on JEG-3 cells surface and intracellular HLA molecules was tested using monoclonal antibodies, flow cytometry, and Western blotting. PIF and IL17 effects on P4 and cytokines secretion was determined by ELISA. PIF and P4 effects on JEG-3 cells proteome was examined using 2D gel staining followed by spot analysis, mass spectrometry and bioinformatic analysis. Results: In cytotrophoblastic JEG-3 cells PIF increased intracellular expression of HLA-G, HLA-F, HLA-E and HLA-C and surface expression of HLA-G, HLA-E and HLA-C in dose and time dependent manner. In case of HLA-E, -F results were confirmed also by Western blot. Proteome analysis confirmed an increase in HLA-G, pro-tolerance FOXP3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs, coagulation factors and complement regulator. In contrast, PIF reduced PRDX2 and HSP70s to negate oxidative stress and protein misfolding. PIF enhanced local progesterone activity, increasing steroid secretion and the receptor protein. It also promoted the secretion of the Th1/Th2 cytokines (IL-10, IL-1β, IL-8, GM-CSF and TGF-β1, resulting in improved maternal signalling. Conclusion: PIF can generate a pro

  20. Global climate feedbacks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manowitz, B.

    1990-10-01

    The important physical, chemical, and biological events that affect global climate change occur on a mesoscale -- requiring high spatial resolution for their analysis. The Department of Energy has formulated two major initiatives under the US Global Change Program: ARM (Atmospheric Radiation Measurements), and CHAMMP (Computer Hardware Advanced Mathematics and Model Physics). ARM is designed to use ground and air-craft based observations to document profiles of atmospheric composition, clouds, and radiative fluxes. With research and models of important physical processes, ARM will delineate the relationships between trace gases, aerosol and cloud structure, and radiative transfer in the atmosphere, and will improve the parameterization of global circulation models. The present GCMs do not model important feedbacks, including those from clouds, oceans, and land processes. The purpose of this workshop is to identify such potential feedbacks, to evaluate the uncertainties in the feedback processes (and, if possible, to parameterize the feedback processes so that they can be treated in a GCM), and to recommend research programs that will reduce the uncertainties in important feedback processes. Individual reports are processed separately for the data bases.

  1. Comparison of the administration of progesterone versus progesterone and vitamin D in improvement of outcomes in patients with traumatic brain injury: A randomized clinical trial with placebo group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aminmansour, Bahram; Nikbakht, Hossein; Ghorbani, Abbas; Rezvani, Majid; Rahmani, Paiman; Torkashvand, Mostaffa; Nourian, Mohammadamin; Moradi, Mehran

    2012-01-01

    Due to the heterogeneity of traumatic brain injury (TBI), many of single treatments have not been successful in prevention and cure of these kinds of injuries. The neuroprotective effect of progesterone drug on severe brain injuries has been identified, and recently, the neuroprotective effect of vitamin D has also been studied as the combination of these two drugs has shown better effects on animal samples in some studies. This study was conducted to examine the effect of vitamin D and progesterone on brain injury treatment after brain trauma. This study was performed on patients with severe brain trauma (Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) ≤ 8) from April to September, 2011. The patients were divided to 3 groups (placebo, progesterone, progesterone-vitamin D), each with 20 people. Upon the patients' admission, their GCS and demographic information were recorded. After 3 months, they were reassessed, and their GCS and GOS (Glasgow outcome scale) were recorded. The collected data were analyzed using SPSS 18 software (SPSS Inc., Chicago IL, USA). Before intervention, GCS mean of the placebo, progesterone, and progesterone-vitamin D groups were 6.3 ± 0.88, 6.31 ± 0.87, and 6 ± 0.88, respectively. They increased to 9.16 ± 1.11, 10.25 ± 1.34, and 11.27 ± 2.27, respectively 3 months after intervention. There was a significant difference among GCS means of the 3 groups (P-value = 0.001). GOS was classified to 2 main categories of favorable and unfavorable recovery, of which, favorable recovery in placebo, progesterone, and progesterone-vitamin D was 25%, 45%, and 60%, respectively which showed a statistical significant difference among the groups (P-value = 0.03). The results showed that recovery rate in patients with severe brain trauma in the group receiving progesterone and vitamin D together was significantly higher than that of progesterone group, which was in turn higher than that of placebo group.

  2. Comparison of the administration of progesterone versus progesterone and vitamin D in improvement of outcomes in patients with traumatic brain injury: A randomized clinical trial with placebo group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahram Aminmansour

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Due to the heterogeneity of traumatic brain injury (TBI, many of single treatments have not been successful in prevention and cure of these kinds of injuries. The neuroprotective effect of progesterone drug on severe brain injuries has been identified, and recently, the neuroprotective effect of vitamin D has also been studied as the combination of these two drugs has shown better effects on animal samples in some studies. This study was conducted to examine the effect of vitamin D and progesterone on brain injury treatment after brain trauma. Materials and Methods: This study was performed on patients with severe brain trauma (Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS ≤ 8 from April to September, 2011. The patients were divided to 3 groups (placebo, progesterone, progesterone-vitamin D, each with 20 people. Upon the patients′ admission, their GCS and demographic information were recorded. After 3 months, they were reassessed, and their GCS and GOS (Glasgow outcome scale were recorded. The collected data were analyzed using SPSS 18 software (SPSS Inc., Chicago IL, USA. Results: Before intervention, GCS mean of the placebo, progesterone, and progesterone-vitamin D groups were 6.3 ± 0.88, 6.31 ± 0.87, and 6 ± 0.88, respectively. They increased to 9.16 ± 1.11, 10.25 ± 1.34, and 11.27 ± 2.27, respectively 3 months after intervention. There was a significant difference among GCS means of the 3 groups (P-value = 0.001. GOS was classified to 2 main categories of favorable and unfavorable recovery, of which, favorable recovery in placebo, progesterone, and progesterone-vitamin D was 25%, 45%, and 60%, respectively which showed a statistical significant difference among the groups (P-value = 0.03. Conclusion: The results showed that recovery rate in patients with severe brain trauma in the group receiving progesterone and vitamin D together was significantly higher than that of progesterone group, which was in turn higher than that of placebo group.

  3. The Rightful Demise of the Sh*t Sandwich: Providing Effective Feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Ian Andrew

    2015-11-01

    As a trainee cognitive therapist in the early 1990s, I was taught the Sh*t Sandwich by my supervisor. I continued to use this technique for many years without seeing the need to extend my repertoire of feedback strategies. This article describes a number of other feedback techniques, raising awareness of the processes underpinning feedback, and facilitating reflection on feedback methods. This review examines feedback and the methods of feedback used to improve clinical competence. Evidence informs us that the use of good feedback has a significant effect on learners' outcomes (Milne, 2009). However, despite recognition of its importance, many supervisors fail to give adequate feedback and utilize methods that are sub-optimal. One such problematic method is the notorious "Sh*t Sandwich" (SS), which attempts to hide criticism within a cushion of two positive statements. This paper looks at various models of giving negative and positive feedback, suggesting that our repertoire of feedback methods may require expanding. The review suggests that feedback is a complex process and methods that place an emphasis on the learner as an active participant in the learning process (i.e. interactive approaches) should be encouraged. The paper suggests that negative feedback should generally be avoided in favour of constructive support, accompanied by specific, descriptive, balanced feedback, with new learning being consolidated by role play. Generally, feedback should be given about the task rather than the person, but when it is personalized it should relate to effort rather than ability.

  4. Upregulation of ATBF1 by progesterone-PR signaling and its functional implication in mammary epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mei; Zhao, Dan; Ma, Gui; Zhang, Baotong; Fu, Xiaoying; Zhu, Zhengmao; Fu, Liya; Sun, Xiaodong; Dong, Jin-Tang

    2013-01-04

    Progesterone (Pg) is an essential steroid hormone during mammary gland development and tumorigenesis, including the maintenance of epithelial stem/progenitor cells. Pg functions through interaction with the progesterone receptors (PR) and Pg-PR signaling is thought to be mediated by key transcription factors, which are largely unidentified. In this study, we have identified the ATBF1 transcription factor as a transcriptional target of Pg-PR signaling in mammary epithelial cells. Pg treatment dramatically increased ATBF1 expression at both mRNA and protein levels in cultured cells and mammary tissues. As expected, the induction of ATBF1 was PR-dependent, as it only occurred in PR-positive but not in PR-negative cells, and pretreatment with the Pg antagonist RU-486 or RNAi-mediated knockdown of PR abolished the upregulation of ATBF1 by Pg. Promoter-reporter and ChIP assays further showed that Pg-activated PR directly binds to the ATBF1 promoter to induce its transcription. Prevention of ATBF1 induction inhibited the function of Pg in promoting progenitor cell transition, as indicated by colony formation in a Matrigel culture assay and expression of stem cell markers CD49f and CD44. These findings suggest that ATBF1 plays a crucial role in the Pg-PR signaling pathway in mammary epithelial cells. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Serial hCG and progesterone levels to predict early pregnancy outcomes in pregnancies of uncertain viability: A prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puget, Claire; Joueidi, Yolaine; Bauville, Estelle; Laviolle, Bruno; Bendavid, Claude; Lavoué, Vincent; Le Lous, Maela

    2018-01-01

    To assess the value of serial hCG and progesterone serum level in the diagnosis of early pregnancy viability. It was a prospective cohort study. Women with a pregnancy of uncertain viability (PUV), defined as the presence of an intra-uterine embryo with a crown-rump length hCG levels on the first day and 48h after as well as the initial progesterone level were evaluated to diagnose pregnancy viability. Pregnancy viability was assessed by TVS 7 to 14days after inclusion. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) of an hCG H48/H0 ratio increase hCG H48/H0 ratio increase >75% to diagnose a viable pregnancy were 100%, 31%, 45.9% and 100%, respectively. hCG H48/H0 ratio increase hCG H48/H0 ratio increase >75% was associated with 100% of viable pregnancies in 100% of the cases. Serial hCG levels alone permitted an early viability diagnosis within 48h for 41.1% of patients with PUV instead of 7 to 14days with TVS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Effects of Stratospheric Ozone Depletion, Solar UV Radiation, and Climate Change on Biogeochemical Cycling: Interactions and Feedbacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Climate change modulates the effects of solar UV radiation on biogeochemical cycles in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, particularly for carbon cycling, resulting in UV-mediated positive or negative feedbacks on climate. Possible positive feedbacks discussed in this assessment...

  7. Ulipristal acetate, a progesterone receptor modulator for emergency contraception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadav, Shilpa P.; Parmar, Dinesh M.

    2012-01-01

    Unwanted pregnancy is a global reproductive health problem. Emergency contraception is defined as the use of drug or device after unprotected or underprotected intercourse to prevent an unwanted pregnancy. 1.5 mg of levonorgestrel as a single dose or in two doses with 12 h apart taken within 72 h of unprotected intercourse is the current gold standard emergency contraception regimen. This method is only effective if used as soon as possible after sexual intercourse and before ovulation. A single dose of 30 mg ulipristal acetate, a novel selective progesterone receptor modulator, has recently been proposed for the emergency contraception use up to 120 h of unprotected intercourse with similar side effect profiles as levonorgestrel. Ulipristal acetate could possibly prevent pregnancy when administered in the advanced follicular phase, even if luteinizing hormone levels have already begun to rise, a time when levonorgestrel is no longer effective in inhibiting ovulation. PMID:22629083

  8. Progesterone release from magnetic alginate/chitosan microcapsules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leite, Melina Vasconcelos; Castro, Mayara de Freitas e; Sanchez Rodriguez, Ruben J., E-mail: sanchez@uenf.br [Universidade Estadual do Norte Fluminense (UENF), Campos dos Goytacazes, RJ (Brazil); Rojas-Ayala, Chachi; Baggio-Saitovitch, Elisa Maria [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisa Fisicas (CBPF), Rio de Janeir, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Magnetite nanoparticles (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) were prepared using the hydrothermal method (160°C) in a closed system and characterized with the aid of the techniques of X-ray Diffraction patterns (DRX), Mössbauer spectroscopy and Vibrating Sample Magnetometer (VSM). The Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} phase showed high crystallinity and medium crystallite size of 19nm with superparamagnetic properties, reversible behavior and saturation magnetization of 43 emu g{sup -1}. The nanoparticles coated with alginate / chitosan were characterized morphologically by Scanning and Transmission Electron Microscope. The microcapsules have a regular spherical shape with the main contribution of the size distribution in the range of 34-53μm. The progesterone released was 14% higher when external magnetic field was applied. (author)

  9. A critical period of progesterone withdrawal precedes menstruation in macaques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slayden, Ov D; Brenner, Robert M

    2006-01-01

    Macaques are menstruating nonhuman primates that provide important animal models for studies of hormonal regulation in the uterus. In women and macaques the decline of progesterone (P) at the end of the cycle triggers endometrial expression of a variety of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) enzymes that participate in tissue breakdown and menstrual sloughing. To determine the minimal duration of P withdrawal required to induce menses, we assessed the effects of adding P back at various time points after P withdrawal on both frank bleeding patterns and endometrial MMP expression. Artificial menstrual cycles were induced by treating the animals sequentially with implants releasing estradiol (E2) and progesterone (P). To assess bleeding patterns, P implants were removed at the end of a cycle and then added back at 12, 24, 30, 36, 40, 48, 60, or 72 hours (h) after the initial P withdrawal. Observational analysis of frank bleeding patterns showed that P replacement at 12 and 24 h blocked menses, replacement at 36 h reduced menses but replacement after 36 h failed to block menses. These data indicate that in macaques, a critical period of P withdrawal exists and lasts approximately 36 h. In other similarly cycled animals, we withdrew P and then added P back either during (12–24 h) or after (48 h) the critical period, removed the uterus 24 h after P add back and evaluated endometrial MMP expression. Immunocytochemistry showed that replacement of P during the critical period suppressed MMP-1, -2 and -3 expression along with menses, but replacement of P at 48 h, which failed to suppress mense, suppressed MMP-1 and MMP-3 but did not block MMP-2. We concluded that upregulation of MMPs is essential to menses induction, but that after the critical period, menses will occur even if some MMPs are experimentally blocked. PMID:17118170

  10. Sensitivity, specificity, predictive value and accuracy of ultrasonography in pregnancy rate prediction in Sahelian goats after progesterone impregnated sponge synchronization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin Kouamo

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study was aimed to evaluate the sensitivity, specificity, predictive value and accuracy of ultrasonography in pregnancy rate (PR prediction in Sahelian goats after progesterone impregnated sponge synchronization within the framework of caprine artificial insemination (AI program in Fatick (Senegal. Materials and Methods: Of 193 candidate goats in AI program, 167 were selected (day 50 in six villages. Estrus was synchronized by progesterone impregnated sponges installed for 11 days. Two days before the time of sponge removal (day 4, each goat was treated with 500 IU of equine chorionic gonadotropin and 50 μg of dcloprostenol. All goats were inseminated (day 0 with alpine goat semen from France at 45±3 h after sponge removal (day 2. Real-time B-mode ultrasonography was performed at day 50, day 13, day 0, day 40 and day 60 post-AI. Results: Selection rate, estrus response rate, AI rate, PR at days 40 and days 60 were 86.53%; 71.85%; 83.34%; 51% and 68% (p<0.05 respectively. Value of sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value, accuracy, total conformity, conformity of correct positive, conformity of correct negative and discordance of pregnancy diagnosis by trans-abdominal ultrasonography (TU were 98.03%; 63.26%; 73.52%; 3.12%; 81%; 81%; 50%; 31% and 19%, respectively. Conclusion: These results indicate that the TU can be performed in goats under traditional condition and emphasized the importance of re-examination of goats with negative or doubtful TU diagnoses performed at day 40 post-AI.

  11. Intestinal tumorigenesis is not affected by progesterone signaling in rodent models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarom Heijmans

    Full Text Available Clinical data suggest that progestins have chemopreventive properties in the development of colorectal cancer. We set out to examine a potential protective effect of progestins and progesterone signaling on colon cancer development. In normal and neoplastic intestinal tissue, we found that the progesterone receptor (PR is not expressed. Expression was confined to sporadic mesenchymal cells. To analyze the influence of systemic progesterone receptor signaling, we crossed mice that lacked the progesterone receptor (PRKO to the Apc(Min/+ mouse, a model for spontaneous intestinal polyposis. PRKO-Apc(Min/+ mice exhibited no change in polyp number, size or localization compared to Apc(Min/+. To examine effects of progestins on the intestinal epithelium that are independent of the PR, we treated mice with MPA. We found no effects of either progesterone or MPA on gross intestinal morphology or epithelial proliferation. Also, in rats treated with MPA, injection with the carcinogen azoxymethane did not result in a difference in the number or size of aberrant crypt foci, a surrogate end-point for adenoma development. We conclude that expression of the progesterone receptor is limited to cells in the intestinal mesenchyme. We did not observe any effect of progesterone receptor signaling or of progestin treatment in rodent models of intestinal tumorigenesis.

  12. Effects of estradiol and progesterone on the reproduction of the freshwater crayfish Cherax albidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coccia, E; De Lisa, E; Di Cristo, C; Di Cosmo, A; Paolucci, M

    2010-02-01

    In this study we have investigated the role of 17beta-estradiol and progesterone in the reproduction of the crayfish Cherax albidus by using vitellogenin (VTG) as a biomarker. Early-vitellogenic (EV), full-vitellogenic (FV), and non-vitellogenic (NV) females of Cherax albidus were treated with 17beta-estradiol, progesterone, or both for 4 weeks. Levels of VTG mRNA in the hepatopancreas were detected by RT-PCR. The PCR product was sequenced and showed 97% homology with Cherax quadricarinatus VTG. 17beta-estradiol was more effective than progesterone and 17beta-estradiol plus progesterone in increasing the vitellogenin transcript in the hepatopancreas of EV and FV females. On the contrary, progesterone was more effective than 17beta-estradiol and 17beta-estradiol plus progesterone in increasing the vitellogenin concentration in the hemolymph of EV and FV females. Hepatopancreas histology and fatty acid composition of females injected with hormones showed major modifications. No effects were registered in NV females. In conclusion, 17beta-estradiol and progesterone influence VTG synthesis, although our data indicate that they act through different pathways and are not effective until the proper hormonal environment is established, as demonstrated by their inefficacy in NV females.

  13. Variability of ovarian structures and plasma progesterone profiles in dairy cows with ovarian cysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, D J; Pierson, R A; Hauser, E R; Grummer, R R; Combs, D K

    1990-08-01

    Weekly reproductive health examinations were performed on 46 multiparous Holstein cows from 14 to 100 d post partum. Sixteen cows developed 19 nonsimultaneous ovarian cysts, with a mean day of first detection at 34.3 +/- 4.5 d post partum and a mean duration of 31.0 +/- 4.3 d after first detection. Coccygeal blood was collected three times weekly, and plasma progesterone concentrations were determined by radioimmunoassay. Cysts were diagnosed by palpation per rectum or by ultrasonography and classified as follicular or luteal cysts; the cows were not treated. Cows with a mean plasma progesterone concentration of cyst until Day 10 were classified as having a follicular cyst, and those with a mean plasma progesterone concentration of >or= 1 ng/ml from Day 1 to Day 10 were classified as having a luteal cyst. According to this classification, 58% of the cysts were follicular and 42% were luteal. There was an overall 47% agreement between classification by palpation and by ultrasonography on Day 1 with progesterone concentration during Days 1 to 10 after detection of the cyst. Detailed graphs of progesterone concentrations and area of largest follicles or cysts and corpora lutea demonstrate the variability of ovarian structures and progesterone profiles in cystic cows. Detection of a cyst at any one time accompanied by simultaneous measurement of progesterone can lead to different diagnoses of cyst type depending on the method of classification, the presence and age of luteinized tissue in the cyst and undetected corpora lutea.

  14. Effect of a single injection of progesterone on ovarian follicular cysts in lactating dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatler, T B; Hayes, S H; Anderson, L H; Silvia, W J

    2006-09-01

    The objective of this experiment was to evaluate the effect of a single injection of progesterone on the lifespan of ovarian follicular cysts and to examine the fate of follicles that mature following treatment. Lactating Holstein and Jersey cows with ovarian follicular cysts were identified by rectal palpation. The ovaries of cystic cows were then examined by transrectal ultrasonography three times weekly to monitor formation of new follicular cysts. Cows with newly formed follicular cysts were treated either with a single injection of progesterone (200 mg, IM, n = 11) or corn oil vehicle (n = 7). Venous blood samples were collected daily for quantification of progesterone. Blood sampling and ultrasonography continued until ovulation or a new follicular cyst formed. Treatment reduced the lifespan of the cyst by 12 days, from 29.8 +/- 2.3 days in control cows to 17.2 +/- 1.8 days in progesterone-treated cows (P = 0.01). Progesterone treatment also tended to alter the frequency of subsequent follicular events. Ovulation occurred in 4/11 cows that were treated with progesterone whereas none of the vehicle treated cows ovulated (P = 0.07). In conclusion, a single injection of 200mg of progesterone, administered early in the life of an ovarian follicular cyst, shortened its lifespan and in some cases was followed by ovulation of a new follicle.

  15. Development of a TIRF-based biosensor for sensitive detection of progesterone in bovine milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Käppel, Nina D; Pröll, Florian; Gauglitz, Guenter

    2007-04-15

    A total internal reflectance fluorescence (TIRF)-based biosensor for progesterone in bovine milk was developed and tested by measuring the progesterone level in daily milk samples for 25 days, covering a whole estrus cycle. The detection is based on total internal reflectance fluorescence. The assay has been designed as a binding-inhibition test with a progesterone derivative covalently immobilized on the sensor surface and a monoclonal anti-progesterone antibody as biological recognition element. First an existing progesterone assay was optimized by reducing the assay time per measurement, resulting in an assay time of about 5 min and reaching a limit of detection (LOD) of 0.04 ng mL(-1) and a quantification limit (LOQ) of 0.34 ng mL(-1). After calibration the assay was tested by measuring the progesterone level in daily milk samples over several weeks. An estrus cycle of a cow could be measured. As results become available within minutes without any preparation or pre-concentration of the milk samples the fully automated TIRF-based biosensor for progesterone can be used in-line in the milking parlor and thus could be an important tool for reproductive management of dairy cattle detecting heat and predicting pregnancy, which are critical parameters in milk production.

  16. MicroRNA signatures predict oestrogen receptor, progesterone receptor and HER2/neu receptor status in breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowery, Aoife J; Miller, Nicola; Devaney, Amanda; McNeill, Roisin E; Davoren, Pamela A; Lemetre, Christophe; Benes, Vladimir; Schmidt, Sabine; Blake, Jonathon; Ball, Graham; Kerin, Michael J

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease encompassing a number of phenotypically diverse tumours. Expression levels of the oestrogen, progesterone and HER2/neu receptors which characterize clinically distinct breast tumours have been shown to change during disease progression and in response to systemic therapies. Mi(cro)RNAs play critical roles in diverse biological processes and are aberrantly expressed in several human neoplasms including breast cancer, where they function as regulators of tumour behaviour and progression. The aims of this study were to identify miRNA signatures that accurately predict the oestrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR) and HER2/neu receptor status of breast cancer patients to provide insight into the regulation of breast cancer phenotypes and progression. Methods Expression profiling of 453 miRNAs was performed in 29 early-stage breast cancer specimens. miRNA signatures associated with ER, PR and HER2/neu status were generated using artificial neural networks (ANN), and expression of specific miRNAs was validated using RQ-PCR. Results Stepwise ANN analysis identified predictive miRNA signatures corresponding with oestrogen (miR-342, miR-299, miR-217, miR-190, miR-135b, miR-218), progesterone (miR-520g, miR-377, miR-527-518a, miR-520f-520c) and HER2/neu (miR-520d, miR-181c, miR-302c, miR-376b, miR-30e) receptor status. MiR-342 and miR-520g expression was further analysed in 95 breast tumours. MiR-342 expression was highest in ER and HER2/neu-positive luminal B tumours and lowest in triple-negative tumours. MiR-520g expression was elevated in ER and PR-negative tumours. Conclusions This study demonstrates that ANN analysis reliably identifies biologically relevant miRNAs associated with specific breast cancer phenotypes. The association of specific miRNAs with ER, PR and HER2/neu status indicates a role for these miRNAs in disease classification of breast cancer. Decreased expression of miR-342 in the

  17. Surgery and radiation therapy of triple-negative breast cancers: From biology to clinics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bernier, J.; Poortmans, P.M.P.

    2016-01-01

    Triple negative breast cancer refers to tumours lacking the expression of the three most used tumour markers, namely oestrogen receptors, progesterone receptors, and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2). These cancers are known to carry a more dismal prognosis than the other molecular

  18. Prognostic significance of progesterone receptor-positive tumor cells within immunohistochemically defined luminal A breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prat, Aleix; Cheang, Maggie Chon U; Martín, Miguel; Parker, Joel S; Carrasco, Eva; Caballero, Rosalía; Tyldesley, Scott; Gelmon, Karen; Bernard, Philip S; Nielsen, Torsten O; Perou, Charles M

    2013-01-10

    Current immunohistochemical (IHC)-based definitions of luminal A and B breast cancers are imperfect when compared with multigene expression-based assays. In this study, we sought to improve the IHC subtyping by examining the pathologic and gene expression characteristics of genomically defined luminal A and B subtypes. Gene expression and pathologic features were collected from primary tumors across five independent cohorts: British Columbia Cancer Agency (BCCA) tamoxifen-treated only, Grupo Español de Investigación en Cáncer de Mama 9906 trial, BCCA no systemic treatment cohort, PAM50 microarray training data set, and a combined publicly available microarray data set. Optimal cutoffs of percentage of progesterone receptor (PR) -positive tumor cells to predict survival were derived and independently tested. Multivariable Cox models were used to test the prognostic significance. Clinicopathologic comparisons among luminal A and B subtypes consistently identified higher rates of PR positivity, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) negativity, and histologic grade 1 in luminal A tumors. Quantitative PR gene and protein expression were also found to be significantly higher in luminal A tumors. An empiric cutoff of more than 20% of PR-positive tumor cells was statistically chosen and proved significant for predicting survival differences within IHC-defined luminal A tumors independently of endocrine therapy administration. Finally, no additional prognostic value within hormonal receptor (HR) -positive/HER2-negative disease was observed with the use of the IHC4 score when intrinsic IHC-based subtypes were used that included the more than 20% PR-positive tumor cells and vice versa. Semiquantitative IHC expression of PR adds prognostic value within the current IHC-based luminal A definition by improving the identification of good outcome breast cancers. The new proposed IHC-based definition of luminal A tumors is HR positive/HER2 negative/Ki-67 less than 14

  19. Progesterone level on the day of hCG administration in relation to the pregnancy rates of patients undergoing assisted reproduction techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Renato de; Cabral, Fernanda Godoy; Carvalho, Waldemar de Almeida Pereira; Cordts, Emerson Barchi; Bianco, Bianca; Barbosa, Caio Parente

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the predictive capacity for pregnancy of the progesterone level on the day of administering human chorionic gonadotropin, in women submitted to assisted reproductive techniques. An observational study with 914 women submitted to assisted reproductive techniques from August 2014 to June 2016. Total pregnancy rate was 34.58%; in that, the pregnancy rate in women 38 years was, respectively, 42.3%, 38.7% and 16.1% (p<0.001). For embryo transfer in the same cycle, and progesterone of 1.3ng/dL, sensitivity was 4.78%, specificity, 84.18%, accuracy, 56.72%, positive likelihood ratio of 0.3019, and negative likelihood ratio of 1.1312, with receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.46 (95%CI: 0.42-0.49). The progesterone level on the day of administering human chorionic gonadotropin of 1.3ng/dL differs from that empirically adopted at the study site (1.7ng/dL), and has a better predictive capacity for pregnancy in the patients studied. However, the low sensitivity of this examination raises questions about its real importance.

  20. The relationship among vitamin C, beta-carotene, vitamin A, progesterone and oestradiol 17-beta concentrations in plasma and cyst fluid of Holstein cows with ovarian cyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haliloglu, S; Erdem, H; Serpek, B; Tekeli, T; Bulut, Z

    2008-10-01

    The aims of this study were to determine the concentrations of the progesterone, oestradiol-17-beta, vitamin A, C and beta-carotene in plasma and cyst fluid and to relate these values with cystic diameter and membrane thickness of Holstein cattle with ovarian luteal cyst. 1650 Holstein cows were examined for the presence of the ovarian cyst and luteal and follicular cystic ovaries were obtained following slaughtering in personal slaughterhouse in Konya-Turkey. 15 Luteal and 15 follicular cystic ovaries were distinguished by rectal palpation and by post mortem ultrasonographic examination. Plasma and cyst fluid, hormone and vitamin analyses were carried out by EIA method and spectrophotometric measurement respectively. Although there was no relationship between beta-carotene and vitamin A in plasma and cyst fluid of both cyst type and hormone concentrations, the vitamin C concentration of cyst fluid was found significantly higher in luteal cyst than in follicular cyst. Moreover, there is a positive correlation among values of the vitamin C concentrations of cyst fluid and cystic membrane thickness, plasma and the cyst fluid progesterone concentrations, but there is a negative correlation among the vitamin C concentrations of cystic fluid and oestradiol 17beta levels of plasma and cyst fluid. In conclusion, vitamin C concentration of cyst fluid supported ultrasonographic and endocrinologic findings. Also, it can be postulated that vitamin C is probably effective on progesterone synthesis in the luteal tissue of cyst.

  1. Inhalation of progesterone inhibits chronic airway inflammation of mice exposed to ozone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, Xia; Bao, Wuping; Zhang, Pengyu; Zhang, Xue; Zhang, Guoqing; Zhang, Yingying; Zhou, Xin; Zhang, Min

    2017-05-01

    Chronic ozone exposure leads to a model of mice with lung inflammation, emphysema and oxidative stress. Progesterone plays an important role in attenuating the neuroinflammation. We assume that progesterone will reduce the chronic airway inflammation exposed to ozone and evaluate whether combination of progesterone with glucocorticoids results in synergistic effects. C57/BL6 mice were exposed to ozone (2.5ppm, 3h) 12 times over 6 weeks, and were administered with progesterone (0.03 or 0.3mg/L; inhaled) alone or combined with budesonide (BUD) (0.2g/L) after each exposure until the tenth week. Mice were studied 24h after final exposure, cells and inflammatory mediators were assessed in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and lungs used for evaluation of glucocorticoids receptors (GR), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphorylation and nuclear transcription factor κB (NF-κB) activation. Exposure to ozone resulted in a marked lung neutrophilia. Moreover, in ozone-exposed group, the levels of oxidative stress-related interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-17A, activated NF-κB and p38MAPK, airway inflammatory cells infiltration density, mean linear intercept (Lm) were greatly increased, FEV25 and glucocorticoids receptors (GR) were markedly decreased. Comparable to BUD, progesterone treatment dose-dependently led to a significant reduction of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-17A, activated NF-κB and p38MAPK, and an increase of FEV25 and GR. Progesterone combined with BUD resulted in dramatic changes, compared to monotherapy of BUD or progesterone. Therefore, these results demonstrate that chronic ozone exposure has profound airway inflammatory effects counteracted by progesterone and progesterone acts synergistically with glucocorticoids in attenuating the airway inflammation dose-dependently. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The Biology of Progesterone Receptor in the Normal Mammary gland and in Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obr, Alison; Edwards, Dean P.

    2011-01-01

    This paper reviews work on progesterone and the progesterone receptor (PR) in the mouse mammary gland that has been used extensively as an experimental model. Studies have led to the concept that progesterone controls proliferation and morphogenesis of the luminal epithelium in a tightly orchestrated manner at distinct stages of development by paracrine signaling pathways, including receptor of activated nuclear factor κ ligand (RANKL) as a major paracrine factor. Progesterone also drives expansion of stem cells by paracrine signals to generate progenitors required for alveologenesis. During mid-to-late pregnancy, progesterone has another role to suppress secretory activation until parturition mediated in part by crosstalk between PR and prolactin/Stat5 signaling to inhibit induction of milk protein gene expression, and by inhibiting tight junction closure. In models of hormone-dependent mouse mammary tumors, the progesterone/PR signaling axis enhances pre-neoplastic progression by a switch from a paracrine to an autocrine mode of proliferation and dysregulation of the RANKL signaling pathway. Limited experiments with normal human breast show that progesterone/PR signaling also stimulates epithelial cell proliferation by a paracrine mechanism; however, the signaling pathways and whether RANKL is a major mediator remains unknown. Work with human breast cancer cell lines, patient tumor samples and clinical studies indicates that progesterone is a risk factor for breast cancer and that alteration in progesterone/PR signaling pathways contributes to early stage human breast cancer progression. However, loss of PR expression in primary tumors is associated with a less differentiated more invasive phenotype and worse prognosis, suggesting that PR may limit later stages of tumor progression. PMID:22193050

  3. Gender differences in reward and punishment for monetary and social feedback in children: An ERP study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Ying; Wang, Encong; Zou, Yuchen; Song, Yan; Xiao, Xue; Huang, Wanyi; Li, Yanfang

    2017-01-01

    Gender differences in feedback processing have been observed among adolescents and adults through event-related potentials. However, information on whether and how this feedback processing is affected by feedback valence, feedback type, and individual sensitivity in reward/punishment among children remains minimal. In this study, we used a guessing game task coupled with electroencephalography to investigate gender differences in feedback processing, in which feedback to reward and punishment was presented in the context of monetary and social conditions. Results showed that boys were less likely to switch their response after punishment, had generally less feedback-related negativity (FRN) amplitude, and longer FRN latency in monetary and punishment conditions than girls. Moreover, FRN for monetary punishment, which is related to individual difference in reward sensitivity, was observed only in girls. The study provides gender-specific evidence for the neural processing of feedback, which may offer educational guidance for appropriate feedback for girls and boys.

  4. Gender differences in reward and punishment for monetary and social feedback in children: An ERP study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Ding

    Full Text Available Gender differences in feedback processing have been observed among adolescents and adults through event-related potentials. However, information on whether and how this feedback processing is affected by feedback valence, feedback type, and individual sensitivity in reward/punishment among children remains minimal. In this study, we used a guessing game task coupled with electroencephalography to investigate gender differences in feedback processing, in which feedback to reward and punishment was presented in the context of monetary and social conditions. Results showed that boys were less likely to switch their response after punishment, had generally less feedback-related negativity (FRN amplitude, and longer FRN latency in monetary and punishment conditions than girls. Moreover, FRN for monetary punishment, which is related to individual difference in reward sensitivity, was observed only in girls. The study provides gender-specific evidence for the neural processing of feedback, which may offer educational guidance for appropriate feedback for girls and boys.

  5. Plant–soil feedbacks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cortois, Roeland; Schröder-Georgi, Thomas; Weigelt, Alexandra; Putten, van der Wim H.; Deyn, De Gerlinde B.

    2016-01-01

    Plant–soil feedback (PSF), plant trait and functional group concepts advanced our understanding of plant community dynamics, but how they are interlinked is poorly known. To test how plant functional groups (FGs: graminoids, small herbs, tall herbs, legumes) and plant traits relate to PSF, we

  6. Giving Students Feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowman, Joseph

    1987-01-01

    Some of the special challenges associated with evaluation and grading in the large class are discussed. Suggestions for evaluation methods include seeking clarity, reducing the stress of test administration, giving feedback, guarding against errors in record keeping, and returning exams efficiently and with respect. (MLW)

  7. Feedback i undervisningen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Preben Olund

    2015-01-01

    undervisningsdifferentiering, feedback på læreprocesser, formativ og summativ evaluering, observationer og analyse af undervisning samt lærernes teamsamarbejde herom. Praktikken udgør et særligt læringsrum i læreruddannelsen. Samspillet mellem studerende, praktiklærere og undervisere giver den studerende en unik mulighed...

  8. The Endogenous Feedback Network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Augustenborg, Claudia Carrara

    2010-01-01

    proposals, it will first be considered the extents of their reciprocal compatibility, tentatively shaping an integrated, theoretical profile of consciousness. A new theory, the Endogenous Feedback Network (EFN) will consequently be introduced which, beside being able to accommodate the main tenets...

  9. Portfolio, refleksion og feedback

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jens Jørgen; Qvortrup, Ane; Christensen, Inger-Marie F.

    2017-01-01

    Denne leder definerer indledningsvist begrebet portfolio og gør rede for anvendelsesmuligheder i en uddannelseskontekst. Dernæst behandles portfoliometodens kvalitet og effekt for læring og undervisning og de centrale begreber refleksion, progression og feedback præsenteres og diskuteres. Herefter...

  10. Endometrial Effects of Prolonged Therapy with the Selective Progesterone Receptor Modulator Ulipristal Acetate: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Gary; Elkas, John; Armstrong, Alicia Y; Nieman, Lynnette K

    2016-01-01

    Prolonged exposure to a selective progesterone receptor modulator (ulipristal acetate) in a patient with benign metastasizing leiomyoma did not result in endometrial hyperplasia or neoplasia. A woman with history of benign metastasizing leiomyoma underwent medical treatment for 5 years with ulipristal acetate. Endometrial biopsies were performed at established intervals to monitor for intraepithelial neoplasia or progesterone receptor modulator-associated endometrial changes (PAECs). The patient tolerated UPA therapy well; there was no evidence of hyperplasia or proliferative changes associated with progesterone-associated endometrial changes. In this case prolonged exposure to ulipristal acetate did not result in premalignant or malignant endometrial pathology.

  11. Chemical UV filters can affect human sperm function in a progesterone-like manner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehfeld, Anders; Egeberg, Dorte; Almstrup, Kristian

    2018-01-01

    Human sperm cell function must be precisely regulated to achieve natural fertilization. Progesterone released by the cumulus cells surrounding the egg induces a Ca2+-influx into human sperm cells via the CatSper Ca2+-channel and thereby controls sperm function. Multiple chemical UV filters have...... the effect of progesterone on Ca2+-signaling in human sperm cells, can similarly mimic the effect of progesterone on acrosome reaction and sperm penetration. Human exposure to these chemical UV filters may impair fertility by interfering with sperm function, e.g. through induction of premature acrosome...

  12. Artificial induction of lactation in ewes: the involvement of progesterone and prolactin in lactogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulkerson, W J; Hooley, R D; McDowell, G H; Fell, L R

    1976-10-01

    An attempt has been made to evaluate the importance of prolactin and 'progesterone withdrawal' for lactogenesis. The experimental model system used was the ovariectomized, non-pregnant ewe induced to lactate artifically by treatment with trigger hormone (either oestrogen, glucocorticoid or oxytocin) alone or in combination with progesterone. It appears from the results that prolactin is important in the lactogenic responses elicited by oestrogen and oxytocin but not as important in the response elicited by glucocorticoid. Moreover, the results suggest that, in the ewe, an appropriate positive hormonal stimulus will overcome the inhibitory influence of progesterone on lactogenesis.

  13. Systematic review of progesterone for the prevention of preterm birth in singleton pregnancies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rode, Line; Langhoff-Roos, Jens; Andersson, Charlotte

    2009-01-01

    of preterm delivery in women with preterm labor. CONCLUSIONS: In women with a singleton pregnancy and previous preterm delivery, progesterone reduces the rates of preterm delivery before 32 weeks, perinatal death, as well as respiratory distress syndrome and necrotizing enterocolitis in the newborn. Women...... now showed that progesterone supplementation was associated with a significant reduction of delivery before 32 weeks and of perinatal mortality. Furthermore, a third trial showed a positive effect on women with a short cervix at 23 weeks, and a fourth study showed that progesterone reduces the risk...

  14. Global Stability in Dynamical Systems with Multiple Feedback Mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Morten; Vinther, Frank; Ottesen, Johnny T.

    2016-01-01

    . This is a bounded set with non-negative elements where solutions cannot escape. All solutions are shown to converge to a “minimal” trapping region. 2) At least one fixed point exists. 3) Sufficient criteria for a unique fixed point are formulated. One case where this is fulfilled is when the feedbacks are negative....

  15. Vaginal micronized progesterone and risk of preterm delivery in high-risk twin pregnancies: secondary analysis of a placebo-controlled randomized trial and meta-analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klein, K; Rode, L; Nicolaides, K H

    2011-01-01

    Progesterone treatment reduces the risk of preterm delivery in high-risk singleton pregnancies. Our aim was to evaluate the preventive effect of vaginal progesterone in high-risk twins.......Progesterone treatment reduces the risk of preterm delivery in high-risk singleton pregnancies. Our aim was to evaluate the preventive effect of vaginal progesterone in high-risk twins....

  16. Effect of early pregnancy on the expression of progesterone receptor and progesterone-induced blocking factor in ovine lymph node.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ling; Zang, Shengqin; Bai, Ying; Yao, Xiaolei; Zhang, Leying

    2017-04-15

    Lymph nodes are the sites where the immune reaction or suppression takes place. Progesterone (P4) exerts an essential effect of the immunomodulation on the maternal uterus during early pregnancy in ruminants. At present study, the inguinal lymph nodes were obtained at day 16 of non-pregnancy, days 13, 16 and 25 of pregnancy (n = 3 for each group) in ewes, and RT-PCR assay, western blot and immunohistochemistry analysis were used to analyze to the effect of early pregnancy on the expression of P4 receptor (PGR) and progesterone-induced blocking factor (PIBF) in the lymph nodes. Our results showed that the PGR and PIBF mRNA were up-regulated in the lymph nodes in pregnant ewes, and the PGR isoform (60 kDa) and the PIBF variant (75 kDa) were expressed constantly in the lymph nodes. However, there was no expression of the PGR isoform (40 kDa) and the PIBF variant (48 kDa) at day 16 of the estrous cycle. The immunohistochemistry results confirmed that the PGR and PIBF proteins were limited to the subcapsular sinus and trabeculae in the cortex, medullary sinuses, and were localized in the cytoplasm of the specific cells. This paper reports for the first time that early pregnancy exerts its effect on the specific cells in the lymph nodes through P4, which results in the up-regulated expression of the PGR mRNA and 40 kDa isoform, the PIBF mRNA and 48 kDa variant, and is involved in the immunoregulation of the lymph nodes through a cytosolic pathway in ewes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Primary carcinoid tumor of the kidney with estrogen and progesterone receptor expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    LIN, CHUNHUA; WU, JITAO; GAO, ZHENLI; QU, GUIMEI; WANG, WEI; YU, GUOHUA

    2015-01-01

    Primary carcinoid tumors are uncommon neoplasms in the kidney. The current study presents a case of primary carcinoid tumor of the kidney in a 49-year-old female who suffered from painless gross hematuria for half a month. Left hydronephrosis, a horseshoe kidney and a space-occupying lesion of the left ureter were found by abdominal computed tomography scans and ultrasonic testing. Surgery was performed and an oval tumor was found under the left ureter; the tumor and left kidney were excised completely. The neoplasm was composed of solid nests of cells, trabeculae, adenoid structures and anastomosing cords in a loose and myxoid background. The tumor cells, which were consistent in volume, exhibited centrally oval nuclei with inconspicuous nucleoli, and eosinophilic finely granular cytoplasm. Upon immunohistochemical staining, the neoplastic cells were positive for AE1/AE3, vimentin, synaptophysin, chromogranin A, estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor, while being negative for epithelial membrane antigen, inhibin A, cluster of differentiation (CD)99, S-100 and CD10. Based on the histological characteristics, a diagnosis of primary carcinoid tumor of the left kidney was formed. The patient did not receive further treatment. The total follow-up period was 18 months after the surgery and repeated imaging examinations every 6 months revealed no recurrence. PMID:26171049

  18. Neural Activities Underlying the Feedback Express Salience Prediction Errors for Appetitive and Aversive Stimuli

    OpenAIRE

    Yan Gu; Xueping Hu; Weigang Pan; Chun Yang; Lijun Wang; Yiyuan Li; Antao Chen

    2016-01-01

    Feedback information is essential for us to adapt appropriately to the environment. The feedback-related negativity (FRN), a frontocentral negative deflection after the delivery of feedback, has been found to be larger for outcomes that are worse than expected, and it reflects a reward prediction error derived from the midbrain dopaminergic projections to the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), as stated in reinforcement learning theory. In contrast, the prediction of response-outcome (PRO) mode...

  19. Online feedback op schriftelijk werk: betere feedback in minder tijd.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, B.A.M.; van der Hulst, M.E.

    2015-01-01

    Feedback is a powerful teaching technic to raise students’ performance, provided that the feedback is informative on how to improve, is given in a timely manner and students have the opportunity to act upon it. Therefore, many institutions want their students to receive feedback on their performance

  20. Linear feedback stabilization of a dispersively monitored qubit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patti, Taylor Lee; Chantasri, Areeya; García-Pintos, Luis Pedro; Jordan, Andrew N.; Dressel, Justin

    2017-08-01

    The state of a continuously monitored qubit evolves stochastically, exhibiting competition between coherent Hamiltonian dynamics and diffusive partial collapse dynamics that follow the measurement record. We couple these distinct types of dynamics together by linearly feeding the collected record for dispersive energy measurements directly back into a coherent Rabi drive amplitude. Such feedback turns the competition cooperative and effectively stabilizes the qubit state near a target state. We derive the conditions for obtaining such dispersive state stabilization and verify the stabilization conditions numerically. We include common experimental nonidealities, such as energy decay, environmental dephasing, detector efficiency, and feedback delay, and show that the feedback delay has the most significant negative effect on the feedback protocol. Setting the measurement collapse time scale to be long compared to the feedback delay yields the best stabilization.